WorldWideScience

Sample records for cycle industrial facilities

  1. Costs of fuel cycle industrial facilities: an international review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    This document presents, comments, and compares economic and financial data for industrial facilities concerning different aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle. It first comments the present situation and the short term trends for the natural uranium market, the conversion market, the enrichment market, the reprocessing market, the storage market. It gives an assessment of the elementary costs of the existing facilities for the different stages and processes: reprocessing, spent fuel warehousing (example of the CLAB in Sweden and comparison with other available data), warehousing of all types of wastes (examples of Habog in Netherlands, Zwilag in Switzerland), spent fuel storage (example of Yucca Mountain in the USA, Onkalo in Finland, projects and studies in Sweden), storage of vitrified wastes in Belgium, storing of transuranic wastes in the USA, storage of low and intermediate level and short life wastes in Sweden

  2. OECD/NEA WGFCS Workshop: Safety Assessment of Fuel Cycle Facilities - Regulatory Approaches and Industry Perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear fuel is produced, processed, and stored mainly in industrial-scale facilities. Uranium ores are processed and refined to produce a pure uranium salt stream, Uranium is converted and enriched, nuclear fuel is fabricated (U fuel and U/Pu fuel for the closed cycle option); and spent fuel is stored and reprocessed in some countries (close cycle option). Facilities dedicated to the research and development of new fuel or new processes are also considered as Fuel Cycle Facilities. The safety assessment of nuclear facilities has often been led by the methodology and techniques initially developed for Nuclear Power Plants. As FCFs cover a wide diversity of installations the various approaches of national regulators, and their technical support organizations, for the Safety Assessment of Fuel Cycle Facilities are also diverse, as are the approaches by their industries in providing safety justifications for their facilities. The objective of the Working Group on Fuel Cycle Safety is to advance the understanding for both regulators and operators of relevant aspects of nuclear fuel cycle safety in member countries. A large amount of experience is available in safety assessment of FCFs, which should be shared to develop ideas in this field. To contribute to this task, the Workshop on 'Safety Assessment of Fuel Cycle Facilities - Regulatory Approaches and Industry Perspectives' was held in Toronto, on 27 - 29 September 2011. The workshop was hosted by Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission. The current proceedings provide summary of the results of the workshop with the text of the papers given and presentations made

  3. Nuclear fuel cycle bringing about opportunity for industrial structure conversion; On social environment survey regarding location of nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Taiki (Agency of Natural Resources and Energy, Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-10-01

    Three facilities of nuclear fuel cycle, that is, uranium enrichment, fuel reprocessing and low level radioactive waste storage and burying, are being constructed by electric power industry in Rokkasho Village, Kamikita County, Aomori Prefecture. These are the large scale project of the total investment of 1.2 trillion yen. It is expected that the promotion of this project exerts not a little effect to the social economy of the surrounding districts. Agency of Natural Resources and Energy, Ministry of International Trade and Industry, carried out the social environment survey on the location of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. In this report, the outline of the economical pervasive effect due to the construction and operation of the three facilities in the report of this survey is described. The method of survey and the organization, the outline of three nuclear fuel cycle facilities, the economical pervasive effect, the effect to the local social structure, and the direction of arranging occupation, residence and leisure accompanying the location of three nuclear fuel cycle facilities are reported. (K.I.).

  4. High Pressure Industrial Water Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    In conjunction with Space Shuttle Main Engine testing at Stennis, the Nordberg Water Pumps at the High Pressure Industrial Water Facility provide water for cooling the flame deflectors at the test stands during test firings.

  5. Significant incidents in nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    In contrast to nuclear power plants, events in nuclear fuel cycle facilities are not well documented. The INES database covers all the nuclear fuel cycle facilities; however, it was developed in the early 1990s and does not contain information on events prior to that. The purpose of the present report is to collect significant events and analyze them in order to give a safety related overview of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Significant incidents were selected using the following criteria: release of radioactive material or exposure to radiation; degradation of items important to safety; and deficiencies in design, quality assurance, etc. which include criticality incidents, fire, explosion, radioactive release and contamination. This report includes an explanation, where possible, of root causes, lessons learned and action taken. 4 refs, 4 tabs

  6. Which Industries Are Sensitive to Business Cycles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Jay; Pfleeger, Janet

    1997-01-01

    An analysis of the 1994-2005 Bureau of Labor Statistics employment projections can be used to identify industries that are projected to move differently with business cycles in the future than with those of the past, and can be used to identify the industries and occupations that are most prone to business cycle swings. (Author)

  7. Radiation protection at nuclear fuel cycle facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Kuniaki; Momose, Takumaro; Furuta, Sadaaki

    2011-07-01

    Radiation protection methodologies concerning individual monitoring, workplace monitoring and environmental monitoring in nuclear fuel facilities have been developed and applied to facilities in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories (NCL) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) for over 40 y. External exposure to photon, beta ray and neutron and internal exposure to alpha emitter are important issues for radiation protection at these facilities. Monitoring of airborne and surface contamination by alpha and beta/photon emitters at workplace is also essential to avoid internal exposure. A critical accident alarm system developed by JAEA has been proved through application at the facilities for a long time. A centralised area monitoring system is effective for emergency situations. Air and liquid effluents from facilities are monitored by continuous monitors or sampling methods to comply with regulations. Effluent monitoring has been carried out for 40 y to assess the radiological impacts on the public and the environment due to plant operation.

  8. Reducing Proliferation Rick Through Multinational Fuel Cycle Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amanda Rynes

    2010-11-01

    With the prospect of rapid expansion of the nuclear energy industry and the ongoing concern over weapons proliferation, there is a growing need for a viable alternative to traditional nation-based fuel production facilities. While some in the international community remain apprehensive, the advantages of multinational fuel cycle facilities are becoming increasingly apparent, with states on both sides of the supply chain able to garner the security and financial benefits of such facilities. Proliferation risk is minimized by eliminating the need of states to establish indigenous fuel production capabilities and the concept's structure provides an additional internationally monitored barrier against the misuse or diversion of nuclear materials. This article gives a brief description of the arguments for and against the implementation of a complete multinational fuel cycle.

  9. Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayer, J E; Clark, A T; Loysen, P; Ballinger, M Y; Mishima, J; Owczarski, P C; Gregory, W S; Nichols, B D

    1988-05-01

    The Accident Analysis Handbook (AAH) covers four generic facilities: fuel manufacturing, fuel reprocessing, waste storage/solidification, and spent fuel storage; and six accident types: fire, explosion, tornado, criticality, spill, and equipment failure. These are the accident types considered to make major contributions to the radiological risk from accidents in nuclear fuel cycle facility operations. The AAH will enable the user to calculate source term releases from accident scenarios manually or by computer. A major feature of the AAH is development of accident sample problems to provide input to source term analysis methods and transport computer codes. Sample problems and illustrative examples for different accident types are included in the AAH.

  10. Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayer, J.E.; Clark, A.T.; Loysen, P.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Mishima, J.; Owczarski, P.C.; Gregory, W.S.; Nichols, B.D.

    1988-05-01

    The Accident Analysis Handbook (AAH) covers four generic facilities: fuel manufacturing, fuel reprocessing, waste storage/solidification, and spent fuel storage; and six accident types: fire, explosion, tornado, criticality, spill, and equipment failure. These are the accident types considered to make major contributions to the radiological risk from accidents in nuclear fuel cycle facility operations. The AAH will enable the user to calculate source term releases from accident scenarios manually or by computer. A major feature of the AAH is development of accident sample problems to provide input to source term analysis methods and transport computer codes. Sample problems and illustrative examples for different accident types are included in the AAH

  11. Practical lubrication for industrial facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Bloch, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Now completely revised and updated, this definitive, hands-on reference provides a comprehensive resource on the fundamental principles of lubricant application, what products are available, and which lubricants are most effective for specific applications. It also offers a detailed and highly practical discussion of lubrication delivery systems. You'll gain a clearer understanding of the "why" of relevant industrial lubrication practices, and, importantly, how these practices will facilitate optimized results. Lubricant applications covered include bearings and machine elements in earthbound

  12. Nuclear fuel cycle bringing about opportunity for industrial structure conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Taiki

    1991-01-01

    Three facilities of nuclear fuel cycle, that is, uranium enrichment, fuel reprocessing and low level radioactive waste storage and burying, are being constructed by electric power industry in Rokkasho Village, Kamikita County, Aomori Prefecture. These are the large scale project of the total investment of 1.2 trillion yen. It is expected that the promotion of this project exerts not a little effect to the social economy of the surrounding districts. Agency of Natural Resources and Energy, Ministry of International Trade and Industry, carried out the social environment survey on the location of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. In this report, the outline of the economical pervasive effect due to the construction and operation of the three facilities in the report of this survey is described. The method of survey and the organization, the outline of three nuclear fuel cycle facilities, the economical pervasive effect, the effect to the local social structure, and the direction of arranging occupation, residence and leisure accompanying the location of three nuclear fuel cycle facilities are reported. (K.I.)

  13. Financing Strategies for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David Shropshire; Sharon Chandler

    2005-01-01

    To help meet our nation's energy needs, reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel is being considered more and more as a necessary step in a future nuclear fuel cycle, but incorporating this step into the fuel cycle will require considerable investment. This report presents an evaluation of financing scenarios for reprocessing facilities integrated into the nuclear fuel cycle. A range of options, from fully government owned to fully private owned, was evaluated using a DPL (Dynamic Programming Language) 6.0 model, which can systematically optimize outcomes based on user-defined criteria (e.g., lowest life-cycle cost, lowest unit cost). Though all business decisions follow similar logic with regard to financing, reprocessing facilities are an exception due to the range of financing options available. The evaluation concludes that lowest unit costs and lifetime costs follow a fully government-owned financing strategy, due to government forgiveness of debt as sunk costs. Other financing arrangements, however, including regulated utility ownership and a hybrid ownership scheme, led to acceptable costs, below the Nuclear Energy Agency published estimates. Overwhelmingly, uncertainty in annual capacity led to the greatest fluctuations in unit costs necessary for recovery of operating and capital expenditures; the ability to determine annual capacity will be a driving factor in setting unit costs. For private ventures, the costs of capital, especially equity interest rates, dominate the balance sheet; the annual operating costs dominate the government case. It is concluded that to finance the construction and operation of such a facility without government ownership could be feasible with measures taken to mitigate risk, and that factors besides unit costs should be considered (e.g., legal issues, social effects, proliferation concerns) before making a decision on financing strategy

  14. The National Ignition Facility and Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harri, J. G.; Paisner, J. A.; Lowdermilk, W. H.; Boyes, J. D.; Kumpan, S. A.; Sorem, M. S.

    1994-09-01

    The mission of the National Ignition Facility is to achieve ignition and gain in inertial confinement fusion targets in the laboratory. The facility will be used for defense applications such as weapons physics and weapons effects testing, and for civilian applications such as fusion energy development and fundamental studies of matter at high temperatures and densities. The National Ignition Facility construction project will require the best of our construction industries and its success will depend on the best products offered by hundreds of the nation's high technology companies. Three-fourths of the construction costs will be invested in industry. This article reviews the design, cost and schedule, and required industrial involvement associated with the construction project.

  15. The National Ignition Facility and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harri, J.G.; Lowdermilk, W.H.; Paisner, J.A.; Boyes, J.D.; Kumpan, S.A.; Sorem, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    The mission of the National Ignition Facility is to achieve ignition and gain in inertial confinement fusion targets in the laboratory. The facility will be used for defense applications such as weapons physics and weapons effects testing, and for civilian applications such as fusion energy development and fundamental studies of matter at high temperatures and densities. The National Ignition Facility construction project will require the best of national construction industries and its success will depend on the best products offered by hundreds of the nation's high technology companies. Three-fourths of the construction costs will be invested in industry. This article reviews the design, cost and schedule, and required industrial involvement associated with the construction project

  16. 77 FR 823 - Guidance for Fuel Cycle Facility Change Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-06

    ... is required before implementing them. Operating experience from nuclear fuel cycle facilities shows... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2009-0262] Guidance for Fuel Cycle Facility Change Processes... Fuel Cycle Facility Change Processes.'' This regulatory guide describes the types of changes for which...

  17. Chemical process safety at fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, D.A.

    1997-08-01

    This NUREG provides broad guidance on chemical safety issues relevant to fuel cycle facilities. It describes an approach acceptable to the NRC staff, with examples that are not exhaustive, for addressing chemical process safety in the safe storage, handling, and processing of licensed nuclear material. It expounds to license holders and applicants a general philosophy of the role of chemical process safety with respect to NRC-licensed materials; sets forth the basic information needed to properly evaluate chemical process safety; and describes plausible methods of identifying and evaluating chemical hazards and assessing the adequacy of the chemical safety of the proposed equipment and facilities. Examples of equipment and methods commonly used to prevent and/or mitigate the consequences of chemical incidents are discussed in this document

  18. A Guide for Equipping Industrial Arts Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Industrial Arts Association, Washington, DC. Equipment Guide Committee.

    A guide for planning new and revising existing industrial arts facilities which gives a listing of tools and equipment recommended for each of the major areas of instruction (automotive and power mechanics, ceramics, drafting, electronics, elementary, general shop, graphic arts, metalworking, plastics, and woodworking). General descriptions and…

  19. Upgrading safety systems of industrial irradiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, R.S.; Gomes, J.D.R.L.; Costa, E.L.C.; Costa, M.L.L.; Thomé, Z.D.

    2017-01-01

    The first industrial irradiation facility in operation in Brazil was designed in the 70s. Nowadays, twelve commercial and research facilities are in operation and two already decommissioned. Minor modifications and upgrades, as sensors replacement, have been introduced in these facilities, in order to reduce the technological gap in the control and safety systems. The safety systems are designed in agreement with the codes and standards at the time. Since then, new standards, codes and recommendations, as well as lessons learned from accidents, have been issued by various international committees or regulatory bodies. The rapid advance of the industry makes the safety equipment used in the original construction become obsolete. The decreasing demand for these older products means that they are no longer produced, which can make it impossible or costly to obtain spare parts and the expansion of legacy systems to include new features. This work aims to evaluate existing safety systems at Brazilian irradiation facilities, mainly the oldest facilities, taking into account the recommended IAEA's design requirements. Irrespective of the fact that during its operational period no event with victims have been recorded in Brazilian facilities, and that the regulatory inspections do not present any serious deviations regarding the safety procedures, it is necessary an assessment of safety system with the purpose of bringing their systems to 'the state of the art', avoiding their rapid obsolescence. This study has also taken into account the knowledge, concepts and solutions developed to upgrading safety system in irradiation facilities throughout the world. (author)

  20. Upgrading safety systems of industrial irradiation facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, R.S.; Gomes, J.D.R.L.; Costa, E.L.C.; Costa, M.L.L., E-mail: rogeriog@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: jlopes@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: evaldo@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: mara@cnen.gov.br [Comissão Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Diretoria de Radioproteção e Segurança Nuclear; Thomé, Z.D., E-mail: zielithome@gmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Seção de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    The first industrial irradiation facility in operation in Brazil was designed in the 70s. Nowadays, twelve commercial and research facilities are in operation and two already decommissioned. Minor modifications and upgrades, as sensors replacement, have been introduced in these facilities, in order to reduce the technological gap in the control and safety systems. The safety systems are designed in agreement with the codes and standards at the time. Since then, new standards, codes and recommendations, as well as lessons learned from accidents, have been issued by various international committees or regulatory bodies. The rapid advance of the industry makes the safety equipment used in the original construction become obsolete. The decreasing demand for these older products means that they are no longer produced, which can make it impossible or costly to obtain spare parts and the expansion of legacy systems to include new features. This work aims to evaluate existing safety systems at Brazilian irradiation facilities, mainly the oldest facilities, taking into account the recommended IAEA's design requirements. Irrespective of the fact that during its operational period no event with victims have been recorded in Brazilian facilities, and that the regulatory inspections do not present any serious deviations regarding the safety procedures, it is necessary an assessment of safety system with the purpose of bringing their systems to 'the state of the art', avoiding their rapid obsolescence. This study has also taken into account the knowledge, concepts and solutions developed to upgrading safety system in irradiation facilities throughout the world. (author)

  1. Training development in Juzbado's Fuel Cycle Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, A.; Cunado, E.; Ortiz, D.

    2003-01-01

    In Juzbado's fuel cycle facility, because of the special activities developed, training is a very important issues. Training has been evolved, due to changes on the standards applicable each moment, and also due to the technological resources available. Both aspects have resulted in an evolution of the documents referred to training, such as training programs procedures, Radiation Protection Manual as well as the teaching methods. In the report we are going to present, we will show more precisely the changes that take place, referring to the different training methods used, present training sanitations, and the improvements already planned in training subjects as well as tools used, accomplishing with the legislation and improving in our effort of a better assimilation of the necessary knowledge. (Author)

  2. The industrial nuclear fuel cycle in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koll, J.H.; Kittl, J.E.; Parera, C.A.; Coppa, R.C.; Aguirre, E.J.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear power program of Argentina for the period 1976-85 is described, as a basis to indicate fuel requirements and the consequent implementation of a national fuel cycle industry. Fuel cycle activities in Argentina were initiated as soon as 1951-2 in the prospection and mining activities through the country. Following this step, yellow-cake production was initiated in plants of limited capacity. National production of uranium concentrate has met requirements up to the present time, and will continue to do so until the Sierra Pintada Industrial Complex starts operation in 1979. Presently, there is a gap in local production of uranium dioxide and fuel elements for the Atucha power station, which are produced abroad using Argentine uranium concentrate. With its background, the argentine program for the installation of nuclear fuel cycle industries is described, and the techno-economical implications considered. Individual projects are reviewed, as well as the present and planned infrastructure needed to support the industrial effort [es

  3. Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance on how to calculate the characteristics of releases of radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals from nonreactor nuclear facilities. In addition, the Handbook provides guidance on how to calculate the consequences of those releases. There are four major chapters: Hazard Evaluation and Scenario Development; Source Term Determination; Transport Within Containment/Confinement; and Atmospheric Dispersion and Consequences Modeling. These chapters are supported by Appendices, including: a summary of chemical and nuclear information that contains descriptions of various fuel cycle facilities; details on how to calculate the characteristics of source terms for releases of hazardous chemicals; a comparison of NRC, EPA, and OSHA programs that address chemical safety; a summary of the performance of HEPA and other filters; and a discussion of uncertainties. Several sample problems are presented: a free-fall spill of powder, an explosion with radioactive release; a fire with radioactive release; filter failure; hydrogen fluoride release from a tankcar; a uranium hexafluoride cylinder rupture; a liquid spill in a vitrification plant; and a criticality incident. Finally, this Handbook includes a computer model, LPF No.1B, that is intended for use in calculating Leak Path Factors. A list of contributors to the Handbook is presented in Chapter 6. 39 figs., 35 tabs

  4. Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance on how to calculate the characteristics of releases of radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals from nonreactor nuclear facilities. In addition, the Handbook provides guidance on how to calculate the consequences of those releases. There are four major chapters: Hazard Evaluation and Scenario Development; Source Term Determination; Transport Within Containment/Confinement; and Atmospheric Dispersion and Consequences Modeling. These chapters are supported by Appendices, including: a summary of chemical and nuclear information that contains descriptions of various fuel cycle facilities; details on how to calculate the characteristics of source terms for releases of hazardous chemicals; a comparison of NRC, EPA, and OSHA programs that address chemical safety; a summary of the performance of HEPA and other filters; and a discussion of uncertainties. Several sample problems are presented: a free-fall spill of powder, an explosion with radioactive release; a fire with radioactive release; filter failure; hydrogen fluoride release from a tankcar; a uranium hexafluoride cylinder rupture; a liquid spill in a vitrification plant; and a criticality incident. Finally, this Handbook includes a computer model, LPF No.1B, that is intended for use in calculating Leak Path Factors. A list of contributors to the Handbook is presented in Chapter 6. 39 figs., 35 tabs.

  5. Industrial fans used in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Industrial fans are widely used in nuclear facilities, and their most common use is in building ventilation. To control the spread of contamination, airflows are maintained at high levels. Therefore, the selection of the fan and fan control are important to the safety of people, equipment and the environment. As a result, 80% of all energy used in nuclear facilities is fan energy. Safety evolves from the durability, control and redundancy in the system. In new or retrofit installations, testing and qualification of fans and systems are completed prior to start-up. Less important but necessary is the energy conservation aspect of fan selection and installations. Fan efficiency, type of control and system installation are evaluated for energy use

  6. 76 FR 44049 - Guidance for Fuel Cycle Facility Change Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ... COMMISSION Guidance for Fuel Cycle Facility Change Processes AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION... for Fuel Cycle Facility Change Processes'' in the Federal Register for a 30 day public comment period... Change Processes.'' By e-mail ] dated July 7, 2011, the Nuclear Energy Institute (ADAMS Accession No...

  7. A study on domino effect in nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozzolan, Jean-Claude

    2006-01-01

    Accidents caused by domino effect are among the most severe accidents in the chemical and process industry. Although the destructive potential of these accidental scenarios is widely known, little attention has been paid to this problem in the technical literature and a complete methodology for quantitative assessment of domino accidents contribution to industrial risk is still lacking. The present study proposed a systematic procedure for the quantitative assessment of the risk caused by domino effect in chemical plants that are part of nuclear fuel cycle plants. This work is based on recent advances in the modeling of fire and explosion damage to process equipment due to different escalation vectors (heat radiation, overpressure and fragment projection). Available data from literature and specific vulnerability models derived for several categories of process equipment had been used in the present work. The proposed procedure is applied to a typical storage area of a reconversion plant situated in a complex that shelters other nuclear fuel cycle facilities. The top-events and escalation vectors are identified, their consequences estimated and credible domino scenarios selected on the basis of their frequencies. (author)

  8. Storm Water General Permit 1 for Industrial Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — General permit #1 for storm water discharges associated with industrial facilities in Iowa for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program.

  9. Financing Strategies For A Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David Shropshire; Sharon Chandler

    2006-01-01

    To help meet the nation's energy needs, recycling of partially used nuclear fuel is required to close the nuclear fuel cycle, but implementing this step will require considerable investment. This report evaluates financing scenarios for integrating recycling facilities into the nuclear fuel cycle. A range of options from fully government owned to fully private owned were evaluated using DPL (Decision Programming Language 6.0), which can systematically optimize outcomes based on user-defined criteria (e.g., lowest lifecycle cost, lowest unit cost). This evaluation concludes that the lowest unit costs and lifetime costs are found for a fully government-owned financing strategy, due to government forgiveness of debt as sunk costs. However, this does not mean that the facilities should necessarily be constructed and operated by the government. The costs for hybrid combinations of public and private (commercial) financed options can compete under some circumstances with the costs of the government option. This analysis shows that commercial operations have potential to be economical, but there is presently no incentive for private industry involvement. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) currently establishes government ownership of partially used commercial nuclear fuel. In addition, the recently announced Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) suggests fuels from several countries will be recycled in the United States as part of an international governmental agreement; this also assumes government ownership. Overwhelmingly, uncertainty in annual facility capacity led to the greatest variations in unit costs necessary for recovery of operating and capital expenditures; the ability to determine annual capacity will be a driving factor in setting unit costs. For private ventures, the costs of capital, especially equity interest rates, dominate the balance sheet; and the annual operating costs, forgiveness of debt, and overnight costs dominate the costs computed for the

  10. Hematite nuclear fuel cycle facility decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, K.

    2004-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Company LLC ('Westinghouse') acquired a nuclear fuel processing plant at Hematite, Missouri ('Hematite', the 'Facility', or the 'Plant') in April 2000. The plant has subsequently been closed, and its operations have been relocated to a newer, larger facility. Westinghouse has announced plans to complete its clean-up, decommissioning, and license retirement in a safe, socially responsible, and environmentally sound manner as required by internal policies, as well as those of its parent company, British Nuclear Fuels plc. ('BNFL'). Preliminary investigations have revealed the presence of environmental contamination in various areas of the facility and grounds, including both radioactive contamination and various other substances related to the nuclear fuel processing operations. The disparity in regulatory requirements for radiological and nonradiological contaminants, the variety of historic and recent operations, and the number of previous owners working under various contractual arrangements for both governmental and private concerns has resulted in a complex project. This paper discusses Westinghouse's efforts to develop and implement a comprehensive decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) strategy for the facility and grounds. (author)

  11. Revised Analyses of Decommissioning Reference Non-Fuel-Cycle Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierschbach, M.C.; Haffner, D.R.; Schneider, K.J.; Short, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    Cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of non-fuel-cycle nuclear facilities that represent a significant decommissioning task in terms of decontamination and disposal activities. This study is a re-evaluation of the original study (NUREG/CR-1754 and NUREG/CR-1754, Addendum 1). The reference facilities examined in this study are the same as in the original study and include: a laboratory for the manufacture of 3 H-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of 14 C-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of 123 I-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of 137 Cs sealed sources; a laboratory for the manufacture of 241 Am sealed sources; and an institutional user laboratory. In addition to the laboratories, three reference sites that require some decommissioning effort were also examined. These sites are: (1) a site with a contaminated drain line and hold-up tank; (2) a site with a contaminated ground surface; and (3) a tailings pile containing uranium and thorium residues. Decommissioning of these reference facilities and sites can be accomplished using techniques and equipment that are in common industrial use. Essentially the same technology assumed in the original study is used in this study. For the reference laboratory-type facilities, the study approach is to first evaluate the decommissioning of individual components (e.g., fume hoods, glove boxes, and building surfaces) that are common to many laboratory facilities. The information obtained from analyzing the individual components of each facility are then used to determine the cost, manpower requirements and dose information for the decommissioning of the entire facility. DECON, the objective of the 1988 Rulemaking for materials facilities, is the decommissioning alternative evaluated for the reference laboratories because it results in the release of the facility for restricted or unrestricted use as soon as possible. For a facility, DECON requires

  12. Revised Analyses of Decommissioning Reference Non-Fuel-Cycle Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MC Bierschbach; DR Haffner; KJ Schneider; SM Short

    2002-12-01

    Cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of non-fuel-cycle nuclear facilities that represent a significant decommissioning task in terms of decontamination and disposal activities. This study is a re-evaluation of the original study (NUREG/CR-1754 and NUREG/CR-1754, Addendum 1). The reference facilities examined in this study are the same as in the original study and include: a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 3}H-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 14}C-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 123}I-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 137}Cs sealed sources; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 241}Am sealed sources; and an institutional user laboratory. In addition to the laboratories, three reference sites that require some decommissioning effort were also examined. These sites are: (1) a site with a contaminated drain line and hold-up tank; (2) a site with a contaminated ground surface; and (3) a tailings pile containing uranium and thorium residues. Decommissioning of these reference facilities and sites can be accomplished using techniques and equipment that are in common industrial use. Essentially the same technology assumed in the original study is used in this study. For the reference laboratory-type facilities, the study approach is to first evaluate the decommissioning of individual components (e.g., fume hoods, glove boxes, and building surfaces) that are common to many laboratory facilities. The information obtained from analyzing the individual components of each facility are then used to determine the cost, manpower requirements and dose information for the decommissioning of the entire facility. DECON, the objective of the 1988 Rulemaking for materials facilities, is the decommissioning alternative evaluated for the reference laboratories because it results in the release of the facility for restricted or unrestricted use as soon as possible. For a

  13. IFR fuel cycle demonstration in the EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lineberry, M.J.; Phipps, R.D.; Rigg, R.H.; Benedict, R.W.; Carnes, M.D.; Herceg, J.E.; Holtz, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    The next major milestone of the IFR (Integral Fast Reactor) program is engineering-scale demonstration of the pyroprocess fuel cycle. The EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility has just entered a startup phase which includes completion of facility modifications, and installation and cold checkout of process equipment. This paper reviews the design and construction of the facility, the design and fabrication of the process equipment, and the schedule and initial plan for its operation. (author)

  14. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System. A directory of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. 2009 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-04-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System (NFCIS) is an international directory of civilian nuclear fuel cycle facilities, published online as part of the Integrated Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System (iNFCIS: http://www-nfcis.iaea.org/). This is the fourth hardcopy publication in almost 30 years and it represents a snapshot of the NFCIS database as of the end of 2008. Together with the attached CD-ROM, it provides information on 650 civilian nuclear fuel cycle facilities in 53 countries, thus helping to improve the transparency of global nuclear fuel cycle activities

  15. Health and environmental aspects of nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of the present publication is to give a generic description of health and environmental aspects of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Primarily the report is meant to stand alone; however, because of the content of the publication and in the context of the DECADES project, it may serve as a means of introducing specialists in other fuel cycles to the nuclear fuel cycle. Refs, figs, tabs

  16. Part 6. Internationalization and collocation of FBR fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, M.G.; Abramson, P.B.; LeSage, L.G.

    1980-01-01

    This report examines some of the non-proliferation, technical, and institutional aspects of internationalization and/or collocation of major facilities of the Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) fuel cycle. The national incentives and disincentives for establishment of FBR Fuel Cycle Centers are enumerated. The technical, legal, and administrative considerations in determining the feasibility of FBR Fuel Cycle Centers are addressed by making comparisons with Light Water Reactor (LWR) centers which have been studied in detail by the IAEA and UNSRC

  17. Recycle and reuse of materials and components from waste streams of nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    All nuclear fuel cycle processes utilize a wide range of equipment and materials to produce the final products they are designed for. However, as at any other industrial facility, during operation of the nuclear fuel cycle facilities, apart from the main products some byproducts, spent materials and waste are generated. A lot of these materials, byproducts or some components of waste have a potential value and may be recycled within the original process or reused outside either directly or after appropriate treatment. The issue of recycle and reuse of valuable material is important for all industries including the nuclear fuel cycle. The level of different materials involvement and opportunities for their recycle and reuse in nuclear industry are different at different stages of nuclear fuel cycle activity, generally increasing from the front end to the back end processes and decommissioning. Minimization of waste arisings and the practice of recycle and reuse can improve process economics and can minimize the potential environmental impact. Recognizing the importance of this subject, the International Atomic Energy Agency initiated the preparation of this report aiming to review and summarize the information on the existing recycling and reuse practice for both radioactive and non-radioactive components of waste streams at nuclear fuel cycle facilities. This report analyses the existing options, approaches and developments in recycle and reuse in nuclear industry

  18. Drop test facility available to private industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shappert, L.B.; Box, W.D.

    1983-01-01

    In 1978, a virtually unyielding drop test impact pad was constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) for the testing of heavy shipping containers designed for transporting radioactive materials. Because of the facility's unique capability for drop-testing large, massive shipping packages, it has been identified as a facility which can be made available for non-DOE users

  19. Towards a Cycle without Loss. Cobalt in the Aircraft Industry,

    Science.gov (United States)

    COBALT , *AIRCRAFT INDUSTRY, *STRATEGIC MATERIALS, *MANUFACTURING, CYCLES, SUPERALLOYS , HIGH STRENGTH ALLOYS, STEEL, TOOL STEEL, ALLOYS, QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS, MATERIALS RECOVERY, RATES, ALLOYS, RECYCLED MATERIALS, LOSSES, SYMPOSIA

  20. Safety of fuel cycle facilities. Topical issues paper no. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranguelova, V.; Niehaus, F.; Delattre, D.

    2001-01-01

    A wide range of nuclear fuel cycle facilities are in operation. These installations process, use, store and dispose of radioactive material and cover: mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication (including mixed oxide fuel), reactor, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste treatment and waste disposal facilities. For the purposes of this paper, reactors and waste disposal facilities are not considered. The term 'fuel cycle facilities' covers only the remainder of the installations listed above. The IAEA Secretariat maintains a database of fuel cycle facilities in its Member States. Known as the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System (NFCIS), it is available as an on-line service through the Internet. More than 500 such facilities have been reported under this system. The facilities are listed by facility type and operating status. Approximately one third of all of the facilities are located in developing States. About half of all facilities are reported to be operating, of which approximately 40% are operating in developing States. In addition, some 60 facilities are either in the design stage or under construction. Although the radioactive source term for most fuel cycle facilities is lower than the source term for reactors, which results in less severe consequences to the public from potential accidents at these fuel cycle installations, recent events at some fuel cycle facilities have given rise to public concern which has to be addressed adequately by national regulatory bodies and at the international level. Worldwide, operational experience feedback warrants improvements in the safety of these facilities. Some of the hazards are similar for reactor and non-reactor facilities. However, the differences between these installations give rise to specific safety concerns at fuel cycle facilities. In particular, these concerns include: criticality, radiation protection of workers, chemical hazards, fire and explosion hazards. It is recognized

  1. Remote handling technology for nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Akira; Maekawa, Hiromichi; Ohmura, Yutaka

    1997-01-01

    Design and R and D on nuclear fuel cycle facilities has intended development of remote handling and maintenance technology since 1977. IHI has completed the design and construction of several facilities with remote handling systems for Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC), Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), and Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd. (JNFL). Based on the above experiences, IHI is now undertaking integration of specific technology and remote handling technology for application to new fields such as fusion reactor facilities, decommissioning of nuclear reactors, accelerator testing facilities, and robot simulator-aided remote operation systems in the future. (author)

  2. Considerations about the licensing process of special nuclear industrial facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talarico, M.A., E-mail: talaricomarco@hotmail.com [Marinha do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao do Porgrama de Submarino com Propulsao Nuclear; Melo, P.F. Frutuoso e [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    This paper brings a discussion about the challenges involved in the development of a new kind of nuclear facility in Brazil, a naval base for nuclear submarines, with attention to the licensing process and considerations about the risk-informed decision making application to the licensing process. Initially, a model of such a naval base, called in this work, special industrial facility, is proposed, with its systems and respective sets of basic requirements, in order to make it possible the accomplishment of the special industrial facility support function to the nuclear submarine. A discussion about current challenges to overcome in this project is presented: the challenges due to the new characteristics of this type of nuclear facility; existence of several interfaces between the special industrial facilities systems and nuclear submarine systems in design activities; lack of specific regulation in Brazil to allow the licensing process of special industrial facilities by the nuclear safety authority; and comments about the lack of information from reference nuclear facilities, as is the case with nuclear power reactors (for example, the German Grafenrheinfeld nuclear plant is the reference plant for the Brazilian Angra 2 nuclear plant). Finally, in view of these challenges, an analysis method of special industrial facility operational scenarios to assist the licensing process is proposed. Also, considerations about the application of risk-informed decision making to the special industrial facility activity and licensing process in Brazil are presented. (author)

  3. Considerations about the licensing process of special nuclear industrial facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talarico, M.A.; Melo, P.F. Frutuoso e

    2015-01-01

    This paper brings a discussion about the challenges involved in the development of a new kind of nuclear facility in Brazil, a naval base for nuclear submarines, with attention to the licensing process and considerations about the risk-informed decision making application to the licensing process. Initially, a model of such a naval base, called in this work, special industrial facility, is proposed, with its systems and respective sets of basic requirements, in order to make it possible the accomplishment of the special industrial facility support function to the nuclear submarine. A discussion about current challenges to overcome in this project is presented: the challenges due to the new characteristics of this type of nuclear facility; existence of several interfaces between the special industrial facilities systems and nuclear submarine systems in design activities; lack of specific regulation in Brazil to allow the licensing process of special industrial facilities by the nuclear safety authority; and comments about the lack of information from reference nuclear facilities, as is the case with nuclear power reactors (for example, the German Grafenrheinfeld nuclear plant is the reference plant for the Brazilian Angra 2 nuclear plant). Finally, in view of these challenges, an analysis method of special industrial facility operational scenarios to assist the licensing process is proposed. Also, considerations about the application of risk-informed decision making to the special industrial facility activity and licensing process in Brazil are presented. (author)

  4. Corporate Statements in the Facilities Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzweber, Markus

    In today’s services business domain, especially in facility services and facilities management (FM), customers are becoming more informed as to the level of choice and competition for their custom. This has led businesses to develop and maintain strategic elements of corporate statements that wil......In today’s services business domain, especially in facility services and facilities management (FM), customers are becoming more informed as to the level of choice and competition for their custom. This has led businesses to develop and maintain strategic elements of corporate statements...

  5. Nuclear-fuel-cycle facility deployment and price generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andress, D.A.

    1981-04-01

    The enrichment process and how it is to be modeled in the International Nuclear Model (INM) is described. The details of enrichment production, planning, unit price generation, demand estimation and ordering are examined. The enrichment process from both the producer's and the utility's point of view is analyzed. The enrichment separative-work-unit (SWU) contracts are also discussed. The relationship of the enrichment process with other sectors of the nuclear fuel cycle, expecially uranium mining and milling is considered. There are portions of the enrichment process that are not completely understood at the present time. These areas, which require further study, will be pinpointed in the following discussion. In many cases, e.g., the advent of SMU brokerage activities, the answers will emerge only in time. In other cases, e.g., political trends, uncertainties will always remain. It is possible to cast the uncertainties in a probabilistic framework, but this is beyond the scope of this report. INM, a comprehensive model of the international nuclear industry, simulates the market decision process based on current and future price expectations under a broad range of scenario specifications. INM determines the proper reactor mix as well as the planning, operation, and unit price generation of the attendant nuclear fuel cycle facilities. The level of detail of many of the enrichment activities presented in this report, e.g., the enrichment contracts, is too fine to be incorporated into INM. Nevertheless, they are presented in a form that is ammendable to modeling. The reasons for this are two-fold. First, it shows the level of complexity that would be required to model the entire system. Second, it presents the structural framework for a detailed, stand-alone enrichment model

  6. The industrial facility for Grouping, Storage and Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Patrice

    2013-07-01

    The industrial facility for grouping, storage and disposal (called Cires in French), in the Aube district, is run by Andra. The facility is licensed to dispose of very-low-level waste, to collect non-nuclear-power radioactive waste and to provide storage for some of the waste for which a final management solution has not yet been found. The Cires facility is located a few kilometers from the Aube disposal facility (CSA), another of Andra's waste disposal facilities, currently dealing with low- and intermediate-level, short-lived waste. Contents: Andra in the Aube district, an exemplary industrial operator - The industrial facility for grouping, storage and disposal (Cires); Disposal of very-low-level waste (VLLW); The journey taken by VLL waste; Grouping of non-nuclear-power waste; Storage of non-nuclear-power waste; The journey taken by non-nuclear-power waste; Protecting present and future generations

  7. Pyrochemistry: from flowsheet to industrial facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, N.; Thied, R.; Lamorlette, G.; Greneche, D.

    2001-01-01

    Challenges to any future commercial deployment of pyro-chemistry will be significant. The implications of industrial use must be well understood in technical, economic and social terms to gain commercial and regulatory acceptance. The broad base of knowledge necessary to support general commercial use of pyro-chemistry in the nuclear field is considered. Pyro-chemistry development is discussed in the context of a commercial application-based approach and issues to be addressed are outlined. A stepwise evolutionary development of pyro-chemical processing is anticipated which might allow industrialization in the absence of acceptance of evolutionary development at industrial scale which benefited Purex development. (author)

  8. Industrial Crystallization Facility for Nonlinear Optical Materials, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Made In Space, Inc. (MIS) proposes the development of an Industrial Crystal Facility (ICF) for microgravity product manufacturing and applied research. The ICF is...

  9. Seismic design considerations of nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-10-01

    An Advisory Group Meeting (AGM) on Seismic Technologies of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities was convened in Vienna from 12 to 14 November 1997. The main objective of the meeting was the investigation of the present status of seismic technologies in nuclear fuel cycle facilities in Member States as a starting point for understanding of the most important directions and trends of national initiatives, including research and development, in the area of seismic safety. The AGM gave priority to the establishment of a consistent programme for seismic assessment of nuclear fuel cycle facilities worldwide. A consultants meeting subsequently met in Vienna from 16 to 19 March 1999. At this meeting the necessity of a dedicated programme was further supported and a technical background to the initiative was provided. This publication provides recommendations both for the seismic design of new plants and for re-evaluation projects of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. After a short introduction of the general IAEA approach, some key contributions from Member State participants are presented. Each of them was indexed separately

  10. Nuclear criticality safety program at the Fuel Cycle Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lell, R.M.; Fujita, E.K.; Tracy, D.B.; Klann, R.T.; Imel, G.R.; Benedict, R.W.; Rigg, R.H.

    1994-01-01

    The Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) is designed to demonstrate the feasibility of a novel commercial-scale remote pyrometallurgical process for metallic fuels from liquid metal-cooled reactors and to show closure of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle. Requirements for nuclear criticality safety impose the most restrictive of the various constraints on the operation of FCF. The upper limits on batch sizes and other important process parameters are determined principally by criticality safety considerations. To maintain an efficient operation within appropriate safety limits, it is necessary to formulate a nuclear criticality safety program that integrates equipment design, process development, process modeling, conduct of operations, a measurement program, adequate material control procedures, and nuclear criticality analysis. The nuclear criticality safety program for FCF reflects this integration, ensuring that the facility can be operated efficiently without compromising safety. The experience gained from the conduct of this program in the Fuel cycle Facility will be used to design and safely operate IFR facilities on a commercial scale. The key features of the nuclear criticality safety program are described. The relationship of these features to normal facility operation is also described

  11. Regulatory cross-cutting topics for fuel cycle facilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denman, Matthew R.; Brown, Jason; Goldmann, Andrew Scott; Louie, David

    2013-10-01

    This report overviews crosscutting regulatory topics for nuclear fuel cycle facilities for use in the Fuel Cycle Research & Development Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation and Screening study. In particular, the regulatory infrastructure and analysis capability is assessed for the following topical areas: Fire Regulations (i.e., how applicable are current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and/or International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) fire regulations to advance fuel cycle facilities) Consequence Assessment (i.e., how applicable are current radionuclide transportation tools to support risk-informed regulations and Level 2 and/or 3 PRA) While not addressed in detail, the following regulatory topic is also discussed: Integrated Security, Safeguard and Safety Requirement (i.e., how applicable are current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations to future fuel cycle facilities which will likely be required to balance the sometimes conflicting Material Accountability, Security, and Safety requirements.)

  12. Use of probabilistic risk assessment in fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Felix; Gonzalez, Michelle; Wagner, Brian

    2013-01-01

    As expressed in its Policy Statement on the Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Methods in Nuclear Regulatory Activities, the U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission has been working for decades to increase the use of PRA technology in its regulatory activities. Since the policy statement was issued in 1995, PRA has become a core component of the nuclear power plant (NPP) licensing and oversight processes. In the last several years, interest has increased in PRA technologies and their possible application to other areas including, but not limited to, spent fuel handling, fuel cycle facilities, reprocessing facilities, and advanced reactors. This paper describes the application of PRA technology currently used in NPPs and its application in other areas such as fuel cycle facilities and advanced reactors. It describes major challenges that are being faced in the application of PRA into new technical areas and possible ways to resolve them. (authors)

  13. Aerial infrared monitoring for nuclear fuel cycle facilities in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankevich, S.A.; Dudar, T.V.; Kovalenko, G.D.; Kartashov, V.V.

    2015-01-01

    The scientific research overall objective is rapid express detection and preliminary identification of pre-accidental conditions at nuclear fuel cycle facilities. We consider development of a miniature unmanned aerial vehicle equipped with high-precision infrared spectroradiometer able to detect remotely internal warming up of hazardous facilities by its thermal infrared radiation. The possibility of remote monitoring using unmanned aerial vehicle is considered at the example of the dry spent fuel storage facility of the Zaporizhzhya Nuclear Power Plant. Infrared remote monitoring is supposed to present additional information on the monitored facilities based on different physical principles rather than those currently in use. Models and specifications towards up-to-date samples of infrared surveying equipment and its small-sized unmanned vehicles are presented in the paper.

  14. Industrial Maturity of FR Fuel Cycle Processes and Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruezière, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    FR fuel cycle processes and technologies have already been proven industrially for Oxide Fuel, and to a lesser extent for metal fuel. In addition, both used oxide fuel reprocessing and fresh oxide fuel manufacturing benefit from similar industrial experience currently deployed for LWR. Alternative fuel type will have to generate very significant benefit in reactor ( safety, cost, … ) to justify corresponding development and industrialization costs

  15. Assessment of risk of potential exposures on facilities industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leocadio, Joao Carlos

    2007-03-01

    This work develops a model to evaluate potential exposures on open facilities of industrial radiography in Brazil. This model will decisively contribute to optimize operational, radiological protection and safety procedures, to prevent radiation accidents and to reduce human errors in industrial radiography. The probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) methodology was very useful to assess potential exposures. The open facilities of industrial radiography were identified as the scenario to be analyzed in what concerns the evaluation of potential exposures, due to their high accidents indices. The results of the assessment of potential exposures confirm that the industrial radiography in Brazil is a high-risk practice as classified by the IAEA. The risk of potential exposure was estimated to be 40,5 x 10 -2 per year in Brazil, having as main consequences injuries to the workers' hands and arms. In the world scene, the consequences are worst, leading to fatalities of people, thus emphasizing the high risk of industrial radiography. (author)

  16. Industrial oriented research at Ljubljana Tandetron Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelicon, P.; Simcic, J.; Razpet, A.; Budnar, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Galvanization is the cheapest and the most frequently used industrial coating technique. The diagnostics of usually thick deposited layers is rather time consuming and expensive, when surface layers have to be removed to obtain depth concentration profiles. Proton- impact RBS exhibits both large range and sufficient depth resolution for efficient and cost-effective depth profiling. Several galvanic coatings, composed of Sn/Cu/Ni/Graphite layers were analyzed by current-normalized RBS. 3 MeV protons were used to enable detection range of up to 25 micrometers. SIMNRA code was used to analyze the spectra. The depth concentration profiles obtained enable the control of annealing to obtain proper concentration mixing at the interfaces. In this way, the melting point of the upper layer for contact welding and wear hardness could be optimized. (author)

  17. The role of spent fuel test facilities in the fuel cycle strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, S. T.; Gross, D. L.; Snyder, N. W.; Woods, W. D.

    1988-01-01

    Disposal of commercial spent nuclear fuels in the major industrialized countries may be categorized into two broad approaches: a once-through policy which will dispose of spent fuels and recycle fissile materials. Within reprocess spent fuels and recycle fissile materials. Within each policy, various technical, licensing, institutional and public issues exist. These issues tend to complicate the formulation of an effective and acceptable fuel cycle strategy which will meet various cost, schedule, and legislative constraints. This paper examines overall fuel cycle strategies from the viewpoint of these underlying technical issues and assesses the roles of spent fuel test facilities in the overall fuel cycles steps. Basic functions of such test facilities are also discussed. The main emphasis is placed on the once-through policy although the reprocessing / recycle policy is also discussed. Benefits of utilizing test facilities in the fuel cycle strategies are explored. The results indicate that substantial benefits may be obtained in terms of minimizing programmatic risks, increasing public confidence, and more effective utilization of overall budgetary resources by structuring and highlighting the test facilities as an important element in the overall strategy

  18. Direction of Improvement for Licensing Advanced Fuel Cycle Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Il; Yook, Dae Sik; Jeong, Seung Yeong; Jeong, Chan Woo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The final spent fuel management method has yet to be established, and the South Korean government is expected to decide on the final spent fuel management method under a national consensus. In particular, two methods of spent fuel management are under consideration: Direct disposal in base rock several hundred meters underground and recycling. The present study reviewed the direction of improvement of the regulatory system that can be applied when an advanced fuel cycle for recycling spent fuel is adopted as the final management method. For recycling to be adopted as the domestic final spent fuel management method, there remains the task of having to overcome the stumbling blocks of a national consensus and the Agreement for Cooperation between the Government of the Republic of Korea and the Government of the United States of America concerning the Civil Use of Atomic Energy (Korea-US Atomic Energy Agreement). To resolve this and to construct and operate advanced fuel cycle facilities, it is necessary to establish an applicable legal system, which the present study reviewed. The results of the present study are expected to be used as the basic data in improving the legal system after the realization of advanced fuel cycles in the future. In addition, research on the development of technical standards and safety requirements for advanced fuel cycle facilities will continue to be necessary.

  19. Life Cycle Design - a Route to the Sustainable Industrial Culture?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Wenzel, Henrik; Alting, Leo

    1999-01-01

    In the attempt to reorient Society's development in a more sustainable direction attention is focused on the environmental impact of products and systems over their entire life cycle, but how can the environmental life cycle perspective be introduced into the design of new solutions and how much...... can be optained through life cycle design? The authors' experience with integration of environmental considerations in product development is presented, ranging from the detailed interactive approach to the EDIP-method through various simplified approaches. The potential for environmental improvements...... is reviewed and the overall question of to what extent life cycle design is a route to the sustainable industrial culture is discussed....

  20. The technical and industrial evolutions in the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rougeau, J.P.; Guais, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    The fuel cycle industry is a vital part of nuclear energy generation. Producers in every step of this industry, from uranium to reprocessing are working to adapt their products and services both to the more and more competitive conditions of the market and to the utilities evoluting specific needs. For the next decade, the main trend is uranium economy and reduction of industrial costs. For the longer term, the difficult prevision of nuclear energy developments, in particular with new types of reactors necessitates a true capacity of adaptation both from the utilities and from the fuel cycle industry. Cogema has already demonstrated the ability to adapt its industrial capabilities and therefore can prepare confidently for the future challenges [fr

  1. Implementation of high-dose chemical dosimetry for industrial facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceicao, Cirilo Cezar Sant'Anna da

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this work is the implementation of methodology for high dose measurements using chemical dosimeters in liquid phase, traceable to the international metrology system, and make available in the country, the standard of high-dose to industrial irradiation facilities and research irradiators, trough the quality program with comparative measurements and direct use of the standard dosimeters in routine. The use of these low cost dosimetry systems in industrial irradiation facilities, assists to the certification requirements and it can reduce the costs with dosimetry for approximately 20% of the total dosimetry costs, using these systems in routine measurements and validation process, largely substituting the imported PMMA dosimeters, among others. (author)

  2. Optimal capacity design of LID facility for conserving natural water cycle and its sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, O.; Choi, J.; Lee, J.; Kim, S.

    2017-12-01

    Since the 20th century, urbanization has resulted in increased impermeable land surface and reduced infiltration capacity in catchment scale. Especially, when agriculture area or forest area would be developed into urban area, it can cause more runoff in the same climate condition. Such urbanization causes problems such as changes in hydrological cycle and ecosystem disturbance. Various methods have been proposed worldwide to reduce the impact of such urbanization. Among the various strategies, the low-impact development is a development strategy that aims to return to pre-development state by minimizing the change of the hydrological cycle due to urbanization. In this strategy, the infiltration and/or surface storage of stormwater runoff can be increased through the installation of various facilities. In this study, a facility capacity design strategy is proposed to return into the natural water cycle through the installation of various LID facilities. This is accomplished by determining the optimal LID facility design capacity through which flow duration curves remain the same before and after urban development. For this purpose, EPA-SWMM is constructed with a part of Busan Metropolitan City Noksan Industrial Complex as a virtual processing area. Under the various land-use scenarios, the optimum design capacity of various LID facilities capable of retaining the flow duration curve before and after development is determined. In addition, the sensitivity of the optimal design capacity of LID facilities is analyzed according to the design specifications of various LID facilities, the local rainfall characteristics, and the size of the treatment area. Acknowledgement This research was supported by a grant (2016000200002) from Public Welfare Technology Development Program funded by Ministry of Environment of Korean government.

  3. Summary of Off-Normal Events in US Fuel Cycle Facilities for AFCI Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. C. Cadwallader; S. J. Piet; S. O. Sheetz; D. H. McGuire; W. B. Boore

    2005-09-01

    This report is a collection and review of system operation and failure experiences for facilities comprising the fission reactor fuel cycle, with the exception of reactor operations. This report includes mines, mills, conversion plants, enrichment plants, fuel fabrication plants, transportation of fuel materials between these centers, and waste storage facilities. Some of the facilities discussed are no longer operating; others continue to produce fuel for the commercial fission power plant industry. Some of the facilities discussed have been part of the military’s nuclear effort; these are included when the processes used are similar to those used for commercial nuclear power. When reading compilations of incidents and accidents, after repeated entries it is natural to form an opinion that there exists nothing but accidents. For this reason, production or throughput values are described when available. These adverse operating experiences are compiled to support the design and decisions needed for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The AFCI is to weigh options for a new fission reactor fuel cycle that is efficient, safe, and productive for US energy security.

  4. Application of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA in Sugar Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Astuti Arieyanti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sugar is one of the main commodities that are needed for human life. The demand of sugar is very high with the trend increase from year to year. This condition makes the sugar industry become a leading industry that must be maintained sustainability. The sustainability of the sugar industry is influenced by the use of energy and natural resources and the resulting environmental impacts. Therefore, an effort is needed to analyze the environmental aspects and potential environmental impacts resulting from a product (sugar, by using Life Cycle Assessment (LCA. LCA is a very important tool for the analysis of a process/system from its cradle to grave. This technique is very useful in the estimation of energy usage and environmental load of a product/system. This paper aims to describe the main elements of sugar industries using Life Cycle Assessment.

  5. Application of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) in Sugar Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, Arieyanti Dwi; Astuti, Rahayu Siwi Dwi; Hadiyanto, Hadiyanto

    2018-02-01

    Sugar is one of the main commodities that are needed for human life. The demand of sugar is very high with the trend increase from year to year. This condition makes the sugar industry become a leading industry that must be maintained sustainability. The sustainability of the sugar industry is influenced by the use of energy and natural resources and the resulting environmental impacts. Therefore, an effort is needed to analyze the environmental aspects and potential environmental impacts resulting from a product (sugar), by using Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). LCA is a very important tool for the analysis of a process/system from its cradle to grave. This technique is very useful in the estimation of energy usage and environmental load of a product/system. This paper aims to describe the main elements of sugar industries using Life Cycle Assessment.

  6. Stakeholder Involvement Throughout the Life Cycle of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This report demonstrates the importance of stakeholder involvement throughout the life cycle of all nuclear facilities; including operating reactors, temporary spent fuel storage facilities and final radioactive waste repositories and follows what is defined in the IAEA Safety Standards GS-R-3 where the stakeholders' expectations (identified as 'interested parties' in GS-R-3) shall be taken into consideration 'in the activities and interactions in the processes of the management system, with the aim of enhancing the satisfaction of interested parties while at the same time ensuring that safety is not compromised'. This report explains how involving stakeholders in decision making processes, even for those stakeholder groups that do not have a direct role in making those decisions, can enhance public confidence in the application of nuclear science and technology. In addition, this report presents general guidance on stakeholder involvement. It does not provide detailed procedures for developing and implementing stakeholder involvement programmes, and specifics regarding stakeholder involvement for particular types of nuclear facilities. However, this publication references reports that provide such details. This publication provides assistance to those responsible for planning, designing, constructing, operating or decommissioning a nuclear facility. In addition, regulatory organizations and other authorities overseeing nuclear activities or managing nuclear facility licensing processes are often seen as the main source of independent information for the general public; therefore, stakeholder involvement can demonstrate capability and trustworthiness of regulatory organizations as well. The role of stakeholder involvement at different stages of a facility's life cycle is discussed, with suggestions on developing the components of a comprehensive stakeholder involvement plan. Included is guidance on focusing communication with certain stakeholders, applying various

  7. Implications of multinational arrangements for nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muench, E.; Richter, B.; Stein, G.

    1980-01-01

    In the recently concluded INFCE study a variety of possibilities to minimize the proliferation risk was discussed, and their applicability in the nuclear fuel cycle was investigated. It was found that safeguards still play a central part as an anti-proliferation measure. Aspect of institutional arrangements with the aim of placing nuclear material processing and storage facilities under multinational or international auspices is the basis and goal of this study, as in international discussions some degree of proliferation hindrance is attributed to such models. In the assessment of the internationalization of nuclear facilities as an anti-proliferation measure two aspects have to be emphasized: Firstly, internationalization may be understood as a political measure to hinder proliferation, and secondly, no additional control effort should be caused by the possible complementary character to safeguards. 5 refs

  8. Defense Waste Processing Facility Process Simulation Package Life Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, K.

    1991-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will be used to immobilize high level liquid radioactive waste into safe, stable, and manageable solid form. The complexity and classification of the facility requires that a performance based operator training to satisfy Department of Energy orders and guidelines. A major portion of the training program will be the application and utilization of Process Simulation Packages to assist in training the Control Room Operators on the fluctionality of the process and the application of the Distribution Control System (DCS) in operating and managing the DWPF process. The packages are being developed by the DWPF Computer and Information Systems Simulation Group. This paper will describe the DWPF Process Simulation Package Life Cycle. The areas of package scope, development, validation, and configuration management will be reviewed and discussed in detail

  9. Analysis of radiation protection on industrial radiography open facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leocadio, Joao C.; Tauhata, Luiz; Crispim, Verginia R.

    2000-01-01

    This work had the objective to analyze the open facilities or mobile industrial radiography to obtain the distribution of doses in the radiographers, to evaluate the radiological conditions and the operational procedures, besides to present proposed for the reference levels and to esteem the potential exposure. The results of the additional monitoring revealed an improvement of the radiation protection conditions in the open facilities and the risk of potential exposure was reduced. With relationship to the radiation protection procedures, the accompaniment of the radiographic testing verified that most of the problems was solved. The advantage of the proposed reference levels is that the supervisors would enlarge the frequency of audits to accomplish the investigations and interventions. The mobile industrial radiography with 'bunkers' presented distributions with 95% of the doses below 0,2 mSv and the distributions of the facilities with cordoned area they had 75% of the doses below 0,4 mSv. (author)

  10. Procedure for estimating facility decommissioning costs for non-fuel-cycle nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short, S.M.

    1988-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has been reappraising its regulatory position relative to the decommissioning of nuclear facilities over the last several years. Approximately 30 reports covering the technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear facilities have been published during this period in support of this effort. One of these reports, Technology, Safety, and Costs of Decommissioning Reference Non-Fuel-Cycle Nuclear Facilities (NUREG/CR-1754), was published in 1981 and was felt by the NRC staff to be outdated. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was asked by the NRC staff to revise the information provided in this report to reflect the latest information on decommissioning technology and costs and publish the results as an addendum to the previous report. During the course of this study, the NRC staff also asked that PNL provide a simplified procedure for estimating decommissioning costs of non-fuel-cycle nuclear facilities. The purpose being to provide NRC staff with the means to easily generate their own estimate of decommissioning costs for a given facility for comparison against a licensee's submittal. This report presents the procedure developed for use by NRC staff

  11. An Evaluation of Industrial Facilities Defects in Selected Industrial Estates in Lagos State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oseghale, G.E.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study appraised the state of industrial facilities in selected industrial estates established between 1957 and 1981 in Lagos State by examining the nature and causes of facilities’ defects in the selected industrial estates. The buildings sampled were load bearing sandcrete block wall (1%, concrete framed structure (83% and steel framed structure (16%. Data were sourced using structured questionnaire administered on the staff of maintenance department of 35 building materials and plastic manufacturing industries purposively selected and located in 18 industrial estates. Data obtained were analyzed using descriptive statistic. The study found the structural elements of the buildings, i.e. foundations, beams, walls, and floors satisfactory. Using the mean response analysis, the result showed that the most severe factors responsible for industrial facilities’ defects were combined effects of geo-climatic factors (2.35, combined effects of biological agencies (2.15, corrosion (1.98, and physical aggression on the facilities (1.71.

