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Sample records for cyanobacterium cyanothece sp

  1. Analysis of carbohydrate storage granules in the diazotrophic cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. PCC 7822

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    Welkie, David G. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Sherman, Debra M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Chrisler, William B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Orr, Galya [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sherman, Louis A. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2013-10-19

    The unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria of the genus Cyanothece demonstrate oscillations in nitrogenase activity and H2 production when grown under 12h light-12h dark cycles. We established that Cyanothece sp. PCC 7822 allows for the construction of knock-out mutants and our objective was to improve the growth characteristics of this strain and to identify the nature of the intracellular storage granules. We report the physiological and morphological effects of reduction in nitrate and phosphate concentrations in BG-11 media on this strain. We developed a series of BG-11-derived growth media and monitored batch culture growth, nitrogenase activity and nitrogenase-mediated hydrogen production, culture synchronicity, and intracellular storage content. Reduction in NaNO3 and K2HPO4 concentrations from 17.6 and 0.23 mM to 4.41 and 0.06 mM, respectively, improved growth characteristics such as cell size and uniformity, and enhanced the rate of cell division. Cells grown in this low NP BG-11 were less complex, a parameter that related to the composition of the intracellular storage granules. Cells grown in low NP BG-11 had less polyphosphate, fewer polyhydroxybutyrate granules and many smaller granules became evident. Biochemical analysis and transmission electron microscopy using the histocytochemical PATO technique demonstrated that these small granules contained glycogen. The glycogen levels and the number of granules per cell correlated nicely with a 2.3 to 3.3-fold change from the minimum at L0 to the maximum at D0. The differences in granule morphology and enzymes between Cyanothece ATCC 51142 and Cyanothece PCC 7822 provide insights into the formation of large starch-like granules in some cyanobacteria.

  2. A Model of Cyclic Transcriptomic Behavior in Cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142

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    McDermott, Jason E.; Oehmen, Christopher S.; McCue, Lee Ann; Hill, Eric A.; Choi, Daniel M.; Stockel, Jana; Liberton, Michelle L.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Sherman, Louis A.

    2011-07-01

    Systems biology attempts to reconcile large amounts of disparate data with existing knowledge to provide models of functioning biological systems. Useful and predictive models aim to summarize complex and dynamic processes and represent the relationships between these processes. The cyanobacterial Cyanothece species Strain sp. ATCC 51142 is an excellent candidate for such systems studies because: (i) it displays tight functional regulation as it must separate the opposing processes of oxygen-generating photosynthesis and oxygen-sensitive nitrogen fixation temporally in the same cell, ; (ii) it has robust cyclic patterns at the genetic, protein and metabolomic levels, ; and (iii) and it has potential applications for bioenergy and carbon sequestration, and thus a predictive model of its function is of practical use. We have represented the transcriptomic data from Cyanothece 51142 under diurnal light/dark cycles as a high-level functional abstraction and describe development of a predictive in silico model of diurnal and circadian behavior in terms of regulatory and metabolic processes in Cyanothece 51142. Our model provides a way to integrate disparate data types into a framework that can be used to explain behavior, generate high-quality predictions for validation, and to suggest future experiments. We show that incorporating network topology into the model improves performance in terms of our ability to explain the behavior of the system under new conditions. The model presented robustly describes transcriptomic behavior of Cyanothece 51142 under different cyclic and non-cyclic growth conditions robustly, and represents a significant advance in the understanding of gene regulation in this important organism.

  3. Oscillating behavior of carbohydrate granule formation and dinitrogen fixation in the cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneegurt, M. A.; Sherman, D. M.; Nayar, S.; Sherman, L. A.; Mitchell, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    It has been shown that some aerobic, unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacteria temporally separate photosynthetic O2 evolution and oxygen-sensitive N2 fixation. Cyanothece sp. ATCC strain 51142 is an aerobic, unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium that fixes N2 during discrete periods of its cell cycle. When the bacteria are maintained under diurnal light-dark cycles, N2 fixation occurs in the dark. Similar cycling is observed in continuous light, implicating a circadian rhythm. Under N2-fixing conditions, large inclusion granules form between the thylakoid membranes. Maximum granulation, as observed by electron microscopy, occurs before the onset of N2 fixation, and the granules decrease in number during the period of N2 fixation. The granules can be purified from cell homogenates by differential centrifugation. Biochemical analyses of the granules indicate that these structures are primarily carbohydrate, with some protein. Further analyses of the carbohydrate have shown that it is a glucose polymer with some characteristics of glycogen. It is proposed that N2 fixation is driven by energy and reducing power stored in these inclusion granules. Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142 represents an excellent experimental organism for the study of the protective mechanisms of nitrogenase, metabolic events in cyanobacteria under normal and stress conditions, the partitioning of resources between growth and storage, and biological rhythms.

  4. Transcriptional analysis of the unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 grown under short day/night cycles

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    Toepel, Jorg; McDermott, Jason E.; Summerfield, Tina; Sherman, Louis A.

    2009-06-01

    Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142 is a unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium that demonstrates extensive metabolic periodicities of photosynthesis, respiration and nitrogen fixation when grown under N2-fixing conditions. We have performed a global transcription analysis of this organism using 6 h light/dark cycles in order to determine the response of the cell to these conditions and to differentiate between diurnal and circadian regulated genes. In addition, we used a context-likelihood of relatedness (CLR) analysis with this data and those from two-day light/dark and light-dark plus continuous light experiments to better differentiate between diurnal and circadian regulated genes. Cyanothece sp. adapted in several ways to growth under short light/dark conditions. Nitrogen was fixed in every second dark period and only once in each 24 h period. Nitrogen fixation was strongly correlated to the energy status of the cells and glycogen breakdown and high respiration rates were necessary to provide appropriate energy and anoxic conditions for this process. We conclude that glycogen breakdown is a key regulatory step within these complex processes. Our results demonstrated that the main metabolic genes involved in photosynthesis, respiration, nitrogen fixation and central carbohydrate metabolism have strong (or total) circadian-regulated components. The short light/dark cycles enable us to identify transcriptional differences among the family of psbA genes, as well as the differing patterns of the hup genes, which follow the same pattern as nitrogenase genes, relative to the hox genes which displayed a diurnal, dark-dependent gene expression.

  5. Genome-scale modeling of light-driven reductant partitioning and carbon fluxes in diazotrophic unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142.

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    Trang T Vu

    Full Text Available Genome-scale metabolic models have proven useful for answering fundamental questions about metabolic capabilities of a variety of microorganisms, as well as informing their metabolic engineering. However, only a few models are available for oxygenic photosynthetic microorganisms, particularly in cyanobacteria in which photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains (ETC share components. We addressed the complexity of cyanobacterial ETC by developing a genome-scale model for the diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142. The resulting metabolic reconstruction, iCce806, consists of 806 genes associated with 667 metabolic reactions and includes a detailed representation of the ETC and a biomass equation based on experimental measurements. Both computational and experimental approaches were used to investigate light-driven metabolism in Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, with a particular focus on reductant production and partitioning within the ETC. The simulation results suggest that growth and metabolic flux distributions are substantially impacted by the relative amounts of light going into the individual photosystems. When growth is limited by the flux through photosystem I, terminal respiratory oxidases are predicted to be an important mechanism for removing excess reductant. Similarly, under photosystem II flux limitation, excess electron carriers must be removed via cyclic electron transport. Furthermore, in silico calculations were in good quantitative agreement with the measured growth rates whereas predictions of reaction usage were qualitatively consistent with protein and mRNA expression data, which we used to further improve the resolution of intracellular flux values.

  6. Genome-scale modeling of light-driven reductant partitioning and carbon fluxes in diazotrophic unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Trang T; Stolyar, Sergey M; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E; Hill, Eric A; Kucek, Leo A; Brown, Roslyn N; Lipton, Mary S; Osterman, Andrei; Fredrickson, Jim K; Konopka, Allan E; Beliaev, Alexander S; Reed, Jennifer L

    2012-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models have proven useful for answering fundamental questions about metabolic capabilities of a variety of microorganisms, as well as informing their metabolic engineering. However, only a few models are available for oxygenic photosynthetic microorganisms, particularly in cyanobacteria in which photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains (ETC) share components. We addressed the complexity of cyanobacterial ETC by developing a genome-scale model for the diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142. The resulting metabolic reconstruction, iCce806, consists of 806 genes associated with 667 metabolic reactions and includes a detailed representation of the ETC and a biomass equation based on experimental measurements. Both computational and experimental approaches were used to investigate light-driven metabolism in Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, with a particular focus on reductant production and partitioning within the ETC. The simulation results suggest that growth and metabolic flux distributions are substantially impacted by the relative amounts of light going into the individual photosystems. When growth is limited by the flux through photosystem I, terminal respiratory oxidases are predicted to be an important mechanism for removing excess reductant. Similarly, under photosystem II flux limitation, excess electron carriers must be removed via cyclic electron transport. Furthermore, in silico calculations were in good quantitative agreement with the measured growth rates whereas predictions of reaction usage were qualitatively consistent with protein and mRNA expression data, which we used to further improve the resolution of intracellular flux values.

  7. Proteome Analyses of Strains ATCC 51142 and PCC 7822 of the Diazotrophic Cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. under Culture Conditions Resulting in Enhanced H2 Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Uma K.; Callister, Stephen J.; Mishra, Sujata; Zhang, Xiaohui; Shutthanandan, Janani I.; Angel, Thomas E.; Shukla, Anil K.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Smith, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Cultures of the cyanobacterial genus Cyanothece have been shown to produce high levels of biohydrogen. These strains are diazotrophic and undergo pronounced diurnal cycles when grown under N2-fixing conditions in light-dark cycles. We seek to better understand the way in which proteins respond to these diurnal changes, and we performed quantitative proteome analysis of Cyanothece sp. strains ATCC 51142 and PCC 7822 grown under 8 different nutritional conditions. Nitrogenase expression was limited to N2-fixing conditions, and in the absence of glycerol, nitrogenase gene expression was linked to the dark period. However, glycerol induced expression of nitrogenase during part of the light period, together with cytochrome c oxidase (Cox), glycogen phosphorylase (Glp), and glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) enzymes. This indicated that nitrogenase expression in the light was facilitated via higher levels of respiration and glycogen breakdown. Key enzymes of the Calvin cycle were inhibited in Cyanothece ATCC 51142 in the presence of glycerol under H2-producing conditions, suggesting a competition between these sources of carbon. However, in Cyanothece PCC 7822, the Calvin cycle still played a role in cofactor recycling during H2 production. Our data comprise the first comprehensive profiling of proteome changes in Cyanothece PCC 7822 and allow an in-depth comparative analysis of major physiological and biochemical processes that influence H2 production in both strains. Our results revealed many previously uncharacterized proteins that may play a role in nitrogenase activity and in other metabolic pathways and may provide suitable targets for genetic manipulation that would lead to improvement of large-scale H2 production. PMID:23204418

  8. Diurnal Rhythms Result in Significant Changes in the Cellular Protein Complement in the Cyanobacterium Cyanothece 51142

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    Stockel, Jana; Jacobs, Jon M.; Elvitigala, Thanura R.; Liberton, Michelle L.; Welsh, Eric A.; Polpitiya, Ashoka D.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Smith, Richard D.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2011-02-22

    Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 is a diazotrophic cyanobacterium notable for its ability to perform oxygenic photosynthesis and dinitrogen fixation in the same single cell. Previous transcriptional analysis revealed that the existence of these incompatible cellular processes largely depends on tightly synchronized expression programs involving ,30% of genes in the genome. To expand upon current knowledge, we have utilized sensitive proteomic approaches to examine the impact of diurnal rhythms on the protein complement in Cyanothece 51142. We found that 250 proteins accounting for,5% of the predicted ORFs from the Cyanothece 51142 genome and 20% of proteins detected under alternating light/dark conditions exhibited periodic oscillations in their abundances. Our results suggest that altered enzyme activities at different phases during the diurnal cycle can be attributed to changes in the abundance of related proteins and key compounds. The integration of global proteomics and transcriptomic data further revealed that post-transcriptional events are important for temporal regulation of processes such as photosynthesis in Cyanothece 51142. This analysis is the first comprehensive report on global quantitative proteomics in a unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium and uncovers novel findings about diurnal rhythms.

  9. Diurnal Rhythms Result in Significant Changes in the Cellular Protein Complement in the Cyanobacterium Cyanothece 51142

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvitigala, Thanura R.; Liberton, Michelle; Welsh, Eric A.; Polpitiya, Ashoka D.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Smith, Richard D.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2011-01-01

    Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 is a diazotrophic cyanobacterium notable for its ability to perform oxygenic photosynthesis and dinitrogen fixation in the same single cell. Previous transcriptional analysis revealed that the existence of these incompatible cellular processes largely depends on tightly synchronized expression programs involving ∼30% of genes in the genome. To expand upon current knowledge, we have utilized sensitive proteomic approaches to examine the impact of diurnal rhythms on the protein complement in Cyanothece 51142. We found that 250 proteins accounting for ∼5% of the predicted ORFs from the Cyanothece 51142 genome and 20% of proteins detected under alternating light/dark conditions exhibited periodic oscillations in their abundances. Our results suggest that altered enzyme activities at different phases during the diurnal cycle can be attributed to changes in the abundance of related proteins and key compounds. The integration of global proteomics and transcriptomic data further revealed that post-transcriptional events are important for temporal regulation of processes such as photosynthesis in Cyanothece 51142. This analysis is the first comprehensive report on global quantitative proteomics in a unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium and uncovers novel findings about diurnal rhythms. PMID:21364985

  10. Diurnal rhythms result in significant changes in the cellular protein complement in the cyanobacterium Cyanothece 51142.

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    Jana Stöckel

    Full Text Available Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 is a diazotrophic cyanobacterium notable for its ability to perform oxygenic photosynthesis and dinitrogen fixation in the same single cell. Previous transcriptional analysis revealed that the existence of these incompatible cellular processes largely depends on tightly synchronized expression programs involving ∼30% of genes in the genome. To expand upon current knowledge, we have utilized sensitive proteomic approaches to examine the impact of diurnal rhythms on the protein complement in Cyanothece 51142. We found that 250 proteins accounting for ∼5% of the predicted ORFs from the Cyanothece 51142 genome and 20% of proteins detected under alternating light/dark conditions exhibited periodic oscillations in their abundances. Our results suggest that altered enzyme activities at different phases during the diurnal cycle can be attributed to changes in the abundance of related proteins and key compounds. The integration of global proteomics and transcriptomic data further revealed that post-transcriptional events are important for temporal regulation of processes such as photosynthesis in Cyanothece 51142. This analysis is the first comprehensive report on global quantitative proteomics in a unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium and uncovers novel findings about diurnal rhythms.

  11. Diurnal rhythms result in significant changes in the cellular protein complement in the cyanobacterium Cyanothece 51142.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckel, Jana; Jacobs, Jon M; Elvitigala, Thanura R; Liberton, Michelle; Welsh, Eric A; Polpitiya, Ashoka D; Gritsenko, Marina A; Nicora, Carrie D; Koppenaal, David W; Smith, Richard D; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2011-02-22

    Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 is a diazotrophic cyanobacterium notable for its ability to perform oxygenic photosynthesis and dinitrogen fixation in the same single cell. Previous transcriptional analysis revealed that the existence of these incompatible cellular processes largely depends on tightly synchronized expression programs involving ∼30% of genes in the genome. To expand upon current knowledge, we have utilized sensitive proteomic approaches to examine the impact of diurnal rhythms on the protein complement in Cyanothece 51142. We found that 250 proteins accounting for ∼5% of the predicted ORFs from the Cyanothece 51142 genome and 20% of proteins detected under alternating light/dark conditions exhibited periodic oscillations in their abundances. Our results suggest that altered enzyme activities at different phases during the diurnal cycle can be attributed to changes in the abundance of related proteins and key compounds. The integration of global proteomics and transcriptomic data further revealed that post-transcriptional events are important for temporal regulation of processes such as photosynthesis in Cyanothece 51142. This analysis is the first comprehensive report on global quantitative proteomics in a unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium and uncovers novel findings about diurnal rhythms.

  12. The genome of Cyanothece 51142, a unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium important in the marine nitrogen cycle

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    Welsh, Eric A.; Liberton, Michelle L.; Stockel, Jana; Loh, Thomas; Elvitigala, Thanura R.; Wang, Chunyan; Wollam, Aye; Fulton, Robert S.; Clifton, Sandra W.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Aurora, Rajeev; Ghosh, Bijoy K.; Sherman, Louis A.; Smith, Richard D.; Wilson, Richard K.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2008-09-30

    Cyanobacteria are oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria that have significant roles in global biological carbon sequestration and oxygen production. They occupy a diverse range of habitats, from open ocean, to hot springs, deserts, and arctic waters. Cyanobacteria are known as the progenitors of the chloroplasts of plants and algae, and are the simplest known organisms to exhibit circadian behavior4. Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 is a unicellular marine cyanobacterium capable of N2-fixation, a process that is biochemically incompatible with oxygenic photosynthesis. To resolve this problem, Cyanothece performs photosynthesis during the day and nitrogen fixation at night, thus temporally separating these processes in the same cell. The genome of Cyanothece 51142 was completely sequenced and found to contain a unique arrangement of one large circular chromosome, four small plasmids, and one linear chromosome, the first report of such a linear element in a photosynthetic bacterium. Annotation of the Cyanothece genome was aided by the use of highthroughput proteomics data, enabling the reclassification of 25% of the proteins with no informative sequence homology. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that nitrogen fixation is an ancient process that arose early in evolution and has subsequently been lost in many cyanobacterial strains. In cyanobacterial cells, the circadian clock influences numerous processes, including carbohydrate synthesis, nitrogen fixation, photosynthesis, respiration, and the cell division cycle. During a diurnal period, Cyanothece cells actively accumulate and degrade different storage inclusion bodies for the products of photosynthesis and N2-fixation. This ability to utilize metabolic compartmentalization and energy storage makes Cyanothece an ideal system for bioenergy research, as well as studies of how a unicellular organism balances multiple, often incompatible, processes in the same cell.

  13. Competition and facilitation between the marine nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Cyanothece and its associated bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Verena S; Stomp, Maayke; Bouvier, Thierry; Fouilland, Eric; Leboulanger, Christophe; Confurius-Guns, Veronique; Weissing, Franz J; Stal, LucasJ; Huisman, Jef

    2014-01-01

    N2-fixing cyanobacteria represent a major source of new nitrogen and carbon for marine microbial communities, but little is known about their ecological interactions with associated microbiota. In this study we investigated the interactions between the unicellular N2-fixing cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. Miami BG043511 and its associated free-living chemotrophic bacteria at different concentrations of nitrate and dissolved organic carbon and different temperatures. High temperature strongly stimulated the growth of Cyanothece, but had less effect on the growth and community composition of the chemotrophic bacteria. Conversely, nitrate and carbon addition did not significantly increase the abundance of Cyanothece, but strongly affected the abundance and species composition of the associated chemotrophic bacteria. In nitrate-free medium the associated bacterial community was co-dominated by the putative diazotroph Mesorhizobium and the putative aerobic anoxygenic phototroph Erythrobacter and after addition of organic carbon also by the Flavobacterium Muricauda. Addition of nitrate shifted the composition toward co-dominance by Erythrobacter and the Gammaproteobacterium Marinobacter. Our results indicate that Cyanothece modified the species composition of its associated bacteria through a combination of competition and facilitation. Furthermore, within the bacterial community, niche differentiation appeared to play an important role, contributing to the coexistence of a variety of different functional groups. An important implication of these findings is that changes in nitrogen and carbon availability due to, e.g., eutrophication and climate change are likely to have a major impact on the species composition of the bacterial community associated with N2-fixing cyanobacteria.

  14. Competition and facilitation between the marine nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Cyanothece and its associated bacterial community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Verena S.; Stomp, Maayke; Bouvier, Thierry; Fouilland, Eric; Leboulanger, Christophe; Confurius-Guns, Veronique; Weissing, Franz J.; Stal, LucasJ.; Huisman, Jef

    2014-01-01

    N2-fixing cyanobacteria represent a major source of new nitrogen and carbon for marine microbial communities, but little is known about their ecological interactions with associated microbiota. In this study we investigated the interactions between the unicellular N2-fixing cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. Miami BG043511 and its associated free-living chemotrophic bacteria at different concentrations of nitrate and dissolved organic carbon and different temperatures. High temperature strongly stimulated the growth of Cyanothece, but had less effect on the growth and community composition of the chemotrophic bacteria. Conversely, nitrate and carbon addition did not significantly increase the abundance of Cyanothece, but strongly affected the abundance and species composition of the associated chemotrophic bacteria. In nitrate-free medium the associated bacterial community was co-dominated by the putative diazotroph Mesorhizobium and the putative aerobic anoxygenic phototroph Erythrobacter and after addition of organic carbon also by the Flavobacterium Muricauda. Addition of nitrate shifted the composition toward co-dominance by Erythrobacter and the Gammaproteobacterium Marinobacter. Our results indicate that Cyanothece modified the species composition of its associated bacteria through a combination of competition and facilitation. Furthermore, within the bacterial community, niche differentiation appeared to play an important role, contributing to the coexistence of a variety of different functional groups. An important implication of these findings is that changes in nitrogen and carbon availability due to, e.g., eutrophication and climate change are likely to have a major impact on the species composition of the bacterial community associated with N2-fixing cyanobacteria. PMID:25642224

  15. Proteome Analyses of Strains ATCC 51142 and PCC 7822 of the Diazotrophic Cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp under Culture Conditions Resulting in Enhanced H-2 Production

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    Aryal, Uma K.; Callister, Stephen J.; Mishra, Sujata; Zhang, Xiaohui; Shutthanandan, Janani I.; Angel, Thomas E.; Shukla, Anil K.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Smith, Richard D.; Sherman, Louis

    2013-02-01

    Cultures of the cyanobacterial genus Cyanothece have been shown to produce high levels of biohydrogen. These strains are diazotrophic and undergo pronounced diurnal cycles when grown under N2-fixing conditions in light-dark cycles. We seek to better understand the way in which proteins respond to these diurnal changes and we performed quantitative proteome analysis of Cyanothece ATCC 51142 and PCC 7822 grown under 8 different nutritional conditions. Nitrogenase expression was limited to N2-fixing conditions, and in the absence of glycerol, nitrogenase gene expression was linked to the dark period. However, glycerol induced expression of nitrogenase during part of the light period, together with cytochrome c oxidase (Cox), glycogen phosphorylase (Glp), and glycolytic and pentose-phosphate pathway (PPP) enzymes. This indicated that nitrogenase expression in the light was facilitated via higher respiration and glycogen breakdown. Key enzymes of the Calvin cycle were inhibited in Cyanothece ATCC 51142 in the presence of glycerol under H2 producing conditions, suggesting a competition between these sources of carbon. However, in Cyanothece PCC 7822, the Calvin cycle still played a role in cofactor recycling during H2 production. Our data comprise the first comprehensive profiling of proteome changes in Cyanothece PCC 7822, and allows an in-depth comparative analysis of major physiological and biochemical processes that influence H2-production in both the strains. Our results revealed many previously uncharacterized proteins that may play a role in nitrogenase activity and in other metabolic pathways and may provide suitable targets for genetic manipulation that would lead to improvement of large scale H2 production.

  16. Competition and facilitation between the marine nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Cyanothece and its associated bacterial community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brauer, Verena S; Stomp, Maayke; Bouvier, Thierry; Fouilland, Eric; Leboulanger, Christophe; Confurius-Guns, Veronique; Weissing, Franz J; Stal, Lucas J; Huisman, Jef

    2015-01-01

    N2-fixing cyanobacteria represent a major source of new nitrogen and carbon for marine microbial communities, but little is known about their ecological interactions with associated microbiota. In this study we investigated the interactions between the unicellular N2-fixing cyanobacterium Cyanothece

  17. Optimization of medium and cultivation conditions for enhanced exopolysaccharide yield by marine Cyanothece sp. 113

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Cyanothece sp. 113 is a unicellular, aerobic, diazotrophic and photosynthetic marine cyanobacterium. The optimal medium for exopolysaccharide yield by the strain was 70.0 g/L of NaCl,and 0.9 g/L of MgSO4 based on the modified F/2 medium for cultivation of marine algae. The optimal cultivation condition for exopolysaccharide yield by this cyanobacterial strain was 29℃, aeration, and continuous illumination at 86.0 μE/M2/S. Under the optimal conditions, over 18.4 g/L of exopolysaccharide was produced within 12 days. This was so far the highest exopolysaccharide yield produced with strains of Cyanothece sp. obtained.

  18. Rhythmic and sustained oscillations in metabolism and gene expression of Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 under constant light

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    Sandeep Bhupendra Gaudana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria, a group of photosynthetic prokaryotes, oscillate between day and night time metabolisms with concomitant oscillations in gene expression in response to light/dark cycles (LD. The oscillations in gene expression have been shown to sustain in constant light (LL with a free running period of 24 h in a model cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. However, equivalent oscillations in metabolism are not reported under LL in this non-nitrogen fixing cyanobacterium. Here we focus on Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, a unicellular, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium known to temporally separate the processes of oxygenic photosynthesis and oxygen-sensitive nitrogen fixation. In a recent report, metabolism of Cyanothece 51142 has been shown to oscillate between photosynthetic and respiratory phases under LL with free running periods that are temperature dependent but significantly shorter than the circadian period. Further, the oscillations shift to circadian pattern at moderate cell densities that are concomitant with slower growth rates. Here we take this understanding forward and demonstrate that the utradian rhythm under LL sustains at much higher cell densities when grown under turbulent regimes that simulate flashing light effect. Our results suggest that the ultradian rhythm in metabolism may be needed to support higher carbon and nitrogen requirements of rapidly growing cells under LL. With a comprehensive Real time PCR based gene expression analysis we account for key regulatory interactions and demonstrate the interplay between clock genes and the genes of key metabolic pathways. Further, we observe that several genes that peak at dusk in Synechococcus peak at dawn in Cyanothece and vice versa. The circadian rhythm of this organism appears to be more robust with peaking of genes in anticipation of the ensuing photosynthetic and respiratory metabolic phases.

  19. Dinitrogenase-Driven Photobiological Hydrogen Production Combats Oxidative Stress in Cyanothece sp. Strain ATCC 51142

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    Sadler, Natalie C.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Melnicki, Matthew R.; Charania, Moiz A.; Hill, Eric A.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Beliaev, Alexander S.; Wright, Aaron T.; Nojiri, H.

    2016-10-14

    ABSTRACT

    Photobiologically synthesized hydrogen (H2) gas is carbon neutral to produce and clean to combust, making it an ideal biofuel.Cyanothecesp. strain ATCC 51142 is a cyanobacterium capable of performing simultaneous oxygenic photosynthesis and H2production, a highly perplexing phenomenon because H2evolving enzymes are O2sensitive. We employed a system-levelin vivochemoproteomic profiling approach to explore the cellular dynamics of protein thiol redox and how thiol redox mediates the function of the dinitrogenase NifHDK, an enzyme complex capable of aerobic hydrogenase activity. We found that NifHDK responds to intracellular redox conditions and may act as an emergency electron valve to prevent harmful reactive oxygen species formation in concert with other cell strategies for maintaining redox homeostasis. These results provide new insight into cellular redox dynamics useful for advancing photolytic bioenergy technology and reveal a new understanding for the biological function of NifHDK.

    IMPORTANCEHere, we demonstrate that high levels of hydrogen synthesis can be induced as a protection mechanism against oxidative stress via the dinitrogenase enzyme complex inCyanothecesp. strain ATCC 51142. This is a previously unknown feature of cyanobacterial dinitrogenase, and we anticipate that it may represent a strategy to exploit cyanobacteria for efficient and scalable hydrogen production. We utilized a chemoproteomic approach to capture thein situdynamics of reductant partitioning within the cell, revealing proteins and reactive thiols that may be involved in redox sensing and signaling. Additionally, this method is widely applicable across biological systems to achieve a greater understanding of how cells

  20. Metabolic flux analysis of Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 under mixotrophic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagesan, Swathi; Gaudana, Sandeep B; Sinha, Avinash; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2013-11-01

    Cyanobacteria are a group of photosynthetic prokaryotes capable of utilizing solar energy to fix atmospheric carbon dioxide to biomass. Despite several "proof of principle" studies, low product yield is an impediment in commercialization of cyanobacteria-derived biofuels. Estimation of intracellular reaction rates by (13)C metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) would be a step toward enhancing biofuel yield via metabolic engineering. We report (13)C-MFA for Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, a unicellular nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, known for enhanced hydrogen yield under mixotrophic conditions. Rates of reactions in the central carbon metabolism under nitrogen-fixing and -non-fixing conditions were estimated by monitoring the competitive incorporation of (12)C and (13)C from unlabeled CO2 and uniformly labeled glycerol, respectively, into terminal metabolites such as amino acids. The observed labeling patterns suggest mixotrophic growth under both the conditions, with a larger fraction of unlabeled carbon in nitrate-sufficient cultures asserting a greater contribution of carbon fixation by photosynthesis and an anaplerotic pathway. Indeed, flux analysis complements the higher growth observed under nitrate-sufficient conditions. On the other hand, the flux through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and tricarboxylic acid cycle was greater in nitrate-deficient conditions, possibly to supply the precursors and reducing equivalents needed for nitrogen fixation. In addition, an enhanced flux through fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase possibly suggests the organism's preferred mode under nitrogen-fixing conditions. The (13)C-MFA results complement the reported predictions by flux balance analysis and provide quantitative insight into the organism's distinct metabolic features under nitrogen-fixing and -non-fixing conditions.

  1. Dynamic proteomic profiling of a unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece ATCC51142 across light-dark diurnal cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aryal, Uma K.; Stockel, Jana; Krovvidi, Ravi K.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Smith, Richard D.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Jacobs, Jon M.

    2011-12-01

    Unicellular cyanobacteria of the genus Cyanothece are recognized for their ability to execute nitrogen (N2)-fixation in the dark and photosynthesis in the light. Systems-wide dynamic proteomic profiling with mass spectrometry (MS) analysis reveals fundamental insights into the control and regulation of these functions. To expand upon the current knowledge of protein expression patterns in Cyanothece ATCC51142, we performed quantitative proteomic analysis using partial ("unsaturated") metabolic labeling and high mass accuracy LC-MS analysis. This dynamic proteomic profiling identified 721 actively synthesized proteins with significant temporal changes in expression throughout the light-dark cycles, of which 425 proteins matched with previously characterized cycling transcripts. The remaining 296 proteins contained a cluster of proteins uniquely involved in DNA replication and repair, protein degradation, tRNA synthesis and modification, transport and binding, and regulatory functions. Analysis of protein functions revealed that the expression of nitrogenase in the dark is mediated by higher respiration and glycogen metabolism. We have also shown that Cyanothece ATCC51142 utilizes alternative pathways for carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) acquisition, particularly, aspartic acid and glutamate as substrates of C and N, respectively. Utilization of phosphoketolase (PHK) pathway for the conversion of xylulose-5P to pyruvate and acetyl-P likely constitutes an alternative strategy to compensate higher ATP and NADPH demand. In conclusion, this study provides a deeper insight into how Cyanothece ATCC51142 modulates cellular functions to accommodate photosynthesis and N2-fixation within the single cell.

  2. Dynamic proteomic profiling of a unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece ATCC51142 across light-dark diurnal cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aryal Uma K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unicellular cyanobacteria of the genus Cyanothece are recognized for their ability to execute nitrogen (N2-fixation in the dark and photosynthesis in the light. An understanding of these mechanistic processes in an integrated systems context should provide insights into how Cyanothece might be optimized for specialized environments and/or industrial purposes. Systems-wide dynamic proteomic profiling with mass spectrometry (MS analysis should reveal fundamental insights into the control and regulation of these functions. Results To expand upon the current knowledge of protein expression patterns in Cyanothece ATCC51142, we performed quantitative proteomic analysis using partial ("unsaturated" metabolic labeling and high mass accuracy LC-MS analysis. This dynamic proteomic profiling identified 721 actively synthesized proteins with significant temporal changes in expression throughout the light-dark cycles, of which 425 proteins matched with previously characterized cycling transcripts. The remaining 296 proteins contained a cluster of proteins uniquely involved in DNA replication and repair, protein degradation, tRNA synthesis and modification, transport and binding, and regulatory functions. Functional classification of labeled proteins suggested that proteins involved in respiration and glycogen metabolism showed increased expression in the dark cycle together with nitrogenase, suggesting that N2-fixation is mediated by higher respiration and glycogen metabolism. Results indicated that Cyanothece ATCC51142 might utilize alternative pathways for carbon (C and nitrogen (N acquisition, particularly, aspartic acid and glutamate as substrates of C and N, respectively. Utilization of phosphoketolase (PHK pathway for the conversion of xylulose-5P to pyruvate and acetyl-P likely constitutes an alternative strategy to compensate higher ATP and NADPH demand. Conclusion This study provides a deeper systems level insight into how

  3. Released polysaccharides (RPS) from Cyanothece sp. CCY 0110 as biosorbent for heavy metals bioremediation: interactions between metals and RPS binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Rita; Rossi, Federico; Andrenelli, Luisa; Pereira, Sara Bernardes; De Philippis, Roberto; Tamagnini, Paula

    2016-09-01

    Bioremediation of heavy metals using microorganisms can be advantageous compared to conventional physicochemical methods due to the use of renewable resources and efficiencies of removal particularly cations at low concentrations. In this context, cyanobacteria/cyanobacterial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) emerge as a valid alternative due to the anionic nature and particular composition of these polymers. In this work, various culture fractions of the unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. CCY 0110 were employed in bioremoval assays using three of the most common heavy metal pollutants in water bodies-copper, cadmium, and lead-separately or in combined systems. Our study showed that the released polysaccharides (RPS) were the most efficient fraction, removing the metal(s) by biosorption. Therefore, this polymer was subsequently used to evaluate the interactions between the metals/RPS binding sites using SEM-EDX, ICP-OES, and FTIR. Acid and basic pretreatments applied to the polymer further improve the process efficiency, and the exposure to an alkaline solution seems to alter the RPS conformation. The differences observed in the specific metal bioremoval seem to be mainly due to the RPS organic functional groups available, mainly carboxyl and hydroxyl, than to an ion exchange mechanism. Considering that Cyanothece is a highly efficient RPS-producer and that RPS can be easily separated from the culture, immobilized or confined, this polymer can be advantageous for the establishment/improvement of heavy metal removal systems.

  4. Effect of continuous light on diurnal rhythms in Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Bijoy K

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Life on earth is strongly affected by alternating day and night cycles. Accordingly, many organisms have evolved an internal timekeeping system with a period of approximately 24 hours. Cyanobacteria are the only known prokaryotes with robust rhythms under control of a central clock. Numerous studies have been conducted to elucidate components of the circadian clock and to identify circadian-controlled genes. However, the complex interactions between endogenous circadian rhythms and external cues are currently not well understood, and a direct and mathematical based comparison between light-mediated and circadian-controlled gene expression is still outstanding. Therefore, we combined and analyzed data from two independent microarray experiments, previously performed under alternating light-dark and continuous light conditions in Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, and sought to classify light responsive and circadian controlled genes. Results Fourier Score-based methods together with random permutations and False Discovery Rates were used to identify genes with oscillatory expression patterns, and an angular distance based criterion was applied to recognize transient behaviors in gene expression under constant light conditions. Compared to previously reported mathematical approaches, the combination of these methods also facilitated the detection of modified amplitudes and phase-shifts of gene expression. Our analysis showed that the majority of diurnally regulated genes, essentially those genes that are maximally expressed during the middle of the light and dark period, are in fact light responsive. In contrast, most of the circadian controlled genes are up-regulated during the beginning of the dark or subjective dark, and are greatly enriched for genes associated with energy metabolism. Many of the circadian controlled and light responsive genes are found in gene clusters within the Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 genome. Interestingly, in

  5. Reconstruction and comparison of the metabolic potential of cyanobacteria Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajib Saha

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are an important group of photoautotrophic organisms that can synthesize valuable bio-products by harnessing solar energy. They are endowed with high photosynthetic efficiencies and diverse metabolic capabilities that confer the ability to convert solar energy into a variety of biofuels and their precursors. However, less well studied are the similarities and differences in metabolism of different species of cyanobacteria as they pertain to their suitability as microbial production chassis. Here we assemble, update and compare genome-scale models (iCyt773 and iSyn731 for two phylogenetically related cyanobacterial species, namely Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. All reactions are elementally and charge balanced and localized into four different intracellular compartments (i.e., periplasm, cytosol, carboxysome and thylakoid lumen and biomass descriptions are derived based on experimental measurements. Newly added reactions absent in earlier models (266 and 322, respectively span most metabolic pathways with an emphasis on lipid biosynthesis. All thermodynamically infeasible loops are identified and eliminated from both models. Comparisons of model predictions against gene essentiality data reveal a specificity of 0.94 (94/100 and a sensitivity of 1 (19/19 for the Synechocystis iSyn731 model. The diurnal rhythm of Cyanothece 51142 metabolism is modeled by constructing separate (light/dark biomass equations and introducing regulatory restrictions over light and dark phases. Specific metabolic pathway differences between the two cyanobacteria alluding to different bio-production potentials are reflected in both models.