  12. Confirming competence of operators - A regulatory approach to fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesely, M.; Sigetich, J.

    2013-01-01

    For the past 40 years the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), formerly the Atomic Energy Control Board, has certified workers in nuclear facilities. The requirement for certified personnel has ensured that workers assigned to positions that have a direct impact on the safe operation of the facility are fully qualified to perform their duties. This certification regime is defined in the regulatory framework under which the CNSC operates. Traditionally, this certification regime has been applied to Reactor Operators, Shift Supervisors and Health Physicists in Nuclear Power Plants and research reactors as well as to Exposure Device Operators who use nuclear substances for the purposes of industrial radiography. Stemming from progress made in implementing risk-informed regulatory oversight activities as well as a formal suggestion from the International Atomic Energy Agency - International Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) conducted on the CNSC in 2009, a regulatory approach to confirming the competence of Operators at Fuel Cycle Facilities has been initiated by CNSC staff. In the first stage of the implementation of this new regulatory approach, the CNSC had Cameco Corporation implement a formal internal qualification programme for the UF6 Operators at its Port Hope Conversion Facility (PHCF) in Port Hope, Ontario. In the future, following a review of the results of the qualification programme at the PHCF, the CNSC staff will evaluate the need for the application of a similar regulatory approach to confirm the competence of the Operators at other Fuel Cycle Facilities in Canada. (authors)

  13. Descriptions of reference LWR facilities for analysis of nuclear fuel cycles. Appendixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.J.; Kabele, T.J.

    1979-09-01

    The appendixes present the calculations that were used to derive the release factors discussed for each fuel cycle facility in Volume I. Appendix A presents release factor calculations for a surface mine, underground mine, milling facility, conversion facility, diffusion enrichment facility, fuel fabrication facility, PWR, BWR, and reprocessing facility. Appendix B contains additional release factors calculated for a BWR, PWR, and a reprocessing facility. Appendix C presents release factors for a UO 2 fuel fabrication facility

  14. Influencing Factors on Life-Cycle Cost of Mooring Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Wataru; Yokota, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Katsufumi; Furuya, Koichi; Kato, Hirotoshi

    It is required that infrastructure should satisfy performance requirement through their service life based on an appropriate life cycle management strategy. Now adays, to determine the maintenance strategy and to consider the appropriate timing and method of intervention, the life-cycle cost (LCC) has been widely used as one of the decision-making indices. However, many factors influence on the estimation of LCC and they have not been adequately investigated. In this paper, the authors have made analytical investigation to quantify the influence of important factors on the results of LCC estimation. Four kinds of mooring facilities are focused; two of them are open-type wharves and the other two are sheet pile type quay walls having different design water depths. Prediction of deterioration progress and performance degradation is made by using the Markov models. The influences of structural sizes, transition probability in the Markov model, design service life, periodic inspection and methods of intervention on LCC were investigated. The influence of those factors has been discussed based on the calculated results of LCC by creating the maintenance scenarios for model mooring facilities.

  15. Nuclear-fuel-cycle risk assessment: descriptions of representative non-reactor facilities. Sections 1-14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.J.

    1982-09-01

    The Fuel Cycle Risk Assessment Program was initiated to provide risk assessment methods for assistance in the regulatory process for nuclear fuel cycle facilities other than reactors. This report, the first from the program, defines and describes fuel cycle elements that are being considered in the program. One type of facility (and in some cases two) is described that is representative of each element of the fuel cycle. The descriptions are based on real industrial-scale facilities that are current state-of-the-art, or on conceptual facilities where none now exist. Each representative fuel cycle facility is assumed to be located on the appropriate one of four hypothetical but representative sites described. The fuel cycles considered are for Light Water Reactors with once-through flow of spent fuel, and with plutonium and uranium recycle. Representative facilities for the following fuel cycle elements are described for uranium (or uranium plus plutonium where appropriate): mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, mixed-oxide fuel refabrication, fuel reprocessing, spent fuel storage, high-level waste storage, transuranic waste storage, spent fuel and high-level and transuranic waste disposal, low-level and intermediate-level waste disposal, and transportation. For each representative facility the description includes: mainline process, effluent processing and waste management, facility and hardware description, safety-related information and potential alternative concepts for that fuel cycle element. The emphasis of the descriptive material is on safety-related information. This includes: operating and maintenance requirements, input/output of major materials, identification and inventories of hazardous materials (particularly radioactive materials), unit operations involved, potential accident driving forces, containment and shielding, and degree of hands-on operation.

  16. Nuclear-fuel-cycle risk assessment: descriptions of representative non-reactor facilities. Sections 1-14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.J.

    1982-09-01

    The Fuel Cycle Risk Assessment Program was initiated to provide risk assessment methods for assistance in the regulatory process for nuclear fuel cycle facilities other than reactors. This report, the first from the program, defines and describes fuel cycle elements that are being considered in the program. One type of facility (and in some cases two) is described that is representative of each element of the fuel cycle. The descriptions are based on real industrial-scale facilities that are current state-of-the-art, or on conceptual facilities where none now exist. Each representative fuel cycle facility is assumed to be located on the appropriate one of four hypothetical but representative sites described. The fuel cycles considered are for Light Water Reactors with once-through flow of spent fuel, and with plutonium and uranium recycle. Representative facilities for the following fuel cycle elements are described for uranium (or uranium plus plutonium where appropriate): mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, mixed-oxide fuel refabrication, fuel reprocessing, spent fuel storage, high-level waste storage, transuranic waste storage, spent fuel and high-level and transuranic waste disposal, low-level and intermediate-level waste disposal, and transportation. For each representative facility the description includes: mainline process, effluent processing and waste management, facility and hardware description, safety-related information and potential alternative concepts for that fuel cycle element. The emphasis of the descriptive material is on safety-related information. This includes: operating and maintenance requirements, input/output of major materials, identification and inventories of hazardous materials (particularly radioactive materials), unit operations involved, potential accident driving forces, containment and shielding, and degree of hands-on operation

  17. Nuclear fuel cycle industry. A responsible approach supporting non proliferation efforts in global perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorant, Caroline

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the reasons why and the manner in which nuclear industry is a stakeholder in non proliferation efforts. It then presents some recent proposals on multinational approaches to the fuel cycle industry and offers some comments and an industry view on these issues. A parallel is established with fundamental concepts in the field of radiation protection. Our industry, involved in 'nuclear technology development' (activities) qualified of 'sensitive' from a non proliferation standpoint, has major interests at stake in the evolution of the international non proliferation regime and is genuinely committed to the spreading of a non proliferation culture. The international community and in particular the nuclear community have been recently reflecting on ways to strengthen the non-proliferation regime in reaction to new threats or the perception thereof. Multilateral approaches regarding the nuclear fuel cycle are being discussed or proposed in this regard. Our approach as an industrial may be illustrated using the three basic principles developed in the field of radiation protection, namely limitation, justification and optimization. a) an overall limitation of sensitive facilities worldwide may be judicious, b) however no prohibition should be imposed if justified needs can be demonstrated on objective criteria, c) optimized used for existing facilities should be promoted through strengthened guarantees of supply where it may be necessary. (author)

  18. SAF-BRET-FMEF: a developmental LMR fuel cycle facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stradley, J.G.; Yook, H.R.; Gerber, E.W.; Lerch, R.E.; Rice, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    The SAF-BRET-FMEF complex represents a versatile fuel cycle facility for processing LMR fuel. While originally conceived for processing FFTF and CRBRP fuel, it represents a facility where LMR fuel from the first generation of innovative LMRs could be processed. The cost of transporting fuel from the LMR to the Hanford site would have to be assessed when the LMR site is identified. The throughput of BRET was set at 15 MTHM/yr during conceptual design of the facility, a rate which was adequate to process all of the fuel from FFTF and fuel and blanket material from CRBRP. The design is currently being reevaluated to see if BRET could be expanded to approx.35 MTHM/yr to process fuel and blanket material from approx.1300 MWe generating capacity of the innovative LMRs. This expanded throughput is possible by designing the equipment for an instantaneous throughput of 0.2 MTHM/d, and by selected additional modifications to the facility (e.g., expansion of shipping and receiving area, and addition of a second entry tunnel transporter), and by the fact that the LMR fuel assemblies contain more fuel than the FFTF assemblies (therefore, fewer assemblies must be handled for the same throughput). The estimated cost of such an expansion is also being assessed. As stated previously, the throughput of SAF and Fuel Assembly could be made to support typical LMRs at little additional cost. The throughput could be increased to support the fuel fabrication requirements for 1300 MWe generating capacity of the innovative LMRs. This added capacity may be achieved by increasing the number of operating shifts, and is affected by variables such as fuel design, fuel enrichment, and plutonium isotopic composition

  19. Decommissioning of small medical, industrial and research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Most of the technical literature on decommissioning addresses the regulatory, organizational, technical and other aspects for large facilities such as nuclear power plants, reprocessing plants and relatively large prototype, research and test reactors. There are, however, a much larger number of licensed users of radioactive material in the fields of medicine, research and industry. Most of these nuclear facilities are smaller in size and complexity and may present a lower radiological risk during their decommissioning. Such facilities are located at research establishments, biological and medical laboratories, universities, medical centres, and industrial and manufacturing premises. They are often operated by users who have not been trained or are unfamiliar with the decommissioning, waste management and associated safety aspects of these types of facility at the end of their operating lives. Also, for many small users of radioactive material such as radiation sources, nuclear applications are a small part of the overall business or process and, although the operating safety requirements may be adhered to, concern or responsibility may not go much beyond this. There is concern that even the minimum requirements of decommissioning may be disregarded, resulting in avoidable delays, risks and safety implications (e.g. a loss of radioactive material and a loss of all records). Incidents have occurred in which persons have been injured or put at risk. It is recognized that the strategies and specific requirements for small facilities may be much less onerous than for large ones such as nuclear power plants or fuel processing facilities, but many of the same principles apply. There has been considerable attention given to nuclear facilities and many IAEA publications are complementary to this report. This report, however, attempts to give specific guidance for small facilities. 'Small' in this report does not necessarily mean small in size but generally modest in terms

  20. Lessons learned from accidents in industrial irradiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Use of ionizing radiation in medicine, industry and research for technical development continues to increase throughout the world. One application with a high growth rate is irradiation suing high energy gamma photons and electron beams. There are currently more than 160 gamma irradiation facilities and over 600 electron beam facilities in operation in almost all IAEA Member States. The most common uses of these facilities are to sterilize medical and pharmaceutical products, to preserve foodstuffs, to synthesize polymers and to eradicate insects. Although this industry has a good safety record, there is a potential for accidents with serious consequences to human health because of the high dose rates produced by these sources. Fatal accidents have occurred at installations in both developed and developing countries. Such accidents have prompted a review of several accidents, including five with fatalities, by a team of manufacturers, regulatory authorities and operating organizations. Having looked closely at the circumstances of each accident and the apparent deficiencies in design, safety and regulatory systems and personnel performance, the team made a number of recommendations on the ways in which the safety of irradiators can be improved. The findings of extensive research pertaining to the lessons that can be learned from irradiator accidents are presented. This publication is intended for manufacturers, regulatory authorities and operating organizations dealing with industrial irradiators. It was drafted by J.E. Glen, United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, United States of America, and P. Zuniga-Bello, Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Technologia, Mexico

  1. Operation of an industrial radiation processing facility in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres C., Gilberto

    A 10 years old JS-6500 industrial Cobalt 60 irradiator was installed in 1980 at the ININ Nuclear Center in Mexico with 960 kGy. The facility was commissioning in August with some minor changes with respect to the original AECL design, in order to give services to different industries and also to do research in several fields. During that year promotional activities were done to increase interest from industry in the use of radiation processing. In 1981, an interruption due to pool's leakage and its reparation, put the facility out of operation. During the next three years the demand increases but never reach more than 50% if the capacity. In that time, the potential users did not show confidence in the process, even knowing that health authorities approved with no restrictions radiation sterilization. Actually, there are 34 different companies irradiating 48 different products. Even those within the same grouping, require different minimum and maximum radiation doses, so the facility has been operated combining products and valumes. The experiences are presented in this paper. Also, maintenance of the irradiator is discussed and some modifications to the original programme have been done due to the necessity to use local spare parts instead of imported ones.

  2. Environmental impacts of electricity self-consumption from organic photovoltaic battery systems at industrial facilities in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzisideris, Marios Dimos; Laurent, Alexis; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2017-01-01

    Organic photovoltaics (OPV) show promise of greatly improving the environmental and economic performance of PV compared to conventional silicon. Life cycle assessment studies have assessed the environmental impacts of OPV, but not under a self-consumption scheme for industrial facilities. We...... investigate the life cycle environmental impacts of electricity self-consumption from an OPV system coupled with a sodium/nickel chloride battery at an iron/metal industry in Denmark. Results show that an OPV system without storage could decrease the carbon footprint of the industry; installation...

  3. The conceptual design of waste repository for radioactive waste from medical, industrial and research facilities containing comparatively high radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Masayuki; Hashimoto, Naro

    2002-02-01

    Advisory Committee on Nuclear Fuel Cycle Backend Policy reported the basic approach to the RI and Institute etc. wastes on March 2002. According to it, radioactive waste form medical, industrial and research facilities should be classified by their radioactivity properties and physical and chemical properties, and should be disposed in the appropriate types of repository with that classification. For the radioactive waste containing comparatively high radioactivity generated from reactors, NSC has established the Concentration limit for disposal. NSC is now discussing about the limit for the radioactive waste from medical, industrial and research facilities containing comparatively high radioactivity. Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) preliminary studied about the repository for radioactive waste from medical, industrial and research facilities and discussed about the problems for design on H12. This study was started to consider those problems, and to develop the conceptual design of the repository for radioactive waste from medical, industrial and research facilities. Safety assessment for that repository is also performed. The result of this study showed that radioactive waste from medical, industrial and research facilities of high activity should be disposed in the repository that has higher performance of barrier system comparing with the vault type near surface facility. If the conditions of the natural barrier and the engineering barrier are clearer, optimization of the design will be possible. (author)

  4. An advanced C/S system for fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, O.; Seya, M.; Ohtani, T.; Takahashi, S.

    1987-01-01

    The IAEA have given a top priority to the R and D theme of ''Speed up Review of Video Tape'' in the ''Safeguards Needs List (APRIL, 1986) by WG-R and D Needs Under Support Programmes.'' Because it always consumes work time for inspector to review conventional surveillance records (film or video tape). PNC is now developing Advanced Containment and Surveillance (C/S) system which enables quick reviewing and direct retrieval of surveillance image records. In recent years, a rapid progress has been made in the field of optical image processing technology. Combining this optical technology with appropriate trigger devices, all activities to be surveyed in a specified area (storage) can be recorded as a series of fine motion pictures. Electronic seal and γ-ray detector have been developed as the trigger signal generators for personal entry and SNM passage. Inspector can review all operators' recorded activities in a short time through easy-operating man-machine system. Also, a direct retrieval system based on frame index contributes to save much time for reviewing. This advanced C/S system could be applied to storages of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. A Proto-type system has been introduced at the fuel assembly storage in the PNC MOX (Mixed Oxide) plant PPFF and a demonstration system will be introduced in the new MOX plant PFPF (Plutonium Fuel Production Facility)

  5. Design strategies for pollution prevention in industries (life cycle design)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleemi, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    Pollution prevention and adoption of clean technologies in the industry are to be the proper strategies to flight against the growing industrial pollution in Pakistan. These strategies will not only reduce the existing pollution load and will also help to have sustainable industrial development in Pakistan in is well established that the concept of pollution prevention demands use of minimum, resources with maximum efficiency to achieve double benefits such as resource conservation and environmental protection. The application of cleaner production and waste minimization in thousand of industries in other part of world has proved beyond doubt that the use of cleaner technology is cheaper as compared to installation of waste treatment plants for end of pipe treatment. Waste treatment plants have been blamed not to solve any pollution problem, but only to transfer pollution from one environmental media to another. The adoption of waste treatment technologies have also created lot of other problems. Thousand of industries in the world have change their focus of activities from end of pipe treatment to pollution prevention techniques. It is the right time to start pollution prevention activities in industry. The design of a product system in the industry can be represented logically as a series of decision and choices made individually and collectively by design participant. The choices range from the selection of materials and manufacturing processes to choices relating to shape, from and function of a product. The product life cycle design provides a logical system for addressing pollution prevention because the full range of environmental consequence associated with the product can be considered and it is a powerful tool for identifying and maximizing the environmental benefits of pollution prevention. The life cycle assesment (LCA) concept suggests that decision making should be based on consideration of the cradle-to grave characteristics of the product, process

  6. Criticality safety evaluation of the fuel cycle facility electrorefiner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lell, R.M.; Mariani, R.D.; Fujita, E.K.; Benedict, R.W.; Turski, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    The integral Fast Reactor (IFR) being developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) combines the advantages of metal-fueled, liquid-metal cooled reactors and a closed-loop fuel cycle. Some of the primary advantages are passive safety for the reactor and resistance to diversion for the heavy metal in the fuel cycle. in addition, the IFR pyroprocess recycles all the long-lived actinide activation products for casting into new fuel pins so that they may be burned in the reactor. A key component in the Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) recycling process is the electrorefiner (ER) in which the actinides are separated from the fission products. In the process, the metal fuel is electrochemically dissolved into a high-temperature molten salt, and electrorefined uranium or uranium/plutonium products are deposited at cathodes. This report addresses the new and innovative aspects of the criticality analysis ensuing from processing metallic fuel, rather than metal oxide fuel, and from processing the spent fuel in batch operations. in particular, the criticality analysis employed a mechanistic approach as opposed to a probabilistic one. A probabilistic approach was unsuitable because of a lack of operational experience with some of the processes, rendering the estimation of accident event risk factors difficult. The criticality analysis also incorporated the uncertainties in heavy metal content attending the process items by defining normal operations envelopes (NOES) for key process parameters. The goal was to show that reasonable process uncertainties would be demonstrably safe toward criticality for continuous batch operations provided the key process parameters stayed within their NOES. Consequently the NOEs became the point of departure for accident events in the criticality analysis

  7. Analysis and consideration for the US criteria of nuclear fuel cycle facilities to resist natural disasters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Hong

    2013-01-01

    Natural disasters pose a threat to the safety of nuclear facilities. Fukushima nuclear accident tells us that nuclear safety in siting, design and construction shall be strengthened in case of external events caused by natural disasters. This paper first analyzes the DOE criteria of nuclear fuel cycle facilities to resist natural disasters. Then to develop our national criteria for natural disaster resistance of nuclear fuel cycle facilities is suggested, so as to ensure the safety of these facilities. (authors)

  8. Argonne Fuel Cycle Facility ventilation system -- modeling and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohr, D.; Feldman, E.E.; Danielson, W.F.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated study of the Argonne-West Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) interconnected ventilation systems during various operations. Analyses and test results include first a nominal condition reflecting balanced pressures and flows followed by several infrequent and off-normal scenarios. This effort is the first study of the FCF ventilation systems as an integrated network wherein the hydraulic effects of all major air systems have been analyzed and tested. The FCF building consists of many interconnected regions in which nuclear fuel is handled, transported and reprocessed. The ventilation systems comprise a large number of ducts, fans, dampers, and filters which together must provide clean, properly conditioned air to the worker occupied spaces of the facility while preventing the spread of airborne radioactive materials to clean am-as or the atmosphere. This objective is achieved by keeping the FCF building at a partial vacuum in which the contaminated areas are kept at lower pressures than the other worker occupied spaces. The ventilation systems of FCF and the EBR-II reactor are analyzed as an integrated totality, as demonstrated. We then developed the network model shown in Fig. 2 for the TORAC code. The scope of this study was to assess the measured results from the acceptance/flow balancing testing and to predict the effects of power failures, hatch and door openings, single-failure faulted conditions, EBR-II isolation, and other infrequent operations. The studies show that the FCF ventilation systems am very controllable and remain stable following off-normal events. In addition, the FCF ventilation system complex is essentially immune to reverse flows and spread of contamination to clean areas during normal and off-normal operation

  9. Peak Waste? The Other Side of the Industrial Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugo Bardi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The modern industrial cycle is mainly based on non-renewable mineral resources extracted from the Earth’s crust. After being processed and transformed into commodities, the products of mining become manufactured products which go through the economic system and are then discarded in the form of gaseous, liquid or solid waste. Eventually, the mass of the output in the form of waste must balance the input in the form of minerals. A large number of model studies have been performed on the first phase of the cycle—the production of mineral commodities—often with a specific interest in fossil fuels, with the objective of determining the future prospects of production. However, very few model studies of this kind have been performed about the future trends of waste generation. In this paper, we examine models of the industrial cycle compared to historical trends in municipal solid waste generation for different regions of the world. We show that waste generation in developed countries goes in parallel with the trends of industrial production and that several regions are showing a declining trend which may be interpreted in terms of “peaking” just as it is often done for the production of fossil fuels. Therefore, the “waste problem” in terms of increasing amounts of waste to be processed and disposed may not be so urgent as it is commonly perceived.

  10. Nuclear fuel cycle facilities and RP: the case of Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tranjan Filho, Alfredo; Costa, Cesar Gustavo S.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The renewed nuclear energy scenario, national and worldwide, calls for the strengthening of all activities involving the nuclear fuel production, from uranium extraction at the mines to fuel assemblies delivery at the nuclear power plants, which in Brazil is the mission of the Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB). With only a third of its territory prospected, Brazil currently has the sixth largest uranium reserve in the world. Brazil's three main deposits are: the Caldas mine (in the state of Minas Gerais) the first mineral-industrial complex that processed uranium, developed in 1982, and presently being decommissioned; Caetite mine and processing facility (located in the state of Bahia), nowadays operational and with a current production capacity of 400 tonnes per year of uranium concentrates, being in trend of doubling its annual capacity; and the Itataia/Santa Quiteria deposit (in Ceara State), the largest geological uranium reserve in Brazil, although its feasible future production depends on the exploration of the phosphate associated to it. Concerning the nuclear fuel fabrication, INB plant at Resende (in the state of Rio de Janeiro) is responsible for the conversion of Uf 6 to UO 2 the production of fuel pellets and the assembly of the fuel elements, in order to supply the demands of Brazil's two operating PWR (Angra 1 and Angra 2). In addition, in May 2006, INB-Resende inaugurated the uranium enrichment facility, employing the ultra-centrifugation technology. Today still in its first phase of operation, when completed the enrichment facility is intended to provide 100 percent of the domestic requirements, eventually by the year 2015. Detailing present status and future perspectives of INB, in face of the global and national renaissance of nuclear energy, this paper addresses the Radiation Protection (RP) aspects related to INB's achievements and performance, as well as the pressing future challenges to be dealt with, in order to guarantee

  11. An industrial 60Co gamma irradiation facility in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Yongling; Zhou Ruiying; Wang Binglin

    1990-01-01

    The radiation processing has developed very fast in China since 1980. There are more than 100 of 60 Co radiation facilities having been set up. Majority of them was with relatively small capacity and was used mainly for the laboratory study. An industrial radiation facility has been established and put into operation in Beijing Radiation Application Center (BRAC) recently. The project was based on the research works of irradiation technology during the period of 1980-1985. The main pre-research work was radiation sterilization of medical products and food irradiation. This work has obtained an award from State Commission of Science and Technology. The Commission has arranged the construction of an industrial sterilization plant for medical products as a major import project. The project has also been supported by IAEA as project CPR/8/002. The project includes a plant of production of 100,000,000 needles per year, a plant of production of 50,000,000 syringes per year and an automatic irradiation plant. All three parts have been set up now. The maximum capacity of 60 Co sources is 3.7 x 10 16 Bq, the first-time-loaded source is 12.21 x 10 15 Bq. (author)

  12. Decommissioning of Medical, Industrial and Research Facilities. Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Radioactive waste is produced in the generation of nuclear power and the use of radioactive materials in industry, research and medicine. The importance of the safe management of radioactive waste for the protection of human health and the environment has long been recognized, and considerable experience has been gained in this field. The IAEA's Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme aimed at establishing a coherent and comprehensive set of principles and requirements for the safe management of waste and formulating the guidelines necessary for their application. This is accomplished within the IAEA Safety Standards Series in an internally consistent set of publications that reflect an international consensus. The publications will provide Member States with a comprehensive series of internationally agreed publications to assist in the derivation of, and to complement, national criteria, standards and practices. The Safety Standards Series consists of three categories of publications: Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. With respect to the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme, the set of publications is currently undergoing review to ensure a harmonized approach throughout the Safety Standards Series. This Safety Guide addresses the subject of decommissioning of medical, industrial and research facilities where radioactive materials and sources are produced, received, used and stored. It is intended to provide guidance to national authorities and operating organizations, particularly to those in developing countries (as such facilities are predominant in these countries), for the planning and safe management of the decommissioning of such facilities. The Safety Guide has been prepared through a series of Consultants meetings and a Technical Committee meeting

  13. Decommissioning of medical, industrial and research facilities. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Radioactive waste is produced in the generation of nuclear power and the use of radioactive materials in industry, research and medicine. The importance of the safe management of radioactive waste for the protection of human health and the environment has long been recognized, and considerable experience has been gained in this field. The IAEA's Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme aimed at establishing a coherent and comprehensive set of principles and requirements for the safe management of waste and formulating the guidelines necessary for their application. This is accomplished within the IAEA Safety Standards Series in an internally consistent set of publications that reflect an international consensus. The publications will provide Member States with a comprehensive series of internationally agreed publications to assist in the derivation of, and to complement, national criteria, standards and practices. The Safety Standards Series consists of three categories of publications: Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. With respect to the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme, the set of publications is currently undergoing review to ensure a harmonized approach throughout the Safety Standards Series. This Safety Guide addresses the subject of decommissioning of medical, industrial and research facilities where radioactive materials and sources are produced, received, used and stored. It is intended to provide guidance to national authorities and operating organizations, particularly to those in developing countries (as such facilities are predominant in these countries), for the planning and safe management of the decommissioning of such facilities. The Safety Guide has been prepared through a series of Consultants meetings and a Technical Committee meeting

  14. Nuclear fuel cycle facilities in the world (excluding the centrally planned economies)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Information on the existing, under construction and planned fuel cycle facilities in the various countries is presented. Some thirty countries have activities related to different nuclear fuel cycle steps and the information covers the capacity, status, location, and the names of owners of the facilities

  15. Industry of nuclear fuel cycle: Status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikipelov, B.V.

    1992-01-01

    The nuclear industry in Russia was started in the late forties and early fifties, it was aimed at solving certain defense problems. During 1948-1949, the first plant for enriching uranium 235 U and an industrial complex for obtaining and reprocessing plutonium for the defense applications were put into operation. By 1991, the country had 47 plants having a total rated power of 37 GW, i.e., 12.5% of the total power generated in the country. After the Chernobyl' accident, the plans for starting new NPPs were curtailed. Towards the end of this century, the total power generation of all the nuclear power plants of the country is estimated at ∼60 GW. In view of the decreased volume of the nuclear equipment, processing of the concentrated uranium for defense purposes was stopped and, consequently, at the present time, the nuclear industry has a capacity exceeding the requirements of the internal market. The author examines in detail the infrastructure of the nuclear industry that is based on the concept of a closed fuel cycle consisting of reprocessing of the spent nuclear fuel using the unburnt uranium, plutonium, and other isotopes separated from it. It includes recovery and processing of the uranium ores, production of uranium hexafluoride, its enrichment to yield 235 U, production of the fuel assemblies (FA), radiochemical processing of the spent nuclear fuel, and reprocessing and open-quotes buryingclose quotes of the radioactive waste materials and the spent nuclear fuel that is not suitable for regeneration. This article includes section on (1) recovery and processing of uranium ores, (2) production of enriched uranium, (3) production of fuel assemblies, control elements, and rolled zirconium alloys, (4) radiochemical processing of spent fuel, and (5) prospects of the Russian nuclear industry through the year 2000

  16. Gas cooled fast reactor background, facilities, industries and programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.

    1980-05-01

    This report was prepared at the request of the OECD-NEA Coordinating Group on Gas Cooled Fast Reactor Development and it represents a contribution (Vol.II) to the jointly sponsored Vol.I (GCFR Status Report). After a chapter on background with a brief description of the early studies and the activities in the various countries involved in the collaborative programme (Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom and United States), the report describes the facilities available in those countries and at the Gas Breeder Reactor Association and the industrial capabilities relevant to the GCFR. Finally the programmes are described briefly with programme charts, conclusions and recommendations are given. (orig.) [de

  17. Impact of Maintenance Strategies on the Performance Of Industrial Facilities In Selected Industrial Estates In Lagos State, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Oseghale, G.E

    2014-01-01

    The study appraised the facilities and the maintenance management strategies employed in selected industrial estates in Lagos State by identifying and examining facilities maintenance strategies, and determining their impact on the physical condition of the facilities. This was with a view to establishing the optimal strategies. Data were sourced using structured questionnaire administered on the staff of maintenance department of the industrial firms located in the estates, only building mat...

  18. A UAV system for inspection of industrial facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, J.; Burri, M.; Rehder, J.; Leutenegger, S.; Huerzeler, C.; Siegwart, R.

    This work presents a small-scale Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) capable of performing inspection tasks in enclosed industrial environments. Vehicles with such capabilities have the potential to reduce human involvement in hazardous tasks and can minimize facility outage periods. The results presented generalize to UAS exploration tasks in almost any GPS-denied indoor environment. The contribution of this work is twofold. First, results from autonomous flights inside an industrial boiler of a power plant are presented. A lightweight, vision-aided inertial navigation system provides reliable state estimates under difficult environmental conditions typical for such sites. It relies solely on measurements from an on-board MEMS inertial measurement unit and a pair of cameras arranged in a classical stereo configuration. A model-predictive controller allows for efficient trajectory following and enables flight in close proximity to the boiler surface. As a second contribution, we highlight ongoing developments by displaying state estimation and structure recovery results acquired with an integrated visual/inertial sensor that will be employed on future aerial service robotic platforms. A tight integration in hardware facilitates spatial and temporal calibration of the different sensors and thus enables more accurate and robust ego-motion estimates. Comparison with ground truth obtained from a laser tracker shows that such a sensor can provide motion estimates with drift rates of only few centimeters over the period of a typical flight.

  19. 78 FR 72899 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Registration for Human Drug Compounding Outsourcing Facilities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-04

    ...] Draft Guidance for Industry on Registration for Human Drug Compounding Outsourcing Facilities Under... Outsourcing Facilities Under Section 503B of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.'' The draft guidance... choose to register as outsourcing facilities (outsourcing facilities) in registering with FDA. The draft...

  20. CSNI Technical Opinion Papers No. 15 - Ageing management of nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nocture, Pierre; Daubard, Jean-Paul; Lhomme, Veronique; Martineau, Dominique; Blundell, Neil; Conte, Dorothee; Dobson, Martin; Gmal, Bernhard; Hiltz, Thomas; Ueda, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    Managing the ageing of fuel cycle facilities (FCFs) means, as for other nuclear installations, ensuring the availability of required safety functions throughout their service life while taking into account the changes that occur with time and use. This technical opinion paper identifies a set of good practices by benchmarking strategies and good practices on coping with physical ageing and obsolescence from the facility design stage until decommissioning. It should be of particular interest to nuclear safety regulators, fuel cycle facilities operators and fuel cycle researchers [fr

  1. Nuclear facilities in the fuel cycle - Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    The map of the Federal Republic of Germany (scale 1:800000) presents the sites of nuclear facilities. These include uranium mines and mills, fuel element fabrication and reprocessing plants, nuclear power plants (in operation or under construction), fuel transfer storage, and ultimate storage facilities. As a geographical extension, the PAMELA vitrification plant in Belgium is also shown. The map is of November 1984. (UA) [de

  2. Optimal integration of organic Rankine cycles with industrial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hipólito-Valencia, Brígido J.; Rubio-Castro, Eusiel; Ponce-Ortega, José M.; Serna-González, Medardo; Nápoles-Rivera, Fabricio; El-Halwagi, Mahmoud M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • An optimization approach for heat integration is proposed. • A new general superstructure for heat integration is proposed. • Heat process streams are simultaneously integrated with an organic Rankine cycle. • Better results can be obtained respect to other previously reported methodologies. - Abstract: This paper presents a procedure for simultaneously handling the problem of optimal integration of regenerative organic Rankine cycles (ORCs) with overall processes. ORCs may allow the recovery of an important fraction of the low-temperature process excess heat (i.e., waste heat from industrial processes) in the form of mechanical energy. An integrated stagewise superstructure is proposed for representing the interconnections and interactions between the HEN and ORC for fixed data of process streams. Based on the integrated superstructure, the optimization problem is formulated as a mixed integer nonlinear programming problem to simultaneously account for the capital and operating costs including the revenue from the sale of the shaft power produced by the integrated system. The application of this method is illustrated with three example problems. Results show that the proposed procedure provides significantly better results than an earlier developed method for discovering optimal integrated systems using a sequential approach, due to the fact that it accounts simultaneously for the tradeoffs between the capital and operating costs as well as the sale of the produced energy. Also, the proposed method is an improvement over the previously reported methods for solving the synthesis problem of heat exchanger networks without the option of integration with an ORC (i.e., stand-alone heat exchanger networks)

  3. Development of remote handling technology for nuclear fuel cycle facilities in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Hiromichi; Sakai, Akira; Miura, Noriaki; Kozaka, Tetsuo; Hamada, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    and two bilateral servo-manipulators and ITV (Industrial Television) systems for monitoring are installed for Maintenance and also Operation in the cell. These cranes and manipulators are mounted on the bridge to ensure the wide range of operations in the cell and also designed to be remotely maintained themselves by each other. In case of K-facility (active tests stated in 2007) the operating experiences at TVF were reflected to make some improvements on its remote handling system in order to ensure the availability and reduce the cost. There adopted the unilateral servo-manipulator and the auxiliary hoist with remote operation support system, the rack module design for periodically replaced components, and the direct contact maintenance for the in cell cranes and manipulators in the shielded parking space. The glass melter in the vitrification process is designed to be replaced every 5 years, so the remote replacement and dismantling technology for the spent melters have been also developed and installed in TVF and K-facility for 40 years’ operation. This paper describes our development experiences on the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of the remote handling systems in nuclear fuel cycle facilities in Japan. (author)

  4. Pendekatan Catching-Up Product Cycle untuk Industri Elektronika di Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Wiratmo, Masykur

    2002-01-01

    Catching-up product cycle (CPC) is still as powerful framework to analyze industrial performance, especially for foot-loose industry such as electronics in Indonesia although the CPC approach is established in Japan having different culture, social-politics and economic environment. The CPC can explain well the development of industry.Indonesian electronic industry has grown since Indonesia industrialized its economy. However, almost 20 years electronic Industry grew slowly as the CPC framewo...

  5. Pendekatan Catching-Up Product Cycle Untuk Industri Elektronika Di Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Wiratmo, Masykur

    2009-01-01

    Catching-up product cycle (CPC) is still as powerful framework to analyze industrial performance, especially for foot-loose industry such as electronics in Indonesia although the CPC approach is established in Japan having different culture, social-politics and economic environment. The CPC can explain well the development of industry.Indonesian electronic industry has grown since Indonesia industrialized its economy. However, almost 20 years electronic Industry grew slowly as the CPC framewo...

  6. Recovery of Information from the Fast Flux Test Facility for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Deborah L.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Wootan, David W.; Butner, R. Scott; Omberg, Ronald P.

    2009-09-30

    The Fast Flux Test Facility is the most recent Liquid Metal Reactor to operate in the United States. Information from the design, construction, and operation of this reactor was at risk as the facilities associated with the reactor are being shut down. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative is a program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy with a mission to develop new fuel cycle technologies to support both current and advanced reactors. Securing and preserving the knowledge gained from operation and testing in the Fast Flux Test Facility is an important part of the Knowledge Preservation activity in this program.

  7. Integration of facility reuse analysis with life cycle cost analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canestaro, J.; Fritts, S.; Howard, S.; Jones, L.; Velazquez, L.E.

    1994-01-01

    A low level waste storage (LLWS) study to evaluate suitable vacant and unoccupied Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) space was recently commissioned by ESWMO and completed by BWSC. Sixty buildings, most of them more than 50 years old and designated for D ampersand D, were evaluated for LLWS capacity, possible storage configurations, and life cycle cost. The planning and evaluation process was executed in five phases: (1) initial screening of 21 million square feet of ORR buildings to identify potential storage candidates, (2) detailed screening of 60 candidate buildings to determine technically suitable LLWS space, (3) evaluation of 14 buildings (totaling 12.3 million square feet) to determine the conservative number and layout of LLWS containers that could be placed at each location, (4) testing of representative long-term cost feasibility by life cycle cost analysis that compared an existing building to a new fabric membrane structure of equal capacity, and (5) recommendation of the most feasible LLWS strategy based on planning and life cycle cost analysis. This methodology provides an objective means of comparing fundamentally different storage options. In cases where all other evaluation criteria are relatively equal, the option with significantly lower present value of costs over its planning life cycle should be selected as the preferred option, absent site, program, or DOE guidance to the contrary. The use of a computer spreadsheet program to calculate and compare alternatives provides accuracy, analysis speed, and the capability to easily complete open-quotes what ifclose quotes scenarios for the client. These computer capabilities are shown in the spreadsheet output for the LLWS alternatives that was included in the recent ESWMO report

  8. 78 FR 18353 - Guidance for Industry: Blood Establishment Computer System Validation in the User's Facility...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ...; (Formerly FDA-2007D-0393)] Guidance for Industry: Blood Establishment Computer System Validation in the User... Industry: Blood Establishment Computer System Validation in the User's Facility'' dated April 2013. The... document entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Blood Establishment Computer System Validation in the User's...

  9. A Study on an appropriate operating system of environmental basic facility service industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Hyun Joo [Korea Environment Institute, Seoul (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    The environmental basic facility service industry is designed to have a structural reorganization of general operating system and the efficient and effective participation of private industry and regulation of industry in connection with the general system. 35 refs., 9 figs., 20 tabs.

  10. Predisposal Management of Radioactive Waste from Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities. Specific Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides guidance on the predisposal management of all types of radioactive waste (including spent nuclear fuel declared as waste and high level waste) generated at nuclear fuel cycle facilities. These waste management facilities may be located within larger facilities or may be separate, dedicated waste management facilities (including centralized waste management facilities). The Safety Guide covers all stages in the lifetime of these facilities, including their siting, design, construction, commissioning, operation, and shutdown and decommissioning. It covers all steps carried out in the management of radioactive waste following its generation up to (but not including) disposal, including its processing (pretreatment, treatment and conditioning). Radioactive waste generated both during normal operation and in accident conditions is considered

  11. Descriptions of reference LWR facilities for analysis of nuclear fuel cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.J.; Kabele, T.J.

    1979-09-01

    To contribute to the Department of Energy's identification of needs for improved environmental controls in nuclear fuel cycles, a study was made of a light water reactor system. A reference LWR fuel cycle was defined, and each step in this cycle was characterized by facility description and mainline and effluent treatment process performance. The reference fuel cycle uses fresh uranium in light water reactors. Final treatment and ultimate disposition of waste from the fuel cycle steps were not included, and the waste is assumed to be disposed of by approved but currently undefined means. The characterization of the reference fuel cycle system is intended as basic information for further evaluation of alternative effluent control systems.

  12. Descriptions of reference LWR facilities for analysis of nuclear fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.J.; Kabele, T.J.

    1979-09-01

    To contribute to the Department of Energy's identification of needs for improved environmental controls in nuclear fuel cycles, a study was made of a light water reactor system. A reference LWR fuel cycle was defined, and each step in this cycle was characterized by facility description and mainline and effluent treatment process performance. The reference fuel cycle uses fresh uranium in light water reactors. Final treatment and ultimate disposition of waste from the fuel cycle steps were not included, and the waste is assumed to be disposed of by approved but currently undefined means. The characterization of the reference fuel cycle system is intended as basic information for further evaluation of alternative effluent control systems

  13. Safety of and regulations for nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Report of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    In order to compile information on the nature of the safety concerns and current status of the regulations concerning nuclear fuel cycle facilities in Member States, an IAEA Technical Committee meeting on this topic was convened from 8 to 12 May 2000 in Vienna. The present publication contains the results of this meeting. The contributions of the participants in Annex 3 exemplify the work done in some Member States to develop an adequate regulatory framework to oversee the safe operation of these facilities

  14. Engineered safeguards system activities at Sandia Laboratories for back-end fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellers, T.A.; Fienning, W.C.; Winblad, A.E.

    1978-01-01

    Sandia Laboratories have been developing concepts for safeguards systems to protect facilities in the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle against potential threats of sabotage and theft of special nuclear material (SNM). Conceptual designs for Engineered Safeguards Systems (ESSs) have been developed for a Fuel Reprocessing Facility (including chemical separations, plutonium conversion, and waste solidification), a Mixed-Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility, and a Plutonium Transport Vehicle. Performance criteria for the various elements of these systems and a candidate systematic design approach have been defined. In addition, a conceptual layout for a large-scale Fuel-Cycle Plutonium Storage Facility has been completed. Work is continuing to develop safeguards systems for spent fuel facilities, light-water reactors, alternative fuel cycles, and improved transportation systems. Additional emphasis will be placed on the problems associated with national diversion of special nuclear material. The impact on safeguards element performance criteria for surveillance and containment to protect against national diversion in various alternative fuel cycle complexes is also being investigated

  15. Technical Meeting on Fast Reactors and Related Fuel Cycle Facilities with Improved Economic Characteristics. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of the meeting were: • To identify the main issues and technical features that affect capital and energy production costs of fast reactors and related fuel cycle facilities; • To present fast reactor concepts and designs with enhanced economic characteristics, as well as innovative technical solutions (components, subsystems, etc.) that have the potential to reduce the capital costs of fast reactors and related fuel cycle facilities; • To present energy models and advanced tools for the cost assessment of innovative fast reactors and associated nuclear fuel cycles; • To discuss the results of studies and ongoing R&D activities that address cost reduction and the future economic competitiveness of fast reactors; • To identify research and technology development needs in the field, also in view of new IAEA initiatives to help and support Member States in improving the economic competitiveness of fast reactors and associated nuclear fuel cycles

  16. Technical Meeting on Fast Reactors and Related Fuel Cycle Facilities with Improved Economic Characteristics. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of the meeting were: - To identify the main issues and technical features that affect capital and energy production costs of fast reactors and related fuel cycle facilities; - To present fast reactor concepts and designs with enhanced economic characteristics, as well as innovative technical solutions (components, subsystems, etc.) that have the potential to reduce the capital costs of fast reactors and related fuel cycle facilities; - To present energy models and advanced tools for the cost assessment of innovative fast reactors and associated nuclear fuel cycles; - To discuss the results of studies and on-going R&D activities that address cost reduction and the future economic competitiveness of fast reactors; and - To identify research and technology development needs in the field, also in view of new IAEA initiatives to help and support Member States in improving the economic competitiveness of fast reactors and associated nuclear fuel cycles

  17. Needs of Advanced Safeguards Technologies for Future Nuclear Fuel Cycle (FNFC) Facilities and a Trial Application of SBD Concept to Facility Design of a Hypothetical FNFC Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seya, M.; Hajima, R.; Nishimori, N.; Hayakawa, T.; Kikuzawa, N.; Shizuma, T.; Fujiwara, M.

    2010-01-01

    Some of future nuclear fuel cycle (FNFC) facilities are supposed to have the characteristic features of very large throughput of plutonium, low decontamination reprocessing (no purification process; existence of certain amount of fission products (FP) in all process material), full minor actinides (MA) recycle, and treatment of MOX with FP and MA in fuel fabrication. In addition, the following international safeguards requirements have to be taken into account for safeguards approaches of the FNFC facilities. -Application of integrated safeguards (IS) approach; -Remote (unattended) verification; - 'Safeguards by Design' (SBD) concept. These features and requirements compel us to develop advanced technologies, which are not emerged yet. In order to realize the SBD, facility designers have to know important parts of design information on advanced safeguards systems before starting the facility design. The SBD concept requires not only early start of R and D of advanced safeguards technologies (before starting preliminary design of the facility) but also interaction steps between researchers working on safeguards systems and nuclear facility designers. The interaction steps are follows. Step-1; researchers show images of advanced safeguards systems to facility designers based on their research. Step-2; facility designers take important design information on safeguards systems into process systems of demonstration (or test) facility. Step-3; demonstration and improvement of both systems based on the conceptual design. Step-4; Construction of a FNFC facility with the advanced safeguards systems We present a trial application of the SBD concept to a hypothetical FNFC facility with an advanced hybrid K-edge densitometer and a Pu NDA system for spent nuclear fuel assembly using laser Compton scattering (LCS) X-rays and γ-rays and other advanced safeguards systems. (author)

  18. Partnering with Industry to Advance Biofuels, NREL's Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-10-01

    Fact sheet describing NREL's Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility and its availability to biofuels' industry partners who want to operate, test, and develop biorefining technology and equipment.

  19. Closed fuel cycle and contemporary tendencies of the nuclear facilities development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lelek, V.; Hron, M.

    2003-01-01

    The decision to develop nuclear facility is given not only through technical and financial arguments, but sometimes even the greater weight is on political, general safety and public acceptance reasons. Moreover a responsible statement about financial needs is at the beginning of the study possible only with a great error (roughly speaking - factor of two) and a time estimation up to the industrial facilities is about fifteen or even more years. If the technical development and realization is successful, we can express a more responsible conclusion only in such long time intervals. During such long periods, the criteria for political and financial decisions could be changed and the technical development will necessary follow the new situation with a change in the stream of money. On the other side, the stream of money into technology leads to a more precise forecast and a more responsible decision for future realizations. We shall try, in the paper, to reflect technical problems in the closed fuel cycle (like solid and liquid fuel options) with the public demands (refusing of nuclear energy and spent fuel disposal generally, preferring waste less technologies) and political safety aspects (nonproliferation, spent fuel storages). There will be a special attention devoted to such problems in smaller countries, where demands for energy cannot be covered by local classical sources and nuclear energy and spent fuel are already long time reality. The organizational measures and tendencies will be analyzed how to compose sufficiently great and qualified collectives to be able to overcome from the local final disposal development to the common technology realizing practically closed fuel cycle and enabling decomposition of water for the hydrogen production during the first half of this century. Overview information will be given about the Czech national technical program within the EU Program (MOST Project) and within the cooperation with Russian institutes in the molten

  20. Survey of technology for decommissioning of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. 8. Remote handling and cutting techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Ryuichiro; Ishijima, Noboru

    1999-03-01

    In nuclear fuel cycle facility decommissioning and refurbishment, the remote handling techniques such as dismantling, waste handling and decontamination are needed to reduce personnel radiation exposure. The survey research for the status of R and D activities on remote handling tools suitable for nuclear facilities in the world and domestic existing commercial cutting tools applicable to decommissioning of the facilities was conducted. In addition, the drive mechanism, sensing element and control system applicable to the remote handling devices were also surveyed. This report presents brief surveyed summaries. (H. Itami)

  1. Safety analysis of IFR fuel processing in the Argonne National Laboratory Fuel Cycle Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charak, I; Pedersen, D.R.; Forrester, R.J.; Phipps, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) includes on-site processing and recycling of discharged core and blanket fuel materials. The process is being demonstrated in the Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) at ANL's Idaho site. This paper describes the safety analyses that were performed in support of the FCF program; the resulting safety analysis report was the vehicle used to secure authorization to operate the facility and carry out the program, which is now under way. This work also provided some insights into safety-related issues of a commercial IFR fuel processing facility. These are also discussed

  2. Life Cycle Based Environmental Approach in the Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Tine Herreborg; Thrane, Mikkel

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the need for industries to extend the focus from environmental impacts in their own production, towards considerations of impacts and improvement potentials in the whole product chain....

  3. Regulation of chemical safety at fuel cycle facilities by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    When the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was established in 1975, its regulations were based on radiation dose limits. Chemical hazards rarely influenced NRC regulations. After the Three Mile Island reactor accident in 1979, the NRC staff was directed to address emergency planning at non-reactor facilities. Several fuel cycle facilities were ordered to submit emergency plans consistent with reactor emergency plans because no other guidance was available. NRC published a notice that it was writing regulations to codify the requirements in the Orders and upgrade the emergency plans to address all hazards, including chemical hazards. The legal authority of NRC to regulate chemical safety was questioned. In 1986, an overfilled uranium hexafluoride cylinder ruptured and killed a worker. The NRC staff was directed to address emergency planning for hazardous chemicals in its regulations. The final rule included a requirement for fuel cycle facilities to certify compliance with legislation requiring local authorities to establish emergency plans for hazardous chemicals. As with emergency planning, NRC's authority to regulate chemical safety during routine operations was limited. NRC established memoranda of understanding (MOUs) with other regulatory agencies to encourage exchange of information between the agencies regarding occupational hazards. In 2000, NRC published new, performance-based, regulations for fuel cycle facilities. The new regulations required an integrated safety analysis (ISA) which used quantitative standards to assess chemical exposures. Some unique chemical exposure cases were addressed while implementing the new regulations. In addition, some gaps remain in the regulation of hazardous chemicals at fuel cycle facilities. The status of ongoing efforts to improve regulation of chemical safety at fuel cycle facilities is discussed. (authors)

  4. Industrial open source solutions for product life cycle management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Campos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors go through the open source for product life cycle management (PLM and the efforts done from communities such as the open source initiative. The characteristics of the open source solutions are highlighted as well. Next, the authors go through the requirements for PLM. This is an area where more attention has been given as the manufacturers are competing with the quality and life cycle costs of their products. Especially, the need of companies to try to get a strong position in providing services for their products and thus to make themselves less vulnerable to changes in the market has led to high interest in product life cycle simulation. The potential of applying semantic data management to solve these problems discussed in the light of recent developments. In addition, a basic roadmap is presented as to how the above-described problems could be tackled with open software solutions.

  5. Life-Cycle Assessments of Selected NASA Ground-Based Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydnor, George Honeycutt

    2012-01-01

    In the past two years, two separate facility-specific life cycle assessments (LCAs) have been performed as summer student projects. The first project focused on 13 facilities managed by NASA s Aeronautics Test Program (ATP), an organization responsible for large, high-energy ground test facilities that accomplish the nation s most advanced aerospace research. A facility inventory was created for each facility, and the operational-phase carbon footprint and environmental impact were calculated. The largest impacts stemmed from electricity and natural gas used directly at the facility and to generate support processes such as compressed air and steam. However, in specialized facilities that use unique inputs like R-134a, R-14, jet fuels, or nitrogen gas, these sometimes had a considerable effect on the facility s overall environmental impact. The second LCA project was conducted on the NASA Ames Arc Jet Complex and also involved creating a facility inventory and calculating the carbon footprint and environmental impact. In addition, operational alternatives were analyzed for their effectiveness at reducing impact. Overall, the Arc Jet Complex impact is dominated by the natural-gas fired boiler producing steam on-site, but alternatives were provided that could reduce the impact of the boiler operation, some of which are already being implemented. The data and results provided by these LCA projects are beneficial to both the individual facilities and NASA as a whole; the results have already been used in a proposal to reduce carbon footprint at Ames Research Center. To help future life cycle projects, several lessons learned have been recommended as simple and effective infrastructure improvements to NASA, including better utility metering and data recording and standardization of modeling choices and methods. These studies also increased sensitivity to and appreciation for quantifying the impact of NASA s activities.

  6. Life-Cycle Cost Study for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility in Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, B.C.; Walter, P.L.; Baird, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    This report documents the life-cycle cost estimates for a proposed low-level radioactive waste disposal facility near Sierra Blanca, Texas. The work was requested by the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority and performed by the National Low-Level Waste Management Program with the assistance of Rogers and Associates Engineering Corporation

  7. Long term assurance of supply of back end of fuel cycle facilities and services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The paper deals with the long-term assurance of supply of the back end of fuel cycle facilities and services. 11 fundamental questions are posed and commented on by representatives of 7 countries. Non-proliferation aspects are not considered as they will be discussed elsewhere

  8. Life cycle assessment of facile microwave-assisted zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Papadaki, D

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The life cycle assessment of several zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures, fabricated by a facile microwave technique, is presented. Key synthesis parameters such as annealing temperature, varied from 90 °C to 220 °C, and microwave power, varied from 110...

  9. 77 FR 74671 - Guidance for Industry: Questions and Answers Regarding Food Facility Registration (Fifth Edition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-D-1002] Guidance for Industry: Questions and Answers Regarding Food Facility Registration (Fifth Edition) AGENCY... announcing the availability of a guidance for industry entitled ``Questions and Answers Regarding Food...

  10. Overview of power plant and industrial facility performance in earthquakes in 1985 through 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horstman, N.G.; Yanev, P.I.; McCormick, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper briefly documents the performance of power and industrial facilities during five destructive earthquakes in 1985 and 1986. These earthquakes represent varying levels of intensity, duration, frequency content, epicentral distance and construction practice. All of the earthquakes reinforce the findings of earlier earthquake investigations. Damage to equipment in power and industrial facilities is rare, as long as the equipment is adequately anchored. The ceramic components of switchyard equipment and the actuation of electro-mechanical relays remain concerns in the design of facilities which must remain operational during and following strong motion earthquakes. (orig.)

  11. Concept for a small, colocated fuel cycle facility for oxide breeder fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burch, W.D.; Lerch, R.E.; Stradley, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    As part of a United States Department of Energy (USDOE) program to examine innovative liquid-metal reactor (LMR) system designs over the past three years, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) collaborated on studies of mixed oxide fuel cycle options. A principal effort was an advanced concept for a small integrated fuel cycle colocated with a 1300-MW(e) reactor station. The study provided a scoping design, capital and operating cost estimates, and a basis on which to proceed with implementation of such a facility if future plans so dictate. The facility integrated reprocessing, waste management, and refabrication functions in a single facility of nominal 35-t/year capacity utilizing the latest technology developed in fabrication programs at WHC and in reprocessing at ORNL. The concept was based on many years of work at both sites and extensive design studies of prior years

  12. Industry best practices for the software development life cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    In the area of software development, there are many different views of what constitutes a best practice. The goal of this project was to identify a set of industry best practice techniques that fit the needs of the Montana Department of Transportatio...

  13. The December 7, 1988 Armenia earthquake effects on selected power, industrial and commercial facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, R.D.; Griffin, M.J.; Bragagnolo, L.J.; Yanev, P.I.

    1996-01-01

    A detailed overview of the Armenia earthquake (occurred on December 7, 1988) effects on selected power, industrial and commercial facilities is presented in this paper. It involves geologic and seismology study of the region; description of the design building standards; detailed description of the damaged nuclear and other power plants as well as other industrial facilities. Extensive damage was sustained by the industrial facilities in the epicentral area, the majority due to poor design and construction. The effects on power facilities were much less severe. response time to restore power to the transmission was 2 to 3 days following the earthquake. Power plant equipment without rigorous seismic design performed well. Mechanical equipment, pumps, valves, compressors, and piping all performed with minimal damage, Electrical control equipment if properly anchored performed well without exception

  14. Life-cycle-based multicriteria sustainability evaluation of industrial parks: a case study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin; Chen, Bin; Qi, Jing; Zhou, Shiyi; Jiang, Meiming

    2012-01-01

    Along with increasing concerns on environmental protection and global warming mitigation, new industrial organization modes such as "Ecoindustrial Park" and "Low Carbon Industrial Park" are emerging. Since ecoindustrial parks and low carbon industrial parks may offer multifaceted benefits to the users, it naturally follows that the sustainability assessment of the industrial parks ought to adopt a multicriteria methodology. In this paper, a multicriteria sustainable evaluation framework is proposed in combination with the life cycle analysis and applied to a low carbon and high end industrial park (LCHE) in Beijing, China. Results show that the LCHE industrial park can contribute to both energy-saving and greenhouse gas emission mitigations compared with other industrial parks. In terms of economic performance, although the economic profits are considerable, the investment per constructed area is relatively high. The results of sustainable analysis of the LCHE industrial park can thus shed light on future upgrading of industrial parks.

  15. Life-Cycle-Based Multicriteria Sustainability Evaluation of Industrial Parks: A Case Study in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Along with increasing concerns on environmental protection and global warming mitigation, new industrial organization modes such as “Ecoindustrial Park” and “Low Carbon Industrial Park” are emerging. Since ecoindustrial parks and low carbon industrial parks may offer multifaceted benefits to the users, it naturally follows that the sustainability assessment of the industrial parks ought to adopt a multicriteria methodology. In this paper, a multicriteria sustainable evaluation framework is proposed in combination with the life cycle analysis and applied to a low carbon and high end industrial park (LCHE in Beijing, China. Results show that the LCHE industrial park can contribute to both energy-saving and greenhouse gas emission mitigations compared with other industrial parks. In terms of economic performance, although the economic profits are considerable, the investment per constructed area is relatively high. The results of sustainable analysis of the LCHE industrial park can thus shed light on future upgrading of industrial parks.

  16. Cycle Time Analysis Of Tipping Trailer Frame: A Case Study In A Heavy Equipment Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsudi, Muhammad

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A key element with which manufacturing industries should concern themselves in respect of cost and efficiency of operation is the cycle time for preparing their products. A reduction in operational time can result in dramatic improvements in both cost and efficiency. Unfortunately, cycle time problems are sometimes difficult to analyse: there are many factors related to this parameter. This paper presents a cycle time analysis of a tipping trailer frame in a heavy equipment industry. The cycle time analysis, based on the cycle time data collected by a time study, together with the use of an Arena software simulation, is outlined. From the results of this study, it was found that the manufacturing cycle time was 56 hours, and that resources were under-utilised.