  6. Reconstruction and comparison of the metabolic potential of cyanobacteria Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Rajib; Verseput, Alex T; Berla, Bertram M; Mueller, Thomas J; Pakrasi, Himadri B; Maranas, Costas D

    2012-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are an important group of photoautotrophic organisms that can synthesize valuable bio-products by harnessing solar energy. They are endowed with high photosynthetic efficiencies and diverse metabolic capabilities that confer the ability to convert solar energy into a variety of biofuels and their precursors. However, less well studied are the similarities and differences in metabolism of different species of cyanobacteria as they pertain to their suitability as microbial production chassis. Here we assemble, update and compare genome-scale models (iCyt773 and iSyn731) for two phylogenetically related cyanobacterial species, namely Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. All reactions are elementally and charge balanced and localized into four different intracellular compartments (i.e., periplasm, cytosol, carboxysome and thylakoid lumen) and biomass descriptions are derived based on experimental measurements. Newly added reactions absent in earlier models (266 and 322, respectively) span most metabolic pathways with an emphasis on lipid biosynthesis. All thermodynamically infeasible loops are identified and eliminated from both models. Comparisons of model predictions against gene essentiality data reveal a specificity of 0.94 (94/100) and a sensitivity of 1 (19/19) for the Synechocystis iSyn731 model. The diurnal rhythm of Cyanothece 51142 metabolism is modeled by constructing separate (light/dark) biomass equations and introducing regulatory restrictions over light and dark phases. Specific metabolic pathway differences between the two cyanobacteria alluding to different bio-production potentials are reflected in both models.

  7. Reconstruction and Comparison of the Metabolic Potential of Cyanobacteria Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Rajib; Verseput, Alex T.; Berla, Bertram M.; Mueller, Thomas J.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2012-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are an important group of photoautotrophic organisms that can synthesize valuable bio-products by harnessing solar energy. They are endowed with high photosynthetic efficiencies and diverse metabolic capabilities that confer the ability to convert solar energy into a variety of biofuels and their precursors. However, less well studied are the similarities and differences in metabolism of different species of cyanobacteria as they pertain to their suitability as microbial production chassis. Here we assemble, update and compare genome-scale models (iCyt773 and iSyn731) for two phylogenetically related cyanobacterial species, namely Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. All reactions are elementally and charge balanced and localized into four different intracellular compartments (i.e., periplasm, cytosol, carboxysome and thylakoid lumen) and biomass descriptions are derived based on experimental measurements. Newly added reactions absent in earlier models (266 and 322, respectively) span most metabolic pathways with an emphasis on lipid biosynthesis. All thermodynamically infeasible loops are identified and eliminated from both models. Comparisons of model predictions against gene essentiality data reveal a specificity of 0.94 (94/100) and a sensitivity of 1 (19/19) for the Synechocystis iSyn731 model. The diurnal rhythm of Cyanothece 51142 metabolism is modeled by constructing separate (light/dark) biomass equations and introducing regulatory restrictions over light and dark phases. Specific metabolic pathway differences between the two cyanobacteria alluding to different bio-production potentials are reflected in both models. PMID:23133581

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. 33047

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the complete nucleotide sequence of Anabaena sp. ATCC 33047 (Anabaena CA), a filamentous, nitrogen-fixing marine cyanobacterium, which under salt stress conditions accumulates sucrose internally. The elucidation of the genome will contribute to the understanding of cyanobacterial diversity. PMID:27516507

  9. Dynamic proteome analysis of Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 under constant light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aryal, Uma K.; Stockel, Jana; Welsh, Eric A.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Smith, Richard D.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Jacobs, Jon M.

    2012-02-03

    Understanding the dynamic nature of protein abundances provides insights into protein turnover not readily apparent from conventional, static mass spectrometry measurements. This level of data is particularly informative when surveying protein abundances in biological systems subjected to large perturbations or alterations in environment such as cyanobacteria. Our current analysis expands upon conventional proteomic approaches in cyanobacteria by measuring dynamic changes of the proteome using a 13C15N-L-leucine metabolic labeling in Cyanothece ATCC51142. Metabolically labeled Cyanothece ATCC51142 cells grown under nitrogen sufficient conditions in continuous light were monitored longitudinally for isotope incorporation over a 48 h period, revealing 422 proteins with dynamic changes in abundances. In particular, proteins involved in carbon fixation, pentose phosphate pathway, cellular protection, redox regulation, protein folding, assembly and degradation showed higher levels of isotope incorporation suggesting that these biochemical pathways are important for growth under non-diazotrophic conditions. Calculation of relative isotope abundances (RIA) values allowed to measure actual active protein synthesis over time for different biochemical pathways under non-diazotrophic conditions. Overall results demonstrated the utility of 'non-steady state' pulsed metabolic labeling for systems-wide dynamic quantification of the proteome in Cyanothece ATCC51142 that can also be applied to other cyanobacteria.

  10. Dynamic proteome analysis of Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 under constant light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Uma K; Stöckel, Jana; Welsh, Eric A; Gritsenko, Marina A; Nicora, Carrie D; Koppenaal, David W; Smith, Richard D; Pakrasi, Himadri B; Jacobs, Jon M

    2012-02-03

    Understanding the dynamic nature of protein abundances provides insights into protein turnover not readily apparent from conventional, static mass spectrometry measurements. This level of data is particularly informative when surveying protein abundances in biological systems subjected to large perturbations or alterations in environment such as cyanobacteria. Our current analysis expands upon conventional proteomic approaches in cyanobacteria by measuring dynamic changes of the proteome using a (13)C(15)N-l-leucine metabolic labeling in Cyanothece ATCC51142. Metabolically labeled Cyanothece ATCC51142 cells grown under nitrogen-sufficient conditions in continuous light were monitored longitudinally for isotope incorporation over a 48 h period, revealing 414 proteins with dynamic changes in abundances. In particular, proteins involved in carbon fixation, pentose phosphate pathway, cellular protection, redox regulation, protein folding, assembly, and degradation showed higher levels of isotope incorporation, suggesting that these biochemical pathways are important for growth under continuous light. Calculation of relative isotope abundances (RIA) values allowed the measurement of actual active protein synthesis over time for different biochemical pathways under high light exposure. Overall results demonstrated the utility of "non-steady state" pulsed metabolic labeling for systems-wide dynamic quantification of the proteome in Cyanothece ATCC51142 that can also be applied to other cyanobacteria.

  11. Cyanobacterium sp. host cell and vector for production of chemical compounds in Cyanobacterial cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piven, Irina; Friedrich, Alexandra; Duhring, Ulf; Uliczka, Frank; Baier, Kerstin; Inaba, Masami; Shi, Tuo; Wang, Kui; Enke, Heike; Kramer, Dan

    2016-04-19

    A cyanobacterial host cell, Cyanobacterium sp., that harbors at least one recombinant gene for the production of a chemical compounds is provided, as well as vectors derived from an endogenous plasmid isolated from the cell.

  12. Cyanobacterium sp. host cell and vector for production of chemical compounds in cyanobacterial cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piven, Irina; Friedrich, Alexandra; Duhring, Ulf; Uliczka, Frank; Baier, Kerstin; Inaba, Masami; Shi, Tuo; Wang, Kui; Enke, Heike; Kramer, Dan

    2014-09-30

    A cyanobacterial host cell, Cyanobacterium sp., that harbors at least one recombinant gene for the production of a chemical compounds is provided, as well as vectors derived from an endogenous plasmid isolated from the cell.

  13. Arsenic biotransformation by a cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xi-Mei; Yan, Yu; Xiong, Chan; Raber, Georg; Francesconi, Kevin; Pan, Ting; Ye, Jun; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2017-09-01

    Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 (Nostoc), a typical filamentous cyanobacterium ubiquitous in aquatic system, is recognized as a model organism to study prokaryotic cell differentiation and nitrogen fixation. In this study, Nostoc cells incubated with arsenite (As(III)) for two weeks were extracted with dichloromethane/methanol (DCM/MeOH) and the extract was partitioned between water and DCM. Arsenic species in aqueous and DCM layers were determined using high performance liquid chromatography - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICPMS/ESIMSMS). In addition to inorganic arsenic (iAs), the aqueous layer also contained monomethylarsonate (MAs(V)), dimethylarsinate (DMAs(V)), and the two arsenosugars, namely a glycerol arsenosugar (Oxo-Gly) and a phosphate arsenosugar (Oxo-PO4). Two major arsenosugar phospholipids (AsSugPL982 and AsSugPL984) were detected in DCM fraction. Arsenic in the growth medium was also investigated by HPLC/ICPMS and shown to be present mainly as the inorganic forms As(III) and As(V) accounting for 29%-38% and 29%-57% of the total arsenic respectively. The total arsenic of methylated arsenic, arsenosugars, and arsenosugar phospholipids in Nostoc cells with increasing As(III) exposure were not markedly different, indicating that the transformation to organoarsenic in Nostoc was not dependent on As(III) concentration in the medium. Our results provide new insights into the role of cyanobacteria in the biogeochemical cycling of arsenic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ferredoxin and flavodoxin from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottin, H; Lagoutte, B

    1992-07-06

    The unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp PCC 6803 is capable of synthesizing two different Photosystem-I electron acceptors, ferredoxin and flavodoxin. Under normal growth conditions a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin was recovered and purified to homogeneity. The complete amino-acid sequence of this protein was established. The isoelectric point (pI = 3.48), midpoint redox potential (Em = -0.412 V) and stability under denaturing conditions were also determined. This ferredoxin exhibits an unusual electrophoretic behavior, resulting in a very low apparent molecular mass between 2 and 3.5 kDa, even in the presence of high concentrations of urea. However, a molecular mass of 10,232 Da (apo-ferredoxin) is calculated from the sequence. Free thiol assays indicate the presence of a disulfide bridge in this protein. A small amount of ferredoxin was also found in another fraction during the purification procedure. The amino-acid sequence and properties of this minor ferredoxin were similar to those of the major ferredoxin. However, its solubility in ammonium sulfate and its reactivity with antibodies directed against spinach ferredoxin were different. Traces of flavodoxin were also recovered from the same fraction. The amount of flavodoxin was dramatically increased under iron-deficient growth conditions. An acidic isoelectric point was measured (pI = 3.76), close to that of ferredoxin. The midpoint redox potentials of flavodoxin are Em1 = -0.433 V and Em2 = -0.238 V at pH 7.8. Sequence comparison based on the 42 N-terminal amino acids indicates that Synechocystis 6803 flavodoxin most likely belongs to the long-chain class, despite an apparent molecular mass of 15 kDa determined by SDS-PAGE.

  15. Dried Colony in Cyanobacterium, Nostoc sp. HK-01 — Several high Space Environment Tolerances for ``Tanpopo'' Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita-Yokotani, K.; Kimura, S.; Kimura, Y.; Igarashi, Y.; Ajioka, R.; Sato, S.; Katoh, H.; Baba, K.

    2013-11-01

    A cyanobacterium, Nostoc sp. HK-01, has high several space environmental tolerance. Nostoc sp HK-01 would have high contribution for the “Tanpopo” mission in Japan Experimental Module of the International Space Station.

  16. Evidence for a trimeric organization of the photosystem I complex from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, E.J.; Dekker, J.P.; Heel, M.G. van; Rögner, M.; Saenger, W.; Witt, I.; Witt, H.T.

    1987-01-01

    A photosystem I (PS I) reaction center complex was isolated and purified from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. The complex has a molecular mass of about 600 kDa and contains 120 Chl a molecules per photoactive Chl a1 (P-700). Electron micrographs show that the PS I complex has the shape of a dis

  17. Novel metabolic attributes of the genus cyanothece, comprising a group of unicellular nitrogen-fixing Cyanothece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Anindita; Elvitigala, Thanura; Welsh, Eric; Stöckel, Jana; Liberton, Michelle; Min, Hongtao; Sherman, Louis A; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2011-01-01

    The genus Cyanothece comprises unicellular cyanobacteria that are morphologically diverse and ecologically versatile. Studies over the last decade have established members of this genus to be important components of the marine ecosystem, contributing significantly to the nitrogen and carbon cycle. System-level studies of Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, a prototypic member of this group, revealed many interesting metabolic attributes. To identify the metabolic traits that define this class of cyanobacteria, five additional Cyanothece strains were sequenced to completion. The presence of a large, contiguous nitrogenase gene cluster and the ability to carry out aerobic nitrogen fixation distinguish Cyanothece as a genus of unicellular, aerobic nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria. Cyanothece cells can create an anoxic intracellular environment at night, allowing oxygen-sensitive processes to take place in these oxygenic organisms. Large carbohydrate reserves accumulate in the cells during the day, ensuring sufficient energy for the processes that require the anoxic phase of the cells. Our study indicates that this genus maintains a plastic genome, incorporating new metabolic capabilities while simultaneously retaining archaic metabolic traits, a unique combination which provides the flexibility to adapt to various ecological and environmental conditions. Rearrangement of the nitrogenase cluster in Cyanothece sp. strain 7425 and the concomitant loss of its aerobic nitrogen-fixing ability suggest that a similar mechanism might have been at play in cyanobacterial strains that eventually lost their nitrogen-fixing ability. The unicellular cyanobacterial genus Cyanothece has significant roles in the nitrogen cycle in aquatic and terrestrial environments. Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 was extensively studied over the last decade and has emerged as an important model photosynthetic microbe for bioenergy production. To expand our understanding of the distinctive metabolic capabilities of

  18. Near-UV cyanobacteriochrome signaling system elicits negative phototaxis in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Ji-Young; Cho, Hye Sun; Cho, Jung-Il; Jeon, Jong-Seong; Lagarias, J. Clark; Park, Youn-Il

    2011-01-01

    Positive phototaxis systems have been well studied in bacteria; however, the photoreceptor(s) and their downstream signaling components that are responsible for negative phototaxis are poorly understood. Negative phototaxis sensory systems are important for cyanobacteria, oxygenic photosynthetic organisms that must contend with reactive oxygen species generated by an abundance of pigment photosensitizers. The unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 exhibits type IV pilus-dependen...

  19. Aeruginazole A, a novel thiazole-containing cyclopeptide from the cyanobacterium Microcystis sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveh, Avi; Carmeli, Shmuel

    2010-08-01

    A novel thiazole-containing cyclic peptide, aeruginazole A (1), was isolated from the cyanobacterium Microcystis sp. strain (IL-323), which was collected from a water reservoir near Kfar-Yehoshua, Valley of Armageddon, Israel. The planar structure of aeruginazole A was established using homonuclear and inverse-heteronuclear 2D NMR techniques, as well as high-resolution mass spectrometry. The absolute configuration of the asymmetric centers was determined using Marfey's method. Aeruginazole A potently inhibited Bacillus subtilis.

  20. Physiological and proteomic analysis of salinity tolerance of the halotolerant cyanobacterium Anabaena sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ravindra Kumar; Thagela, Preeti; Tripathi, Keshawanand; Abraham, G

    2016-09-01

    The halotolerant cyanobacterium Anabaena sp was grown under NaCl concentration of 0, 170 and 515 mM and physiological and proteomic analysis was performed. At 515 mM NaCl the cyanobacterium showed reduced photosynthetic activities and significant increase in soluble sugar content, proline and SOD activity. On the other hand Anabaena sp grown at 170 mM NaCl showed optimal growth, photosynthetic activities and comparatively low soluble sugar content, proline accumulation and SOD activity. The intracellular Na(+) content of the cells increased both at 170 and 515 mM NaCl. In contrast, the K(+) content of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp remained stable in response to growth at identical concentration of NaCl. While cells grown at 170 mM NaCl showed highest intracellular K(+)/Na(+) ratio, salinity level of 515 mM NaCl resulted in reduced ratio of K(+)/Na(+). Proteomic analysis revealed 50 salt-responsive proteins in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp under salt treatment compared with control. Ten protein spots were subjected to MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis and the identified proteins are involved in photosynthesis, protein folding, cell organization and energy metabolism. Differential expression of proteins related to photosynthesis, energy metabolism was observed in Anabaena sp grown at 170 mM NaCl. At 170 mM NaCl increased expression of photosynthesis related proteins and effective osmotic adjustment through increased antioxidant enzymes and modulation of intracellular ions contributed to better salinity tolerance and optimal growth. On the contrary, increased intracellular Na(+) content coupled with down regulation of photosynthetic and energy related proteins resulted in reduced growth at 515 mM NaCl. Therefore reduced growth at 515 mM NaCl could be due to accumulation of Na(+) ions and requirement to maintain higher organic osmolytes and antioxidants which is energy intensive. The results thus show that the basis of salt tolerance is different when the

  1. High-yield production of extracellular type-I cellulose by the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Chi; Li,Zhongkui; Li, Tao; Zhang, Yingjiao; Bryant, Donald A.; Zhao, Jindong

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose synthase, encoded by the cesA gene, is responsible for the synthesis of cellulose in nature. We show that the cell wall of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 naturally contains cellulose. Cellulose occurs as a possibly laminated layer between the inner and outer membrane, as well as being an important component of the extracellular glycocalyx in this cyanobacterium. Overexpression of six genes, cmc–ccp–cesAB–cesC–cesD–bgl, from Gluconacetobacter xylinus in Synechococcus s...

  2. Genetic transformation of marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. CC9311 (Cyanophyceae) by electroporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huaxin; Lin, Hanzhi; Jiang, Peng; Li, Fuchao; Qin, Song

    2013-03-01

    Synechococcus sp. CC9311 is a marine cyanobacterium characterized by type IV chromatic acclimation (CA). A genetic transformation system was developed as a first step to elucidate the molecular mechanism of CA. The results show that Synechococcus sp. CC9311 cells were sensitive to four commonly used antibiotics: ampicillin, kanamycin, spectinomycin, and chloramphenicol. An integrative plasmid to disrupt the putative phycoerythrin lyase gene mpeV, using a kanamycin resistance gene as selectable marker, was constructed by recombinant polymerase chain reaction. The plasmid was then transformed into Synechococcus sp. CC9311 via electroporation. High transformation efficiency was achieved at a field strength of 2 kV/cm. DNA analysis showed that mpeV was fully disrupted following challenge of the transformants with a high concentration of kanamycin. In addition, the transformants that displayed poor growth on agar SN medium could be successfully plated on agarose SN medium.

  3. Genetic transformation of marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp.CC9311 (Cyanophyceae) by electroporation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Huaxin; LIN Hanzhi; JIANG Peng; LI Fuchao; QIN Song

    2013-01-01

    Synechococcus sp.CC9311 is a marine cyanobacterium characterized by type V chromatic acclimation (CA).A genetic transformation system was developed as a first step to elucidate the molecular mechanism of CA.The results show that Synechococcus sp.CC9311 cells were sensitive to four commonly used antibiotics:ampicillin,kanamycin,spectinomycin,and chloramphenicol.An integrative plasmid to disrupt the putative phycoerythrin lyase gene mpeV,using a kanamycin resistance gene as selectable marker,was constructed by recombinant polymerase chain reaction.The plasmid was then transformed into Synechococcus sp.CC9311 via electroporation.High transformation efficiency was achieved at a field strength of 2 kV/cm.DNA analysis showed that rpe V was fully disrupted following challenge of the transformants with a high concentration of kanamycin.In addition,the transformants that displayed poor growth on agar SN medium could be successfully plated on agarose SN medium.

  4. Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xingguo; HUANG Wei; WU Qingyu

    2006-01-01

    Two-component systems are signal transduction systems which enable bacteria to regulate cellular functions in response to changing environmental conditions. The unicellular Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has become a model organism for a range of biochemical and molecular biology studies aiming at investigating environmental stress response. The publication of the complete genome sequence of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 provided a tremendous stimulus for research in this field, and at least 80 open reading frames were identified as members of the two-component signal transduction systems in this single species of cyanobacteria. To date, functional roles have been determined for only a limited number of such proteins. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the two-component signal transduction systems in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and describes recent achievements in elucidating the functional roles of these systems.

  5. Bifunctional enzyme FBPase/SBPase is essential for photoautotrophic growth in cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunlan Yan; Xudong Xu

    2008-01-01

    From a random insertion mutant library of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, a mutant defective in photoautotrophic growth was obtained. The interrupted gene was identified to be sir2094 (fbpl), which encodes the fructose-l,6-biphosphatase (FBPase)/sedoheptu-lose-1,7-biphosphatase (SBPase) bifunctional enzyme (F-I). Two other independently constructed slr2094 mutants showed an identical phenotype. The FBPase activity was found to be virtually lacking in an sir2094 mutant, which was sensitive to light under mixotrophic growth conditions. These results indicate that sir2094 is the only active FBPase-encoding gene in this cyanobacterium. Inactivation of photosystem 11 by interrupting psbB in sir2094 mutant alleviated the sensitiveness to light. This report provides the direct genetic evi-dence for the essential role of F-I in the photosynthesis of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

  6. Discovery of Rare and Highly Toxic Microcystins from Lichen-Associated Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. Strain IO-102-I

    OpenAIRE

    Oksanen, Ilona; Jokela, Jouni; Fewer, David P.; Wahlsten, Matti; Rikkinen, Jouko; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2004-01-01

    The production of hepatotoxic cyclic heptapeptides, microcystins, is almost exclusively reported from planktonic cyanobacteria. Here we show that a terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I isolated from a lichen association produces six different microcystins. Microcystins were identified with liquid chromatography-UV mass spectrometry by their retention times, UV spectra, mass fragmentation, and comparison to microcystins from the aquatic Nostoc sp. strain 152. The dominant micr...

  7. Multiple modes of iron uptake by the filamentous, siderophore-producing cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Mareike; Kranzler, Chana; Lis, Hagar; Margulis, Ketty; Stevanovic, Mara; Keren, Nir; Schleiff, Enrico

    2015-08-01

    Iron is a member of a small group of nutrients that limits aquatic primary production. Mechanisms for utilizing iron have to be efficient and adapted according to the ecological niche. In respect to iron acquisition cyanobacteria, prokaryotic oxygen evolving photosynthetic organisms can be divided into siderophore- and non-siderophore-producing strains. The results presented in this paper suggest that the situation is far more complex. To understand the bioavailability of different iron substrates and the advantages of various uptake strategies, we examined iron uptake mechanisms in the siderophore-producing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Comparison of the uptake of iron complexed with exogenous (desferrioxamine B, DFB) or to self-secreted (schizokinen) siderophores by Anabaena sp. revealed that uptake of the endogenous produced siderophore complexed to iron is more efficient. In addition, Anabaena sp. is able to take up dissolved, ferric iron hydroxide species (Fe') via a reductive mechanism. Thus, Anabaena sp. exhibits both, siderophore- and non-siderophore-mediated iron uptake. While assimilation of Fe' and FeDFB are not induced by iron starvation, FeSchizokinen uptake rates increase with increasing iron starvation. Consequently, we suggest that Fe' reduction and uptake is advantageous for low-density cultures, while at higher densities siderophore uptake is preferred.

  8. Space-environmental tolerances in a cyanobacterium, Nostoc sp. HK-01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Kimura, Shunta; Sato, Seigo; Katoh, Hiroshi; Ajioka, Reiko; Yamagishi, Akihiko; Inoue, Kotomi

    2016-07-01

    We have been investigating the tolerances to space-environments of a cyanobacterium, Nostoc sp. HK-01 (hereafter referred to as HK-01). Dry colonies of HK-01 had high tolerance to dry conditions, but more detailed information about tolerance to high-temperature, UV, gamma-ray and heavy particle beams were not deeply investigated. The obtained dry colonies of HK-01 after exposure to each of the conditions described above were investigated. In all of the tested colonies of HK-01 after exposure, all or some of the cells in the colonies were alive. One of the purposes of space agriculture is growing plants on Mars. In the early stages, of our research, cyanobacteria are introduced on Mars to promote the oxidation of the atmosphere and the formation of soil from Mars's regolith. HK-01 will contribute to each of these factors in the future.

  9. BMAA Inhibits Nitrogen Fixation in the Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntzon, Lotta; Erasmie, Sven; Celepli, Narin; Eriksson, Johan; Rasmussen, Ulla; Bergman, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria produce a range of secondary metabolites, one being the neurotoxic non-protein amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), proposed to be a causative agent of human neurodegeneration. As for most cyanotoxins, the function of BMAA in cyanobacteria is unknown. Here, we examined the effects of BMAA on the physiology of the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120. Our data show that exogenously applied BMAA rapidly inhibits nitrogenase activity (acetylene reduction assay), even at micromolar concentrations, and that the inhibition was considerably more severe than that induced by combined nitrogen sources and most other amino acids. BMAA also caused growth arrest and massive cellular glycogen accumulation, as observed by electron microscopy. With nitrogen fixation being a process highly sensitive to oxygen species we propose that the BMAA effects found here may be related to the production of reactive oxygen species, as reported for other organisms. PMID:23966039

  10. Utilization of a terrestrial cyanobacterium, Nostoc sp. HK-01, for space habitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Shunta; Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Arai, Mayumi; Yamashita, Masamichi; Katoh, Hiroshi; Ajioka, Reiko; Inoue, Kotomi

    2016-07-01

    A terrestrial cyanobacterium, Nostoc sp. HK-01 (hereafter HK-01), has several useful abilities for space habitation; photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation, and space environmental tolerances to vacuum, UV, gamma-ray, heavy particle beam, low and high temperature. Space environmental tolerances are important for transportation to Mars. HK-01 can grow on Martian regolith simulant (MRS) in vitro. Furthermore, HK-01 is useful as food. HK-01 may be utilized as oxygen supply, soil formation and food material for bio-chemical circulation in closed bio-ecosystems, including space habitation such as Mars. HK-01 was adopted as a biological material for the "TANPOPO" mission (JAXA et al.,), because of their high environmental tolerances. The "TANPOPO" mission is performing the space exposure experiments on the Japan Experimental Module (JEM) of the International Space Station (ISS). The results of these experiments will show the ability of HK-01 to survive in space.

  11. The regulation of HanA during heterocyst development in cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing-Jing; Shi, Lei; Chen, Wen-Li; Wang, Li

    2014-10-01

    In response to deprivation of combined nitrogen, the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 develops heterocyst, which is specifically involved in the nitrogen fixation. In this study, we focused on the regulation of HanA, a histone-like protein, in heterocyst development. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay results showed that NtcA, a global nitrogen regulator necessary for heterocyst differentiation, could bind to two NtcA-binding motifs in the hanA promoter region. qPCR results also showed that NtcA may regulate the expression of hanA. By using the hanA promoter-controlled gfp as a reporter gene and performing western blot we found that the amount of HanA in mature heterocysts was decreased gradually.

  12. Metabolomic analysis of NAD kinase-deficient mutants of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yuuma; Miyagi, Atsuko; Haishima, Yuto; Ishikawa, Toshiki; Nagano, Minoru; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Hihara, Yukako; Kawai-Yamada, Maki

    2016-10-20

    NAD kinase (NADK) phosphorylates NAD(H) to NADP(H). The enzyme has a crucial role in the regulation of the NADP(H)/NAD(H) ratio in various organisms. The unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 possesses two NADK-encoding genes, sll1415 and slr0400. To elucidate the metabolic change in NADK-deficient mutants growing under photoautotrophic conditions, we conducted metabolomic analysis using capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry (CE-MS). The growth curves of the wild-type parent (WT) and NADK-deficient mutants (Δ1415 and Δ0400) did not show any differences under photoautotrophic conditions. The NAD(P)(H) balance showed abnormality in both mutants. However, only the metabolite pattern of Δ0400 showed differences compared to WT. These results indicated that the two NADK isoforms have distinct functions in cyanobacterial metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. ADP-ribosylation of glutamine synthetase in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silman, N J; Carr, N G; Mann, N H

    1995-06-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) inactivation was observed in crude cell extracts and in the high-speed supernatant fraction from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 following the addition of ammonium ions, glutamine, or glutamate. Dialysis of the high-speed supernatant resulted in loss of inactivation activity, but this could be restored by the addition of NADH, NADPH, or NADP+ and, to a lesser extent, NAD+, suggesting that inactivation of GS involved ADP-ribosylation. This form of modification was confirmed both by labelling experiments using [32P]NAD+ and by chemical analysis of the hydrolyzed enzyme. Three different forms of GS, exhibiting no activity, biosynthetic activity only, or transferase activity only, could be resolved by chromatography, and the differences in activity were correlated with the extent of the modification. Both biosynthetic and transferase activities were restored to the completely inactive form of GS by treatment with phosphodiesterase.

  14. BMAA Inhibits Nitrogen Fixation in the Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitta Bergman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria produce a range of secondary metabolites, one being the neurotoxic non-protein amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA, proposed to be a causative agent of human neurodegeneration. As for most cyanotoxins, the function of BMAA in cyanobacteria is unknown. Here, we examined the effects of BMAA on the physiology of the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120. Our data show that exogenously applied BMAA rapidly inhibits nitrogenase activity (acetylene reduction assay, even at micromolar concentrations, and that the inhibition was considerably more severe than that induced by combined nitrogen sources and most other amino acids. BMAA also caused growth arrest and massive cellular glycogen accumulation, as observed by electron microscopy. With nitrogen fixation being a process highly sensitive to oxygen species we propose that the BMAA effects found here may be related to the production of reactive oxygen species, as reported for other organisms.

  15. Molecular exploration of the highly radiation resistant cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badri, Hanène; Leys, Natalie; Wattiez, Ruddy

    Arthrospira (Spirulina) is a photosynthetic cyanobacterium able to use sunlight to release oxygen from water and remove carbon dioxide and nitrate from water. In addition, it is suited for human consumption (edible). For these traits, the cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 was selected by the European Space Agency (ESA) as part of the life support system MELiSSA for recycling oxygen, water, and food during future long-haul space missions. However, during such extended missions, Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 will be exposed to continuous artificial illumination and harmful cosmic radiation. The aim of this study was to investigate how Arthrospira will react and behave when exposed to such stress environment. The cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 was exposed to high gamma rays doses in order to unravel in details the response of this bacterium following such stress. Test results showed that after acute exposure to high doses of 60Co gamma radiation upto 3200 Gy, Arthrospira filaments were still able to restart photosynthesis and proliferate normally. Doses above 3200 Gy, did have a detrimental effect on the cells, and delayed post-irradiation proliferation. The photosystem activity, measured as the PSII quantum yield immediately after irradiation, decreased significantly at radiation doses above 3200 Gy. Likewise through pigment content analysis a significant decrease in phycocyanin was observed following exposure to 3200 Gy. The high tolerance of this bacterium to 60Co gamma rays (i.e. ca. 1000x more resistant than human cells for example) raised our interest to investigate in details the cellular and molecular mechanisms behind this amazing resistance. Optimised DNA, RNA and protein extraction methods and a new microarray chip specific for Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 were developed to identify the global cellular and molecular response following exposure to 3200 Gy and 5000 Gy A total of 15,29 % and 30,18 % genes were found differentially expressed in RNA

  16. High-yield production of extracellular type-I cellulose by the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chi; Li, Zhongkui; Li, Tao; Zhang, Yingjiao; Bryant, Donald A; Zhao, Jindong

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose synthase, encoded by the cesA gene, is responsible for the synthesis of cellulose in nature. We show that the cell wall of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 naturally contains cellulose. Cellulose occurs as a possibly laminated layer between the inner and outer membrane, as well as being an important component of the extracellular glycocalyx in this cyanobacterium. Overexpression of six genes, cmc-ccp-cesAB-cesC-cesD-bgl, from Gluconacetobacter xylinus in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 resulted in very high-yield production of extracellular type-I cellulose. High-level cellulose production only occurred when the native cesA gene was inactivated and when cells were grown at low salinity. This system provides a method for the production of lignin-free cellulose from sunlight and CO2 for biofuel production and other biotechnological applications.

  17. Merocyclophanes C and D from the Cultured Freshwater Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. (UIC 10110).

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Daniel S; Chen, Wei-Lun; Lantvit, Daniel D; Zhang, Xiaoli; Krunic, Aleksej; Burdette, Joanna E; Eustaquio, Alessandra; Orjala, Jimmy

    2017-04-28

    Merocyclophanes C and D (1 and 2) were isolated from the cell extract of the cultured cyanobacterium UIC 10110. The structures were determined by one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and confirmed by 2D NMR techniques. The absolute configurations were determined using electronic circular dichroism spectroscopy. Merocyclophanes C and D represent the first known analogues of the merocyclophane core structure, a recently discovered scaffold of [7,7] paracyclophanes characterized by an α-branched methyl at C-1/C-14; 1 and 2 showed antiproliferative activity against the MDA-MB-435 cell line with IC50 values of 1.6 and 0.9 μM, respectively. Partial 16S analysis determined UIC 10110 to be a Nostoc sp., and it was found to clade with UIC 10062 Nostoc sp., the only other strain known to produce merocyclophanes. The genome of UIC 10110 was sequenced, and a biosynthetic gene cluster was identified that is proposed to encode type I and type III polyketide synthases that are potentially responsible for production of the merocyclophanes; however, further experiments will be required to verify the true function of the gene cluster. The gene cluster provides a genetic basis for the observed structural differences of the [7,7] paracyclophane core structures.

  18. Paired cloning vectors for complementation of mutations in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolk, C. Peter Wolk [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Fan, Qing [Northwestern University, Evanston; Zhou, Ruanbao [Anhui Normal University, People' s Republic of China; Huang, Guocun [University of Texas Southwestern Medical; Lechno-Yossef, Sigal [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Kuritz, Tanya [ORNL; Wojciuch, Elizabeth [Michigan State University, East Lansing

    2007-01-01

    The clones generated in a sequencing project represent a resource for subsequent analysis of the organism whose genome has been sequenced. We describe an interrelated group of cloning vectors that either integrate into the genome or replicate, and that enhance the utility, for developmental and other studies, of the clones used to determine the genomic sequence of the cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. One integrating vector is a mobilizable BAC vector that was used both to generate bridging clones and to complement transposon mutations. Upon addition of a cassette that permits mobilization and selection, pUC-based sequencing clones can also integrate into the genome and thereupon complement transposon mutations. The replicating vectors are based on cyanobacterial plasmid pDU1, whose sequence we report, and on broad-host-range plasmid RSF1010. The RSF1010- and pDU1-based vectors provide the opportunity to express different genes from either cell-type-specific or -generalist promoters, simultaneously from different plasmids in the same cyanobacterial cells. We show that pDU1 ORF4 and its upstream region play an essential role in the replication and copy number of pDU1, and that ORFs alr2887 and alr3546 (hetF{sub A}) of Anabaena sp. are required specifically for fixation of dinitrogen under oxic conditions.

  19. Envelope structure of Synechococcus sp. WH8113, a nonflagellated swimming cyanobacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reese Thomas S

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many bacteria swim by rotating helical flagellar filaments [1]. Waterbury et al. [15] discovered an exception, strains of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus that swim without flagella or visible changes in shape. Other species of cyanobacteria glide on surfaces [2,7]. The hypothesis that Synechococcus might swim using traveling surface waves [6,13] prompted this investigation. Results Using quick-freeze electron microscopy, we have identified a crystalline surface layer that encloses the outer membrane of the motile strain Synechococcus sp. WH8113, the components of which are arranged in a rhomboid lattice. Spicules emerge in profusion from the layer and extend up to 150 nm into the surrounding fluid. These spicules also send extensions inwards to the inner cell membrane where motility is powered by an ion-motive force [17]. Conclusion The envelope structure of Synechococcus sp. WH8113 provides new constraints on its motile mechanism. The spicules are well positioned to transduce energy at the cell membrane into mechanical work at the cell surface. One model is that an unidentified motor embedded in the cell membrane utilizes the spicules as oars to generate a traveling wave external to the surface layer in the manner of ciliated eukaryotes.

  20. Transcription and Regulation of the Bidirectional Hydrogenase in the Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. Strain PCC 7120▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöholm, Johannes; Oliveira, Paulo; Lindblad, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The filamentous, heterocystous cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 (Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120) possesses an uptake hydrogenase and a bidirectional enzyme, the latter being capable of catalyzing both H2 production and evolution. The completely sequenced genome of Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 reveals that the five structural genes encoding the bidirectional hydrogenase (hoxEFUYH) are separated in two clusters at a distance of approximately 8.8 kb. The transcription of the hox genes was examined under nitrogen-fixing conditions, and the results demonstrate that the cluster containing hoxE and hoxF can be transcribed as one polycistronic unit together with the open reading frame alr0750. The second cluster, containing hoxU, hoxY, and hoxH, is transcribed together with alr0763 and alr0765, located between the hox genes. Moreover, alr0760 and alr0761 form an additional larger operon. Nevertheless, Northern blot hybridizations revealed a rather complex transcription pattern in which the different hox genes are expressed differently. Transcriptional start points (TSPs) were identified 66 and 57 bp upstream from the start codon of alr0750 and hoxU, respectively. The transcriptions of the two clusters containing the hox genes are both induced under anaerobic conditions concomitantly with the induction of a higher level of hydrogenase activity. An additional TSP, within the annotated alr0760, 244 bp downstream from the suggested translation start codon, was identified. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays with purified LexA from Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 demonstrated specific interactions between the transcriptional regulator and both hox promoter regions. However, when LexA from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 was used, the purified protein interacted only with the promoter region of the alr0750-hoxE-hoxF operon. A search of the whole Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 genome demonstrated the presence of 216 putative LexA binding sites in total, including recA and rec

  1. Unique Thylakoid Membrane Architecture of a Unicellular N2-Fixing Cyanobacterium Revealed by Electron Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liberton, Michelle L.; Austin, Jotham R.; Berg, R. H.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2011-04-01

    Cyanobacteria, descendants of the endosymbiont that gave rise to modern-day chloroplasts, are vital contributors to global biological energy conversion processes. A thorough understanding of the physiology of cyanobacteria requires detailed knowledge of these organisms at the level of cellular architecture and organization. In these prokaryotes, the large membrane protein complexes of the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains function in the intracellular thylakoid membranes. Like plants, the architecture of the thylakoid membranes in cyanobacteria has direct impact on cellular bioenergetics, protein transport, and molecular trafficking. However, whole-cell thylakoid organization in cyanobacteria is not well understood. Here we present, by using electron tomography, an in-depth analysis of the architecture of the thylakoid membranes in a unicellular cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142. Based on the results of three-dimensional tomographic reconstructions of near-entire cells, we determined that the thylakoids in Cyanothece 51142 form a dense and complex network that extends throughout the entire cell. This thylakoid membrane network is formed from the branching and splitting of membranes and encloses a single lumenal space. The entire thylakoid network spirals as a peripheral ring of membranes around the cell, an organization that has not previously been described in a cyanobacterium. Within the thylakoid membrane network are areas of quasi-helical arrangement with similarities to the thylakoid membrane system in chloroplasts. This cyanobacterial thylakoid arrangement is an efficient means of packing a large volume of membranes in the cell while optimizing intracellular transport and trafficking.

  2. Unique thylakoid membrane architecture of a unicellular N2-fixing cyanobacterium revealed by electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liberton, Michelle; Austin II, Jotham R; Berg, R. Howard; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2011-04-01

    Cyanobacteria, descendants of the endosymbiont that gave rise to modern-day chloroplasts, are vital contributors to global biological energy conversion processes. A thorough understanding of the physiology of cyanobacteria requires detailed knowledge of these organisms at the level of cellular architecture and organization. In these prokaryotes, the large membrane protein complexes of the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains function in the intracellular thylakoid membranes. Like plants, the architecture of the thylakoid membranes in cyanobacteria has direct impact on cellular bioenergetics, protein transport, and molecular trafficking. However, whole-cell thylakoid organization in cyanobacteria is not well understood. Here we present, by using electron tomography, an in-depth analysis of the architecture of the thylakoid membranes in a unicellular cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142. Based on the results of three-dimensional tomographic reconstructions of near-entire cells, we determined that the thylakoids in Cyanothece 51142 form a dense and complex network that extends throughout the entire cell. This thylakoid membrane network is formed from the branching and splitting of membranes and encloses a single lumenal space. The entire thylakoid network spirals as a peripheral ring of membranes around the cell, an organization that has not previously been described in a cyanobacterium. Within the thylakoid membrane network are areas of quasi-helical arrangement with similarities to the thylakoid membrane system in chloroplasts. This cyanobacterial thylakoid arrangement is an efficient means of packing a large volume of membranes in the cell while optimizing intracellular transport and trafficking.

  3. Unique thylakoid membrane architecture of a unicellular N2-fixing cyanobacterium revealed by electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberton, Michelle; Austin, Jotham R; Berg, R Howard; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2011-04-01

    Cyanobacteria, descendants of the endosymbiont that gave rise to modern-day chloroplasts, are vital contributors to global biological energy conversion processes. A thorough understanding of the physiology of cyanobacteria requires detailed knowledge of these organisms at the level of cellular architecture and organization. In these prokaryotes, the large membrane protein complexes of the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains function in the intracellular thylakoid membranes. Like plants, the architecture of the thylakoid membranes in cyanobacteria has direct impact on cellular bioenergetics, protein transport, and molecular trafficking. However, whole-cell thylakoid organization in cyanobacteria is not well understood. Here we present, by using electron tomography, an in-depth analysis of the architecture of the thylakoid membranes in a unicellular cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142. Based on the results of three-dimensional tomographic reconstructions of near-entire cells, we determined that the thylakoids in Cyanothece 51142 form a dense and complex network that extends throughout the entire cell. This thylakoid membrane network is formed from the branching and splitting of membranes and encloses a single lumenal space. The entire thylakoid network spirals as a peripheral ring of membranes around the cell, an organization that has not previously been described in a cyanobacterium. Within the thylakoid membrane network are areas of quasi-helical arrangement with similarities to the thylakoid membrane system in chloroplasts. This cyanobacterial thylakoid arrangement is an efficient means of packing a large volume of membranes in the cell while optimizing intracellular transport and trafficking.

  4. Crystal Structure of Allophycocyanin from Marine Cyanobacterium Phormidium sp. A09DM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonani, Ravi Raghav; Gupta, Gagan Deep; Madamwar, Datta; Kumar, Vinay

    2015-01-01

    Isolated phycobilisome (PBS) sub-assemblies have been widely subjected to X-ray crystallography analysis to obtain greater insights into the structure-function relationship of this light harvesting complex. Allophycocyanin (APC) is the phycobiliprotein always found in the PBS core complex. Phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophores, covalently bound to conserved Cys residues of α- and β- subunits of APC, are responsible for solar energy absorption from phycocyanin and for transfer to photosynthetic apparatus. In the known APC structures, heterodimers of α- and β- subunits (known as αβ monomers) assemble as trimer or hexamer. We here for the first time report the crystal structure of APC isolated from a marine cyanobacterium (Phormidium sp. A09DM). The crystal structure has been refined against all the observed data to the resolution of 2.51 Å to Rwork (Rfree) of 0.158 (0.229) with good stereochemistry of the atomic model. The Phormidium protein exists as a trimer of αβ monomers in solution and in crystal lattice. The overall tertiary structures of α- and β- subunits, and trimeric quaternary fold of the Phormidium protein resemble the other known APC structures. Also, configuration and conformation of the two covalently bound PCB chromophores in the marine APC are same as those observed in fresh water cyanobacteria and marine red algae. More hydrophobic residues, however, constitute the environment of the chromophore bound to α-subunit of the Phormidium protein, owing mainly to amino acid substitutions in the marine protein.

  5. Anilofos tolerance and its mineralization by the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PUPCCC 64.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D P Singh

    Full Text Available This study deals with anilofos tolerance and its mineralization by the common rice field cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PUPCCC 64. The organism tolerated anilofos up to 25 mg L(-1. The herbicide caused inhibitory effects on photosynthetic pigments of the test organism in a dose-dependent manner. The organism exhibited 60, 89, 96, 85 and 79% decrease in chlorophyll a, carotenoids, phycocyanin, allophycocyanin and phycoerythrin, respectively, in 20 mg L(-1 anilofos on day six. Activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase increased by 1.04 to 1.80 times over control cultures in presence of 20 mg L(-1 anilofos. Glutathione content decreased by 26% while proline content was unaffected by 20 mg L(-1 anilofos. The test organism showed intracellular uptake and metabolized the herbicide. Uptake of herbicide by test organism was fast during initial six hours followed by slow uptake until 120 hours. The organism exhibited maximum anilofos removal at 100 mg protein L(-1, pH 8.0 and 30°C. Its growth in phosphate deficient basal medium in the presence of anilofos (2.5 mg L(-1 indicated that herbicide was used by the strain PUPCCC 64 as a source of phosphate.

  6. Structural Elucidation and Molecular Docking of a Novel Antibiotic Compound from Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. MGL001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niveshika; Verma, Ekta; Mishra, Arun K.; Singh, Angad K.; Singh, Vinay K.

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are rich source of array of bioactive compounds. The present study reports a novel antibacterial bioactive compound purified from cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. MGL001 using various chromatographic techniques viz. thin layer chromatography (TLC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Further characterization was done using electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy (ESIMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and predicted structure of bioactive compound was 9-Ethyliminomethyl-12-(morpholin - 4 - ylmethoxy) -5, 8, 13, 16–tetraaza–hexacene - 2, 3 dicarboxylic acid (EMTAHDCA). Structure of EMTAHDCA clearly indicated that it is a novel compound that was not reported in literature or natural product database. The compound exhibited growth inhibiting effects mainly against the gram negative bacterial strains and produced maximum zone of inhibition at 150 μg/mL concentration. The compound was evaluated through in silico studies for its ability to bind 30S ribosomal fragment (PDB ID: 1YRJ, 1MWL, 1J7T, and 1LC4) and OmpF porin protein (4GCP, 4GCQ, and 4GCS) which are the common targets of various antibiotic drugs. Comparative molecular docking study revealed that EMTAHDCA has strong binding affinity for these selected targets in comparison to a number of most commonly used antibiotics. The ability of EMTAHDCA to bind the active sites on the proteins and 30S ribosomal fragments where the antibiotic drugs generally bind indicated that it is functionally similar to the commercially available drugs. PMID:27965634

  7. Anti-MRSA-acting carbamidocyclophanes H-L from the Vietnamese cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. CAVN2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preisitsch, Michael; Harmrolfs, Kirsten; Pham, Hang T L; Heiden, Stefan E; Füssel, Anna; Wiesner, Christoph; Pretsch, Alexander; Swiatecka-Hagenbruch, Monika; Niedermeyer, Timo H J; Müller, Rolf; Mundt, Sabine

    2015-03-01

    The methanol extract of the Vietnamese freshwater cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. CAVN2 exhibited cytotoxic effects against MCF-7 and 5637 cancer cell lines as well as against nontumorigenic FL and HaCaT cells and was active against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Streptococcus pneumoniae. High-resolution mass spectrometric analysis indicated the presence of over 60 putative cyclophane-like compounds in an antimicrobially active methanol extract fraction. A paracyclophanes-focusing extraction and separation methodology led to the isolation of 5 new carbamidocyclophanes (1-5) and 11 known paracyclophanes (6-16). The structures and their stereochemical configurations were elucidated by a combination of spectrometric and spectroscopic methods including HRMS, 1D and 2D NMR analyses and detailed comparative CD analysis. The newly described monocarbamoylated [7.7]paracyclophanes (1, 2, 4 and 5) differ by a varying degree of chlorination in the side chains. Carbamidocyclophane J (3) is the very first reported carbamidocyclophane bearing a single halogenation in both butyl residues. Based on previous studies a detailed phylogenetic examination of cyclophane-producing cyanobacteria was carried out. The biological evaluation of 1-16 against various clinical pathogens highlighted a remarkable antimicrobial activity against MRSA with MICs of 0.1-1.0 μM, and indicated that the level of antibacterial activity is related to the presence of carbamoyl moieties.

  8. Structural elucidation and molecular docking of a novel antibiotic compound from cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. MGL001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niveshika No Name

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are rich source of array of bioactive compounds. The present study reports a novel antibacterial bioactive compound purified from cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. MGL001 using various chromatographic techniques viz. thin layer chromatography (TLC and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Further characterization was done using electrospray ionisation mass spectroscopy (ESIMS and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and predicted structure of bioactive compound was 9-Ethyliminomethyl-12-(morpholin - 4 - ylmethoxy -5, 8, 13, 16 – tetraaza – hexacene - 2, 3 dicarboxylic acid (EMTAHDCA. Structure of EMTAHDCA clearly indicated that it is a novel compound that was not reported in literature or natural product database. The compound exhibited growth inhibiting effects mainly against the gram negative bacterial strains and produced maximum zone of inhibition at 150 μg/mL concentration. The compound was evaluated through in silico studies for its ability to bind 30S ribosomal fragment (PDB ID: 1YRJ, 1MWL, 1J7T and 1LC4 and OmpF porin protein (4GCP, 4GCQ and 4GCS which are the common targets of various antibiotic drugs. Comparative molecular docking study revealed that EMTAHDCA has strong binding affinity for these selected targets in comparison to a number of most commonly used antibiotics. The ability of EMTAHDCA to bind the active sites on the proteins and 30S ribosomal fragments where the antibiotic drugs generally bind indicated that it is functionally similar to the commercially available drugs.

  9. Refolding and enzyme kinetic studies on the ferrochelatase of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik Storm

    Full Text Available Heme is a cofactor for proteins participating in many important cellular processes, including respiration, oxygen metabolism and oxygen binding. The key enzyme in the heme biosynthesis pathway is ferrochelatase (protohaem ferrolyase, EC 4.99.1.1, which catalyzes the insertion of ferrous iron into protoporphyrin IX. In higher plants, the ferrochelatase enzyme is localized not only in mitochondria, but also in chloroplasts. The plastidic type II ferrochelatase contains a C-terminal chlorophyll a/b (CAB motif, a conserved hydrophobic stretch homologous to the CAB domain of plant light harvesting proteins and light-harvesting like proteins. This type II ferrochelatase, found in all photosynthetic organisms, is presumed to have evolved from the cyanobacterial ferrochelatase. Here we describe a detailed enzymological study on recombinant, refolded and functionally active type II ferrochelatase (FeCh from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. A protocol was developed for the functional refolding and purification of the recombinant enzyme from inclusion bodies, without truncation products or soluble aggregates. The refolded FeCh is active in its monomeric form, however, addition of an N-terminal His(6-tag has significant effects on its enzyme kinetics. Strikingly, removal of the C-terminal CAB-domain led to a greatly increased turnover number, k(cat, compared to the full length protein. While pigments isolated from photosynthetic membranes decrease the activity of FeCh, direct pigment binding to the CAB domain of FeCh was not evident.

  10. Refolding and enzyme kinetic studies on the ferrochelatase of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Patrik; Tibiletti, Tania; Hall, Michael; Funk, Christiane

    2013-01-01

    Heme is a cofactor for proteins participating in many important cellular processes, including respiration, oxygen metabolism and oxygen binding. The key enzyme in the heme biosynthesis pathway is ferrochelatase (protohaem ferrolyase, EC 4.99.1.1), which catalyzes the insertion of ferrous iron into protoporphyrin IX. In higher plants, the ferrochelatase enzyme is localized not only in mitochondria, but also in chloroplasts. The plastidic type II ferrochelatase contains a C-terminal chlorophyll a/b (CAB) motif, a conserved hydrophobic stretch homologous to the CAB domain of plant light harvesting proteins and light-harvesting like proteins. This type II ferrochelatase, found in all photosynthetic organisms, is presumed to have evolved from the cyanobacterial ferrochelatase. Here we describe a detailed enzymological study on recombinant, refolded and functionally active type II ferrochelatase (FeCh) from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. A protocol was developed for the functional refolding and purification of the recombinant enzyme from inclusion bodies, without truncation products or soluble aggregates. The refolded FeCh is active in its monomeric form, however, addition of an N-terminal His(6)-tag has significant effects on its enzyme kinetics. Strikingly, removal of the C-terminal CAB-domain led to a greatly increased turnover number, k(cat), compared to the full length protein. While pigments isolated from photosynthetic membranes decrease the activity of FeCh, direct pigment binding to the CAB domain of FeCh was not evident.

  11. Effect of growth conditions on the hydrogen production with cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain CH3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Pei-Chung [Institute of Clinical Nutrition, Hungkuang University, 34, Chung-Chie Road, Sha Lu, Taichung 433 (China); Fan, Shin-Huei; Chiang, Char-Lin; Lee, Chi-Mei [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250, Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 402 (China)

    2008-03-15

    Cyanobacteria could use sugars as carbon source and reductant to produce hydrogen by nitrogenase. However, oxygen is also produced during photosynthesis and it is an inhibitor of the enzyme nitrogenase. Filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. CH{sub 3} could use sugars as substrate to produce molecular hydrogen anaerobically. The production activity was dependent on growth phases. It was found that the cells at sub-stage of late-log phase had better ability to produce hydrogen than at log phase. In such case, oxygen content was too low to be detected to inhibit hydrogen production. Among different kinds of sugar, fructose and glucose had the best performance for producing hydrogen. Hydrogen could be accumulated to 0.6 mmol (in 40 ml head space) in 100 h from 1000 ppm fructose. Increasing light intensities from 65 to 130{mu}molm{sup -2}s{sup -1} would enhance hydrogen production to 0.8 mmol. Under illumination of 130{mu}molm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and 2000 ppm fructose, 1.7 mmol of hydrogen could be accumulated. When fructose content was higher than 2000 ppm, cells could not produce more hydrogen at all. (author)

  12. Functional Diversity of Transcriptional Regulators in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Mengliang; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Pei, Guangsheng; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Weiwen

    2017-01-01

    Functions of transcriptional regulators (TRs) are still poorly understood in the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. To address the issue, we constructed knockout mutants for 32 putative TR-encoding genes of Synechocystis, and comparatively analyzed their phenotypes under autotrophic growth condition and metabolic profiles using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolomics. The results showed that only four mutants of TR genes, sll1872 (lytR), slr0741 (phoU), slr0395 (ntcB), and slr1871 (pirR), showed differential growth patterns in BG11 medium when compared with the wild type; however, in spite of no growth difference observed for the remaining TR mutants, metabolomic profiling showed that they were different at the metabolite level, suggesting significant functional diversity of TRs in Synechocystis. In addition, an integrative metabolomic and gene families’ analysis of all TR mutants led to the identification of five pairs of TR genes that each shared close relationship in both gene families and metabolomic clustering trees, suggesting possible conserved functions of these TRs during evolution. Moreover, more than a dozen pairs of TR genes with different origin and evolution were found with similar metabolomic profiles, suggesting a possible functional convergence of the TRs during genome evolution. Finally, a protein–protein network analysis was performed to predict regulatory targets of TRs, allowing inference of possible regulatory gene targets for 4 out of five pairs of TRs. This study provided new insights into the regulatory functions and evolution of TR genes in Synechocystis. PMID:28270809

  13. Fur-type transcriptional repressors and metal homeostasis in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus eLudwig

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metal homeostasis is a crucial cellular function for nearly all organisms. Some heavy metals (e.g. Fe, Zn, Co, Mo are essential because they serve as cofactors for enzymes or metalloproteins, and chlorophototrophs such as cyanobacteria have an especially high demand for iron. At excessive levels, however, metals become toxic to cyanobacteria. Therefore, a tight control mechanism is essential for metal homeostasis. Metal homeostasis in microorganisms comprises two elements: metal acquisition from the environment and detoxification or excretion of excess metal ions. Different families of metal-sensing regulators exist in cyanobacteria and each addresses a more or less specific set of target genes. In this study the regulons of three Fur-type and two ArsR-SmtB-type regulators were investigated in a comparative approach in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. One Fur-type regulator controls genes for iron acquisition (Fur; one controls genes for zinc acquisition (Zur; and the third controls two genes involved in oxidative stress (Per. Compared to other well-investigated cyanobacterial strains, however, the set of target genes for each regulator is relatively small. Target genes for the two ArsR-SmtB transcriptional repressors (SmtB (SYNPCC7002_A2564 and SYNPCC7002_A0590; ArsR are involved in zinc homeostasis in addition to Zur. Their target genes, however, are less specific for zinc and point to roles in a broader heavy metal detoxification response.

  14. Interplay between gold nanoparticle biosynthesis and metabolic activity of cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focsan, Monica; Ardelean, Ioan I.; Craciun, Constantin; Astilean, Simion

    2011-12-01

    Many microorganisms have long been known to be able to synthesize nanoparticles either in extracellular media or inside cells but the biochemical mechanisms involved in biomineralization are still poorly understood. In this paper we report the intracellular synthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) by the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 exposed to an aqueous solution of chloroauric acid. We assess the interplay between the biomineralization process and the metabolic activities (i.e. photosynthesis and respiration) of cyanobacteria cells by correlating the GNP synthesis yield with the amount of respiratory and photosynthetic oxygen exchange. The biogenic GNPs are compared in terms of their internalization and biological effects to GNPs synthesized by a standard citrate reduction procedure (cGNPs). The TEM analysis, in conjunction with spectroscopic measurements (i.e. surface plasmon resonance, fluorescence quenching and surface-enhanced Raman scattering, SERS), reveals the localization of biogenic GNPs at the level of intracytoplasmic membranes whereas the pre-formed cGNPs are located at the level of external cellular membrane. Our findings have implications for better understanding the process of biomineralization and assessing the potential risks associated with the accumulation of nanomaterials by various biological systems.

  15. Regulation of the scp Genes in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803--What is New?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheregi, Otilia; Funk, Christiane

    2015-08-12

    In the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 there are five genes encoding small CAB-like (SCP) proteins, which have been shown to be up-regulated under stress. Analyses of the promoter sequences of the scp genes revealed the existence of an NtcA binding motif in two scp genes, scpB and scpE. Binding of NtcA, the key transcriptional regulator during nitrogen stress, to the promoter regions was shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The metabolite 2-oxoglutarate did not increase the affinity of NtcA for binding to the promoters of scpB and scpE. A second motif, the HIP1 palindrome 5' GGCGATCGCC 3', was detected in the upstream regions of scpB and scpC. The transcription factor encoded by sll1130 has been suggested to recognize this motif to regulate heat-responsive genes. Our data suggest that HIP1 is not a regulatory element within the scp genes. Further, the presence of the high light regulatory (HLR1) motif was confirmed in scpB-E, in accordance to their induced transcriptions in cells exposed to high light. The HLR1 motif was newly discovered in eight additional genes.

  16. Refolding and Enzyme Kinetic Studies on the Ferrochelatase of the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Patrik; Tibiletti, Tania; Hall, Michael; Funk, Christiane

    2013-01-01

    Heme is a cofactor for proteins participating in many important cellular processes, including respiration, oxygen metabolism and oxygen binding. The key enzyme in the heme biosynthesis pathway is ferrochelatase (protohaem ferrolyase, EC 4.99.1.1), which catalyzes the insertion of ferrous iron into protoporphyrin IX. In higher plants, the ferrochelatase enzyme is localized not only in mitochondria, but also in chloroplasts. The plastidic type II ferrochelatase contains a C-terminal chlorophyll a/b (CAB) motif, a conserved hydrophobic stretch homologous to the CAB domain of plant light harvesting proteins and light-harvesting like proteins. This type II ferrochelatase, found in all photosynthetic organisms, is presumed to have evolved from the cyanobacterial ferrochelatase. Here we describe a detailed enzymological study on recombinant, refolded and functionally active type II ferrochelatase (FeCh) from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. A protocol was developed for the functional refolding and purification of the recombinant enzyme from inclusion bodies, without truncation products or soluble aggregates. The refolded FeCh is active in its monomeric form, however, addition of an N-terminal His6-tag has significant effects on its enzyme kinetics. Strikingly, removal of the C-terminal CAB-domain led to a greatly increased turnover number, kcat, compared to the full length protein. While pigments isolated from photosynthetic membranes decrease the activity of FeCh, direct pigment binding to the CAB domain of FeCh was not evident. PMID:23390541

  17. Phosphoproteome of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and its dynamics during nitrogen starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spät, Philipp; Maček, Boris; Forchhammer, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have shaped the earth's biosphere as the first oxygenic photoautotrophs and still play an important role in many ecosystems. The ability to adapt to changing environmental conditions is an essential characteristic in order to ensure survival. To this end, numerous studies have shown that bacteria use protein post-translational modifications such as Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation in cell signaling, adaptation, and regulation. Nevertheless, our knowledge of cyanobacterial phosphoproteomes and their dynamic response to environmental stimuli is relatively limited. In this study, we applied gel-free methods and high accuracy mass spectrometry toward the detection of Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation events in the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. We could identify over 300 phosphorylation events in cultures grown on nitrate as exclusive nitrogen source. Chemical dimethylation labeling was applied to investigate proteome and phosphoproteome dynamics during nitrogen starvation. Our dataset describes the most comprehensive (phospho)proteome of Synechocystis to date, identifying 2382 proteins and 183 phosphorylation events and quantifying 2111 proteins and 148 phosphorylation events during nitrogen starvation. Global protein phosphorylation levels were increased in response to nitrogen depletion after 24 h. Among the proteins with increased phosphorylation, the PII signaling protein showed the highest fold-change, serving as positive control. Other proteins with increased phosphorylation levels comprised functions in photosynthesis and in carbon and nitrogen metabolism. This study reveals dynamics of Synechocystis phosphoproteome in response to environmental stimuli and suggests an important role of protein Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation in fundamental mechanisms of homeostatic control in cyanobacteria.

  18. GABA accumulation in response to different nitrogenous compounds in unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanwal, Simab; Khetkorn, Wanthanee; Incharoensakdi, Aran

    2015-01-01

    GABA accumulation and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity, the principal enzyme involved in GABA formation, was investigated in cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 wild-type (WT) and gad knockout mutant strains grown in medium containing different nitrogenous compounds. Nitrate was the best nitrogen source for GAD activity and GABA accumulation followed by nitrite, ammonium, and urea. An increase in the accumulation of GABA was observed in WT and mutant cells grown for 24 h in medium supplemented with 0.5 mM putrescine or spermidine with a parallel increase in GAD activity. The mutant could not accumulate GABA at all the conditions tested except when supplemented with putrescine or spermidine, where high GABA levels were observed in both WT and mutant strains. Glutamate supplementation up to 10 mM for 24 h resulted in a significant increase in both GAD activity and GABA content. Overall results suggested that optimization of nitrogen source and nitrogenous compounds supplementation was effective for the enhancement of GABA accumulation in Synechocystis.

  19. Nitrate assimilation gene cluster from the heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frías, J E; Flores, E; Herrero, A

    1997-01-01

    A region of the genome of the filamentous, nitrogen-fixing, heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 that contains a cluster of genes involved in nitrate assimilation has been identified. The genes nir, encoding nitrite reductase, and nrtABC, encoding elements of a nitrate permease, have been cloned. Insertion of a gene cassette into the nir-nrtA region impaired expression of narB, the nitrate reductase structural gene which together with nrtD is found downstream from nrtC in the gene cluster. This indicates that the nir-nrtABCD-narB genes are cotranscribed, thus constituting an operon. Expression of the nir operon in strain PCC 7120 is subjected to ammonium-promoted repression and takes place from an NtcA-activated promoter located 460 bp upstream from the start of the nir gene. In the absence of ammonium, cellular levels of the products of the nir operon are higher in the presence of nitrate than in the absence of combined nitrogen.

  20. Changes in photosynthesis and pigmentation in an agp deletion mutant of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xiaoling; Wu, Qingyu; Wu, Guifang; Zhao, Nanming

    2003-03-01

    The agp gene encoding ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase is involved in cyanobacterial glycogen synthesis. By in vitro DNA recombination technology, agp deletion mutant (agp-) of cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was constructed. This mutation led to a complete absence of glycogen biosynthesis. As compared with WT (wild type), a 60% decrease in ratio of the c-phycocyanine/chlorophyll a and no significant change in the carotenoid/chlorophyll a were observed in agp- cells. The agp- mutant had 38% less photosynthetic capacity when grown in light over 600 micromol m(-2) s(-1). Under lower light intensity, the final biomass of the mutant strain was only 1.1 times of that of the WT strain under mixotrophic condition after 6 d culture. Under higher light intensity, however, the final biomass of the WT strain under mixotrophic conditions was 3 times that of the mutant strain after 6 d culture and 1.5 times under photoautotrophic conditions. The results indicate that there is a minimum requirement for glycogen synthesis for normal growth and development in cyanobacteria.

  1. The biosynthetic pathway for myxol-2' fucoside (myxoxanthophyll) in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Joel E; Bryant, Donald A

    2009-05-01

    Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 produces a variety of carotenoids, which comprise predominantly dicylic beta-carotene and two dicyclic xanthophylls, zeaxanthin and synechoxanthin. However, this cyanobacterium also produces a monocyclic myxoxanthophyll, which was identified as myxol-2' fucoside. Compared to the carotenoid glycosides produced by diverse microorganisms, cyanobacterial myxoxanthophyll and closely related compounds are unusual because they are glycosylated on the 2'-OH rather than on the 1'-OH position of the psi end of the molecule. In this study, the genes encoding two enzymes that modify the psi end of myxoxanthophyll in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 were identified. Mutational and biochemical studies showed that open reading frame SynPCC7002_A2032, renamed cruF, encodes a 1',2'-hydroxylase [corrected] and that open reading frame SynPCC7002_A2031, renamed cruG, encodes a 2'-O-glycosyltransferase. The enzymatic activity of CruF was verified by chemical characterization of the carotenoid products synthesized when cruF was expressed in a lycopene-producing strain of Escherichia coli. Database searches showed that homologs of cruF and cruG occur in the genomes of all sequenced cyanobacterial strains that are known to produce myxol or the acylic xanthophyll oscillaxanthin. The genomes of many other bacteria that produce hydroxylated carotenoids but do not contain crtC homologs also contain cruF orthologs. Based upon observable intermediates, a complete biosynthetic pathway for myxoxanthophyll is proposed. This study expands the suite of enzymes available for metabolic engineering of carotenoid biosynthetic pathways for biotechnological applications.

  2. Arsenic Demethylation by a C·As Lyase in Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yu; Ye, Jun; Xue, Xi-Mei; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2015-12-15

    Arsenic, a ubiquitous toxic substance, exists mainly as inorganic forms in the environment. It is perceived that organoarsenicals can be demethylated and degraded into inorganic arsenic by microorganisms. Few studies have focused on the mechanism of arsenic demethylation in bacteria. Here, we investigated arsenic demethylation in a typical freshwater cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120. This bacterium was able to demethylate monomethylarsenite [MAs(III)] rapidly to arsenite [As(III)] and also had the ability to demethylate monomethylarsenate [MAs(V)] to As(III). The NsarsI encoding a C·As lyase responsible for MAs(III) demethylation was cloned from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 and heterologously expressed in an As-hypersensitive strain Escherichia coli AW3110 (ΔarsRBC). Expression of NsarsI was shown to confer MAs(III) resistance through arsenic demethylation. The purified NsArsI was further identified and functionally characterized in vitro. NsArsI existed mainly as the trimeric state, and the kinetic data were well-fit to the Hill equation with K0.5 = 7.55 ± 0.33 μM for MAs(III), Vmax = 0.79 ± 0.02 μM min(-1), and h = 2.7. Both of the NsArsI truncated derivatives lacking the C-terminal 10 residues (ArsI10) or 23 residues (ArsI23) had a reduced ability of MAs(III) demethylation. These results provide new insights for understanding the important role of cyanobacteria in arsenic biogeochemical cycling in the environment.

  3. Radiation characteristics and effective optical properties of dumbbell-shaped cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Ri-Liang; Pilon, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    This study presents experimental measurements of the radiation characteristics of unicellular freshwater cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. during their exponential growth in F medium. Their scattering phase function at 633 nm average spectral absorption and scattering cross-sections between 400 and 750 nm were measured. In addition, an inverse method was used for retrieving the spectral effective complex index of refraction of overlapping or touching bispheres and quadspheres from their absorption and scattering cross-sections. The inverse method combines a genetic algorithm and a forward model based on Lorenz-Mie theory, treating bispheres and quadspheres as projected area and volume-equivalent coated spheres. The inverse method was successfully validated with numerically predicted average absorption and scattering cross-sections of suspensions consisting of bispheres and quadspheres, with realistic size distributions, using the T-matrix method. It was able to retrieve the monomers' complex index of refraction with size parameter up to 11, relative refraction index less than 1.3, and absorption index less than 0.1. Then, the inverse method was applied to retrieve the effective spectral complex index of refraction of Synechocystis sp. approximated as randomly oriented aggregates consisting of two overlapping homogeneous spheres. Both the measured absorption cross-section and the retrieved absorption index featured peaks at 435 and 676 nm corresponding to chlorophyll a, a peak at 625 nm corresponding to phycocyanin, and a shoulder around 485 nm corresponding to carotenoids. These results can be used to optimize and control light transfer in photobioreactors. The inverse method and the equivalent coated sphere model could be applied to other optically soft particles of similar morphologies.

  4. Alkane production by the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. NKBG15041c possessing the α-olefin biosynthesis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Tomoko; Liang, Yue; Arai, Daichi; Maeda, Yoshiaki; Honda, Toru; Muto, Masaki; Kakunaka, Natsumi; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi

    2015-02-01

    The production of alkanes in a marine cyanobacterium possessing the α-olefin biosynthesis pathway was achieved by introducing an exogenous alkane biosynthesis pathway. Cyanobacterial hydrocarbons are synthesized via two separate pathways: the acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase/aldehyde-deformylating oxygenase (AAR/ADO) pathway for the alkane biosynthesis and the α-olefin synthase (OLS) pathway for the α-olefin biosynthesis. Coexistence of these pathways has not yet been reported. In this study, the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. NKBG15041c was shown to produce α-olefins similar to those of Synechococcus sp. PCC7002 via the α-olefin biosynthesis pathway. The production of heptadecane in Synechococcus sp. NKBG15041c was achieved by expressing the AAR/ADO pathway genes from Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. The production yields of heptadecane in Synechococcus sp. NKBG15041c varied with the expression level of the aar and ado genes. The maximal yield of heptadecane was 4.2 ± 1.2 μg/g of dried cell weight in the transformant carrying a homologous promoter. Our results also suggested that the effective activation of ADO may be more important for the enhancement of alkane production by cyanobacteria.

  5. Transfer of diazotroph-derived nitrogen towards non-diazotrophic planktonic communities: a comparative study between Trichodesmium erythraeum, Crocosphaera watsonii and Cyanothece sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Hugo; Bonnet, Sophie; Grosso, Olivier; Cornet, Véronique; Barani, Aude

    2016-07-01

    Biological dinitrogen (N2) fixation is the major source of new nitrogen (N) for the open ocean, and thus promotes marine productivity, in particular in the vast N-depleted regions of the surface ocean. Yet, the fate of the diazotroph-derived N (DDN) in marine ecosystems is poorly understood, and its transfer to auto- and heterotrophic surrounding plankton communities is rarely measured due to technical limitations. Moreover, the different diazotrophs involved in N2 fixation (Trichodesmium spp. vs. UCYN) exhibit distinct patterns of N2 fixation and inhabit different ecological niches, thus having potentially different fates in the marine food webs that remain to be explored. Here we used nanometer scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (nanoSIMS) coupled with 15N2 isotopic labelling and flow cytometry cell sorting to examine the DDN transfer to specific groups of natural phytoplankton and bacteria during artificially induced diazotroph blooms in New Caledonia (southwestern Pacific). The fate of the DDN was compared according to the three diazotrophs: the filamentous and colony-forming Trichodesmium erythraeum (IMS101), and the unicellular strains Crocosphaera watsonii WH8501 and Cyanothece ATCC51142. After 48 h, 7-17 % of the N2 fixed during the experiment was transferred to the dissolved pool and 6-12 % was transferred to non-diazotrophic plankton. The transfer was twice as high in the T. erythraeum bloom than in the C. watsonii and Cyanothece blooms, which shows that filamentous diazotrophs blooms are more efficient at promoting non-diazotrophic production in N-depleted areas. The amount of DDN released in the dissolved pool did not appear to be a good indicator of the DDN transfer efficiency towards the non-diazotrophic plankton. In contrast, the 15N-enrichment of the extracellular ammonium (NH4+) pool was a good indicator of the DDN transfer efficiency: it was significantly higher in the T. erythraeum than in unicellular diazotroph blooms, leading to a DDN

  6. Viruses Infecting a Freshwater Filamentous Cyanobacterium (Nostoc sp. Encode a Functional CRISPR Array and a Proteobacterial DNA Polymerase B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Chénard

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Here we present the first genomic characterization of viruses infecting Nostoc, a genus of ecologically important cyanobacteria that are widespread in freshwater. Cyanophages A-1 and N-1 were isolated in the 1970s and infect Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7210 but remained genomically uncharacterized. Their 68,304- and 64,960-bp genomes are strikingly different from those of other sequenced cyanophages. Many putative genes that code for proteins with known functions are similar to those found in filamentous cyanobacteria, showing a long evolutionary history in their host. Cyanophage N-1 encodes a CRISPR array that is transcribed during infection and is similar to the DR5 family of CRISPRs commonly found in cyanobacteria. The presence of a host-related CRISPR array in a cyanophage suggests that the phage can transfer the CRISPR among related cyanobacteria and thereby provide resistance to infection with competing phages. Both viruses also encode a distinct DNA polymerase B that is closely related to those found in plasmids of Cyanothece sp. strain PCC 7424, Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120, and Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413. These polymerases form a distinct evolutionary group that is more closely related to DNA polymerases of proteobacteria than to those of other viruses. This suggests that the polymerase was acquired from a proteobacterium by an ancestral virus and transferred to the cyanobacterial plasmid. Many other open reading frames are similar to a prophage-like element in the genome of Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7524. The Nostoc cyanophages reveal a history of gene transfers between filamentous cyanobacteria and their viruses that have helped to forge the evolutionary trajectory of this previously unrecognized group of phages.

  7. Viruses Infecting a Freshwater Filamentous Cyanobacterium (Nostoc sp.) Encode a Functional CRISPR Array and a Proteobacterial DNA Polymerase B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chénard, Caroline; Wirth, Jennifer F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Here we present the first genomic characterization of viruses infecting Nostoc, a genus of ecologically important cyanobacteria that are widespread in freshwater. Cyanophages A-1 and N-1 were isolated in the 1970s and infect Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7210 but remained genomically uncharacterized. Their 68,304- and 64,960-bp genomes are strikingly different from those of other sequenced cyanophages. Many putative genes that code for proteins with known functions are similar to those found in filamentous cyanobacteria, showing a long evolutionary history in their host. Cyanophage N-1 encodes a CRISPR array that is transcribed during infection and is similar to the DR5 family of CRISPRs commonly found in cyanobacteria. The presence of a host-related CRISPR array in a cyanophage suggests that the phage can transfer the CRISPR among related cyanobacteria and thereby provide resistance to infection with competing phages. Both viruses also encode a distinct DNA polymerase B that is closely related to those found in plasmids of Cyanothece sp. strain PCC 7424, Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120, and Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413. These polymerases form a distinct evolutionary group that is more closely related to DNA polymerases of proteobacteria than to those of other viruses. This suggests that the polymerase was acquired from a proteobacterium by an ancestral virus and transferred to the cyanobacterial plasmid. Many other open reading frames are similar to a prophage-like element in the genome of Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7524. The Nostoc cyanophages reveal a history of gene transfers between filamentous cyanobacteria and their viruses that have helped to forge the evolutionary trajectory of this previously unrecognized group of phages. PMID:27302758

  8. Phosphoproteome of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and its dynamics during nitrogen starvation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp eSpät

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria have shaped the earth’s biosphere as the first oxygenic photoautotrophs and still play an important role in many ecosystems. The ability to adapt to changing environmental conditions is an essential characteristic in order to ensure survival. To this end, numerous studies have shown that bacteria use protein post-translational modifications such as Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation in cell signalling, adaptation and regulation. Nevertheless, our knowledge of cyanobacterial phosphoproteomes and their dynamic response to environmental stimuli is relatively limited. In this study, we applied gel-free methods and high accuracy mass spectrometry towards the unbiased detection of Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation events in the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. We could identify over 300 phosphorylation events in cultures grown on nitrate as exclusive nitrogen source. Chemical dimethylation labelling was applied to investigate proteome and phosphoproteome dynamics during nitrogen starvation. Our dataset describes the most comprehensive (phosphoproteome of Synechocystis to date, identifying 2,382 proteins and 183 phosphorylation events and quantifying 2,111 proteins and 148 phosphorylation events during nitrogen starvation. Global protein phosphorylation levels were increased in response to nitrogen depletion after 24 hours. Among the proteins with increased phosphorylation, the PII signalling protein showed the highest fold-change, serving as positive control. Other proteins with increased phosphorylation levels comprised functions in photosynthesis and in carbon and nitrogen metabolism. This study reveals dynamics of Synechocystis phosphoproteome in response to environmental stimuli and suggests an important role of protein Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation in fundamental mechanisms of homeostatic control in cyanobacteria.