  17. The present situation of the irradiation application industry and irradiation facilities in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizusawa, K.; Baba, T.

    2003-01-01

    The irradiation application industry and irradiation facilities in Japan have been making slow but steady progress for the past 2-3 years. Beside conventional applications, new ones such as carbon fibers and membrane filters have come into the market. There are a lot of new applications about to emerge. PE tubing, already is in the European market, is being evaluated by end users in Japan. Cleaning of dioxin in exhaust gas was successfully tested at a pilot plant. Cross-linked PTFE and polyamide are waiting customers' evaluations as an engineering plastic. Surface cross-linking of artificial polycarbonate teeth has yielded remarkable experimental results. Cross-linking of polycaprolactone will be useful for biodegradable products. Being aware of the future growth of irradiation industry, contract service providers opened new facilities or increased their capability. Beside in-house facilities, there are now three Co-60 facilities and nine EB facilities available for contract irradiation in Japan

  18. Integrating industry nuclear codes and standards into United States Department of Energy facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacox, J.

    1995-02-01

    Recently the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has mandated facilities under their jurisdiction use various industry Codes and Standards developed for civilian power reactors that operate under U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission License. While this is a major step forward in putting all our nuclear facilities under common technical standards there are always problems associated with implementing such advances. This paper will discuss some of the advantages and problems experienced to date. These include the universal challenge of educating new users of any technical documents, repeating errors made by the NRC licensed facilities over the years and some unique problems specific to DOE facilities.

  19. Occupational control of the uranium mine industrial facility in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neto, C.A.; Figueiredo, N.; Py, J.; Azevedo, D. de; Torrico, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    This Occupational Radiation Protection Plan is applied to uranium ore mining and milling, for uranium concentrate production in form of ammonium diuranate (DUA), in 'Complexo Minero-industrial do Planalto de Pocos de Caldas' - CIPC, in 'Caldas', sited in the southwest of Minas Gerais State. The aims of this program are: to estimate the exposure doses of workers by applying dose calculation models; to control the workplace conditions based on monitoring results, variation studies, and to minimize the radiological risks, with available radiation protection resources optimization. The utilized techniques are: talks, area and individual monitoring, individual protection clothes and equipment, use and application of proper conducts in the workplace, according to the radiation protection norms. (authors)

  20. Strong explosions impact on buildings representative of an industrial facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trelat, S.

    2006-12-01

    The goal of this study is to focus on the analysis of blast wave damage to structures when blast wave is consequence of explosive charge detonation. The objective is to propose useful tools to predict charges on structure. All experiences are realized in laboratory. The experimental investigation consists in simulating a detonation of a stoichiometric propane-oxygen mixture at ground level or at higher altitude. The study is going to give us experimental data on blast wave effects on a structure. For that, two types of structures frequently found on industrial site are going to be used: a parallelepipedal structure and a cylindrical structure, both with known dimensions. Finally, the important point of the problem is to determine an energetic equivalence between TNT and gas used in the experiments, in order to model TNT explosions at full scale by gaseous explosions at reduced scale. (author)

  1. Initial concepts on energetics and mass releases during nonnuclear explosive events in fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halverson, M.A.; Mishima, J.

    1986-09-01

    Non-nuclear explosions are one of the initiating events (accidents) considered in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission study of formal methods for estimating the airborne release of radionuclides from fuel cycle facilities. Methods currently available to estimate the energetics and mass airborne release from the four types of non-nuclear explosive events (fast and slow physical explosions and fast and slow chemical explosions) are reviewed. The likelihood that fast physical explosions will occur in fuel cycle facilities appears to be remote and this type of explosion is not considered. Methods to estimate the consequences of slow physical and fast chemical explosions are available. Methods to estimate the consequences of slow chemical explosions are less well defined

  2. 77 FR 64999 - Guidance for Industry: Necessity of the Use of Food Product Categories in Food Facility...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-24

    ...] Guidance for Industry: Necessity of the Use of Food Product Categories in Food Facility Registrations and... industry entitled ``Necessity of the Use of Food Product Categories in Food Facility Registrations and... made available a draft guidance entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Necessity of the Use of Food [[Page...

  3. 77 FR 48990 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Necessity of the Use of Food Categories in Food Facility...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-15

    ...] Draft Guidance for Industry: Necessity of the Use of Food Categories in Food Facility Registrations and... industry entitled ``Necessity of the Use of Food Categories in Food Facility Registrations and Updates to... announcing the availability of a draft guidance for industry entitled ``Necessity of the Use of Food...

  4. Analysis of material recovery facilities for use in life-cycle assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Pressley, Phillip N.; Levis, James W.; Damgaard, Anders; Barlaz, Morton A.; DeCarolis, Joseph F.

    2015-01-01

    Insights derived from life-cycle assessment of solid waste management strategies depend critically on assumptions, data, and modeling at the unit process level. Based on new primary data, a process model was developed to estimate the cost and energy use associated with material recovery facilities (MRFs), which are responsible for sorting recyclables into saleable streams and as such represent a key piece of recycling infrastructure. The model includes four modules, each with a different proc...

  5. Lessons learned from decontaminating and decommissioning fuel cycle facilities in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordier, Jean-Claude; Dalcorso, J. P.; Nokhamzon, Jean-Guy

    2000-01-01

    This paper draws on 20 years of experience and lessons learned by COGEMA and the CEA during the decontamination and decommissioning (DandD) of its nuclear fuel cycle facilities. COGEMA and the CEA have developed a wealth of knowledge on issues such as assessing decommissioning alternatives, selecting appropriate technical procedures on the basis of thorough site characterization, and developing waste management and disposal procedures. (author)

  6. The present status of IAEA safeguards on nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    This paper examines the present approach of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to safeguarding various types of facilities in the nuclear fuel cycle, in the hope that it will serve as useful background material for several of the various working groups of the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation (INFCE). The objectives and criteria of safeguards as well as the specific safeguards techniques which are utilized by the Agency, are addressed. In Part I, a general overview of safeguards as well as a discussion of procedures applicable to most if not all IAEA safeguarded facilities are included. Part II is broken down into specific facility types and focusses on the particular safeguards measures applied to them. Safeguards have reached different degrees of development for different types of facilities, in part because the Agency's experience in safeguarding certain types is considerably greater than for other types. Thus the Agency safeguards described herein are not static, but are continuously evolving. This evolution results not only from the fact that larger and more complex facilities have been coming under safeguards. Changes are also continually being introduced based on practical experience and research and development aimed at improving safeguards efficiency, reducing intrusiveness into plant operations, minimizing operator and inspector radiation exposure, and reducing subjective evaluations in determining the effectiveness of safeguards. To these ends, the technical support programmes of various countries are playing an important role. It is emphasized that this paper is not intended to evaluate the effectiveness of Agency safeguards or to highlight problem areas. It is simply aimed at providing a picture of what safeguards are or are planned to be at various stages of the fuel cycle

  7. Operational Phase Life Cycle Assessment of Select NASA Ground Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydnor, George H.; Marshall, Timothy J.; McGinnis, Sean

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) is responsible for many large, high-energy ground test facilities that accomplish the nation s most advanced aerospace research. In order to accomplish these national objectives, significant energy and resources are consumed. A select group of facilities was analyzed using life-cycle assessment (LCA) to determine carbon footprint and environmental impacts. Most of these impacts stem from electricity and natural gas consumption, used directly at the facility and to generate support processes such as compressed air and steam. Other activities were analyzed but determined to be smaller in scale and frequency with relatively negligible environmental impacts. More specialized facilities use R-134a, R-14, jet fuels, or nitrogen gas, and these unique inputs can have a considerable effect on a facility s overall environmental impact. The results of this LCA will be useful to ATP and NASA as the nation looks to identify its top energy consumers and NASA looks to maximize research output and minimize environmental impact. Keywords: NASA, Aeronautics, Wind tunnel, Keyword 4, Keyword 5

  8. THE IMPACT OF THE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY ON THE ECONOMIC CYCLE OF EUROPEAN UNION COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Behun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The manufacturing industry is a key sector in many national economies and is involved in creating sustainable economic growth. At the same time, it is a sector sensitive to internal and external impacts that result in fluctuations in the economic cycle, copying its development or even outstripping the development of economic cycles. The main objective of this contribution was to identify the relationship between manufacturing and GDP, which represents the economic cycle in European Union countries. The time series of selected indicators of the manufacturing industry and GDP from the Eurostat database for Q1 2000-Q4 2016 were used for analysis purposes. An analysis of 296 time series with a quarterly periodicity from 22 EU countries (including the United Kingdom was performed. The results of analyses indicate that the processing industry is a sector with significant cyclical behavior. In most countries, production and sales in the manufacturing industry behaved as concurrent indicators, changes in production and sales almost immediately reflected in the growth or decline in GDP. Labor market indicators have been shown to be delayed cyclical indicators. Changes in the economic development of the countries have a strong impact on employment, the remuneration of employees and the number of hours worked in the sector. Strong cyclical industries must be constantly monitored, as negative changes in these sectors will automatically exacerbate the economic cycle recession. The results of our analyses represent a valuable platform for economic policy makers and regional strategic plans.

  9. Assessing Water Risks in the Mining Industry using Life Cycle Assessment Based Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    STEPHEN ALAN NORTHEY

    2018-01-01

    Recent advances life cycle assessment methodology provide an opportunity to gain a more holistic understanding of how the mining industry interacts with water resources. A detailed review of assessment methodology and water management in the mining industry was undertaken to identify research needs. Global datasets of water use statistics for mining operations were also developed, and an exhaustive analysis of how global mineral resources and production are spatially distributed across local ...

  10. Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook: Guidelines for Conducting an Energy Audit in Industrial Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasanbeigi, Ali; Price, Lynn

    2010-10-07

    Various studies in different countries have shown that significant energy-efficiency improvement opportunities exist in the industrial sector, many of which are cost-effective. These energy-efficiency options include both cross-cutting as well as sector-specific measures. However, industrial plants are not always aware of energy-efficiency improvement potentials. Conducting an energy audit is one of the first steps in identifying these potentials. Even so, many plants do not have the capacity to conduct an effective energy audit. In some countries, government policies and programs aim to assist industry to improve competitiveness through increased energy efficiency. However, usually only limited technical and financial resources for improving energy efficiency are available, especially for small and medium-sized enterprises. Information on energy auditing and practices should, therefore, be prepared and disseminated to industrial plants. This guidebook provides guidelines for energy auditors regarding the key elements for preparing for an energy audit, conducting an inventory and measuring energy use, analyzing energy bills, benchmarking, analyzing energy use patterns, identifying energy-efficiency opportunities, conducting cost-benefit analysis, preparing energy audit reports, and undertaking post-audit activities. The purpose of this guidebook is to assist energy auditors and engineers in the plant to conduct a well-structured and effective energy audit.

  11. Strategy of Construction and Demolition Waste Management after Chemical Industry Facilities Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashkinova, I. N.; Batrakova, G. M.; Vaisman, Ya I.

    2017-06-01

    Mixed waste products are generated in the process of irrelevant industrial projects’ removal if conventional techniques of their demolition and dismantling are applied. In Russia the number of unused chemical industry facilities including structures with high rate of wear is growing. In removing industrial buildings and production shops it is used conventional techniques of demolition and dismantling in the process of which mixed waste products are generated. The presence of hazardous chemicals in these wastes makes difficulties for their use and leads to the increasing volume of unutilized residues. In the process of chemical industry facilities’ removal this fact takes on special significance as a high level of hazardous chemicals in the waste composition demands for the realization of unprofitable measures aimed at ensuring environmental and industrial safety. The proposed strategy of managing waste originated from the demolition and dismantling of chemical industry facilities is based on the methodology of industrial metabolism which allows identifying separate material flows of recycled, harmful and ballast components, performing separate collection of components during removal and taking necessary preventive measures. This strategy has been tested on the aniline synthesis plant being in the process of removal. As a result, a flow of 10 wt. %, subjected to decontamination, was isolated from the total volume of construction and demolition waste (C&D waste). The considered approach allowed using the resource potential of more than 80wt. % of waste and minimizing the disposed waste volume.

  12. Technical Meeting on Fast Reactors and Related Fuel Cycle Facilities with Improved Economic Characteristics. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, engineering oriented work, rather than basic research and development (R&D), has led to significant progress in improving the economics of innovative fast reactors and associated fuel cycle facilities, while maintaining and even enhancing the safety features of these systems. Optimization of plant size and layout, more compact designs, reduction of the amount of plant materials and the building volumes, higher operating temperatures to attain higher generating efficiencies, improvement of load factor, extended core lifetimes, high fuel burnup, etc. are good examples of achievements to date that have improved the economics of fast neutron systems. The IAEA, through its Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR) and Technical Working Group on Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options and Spent Fuel Management (TWG-NFCO), devotes many of its initiatives to encouraging technical cooperation and promoting common research and technology development projects among Member States with fast reactor and advanced fuel cycle development programmes, with the general aim of catalysing and accelerating technology advances in these fields. In particular the theme of fast reactor deployment, scenarios and economics has been largely debated during the recent IAEA International Conference on Fast Reactors and Related Fuel Cycles: Safe Technologies and Sustainable Scenarios, held in Paris in March 2013. Several papers presented at this conference discussed the economics of fast reactors from different national and regional perspectives, including business cases, investment scenarios, funding mechanisms and design options that offer significant capital and energy production cost reductions. This Technical Meeting on Fast Reactors and Related Fuel Cycle Facilities with Improved Economic Characteristics addresses Member States’ expressed need for information exchange in the field, with the aim of identifying the main open issues and launching possible initiatives to help and

  13. Hybrid gas turbine–organic Rankine cycle for seawater desalination by reverse osmosis in a hydrocarbon production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eveloy, Valérie; Rodgers, Peter; Qiu, Linyue

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Seawater reverse osmosis driven by hybrid gas turbine–organic Rankine power cycle. • High ambient air and seawater temperatures, and high seawater salinity. • Energy–exergy analysis of power and desalination systems for six organic fluids. • Economic viability of waste heat recovery in subsidized utility pricing context. - Abstract: Despite water scarcity, the use of industrial waste heat for seawater desalination has been limited in the Middle East to date. This study evaluates the technical and economic feasibility of integrating on-site gas turbine power generation and reverse osmosis equipment for the production of both electricity and fresh water in a coastal hydrocarbon production facility. Gas turbine exhaust gas waste heat is recovered using an intermediate heat transfer fluid and fed to an organic Rankine cycle evaporator, to generate mechanical power to drive the reverse osmosis high pressure pump. Six candidate organic working fluids are evaluated, namely toluene, benzene, cyclohexane, cyclopentane, n-pentane and R245fa. Thermodynamic and desalination performance are assessed in the harsh climatic and salinity conditions of the Arabian Gulf. The performance metrics considered incorporate electric power and permeate production, thermal and exergy efficiency, specific energy consumption, system size, and permeate quality. Using toluene in the bottoming power cycle, a gain in power generation efficiency of approximately 12% is achieved relative to the existing gas turbine cycle, with an annual average of 2260 m 3 /h of fresh water produced. Depending upon the projected evolution of local water prices, the investment becomes profitable after two to four years, with an end-of-life net present value of 220–380 million USD, and internal rate of return of 26–48%.

  14. Aviation Technology Life Cycle Management: Importance for Aviation Companies, Aerospace Industry Organizations and Relevant Stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Szabo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper in the introductory part underlines some aspects concerning the importance of Aviation Technology Life Cycle Management and informs on basic international standards for the processes and stages of life cycle. The second part is focused on definition and main objectives of system life cycle management. The authors subsequently inform on system life cycle stages (in general and system life cycle processes according to ISO/IEC/IEEE 15288:2015 standard. Following the fact, that life cycle cost (LCC is inseparable part and has direct connection to the life cycle management, the paper contains brief information regarding to LCC (cost categories, cost breakdown structure, cost estimation a.o.. Recently was issued the first part of Aviation Technology Life Cycle Management monograph (in Slovak: ”Manažment životného cyklu leteckej techniky I”, written by I.Koblen and S.Szabo. Following this fact and direct relation to the topic of article it is a part of article briefly introduced the content of two parts of this monograph (the 2nd part of monograph it has been prepared for the print. The last part of article is focused on issue concerning main assumptions and conditions for successful application of aviation technology life cycle management in aviation companies, aerospace industry organizations as well as from the relevant stakeholders side.

  15. Building Industry Enterprises Logistic System according to their Life-cycle and Organizational Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Voznenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a survey of the Ukrainian machinery-building industry enterprises performance in 2012-2014 due to the state of their logistic systems development and companies’ life-cycle stage. The review of existing theoretical approaches shows the range of possible criteria for evaluation at each level of the industry, enterprise and product. The conducted research evaluates the Ukrainian machinery-building industry and the companies that create that potential. The peculiarities of the organizational adaptation of the above mentioned enterprises and the developed recommendations will help to establish an adaptive management and gain enterprises’ market competitiveness.

  16. Revealing the costs of air pollution from industrial facilities in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, M. (EMRC, Brussels (Belgium)); Wagner, A.; Davies, T. (AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom)); Spadaro, J. (SERC, Charlotte, NC (United States)); Adams, M. (EEA, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    2011-11-15

    This European Environment Agency (EEA) report assesses the damage costs to health and the environment resulting from pollutants emitted from industrial facilities. It is based on the latest information, namely for 2009, publicly available through the European Pollutant Release and Transfer Register (E-PRTR, 2011) in line with the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) Aarhus Convention regarding access to environmental information. This report investigates the use of a simplified modelling approach to quantify, in monetary terms, the damage costs caused by emissions of air pollutants from industrial facilities reported to the E-PRTR pollutant register. The approach is based on existing policy tools and methods, such as those developed under the EU's CAFE programme for the main air pollutants. This study also employs other existing models and approaches used to inform policymakers about the damage costs of pollutants. Together, the methods are used to estimate the impacts and associated economic damage caused by a number of pollutants emitted from industrial facilities, including: (1) ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs), particulate matter (PM{sub 10}) and sulphur oxides (SO{sub x}); (2) heavy metals; (3) benzene, dioxins and furans, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); (4) carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The cost of damage caused by emissions from the E-PRTR industrial facilities in 2009 is estimated as being at least EUR 102-169 billion. A small number of industrial facilities cause the majority of the damage costs to health and the environment. Fifty per cent of the total damage cost occurs as a result of emissions from just 191 (or 2 %) of the approximately 10 000 facilities that reported at least some data for releases to air in 2009. Three quarters of the total damage costs are caused by the emissions of 622 facilities, which comprise 6 % of the total number. Of the

  17. An innovative ecological hybrid refrigeration cycle for high power refrigeration facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyklis Piotr

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Searching for new refrigerants is one of the most significant scientific problems in refrigeration. There are ecological refrigerants commonly known: H2O and CO2. H2O and CO2 known as natural refrigerants, but they have problems:a high freezing point of H2O and a low triple point of CO2. These problems can be solved by the application of a hybrid sorption-compression refrigeration cycle. The cycle combines the application possibility of H2O in the high temperature sorption stage and the low temperature application of CO2 in the compression stage. This solution gives significant energy savings in comparison with the two-stage compressor cycle and with the one-stage transcritical CO2 cycle. Besides, the sorption cycle may be powered by low temperature waste heat or renewable heat. This is an original idea of the authors. In the paper an analysis of the possible extension of this solution for high capacity industrial refrigeration is presented. The estimated energy savings as well as TEWI (Total Equivalent Warming Impact index for ecological gains are calculated.

  18. The Environmental Impact of Industrial Bamboo Products : Life-cycle Assessment and Carbon Sequestration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogtlander, J.G.; Van der Lugt, P.

    2014-01-01

    This report gives a Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) and carbon footprint analysis on a selection of industrial bamboo products. The LCA is made for cradle-to-gate, plus the end-of-life stages of the bamboo products. For end-of-life it is assumed that 90% of the bamboo products are incinerated in an

  19. The dynamics of business cycles stylized facts using quarterly data for six industrialized countries

    OpenAIRE

    Βαρελάς, Ερωτόκριτος Γ.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the empirical evidence concerning the identification of cycles of the aggregate industrial production, prices and money for six OECD countries using quarterly data. We used Spectral Analysis (univariate and multivariate). An interesting result is that the monetary aggregates are procyclical.

  20. Quantifying the Industrial Facility-Level Emission Rate of Methane in Various Segments of the Natural Gas Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, S. C.; Roscioli, J. R.; Yacovitch, T. I.; Floerchinger, C. R.; Mitchell, A.; Tkacik, D. S.; Subramanian, R.; Robinson, A. L.; Martinez, D. M.; Vaughn, T. L.; Williams, L.; Zimmerle, D.; Marchese, A.

    2014-12-01

    Methane, the dominant component in natural gas, is a potent short-lived radiative forcer. Recent technological advances in the extraction of oil and gas have increased the production rate dramatically since early 2000. In the context of CO2 emissions per energy generated, natural gas promises a tantalizing thermodynamic advantage over coal and other hydrocarbons. Natural gas emissions to the atmosphere along the entire path from well to customer, however, can wipe out the radiative forcing advantage once they surpass a threshold fraction of distributed gas. Recent studies have been undertaken to assess the methane emissions at various types of facilities within different sectors of the oil and gas industry. The distribution of observed facility level emission rates along with other results and conclusions from those studies will be presented. The implications that these findings have on the emissions inventories from these sectors will be discussed.

  1. Business cycle and innovation activity in medium-high and high technology industry in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzikowski Piotr

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines differences in an impact of business cycle phases on innovation activity in medium-high and high technology industry in Poland. It is assumed that each business cycle phase influences innovation activity in the same fashion, but its impact varies and it depends on the firm’s innovation activity. The higher innovation activity the less impact of business cycle. The scope of the survey relates to innovation in MHT and HT industry in Poland. The data concerns the innovation at the firm level and the diffusion “new for the company”. Innovation activity is defined by the following activities: (1 expenditure on research and development and investments in fixed assets not used so far such as: abuildings, premises and land; b machinery and equipment, c computer software; (2 implementation of new products and technological processes and (3 innovation cooperation. The methodological part of the analysis includes a logit modeling. The survey includes 1355 companies. Business cycle has a great influence on innovation activity in MTH and HT industry in Poland. The influence of recovery phase is positive whereas both stagnation and recession phases decrease the probability of innovation activity. The character of influence depends on the propensity to take innovation activity. The higher level of innovation activity the enterprises present the less influence of business cycle they get.

  2. Facile fabrication of cobalt oxalate nanostructures with superior specific capacitance and super-long cycling stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Guanhua; Si, Conghui; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Ying; Yang, Wanfeng; Dong, Chaoqun; Zhang, Zhonghua

    2016-04-01

    Transition metal oxalate materials have shown huge competitive advantages for applications in supercapacitors. Herein, nanostructured cobalt oxalate supported on cobalt foils has been facilely fabricated by anodization, and could directly serve as additive/binder-free electrodes for supercapacitors. The as-prepared cobalt oxalate electrodes present superior specific capacitance of 1269 F g-1 at the current density of 6 A g-1 in the galvanostatic charge/discharge test. Moreover, the retained capacitance is as high as 87.2% as the current density increases from 6 A g-1 to 30 A g-1. More importantly, the specific capacitance of cobalt oxalate retains 91.9% even after super-long cycling of 100,000 cycles. In addition, an asymmetric supercapacitor assembled with cobalt oxalate (positive electrode) and activated carbon (negative electrode) demonstrates excellent capacitive performance with high energy density and power density.

  3. Importance of the licensing process on the safety culture in the Brazilian nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motta, E.S.; Sousa, A.L.B. de; Paiva, R.L.C. de; Mezrahi, A.

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities licensing processes is to ensure the safety of these installations in their entire life cycle (in the installation site selection, designing, construction, pre-operational tests, operational and decommissioning phases). The Brazilian licensing process requires from the operator, among others, before the operating license: (I) a Site Report and a Final Safety Analysis Report, ensuring that all safety related issues are adequately analyzed and understood; (II) a formal structured Management System focused on the installation safety; and (III) dissemination of safety related information to all involved operator employees and subcontractors. Therefore, these requirements reflect in an adequate operator actions and practices, ensuring a working environment with a high level of safety culture. (author)

  4. Importance of the licensing process on the safety culture in the Brazilian nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motta, E.S.; Sousa, A.L.B. de; Paiva, R.L.C. de; Mezrahi, A., E-mail: emotta@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The main objective of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities licensing processes is to ensure the safety of these installations in their entire life cycle (in the installation site selection, designing, construction, pre-operational tests, operational and decommissioning phases). The Brazilian licensing process requires from the operator, among others, before the operating license: (I) a Site Report and a Final Safety Analysis Report, ensuring that all safety related issues are adequately analyzed and understood; (II) a formal structured Management System focused on the installation safety; and (III) dissemination of safety related information to all involved operator employees and subcontractors. Therefore, these requirements reflect in an adequate operator actions and practices, ensuring a working environment with a high level of safety culture. (author)

  5. An alternative format for Category I fuel cycle facility physical protection plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwyer, P.A.

    1992-06-01

    This document provides an alternative format for physical protection plans designed to meet the requirements of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Sections 73.20, 73.45, and 73.46. These requirements apply to licensees who operate Category I fuel cycle facilities. Such licensees are authorized to use or possess a formula quantity of strategic special nuclear material. The format described is an alternative to that found under Regulatory Guide 5.52, Rev. 2 ''Standard Format and Content of a Licensee Physical Protection Plan for Strategic Special Nuclear Material at Fixed Sites (Other than Nuclear Power Plants).''

  6. Nuclear decay data for radionuclides occurring in routine releases from nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1977-08-01

    This report gives tabulations of the atomic and nuclear radiations emitted by 240 radionuclides. Most of the radionuclides are those expected to occur in routine releases of effluents from nuclear fuel cycle facilities. For each radionuclide are given the half-life and recommended values for the energies, intensities, and equilibrium absorbed-dose constants for each of the atomic and nuclear radiations. Also given are the daughter radionuclides produced and recommended values for decay branching ratios, where applicable. The radioactivity decay chains and branching ratios are displayed in diagram form

  7. Nuclear decay data for radionuclides occurring in routine releases from nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1977-08-01

    This report gives tabulations of the atomic and nuclear radiations emitted by 240 radionuclides. Most of the radionuclides are those expected to occur in routine releases of effluents from nuclear fuel cycle facilities. For each radionuclide are given the half-life and recommended values for the energies, intensities, and equilibrium absorbed-dose constants for each of the atomic and nuclear radiations. Also given are the daughter radionuclides produced and recommended values for decay branching ratios, where applicable. The radioactivity decay chains and branching ratios are displayed in diagram form.

  8. Consideration of Regulatory System for Fuel Cycle Facilities in Foreign Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sang-Kyu; Ahn, Hyung-Joon; Oh, Kyu-Myung; Lee, Hoon-Joo

    2006-01-01

    Three units of fuel fabrication plants are operating now in Korea. These fuel fabrication plants produce fuels for PWR, CANDU and HANARO research reactor, respectively. To enhance our regulatory systems for fuel cycle facilities including fuel fabrication plants, the related system of foreign countries is surveyed. In this study, the overall regulatory systems of the United States of America, France, Germany, the United Kingdom and Japan are surveyed. The survey items consist of laws and regulations, regulatory organization, licensing procedure, documents to be submitted with a license application, regulatory inspection, and etc

  9. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elder, H.K.

    1986-05-01

    The radioactive wastes expected to result from decommissioning nuclear fuel cycle facilities are reviewed and classified in accordance with 10 CFR 61. Most of the wastes from the MOX plant (exclusive of the lagoon wastes) will require interim storage (11% Class A 49 m/sup 3/; 89% interim storage, 383 m/sup 3/). The MOX plant lagoon wastes are Class A waste (2930 m/sup 3/). All of the wastes from the U-Fab and UF/sub 6/ plants are designated as Class A waste (U-Fab 1090 m/sup 3/, UF/sub 6/ 1259 m/sup 3/).

  10. Vulnerability assessment of chemical industry facilities in South Korea based on the chemical accident history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, S.; Lee, W. K.; Jong-Ryeul, S.; Kim, M. I.

    2016-12-01

    The use of chemical compounds are keep increasing because of their use in manufacturing industry. Chemical accident is growing as the consequence of the chemical use increment. Devastating damages from chemical accidents are far enough to aware people's cautious about the risk of the chemical accident. In South Korea, Gumi Hydrofluoric acid leaking accident triggered the importance of risk management and emphasized the preventing the accident over the damage reducing process after the accident occurs. Gumi accident encouraged the government data base construction relate to the chemical accident. As the result of this effort Chemical Safety-Clearing-house (CSC) have started to record the chemical accident information and damages according to the Harmful Chemical Substance Control Act (HCSC). CSC provide details information about the chemical accidents from 2002 to present. The detail informations are including title of company, address, business type, accident dates, accident types, accident chemical compounds, human damages inside of the chemical industry facilities, human damage outside of the chemical industry facilities, financial damages inside of the chemical industry facilities, and financial damages outside of the chemical industry facilities, environmental damages and response to the chemical accident. Collected the chemical accident history of South Korea from 2002 to 2015 and provide the spatial information to the each accident records based on their address. With the spatial information, compute the data on ArcGIS for the spatial-temporal analysis. The spatial-temporal information of chemical accident is organized by the chemical accident types, damages, and damages on environment and conduct the spatial proximity with local community and environmental receptors. Find the chemical accident vulnerable area of South Korea from 2002 to 2015 and add the vulnerable area of total period to examine the historically vulnerable area from the chemical accident in

  11. Environmental Design of Industrial Products (EDIP), anchoring of the life cycle concept in industry and society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alting, Leo; Wenzel, Henrik; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    1999-01-01

    The Danish methodology and tools for environmental assessment of products (EDIP) became public available in 1996-97. Following the EDIP-project, projects reflecting methodological developments and simplifications for a broader use have been lanuched, also taking the methodology beyond Danish...... borders and into Europe and Asia. Simplification projects comprise development of a manual for SME's and identification of product families. Industrial applications are exemplified by a product development project at the pump manufacturer Grundfos, and by this company's use of the EDIP...

  12. Reliability Analysis Of Fire System On The Industry Facility By Use Fameca Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sony T, D.T.; Situmorang, Johnny; Ismu W, Puradwi; Demon H; Mulyanto, Dwijo; Kusmono, Slamet; Santa, Sigit Asmara

    2000-01-01

    FAMECA is one of the analysis method to determine system reliability on the industry facility. Analysis is done by some procedure that is identification of component function, determination of failure mode, severity level and effect of their failure. Reliability value is determined by three combinations that is severity level, component failure value and critical component. Reliability of analysis has been done for fire system on the industry by FAMECA method. Critical component which identified is pump, air release valve, check valve, manual test valve, isolation valve, control system etc

  13. Exploring the life cycle management of industrial solid waste in the case of copper slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaolong; Yang, Jianxin; Lu, Bin; Li, Bo

    2013-06-01

    Industrial solid waste has potential impacts on soil, water and air quality, as well as human health, during its whole life stages. A framework for the life cycle management of industrial solid waste, which integrates the source reduction process, is presented and applied to copper slag management. Three management scenarios of copper slag are developed: (i) production of cement after electric furnace treatment, (ii) production of cement after flotation, and (iii) source reduction before the recycling process. A life cycle assessment is carried out to estimate the environmental burdens of these three scenarios. Life cycle assessment results showed that the environmental burdens of the three scenarios are 2710.09, 2061.19 and 2145.02 Pt respectively. In consideration of the closed-loop recycling process, the environmental performance of the flotation approach excelled that of the electric furnace approach. Additionally, although flash smelting promotes the source reduction of copper slag compared with bath smelting, it did not reduce the overall environmental burdens resulting from the complete copper slag management process. Moreover, it led to the shifting of environmental burdens from ecosystem quality damage and resources depletion to human health damage. The case study shows that it is necessary to integrate the generation process into the whole life cycle of industrial solid waste, and to make an integrated assessment for quantifying the contribution of source reduction, rather than to simply follow the priority of source reduction and the hierarchy of waste management.

  14. Radiation and physical protection challenges at advanced nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickett, Susan E.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The purpose of this study is to examine challenges and opportunities for radiation protection in advanced nuclear reactors and fuel facilities proposed under the Generation IV (GEN IV) initiative which is examining and pursuing the exploration and development of advanced nuclear science and technology; and the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), which seeks to develop worldwide consensus on enabling expanded use of economical, carbon-free nuclear energy to meet growing energy demand. The International Energy Agency projects nuclear power to increase at a rate of 1.3 to 1.5 percent a year over the next 20 years, depending on economic growth. Much of this growth will be in Asia, which, as a whole, currently has plans for 40 new nuclear power plants. Given this increase in demand for new nuclear power facilities, ranging from light water reactors to advanced fuel processing and fabrication facilities, it is necessary for radiation protection and physical protection technologies to keep pace to ensure both worker and public health. This paper is based on a review of current initiatives and the proposed reactors and facilities, primarily the nuclear fuel cycle facilities proposed under the GEN IV and GNEP initiatives. Drawing on the Technology Road map developed under GEN IV, this work examines the potential radiation detection and protection challenges and issues at advanced reactors, including thermal neutron spectrum systems, fast neutron spectrum systems and nuclear fuel recycle facilities. The thermal neutron systems look to improve the efficiency of production of hydrogen or electricity, while the fast neutron systems aim to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel. While there are components of these advanced systems that can draw on the current and well-developed radiation protection practices, there will inevitably be opportunities to improve the overall quality of radiation

  15. Life cycle assessment of a medium sized PV facility in Scotland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muneer, T; Younes, S.; Kubie, J.

    2006-01-01

    Napier University's School of Engineering has been involved in education and research in renewable energy for the past 35 years. With the aim demonstration of the viability of production of solar electricity at a high latitude location such as Edinburgh (56 degree north)the school undertook to commission a medium-sized PV electricity generation project. The installation of 32 rows of BP solar silicon panels covering a total area of 160 square metres ensures generation of 17.6kW peak (AC) power. Figure 1 presents a photograph of the facility under discussion. The project has been part (60%) financed by UK Government's PV electricity demonstration programme through the office of Energy Saving Trust. The University has plans to generate hydrogen from solar electricity that will be stored for noctumal production of electricity using fuel-cell technology, thus completing the complete cycle of generation, storage and reproduction of sustainable energy. The project that is part of Napier University's Merchiton Campus was completed on 6 April 2005 and since that date AC power has been fed into the University grid with the peak power being enough to operate up to 80 of the 500 computers at the University's Jack Kilby Computing Centre. DC power is produced from the BP solar high efficincy (17%) monocrystalline panels, each of which produces 90W of power at 22 Volts. This DC electricity is then fed into a total of four inverters hence converting to a stable AC supply. Two of the larger inverters receive current from 12 rows (4 strings x 3 rows) each, while the smaller inverters take power in from 4 rows (2 strings x 2 rows) each. The PV facility is fully instrumented with both input (incident solar energy) and PV electrical energy output recorded at a frequency of 15 minutes. This article will present the energetic, environmental and monetary life cycle assessment (LCA) of the above facility.(Author)

  16. The Atalante facility at CEA/Marcoule: towards Gen IV systems fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordier, Gilles; Warin, Dominique; Masson, Michel

    2008-01-01

    The Atalante facility is a complete set of 18 hot labs and 9 shielded cells devoted to the research and development on fuel cycle. The activities correspond to 4 major sectors of nuclear research: -) to support the operation of actual reprocessing plants with the aim of adapting the head of the process to the increase of the spend fuel burn-up and to different types of new burnt fuels to be reprocessed (including MOX, USi or UMo fuels); -) to develop the COEX TM process that jointly manages uranium and plutonium from the dissolution of spent fuel to the production of UPuO 2 powder and the fabrication of MOX fuel pellets; -) to prepare the recycling of minor actinides (MA) by partitioning or by grouped actinide extraction, and by MA bearing fuel fabrication; -) to study the long term behavior of high level waste conditioning matrices and especially self irradiation and leaching of vitrified waste. The first hot lab of Atalante was operated in 1992, the process shielded cell (CBP) in 2003 and the last LN1 lab in 2005, while at the same time a large scale demonstration test on the DIAMEX-SANEX MA partitioning process was performed. Now some new challenges involve further necessary evolutions of the facility. Some are related to safety assessment and operating flexibility; the major evolutions will come from new scientific goals and research programs. Furthermore, minor actinides materials irradiation tests in fast reactors will be prepared in the framework of a large international cooperation (GACID program) and need the production of significant amounts of MA bearing mixed U-Pu oxide compounds in new hot labs and shielded cells equipment. The major new research tools are presented and we highlight how Atalante is a unique facility which brings a real opportunity to reinforce the European and international scientific cooperation in order to prepare the next Gen IV fuel cycle. (authors)

  17. Experiences of Labor Exploitation : Case study of some male migrant workers in Finnish facility industries

    OpenAIRE

    Chukwu, Dominic-Savior

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the experiences of some male migrant workers who have encountered labor exploitation in their workplaces in Finnish facility industries, specifically in the cleaning companies. This study considered the various types of labor exploitations that migrant workers face in their workplaces. It equally look at the effects of labor exploitation on migrant workers, and suggested possible ways that migrant workers could make themselves less vulnerable to workplace ...

  18. Columbus orbital facility and automated transfer vehicle. A challenge for agency & industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, H.; Luttmann, H.

    Long term continuous operation of the COLUMBUS Orbital Facility (COF) flight- and ground segment requires continuous mission control and operations support capability to ensure proper operation and configuration of the COF systems in support of ongoing science and technology payloads. The ISS logistics scenario will be supported by the Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV). These operational needs require the built-up of a new ground infrastructure in Europe and USA, enabling an efficient operations for preparation, planning and mission execution. The challenge for the European space community consists in the development and operation of a user friendly operational environment but keeping costs within budgetary constraints. Results of detailed definition studies performed by both agency and industry for the ground infrastructure indicate solutions to those technical and programmatic requirements by using of existing centers and facilities, re-use of C/D phase products (Hardware, Software) and COTS equipment to avoid costly new developments, using engineering expertise of the industrial personnel from flight element phase C/D. The concept for operations execution defines the task sharing between Operations Control Facilities (OCF), Operations Support Facilities and User Operations Sites. Operations support consists of on-line engineering support, off-line engineering support, payload integration, logistics support and crew training support performed by industry. DASA RI has made internal investments in organizational concepts for mission operations as well as in mission technologies and tools based on the standard COLUMBUS Ground Software (CGS) toolset and on knowledge based systems to enable an efficient industrial operations support. These tools are available as prototypes being evaluated in a simulated operational environment.

  19. A study on building performance analysis for energy retrofit of existing industrial facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourlis, Georgios; Kovacic, Iva

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal simulation of a historical industrial hall with limited data availability. • Considering waste heat from machinery after measuring production fluctuations. • Test of retrofit alternatives for roof and skylights. • Results indicate a significant reduction in heating energy demand up to 52%. • After retrofit naturally ventilated hall can achieve thermal comfort in summer. - Abstract: Due to the strengthening of regulations and codes on building energy performance, as well as with the application of national legislations regarding energy management and efficiency, existing industrial facilities are using thermal refurbishment and renovation as impetus for increasing their overall energy efficiency. This paper analyzes a building envelope refurbishment for a case study of an existing historical industrial facility. Critical parameters affecting energy performance of industrial buildings were identified by reviewing relevant literate. Two retrofit scenarios were developed and dynamic thermal simulation using EnergyPlus was implemented to evaluate the potential for improvement. Thereby the impact of interior loads was considered, determined by measurements conducted on factory machines, occupancy and lighting operation patterns. However, information regarding constructions of the existing facility and installed technical building services is limited. There is also uncertainty in the quantification of natural ventilation air change rate for such buildings. To overcome these limitations a study of various material databases was carried out, in order to assess data for building envelope composition. Input values for missing data were provided based on literature, allowing a fair comparison between refurbishment alternatives. Simulation results showed that the heating demand of the facility could be reduced up to 52%, indicating a significant potential for energy savings. Beyond that, thermal performance against summer overheating also

  20. Progress on management business system of LLW generated from research and industrial nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumida, Tatsuo

    2014-01-01

    RANDEC has been studying a management business system of LLW (Low Level Waste) generated from research and industrial facilities since 2008. To examine economical problems, the income and expenditure of LLW treatment business was simulated. As a result, raising method of the funds which is required in preparatory stage of LLW treatment business is an obvious issue to carry out as public utility works. (author)

  1. Life cycle assessment of solid waste management strategies in a chlor-alkali production facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Edmundo; Navia, Rodrigo

    2011-06-01

    The waste management of a chlor-alkali and calcium chloride industrial facility from southern Chile was the object of this study. The main solid waste materials generated in these processes are brine sediments and calcium chloride sediments, respectively. Both residues are mixed in the liquid phase and filtered in a press filter, obtaining a final low humidity solid waste, called 'mixed sediments', which is disposed of in an industrial landfill as non-hazardous waste. The aim of the present study was to compare by means of LCA, the current waste management option of the studied chlor-alkali facility, namely landfill disposal, with two new possible options: the reuse of the mixed sediments as mineral additive in compost and the use of brine sediments as an unconventional sorbent for the removal of heavy metals from wastewater. The functional unit was defined as 1 tonne of waste being managed. To perform this evaluation, software SimaPro 7.0 was used, selecting the Ecoindicator 99 and CML 2000 methodologies for impact evaluation. The obtained results indicate that the use of brine sediments as a novel material for the removal of heavy metals from wastewater (scenario 3) presented environmental benefits when compared with the waste management option of sediments landfilling (scenario 1). The avoided environmental loads, generated by the substitution of activated granular carbon and the removal of Cu and Zn from wastewater in the treatment process generated positive environmental impacts, enhancing the environmental performance of scenario 3.

  2. Nasreya: a treatment and disposal facility for industrial hazardous waste in Alexandria, Egypt: phase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Adham R; Kock, Per; Nadim, Amani

    2005-04-01

    A facility for the treatment and disposal of industrial hazardous waste has been established in Alexandria, Egypt. Phase I of the facility encompassing a secure landfill and solar evaporation ponds is ready to receive waste, and Phase II encompassing physico-chemical treatment, solidification, and interim storage is underway. The facility, the Nasreya Centre, is the first of its kind in Egypt, and represents the nucleus for the integration, improvement and further expansion of different hazardous waste management practices and services in Alexandria. It has been developed within the overall legal framework of the Egyptian Law for the Environment, and is expected to improve prospects for enforcement of the regulatory requirements specified in this law. It has been developed with the overall aim of promoting the establishment of an integrated industrial hazardous waste management system in Alexandria, serving as a demonstration to be replicated elsewhere in Egypt. For Phase I, the Centre only accepts inorganic industrial wastes. In this respect, a waste acceptance policy has been developed, which is expected to be reviewed during Phase II, with an expansion of the waste types accepted.

  3. Environmental performances of different configurations of a material recovery facility in a life cycle perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardolino, Filomena; Berto, Chiara; Arena, Umberto

    2017-10-01

    The study evaluated the environmental performances of an integrated material recovery facility (MRF) able to treat 32kt/y of unsorted mixed waste, made of residuals from household source separation and separate collection. The facility includes a mechanical sorting platform for the production of a solid recovered fuel (SRF) utilized in an external waste-to-energy plant, bio-cells for tunnel composting of organic fraction, and a sanitary landfill for the safe disposal of ultimate waste. All the MRF sub-units have been analysed in depth in order to acquire reliable data for a life cycle assessment study, focused on the environmental performances of different configurations of the facility. The study investigated a "past" configuration, including just mechanical sorting, landfilling and biogas combustion in a gas engine, and the "present" one, which includes also a composting unit. Two possible "future" configurations, having a gasifier inside the MRF battery limits, have been also analysed, assessing the performances of two fluidized bed reactors of different size, able to gasify only the residues generated by the sorting platform or the whole amount of produced SRF, respectively. The analysis evaluated the contributions of each unit in the different configurations and allowed a reliable assessment of the technological evolution of the facility. The results quantified the positive effect of the inclusion of an aerobic treatment of the waste organic fraction. The SRF gasification in situ appears to improve the MRF environmental performances in all the impact categories, with the exclusion of that of global warming. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. 75 FR 21632 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Total Product Life Cycle...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ...] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Total Product Life Cycle: Infusion... the draft guidance document entitled ``Total Product Life Cycle: Infusion Pump--Premarket Notification... the Internet. To receive ``Total Product Life Cycle: Infusion Pump--Premarket Notification [510(k...

  5. ECOLOGICAL LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF MODIFIED NOVOLAKS WASTE USED IN INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wioletta M. BAJDUR

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ecological Life Cycle Assessment (LCA applied in the assessment of the impact of products on the environment is a technique that allows for the evaluation of the environmental impact of polymeric flocculants used in industrial wastewater treatment. The possibility of conducting a full life cycle and thus manufacturing process analysis allows for reliable and accurate identification of the sources of environmental hazards and the impact of new products on the environment. Newly synthesized waste-based polymers are water soluble and possess the properties of flocculants, while reducing the parameters in industrial wastewater. In the paper, there are presented the results of the analysis conducted using LCA technique for the assessment of the impact of modified waste phenol formaldehyde resin (Novolak on the environment. LCA technique was used to assess the impact of the new flocculant applied in the process of metallurgical wastewater treatment taking into account the environmental impact of the flocculant manufacturing process.

  6. IDENTIFYING THE INDUSTRY BUSINESS CYCLE USING THE MARKOV SWITCHING APPROACH IN CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristi SPULBĂR

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we use a Markov Switching model with two lags to identify and to compare the business cycle in Romania, Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland using data on industrial production for the 1991-2011 period. We use a model with two regimes that reflect the economic expansions and contractions. The Markov Switching models have been widely used in order to detect and to date the business cycle turning points. However, it should be pointed out that the industrial production may have a little bit different dynamics than the quarterly gross domestic product which is the main measure of economic activity. Based on the smoothed regime probabilities the model track three recessionary periods of the Romanian economy in 1991, 1997 and 2009 and two recessionary periods for the other countries in 1991 and 2009. Mean yoy growth of IPI is 5.01% during expansion periods, while it switches to -18.6% during contraction periods for the Romanian economy. In comparison, mean yoy growth of IPI is 7.25% during expansion periods, while it switches to -13.4% during contraction periods for the Poland economy. Furthermore, in Romania, the duration of the three recessions in months was 25, 25 and 9 months. In Poland, the duration of the two recessions was 16 and 10 months. The results of the study may be used in order to compare the business cycle in Central and Eastern European countries with the Euro Area business cycle.

  7. Lessons learned in over 100 zebra mussel control applications at industrial facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGough, C.M.; Gilland, P.H.; Muia, R.A. [Calgon Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Since their introduction into US waterways, Zebra Mussels (Dreissena polymorphae) have spread rapidly throughout the Great Lakes and Mississippi regions. These mussels have continued to colonize the intake pipes of industrial water supplies and water distribution systems throughout the affected areas. Their colonization has compromised plant safety and production efficiency, and steadily increased costs to water users. The design of each industrial plant water distribution system is unique. A comprehensive zebra mussel control strategy using the best available options must be considered in each specific situation. This paper discusses the successful use of one strategy (a quaternary ammonia-based molluscicide) in the battle against zebra mussels. The commercial life cycle of an industrial molluscicide began with initial toxicity screening in the laboratory. The evaluation continued at plant sites through field trials and applications. Lessons learned from these experiences helped direct the efforts toward the development of a second generation program.

  8. Criticality control during conditioning of spent nuclear fuel in the Fuel Cycle Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lell, R.M.; Khalil, H.S.

    1994-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel may be unacceptable for direct repository storage because of composition, enrichment, form, physical condition, or the presence of undesirable materials such as sodium. Fuel types which are not acceptable for direct storage must be processed or conditioned to produce physical forms which can safely be stored in a repository. One possible approach to conditioning is the pyroprocess implemented in the Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) at Argonne National Laboratory-West. Conditioning of binary (U-Zr) and ternary (U-Pu-Zr) metallic fuels from the EBR-2 reactor is used to demonstrate the process. Criticality safety considerations limit batch sizes during the conditioning steps and provide one constraint on the final form of conditioned material. Criticality safety during conditioning is assured by the integration of criticality safety analysis, equipment design, process development, a measurement program, accountability procedures, and a computerized Mass Tracking System. Criticality issues related to storage and shipment of conditioned material have been examined

  9. Investigation on proper materials of a liner system for trench type disposal facilities of radioactive wastes from research, industrial and medical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Hisakazu; Amazawa, Hiroya; Sakai, Akihiro; Arikawa, Masanobu; Sakamoto, Yoshiaki

    2011-08-01

    The Low-level Radioactive Waste Disposal Project Center of Japan Atomic Energy Agency will settle on near surface disposal facilities with and without engineered barriers for radioactive wastes from research, industrial and medical facilities. Both of them are so called 'concrete pit type' and 'trench type', respectively. The technical standard of constructing and operating a disposal facility based on 'Law for the Regulations of Nuclear Source Material, Nuclear Fuel Material and Reactors' have been regulated partly by referring to that of 'Waste Management and Public Cleansing Law'. This means that the concrete pit type and the trench type disposal facility resemble an isolated type for specified industrial wastes and a non leachate controlled type final disposal site for stable industrial wastes, respectively. On the other, We plan to design a disposal facility with a liner system corresponding to a leachate controlled type final disposal site on a crucial assumption that radioactive wastes other than stable industrial wastes to be disposed into the trench type disposal facility is generated. By current nuclear related regulations in Japan, There are no technical standard of constructing the disposal facility with the liner system referring to that of 'Waste Management and Public Cleansing Law'. We investigate the function of the liner system in order to design a proper liner system for the trench type disposal facility. In this report, We investigated liner materials currently in use by actual leachate controlled type final disposal sites in Japan. Thereby important items such as tensile strength, durability from a view point of selecting proper liner materials were studied. The items were classified into three categories according to importance. We ranked proper liner materials for the trench type disposal facility by evaluating the important items per material. As a result, high density polyethylene(HDPE) of high elasticity type polymetric sheet was selected

  10. Probalistisk short-term risk modeling for back-end fuel cycle and waste management facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kjellbert, N.A.

    1980-03-01

    This study of probabilistic short-term risk modeling of back-end fuel cycle and waste management facilities represents the continuation of work started in 1977. The purpose of the report is to present a more detailed survey of models and analysis techniques that mey be applicable. The definition of the risk concept and the nature of the facilities and events which are to be analyzed are described. The most important criteria are that the model or method shall be quantitative, logically/scientifically based, and be able to handle systems of some complexity. Several formalized analysis methods are described, most of them emanating from reliability theory. No single model will fulfill all criteria simultaneously, to the degree desired. Nevertheless, fault tree analysis seems to be an efficient tool in many applications, although it must probably be used together with other models in most cases. Other methodologies described can also be useful, such as failure modes and effects analysis, renewal theory and Markov chains, reliability block diagrams, event trees and cause/consequence diagrams, the GO methodology, Monte Carlo simulation, and, often necessary, various consequence modeling techniques. (author)

  11. Seismic experience in power and industrial facilities as it relates to small magnitude earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swan, S.W.; Horstman, N.G.

    1987-01-01

    The data base on the performance of power and industrial facilities in small magnitude earthquakes (M = 4.0 - 5.5) is potentially very large. In California alone many earthquakes in this magnitude range occur every year, often near industrial areas. In 1986 for example, in northern California alone, there were 76 earthquakes between Richter magnitude 4.0 and 5.5. Experience has shown that the effects of small magnitude earthquakes are seldom significant to well-engineered facilities. (The term well-engineered is here defined to include most modern industrial installations, as well as power plants and substations.) Therefore detailed investigations of small magnitude earthquakes are normally not considered worthwhile. The purpose of this paper is to review the tendency toward seismic damage of equipment installations representative of nuclear power plant safety systems. Estimates are made of the thresholds of seismic damage to certain types of equipment in terms of conventional means of measuring the damage potential of an earthquake. The objective is to define thresholds of damage that can be correlated with Richter magnitude. In this manner an earthquake magnitude might be chosen below which damage to nuclear plant safety systems is not considered credible

  12. Facility Composer (Trademark) and PACES (Trademark) Integration: Development of an XML Interface Based on Industry Foundation Classes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nachtigall, Susan D; Brucker, Beth A

    2007-01-01

    The Architectural Engineering and Construction (AEC) industry has made substantial effort over the past several years to create a standard facility modeling format that better enables their different software applications to work together...

  13. Economic Analysis for Setting Appropriate Repair Cycles on the Fixed Materials and Facilities in the Public Rental Housing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Min Choi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, repair and maintenance cycles that follow the completion of construction facilities lead to the necessitation of subsequent data on the analysis of study and plan for maintenance. As such, an index of evaluation was drafted and a plan of maintenance cycle was computed using the investigation data derived from surveying target housing units in permanent rental environmental conditions, with a minimum age of 20 years, and their maintenance history. Optimal maintenance and replacement methods were proposed based on this data. Economic analysis was conducted through the Risk-Weighted Life Cycle Cost (RWLCC method in order to determine the cost analysis of maintenance life cycle methods used for repair. Current maintenance cycle methods that have been used for 20 years were also compared with alternative maintenance cycles.

  14. Quantifying life cycle environmental benefits from the reuse of industrial materials in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckelman, Matthew J; Chertow, Marian R

    2009-04-01

    Local reuse of waste materials from industrial processes has many potential environmental benefits, but these have been difficult to aggregate and measure across industries on a broad geographic scale. Nonhazardous industrial waste is a high volume flow principally constituted of wastewater with some solid materials. The state of Pennsylvania produced some 20 million metric tons of these residual wastes in 2004. An innovative reporting requirement for industrial generators implemented and compiled by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection has resulted in a rich database collected since 1992 of residual waste generation, detailing the fate of more than 100 materials. By combining these records with life cycle inventory (LCI) data, the current and potential environmental benefits of residual waste use have been assessed. Results for Pennsylvania indicate a savings in 2004 of 13 PJ of primary energy, 0.9 million metric tons of CO2eq, 4300 tons of SO2eq, and 4200 tons of NOx emissions from reuse of residual wastes. While these energy savings constitute less than 1% of total industrial primary energy use in the state, it is a greater quantity of energy than that generated by the state's renewable energy sector. The framework and constraints surrounding reuse of residualwaste in Pennsylvania are discussed.

  15. Utility industry evaluation of the metal fuel facility and metal fuel performance for liquid metal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burstein, S.; Gibbons, J.P.; High, M.D.; O'Boyle, D.R.; Pickens, T.A.; Pilmer, D.F.; Tomonto, J.R.; Weinberg, C.J.

    1990-02-01

    A team of utility industry representatives evaluated the liquid metal reactor metal fuel process and facility conceptual design being developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) under Department of Energy sponsorship. The utility team concluded that a highly competent ANL team was making impressive progress in developing high performance advanced metal fuel and an economic processing and fabrication technology. The utility team concluded that the potential benefits of advanced metal fuel justified the development program, but that, at this early stage, there are considerable uncertainties in predicting the net overall economic benefit of metal fuel. Specific comments and recommendations are provided as a contribution towards enhancing the development program. 6 refs

  16. Intelligence and Security Standards on Industrial Facilities Protection in Case of Terrorism and Military Attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stipetic, D.

    2007-01-01

    Industrial facilities, which use toxic chemicals in their production processes, are tempting targets for military and terrorist strategists. They know that these facilities when attacked could produce effects not realizable with conventional weapons. The resulting legal, policy and political consequences would be minimal as compared to that of disseminating toxic chemicals or chemical agents as weapons on enemy territory. At this time there is no clear definition of the legality or illegality of these types of actions used against specific industrial targets for the purpose of mass destruction or disruption. Without clearly defined international regulations covering these actions, we must depend solely on national defense systems. Not only are these regulation not defined, there are no implementation tools, which would be available if the various treaties (CWC/BWC) etc., were able to incorporate needed legislative action. Consequently we must depend on and put into practice defense security standards for industrial facilities for protection against both possible terrorist and military attacks. Emergency responses to incidents involving violent criminals and terrorists are extremely dangerous. Incidents involving weapons of mass destruction, firearms, and hazardous materials have resulted in the injury and death of many firefighters, police officers and medical personnel. We wish to intend display place and role of intelligence and counter intelligence system to prevention potential target and military attack. Security needs to be incorporated into the public safety culture and it must become the routine for how we operate. The recognition and identification process is an important skill that needs continual refinement. The use of transportation or facility paperwork assists in recognizing what potential hazards. A key factor in the successful command and management of a hazmat incident or terrorism event is the ability of public safety agencies to function as a

  17. Technical Means and Methods of Environmental Protection in Case of Accident at Chemically Hazardous Industrial Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zherlykina, M. N.; Vorob’eva, Y. A.; Jaremenko, S. A.

    2017-11-01

    Various solutions to the application of the methods for cleaning emissions of harmful substances (explosives) in the event of accident at an industrial facility are considered. It has been established that the rational cleaning of significant emissions by the absorption, thermal, thermocatalytic method is not ensured. In case of accident, the most effective way for purifying the emissions of explosives from the ecological and economic point of view is the adsorption method. The methodical approach and the basis for determination of the characteristics to select the necessary ventilation equipment are presented.

  18. The Implementation of Performance Measurement System (PMS: Malaysian Facilities Management (FM Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myeda N.E.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Performance Measurement System (PMS is an effective performance measurement tool and technique that is being widely implemented in the global industries. Literature has suggested the significant contributions of its implementation in enhancing the strategic service delivery and performance. However, there is little study undertaken to explore the PMS implementation in Facilities Management (FM industry, particularly focusing on Malaysia. This study explores the PMS practice among FM practitioners and their knowledge in Performance Measurement (PM generally. Findings from this study also proposed the 20 contributing factors that the FM practitioners believed are the barriers in implementing PMS. This research also suggests the future research opportunities in developing a PMS framework that can be used as guidance for FM service delivery in Malaysia.

  19. Transportable activation facility for preparation of radioactive sodium under industrial conditions to study boreholes by isotope methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostin, Yu.I.; Zajchenkov, B.D.; Ibatullin, R.A.; Gulin, Yu.A.; Tugarinov, L.N.