  9. Global transcriptional profiles of the copper responses in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

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    Joaquin Giner-Lamia

    Full Text Available Copper is an essential element involved in fundamental processes like respiration and photosynthesis. However, it becomes toxic at high concentration, which has forced organisms to control its cellular concentration. We have recently described a copper resistance system in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, which is mediated by the two-component system, CopRS, a RND metal transport system, CopBAC and a protein of unknown function, CopM. Here, we report the transcriptional responses to copper additions at non-toxic (0.3 µM and toxic concentrations (3 µM in the wild type and in the copper sensitive copR mutant strain. While 0.3 µM copper slightly stimulated metabolism and promoted the exchange between cytochrome c6 and plastocyanin as soluble electron carriers, the addition of 3 µM copper catalyzed the formation of ROS, led to a general stress response and induced expression of Fe-S cluster biogenesis genes. According to this, a double mutant strain copRsufR, which expresses constitutively the sufBCDS operon, tolerated higher copper concentration than the copR mutant strain, suggesting that Fe-S clusters are direct targets of copper toxicity in Synechocystis. In addition we have also demonstrated that InrS, a nickel binding transcriptional repressor that belong to the CsoR family of transcriptional factor, was involved in heavy metal homeostasis, including copper, in Synechocystis. Finally, global gene expression analysis of the copR mutant strain suggested that CopRS only controls the expression of copMRS and copBAC operons in response to copper.

  10. Efficient Gene Induction and Endogenous Gene Repression Systems for the Filamentous Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higo, Akiyoshi; Isu, Atsuko; Fukaya, Yuki; Hisabori, Toru

    2016-02-01

    In the last decade, many studies have been conducted to employ genetically engineered cyanobacteria in the production of various metabolites. However, the lack of a strict gene regulation system in cyanobacteria has hampered these attempts. The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 performs both nitrogen and carbon fixation and is, therefore, a good candidate organism for such production. To employ Anabaena cells for this purpose, we intended to develop artificial gene regulation systems to alter the cell metabolic pathways efficiently. We introduced into Anabaena a transcriptional repressor TetR, widely used in diverse organisms, and green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter. We found that anhydrotetracycline (aTc) substantially induced GFP fluorescence in a concentration-dependent manner. By expressing tetR under the nitrate-specific promoter nirA, we successfully reduced the concentration of aTc required for the induction of gfp under nitrogen fixation conditions (to 10% of the concentration needed under nitrate-replete conditions). Further, we succeeded in the overexpression of GFP by depletion of nitrate without the inducer by means of promoter engineering of the nirA promoter. Moreover, we applied these gene regulation systems to a metabolic enzyme in Anabaena and successfully repressed glnA, the gene encoding glutamine synthetase that is essential for nitrogen assimilation in cyanobacteria, by expressing the small antisense RNA for glnA. Consequently, the ammonium production of an ammonium-excreting Anabaena mutant was significantly enhanced. We therefore conclude that the gene regulation systems developed in this study are useful tools for the regulation of metabolic enzymes and will help to increase the production of desired substances in Anabaena.

  11. Oxidative stress and photoinhibition can be separated in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkila, Kaisa; Antal, Taras; Rehman, Ateeq Ur; Kurkela, Juha; Wada, Hajime; Vass, Imre; Tyystjärvi, Esa; Tyystjärvi, Taina

    2014-02-01

    Roles of oxidative stress and photoinhibition in high light acclimation were studied using a regulatory mutant of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The mutant strain ΔsigCDE contains the stress responsive SigB as the only functional group 2 σ factor. The ∆sigCDE strain grew more slowly than the control strain in methyl-viologen-induced oxidative stress. Furthermore, a fluorescence dye detecting H2O2, hydroxyl and peroxyl radicals and peroxynitrite, produced a stronger signal in ∆sigCDE than in the control strain, and immunological detection of carbonylated residues showed more protein oxidation in ∆sigCDE than in the control strain. These results indicate that ∆sigCDE suffers from oxidative stress in standard conditions. The oxidative stress may be explained by the findings that ∆sigCDE had a low content of glutathione and low amount of Flv3 protein functioning in the Mehler-like reaction. Although ∆sigCDE suffers from oxidative stress, up-regulation of photoprotective carotenoids and Flv4, Sll2018, Flv2 proteins protected PSII against light induced damage by quenching singlet oxygen more efficiently in ∆sigCDE than in the control strain in visible and in UV-A/B light. However, in UV-C light singlet oxygen is not produced and PSII damage occurred similarly in the ∆sigCDE and control strains. According to our results, resistance against the light-induced damage of PSII alone does not lead to high light tolerance of the cells, but in addition efficient protection against oxidative stress would be required. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Purification and properties of NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase from the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muro-Pastor, M I; Florencio, F J

    1992-01-15

    NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity has been screened in several cyanobacteria grown on different nitrogen sources; in all the strains tested isocitrate dehydrogenase activity levels were similar in cells grown either on ammonium or nitrate. The enzyme from the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by a procedure that includes Reactive-Red-120-agarose affinity chromatography and phenyl-Sepharose chromatography as main steps. The enzyme was purified about 600-fold, with a yield of 38% and a specific activity of 15.7 U/mg protein. The native enzyme (108 kDa) is composed of two identical subunits with an apparent molecular mass of 57 kDa. Synechocystis isocitrate dehydrogenase was absolutely specific for NADP as electron acceptor. Apparent Km values were 125, 59 and 12 microM for Mg2+, D,L-isocitrate and NADP, respectively, using Mg2+ as divalent cation and 4, 5.7 and 6 microM for Mn2+, D,L-isocitrate and NADP, respectively, using Mn2+ as a cofactor. The enzyme was inhibited non-competitively by ADP (Ki, 6.4 mM) and 2-oxoglutarate, (Ki, 6 mM) with respect to isocitrate and in a competitive manner by NADPH (Ki, 0.6 mM). The circular-dichroism spectrum showed a protein with a secondary structure consisting of about 30% alpha-helix and 36% beta-pleated sheet. The enzyme is an acidic protein with an isoelectric point of 4.4 and analysis of the NH2-terminal sequence revealed 45% identity with the same region of Escherichia coli isocitrate dehydrogenase. The aforementioned data indicate that NADP isocitrate dehydrogenase from Synechocystis resembles isocitrate dehydrogenase from prokaryotes and shows similar molecular and structural properties to the well-known E. coli enzyme.

  13. Posttranslational regulation of nitrate assimilation in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Takatani, Nobuyuki; Tanigawa, Mari; Omata, Tatsuo

    2005-01-01

    Posttranslational regulation of nitrate assimilation was studied in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. The ABC-type nitrate and nitrite bispecific transporter encoded by the nrtABCD genes was completely inhibited by ammonium as in Synechococcus elongatus strain PCC 7942. Nitrate reductase was insensitive to ammonium, while it is inhibited in the Synechococcus strain. Nitrite reductase was also insensitive to ammonium. The inhibition of nitrate and nitrite transport required the PII protein (glnB gene product) and the C-terminal domain of NrtC, one of the two ATP-binding subunits of the transporter, as in the Synechococcus strain. Mutants expressing the PII derivatives in which Ala or Glu is substituted for the conserved Ser49, which has been shown to be the phosphorylation site in the Synechococcus strain, showed ammonium-promoted inhibition of nitrate uptake like that of the wild-type strain. The S49A and S49E substitutions in GlnB did not affect the regulation of the nitrate and nitrite transporter in Synechococcus either. These results indicated that the presence or absence of negative electric charge at the 49th position does not affect the activity of the PII protein to regulate the cyanobacterial ABC-type nitrate and nitrite transporter according to the cellular nitrogen status. This finding suggested that the permanent inhibition of nitrate assimilation by an S49A derivative of PII, as was previously reported for Synechococcus elongatus strain PCC 7942, is likely to have resulted from inhibition of nitrate reductase rather than the nitrate and nitrite transporter.

  14. Characterization of three putative xylulose 5-phosphate/fructose 6-phosphate phosphoketolases in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Takashi; Tajima, Naoyuki; Sekine, Kohsuke; Sato, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Xylulose 5-phosphate/fructose 6-phosphate phosphoketolase (Xfp) is a key enzyme in the central carbohydrate metabolism in heterofermentative bacteria, in which enzymatic property of Xfps is well characterized. This is not the case in other microbes. The cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 possesses three putative genes encoding Xfp, all1483, all2567, and alr1850. We purified three putative Xfps as recombinant proteins. The results of gel filtration indicated that these proteins form homomultimer complex. All1483 and All2567 showed phosphoketolase activity, whereas Alr1850 did not show the activity. Kinetic analyses demonstrated that substrates, fructose 6-phosphate and inorganic phosphate, are cooperatively bound to enzymes positively and negatively, respectively.

  15. Discovery of Rare and Highly Toxic Microcystins from Lichen-Associated Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. Strain IO-102-I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksanen, Ilona; Jokela, Jouni; Fewer, David P.; Wahlsten, Matti; Rikkinen, Jouko; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2004-01-01

    The production of hepatotoxic cyclic heptapeptides, microcystins, is almost exclusively reported from planktonic cyanobacteria. Here we show that a terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I isolated from a lichen association produces six different microcystins. Microcystins were identified with liquid chromatography-UV mass spectrometry by their retention times, UV spectra, mass fragmentation, and comparison to microcystins from the aquatic Nostoc sp. strain 152. The dominant microcystin produced by Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I was the highly toxic [ADMAdda5]microcystin-LR, which accounted for ca. 80% of the total microcystins. We assigned a structure of [DMAdda5]microcystin-LR and [d-Asp3,ADMAdda5]microcystin-LR and a partial structure of three new [ADMAdda5]-XR type of microcystin variants. Interestingly, Nostoc spp. strains IO-102-I and 152 synthesized only the rare ADMAdda and DMAdda subfamilies of microcystin variants. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated congruence between genes involved directly in microcystin biosynthesis and the 16S rRNA and rpoC1 genes of Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I. Nostoc sp. strain 152 and the Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I are distantly related, revealing a sporadic distribution of toxin production in the genus Nostoc. Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I is closely related to Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 and other symbiotic Nostoc strains and most likely belongs to this species. Together, this suggests that other terrestrial and aquatic strains of the genus Nostoc may have retained the genes necessary for microcystin biosynthesis. PMID:15466511

  16. Localization of Membrane Proteins in the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 (Radial Asymmetry in the Photosynthetic Complexes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, D. M.; Troyan, T. A.; Sherman, L. A.

    1994-09-01

    Localization of membrane proteins in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 was determined by transmission electron microscopy utilizing immunocytochemistry with cells prepared by freeze-substitution. This preparation procedure maintained cellular morphology and permitted detection of cellular antigens with high sensitivity and low background. Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 is a unicellular cyanobacterium with thylakoids organized in concentric layers toward the periphery of the cell. Cytochrome oxidase was localized almost entirely in the cytoplasmic membrane, whereas a carotenoprotein (P35) was shown to be a cell wall component. The major photosystem II (PSII) proteins (D1, D2 CP43, and CP47) were localized throughout the thylakoids. Proteins of the Cyt b6/f complex were found to have a similar distribution. Thylakoid luminal proteins, such as the Mn-stabilizing protein, were located primarily in the thylakoid, but a small, reproducible fraction was found in the outer compartment. The photosystem I (PSI) reaction center proteins and the ATP synthase proteins were found associated mostly with the outermost thylakoid and with the cytoplasmic membrane. These results indicated that the photosynthetic apparatus is not evenly distributed throughout the thylakoids. Rather, there is a radial asymmetry such that much of the PSI and the ATPase synthase is located in the outermost thylakoid. The relationship of this structure to the photosynthetic mechanism is discussed. It is suggested that the photosystems are separated because of kinetic differences between PSII and PSI, as hypothesized by H.-W. Trissl and C. Wilhelm (Trends Biochem Sci [1993] 18:415-419).

  17. Novel Insights into the Regulation of LexA in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Paulo; Lindblad, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor LexA in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 has been shown to regulate genes that are not directly involved in DNA repair but instead in several different metabolic pathways. However, the signal transduction pathways remain largely uncharacterized. The present work gives novel insights into the regulation of LexA in this unicellular cyanobacterium. A combination of Northern and Western blotting, using specific antibodies against the cyanobacterial LexA, was employed to show that this transcription regulator is under posttranscriptional control, in addition to the classical and already-described transcriptional regulation. Moreover, detailed two-dimensional (2D) electrophoresis analyses of the protein revealed that LexA undergoes posttranslational modifications. Finally, a fully segregated LexA::GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion-modified strain was produced to image LexA's spatial distribution in live cells. The fusion protein retains DNA binding capabilities, and the GFP fluorescence indicates that LexA is localized in the innermost region of the cytoplasm, decorating the DNA in an evenly distributed pattern. The implications of these findings for the overall role of LexA in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 are further discussed. PMID:21642463

  18. Global transcriptomic analysis of Cyanothece 51142 reveals robust diurnal oscillation of central metabolic processes

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    Stockel, Jana; Welsh, Eric A.; Liberton, Michelle L.; Kunnavakkam, Rangesh V.; Aurora, Rajeev; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2008-04-22

    Cyanobacteria are oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, and the only prokaryotes known to have a circadian cycle. Unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria such as Cyanothece 51142 can fix atmospheric nitrogen, a process exquisitely sensitive to oxygen. Thus, the intracellular environment of Cyanothece oscillates between aerobic and anaerobic conditions during a day-night cycle. This is accomplished by temporal separation of two processes: photosynthesis during the day, and nitrogen fixation at night. While previous studies have examined periodic changes transcript levels for a limited number of genes in Cyanothece and other unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria, a comprehensive study of transcriptional activity in a nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium is necessary to understand the impact of the temporal separation of photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation on global gene regulation and cellular metabolism. We have examined the expression patterns of nearly 5000 genes in Cyanothece 51142 during two consecutive diurnal periods. We found that ~30% of these genes exhibited robust oscillating expression profiles. Interestingly, this set included genes for almost all central metabolic processes in Cyanothece. A transcriptional network of all genes with significantly oscillating transcript levels revealed that the majority of genes in numerous individual pathways, such as glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway and glycogen metabolism, were co-regulated and maximally expressed at distinct phases during the diurnal cycle. Our analyses suggest that the demands of nitrogen fixation greatly influence major metabolic activities inside Cyanothece cells and thus drive various cellular activities. These studies provide a comprehensive picture of how a physiologically relevant diurnal light-dark cycle influences the metabolism in a photosynthetic bacterium

  19. Diurnal Regulation of Cellular Processes in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803: Insights from Transcriptomic, Fluxomic, and Physiological Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajib Saha

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 is the most widely studied model cyanobacterium, with a well-developed omics level knowledgebase. Like the lifestyles of other cyanobacteria, that of Synechocystis PCC 6803 is tuned to diurnal changes in light intensity. In this study, we analyzed the expression patterns of all of the genes of this cyanobacterium over two consecutive diurnal periods. Using stringent criteria, we determined that the transcript levels of nearly 40% of the genes in Synechocystis PCC 6803 show robust diurnal oscillating behavior, with a majority of the transcripts being upregulated during the early light period. Such transcripts corresponded to a wide array of cellular processes, such as light harvesting, photosynthetic light and dark reactions, and central carbon metabolism. In contrast, transcripts of membrane transporters for transition metals involved in the photosynthetic electron transport chain (e.g., iron, manganese, and copper were significantly upregulated during the late dark period. Thus, the pattern of global gene expression led to the development of two distinct transcriptional networks of coregulated oscillatory genes. These networks help describe how Synechocystis PCC 6803 regulates its metabolism toward the end of the dark period in anticipation of efficient photosynthesis during the early light period. Furthermore, in silico flux prediction of important cellular processes and experimental measurements of cellular ATP, NADP(H, and glycogen levels showed how this diurnal behavior influences its metabolic characteristics. In particular, NADPH/NADP+ showed a strong correlation with the majority of the genes whose expression peaks in the light. We conclude that this ratio is a key endogenous determinant of the diurnal behavior of this cyanobacterium.

  20. Viruses Infecting a Freshwater Filamentous Cyanobacterium (Nostoc sp.) Encode a Functional CRISPR Array and a Proteobacterial DNA Polymerase B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chénard, Caroline; Wirth, Jennifer F; Suttle, Curtis A

    2016-06-14

    Here we present the first genomic characterization of viruses infecting Nostoc, a genus of ecologically important cyanobacteria that are widespread in freshwater. Cyanophages A-1 and N-1 were isolated in the 1970s and infect Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7210 but remained genomically uncharacterized. Their 68,304- and 64,960-bp genomes are strikingly different from those of other sequenced cyanophages. Many putative genes that code for proteins with known functions are similar to those found in filamentous cyanobacteria, showing a long evolutionary history in their host. Cyanophage N-1 encodes a CRISPR array that is transcribed during infection and is similar to the DR5 family of CRISPRs commonly found in cyanobacteria. The presence of a host-related CRISPR array in a cyanophage suggests that the phage can transfer the CRISPR among related cyanobacteria and thereby provide resistance to infection with competing phages. Both viruses also encode a distinct DNA polymerase B that is closely related to those found in plasmids of Cyanothece sp. strain PCC 7424, Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120, and Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413. These polymerases form a distinct evolutionary group that is more closely related to DNA polymerases of proteobacteria than to those of other viruses. This suggests that the polymerase was acquired from a proteobacterium by an ancestral virus and transferred to the cyanobacterial plasmid. Many other open reading frames are similar to a prophage-like element in the genome of Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7524. The Nostoc cyanophages reveal a history of gene transfers between filamentous cyanobacteria and their viruses that have helped to forge the evolutionary trajectory of this previously unrecognized group of phages. Filamentous cyanobacteria belonging to the genus Nostoc are widespread and ecologically important in freshwater, yet little is known about the genomic content of their viruses. Here we report the first genomic analysis of cyanophages infecting

  1. Characterization of the coccoid cyanobacterium Myxosarcina sp. KIOST-1 isolated from mangrove forest in Chuuk State, Federated States of Micronesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Hyung; Lee, JunMo; Affan, Md-Abu; Lee, Dae-Won; Kang, Do-Hyung

    2017-05-01

    Mangrove forests are known to be inhabited by diverse symbiotic cyanobacterial communities that are capable of N2 fixation. To investigate its biodiversity, root sediments were collected from a mangrove forest in Chuuk State, Federated States of Micronesia (FSM), and an entangled yellow-brown coccoid cyanobacterium was isolated. The isolated cyanobacterium was reproduced by multiple fission and eventually produced baeocytes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the isolate was most similar to the genera Myxosarcina and Chroococcidiopsis in the order Pleurocapsales. Compositions of protein, lipid and carbohydrate in the cyanobacterial cells were estimated to be 19.4 ± 0.1%, 18.8 ± 0.4% and 31.5 ± 0.1%, respectively. Interestingly, total fatty acids in the isolate were mainly composed of saturated fatty acids and monounsaturated fatty acids, whereas polyunsaturated fatty acids were not detected. Based on the molecular and biochemical characteristics, the isolate was finally classified in the genus Myxosarcina, and designated as Myxosarcina sp. KIOST-1. These results will contribute to better understanding of cyanobacterial biodiversity in the mangrove forest in FSM as well as the genus Myxosarcina, and also will allow further exploitation of its biotechnological potential on the basis of its cellular characteristics.

  2. Diurnal Regulation of Cellular Processes in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803: Insights from Transcriptomic, Fluxomic, and Physiological Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Rajib; Liu, Deng; Hoynes-O'Connor, Allison; Liberton, Michelle; Yu, Jingjie; Bhattacharyya-Pakrasi, Maitrayee; Balassy, Andrea; Zhang, Fuzhong; Moon, Tae Seok; Maranas, Costas D; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2016-05-03

    Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 is the most widely studied model cyanobacterium, with a well-developed omics level knowledgebase. Like the lifestyles of other cyanobacteria, that of Synechocystis PCC 6803 is tuned to diurnal changes in light intensity. In this study, we analyzed the expression patterns of all of the genes of this cyanobacterium over two consecutive diurnal periods. Using stringent criteria, we determined that the transcript levels of nearly 40% of the genes in Synechocystis PCC 6803 show robust diurnal oscillating behavior, with a majority of the transcripts being upregulated during the early light period. Such transcripts corresponded to a wide array of cellular processes, such as light harvesting, photosynthetic light and dark reactions, and central carbon metabolism. In contrast, transcripts of membrane transporters for transition metals involved in the photosynthetic electron transport chain (e.g., iron, manganese, and copper) were significantly upregulated during the late dark period. Thus, the pattern of global gene expression led to the development of two distinct transcriptional networks of coregulated oscillatory genes. These networks help describe how Synechocystis PCC 6803 regulates its metabolism toward the end of the dark period in anticipation of efficient photosynthesis during the early light period. Furthermore, in silico flux prediction of important cellular processes and experimental measurements of cellular ATP, NADP(H), and glycogen levels showed how this diurnal behavior influences its metabolic characteristics. In particular, NADPH/NADP(+) showed a strong correlation with the majority of the genes whose expression peaks in the light. We conclude that this ratio is a key endogenous determinant of the diurnal behavior of this cyanobacterium. Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic microbes that use energy from sunlight and CO2 as feedstock. Certain cyanobacterial strains are amenable to facile genetic manipulation, thus enabling

  3. Stigonemapeptin, an Ahp-containing depsipeptide with elastase inhibitory activity from the bloom-forming freshwater cyanobacterium Stigonema sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hahk-Soo; Krunic, Aleksej; Orjala, Jimmy

    2012-04-27

    Stigonemapeptin (1), a depsipeptide containing an Ahp (3-amino-6-hydroxy-2-piperidone) residue, was isolated from a bloom sample of the freshwater cyanobacterium Stigonema sp. collected from North Nokomis Lake in the Highland Lake District of northern Wisconsin. The planar structure was determined by 1D and 2D NMR experiments as well as HRESIMS analysis. The absolute configurations of the amino acids were determined using the advanced Marfey's method after acid hydrolysis. Stigonemapeptin (1), characterized by the presence of the Ahp residue, also contained the modified amino acids Abu (2-amino-2-butenoic acid) and N-formylated Pro. Stigonemapeptin (1) showed in vitro elastase and chymotrypsin inhibitory activity, with IC(50) values of 0.26 and 2.93 μM, respectively.

  4. Requirement of Fra proteins for communication channels between cells in the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omairi-Nasser, Amin; Mariscal, Vicente; Austin, Jotham R; Haselkorn, Robert

    2015-08-11

    The filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 differentiates specialized cells, heterocysts, that fix atmospheric nitrogen and transfer the fixed nitrogen to adjacent vegetative cells. Reciprocally, vegetative cells transfer fixed carbon to heterocysts. Several routes have been described for metabolite exchange within the filament, one of which involves communicating channels that penetrate the septum between adjacent cells. Several fra gene mutants were isolated 25 y ago on the basis of their phenotypes: inability to fix nitrogen and fragmentation of filaments upon transfer from N+ to N- media. Cryopreservation combined with electron tomography were used to investigate the role of three fra gene products in channel formation. FraC and FraG are clearly involved in channel formation, whereas FraD has a minor part. Additionally, FraG was located close to the cytoplasmic membrane and in the heterocyst neck, using immunogold labeling with antibody raised to the N-terminal domain of the FraG protein.

  5. PilB localization correlates with the direction of twitching motility in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuergers, Nils; Nürnberg, Dennis J; Wallner, Thomas; Mullineaux, Conrad W; Wilde, Annegret

    2015-05-01

    Twitching motility depends on the adhesion of type IV pili (T4P) to a substrate, with cell movement driven by extension and retraction of the pili. The mechanism of twitching motility, and the events that lead to a reversal of direction, are best understood in rod-shaped bacteria such as Myxococcus xanthus. In M. xanthus, the direction of movement depends on the unipolar localization of the pilus extension and retraction motors PilB and PilT to opposite cell poles. Reversal of direction results from relocalization of PilB and PilT. Some cyanobacteria utilize twitching motility for phototaxis. Here, we examine twitching motility in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, which has a spherical cell shape without obvious polarity. We use a motile Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 strain expressing a functional GFP-tagged PilB1 protein to show that PilB1 tends to localize in 'crescents' adjacent to a specific region of the cytoplasmic membrane. Crescents are more prevalent under the low-light conditions that favour phototactic motility, and the direction of motility strongly correlates with the orientation of the crescent. We conclude that the direction of twitching motility in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is controlled by the localization of the T4P apparatus, as it is in M. xanthus. The PilB1 crescents in the spherical cells of Synechocystis can be regarded as being equivalent to the leading pole in the rod-shaped cells. © 2015 The Authors.

  6. Inactivation of the Deg protease family in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has impact on the outer cell layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheregi, Otilia; Miranda, Hélder; Gröbner, Gerhard; Funk, Christiane

    2015-11-01

    The serine type Deg/HtrA proteases are distributed in a wide range of organisms from Escherichia coli to humans. The cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 possesses three Deg protease orthologues: HtrA, HhoA and HhoB. Previously we compared Synechocystis 6803 wild type cells exposed to mild or severe stress conditions with a mutant lacking all three Deg proteases and demonstrated that stress had strong impact on the proteomes and metabolomes. To identify the biochemical processes, which this protease family is involved in, here we compared Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 wild type cells with a mutant lacking all three Deg proteases grown under normal growth conditions (30°C and 40 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)). Deletion of the Deg proteases lead to the down-regulation of proteins related to the biosynthesis of outer cell layers (e.g. the GDP mannose 4,6-dehydratase) and affected protein secretion. During the late growth phase of the culture Deg proteases were found to be secreted to the extracellular medium of the Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 wild type strain. While cyanobacterial Deg proteases seem to act mainly in the periplasmic space, deletion of the three proteases influences the proteome and metabolome of the whole cell. Impairments in the outer cell layers of the triple mutant might explain the higher sensitivity toward light and oxidative stress, which was observed earlier by Barker and coworkers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Construction of new synthetic biology tools for the control of gene expression in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zess, Erin K; Begemann, Matthew B; Pfleger, Brian F

    2016-02-01

    Predictive control of gene expression is an essential tool for developing synthetic biological systems. The current toolbox for controlling gene expression in cyanobacteria is a barrier to more in-depth genetic analysis and manipulation. Towards relieving this bottleneck, this work describes the use of synthetic biology to construct an anhydrotetracycline-based induction system and adapt a trans-acting small RNA (sRNA) system for use in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. An anhydrotetracycline-inducible promoter was developed to maximize intrinsic strength and dynamic range. The resulting construct, PEZtet , exhibited tight repression and a maximum 32-fold induction upon addition of anhydrotetracycline. Additionally, a sRNA system based on the Escherichia coli IS10 RNA-IN/OUT regulator was adapted for use in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. This system exhibited 70% attenuation of target gene expression, providing a demonstration of the use of sRNAs for differential gene expression in cyanobacteria. These systems were combined to produce an inducible sRNA system, which demonstrated 59% attenuation of target gene expression. Lastly, the role of Hfq, a critical component of sRNA systems in E. coli, was investigated. Genetic studies showed that the Hfq homolog in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 did not impact repression by the engineered sRNA system. In summary, this work describes new synthetic biology tools that can be applied to physiological studies, metabolic engineering, or sRNA platforms in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A Comprehensively Curated Genome-Scale Two-Cell Model for the Heterocystous Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malatinszky, David; Steuer, Ralf; Jones, Patrik R

    2017-01-01

    Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 is a nitrogen-fixing filamentous cyanobacterium. Under nitrogen-limiting conditions, a fraction of the vegetative cells in each filament terminally differentiate to nongrowing heterocysts. Heterocysts are metabolically and structurally specialized to enable O2-sensitive nitrogen fixation. The functionality of the filament, as an association of vegetative cells and heterocysts, is postulated to depend on metabolic exchange of electrons, carbon, and fixed nitrogen. In this study, we compile and evaluate a comprehensive curated stoichiometric model of this two-cell system, with the objective function based on the growth of the filament under diazotrophic conditions. The predicted growth rate under nitrogen-replete and -deplete conditions, as well as the effect of external carbon and nitrogen sources, was thereafter verified. Furthermore, the model was utilized to comprehensively evaluate the optimality of putative metabolic exchange reactions between heterocysts and vegetative cells. The model suggested that optimal growth requires at least four exchange metabolites. Several combinations of exchange metabolites resulted in predicted growth rates that are higher than growth rates achieved by only considering exchange of metabolites previously suggested in the literature. The curated model of the metabolic network of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 enhances our ability to understand the metabolic organization of multicellular cyanobacteria and provides a platform for further study and engineering of their metabolism.

  9. Posttranscriptional regulation of glutamine synthetase in the filamentous Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120: differential expression between vegetative cells and heterocysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galmozzi, Carla V; Saelices, Lorena; Florencio, Francisco J; Muro-Pastor, M Isabel

    2010-09-01

    Genes homologous to those implicated in glutamine synthetase (GS) regulation by protein-protein interaction in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 are conserved in several cyanobacterial sequenced genomes. We investigated this GS regulatory mechanism in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. In this strain the system operates with only one GS inactivation factor (inactivation factor 7A [IF7A]), encoded by open reading frame (ORF) asl2329 (gifA). Following addition of ammonium, expression of gifA is derepressed, leading to the synthesis of IF7A, and consequently, GS is inactivated. Upon ammonium removal, the GS activity returns to the initial level and IF7A becomes undetectable. The global nitrogen control protein NtcA binds to the gifA promoter. Constitutive high expression levels of gifA were found in an Anabaena ntcA mutant (CSE2), indicating a repressor role for NtcA. In vitro studies demonstrate that Anabaena GS is not inactivated by Synechocystis IFs (IF7 and IF17), indicating the specificity of the system. We constructed an Anabaena strain expressing a second inactivating factor, containing the amino-terminal part of IF17 from Synechocystis fused to IF7A. GS inactivation in this strain is more effective than that in the wild type (WT) and resembles that observed in Synechocystis. Finally we found differential expression of the IF system between heterocysts and vegetative cells of Anabaena.

  10. Transduction of the light signal during complementary chromatic adaptation in the cyanobacterium Calothrix sp. PCC 7601: DNA-binding proteins and modulation by phosphorylation.

    OpenAIRE

    Sobczyk, A.; Schyns, G; Tandeau de Marsac, N.; Houmard, J

    1993-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Calothrix sp. PCC 7601 can adapt its pigment content in response to changes in the incident light wavelength. It synthesizes, as major light-harvesting pigments, either phycocyanin 2 (PC2, encoded by the cpc2 operon) under red light or phycoerythrin (PE, encoded by the cpeBA operon) under green light conditions. The last step of the signal transduction pathway is characterized by a transcriptional control of the expression of these operons. Partially purified protein extrac...

  11. Proteomic pattern alterations of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 in response to cadmium, nickel and cobalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Angela; López-Maury, Luis; Florencio, Francisco J

    2014-05-06

    Cyanobacteria represent the largest and most diverse group of prokaryotes capable of performing oxygenic photosynthesis and are frequently found in environments contaminated with heavy metals. Several studies have been performed in these organisms in order to better understand the effects of metals such as Zn, Cd, Cu, Ni and Co. In Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, genes involved in Ni, Co, Cu and Zn resistance have been reported. However, proteomic studies for the identification of proteins modulated by heavy metals have not been carried out. In the present work, we have analyzed the proteomic pattern alterations of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 in response to Ni, Co and Cd in order to identify the metabolic processes affected by these metals. We show that some proteins are commonly regulated in response to the different metal ions, including ribulose1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase and the periplasmic iron-binding protein FutA2, while others, such as chaperones, were specifically induced by each metal. We also show that the main processes affected by the metals are carbon metabolism and photosynthesis, since heavy metals affect proteins required for the correct functioning of these activities. This is the first report on the proteomic profile of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 wild type and mutant strains for the identification of proteins affected by the heavy metals Ni, Co and Cd. We have identified proteins commonly responsive to all three metals and also chaperones specifically modulated by each metal. Our data also supports previous studies that suggest the existence of additional sensor systems for Co. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Type II Toxin–Antitoxin Systems in the Unicellular Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Kopfmann

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial toxin–antitoxin (TA systems are genetic elements, which are encoded by plasmid as well as chromosomal loci. They mediate plasmid and genomic island maintenance through post-segregational killing mechanisms but may also have milder effects, acting as mobile stress response systems that help certain cells of a population in persisting adverse growth conditions. Very few cyanobacterial TA system have been characterized thus far. In this work, we focus on the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803, a widely used model organism. We expand the number of putative Type II TA systems from 36 to 69 plus seven stand-alone components. Forty-seven TA pairs are located on the chromosome and 22 are plasmid-located. Different types of toxins are associated with various antitoxins in a mix and match principle. According to protein domains and experimental data, 81% of all toxins in Synechocystis 6803 likely exhibit RNase activity, suggesting extensive potential for toxicity-related RNA degradation and toxin-mediated transcriptome remodeling. Of particular interest is the Ssr8013–Slr8014 system encoded on plasmid pSYSG, which is part of a larger defense island or the pSYSX system Slr6056–Slr6057, which is linked to a bacterial ubiquitin-like system. Consequently, Synechocystis 6803 is one of the most prolific sources of new information about these genetic elements.

  13. Type II Toxin–Antitoxin Systems in the Unicellular Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopfmann, Stefan; Roesch, Stefanie K.; Hess, Wolfgang R.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial toxin–antitoxin (TA) systems are genetic elements, which are encoded by plasmid as well as chromosomal loci. They mediate plasmid and genomic island maintenance through post-segregational killing mechanisms but may also have milder effects, acting as mobile stress response systems that help certain cells of a population in persisting adverse growth conditions. Very few cyanobacterial TA system have been characterized thus far. In this work, we focus on the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803, a widely used model organism. We expand the number of putative Type II TA systems from 36 to 69 plus seven stand-alone components. Forty-seven TA pairs are located on the chromosome and 22 are plasmid-located. Different types of toxins are associated with various antitoxins in a mix and match principle. According to protein domains and experimental data, 81% of all toxins in Synechocystis 6803 likely exhibit RNase activity, suggesting extensive potential for toxicity-related RNA degradation and toxin-mediated transcriptome remodeling. Of particular interest is the Ssr8013–Slr8014 system encoded on plasmid pSYSG, which is part of a larger defense island or the pSYSX system Slr6056–Slr6057, which is linked to a bacterial ubiquitin-like system. Consequently, Synechocystis 6803 is one of the most prolific sources of new information about these genetic elements. PMID:27455323

  14. Type II Toxin-Antitoxin Systems in the Unicellular Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopfmann, Stefan; Roesch, Stefanie K; Hess, Wolfgang R

    2016-07-21

    Bacterial toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are genetic elements, which are encoded by plasmid as well as chromosomal loci. They mediate plasmid and genomic island maintenance through post-segregational killing mechanisms but may also have milder effects, acting as mobile stress response systems that help certain cells of a population in persisting adverse growth conditions. Very few cyanobacterial TA system have been characterized thus far. In this work, we focus on the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803, a widely used model organism. We expand the number of putative Type II TA systems from 36 to 69 plus seven stand-alone components. Forty-seven TA pairs are located on the chromosome and 22 are plasmid-located. Different types of toxins are associated with various antitoxins in a mix and match principle. According to protein domains and experimental data, 81% of all toxins in Synechocystis 6803 likely exhibit RNase activity, suggesting extensive potential for toxicity-related RNA degradation and toxin-mediated transcriptome remodeling. Of particular interest is the Ssr8013-Slr8014 system encoded on plasmid pSYSG, which is part of a larger defense island or the pSYSX system Slr6056-Slr6057, which is linked to a bacterial ubiquitin-like system. Consequently, Synechocystis 6803 is one of the most prolific sources of new information about these genetic elements.

  15. Engineered xylose utilization enhances bio-products productivity in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tai-Chi; Xiong, Wei; Paddock, Troy; Carrieri, Damian; Chang, Ing-Feng; Chiu, Hui-Fen; Ungerer, Justin; Hank Juo, Suh-Hang; Maness, Pin-Ching; Yu, Jianping

    2015-06-12

    Hydrolysis of plant biomass generates a mixture of simple sugars that is particularly rich in glucose and xylose. Fermentation of the released sugars emits CO2 as byproduct due to metabolic inefficiencies. Therefore, the ability of a microbe to simultaneously convert biomass sugars and photosynthetically fix CO2 into target products is very desirable. In this work, the cyanobacterium, Synechocystis 6803, was engineered to grow on xylose in addition to glucose. Both the xylA (xylose isomerase) and xylB (xylulokinase) genes from Escherichia coli were required to confer xylose utilization, but a xylose-specific transporter was not required. Introducing xylAB into an ethylene-producing strain increased the rate of ethylene production in the presence of xylose. Additionally, introduction of xylAB into a glycogen-synthesis mutant enhanced production of keto acids. Moreover, isotopic tracer studies found that nearly half of the carbon in the excreted keto acids was derived from the engineered xylose metabolism, while the remainder was derived from CO2 fixation.