    1981-01-01

    A method of short-living isotope production at the place their application is proposed. A transportable activation facility for the preparation of radioactive sodium under industrial conditions was developed to radioactive tracer logging. Facility specifications and its application results are given [ru

  20. Transportable activation facility for preparation of radioactive sodium under industrial conditions to study boreholes by isotope methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostin, Yu.I.; Zajchenkov, B.D.; Ibatullin, R.A.; Gulin, Yu.A.; Tugarinov, L.N. (Vsesoyuznyj Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij i Proektno-Konstruktorskij Inst. Geofizicheskikh Issledovanij Geologorazvedochnykh Skvazhin, Oktyabr' skij (USSR))

    1981-01-01

    A method of short-living isotope production at the place their application is proposed. A transportable activation facility for the preparation of radioactive sodium under industrial conditions was developed to radioactive tracer logging. Facility specifications and its application results are given.

  1. Dampak Business Cycle pada Efisiensi Industri Properti yang Go Public di Pasar Modal Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sukardi Kodrat

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This research aim is to analyze the effect of efficiency business cycle in up and down stream condition by using real estate industries listed on Jakarta Stock Exchange. The analytical is used multivariate analysis of variance (Manova. The result shown that Wilks Lambda 0.364 and p-value 0.000.In up stream condition shows that variable efficiency: return on asset, return on equity, current ratio, debt to equity ratio and total liabilities to total asset have higher value than in down stream condition.In down stream condition, some assets are not used so that returns on asset to be low. Interest rate of commercial banks are high so interest expense to be big and finally real estate industries to be loss so return on equity to be low.Current ratio is lower because long term debt has been restructurization and rescheduling due to be current liabilities. There for asset financing for realestate industries are used debt than equity so total liabilities to total asset and debt to equity to be higher.Keywords:    Business Cycle, efficiency, return on asset, return on equity, current ratio, debt to equity and total liabilities to total asset.

  2. Industrial complex for solid radwaste management (ICSRM) at Chernobyl nuclear power plant pre-commissioning of the facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietsch, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    NUKEM was awarded to build the industrial complex for solid radwaste management (ICSRM) at the NPP Chernobyl. ICSRM consists of four facilities: SLWS (solid low waste storage), solid waste retrieval facility, solid waste processing plant, repository for the disposal of short-lived waste. The contribution describes the approach for testing and pre-commissioning the following systems: sorting, compaction, incineration, transport systems, monitoring, tracking and retrieval. Start-up of the facilities is planned for 2009.

  3. Analysis of performance in radiation protection of the industrial radiography facilities in Brazil in the period of 1995 to 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira de Aquino, J.; Barbosa Teixeira, P.; De Souza, L.A.

    1998-01-01

    Accomplishment of irregularities analysis verified in the industrial X-ray facilities in the period of 1995 to 1997, containing the following information: number of facilities, irregularities, classification, occurrence frequency and number of accomplished inspections. This work discusses some articles of radiation protection put in practice in the period in study, as well as some suggestions that they could be implemented, with the objective of perfecting the radiation protection of the facilities and the control accomplished by the CNEN

  4. Climate change and macro-economic cycles in pre-industrial europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Pei

    Full Text Available Climate change has been proven to be the ultimate cause of social crisis in pre-industrial Europe at a large scale. However, detailed analyses on climate change and macro-economic cycles in the pre-industrial era remain lacking, especially within different temporal scales. Therefore, fine-grained, paleo-climate, and economic data were employed with statistical methods to quantitatively assess the relations between climate change and agrarian economy in Europe during AD 1500 to 1800. In the study, the Butterworth filter was adopted to filter the data series into a long-term trend (low-frequency and short-term fluctuations (high-frequency. Granger Causality Analysis was conducted to scrutinize the associations between climate change and macro-economic cycle at different frequency bands. Based on quantitative results, climate change can only show significant effects on the macro-economic cycle within the long-term. In terms of the short-term effects, society can relieve the influences from climate variations by social adaptation methods and self-adjustment mechanism. On a large spatial scale, temperature holds higher importance for the European agrarian economy than precipitation. By examining the supply-demand mechanism in the grain market, population during the study period acted as the producer in the long term, whereas as the consumer in the short term. These findings merely reflect the general interactions between climate change and macro-economic cycles at the large spatial region with a long-term study period. The findings neither illustrate individual incidents that can temporarily distort the agrarian economy nor explain some specific cases. In the study, the scale thinking in the analysis is raised as an essential methodological issue for the first time to interpret the associations between climatic impact and macro-economy in the past agrarian society within different temporal scales.

  5. 75 FR 14445 - Guidance for Industry on Submitting a Report for Multiple Facilities to the Reportable Food...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2009-D-0260] Guidance for Industry on Submitting a Report for Multiple Facilities to the Reportable Food Electronic... Act of 2007.'' The document provides guidance to the industry in complying with the Reportable Food...

  6. Criticality safety strategy for the Fuel Cycle Facility electrorefiner at Argonne National Laboratory, West

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariani, R.D.; Benedict, R.W.; Lell, R.M.; Turski, R.B.; Fujita, E.K.

    1993-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor being developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) combines the advantages of metal-fueled, liquid-metal-cooled reactors and a closed fuel cycle. Presently, the Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) at ANL-West in Idaho Falls, Idaho is being modified to recycle spent metallic fuel from Experimental Breeder Reactor II as part of a demonstration project sponsored by the Department of Energy. A key component of the FCF is the electrorefiner (ER) in which the actinides are separated from the fission products. In the electrorefining process, the metal fuel is anodically dissolved into a high-temperature molten salt and refined uranium or uranium/plutonium products are deposited at cathodes. In this report, the criticality safety strategy for the FCF ER is summarized. FCF ER operations and processes formed the basis for evaluating criticality safety and control during actinide metal fuel refining. In order to show criticality safety for the FCF ER, the reference operating conditions for the ER had to be defined. Normal operating envelopes (NOES) were then defined to bracket the important operating conditions. To keep the operating conditions within their NOES, process controls were identified that can be used to regulate the actinide forms and content within the ER. A series of operational checks were developed for each operation that wig verify the extent or success of an operation. The criticality analysis considered the ER operating conditions at their NOE values as the point of departure for credible and incredible failure modes. As a result of the analysis, FCF ER operations were found to be safe with respect to criticality

  7. Exercise facilities for neurologically disabled populations - Perceptions from the fitness industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Cheryl; Grant, Robert L; Hurley, Michael V

    2017-01-01

    People with neurological disabilities (pwND) face many barriers to undertaking physical activity. One option for exercise alongside formal physiotherapy is local fitness facilities but accessibility is often found wanting and gyms are seen as unwelcoming to pwND. The objective of this exploratory study was to investigate the perceptions of fitness facility managers with respect to exercise for pwND in a gym environment. The aim was to identify potential barriers to provision by the fitness industry for pwND. The participants included those who were in a position to influence provision at a policy level and those working at management level within fitness providers. A mixed methods approach was used: a quantitative questionnaire and 4 qualitative interviews. Descriptive and correlational analysis, thematic content analysis and concurrent triangulation analysis was undertaken. Specially trained staff is perceived to be necessary to make fitness facilities accessible for pwND. Ensuring the provision of specially trained staff to support pwND to exercise in gyms may be the main barrier to provision for this population. Investigation into the standard training of fitness professionals combining the expertise of neurological physiotherapists with that of fitness professionals to meet the needs of pwND would be advantageous. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The improvement of the fire protections system for nuclear cycle facilities. Formulation of a fire protection guideline for nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-04-01

    The private side Fire Protection Guideline was investigated with respect to the fire having taken place at the nuclear reactor site followed by the Chuetsu-Oki earthquake in Niigata Prefecture in 2007. To improve the fire protection system especially applicable to MOX fuel fabrication facilities, JNES (Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization) investigated private guidelines adopted in Japanese Light Water cooled Reactors, the standardized guidelines used in Nuclear Facilities in other countries including USA, and the standards in the chemical plants. The content of the guideline concerns the prevention of the fire breakout, the prevention of fire extension, the reduction of the fire effects, as well as the facility-characteristic protection countermeasures and the fire effect evaluations. (S. Ohno)

  9. Selecting Formation-Accumulator for Industrial Waste Disposal of Arbuzovsky Underground Gas Storage Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Garayshin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In domestic and foreign practice of constructing underground gas storage facilities, industrial sewage, as a rule, is pumped back into the reservoirs-gas storage facilities. Underground disposal of liquid waste is the most rational way to maintain and improve the ecological environment. When selecting the horizon for disposal of industrial waste, the authors considered the lower part of the sedimentary cover and, in the first place, the Bobrikovian horizon, as well as carbonates of the Turnaisian stage. In the sedimentary cover of the Middle-Upper Carboniferous complex studied by drilling, there are twelve major water-bearing horizons and complexes, separated by regional and local confining strata. Regional water confining bodies in this sedimentary stratum are gypsum-anhydrite layers of the Upper and Lower Permian and mature packs of mudstones, argillaceous limestones and dense dolomites in carboniferous sediments. According to the degree of hydrodynamic activity, zones of active (free, hampered and very difficult (stagnant regimes are distinguished in the section of the sedimentary cover. There are aquifers of Quaternary and Upper Permian sediments in the zone of active water exchange. The lower boundary of the active water exchange zone passes along the roof of the gypsum-anhydrite stratum of the Kazanian stage of the Upper Permian. As an object for industrial waste disposal in the operation of underground gas storage, the Bobrikovian is the most promising reservoir. It has the best reservoir properties and is reliably isolated from overlying deposits. Due to high mineralization, waters of the Bobrikovian horizon of the Librovichian superhorizon of the lower Visean stage are unsuitable for domestic, potable, production, technical and balneological purposes.

  10. INDUSTRIAL CONTROL SYSTEM CYBER SECURITY: QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS RELEVANT TO NUCLEAR FACILITIES, SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert S. Anderson; Mark Schanfein; Trond Bjornard; Paul Moskowitz

    2011-07-01

    Typical questions surrounding industrial control system (ICS) cyber security always lead back to: What could a cyber attack do to my system(s) and; how much should I worry about it? These two leading questions represent only a fraction of questions asked when discussing cyber security as it applies to any program, company, business, or organization. The intent of this paper is to open a dialog of important pertinent questions and answers that managers of nuclear facilities engaged in nuclear facility security and safeguards should examine, i.e., what questions should be asked; and how do the answers affect an organization's ability to effectively safeguard and secure nuclear material. When a cyber intrusion is reported, what does that mean? Can an intrusion be detected or go un-noticed? Are nuclear security or safeguards systems potentially vulnerable? What about the digital systems employed in process monitoring, and international safeguards? Organizations expend considerable efforts to ensure that their facilities can maintain continuity of operations against physical threats. However, cyber threats particularly on ICSs may not be well known or understood, and often do not receive adequate attention. With the disclosure of the Stuxnet virus that has recently attacked nuclear infrastructure, many organizations have recognized the need for an urgent interest in cyber attacks and defenses against them. Several questions arise including discussions about the insider threat, adequate cyber protections, program readiness, encryption, and many more. These questions, among others, are discussed so as to raise the awareness and shed light on ways to protect nuclear facilities and materials against such attacks.

  11. Industrial Control System Cyber Security: Questions And Answers Relevant To Nuclear Facilities, Safeguards And Security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Robert S.; Schanfein, Mark; Bjornard, Trond; Moskowitz, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Typical questions surrounding industrial control system (ICS) cyber security always lead back to: What could a cyber attack do to my system(s) and; how much should I worry about it? These two leading questions represent only a fraction of questions asked when discussing cyber security as it applies to any program, company, business, or organization. The intent of this paper is to open a dialog of important pertinent questions and answers that managers of nuclear facilities engaged in nuclear facility security and safeguards should examine, i.e., what questions should be asked; and how do the answers affect an organization's ability to effectively safeguard and secure nuclear material. When a cyber intrusion is reported, what does that mean? Can an intrusion be detected or go un-noticed? Are nuclear security or safeguards systems potentially vulnerable? What about the digital systems employed in process monitoring, and international safeguards? Organizations expend considerable efforts to ensure that their facilities can maintain continuity of operations against physical threats. However, cyber threats particularly on ICSs may not be well known or understood, and often do not receive adequate attention. With the disclosure of the Stuxnet virus that has recently attacked nuclear infrastructure, many organizations have recognized the need for an urgent interest in cyber attacks and defenses against them. Several questions arise including discussions about the insider threat, adequate cyber protections, program readiness, encryption, and many more. These questions, among others, are discussed so as to raise the awareness and shed light on ways to protect nuclear facilities and materials against such attacks.

  12. Test facility for investigation of heat transfer of promising coolants for the nuclear power industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, I. A.; Sviridov, V. G.; Batenin, V. M.; Biryukov, D. A.; Nikitina, I. S.; Manchkha, S. P.; Pyatnitskaya, N. Yu.; Razuvanov, N. G.; Sviridov, E. V.

    2017-11-01

    The results are presented of experimental investigations into liquid metal heat transfer performed by the joint research group consisting of specialist in heat transfer and hydrodynamics from NIU MPEI and JIHT RAS. The program of experiments has been prepared considering the concept of development of the nuclear power industry in Russia. This concept calls for, in addition to extensive application of water-cooled, water-moderated (VVER-type) power reactors and BN-type sodium cooled fast reactors, development of the new generation of BREST-type reactors, fusion power reactors, and thermonuclear neutron sources. The basic coolants for these nuclear power installations will be heavy liquid metals, such as lead and lithium-lead alloy. The team of specialists from NRU MPEI and JIHT RAS commissioned a new RK-3 mercury MHD-test facility. The major components of this test facility are a unique electrical magnet constructed at Budker Nuclear Physics Institute and a pressurized liquid metal circuit. The test facility is designed for investigating upward and downward liquid metal flows in channels of various cross-sections in a transverse magnetic field. A probe procedure will be used for experimental investigation into heat transfer and hydrodynamics as well as for measuring temperature, velocity, and flow parameter fluctuations. It is generally adopted that liquid metals are the best coolants for the Tokamak reactors. However, alternative coolants should be sought for. As an alternative to liquid metal coolants, molten salts, such as fluorides of lithium and beryllium (so-called FLiBes) or fluorides of alkali metals (so-called FLiNaK) doped with uranium fluoride, can be used. That is why the team of specialists from NRU MPEI and JIHT RAS, in parallel with development of a mercury MHD test facility, is designing a test facility for simulating molten salt heat transfer and hydrodynamics. Since development of this test facility requires numerical predictions and verification

  13. Assessment of life cycle environmental benefits of an industrial symbiosis cluster in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fei; Han, Feng; Cui, Zhaojie

    2015-04-01

    Reusing industrial waste may have impressive potential environmental benefits, especially in terms of the total life cycle, and life cycle assessment (LCA) has been proved to be an effective method to evaluate industrial symbiosis (IS). Circular economy and IS have been developed for decades and have been successful in China. However, very few studies about the environmental benefit assessment of IS applied by LCA in China have been conducted. In the current article, LCA was used to evaluate the environmental benefits and costs of IS, compared with a no-IS scenario for four environmental impact categories. The results showed that four environmental benefits were avoided by the 11 symbiosis performances, namely, 41.6 thousand TJ of primary energy, 4.47 million t CO2e of greenhouse gasses, 19.7 thousand t SO2e of acidification, and 81.1 t PO4(3+)e of eutrophication. Among these IS performances, the comprehensive utilization of red mud produced the most visible benefit. The results also present that energy conservation was the distinctive feature of IS in China.

  14. Combinatorial life cycle assessment to inform process design of industrial production of algal biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brentner, Laura B; Eckelman, Matthew J; Zimmerman, Julie B

    2011-08-15

    The use of algae as a feedstock for biodiesel production is a rapidly growing industry, in the United States and globally. A life cycle assessment (LCA) is presented that compares various methods, either proposed or under development, for algal biodiesel to inform the most promising pathways for sustainable full-scale production. For this analysis, the system is divided into five distinct process steps: (1) microalgae cultivation, (2) harvesting and/or dewatering, (3) lipid extraction, (4) conversion (transesterification) into biodiesel, and (5) byproduct management. A number of technology options are considered for each process step and various technology combinations are assessed for their life cycle environmental impacts. The optimal option for each process step is selected yielding a best case scenario, comprised of a flat panel enclosed photobioreactor and direct transesterification of algal cells with supercritical methanol. For a functional unit of 10 GJ biodiesel, the best case production system yields a cumulative energy demand savings of more than 65 GJ, reduces water consumption by 585 m(3) and decreases greenhouse gas emissions by 86% compared to a base case scenario typical of early industrial practices, highlighting the importance of technological innovation in algae processing and providing guidance on promising production pathways.

  15. MRS/IS facility co-located with a repository: preconceptual design and life-cycle cost estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.I.; Nesbitt, J.F.

    1982-11-01

    A program is described to examine the various alternatives for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) and interim storage (IS) of spent nuclear fuel, solidified high-level waste (HLW), and transuranic (TRU) waste until appropriate geologic repository/repositories are available. The objectives of this study are: (1) to develop a preconceptual design for an MRS/IS facility that would become the principal surface facility for a deep geologic repository when the repository is opened, (2) to examine various issues such as transportation of wastes, licensing of the facility, and environmental concerns associated with operation of such a facility, and (3) to estimate the life cycle costs of the facility when operated in response to a set of scenarios which define the quantities and types of waste requiring storage in specific time periods, which generally span the years from 1990 until 2016. The life cycle costs estimated in this study include: the capital expenditures for structures, casks and/or drywells, storage areas and pads, and transfer equipment; the cost of staff labor, supplies, and services; and the incremental cost of transporting the waste materials from the site of origin to the MRS/IS facility. Three scenarios are examined to develop estimates of life cycle costs of the MRS/IS facility. In the first scenario, HLW canisters are stored, starting in 1990, until the co-located repository is opened in the year 1998. Additional reprocessing plants and repositories are placed in service at various intervals. In the second scenario, spent fuel is stored, starting in 1990, because the reprocessing plants are delayed in starting operations by 10 years, but no HLW is stored because the repositories open on schedule. In the third scenario, HLW is stored, starting in 1990, because the repositories are delayed 10 years, but the reprocessing plants open on schedule.

  16. MRS/IS facility co-located with a repository: preconceptual design and life-cycle cost estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.I.; Nesbitt, J.F.

    1982-11-01

    A program is described to examine the various alternatives for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) and interim storage (IS) of spent nuclear fuel, solidified high-level waste (HLW), and transuranic (TRU) waste until appropriate geologic repository/repositories are available. The objectives of this study are: (1) to develop a preconceptual design for an MRS/IS facility that would become the principal surface facility for a deep geologic repository when the repository is opened, (2) to examine various issues such as transportation of wastes, licensing of the facility, and environmental concerns associated with operation of such a facility, and (3) to estimate the life cycle costs of the facility when operated in response to a set of scenarios which define the quantities and types of waste requiring storage in specific time periods, which generally span the years from 1990 until 2016. The life cycle costs estimated in this study include: the capital expenditures for structures, casks and/or drywells, storage areas and pads, and transfer equipment; the cost of staff labor, supplies, and services; and the incremental cost of transporting the waste materials from the site of origin to the MRS/IS facility. Three scenarios are examined to develop estimates of life cycle costs of the MRS/IS facility. In the first scenario, HLW canisters are stored, starting in 1990, until the co-located repository is opened in the year 1998. Additional reprocessing plants and repositories are placed in service at various intervals. In the second scenario, spent fuel is stored, starting in 1990, because the reprocessing plants are delayed in starting operations by 10 years, but no HLW is stored because the repositories open on schedule. In the third scenario, HLW is stored, starting in 1990, because the repositories are delayed 10 years, but the reprocessing plants open on schedule

  17. Durability test of geomembrane liners presumed to avail near surface disposal facilities for low-level waste generated from research, industrial and medical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Hisakazu; Amazawa, Hiroya; Sakai, Akihiro; Kurosawa, Ryohei; Sakamoto, Yoshiaki; Kanno, Naohiro; Kashima, Takahiro

    2014-02-01

    The Low-level Radioactive Waste Disposal Project Center will construct near surface disposal facilities for radioactive wastes from research, industrial and medical facilities. The disposal facilities consist of “concrete pit type” for low-level radioactive wastes and “trench type” for very low level radioactive wastes. As for the trench type disposal facility, two kinds of facility designs are on projects – one for a normal trench type disposal facility without any of engineered barriers and the other for a trench type disposal facility with geomembrane liners that could prevent from causing environmental effects of non radioactive toxic materials contained in the waste packages. The disposal facility should be designed taking basic properties of durability on geomembrane liners into account, for it is exposed to natural environment on a long-term basis. This study examined mechanical strength and permeability properties to assess the durability on the basis of an indoor accelerated exposure experiment targeting the liner materials presumed to avail the conceptual design so far. Its results will be used for the basic and detailed design henceforth by confirming the empirical degradation characteristic with the progress of the exposure time. (author)

  18. A Cumulative Energy Demand indicator (CED), life cycle based, for industrial waste management decision making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puig, Rita, E-mail: rita.puig@eei.upc.edu [Escola d’Enginyeria d’Igualada (EEI), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Plaça del Rei, 15, 08700 Igualada (Spain); Fullana-i-Palmer, Pere [UNESCO Chair in Life Cycle and Climate Change, Escola Superior de Comerç Internacional, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), c/Passeig Pujades, 1, 08003 Barcelona (Spain); Baquero, Grau; Riba, Jordi-Roger [Escola d’Enginyeria d’Igualada (EEI), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Plaça del Rei, 15, 08700 Igualada (Spain); Bala, Alba [UNESCO Chair in Life Cycle and Climate Change, Escola Superior de Comerç Internacional, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), c/Passeig Pujades, 1, 08003 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • We developed a methodology useful to environmentally compare industrial waste management options. • The methodology uses a Net Energy Demand indicator which is life cycle based. • The method was simplified to be widely used, thus avoiding cost driven decisions. • This methodology is useful for governments to promote the best environmental options. • This methodology can be widely used by other countries or regions around the world. - Abstract: Life cycle thinking is a good approach to be used for environmental decision-support, although the complexity of the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies sometimes prevents their wide use. The purpose of this paper is to show how LCA methodology can be simplified to be more useful for certain applications. In order to improve waste management in Catalonia (Spain), a Cumulative Energy Demand indicator (LCA-based) has been used to obtain four mathematical models to help the government in the decision of preventing or allowing a specific waste from going out of the borders. The conceptual equations and all the subsequent developments and assumptions made to obtain the simplified models are presented. One of the four models is discussed in detail, presenting the final simplified equation to be subsequently used by the government in decision making. The resulting model has been found to be scientifically robust, simple to implement and, above all, fulfilling its purpose: the limitation of waste transport out of Catalonia unless the waste recovery operations are significantly better and justify this transport.

  19. Safety assessment of human and organizational factors in French fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menuet, Lise; Beauquier, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    According to the French law, each nuclear facility has to provide a safety demonstration every ten years. The assessment of this demonstration supports the decision of the French Safety Authority regarding the authorisation of operating for the ten years to come. In addition, transversal topics, which are linked with safety performance, such as safety management, management of competencies, maintenance's policy are periodically evaluated. One aspect of these assessments relates to Human and Organizational Factors (HOF) and their contribution to safety. Our communication will describe the assessment of the HOF-related part, performed by the Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety Institute (IRSN) the Technical Support Organisation of the French Safety Authority). It will focus on the methodological framework, the tools which are developed and used for assessing the integration of HOF in safety demonstration, and the main difficulties of this kind of assessment. Each situation will be illustrated by concrete examples coming from safety assessments concerning fuel cycle's plants: Areva's plants dedicated to uranium conversion, uranium enrichment, fuel manufacturing, spent fuel reprocessing, treatment facilities and CEA's laboratories dedicated to research and development and to interim spent fuel storage. The methodological framework for assessing HOF currently implements three main steps which will be precisely described: - checking that the nuclear plant has made an exhaustive analysis of the risks linked with HOF. Regarding to HOF, the Licensee safety demonstration is based on the description of the main human activities which are considered as hazardous regarding safety. These activities are accomplished with a human contribution and they require a safe realisation. - assessing the human, organisational and technical barriers that the nuclear plant have planed in order to make the operations safe, to avoid, prevent or detect an

  20. Development techniques of computerized maintenance management system for nuclear fuel cycle examination facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Yon Woo; Kim, S. D.; Soong, W. S.; Kim, G. H.; Oh, W. H.; Kim, Y. G.

    2000-12-01

    Normal operation of the facility is one of the key factors in the accomplishments of research goals. As confirmed by a case study of the influence of the facility operation condition on the research results, emphasis should be put on the facility preserve management. Facilities should be maintained in solid operational condition and their malfunctions should be repaired as soon as possible. The purpose of this project is to make propositions on the development of the facility Preserve management system which is to maximize the efficiency of the budget execution, manpower organization and maintenance planning, and is to minimize the duration of the operational pause due to malfunctions with the least disbursement

  1. Development techniques of computerized maintenance management system for nuclear fuel cycle examination facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Yon Woo; Kim, S. D.; Soong, W. S.; Kim, G. H.; Oh, W. H.; Kim, Y. G

    2000-12-01

    Normal operation of the facility is one of the key factors in the accomplishments of research goals. As confirmed by a case study of the influence of the facility operation condition on the research results, emphasis should be put on the facility preserve management. Facilities should be maintained in solid operational condition and their malfunctions should be repaired as soon as possible. The purpose of this project is to make propositions on the development of the facility Preserve management system which is to maximize the efficiency of the budget execution, manpower organization and maintenance planning, and is to minimize the duration of the operational pause due to malfunctions with the least disbursement.

  2. NIST Accelerator Facilities And Programs In Support Of Industrial Radiation Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, F.B.; Desrosiers, M.F.; Hudson, L.T.; Coursey, B.M.; Bergstrom, P.M. Jr.; Seltzer, S.M.

    2003-01-01

    NIST's Ionizing Radiation Division maintains and operates three electron accelerators used in a number of applications including waste treatment and sterilization, radiation hardness testing, detector calibrations and materials modification studies. These facilities serve a large number of governmental, academic and industrial users as well as an active intramural research program. They include a 500 kV cascaded-rectifier accelerator, a 2.5 MV electron Van de Graaff accelerator and a 7 to 32 MeV electron linac, supplying beams ranging in energy from a few keV up to 32 MeV. In response to the recent anthrax incident, NIST along with the US Postal Service and the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) are working to develop protocols and testing procedures for the USPS mail sanitization program. NIST facilities and personnel are being employed in a series of quality-assurance measurements for both electron- and photon-beam sanitization. These include computational modeling, dose verification and VOC (volatile organic compounds) testing using megavoltage electron and photon sources

  3. Real-time monitoring of emissions from monoethanolamine-based industrial scale carbon capture facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liang; Schade, Gunnar Wolfgang; Nielsen, Claus Jørgen

    2013-12-17

    We demonstrate the capabilities and properties of using Proton Transfer Reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) to real-time monitor gaseous emissions from industrial scale amine-based carbon capture processes. The benchmark monoethanolamine (MEA) was used as an example of amines needing to be monitored from carbon capture facilities, and to describe how the measurements may be influenced by potentially interfering species in CO2 absorber stack discharges. On the basis of known or expected emission compositions, we investigated the PTR-ToF-MS MEA response as a function of sample flow humidity, ammonia, and CO2 abundances, and show that all can exhibit interferences, thus making accurate amine measurements difficult. This warrants a proper sample pretreatment, and we show an example using a dilution with bottled zero air of 1:20 to 1:10 to monitor stack gas concentrations at the CO2 Technology Center Mongstad (TCM), Norway. Observed emissions included many expected chemical species, dominantly ammonia and acetaldehyde, but also two new species previously not reported but emitted in significant quantities. With respect to concerns regarding amine emissions, we show that accurate amine quantifications in the presence of water vapor, ammonia, and CO2 become feasible after proper sample dilution, thus making PTR-ToF-MS a viable technique to monitor future carbon capture facility emissions, without conventional laborious sample pretreatment.

  4. Risk assessment and early warning systems for industrial facilities in seismic zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salzano, Ernesto; Garcia Agreda, Anita; Di Carluccio, Antonio; Fabbrocino, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    Industrial equipments and systems can suffer structural damage when hit by earthquakes, so that accidental scenarios as fire, explosion and dispersion of toxic substances can take place. As a result, overall damage to people, environment and properties increases. The present paper deals with seismic risk analysis of industrial facilities where atmospheric storage tanks (anchored or unanchored to ground), horizontal pressurised tanks, reactors and pumps are installed. Simplified procedures and methodologies based on historical database and literature data on natural-technological (Na-Tech) accidents for seismic risk assessment are discussed. Equipment-specific fragility curves have been thus derived depending on a single earthquake measure, peak ground acceleration (PGA). Fragility parameters have been then transformed to linear probit coefficients in order to obtain reliable threshold values for earthquake intensity measure, both for structural damage and loss of containment. These threshold values are of great interest when development of active and passive mitigation actions and systems, safety management, and the implementation of early warning system are concerned. The approach is general and can be implemented in any available code or procedure for risk assessment. Some results of seismic analysis of atmospheric storage tanks are also presented for validation.

  5. NFC like wireless technology for monitoring purposes in scientific/industrial facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badillo, I.; Eguiraun, M.; Jugo, J.

    2012-01-01

    Wireless technologies are becoming more and more used in large industrial and scientific facilities like particle accelerators for facilitating the monitoring and indeed sensing in these kind of large environments. Cabled equipment means little flexibility in placement and is very expensive in both money and effort whenever reorganization or new installation is needed. So, when cabling is not really needed for performance reasons wireless monitoring and control is a good option, due to the speed of implementation. There are several wireless flavors to choose, as Bluetooth, Zigbee, WiFi, etc. depending on the requirements of each specific application. In this work a wireless monitoring system for EPICS (Experimental and Industrial Control System) is presented. The desired control system variables are acquired over the network and published in a mobile device, allowing the operator to check process variables everywhere the signal spreads. In this approach, a Python based server will be continuously getting EPICS Process Variables via Channel Access protocol and sending them through a WiFi standard 802.11 network using ICE middle-ware. ICE is a tool-kit oriented to build distributed applications. Finally, the mobile device will read the data and show it to the operator. The security of the communication can be improved by means of a weak wireless signal, following the same idea as in Near Field Communication (NFC), but for more large distances. With this approach, local monitoring and control applications, as for example a vacuum control system for several pumps, are currently implemented. (authors)

  6. Conceptual design study of a coal gasification combined-cycle powerplant for industrial cogeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, H. S.; Nelson, S. G.; Straight, H. F.; Subramaniam, T. K.; Winklepleck, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    A conceptual design study was conducted to assess technical feasibility, environmental characteristics, and economics of coal gasification. The feasibility of a coal gasification combined cycle cogeneration powerplant was examined in response to energy needs and to national policy aimed at decreasing dependence on oil and natural gas. The powerplant provides the steam heating and baseload electrical requirements while serving as a prototype for industrial cogeneration and a modular building block for utility applications. The following topics are discussed: (1) screening of candidate gasification, sulfur removal and power conversion components; (2) definition of a reference system; (3) quantification of plant emissions and waste streams; (4) estimates of capital and operating costs; and (5) a procurement and construction schedule. It is concluded that the proposed powerplant is technically feasible and environmentally superior.

  7. Life cycle assessment (LCA) of an energy recovery plant in the olive oil industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intini, Francesca; Kuhtz, Silvana [Dep. Engineering and Environmental Physics, Faculty of Engineering, University of Basilicata (Italy); Gianluca Rospi, [Dep. Engineering and Environmental Physics, Faculty of Architecture, University of Basilicata (Italy)

    2012-07-01

    To reduce the GHG emissions in the UE and to increase the produced energy it is important to spread out decentralized technologies for renewable energy production. In this paper a power plant fed with biomass is studied, in particular the biomass considered is the waste of the olive oil industries. This study focuses on the possibility of using the de-oiled pomace and waste wood as fuel. A life cycle assessment (LCA) of a biomass power plant located in the South of Italy was performed. The global warming potential has been calculated and compared with that of a plant for energy production that uses refuse derived fuel (RDF) and that of one that uses coal. The LCA shows the important environmental advantages of biomass utilization in terms of greenhouse gas emissions reduction. An improved impact assessment methodology may better underline the advantages due to the biomass utilization.

  8. Assessment of safety culture from the INB organization: A case study for nuclear fuel cycle industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, J.S.; Barreto, A.C.

    2002-01-01

    The present article describes strategies, methodologies and first results on the Safety Culture Self-assessment Project under way at INB since August 2001. As a Brazilian Government company in charge of the nuclear fuel cycle activities,. the main purposes of the Project is to evaluate the present status of its safety culture and to propose actions to ensure continuous safety improvement at management level of its industrial processes. The proposed safety culture assessment describes INB's various production sites taking into account the different aspects of their activities, such as regional, social and technical issues. The survey was performed in March/2002 very good attendance (about 80%) the employees. The first global survey results are presented in item 4. (author)

  9. A study on domino effect in nuclear fuel cycle facilities; Um estudo sobre o efeito domino em instalacoes do ciclo do combustivel nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozzolan, Jean-Claude

    2006-07-01

    Accidents caused by domino effect are among the most severe accidents in the chemical and process industry. Although the destructive potential of these accidental scenarios is widely known, little attention has been paid to this problem in the technical literature and a complete methodology for quantitative assessment of domino accidents contribution to industrial risk is still lacking. The present study proposed a systematic procedure for the quantitative assessment of the risk caused by domino effect in chemical plants that are part of nuclear fuel cycle plants. This work is based on recent advances in the modeling of fire and explosion damage to process equipment due to different escalation vectors (heat radiation, overpressure and fragment projection). Available data from literature and specific vulnerability models derived for several categories of process equipment had been used in the present work. The proposed procedure is applied to a typical storage area of a reconversion plant situated in a complex that shelters other nuclear fuel cycle facilities. The top-events and escalation vectors are identified, their consequences estimated and credible domino scenarios selected on the basis of their frequencies. (author)

  10. Energy efficiency potentials: Contrasting thermodynamic, technical and economic limits for organic Rankine cycles within UK industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Q.; Hammond, G.P.; Norman, J.B.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Energy savings have a thermodynamic, technical and economic limit. • The potential for organic Rankine cycles in UK industry was assessed. • 3.5 PJ/yr of electricity was generated by economically attractive opportunities. • The steel, chemical and cement subsectors comprised the majority of potential. • Drivers and barriers to realising the potentials were discussed. - Abstract: The laws of thermodynamics set a theoretical limit on the energy savings that can be realised in a given application. This thermodynamic potential cannot be reached in practice, and a technical potential for energy savings is defined by the performance of available technology. Only applications of the technology that are considered economic will usually be considered for installation. This economic potential will itself not be fully realised, with the actual savings that are achieved limited by further barriers. A database on surplus heat availability within UK industry was used to estimate the thermodynamic, technical, and economic potentials when converting this surplus heat to electricity using organic Rankine cycles (ORCs). Technical and economic information was based on that reported from existing installations and manufacturers. Installations economic over the target payback period totalled approximately 3.5 PJ/yr of electricity generation, primarily in the steel, chemicals and cement subsectors. However, this result is sensitive to the input parameters, particularly the future price of electricity and required payback period, which are uncertain. Therefore a range of possible scenarios were investigated. The results form a basis for discussion on how to close this “gap” between the identified potentials and the savings realised in practice.

  11. THE PROBLEM OF PREPARATION OF FUTURE TEACHERS OF HUMANITARIAN CYCLE SUBJECTS TO THE USE OF EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMATIC FACILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena S. Tselykh

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The actual questions related to the development of methods and receptions of improvement of preparation of future teachers of humanitarian cycle subjects to application the educational programmatic facilities (EPF in their professional activity are examined in the article. On the basis of the conducted research the level of readiness of students of humanitarian faculties of the South Ukrainian National Pedagogical University by K. D. Ushinskogo is analyzed the noted activity. It is set that application of educational programmatic facilities considerably intensifies professional preparation of future teachers of humanitarian cycle subjects. It is well-proven that teaching technologies which oriented on application of EPF in professional activity can considerably facilitate and improve teacher’s work to high-quality level, increase the level of knowledge and abilities of students.

  12. Current status of personnel exposure at nuclear power plants and other medical, industrial and educational facilities in JAPAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Fumiaki

    1991-01-01

    The state of radiation exposure of the workers engaging in radiation works in Japanese nuclear power stations, the factors of the radiation exposure of the workers engaging in radiation works, the countermeasures for reducing exposure in nuclear power stations, the state of radiation exposure of doctors, the workers engaging in radiation works, researchers and others in medical, industrial, research and educational and other facilities in Japan, the factors of their radiation exposure and the countermeasures for reducing the exposure, and the comparison of the exposure in nuclear power stations with that in medical, industrial, research and educational facilities are reported. (K.I.)

  13. Nuclear facilities siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, P.

    1979-01-01

    A review of the status of requirements for the selection of sites for the facilities comprising the nuclear fuel cycle for electric power production. The report includes a summary of the legal and regulatory constraints that have resulted in complex and lengthy process for licensing of nuclear facilities. The nuclear fuel cycle, including the post-reactor operations of spent fuel reprocessing and waste disposal, is reviewed. Site evaluation factors for each major activity in the fuel cycle include geology, hydrology, demography, geography, meteorology, ecology, and institutional and social aspects. An analysis of current methods available for site evaluation are described. The report concludes with analysis of current issues affecting the ability of the nation's industry to license suitable sites for the many types of facility needed in the nuclear fuel cycle. The report should be of interest to civil engineers concerned with the resolution of technical problems of facility site selection. 36 refs

  14. Establishment and prioritization of relevant factors to the safety of fuel cycle facilities non reactor through dynamics archetypes evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa, Anna Leticia Barbosa de

    2012-01-01

    The present work aims to establish and prioritize factors that are important to the safety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities in order to model, analyze and design safety as a physical system, employing systemic models in an innovative way. This work takes into consideration the fact that models that use adaptations of methodologies for nuclear reactors will not properly work due to the specificities of fuel cycle facilities. Based on the fundamentals of the theory of systems, the four levels of system thinking, and the relationship of eight socio technical factors, a mental model has been developed for safety management in the nuclear fuel cycle context. From this conceptual model, safety archetypes were constructed in order to identify and highlight the processes of change and decision making that allow the system to migrate to a state of loss of safety. After that, stock and flow diagrams were created so that their behavior could be assessed by the system's dynamics. The results from the analysis using the model that simulates the dynamic behavior of the variables (socio technical factors) indicated, as expected, that the system's dynamics proved to be an appropriate and efficient tool for modeling fuel cycle safety as an emergent property. (author)

  15. A Fe-C-Ca big cycle in modern carbon-intensive industries: toward emission reduction and resource utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongqi; Sridhar, Seetharaman; Seetharaman, Seshadri; Wang, Hao; Liu, Lili; Wang, Xidong; Zhang, Zuotai

    2016-02-01

    Herein a big Fe-C-Ca cycle, clarifying the basic element flows and energy flows in modern carbon-intensive industries including the metallurgical industry and the cement industry, was proposed for the first time in the contexts of emission reduction and iron ore degradation nowadays. This big cycle was focused on three industrial elements of Fe, C and Ca and thus it mainly comprised three interdependent loops, i.e., a C-cycle, a Fe-cycle and a Ca-path. As exemplified, we started from the integrated disposal of hot steel slags, a man-made iron resource via char gasification and the employment of hematite, a natural iron resource greatly extended the application area of this idea. Accordingly, based on this concept, the theoretical potentials for energy saving, emission reduction and Fe resource recovery achieved in modern industry are estimated up to 7.66 Mt of standard coal, 63.9 Mt of CO2 and 25.2 Mt of pig iron, respectively.

  16. Industrial irradiators for the processing of agro-alimentary products: the criteriom for the choice of an irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laizier, J.

    1984-01-01

    The various available technologies for the processing of foods by ionizing radiation are described and discussed, both from the technical and economical point of view. The analysis allows to select the criterions and to give a methodology of the choice of an industrial facility [fr

  17. The Attached Payload Facility Program: A Family of In-Space Commercial Facilities for Technology, Science and Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Don E.; Kaszubowski, Martin J.; Kearney, Michael E.; Howard, Trevor P.

    1996-01-01

    It is anticipated that as the utilization of space increases in both the government and commercial sec tors the re will be a high degree of interest in materials and coatings research as well as research in space environment definition, deployable structures, multi-functional structures and electronics. The International Space Station (ISS) is an excellent platform for long-term technology development because it provides large areas for external attached payloads, power and data capability, and ready access for experiment exchange and return. An alliance of SPACEHAB, MicroCraft, Inc. and SpaceTec, Inc. has been formed to satisfy this research need through commercial utilization of the capabilities of ISS. The alliance will provide a family of facilities designed to provide low-cost, reliable access to space for experimenters. This service would start as early as 1997 and mature to a fully functional attached facility on ISS by 2001. The alliances facilities are based on early activities by NASA, Langley Research Center (LaRC) to determine the feasibility of a Material Exposure Facility (MEF).

  18. The present status of IAEA safeguards on nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    The present IAEA approach to safeguarding various types of nuclear facilities is examined. The IAEA safeguards objectives, criteria and specific techniques are addressed, with reference e.g. to concepts like timely detection, quantities of safeguards significance, and conversion times. Material accountancy and containment and surveillance as basic features of IAEA safeguards verification are discussed. Safeguards measures for specific facility types are considered and corresponding levels of IAEA safeguards experience are assessed. Outlines of expected IAEA safeguard approaches to large bulk handling facilities are discussed. The evolutionary nature of safeguards based on experience and research and development is mentioned

  19. Analysis of material recovery facilities for use in life-cycle assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pressley, Phillip N.; Levis, James W.; Damgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    contributes a much larger fraction of electricity consumption in a pre-sorted MRF, due to lower overall facility electricity consumption. Parametric analysis revealed that reducing separation efficiency for each piece of equipment by 25% altered total facility electricity consumption by less than 4% in each...... case. When model results were compared with actual data for an existing single-stream MRF, the model estimated the facility's electricity consumption within 2%. The results from this study can be integrated into LCAs of solid waste management with system boundaries that extend from the curb through...... final disposal. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  20. Proceedings of the GLOBAL 2009 congress - The Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Sustainable Options and Industrial Perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-06-15

    GLOBAL 2009 is the ninth bi-annual scientific world meeting on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (NFC) that started in 1993 in Seattle. This meeting has established itself as a dedicated international forum for experts, to provide an overall review of the status and new trends of research applications and policies related to the fuel cycle. The international nuclear community is actively developing advanced processes and innovative technologies that enhance economic competitiveness of nuclear energy and ensure its sustainability, through optimized utilization of natural resources, minimization of nuclear wastes, resistance to proliferation and compliance with safety requirements. In this context, and under the profound evolutions concerning energy supply, GLOBAL 2009 is a great opportunity for sharing ideas and visions on the NFC. Special emphasis are placed on the results of the international studies for developing next generation systems. GLOBAL 2009 highlights the technical challenges and successes involved in closing the NFC and recycling long lived nuclear waste. It is also an excellent occasion to review and discuss social and regulatory aspects as well as national plans and international policies and decision affecting the future of nuclear energy. This meeting provides a forum for the exchange of the newest ideas and developments related to the initiatives at of establishing an acceptable, reliable and universal international non proliferation regime. The congress, organized by the French Nuclear Energy Society (SFEN), under the aegis of the IAEA, NEA of the OECD and the UE Commission with the basic sponsorships of ANS, ENS and AESJ, combines plenary sessions, general panel sessions, parallel sessions and technical visits. The program has full length technical papers, which are peer reviewed and published in conference proceedings. A large industrial exhibition takes place to complement the congress. The GLOBAL 2009 congress is organized in coordination with the 2009

  1. Fuel-cycle facilities: preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume VII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Information is presented concerning the mining and milling of uranium and thorium; uranium hexafluoride conversion; enrichment; fuel fabrication; reprocessing; storage options; waste disposal options; transportation; heavy-water-production facilities; and international fuel service centers.

  2. Fuel-cycle facilities: preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume VII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Information is presented concerning the mining and milling of uranium and thorium; uranium hexafluoride conversion; enrichment; fuel fabrication; reprocessing; storage options; waste disposal options; transportation; heavy-water-production facilities; and international fuel service centers

  3. Applications of industrial machine vision systems in the nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandergheynst, A.; Vanderborck, Y.

    1984-01-01

    In the paper, two multi-functional machine systems basically developed for the industrial robotics and representing the state of the art are presented. Their potential applications in the nuclear industry (nuclear power plants and fuel cycle facilities) are reviewed

  4. A Preliminary Exploration of Operating Models of Second Cycle/Research Led Open Education Involving Industry Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    Scientists from five Swedish universities were interviewed about open second cycle education. Research groups and scientists collaborate closely with industry, and the selection of scientists for the study was made in relation to an interest in developing technology-enhanced open education, indicated by applications for funding from the Knowledge…

  5. Life cycle assessment of cheese production process in a small-sized dairy industry in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Hudson Carlos Maia; Maranduba, Henrique Leonardo; de Almeida Neto, José Adolfo; Rodrigues, Luciano Brito

    2017-02-01

    Current research identifies, analyzes, and suggests improvements for minimizing environmental impacts in the manufacture of cheese using the life cycle assessment. Data collection and development of the inventory were performed in a small-sized dairy industry in Brazil. A cradle-to-gate approach was conducted based on the primary data from cheese production and secondary data from databases. The ReCiPe method was used for the impact assessment, considering the categories climate change, ozone depletion, terrestrial acidification, freshwater eutrophication, photochemical oxidant formation, particulate matter formation, water depletion, and fossil depletion. A sensitivity analysis was performed including evaluations of different fuels for generating thermal energy, strategies for cleaning of dairy plant and utensils, variations in the way of cheese production based on the fat content, and production percentage changes. The results showed that the skimmed milk and thermal energy productions, electricity usage, and water consumptions were the main elementary flows. The pallet residues showed the best to be used as fuel for thermal energy. Detergent combinations did not influence the impact categories. There was a direct relationship between fat content range (20 to 30%) and the contribution in six impact categories. Changes from 20% in cheese allocation factor influenced the impact assessment results. LCA allowed identifying the main elementary flow of cheese production, providing valuable information with the potential to verify opportunities for on-site improvements.

  6. Life Cycle Inventory analysis of degreasing processes in the metal-processing industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkbeiner, M.; Hoffmann, E.; Kreisel, G. [Friedrich-Schiller-Univ. Jena (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische Chemie

    1995-12-31

    In 1986 degreasing processes in the German metal-processing industry contributed about 70,000 t to the emissions of chlorinated C{sub 1}-C{sub 2}-hydrocarbons (trichloroethane, trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, dichloromethane). Due to legal requirements these emissions decreased to roughly 18,000 t in 1992. This was achieved by operating modern, closed-chamber plants and substitution of halogenated solvents by aqueous cleansing agents or non-halogenated hydrocarbons. The reduction of toxic emissions and Ozone Depletion Potential (ODP) leads to a shift of environmental impacts towards higher energy consumption, emission of waste water and VOCs with Photochemical Ozone Creation Potential (POCP). A Life Cycle Inventory Analysis was carried out to compare the integral environmental impact of the three main degreasing processes which cover about 90% of the German market. In their study the authors showed the feasibility to apply the established LCI-method for products to processes, though difficulties arise especially in the step of the goal definition, e.g. the definition of the use of the process and the functional unit is not as straightforward as for most products. Purpose, scope, system boundaries, deliberate omissions, process trees and data quality of the study are discussed. The chosen method was applied to representative examples of each process. Data of the LCI are given and a preliminary impact assessment presented.

  7. The relationship between macroeconomic and industry-specific business cycle indicators and workrelated injuries among Danish construction workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kent Jacob; Lander, F.; Lauritsen, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The current study examines and compares the relationship between both macroeconomic and industry-specific business cycle indicators, and work-related injuries among construction workers in Denmark using emergency department (ED) injury data and also officially reported injuries...... (range 0.14–0.20) and WEA injuries (range 0.13–0.36). Furthermore, although there is some variability in the strength of the relationship of the different business cycle indicators, the relationships are generally not stronger for the WEA injuries than for the ED injuries, except for general unemployment....... Similarly, no substantial differences in strength of relation between industry-specific and macroeconomic indicators were identified. Conclusions The study shows that there was no difference in the relationship between business cycle indicators, and WEA and ED injury data. This indicates that changes...

  8. Standard format and content for emergency plans for fuel cycle and materials facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    This regulatory guides is being developed to provide guidance acceptable to the NRC staff on the information to be included in emergency plans and to establish a format for presenting the information. Use of a standard format will help ensure uniformity and completeness in the preparation of emergency plans. An acceptable emergency plan should describe the licensed activities conducted at the facility and the types of accidents that might occur. It should provide information on classifying postulated accidents and the licensee's procedures for notifying and coordinating with offsite authorities. The plan should provide information on emergency response measures that might be necessary, the equipment and facilities available to respond to an emergency, and how the licensee will maintain emergency preparedness capability. It should describe the records and reports that will be maintained. There should also be a section on recovery after an accident and plans for restoring the facility to a safe condition. 4 refs

  9. Uranium Determination in Samples from Decommissioning of Nuclear facilities Related to the First Stage of Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, A.; Correa, E.; Navarro, N.; Sancho, C.; Angeles, A.

    2000-01-01

    An adequate workplace monitoring must be carried out during the decommissioning activities, to ensure the protection of workers involved in these tasks. In addition, a large amount of waste materials are generated during the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Clearance levels are established by regulatory authorities and are normally quite low. The determination of those activity concentration levels become more difficult when it is necessary to quantify alpha emitters such as uranium, especially when complex matrices are involved. Several methods for uranium determination in samples obtained during the decommissioning of a facility related to the first stage of the nuclear fuel cycle are presented in this work. Measurements were carried out by laboratory techniques. In situ gamma spectrometry was also used to perform measurements on site. A comparison among the different techniques was also done by analysing the results obtained in some practical applications. (Author)

  10. Summary of estimated doses and risks resulting from routine radionuclide releases from fast breeder reactor fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.W.; Meyer, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    A project is underway at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to assess the human health and environment effects associated with operation of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor fuel cycle. In this first phase of the work, emphasis was focused on routine radionuclide releases from reactor and reprocessing facilities. For this study, sites for fifty 1-GW(e) capacity reactors and three reprocessing plants were selected to develop scenarios representative of US power requirements. For both the reactor and reprocessing facility siting schemes selected, relatively small impacts were calculated for locality-specific populations residing within 100 km. Also, the results of these analyses are being used in the identification of research priorities. 13 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Development of an XUV-IR free-electron laser user facility for scientific research and industrial applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newnam, B.E.; Warren, R.W.; Conradson, S.D.; Goldstein, J.C.; McVey, B.D.; Schmitt, M.J.; Elliott, C.J.; Burns, M.J.; Carlsten, B.E.; Chan, K.C.; Johnson, W.J.; Wang, T.S.; Sheffield, R.L.; Meier, K.L.; Olsher, R.H.; Scott, M.L.; Griggs, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    Los Alamos has designed and proposes to establish an XUV-IR free- electron laser (FEL) user facility for scientific research and industrial applications based on coherent radiation ranging from soft x-rays as short as 1 nm to far-infrared wavelengths as long as 100 {mu}m. As the next-generation light source beyond low-emittance storage rings with undulator insertion devices, this proposed national FEL user facility should make available to researchers broadly tunable, picosecond-pulse, coherent radiation with 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 7} greater spectral flux and brightness. The facility design is based on two series of FEL oscillators including one regenerative amplifier. The primary series of seven FEL oscillators, driven by a single, 1-GeV rf linac, spans the short-wavelength range from 1 to 600 nm. A second 60-MeV rf linac, synchronized with the first, drives a series of three Vis/IR FEL oscillators to cover the 0. 5 to 100-{mu}m range. This paper presents the motivation for such a facility arising from its inherently high power per unit bandwidth and its potential use for an array of scientific and industrial applications, describes the facility design, output parameters, and user laboratories, makes comparisons with synchrotron radiation sources, and summarizes recent technical progress that supports the technical feasibility. 80 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Report of the AD HOC Study Group on integrated versus dispersed fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreiter, M.R.; Platt, A.M.

    1975-04-01

    To provide isolation of strategic materials and confinement of nuclear wastes, the basic facilities considered in assessing the DFCF and IFCF were mixed plutonium and uranium oxide and HTGR fuel fabrication, fuel reprocessing, high-enrichment isotopic separation and interim waste storage. Reactors, low-enrichment isotopic separation, and low-enrichment uranium facilities were excluded. It is expected that the IFCF would attract uranium fuel fabrication and possibly reactors. An assumption was made for the study that the choice of either IFCF or DFCF would not alter the nuclear power generation pattern postulated to exist up to the year 2000. The advantages of IFCF are seen to outweigh disadvantages

  13. A computer code to estimate accidental fire and radioactive airborne releases in nuclear fuel cycle facilities: User's manual for FIRIN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, M.K.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Owczarski, P.C.

    1989-02-01

    This manual describes the technical bases and use of the computer code FIRIN. This code was developed to estimate the source term release of smoke and radioactive particles from potential fires in nuclear fuel cycle facilities. FIRIN is a product of a broader study, Fuel Cycle Accident Analysis, which Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The technical bases of FIRIN consist of a nonradioactive fire source term model, compartment effects modeling, and radioactive source term models. These three elements interact with each other in the code affecting the course of the fire. This report also serves as a complete FIRIN user's manual. Included are the FIRIN code description with methods/algorithms of calculation and subroutines, code operating instructions with input requirements, and output descriptions. 40 refs., 5 figs., 31 tabs

  14. Inhalation and dermal exposure to eight antineoplastic drugs in an industrial laundry facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransman, Wouter; Huizer, Daan; Tuerk, Jochen; Kromhout, Hans

    2007-04-01

    The aims of the study were to quantify levels of dermal and inhalation exposure to antineoplastic drugs in an industrial laundry service in the Netherlands and to test the removal efficiency of the washing procedure for removal of antineoplastic drugs. During four workdays dermal and inhalation exposure to eight frequently used antineoplastic drugs (cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil, etoposide, cytarabine, gemcitabine and chlorambucil) were measured for all job titles involved in handling unwashed laundry. To test the removal efficiency of the washing procedure, 10 x 10 cm sections were excised before and after the washing procedure. These sections were taken from 15 bed sheets that were collected in hospitals of patients who were treated with one of the selected antineoplastic drugs. During none of the four measurement days, detectable levels of any of the eight antineoplastic drugs (cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil, etoposide, cytarabine, gemcitabine, or chlorambucil) were found on workers' skin of hands or in any of the air samples. Only four out of the 15 bed sheets from patients that were treated with antineoplastic drugs appeared to be contaminated with detectable levels of antineoplastic drugs before the washing procedure (range 13.0-3,060 ng/100 cm(2)). After the pre-washing and after the complete washing procedure, no detectable levels of any of the eight antineoplastic drugs were found anymore in the selected bed sheets. The implementation of guidelines for working with antineoplastic drugs seems to be successful in reducing exposure to antineoplastic drugs of workers in this laundry facility to an acceptable, non-detectable level and to remove antineoplastic drug contamination from bed linen.

  15. Status and prospects of safety research about fuel cycle facilities in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auchere, H.; Mercier, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    Although there is a good knowledge of the risks and no major accident occurred in France, as in other OECD countries, it remains useful to complete basic knowledge and to allow the quality of fuel cycle plants safety assessments to be improved further, particularly in countries equipped with a 'complete' nuclear fuel cycle (France, Japan and U.K.). The scope of the current and future IPSN ('Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire': institute for protection and nuclear safety) research deals with the whole fuel cycle. The overview presented here in NUCEF'95 symposium contains a number of specific themes, some of which have already been started. Successful conclusion of the safety researches will allow the IPSN to have a more precise understanding about specific phenomena and notably to replace 'engineer judgements', though they may be based on a lot of experience and competence, by more scientifically established basic data. (J.P.N.)

  16. Development of decommissioning management system for nuclear fuel cycle facilities (DECMAN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Ryuichirou; Ishijima, Noboru; Tanimoto, Ken-ichi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1999-04-01

    In making a plan of decommissioning of nuclear fuel facilities, it is important to optimize the plan on the standpoint of a few viewpoints, that is, the amount of working days, workers, radioactive waste, exposure dose of worker, and cost (they are called evaluation indexes). In the midst of decommissioning, the decommissioning plan would be modified suitably to optimize the evaluation indexes adjusting to progress of the decommissioning. The decommissioning management code (DECMAN), that is support system on computer, has been developed to assist the decommissioning planning. The system calculates the evaluation indexes quantitatively. The system consists of three fundamental codes, facility information database code, technical know-how database code and index evaluation code, they are composed using Oracle' database and 'G2' expert system. The functions of the system are as follows. (1) Facility information database code. Information of decommissioning facility and its rooms, machines and pipes in the code. (2) Technical know-how database code. Technical Information of tools to use in decommissioning work, cutting, dose measure, and decontamination are there. (3) Index evaluation code. User build decommissioning program using above two database codes. The code evaluates five indexes, the amount of working days, workers, radioactive waste, exposure dose of worker, and cost, on planning decommissioning program. Results of calculation are shown in table, chart, and etc. (author)

  17. Acceptance criteria for the evaluation of Category 1 fuel cycle facility physical security plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, P.A.

    1991-10-01

    This NUREG document presents criteria developed from US Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations for the evaluation of physical security plans submitted by Category 1 fuel facility licensees. Category 1 refers to those licensees who use or possess a formula quantity of strategic special nuclear material.

  18. Acceptance criteria for the evaluation of Category 1 fuel cycle facility physical security plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwyer, P.A.