  16. Alcohol dehydrogenase AdhA plays a role in ethanol tolerance in model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Rebeca

    2017-04-01

    The protein AdhA from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (hereafter Synechocystis) has been previously reported to show alcohol dehydrogenase activity towards ethanol and both NAD and NADP. This protein is currently being used in genetically modified strains of Synechocystis capable of synthesizing ethanol showing the highest ethanol productivities. In the present work, mutant strains of Synechocystis lacking AdhA have been constructed and tested for tolerance to ethanol. The lack of AdhA in the wild-type strain reduces survival to externally added ethanol at lethal concentration of 4% (v/v). On the other hand, the lack of AdhA in an ethanologenic strain diminishes tolerance of cells to internally produced ethanol. It is also shown that light-activated heterotrophic growth (LAHG) of the wild-type strain is impaired in the mutant strain lacking AdhA (∆adhA strain). Photoautotrophic, mixotrophic, and photoheterotrophic growth are not affected in the mutant strain. Based on phenotypic characterization of ∆adhA mutants, the possible physiological function of AdhA in Synechocystis is discussed.

  17. RNA-seq profiling reveals novel target genes of LexA in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayumi eKizawa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available LexA is a well-established transcriptional repressor of SOS genes induced by DNA damage in E. coli and other bacterial species. However, LexA in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has been suggested not to be involved in SOS response. In this study, we performed RNA-seq analysis of the wild-type strain and the lexA-disrupted mutant to obtain the comprehensive view of LexA-regulated genes in Synechocystis. Disruption of lexA positively or negatively affected expression of genes related to various cellular functions such as phototactic motility, accumulation of the major compatible solute glucosylglycerol and subunits of bidirectional hydrogenase, photosystem I and phycobilisome complexes. We also observed increase in the expression level of genes related to iron and manganese uptake in the mutant at the later stage of cultivation. However, none of the genes related to DNA metabolism were affected by disruption of lexA. DNA gel mobility shift assay using the recombinant LexA protein suggested that LexA binds to the upstream region of pilA7, pilA9, ggpS and slr1670 to directly regulate their expression, but changes in the expression level of photosystem I genes by disruption of lexA is likely a secondary effect.

  18. Seawater cultivation of freshwater cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 drastically alters amino acid composition and glycogen metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko eIijima

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Water use assessment is important for bioproduction using cyanobacteria. For eco-friendly reasons, seawater should preferably be used for cyanobacteria cultivation instead of freshwater. In this study, we demonstrated that the freshwater unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 could be grown in a medium based on seawater. The Synechocystis wild-type strain grew well in an artificial seawater (ASW medium supplemented with nitrogen and phosphorus sources. The addition of HEPES buffer improved cell growth overall, although the growth in ASW medium was inferior to that in the synthetic BG-11 medium. The levels of proteins involved in sugar metabolism changed depending on the culture conditions. The biosynthesis of several amino acids including aspartate, glutamine, glycine, proline, ornithine, and lysine, was highly up-regulated by cultivation in ASW. Two types of natural seawater (NSW were also made available for the cultivation of Synechocystis cells, with supplementation of both nitrogen and phosphorus sources. These results revealed the potential use of seawater for the cultivation of freshwater cyanobacteria, which would help to reduce freshwater consumption during biorefinery using cyanobacteria.

  19. Acrolein, an α,β-unsaturated carbonyl, inhibits both growth and PSII activity in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimakawa, Ginga; Iwamoto, Tatsuya; Mabuchi, Tomohito; Saito, Ryota; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Amako, Katsumi; Sugimoto, Toshio; Makino, Amane; Miyake, Chikahiro

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we sought to determine whether and how an α,β-unsaturated carbonyl, acrolein, can inhibit the growth of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 (S. 6803). Treatment of S. 6803 with 200 µM acrolein for 3 d significantly and irreversibly inhibited its growth. To elucidate the inhibitory mechanism, we examined the effects of acrolein on photosynthesis. In contrast to dark conditions, the addition of acrolein to S. 6803 under conditions of illumination lowered the CO₂-dependent O₂ evolution rate (photosynthetic activity). Furthermore, treatment with acrolein lowered the activity reducing dimethyl benzoquinone in photosystem II (PSII). Acrolein also suppressed the reduction rate for the oxidized form of the reaction center chlorophyll of photosystem I (PSI), P700. These results indicate that acrolein inhibited PSII activity in thylakoid membranes. The addition of 200 µM acrolein to the illuminated S. 6803 cells gradually increased the steady-state level (Fs) of Chl fluorescence and decreased the quantum yield of PSII. These results suggested that acrolein damaged the acceptor side of PSII. On the other hand, acrolein did not inhibit respiration. From the above results, we gained insight into the metabolism of acrolein and its physiological effects in S. 6803.

  20. Cell envelope components influencing filament length in the heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnat, Mireia; Schleiff, Enrico; Flores, Enrique

    2014-12-01

    Heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria grow as chains of cells (known as trichomes or filaments) that can be hundreds of cells long. The filament consists of individual cells surrounded by a cytoplasmic membrane and peptidoglycan layers. The cells, however, share a continuous outer membrane, and septal proteins, such as SepJ, are important for cell-cell contact and filament formation. Here, we addressed a possible role of cell envelope components in filamentation, the process of producing and maintaining filaments, in the model cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. We studied filament length and the response of the filaments to mechanical fragmentation in a number of strains with mutations in genes encoding cell envelope components. Previously published peptidoglycan- and outer membrane-related gene mutants and strains with mutations in two genes (all5045 and alr0718) encoding class B penicillin-binding proteins isolated in this work were used. Our results show that filament length is affected in most cell envelope mutants, but the filaments of alr5045 and alr2270 gene mutants were particularly fragmented. All5045 is a dd-transpeptidase involved in peptidoglycan elongation during cell growth, and Alr2270 is an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of lipid A, a key component of lipopolysaccharide. These results indicate that both components of the cell envelope, the murein sacculus and the outer membrane, influence filamentation. As deduced from the filament fragmentation phenotypes of their mutants, however, none of these elements is as important for filamentation as the septal protein SepJ.

  1. Heterocyst-specific flavodiiron protein Flv3B enables oxic diazotrophic growth of the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakova, Maria; Battchikova, Natalia; Richaud, Pierre; Leino, Hannu; Kosourov, Sergey; Isojärvi, Janne; Peltier, Gilles; Flores, Enrique; Cournac, Laurent; Allahverdiyeva, Yagut; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2014-07-29

    Flavodiiron proteins are known to have crucial and specific roles in photoprotection of photosystems I and II in cyanobacteria. The filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 contains, besides the four flavodiiron proteins Flv1A, Flv2, Flv3A, and Flv4 present in vegetative cells, two heterocyst-specific flavodiiron proteins, Flv1B and Flv3B. Here, we demonstrate that Flv3B is responsible for light-induced O2 uptake in heterocysts, and that the absence of the Flv3B protein severely compromises the growth of filaments in oxic, but not in microoxic, conditions. It is further demonstrated that Flv3B-mediated photosynthetic O2 uptake has a distinct role in heterocysts which cannot be substituted by respiratory O2 uptake in the protection of nitrogenase from oxidative damage and, thus, in an efficient provision of nitrogen to filaments. In line with this conclusion, the Δflv3B strain has reduced amounts of nitrogenase NifHDK subunits and shows multiple symptoms of nitrogen deficiency in the filaments. The apparent imbalance of cytosolic redox state in Δflv3B heterocysts also has a pronounced influence on the amounts of different transcripts and proteins. Therefore, an O2-related mechanism for control of gene expression is suggested to take place in heterocysts.

  2. Amino Acid Transporters and Release of Hydrophobic Amino Acids in the Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Pernil

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that can use inorganic compounds such as nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources. In the absence of combined nitrogen, it can fix N2 in differentiated cells called heterocysts. Anabaena also shows substantial activities of amino acid uptake, and three ABC-type transporters for amino acids have been previously characterized. Seven new loci encoding predicted amino acid transporters were identified in the Anabaena genomic sequence and inactivated. Two of them were involved in amino acid uptake. Locus alr2535-alr2541 encodes the elements of a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter that is mainly involved in the uptake of glycine. ORF all0342 encodes a putative transporter from the dicarboxylate/amino acid:cation symporter (DAACS family whose inactivation resulted in an increased uptake of a broad range of amino acids. An assay to study amino acid release from Anabaena filaments to the external medium was set up. Net release of the alanine analogue α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB was observed when transport system N-I (a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter was engaged in the uptake of a specific substrate. The rate of AIB release was directly proportional to the intracellular AIB concentration, suggesting leakage from the cells by diffusion.

  3. Effect of Iron Deficiency on Heterocyst Differentiation and Physiology of the Filamentous Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Cheng-cai

    2003-01-01

    The effect of iron deficiency on heterocyst differentiation and some physiological properties of the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120was investigated. Under moderate iron limitation conditions, achieved by addition of iron chelator 2,2′-Dipyridyl (<80 μmol/L) led to delayed heterocyst differentiation,no heterocyst differentiation was observed under severe iron limitation conditions,when the concentration of 2,2′-Dipyridyl in the medium was more than 100 μmol/L.It seemed that there are certain iron-regulated genes or operons whose function is to control heterocyst development. In addition, iron deficiency impaired the growth.Low-iron cells had a decrease in the quantities of pigment content (chlorophyll and phycocyanin content), the whole cell in vivo absorbance spectra confirmed the de crease, the protein electrophoretic profiles revealed that iron-deficient cells had less protein bands, with the increase of 2,2′ Dipyridyl , the protein bands was more and more less. And differently, iron deficiency also caused an increase of ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species)and SOD activity, it suggests that iron deficiency led to oxidative stress, which generally occured under high-iron conditions.

  4. Effect of Iron Deficiency on Heterocyst Differentiation and Physiology of the Filamentous Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XuWen-liang; LiuYong-ding; ZhangCheng-cai

    2003-01-01

    The effect of iron deficiency on heterocyst differentiation and some physiological properties of the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 was investigated. Under moderate iron limitation conditions, achieved by addition of iron chelator 2,2′-Dipyridyl (<80 μmol/L) led to delayed heterocyst differentiation,no heterocyst differentiation was observed under severe iron limitation conditions,when the concentration of 2,2′-Dipyridyl in the medium was more than 100 μmol/L.It seemed that there are certain iron-regulated genes or operons whose function is to control heterocyst development. In addition, iron deficiency impaired the growth.Low-iron cells had a decrease in the quantities of pigment content (chlorophyll and phycocyanin content), the whole cell in vivo absorbance spectra confirmed the decrease, the protein electrophoretic profiles revealed that iron-deficient cells had less protein bands, with the increase of 2,2'-Dipyridyl , the protein bands was more and more less. And differently, iron deficiency also caused an increase of ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species)and SOD activity, it suggests that iron deficiency led to oxidative stress, which uenerallv occured under hiuh-iron conditions.

  5. RNA-seq Profiling Reveals Novel Target Genes of LexA in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizawa, Ayumi; Kawahara, Akihito; Takimura, Yasushi; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka; Hihara, Yukako

    2016-01-01

    LexA is a well-established transcriptional repressor of SOS genes induced by DNA damage in Escherichia coli and other bacterial species. However, LexA in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has been suggested not to be involved in SOS response. In this study, we performed RNA-seq analysis of the wild-type strain and the lexA-disrupted mutant to obtain the comprehensive view of LexA-regulated genes in Synechocystis. Disruption of lexA positively or negatively affected expression of genes related to various cellular functions such as phototactic motility, accumulation of the major compatible solute glucosylglycerol and subunits of bidirectional hydrogenase, photosystem I, and phycobilisome complexes. We also observed increase in the expression level of genes related to iron and manganese uptake in the mutant at the later stage of cultivation. However, none of the genes related to DNA metabolism were affected by disruption of lexA. DNA gel mobility shift assay using the recombinant LexA protein suggested that LexA binds to the upstream region of pilA7, pilA9, ggpS, and slr1670 to directly regulate their expression, but changes in the expression level of photosystem I genes by disruption of lexA is likely a secondary effect. PMID:26925056

  6. Seawater cultivation of freshwater cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 drastically alters amino acid composition and glycogen metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Hiroko; Nakaya, Yuka; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Hirai, Masami Yokota; Osanai, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Water use assessment is important for bioproduction using cyanobacteria. For eco-friendly reasons, seawater should preferably be used for cyanobacteria cultivation instead of freshwater. In this study, we demonstrated that the freshwater unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 could be grown in a medium based on seawater. The Synechocystis wild-type strain grew well in an artificial seawater (ASW) medium supplemented with nitrogen and phosphorus sources. The addition of HEPES buffer improved cell growth overall, although the growth in ASW medium was inferior to that in the synthetic BG-11 medium. The levels of proteins involved in sugar metabolism changed depending on the culture conditions. The biosynthesis of several amino acids including aspartate, glutamine, glycine, proline, ornithine, and lysine, was highly up-regulated by cultivation in ASW. Two types of natural seawater (NSW) were also made available for the cultivation of Synechocystis cells, with supplementation of both nitrogen and phosphorus sources. These results revealed the potential use of seawater for the cultivation of freshwater cyanobacteria, which would help to reduce freshwater consumption during biorefinery using cyanobacteria. PMID:25954257

  7. Constant Phycobilisome Size in Chromatically Adapted Cells of the Cyanobacterium Tolypothrix tenuis, and Variation in Nostoc sp. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohki, Kaori; Gantt, Elisabeth; Lipschultz, Claudia A.; Ernst, Marjorie C.

    1985-01-01

    Phycobilisomes of Tolypothrix tenuis, a cyanobacterium capable of complete chromatic adaptation, were studied from cells grown in red and green light, and in darkness. The phycobilisome size remained constant irrespective of the light quality. The hemidiscoidal phycobilisomes had an average diameter of about 52 nanometers and height of about 33 nanometers, by negative staining. The thickness was equivalent to a phycocyanin molecule (about 10 nanometers). The molar ratio of allophycocyanin, relative to other phycobiliproteins always remained at about 1:3. Phycobilisomes from red light grown cells and cells grown heterotrophically in darkness were indistinguishable in their pigment composition, polypeptide pattern, and size. Eight polypeptides were resolved in the phycobilin region (17.5 to 23.5 kilodaltons) by isoelectric focusing followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Half of these were invariable, while others were variable in green and red light. It is inferred that phycoerythrin synthesis in green light resulted in a one for one substitution of phycocyanin, thus retaining a constant phycobilisome size. Tolypothrix appears to be one of the best examples of phycobiliprotein regulation with wavelength. By contrast, in Nostoc sp., the decrease in phycoerythrin in red light cells was accompanied by a decrease in phycobilisome size but not a regulated substitution. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:16664550

  8. Carbon availability affects diurnally controlled processes and cell morphology of Cyanothece 51142.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Stöckel

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are oxygenic photoautotrophs notable for their ability to utilize atmospheric CO2 as the major source of carbon. The prospect of using cyanobacteria to convert solar energy and high concentrations of CO2 efficiently into biomass and renewable energy sources has sparked substantial interest in using flue gas from coal-burning power plants as a source of inorganic carbon. However, in order to guide further advances in this area, a better understanding of the metabolic changes that occur under conditions of high CO2 is needed. To determine the effect of high CO2 on cell physiology and growth, we analyzed the global transcriptional changes in the unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium Cyanothece 51142 grown in 8% CO2-enriched air. We found a concerted response of genes related to photosynthesis, carbon metabolism, respiration, nitrogen fixation, ribosome biosynthesis, and the synthesis of nucleotides and structural cell wall polysaccharides. The overall response to 8% CO2 in Cyanothece 51142 involves different strategies, to compensate for the high C/N ratio during both phases of the diurnal cycle. Our analyses show that high CO2 conditions trigger the production of carbon-rich compounds and stimulate processes such as respiration and nitrogen fixation. In addition, we observed that high levels of CO2 affect fundamental cellular processes such as cell growth and dramatically alter the intracellular morphology. This study provides novel insights on how diurnal and developmental rhythms are integrated to facilitate adaptation to high CO2 in Cyanothece 51142.

  9. ppGpp metabolism is involved in heterocyst development in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shao-Ran; Lin, Gui-Ming; Chen, Wen-Li; Wang, Li; Zhang, Cheng-Cai

    2013-10-01

    When deprived of a combined-nitrogen source in the growth medium, the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 (Anabaena) can form heterocysts capable of nitrogen fixation. The process of heterocyst differentiation takes about 20 to 24 h, during which extensive metabolic and morphological changes take place. Guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp) is the signal of the stringent response that ensures cell survival by adjusting major cellular activities in response to nutrient starvation in bacteria, and ppGpp accumulates at the early stage of heterocyst differentiation (J. Akinyanju, R. J. Smith, FEBS Lett. 107:173-176, 1979; J Akinyanju, R. J. Smith, New Phytol. 105:117-122, 1987). Here we show that all1549 (here designated relana) in Anabaena, homologous to relA/spoT, is upregulated in response to nitrogen deprivation and predominantly localized in vegetative cells. The disruption of relana strongly affects the synthesis of ppGpp, and the resulting mutant, all1549Ωsp/sm, fails to form heterocysts and to grow in the absence of a combined-nitrogen source. This phenotype can be complemented by a wild-type copy of relana. Although the upregulation of hetR is affected in the mutant, ectopic overexpression of hetR cannot rescue the phenotype. However, we found that the mutant rapidly loses its viability, within a time window of 3 to 6 h, following the deprivation of combined nitrogen. We propose that ppGpp plays a major role in rebalancing the metabolic activities of the cells in the absence of the nitrogen source supply and that this regulation is necessary for filament survival and consequently for the success of heterocyst differentiation.

  10. Inhibition of hydrogen uptake in Escherichia coli by expressing the hydrogenase from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wood Thomas K

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular hydrogen is an environmentally-clean fuel and the reversible (bi-directional hydrogenase of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 as well as the native Escherichia coli hydrogenase 3 hold great promise for hydrogen generation. These enzymes perform the simple reaction 2H+ + 2e- ↔ H2 (g. Results Hydrogen yields were enhanced up to 41-fold by cloning the bidirectional hydrogenase (encoded by hoxEFUYH from the cyanobacterium into E. coli. Using an optimized medium, E. coli cells expressing hoxEFUYH also produced twice as much hydrogen as the well-studied Enterobacter aerogenes HU-101, and hydrogen gas bubbles are clearly visible from the cultures. Overexpression of HoxU alone (small diaphorase subunit accounts for 43% of the additional hydrogen produced by HoxEFUYH. In addition, hydrogen production in E. coli mutants with defects in the native formate hydrogenlyase system show that the cyanobacterial hydrogenase depends on both the native E. coli hydrogenase 3 as well as on its maturation proteins. Hydrogen absorption by cells expressing hoxEFUYH was up to 10 times lower than cells which lack the cloned cyanobacterial hydrogenase; hence, the enhanced hydrogen production in the presence of hoxEFUYH is due to inhibition of hydrogen uptake activity in E. coli. Hydrogen uptake by cells expressing hoxEFUYH was suppressed in three wild-type strains and in two hycE mutants but not in a double mutant defective in hydrogenase 1 and hydrogenase 2; hence, the active cyanobacterial locus suppresses hydrogen uptake by hydrogenase 1 and hydrogenase 2 but not by hydrogenase 3. Differential gene expression indicated that overexpression of HoxEFUYH does not alter expression of the native E. coli hydrogenase system; instead, biofilm-related genes are differentially regulated by expression of the cyanobacterial enzymes which resulted in 2-fold elevated biofilm formation. This appears to be the first enhanced hydrogen production

  11. The 2.15 A crystal structure of a triple mutant plastocyanin from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, A; De la Cerda, B; Varela, P F; Navarro, J A; Hervás, M; De la Rosa, M A

    1998-01-16

    The crystal structure of the triple mutant A42D/D47P/A63L plastocyanin from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has been determined by Patterson search methods using the known structure of the poplar protein. Crystals of the triple mutant A42D/D47P/A63L, which are stable for days in its oxidized form, were grown from ammonium sulfate, with the cell constants a = b = 34.3 A and c = 111.8 A belonging to space group P3(2)21. The structure was refined using restrained crystallographic refinement to an R-factor of 16.7% for 4070 independent reflections between 8.0 and 2.15 A with intensities greater than 2 sigma (I), with root mean square deviations of 0.013 A and 1.63 degrees from ideal bond lengths and bond angles, respectively. The final model comprises 727 non-hydrogen protein atoms within 98 residues, 75 water molecules and a single copper ion. The overall tertiary fold of Synechocystis plastocyanin consists of a compact ellipsoidal beta-sandwich structure made up of two beta-sheets embracing a hydrophobic core. Each sheet contains parallel and antiparallel beta-strands. In addition to the beta-sheets, the structure contains an alpha-helix from Pro47 to Lys54 that follows beta-strand 4. The three-dimensional structure of Synechocystis plastocyanin is thus similar to those reported for the copper protein isolated from eukaryotic organisms and, in particular, from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis, the only cyanobacterial plastocyanin structure available so far. The molecule holds an hydrophobic region surrounding His87, as do other plastocyanins, but the lack of negatively charged residues at the putative distant remote site surrounding Tyr83 could explain why the Synechocystis protein exhibits a collisional reaction mechanism for electron transfer to photosystem I (PSI), which involves no formation of the transient plastocyanin-PSI complex kinetically observed in green algae and higher plants.

  12. Molecular investigation of the radiation resistance of edible cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize in detail the response of Arthrospira to ionizing radiation, to better understand its radiation resistance capacity. Live cells of Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 were irradiated with 60Co gamma rays. This study is the first, showing that Arthrospira is highly tolerant to gamma rays, and can survive at least 6400 Gy (dose rate of 527 Gy h−1), which identified Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 as a radiation resistant bacterium. Biochemical, including proteomic and tra...

  13. Genome Sequence of the Edible Cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005▿

    OpenAIRE

    Janssen, P. J.; Morin, N.; Mergeay, M; Leroy, B.; Wattiez, R; Vallaeys, T.; Waleron, K.; Waleron, M.; Wilmotte, A.; Quillardet, P; de Marsac, N. Tandeau; Talla, E.; Zhang, C.-C.; Leys, N.

    2010-01-01

    We determined the genome sequence of Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005, a cyanobacterial strain of great interest to the European Space Agency for its nutritive value and oxygenic properties in the Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) biological life support system for long-term manned missions into space.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of a Novel Strain of Cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. 4-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowa, Steven

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete nucleotide sequence of Anabaena sp. 4-3, an efficient producer of sucrose. It was isolated from salt flats near the University of Texas Marine Science Institute in Port Aransas, Texas. The genome may provide insight into the utilization of cyanobacteria as a source for biofuels. PMID:27540066

  15. Genomic analysis of parallel-evolved cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 under acid stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Junji; Kanesaki, Yu; Iwata, Naoya; Asakura, Ryousuke; Funamizu, Kento; Tasaki, Rizumu; Agatsuma, Mina; Tahara, Hiroko; Matsuhashi, Ayumi; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Ogawa, Satoru; Ohta, Hisataka

    2015-08-01

    Experimental evolution is a powerful tool for clarifying phenotypic and genotypic changes responsible for adaptive evolution. In this study, we isolated acid-adapted Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (Synechocystis 6803) strains to identify genes involved in acid tolerance. Synechocystis 6803 is rarely found in habitants with pH 6803.

  16. Feeding characteristics of a golden alga (Poterioochromonas sp.) grazing on toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xue; Hu, Hong-Ying; Men, Yu-Jie

    2009-01-01

    Microcystis aeruginosa has quickly risen in infamy as one of the most universal and toxic bloom-forming cyanobacteria. Here we presented a species of golden alga (Poterioochromonas sp. strain ZX1), which can feed on toxic M. aeruginosa without any adverse effects from the cyanotoxins. Using flow...

  17. Rubidibacter lacunae gen. nov., sp. nov., a unicellular, phycoerythrin-containing cyanobacterium isolated from seawater of Chuuk lagoon, Micronesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dong Han; Noh, Jae Hoon; Lee, Charity M; Rho, Seungmok

    2008-12-01

    A unicellular cyanobacterium, designated KORDI 51-2(T), was isolated from surface seawater of Chuuk lagoon, Micronesia. The cells were wine-coloured rods and emitted red fluorescence under green excitation of an epifluorescence microscope. Thus, morphologically, the strain resembled Synechococcus species. However, based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities between strain KORDI 51-2(T) and related strains belonging to cyanobacteria, the novel strain was distantly related to members of the 'Halothece' cluster. However, sequence similarities between strain KORDI 51-2(T) and members of the 'Halothece' cluster were very low, ranging from 90.7 to 92.1 %, and phylogenetic analyses showed that the strain formed a distinct branch. Therefore, a polyphasic characterization including morphology, physiology and pigment composition was conducted to elucidate the taxonomic position of strain KORDI 51-2(T). The strain grew within a temperature range of 25-35 degrees C and a salinity range of 2-7 %. The optimal temperature and salinity were about 30 degrees C and 5 %, respectively. Strain KORDI 51-2(T) contained phycoerythrin, and the dominant carotenoid pigments were zeaxanthin, beta-carotene and echinenone. The DNA G+C content was 60.5 mol%. Based on phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence, and the physiological data and pigment compositions, strain KORDI 51-2(T) is considered to represent a new genus and novel species of cyanobacteria for which the name Rubidibacter lacunae gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is KORDI 51-2(T) (=KCTC 40015(T)=UTEX L2944(T)).

  18. Roles of Group 2 Sigma Factors in Acclimation of the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 to Nitrogen Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antal, Taras; Kurkela, Juha; Parikainen, Marjaana; Kårlund, Anna; Hakkila, Kaisa; Tyystjärvi, Esa; Tyystjärvi, Taina

    2016-06-01

    Acclimation of cyanobacteria to environmental conditions is mainly controlled at the transcriptional level, and σ factors of the RNA polymerase have a central role in this process. The model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has four non-essential group 2 σ factors (SigB, SigC, SigD and SigE) that regulate global metabolic responses to various adverse environmental conditions. Here we show that although none of the group 2 σ factors is essential for the major metabolic realignments induced by a short period of nitrogen starvation, the quadruple mutant without any group 2 σ factors and triple mutants missing both SigB and SigD grow slowly in BG-11 medium containing only 5% of the nitrate present in standard BG-11. These ΔsigBCDE, ΔsigBCD and ΔsigBDE strains lost PSII activity rapidly in low nitrogen and accumulated less glycogen than the control strain. An abnormally high glycogen content was detected in ΔsigBCE (SigD is active), while the carotenoid content became high in ΔsigCDE (SigB is active), indicating that SigB and SigD regulate the partitioning of carbon skeletons in low nitrogen. Long-term survival and recovery of the cells after nitrogen deficiency was strongly dependent on group 2 σ factors. The quadruple mutant and the ΔsigBDE strain (only SigC is active) recovered more slowly from nitrogen deficiency than the control strain, and ΔsigBCDE in particular lost viability during nitrogen starvation. Nitrogen deficiency-induced changes in the pigment content of the control strain recovered essentially in 1 d in nitrogen-replete medium, but little recovery occurred in ΔsigBCDE and ΔsigBDE.

  19. Identification of OmpR-family response regulators interacting with thioredoxin in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Kadowaki

    Full Text Available The redox state of the photosynthetic electron transport chain is known to act as a signal to regulate the transcription of key genes involved in the acclimation responses to environmental changes. We hypothesized that the protein thioredoxin (Trx acts as a mediator connecting the redox state of the photosynthetic electron transport chain and transcriptional regulation, and established a screening system to identify transcription factors (TFs that interact with Trx. His-tagged TFs and S-tagged mutated form of Trx, TrxMC35S, whose active site cysteine 35 was substituted with serine to trap the target interacting protein, were co-expressed in E. coli cells and Trx-TF complexes were detected by immuno-blotting analysis. We examined the interaction between Trx and ten OmpR family TFs encoded in the chromosome of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (S.6803. Although there is a highly conserved cysteine residue in the receiver domain of all OmpR family TFs, only three, RpaA (Slr0115, RpaB (Slr0947 and ManR (Slr1837, were identified as putative Trx targets [corrected].The recombinant forms of wild-type TrxM, RpaA, RpaB and ManR proteins from S.6803 were purified following over-expression in E. coli and their interaction was further assessed by monitoring changes in the number of cysteine residues with free thiol groups. An increase in the number of free thiols was observed after incubation of the oxidized TFs with Trx, indicating the reduction of cysteine residues as a consequence of interaction with Trx. Our results suggest, for the first time, the possible regulation of OmpR family TFs through the supply of reducing equivalents from Trx, as well as through the phospho-transfer from its cognate sensor histidine kinase.

  20. Functional characterization of three (GH13) branching enzymes involved in cyanobacterial starch biosynthesis from Cyanobacterium sp. NBRC 102756.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ryuichiro; Koide, Keiichi; Hayashi, Mari; Suzuki, Tomoko; Sawada, Takayuki; Ohdan, Takashi; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Nakamura, Yasunori; Fujita, Naoko; Suzuki, Eiji

    2015-05-01

    Starch and glycogen are widespread storage polysaccharides in bacteria, plants, and animals. Recently, some cyanobacteria were found to accumulate water-insoluble α-glucan similar to amylopectin rather than glycogen, the latter of which is more commonly produced in these organisms. The amylopectin-producing species including Cyanobacterium sp. NBRC 102756 invariably have three branching enzyme (BE) homologs, BE1, BE2, and BE3, all belonging to the glycoside hydrolase family 13. Multiple BE isoforms in prokaryotes have not been previously studied. In the present work, we carried out functional characterization of these enzymes expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzymes were all active, although the specific activity of BE3 was much lower than those of BE1 and BE2. After the incubation of the enzymes with amylopectin or amylose, the reaction products were analyzed by fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate capillary electrophoresis method. BE1 and BE2 showed similar chain-length preference to BEIIb isoform of rice (Oryza sativa L.), while the catalytic specificity of BE3 was similar to that of rice BEI. These results indicate that starch-producing cyanobacteria have both type-I BE (BE3) and type-II BEs (BE1 and BE2) in terms of chain-length preferences, as is the case of plants. All BE isoforms were active against phosphorylase limit dextrin, in which outer branches had been uniformly diminished to 4 glucose residues. Based on its catalytic properties, BE3 was assumed to have a role to transfer the glucan chain bearing branch(es) to give rise to a newly growing unit, or cluster as observed in amylopectin molecule. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization of two naturally truncated, Ssb-like proteins from the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirti, Anurag; Rajaram, Hema; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2013-11-01

    Single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding (Ssb) proteins are vital for all DNA metabolic processes and are characterized by an N-terminal OB-fold followed by P/G-rich spacer region and a C-terminal tail. In the genome of the heterocystous, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, two genes alr0088 and alr7579 are annotated as ssb, but the corresponding proteins have only the N-terminal OB-fold and no P/G-rich region or acidic tail, thereby rendering them unable to interact with genome maintenance proteins. Both the proteins were expressed under normal growth conditions in Anabaena PCC7120 and regulated differentially under abiotic stresses which induce DNA damage, indicating that these are functional genes. Constitutive overexpression of Alr0088 in Anabaena enhanced the tolerance to DNA-damaging stresses which caused formation of DNA adducts such as UV and MitomycinC, but significantly decreased the tolerance to γ-irradiation, which causes single- and double-stranded DNA breaks. On the other hand, overexpression of Alr7579 had no significant effect on normal growth or stress tolerance of Anabaena. Thus, of the two truncated Ssb-like proteins, Alr0088 may be involved in protection of ssDNA from damage, but due to the absence of acidic tail, it may not aid in repair of damaged DNA. These two proteins are present across cyanobacterial genera and unique to them. These initial studies pave the way to the understanding of DNA repair in cyanobacteria, which is not very well documented.

  2. Characterization of five putative aspartate aminotransferase genes in the N2-fixing heterocystous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinyi; Gu, Liping; He, Ping; Zhou, Ruanbao

    2015-06-01

    Aspartate and glutamate are two key amino acids used in biosynthesis of many amino acids that play vital role in cellular metabolism. Aspartate aminotransferases (AspATs) are required for channelling nitrogen (N(2)) between Glu and Asp in all life forms. Biochemical and genetic characterization of AspATs have been lacking in N(2)-fixing cyanobacteria. In this report, five putative AspAT genes (alr1039, all2340, alr2765, all4327 and alr4853) were identified in the N(2)-fixing heterocystous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Five recombinant C-terminal hexahistidine-tagged AspATs (AspAT-H(6)) were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Biochemical analysis demonstrated that these five putative AspATs have authentic AspAT activity in vitro using aspartate as an amino donor. However, the enzymic activities of the five AspATs differed in vitro. Alr4853-H(6) showed the highest AspAT activity, while the enzymic activity for the other four AspATs ranged from 6.5 to 53.7 % activity compared to Alr4853 (100 %). Genetic characterization of the five AspAT genes was also performed by inactivating each individual gene. All of the five AspAT knockout mutants exhibited reduced diazotrophic growth, and alr4853 was further identified to be a Fox gene (requiring fixed N(2) for growth in the presence of oxygen). Four out of five P(aspAT)-gfp transcriptional fusions were constitutively expressed in both diazotrophic and nitrate-dependent growth conditions. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR showed that alr4853 expression was increased by 2.3-fold after 24 h of N(2) deprivation. Taken together, these findings add to our understanding of the role of AspATs in N(2)-fixing within heterocystous cyanobacteria.

  3. Effects of Phosphorylation of β Subunits of Phycocyanins on State Transition in the Model Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuo; Zhan, Jiao; Chen, Ying; Yang, Mingkun; He, Chenliu; Ge, Feng; Wang, Qiang

    2015-10-01

    Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (hereafter Synechocystis) is a model cyanobacterium and has been used extensively for studies concerned with photosynthesis and environmental adaptation. Although dozens of protein kinases and phosphatases with specificity for Ser/Thr/Tyr residues have been predicted, only a few substrate proteins are known in Synechocystis. In this study, we report 194 in vivo phosphorylation sites from 149 proteins in Synechocystis, which were identified using a combination of peptide pre-fractionation, TiO(2) enrichment and liquid chromatograpy-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. These phosphorylated proteins are implicated in diverse biological processes, such as photosynthesis. Among all identified phosphoproteins involved in photosynthesis, the β subunits of phycocyanins (CpcBs) were found to be phosphorylated on Ser22, Ser49, Thr94 and Ser154. Four non-phosphorylated mutants were constructed by using site-directed mutagenesis. The in vivo characterization of the cpcB mutants showed a slower growth under high light irradiance and displayed fluorescence quenching to a lower level and less efficient energy transfer inside the phycobilisome (PBS). Notably, the non-phosphorylated mutants exhibited a slower state transition than the wild type. The current results demonstrated that the phosphorylation status of CpcBs affects the energy transfer and state transition of photosynthesis in Synechocystis. This study provides novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of protein phosphorylation in the regulation of photosynthesis in cyanobacteria and may facilitate the elucidation of the entire regulatory network by linking kinases to their physiological substrates. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The LexA transcription factor regulates fatty acid biosynthetic genes in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizawa, Ayumi; Kawahara, Akihito; Takashima, Kosuke; Takimura, Yasushi; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka; Hihara, Yukako

    2017-07-26

    Specific transcription factors have been identified in various heterotrophic bacterial species that regulate the sets of genes required for fatty acid metabolism. Here, we report that expression of the fab genes, encoding fatty acid biosynthetic enzymes, is regulated by the global regulator LexA in the photoautotrophic cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Sll1626, an ortholog of the well-known LexA repressor involved in the SOS response in heterotrophic bacteria, was isolated from crude extracts of Synechocystis by DNA affinity chromatography, reflecting its binding to the upstream region of the acpP-fabF and fabI genes. An electrophoresis mobility shift assay revealed that the recombinant LexA protein can bind to the upstream region of each fab gene tested (fabD, fabH, fabF, fabG, fabZ and fabI). Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of the wild type and a lexA-disrupted mutant strain suggested that LexA acts as a repressor of the fab genes involved in initiation of fatty acid biosynthesis (fabD, fabH and fabF) and the first reductive step in the subsequent elongation cycle (fabG) under normal growth conditions. Under nitrogen-depleted conditions, downregulation of fab gene expression is partly achieved through an increase in LexA-repressing activity. In contrast, under phosphate-depleted conditions, fab gene expression is upregulated, probably due to the loss of repression by LexA. We further demonstrate that elimination of LexA largely increases the production of fatty acids in strains modified to secrete free fatty acids. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Identification of OmpR-family response regulators interacting with thioredoxin in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadowaki, Taro; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka; Hisabori, Toru; Hihara, Yukako

    2015-01-01

    The redox state of the photosynthetic electron transport chain is known to act as a signal to regulate the transcription of key genes involved in the acclimation responses to environmental changes. We hypothesized that the protein thioredoxin (Trx) acts as a mediator connecting the redox state of the photosynthetic electron transport chain and transcriptional regulation, and established a screening system to identify transcription factors (TFs) that interact with Trx. His-tagged TFs and S-tagged mutated form of Trx, TrxMC35S, whose active site cysteine 35 was substituted with serine to trap the target interacting protein, were co-expressed in E. coli cells and Trx-TF complexes were detected by immuno-blotting analysis. We examined the interaction between Trx and ten OmpR family TFs encoded in the chromosome of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (S.6803). Although there is a highly conserved cysteine residue in the receiver domain of all OmpR family TFs, only three, RpaA (Slr0115), RpaB (Slr0947) and ManR (Slr1837), were identified as putative Trx targets [corrected].The recombinant forms of wild-type TrxM, RpaA, RpaB and ManR proteins from S.6803 were purified following over-expression in E. coli and their interaction was further assessed by monitoring changes in the number of cysteine residues with free thiol groups. An increase in the number of free thiols was observed after incubation of the oxidized TFs with Trx, indicating the reduction of cysteine residues as a consequence of interaction with Trx. Our results suggest, for the first time, the possible regulation of OmpR family TFs through the supply of reducing equivalents from Trx, as well as through the phospho-transfer from its cognate sensor histidine kinase.