    1991-10-01

    This NUREG document presents criteria developed from US Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations for the evaluation of physical security plans submitted by Category 1 fuel facility licensees. Category 1 refers to those licensees who use or possess a formula quantity of strategic special nuclear material

  19. International inventory of training facilities in nuclear power and its fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Because the development of trained manpower is important for full use of nuclear power, the International Atomic Energy Agency has compiled this first inventory of training facilities and programs. It is based on information submitted by Member States and received up to 31 January 1977. The inventory is arranged by country, type of training organization, and by subject

  20. Thoron Mitigation System based on charcoal bed for applications in thorium fuel cycle facilities (part 2): Development, characterization, and performance evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudeep Kumara, K; Sahoo, B K; Gaware, J J; Sapra, B K; Mayya, Y S; Karunakara, N

    2017-06-01

    Exposure due to thoron ( 220 Rn) gas and its decay products in a thorium fuel cycle facility handling thorium or 232 U/ 233 U mixture compounds is an important issue of radiological concern requiring control and mitigation. Adsorption in a flow-through charcoal bed offers an excellent method of alleviating the release of 220 Rn into occupational and public domain. In this paper, we present the design, development, and characterization of a Thoron Mitigation System (TMS) for industrial application. Systematic experiments were conducted in the TMS for examining the 220 Rn mitigation characteristics with respect to a host of parameters such as flow rate, pressure drop, charcoal grain size, charcoal mass and bed depth, water content, and heat of the carrier gas. An analysis of the experimental data shows that 220 Rn attenuation in a flow through charcoal bed is not exponential with respect to the residence time, L/U a (L: bed depth; U a : superficial velocity), but follows a power law behaviour, which can be attributed to the occurrence of large voids due to wall channeling in a flow through bed. The study demonstrates the regeneration of charcoal adsorption capacity degraded due to moisture adsorption, by hot air blowing technique. It is found that the mitigation factor (MF), which is the ratio of the inlet 220 Rn concentration (C in ) to the outlet 220 Rn concentration (C out ), of more than 10 4 for the TMS is easily achievable during continuous operation (>1000 h) at a flow rate of 40 L min -1 with negligible (charcoal bed offers a compact and effective device to remove 220 Rn from affluent air streams in a space constrained domain. The prototype system has been installed in a thorium fuel cycle facility where it is being evaluated for its long-term performance and overall effectiveness in mitigating 220 Rn levels in the workplace. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Global Biogeochemical Cycle of Si: Its Coupling to the Perturbed C-N-P cycles in Industrial Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, A.; Li, D. D.; MacKenzie, F. T.

    2010-12-01

    The importance of silicon (Si) in global biogeochemical cycles is demonstrated by its abundance in the land and aquatic biomass, where Si/C is 0.02 in land plants and 0.15 in marine organisms. Estimates show that Si-bioproduction accounts for ~1.5% of terrestrial primary production, and ~4.5% in the coastal ocean. Human land-use activities have substantially changed regional patterns of vegetation distribution, soil conditions, and nutrient fluxes via runoff to the coastal ocean. Anthropogenic chemical fertilization of the land has caused a significant increase in fluvial nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) transport, whereas land-use and vegetation mass changes have caused variations in the riverine Si input, all eventually affecting the cycling of nutrients in the marine environment. We developed a global biogeochemical model of the Si cycle as coupled to the global C-N-P cycle model, TOTEM II (Terrestrial-Ocean-aTmosphere-Ecosystem-Model). In the model analysis from year 1700, taken as the start of the Anthropocene, to 2050, the bioproduction of Si on land and in the ocean is coupled to the bioproduction of C, perturbed by the atmospheric CO2 rise, land-use changes, and chemical fertilization. Also, temperature rise affects the Si cycling on land through bioproduction rates, terrestrial organic matter remineralization, and weathering, thereby affecting its delivery to the coastal zone. The results show that biouptake and subsequent release of Si on land strongly affect the Si river flux to the coastal ocean. During the 350-year period, Si river discharge has increased by ~10% until ~1940, decreasing since then to below its 1700 value and continuing to drop, under the current IPCC IS92 projections of CO2, temperature and other forcings. From 1700 to ~1950, land-use changes, associated with slash and burn of large areas of high-productivity land, caused a decrease of global land vegetation. Dissolution of Si in soil humus and weathering of silicate minerals are the

  2. Life cycle inventory of electricity cogeneration from bagasse in the South African sugar industry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mashoko, L

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available methodology. This study develops the life cycle inventories for bagasse power production in South Africa. The life cycle inventory can help to evaluate the environmental impacts of the cogeneration throughout the life cycle. The data for this inventory stage...

  3. Assessment of risk of potential exposures on facilities industries; Estimativa do risco de exposicao potencial em instalacoes industriais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leocadio, Joao Carlos

    2007-03-15

    This work develops a model to evaluate potential exposures on open facilities of industrial radiography in Brazil. This model will decisively contribute to optimize operational, radiological protection and safety procedures, to prevent radiation accidents and to reduce human errors in industrial radiography. The probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) methodology was very useful to assess potential exposures. The open facilities of industrial radiography were identified as the scenario to be analyzed in what concerns the evaluation of potential exposures, due to their high accidents indices. The results of the assessment of potential exposures confirm that the industrial radiography in Brazil is a high-risk practice as classified by the IAEA. The risk of potential exposure was estimated to be 40,5 x 10{sup -2} per year in Brazil, having as main consequences injuries to the workers' hands and arms. In the world scene, the consequences are worst, leading to fatalities of people, thus emphasizing the high risk of industrial radiography. (author)

  4. The development of an integrated nuclear fuel-cycle industry to meet the needs of the Italian nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelini, A.M.; Badolato, G.; Clementel, E.

    1977-01-01

    The paper summarizes the Italian nuclear power station programme, recently approved by the Government, and illustrates the main reasons for the programme, which are in line with those presented at the Geneva Conference in 1971, and which lead to the consideration that nuclear energy is the main source for meeting practically all new electric power requirements in Italy. The implementation of this programme involves considerable nuclear fuel-cycle services, ranging from uranium supply to waste disposal. The industrial strategy to meet these needs is discussed. Technical and economic factors affecting such strategy, both for the fuel cycle as a whole and for its individual phases, are considered. Attention is focused on problems typical of the Italian situation and on various ways of solving them. A prominent feature of the Italian situation is the lack of sizeable domestic uranium resources, which makes it even more important to try, by local industrial efforts, to cover the phases of the cycle subsequent to uranium supply, so as to increase as much as possible the fraction of added value produced inside the country. The present status of the Italian nuclear fuel-cycle industry is reviewed in detail, and its capability of supporting the nuclear programme is analysed. Future development plans are discussed, taking into account the possibility of European co-operation. While the focus is on short- and medium-term programmes, the long-term nuclear programmes are discussed, such as those based on fast breeders, and stress is laid on the need to build up as quickly as possible a strong nuclear fuel-cycle industry. (author)

  5. Integration and Assessment of Multiple Mobile Manipulators in a Real-World Industrial Production Facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Simon; Schou, Casper; Rühr, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a large-scale research experiment carried out within the TAPAS project, where multiple mobile manipulators were integrated and assessed in an industrial context. We consider an industrial scenario in which mobile manipulators naturally extend automation of logistic tasks towar...... is on the right track on transferring mobile manipulation from research to industry....

  6. Obtaining Life-Cycle Cost-Effective Facilities in the Department of Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    buildings must also use noncombustible materials for their exterior walls but may use heavy timber , a type of wood construction with specific...adhere to the IBC, designers could propose a Type III facility, consisting of exterior load -bearing walls made with noncombustible materials with a...for all building elements Concrete, masonry , or steel type III noncombustible for exterior walls ; other elements may be combustible or

  7. Impact of certain safeguards considerations on fuel-cycle facility design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darby, J.L.; de Montmollin, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    Both physical protection and containment/surveillance systems impact plant design and operations. Effective physical protection systems can be systematically designed; work on designing containment/surveillance systems is in progress. Fuel fabrication facility designers need to be cognizant of these safeguards system developments to enable effective implementation of them with as little effect on plant functions as possible. This brief overview provides a general indication of what the impacts of the systems might be, and current thinking on their structure

  8. Thermal performance analysis of Brayton cycle with waste heat recovery boiler for diesel engines of offshore oil production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xianglong; Gong, Guangcai; Wu, Yi; Li, Hangxin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Comparison of Brayton cycle with WHRB adopted in diesel engines with and without fans by thermal performance. • Waste heat recovery technology for FPSO. • The thermoeconomic analysis for the heat recovery for FPSO. - Abstract: This paper presents the theoretical analysis and on-site testing on the thermal performance of the waste heat recovery system for offshore oil production facilities, including the components of diesel engines, thermal boilers and waste heat boilers. We use the ideal air standard Brayton cycle to analyse the thermal performance. In comparison with the traditional design, the fans at the engine outlet of the waste heat recovery boiler is removed due to the limited space of the offshore platform. The cases with fan and without fan are compared in terms of thermal dynamics performance, energy efficiency and thermo-economic index of the system. The results show that the application of the WHRB increases the energy efficiency of the whole system, but increases the flow resistance in the duct. It is proved that as the waste heat recovery boiler takes the place of the thermal boiler, the energy efficiency of whole system without fan is slightly reduced but heat recovery efficiency is improved. This research provides an important guidance to improve the waste heat recovery for offshore oil production facilities.

  9. The implications of plant design on the life-time costs for nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macphee, D.S.; Hexter, B.C.; Young, M.P.; Wilson, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    Utilising the experience gained during many years of design and project management of nuclear plant, BNFL is now approaching the final stages of the construction and commissioning of the Sellafield MOX Plant (SMP) in the UK. The paper uses the SMP project to highlight the benefits of these experiences, in particular addressing the implications of the approach to plant design on life time costs. In addition to providing BNFL with a state of the art, commercial scale MOX fuel fabrication facility, the construction of this 120 tHM/yr facility, which is currently in the advanced stages of commissioning, represents a significant demonstration of the design and project management skills of BNFL Engineering Ltd. As well as meeting the main process requirements, the plant design incorporates the highest standards of safety, together with input from the future plant operators and potential customers. As befits a commercial scale plutonium handling facility, SMP also incorporates material accountancy and security provisions that will meet all international requirements. Design, construction and commissioning of this complex and highly automated plant, has benefited from a totally integrated approach to design and documentation that considers not only project implementation but also overall lifetime costs. In addition, project management techniques, developed over many years of major project construction at Sellafield, have been utilised in order to ensure successful project implementation against a background of significant technical challenge and 'fast track' timescales. (author)

  10. A preliminary comprehensive dynamic analysis of the typical FaCT scenarios with JSFR and related fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiotani, Hiroki; Ono, Kiyoshi; Ogawa, Takashi; Koma, Yoshikazu; Kawaguchi, Koichi

    2009-01-01

    A preliminary comprehensive dynamic analysis of the typical Fast Reactor (FR) deployment scenarios with JSFR and related fuel cycle facilities developed in 'FaCT: Fast Reactor Cycle Technology Development Project' was conducted. The scenarios were evaluated from some of the development targets and design goals in the FaCT project. The isotopic compositions of the nuclear fuels and wastes and the quantities of radioactive wastes (HLWs, LLWs) from Japanese nuclear fuel cycle facilities were calculated to grasp the sustainability characteristics. Regarding the long-term economics, the total cash out-flows and the average electricity generation costs to 22nd century were calculated. Cash out-flow peaks and waste generation peaks were found from 2030s to 2050s, 2090s to 2110s, and 2150s to 2170s because of the cost and wastes from decommissioning of the nuclear power plants and reprocessing plants for LWR spent fuel and the construction costs of them. Firstly, the major results of the reference case are explained combined with introduction of the function of the dynamic analysis tool (Supply Chain Management Code). The analysis is related to sustainability and economics in FaCT project development targets since they are important in the sustainability and economics evaluation. Secondly, the comparisons between the reference case and the three other option cases with their own issues of choice are explained. Those options are different breeding ratios, dual-purpose reprocessing plant, and Am-Cm recycling. As the tentative conclusions of the analyses are: the exploration of the optimal breeding ratio between B.R. =1.1 and 1.2 at the start up stage of FR is regarded as reasonable; the cost reduction of the dual purpose reprocessing plant resulted from the facility integration was confirmed though the cost estimation of the facility should be modified, it is a little bit too hasty to decide the manner of MA recycling because many issues to be considered are left at present

  11. Life-Cycle-Based Multicriteria Sustainability Evaluation of Industrial Parks: A Case Study in China

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jin; Chen, Bin; Qi, Jing; Zhou, Shiyi; Jiang, Meiming

    2012-01-01

    Along with increasing concerns on environmental protection and global warming mitigation, new industrial organization modes such as “Ecoindustrial Park” and “Low Carbon Industrial Park” are emerging. Since ecoindustrial parks and low carbon industrial parks may offer multifaceted benefits to the users, it naturally follows that the sustainability assessment of the industrial parks ought to adopt a multicriteria methodology. In this paper, a multicriteria sustainable evaluation framework is pr...

  12. Towards the design of a zero effluent facility in the pharmaceutical industry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gouws, JF

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the main goals of any production facility is to have the least negative effect on the surrounding environment, while still producing the required output. The perfect scenario would be a production facility that produces zero effluents...

  13. Input-dependent life-cycle inventory model of industrial wastewater-treatment processes in the chemical sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Annette; Hellweg, Stefanie; Recan, Ercan; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2007-08-01

    Industrial wastewater-treatment systems need to ensure a high level of protection for the environment as a whole. Life-cycle assessment (LCA) comprehensively evaluates the environmental impacts of complex treatment systems, taking into account impacts from auxiliaries and energy consumption as well as emissions. However, the application of LCA is limited by a scarcity of wastewater-specific life-cycle inventory (LCI) data. This study presents a modular gate-to-gate inventory model for industrial wastewater purification in the chemical and related sectors. It enables the calculation of inventory parameters as a function of the wastewater composition and the technologies applied. Forthis purpose, data on energy and auxiliaries' consumption, wastewater composition, and process parameters was collected from chemical industry. On this basis, causal relationships between wastewater input, emissions, and technical inputs were identified. These causal relationships were translated into a generic inventory model. Generic and site-specific data ranges for LCI parameters are provided for the following processes: mechanical-biological treatment, high-pressure wet-air oxidation, nanofiltration, and extraction. The input- and technology-dependent process inventories help to bridge data gaps where primary data are not available. Thus, they substantially help to perform an environmental assessment of industrial wastewater purification in the chemical and associated industries, which may be used, for instance, for technology choices.

  14. Report on emergency electrical power supply systems for nuclear fuel cycle and reactor facilities security systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    The report includes information that will be useful to those responsible for the planning, design and implementation of emergency electric power systems for physical security and special nuclear materials accountability systems. Basic considerations for establishing the system requirements for emergency electric power for security and accountability operations are presented. Methods of supplying emergency power that are available at present and methods predicted to be available in the future are discussed. The characteristics of capacity, cost, safety, reliability and environmental and physical facility considerations of emergency electric power techniques are presented. The report includes basic considerations for the development of a system concept and the preparation of a detailed system design.

  15. Report on emergency electrical power supply systems for nuclear fuel cycle and reactor facilities security systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The report includes information that will be useful to those responsible for the planning, design and implementation of emergency electric power systems for physical security and special nuclear materials accountability systems. Basic considerations for establishing the system requirements for emergency electric power for security and accountability operations are presented. Methods of supplying emergency power that are available at present and methods predicted to be available in the future are discussed. The characteristics of capacity, cost, safety, reliability and environmental and physical facility considerations of emergency electric power techniques are presented. The report includes basic considerations for the development of a system concept and the preparation of a detailed system design

  16. Development and application of computerized maintenance management system at a nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Yon Woo; Kim, S. D.; Jang, K. D.; Kim, Y. G.

    2001-12-01

    In order to accomplish the purpose of research, it is the most important for the equipment to work well. The computerized maintenance management system proven by the case-studies can have an effect on the research and it can be one of the most major elements to assist the research at the research laboratory. To prevent the breakdown of the equipment at the research facility which can hinder the improvement of the research work, it is essential to maintain the equipment of facility without the sudden breakdown and to short the recovery time. If these elements such as the causes of the breakdown were well-managed and suvervised with care, this recovery time could be minimized. The aims of this research, therefore, are to introduce the development of the computerized maintenance management system and to apply it at the field in order to minimize the breakdown of the equipment and the recovery time and in order to perform the equipment maintenance service with the minimized expense and maximize the service efficiency through the planned management of the budget, the manpower and the service

  17. Scenarios and analytical methods for UF6 releases at NRC-licensed fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siman-Tov, M.; Dykstra, J.; Holt, D.D.; Huxtable, W.P.; Just, R.A.; Williams, W.R.

    1984-06-01

    This report identifies and discusses potential scenarios for the accidental release of UF 6 at NRC-licensed UF 6 production and fuel fabrication facilities based on a literature review, site visits, and DOE enrichment plant experience. Analytical tools needed for evaluating source terms for such releases are discussed, and the applicability of existing methods is reviewed. Accident scenarios are discussed under the broad headings of cylinder failures, UF 6 process system failures, nuclear criticality events, and operator errors and are categorized by location, release source, phase of UF 6 prior to release, release flow characteristics, release causes, initiating events, and UF 6 inventory at risk. At least three types of releases are identified for further examination: (1) a release from a liquid-filled cylinder outdoors, (2) a release from a pigtail or cylinder in a steam chest, (3) an indoor release from either (a) a pigtail or liquid-filled cylinder or (b) other indoor source depending on facility design and operating procedures. Indoor release phenomena may be analyzed to determine input terms for a ventilation model by using a time-dependent homogeneous compartment model or a more complex hydrodynamic model if time-dependent, spatial variations in concentrations, temperature, and pressure are important. Analytical tools for modeling directed jets and explosive releases are discussed as well as some of the complex phenomena to be considered in analyzing UF 6 releases both indoors and outdoors

  18. Safety-licensing assessment of NASAP reactor concepts and fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipinski, W.C.; Prohammer, F.G.; van Erp, J.B.; Seefeldt, W.B.

    1978-06-01

    Assessments are presented of the safety/licensability of reactor concepts based on information supplied by the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) characterization contractors in their updated responses to the data package for NASAP Rolling Report II. The assessment of the LMFBR includes information from a characterization contractor on alternate fuel cycles but does not include information provided by a characterization contractor on plant-related safety issues. The information provided by the characterization contractors was supplemented by assessments provided by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  19. Status and prospects of safety research of fuel cycle facilities in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auchere, H.; Mercier, J.P.

    1996-12-31

    The following themes of research are discussed: prolonged loss of cooling in concentrated fission product solution storage tanks; dewatering of a spent fuel storage pond; explosion risks in nuclear fuel cycle laboratories and plants; dissemination of radioactive materials in case of fire in fuel manufacturing plants and in spent fuel analysis laboratories; contamination transfer; phenomenology of liquid uranium hexafluoride vaporization into the atmosphere; ways and means of intervention in the event of liquid ClF{sub 3} leakage; offsite explosion; seismic research. (K.A.).

  20. Status and prospects of safety research of fuel cycle facilities in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auchere, H.; Mercier, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    The following themes of research are discussed: prolonged loss of cooling in concentrated fission product solution storage tanks; dewatering of a spent fuel storage pond; explosion risks in nuclear fuel cycle laboratories and plants; dissemination of radioactive materials in case of fire in fuel manufacturing plants and in spent fuel analysis laboratories; contamination transfer; phenomenology of liquid uranium hexafluoride vaporization into the atmosphere; ways and means of intervention in the event of liquid ClF 3 leakage; offsite explosion; seismic research. (K.A.)

  1. Environmental Assessment of Industrial Bamboo Products : Life Cycle Assessment and Carbon Sequestration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lugt, P.; Vogtländer, J.G.; van der Vegte, JH; Brezet, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is the commonly accepted methodology to systematically assess the environmental impact of a material over the full life cycle, from the extraction of resources until the end phase of demolition or recycling (from cradle till grave).
    The first objective of this study

  2. Developing Students' Understanding of Industrially Relevant Economic and Life Cycle Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Claudia J.; Chapman, Clint; Pennybaker, Atherly; Subramaniam, Bala

    2017-01-01

    Training future leaders to understand life cycle assessment data is critical for effective research, business, and sociopolitical decision-making. However, the technical nature of these life cycle reports often makes them challenging for students and other nonexperts to comprehend. Therefore, we outline here the key takeaways from recent economic…

  3. Natech accidents at industrial facilities. The case of the Wenchuan earthquake

    OpenAIRE

    Krausmann , Elisabeth; Cruz , Ana Maria; Affeltranger , Bastien

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Natural disasters can trigger chemical accidents (so-called Natech accidents) with severe consequences on man or the environment. This work highlights the main characteristics of earthquake-triggered Natechs by describing our insights from a field trip to chemical facilities in the area affected by the 12 May, 2008, Wenchuan earthquake in China. Our preliminary results indicate that damage was most severe in older facilities with masonry and un- or poorly reinforced co...

  4. The geographical concentration of hotels in Switzerland and the industry life cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Sund, Kristian J.

    2006-01-01

    Empirical studies of numerous products and industries have shown that the evolution of variables such as the market price of a product, output and the number of competitors in an industry are non-monotonic and follow a typical pattern over the life span of that industry. The Swiss hotel industry has been experiencing stagnation, even decline, for a period of over 20 years. This can be measured in terms of arrivals, overnight stays and, perhaps most importantly, the number of firms. Thus the n...

  5. Analysis on the application and actual condition of facilities preservation system in each industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Yon Woo; Kim, Seon Duk; Nam, Ji Hee

    2000-11-01

    In order to secure the maximum of a company's benefit through increasing the efficiency and the productivity of it. the facility preservation system has been developed and used so that can find it's maximum efficiency with a series of activities which make a plan for, install, maintain, and improve for it. Factories are managed to be classified by operation and maintenance with great interest in the facility preservation in South Korea. and the facilities has taken up much part in the management. But it has not been researched how the facilities affects the management of a company. According to that reasons, the facility preservation is underestimated compared with what it is and is regarded just as a cost. This report has an object to construct a fundamental electronic-database on the facility preservation in order to obtain excellent results in KAERI with researches into the introduction of the TPM technology in South Korea, and analysis the effect of the TPM on a company

  6. Technology life cycle and specialization patterns of latecomer countries: The case of the semiconductor industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Triulzi, G.

    2014-01-01

    Catching-up, leapfrogging and falling behind in terms of output and productivity in high-tech industries crucially depends on firms' ability to keep pace with technological change. In fast changing industries today's specialization does not guarantee tomorrow's success as changes in the

  7. The connected firm: The spatial dimension of interorganizational dependence along the industry life cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vaan, M.

    2012-01-01

    The high-tech industry in Silicon Valley, automobile production in Detroit, and financial services in New York and London are just a few examples of industries that are spatially concentrated. This phenomenon has attracted interest from a wide range of social scientists and regional and national

  8. Avenues for research and technology development for industrial applications using electron beam facilities and their exploitation through BRNS schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markandeya, S.G.

    2013-01-01

    BARC has been responsible to establish indigenously designed state-of-the-art electron accelerator facilities at its Electron Beam Centre at Kharghar, Navi Mumbai. The centre offers two versatile machines namely, (i) 3 MeV, 30 kW Parallel Coupled Self Capacitance type Multiplier (Dynamitron) DC accelerator and (ii) 10 MeV, 10 kW RF Electron Linac. While these machines are being used by scientists and engineers from within DAE, there is tremendous scope for exploiting their use by researchers in the country for basic research as well as by technologists and entrepreneurs for exploiting its potential for industrial applications. However, due to lack of adequate information about the facilities and due to paucity of research funds for the academia in the country, there is always a gap which researchers seldom look forward to be filled up appropriately. The present talk will give a glimpse of some opportunities to exploit the facilities at EBC, Kharghar for variety of applications followed by a brief presentation on provisions under BRNS to carry out sponsored research activities for basic research as well as for technology development for the industrial applications. (author)

  9. The relationship between macroeconomic and industry-specific business cycle indicators and work-related injuries among Danish construction workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Kent Jacob; Lander, F; Lauritsen, J M

    2015-04-01

    The current study examines and compares the relationship between both macroeconomic and industry-specific business cycle indicators, and work-related injuries among construction workers in Denmark using emergency department (ED) injury data and also officially reported injuries to the Danish Working Environment Authority (WEA). The correlations between ED and WEA injury data from the catchment area of Odense University Hospital during the period 1984-2010 were tested separately for variability and trend with two general macroeconomic indicators (gross domestic product and the Danish unemployment rate) and two construction industry-specific indicators (gross value added and the number of employees). The results show that injury rates increase during economic booms and decrease during recessions. However, the regression coefficients were generally weak for both the ED (range 0.14-0.20) and WEA injuries (range 0.13-0.36). Furthermore, although there is some variability in the strength of the relationship of the different business cycle indicators, the relationships are generally not stronger for the WEA injuries than for the ED injuries, except for general unemployment. Similarly, no substantial differences in strength of relation between industry-specific and macroeconomic indicators were identified. The study shows that there was no difference in the relationship between business cycle indicators, and WEA and ED injury data. This indicates that changes in reporting behaviour do not seem to play a major role in the relation between the business cycle and workplace injuries in a Danish context. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Design concepts and advanced telerobotics development for facilities in the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    In the Fuel Recycle Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a comprehensive remote systems development program has existed for the past seven years. The new remote technology under development is expected to significantly improve remote operations by extending the range of tasks accomplished by remote means and increasing the efficiency of remote work undertaken. Five areas of the development effort are primary contributors to the goal of higher operating efficiency for major facilities for the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. These areas are (1) the single-cell concept, (2) the low-flow ventilation concept, (3) television viewing, (4) equipment-mounting racks, and (5) force-reflecting manipulation. These somewhat innovative directions are products of a design process where the technical scenario to be accomplished, the remote equipment to accomplish the scenario, and the facility design to house the equipment, are considered in an iterative design process to optimize performance, maximize long-term costs effectiveness, and minimize initial capital outlay. (author)

  11. Design concepts and advanced telerobotics development for facilities in the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    In the Fuel Recycle Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a comprehensive remote systems development program has existed for the past seven years. The new remote technology under development is expected to significantly improve remote operations by extending the range of tasks accomplished by remote means and increasing the efficiency of remote work undertaken. Five areas of the development effort are primary contributors to the goal of higher operating efficiency for major facilities for the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. These areas are the single-cell concept, the low-flow ventilation concept, television viewing, equipment-mounting racks, and force-reflecting manipulation. These somewhat innovative directions are products of a design process where the technical scenario to be accomplished, the remote equipment to accomplish the scenario, and the facility design to house the equipment, are considered in an iterative design process to optimize performance, maximize long-term costs effectiveness, and minimize initial capital outlay. 14 refs., 3 figs

  12. International arrangements for nuclear-fuel-cycle facilities: the politics of the problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, W.

    1977-01-01

    Thirty years after the Three-Power Declaration on November 5, 1945, promising effective safeguards on the information exchange on atomic energy, many nations are selling and transferring nuclear materials, equipment, and technology without these ''effective enforceable safeguards.'' Even though there is no actual commercial need to reprocess spent fuel into Pu, France and West Germany are planning to sell reprocessing plants to non-NPT countries. The erosion of faith in and the weakening of the NPT are pointed out. The Canadian decision not to resume nuclear aid to India is commended. The question of how effective and enforceable the international (IAEA/NPT) safeguards are, is addressed. The weaknesses of the London Suppliers' Club position on safeguards are pointed out. Multinational fuel cycle centers would not much help to contain the risks of nuclear proliferation. Additional measures needed for really effective safeguards are listed. The unilateral embargo of nuclear exports by U.S. is proposed. Political measures to discourage nations from acquiring nuclear weapons are also listed. Only a combination of political, psychological, and technical measures can produce an effective nonproliferation regime

  13. The Rapid Cycling Synchrotron of the EURISOL Beta-Beam facility

    CERN Document Server

    Lachaize, A

    During the last two years, several upgrades of the initial baseline scenario were studied with the aim of increasing the average intensity of ion beams in the accelerator chain of the Beta Beam complex. This is the reason why the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) specifications were reconsidered many times.General considerations on the optical design were presented at the Beta Beam Task Meetings held at CERN and at Saclay in 2005 (http://beta-beam.web.cern.ch/beta-beam/). More detailed beam optics studies were performed during the next months. Lattices, RF system parameters, multi-turn injection scheme, fast extraction, closed orbit correction and chromaticity correction systems were proposed for different versions of the RCS.Finally, the RCS specifications have stabilized in November 2006 after the fourth Beta Beam Task Meeting when it was decided to fix the maximum magnetic rigidity of ion beams to 14.47 T.m (3.5 GeV equivalent proton energy) and to adopt a ring physical radius of 40 m in order to facilitat...

  14. Assessing the impacts of industrial water use in Life Cycle Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lévová, Tereza; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2011-01-01

    Use of freshwater gives rise to important environmental impacts to consider in the sustainability analysis of an industry or a product. Water use impacts are highly dependent on the local or regional conditions, and apart from the quantity that is extracted and used, the impact of the freshwater...... use also depends on the local sensitivity to freshwater extraction, and the change in the quality from water intake to discharge of the usedwater. A methodology is presented catering to these characteristics of the water use issue and demonstrated on an industrial case study from the biotech industry....

  15. Urban Attractiveness. Why Put People’s Money into Cycling Facilities?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RADU C. BARNA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the advantages offered by agglomerations, human activities have always concentrated, and cities have become multifunctional places: living places, places where goods and services are produced, culture and socialisation places. Nowadays however, the negative effects produced by agglomerations often get to overbalance the positive effects and to repel people and activities. Agglomerations often become impersonal and unfamiliar. They are no longer a “lived space” and people can hardly wait to “evade” at least during the weekend. Among the development factors for which a city should be attractive, Qualified Workforce (QwF has become the main one, due to the knowledge society we live in. In the Western societies, the QwF has met its basic, material needs, also aiming to meet the others that are linked to the Quality of Life (QoL (safety, health, mobility, leisure, etc.. That is why the attractiveness for the development factors is more and more linked to the QoL that a city offers, the bicycle being able to bring a large number of answers in this direction. By means of this study, we will try to show the influence that the bicycle has on the urban attractiveness factors. We will find out that the bicycle influences them all and, moreover, without producing any drawbacks in other domains. It exercises however the most powerful effects on two of the most important soft factors of attractiveness, namely QoL and image. By noting the increasing importance of the soft factors in relation to the hard factors, we will be able to sustain the opportunity of investing in facilities for bicycle. Moreover, we will show that a city which aims to remain competitive on the global market of the development factors has no more choices and has to become bicycle-friendly.

  16. The importance of independent research and evaluation in assessing nuclear fuel cycle and waste management facility safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downing, Walter D.; Patrick, Wesley C.; Sagar, Budhi

    2009-01-01

    In 1987, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) a federally funded research and development center. Known as the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA), its overall mission is to provide NRC with an independent assessment capability on technical and regulatory issues related to a potential geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, as well as interim storage and other nuclear fuel-cycle facilities. For more than 20 years, the CNWRA has supported NRC through an extensive pre-licensing period of establishing the framework of regulations and guidance documents, developing computer codes and other review tools, and conducting independent laboratory, field, and numerical analyses. In June 2008, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) submitted a license application and final environmental impact statement to NRC seeking authorization to construct the nation's first geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The CNWRA will assist NRC in conducting a detailed technical review to critically evaluate the DOE license application to assess whether the potential repository has been designed and can be constructed and operated to safely dispose spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. NRC access to independent, unbiased, technical advice from the CNWRA is an important aspect of the evaluation process. This paper discusses why an independent perspective is important when dealing with nuclear fuel cycle and waste management issues. It addresses practical considerations such as avoiding conflicts of interest while at the same time maintaining a world-class research program in technical areas related to the nuclear fuel cycle. It also describes an innovative approach for providing CNWRA scientists and engineers a creative outlet for professional development through an internally funded research program that is focused on future nuclear waste

  17. Industrial gamma irradiation facility with a wet storage source in Syrian Arab Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, I.; Moussa, A.; Stepanov, D.G.; Ermakov, V.

    1998-01-01

    A gamma radiation facility was built in Damascus, Syria. The plant (ROBO) is a Co-60 wet storage, batch/continuous facility with nominal capacity of 1.85x10 16 Bq. The initial activity is 3.7x10 15 Bq. The ratio of maximum absorbed dose to the minimum one within irradiated materials is around 1.3+/-0.03. The irradiator consists of two sections to select required sources for irradiation. Two pools were constructed. The main pool will serve as biological shield for the main sources frame. The second pool will host a fixed circular frame to be used as calibration source or to irradiate small samples to low doses. The conveyor consists of a chain facility moving along trucks. A repair section is provided on the conveyor route in the load-unload area for carrying out inspection, repair, etc. The trucks are holed with a rectangular frames. Loading, unloading and rearrangement of the products is carried out automatically. This mechanism is carried out by seven pneumatic cylinders, lifting devices and roller conveyors. Many safety features were included: push-back platform, followed by pit used as a physical barrier. Interlocks are connected to the platform, pit cover and to ionization chambers. In case of power failure or any overriding of interlocks, the irradiator comes to emergency dropping. Ventilation system, fire system, emergency power and closed water purification system are indicated on control panel. The facility will be utilized for medical products sterilization, research and calibration

  18. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume III. Resources and fuel cycle facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    The ability of uranium supply and the rest of the nuclear fuel cycle to meet the demand for nuclear power is an important consideration in future domestic and international planning. Accordingly, the purpose of this assessment is to evaluate the adequacy of potential supply for various nuclear resources and fuel cycle facilities in the United States and in the world outside centrally planned economy areas (WOCA). Although major emphasis was placed on uranium supply and demand, material resources (thorium and heavy water) and facility resources (separative work, spent fuel storage, and reprocessing) were also considered.

  19. Spatial distribution of heavy metals in top soils around the industrial facilities of Cromatos de México, Tultitlan Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton-Bermea, Ofelia; Hernández-Álvarez, Elizabeth; Lozano, Rufino; Guzmán-Morales, Janin; Martínez, Gerardo

    2010-11-01

    The environmental damage caused by industrial activities in Cromatos de México, (Tultitlán, México) has been evaluated in terms of heavy metal concentrations in topsoils of the surrounding area. The concentrations of lead, copper and zinc demonstrate a significant enrichment with respect to unpolluted levels. Their maximum enrichment factors are 37.7, 21.1 and 9.6 mg kg⁻¹, respectively; such increase is related to traffic emissions. Nickel concentrations show no significant difference in the analyzed samples. Total chromium concentrations show a significant decrease with distance from the industrial facilities, ranging from 15 to 1,837 mg kg⁻¹. The enrichment factors of chromium (total), with respect to the background values reach up to 40.8 mg kg⁻¹. In spite of this pronounced increase, only three analyzed samples show chromium (VI) concentrations over 0.5 mg kg⁻¹ (instrumental detection limit) and do not exceed the values recommended by the Mexican official norm. The current results show that the chromium present in the studied area does not represent serious health risks and environmental damage in the zone, nevertheless, it is necessary to consider that the oxidation of chromium (III) is determinate by changes in redox and/or pH conditions which would imply significant impacts upon its toxic risk. This study suggests that the waste material generated during the industrial activities of Cromatos de Mexico represents a relevant metal pollution source for the area even 30 years after the closure of the industrial facilities.

  20. Development of a Code for the Long Term Radiological Safety Assessment of Radioactive Wastes from Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities in Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Yong Soo

    2010-01-01

    For the purpose of evaluating annual individual doses from a potential repository disposing of radioactive wastes from the operation of the prospective advanced nuclear fuel cycle facilities in Korea, the new safety assessment code based on the Goldsim has been developed. It was designed to compare the environmental impacts from many fuel cycle options such as direct disposal, wet and dry recycling. The code based on the compartment theory can be applied to assess both normal and what if scenarios

  1. Crossing industrial boundaries at the pharma-nutrition interface in probiotics: a life cycle perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bornkessel, S.; Broring, Stefanie; Omta, S.W.F.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to advance the research on innovation at the pharma-nutrition interface by analysing the three steps of science, technology and market convergence in the area of probiotics using a life cycle perspective. Results from a bibliometric analysis drawing upon 8245 scientific

  2. Comparison of Integrated Gasifier-Combined Cycle and AFB-steam turbine systems for industrial cogeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nainiger, J. J.; Abbott, J. M.; Burns, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    In the cogeneration technology alternatives study (CTAS) a number of advanced coal fired systems were examined and systems using a integrated coal gasifier IGCC or a fluid bed combustor AFB were found to yield attractive cogeneration results in industrial cogeneration applications. A range of site requirements and cogeneration sizing strategies using ground rules based on CTAS were used in comparing an IGCC and an AFB. The effect of time variations in site requirements and the sensitivity to fuel and electricity price assumptions are examined. The economic alternatives of industrial or utility ownership are also considered. The results indicate that the IGCC system has potentially higher fuel and emission savings and could be an attractive option for utility ownership. The AFB steam turbine system has a potentially higher return on investment and could be attractive assuming industrial ownership.

  3. System Evaluations and Life-Cycle Cost Analyses for High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O' Brien; Michael G. McKellar

    2012-05-01

    spreadsheets when better information is available or to allow the performance of sensitivity studies. The selected reference plant design for this study was a 1500 kg/day forecourt hydrogen production plant operating in the thermal-neutral mode. The plant utilized industrial natural gas-fired heaters to provide process heat, and grid electricity to supply power to the electrolyzer modules and system components. Modifications to the reference design included replacing the gas-fired heaters with electric resistance heaters, changing the operating mode of the electrolyzer (to operate below the thermal-neutral voltage), and considering a larger 50,000 kg/day central hydrogen production plant design. Total H2A-calculated hydrogen production costs for the reference 1,500 kg/day forecourt hydrogen production plant were $3.42/kg. The all-electric plant design using electric resistance heaters for process heat, and the reference design operating below the thermal-neutral voltage had calculated lifecycle hydrogen productions costs of $3.55/kg and $5.29/kg, respectively. Because of its larger size and associated economies of scale, the 50,000 kg/day central hydrogen production plant was able to produce hydrogen at a cost of only $2.89/kg.

  4. Sustainable Industrial Product Systems. Integration of Life Cycle Assessment in Product development and Optimization of Product Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanssen, Ole Joergen

    1997-12-31

    This thesis contributes to the development and testing of environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) in product development and management in industry. It is based on systems theory and systems engineering. It develops a method for sustainable product development that has been successfully tested in the Nordic project called NEP. The LCA method is also a basis for an optimization model, where life cycle economy and environmental impacts from product systems are optimized with a non-linear model. A more complete mathematical model for LCA, based on the functional requirements on a product system, is also developed. The statistical properties of emission factors are studied using a data set from the Swedish Kraft Mill industry. It is shown that emission factors may be assumed constants in the LCA model, but with rather large variations within a population of Kraft mills. It is shown that there are a few environmental impacts which are important for most types of products under Scandinavian conditions, especially global warming potential, acidification, human toxicity and fossil energy depletion. There are significant differences between the contribution to these impacts from different life cycle stages, where raw material processing and use of products are generally more important than the other stages. Test cases indicate that there are no large conflicts between improvements in environmental impacts and customer requirements. Environmental improvements seem to increase purchase cost of products in some cases, but the life cycle cost of the products seem in most cases to be reduced. It is concluded that there are opportunities for 30-50% improvements in product system, based on relatively simple modifications of the systems. 246 refs., 63 figs., 19 tabs.

  5. Carbon exergy tax applied to biomass integrated gasification combined cycle in sugarcane industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca Filho, Valdi Freire da; Matelli, José Alexandre; Perrella Balestieri, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The development of technologies based on energy renewable sources is increasing worldwide in order to diversify the energy mix and satisfy the rigorous environmental legislation and international agreements to reduce pollutant emission. Considering specific characteristics of biofuels available in Brazil, studies regarding such technologies should be carried out aiming energy mix diversification. Several technologies for power generation from biomass have been presented in the technical literature, and plants with BIGCC (biomass integrated gasification combined cycle) emerge as a major technological innovation. By obtaining a fuel rich in hydrogen from solid biomass gasification, BIGCC presents higher overall process efficiency than direct burning of the solid fuel in conventional boilers. The objective of this paper is to develop a thermodynamic and chemical equilibrium model of a BIGCC configuration for sugarcane bagasse. The model embodies exergetic cost and CO 2 emission analyses through the method of CET (carbon exergy tax). An exergetic penalty comparison between the BIGCC technology (with and without CO 2 capture and sequestration), a natural gas combined cycle and the traditional steam cycle of sugarcane sector is then presented. It is verified that the BIGCC configuration with CO 2 capture and sequestration presents technical and environmental advantages when compared to traditional technology. - Highlights: • We compared thermal cycles with the exergetic carbon exergy tax. • Thermal cycles with and without carbon capture and sequestration were considered. • Burned and gasified sugarcane bagasse was assumed as renewable fuel. • Exergetic carbon penalty tax was imposed to all studied configurations. • BIGCC with carbon sequestration revealed to be advantageous.

  6. Two essays on electricity markets: Entry into hydroelectric generation industry and the political cycle of regulated prices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moita, Rodrigo Menon Simoes

    This dissertation is about the electricity industry and the problems that arise with the liberalization and de-regulation of the industry. Characteristics intrinsic to the electricity market create problems that can compromise an efficient functioning of this market. Each of the two chapters of this dissertation focus on a specific aspect of this industry. The first chapter analyzes entry in the hydroelectric generation industry. The operation of a generator upstream regularizes the river flow for generators located downstream on the same river, increasing the production capacity of the latter. This positive externality increases the attractiveness of the locations downstream whenever a generator decides to enter upstream. Therefore, the entry decision of a generator in a given location may affect all entry decisions in potential locations for plants located downstream. I first model the problem of generators located in cascade on the same river and show the positive effect of the externality. Second, I use a panel of data on investment decisions of hydro-generation firms to estimate an entry model that takes into account the effect of the externality generated by entry upriver. The results show a positive incentive to locate downstream from existing plants and from locations where entry is likely to occur. Location characteristics also play an important role on the entrants' decisions. The model provides estimates of the average expected market price across the different years covered by the sample and shows that it rose one year before the energy crisis of 2001, evidencing that the market anticipated the crisis. This result has important implications on the evaluation of the Brazilian market design. It shows that entry responded to a rise in expectations about excess demand in the future, contradicting the argument that the crisis was a consequence of mis-designed market institutions. The second chapter deals with the problem of the political cycle in regulated

  7. Life cycle of meats: an opportunity to abate the greenhouse gas emission from meat industry in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Poritosh; Orikasa, Takahiro; Thammawong, Manasikan; Nakamura, Nobutaka; Xu, Qingyi; Shiina, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    The food industry is one of the world's largest industrial sectors, hence a large contributor of greenhouse gases (GHG) which cause global warming. This study evaluates the life cycle of various types of meat to determine if the GHG emission from the meat industry in Japan could be reduced if the population makes different dietary choices. It was confirmed that the GHG emission of beef was greater than that of pork or chicken. The GHG emission from meat in general also depends on the per capita caloric intake (if meat supplies the recommended animal protein or contributes to it at the present rate). In a healthy and balanced diet (9.2 MJ i.e., 2200 kcal in total, where either mixed meat or chicken or pork or beef contributes 2.2%), the GHG emission is estimated to be 0.28 or 0.17 or 0.15 or 0.77 kg CO₂ eq/person/day, respectively. A change in consumption patterns (from beef to chicken or pork) and the adoption of a healthy and balanced diet would help to abate about 2.5-54.0 million tons (CO₂ eq) produced by the meat industry each year in Japan. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Model for deployment of a Quality Assurance System in the nuclear fuel cycle facilities using Project Management techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lage, Ricardo F.; Ribeiro, Saulo F.Q.

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety is the main goal in any nuclear facility. In this sense the Norm CNEN-NN-1.16 classifies the quality assurance issue as a management system to be deployed and implemented by the organization to achieving security goals. Quality Assurance is a set of systematic and planned actions necessary to provide adequate confidence ensuring that a structure, system, component or installation will work satisfactorily in s. Hence, the Quality Assurance System (QAS) is a complete and comprehensive methodology, going far beyond a management plan quality from the perspective of project management. The fundamental of QAS requirements is all activities that influence the quality, involving organizational, human resources, procurement, nuclear safety, projects, procedures and communication. Coordination of all these elements requires a great effort by the team responsible because it usually involves different areas and different levels of hierarchy within the organization. The objectives and desired benefits should be well set for everyone to understand what it means to be achieved and how to achieve. The support of senior management is critical at this stage, providing guidelines and resources necessary to get the job elapse clearly and efficiently, on time, cost and certain scope. The methodology of project management processes can be applied to facilitate and expedite the implementation of this system. Many of the principles of the QAS are correlated with knowledge areas of project management. The proposed model for implementation of a QAS in the nuclear fuel cycle facilities considered the best project management practices according to the Project Management Book of Knowledge (PMBOK - 5th edition) of the Project Management Institute (PMI). This knowledge is considered very good practices around the world. Since the model was defined, the deployment process becomes more practical and efficient, providing reduction in deployment time, better management of human

  9. Model for deployment of a Quality Assurance System in the nuclear fuel cycle facilities using Project Management techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lage, Ricardo F.; Ribeiro, Saulo F.Q., E-mail: rflage@gmail.com, E-mail: quintao.saulo@gmail.com [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The Nuclear Safety is the main goal in any nuclear facility. In this sense the Norm CNEN-NN-1.16 classifies the quality assurance issue as a management system to be deployed and implemented by the organization to achieving security goals. Quality Assurance is a set of systematic and planned actions necessary to provide adequate confidence ensuring that a structure, system, component or installation will work satisfactorily in s. Hence, the Quality Assurance System (QAS) is a complete and comprehensive methodology, going far beyond a management plan quality from the perspective of project management. The fundamental of QAS requirements is all activities that influence the quality, involving organizational, human resources, procurement, nuclear safety, projects, procedures and communication. Coordination of all these elements requires a great effort by the team responsible because it usually involves different areas and different levels of hierarchy within the organization. The objectives and desired benefits should be well set for everyone to understand what it means to be achieved and how to achieve. The support of senior management is critical at this stage, providing guidelines and resources necessary to get the job elapse clearly and efficiently, on time, cost and certain scope. The methodology of project management processes can be applied to facilitate and expedite the implementation of this system. Many of the principles of the QAS are correlated with knowledge areas of project management. The proposed model for implementation of a QAS in the nuclear fuel cycle facilities considered the best project management practices according to the Project Management Book of Knowledge (PMBOK - 5th edition) of the Project Management Institute (PMI). This knowledge is considered very good practices around the world. Since the model was defined, the deployment process becomes more practical and efficient, providing reduction in deployment time, better management of human

  10. Harmonization between a Framework of Multilateral Approaches to Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities and Bilateral Nuclear Cooperation Agreements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makiko Tazaki

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available One of primary challenges for ensuring effective and efficient functions of the multilateral nuclear approaches (MNA to nuclear fuel cycle facilities is harmonization between a MNA framework and existing nuclear cooperation agreements (NCA. A method to achieve such harmonization is to construct a MNA framework with robust non-proliferation characteristics, in order to obtain supplier states’, especially the US’s prior consents for non-supplier states’ certain activities including spent fuel reprocessing, plutonium storages and retransfers of plutonium originated in NCAs. Such robust characteristics can be accomplished by MNA member states’ compliances with International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA Safeguards, regional safeguards agreements, international conventions, guidelines and recommendations on nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear security, safety, and export control. Those provisions are to be incorporated into an MNA founding agreement, as requirements to be MNA members in relation to NCAs. Furthermore, if an MNA facility is, (1 owned and operated jointly by all MNA member states, (2 able to conclude bilateral NCAs with non-MNA/supplier states as a single legal entity representing its all member states like an international organization, and (3 able to obtain necessary prior consents, stable, smooth, and timely supplies of nuclear fuel and services can be assured among MNA member states. In this paper, the authors will set out a general MNA framework and then apply it to a specific example of Europe Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM and then consider its applicability to the Asian region, where an establishment of an MNA framework is expected to be explored.

  11. Approach to the open advanced facilities initiative for innovation (strategic use by industry) at the University of Tsukuba, Tandem Accelerator Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasa, K.; Tagishi, Y.; Naramoto, H.; Kudo, H.; Kita, E.

    2010-01-01

    The University of Tsukuba, Tandem Accelerator Complex (UTTAC) possesses the 12UD Pelletron tandem accelerator and the 1 MV Tandetron accelerator for University's inter-department education research. We have actively advanced collaborative researches with other research institutes and industrial users. Since the Open Advanced Facilities Initiative for Innovation by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology started in 2007, 12 industrial experiments have been carried out at the UTTAC. This report describes efforts by University's accelerator facility to get industrial users. (author)

  12. Waste management under a life cycle approach as a tool for a circular economy in the canned anchovy industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laso, J; Margallo, M; Celaya, J; Fullana, P; Bala, A; Gazulla, C; Irabien, A; Aldaco, R

    2016-08-01

    The anchovy canning industry has high importance in the Cantabria Region (North Spain) from economic, social and touristic points of view. The Cantabrian canned anchovy is world-renowned owing to its handmade and traditional manufacture. The canning process generates huge amounts of several food wastes, whose suitable management can contribute to benefits for both the environment and the economy, closing the loop of the product life cycle. Life cycle assessment methodology was used in this work to assess the environmental performance of two waste management alternatives: Head and spine valorisation to produce fishmeal and fish oil; and anchovy meat valorisation to produce anchovy paste. Fuel oil production has been a hotspot of the valorisation of heads and spines, so several improvements should be applied. With respect to anchovy meat valorisation, the production of polypropylene and glass for packaging was the least environmentally friendly aspect of the process. Furthermore, the environmental characterisation of anchovy waste valorisation was compared with incineration and landfilling alternatives. In both cases, the valorisation management options were the best owing to the avoided burdens associated with the processes. Therefore, it is possible to contribute to the circular economy in the Cantabrian canned anchovy industry. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. DOE/DHS INDUSTRIAL CONTROL SYSTEM CYBER SECURITY PROGRAMS: A MODEL FOR USE IN NUCLEAR FACILITY SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert S. Anderson; Mark Schanfein; Trond Bjornard; Paul Moskowitz

    2011-07-01

    Many critical infrastructure sectors have been investigating cyber security issues for several years especially with the help of two primary government programs. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National SCADA Test Bed and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Control Systems Security Program have both implemented activities aimed at securing the industrial control systems that operate the North American electric grid along with several other critical infrastructure sectors (ICS). These programs have spent the last seven years working with industry including asset owners, educational institutions, standards and regulating bodies, and control system vendors. The programs common mission is to provide outreach, identification of cyber vulnerabilities to ICS and mitigation strategies to enhance security postures. The success of these programs indicates that a similar approach can be successfully translated into other sectors including nuclear operations, safeguards, and security. The industry regulating bodies have included cyber security requirements and in some cases, have incorporated sets of standards with penalties for non-compliance such as the North American Electric Reliability Corporation Critical Infrastructure Protection standards. These DOE and DHS programs that address security improvements by both suppliers and end users provide an excellent model for nuclear facility personnel concerned with safeguards and security cyber vulnerabilities and countermeasures. It is not a stretch to imagine complete surreptitious collapse of protection against the removal of nuclear material or even initiation of a criticality event as witnessed at Three Mile Island or Chernobyl in a nuclear ICS inadequately protected against the cyber threat.

  14. Life cycle assessment of bio-based, waterborne PU adhesives for fast industrial bonding processes

    OpenAIRE

    Maga, Daniel; Melchiors, Martin; Henneken, Hartmut; Taden, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Aqueous PU dispersion adhesives based on high molecular weight, semi-crystalline polyurethane polymers have long demonstrated their outstanding performance and are a well-established bonding technology in several industrial applications. Due to their thermal activation properties and sharp melting area, these adhesives allow for efficient bonding processes with short bond strength build-up times. State-of-the-art is the use of polyester building blocks from fossil raw material resources to sy...

  15. An application of oscillation-damped motion for suspended payloads to the advanced integrated maintenance system in fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noakes, M.W.; Petterson, B.J.; Werner, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    The transportation of objects using overhead cranes can induce pendular motion of the object, which usually must be damped or allowed to decay before the next process can take place. Recent work at Sandia National Laboratories has shown that oscillation-damped transport and swing-free stops are possible by properly programming the acceleration of the transporting crane. Initial studies have been completed using a CIMCORP XR6100 gantry robot. The Advanced Integrated Maintenance System (AIMS) is an engineering and operations test bed developed for remote maintenance and handling studies within the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The goal of CFRP has been to advanced the technology of in-cell systems planned for future nuclear fuel cycle facilities. The AIMS provides the capabilities to examine the needs and constraints necessary for hot-cell remote maintenance and includes a force-reflecting master/slave teleoperator and overhead transporter system. The associated control system provides a flexible programming environment conducive to controls experimentation. This paper reviews the theory associated with oscillation-damped trajectories for simply suspended objects and describes a specific implementation of the oscillation damping methods for the AIMS transporter. Hardware and software requirements and constraints for proper operation are discussed

  16. Criticality safety strategy and analysis summary for the fuel cycle facility electrorefiner at Argonne National Laboratory West

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariani, R.D.; Benedict, R.W.; Lell, R.M.; Turski, R.B.; Fujita, E.K.

    1996-01-01

    As part of the termination activities of Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) West, the spent metallic fuel from EBR-II will be treated in the fuel cycle facility (FCF). A key component of the spent-fuel treatment process in the FCF is the electrorefiner (ER) in which the actinide metals are separated from the active metal fission products and the reactive bond sodium. In the electrorefining process, the metal fuel is anodically dissolved into a high-temperature molten salt, and refined uranium or uranium/plutonium products are deposited at cathodes. The criticality safety strategy and analysis for the ANL West FCF ER is summarized. The FCF ER operations and processes formed the basis for evaluating criticality safety and control during actinide metal fuel refining. To show criticality safety for the FCF ER, the reference operating conditions for the ER had to be defined. Normal operating envelopes (NOEs) were then defined to bracket the important operating conditions. To keep the operating conditions within their NOEs, process controls were identified that can be used to regulate the actinide forms and content within the ER. A series of operational checks were developed for each operation that will verify the extent or success of an operation. The criticality analysis considered the ER operating conditions at their NOE values as the point of departure for credible and incredible failure modes. As a result of the analysis, FCF ER operations were found to be safe with respect to criticality

  17. Determining the potential volume of industrial process steam to be generated in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jobsky, T.

    1990-01-01

    The present study serves to determine the market potential of nuclear energy for industrial process steam supply according to branches and sites in the Federal Republic of Germany (excluding the new East German Laender). On the nuclear plant side two HTR reference plants with different unit powers of 200 MWth (HTR-Modul) and 100 MWth are investigated. An essential result in analysing the nuclear market potential is the finding that the number of potential users and sites will triple if smaller unit sizes were introduced. This corresponds to an increase in nuclear plant potential from 28 units of 200 MWth each to 91 units of 100 MWth on the assumptions made in this study. A comparison of economic efficiency between fossil-fired power production plants and the HTR-Modul shows the competitiveness of nuclear process steam and electricity production in the base load range. A single-site evaluation for the centres of energy demand competes conceptually with a combined heat supply by nuclear long-distance energy. This integrated supply concept makes it possible to supply considerably more industrial companies with process steam while reducing the number of sites, since the heat requirements of smaller sites can also be covered by the integrated system. (orig.) [de

  18. Intertidal Concentrations of Microplastics and Their Influence on Ammonium Cycling as Related to the Shellfish Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluzard, Melanie; Kazmiruk, Tamara N; Kazmiruk, Vasily D; Bendell, L I

    2015-10-01

    Microplastics are ubiquitous within the marine environment. The last 10 years have seen research directed at understanding the fate and effect of microplastics within the marine environment; however, no studies have yet addressed how concentrations of these particles could affect sedimentary processes such as nutrient cycling. Herein we first determine the concentration and spatial distribution of microplastics within Baynes Sound, a key shellfish-growing area within coastal British Columbia (BC). We also determined sediment grain size and % organic matter (OM) such that we could relate spatial patterns in sediment microplastic concentrations to sedimentary processes that determine zones of accretion and erosion. Using field-determined concentrations of microplastics, we applied laboratory microcosms studies, which manipulated sediment concentrations of microplastics, OM, and bivalves to determine the influence of sediment microplastics on ammonium cycling within intertidal sediments. Concentrations of microplastics determined within the intertidal sediment varied spatially and were similar to those found in other coastal regions of high urban use. Concentrations were independent of grain size and OM suggesting that physical processes other than those that govern natural sediment components determine the fate of microplastics within sediments. Under laboratory conditions, concentrations of ammonium were significantly greater in the overlying water of treatments with microplastics, clams, and OM compared with treatments without microplastics. These preliminary studies suggest that high concentrations of microplastics have the potential to alter key sedimentary processes such as ammonium flux. This could have serious implications, for example, contributing to eutrophication events in regions of the coast that are highly urbanized.

  19. A cumulative energy demand indicator (CED), life cycle based, for industrial waste management decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, Rita; Fullana-I-Palmer, Pere; Baquero, Grau; Riba, Jordi-Roger; Bala, Alba

    2013-12-01

    Life cycle thinking is a good approach to be used for environmental decision-support, although the complexity of the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies sometimes prevents their wide use. The purpose of this paper is to show how LCA methodology can be simplified to be more useful for certain applications. In order to improve waste management in Catalonia (Spain), a Cumulative Energy Demand indicator (LCA-based) has been used to obtain four mathematical models to help the government in the decision of preventing or allowing a specific waste from going out of the borders. The conceptual equations and all the subsequent developments and assumptions made to obtain the simplified models are presented. One of the four models is discussed in detail, presenting the final simplified equation to be subsequently used by the government in decision making. The resulting model has been found to be scientifically robust, simple to implement and, above all, fulfilling its purpose: the limitation of waste transport out of Catalonia unless the waste recovery operations are significantly better and justify this transport. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. A methodology to incorporate life cycle analysis and the triple bottom line mechanism for sustainable management of industrial enterprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Lin, Li

    2004-02-01

    Since 1970"s, the environmental protection movement has challenged industries to increase their investment in Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing (ECM) techniques and management tools. Social considerations for global citizens and their descendants also motivated the examination on the complex issues of sustainable development beyond the immediate economic impact. Consequently, industrial enterprises have started to understand sustainable development in considering the Triple Bottom Line (TBL): economic prosperity, environmental quality and social justice. For the management, however, a lack of systematic ECM methodologies hinders their effort in planning, evaluating, reporting and auditing of sustainability. To address this critical need, this research develops a framework of a sustainable management system by incorporating a Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of industrial operations with the TBL mechanism. A TBL metric system with seven sets of indices for the TBL elements and their complex relations is identified for the comprehensive evaluation of a company"s sustainability performance. Utilities of the TBL indices are estimated to represent the views of various stakeholders, including the company, investors, employees and the society at large. Costs of these indices are also captured to reflect the company"s effort in meeting the utilities. An optimization model is formulated to maximize the economic, environmental and social benefits by the company"s effort in developing sustainable strategies. To promote environmental and social consciousness, the methodology can significantly facilitate management decisions by its capabilities of including "non-business" values and external costs that the company has not contemplated before.