  6. Proteomic approaches to identify substrates of the three Deg/HtrA proteases of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Lam X; Aigner, Harald; Timmerman, Evy; Gevaert, Kris; Funk, Christiane

    2015-06-15

    The family of Deg/HtrA proteases plays an important role in quality control of cellular proteins in a wide range of organisms. In the genome of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, a model organism for photosynthetic research and renewable energy products, three Deg proteases are encoded, termed HhoA, HhoB and HtrA. In the present study, we compared wild-type (WT) Synechocystis cells with the single insertion mutants ΔhhoA, ΔhhoB and ΔhtrA. Protein expression of the remaining Deg/HtrA proteases was strongly affected in the single insertion mutants. Detailed proteomic studies using DIGE (difference gel electrophoresis) and N-terminal COFRADIC (N-terminal combined fractional diagonal chromatography) revealed that inactivation of a single Deg protease has similar impact on the proteomes of the three mutants; differences to WT were observed in enzymes involved in the major metabolic pathways. Changes in the amount of phosphate permease system Pst-1 were observed only in the insertion mutant ΔhhoB. N-terminal COFRADIC analyses on cell lysates of ΔhhoB confirmed changed amounts of many cell envelope proteins, including the phosphate permease systems, compared with WT. In vitro COFRADIC studies were performed to identify the specificity profiles of the recombinant proteases rHhoA, rHhoB or rHtrA added to the Synechocystis WT proteome. The combined in vivo and in vitro N-terminal COFRADIC datasets propose RbcS as a natural substrate for HhoA, PsbO for HhoB and HtrA and Pbp8 for HtrA. We therefore suggest that each Synechocystis Deg protease protects the cell through different, but connected mechanisms. © The Authors Journal compilation © 2015 Biochemical Society.

  7. Role of the all1549 (ana-rsh) gene, a relA/spoT homolog, of the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Degang; Qian, Yaru; Miao, Xiaogang; Wen, Chongwei

    2011-06-01

    The role of a single relA/spoT homolog all1549 (designated hereafter as ana-rsh) of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120 was investigated. The complementation test in Escherichia coli showed that the protein encoded by ana-rsh possesses guanosine tetraphosphate (p)ppGpp-synthase/hydrolase activity. Under laboratory growth conditions, a low level of ppGpp was detected in Anabaena sp. PCC7120 and the loss of ana-rsh was lethal. Amino acid starvation induced ppGpp accumulation to an appropriate level, and nitrogen deficiency did not alter the ppGpp concentration in Anabaena cells. These data suggest that ana-rsh is required for cell viability under normal growth conditions and involved in the (p)ppGpp-related stringent response to amino acid deprivation, but not related to heterocyst formation and nitrogen fixation of Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

  8. Nitrate Assimilation Genes of the Marine Diazotrophic, Filamentous Cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp. Strain WH9601

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Qingfeng; Li, Hong; Post, Anton F.

    2000-01-01

    A 4.0-kb DNA fragment of Trichodesmium sp. strain WH9601 contained gene sequences encoding the nitrate reduction enzymes, nirA and narB. A third gene positioned between nirA and narB encodes a putative membrane protein with similarity to the nitrate permeases of Bacillus subtilis (NasA) and Emericella nidulans (CrnA). The gene was shown to functionally complement a ΔnasA mutant of B. subtilis and was assigned the name napA (nitrate permease). NapA was involved in both nitrate and nitrite upta...

  9. Identification and characterization of the nifV-nifZ-nifT gene region from the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    The nifV and leuA genes, which encode homocitrate synthase and alpha-isopropylmalate synthase, respectively, were cloned from the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 by a PCR-based strategy. Since the N-terminal parts of NifV and LeuA from other bacteria are highly similar to each other, a single pair of PCR primers was used to amplify internal fragments of both Anabaena strain 7120 genes. Sequence analysis of cloned PCR products confirmed the presence of two different nif...

  10. High radiation and desiccation tolerance of nitrogen-fixing cultures of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 emanates from genome/proteome repair capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harinder; Anurag, Kirti; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2013-10-12

    The filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 was found to tolerate very high doses of (60)Co-gamma radiation or prolonged desiccation. Post-stress, cells remained intact and revived all the vital functions. A remarkable capacity to repair highly disintegrated genome and recycle the damaged proteome appeared to underlie such high radioresistance and desiccation tolerance. The close similarity observed between the cellular response to irradiation or desiccation stress lends strong support to the notion that tolerance to these stresses may involve similar mechanisms.

  11. Sigma factor genes sigC, sigE, and sigG are upregulated in heterocysts of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldea, M Ramona; Mella-Herrera, Rodrigo A; Golden, James W

    2007-11-01

    We used gfp transcriptional fusions to investigate the regulation of eight sigma factor genes during heterocyst development in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. Reporter strains containing gfp fusions with the upstream regions of sigB2, sigD, sigI, and sigJ did not show developmental regulation. Time-lapse microscopy of sigC, sigE, and sigG reporter strains showed increased green fluorescent protein fluorescence in differentiating cells at 4 h, 16 h, and 9 h, respectively, after nitrogen step down.

  12. Transcription Profiling of the Model Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7002 by Next-Gen (SOLiD™) Sequencing of cDNA

    OpenAIRE

    Ludwig, Marcus; Bryant, Donald A.

    2011-01-01

    The genome of the unicellular, euryhaline cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 encodes about 3200 proteins. Transcripts were detected for nearly all annotated open reading frames by a global transcriptomic analysis by Next-Generation (SOLiD™) sequencing of cDNA. In the cDNA samples sequenced, ∼90% of the mapped sequences were derived from the 16S and 23S ribosomal RNAs and ∼10% of the sequences were derived from mRNAs. In cells grown photoautotrophically under standard conditions [38°C, ...

  13. Transcription profiling of the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 by NextGen (SOLiD™) Sequencing of cDNA

    OpenAIRE

    Marcus eLudwig; Bryant, Donald A.

    2011-01-01

    The genome of the unicellular, euryhaline cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 encodes about 3200 proteins. Transcripts were detected for nearly all annotated open reading frames by a global transcriptomic analysis by Next-Generation (SOLiDTM) sequencing of cDNA. In the cDNA samples sequenced, ~90% of the mapped sequences were derived from the 16S and 23S ribosomal RNAs and ~10% of the sequences were derived from mRNAs. In cells grown photoautotrophically under standard conditions (38 &#...

  14. A novel periplasmic protein (Slr0280) tunes photomixotrophic growth of the cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Liang-Liang; Li, Qing-Dong; Wu, Dong; Sun, Ya-Fang; Zhou, Ming; Zhao, Kai-Hong

    2016-01-10

    Cyanobacteria are among the main contributors to global photosynthesis and show a high degree of metabolic plasticity. Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 can grow under photoautotrophic, photomixotrophic or photoheterotrophic conditions. We have characterized a novel periplasmic protein (Slr0280) that tunes the photomixotrophic growth of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Slr0280 is a multi-domain protein consisting mainly of β-sheets. Several proteins that interact with Slr0280 were identified via bacterial two-hybrid screening. Slr0280 may interact through its DUF2233 domain with partners that participate in sugar metabolism, thereby coordinating the respective regulations. When slr0280 was deleted, the mutant grew more slowly than wild-type in the presence of glucose, which is ascribed to the down-regulation of glycolysis, glycogen catabolism, oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, Calvin cycle and glucose utilization. A positive regulation of Slr0280 on these sugar catabolic enzymes was confirmed by transcript (qPCR) analyses. Based on these findings, we proposed a speculative model that Slr0280 plays a coordinating regulatory role in sugar metabolism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The versatile TolC-like Slr1270 in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Paulo; Martins, Nuno M; Santos, Marina; Pinto, Filipe; Büttel, Zsófia; Couto, Narciso A S; Wright, Phillip C; Tamagnini, Paula

    2016-02-01

    Here we report on the functional characterization of the hypothetical protein Slr1270, a TolC homologue in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Analysis of a slr1270 insertion deletion mutant and respective wild-type revealed that the mutant presents increased susceptibility to antibiotics. In addition, a detailed study of the exoproteome showed that Slr1270 mediates protein secretion. Among the protein substrates dependent on Slr1270 function, we found the S-layer structural component. Electron microscopy studies of the slr1270 mutant showed that the S-layer is indeed absent. The requirement of functional Slr1270 for protein secretion and drug resistance mechanisms suggests that Slr1270 plays a role similar to that described for TolC in other bacteria. Additional phenotypic traits could also be observed, including slower growth rates at low temperature, impairment in biofilm formation and increased activity of enzymes detoxifying reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, an increased capacity of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) formation and release was also found in the slr1270 mutant, a feature that has not yet been observed in bacteria lacking TolC. This work highlights the marked physiological fitness that the TolC-like Slr1270 bestows to the photosynthetic model Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and presents a valuable model for studying OMVs formation and release. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Identification and characterization of a carboxysomal γ-carbonic anhydrase from the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Charlotte; Arefeen, Dewan; Tadesse, Yohannes; Long, Benedict M; Price, G Dean; Rowlett, Roger S; Kimber, Matthew S; Espie, George S

    2014-09-01

    Carboxysomes are proteinaceous microcompartments that encapsulate carbonic anhydrase (CA) and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco); carboxysomes, therefore, catalyze reversible HCO3 (-) dehydration and the subsequent fixation of CO2. The N- and C-terminal domains of the β-carboxysome scaffold protein CcmM participate in a network of protein-protein interactions that are essential for carboxysome biogenesis, organization, and function. The N-terminal domain of CcmM in the thermophile Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 is also a catalytically active, redox regulated γ-CA. To experimentally determine if CcmM from a mesophilic cyanobacterium is active, we cloned, expressed and purified recombinant, full-length CcmM from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 as well as the N-terminal 209 amino acid γ-CA-like domain. Both recombinant proteins displayed ethoxyzolamide-sensitive CA activity in mass spectrometric assays, as did the carboxysome-enriched TP fraction. NstCcmM209 was characterized as a moderately active and efficient γ-CA with a k cat of 2.0 × 10(4) s(-1) and k cat/K m of 4.1 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) at 25 °C and pH 8, a pH optimum between 8 and 9.5 and a temperature optimum spanning 25-35 °C. NstCcmM209 also catalyzed the hydrolysis of the CO2 analog carbonyl sulfide. Circular dichroism and intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence analysis demonstrated that NstCcmM209 was progressively and irreversibly denatured above 50 °C. NstCcmM209 activity was inhibited by the reducing agent tris(hydroxymethyl)phosphine, an effect that was fully reversed by a molar excess of diamide, a thiol oxidizing agent, consistent with oxidative activation being a universal regulatory mechanism of CcmM orthologs. Immunogold electron microscopy and Western blot analysis of TP pellets indicated that Rubisco and CcmM co-localize and are concentrated in Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 carboxysomes.

  17. An integrative approach to energy, carbon, and redox metabolism in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbeek, Ross; Fonstein, Veronika; Osterman, Andrei; Gerdes, Svetlana; Vassieva, Olga; Zagnitko, Olga; Rodionov, Dmitry

    2005-02-15

    The team of the Fellowship for Interpretation of Genomes (FIG) under the leadership of Ross Overbeek, began working on this Project in November 2003. During the previous year, the Project was performed at Integrated Genomics Inc. A transition from the industrial environment to the public domain prompted us to adjust some aspects of the Project. Notwithstanding the challenges, we believe that these adjustments had a strong positive impact on our deliverables. Most importantly, the work of the research team led by R. Overbeek resulted in the deployment of a new open source genomic platform, the SEED (Specific Aim 1). This platform provided a foundation for the development of CyanoSEED a specialized portal to comparative analysis and metabolic reconstruction of all available cyanobacterial genomes (Specific Aim 3). The SEED represents a new generation of software for genome analysis. Briefly, it is a portable and extendable system, containing one of the largest and permanently growing collections of complete and partial genomes. The complete system with annotations and tools is freely available via browsing or via installation on a user's Mac or Linux computer. One of the important unique features of the SEED is the support of metabolic reconstruction and comparative genome analysis via encoding and projection of functional subsystems. During the project period, the FIG research team has validated the new software by developing a significant number of core subsystems, covering many aspects of central metabolism (Specific Aim 2), as well as metabolic areas specific for cyanobacteria and other photoautotrophic organisms (Specific Aim 3). In addition to providing a proof of technology and a starting point for further community-based efforts, these subsystems represent a valuable asset. An extensive coverage of central metabolism provides the bulk of information required for metabolic modeling in Synechocystis sp.PCC 6803. Detailed analysis of several subsystems

  18. An integrative approach to energy, carbon, and redox metabolism in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbeek, Ross; Fonstein, Veronika; Osterman, Andrei; Gerdes, Svetlana; Vassieva, Olga; Zagnitko, Olga; Rodionov, Dmitry

    2005-02-15

    The team of the Fellowship for Interpretation of Genomes (FIG) under the leadership of Ross Overbeek, began working on this Project in November 2003. During the previous year, the Project was performed at Integrated Genomics Inc. A transition from the industrial environment to the public domain prompted us to adjust some aspects of the Project. Notwithstanding the challenges, we believe that these adjustments had a strong positive impact on our deliverables. Most importantly, the work of the research team led by R. Overbeek resulted in the deployment of a new open source genomic platform, the SEED (Specific Aim 1). This platform provided a foundation for the development of CyanoSEED a specialized portal to comparative analysis and metabolic reconstruction of all available cyanobacterial genomes (Specific Aim 3). The SEED represents a new generation of software for genome analysis. Briefly, it is a portable and extendable system, containing one of the largest and permanently growing collections of complete and partial genomes. The complete system with annotations and tools is freely available via browsing or via installation on a user's Mac or Linux computer. One of the important unique features of the SEED is the support of metabolic reconstruction and comparative genome analysis via encoding and projection of functional subsystems. During the project period, the FIG research team has validated the new software by developing a significant number of core subsystems, covering many aspects of central metabolism (Specific Aim 2), as well as metabolic areas specific for cyanobacteria and other photoautotrophic organisms (Specific Aim 3). In addition to providing a proof of technology and a starting point for further community-based efforts, these subsystems represent a valuable asset. An extensive coverage of central metabolism provides the bulk of information required for metabolic modeling in Synechocystis sp.PCC 6803. Detailed analysis of several subsystems

  19. Symplocamide A, a potent cytotoxin and chymotrypsin inhibitor from the marine Cyanobacterium Symploca sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linington, Roger G; Edwards, Daniel J; Shuman, Cynthia F; McPhail, Kerry L; Matainaho, Teatulohi; Gerwick, William H

    2008-01-01

    Investigation of a Symploca sp. from Papua New Guinea has led to the isolation of symplocamide A (1), a potent cancer cell cytotoxin, which also inhibits serine proteases with a 200-fold greater inhibition of chymotrypsin over trypsin. The complete stereostructure of symplocamide A was determined by detailed NMR and MS analysis as well as chiral HPLC analysis of the component amino acid residues. The presence of several unusual structural features in symplocamide A provides new insights into the pharmacophore model for protease selectivity in this drug class and may underlie the potent cytotoxicity of this compound to H-460 lung cancer cells (IC50=40 nM) as well as neuro-2a neuroblastoma cells (IC50=29 nM).

  20. DETECTION OF UV-B-INDUCED THYMINE DIMER IN A CYANOBACTERIUM, SCYTONEMA SP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA molecule is one of the major targets for UVR that can alter its molecular structure by forming different types of lesions leading to chronic mutagenic and even death of the cell. In comparison to UV-B, the wavelength of UV-A has poor efficiency in inducing the DNA damage; because they are not absorbed by native DNA. Before assessing the impact of UV-B radiation on DNA, we observed its effects on growth and survival of the test organism Scytonema sp. It was observed that growth and survival were severely affected by UV-B radiation for different durations. UV-B treatment causes loss in the cooperative binding property of DNA which is evident from the failure of complementary strands of DNA.

  1. Transcriptomic response to prolonged ethanol production in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienst, Dennis; Georg, Jens; Abts, Thomas; Jakorew, Lew; Kuchmina, Ekaterina; Börner, Thomas; Wilde, Annegret; Dühring, Ulf; Enke, Heike; Hess, Wolfgang R

    2014-02-06

    The production of biofuels in photosynthetic microalgae and cyanobacteria is a promising alternative to the generation of fuels from fossil resources. To be economically competitive, producer strains need to be established that synthesize the targeted product at high yield and over a long time. Engineering cyanobacteria into forced fuel producers should considerably interfere with overall cell homeostasis, which in turn might counteract productivity and sustainability of the process. Therefore, in-depth characterization of the cellular response upon long-term production is of high interest for the targeted improvement of a desired strain. The transcriptome-wide response to continuous ethanol production was examined in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 using high resolution microarrays. In two independent experiments, ethanol production rates of 0.0338% (v/v) ethanol d-1 and 0.0303% (v/v) ethanol d-1 were obtained over 18 consecutive days, measuring two sets of biological triplicates in fully automated photobioreactors. Ethanol production caused a significant (~40%) delay in biomass accumulation, the development of a bleaching phenotype and a down-regulation of light harvesting capacity. However, microarray analyses performed at day 4, 7, 11 and 18 of the experiment revealed only three mRNAs with a strongly modified accumulation level throughout the course of the experiment. In addition to the overexpressed adhA (slr1192) gene, this was an approximately 4 fold reduction in cpcB (sll1577) and 3 to 6 fold increase in rps8 (sll1809) mRNA levels. Much weaker modifications of expression level or modifications restricted to day 18 of the experiment were observed for genes involved in carbon assimilation (Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase and Glutamate decarboxylase). Molecular analysis of the reduced cpcB levels revealed a post-transcriptional processing of the cpcBA operon mRNA leaving a truncated mRNA cpcA* likely not competent for translation. Moreover, western blots and zinc

  2. Genomic responses to arsenic in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Sánchez-Riego

    Full Text Available Arsenic is a ubiquitous contaminant and a toxic metalloid which presents two main redox states in nature: arsenite [As(III] and arsenate [As(V]. Arsenic resistance in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 is mediated by the arsBHC operon and two additional arsenate reductases encoded by the arsI1 and arsI2 genes. Here we describe the genome-wide responses to the presence of arsenate and arsenite in wild type and mutants in the arsenic resistance system. Both forms of arsenic produced similar responses in the wild type strain, including induction of several stress related genes and repression of energy generation processes. These responses were transient in the wild type strain but maintained in time in an arsB mutant strain, which lacks the arsenite transporter. In contrast, the responses observed in a strain lacking all arsenate reductases were somewhat different and included lower induction of genes involved in metal homeostasis and Fe-S cluster biogenesis, suggesting that these two processes are targeted by arsenite in the wild type strain. Finally, analysis of the arsR mutant strain revealed that ArsR seems to only control 5 genes in the genome. Furthermore, the arsR mutant strain exhibited hypersentivity to nickel, copper and cadmium and this phenotype was suppressed by mutation in arsB but not in arsC gene suggesting that overexpression of arsB is detrimental in the presence of these metals in the media.

  3. Homology modeling and functional sites prediction of azoreductase enzyme from the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Philem Priyadarshini; Adhikari, Samrat

    2012-12-01

    Industrial dyes such as azodyes are potential environmental pollutants causing deleterious health hazards complications. These dyes are potentially degraded by azoreductase enzyme which is widely distributed in bacteria and also cyanobacteria. The azoreductase enzymes from cyanobacteria have not been explored in detail. Hence this enzyme from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 has been addressed in detail in the present study considering to explore the physico-chemical properties, evolutionary relationships, functional sites and structural properties using various bioinformatics tools. Four conserved regions were obtained from the multiple sequence analysis. The multiple sequence alignment showed conserved regions at different stretches from 1-11, 40-57, 82-120 and 161-177 amino acid residues. These regions could be used for designing degenerate primers or probes for PCR-based amplification or hybridization-based detection of azoreductase sequences from different source organisms. Domain analysis and functional site prediction showed the presence of functional sites and domain such as flavodoxin like fold responsible for enzyme activity. 3D model was constructed and the best model was selected and validated. Superimposition of the final structure and the template showed variations in certain regions which might be involved in the accommodation of various dyes. Our results may be helpful for further investigations like docking studies as well as in vivo and in vitro conditions although these predictions still need to be studied.

  4. Raman spectroscopic analysis of the responds of desert cyanobacterium Nostoc sp under UV-B radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gaohong; Hao, Zongjie; Hu, Chunxiang; Liu, Yongding

    Cyanobacteria are renowned for tolerating extremes of desiccation, UV radiation, freezethaw cycles, hypersalinity and oligotrophy, which make them as candidate par excellence for terraforming in extraterrestrial planet. Recently Raman spectrum was applied to study the biochemical information changes in different field of life science. In this study, we investigated the respond of desert cyanobactreium Nostoc sp under UV-B radiation via FT-Raman spectra. It was found that the spectral biomarkers of protectant molecular of UV radiation such as β-carotene and scytonemin were induced by UV-B radiation, but Chlorophyll a content was decreased, and also the photosynthesis activity was inhibited significantly. After light adaptation without UV-B radiation, the Chlorophyll a content and photosynthesis activity returned to high level, butβ-carotene and scytonemin content remained in the cells. Those results indicated that desert Cyanobacteria have good adaptation ability for UV-B radiation and synthesis of protectant molecular may be an effective strategy for its adaptation in evolution.

  5. Cellular Dynamics Drives the Emergence of Supracellular Structure in the Cyanobacterium, Phormidium sp. KS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Sato

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Motile filamentous cyanobacteria, such as Oscillatoria, Phormidium and Arthrospira, are ubiquitous in terrestrial and aquatic environments. As noted by Nägeli in 1860, many of them form complex three-dimensional or two-dimensional structures, such as biofilm, weed-like thalli, bundles of filaments and spirals, which we call supracellular structures. In all of these structures, individual filaments incessantly move back and forth. The structures are, therefore, macroscopic, dynamic structures that are continuously changing their microscopic arrangement of filaments. In the present study, we analyzed quantitatively the movement of individual filaments of Phormidium sp. KS grown on agar plates. Junctional pores, which have been proposed to drive cell movement by mucilage/slime secretion, were found to align on both sides of each septum. The velocity of movement was highest just after the reversal of direction and, then, attenuated exponentially to a final value before the next reversal of direction. This kinetics is compatible with the “slime gun” model. A higher agar concentration restricts the movement more severely and, thus, resulted in more spiral formation. The spiral is a robust form compatible with non-homogeneous movements of different parts of a long filament. We propose a model of spiral formation based on the microscopic movement of filaments.

  6. Electron Transport Controls Glutamine Synthetase Activity in the Facultative Heterotrophic Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, J. C.; Crespo, J. L.; Garcia-Dominguez, M.; Florencio, F. J.

    1995-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was inactivated in vivo by transferring cells from light to darkness or by incubation with the photosynthetic inhibitor 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea but not with 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-p-benzoquinone. Addition of glucose prevented both dark and 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea GS inactivation. In a Synechocystis psbE-psbF mutant (T1297) lacking photosystem II, glucose was required to maintain active GS, even in the light. However, in nitrogen-starved T1297 cells the removal of glucose did not affect GS activity. The fact that dark-inactivated GS was reactivated in vitro by the same treatments that reactivate the ammonium-inactivated GS points out that both nitrogen metabolism and redox state of the cells lead to the same molecular regulatory mechanism in the control of GS activity. Using GS antibodies we detected that dark-inactivated GS displayed a different electrophoretic migration with respect to the active form in nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis but not in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The possible pathway to modulate GS activity by the electron transport flow in Synechocystis cells is discussed.

  7. Impacts of diurnal variation of ultraviolet-B and photosynthetically active radiation on phycobiliproteins of the hot-spring cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain HKAR-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannaujiya, Vinod K; Sinha, Rajeshwar P

    2017-01-01

    The effects of diurnal variation of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR; 400-700 nm) and ultraviolet-B (UV-B; 280-315 nm) radiation on phycobiliproteins (PBPs) and photosynthetic pigments (PP) have been studied in the hot-spring cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain HKAR-2. The variations in PBPs and PP were monitored by alternating light and dark under PAR, UV-B, and PAR + UV-B radiations over a period of 25 h. There was a decline in the amount of Chl a and PBPs during light periods of UV-B and PAR + UV-B and an increase during dark periods showing a circadian rhythm by destruction and resynthesis of pigment-protein complex. However, a marked induction in carotenoids was recorded during light periods of the same radiations. Moreover, the ratio of Chl a/PE and Chl a/PC was increased in dark periods showing the resynthesis of bleached Chl a. The wavelength shift in emission fluorescence of PBPs toward shorter wavelengths further indicated the bleaching and destruction of PBPs during light periods. Oxidative damage upon exposure to PAR, UV-B, and PAR + UV-B was alleviated by induction of antioxidative enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX). The studied cyanobacterium exhibits a significant increase in the activities of SOD, CAT, and APX upon exposure to UV-B and PAR + UV-B radiations. The results indicate that pigment-protein composition of Nostoc sp. stain HKAR-2 was significantly altered during diurnal variation of light/radiation, which might play an important role in optimization for their productivity in a particular cyanobacterium.

  8. Ciliate Nassula sp. grazing on a microcystin-producing cyanobacterium (Planktothrix agardhii): impact on cell growth and in the microcystin fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combes, Audrey; Dellinger, Marc [' Molecules de communication et adaptation des microorganismes' , UMR 7245 CNRS-MNHN, Museum national d' Histoire naturelle, CP 39, 57 rue Cuvier, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Cadel-six, Sabrina [' Unite Caracterisation des Toxines' - Laboratoire de securite des aliments de Maisons-Alfort - ANSES, F-94701 Maisons Alfort Cedex (France); Amand, Severine [' Molecules de communication et adaptation des microorganismes' , UMR 7245 CNRS-MNHN, Museum national d' Histoire naturelle, CP 39, 57 rue Cuvier, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Comte, Katia, E-mail: kcomte@mnhn.fr [' Molecules de communication et adaptation des microorganismes' , UMR 7245 CNRS-MNHN, Museum national d' Histoire naturelle, CP 39, 57 rue Cuvier, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2013-01-15

    The proliferation of microcystins (MCs)-producing cyanobacteria (MCs) can have detrimental effects on the food chain in aquatic environments. Until recently, few studies had focused on the fate of MCs in exposed organisms, such as primary consumers of cyanobacteria. In this study, we investigate the impact of an MC-producing strain of the cyanobacterium Planktothrix agardhii on the growth and physiology of a Nassula sp. ciliate isolated from a non-toxic cyanobacterial bloom. We show that this Nassula sp. strain was able to consume and grow while feeding exclusively on an MC-producing cyanobacterium over a prolonged period of time (8 months). In short-term exposure experiments (8 days), ciliates consuming an MC-producing cyanobacterial strain displayed slower growth rate and higher levels of antioxidant enzymes than ciliates feeding on two non-MC-producing strains. Three high-performance methods (LC/MS, LC/MS-MS and ELISA) were used to quantify the free and bound MCs in the culture medium and in the cells. We show that ciliate grazing led to a marked decrease in free MCs (methanol extractable) in cells, the MCs were therefore no longer found in the surrounding culture medium. These findings suggest that MCs may have undergone redistribution (free vs bound MCs) or chemical degradation within the ciliates.

  9. Antagonism at combined effects of chemical fertilizers and carbamate insecticides on the rice-field N2-fixing cyanobacterium Cylindrospermum sp. in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padhy Rabindra N.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Effects of chemical fertilizers (urea, super phosphate and potash on toxicities of two carbamate insecticides, carbaryl and carbofuran, individually to the N2-fixing cyanobacterium, Cylindrospermum sp. were studied in vitro at partially lethal levels (below highest permissive concentrations of each insecticide. The average number of vegetative cells between two polar heterocysts was 16.3 in control cultures, while the mean value of filament length increased in the presence of chemical fertilizers, individually. Urea at the 10 ppm level was growth stimulatory and at the 50 ppm level it was growth inhibitory in control cultures, while at 100 ppm it was antagonistic, i.e. toxicity-enhancing along with carbaryl, individually to the cyanobacterium, antagonism was recorded. Urea at 50 ppm had toxicity reducing effect with carbaryl or carbofuran. At 100 and 250 ppm carbofuran levels, 50 ppm urea only had a progressive growth enhancing effect, which was marked well at 250 ppm carbofuran level, a situation of synergism. Super phosphate at the 10 ppm level only was growth promoting in control cultures, but it was antagonistic at its higher levels (50 and 100 ppm along with both insecticides, individually. Potash (100, 200, 300 and 400 ppm reduced toxicity due to carbaryl 20 and carbofuran 250 ppm levels, but potash was antagonistic at the other insecticide levels. The data clearly showed that the chemical fertilizers used were antagonistic with both the insecticides during toxicity to Cylindrospermum sp.

  10. Nitrogen control of the glnN gene that codes for GS type III, the only glutamine synthetase in the cyanobacterium Pseudanabaena sp. PCC 6903.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, J L; García-Domínguez, M; Florencio, F J

    1998-12-01

    Pseudanabaena sp. strain PCC 6903 is the first cyanobacteria lacking the typical prokaryotic glutamine synthetase type I encoded by the glnA gene. The glnN gene product, glutamine synthetase type III, is the only glutamine synthetase activity present in this cyanobacterium. Analysis of glnN expression clearly indicated a nitrogen-dependent regulation. Pseudanabaena glnN gene expression and GSIII activity were upregulated under nitrogen starvation or using nitrate as a nitrogen source, while low levels of transcript and activity were found in ammonium-containing medium. Primer extension analysis showed that the glnN gene promoter structure resembled that of the NtcA-related promoters. Mobility shift assays demonstrated that Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 NtcA protein, expressed and purified from Escherichia coli, bound to the promoter of the Pseudanabaena 6903 glnN gene. The NtcA control of the glnN gene in this cyanobacterium suggested that, in the absence of a glnA gene, NtcA took control of the only glutamine synthetase gene in a fashion similar to the way the glnA gene is governed in those cyanobacteria harbouring a glnA gene.

  11. Glutaredoxins are essential for stress adaptation in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M Sánchez-Riego

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Glutaredoxin are small redox proteins able to reduce disulfides and mixed disulfides between GSH and proteins. Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 contains three genes coding for glutaredoxins: ssr2061 (grxA and slr1562 (grxB code for dithiolic glutaredoxins while slr1846 (grxC codes for a monothiolic glutaredoxin. We have analyzed the expression of these glutaredoxins in response to different stresses, such as high light, H2O2 and heat shock. Analysis of the mRNA levels showed that grxA is only induced by heat while grxC is repressed by heat shock and is induced by high light and H2O2. In contrast, grxB expression was maintained almost constant under all conditions. Analysis of GrxA and GrxC protein levels by western blot showed that GrxA increases in response to high light, heat or H2O2 while GrxC is only induced by high light and H2O2, in accordance with its mRNA levels. In addition, we have also generated mutants that have interrupted one, two or three glutaredoxin genes. These mutants were viable and did not show any different phenotype from the WT under standard growth conditions. Nevertheless, analysis of these mutants under several stress conditions revealed that single grxA mutants grow slower after H2O2, heat and high light treatments, while mutants in grxB are indistinguishable from WT. grxC mutants were hypersensitive to treatments with H2O2, heat, high light and metals. A double grxAgrxC mutant was found to be even more sensitive to H2O2 than each corresponding single mutants. Surprisingly a mutation in grxB suppressed totally or partially the phenotypes of grxA and grxC mutants except the H2O2 sensitivity of the grxC mutant. This suggests that grxA and grxC participate in independent pathways while grxA and grxB participate in a common pathway for H2O2 resistance. The data presented here show that glutaredoxins are essential for stress adaptation in cyanobacteria, although their targets and mechanism of action remain unidentified.

  12. Characterization of a sodium-regulated glutaminase from cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Glutaminase is widely distributed among microorganisms and mammals with important functions. Lit-tle is known regarding the biochemical properties and functions of the deamidating enzyme glutami-nase in cyanobacteria. In this study a putative glutaminase encoded by gene slr2079 in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was investigated. The slr2079 was expressed as histidine-tagged fusion protein in Es-cherichia coli. The purified protein possessed glutaminase activity, validating the functional assign-ment of the genomic annotation. The apparent Km value of the recombinant protein for glutamine was 26.6 ± 0.9 mmol/L, which was comparable to that for some of other microbial glutaminases. Analysis of the purified protein revealed a two-fold increase in catalytic activity in the presence of 1 mol/L Na+. Moreover, the Km value was decreased to 12.2 ± 1.9 mmol/L in the presence of Na+. These data demon-strate that the recombinant protein Slr2079 is a glutaminase which is regulated by Na+ through in-creasing its affinity for substrate glutamine. The slr2079 gene was successfully disrupted in Synecho-cystis by targeted mutagenesis and the △slr2079 mutant strain was analyzed. No differences in cell growth and oxygen evolution rate were observed between △slr2079 and the wild type under standard growth conditions, demonstrating slr2079 is not essential in Synechocystis. Under high salt stress condition, however, △slr2079 cells grew 1.25-fold faster than wild-type cells. Moreover, the photosyn-thetic oxygen evolution rate of △slr2079 cells was higher than that of the wild-type. To further charac-terize this phenotype, a number of salt stress-related genes were analyzed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Expression of gdhB and prc was enhanced and expression of desD and guaA was repressed in △slr2079 compared to the wild type. In addition, expression of two key enzymes of ammonium assimi-lation in cyanobacteria, glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT) was examined

  13. Characterization of a sodium-regulated glutaminase from cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jie; ZHOU JunXia; YANG HaoMeng; YAN ChengShi; HUANG Fang

    2008-01-01

    Glutaminase is widely distributed among microorganisms and mammals with important funotions. Little is known regarding the biochemical properties and functions of the deamidating enzyme glutaminase in cyanobacteria. In this study a putative glutaminase encoded by gene slr2079 in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was investigated. The slr2079 was expressed as histidine-tagged fusion protein in Escheriohia coli. The purified protein possessed glutaminase activity, validating the functional assignment of the genomic annotation. The apparent Km value of the recombinant protein for glutamine was 26.6 ± 0.9 mmol/L, which was comparable to that for some of other microbial glutaminases. Analysis of the purified protein revealed a two-fold increase in catalytic activity in the presence of 1 mol/L Na+. Moreover, the Km value was decreased to 12.2 ± 1.9 mmol/L in the presence of Na+. These data demonstrate that the recombinant protein Slr2079 is a glutaminase which is regulated by Na+ through inoreasing its affinity for substrate glutamine. The sir2079 gene was successfully disrupted in Synechocystis by targeted mutagenesis and the △slr2079 mutant strain was analyzed. No differences in cell growth and oxygen evolution rate were observed between △slr2079 and the wild type under standard growth conditions, demonstrating sir2079 is not essential in Synechocystis. Under high salt stress condition, however, △slr2079 cells grew 1.25-fold faster than wild- type cells. Moreover, the photosynthetic oxygen evolution rate of △slr2079 cells was higher than that of the wild-type. To further characterize this phenotype, a number of salt stress-related genes were analyzed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Expression of gdhB and prc was enhanced and expression of desD and guaA was repressed in △slr2079 compared to the wild type. In addition, expression of two key enzymes of ammonium assimilation in cyanobacteria, glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT) was examined by semi

  14. Temperature dependence and polarization of fluorescence from Photosystem I in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmershaus, B P; Woolf, V M; Vermaas, W F

    1992-02-01

    To determine the fluorescence properties of cyanobacterial Photosystem I (PS I) in relatively intact systems, fluorescence emission from 20 to 295 K and polarization at 77 K have been measured from phycobilisomes-less thylakoids of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and a mutant strain lacking Photosystem II (PS II). At 295 K, the fluorescence maxima are 686 nm in the wild type from PS I and PS II and at 688 nm from PS I in the mutant. This emission is characteristic of bulk antenna chlorophylls (Chls). The 690-nm fluorescence component of PS I is temperature independent. For wild-type and mutant, 725-nm fluorescence increases by a factor of at least 40 from 295 to 20 K. We model this temperature dependence assuming a small number of Chls within PS I, emitting at 725 nm, with an energy level below that of the reaction center, P700. Their excitation transfer rate to P700 decreases with decreasing temperature increasing the yield of 725-nm fluorescence.Fluorescence excitation spectra of polarized emission from low-energy Chls were measured at 77 and 295 K on the mutant lacking PS II. At excitation wavelengths longer than 715 nm, 760-nm emission is highly polarized indicating either direct excitation of the emitting Chls with no participation in excitation transfer or total alignment of the chromophores. Fluorescence at 760 nm is unpolarized for excitation wavelengths shorter than 690 nm, inferring excitation transfer between Chls before 760-nm fluorescence occurs.Our measurements illustrate that: 1) a single group of low-energy Chls (F725) of the core-like PS I complex in cyanobacteria shows a strongly temperature-dependent fluorescence and, when directly excited, nearly complete fluorescence polarization, 2) these properties are not the result of detergent-induced artifacts as we are examining intact PS I within the thylakoid membrane of S. 6803, and 3) the activation energy for excitation transfer from F725 Chls to P700 is less than that of F735 Chls in green plants; F725

  15. Characterization of a sodium-regulated glutaminase from cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Zhou, JunXia; Yang, HaoMeng; Yan, ChengShi; Huang, Fang

    2008-12-01

    Glutaminase is widely distributed among microorganisms and mammals with important functions. Little is known regarding the biochemical properties and functions of the deamidating enzyme glutaminase in cyanobacteria. In this study a putative glutaminase encoded by gene slr2079 in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was investigated. The slr2079 was expressed as histidine-tagged fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The purified protein possessed glutaminase activity, validating the functional assignment of the genomic annotation. The apparent K (m) value of the recombinant protein for glutamine was 26.6 +/- 0.9 mmol/L, which was comparable to that for some of other microbial glutaminases. Analysis of the purified protein revealed a two-fold increase in catalytic activity in the presence of 1 mol/L Na(+). Moreover, the K (m) value was decreased to 12.2 +/- 1.9 mmol/L in the presence of Na(+). These data demonstrate that the recombinant protein Slr2079 is a glutaminase which is regulated by Na(+) through increasing its affinity for substrate glutamine. The slr2079 gene was successfully disrupted in Synechocystis by targeted mutagenesis and the Deltaslr2079 mutant strain was analyzed. No differences in cell growth and oxygen evolution rate were observed between Deltaslr2079 and the wild type under standard growth conditions, demonstrating slr2079 is not essential in Synechocystis. Under high salt stress condition, however, Deltaslr2079 cells grew 1.25-fold faster than wild-type cells. Moreover, the photosynthetic oxygen evolution rate of Deltaslr2079 cells was higher than that of the wild-type. To further characterize this phenotype, a number of salt stress-related genes were analyzed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Expression of gdhB and prc was enhanced and expression of desD and guaA was repressed in Deltaslr2079 compared to the wild type. In addition, expression of two key enzymes of ammonium assimilation in cyanobacteria, glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT

  16. Cloning and Characterization of the fecC Gene Necessary for Optimal Growth under Iron-Deficiency Conditions in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp.PCC 7120

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Wen-liang; LIU Yong-ding; ZHANG Cheng-cai; LI Juan

    2004-01-01

    The fecC gene encoding a putative iron (Ⅲ) dicitrate transporter was cloned from nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, and inactivated. The mutant grows normally in medium with NO-3, NH+4 or without combined nitrogen. But in iron-deficient medium, the mutant grows slowly. Photosynthetic properties were compared between the mutant and the wild-type strain, the content of photosynthetic pigments in the mutant is lower than that of the wild-type. The results of RT-PCR experiments show that the fecC gene is expressed under iron-deficient conditions, but is not expressed under iron-replete conditions. These results revealed that fecC gene product is required for optimal growth under iron-deficient conditions in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

  17. Interrelation between cyanophycin synthesis, L-arginine catabolism and photosynthesis in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, D P; Ruppel, H G; Pistorius, E K

    2000-01-01

    Ultrastructural and immunocytochemical investigations gave evidence that cyanophycin (multi-L-arginyl-poly-L-aspartate) granules accumulate in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 under nutrient deficient growth conditions, especially under phosphate limitation. Besides nutrient deficiency, growth of Synechocystis PCC 6803 on L-arginine or L-asparagine as sole N-source also led to high increase of cyanophycin synthesis, while growth on the combination of L-arginine or L-asparagine with nitrate only caused minor cyanophycin accumulation. Growth of Synechocystis PCC 6803 on L-arginine as sole N-source caused substantial morphological and physiological changes, such as severe thylakoid membrane degradation with partial loss of pigments and photosynthetic activity leading to a phenotype almost like that seen under nutrient deficiency. In contrast to the wild type, the PsbO-free Synechocystis PCC 6803 mutant could grow on L-arginine as sole N-source with only minor morphological and physiological changes. Due to its fairly balanced growth, the mutant accumulated only few cyanophycin granules. L-arginine degrading activity (measured as ornithine and ammonium formation) was high in the PsbO-free mutant but not in the wild type when cells were grown on L-arginine as sole N-source. In both cells types the L-arginine degrading activity was high (although in the PsbO-free mutant about twice as high as in wild type), when cells were grown on L-arginine in combination with nitrate, and as expected very low when cells were grown on nitrate as sole N-source. Thus, net cyanophycin accumulation in Synechocystis PCC 6803 is regulated by the relative concentration of L-arginine to the total nitrogen pool, and the intracellular L-arginine concentration is greatly influenced by the activity of the L-arginine degrading enzyme system which in part is regulated by the activity status of photosystem II. These results suggest a complex interrelation between cyanophycin

  18. Assessment of the effect of azo dye RP2B on the growth of a nitrogen fixing cyanobacterium--Anabaena sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, T L; Wu, S C

    2001-03-01

    Certain nitrogen fixing cyanobacteria are diazotrophic, which profoundly impacts the aquatic ecosystem chemically and biologically. Although certain types are banned due to their carcinogenicity, azo dyes are commonly used in the dyeing or textile industry. This work investigates the effect of azo dye on the growth of cyanobacteria. Anabaena sp. isolated from the Da Jia Brook is an odor producing, nitrogen fixing cyanobacterium. The growth rates of Anabaena sp. in the media with or without nitrogen source were 3.56 x 10(-2) mg/ml day and 2.44 x 10(-2) mg/ml day, respectively. Anabaena sp. could not use azo dye RP2B as the nitrogen source. Experimental results indicated that the growth of Anabaena sp. was inhibited in the medium containing RP2B. The degree of inhibition increased from 50% to 81% with an increasing concentration of RP2B (0-50 mg/l). The IC-50 (inhibitory concentration) of RP2B on the growth of Anabaena sp. was 5 mg/l (as based on dry weight) or 7 mg/l (as measured by chlorophyll a).

  19. Sustained H(2) production driven by photosynthetic water splitting in a unicellular cyanobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnicki, Matthew R; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E; Hill, Eric A; Kucek, Leo A; Fredrickson, Jim K; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alexander S

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between dinitrogenase-driven H(2) production and oxygenic photosynthesis was investigated in a unicellular cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, using a novel custom-built photobioreactor equipped with advanced process control. Continuously illuminated nitrogen-deprived cells evolved H(2) at rates up to 400 µmol ⋅ mg Chl(-1) ⋅ h(-1) in parallel with uninterrupted photosynthetic O(2) production. Notably, sustained coproduction of H(2) and O(2) occurred over 100 h in the presence of CO(2), with both gases displaying inverse oscillations which eventually dampened toward stable rates of 125 and 90 µmol ⋅ mg Chl(-1) ⋅ h(-1), respectively. Oscillations were not observed when CO(2) was omitted, and instead H(2) and O(2) evolution rates were positively correlated. The sustainability of the process was further supported by stable chlorophyll content, maintenance of baseline protein and carbohydrate levels, and an enhanced capacity for linear electron transport as measured by chlorophyll fluorescence throughout the experiment. In situ light saturation analyses of H(2) production displayed a strong dose dependence and lack of O(2) inhibition. Inactivation of photosystem II had substantial long-term effects but did not affect short-term H(2) production, indicating that the process is also supported by photosystem I activity and oxidation of endogenous glycogen. However, mass balance calculations suggest that carbohydrate consumption in the light may, at best, account for no more than 50% of the reductant required for the corresponding H(2) production over that period. Collectively, our results demonstrate that uninterrupted H(2) production in unicellular cyanobacteria can be fueled by water photolysis without the detrimental effects of O(2) and have important implications for sustainable production of biofuels. The study provides an important insight into the photophysiology of light-driven H(2) production by the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium

  20. Alr5068, a Low-Molecular-Weight protein tyrosine phosphatase, is involved in formation of the heterocysts polysaccharide layer in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hui; Wan, Shuang; Liu, Pi-Qiong; Wang, Li; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Wen-Li

    2013-10-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 forms nitrogen-fixing heterocysts after deprivation of combined nitrogen. Under such conditions, vegetative cells provide heterocysts with photosynthate and receive fixed nitrogen from the latter. Heterocyst envelope contains a glycolipid layer and a polysaccharide layer to restrict the diffusion of oxygen into heterocysts. Low-Molecular-Weight protein tyrosine phosphatases (LMW-PTPs) are involved in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides in bacteria. Alr5068, a protein from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, shows significant sequence similarity with LMW-PTPs. In this study we characterized the enzymatic properties of Alr5068 and showed that it can dephosphorylate several autophosphorylated tyrosine kinases (Alr2856, Alr3059 and All4432) of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 in vitro. Several conserved residues among LMW-PTPs are shown to be essential for the phosphatase activity of Alr5068. Overexpression of alr5068 results in a strain unable to survive under diazotrophic conditions, with the formation of morphologically mature heterocysts detached from the filaments. Overexpression of an alr5068 allele that lost phosphatase activity led to the formation of heterocyst with an impaired polysaccharide layer. The alr5068 gene was upregulated after nitrogen step-down and its mutation affected the expression of hepA and hepC, two genes necessary for the formation of the heterocyst envelope polysaccharide (HEP) layer. Our results suggest that Alr5068 is associated with the production of HEP in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

  1. Biochemical examination of the potential eukaryotic-type protein kinase genes in the complete genome of the unicellular Cyanobacterium synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Ayako; Yuasa, Takashi; Geng, Xiaoxing; Ikeuchi, Masahiko

    2002-06-30

    The complete genome of the unicellular motile cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 harbors seven putative genes for a subfamily Pkn2 of the eukaryotic-type (or "Hanks-type") protein kinase. Previously, SpkA and SpkB were shown to have protein kinase activity and to be required for cell motility. Here, the other five genes were examined. These genes, except for spkG (slr0152), were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. Eukaryotic-type protein kinase activity of the expressed SpkC (Slr0599), SpkD (S110776) and SpkF (Slr1225) was demonstrated as autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of the general substrate proteins. SpkE (Slr1443) did not show any activity, a finding consistent with its lack of several key amino acid residues in its kinase motif. Gene-disrupted mutants showed no discernible defect in phenotype except that spkD was apparently essential for survival.

  2. Involvement of thioredoxin on the scaffold activity of NifU in heterocyst cells of the diazotrophic cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomata, Jiro; Maeda, Maki; Isu, Atsuko; Inoue, Kazuhito; Hisabori, Toru

    2015-09-01

    The diazotrophic cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 (A.7120) differentiates into specialized heterocyst cells that fix nitrogen under nitrogen starvation conditions. Although reducing equivalents are essential for nitrogen fixation, little is known about redox systems in heterocyst cells. In this study, we investigated thioredoxin (Trx) networks in Anabaena using TrxM, and identified 16 and 38 candidate target proteins in heterocysts and vegetative cells, respectively, by Trx affinity chromatography (Motohashi et al. (Comprehensive survey of proteins targeted by chloroplast thioredoxin. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 2001; 98: , 11224-11229)). Among these, the Fe-S cluster scaffold protein NifU that facilitates functional expression of nitrogenase in heterocysts was found to be a potential TrxM target. Subsequently, we observed that the scaffold activity of N-terminal catalytic domain of NifU is enhanced in the presence of Trx-system, suggesting that TrxM is involved in the Fe-S cluster biogenesis.

  3. Identification of Specific Variations in a Non-Motile Strain of Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 Originated from ATCC 27184 by Whole Genome Resequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qinglong; Chen, Gu; Wang, Yuling; Wei, Dong

    2015-10-12

    Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is a widely used model organism in basic research and biofuel biotechnology application. Here, we report the genomic sequence of chromosome and seven plasmids of a glucose-tolerant, non-motile strain originated from ATCC 27184, GT-G, in use at Guangzhou. Through high-throughput genome re-sequencing and verification by Sanger sequencing, eight novel variants were identified in its chromosome and plasmids. The eight novel variants, especially the five non-silent mutations might have interesting effects on the phenotype of GT-G strains, for example the truncated Sll1895 and Slr0322 protein. These resequencing data provide background information for further research and application based on the GT-G strain and also provide evidence to study the evolution and divergence of Synechocystis 6803 globally.

  4. A novel mechanism of glutamine synthetase inactivation by ammonium in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Involvement of an inactivating protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, J C; Florencio, F J

    1995-06-19

    The glutamine synthetase of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 can be inactivated in vivo by ammonium addition by a new mechanism that involves the binding to the enzyme of an inactivating factor. This binding provokes a different mobility of the inactive enzyme with respect to the active form in non-denaturing PAGE, but not in SDS-PAGE. This modification of glutamine synthetase is for the first time visualized by Western blot analysis of the active and inactive forms. Cross-linking experiments using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) demonstrate the existence of two main complexes of 56 kDa and 67 kDa between the inactivating factor and the glutamine synthetase subunit (53 kDa) in the inactive but not in the active form of glutamine synthetase.

  5. A quantitative evaluation of ethylene production in the recombinant cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 harboring the ethylene-forming enzyme by membrane inlet mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavřel, Tomáš; Knoop, Henning; Steuer, Ralf; Jones, Patrik R; Červený, Jan; Trtílek, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The prediction of the world's future energy consumption and global climate change makes it desirable to identify new technologies to replace or augment fossil fuels by environmentally sustainable alternatives. One appealing sustainable energy concept is harvesting solar energy via photosynthesis coupled to conversion of CO2 into chemical feedstock and fuel. In this work, the production of ethylene, the most widely used petrochemical produced exclusively from fossil fuels, in the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is studied. A novel instrumentation setup for quantitative monitoring of ethylene production using a combination of flat-panel photobioreactor coupled to a membrane-inlet mass spectrometer is introduced. Carbon partitioning is estimated using a quantitative model of cyanobacterial metabolism. The results show that ethylene is produced under a wide range of light intensities with an optimum at modest irradiances. The results allow production conditions to be optimized in a highly controlled setup.

  6. Acetylome analysis reveals the involvement of lysine acetylation in photosynthesis and carbon metabolism in the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Ran; Yang, Mingkun; Chen, Zhuo; Cheng, Zhongyi; Yi, Xingling; Li, Chongyang; He, Chenliu; Xiong, Qian; Chen, Hui; Wang, Qiang; Ge, Feng

    2015-02-06

    Cyanobacteria are the oldest known life form inhabiting Earth and the only prokaryotes capable of performing oxygenic photosynthesis. Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (Synechocystis) is a model cyanobacterium used extensively in research on photosynthesis and environmental adaptation. Posttranslational protein modification by lysine acetylation plays a critical regulatory role in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes; however, its extent and function in cyanobacteria remain unexplored. Herein, we performed a global acetylome analysis on Synechocystis through peptide prefractionation, antibody enrichment, and high accuracy LC-MS/MS analysis; identified 776 acetylation sites on 513 acetylated proteins; and functionally categorized them into an interaction map showing their involvement in various biological processes. Consistent with previous reports, a large fraction of the acetylation sites are present on proteins involved in cellular metabolism. Interestingly, for the first time, many proteins involved in photosynthesis, including the subunits of phycocyanin (CpcA, CpcB, CpcC, and CpcG) and allophycocyanin (ApcA, ApcB, ApcD, ApcE, and ApcF), were found to be lysine acetylated, suggesting that lysine acetylation may play regulatory roles in the photosynthesis process. Six identified acetylated proteins associated with photosynthesis and carbon metabolism were further validated by immunoprecipitation and Western blotting. Our data provide the first global survey of lysine acetylation in cyanobacteria and reveal previously unappreciated roles of lysine acetylation in the regulation of photosynthesis. The provided data set may serve as an important resource for the functional analysis of lysine acetylation in cyanobacteria and facilitate the elucidation of the entire metabolic networks and photosynthesis process in this model cyanobacterium.

  7. Identification of a cis-acting element in nitrogen fixation genes recognized by CnfR in the nonheterocystous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya boryana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Ryoma; Kamiya, Narumi; Fujita, Yuichi

    2016-08-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya boryana has the ability to fix nitrogen without any heterocysts under microoxic conditions. Previously, we identified the cnfR gene for a master transcriptional activator for nitrogen fixation (nif) genes in a 50-kb gene cluster containing nif and nif-related genes in L. boryana. We showed that CnfR activates the transcription of nif genes in response to low oxygen conditions, which allows the oxygen-vulnerable enzyme nitrogenase to function. However, the regulatory mechanism that underlies regulation by CnfR remains unknown. In this study, we identified a conserved cis-acting element that is recognized by CnfR. We established a reporter system in the non-diazotrophic cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 using luciferase genes (luxAB). Reporter analysis was performed with a series of truncated and modified upstream regulatory regions of nifB and nifP. The cis-element can be divided into nine motifs I-IX, and it is located 76 bp upstream of the transcriptional start sites of nifB and nifP. Six motifs of them are essential for transcriptional activation by CnfR. This cis-acting element is conserved in the upstream regions of nif genes in all diazotrophic cyanobacteria, including Anabaena and Cyanothece, thereby suggesting that the transcriptional regulation by CnfR is widespread in nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria.

  8. Therapeutic properties in Tunisian hot springs: first evidence of phenolic compounds in the cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya sp. biomass, capsular polysaccharides and releasing polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabelsi, Lamia; Mnari, Amira; Abdel-Daim, Mohamed M; Abid-Essafi, Salwa; Aleya, Lotfi

    2016-12-13

    In Tunisia, the use of hot spring waters for both health and recreation is a tradition dating back to Roman times. In fact, thermal baths, usually called "Hammam" are recommended as a therapeutic and prophylactic measure against many types of illness and toxicity. While the chemical concentration of thermal water is admittedly associated with its therapeutic effects, the inclusion in spa waters of efficient bioproduct additives produced by photosynthetic microorganisms and that act against oxidative stress may comprise a significant supplementary value for thermal centers. The aim of this study was to investigate the antioxidant potential of the Tunisian thermophilic cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya sp. and to determine its phytochemical constituents and phenolic profile. BME (Biomass Methanolic Extract), CME (Capsular polysaccharides Methanolic Extract) and RME (Releasing polysaccharides Methanolic Extract) of Leptolyngbya sp. were examined for their antioxidant activities by means of DPPH, hydroxyl radical scavenging and ferrous ion chelating assays. Their total phenols, flavonoids, carotenoids, Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) and vitamin C contents, as well as their phenolic profiles were also determined. BME has the highest content of phenols (139 ± 1.2 mg/g), flavonoids (34.9 ± 0.32 mg CEQ/g), carotenoids (2.03 ± 0.56 mg/g) and vitamin C (15.7 ± 1.55 mg/g), while the highest MAAs content (0.42 ± 0.03 mg/g) was observed in CME. BME presented both the highest DPPH and hydroxyl radical scavenging ability with an IC50 of 0.07 and 0.38 mg/ml, respectively. The highest ferrous chelating capacity was detected in CME with an IC50 = 0.59 mg/ml. Phenolic profiles revealed the presence of 25 phenolic compounds with the existence of hydroxytyrosol, oleuropein, resveratrol and pinoresinol. The study demonstrated that the cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya sp. possesses abundant natural antioxidant products which may have prophylactic and

  9. Serine/threonine protein kinase SpkG is a candidate for high salt resistance in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengwei Liang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Seven serine/threonine kinase genes have been predicted in unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. SpkA and SpkB were shown to be required for cell motility and SpkE has no kinase activity. There is no report whether the other four STKs are involved in stress-mediated signaling in Synechocystis PCC6803. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this paper, we examined differential expression of the other four serine/threonine kinases, SpkC, SpkD, SpkF and SpkG, at seven different stress conditions. The transcriptional level was up-regulated of spkG and down-regulated of spkC under high salt stress condition. Two spk deletion mutants, ΔspkC and ΔspkG, were constructed and their growth characteristic were examined compared to the wild strain. The wild strain and ΔspkC mutant were not affected under high salt stress conditions. In contrast, growth of spkG mutant was completely impaired. To further confirm the function of spkG, we also examined the effect of mutation of spkG on the expression of salt stress-inducible genes. We compared genome-wide patterns of transcription between wild-type Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 and cells with a mutation in the SpkG with DNA microarray analysis. CONCLUSION: In this study, we first study the spkG gene as sensor of high salt signal. We consider that SpkG play essential roles in Synechocystis sp. for sensing the high salt signal directly, rather than mediating signals among other kinases. Our microarray experiment may help select relatively significant genes for further research on mechanisms of signal transduction of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 under high salt stress.

  10. A mutant lacking the glutamine synthetase gene (glnA) is impaired in the regulation of the nitrate assimilation system in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, J C; Florencio, F J

    1994-12-01

    The existence in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 of two genes (glnA and glnN) coding for glutamine synthetase (GS) has been recently reported (J.C. Reyes and F.J. Florencio, J. Bacteriol. 176:1260-1267, 1994). In the current work, the regulation of the nitrate assimilation system was studied with a glnA-disrupted Synechocystis mutant (strain SJCR3) in which the only GS activity is that corresponding to the glnN product. This mutant was unable to grow in ammonium-containing medium because of its very low levels of GS activity. In the SJCR3 strain, nitrate and nitrite reductases were not repressed by ammonium, and short-term ammonium-promoted inhibition of nitrate uptake was impaired. In Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803, nitrate seems to act as a true inducer of its assimilation system, in a way similar to that proposed for the dinitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria. A spontaneous derivative strain from SJCR3 (SJCR3.1), was able to grow in ammonium-containing medium and exhibited a fourfold-higher level of GS activity than but the same amount of glnN transcript as its parental strain (SJCR3). Taken together, these finding suggest that SJCR3.1 is a mutant affected in the posttranscriptional regulation of the GS encoded by glnN. This strain recovered regulation by ammonium of nitrate assimilation. SJCR3 cells were completely depleted of intracellular glutamine shortly after addition of ammonium to cells growing with nitrate, while SJCR3.1 cells maintained glutamine levels similar to that reached in the wild-type Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. Our results indicate that metabolic signals that control the nitrate assimilation system in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 require ammonium metabolism through GS.

  11. An alternative methionine aminopeptidase, MAP-A, is required for nitrogen starvation and high-light acclimation in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drath, Miriam; Baier, Kerstin; Forchhammer, Karl

    2009-05-01

    Methionine aminopeptidases (MetAPs or MAPs, encoded by map genes) are ubiquitous and pivotal enzymes for protein maturation in all living organisms. Whereas most bacteria harbour only one map gene, many cyanobacterial genomes contain two map paralogues, the genome of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 even three. The physiological function of multiple map paralogues remains elusive so far. This communication reports for the first time differential MetAP function in a cyanobacterium. In Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, the universally conserved mapC gene (sll0555) is predominantly expressed in exponentially growing cells and appears to be a housekeeping gene. By contrast, expression of mapA (slr0918) and mapB (slr0786) genes increases during stress conditions. The mapB paralogue is only transiently expressed, whereas the widely distributed mapA gene appears to be the major MetAP during stress conditions. A mapA-deficient Synechocystis mutant shows a subtle impairment of photosystem II properties even under non-stressed conditions. In particular, the binding site for the quinone Q(B) is affected, indicating specific N-terminal methionine processing requirements of photosystem II components. MAP-A-specific processing becomes essential under certain stress conditions, since the mapA-deficient mutant is severely impaired in surviving conditions of prolonged nitrogen starvation and high light exposure.

  12. Construction of shuttle, expression vector of human tumor necrosis factor alpha (hTNF-α) gene and its expression in a cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘凤龙; 施定基; 商之狄; 邵宁; 徐旭东; 钟泽璞; 张宏斌; 吴锦银; 王捷; 江悦华; 赵树进; 林晨; 张雪艳; 吴旻; 彭国宏; 张海霞; 曾呈奎

    1999-01-01

    The construction of the shuttle, expression vector of human tumor necrosis factor alpha (hTNF-a) gene and its expression in a cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 was reported. The 700-bp hTNF cDNA fragments have been recovered from plasmid pRL-rhTNF, then inserted downstream of the promoter PpsbA in the plasmid pRL439. The resultant intermediary plasmid pRL-TC has further been combined with the shuttle vector pDC-8 to get the shuttle, expression vector pDC-TNF. The expression of the rhTNF gene in Escherichia coli has been analyzed by SDS-PAGE and thin-layer scanning, and the results show that the expressed TNF protein with these two vectors is 16.9 percent (pRL-TC) and 15.0 percent (pDC-TNF) of the total proteins in the cells, respectively, while the expression level of TNF gene in plasmid pRL-rhTNF is only 11.8 percent. Combined with the participation of the conjugal and helper plasmids, pDC-TNF has been introduced into Anabaena sp PCC 7120 by triparental conjugative transfer, and the stable transgenic

  13. Regulation of glutamine synthetase activity in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 by the nitrogen source: effect of ammonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mérida, A; Candau, P; Florencio, F J

    1991-07-01

    Glutamine synthetase activity from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 is regulated as a function of the nitrogen source available in the medium. Addition of 0.25 mM NH4Cl to nitrate-grown cells promotes a clear short-term inactivation of glutamine synthetase, whose enzyme activity decreases to 5 to 10% of the initial value in 25 min. The intracellular levels of glutamine, determined under various conditions, taken together with the results obtained with azaserine (an inhibitor of transamidases), rule out the possibility that glutamine per se is responsible for glutamine synthetase inactivation. Nitrogen starvation attenuates the ammonium-mediated glutamine synthetase inactivation, indicating that glutamine synthetase regulation is modulated through the internal balance between carbon-nitrogen compounds and carbon compounds. The parallelism observed between the glutamine synthetase activity and the internal concentration of alpha-ketoglutarate suggests that this metabolite could play a role as a positive effector of glutamine synthetase activity in Synechocystis sp. Despite the similarities of this physiological system to that described for enterobacteria, the lack of in vivo 32P labeling of glutamine synthetase during the inactivation process excludes the existence of an adenylylation-deadenylylation system in this cyanobacterium.

  14. The presence of glutamate dehydrogenase is a selective advantage for the Cyanobacterium synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 under nonexponential growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, S; Lucena, J M; Reyes, J C; Florencio, F J; Candau, P

    1999-02-01

    The unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 has two putative pathways for ammonium assimilation: the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase cycle, which is the main one and is finely regulated by the nitrogen source; and a high NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activity (NADP-GDH) whose contribution to glutamate synthesis is uncertain. To investigate the role of the latter, we used two engineered mutants, one lacking and another overproducing NADP-GDH. No major disturbances in the regulation of nitrogen-assimilating enzymes or in amino acids pools were detected in the null mutant, but phycobiline content, a sensitive indicator of the nutritional state of cyanobacterial cells, was significantly reduced, indicating that NADP-GDH plays an auxiliary role in ammonium assimilation. This effect was already prominent in the initial phase of growth, although differences in growth rate between the wild type and the mutants were observed at this stage only at low light intensities. However, the null mutant was unable to sustain growth at the late stage of the culture at the point when the wild type showed the maximum NADP-GDH activity, and died faster in ammonium-containing medium. Overexpression of NADP-GDH improved culture proliferation under moderate ammonium concentrations. Competition experiments between the wild type and the null mutant confirmed that the presence of NADP-GDH confers a selective advantage to Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 in late stages of growth.

  15. Effects of heavy metals (Pb2+ and Cd2+) on the ultrastructure, growth and pigment contents of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. K. I. U. Arunakumara; ZHANG Xuecheng

    2009-01-01

    The unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, a model organism known for its unique combination of highly desirable molecular genetic, physiological and morphological characteristics, was employed in the present study. The species was cultured in BG11 liquid medium contained various initial concentrations of Pb2+ and Cd2+ (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 mg/L). The experiment was conducted for six days and the metal induced alterations in the ultrastructure, growth and pigment contents were assessed. Alterations in the ultrastructure of the Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 ceils became evident with the increased (>4 mg/L Pb2+) metal concentration. The photosynthetic apparatus (thylakoid membranes) were found to be the worst affected. Deteriorated or completely destroyed thylakoid membranes have made large empty spaces in the cell interior. In addition, at the highest concentration (8 mg/L pb2+), the polyphosphate granules became more prominent both in size and number. Despite the initial slight stimulations (0.2, 3.8 and 6.5% respectively at 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/L Pb2+), both metals inhibited the growth in a dose-dependent manner as incubation progressed. Pigment contents (chlorophyll a, βcarotene and phycocyanin) were also decreased with increasing metal concentration. Cells exposed to 6 mg/L Pb2+, resulted in 36.56, 37.39 and 29.34% reductions of chlorophyll a, β carotene and phycocyanin respectively over the control. Corresponding reductions for the same Cd2+concentrations were 57.83, 48.94 and 56.90%. Lethal concentration (96 h LC50) values (3.47 mg/L Cd2+ and 12.11 mg/L Pb2+) indicated that Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is more vulnerable to Cd2+ than Pb2+.

  16. Effects of heavy metals (Pb2+ and Cd2+) on the ultrastructure, growth and pigment contents of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunakumara, K. K. I. U.; Zhang, Xuecheng

    2009-05-01

    The unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, a model organism known for its unique combination of highly desirable molecular genetic, physiological and morphological characteristics, was employed in the present study. The species was cultured in BG11 liquid medium contained various initial concentrations of Pb2+ and Cd2+ (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 mg/L). The experiment was conducted for six days and the metal induced alterations in the ultrastructure, growth and pigment contents were assessed. Alterations in the ultrastructure of the Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 cells became evident with the increased (>4 mg/L Pb2+) metal concentration. The photosynthetic apparatus (thylakoid membranes) were found to be the worst affected. Deteriorated or completely destroyed thylakoid membranes have made large empty spaces in the cell interior. In addition, at the highest concentration (8 mg/L Pb2+), the polyphosphate granules became more prominent both in size and number. Despite the initial slight stimulations (0.2, 3.8 and 6.5% respectively at 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/L Pb2+), both metals inhibited the growth in a dose-dependent manner as incubation progressed. Pigment contents (chlorophyll α, β carotene and phycocyanin) were also decreased with increasing metal concentration. Cells exposed to 6 mg/L Pb2+, resulted in 36.56, 37.39 and 29.34% reductions of chlorophyll α, β carotene and phycocyanin respectively over the control. Corresponding reductions for the same Cd2+concentrations were 57.83, 48.94 and 56.90%. Lethal concentration (96 h LC50) values (3.47 mg/L Cd2+ and 12.11 mg/L Pb2+) indicated that Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is more vulnerable to Cd2+ than Pb2+.

  17. Transduction of the light signal during complementary chromatic adaptation in the cyanobacterium Calothrix sp. PCC 7601: DNA-binding proteins and modulation by phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobczyk, A; Schyns, G; Tandeau de Marsac, N; Houmard, J

    1993-03-01

    The cyanobacterium Calothrix sp. PCC 7601 can adapt its pigment content in response to changes in the incident light wavelength. It synthesizes, as major light-harvesting pigments, either phycocyanin 2 (PC2, encoded by the cpc2 operon) under red light or phycoerythrin (PE, encoded by the cpeBA operon) under green light conditions. The last step of the signal transduction pathway is characterized by a transcriptional control of the expression of these operons. Partially purified protein extracts were used in gel retardation assays and DNase I footprinting experiments to identify the factors that interact with the promoter region of the cpeBA operon. We found that two proteins, RcaA and RcaB, only detected in extracts of cells grown under green light, behave as positive transcriptional factors for the expression of the cpeBA operon. Treatment of the fractions containing RcaA and RcaB with alkaline phosphatase prevents the binding of RcaA but not of RcaB to the cpeBA promoter region. A post-translational modification of RcaA thus modulates its affinity for DNA.

  18. Biochemical and functional characterization of a eukaryotic-type protein kinase, SpkB, in the cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Ayako; Yoshihara, Shizue; Yuasa, Takashi; Geng, Xiaoxing; Ikeuchi, Masahiko

    2003-04-01

    On the basis of the genome sequence, the unicellular motile cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 harbors seven putative genes for eukaryotic-type protein kinase belonging to Pkn2 subfamily ( spkA approximately spkG). Previously, SpkA was shown to have protein kinase activity and to be required for cell motility. Here, the role of the spkB was examined. The spkB gene was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with His-tag, and the protein was purified by Ni(2+) affinity chromatography. The eukaryotic-type protein kinase activity of the expressed SpkB was demonstrated as autophosphorylation to itself and phosphorylation of the general substrate proteins. SpkB showed autophosphorylation activity in the presence of both Mg(2+) and Mn(2+), but not in Ca(2+). Phenotype analysis of spkB disruptant of Synechocystis revealed that spkB is required for cell motility, but not for phototaxis. These results suggest that SpkB is the eukaryotic-type protein kinase, which regulates cellular motility via protein phosphorylation like SpkA.

  19. Treatment with moderate concentrations of NaHSO{sub 3} enhances photobiological H{sub 2} production in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lianjun; Chen, Ming; Wei, Lanzhen; Gao, Fudan; Lv, Zhongxian; Wang, Quanxi; Ma, Weimin [College of Life and Environment Sciences, Shanghai Normal University, Guilin Road 100, Shanghai 200234 (China)

    2010-12-15

    In cyanobacteria, treatment with low concentrations of NaHSO{sub 3} can enhance photosynthetic efficiency, whereas NaHSO{sub 3} in high amounts often inhibits cell growth and photosynthesis may even cause death. In the present study, our results showed that treatment with moderate concentrations of NaHSO{sub 3} considerably improved the yield of photobiological H{sub 2} production in the filamentous N{sub 2}-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. Under steady state conditions, the accumulated H{sub 2} levels in cells treated with 1 mM NaHSO{sub 3} were approximately 10 times higher than that in untreated cells. Such improvement occurred in heterocysts and was most likely caused by increases in the expression and activity of nitrogenase. The effects of treatment with low, moderate, and high concentrations of NaHSO{sub 3} in cyanobacteria were proposed on the basis of the results obtained in the present study and from previous knowledge. (author)

  20. Sucrose synthesis in the nitrogen-fixing Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is controlled by the two-component response regulator OrrA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehira, Shigeki; Kimura, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Shogo; Ohmori, Masayuki

    2014-09-01

    The filamentous, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 accumulates sucrose as a compatible solute against salt stress. Sucrose-phosphate synthase activity, which is responsible for the sucrose synthesis, is increased by salt stress, but the mechanism underlying the regulation of sucrose synthesis remains unknown. In the present study, a response regulator, OrrA, was shown to control sucrose synthesis. Expression of spsA, which encodes a sucrose-phosphate synthase, and susA and susB, which encode sucrose synthases, was induced by salt stress. In the orrA disruptant, salt induction of these genes was completely abolished. The cellular sucrose level of the orrA disruptant was reduced to 40% of that in the wild type under salt stress conditions. Moreover, overexpression of orrA resulted in enhanced expression of spsA, susA, and susB, followed by accumulation of sucrose, without the addition of NaCl. We also found that SigB2, a group 2 sigma factor of RNA polymerase, regulated the early response to salt stress under the control of OrrA. It is concluded that OrrA controls sucrose synthesis in collaboration with SigB2.

  1. Dynamics and Cell-Type Specificity of the DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Protein RecN in the Developmental Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Hu

    Full Text Available DNA replication and repair are two fundamental processes required in life proliferation and cellular defense and some common proteins are involved in both processes. The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is capable of forming heterocysts for N2 fixation in the absence of a combined-nitrogen source. This developmental process is intimately linked to cell cycle control. In this study, we investigated the localization of the DNA double-strand break repair protein RecN during key cellular events, such as chromosome damaging, cell division, and heterocyst differentiation. Treatment by a drug causing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs induced reorganization of the RecN focus preferentially towards the mid-cell position. RecN-GFP was absent in most mature heterocysts. Furthermore, our results showed that HetR, a central player in heterocyst development, was involved in the proper positioning and distribution of RecN-GFP. These results showed the dynamics of RecN in DSB repair and suggested a differential regulation of DNA DSB repair in vegetative cell and heterocysts. The absence of RecN in mature heterocysts is compatible with the terminal nature of these cells.

  2. Dynamics and Cell-Type Specificity of the DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Protein RecN in the Developmental Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sheng; Wang, Jinglan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Wen-Li

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication and repair are two fundamental processes required in life proliferation and cellular defense and some common proteins are involved in both processes. The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is capable of forming heterocysts for N2 fixation in the absence of a combined-nitrogen source. This developmental process is intimately linked to cell cycle control. In this study, we investigated the localization of the DNA double-strand break repair protein RecN during key cellular events, such as chromosome damaging, cell division, and heterocyst differentiation. Treatment by a drug causing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced reorganization of the RecN focus preferentially towards the mid-cell position. RecN-GFP was absent in most mature heterocysts. Furthermore, our results showed that HetR, a central player in heterocyst development, was involved in the proper positioning and distribution of RecN-GFP. These results showed the dynamics of RecN in DSB repair and suggested a differential regulation of DNA DSB repair in vegetative cell and heterocysts. The absence of RecN in mature heterocysts is compatible with the terminal nature of these cells.

  3. Construction of a stepwise gene integration system by transient expression of actinophage R4 integrase in cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Takamasa; Nishizawa, Akito; Nishizawa, Tomoyasu; Asayama, Munehiko; Takahashi, Hideo; Shirai, Makoto

    2014-08-01

    The integrase of actinophage R4, which belongs to the large serine-recombinase family, catalyzes site-specific recombination between two distinct attachment site sequences of the phage (attP) and actinomycete Streptomyces parvulus 2297 chromosome (attB). We previously reported that R4 integrase (Sre) catalyzed site-specific recombination both in vivo and in vitro. In the present study, a Sre-based system was developed for the stepwise site-specific integration of multiple genes into the chromosome of cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (hereafter PCC 6803). A transgene-integrated plasmid with two attP sites and a non-replicative sre-containing plasmid were co-introduced into attB-inserted PCC 6803 cells. The transiently expressed Sre catalyzed highly efficient site-specific integration between one of the two attP sites on the integration plasmid and the attB site on the chromosome of PCC 6803. A second transgene-integrated plasmid with an attB site was integrated into the residual attP site on the chromosome by repeating site-specific recombination. The transformation frequencies (%) of the first and second integrations were approximately 5.1 × 10(-5) and 8.2 × 10(-5), respectively. Furthermore, the expression of two transgenes was detected. This study is the first to apply the multiple gene site-specific integration system based on R4 integrase to cyanobacteria.