  1. Industrialization

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lucy

    importantly exploiting cheap labour for industrial purposes from the native population. 13 . During the colonial era manufacturing in the continent was generally at the handicraft and small scale levels. In some colonies this was supplemented by some relatively complex industries producing mainly for export, but also ...

  2. ORNL necessary and sufficient standards for environment, safety, and health. Final report of the Identification Team for other industrial, radiological, and non-radiological hazard facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    This Necessary and Sufficient (N and S) set of standards is for Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These facility classifications are based on a laboratory-wide approach to classify facilities by hazard category. An analysis of the hazards associated with the facilities at ORNL was conducted in 1993. To identify standards appropriate for these Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities, the activities conducted in these facilities were assessed, and the hazards associated with the activities were identified. A preliminary hazards list was distributed to all ORNL organizations. The hazards identified in prior hazard analyses are contained in the list, and a category of other was provided in each general hazard area. A workshop to assist organizations in properly completing the list was held. Completed hazard screening lists were compiled for each ORNL division, and a master list was compiled for all Other Industrial, Radiological Hazard, and Non-Radiological facilities and activities. The master list was compared against the results of prior hazard analyses by research and development and environment, safety, and health personnel to ensure completeness. This list, which served as a basis for identifying applicable environment, safety, and health standards, appears in Appendix A.

  3. Development of an Industry Dynamometer/Spin Test Facility--Equipment Only: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-05-164

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDade, Mark [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory (DOE/NREL) owns and operates a megawatt-scale dynamometer used for testing wind turbine drive trains up to 1.5 megawatt (MW) in rated capacity. At this time, this unit is the only unit of its type in the United States, available for use by the American Wind Industry. Currently this dynamometer is heavily backlogged and unavailable to provide testing needed by various wind industry members. DOE/NREL is in possession of two critical pieces of equipment that may be used to develop an alternative Dynamometer facility, but does not have the funds or other resources necessary to develop such a facility. The Participant possesses complimentary facilities and infrastructure that when combined with the NREL equipment can create such a test facility. The Participant is also committed to expending funds to develop and operate such a facility to the subsequent benefit of the Wind Industry and DOE Wind Energy program. In exchange for DOE/NREL providing the critical equipment, the Participant will grant DOE/NREL a minimum of 90 days of testing time per year in the new facility while incurring no facilities fees.

  4. ORNL necessary and sufficient standards for environment, safety, and health. Final report of the Identification Team for other industrial, radiological, and non-radiological hazard facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    This Necessary and Sufficient (N and S) set of standards is for Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These facility classifications are based on a laboratory-wide approach to classify facilities by hazard category. An analysis of the hazards associated with the facilities at ORNL was conducted in 1993. To identify standards appropriate for these Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities, the activities conducted in these facilities were assessed, and the hazards associated with the activities were identified. A preliminary hazards list was distributed to all ORNL organizations. The hazards identified in prior hazard analyses are contained in the list, and a category of other was provided in each general hazard area. A workshop to assist organizations in properly completing the list was held. Completed hazard screening lists were compiled for each ORNL division, and a master list was compiled for all Other Industrial, Radiological Hazard, and Non-Radiological facilities and activities. The master list was compared against the results of prior hazard analyses by research and development and environment, safety, and health personnel to ensure completeness. This list, which served as a basis for identifying applicable environment, safety, and health standards, appears in Appendix A

  5. Managing nuclear safety research facilities and capabilities in a changing nuclear industry: the contribution of the OECD/NEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royen, J.

    2000-01-01

    Although the safety level of nuclear power plants in OECD countries is very satisfactory and the technologies basic to the resolution of safety issues have advanced considerably, continued nuclear safety research work is necessary to address many of the residual concerns, and it remains an important element in ensuring the safe operation of nuclear power plants. However, the funding levels of national Government safety research programmes have been reduced over recent years. There is concern about the ability of OECD Member countries to sustain an adequate level of nuclear safety research capability. The OECD/NEA has a key role to play in organizing reflection and exchange of information on the most efficient use of available technical resources, and in the international management of nuclear safety research facilities and capabilities in a changing nuclear industry. Possible initiatives are mentioned in the paper. (author)

  6. REVIEW OF INDUSTRIES AND GOVERNMENT AGENCIES FOR TECHNOLOGIES APPLICABLE TO DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS FACILITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilkoff, T. E.; Hetland, M. D.; O' Leary, E. M.

    2002-02-25

    The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area's (DDFA's) mission is to develop, demonstrate, and deploy improved deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) technologies. This mission requires that emphasis be continually placed on identifying technologies currently employed or under development in other nuclear as well as nonnuclear industries and government agencies. In support of DDFA efforts to clean up the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) radiologically contaminated surplus facilities using technologies that improve worker safety, reduce costs, and accelerate cleanup schedules, a study was conducted to identify innovative technologies developed for use in nonnuclear arenas that are appropriate for D&D applications.

  7. Small scale wind power harnessing in Colombian oil industry facilities: Wind resource and technology issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraldo, Mauricio; Nieto, Cesar; Escudero, Ana C.; Cobos, Juan C.; Delgado, Fernando

    2010-07-01

    Full text: Looking to improve its national and international standing, Colombia's national oil company, Ecopetrol, has set its goal on becoming involved on the production of energy from multiple sources, most importantly, on having an important percentage of its installed capacity from renewable sources. Part of this effort entices the evaluation of wind power potential on its facilities, including production, transportation and administrative, as well as identifying those technologies most suitable for the specific conditions of an equatorial country such as Colombia. Due to the lack of adequate site information, the first step consisted in superimposing national data to the facilities map of the company; this allowed for the selection of the first set of potential sites. From this set, the terminal at Covenas-Sucre was selected taking into account not only wind resource, but ease of access and power needs, as well as having a more or less representative wind potential in comparison to the rest of the country. A weather station was then installed to monitor wind variables. Measurements taken showed high variations in wind direction, and relatively low velocity profiles, making most commercially available wind turbines difficult to implement. In light of the above, a series of iterative steps were taken, first considering a range of individual Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT), given their capacity to adapt to changing wind directions. However, wind speed variations proved to be a challenge for individual VAWT's, i.e. Darriues turbines do not work well with low wind speeds, and Savonius turbines are not efficient of high wind speeds. As a result, a combined Darrieus- Savonius VAWT was selected given the capacity to adapt to both wind regimes, while at the same time modifying the size and shape of the blades in order to adapt to the lower average wind speeds present at the site. The resulting prototype is currently under construction and is scheduled to

  8. Implementation of advanced control system in 700 MWe fuelling machine test facility using FPGA and Industrial PCs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Ritu; Verma, P.S.; Sil, Jaydeb

    2014-01-01

    Fuelling machines are required to perform ON-POWER refuelling in Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWR). Fuelling machine is an example of high level engineered and precision robotics, which performs more then thousands of complex operations with the help of mechanical actuators using electrical and fluid hydraulic powers. The complete refuelling operation is performed remotely by an automatic control system which is specifically designed to cater the step by step needs of fuelling operation along with built in safety feature to avoid any damage to man, machine and reactor safety. As the design evolution of PHWR from 220 MWe to 700 MWe has resulted in significant changes, Fuelling machines have also experienced substantial advances and design modification from each reactor. These design changes are required to be simulated and verified to ascertain the intended behaviour during actual reactor operation. In view of the above, to validate and verify the design changes of 700 MWe Fuelling machine, a fully automatic Fuelling Machine Test facility (FMTF) is developed at R and D Centre, NPCIL. This facility, with the help of three similar reactor coolant channels, is able to simulate the conditions as in actual reactor environment and performs full refuelling sequence in complete auto mode. The control system philosophy for 700 MWe FMTF was to have fully automatic and safe operating sequence with PC based architecture using minimum hardware to have compact and simplified design. This resulted in the use of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) based hardwired logic implementation along with Industrial Computer based control and display system using Data acquisition Cards. This design has drastically reduced the complex wiring implementation of combinational and sequential logic as compared to the earlier control system of FM and resulted in a very compact and sophisticated operator console. This paper brings out the details of FMTF control system which offers numerous

  9. Potential soil contaminant levels of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans at industrial facilities employing heat transfer operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, N.E.; Muhr, C.A.; Greene, D.W.

    1992-04-01

    Certain manufacturing facilities formerly used large quantities of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) fluids in heat transfer operations. At many of these locations, operations have also involved PCB-containing electrical equipment. Commonly, over many years of plant operations, spills and leaks have resulted in PCB soil contamination. Dioxins and furans have been associated with PCB contamination in both the technical and popular press. Consequently, the need for analyses for dioxins and furans must be evaluated at locations where soils are contaminated with PCBs. This report presents an evaluation of potential dioxin and furan soil contamination based on heat transfer operations and spills from electrical equipment. The following five scenarios were examined for dioxin and furan contamination: (1) impurities in heat transfer fluids, (2) formation during heat transfer operations, (3) pyrolysis of heat transfer fluids, (4) impurities in dielectric fluids, and (5) pyrolysis of dielectric fluids. The potential contamination with dioxins and furans was calculated and compared with a 20 ppb guideline that has been used by the Centers for Disease Control for dioxin in subsoil. The results demonstrated that dioxins are formed only under pyrolytic conditions and only from the trichlorobenzenes present in dielectric fluids. Furans are found as impurities in PCB fluids but, as with dioxins, are not formed in significant quantities except during pyrolysis. Fortunately, pyrolytic conditions involving PCB fluids and soil contamination are unlikely; therefore, analyses for dioxin and furan contamination in soils will rarely be needed.

  10. Investigation of potential soil contamination with Cr and Ni in four metal finishing facilities at Asopos industrial area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Karayannis, Athanassios; Kollias, Konstantinos; Xenidis, Anthimos; Papassiopi, Nymphodora

    2015-01-08

    The objective of this work was to investigate whether previous disposal practices in four metal finishing facilities, located at Asopos river basin (East-Central Greece), have caused any potential serious contamination of soils. The study focused mainly on Cr and Ni, which are the primary elements of concern in the area. To estimate the natural geochemical levels of Cr and Ni, thirty soil samples were collected from locations that were not suspected of any contamination. In this group of samples, Cr concentration varied between 60 and 418 mg/kg, and Ni concentrations varied from 91 to 1200 mg/kg. The second group of samples consisted of more than 100 drill cores and surface soil samples, potentially affected by the disposal of effluents and/or the drainage of runoff water from the industrial facilities. According to the findings of the study, the disposal of treated effluents in absorption type sinks resulted occasionally in the contamination of a thin layer of soil just at the bottom of the sinks, but there was no indication of downward migration, since Cr and Ni concentrations in the lower soil layers were similar to those of the reference soils. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The January 17, 1994 Northridge Earthquake: Effects on selected industrial facilities and lifelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eli, M.W.; Sommer, S.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Roche, T.R.; Merz, K.L.

    1995-02-01

    Revision 0 of this report is being published in February 1995 to closely mark the one-year anniversary of the Northridge Earthquake. A September 1994 Draft version of the report was reviewed by DOE and NRC, and many of the review comments are incorporated into Revision 0. While this revision of the report is not entirely complete, it is being made available for comment, review, and evaluation. Since the report was written by several authors, sections of the report have slightly different styles. Several sections of Revision 0 are not complete, but are planned to be completed in Revision 1. The primary unfinished section is Section 3.3 on Electric Power Transmission. Other sections of Revision 0, such as Section 4.5.2 on the Energy Technology Engineering Center and 3.2 on Electric Power Generation, will be enhanced with further detailed information as it becomes available. In addition, further data, including processed response spectra for investigated facilities and cataloging of relay performance, will be added to Revision 1 depending upon investigation support. While Revision 0 of this report is being published by LLNL, Revision 1 is planned to be published by EPRI. The anticipated release date for Revision 1 is December 1995. Unfortunately, the one-year anniversary of the Northridge Earthquake was also marked by the devastating Hyogo-Ken Nanbu (or Hanshin-Awaji) Earthquake in Kobe, Japan. As compared to the Northridge Earthquake, there were many more deaths, collapsed structures, destroyed lifelines, and fires following the Kobe Earthquake. Lessons from the Kobe Earthquake will both reemphasize topics discussed in this report and provide further issues to be addressed when designing and retrofitting structures, systems, and components for seismic strong motion.

  12. Implementing an energetic life cycle analysis to prove the benefits of lignocellulosic feedstocks with protein separation for the chemical industry from the existing bioethanol industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehmer, Ben; Sanders, Johan

    2009-02-15

    The biofuel ethanol is currently being produced in large quantities from corn in the US and from wheat in the EU and further capacity expansion is expected. Relying on the so-called 1st generation technology, only the starch contained in the edible portion of the crops (ears/grains) is subjected to fermentation. Following life cycle calculations reveals minute levels of fossil fuel replacement placing doubt on its renewability and an imbalance on the domestic animal feed markets are immerging due to the by-product distiller grains. Additional utilization of the lignocellulosic and protein components of the by-product through new developments has the potential to alleviate both setbacks. A cradle-to-factory gate analysis was performed on a variety of bioethanol production layouts incorporating the newest technological developments to determine the maximum fossil fuel reduction potential. Expanding to include lignocellulose pretreatment for ethanol production with protein separation for amine-based chemical production can increase the fossil fuel mitigation potential by seven- to ninefold for US-corn and five- to eightfold for EU-wheat bioethanol facilities.

  13. Monitoring industrial facilities using principles of integration of fiber classifier and local sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotaev, Valery V.; Denisov, Victor M.; Rodrigues, Joel J. P. C.; Serikova, Mariya G.; Timofeev, Andrey V.

    2015-05-01

    The paper deals with the creation of integrated monitoring systems. They combine fiber-optic classifiers and local sensor networks. These systems allow for the monitoring of complex industrial objects. Together with adjacent natural objects, they form the so-called geotechnical systems. An integrated monitoring system may include one or more spatially continuous fiber-optic classifiers based on optic fiber and one or more arrays of discrete measurement sensors, which are usually combined in sensor networks. Fiber-optic classifiers are already widely used for the control of hazardous extended objects (oil and gas pipelines, railways, high-rise buildings, etc.). To monitor local objects, discrete measurement sensors are generally used (temperature, pressure, inclinometers, strain gauges, accelerometers, sensors measuring the composition of impurities in the air, and many others). However, monitoring complex geotechnical systems require a simultaneous use of continuous spatially distributed sensors based on fiber-optic cable and connected local discrete sensors networks. In fact, we are talking about integration of the two monitoring methods. This combination provides an additional way to create intelligent monitoring systems. Modes of operation of intelligent systems can automatically adapt to changing environmental conditions. For this purpose, context data received from one sensor (e.g., optical channel) may be used to change modes of work of other sensors within the same monitoring system. This work also presents experimental results of the prototype of the integrated monitoring system.

  14. A study on relationship between information technology facilities and performance of banking industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Khodaei Valahzaghard

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The recent advances on information technology have made tremendous change on traditional banking. These days, people do not carry cash and prefer to use electronic devices such as point of sale system (POS or PIN entry devices (PinPad to do desirable transactions. These technologies could facilitate e-business and increase profitability in various industries including banking sector. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of five new products namely ATM, POS Machines, PinPad machines, online and swift branches on banking performance indicators including return on assets (ROA, return on equities (ROE and operating investment return (OIR. We use the information of 19 private and governmental banks, which were active in Iran over the period of 2005-2010. The study uses linear regression analysis as well as VAR technique to study the effects of the independent variables on bank performance indicators. The results indicate that while there are some weak and positive relationships between three technology indicators including POS, PinPad and online businesses and ROA as well as ROE, there is relatively strong and positive relationship between these three independent variables and OIR. In addition, while the results of VAR analysis have shown that any reduction on PinPad will reduce OIR but this reduction will disappear after approximately four periods.

  15. On-Line Radiation Test Facility for Industrial Equipment needed for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Rausch, R

    1999-01-01

    The future Large Hadron Collider to be built at CERN will use superconducting magnets cooled down to 1.2 K. To preserve the superconductivity, the energy deposition dose levels in equipment located outside the cryostat, in the LHC tunnel, are calculated to be of the order of 1 to 10 Gy per year. At such dose levels, no major radiation-damage problems are to be expected, and the possibility of installing Commercial Of The Shelf (COTS) electronic equipment in the LHC tunnel along the accelerator is considered. To this purpose, industrial electronic equipment and circuits have to be qualified and tested against radiation to insure their long term stability and reliability. An on-line radiation test facility has been setup at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and a program of on-line tests for electronic equipment is ongoing. Equipment tested includes Industrial Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) from several manufacturers, standard VME modules, Fieldbuses like Profibus, WorldFIP and CAN, various electro...

  16. Industrialization

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lucy

    . African states as ... regarded as the most important ingredients that went to add value to land and labour in order for countries ... B. Sutcliffe Industry and Underdevelopment (Massachusetts Addison – Wesley Publishing Company. 1971), pp.

  17. Industrialization

    OpenAIRE

    Blundel, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Industrialization, the historical development that saw cheesemaking transformed from a largely craft-based or artisanal activity, often located on a dairy farm, to a production process that, for the most part, takes place in large ‘cheese factories’ or creameries [See ARTISANAL]. The principal features of modern industrialized cheesemaking, which set it apart from traditional approaches include: high production volumes; sourcing of milk from multiple dairy herds; pasteurization and re-balanci...

  18. Study of advanced professional educational requirements relative to nuclear fuel cycle engineering in industry and government. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jur, T.A.; Huhns, M.N.; Keating, D.A.; Orloff, D.I.; Rhodes, C.A.; Stanford, T.G.; Stephens, L.M.; Tatterson, G.B.; Van Brunt, V.

    1978-12-01

    Under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, the College of Engineering at the University of South Carolina has conducted an assessment of educational needs among engineers working in nuclear fuel cycle related areas. The study was initiated as a regional effort focusing on the concentration of nuclear industry in the Southeast. Educational needs addressed were those at the post-baccalaureate professional level. The project was envisioned as providing base line information for the eventual implementation of a program in line with the needs of the Southeast's nuclear community. Specific objectives were to establish the content of such a program and to determine those specialized features which would make the program most attractive and useful

  19. Study of advanced professional educational requirements relative to nuclear fuel cycle engineering in industry and government. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jur, T.A.; Huhns, M.N.; Keating, D.A.; Orloff, D.I.; Rhodes, C.A.; Stanford, T.G.; Stephens, L.M.; Tatterson, G.B.; Van Brunt, V.

    1978-12-01

    An assessment was conducted of educational needs among engineers working in nuclear fuel cycle-related areas, focusing on the nuclear industry in the Southeast. Educational needs addressed were those at the post-baccalaureate professional level. As a result of the study, a list of subject areas has been compiled as best representing the current content of an educational program. In addition to identifying subject areas, a set of course descriptions and reference materials has been developed around each subject. Each course description contains information regarding objectives, anticipated audience, and prerequisites and offers a suggested course outline. An initial modest program of implementation is recommended which would continue to concentrate on the Southeast as a target area

  20. Study of advanced professional educational requirements relative to nuclear fuel cycle engineering in industry and government. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jur, T.A.; Huhns, M.N.; Keating, D.A.; Orloff, D.I.; Rhodes, C.A.; Stanford, T.G.; Stephens, L.M.; Tatterson, G.B.; Van Brunt, V.

    1978-12-01

    Under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, the College of Engineering at the University of South Carolina has conducted an assessment of educational needs among engineers working in nuclear fuel cycle related areas. The study was initiated as a regional effort focusing on the concentration of nuclear industry in the Southeast. Educational needs addressed were those at the post-baccalaureate professional level. The project was envisioned as providing base line information for the eventual implementation of a program in line with the needs of the Southeast's nuclear community. Specific objectives were to establish the content of such a program and to determine those specialized features which would make the program most attractive and useful.

  1. Study of advanced professional educational requirements relative to nuclear fuel cycle engineering in industry and government. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jur, T.A.; Huhns, M.N.; Keating, D.A.; Orloff, D.I.; Rhodes, C.A.; Stanford, T.G.; Stephens, L.M.; Tatterson, G.B.; Van Brunt, V.

    1978-12-01

    An assessment was conducted of educational needs among engineers working in nuclear fuel cycle-related areas, focusing on the nuclear industry in the Southeast. Educational needs addressed were those at the post-baccalaureate professional level. As a result of the study, a list of subject areas has been compiled as best representing the current content of an educational program. In addition to identifying subject areas, a set of course descriptions and reference materials has been developed around each subject. Each course description contains information regarding objectives, anticipated audience, and prerequisites and offers a suggested course outline. An initial modest program of implementation is recommended which would continue to concentrate on the Southeast as a target area.

  2. How physical modelling can improve Life Cycle Inventory accuracy and allow predictive LCA: an application to the steel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirgaux, O.; Ablitzer, D.; Iosif, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Assessing traditional iron and steelmaking processes from an environmental point of view and developing breakthrough eco-efficient processes for the future are major challenges for the steel industry today. In the framework of the challenging European project ULCOS, which stands for Ultra Low CO 2 Steelmaking, Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) was chosen to assess breakthrough processes that could be part of the future iron and steel making landscape and to compare them to the reference classical integrated steel-mill. To carry out such a study we propose a new methodological concept which combines LCA thinking with physicochemical process modelling. Physicochemical models were developed for each processes of the classical integrated steelmaking route in order to generate the data required to draw the Life Cycle Inventory of the route. Such a method bypasses the traditional data collection and brings accuracy to the inventory by introducing rigorous mass and energy balances into the methodology. In addition it was shown that such an approach allows testing and assessing different operational practices of the processes in order to optimise the use of energy and the CO 2 emissions, which showed that it can be used as a powerful tool for eco-conception of processes. (authors)

  3. Industry-Cost-Curve Approach for Modeling the Environmental Impact of Introducing New Technologies in Life Cycle Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kätelhön, Arne; von der Assen, Niklas; Suh, Sangwon; Jung, Johannes; Bardow, André

    2015-07-07

    The environmental costs and benefits of introducing a new technology depend not only on the technology itself, but also on the responses of the market where substitution or displacement of competing technologies may occur. An internationally accepted method taking both technological and market-mediated effects into account, however, is still lacking in life cycle assessment (LCA). For the introduction of a new technology, we here present a new approach for modeling the environmental impacts within the framework of LCA. Our approach is motivated by consequential life cycle assessment (CLCA) and aims to contribute to the discussion on how to operationalize consequential thinking in LCA practice. In our approach, we focus on new technologies producing homogeneous products such as chemicals or raw materials. We employ the industry cost-curve (ICC) for modeling market-mediated effects. Thereby, we can determine substitution effects at a level of granularity sufficient to distinguish between competing technologies. In our approach, a new technology alters the ICC potentially replacing the highest-cost producer(s). The technologies that remain competitive after the new technology's introduction determine the new environmental impact profile of the product. We apply our approach in a case study on a new technology for chlor-alkali electrolysis to be introduced in Germany.

  4. Fuel cycle centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, M.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of co-locating and integrating fuel cycle facilities at one site is discussed. This concept offers considerable advantages, especially in minimizing the amount of radioactive material to be transported on public roads. Safeguards and physical protection as relating to such an integrated system of facilities are analysed in detail, also industrial and commercial questions. An overall risk-benefit evaluation turns out to be in favour of fuel cycle centres. These centres seem to be specifically attractive with regard to the back end of the fuel cycle, including on-site disposal of radioactive wastes. The respective German approach is presented as an example. Special emphasis is given to the site selection procedures in this case. Time scale and cost for the implementation of this concept are important factors to be looked at. Since participation of governmental institutions in these centres seems to be indispensable their respective roles as compared to industry must be clearly defined. The idea of adjusting fuel cycle centres to regional rather than national use might be an attractive option, depending on the specific parameters in the region, though results of existing multinational ventures are inconclusive in this respect. Major difficulties might be expected e.g. because of different national safety regulations and standards as well as commercial conditions among partner countries. Public acceptance in the host country seems to be another stumbling block for the realization of this type of multinational facilities

  5. Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of

  6. Benefits of clean development mechanism application on the life cycle assessment perspective: a case study in the palm oil industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuen, Onn Chiu; Yusoff, Sumiani

    2012-03-01

    This study performed an assessment on the beneficial of the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) application on waste treatment system in a local palm oil industry in Malaysia. Life cycle assessment (LCA) was conducted to assess the environmental impacts of the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction from the CDM application. Calculations on the emission reduction used the methodology based on AM002 (Avoided Wastewater and On-site Energy Use Emissions in the Industrial Sector) Version 4 published by United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCC). The results from the studies showed that the introduction of CDM in the palm oil mill through conversion of the captured biogas from palm oil mill effluent (POME) treatment into power generation were able to reduce approximate 0.12 tonnes CO2 equivalent concentration (tCO2e) emission and 30 kW x hr power generation per 1 tonne of fresh fruit bunch processed. Thus, the application of CDM methodology on palm oil mill wastewater treatment was able to reduce up to 1/4 of the overall environment impact generated in palm oil mill.

  7. Mass balance of emerging contaminants in the water cycle of a highly urbanized and industrialized area of Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiglioni, Sara; Davoli, Enrico; Riva, Francesco; Palmiotto, Marinella; Camporini, Paolo; Manenti, Angela; Zuccato, Ettore

    2017-12-22

    The occurrence of several classes of emerging contaminants (ECs) was assessed in the River Lambro basin, one of the most urbanized and industrialized areas of Italy. The study aims were to identify the main sources of ECs, quantify their amounts circulating in the water cycle, and study their fate in the aquatic environment. More than 80 ECs were selected among pharmaceuticals (PHARM), personal care products (PCPs), disinfectants (DIS), illicit drugs (IDs), perfluorinated compounds (PERF), alkylphenols and bisphenol A (Alk-BPA), and anthropogenic markers (AM). Specific analytical methods were developed for quantitative analysis based on solid phase extraction and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. ECs were measured in rivers upstream and downstream of the main city (Milan), and in untreated and treated wastewater from Milan to assess the contribution to river contamination, and in superficial and deep groundwater in the city area to study the relationship between river and groundwater contamination. Samples were collected in a two-year monitoring campaign. Almost all ECs were ubiquitous in untreated wastewater, at concentrations up to the μg/L range, and the most abundant classes were PHARM and AM. Removals during different wastewater treatment processes were studied and the most stable substances were PHARM, PCPs and PERF. The mass loads increased for all the classes of ECs along the River Lambro basin. A mass balance was done in the river basin and allowed to identify the main sources of contamination, which were domestic, from treated or untreated wastewater, for PHARM, PCPs and IDs, mainly industrial for PERF, and both industrial and domestic for Alk-BPA. The study of AM helped to identify direct discharges of untreated wastewater. A substantial contribution of surface water to groundwater contamination was observed. This study improves the knowledge on occurrence, sources and fate of multiple classes of ECs in a highly urbanized area providing

  8. Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt-Belz, B.; Mohamad, Y.; Velasco, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    Industry plays a key role in the path towards eInclusion. While corporate social responsibility statements of leading companies confirm this, surveys show that there is still a long way to go. Among various reasons for the reluctant take-up of Design for All (DfA) by industry providing Information and Communication Technology (ICT), the lack of relevant knowledge and skills obviously plays a crucial role. Therefore, the DfA@eInclusion project has undertaken to develop curriculum guidelines an...

  9. Nuclear fuel cycle facilities, laboratories, irradiators, particle accelerators, under-decommissioning reactors and radioactive waste management facilities safety. Lessons learned from events notified between 2005 and 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Maintaining high levels of safety in nuclear facilities requires constant vigilance by everyone involved, especially by plant operators who are first and foremost responsible for safety in their facilities. Safety can never be taken for granted; constant efforts must be made to improve it, by taking new knowledge and available operating feedback into account. In this respect, a substantial part of operating feedback is made up of lessons learned from analysing events, incidents or accidents occurring in France or in similar facilities abroad. To encourage the diffusion of operating feedback, IRSN has produced a report concerning events notified to the Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) by operators of LUDD facilities between 2005 and 2008. The main objective is to make general lessons for safety in this type of facility available based on a cross-disciplinary analysis of notified events and noted evolution trends. IRSN has had tools for managing information concerning events occurring in France and abroad for many years. These tools are used to analyse the events in order to take into account the relevant lessons learned in the safety assessments performed on behalf of ASN and also to define study and research programmes to maintain its expertise and expand its knowledge. The report has 4 sections: - the first section (chapters 2 to 4) presents the LUDD facilities so that the facilities themselves, their diversity and the main associated risks can be better understood. It also includes a brief reminder of plant operator obligations in notifying events and describes the database used by the Institute to manage the data relating to the notified events; - the second section (chapter 5) summarises the main changes noted in the events notified to ASN during 2005 to 2008 and provides an overall assessment of the consequences of these events for the environment, the population and the workers; - the third section (chapter 6) describes significant events occurring in France

  10. ICPP calcined solids storage facility closure study. Volume II: Cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle cost estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    This document contains Volume II of the Closure Study for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Calcined Solids Storage Facility. This volume contains draft information on cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle costs for the four options described in Volume I: (1) Risk-Based Clean Closure; NRC Class C fill, (2) Risk-Based Clean Closure; Clean fill, (3) Closure to landfill Standards; NRC Class C fill, and (4) Closure to Landfill Standards; Clean fill

  11. Industrial contamination of soil related to some active and closed mine facilities in the Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasev Goran K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several industrial pollution sources at the territory of the Republic of Macedonia, were studied, one Pb-Zn mine with mill, one copper mine with mill and copper leaching facility, as well as one former Pb-Zn smelting facility near the city of Veles and one Fe-Ni smelting facility near the city of Kavadarci. The concentrations of heavy metals at Veles hot-spot were in the range: 20÷1823 mg kg- 1Pb, 29÷2395 mg kg-1Zn, 28÷65 mgkg-1Cd, 27÷82 mg kg-1 Cu, 39÷164 mg kg-1Ni, 508÷938 mgkg-1Mn and 1.6÷3.8% Fe, all of them being above Dutch standard optimal values. The vicinity of the Feni plant displayed concentrations of heavy metals as follows: 16÷31 mg kg-1 Pb, 117÷286 mgkg-1 Zn, 13÷24 mg kg-1Co, 42÷119 mg kg-1 Cu, 158÷292 mg kg-1Ni, 119÷236 mg kg-1 Cr and 2.24÷3.79% Fe. Airborne dust measurements around the Zletovo mine displayed multiplexed above standard values, with an exception of nickel, there enrichment factors ranged from mediate ones such were those for copper of 20.8, cadmium of 28.7, arsenic of 32.5 up to high ones for zinc with 341.7 and lead 925. Soil samples around the Zletovo mine displayed: 19.3-76.9 g kg-1 Fe, 643-28000 mg kg-1 Mn, 42.3-529.66 mg kg-1 Pb and 138-3240 mg kg-1 Zn. Finally around the Bucim copper mine the results displayed the following findings: 13.1÷225 mg kg-1 As, 0.67÷17.9 mg kg-1 Cd, 30.1÷171 mg kg-1 Cr, 17.8÷1734 mg kg-1 Cu, 9.8÷69.4 mg kg-1 Ni, 46÷3456 mg kg-1 Pb, 88÷3438 mg kg-1 Zn, 169÷998 mg kg-1 Mn, 0.73÷5.02% Fe.

  12. Facile synthesis of cookies-shaped LiV{sub 3}O{sub 8} cathode materials with good cycling performance for lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, S.; Wang, X.L., E-mail: wangxl@zju.edu.cn; Lu, Y.; Jian, X.M.; Zhao, X.Y.; Tang, H.; Cai, J.B.; Gu, C.D.; Tu, J.P., E-mail: tujp@zju.edu.cn

    2014-01-25

    Highlights: • Cookies-shaped LiV{sub 3}O{sub 8} material was synthesized by a facile sol–gel method. • The compound shows high capacity retentions at different current densities. • The good performance is due to high crystallinity and little dissolution of vanadium. -- Abstract: Cookies-shaped LiV{sub 3}O{sub 8} materials were successfully synthesized by a facile ethylene glycol-assisted sol–gel method. The LiV{sub 3}O{sub 8} compound fabricated at 550 °C delivers an initial specific discharge capacity of 255.2 mAh g{sup −1} between 2.0 and 4.0 V at a current density of 50 mA g{sup −1}, and possesses a capacity retention of 90.2% after 50 cycles and up to 85% at a current density of 120 mA g{sup −1} after 100 cycles. Furthermore, the compound with a proper particle size and high crystallinity also shows high electrochemical reversibility and structural stability, leading good rate capability. By analysis of inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometer (ICP), the cookies-like LiV{sub 3}O{sub 8} has very little dissolution of vanadium in the electrolyte after 100 cycles, indicating that the well-formed crystal can protect the structure damage to some degree during cycling.

  13. Design Basis Provisions for New and Existing Nuclear Power Plants and Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soni, R.S.

    2013-01-01

    India has 3-Stage Nuclear Power Program. • Various facilities under design, construction or operation. • Design Basis Knowledge Management (DBKM) is an important and challenging task. • Design Basis Knowledge contributes towards: - Safe operation of running plants; - Design and construction of new facilities; - Addresses issues related to future decommissioning activities

  14. Regulatory supervision of industrial waste containing very low activities of man-made radionuclides at SevRAO facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneve, Malgorzata K.; Kochetkov, Oleg; Monastyrskaya, Svetlana; Barchukov, Valerie; Romanov, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Large amounts of waste and materials with very low activity level are generated during operation and especially during decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Selection of the optimum economic and ecologically safe management option of such material is complicated by its specific features: very low level radiation exposure to individuals but rather large initial amounts of waste. On the one hand, it is a poor use of limited resources to em place such low activity waste into expensive facilities for radioactive waste storage and disposal if the radiological impact would be very small even for a much less expensive option; on the other hand, there is some apprehension regarding safety both about its disposal to landfills for conventional (non-radioactive) waste disposal, and about its limited or unlimited re-use or re-cycling. To regulate such waste management, a special waste category is introduced - very low level waste (VLLW). This category includes waste containing radionuclides with specific activity levels, which are higher than clearance levels, but do not need high containment and isolation. This paper discusses experience of regulatory development for VLLW control during remediation of radiation hazardous facilities in northwest Russia. The work has promoted identification of some challenges, whose solution has affected the waste management strategy at the sites. One of the main problems resolved was the selection of criteria according to which waste is allocated to the VLLW category. These is turn were partly determined by the radiological criteria chosen for protection of the public during this waste disposal. Elaboration of safe VLLW management strategy depends upon a source of waste generation and of its radiological composition. The VLLW management strategy at an operating enterprise, e.g. a nuclear power plant is rather different from the strategy implemented at the plant under decommissioning, or at storage facilities for the legacy waste

  15. Management of Discharge of Low Level Liquid Radioactive Waste Generated in Medical, Educational, Research and Industrial Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-07-01

    benefit from the information in this publication, particularly with respect to design optimization for decay tanks or guidance provided on quality assurance arrangements. The most appropriate management option for the country and for individual facilities may be selected on the basis of local organizational preferences and experience, consistent with the national regulatory requirements. Due to the costs involved, the potential complexity of technical and environmental considerations, and the need to ensure adequate performance of any required decay storage arrangements, the process of selecting the optimized liquid effluent management option may be complex. This is especially true in countries with limited liquid radioactive effluent generation, limited practical experience and inadequate resources. This publication is intended for decision makers in countries generating radioactive effluents in the areas of medicine, education, research and industry with non-nuclear power applications. It provides guidance and information on how to implement and optimize their radioactive effluent management practices and describes methodologies, criteria and options for the selection of appropriate technology for the discharge of liquid radioactive effluents into the sewer system. The report reviews both technical and non-technical factors important for decision making and planning, and for the implementation of the most appropriate process design for effluent discharges at the country and facility levels. It makes practical recommendations for the selection of decay storage arrangements for different scales of radioactive effluent generation

  16. Fuel cycle oriented approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, A.

    1987-01-01

    The term fuel cycle oriented approach is currently used to designate two quite different things: the attempt to consider all or part of a national fuel cycle as one material balance area (MBA) or to consider individual MBAs existing in a state while designing a unique safeguards approach for each and applying the principle of nondiscrimination to fuel cycles as a whole, rather than to individual facilities. The merits of such an approach are acceptability by the industry and comparison with the contemplated establishment of long-term criteria. The following points concern the acceptability by the industry: (1) The main interest of the industry is to keep an open international market and therefore, to have effective and efficient safeguards. (2) The main concerns of the industry regarding international safeguards are economic burden, intrusiveness, and discrimination. Answers to these legitimate concerns, which retain the benefits of a fuel cycle oriented approach, are needed. More specifically, the problem of reimbursing the operator the costs that he has incurred for the safeguards must be considered

  17. Analysis of phthalate esters in soils near an electronics manufacturing facility and from a non-industrialized area by gas purge microsyringe extraction and gas chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wei [MOE Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Hu, Jia [Suzhou Center for Disease Prevention and Control, Suzhou, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Jinqi; Chen, Xuerong; Yao, Na [MOE Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Tao, Jing, E-mail: jingtao1982@126.com [MOE Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Zhou, Yi-Kai, E-mail: zhouyk@mails.tjmu.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China)

    2015-03-01

    Here, a novel technique is described for the extraction and quantitative determination of six phthalate esters (PAEs) from soils by gas purge microsyringe extraction and gas chromatography. Recovery of PAEs ranged from 81.4% to 120.3%, and the relative standard deviation (n = 6) ranged from 5.3% to 10.5%. Soil samples were collected from roadsides, farmlands, residential areas, and non-cultivated areas in a non-industrialized region, and from the same land-use types within 1 km of an electronics manufacturing facility (n = 142). Total PAEs varied from 2.21 to 157.62 mg kg{sup −1} in non-industrialized areas and from 8.63 to 171.64 mg kg{sup −1} in the electronics manufacturing area. PAE concentrations in the non-industrialized area were highest in farmland, followed (in decreasing order) by roadsides, residential areas, and non-cultivated soil. In the electronics manufacturing area, PAE concentrations were highest in roadside soils, followed by residential areas, farmland, and non-cultivated soils. Concentrations of dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), and di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP) differed significantly (P < 0.01) between the industrial and non-industrialized areas. Principal component analysis indicated that the strongest explanatory factor was related to DMP and DnBP in non-industrialized soils and to butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) and DMP in soils near the electronics manufacturing facility. Congener-specific analysis confirmed that diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) was a predictive indication both in the non-industrialized area (r{sup 2} = 0.944, P < 0.01) and the industrialized area (r{sup 2} = 0.860, P < 0.01). The higher PAE contents in soils near the electronics manufacturing facility are of concern, considering the large quantities of electronic wastes generated with ongoing industrialization. - Highlights: • A new method for determining phthalate esters in soil samples was developed. • Investigate six phthalates near an industry and a

  18. Sustainability in the Hotel Industry

    OpenAIRE

    SZTRUTEN (LEFTER) Gina Gilet

    2010-01-01

    The tourism industry has a dual relationship with the environment but has for many years claimed to be a "smokeless industry". In fact, accommodation facilities interact with their environments during every stage of their life cycle, often negatively. Resorts are frequently developed in pristine and fragile ecosystems with little or no consideration for the local natural or cultural environment. Many of the services offered by these establishments require the consumption of substantial quanti...

  19. Reference design for a centralized waste processing and storage facility. Technical manual for the management of low and intermediate level wastes generated at small nuclear research centres and by radioisotope users in medicine, research and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    The objective of this report is to present the generic reference design of a centralized waste processing and storage facility (WPSF) intended for countries producing small but significant quantities of liquid and solid radioactive wastes. These wastes are generated through the use of radionuclides for research, medical, industrial and other institutional activities in IAEA Member States that have not yet developed the infrastructure for a complete nuclear fuel cycle. The WPSF comprises two separate buildings. The first, for receiving and processing waste from the producers, includes the necessary equipment and support services for treating and conditioning the waste. The second building acts as a simple but adequate warehouse for storing a ten year inventory of the conditioned waste. In developing the design, it was a requirement of the IAEA that options for waste management techniques for each of the waste streams should be evaluated, in order to demonstrate that the reference design is based on the most appropriate technology. Refs, figs and tabs

  20. Nuclear energy center site survey: fuel cycle studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-05-01

    Background information for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Energy Center Site Survey is presented in the following task areas: economics of integrated vs. dispersed nuclear fuel cycle facilities, plutonium fungibility, fuel cycle industry model, production controls and failure contingencies, environmental impact, waste management, emergency response capability, and feasibility evaluations

  1. Improvement of the management of residual waste in areas without thermal treatment facilities: A life cycle analysis of an Italian management district

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Maria, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.dimaria@unipg.it [LAR Laboratory, Dipartimento di Ingegneria, Via G. Duranti 93, Perugia (Italy); Micale, Caterina; Morettini, Emanuela [LAR Laboratory, Dipartimento di Ingegneria, Via G. Duranti 93, Perugia (Italy); Sisani, Luciano [TSA spa, Via Case Sparse 107, Magione (Italy); Damiano, Roberto [GESENU spa, Via della Molinella 7, Perugia (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • LCA analysis of two option for residual waste management. • Exploitation of mechanical physical sorting facility for extracting recyclable from RMSW. • Processing the mechanically sorted organic fraction in bioreactor landfill. • Sensitivity analysis demonstrate high influence for impact assessment of substitution ratio for recycle materials. - Abstract: Starting from an existing waste management district without thermal treatment facilities, two different management scenarios for residual waste were compared by life cycle assessment (LCA). The adoption of a bioreactor landfill for managing the mechanically sorted organic fraction instead of bio-stabilization led to reduction of global warming and fresh water eutrophication by 50% and 10%, respectively. Extraction of recyclables from residual waste led to avoided emissions for particulate matter, acidification and resource depletion impact categories. Marginal energy and the amount of energy recovered from landfill gas marginally affected the LCA results. On the contrary the quality of the recyclables extracted can significantly modify the eco profile of the management schemes.

  2. Improvement of the management of residual waste in areas without thermal treatment facilities: A life cycle analysis of an Italian management district

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Maria, Francesco; Micale, Caterina; Morettini, Emanuela; Sisani, Luciano; Damiano, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • LCA analysis of two option for residual waste management. • Exploitation of mechanical physical sorting facility for extracting recyclable from RMSW. • Processing the mechanically sorted organic fraction in bioreactor landfill. • Sensitivity analysis demonstrate high influence for impact assessment of substitution ratio for recycle materials. - Abstract: Starting from an existing waste management district without thermal treatment facilities, two different management scenarios for residual waste were compared by life cycle assessment (LCA). The adoption of a bioreactor landfill for managing the mechanically sorted organic fraction instead of bio-stabilization led to reduction of global warming and fresh water eutrophication by 50% and 10%, respectively. Extraction of recyclables from residual waste led to avoided emissions for particulate matter, acidification and resource depletion impact categories. Marginal energy and the amount of energy recovered from landfill gas marginally affected the LCA results. On the contrary the quality of the recyclables extracted can significantly modify the eco profile of the management schemes

  3. A computer code to estimate accidental fire and radioactive airborne releases in nuclear fuel cycle facilities: User's manual for FIRIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, M.K.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Owczarski, P.C.

    1989-02-01

    This manual describes the technical bases and use of the computer code FIRIN. This code was developed to estimate the source term release of smoke and radioactive particles from potential fires in nuclear fuel cycle facilities. FIRIN is a product of a broader study, Fuel Cycle Accident Analysis, which Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The technical bases of FIRIN consist of a nonradioactive fire source term model, compartment effects modeling, and radioactive source term models. These three elements interact with each other in the code affecting the course of the fire. This report also serves as a complete FIRIN user's manual. Included are the FIRIN code description with methods/algorithms of calculation and subroutines, code operating instructions with input requirements, and output descriptions. 40 refs., 5 figs., 31 tabs.

  4. Life cycle baseline summary for ADS 6504IS Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of the Isotopes Facility Deactivation Project (IFDP) is to place former isotopes production facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition; suitable for an extended period of minimum surveillance and maintenance (S ampersand M) and as quickly and economically as possible. This baseline plan establishes the official target schedule for completing the deactivation work and the associated budget required for deactivation and the necessary S ampersand M. Deactivation of the facilities 3026C, 3026D, 3028, 3029, 3038E, 3038M, and 3038AHF, the Center Circle buildings 3047, 3517, and 7025 will continue though Fiscal Year (FY) 1999. The focus of the project in the early years will be on the smaller buildings that require less deactivation and can bring an early return in reducing S ampersand M costs. This baseline plan covers the period from FY1995 throughout FY2000. Deactivation will continue in various facilities through FY1999. A final year of S ampersand M will conclude the project in FY2000. The estimated total cost of the project during this period is $51M

  5. Off-design dynamic model of a real Organic Rankine Cycle system fuelled by exhaust gases from industrial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzi, N.; Rech, S.; Lazzaretto, A.

    2015-01-01

    ORCs (Organic Rankine Cycles) represent an effective option to exploit low grade heat fluxes, the characteristics of which not only affect design, but also performance and stability during operation. This paper presents a detailed design and off-design dynamic model of a superheated regenerative ORC system using the exhaust gases of an industrial process. The point of view is that of a designer who has to predict the system behavior both at steady-state and transient operation to get a reliable and efficient operation. Real physical and operating characteristics of all components are considered, with particular attention to the geometries of shell-and-tube commercial heat exchangers to properly simulate mass and thermal inertias. A suitable control system is chosen to govern the off-design operation taking into account all real operating constraints. Results show a slight decrease in gross system efficiency (less than 1% point) either varying the oil mass flow rate (in the range 80–110%) at constant temperature of the cold sink or this temperature (of 10 °C) at constant oil mass flow rate. Simulation of the transient behavior demonstrates the effectiveness of the control system on ORC stability under variation of the hot source mass flow rate and cold sink temperature. - Highlights: • A detailed off-design dynamic model of a regenerative ORC system is presented. • The model includes real geometries of commercial shell-and-tube heat exchangers. • High efficiency of the ORC system is obtained at partial load in the range 80–110%. • Variations of the evaporator volume does not significantly affect system stability.

  6. Standard format and content for emergency plans for fuel-cycle and materials facilities: Draft report for comment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    This report is issued as guidance to those fuel-cycle and major materials licensees who are required by the NRC to prepare and submit an emergency plan. This Standard Format has been prepared to help ensure uniformity and completeness in the preparation of those plans

  7. FY 2000 report on the results of the model project on facilities for the effective utilization of industrial waste from industrial complex. Separate Volume 3; 2000 nendo Kogyo danchi sangyo haikibutsu yuko riyo setsubi model jigyo. Dai 3 Bunsatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-03-01

    For the purpose of promoting the effective utilization of industrial waste as petroleum substitution energy resource and reducing the consumption of fossil fuels in Thailand, a model project on facilities for the effective utilization of industrial waste from industrial complex was worked on, and the FY 2000 results were reported. In Separate Volume 3, drawings of the following were included: furnace, free board spray nozzle, dispersion air nozzle, secondary burner, sand make-up conveyor, sand discharge gate, boiler, silencer for boiler safety valve, steam header, steam accumulator, gas cooling tower, refuse drainage storage tank, small sized drainage pump, pressure tank, flue gas duct, air damper, incombustible conveyor 2, sand circulation system bag filter, weighing bridge, fan starter panel, control panel, control panel, local switch box, distributed control system, field instrument, flue gas analyzer. (NEDO)

  8. Geothermal energy conversion facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutscher, C.F.

    1997-12-31

    With the termination of favorable electricity generation pricing policies, the geothermal industry is exploring ways to improve the efficiency of existing plants and make them more cost-competitive with natural gas. The Geothermal Energy Conversion Facility (GECF) at NREL will allow researchers to study various means for increasing the thermodynamic efficiency of binary cycle geothermal plants. This work has received considerable support from the US geothermal industry and will be done in collaboration with industry members and utilities. The GECF is being constructed on NREL property at the top of South Table Mountain in Golden, Colorado. As shown in Figure 1, it consists of an electrically heated hot water loop that provides heating to a heater/vaporizer in which the working fluid vaporizes at supercritical or subcritical pressures as high as 700 psia. Both an air-cooled and water-cooled condenser will be available for condensing the working fluid. In order to minimize construction costs, available equipment from the similar INEL Heat Cycle Research Facility is being utilized.

  9. Quantifying the environmental impact of an integrated human/industrial-natural system using life cycle assessment; a case study on a forest and wood processing chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaubroeck, Thomas; Alvarenga, Rodrigo A F; Verheyen, Kris; Muys, Bart; Dewulf, Jo

    2013-01-01

    Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a tool to assess the environmental sustainability of a product; it quantifies the environmental impact of a product's life cycle. In conventional LCAs, the boundaries of a product's life cycle are limited to the human/industrial system, the technosphere. Ecosystems, which provide resources to and take up emissions from the technosphere, are not included in those boundaries. However, similar to the technosphere, ecosystems also have an impact on their (surrounding) environment through their resource usage (e.g., nutrients) and emissions (e.g., CH4). We therefore propose a LCA framework to assess the impact of integrated Techno-Ecological Systems (TES), comprising relevant ecosystems and the technosphere. In our framework, ecosystems are accounted for in the same manner as technosphere compartments. Also, the remediating effect of uptake of pollutants, an ecosystem service, is considered. A case study was performed on a TES of sawn timber production encompassing wood growth in an intensively managed forest ecosystem and further industrial processing. Results show that the managed forest accounted for almost all resource usage and biodiversity loss through land occupation but also for a remediating effect on human health, mostly via capture of airborne fine particles. These findings illustrate the potential relevance of including ecosystems in the product's life cycle of a LCA, though further research is needed to better quantify the environmental impact of TES.

  10. Current significant challenges in the decommissioning and environmental remediation of radioactive facilities: A perspective from outside the nuclear industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Cerezo, V; Domínguez-Vilches, E; González-Barrios, A J

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents the results of implementing an extrajudicial environmental mediation procedure in the socioenvironmental conflict associated with routine operation of the El Cabril Disposal Facility for low- and medium- activity radioactive waste (Spain). We analyse the socio-ethical perspective of this facility's operation with regard to its nearby residents, detailing the structure and development of the environmental mediation procedure through the participation of society and interested parties who are or may become involved in such a conflict. The research, action, and participation method was used to apply the environmental mediation procedure. This experience provides lessons that could help improve decision-making processes in nuclear or radioactive facility decommissioning projects or in environmental remediation projects dealing with ageing facilities or with those in which nuclear or radioactive accidents/incidents may have occurred. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. 26 CFR 17.1 - Industrial development bonds used to provide solid waste disposal facilities; temporary rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... adjacent electric generating facility and B can use steam to power its turbine-generator. B needs steam... be cooled and reduced in volume by means of a heat exchange process using boilers. The precipitator...

  12. Continuing Education In Radiation Protection In The Nuclear Fuel Cycle: The Case Of Nuclear Industries Of Brazil Education And Training In The Uranium Production Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Wagner; Kelecom, Alphonse

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: • Small changes in how to conduct the training have been proposed and are being incorporated. • The assembly of groups of employees resulted in low production of the facility, caused by lack of staff in production lines. • From this observation the training program was rescheduled. Now new trainings are made in individual form. • Organization of classes now occurs only for initial training. • This training occurs when new formations of classes are requested which only occurs when of new employees are admitted. • In these cases the classes are small, no more than 5 employees.

  13. The nuclear fuel cycle light and shadow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, A.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle industry has a far reaching effect on future world energy developments. The growth in turnover of this industry follows a known patterm; by 1985 this turnover will have reached a figure of 2 billion dollars. Furthermore, the fuel cycle plays a determining role in ensuring the physical continuity of energy supplies for countries already engaged in the nuclear domain. Finally, the development of this industry is subject to economic and political constraints which imply the availability of raw materials, technological know-how, and production facilities. Various factors which could have an adverse influence on the cycle: technical, economic, or financial difficulties, environmental impact, nuclear safety, theft or diversion of nuclear materials, nuclear weapon, proliferation risks, are described, and the interaction between the development of the cycle, energy independance, and the fulfillment of nuclear energy programs is emphasized. It is concluded that the nuclear fuel cycle industry is confronted with difficulties due to its extremely rapid growth rate (doubling every 5 years); it is a long time since such a growth rate has been experienced by any heavy industry. The task which lays before us is difficult, but the fruit is worth the toil, as it is the fuel cycle which will govern the growth of the nuclear industry [fr

  14. Wastewater Industrial Contributors

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research FacilityIndustrial contributors to municipal wastewater treatment facilities in Iowa for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program.

  15. Nuclear-fuel-cycle risk assessment: descriptions of representative non-reactor facilities, Sections 15-19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.J.

    1982-09-01

    Information is presented under the following section headings: fuel reprocessing; spent fuel and high-level and transuranic waste storage; spent fuel and high-level and transuranic waste disposal; low-level and intermediate-level waste disposal; and, transportation of radioactive materials in the nuclear fuel cycle. In each of the first three sections a description is given on the mainline process, effluent processing and waste management systems, plant layout, and alternative process schemes. Safety information and a summary are also included in each. The section on transport of radioactive materials includes information on the transportation of uranium ore, uranium ore concentrate, UF/sub 6/, PuO/sub 2/ powder, unirradiated uranium and mixed-oxide fuel assemblies, spent fuel, solidified high-level waste, contact-handled transuranic waste, remote-handled transuranic waste, and low and intermediate level nontransuranic waste. A glossary is included. (JGB)

  16. Nuclear-fuel-cycle risk assessment: descriptions of representative non-reactor facilities, Sections 15-19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.J.

    1982-09-01

    Information is presented under the following section headings: fuel reprocessing; spent fuel and high-level and transuranic waste storage; spent fuel and high-level and transuranic waste disposal; low-level and intermediate-level waste disposal; and, transportation of radioactive materials in the nuclear fuel cycle. In each of the first three sections a description is given on the mainline process, effluent processing and waste management systems, plant layout, and alternative process schemes. Safety information and a summary are also included in each. The section on transport of radioactive materials includes information on the transportation of uranium ore, uranium ore concentrate, UF 6 , PuO 2 powder, unirradiated uranium and mixed-oxide fuel assemblies, spent fuel, solidified high-level waste, contact-handled transuranic waste, remote-handled transuranic waste, and low and intermediate level nontransuranic waste. A glossary is included

  17. School Siting Near Industrial Chemical Facilities: Findings from the U.S. Chemical Safety Board’s Investigation of the West Fertilizer Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinney, Veronica A.; Denton, Jerad M.; Sciallo-Tyler, Lucy; Paulson, Jerome A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB) investigated the 17 April 2013 explosion at the West Fertilizer Company (WFC) that resulted in 15 fatalities, more than 260 injuries, and damage to more than 150 buildings. Among these structures were four nearby school buildings cumulatively housing children in grades kindergarten–12, a nursing care facility, and an apartment complex. The incident occurred during the evening when school was not in session, which reduced the number of injuries. Objectives: The goal of this commentary is to illustrate the consequences of siting schools near facilities that store or use hazardous chemicals, and highlight the need for additional regulations to prevent future siting of schools near these facilities. Discussion: We summarize the findings of the CSB’s investigation related to the damaged school buildings and the lack of regulation surrounding the siting of schools near facilities that store hazardous chemicals. Conclusions: In light of the current lack of federal authority for oversight of land use near educational institutions, state and local governments should take a proactive role in promulgating state regulations that prohibit the siting of public receptors, such as buildings occupied by children, near facilities that store hazardous chemicals. Citation: Tinney VA, Denton JM, Sciallo-Tyler L, Paulson JA. 2016. School siting near industrial chemical facilities: findings from the U.S. Chemical Safety Board’s investigation of the West Fertilizer Explosion. Environ Health Perspect 124:1493–1496; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP132 PMID:27483496

  18. Improvement of the management of residual waste in areas without thermal treatment facilities: A life cycle analysis of an Italian management district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Maria, Francesco; Micale, Caterina; Morettini, Emanuela; Sisani, Luciano; Damiano, Roberto

    2015-10-01

    Starting from an existing waste management district without thermal treatment facilities, two different management scenarios for residual waste were compared by life cycle assessment (LCA). The adoption of a bioreactor landfill for managing the mechanically sorted organic fraction instead of bio-stabilization led to reduction of global warming and fresh water eutrophication by 50% and 10%, respectively. Extraction of recyclables from residual waste led to avoided emissions for particulate matter, acidification and resource depletion impact categories. Marginal energy and the amount of energy recovered from landfill gas marginally affected the LCA results. On the contrary the quality of the recyclables extracted can significantly modify the eco profile of the management schemes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Final Assessment: U.S. Virgin Islands Industrial Development Park and Adjacent Facilities Energy-Efficiency and Micro-Grid Infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Joseph M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Boyd, Paul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dahowski, Robert T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Parker, Graham B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-31

    The purpose of this assessment was to undertake an assessment and analysis of cost-effective options for energy-efficiency improvements and the deployment of a micro-grid to increase the energy resilience at the U.S. Virgin Islands Industrial Development Park (IDP) and adjacent facilities in St. Croix, Virgin Islands. The Economic Development Authority sought assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy to undertake this assessment undertaken by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The assessment included 18 buildings plus the perimeter security lighting at the Virgin Islands Bureau of Correctional Facility, four buildings plus exterior lighting at the IDP, and five buildings (one of which is to be constructed) at the Virgin Islands Police Department for a total of 27 buildings with a total of nearly 323,000 square feet.

  20. Waste management experience during all the life cycle of treatment facilities from commissioning till decommissioning. Today's situation and future trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decobert, Guy; Devezeaux de Lavergne, Jean-Guy; Maurin, Matthieu

    2005-01-01

    Over time, the concepts of waste management have deeply evolved. In the case of the earlier generation of treatment plants, on-line conditioning was generally not implemented. In several cases, the strategy was clearly set as promoting storage of 'interim' raw waste, and implementing long-run R and D programs for future conditioning. Thus, one of the main objectives of the last generation of plants was to implement on-line conditioning of all waste, i.e. including waste issued from the used fuel and also those issued from plant operation (technological waste and effluent treatment waste). These strategic issues are naturally part of the core of the design of every new plant, as part of the operating performance. The enormous amount of experience collected from previous generations of plants, and managed by AREVA, allows us to go one step further. Indeed, our target is to rely on a comprehensive vision of waste management best practices, from the plant design through its decommissioning. This will allow AREVA to think about the next plant generation when encompassing the whole life cycle of the plant, including its different steps: Conception and building, Operation, Decommissioning. The first part of the paper will go back to waste management lessons and achievements in the design-construction phase and the operating phases of past and present treatment plants. From the past till today's generation, a factor of reduction of 50 for the volume of HLW-ILW type of waste was achieved leading to a ratio of 0.0012 m 3 /GWhe for a burn-up of 45 000 MWd/t! With regards to the development of the next generation of reactors and associated back-end, future improvements appear still possible in waste volume reduction. The second part of the paper will focus on decommissioning, which is likely to generate significant amount of waste, whose removal, handling, sorting, measurement, treatment and conditioning represent a substantial part of the cost of the program. Starting from

  1. When life cycle thinking is necessary for decision making: emerging cleaner technologies in the chlor-alkali industry

    OpenAIRE

    Margallo Blanco, María; Onandía de Dios, Raquel; Aldaco García, Rubén; Irabien Gulías, José Ángel

    2016-01-01

    The chlor-alkali industry sector produces chlorine, sodium/potassium hydroxide and hydrogen by the electrolysis of brine. Nowadays, three different electrolysis techniques are applied: mercury, diaphragm, and membrane cell technology. From all these technologies, the European Commission labels the membrane process as the Best Available Technique (BAT) for the chlor-alkali industry. The membrane cell technology has fewer exhausts to the environment and it is relatively more efficient in the us...

  2. Technical feasibility of an Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) as a future option for fast reactor cycles. Integrate a small metal-fueled fast reactor and pyroprocessing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Nobuo

    2017-01-01

    Integral Fast Reactor that integrated fast reactor and pyrorocessing facilities developed by Argonne National Laboratory in the U.S. is an excellent nuclear fuel cycle system for passive safety, nuclear non-proliferation, and reduction in radioactive waste. In addition, this system can be considered as a technology applicable to the treatment of the fuel debris caused by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident. This study assessed the time required for debris processing, safety of the facilities, and construction cost when using this technology, and examined technological possibility including future technological issues. In a small metal-fueled reactor, it is important to design the core that achieves both of reduction in combustion reactivity and reduction in coolant reactivity. In system design, calorimetric analysis, structure soundness assessment, seismic feasibility establishment study, etc. are important. Regarding safety, research and testing are necessary on the capabilities of passive reactor shutdown and reactor core cooling as well as measures for avoiding re-criticality, even when emergency stop has failed. In dry reprocessing system, studies on electrolytic reduction and electrolytic refining process for treating the debris with compositions different from those of normal fuel are necessary. (A.O.)

  3. Evolutionary approaches for the safety evaluation of the nuclear fuel cycle facilities: lessons learnt from french experiences and assessment of future challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greneche, D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper is aimed at presenting the recent work carried out in France on the evolution of the safety of the nuclear fuel cycle facilities (FCF). 5 main categories of FCF have been dealt with in this article: uranium conversion, uranium enrichment, fresh fuel fabrication (including Mox fuel), spent fuel storage, and spent fuel reprocessing. The specific of FCF are reviewed and it appears that FCF have generally a safety advantage over reactors: the relatively slow evolution of physico-chemical phenomena causing severe accident conditions. Generally speaking, nuclear safety is ensured through the combination of actions taken at 4 levels: design, implementation, operation and inspection. It must be underlined that the French safety analysis process is primarily based on a deterministic approach (itself based on the fundamental principle of defense-in-depth), supplemented if necessary with probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) to detect potential weak points in a nuclear facility. All this process is well implemented in reactors but in the case of FCF it is generally limited to the deterministic approach. It is showed that the approaches and general principles implemented in the safety analysis of reactors apply well to FCF but the probabilistic analysis of safety remains nevertheless little practiced in FCF for which they still require significant developments. (A.C.)

  4. 20/20 vision. To celebrate our 20th anniversary, Health Facilities Management explores emerging industry trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle, Amy

    2008-10-01

    In the past 20 years, hospital design has evolved from institutional to evidence-based and patient-centered, medical and information technologies have advanced at unprecedented rates, infection control and security concerns have become more pronounced and environmental issues have broadened hospitals' healing mission to include the facility's impact on the community and the world at large.

  5. Biomass Gasification Combined Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judith A. Kieffer

    2000-07-01

    Gasification combined cycle continues to represent an important defining technology area for the forest products industry. The ''Forest Products Gasification Initiative'', organized under the Industry's Agenda 2020 technology vision and supported by the DOE ''Industries of the Future'' program, is well positioned to guide these technologies to commercial success within a five-to ten-year timeframe given supportive federal budgets and public policy. Commercial success will result in significant environmental and renewable energy goals that are shared by the Industry and the Nation. The Battelle/FERCO LIVG technology, which is the technology of choice for the application reported here, remains of high interest due to characteristics that make it well suited for integration with the infrastructure of a pulp production facility. The capital cost, operating economics and long-term demonstration of this technology area key input to future economically sustainable projects and must be verified by the 200 BDT/day demonstration facility currently operating in Burlington, Vermont. The New Bern application that was the initial objective of this project is not currently economically viable and will not be implemented at this time due to several changes at and around the mill which have occurred since the inception of the project in 1995. The analysis shows that for this technology, and likely other gasification technologies as well, the first few installations will require unique circumstances, or supportive public policies, or both to attract host sites and investors.

  6. Helium heater design for the helium direct cycle component test facility. [for gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, V. R.; Gunn, S. V.; Lee, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes a helium heater to be used to conduct non-nuclear demonstration tests of the complete power conversion loop for a direct-cycle gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant. Requirements for the heater include: heating the helium to a 1500 F temperature, operating at a 1000 psia helium pressure, providing a thermal response capability and helium volume similar to that of the nuclear reactor, and a total heater system helium pressure drop of not more than 15 psi. The unique compact heater system design proposed consists of 18 heater modules; air preheaters, compressors, and compressor drive systems; an integral control system; piping; and auxiliary equipment. The heater modules incorporate the dual-concentric-tube 'Variflux' heat exchanger design which provides a controlled heat flux along the entire length of the tube element. The heater design as proposed will meet all system requirements. The heater uses pressurized combustion (50 psia) to provide intensive heat transfer, and to minimize furnace volume and heat storage mass.

  7. Improvement in high-voltage and high rate cycling performance of nickel-rich layered cathode materials via facile chemical vapor deposition with methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyuk Son, In; Park, Kwangjin; Hwan Park, Jong

    2017-01-01

    Nickel-rich layered-oxide materials are considered promising candidates for application as cathode material in high-energy lithium ion batteries. However, their cycling performance at high voltages and rate conditions require further improvement for the purpose of commercialization. Here, we report on the facile surface modification of nickel-rich layered oxide by chemical vapor deposition with methane which yields a conductive and protective artificial solid electrolyte interphase layer consisting of amorphous carbon, alkyl lithium carbonate, and lithium carbonate. We examine the mechanism of the protective layer formation and structural deformation of the nickel-rich layered oxide during chemical vapor deposition with methane. Via optimizing the reaction conditions, we improve the electrical conductivity as well as the interfacial stability of the nickel-rich layered oxide without inducing structural deformation. The surface-modified nickel-rich layered oxide exhibits an improved performance due to the resulting enhanced rate capability, high initial efficiency, and long cycle life at high voltage (>4.5 V).

  8. The impact of the cycle counting in the inventory accuracy: multiple cases in industries of Paraná

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everton Drohomeretski

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to identify the impact of cycle counting on inventory accuracy. Multiple case studies were used as research method; these include seven case studies of companies in Paraná. A research protocol was used as the basis for collecting the data. For the data analysis, the content analysis method was used with the triangulation of collected data. For the main results, the study demonstrates the relationship between cycle counting, the level of importance attributed by the organization, the number of items and the rate of accuracy obtained. The high level of control of inventory processes, together with the use of cycle counting made it possible to eliminate the main cause of failure in inventory accuracy – errors in recording the movement of material – and with this, improve the operational efficiency of the companies.

  9. The University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) field test facility -- system description, aquifer characterization, and results of short-term test cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, M.; Hoyer, M.C.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Holm, N.L.; Holm, T.R.; Kanivetsky, R.; Jirsa, M.A.; Lee, H.C.; Lauer, J.L.; Miller, R.T.; Norton, J.L.; Runke, H. (Minnesota Geological Survey, St. Paul, MN (United States))

    1991-06-01

    Phase 1 of the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) Project at the University of Minnesota was to test the feasibility, and model, the ATES concept at temperatures above 100{degrees}C using a confined aquifer for the storage and recovery of hot water. Phase 1 included design, construction, and operation of a 5-MW thermal input/output field test facility (FTF) for four short-term ATES cycles (8 days each of heat injection, storage, and heat recover). Phase 1 was conducted from May 1980 to December 1983. This report describes the FTF, the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville (FIG) aquifer used for the test, and the four short-term ATES cycles. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic effects are all included. The FTF consists of monitoring wells and the source and storage well doublet completed in the FIG aquifer with heat exchangers and a fixed-bed precipitator between the wells of the doublet. The FIG aquifer is highly layered and a really anisotropic. The upper Franconia and Ironton-Galesville parts of the aquifer, those parts screened, have hydraulic conductivities of {approximately}0.6 and {approximately}1.0 m/d, respectively. Primary ions in the ambient ground water are calcium and magnesium bicarbonate. Ambient temperature FIG ground water is saturated with respect to calcium/magnesium bicarbonate. Heating the ground water caused most of the dissolved calcium to precipitate out as calcium carbonate in the heat exchanger and precipitator. Silica, calcium, and magnesium were significantly higher in recovered water than in injected water, suggesting dissolution of some constituents of the aquifer during the cycles. Further work on the ground water chemistry is required to understand water-rock interactions.

  10. Evaluate the use of tanning agent in leather industry using material flow analysis, life cycle assessment and fuzzy multi-attribute decision making (FMADM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfarisi, Salman; Sutono, Sugoro Bhakti; Sutopo, Wahyudi

    2017-11-01

    Tanning industry is one of the companies that produce many pollutants and cause the negative impact on the environment. In the production process of tanning leather, the use of input material need to be evaluated. The problem of waste, not only have a negative impact on the environment, but also human health. In this study, the impact of mimosa as vegetable tanning agent evaluated. This study will provide alternative solutions for improvements to the use of vegetable tanning agent. The alternative solution is change mimosa with indusol, gambier, and dulcotan. This study evaluate the vegetable tanning of some aspects using material flow analysis and life cycle assessment approach. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is used to evaluate the environmental impact of vegetable tanning agent. Alternative solution selection using fuzzy multi-attribute decision making (FMADM) approach. Results obtained by considering the environment, human toxicity, climate change, and marine aquatic ecotoxicity, is to use dulcotan.

  11. Class and Home Problems. Lifelong Learning: A "Life Cycle" Approach to Education and Training for the Biopharmaceutical Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilleskie, Gary L.; Reeves, Baley; van Zanten, John H.; Balchunas, John; Carbonell, Ruben G.

    2016-01-01

    The Biomanufacturing Training and Education Center (BTEC) at North Carolina State University is an instructional center that offers education and training programs in the area of biopharmaceutical process development and manufacturing. Our programs are designed to provide educational opportunities throughout the "life cycle" of a…

  12. Features of performance of concrete and reinforced concrete structures of industrial facilities operated under impact of increased and high temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fomin Stanislav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the Normative base of Ukraine has moved to European standards. The process of harmonization with the Eurocodes was completed, new national normative documents of DBN and DSTU were developed and put into effect. At the same time it was turned out that the big section “Concrete and reinforced concrete structures intended for work in conditions of increased and high temperatures” is absent in the Eurocodes. By order of the Ministry of Regional Development, Construction and Housing and Communal Services of Ukraine, the development of a normative act is provided for the replacement of SNiP 2.03.04-84 with DBN with a change in status. Heat-resistant concretes in the elements of thermal aggregates are used in the iron and steel industry (blast furnaces, air heaters, coke batteries, etc., non-ferrous metallurgy (graphite furnaces, fluidized bed furnaces, etc., oil refining and petrochemical industry (tubular furnaces, vertical sectional furnaces, etc., in the industry of building materials, and in various sectors of industry. These norms and rules apply to the design of concrete and reinforced concrete structures designed to operate under conditions of systematic exposure to increased (50 to 200 °C inclusive and high (above 200 °C process temperatures.

  13. 78 FR 54899 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Specification of the Unique Facility Identifier System for Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ... Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft guidance for industry..., information technology, and information management resources. As these variables change over time, FDA may... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-D-0984...

  14. Life-cycle oriented perspectives of augmented reality based human-robot interaction with industrial robots; Lebenszyklusorientierte Betrachtung der Einsatzmoeglichkeiten von Augmented Reality in der Industrierobotik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bischoff, R.; Kogan, Y.; Kurth, J. [KUKA Roboter GmbH, Augsburg (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The industrial robot manufacturer KUKA Roboter GmbH developed a training tool for novice users of industrial robots, which is based on Augmented Reality and significantly lowers the typical barriers to learn robot operation and programming. Based on the experiences gained during the development KUKA begun to systematically analyse the whole life cycle of a robot system and identified more areas that could be suitable for the application of Augmented Reality. The requirements of the identified application areas led to requirements for the core components of an AR system - tracking, visualization, interaction and set-up - to be used in a manufacturing environment. Various algorithms and hardware and software modules were developed to fulfil these requirements. Implementation details and results of initial experiments and a user survey are presented. (orig.)

  15. DOE/Industrial Technologies Program DOE Award Number DE-FG36-05GO15099 Plant Wide Energy Efficiency Assessment Pilgrims Pride Corporation – Mt Pleasant Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paper, Riyaz; Dooley, Bill; Turpish, William J; Symonds, Mark; Carswell, Needham

    2007-04-13

    The U. S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Industrial Technologies Program (ITP), through Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is supporting plant wide energy efficiency assessments that will lead to substantial improvements in industrial efficiency, waste reduction, productivity, and global competitiveness in industries identified in ITP’s Industries of the Future. The stated goal of the assessments is to develop a comprehensive strategy at manufacturing locations that will significantly increase plant productivity, profitability, and energy efficiency, and reduce environmental emissions. ITP awarded a contract to Pilgrim’s Pride Corporation to conduct a plant wide energy efficiency assessment for their Mt Pleasant Facility in Mt Pleasant, Texas. Pilgrim’s Pride Corporation is the largest poultry company in the U.S. and Mexico producing nearly 9 billion pounds of poultry per year. Pilgrim's Pride products are sold to foodservice, retail and frozen entrée customers. Pilgrim's Pride owns and operates 37 chicken processing plants (34 in the U.S. and three in Mexico), 12 prepared foods plants and one turkey processing plant. Thirty-five feed mills and 49 hatcheries support these plants. Pilgrim's Pride is ranked number 382 on 2006's FORTUNE 500 list and net sales were $7.4 billion. In Mt. Pleasant, Texas, Pilgrim's Pride operates one of the largest prepared foods plants in the United States, with the capability of producing 2,000 different products and the capacity to turn out more than 7 million pounds of finished goods per week. The facility is divided into distinct departments: East Kill, West Kill, Prepared Foods, Protein Conversion, Wastewater Treatment, and Truck Shop. Facility processes include killing, eviscerating, refrigeration, baking, frying, and protein conversion. Pilgrim’s Pride formed a team to complete the plant wide energy efficiency assessment. The scope of work for this project was to: provide the analysis of departmental

  16. The Evaluation of Vehicle Mass Reduction and Material Choice in Life Cycle Assessments: Key Factors and Dynamic Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developments in the realm of lightweight materials for automotive use continue to be announced by the industry and by academia. This session will provide new and updated information on new generation of materials. Additionally, this session will focus on the key topics involved i...

  17. Role of non-destructive examinations in leak testing of glove boxes for industrial scale plutonium handling at nuclear fuel fabrication facility along with case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aher, Sachin

    2015-01-01

    Non Destructive Examinations has the prominent role at Nuclear Fuel Fabrication Facilities. Specifically NDE has contributed at utmost stratum in Leak Testing of Glove Boxes and qualifying them as a Class-I confinement for safe Plutonium handling at industrial scale. Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility, BARC, Tarapur is engaged in fabrication of Plutonium based MOX (PuO 2 , DDUO 2 ) fuel with different enrichments for first core of PFBR reactor. Alpha- Leak Tight Glove Boxes along with HEPA Filters and dynamic ventilation form the promising engineering system for safe and reliable handling of plutonium bearing materials considering the radiotoxicity and risk associated with handling of plutonium. Leak Testing of Glove Boxes which involves the leak detection, leak rectification and leak quantifications is major challenging task. To accomplish this challenge, various Non Destructive Testing methods have assisted in promising way to achieve the stringent leak rate criterion for commissioning of Glove Box facilities for plutonium handling. This paper highlights the Role of various NDE techniques like Soap Solution Test, Argon Sniffer Test, Pressure Drop/Rise Test etc. in Glove Box Leak Testing along with procedure and methodology for effective rectification of leakage points. A Flow Chart consisting of Glove Box leak testing procedure starting from preliminary stage up to qualification stage along with a case study and observations are discussed in this paper. (author)

  18. The Environmental Consequences of Altered Nitrogen Cycling Resulting from Industrial Activity, Agricultural Production, and Population Growth in China

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, G.X.; Zhu, Z.L.

    2001-01-01

    Human activities exerted very little effect on nitrogen (N) cycling in China before 1949. Between 1949 and 1999, however, rapid economic development and population growth led to dramatic changes in anthropogenic reactive N, inputted recycling N, N flux on land, N2O emission, and NH3 volatilization. Consequently, these changes have had a tremendous impact on the environment in China. In the current study, we estimated the amount of atmospheric wet N deposition and N transportation into water b...

  19. Pengaruh Family Control, Firm Size, Firm Risk, Dan Firm Life Cycle Terhadap Profitabilitas Dan Nilai Perusahaan Sektor Industri Barang Konsumsi

    OpenAIRE

    Servin, Servin

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to examine the effect of family control, firm size, firm risk, and firm lifecycle towards profitability and firm's value. Sampels were taken from 27 consumer goodscompanies, listed in Indonesia Stock Exchange, ranging from 2010 – 2012. The hypotheseswere tested using multiple regression analysis. In this study, profitability was measured byROA (Return on Asset) and firm's value was measured by Tobin's q. The result were, familycontrol and life cycle stage-growth had negative i...

  20. Metagenetic analysis of the bacterial communities of edible insects from diverse production cycles at industrial rearing companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeweyer, D; Crauwels, S; Lievens, B; Van Campenhout, L

    2017-11-16

    Despite the continuing development of new insect-derived food products, microbial research on edible insects and insect-based foods is still very limited. The goal of this study was to increase the knowledge on the microbial quality of edible insects by comparing the bacterial community composition of mealworms (Tenebrio molitor) and crickets (Acheta domesticus and Gryllodes sigillatus) from several production cycles and rearing companies. Remarkable differences in the bacterial community composition were found between different mealworm rearing companies and mealworm production cycles from the same company. In comparison with mealworms, the bacterial community composition of the investigated crickets was more similar among different companies, and was highly similar between both cricket species investigated. Mealworm communities were dominated by Spiroplasma and Erwinia species, while crickets were abundantly colonised by (Para)bacteroides species. With respect to food safety, only a few operational taxonomic units could be associated with potential human pathogens such as Cronobacter or spoilage bacteria such as Pseudomonas. In summary, our results implicate that at least for cricket rearing, production cycles of constant and good quality in terms of bacterial composition can be obtained by different rearing companies. For mealworms however, more variation in terms of microbial quality occurs between companies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Determining the Mechanism and Efficiency of Industrial Dye Adsorption through Facile Structural Control of Organo-montmorillonite Adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peng; Kazlauciunas, Algy; Menzel, Robert; Lin, Long

    2017-08-09

    The structural evolution of cost-effective organo-clays (montmorillonite modified with different loadings of CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide)) is investigated and linked to the adsorption uptake and mechanism of an important industrial dye (hydrolyzed Remazol Black B). Key organo-clay characteristics, such as the intergallery spacing and the average number of well-stacked layers per clay stack, are determined by low-angle X-ray diffraction, while differential thermogravimetric analysis is used to differentiate between surface-bound and intercalated CTAB. Insights into the dye adsorption mechanism are gained through the study of the adsorption kinetics and through the characterization of the organo-clay structure and surface charge after dye adsorption. It is shown that efficient adsorption of anionic industrial dyes is driven by three key parameters: (i) sufficiently large intergallery spacing to enable accommodation of the relatively large dye molecules, (ii) crystalline disorder in the stacking direction of the clay platelets to facilitate dye access, (iii) and positive surface charge to promote interaction with the anionic dyes. Specifically, it is shown that, at low modifier loadings (0.5 cation exchange capacity (0.5CEC)), CTAB molecules exclusively intercalate as a monolayer into the clay intergallery spaces, while, with increasing modifier loadings, the CTAB molecules adopt a bilayer arrangement and adsorb onto the exterior clay surface. Bilayer intercalation results in sufficiently large expansion of the intergallery spaces and significant disordering along the (001) stacking direction to enable high and relatively fast dye uptake via intraparticle diffusion. Poor and slow dye uptake is observed for the organo-clays with a monolayer structure, suggesting relatively inefficient dye adsorption at the clay edges. The optimized bilayer organo-clays (montmorillonite modified with 3CEC of CTAB) also show enhanced adsorption efficiencies for other important

  2. Industrial sector-based volatile organic compound (VOC) source profiles measured in manufacturing facilities in the Pearl River Delta, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Junyu; Yu, Yufan; Mo, Ziwei; Zhang, Zhou; Wang, Xinming; Yin, Shasha; Peng, Kang; Yang, Yang; Feng, Xiaoqiong; Cai, Huihua

    2013-07-01

    Industrial sector-based VOC source profiles are reported for the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, China, based source samples (stack emissions and fugitive emissions) analyzed from sources operating under normal conditions. The industrial sectors considered are printing (letterpress, offset and gravure printing processes), wood furniture coating, shoemaking, paint manufacturing and metal surface coating. More than 250 VOC species were detected following US EPA methods TO-14 and TO-15. The results indicated that benzene and toluene were the major species associated with letterpress printing, while ethyl acetate and isopropyl alcohol were the most abundant compounds of other two printing processes. Acetone and 2-butanone were the major species observed in the shoemaking sector. The source profile patterns were found to be similar for the paint manufacturing, wood furniture coating, and metal surface coating sectors, with aromatics being the most abundant group and oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) as the second largest contributor in the profiles. While OVOCs were one of the most significant VOC groups detected in these five industrial sectors in the PRD region, they have not been reported in most other source profile studies. Such comparisons with other studies show that there are differences in source profiles for different regions or countries, indicating the importance of developing local source profiles. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Life-cycle impacts of shower water waste heat recovery: case study of an installation at a university sport facility in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Kenneth; She, Kaiming; Adeyeye, Kemi

    2017-10-18

    models were developed and industry price book data were applied. The results indicated that the seasonal thermal effectiveness was over 50% enabling significant energy savings through heat recovery that led to short carbon payback time of less than 2 years to compensate for the additional greenhouse gas emissions associated with the WWHX. However, the life-cycle cost of the WWHX is much higher than using the PVC pipe, even with significant heat recovered under heavy usage, highlighting the need to adopt more economic configurations, such as combining waste water through fewer units, in order to maximize the return on investment and improve the financial viability.

  4. National geothermal test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-03-01

    A brief description of the East Mesa test site is given. The test facility is supplied by brines from three of the existing production wells, each brine having distinctive physical characteristics. Some of the experimental programs involving heat exchangers and power cycles are briefly discussed. These include binary fluid cycles, two-phase expansion cycles, and combination cycles. (MOW)

  5. Experimental geothermal research facilities study (Phase 0). Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-01-01

    The study comprises Phase 0 of a project for Experimental Geothermal Research Facilities. The study focuses on identification of a representative liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir of moderate temperature and salinity, preliminary engineering design of an appropriate energy conversion system, identification of critical technology, and planning for implementation of experimental facilities. The objectives included development of liaison with the industrial sector, to ensure responsiveness to their views in facility requirements and planning, and incorporation of environmental and socioeconomic factors. This Phase 0 report covers problem definition and systems requirements. Facilities will incorporate capability for research in component, system, and materials technology and a nominal 10 MWe experimental, binary cycle, power generating plant.

  6. Is Intra-Industry Trade Specialization a Precondition to Business Cycle Synchronization When Joining the Euro Area? The Case of Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawecka-Wyrzykowska Elżbieta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The first objective of this paper is to present theoretical approaches to the impact of trade growth (induced by monetary integration on business cycle synchronization which is an important factor of a country’s readiness for a currency union accession. The main conclusion from the first part of the analysis is that business cycle convergence and the cost of the lack of an autonomous monetary policy depend on intra-industry trade (IIT intensity rather than on general trade growth. The second objective is to assess - using the IIT index as a measure of business cycle synchronization (and of susceptibility to asymmetric shocks transmitted mostly through trade channels - preparedness of the Polish economy to the euro adoption. Calculations reveal that the IIT intensity in Poland is already relatively high (in particular in relations with the euro area members and continues to rise. This confirms the increasing complementarity of Poland’s economy with the economic structures of the euro area partners which reduces the probability of asymmetric shocks.

  7. Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Individual permits for municipal, industrial, and semi-public wastewater treatment facilities in Iowa for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES)...

  8. Using life cycle assessment and techno-economic analysis in a real options framework to inform the design of algal biofuel production facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Jordan D; Hise, Adam M; Characklis, Greg W; Gerlach, Robin; Viamajala, Sridhar; Gardner, Robert D

    2017-02-01

    This study investigates the use of "real options analysis" (ROA) to quantify the value of greater product flexibility at algal biofuel production facilities. A deterministic optimization framework is integrated with a combined life cycle assessment/techno-economic analysis model and subjected to an ensemble of 30-year commodity price trajectories. Profits are maximized for two competing plant configurations: 1) one that sells lipid-extracted algae as animal feed only; and 2) one that can sell lipid-extracted algae as feed or use it to recover nutrients and energy, due to an up-front investment in anaerobic digestion/combined heat and power. Results show that added investment in plant flexibility does not result in an improvement in net present value, because current feed meal prices discourage use of lipid-extracted algae for nutrient and energy recovery. However, this study demonstrates that ROA provides many useful insights regarding plant design that cannot be captured via traditional techno-economic modeling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Social responsibility at a semi-industrial irradiation plant. Experience statements of ISO 26000 implementation in a nuclear facility class I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Docters, Andrea S.; Lucuix, Maria B.

    2009-01-01

    This presentation is located in the area of radioisotopes and radiation, CNEA. Its main scope is to describe the implementation process of the international standard ISO 26000 at an irradiation facility. This project began as such by the end of 2007 with the objectives established at the Semi-Industrial Irradiation Facility ('Planta de Irradiacion Semi-Industrial'), and it consists on establishing a systematization practice and the subsequent diffusion of its results in order to spread the experience gained. The proposed standard has seven fundamental principles which gather under the term social responsibility. This project was agreed with stake holders directly involved with the facility and it is a continuum of interrelated knowledge. The fact of starting the implementation of this international standard in a relevant facility was meant to be applied in a central activity of the CNEA. The Semi-Industrial Irradiation Facility located at the Ezeiza Atomic Center has the necessary elements for its implementation and will provide after completion of the project, information of interest in order to replicate the experience in other areas. In the case of ISO 26000 the established order is considered appropriate for its application in the same government organization 'to contribute to sustainable development, health and welfare of society'. The concept of Social Responsibility, which ends its consolidation in the nineties, is a conjunction of knowledge and developments. The idea of sustainable development-oriented concept nurtured the current concern especially about the environment, linked to the Brundtland Commission Report of the late eighties which was later accepted by the Earth Summit at Rio de Janeiro in 1992. Meanwhile, the unions through their representatives played a pivotal role in linking the environment to the social perspective and interest to society, widely accepted nowadays, on the concept that appropriate measures for the environment can be extended

  10. The Environmental Consequences of Altered Nitrogen Cycling Resulting from Industrial Activity, Agricultural Production, and Population Growth in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.X. Xing

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Human activities exerted very little effect on nitrogen (N cycling in China before 1949. Between 1949 and 1999, however, rapid economic development and population growth led to dramatic changes in anthropogenic reactive N, inputted recycling N, N flux on land, N2O emission, and NH3 volatilization. Consequently, these changes have had a tremendous impact on the environment in China. In the current study, we estimated the amount of atmospheric wet N deposition and N transportation into water bodies from the watersheds and major valleys in China. Additionally, we addressed issues on leaching and accumulation of NO3� in the farmland under different climate zones, land use, and cropping systems as well as the potential influence of NO3� on underground water in China.

  11. Using a life cycle assessment methodology for the analysis of two treatment systems of food-processing industry wastewaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maya Altamira, Larisa; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye; Baun, Anders

    2007-01-01

    boundaries were limited from the influent entering the wastewater treatment plant until the disposal of the effluents generated, i.e. wastewater, sludge, and biogas (for Scenario 2). Main differences between Scenario 1 & Scenario 2 were: (i) Effluent quality was 65% better when pet food wastewater was fed......Feasibility evaluation of wastewater treatment plants’ designs & operation strategies is nowadays done in a plant-wide perspective. Environmental concerns regarding energy consumption and sludge disposal are the main drivers to consider pre/post-treatment units in these evaluations. Existing...... criteria involve sludge disposal strategies and electrical energy consumption. However, there is a need to develop a systematic methodology to quantify relevant environmental indicators; comprising information of the wastewater treatment system in a life cycle perspective. Also, to identify which...

  12. The Potential of RFID as an Enabler of Knowledge Management and Collaboration for the Procurement Cycle in the Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassine El Ghazali

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the array of innovative ICTs (information and communication technologies, radio frequency identification technology (RFID can be considered as a major innovation with the potential to offer many new opportunities for construction companies to improve communication, facilitate teamwork, improve information management skills, and encourage greater cross-fertilization between business processes. Empirical results point to the need of the four participating firms to overcome several procurement issues and bottlenecks in order to gain more substantial competitive advantages and consistently satisfy project owners throughout the entire procurement cycle. An RFID system has the potential to improve real-time document and material tracking and control. But, more importantly, findings suggest that RFID improves the management, sharing, and transfer of knowledge and fosters collaboration through integrated document management, prompt issue management, risk management and efficient decision making.

  13. The plutonium fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigford, T.H.; Ang, K.P.

    1975-01-01

    The quantities of plutonium and other fuel actinides have been calculated for equilibrium fuel cycles for 1000-MW water reactors fueled with slightly enriched uranium, water reactors fueled with plutonium and natural uranium, fast-breder reactors, gas-cooled reactors fueled with thorium and highly enriched uranium, and gas-cooled reactors fueled with thorium, plutonium and recycled uranium. The radioactivity quantities of plutonium, americium and curium processed yearly in these fuel cycles are greatest for the water reactors fueled with natural uranium and recycled plutonium. The total amount of actinides processed is calculated for the predicted future growth of the U.S. nuclear power industry. For the same total installed nuclear power capacity, the introduction of the plutonium breeder has little effect upon the total amount of plutonium in this century. The estimated amount of plutonium in the low-level process wastes in the plutonium fuel cycles is comparable to the amount of plutonium in the high-level fission product wastes. The amount of plutonium processed in the nuclear fuel cycles can be considerably reduced by using gas-cooled reactors to consume plutonium produced in uranium-fueled water reactors. These, and other reactors dedicated for plutonium utilization, could be co-located with facilities for fuel reprocessing ad fuel fabrication to eliminate the off-site transport of separated plutonium. (author)

  14. Reception and treatment facilities for waste oils and oil-polluted waters from marine and industrial activities in Gothenburg, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, K.; Lexen, S.I.; Hell, M.

    1992-01-01

    At the beginning of the 1980s, comprehensive solutions were found to problems associated with the handling of oil-polluted water from marine and industrial sources in the Gothenburg area. The treatment plant in the oil harbour has permission to treat 700,000 m 3 /yr of sludge, ballast, slops and other oil-contaminated waters. Following treatment by chemical flocculation, flotation and dual-media filtration, the treated water must not contain more than 5 ppm of oil. Work to improve treatment results has been carried out from the start, in close co-operation with environmental authorities and with the waste generators themselves. Through increased consciousness, improvements in control, and greater source separation, it will be possible to bring about a significantly lower concentration of pollutants in the incoming waste streams. Recent plans include separate treatment of waste streams containing aromatic compounds and heavily polluted waters. Complementary treatment methods, such as activated carbon and air stripping, are under evaluation. (author). 10 figs

  15. An assessment of the radiological impact of the operation of selected industrial gamma radiography facilities in Metro Manila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loterina, Roel A.; Espiritu, Raquel T.; Palattao, Ma. Visitacion B.

    1998-01-01

    Observations and radiation monitoring were done during radiographic operations conducted by eleven (11) industrial radiography institutions in 8 installations and in 4 project sites in Metro Manila, Batangas, and Antipolo. Radiological hazards involved during routine normal operations were evaluated in terms of potential doses to radiography workers and members of the public. Based on radiation monitoring results, radiography workers involved in routine and normal operations got whole body dose exposures ranging from 0.03 to 27.96 mSv/year. These are doses lower than the 50 mSv annual limit for radiation workers. Radiological consequences to radiography workers during abnormal occurrences and accident conditions were projected to be from as low as 0.03 mSv to as high as 7,500 mSv or 150 times the annual limit. Dose exposures of members of the public involved or affected were estimated to be from 0.08 mSv to doses easily exceeding the annual limit of 5 mSv. The upper limit of these doses greatly exceeds the half-lethal dose value of 4.5 Gy. This study recommends some measures to ensure safety of operating personnel from undue exposure to radiation during routine normal operations as well as during abnormal occurrences and accident conditions. (Author)

  16. Refractory Materials for Flame Deflector Protection System Corrosion Control: Similar Industries and/or Launch Facilities Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Coffman, Brekke E.; Sampson, Jeffrey W.; Kolody, Mark R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Perusich, Stephen A.; Trejo, David; Whitten, Mary C.; hide

    2009-01-01

    A trade study and litera ture survey of refractory materials (fi rebrick. refractory concrete. and si licone and epoxy ablatives) were conducted to identify candidate replacement materials for Launch Complexes 39A and 398 at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). In addition, site vis its and in terviews with industry expens and vendors of refractory materials were conducted. As a result of the si te visits and interviews, several products were identified for launch applications. Firebrick is costly to procure and install and was not used in the si tes studied. Refractory concrete is gunnable. adheres well. and costs less 10 install. Martyte. a ceramic fi lled epoxy. can protect structural stccl but is costly. difficullto apply. and incompatible with silicone ablatives. Havanex, a phenolic ablative material, is easy to apply but is costly and requires frequent replacement. Silicone ablatives are ineJ[pensive, easy to apply. and perl'onn well outside of direct rocket impingement areas. but refractory concrete and epoxy ablatives provide better protection against direcl rocket exhaust. None of the prodUCIS in this trade study can be considered a panacea for these KSC launch complexes. but the refractory products. individually or in combination, may be considered for use provided the appropriate testing requirements and specifications are met.

  17. Life Cycle Performance of Hydrogen Production via Agro-Industrial Residue Gasification—A Small Scale Power Plant Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Rajabi Hamedani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the environmental profile of a real biomass-based hydrogen production small-scale (1 MWth system composed of catalytic candle indirectly heated steam gasifier coupled with zinc oxide (ZnO guard bed, water gas shift (WGS and pressure swing absorber (PSA reactors. Environmental performance from cradle-to-gate was investigated by life cycle assessment (LCA methodology. Biomass production shows high influence over all impact categories. In the syngas production process, the main impacts observed are global warming potential (GWP and acidification potential (AP. Flue gas emission from gasifier burner has the largest proportion of total GWP. The residual off gas use in internal combustion engine (ICE leads to important environmental savings for all categories. Hydrogen renewability score is computed as 90% due to over 100% decline in non-renewable energy demand. Sensitivity analysis shows that increase in hydrogen production efficiency does not necessarily result in decrease in environmental impacts. In addition, economic allocation of environmental charges increases all impact categories, especially AP and photochemical oxidation (POFP.

  18. Modelling the Influence of Climate on the Performance of the Organic Rankine Cycle for Industrial Waste Heat Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Korolija

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a study of the relative influences of different system design decisions upon the performance of an organic Rankine cycle (ORC used to generate electricity from foundry waste heat. The design choices included concern the working fluid, whether to use a regenerator and the type of condenser. The novelty of the research lies in its inclusion of the influence of both the ORC location and the auxiliary electricity used by the pumps and fans in the ORC power system. Working fluids suitable for high temperature applications are compared, including three cyclic siloxanes, four linear siloxanes and three aromatic fluids. The ORC is modelled from first principles and simulation runs carried out using weather data for 106 European locations and a heat input profile that was derived from empirical data. The impact of design decisions upon ORC nominal efficiency is reported followed by the impact upon annual system efficiency in which variations in heat input and the condition of outdoor air over a year are considered. The main conclusion is that the location can have a significant impact upon the efficiency of ORC systems due to the influence of climate upon the condenser and auxiliary electricity requirements.

  19. Use of life cycle assessment as decision-support tool for water reuse and handling of residues at a Danish industrial laundry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kim; Villanueva, Alejandro; Wenzel, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    This analysis presents the results of a life cycle assessment (LCA) carried out on six alternative options for the recycling of water at a Danish industrial laundry for workwear. The study focuses on the handling and disposal of the wet residues generated when wastewater is treated for recycling......, and in accounting for long-term potential toxicity impacts. The analysed options are a combination of two water-upgrading technologies: biofilter and ultrafiltration, and three residue disposal alternatives: biogas followed by incineration of sludge at local wastewater treatment plant, thermal vitrification...... treatment for production of vitrified sand, and mineralization in a sludge bed. It is concluded from the results that with the current Danish environmental policy priorities, the environmental impacts of highest priority are the toxicity effects derived from the presence of heavy metals in the residues...

  20. Life cycle assessment of coupling household biogas production to agricultural industry: A case study of biogas-linked persimmon cultivation and processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Bin; Chen, Shaoqing

    2013-01-01

    Biogas plant construction has been boosted in rural China not only due to the immediate merit from biogas production but also the succeeding benefit from by-product utilization in agro-industry, both of which are significant strategies to address energy shortage and global warming issues. However, little work has been done to evaluate the coupling of biogas projects to traditional agrosystems from a life-cycle perspective, which is most important in process and system optimization in different senses. By taking persimmon cultivation and processing with supports from a household biogas plant as a case study, this study conducts a life cycle assessment of coupling biogas production to agro-industry in terms of energy, environmental and economic performance. The results suggest that each production stage following the biogas/digestate utilization chain (biogas operation-persimmon cultivation-product processing) is beneficial across all three aspects. However, a tradeoff only exists in utilizing digestate as top-dressing and employing biogas utilization as engine fuel, while biogas application in fresh-keeping and digestate reuse as base fertilizer fails to increase either energy production or greenhouse gas mitigation. The coupled system can be hopefully optimized through increasing fermentation efficiency and joint operation of biogas digesters. -- Highlights: •Biogas/digestate utilization is overall beneficial in all production stages. •Each bioresource application may not be profitable in all respects. •Tradeoffs in using biogas and digestate vary among different utilization ways. •Multi-user operation and fermentation efficiency elevation optimize system

  1. Operating experiences, on-site performances and thermoeconomical analysis of a 5 MW combined cycle plant in agrofood industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ficarella, A.; Laforgia, D. [Lecce Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Materials Science

    1996-11-01

    A solar Taurus 60-T6200 4237 kW{sub e} gas turbine has been operating for about a year at an agro-food industry in cogeneration applications; 15 t/h of 5.0 MPA-410 deg C steam is there produced. About 400 kW of mechanical energy for the main pump of the steam generator and for the cooling water pump is produced by steam turbines, driven by the steam expansion from 5.0 MPa to 1.2 or 0.5 MPa. Experiences in commissioning, start-up and the early months of operation are discussed. The analysis of the on-site performance test data, recorded from the available station instrumentation, assesses the output power and the heat rate of the plant. The thermoeconomic analysis of the energy transformation plant has been completed studying a performance evaluation based on a first-law as well as second-law analysis. 8 refs, 12 figs, 4 tabs

  2. Guidance for the application of an assessment methodology for innovative nuclear energy systems. INPRO manual - Safety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Vol. 9 of the final report of phase 1 of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-11-01

    The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) was initiated in the year 2000, based on a resolution of the IAEA General Conference (GC(44)/RES/21). The main objectives of INPRO are (1) to help to ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute in fulfilling energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner, (2) to bring together both technology holders and technology users to consider jointly the international and national actions required to achieve desired innovations in nuclear reactors and fuel cycles; and (3) to create a forum to involve all relevant stakeholders that will have an impact on, draw from, and complement the activities of existing institutions, as well as ongoing initiatives at the national and international level. The INPRO manual is comprised of an overview volume (No. 1), and eight additional volumes covering the areas of economics (Volume 2), infrastructure (Volume 3), waste management (Volume 4), proliferation resistance (Volume 5), physical protection (Volume 6), environment (Volume 7), safety of nuclear reactors (Volume 8), and safety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities (laid out in this report) (Volume 9).This report elaborates on the guidance given in the INPRO report 'Methodology for the assessment of innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles', IAEA-TECDOC-1434, and the previous INPRO report 'Guidance for the evaluation for innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles', IAEA-TECDOC-1362 (2003), in the area of safety of nuclear reactors. The present version of this manual deals with safety issues related to design and operation of mining, milling, refining, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, fuel storage and fuel reprocessing facilities. The INPRO Manual starts with an introduction in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 sets out the necessary input for an INPRO assessment of the safety of an innovative nuclear fuel cycle facility. This includes information on the design for the plant and the safety

  3. Eco-efficience et analyse des couts du cycle de vie: Developpement d'un outil d'aide a la conception dans l'industrie aeronautique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mami, Fares

    The aeronautical sector, responsible for about 3 % of the world emissions of greenhouse gases, predict a 70 % growth in 2025 and 300 % to 500 % in 2050 of its emissions compared to the level of 2005. The decision-makers must thus be supported in their choice of conception to integrate the environmental aspect into the decision-making. Our industrial partner in the aeronautical sector developed an expertise in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and seeks to integrate the costs and the environmental impacts in a systematic way into the ecodesign of products. Based on the literature review and the objectives of this research we propose a model of eco-efficiency, which integrates LCA with Life Cycle Costing (LCC). This model is consistent with defined cost cutting and environmental impacts reduction targets and allows a simple interpretation of the results while minimizing the efforts during data collection. The model is applied for 3D printing as an alternative production process in the manufacturing of an aircraft blocker door. 3D printing is a new technology of production working by addition of material and present interesting opportunities of cost cutting and environmental impacts, particularly in the aeronautical domain. The results showed that 3D printing, when associated with improvement in the topology of the part, allows an improvement both on costs and environmental impacts of the part life cycle. Nevertheless, the results are sensitive to the productivity of the 3D printing machine, in particular with costs when the productivity of the 3D printing is reduced. This eco-efficiency model presents several opportunities of improvement. A more elaborate definition of the objectives in reduction of environmental impacts would allow to direct the choices in design to considerations of eco-efficiency at a macro level. Moreover, the integration of the social dimension in the model constitutes an important stage to operationalize the stakes of environmental and social

  4. Optimize Deployment of Renewable Energy Technologies for Government Agencies, Industrial Facilities, and Military Installations: NREL Offers Proven Tools and Resources to Reduce Energy Use and Improve Efficiency (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Lab provides expertise, facilities, and technical assistance to campuses, facilities, and government agencies to apply renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies.

  5. A framework of initiatives for successful application of life cycle costing (LCC in industrialised building system (IBS in Malaysian construction industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamsuddin Siti Mazzuana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Industrialised Building System (IBS contributes a great shift in sustainable construction and benefits the society. Previous studies have proven in general that one of the hindrances in promoting sustainable in IBS, is a high cost for any pre-cast material specifically thus effected the overall cost. The introduction of Life Cycle Costing (LCC leads into providing a better and comprehensive cost estimation, including projecting actual cost to operate the building, hence providing a better baseline for decision making. The lacking application of LCC in IBS is still in trivial impact, therefore, this paper presents a framework which produced by expressing the successful initiatives of LCC and IBS in Malaysia construction industry. The framework developed based on findings from the extensive literature reviews, 164 responded questionnaires, and 19 expert opinions, which has three sections: Strategy Development, System Development and the last part is Decision Level. Aspects of objectivity, practicality, reliability, completeness that were likely to be implemented in the Malaysian construction industry were used. There are significant opinions on the usefulness and completeness of the proposed framework in providing a comprehensive cost estimates which helps much in deciding to carry out IBS or remain with a traditional construction method.

  6. Continuing education in radiation protection in the nuclear fuel cycle: The case of Nuclear Industries of Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Pereira, W. de; Kelecom, A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the pedagogical and technical concept that guided training in radiation protection implemented by the Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB; Nuclear Industries of Brazil) to maintain the competence of its technical staff to perform activities with exposure to radiation, the staff responsible for the supervision of this work and as a form of dissemination of knowledge to the staff not involved in the use of ionizing radiation. The groups of workers to be trained are here described, as well as the level of training, the frequency and types of training, the profile of trainers, the training programs, the forms of assessment and recording of training. It also describes the first general training performed in 2004. After this initial training no other general training was realized, and the option was to train small groups of workers, to avoid stopping the production as it occurred when general training was executed. The overall training was conducted in three units: the Uranium Concentration Unit (URA) under production in the city of Caetité, state of Bahia, the Ore Treatment Unit (UTM) undergoing decommissioning at Poços de Caldas, state of Minas Gerais and the Unit of Heavy Minerals (UMP), at Buena, state of Rio de Janeiro. In the initial training at URA 79 workers were trained, distributed in 6 classes (average of 13 students per class); each class had nine hours training and the grades obtained ranged from 7.5 to 10. At UTM, 200 employees were trained distributed in 9 classes (average of 22 students per class); their notes ranged from 8.8 to 10. Finally, at UMP 151 employees were trained, in 5 classes (average of 31 students per class); their grades ranged from 8.6 to 9.0. That year, a total of 180 hours were spent for training 430 employees, with no effective rebuke. Currently employees are trained when they arrive at their Units, and all along the year in small classes, as the general training has been definitely abolished. (author)

  7. IFR fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battles, J.E.; Miller, W.E.; Lineberry, M.J.; Phipps, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    The next major milestone of the IFR program is engineering-scale demonstration of the pyroprocess fuel cycle. The EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility has just entered a startup phase, which includes completion of facility modifications and installation and cold checkout of process equipment. This paper reviews the development of the electrorefining pyroprocess, the design and construction of the facility for the hot demonstration, the design and fabrication of the equipment, and the schedule and initial plan for its operation

  8. Report of the international workshop on safety measures to address the year 2000 issue at radioactive waste management and nuclear fuel cycle facilities. (Supplement to IAEA-TECDOC-1073 and IAEA-TECDOC-1087)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-08-01

    In resolution GC(42)/RES/11 on 'Measures to address the Year 2000 (Y2K) issue', adopted on 25 September 1998, the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) - inter alia - urged Member States 'to share information with the Secretariat regarding diagnostic and corrective actions being planned or implemented by operating and regulatory organizations at ... fuel cycle facilities ... to make those facilities Year 2000 ready', encouraged the Secretariat, 'within existing resources, to act as a clearinghouse and central point of contact for Member States to exchange information regarding diagnostic and remediation actions being taken at ... fuel cycle facilities ... to make these facilities Year 2000 ready', urged the Secretariat 'to handle the information provided by Member States carefully' and requested the Director General to report to it at its next (1999) regular session on the implementation of that resolution. In response to resolution GC(42)/RES/11, the Secretariat convened: a group of consultants who met in Vienna from 20 to 22 January 1999 and produced a technical document (IAEA-TECDOC-1073) entitled Safety Measures to Address the Year 2000 Issue at Radioactive Waste Management Facilities; and a specialists meeting in Vienna from 24 to 26 March 1999, which produced a technical document (IAEA-TECDOC-1087) entitled Potential Vulnerabilities of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities to the Year 2000 (Y2K) Issue and Measures to Address Them. To foster information exchange and share existing experience the IAEA held an International Workshop on Safety Measures to Address the Year 2000 Issue at Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities in Vienna on 1-2 July 1999. Whereas the focus of TECDOC-1073 and TECDOC-1087 had been on identifying relevant safety issues in relation to Y2K computer problems and on proposing methods to address them, the focus of the International Workshop was on sharing experience, setting priorities

  9. Theme 1: fuel cycle and waste management. 1.3 the nuclear fuel cycle in the future. 1.3.1. thermal recycle of plutonium ''Ongoing industrialization of Purex'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakem, M.J.

    2001-01-01

    The Purex process has been developed over many years from a process supporting military programmes in the years 1940 with the emphasis on production of a single product to today sophisticated large scale commercial plants designed to separate Uranium and Plutonium as high quality products. The plants have been designed, and are operated so as to discharge minimal aerial and liquid effluents whilst at the same time minimising arisings of liquid and solid waste. The scope of the facilities includes treatment of such wastes to create a form that is suitable for interim storage prior to final disposal. Typical of such plants are Thorp at Sellafield and UP3 at Cap La Hague, where plutonium dioxide is separated for the production of Mixed Oxide Fuel (MOX). The paper demonstrates the practical application of improvements to the Purex process at an industrial scale with the constraints imposed by technical, regulatory and commercial requirements. Successful examples will be addressed which illustrate the logical progression from technical concept, strategic decision and option taking, front end engineering definition, design and initial safety approval, regulatory approval leading to effective plant implementation and proving. (author)

  10. Consumption of woody biomass in industry, commercial, and public facilities in Serbia: Present state and possible contribution to the share of renewable sources in final energy consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glavonjić Branko D.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the continuation of the presentation of results obtained in comprehensive researches of woody biomass consumption in Serbia conducted as a part of the TCP/FAO project “Wood energy for sustainable rural development”. The previous paper (No. 3, 2011 showed results of wood fuels consumption for households heating and this paper shows their consumption for the needs of industry, commercial and public facilities. Research results show that total consumption of woody biomass in Serbia in 2010 was 7.41 million m3, out of which 7.03 million m3 was in the form of roundwood and 0.38 million m3 was in the form of wood residue from industry. The biggest consumers of woody biomass (roundwood, chips, residues are households with the participation of 86.54%, followed by the production of wood-based panels with 4.47% and energy production for own purposes of wood processing companies with 2.96%. Compared to the officially registered consumption in energy balance in the amount of 0.281 Mtoe, actual consumption of wood energy in Serbia in 2010 was 1.37 Mtoe or 4.9 times higher. Participation of wood energy in final energy consumption in Serbia was 57,300 TJ or 13.6% in 2010. Current use of wood energy substitutes imports of light heating oil in the value of 1.3 billion € or 650 million € in the case of natural gas substituting. Use of wood fuel prevented emissions of about 7 million tonnes of CO2 from fossil fuels.

  11. Overview of light water reactor fuel cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leuze, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    A brief overview of the LWR fuel cycle is given, and the status of the LWR fuel cycle in the U.S. is briefly summarized. A broad base including a variety of industrial facilities is necessary to provide fuel for LWR's. However, capital investments for all the facilities combined are only about 15 percent of the capital needed for the reactors themselves. Capability for the front end of the fuel cycle, mining through fuel fabrication, is adequate for the present, but the expanded capacity will be required in 15 to 20 years, and this calls for immediate action because of long lead times. There are no operating facilities for the back-end of the fuel cycle, which includes spent fuel reprocessing, permanent waste storage, and mixed-oxide fuel fabrication. Decisions must be made concerning permanent waste storage concepts and regulations relating to the use and handling of plutonium before such facilities can be provided and put into operation. (LK)

  12. Radonclose - the system of Soviet designed regional waste management facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, W.C.; Reisman, A.; Purvis, E.E. III.

    1997-01-01

    The Soviet Union established a system of specialized regional facilities to dispose of radioactive waste generated by sources other than the nuclear fuel cycle. The system had 16 facilities in Russia, 5 in Ukraine, one in each of the other CIS states, and one in each of the Baltic Republics. These facilities are still being used. The major generators of radioactive waste they process these are research and industrial organizations, medical and agricultural institution and other activities not related to nuclear power. Waste handled by these facilities is mainly beta- and gamma-emitting nuclides with half lives of less than 30 years. The long-lived and alpha-emitting isotopic content is insignificant. Most of the radwaste has low and medium radioactivity levels. The facilities also handle spent radiation sources, which are highly radioactive and contain 95-98 percent of the activity of all the radwaste buried at these facilities

  13. From waste plastics to industrial raw materials: A life cycle assessment of mechanical plastic recycling practice based on a real-world case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Fu; Guo, Jianfeng; Zhang, Wujie; Summers, Peter A; Hall, Philip

    2017-12-01

    Mechanical recycling of waste plastics is an environmental solution to the problem of waste plastic disposal, and has already become a common practice in industry. However, limited information can be found on either the industralised plastic recycling or the recycled materials, despite the use of recycled plastics has already extended to automobile production. This study investigates the life cycle environmental impacts of mechanical plastic recycling practice of a plastic recycling company in China. Waste plastics from various sources, such as agricultural wastes, plastic product manufacturers, collected solid plastic wastes and parts dismantled from waste electric and electronic equipments, are processed in three routes with products end up in different markets. The results of life cycle assessments show that the extrusion process has the largest environmental impacts, followed by the use of fillers and additives. Compared to production of virgin plastics and composites, the mechanical recycling is proved to be a superior alternative in most environmental aspects. Substituting virgin plastic composites with recycled plastic composites has achieved the highest environmental benefits, as virgin composite production has an impact almost 4 times higher that of the recycled composite production in each ReCiPe endpoint damage factor. Sensitivity analysis shows that the coverage of collecting network contribute affect little to overall environmental impact, and centralisation plays an important role in reducing overall environmental impacts. Among the fillers and additives, impact modifiers account for the most significant contributions to the environmental impacts of recycled composites. This study provides necessary information about the existing industrialised plastic recycling practice, and recommendations are given. Research implications are presented with the purpose to achieve higher substitution rate and lower environmental impact. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  14. The carbon cycle in the Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator (ACCESS-ESM1) - Part 1: Model description and pre-industrial simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Rachel M.; Ziehn, Tilo; Matear, Richard J.; Lenton, Andrew; Chamberlain, Matthew A.; Stevens, Lauren E.; Wang, Ying-Ping; Srbinovsky, Jhan; Bi, Daohua; Yan, Hailin; Vohralik, Peter F.

    2017-07-01

    Earth system models (ESMs) that incorporate carbon-climate feedbacks represent the present state of the art in climate modelling. Here, we describe the Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator (ACCESS)-ESM1, which comprises atmosphere (UM7.3), land (CABLE), ocean (MOM4p1), and sea-ice (CICE4.1) components with OASIS-MCT coupling, to which ocean and land carbon modules have been added. The land carbon model (as part of CABLE) can optionally include both nitrogen and phosphorous limitation on the land carbon uptake. The ocean carbon model (WOMBAT, added to MOM) simulates the evolution of phosphate, oxygen, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity and iron with one class of phytoplankton and zooplankton. We perform multi-centennial pre-industrial simulations with a fixed atmospheric CO2 concentration and different land carbon model configurations (prescribed or prognostic leaf area index). We evaluate the equilibration of the carbon cycle and present the spatial and temporal variability in key carbon exchanges. Simulating leaf area index results in a slight warming of the atmosphere relative to the prescribed leaf area index case. Seasonal and interannual variations in land carbon exchange are sensitive to whether leaf area index is simulated, with interannual variations driven by variability in precipitation and temperature. We find that the response of the ocean carbon cycle shows reasonable agreement with observations. While our model overestimates surface phosphate values, the global primary productivity agrees well with observations. Our analysis highlights some deficiencies inherent in the carbon models and where the carbon simulation is negatively impacted by known biases in the underlying physical model and consequent limits on the applicability of this model version. We conclude the study with a brief discussion of key developments required to further improve the realism of our model simulation.

  15. The carbon cycle in the Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator (ACCESS-ESM1 – Part 1: Model description and pre-industrial simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Law

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Earth system models (ESMs that incorporate carbon–climate feedbacks represent the present state of the art in climate modelling. Here, we describe the Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator (ACCESS-ESM1, which comprises atmosphere (UM7.3, land (CABLE, ocean (MOM4p1, and sea-ice (CICE4.1 components with OASIS-MCT coupling, to which ocean and land carbon modules have been added. The land carbon model (as part of CABLE can optionally include both nitrogen and phosphorous limitation on the land carbon uptake. The ocean carbon model (WOMBAT, added to MOM simulates the evolution of phosphate, oxygen, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity and iron with one class of phytoplankton and zooplankton. We perform multi-centennial pre-industrial simulations with a fixed atmospheric CO2 concentration and different land carbon model configurations (prescribed or prognostic leaf area index. We evaluate the equilibration of the carbon cycle and present the spatial and temporal variability in key carbon exchanges. Simulating leaf area index results in a slight warming of the atmosphere relative to the prescribed leaf area index case. Seasonal and interannual variations in land carbon exchange are sensitive to whether leaf area index is simulated, with interannual variations driven by variability in precipitation and temperature. We find that the response of the ocean carbon cycle shows reasonable agreement with observations. While our model overestimates surface phosphate values, the global primary productivity agrees well with observations. Our analysis highlights some deficiencies inherent in the carbon models and where the carbon simulation is negatively impacted by known biases in the underlying physical model and consequent limits on the applicability of this model version. We conclude the study with a brief discussion of key developments required to further improve the realism of our model simulation.

  16. Facilities management and industrial safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-06-01

    This book lists occupation safety and health acts with purpose, definition and management system of safety and health, enforcement ordinance of occupation safety and health acts and enforcement regulations such as general rules, safety and health cover, system of management on safety and health, regulation of management on safety and health, regulations of harmfulness and protection of danger, heath management for workers, supervisor and command and inspection of machine and equipment.

  17. Comparisons of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry based on physical input-output life-cycle assessment model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Sai; Zhang, Tianzhu; Xu, Yijian

    2012-03-01

    Waste recycling for paper production is an important component of waste management. This study constructs a physical input-output life-cycle assessment (PIO-LCA) model. The PIO-LCA model is used to investigate environmental impacts of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry: crop straws, bagasse, textile wastes and scrap paper. Crop straw recycling and wood utilization for paper production have small total intensity of environmental impacts. Moreover, environmental impacts reduction of crop straw recycling and wood utilization benefits the most from technology development. Thus, using crop straws and wood (including wood wastes) for paper production should be promoted. Technology development has small effects on environmental impacts reduction of bagasse recycling, textile waste recycling and scrap paper recycling. In addition, bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling have big total intensity of environmental impacts. Thus, the development of bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Other pathways for reusing bagasse and textile wastes should be explored and evaluated. Moreover, imports of scrap paper should be encouraged to reduce large indirect impacts of scrap paper recycling on domestic environment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparisons of four categories of waste recycling in China’s paper industry based on physical input–output life-cycle assessment model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Sai; Zhang, Tianzhu; Xu Yijian

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Using crop straws and wood wastes for paper production should be promoted. ► Bagasse and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. ► Imports of scrap paper should be encouraged. ► Sensitivity analysis, uncertainties and policy implications are discussed. - Abstract: Waste recycling for paper production is an important component of waste management. This study constructs a physical input–output life-cycle assessment (PIO-LCA) model. The PIO-LCA model is used to investigate environmental impacts of four categories of waste recycling in China’s paper industry: crop straws, bagasse, textile wastes and scrap paper. Crop straw recycling and wood utilization for paper production have small total intensity of environmental impacts. Moreover, environmental impacts reduction of crop straw recycling and wood utilization benefits the most from technology development. Thus, using crop straws and wood (including wood wastes) for paper production should be promoted. Technology development has small effects on environmental impacts reduction of bagasse recycling, textile waste recycling and scrap paper recycling. In addition, bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling have big total intensity of environmental impacts. Thus, the development of bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Other pathways for reusing bagasse and textile wastes should be explored and evaluated. Moreover, imports of scrap paper should be encouraged to reduce large indirect impacts of scrap paper recycling on domestic environment.

  19. Safeguards and an internationalized nuclear fuel cycle for East Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, John

    2005-01-01

    Concerns about nuclear proliferation by means of illicit enrichment of uranium or reprocessing of plutonium suggest limiting those technologies to a few, large facilities. In turn, countries that renounce acquiring those capabilities would be guaranteed fuel cycle services. Interdependence might lead to an Internationalized Nuclear Fuel Cycle (IFC), which could be formalized in voluntary regional compacts to share management of certain facilities. An IFC could add managerial oversight to strengthen the nonproliferation culture in the region and offer cost and efficiency benefits to participating countries, as well. An East Asian IFC would present opportunities to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of international safeguards by consolidating inspection requirements into relatively few facilities. This may be an opportune time to consider an IFC before the growing national industries each invest in separate facilities. An East Asian IFC regime could minimize international safeguards burdens, strengthen regional non-proliferation cooperation, and help manage future energy costs. (author)

  20. Oxidative potential (OP) and mineralogy of iron ore particulate matter at the Gol-E-Gohar Mining and Industrial Facility (Iran).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Naghmeh; Keshavarzi, Behnam; Sorooshian, Armin; Moore, Farid; Dunster, Christina; Dominguez, Ana Oliete; Kelly, Frank J; Dhakal, Prakash; Ahmadi, Mohamad Reza; Asadi, Sina

    2017-03-09

    Concentrations of total suspended particulate matter, particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter Gol-E-Gohar Mining and Industrial Facility. Samples were characterized in terms of mineralogy, morphology, and oxidative potential. Results show that indoor samples exceeded the 24-h PM 2.5 and PM 10 mass concentration limits (35 and 150 µg m -3 , respectively) set by the US National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Calcite, magnetite, tremolite, pyrite, talc, and clay minerals such as kaolinite, vermiculite, and illite are the major phases of the iron ore PM. Accessory minerals are quartz, dolomite, hematite, actinolite, biotite, albite, nimite, laumontite, diopside, and muscovite. The scanning electron microscope structure of fibrous-elongated minerals revealed individual fibers in the range of 1.5 nm to 71.65 µm in length and 0.2 nm to 3.7 µm in diameter. The presence of minerals related to respiratory diseases, such as talc, crystalline silica, and needle-shaped minerals like amphibole asbestos (tremolite and actinolite), strongly suggests the need for detailed health-based studies in the region. The particulate samples show low to medium oxidative potential per unit of mass, in relation to an urban road side control, being more reactive with ascorbate than with glutathione or urate. However, the PM oxidative potential per volume of air is exceptionally high, confirming that the workers are exposed to a considerable oxidative environment. PM released by iron ore mining and processing activities should be considered a potential health risk to the mine workers and nearby employees, and strategies to combat the issue are suggested.

  1. Use of life cycle assessment as decision-support tool for water reuse and handling of residues at a Danish industrial laundry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Kim Riisgaard; Villanueva, Alejandro; Wenzel, Henrik

    2004-10-01

    This analysis presents the results of a life cycle assessment (LCA) carried out on six alternative options for the recycling of water at a Danish industrial laundry for workwear. The study focuses on the handling and disposal of the wet residues generated when wastewater is treated for recycling, and in accounting for long-term potential toxicity impacts. The analysed options are a combination of two water-upgrading technologies: biofilter and ultrafiltration, and three residue disposal alternatives: biogas followed by incineration of sludge at local wastewater treatment plant, thermal vitrification treatment for production of vitrified sand, and mineralization in a sludge bed. It is concluded from the results that with the current Danish environmental policy priorities, the environmental impacts of highest priority are the toxicity effects derived from the presence of heavy metals in the residues. Heavy metals originate from the dirt in the workwear that is washed in the laundry. It is further concluded that the studied water treatment technologies satisfy both the need of clean water for recycling and simultaneously help controlling a safe disposal of pollutants by concentration of the residues. The results of the study also confirm the potential of LCA as a decision-support tool for assisting water recycling initiatives and for residue handling management. The handling of residues has been identified as a stage of the water recycling strategy that bears important environmental impacts. This holistic perspective provided by LCA can be used as input for the definition of environmental management strategies at an industrial laundry, and the prioritization of investments to the environmental profile of laundry processes. In this case-study, the results of the LCA are made operational by, for example, selecting the water treatment technology which is associated wih a safe disposal of the wet residue. It is important to bear in mind that such prioritization depends on

  2. Uranium Determination in Samples from Decommissioning of Nuclear facilities Related to the First Stage of Nuclear Fuel Cycle; Determinacion de Uranio en Muestras Procedentes del Desmantelamiento de Instalaciones de la Primera Parte del Cielo del Combustible Nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, A.; Correa, E.; Navarro, N.; Sancho, C. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain); Angeles, A.

    2000-07-01

    An adequate workplace monitoring must be carried out during the decommissioning activities, to ensure the protection of workers involved in these tasks. In addition, a large amount of waste materials are generated during the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Clearance levels are established by regulatory authorities and are normally quite low. The determination of those activity concentration levels become more difficult when it is necessary to quantify alpha emitters such as uranium, especially when complex matrices are involved. Several methods for uranium determination in samples obtained during the decommissioning of a facility related to the first stage of the nuclear fuel cycle are presented in this work. Measurements were carried out by laboratory techniques. In situ gamma spectrometry was also used to perform measurements on site. A comparison among the different techniques was also done by analysing the results obtained in some practical applications. (Author)

  3. Assessment of a combined dry anaerobic digestion and post-composting treatment facility for source-separated organic household waste, using material and substance flow analysis and life cycle inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Morten Bang; Møller, Jacob; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2017-08-01

    The fate of total solids, volatile solids, total organic carbon, fossil carbon, biogenic carbon and 17 substances (As, Ca, CaCO 3 , Cd, Cl, Cr, Cu, H, Hg, K, Mg, N, Ni, O, P, Pb, S, Zn) in a combined dry anaerobic digestion and post-composting facility were assessed. Mass balances showed good results with low uncertainties for non-volatile substances, while balances for nitrogen, carbon, volatile solids and total organic carbon showed larger but reasonable uncertainties, due to volatilisation and emissions into the air. Material and substance flow analyses were performed in order to obtain transfer coefficients for a combined dry anaerobic digestion and post-composting facility. All metals passed through the facility and ended up in compost or residues, but all concentrations of metals in the compost complied with legislation. About 23% of the carbon content of the organic waste was transferred to the biogas, 24% to the compost, 13% to residues and 40% into the atmosphere. For nitrogen, 69% was transferred to the compost, 10% volatilised to the biofilter, 11% directly into the atmosphere and 10% to residues. Finally, a full life cycle inventory was conducted for the combined dry anaerobic digestion and post-composting facility, including waste received, fuel consumption, energy use, gaseous emissions, products, energy production and chemical composition of the compost produced. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. PDCA Cycle for facility organization: first step of the PDCA framework based on a case study of the activity of key equipment specialists

    OpenAIRE

    Baba, Fumio; Yagi, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    It is generally known that after the 1990s many Japanese firms had negative growth and established production bases overseas. As economic activity slowed, domestic production volumes, employee numbers, and maintenance fees all decreased. For certain industries, such as the process industry, this situation reduced the ability to manage “quality control”, “safety”, and “environmental preservation”. To create a practical PDCA model to improve production potential, we analyzed the recent difficul...

  5. New Ideas on Facilities Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, James C.

    1986-01-01

    Examines trends in facilities management relating to products and people. Reviews new trends in products, including processes, techniques, and programs that are being expounded by business and industry. Discusses the "people factors" involved in facilities management. (ABB)

  6. Recent development in safety regulation of nuclear fuel cycle activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, S.

    2001-01-01

    Through the effort of deliberation and legislation over five years, Japanese government structure was reformed this January, with the aim of realizing simple, efficient and transparent administration. Under the reform, the Agency for Nuclear and Industrial Safety (ANIS) was founded in the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) to be responsible for safety regulation of energy-related nuclear activities, including nuclear fuel cycle activities, and industrial activities, including explosives, high-pressure gasses and mining. As one of the lessons learned from the JCO criticality accident of September 1999, it was pointed out that the government's inspection function was not enough for fuel fabrication facilities. Accordingly, new statutory regulatory activities were introduced, namely, inspection of observance of safety rules and procedures for all kinds of nuclear operators and periodic inspection of fuel fabrication facilities. In addition, in order to cope with insufficient safety education and training of workers in nuclear facilities, licensees of nuclear facilities are required by law to specify safety education and training for their workers. ANIS is committed to enforce these new regulatory activities effectively and efficiently. In addition, it is going to be prepared, in its capacity as safety regulatory authority, for future development of Japanese fuel cycle activities, including commissioning of JNFL Rokkasho reprocessing plant and possible application for licenses for JNFL MOX fabrication plant and for spent fuel interim storage facilities. (author)

  7. Recent development in safety regulation of nuclear fuel cycle activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, S.

    2002-01-01

    Through the effort of deliberation and legislation over five years, Japanese government structure was reformed this January, with the aim of realizing simple, efficient and transparent administration. Under the reform, the Agency for Nuclear and Industrial Safety (ANIS) was founded in the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) to be responsible for safety regulation of energy-related nuclear activities, including nuclear fuel cycle activities, and industrial activities, including explosives, high-pressure gasses and mining. As one of the lessons learned from the JCO criticality accident of September 1999, it was pointed out that government's inspection function was not enough for fuel fabrication facilities. Accordingly, new statutory regulatory activities were introduced, namely, inspection of observance of safety rules and procedures for all kinds of nuclear operators and periodic inspection of fuel fabrication facilities. In addition, in order to cope with insufficient safety education and training of workers in nuclear facilities, licensees of nuclear facilities are required by law to specify safety education and training for their workers. ANIS is committed to enforce these new regulatory activities effectively and efficiently. In addition, it is going to be prepared for, in its capacity of safety regulatory authority, future development of Japanese fuel cycle activities, including commissioning of JNFL Rokkasho reprocessing plant and possible application for licenses for JNFL MOX fabrication plant and for spent fuel interim storage facilities. (author)

  8. Nuclear industry practice for clearance of materials, facilities and buildings as well as land. Tutorial; Kaerntekniska industrins praxis foer friklassning av material, lokaler och byggnader samt mark. Handledning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-12-15

    This handbook comprises the common practices of the Swedish nuclear industry for the clearance of material, rooms, buildings and soil in order to be exempted from the Swedish Nuclear Activities Act and the Swedish Radiation Protection Act. After clearance the management/usage of material, rooms, buildings and soil is permitted without any control from the radiation protection point of view. Clearance is practiced to reduce the amount radioactive waste. Cleared material can be reused according to its original form, recycled or, if these two possibilities are not available, disposed as conventional waste. The working procedures described in this handbook are mainly based on the regulation SSMFS 2011:2 from the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority: 'Regulations concerning clearance of material, rooms, buildings and soil from activities with ionising radiation'. The purpose of this handbook is to serve as a tool and guidance for generating specific routines and instructions for clearance. It describes the principles, processes and routines that should be followed under a clearance procedure. The intention is to accomplish the current regulation by following the routines and principles described in this manual. This handbook spans over a large number of conditions towards clearance, such as facility specific conditions and different types of objects. Because not all the conceivable conditions and objects can be included here, the purpose has been to cover the most common types of clearance practices. The practices comprise: - Description of regulations and recommendations, Swedish and international, that represent the basis of the requirements in this handbook. - Presentation of the processes for clearance of material, rooms, buildings and soil. Those which cannot be cleared are considered as radioactive waste. A proposal for the decision-making process is presented. - Illustration for radiological surveys to systems and components, buildings and soil in regard

  9. Waste Water Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset contains the locations of municipal and industrial direct discharge wastewater treatment facilities throughout the state of Vermont. Spatial data is not...

  10. Facile synthesis and stable cycling ability of hollow submicron silicon oxide–carbon composite anode material for Li-ion battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joong-Yeon; Nguyen, Dan Thien [Department of Fine Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Joon-Sup [Department of Energy Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Seung-Wan, E-mail: swsong@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Fine Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Energy Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-05

    Highlights: • Hollow submicron SiO{sub 2}–carbon composite material was synthesized using Si{sup 4+}-citrate chelation. • Composite material possessed a homogeneous distribution of SiO{sub 2} and carbon. • Composite electrode delivered ⩾600 mAh/g with a stable cycling stability. • This materials design and synthesis provides a useful platform for scalable production. - Abstract: Advanced SiO{sub 2}–carbon composite anode active material for lithium-ion battery has been synthesized through a simple chelation of silicon cation with citrate in a glyme-based solvent. The resultant composite material demonstrates a homogeneous distribution of constituents over the submicron particles and a unique hollow spherical microstructure, which provides an enhanced electrical conductivity and better accommodation of volume change of silicon during electrochemical charge–discharge cycling, respectively. As a result, the composite electrode exhibits a high cycling stability delivering the capacity retention of 91% at the 100th cycle and discharge capacities of 662–602 mAh/g and coulombic efficiencies of 99.8%. This material synthesis is scalable and cost-effective in preparing various submicron or micron composite electrode materials.

  11. FY 1999 report on the results of the contract project 'The model project for facilities for effective utilization of industrial waste at the industrial complex in Thailand.' Separate Volume 4 - FY 1999 project; 1999 nendo seika hokokusho. Tai ni okeru kogyo danchi sangyo haikibutsu yuko riyo setsubi moderu jigyo - 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    For the purpose of reducing the consumption of fossil fuel by recycling industrial waste for effective use as petroleum substituting energy in Thailand where the amount of industrial waste is expected to increase, a model project on facilities for effective use of industrial waste at the industrial complex was carried out, and the FY 1999 results were reported. Concretely, the industrial waste generated from each plant at the industrial complex owned by IEAT is to be incinerated in fluidized bed incinerator, and the process steam is to be generated by recovering waste heat by waste heat recovery boiler and to be supplied to plants within the complex. In this fiscal year, the first year of the project, the attachment to the agreement was prepared in terms of the allotment of the project work between Japan and Thailand, various kinds of gist, schedules, etc. and signed. After that, the following were conducted at the Japan side according to the attachment to the agreement: determination of the basic specifications for facilities, basic design, detailed design, manufacture of a part of the equipment, etc. Separate Volume 4 included the results of the inspection of the tank, pump, blower, etc. (NEDO)

  12. Management of waste from french nuclear fuel cycle: what are the key issues?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Londres, V.; Do Quang, R.; Fournier, P.

    2000-01-01

    Like any other industry, the nuclear industry generates waste. This waste arises in the different successive stages of the fuel cycle, including nuclear power plants, and its physical and chemical properties vary greatly. What is special about it is the radioactivity it contains. Management of waste generated by spent fuel conditioning in nuclear reprocessing facilities, and which cannot be stored in surface repositories, according to current French regulations (ILW and HLW), is specifically discussed in this paper. (authors)

  13. Process and system innovation in the building and construction industry: Developing a model for integrated value chain and life cycle management of built objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, H.A.J. de; Vrijhoef, R.

    2004-01-01

    The building and construction industry has a large contribution and impact on society, e.g. economical and environmental, involving a vast spectrum of stakeholders. However, the value delivering performance of the industry has often been criticized. The predictability of the value, price and costs

  14. Wind Energy Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurie, Carol

    2017-02-01

    This book takes readers inside the places where daily discoveries shape the next generation of wind power systems. Energy Department laboratory facilities span the United States and offer wind research capabilities to meet industry needs. The facilities described in this book make it possible for industry players to increase reliability, improve efficiency, and reduce the cost of wind energy -- one discovery at a time. Whether you require blade testing or resource characterization, grid integration or high-performance computing, Department of Energy laboratory facilities offer a variety of capabilities to meet your wind research needs.

  15. Risk informed life cycle plant design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Ralph S. III; Nutt, Mark M.

    2003-01-01

    Many facility life cycle activities including design, construction, fabrication, inspection and maintenance are evolving from a deterministic to a risk-informed basis. The risk informed approach uses probabilistic methods to evaluate the contribution of individual system components to total system performance. Total system performance considers both safety and cost considerations including system failure, reliability, and availability. By necessity, a risk-informed approach considers both the component's life cycle and the life cycle of the system. In the nuclear industry, risk-informed approaches, namely probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) or probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), have become a standard tool used to evaluate the safety of nuclear power plants. Recent studies pertaining to advanced reactor development have indicated that these new power plants must provide enhanced safety over existing nuclear facilities and be cost-competitive with other energy sources. Risk-informed approaches, beyond traditional PRA, offer the opportunity to optimize design while considering the total life cycle of the plant in order to realize these goals. The use of risk-informed design approaches in the nuclear industry is only beginning, with recent promulgation of risk-informed regulations and proposals for risk-informed codes. This paper briefly summarizes the current state of affairs regarding the use of risk-informed approaches in design. Key points to fully realize the benefit of applying a risk-informed approach to nuclear power plant design are then presented. These points are equally applicable to non-nuclear facilities where optimization for cost competitiveness and/or safety is desired. (author)

  16. A preliminary simulation of the device arrangement analysis and the remote accessibility evaluation in a nuclear fuel cycle facility using a virtual engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H. S.; Park, B. S.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, H. D.; Song, K. C.

    2010-10-01

    The ultimate goal of this study is to contribute to the conceptual design of a solution which was obtained from various simulations in an early design stage prior to constructing the pyro process facility. The other aim is to remove the problems of repairs that can happen in operation and maintenance tasks of process devices through and accessibility analysis of remote manipulation and equipment. This technology improves error detection by locating clashes and interferences early in the process. One of the best qualities of this technology is the reduction of time-to-design, an improved flexibility in design and production, and reliability. This system is still going to be studied for gathering technical specifications, managing of requirements, and assisting with the design and procurement of new equipment and tools. (Author)

  17. Fuel Cycle Safety - Past, Present and Future. Wilmington, North Carolina, USA, 16-18 October 2007. Papers and presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-10-01

    At the October 2006 meeting of Working Group on Fuel Cycle Safety (WGFCS), participants agreed that several issues associated with the safety of the nuclear fuel cycle merit more detailed attention by regulators and industry. There was general agreement that more information, from a broader audience, would be of benefit both to regulators and the regulated industry. Therefore, this workshop was held in order to collect the views of interested parties from a global perspective. The workshop focused on the following three topics: - Legacy waste concerns (including facilities and waste); - Reprocessing of nuclear fuel and the recycling of nuclear waste; - Ensuring the safety of current and new fuel cycle facilities. The workshop was expected to provide additional insights on these three topics and enabled facility operators and regulators alike an opportunity to maintain and enhance safety in the future. This document brings together the available presentations (slides and papers) given at the meeting

  18. Evaluation of NORM in facility Venezuelan oil industry to establish regulatory criteria; Evaluacion de NORM en una instalacion de la industria petrolera venezolana para establecer los criterios reguladores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acevedo Lozada, D. J.; Rivas, I.; Davila, L.; Flores, Y.

    2013-07-01

    The present work shows the need to identify, in the Venezuelan oil industry, the existence of exposure to natural sources of radiation should be considered as occupational. As Regulatory Authority in the area of ionizing radiation the need for regulatory processes and ensure radiation protection of personnel involved in these practices arises, as well as personal and environmental monitoring. NORM identifying an installation of the Venezuelan oil industry to establish regulatory processes and take steps to ensure occupational radiation protection. (Author)

  19. Facile synthesis of V6O13 micro-flowers for Li-ion and Na-ion battery cathodes with good cycling performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Hailong; Lin, Yunsheng; Wei, Mingdeng

    2014-07-01

    A simple and versatile method for the preparation of V6O13 microflowers is developed via a simple hydrothermal route with the aid of an alkali metal nitrate salt, which has important effects on the formation of V6O13. It is found that V6O13 microflowers display good cycling stability as cathode materials for lithium-ion battery. In addition, they show high capacities for sodium-ion battery. We have V6O13 microflowers discharge capacities up to 225.7 mA h g(-1) for sodium-ion battery. The reason may be the fewer phase transitions occurring upon lithium and sodium insertion for phase-unpure V6O13 microflowers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Model for equipment life-cycle cost forecasting and its application in assets management in the oil industry; Modelo para previsao de custo de ciclo de vida de equipamentos e sua aplicacao na gestao de ativos na industria do petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesca, Igor Gimenes; Elias Junior, Antonio; Carvalho, Marcos Henrique [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (DEP/FEM/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Petroleo; Lima, Gabriel Alves da Costa [Centro de Estudos de Petroleo (CEPETRO/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    In the area of oil exploration and production (E and P), knowing the behavior of the equipment in their life cycles becomes even more important than in other industries due to: 1) high cost and 2) severity in terms of requirements safety. The purchase of equipment should not be decided only at the initial cost, but through the life cycle cost (LCC). This paper presents a study to find the cost over the life cycle of a group of equipment used in the petroleum industry by methods of dynamic programming, as well as a discussion on how to use such information in assets management in order to obtain better financial indicators. The main causes of variation in the useful economic life of equipment is the resale value and maintenance costs. Thus, it is possible to avoid high expenditure on maintenance costs and avoid an excessive depreciation of the equipment. So it is possible to conclude that the more intense the depreciation of value, the greater the useful economic life. For maintenance costs, the more intense are the costs, the lower the useful economic life. (author)

  1. Shorter Harvest Cycles Counteract Increasing Annual Productivity in Industrial Plantation Forests: Trends from Three Decades of Remote Sensing in Southeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, D.; Jackson, R. B.

    2017-12-01

    Plantation forestry can produce woody biomass many times faster than native vegetation, particularly in the tropical regions where plantations have expanded rapidly in the past three decades. However, activists and practitioners have raised concerns over the sustainability of intensive plantations, suggesting that changes to soil properties may inhibit vegetation growth after multiple harvest cycles. We use a 32-year time series of remotely sensed vegetation indices derived from Landsat data, coupled with recent geospatial and wood volume data from plantation companies, to identify trends in management and vegetation productivity in thousands of individual eucalyptus plantation stands. We find that peak vegetation index values at canopy closure, which are correlated with annual wood volume increment, increase over successive harvest cycles, while the length of each cycle decreases. These opposing trends suggest that the number of harvests required to produce a given wood volume peaks around the second harvest cycle and then declines, likely due to refinement of management practices. Across the region, vegetation index data do not support the hypothesized decrease in productivity over multiple harvest cycles. Additional field data and ongoing soil analyses will complement the remote sensing approach to quantifying plantations' long-term effects on the land they occupy.

  2. Status quo of energy recovery from waste in special industrial facilities and evaluation of the environmental impacts of using refuse derived fuel (RDF) in cement kilns in Germany; Untersuchung der Umweltauswirkungen des Einsatzes von Abfaellen ausserhalb thermischer Abfallbehandlungsanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alwast, H.; Marton, C.; Koepp, M.

    2001-10-01

    Within the study presented here the use of energy recovery from waste was analysed for several industrial facilities, focussing on cement plants, kilns in the lime and gypsum industry, steel works and plants for the production of non ferrous metals. 44 German cement plants dispose of an own clinker production. Presently 31 plants have a permit for recovering energy from waste. The total permitted capacity for energy recovery in German cement kilns amounts to nearly 2,6 Mio. t/a. Mainly waste oil, old tyres, fuel derived from processed production-specific and municipal waste, plastics, scrap wood and waste paper are co-incinerated. In 1998/99 a total amount of roughly 945.000 t refuse was processed in 30 units of the studied facilities. In five furnaces at three steel works waste can be used for energy or material recovery. The approved total capacity of high calorific waste for energy recovery comes to nearly 350,000 t/a. Especially industrial plastics and packaging waste from DSD, plastics processed in scrap mills and shreddered waste and granulated paint sludge are used. In 1998 the facilities processed only old plastic, representing a total amount of nearly 109.000 t. At present seven facilities in the non ferrous metal industry have a permit for energy recovery from waste. The maximum capacity amounts on national level to nearly 140.000 t/a. Especially waste oil, packaging waste, plastics and scrap wood can be processed. The analysis of respective applications of the 17th BImSchV shows an inconsistency within the amending permitting procedures. For the time to come a conformity between the respective regional permitting authorities would be recommendable. Moreover, the effects on air emission caused by using waste for energy recovery were analysed for cement kilns with own clinker production. Due to the amendment of the 17th BImSchV more stringent requirements regarding waste composition must be established. This is especially valid for the highly volatile

  3. Testing and analysis of the impact on engine cycle parameters and control system modifications using hydrogen or methane as fuel in an industrial gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, H. H.-W.; Keinz, J.; Börner, S.; Hendrick, P.; Elsing, R.

    2016-07-01

    The paper highlights the modification of the engine control software of the hydrogen (H2) converted gas turbine Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) GTCP 36-300 allowing safe and accurate methane (CH4) operation achieved without mechanical changes of the metering unit. The acceleration and deceleration characteristics of the engine controller from idle to maximum load are analyzed comparing H2 and CH4. Also, the paper presents the influence on the thermodynamic cycle of gas turbine resulting from the different fuels supported by a gas turbine cycle simulation of H2 and CH4 using the software GasTurb.

  4. Estimates of internal dose equivalent to 22 target organs for radionuclides occurring in routine releases from nuclear fuel-cycle facilities. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killough, G.G.; Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Bernard, S.R.; Pleasant, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    This report is the first of a two-volume tabulation of internal radiation dose conversion factors for man for radionuclides of interest in environmental assessments of light-water-reactor fuel cycles. This volume treats 68 radionuclides, all of mass number less than 150. Intake by inhalation and ingestion is considered. In the former case, the ICRP Task Group Lung Model has been used to simulate the behavior of particulate matter in the respiratory tract. Results corresponding to activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMAD) of 0.3, 1.0, and 5.0 μm are given. The GI tract has been represented by a four-segment catenary model with exponential transfer of radioactivity from one segment to the next. Retention of radionuclides in other organs was characterized by linear combinations of decaying exponential functions. Dose equivalent per microcurie intake of each parent nuclide is given for 22 target organs with contributions from specified source organs plus surplus activity in the rest of the body. Cross irradiation due to penetrating radiations has also been considered in the calculations

  5. Life Cycle Environmental Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Stig; Jørgensen, Jørgen; Pedersen, Morten Als

    1996-01-01

    A precondition for environmentally conscious management is the awareness of the environmental impact potentials created by an industrial company. There is an obvious need for management tools to support the implementation of relevant environmental criteria into the industrial decision making...... processes. The discipline of life cycle environmental management (LCEM) focuses on the incorporation of environmental criteria from the life cycles of products and other company activities into the company management processes. This paper introduces the concept of LCEM as an important element...... of the complete set of environmental objects in an industrial manufacturing company....

  6. Decommissioning nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, K.M.; Jenkins, C.E.; Waite, D.A.; Brooksbank, R.E.; Lunis, B.C.; Nemec, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes the currently accepted alternatives for decommissioning retired light water reactor fuel cycle facilities and the current state of decommissioning technology. Three alternatives are recognized: Protective Storage; Entombment; and Dismantling. Application of these alternatives to the following types of facilities is briefly described: light water reactors; fuel reprocessing plants, and mixed oxide fuel fabrication plants. Brief descriptions are given of decommissioning operations and results at a number of sites, and recent studies of the future decommissioning of prototype fuel cycle facilities are reviewed. An overview is provided of the types of operations performed and tools used in common decontamination and decommissioning techniques and needs for improved technology are suggested. Planning for decommissioning a nuclear facility is dependent upon the maximum permitted levels of residual radioactive contamination. Proposed guides and recently developed methodology for development of site release criteria are reviewed. 21 fig, 32 references

  7. Thoron Mitigation System based on charcoal bed for applications in thorium fuel cycle facilities (part 1): Development of theoretical models for design considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, B K; Sudeep Kumara, K; Karunakara, N; Gaware, J J; Sapra, B K; Mayya, Y S

    2017-06-01

    Regulating the environmental discharge of 220 Rn (historically known as thoron) and its decay products from thorium processing facilities is important for protection of environment and general public living in the vicinities. Activated charcoal provides an effective solution to this problem because of its high adsorption capacity to gaseous element like radon. In order to design and develop a charcoal based Thoron Mitigation System, a mathematical model has been developed in the present work for studying the 220 Rn transport and adsorption in a flow through charcoal bed and estimating the 220 Rn mitigation factor (MF) as a function of system and operating parameters. The model accounts for inter- and intra-grain diffusion, advection, radioactive decay and adsorption processes. Also, the effects of large void fluctuation and wall channeling on the mitigation factor have been included through a statistical model. Closed form solution has been provided for the MF in terms of adsorption coefficient, system dimensions, grain size, flow rate and void fluctuation exponent. It is shown that the delay effects due to intra grain diffusion plays a significant role thereby rendering external equilibrium assumptions unsuitable. Also, the application of the statistical model clearly demonstrates the transition from the exponential MF to a power-law form and shows how the occurrence of channels with low probability can lower mitigation factor by several orders of magnitude. As a part of aiding design, the model is further extended to optimise the bed dimensions in respect of pressure drop and MF. The application of the results for the design and development of a practically useful charcoal bed is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Menstrual Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To receive General email updates Enter email Submit Menstrual Cycle The menstrual cycle is the hormonal process ... Preventing problems with your menstrual cycle View more Menstrual Cycle resources Related information Endometriosis Infertility Polycystic ovary ...

  9. School Siting Near Industrial Chemical Facilities: Findings from the U.S. Chemical Safety Board?s Investigation of the West Fertilizer Explosion

    OpenAIRE

    Tinney, Veronica A.; Denton, Jerad M.; Sciallo-Tyler, Lucy; Paulson, Jerome A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB) investigated the 17 April 2013 explosion at the West Fertilizer Company (WFC) that resulted in 15 fatalities, more than 260 injuries, and damage to more than 150 buildings. Among these structures were four nearby school buildings cumulatively housing children in grades kindergarten?12, a nursing care facility, and an apartment complex. The incident occurred during the evening when school was not in session, which reduce...

  10. Motor Assembly Plant Saves$85,000 with Compressed Air System Improvements (Bodine Electric's Chicago Facility): Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) BestPractices Technical Case Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wogsland, J.

    2001-01-01

    This case study is one in a series on industrial firms who are implementing energy efficient technologies and system improvements into their manufacturing processes. This case study documents the activities, savings, and lessons learned on the Bodine Electric motor assembly plant project

  11. Investigations and Recommendations on the Use of Existing Experiments in Criticality Safety Analysis of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities for Weapons-Grade Plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rearden, B.T.

    2002-01-01

    report is given in Sect. 2. This report pertains to two of the five AOAs identified by the licensee [Duke, Cogema, Stone and Webster (DCS)] for the validation of criticality codes in the design of the Mixed-Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). The five AOAs are as follows: (1) Pu-nitrate aqueous solutions (homogeneous systems), (2) Mixed-oxide (MOX) pellets, fuel rods and fuel assemblies (heterogeneous systems), (3) PuO 2 powders, (4) MOX powders, and (5) Aqueous solutions of Pu compounds (Pu-oxalate solutions). This report addresses a S/U analysis pertaining to AOA 3, PuO 2 powders, and AOA 4, MOX powders. AOA 3 and AOA 4 are the subject of this report since the other AOAs (solutions and heterogeneous systems) appear to be well represented in the documented benchmark experiments used in the criticality safety community. Prior to this work, DCS used traditional criticality validation techniques to identify numerous experimental benchmarks that are applicable to AOAs 3 and 4. Traditional techniques for selection of applicable benchmark experiments essentially consist of evaluating the area of applicability for important design parameters (e.g., Pu content or average neutron energy) and ensuring experiments have similar characteristics that bound or nearly bound the range of conditions requiring design analysis. DCS provided ORNL with compositions and dimensions for critical systems used to establish preliminary mass limits for facility powder and fuel pellet handling areas corresponding to AOAs 3 and 4. ORNL has reviewed existing critical experiments to identify those, which, in addition to those provided by DCS, may be applicable to the criticality code validation for AOAs 3 and 4. A S/U analysis was then performed to calculate the integral parameters used to determine the similarity of each critical experiment to each design system provided by DCS. This report contains a review of the S/U theory, a description of the design systems, a brief description of the

  12. Facilities & Leadership

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The facilities web service provides VA facility information. The VA facilities locator is a feature that is available across the enterprise, on any webpage, for the...

  13. Nuclear plant life cycle management implementation guide. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sliter, G.E.; Negin, C.A.

    1998-11-01

    Nuclear power plants, as baseload suppliers of electricity, are major corporate assets. As the nuclear industry enters its fourth decade as a major producer of clean electricity, the structure of the utility industry is undergoing a historical landmark transition from economic deregulation to a competitive, market-driven industry. An integral part of competition is to manage the operation of the key asset, the plant, in the long term, thereby enhancing its long-term profitability. Life cycle management (LCM) is a well-known technical-economic decision-making process for any large industrial facility. LCM optimizes the service life of a facility and maximizes its life-cycle asset value. LCM integrates aging management (maintaining the availability of costly-to-replace components and structures) with asset management (plant valuation and investment strategies that account for economic, performance, regulatory, and environmental uncertainties). LCM involves predicting maintenance, repair, and other capital costs for a nuclear unit far into the future, as well as planning and managing strategic issues such as waste disposal, fuel storage, decommissioning, and public acceptance. This Life Cycle Management Implementation Guide introduces the reader to the LCM concept and its benefits, describes the elements and activities associated with an LCM program (most of which already exist in all plants), gives an overview of asset and aging management, and provides key references related to life cycle management for nuclear power plants. It also summarizes the major elements of life cycle management required for license renewal or, for newer plants, keeping open the option of license renewal

  14. Biochemistry Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Biochemistry Facility provides expert services and consultation in biochemical enzyme assays and protein purification. The facility currently features 1) Liquid...

  15. Bond-market skepticism and stock-market exuberance in the hospital industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James C

    2002-01-01

    The hospital industry needs funds to refurbish physical facilities, upgrade clinical and information technologies, and rebuild financial positions weakened by past external challenges and unwise organizational strategies. The financial markets offer a marked contrast in capital access, as bond creditors remain skeptical while stock investors plunge back into the once-shunned industry. Ironically, high stock prices may drive the for-profit chains to repeat past cycles of overexpansion, while weak bond ratings may save non-profit systems from a comparable loss of focus on the core business of operating and improving inpatient facilities. This turbulence has implications for public payment, antitrust, and financial disclosure policies.

  16. Outline of NUCEF facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeshita, Isao

    1996-01-01

    NUCEF is a multipurpose research facility in the field of safety and advanced technology of nuclear fuel cycle back-end. Various experiment facilities and its supporting installations, in which nuclear fuel materials, radio isotopes and TRU elements can be handled, are arranged in more than one hundred rooms of two experiment buildings. Its construction was completed in middle of 1994 and hot experiments have been started since then. NUCEF is located on the site (30,000 m 2 ) of southeastern part in the Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI facing to the Pacific Ocean. The base of Experiment Buildings A and B was directly founded on the rock existing at 10-15 m below ground level taking the aseismatic design into consideration. Each building is almost same sized and composed of one basement and three floors of which area is 17,500 m 2 in total. In the basement, there are exhaust facilities of ventilation system, treatment system of solution fuel and radioactive waste solution and storage tanks of them. Major experiment facilities are located on the first or the second floors in each building. An air-inlet facility of ventilation system for each building is equipped on the third floor. Most of experiment facilities for criticality safety research including two critical facilities: Static Experiment Critical Facility (STACY) and Transient Experiment Critical Facility (TRACY) are installed in Experiment Building A. Experiment equipments for research on advanced fuel reprocessing process and on TRU waste management, which are named BECKY (Back End Fuel Cycle Key Elements Research Facility), are installed in laboratories and a-g cells in Experiment Building B. (J.P.N.)

  17. Industrial gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, D.; Jackson, D.; Coeyman, M.

    1993-01-01

    Industrial gas companies have fought hard to boost sales and hold margins in the tough economic climate, and investments are well down from their 1989-'91 peak. But 'our industry is still very strong long term' says Alain Joly, CEO of industry leader L'Air Liquide (AL). By 1994, if a European and Japanese recovery follows through on one in the U.S., 'we could see major [investment] commitments starting again,' he says. 'Noncryogenic production technology is lowering the cost of gas-making possible new applications, oxygen is getting plenty of attention in the environmental area, and hydrogen also fits into the environmental thrust,' says Bob Lovett, executive v.p./gases and equipment with Air Products ampersand Chemicals (AP). Through the 1990's, 'Industrial gases could grow even faster than in the past decade,' he says. Virtually a new generation of new gases applications should become reality by the mid-1990s, says John Campbell, of industry consultants J.R. Campbell ampersand Associates (Lexington, MA). Big new oxygen volumes will be required for powder coal injection in blast furnaces-boosting a steel mill's requirement as much as 40% and coal gasification/combined cycle (CGCC). Increased oil refinery hydroprocessing needs promise hydrogen requirements

  18. Record of the facility deactivation, decommissioning, and material disposition (D and D) workshop: A new focus for technology development, opportunities for industry/government collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedick, R.C.; Bossart, S.J.; Hart, P.W.

    1995-07-01

    This workshop was held at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) in Morgantown, West Virginia, on July 11--12, 1995. The workshop sought to establish a foundation for continued dialogue between industry and the DOE to ensure that industry's experiences, lessons learned, and recommendations are incorporated into D and D program policy, strategy, and plans. The mission of the D and D Focus Area is to develop improved technologies, processes and products, to characterize, deactivate, survey, maintain, decontaminate, dismantle, and dispose of DOE surplus structures, buildings, and contents. The target is a five-to-one return on investment through cost avoidance. The cornerstone of the D and D focus area activities is large-scale demonstration projects that actually decontaminate, decommission, and dispose of a building. The aim is to demonstrate innovative D and D technologies as part of an ongoing DOE D and D project. OTD would pay the incremental cost of demonstrating the innovative technologies. The goal is to have the first demonstration project completed within the next 2 years. The intent is to select projects, or a project, with visible impact so all of the stakeholders know that a building was removed, and demonstrate at a scale that is convincing to the customers in the EM program so they feel comfortable using it in subsequent D and D projects. The plan is to use a D and D integrating contractor who can then use the expertise in this project to use in jobs at other DOE sites

  19. Surface Immuno-Functionalisation for the Capture and Detection of Vibrio Species in the Marine Environment: A New Management Tool for Industrial Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laczka, Olivier F.; Labbate, Maurizio; Seymour, Justin R.; Bourne, David G.; Fielder, Stewart S.; Doblin, Martina A.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria from the genus Vibrio are a common and environmentally important group of bacteria within coastal environments and include species pathogenic to aquaculture organisms. Their distribution and abundance are linked to specific environmental parameters, including temperature, salinity and nutrient enrichment. Accurate and efficient detection of Vibrios in environmental samples provides a potential important indicator of overall ecosystem health while also allowing rapid management responses for species pathogenic to humans or species implicated in disease of economically important aquacultured fish and invertebrates. In this study, we developed a surface immuno-functionalisation protocol, based on an avidin-biotin type covalent binding strategy, allowing specific sandwich-type detection of bacteria from the Vibrio genus. The assay was optimized on 12 diverse Vibrio strains, including species that have implications for aquaculture industries, reaching detection limits between 7×103 to 3×104 cells mL−1. Current techniques for the detection of total Vibrios rely on laborious or inefficient analyses resulting in delayed management decisions. This work represents a novel approach for a rapid, accurate, sensitive and robust tool for quantifying Vibrios directly in industrial systems and in the environment, thereby facilitating rapid management responses. PMID:25310801

  20. Industrial ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodfellow, H. D.

    Industrial ventilation design methodology, using computers and using fluid dynamic models, is considered. It is noted that the design of a ventilation system must be incorporated into the plant design and layout at the earliest conceptual stage of the project. A checklist of activities concerning the methodology for the design of a ventilation system for a new facility is given. A flow diagram of the computer ventilation model shows a typical input, the initialization and iteration loop, and the output. The application of the fluid dynamic modeling techniques include external and internal flow fields, and individual sources of heat and contaminants. Major activities for a ventilation field test program are also addressed.

  1. Measurement of cross-sections of fission reactions induced by neutrons on actinides from the thorium cycle at n-TOF facility; Mesures de sections efficaces de fission induite par neutrons sur des actinides du cycle du thorium a n-TOF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrant, L

    2005-09-01

    In the frame of innovating energy source system studies, thorium fuel cycle reactors are considered. Neutron induced fission cross section on such cycle involved actinides play a role in scenario studies. To feed them, data bases are built with experimental results and nuclear models. For some nuclei, they are not complete or in disagreement. In order to complete these data bases, we have built an original set up, consisting in an alternation of PPACs (Parallel Plate Avalanche Chamber) and ultra - thin targets, which we installed on n-TOF facility. We describe detectors, set up, and the particular care brought to target making and characterization. Fission products in coincidence are detected with precise time measurement and localization with delay line read out method. We contributed, within the n-TOF collaboration, to the CERN brand new intense spallation neutron source characterization, based on time of flight measurement, and we describe its characteristics and performances. We were able to measure such actinide fission cross sections as {sup 232}Th, {sup 234}U, {sup 233}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 209}Bi, and {sup nat}Pb relative to {sup 235}U et {sup 238}U standards, using an innovative acquisition system. We took advantage of the lame accessible energy field, from 0.7 eV to 1 GeV, combined with the excellent energy resolution in this field. Data treatment and analysis advancement are described to enlighten performance and limits of the obtained results. (author)

  2. SNL/CA Facilities Management Design Standards Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabb, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Clark, Eva [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    At Sandia National Laboratories in California (SNL/CA), the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of facilities is guided by industry standards, a graded approach, and the systematic analysis of life cycle benefits received for costs incurred. The design of the physical plant must ensure that the facilities are "fit for use," and provide conditions that effectively, efficiently, and safely support current and future mission needs. In addition, SNL/CA applies sustainable design principles, using an integrated whole-building design approach, from site planning to facility design, construction, and operation to ensure building resource efficiency and the health and productivity of occupants. The safety and health of the workforce and the public, any possible effects on the environment, and compliance with building codes take precedence over project issues, such as performance, cost, and schedule.

  3. Strong explosions impact on buildings representative of an industrial facility; Impact de fortes explosions sur les batiments representatifs d'une installation industrielle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trelat, S

    2006-12-15

    The goal of this study is to focus on the analysis of blast wave damage to structures when blast wave is consequence of explosive charge detonation. The objective is to propose useful tools to predict charges on structure. All experiences are realized in laboratory. The experimental investigation consists in simulating a detonation of a stoichiometric propane-oxygen mixture at ground level or at higher altitude. The study is going to give us experimental data on blast wave effects on a structure. For that, two types of structures frequently found on industrial site are going to be used: a parallelepipedal structure and a cylindrical structure, both with known dimensions. Finally, the important point of the problem is to determine an energetic equivalence between TNT and gas used in the experiments, in order to model TNT explosions at full scale by gaseous explosions at reduced scale. (author)

  4. Economical feasibility study of thermal-photovoltaic concentrators facility in a pig farm of close cycle production; Estudio sobre la viabilidad economica de la instalacion de concentradores termico-fotovoltaicos en una explotacion agropecuaria de ciclo cerrado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roca, J.; Ibanez, M.; Rosell, J. I.

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents an application of an hybrid generation device, where solar energy is converted into both electrical and thermal energy (heating and SDHW). The advantages of a PV/T collector are used in pig's farm of close cycle production. The system proposed is based in a reflector Fresnel concentrator and a PV/T collector which uses water as a cooling fluid. This hybrid generator has been designed and constructed at the University of Lleida. The two-axes sun tracking concentrator has an aperture area of 4,16 m2. It works under 12 suns of concentration. The installation of 12 PV/T units would cover 100% of the electrical demand during 7 months. The output power is 4,4 kW electrical and 24,0 kW thermal. The initial investment to install the PV/T facility is around 47.300 . The payback period is 12 years and the NPV is positive at the end of the, 30 years, lifetime period. (Author)

  5. The use of biomass energy in the pulp and paper industry and the prospects for black liquor gasification combined cycle generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, L.J.

    1995-01-01

    The world production of paper and paperboard products, which increased 3.3% per year since 1980, reached 243 million tonnes in 1991 and is expected to continue to grow by about 2.5% per year over the next decade. Consumption levels in 1990 ranged from 2.8 kg per capita in India to 313 kg per capita in the United States. The biggest producers of pulp are the United States, Canada and the Scandinavian countries, but much of the expansion of pulp production capacity is taking place in countries such as Brazil, Chile and Indonesia. The pulp and paper industry has always relied on biomass as a fuel source to meet process energy demands. Kraft pulping is the most common process accounting for about two thirds of world wood pulp production. Energy recovered from burning black liquor, a lignin-rich by-product, in a chemicals recovery boiler typically provides most of the on-site demand for heat and electricity in a modem kraft pulp mill. Another important fuel source is bark and wood waste generated at the mill. Aging recovery boilers in industrialized countries and increasing electricity/heat demand ratios are stimulating interest in alternative co-generation technologies. Most of the interest in new biomass and black liquor co-generation technologies focuses on those that would utilize gas turbines rather than steam turbines. Gas turbines are generally characterized by higher electricity/heat ratios than steam turbines, as well as lower unit capital costs. With the black liquor and biomass gasification technologies that are now being developed and demonstrated, the energy needs of an energy-efficient kraft pulp mill could be met and 40-50 MW of baseload power would be available for export. Using, in addition, currently unused logging residues for fuel would increase that potential. The pulp and paper industry is likely to be an important early market for advanced biomass-based cogeneration technology owing to its access to biomass fuels and the potential for co

  6. Time variations of gaseous and reactive mercury in the industrial area of Puertollano (south-central Spain). Temporal cycles with marked variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Coronado, Alba; Esbrí, Jose Maria; Higueras, Pablo

    2016-06-01

    Puertollano (48,086 inhabitants) is the largest industrial city in the Castilla-La Mancha region (South-Central Spain). The city is located some 250 km South of Madrid; it was an important coal mining site during the last century and today it is the location of one of the most important Spanish oil refineries and the only refinery located away from the coast. Nowadays the area (which mainly includes the Ojailen valley) has a large open pit coal mine (Encasur), two power plants (Eon and Elcogas) and a petrochemical complex (Repsol) located S and SE from the town. These industries give rise to a complex scenario in terms of mercury emissions to the atmosphere: Repsol, Elcogas and Eon act as discrete sources, while coal mine and dumps acts as a general, diffuse source. The mercury contents in Puertollano town and the related industrial area were characterized during 2010 and 2011 by acquiring stationary data of Gaseous Elemental Mercury (GEM), Reactive Gaseous Mercury (RGM), meteorological parameters and other atmospheric contaminants (NO, NO2, SO2, benzene, toluene, xylene, ozone and PM10). In addition, several Total Gaseous Mercury (TGM) mobile surveys were carried out covering the Ojailen valley. Total Gaseous Mercury (TGM) in the whole valley was in the range 0-24 ng m-3 in all surveys, while higher levels were found near to the coal mine and in the vicinity of a coal power plant that employs clean technology (Elcogas). Tekran data showed low GEM levels during 2010-2011 (1.81 ng m-3 on average), while lower GEM levels were measured during autumn and summer, and maximum levels in spring (7.32 ng m-3 on average). RGM measurements were 0.0088 ng m-3, i.e., significantly lower than background levels in the USA and Europe (0.04 ng m-3). Concentrations of these mercury species' were higher during summer (0.0117 ng m-3). Multiple regression analysis was carried out and good relationships between GEM levels, meteorological parameters and other pollutants were identified

  7. The potential for an Australian uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, J.M.

    1982-06-01

    The production of uranium and its part upgrading to enriched uranium for export could be equivalent to 20-25 per cent of Australia's future export income from coal. Australia could be supplying 15,000 tonnes U/yr. and enrichment services of 2.5 million SWU/yr. by 2000. The principles of nuclear energy, nuclear power reactors and the nuclear fuel cycle are described and the relationship between nuclear power and the requirements for uranium and the other steps in the fuel cycle is discussed. Estimates are given of the future world supply-demand balance for each step in the fuel cycle. A survey is made of world uranium resources and fuel cycle upgrading facilities. The costs of production and pricing are assessed in relation to the potential for an Australian industry. Comments are made on the possibility that Australia could provide the repository for both low-level radioactive waste from small countries and the bulk of the world's high level waste. The impact of a uranium industry on the Australian economy is discussed

  8. Numerical and experimental simulation of accident processes using KMS large-scale test facility under the program of training university students for nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aniskevich, Yu.N.

    2005-01-01

    The KMS large-scale test facility is being constructed at NITI site and designed to model accident processes in VVER reactor plants and provide experimental data for safety analysis of both existing and future NPPs. The KMS phase I is at the completion stage. This is a containment model of 2000 m3 volume intended for experimentally simulating heat and mass transfers of steam-gas mixtures and aerosols inside containment. The KMS phase II will incorporate a reactor model (1:27 scale) and be used for analysing a number of events including primary and secondary LOCA. The KMS program for background training of university students in the nuclear field will include preparation and conduction of experiments, analysis of experiment data. The KMS program for background training of university students in nuclear will include: participation in the development and application of experiment procedures, preparation and carrying out experiments; carrying out pretest and post-test calculations with different computer codes; on-the-job training as operators of experiment scenarios; training of specialists in measurement and information acquisition technologies. (author)

  9. Use of life cycle assessment as decision-support tool for water reuse and handling of residues at a Danish industrial laundry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kim; Villanueva, Alejandro; Wenzel, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    . Heavy metals originate from the dirt in the workwear that is washed in the laundry. It is further concluded that the studied water treatment technologies satisfy both the need of clean water for recycling and simultaneously help controlling a safe disposal of pollutants by concentration of the residues....... The results of the study also confirm the potential of LCA as a decision-support tool for assisting water recycling initiatives and for residue handling management. The handling of residues has been identified as a stage of the water recycling strategy that bears important environmental impacts. This holistic...... perspective provided by LCA can be used as input for the definition of environmental management strategies at an industrial laundry, and the prioritization of investments to the environmental profile of laundry processes. In this case-study, the results of the LCA are made operational by, for example...

  10. Content of the safety information on the Critical Instrumentation and Control Systems (CI and C) for an Industrial Gamma Irradiator Facility (Category II); Contenido del informe de seguridad de instalaciones industriales de irradiacion (cat. II): sistemas de control criticos (SCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilizastigui Perez, Fidel [Centro Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear (CNSN), La Habana (Cuba)

    2001-07-01

    A general overview is provided concerning the kind of basic requirements imposed to the scope and content of the design safety information on the Critical Instrumentation and Control Systems (CI and C) for an industrial gamma irradiator facility (Category II). The operating organization is required to provide the National Regulatory Authority with an information of this kind as part of the preliminary safety analysis report which is formally presented to the latter before the beginning of the construction of the facility.Information requirements are divided in two groups. The first one containing requirements to the scope and content of the general information concerning the design of all CI and C, and the second containing requirements to the scope and content of the information concerning each type of CI and C-systems for preventing access to the irradiation source, radiation alarm systems, emergency shutdown systems, control room systems, critical instruments and controls and normal operating interlocks.The present paper has a limited scope, therefore, only those requirements concerning general design information and those of the section 'System Design Evaluation' have been presented in some detail. (author)

  11. Fuel cycle based safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Montmollin, J.M.; Higinbotham, W.A.; Gupta, D.

    1985-07-01

    In NPT safeguards the same model approach and absolute-quantity inspection goals are applied at present to all similar facilities, irrespective of the State's fuel cycle. There is a continuing interest and activity on the part of the IAEA in new NPT safeguards approaches that more directly address a State's nuclear activities as a whole. This fuel cycle based safeguards system is expected to a) provide a statement of findings for the entire State rather than only for individual facilities; b) allocate inspection efforts so as to reflect more realistically the different categories of nuclear materials in the different parts of the fuel cycle and c) provide more timely and better coordinated information on the inputs, outputs and inventories of nuclear materials in a State. (orig./RF) [de

  12. Cradle-to-gate life-cycle assessment of laminated veneer lumber (LVL) produced in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard D. Bergman; Sevda Alanya-Rosenbaum

    2017-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to develop life-cycle impact assessment (LCIA) data associated with laminated veneer lumber (LVL) production in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) region of the United States from cradle-to-gate mill output. The authors collected primary (survey) mill data from LVL production facilities per Consortium on Research for Renewable Industrial...

  13. Cradle-to-gate life-cycle assessment of composite I-joists produced in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard D. Bergman; Sevda Alanya-Rosenbaum

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study was to update life-cycle assessment (LCA) data associated with I-joist production in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) region of the United States from cradle-to-gate mill output. The authors collected primary mill data from I-joist production facilities per Consortium on Research for Renewable Industrial Materials (CORRIM) research guidelines....

  14. Cradle-to-gate life cycle assessment of composite I-joists produced in the southeast region of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard D. Bergman; Sevda Alanya-Rosenbaum

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study was to update life-cycle assessment (LCA) data on I-joist production in the southeast (SE) region of the United States. The authors collected primary mill data from I-joist production facilities per Consortium on Research for Renewable Industrial Materials (CORRIM) research guidelines. Comparative assertions were not a goal of this study.

  15. Fabrication Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fabrication Facilities are a direct result of years of testing support. Through years of experience, the three fabrication facilities (Fort Hood, Fort Lewis, and...

  16. Waste Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset was developed from the Vermont DEC's list of certified solid waste facilities. It includes facility name, contact information, and the materials...

  17. Promoting Implementation of Safety Culture in Nuclear Application for Industrial Facilities; an Important Role of Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setianingsih, Lilis Susanti

    2012-01-01

    Implementation of nuclear energy for industrial purposes has reached its highest peak. BAPETEN, as Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency of Indonesia has published regulations regarding nuclear energy utilization. As high risk associating such utilization requires direct and thoroughly supervision in order to assure its compliance to safety and security aspect, procedures related to operational activities must by fully applied. Radiation Protection Program as one type of procedures that must be available in nuclear energy utilization operation is intended to provide operators specifically technical guidance to avoid undesired negative effects of incidents or accidents. It is the responsibility of managerial level in a company to provide the procedures and to further supervise their application in the field. Radiation workers, those are all employees working in or within radiation area must understand how to execute the procedures properly. The radiation protection program is intended to protect workers, member of community and property as well as the environment from the negative impacts of nuclear utilization operational due to its radiation exposure. Safety culture, a compound of nature derived from behavior of organization and people within the organization to pay a full attention and give main priority in radiation safety matters, is expected to be achieved by implementing the radiation protection program as safety habits at the work place. It requires a management commitment to ensure that all aspect in safety and, whenever necessary, security are accomplished within the radiation protection program in order to build a safety culture in a radiation work place. Government Regulation No. 33 2007 about Safety for Ionizing Radiation and Security for Radioactive Source and Government Regulation No. 29 2008 regarding Licensing for Utilization of Ionizing Radiation and Nuclear Material present regulation and arrangement related to radiation protection program as a basic

  18. Industries and environment - 2014 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurice, Delphine

    2014-04-01

    After a general overview of the French economic context (composition of the French industry, the manufacturing industry, industry production and trade balance), this report presents industrial installations with risks: installations classified for the protection of the environment and submitted to industrial authorizations (ICPEA), basic nuclear installations, Seveso industrial facilities, IPPC industrial installations. The next part analyzes the various pressures exerted by the industry on the environment: material production and consumption, water taking, consumption of energetic products, release of pollutants in waters of industrial ICPE, releases in the air, greenhouse gas emissions, production of wastes, accidents and incidents with environmental consequences, polluted sites and soils, hazardous chemical products in the industry, industrial companies involved in nano-technologies and nano-materials. The last part proposes an overview of responses to these issues: implementation of environmental management system, corporate societal responsibility, investments and expenditures for the protection of the environment, industrial eco-activities, eco-labelled products manufactured by the industry

  19. The atmospheric cycling of radiomethane and the "fossil fraction" of the methane source

    OpenAIRE

    K. R. Lassey; D. C. Lowe; A. M. Smith

    2007-01-01

    The cycling of 14CH4 ("radiomethane") through the atmosphere has been strongly perturbed in the industrial era by the release of 14C-free methane from geologic reservoirs ("fossil methane" emissions), and in the nuclear era, especially since ca 1970, by the direct release of nucleogenic radiomethane from nuclear power facilities. Contemporary measurements of atmospheric radiomethane have been used to estimate the proportion of fossil methane in the global methane source (t...

  20. Status of IFR fuel cycle demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lineberry, M.J.; Phipps, R.D.; McFarlane, H.F.

    1993-01-01

    The next major step in Argonne's Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program is demonstration of the pyroprocess fuel cycle, in conjunction with continued operation of EBR-II. The Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) is being readied for this mission. This paper will address the status of facility systems and process equipment, the initial startup experience, and plans for the demonstration program