  4. Impact of different group 2 sigma factors on light use efficiency and high salt stress in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taina Tyystjärvi

    Full Text Available Sigma factors of RNA polymerase recognize promoters and have a central role in controlling transcription initiation and acclimation to changing environmental conditions. The cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 encodes four non-essential group 2 sigma factors, SigB, SigC, SigD and SigE that closely resemble the essential SigA factor. Three out of four group 2 sigma factors were simultaneously inactivated and acclimation responses of the triple inactivation strains were studied. All triple inactivation strains grew slowly in low light, and our analysis suggests that the reason is a reduced capacity to adjust the perception of light. Simultaneous inactivation of SigB and SigD hampered growth also in high light. SigB is the most important group 2 sigma factor for salt acclimation, and elimination of all the other group 2 sigma factors slightly improved the salt tolerance of Synechocystis. Presence of only SigE allowed full salt acclimation including up-regulation of hspA and ggpS genes, but more slowly than SigB. Cells with only SigD acclimated to high salt but the acclimation processes differed from those of the control strain. Presence of only SigC prevented salt acclimation.

  5. Fine-Tuning of Photoautotrophic Protein Production by Combining Promoters and Neutral Sites in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berla, Bertram M.

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic cell factories that use solar energy to convert CO2 into useful products. Despite this attractive feature, the development of tools for engineering cyanobacterial chassis has lagged behind that for heterotrophs such as Escherichia coli or Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Heterologous genes in cyanobacteria are often integrated at presumptively “neutral” chromosomal sites, with unknown effects. We used transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) data for the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 to identify neutral sites from which no transcripts are expressed. We characterized the two largest such sites on the chromosome, a site on an endogenous plasmid, and a shuttle vector by integrating an enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) expression cassette expressed from either the Pcpc560 or the Ptrc1O promoter into each locus. Expression from the endogenous plasmid was as much as 14-fold higher than that from the chromosome, with intermediate expression from the shuttle vector. The expression characteristics of each locus correlated predictably with the promoters used. These findings provide novel, characterized tools for synthetic biology and metabolic engineering in cyanobacteria. PMID:26209663

  6. Ammonium/methylammonium permeases of a Cyanobacterium. Identification and analysis of three nitrogen-regulated amt genes in synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesinos, M L; Muro-Pastor, A M; Herrero, A; Flores, E

    1998-11-20

    Ammonium is an important nitrogen source for many microorganisms and plants. Ammonium transporters whose activity can be probed with [14C]methylammonium have been described in several organisms including some cyanobacteria, and amt genes encoding ammonium/methylammonium permeases have been recently identified in yeast, Arabidopsis thaliana, and some bacteria. The unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 exhibited a [14C]methylammonium uptake activity that was inhibited by externally added ammonium. Three putative amt genes that are found in the recently published complete sequence of the chromosome of strain PCC 6803 were inactivated by insertion of antibiotic resistance-encoding gene-cassettes. The corresponding mutant strains were impaired in uptake of [14C]methylammonium. Open reading frame sll0108 (amt1) was responsible for a high affinity uptake activity (Ks for methylammonium, 2.7 microM), whereas open reading frames sll1017 (amt2) and sll0537 (amt3) made minor contributions to uptake at low substrate concentrations. Expression of the three amt genes was higher in nitrogen-starved cells than in cells incubated in the presence of a source of nitrogen (either ammonium or nitrate), but amt1 was expressed at higher levels than the other two amt genes. Transcription of amt1 was found to take place from a promoter bearing the structure of the cyanobacterial promoters activated by the nitrogen control transcription factor, NtcA.

  7. Unraveling the Physiological Roles of the Cyanobacterium Geitlerinema sp. BBD and Other Black Band Disease Community Members through Genomic Analysis of a Mixed Culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A Den Uyl

    Full Text Available Black band disease (BBD is a cyanobacterial-dominated polymicrobial mat that propagates on and migrates across coral surfaces, necrotizing coral tissue. Culture-based laboratory studies have investigated cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria isolated from BBD, but the metabolic potential of various BBD microbial community members and interactions between them remain poorly understood. Here we report genomic insights into the physiological and metabolic potential of the BBD-associated cyanobacterium Geitlerinema sp. BBD 1991 and six associated bacteria that were also present in the non-axenic culture. The essentially complete genome of Geitlerinema sp. BBD 1991 contains a sulfide quinone oxidoreductase gene for oxidation of sulfide, suggesting a mechanism for tolerating the sulfidic conditions of BBD mats. Although the operon for biosynthesis of the cyanotoxin microcystin was surprisingly absent, potential relics were identified. Genomic evidence for mixed-acid fermentation indicates a strategy for energy metabolism under the anaerobic conditions present in BBD during darkness. Fermentation products may supply carbon to BBD heterotrophic bacteria. Among the six associated bacteria in the culture, two are closely related to organisms found in culture-independent studies of diseased corals. Their metabolic pathways for carbon and sulfur cycling, energy metabolism, and mechanisms for resisting coral defenses suggest adaptations to the coral surface environment and biogeochemical roles within the BBD mat. Polysulfide reductases were identified in a Flammeovirgaceae genome (Bacteroidetes and the sox pathway for sulfur oxidation was found in the genome of a Rhodospirillales bacterium (Alphaproteobacteria, revealing mechanisms for sulfur cycling, which influences virulence of BBD. Each genomic bin possessed a pathway for conserving energy from glycerol degradation, reflecting adaptations to the glycerol-rich coral environment. The presence of genes

  8. Mutagenesis of hetR reveals amino acids necessary for HetR function in the heterocystous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risser, Douglas D; Callahan, Sean M

    2007-03-01

    HetR is the master regulator of heterocyst differentiation in the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. Genetic selection was used to identify 33 amino acid substitutions in HetR that reduced the proportion of cells undergoing heterocyst differentiation to less than 2%. Conservative substitutions in the wild-type HetR protein revealed three mutations that dramatically reduced the amount of heterocyst differentiation when the mutant allele was present in place of the wild-type allele on a replicating plasmid in a mutant lacking hetR on the chromosome. An H69Y substitution resulted in heterocyst formation among less than 0.1% of cells, and D17E and G36A substitutions resulted in a Het- phenotype, compared to heterocyst formation among approximately 25% of cells with the wild-type hetR under the same conditions. The D17E substitution prevented DNA binding activity exhibited by wild-type HetR in mobility shift assays, whereas G36A and H69Y substitutions had no affect on DNA binding. D17E, G36A, and H69Y substitutions also resulted in higher levels of the corresponding HetR protein than of the wild-type protein when each was expressed from an inducible promoter in a hetR deletion strain, suggesting an effect on HetR protein turnover. Surprisingly, C48A and S152A substitutions, which were previously reported to result in a Het- phenotype, were found to have no effect on heterocyst differentiation or patterning when the corresponding mutations were introduced into an otherwise wild-type genetic background in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. The clustering of mutations that satisfied the positive selection near the amino terminus suggests an important role for this part of the protein in HetR function.

  9. O2-dependent large electron flow functioned as an electron sink, replacing the steady-state electron flux in photosynthesis in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, but not in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Ryosuke; Shimakawa, Ginga; Shaku, Keiichiro; Shimizu, Satoko; Akimoto, Seiji; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Amako, Katsumi; Sugimoto, Toshio; Tamoi, Masahiro; Makino, Amane; Miyake, Chikahiro

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether alternative electron flow (AEF) can replace the photosynthetic electron flow in cyanobacteria, we used an open O2-electrode system to monitor O2-exchange over a long period. In air-grown Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (S. 6803(WT)), the quantum yield of PSII, Y(II), held even after photosynthesis was suppressed by CO2 shortage. The S. 6803 mutant, deficient in flavodiiron (FLV) proteins 1 and 3, showed the same phenotype as S. 6803(WT). In contrast, Y(II) decreased in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 (S. 7942). These results suggest that AEF functioned as the Y(II) in S. 6803 and replaced the photosynthetic electron flux. In contrast, the activity of AEF in S. 7942 was lower. The affinity of AEF for O2 in S. 6803 did not correspond to those of FLVs in bacteria or terminal oxidases in respiration. AEF might be driven by photorespiration.

  10. Casting a net: fibres produced by Microcystis sp. in field and laboratory populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Moshe; Weiss, Gad; Daniel, Einat; Wilenz, Avraham; Hadas, Ora; Sukenik, Assaf; Sedmak, Bojan; Dittmann, Elke; Braun, Sergei; Kaplan, Aaron

    2012-06-01

    The reasons for the apparent dominance of the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis sp., reflected by its massive blooms in many fresh water bodies, are poorly understood. We show that in addition to a large array of secondary metabolites, some of which are toxic to eukaryotes, Microcystis sp. secretes large amounts of fibrous exopolysaccharides that form extremely long fibres several millimetres in length. This phenomenon was detected in field and laboratory cultures of various Microcystis strains. In addition, we have identified and characterized three of the proteins associated with the fibres and the genes encoding them in Microcystis sp. PCC 7806 but were unable to completely delete them from its genome. Phylogenetic analysis of the most abundant one, designated IPF-469, showed its presence only in cyanobacteria. Its closest relatives were detected in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and in Cyanothece sp. strains; in the latter the genomic organization of the IPF-469 was highly conserved. IPF-469 and the other two proteins identified here, a haloperoxidase and a haemolysin-type calcium-binding protein, may be part of the fibres secretion pathway. The biological role of the fibres in Microcystis sp. is discussed.

  11. An Integrative Approach to Energy, Carbon, and Redox Metabolism in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Special Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbeek, R.

    2003-06-30

    The main objectives for the first year were to produce a detailed metabolic reconstruction of synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 especially in interrelated areas of photosynthesis, respiration, and central carbon metabolism to support a more complete understanding and modeling of this organism. Additionally, Integrated Genomics, Inc., provided detailed bioinformatic analysis of selected functional systems related to carbon and energy generation and utilization, and of the corresponding pathways, functional roles and individual genes to support wet lab experiments by collaborators.

  12. Complete genome sequence of cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. NIES-3756, a potentially useful strain for phytochrome-based bioengineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Yuu; Fujisawa, Takatomo; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Katayama, Mitsunori; Misawa, Naomi; Wakazuki, Sachiko; Shimura, Yohei; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Kawachi, Masanobu; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Eki, Toshihiko; Kanesaki, Yu

    2016-01-20

    To explore the diverse photoreceptors of cyanobacteria, we isolated Nostoc sp. strain NIES-3756 from soil at Mimomi-Park, Chiba, Japan, and determined its complete genome sequence. The Genome consists of one chromosome and two plasmids (total 6,987,571 bp containing no gaps). The NIES-3756 strain carries 7 phytochrome and 12 cyanobacteriochrome genes, which will facilitate the studies of phytochrome-based bioengineering. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. CO2 capture using limestone for cultivation of the freshwater microalga Chlorella sorokiniana PAZ and the cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. VSJ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawar, Prachi; Javalkote, Vivek; Burnap, Robert; Mahulikar, Pramod; Puranik, Pravin

    2016-12-01

    The present study reports a process wherein CO2 is captured in the form of bicarbonates using calcium oxide and photosynthetically fixed into biomass. Microalgal cultures viz. Chlorella sorokiniana PAZ and Arthrospira sp. VSJ were grown in the medium containing bicarbonates. The rate of bicarbonate utilization by C. sorokiniana PAZ was higher when CO2 trapped in the presence of 2.67mM calcium oxide than in the presence of 10mM sodium hydroxide and with direct addition of 10mM sodium bicarbonate. For Arthrospira sp. VSJ the bicarbonate utilization was 92.37%, 88.34% and 59.23% for the medium containing CaO, NaOH and NaHCO3, respectively. Illumination of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR)+ultraviolet A radiation (UVA) enhanced the yield of C. sorokiniana PAZ and Arthrospira sp. VSJ by 1.3 and 1.8 folds, respectively. FTIR analysis revealed elevation in the biosynthesis of specific metabolites in response to the UVA exposure.

  14. ApcD is necessary for efficient energy transfer from phycobilisomes to photosystem I and helps to prevent photoinhibition in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chunxia; Tang, Aihui; Zhao, Jindong; Mullineaux, Conrad W; Shen, Gaozhong; Bryant, Donald A

    2009-09-01

    Phycobilisomes (PBS) are the major light-harvesting, protein-pigment complexes in cyanobacteria and red algae. PBS absorb and transfer light energy to photosystem (PS) II as well as PS I, and the distribution of light energy from PBS to the two photosystems is regulated by light conditions through a mechanism known as state transitions. In this study the quantum efficiency of excitation energy transfer from PBS to PS I in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 was determined, and the results showed that energy transfer from PBS to PS I is extremely efficient. The results further demonstrated that energy transfer from PBS to PS I occurred directly and that efficient energy transfer was dependent upon the allophycocyanin-B alpha subunit, ApcD. In the absence of ApcD, cells were unable to perform state transitions and were trapped in state 1. Action spectra showed that light energy transfer from PBS to PS I was severely impaired in the absence of ApcD. An apcD mutant grew more slowly than the wild type in light preferentially absorbed by phycobiliproteins and was more sensitive to high light intensity. On the other hand, a mutant lacking ApcF, which is required for efficient energy transfer from PBS to PS II, showed greater resistance to high light treatment. Therefore, state transitions in cyanobacteria have two roles: (1) they regulate light energy distribution between the two photosystems; and (2) they help to protect cells from the effects of light energy excess at high light intensities.

  15. Description of Gloeomargarita lithophora gen. nov., sp. nov., a thylakoid-bearing basal-branching cyanobacterium with intracellular carbonates, and proposal for Gloeomargaritales ord. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, David; Tavera, Rosaluz; Benzerara, Karim; Skouri-Panet, Fériel; Couradeau, Estelle; Gérard, Emmanuelle; Loussert Fonta, Céline; Novelo, Eberto; Zivanovic, Yvan; López-García, Purificación

    2016-11-21

    A unicellular cyanobacterium, strain Alchichica-D10, was isolated from microbialites of the alkaline Lake Alchichica, Mexico. The cells were short rods (3.9 ± 0.6 μm in length and 1.1 ± 0.1 μm in width) forming biofilms of intense emerald green color. They exhibited red autofluorescence under UV light excitation. UV-visible absorption spectra revealed that they contain chlorophyll a and phycocyanin, and electron microscopy showed the presence of thylakoids. The strain grew within a temperature range of 15-30 °C. Genomic DNA G+C content was 52.2 mol%. The most remarkable feature of this species was its granular cytoplasm, due to the presence of numerous intracellular spherical granules (16-26 per cell) with an average diameter of 270 nm. These granules, easily visible under scanning electron microscopy, were composed of amorphous carbonate containing Ca, Mg, Ba, and Sr. A multi-gene phylogeny based on the analysis of 59 conserved protein markers supported robustly that this strain occupies a deep position in the cyanobacterial tree. Based on its phenotypic characters and phylogenetic position, strain Alchichica-D10 is considered to represent a new genus and novel species of cyanobacteria for which the name Gloeomargarita lithophora gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Alchichica-D10 (Culture Collection of Algae and Protozoa CCAP strain 1437/1; Collections de Cyanobactéries et Microalgues Vivantes of the Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle in Paris strain PMC 919.15). Furthermore, a new family, Gloeomargaritaceae, and a new order, Gloeoemargaritales, are proposed to accommodate this species under the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants.

  16. Photosynthetic Regulation of the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 Thioredoxin System and Functional Analysis of TrxB (Trx x) and TrxQ (Trx y) Thioredoxins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Esther Pérez-Pérez; Eugenio Martín-Figueroa; Francisco J. Florencio

    2009-01-01

    The expression of the genes encoding the ferredoxin-thioredoxin system including the ferredoxin-thiore-doxin reductase (FTR) genes ftrC and ftrV and the four different thioredoxin genes trxA (m-type; slr0623), trxB (x-type; slr1139), trxC (sll1057) and trxQ (y-type; slr0233) of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has been studied according to changes in the photosynthetic conditions. Experiments of light-dark transition indicate that the expression of all these genes except trxQ decreases in the dark in the absence of glucose in the growth medium. The use of two electron transport inhibitors, 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) and 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-p-benzoquinone (DBMIB), reveals a differential effect on thioredoxin genes expression being trxC and trxQ almost unaf-fected, whereas trxA, trxB, and the ftr genes are down-regulated. In the presence of glucose, DCMU does not affect gene expression but DBMIB still does. Analysis of the single TrxB or TrxQ and the double TrxB TrxQ Synechocystis mutant strains reveal different functions for each of these thioredoxins under different growth conditions. Finally, a Synechocystis strain was generated containing a mutated version of TrxB (TrxBC34S), which was used to identify the potential in-vivo targets of this thioredoxin by a proteomic analysis.

  17. Functional differentiation of two analogous coproporphyrinogen III oxidases for heme and chlorophyll biosynthesis pathways in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Takeaki; Aoki, Rina; Minamizaki, Kei; Fujita, Yuichi

    2010-04-01

    Coproporphyrinogen III oxidase (CPO) catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of coproporphyrinogen III to form protoporphyrinogen IX in heme biosynthesis and is shared in chlorophyll biosynthesis in photosynthetic organisms. There are two analogous CPOs, oxygen-dependent (HemF) and oxygen-independent (HemN) CPOs, in various organisms. Little information on cyanobacterial CPOs has been available to date. In the genome of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 there is one hemF-like gene, sll1185, and two hemN-like genes, sll1876 and sll1917. The three genes were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Sll1185 showed CPO activity under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. While Sll1876 and Sll1917 showed absorbance spectra indicative of Fe-S proteins, only Sll1876 showed CPO activity under anaerobic conditions. Three mutants lacking one of these genes were isolated. The Deltasll1185 mutant failed to grow under aerobic conditions, with accumulation of coproporphyrin III. This growth defect was restored by cultivation under micro-oxic conditions. The growth of the Deltasll1876 mutant was significantly slower than that of the wild type under micro-oxic conditions, while it grew normally under aerobic conditions. Coproporphyrin III was accumulated at a low but significant level in the Deltasll1876 mutant grown under micro-oxic conditions. There was no detectable phenotype in Deltasll1917 under the conditions we examined. These results suggested that sll1185 encodes HemF as the sole CPO under aerobic conditions and that sll1876 encodes HemN operating under micro-oxic conditions, together with HemF. Such a differential operation of CPOs would ensure the stable supply of tetrapyrrole pigments under environments where oxygen levels fluctuate greatly.

  18. Regulation of the carbon-concentrating mechanism in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 in response to changing light intensity and inorganic carbon availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnap, Robert L; Nambudiri, Rehka; Holland, Steven

    2013-11-01

    Photosynthetic organisms possess regulatory mechanisms to balance the various inputs of photosynthesis in a manner that minimizes over-excitation of the light-driven electron transfer apparatus, while maximizing the reductive assimilation of inorganic nutrients, most importantly inorganic carbon (Ci). Accordingly, the regulatory interactions coordinating responses to fluctuating light and responses to Ci availability are of fundamental significance. The inducible high affinity carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 has been studied in order to understand how it is integrated with the light and dark reactions of photosynthesis. To probe genetic regulatory mechanisms, genomic DNA microarrays were used to survey for differences in the expression of genes in response to a shift to high light conditions under conditions of either high or low Ci availability. Discrepancies in published experiments exist regarding the extent to which genes for the CCM are upregulated in response to high light treatment. These discrepancies may be due to critical differences in Ci availability existing during the different high light experiments. The present microarray experiments reexamine this by comparing high light treatment under two different Ci regimes: bubbling with air and bubbling with air enriched with CO2. While some transcriptional responses such as the downregulation of antenna proteins are quite similar, pronounced differences exist with respect to the differential expression of CCM and affiliated genes. The results are discussed in the context of a recent analysis revealing that small molecules that are intermediates of the light and dark reaction photosynthetic metabolism act as allosteric effectors of the DNA-binding proteins which modulate the expression of the CCM genes.

  19. Transcription profiling of the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 by NextGen (SOLiD™ Sequencing of cDNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus eLudwig

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The genome of the unicellular, euryhaline cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 encodes about 3200 proteins. Transcripts were detected for nearly all annotated open reading frames by a global transcriptomic analysis by Next-Generation (SOLiDTM sequencing of cDNA. In the cDNA samples sequenced, ~90% of the mapped sequences were derived from the 16S and 23S ribosomal RNAs and ~10% of the sequences were derived from mRNAs. In cells grown photoautotrophically under standard conditions (38 °C, 1% (v/v CO2 in air, 250 µmol photons m-2 s-1, the highest transcript levels (up to 2% of the total mRNA for the most abundantly transcribed genes (e. g., cpcAB, psbA, psaA were generally derived from genes encoding structural components of the photosynthetic apparatus. High light exposure for one hour caused changes in transcript levels for genes encoding proteins of the photosynthetic apparatus, Type-1 NADH dehydrogenase complex and ATP synthase, whereas dark incubation for one hour resulted in a global decrease in transcript levels for photosynthesis-related genes and an increase in transcript levels for genes involved in carbohydrate degradation. Transcript levels for pyruvate kinase and the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex decreased sharply in cells incubated in the dark. Under dark anoxic (fermentative conditions, transcript changes indicated a global decrease in transcripts for respiratory proteins and suggested that cells employ an alternative phosphoenolpyruvate degradation pathway via phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (ppsA and the pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (nifJ. Finally, the data suggested that an apparent operon involved in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis and fatty acid desaturation, acsF2-ho2-hemN2-desF, may be regulated by oxygen concentration.

  20. Transcription of glutamine synthetase genes (glnA and glnN) from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 is differently regulated in response to nitrogen availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, J C; Muro-Pastor, M I; Florencio, F J

    1997-04-01

    In the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 we have previously reported the presence of two different proteins with glutamine synthetase activity: GSI, encoded by the glnA gene, and GSIII, encoded by the glnN gene. In this work we show that expression of both the glnA and glnN genes is subjected to transcriptional regulation in response to changes in nitrogen availability. Northern blot experiments and transcriptional fusions demonstrated that the glnA gene is highly transcribed in nitrate- or ammonium-grown cells and exhibits two- to fourfold-higher expression in nitrogen-starved cells. In contrast, the glnN gene is highly expressed only under nitrogen deficiency. Half-lives of both mRNAs, calculated after addition of rifampin or ammonium to nitrogen-starved cells, were not significantly different (2.5 or 3.4 min, respectively, for glnA mRNA; 1.9 or 1.4 min, respectively, for glnN mRNA), suggesting that changes in transcript stability are not involved in the regulation of the expression of both genes. Deletions of the glnA and glnN upstream regions were used to delimit the promoter and the regulatory sequences of both genes. Primer extension analysis showed that structure of the glnA gene promoter resembles those of the NtcA-regulated promoters. In addition, mobility shift assays demonstrated that purified, Escherichia coli-expressed Synechocystis NtcA protein binds to the promoter of the glnA gene. Primer extension also revealed the existence of a sequence related to the NtcA binding site upstream from the glnN promoter. However, E. coli-expressed NtcA failed to bind to this site. These findings suggest that an additional modification of NtcA or an additional factor is required for the regulation of glnN gene expression.

  1. MapA, an iron-regulated, cytoplasmic membrane protein in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC7942.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, R; Troyan, T; Sherman, D; Sherman, L A

    1994-08-01

    Growth of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 in iron-deficient media leads to the accumulation of an approximately 34-kDa protein. The gene encoding this protein, mapA (membrane-associated protein A), has been cloned and sequenced (GenBank accession number, L01621). The mapA transcript is not detectable in normally grown cultures but is stably accumulated by cells grown in iron-deficient media. However, the promoter sequence for this gene does not resemble other bacterial iron-regulated promoters described to date. The carboxyl-terminal region of the derived amino acid sequence of MapA resembles bacterial proteins involved in iron acquisition, whereas the amino-terminal end of MapA has a high degree of amino acid identity with the abundant, chloroplast envelope protein E37. An approach employing improved cellular fractionation techniques as well as electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry was essential in localizing MapA protein to the cytoplasmic membrane of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942. When these cells were grown under iron-deficient conditions, a significant fraction of MapA could also be localized to the thylakoid membranes.

  2. A gene (ccmA) required for carboxysome formation in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, T; Marco, E; Orus, M I

    1994-04-01

    A high-CO2-requiring mutant, G7, of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 capable of inorganic carbon transport but unable to utilize the intracellular inorganic carbon pool for photosynthesis was isolated. Transmission electron micrographs of the mutant indicated that the mutant does not have any carboxysomes. A clone (pHPG7) with a 7.5-kbp DNA insert that transforms the G7 mutant to the wild-type phenotype was isolated from a genomic library of wild-type Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803. Complementation tests with subclones identified the mutation site in G7 within 208 bp. Sequencing of nucleotides in this region elucidated an open reading frame, designated ccmA, encoding a protein of 302 amino acids. Cloning and sequence analysis of the respective G7 gene revealed an A-to-G substitution that results in an Asp-to-Gly substitution in the deduced amino acid. The result indicated that the ccmA gene encodes a protein essential for the formation of carboxysomes. An open reading frame encoding a proline-rich protein of 271 amino acids was found downstream of the ccmA gene, but no ccm-like genes or rbc operon was found in this region.

  3. Photosynthetic Versatility in the Genome of Geitlerinema sp. PCC 9228 (Formerly Oscillatoria limnetica ‘Solar Lake’), a Model Anoxygenic Photosynthetic Cyanobacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, Sharon L.; Dick, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Anoxygenic cyanobacteria that use sulfide as the electron donor for photosynthesis are a potentially influential but poorly constrained force on Earth’s biogeochemistry. Their versatile metabolism may have boosted primary production and nitrogen cycling in euxinic coastal margins in the Proterozoic. In addition, they represent a biological mechanism for limiting the accumulation of atmospheric oxygen, especially before the Great Oxidation Event and in the low-oxygen conditions of the Proterozoic. In this study, we describe the draft genome sequence of Geitlerinema sp. PCC 9228, formerly Oscillatoria limnetica ‘Solar Lake’, a mat-forming diazotrophic cyanobacterium that can switch between oxygenic photosynthesis and sulfide-based anoxygenic photosynthesis (AP). Geitlerinema possesses three variants of psbA, which encodes protein D1, a core component of the photosystem II reaction center. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that one variant is closely affiliated with cyanobacterial psbA genes that code for a D1 protein used for oxygen-sensitive processes. Another version is phylogenetically similar to cyanobacterial psbA genes that encode D1 proteins used under microaerobic conditions, and the third variant may be cued to high light and/or elevated oxygen concentrations. Geitlerinema has the canonical gene for sulfide quinone reductase (SQR) used in cyanobacterial AP and a putative transcriptional regulatory gene in the same operon. Another operon with a second, distinct sqr and regulatory gene is present, and is phylogenetically related to sqr genes used for high sulfide concentrations. The genome has a comprehensive nif gene suite for nitrogen fixation, supporting previous observations of nitrogenase activity. Geitlerinema possesses a bidirectional hydrogenase rather than the uptake hydrogenase typically used by cyanobacteria in diazotrophy. Overall, the genome sequence of Geitlerinema sp. PCC 9228 highlights potential cyanobacterial strategies to cope with

  4. Photosynthetic versatility in the genome of Geitlerinema sp. PCC 9228 (formerly Oscillatoria limnetica ‘Solar Lake’, a model anoxygenic photosynthetic cyanobacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon L Grim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Anoxygenic cyanobacteria that use sulfide as the electron donor for photosynthesis are a potentially influential but poorly constrained force on Earth’s biogeochemistry. Their versatile metabolism may have boosted primary production and nitrogen cycling in euxinic coastal margins in the Proterozoic. In addition, they represent a biological mechanism for limiting the accumulation of atmospheric oxygen, especially before the Great Oxidation Event and in the low-oxygen conditions of the Proterozoic. In this study, we describe the draft genome sequence of Geitlerinema sp. PCC 9228, formerly Oscillatoria limnetica ‘Solar Lake’, a mat-forming diazotrophic cyanobacterium that can switch between oxygenic photosynthesis and sulfide-based anoxygenic photosynthesis. Geitlerinema possesses three variants of psbA, which encodes protein D1, a core component of the photosystem II reaction center. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that one variant is closely affiliated with cyanobacterial psbA genes that code for a D1 protein used for oxygen-sensitive processes. Another version is phylogenetically similar to cyanobacterial psbA genes that encode D1 proteins used under microaerobic conditions, and the third variant may be cued to high light and/or elevated oxygen concentrations. Geitlerinema has the canonical gene for sulfide quinone reductase (SQR used in cyanobacterial anoxygenic photosynthesis and a putative transcriptional regulatory gene in the same operon. Another operon with a second, distinct sqr and regulatory gene is present, and is phylogenetically related to sqr genes used for high sulfide concentrations. The genome has a comprehensive nif gene suite for nitrogen fixation, supporting previous observations of nitrogenase activity. Geitlerinema possesses a bidirectional hydrogenase rather than the uptake hydrogenase typically used by cyanobacteria in diazotrophy. Overall, the genome sequence of Geitlerinema sp. PCC 9228 highlights potential

  5. Outer Membrane Permeability of Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803: Studies of Passive Diffusion of Small Organic Nutrients Reveal the Absence of Classical Porins and Intrinsically Low Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowata, Hikaru; Tochigi, Saeko; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Kojima, Seiji

    2017-10-01

    The outer membrane of heterotrophic Gram-negative bacteria plays the role of a selective permeability barrier that prevents the influx of toxic compounds while allowing the nonspecific passage of small hydrophilic nutrients through porin channels. Compared with heterotrophic Gram-negative bacteria, the outer membrane properties of cyanobacteria, which are Gram-negative photoautotrophs, are not clearly understood. In this study, using small carbohydrates, amino acids, and inorganic ions as permeation probes, we determined the outer membrane permeability of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 in intact cells and in proteoliposomes reconstituted with outer membrane proteins. The permeability of this cyanobacterium was >20-fold lower than that of Escherichia coli The predominant outer membrane proteins Slr1841, Slr1908, and Slr0042 were not permeable to organic nutrients and allowed only the passage of inorganic ions. Only the less abundant outer membrane protein Slr1270, a homolog of the E. coli export channel TolC, was permeable to organic solutes. The activity of Slr1270 as a channel was verified in a recombinant Slr1270-producing E. coli outer membrane. The lack of putative porins and the low outer membrane permeability appear to suit the cyanobacterial autotrophic lifestyle; the highly impermeable outer membrane would be advantageous to cellular survival by protecting the cell from toxic compounds, especially when the cellular physiology is not dependent on the uptake of organic nutrients.IMPORTANCE Because the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria affects the flux rates for various substances into and out of the cell, its permeability is closely associated with cellular physiology. The outer membrane properties of cyanobacteria, which are photoautotrophic Gram-negative bacteria, are not clearly understood. Here, we examined the outer membrane of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. We revealed that it is relatively permeable to inorganic ions but is markedly less

  6. Altering the Structure of Carbohydrate Storage Granules in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 through Branching-Enzyme Truncations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welkie, David G; Lee, Byung-Hoo; Sherman, Louis A

    2015-12-14

    Carbohydrate storage is an important element of metabolism in cyanobacteria and in the chloroplasts of plants. Understanding how to manipulate the metabolism and storage of carbohydrate is also an important factor toward harnessing cyanobacteria for energy production. While most cyanobacteria produce glycogen, some have been found to accumulate polysaccharides in the form of water-insoluble α-glucan similar to amylopectin. Notably, this alternative form, termed "semi-amylopectin," forms in cyanobacterial species harboring three branching-enzyme (BE) homologs, designated BE1, BE2, and BE3. In this study, mutagenesis of the branching genes found in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 was performed in order to characterize their possible impact on polysaccharide storage granule morphology. N-terminal truncations were made to the native BE gene of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. In addition, one of the two native debranching enzyme genes was replaced with a heterologous debranching enzyme gene from a semi-amylopectin-forming strain. Growth and glycogen content of mutant strains did not significantly differ from those of the wild type, and ultrastructure analysis revealed only slight changes to granule morphology. However, analysis of chain length distribution by anion-exchange chromatography revealed modest changes to the branched-chain length profile. The resulting glycogen shared structure characteristics similar to that of granules isolated from semi-amylopectin-producing strains. This study is the first to investigate the impact of branching-enzyme truncations on the structure of storage carbohydrates in cyanobacteria. The results of this study are an important contribution toward understanding the relationship between the enzymatic repertoire of a cyanobacterial species and the morphology of its storage carbohydrates. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Role of NtcB in activation of nitrate assimilation genes in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichi, M; Takatani, N; Omata, T

    2001-10-01

    In Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803, the genes encoding the proteins involved in nitrate assimilation are organized into two transcription units, nrtABCD-narB and nirA, the expression of which was repressed by ammonium and induced by inhibition of ammonium assimilation, suggesting involvement of NtcA in the transcriptional regulation. Under inducing conditions, expression of the two transcription units was enhanced by nitrite, suggesting regulation by NtcB, the nitrite-responsive transcriptional enhancer we previously identified in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942. The slr0395 gene, which encodes a protein 47% identical to Synechococcus NtcB, was identified as the Synechocystis ntcB gene, on the basis of the inability of an slr0395 mutant to rapidly accumulate the transcripts of the nitrate assimilation genes upon induction and to respond to nitrite. While Synechococcus NtcB strictly requires nitrite for its action, Synechocystis NtcB enhanced transcription significantly even in the absence of nitrite. Whereas the Synechococcus ntcB mutant expresses the nitrate assimilation genes to a significant level in an NtcA-dependent manner, the Synechocystis ntcB mutant showed only low-level expression of the nitrate assimilation genes, indicating that NtcA by itself cannot efficiently promote expression of these genes in Synechocystis. Activities of the nitrate assimilation enzymes in the Synechocystis ntcB mutant were consequently low, being 40 to 50% of the wild-type level, and the cells grew on nitrate at a rate approximately threefold lower than that of the wild-type strain. These results showed that the contribution of NtcB to the expression of nitrate assimilation capability varies considerably among different strains of cyanobacteria.

  8. Characterization of a DUF820 family protein Alr3200 of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRASHANTH S RAGHAVAN; GAGAN D GUPTA; HEMA RAJARAM; VINAY KUMAR

    2016-12-01

    The hypothetical protein ‘Alr3200’ of Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 is highly conserved among cyanobacterialspecies. It is a member of the DUF820 (Domain of Unknown Function) protein family, and is predicted to have aDNase domain. Biochemical analysis revealed a Mg(II)-dependent DNase activity for Alr3200 with a specific activityof 8.62×104 Kunitz Units (KU) mg−1 protein. Circular dichroism analysis predicted Alr3200 to have ~40% β-strandsand ~9% α-helical structures. Anabaena PCC7120 inherently expressed Alr3200 at very low levels, and its overexpressionhad no significant effect on growth of Anabaena under control conditions. However, Analr3200+, therecombinant Anabaena strain overexpressing Alr3200, exhibited zero survival upon exposure to 6 kGy of γ-radiation,which is the LD50 for wild type Anabaena PCC7120 as well as the vector control recombinant strain, AnpAM.Comparative analysis of the two recombinant Anabaena strains suggested that it is not the accumulated Alr3200 perse, but its possible interactions with the radiation-induced unidentified DNA repair proteins of Anabaena, whichhampers DNA repair resulting in radiosensitivity.

  9. Ammonium tolerance in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 and the role of the psbA multigene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Guo-Zheng; Qiu, Bao-Sheng; Forchhammer, Karl

    2014-04-01

    Ammonium is one of the major nutrients for plants, and a ubiquitous intermediate in plant metabolism, but it is also known to be toxic to many organisms, in particular to plants and oxygenic photosynthetic microorganisms. Although previous studies revealed a link between ammonium toxicity and photodamage in cyanobacteria under in vivo conditions, ammonium-induced photodamage of photosystem II (PSII) has not yet been investigated with isolated thylakoid membranes. We show here that ammonium directly accelerated photodamage of PSII in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803, rather than affecting the repair of photodamaged PSII. Using isolated thylakoid membranes, it could be demonstrated that ammonium-induced photodamage of PSII primarily occurred at the oxygen evolution complex, which has a known binding site for ammonium. Wild-type Synechocystis PCC6803 cells can tolerate relatively high concentrations of ammonium because of efficient PSII repair. Ammonium tolerance requires all three psbA genes since mutants of any of the three single psbA genes are more sensitive to ammonium than wild-type cells. Even the poorly expressed psbA1 gene, whose expression was studied in some detail, plays a detectable role in ammonium tolerance. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Genome-derived insights into the biology of the hepatotoxic bloom-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Sivonen, Kaarina; Rouhiainen, Leo; Fewer, David P; Lyra, Christina; Rantala-Ylinen, Anne; Vestola, Johanna; Jokela, Jouni; Rantasärkkä, Kaisa; Li, Zhijie; Liu, Bin

    2012-11-13

    Cyanobacteria can form massive toxic blooms in fresh and brackish bodies of water and are frequently responsible for the poisoning of animals and pose a health risk for humans. Anabaena is a genus of filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacteria commonly implicated as a toxin producer in blooms in aquatic ecosystems throughout the world. The biology of bloom-forming cyanobacteria is poorly understood at the genome level. Here, we report the complete sequence and comprehensive annotation of the bloom-forming Anabaena sp. strain 90 genome. It comprises two circular chromosomes and three plasmids with a total size of 5.3 Mb, encoding a total of 4,738 genes. The genome is replete with mobile genetic elements. Detailed manual annotation demonstrated that almost 5% of the gene repertoire consists of pseudogenes. A further 5% of the genome is dedicated to the synthesis of small peptides that are the products of both ribosomal and nonribosomal biosynthetic pathways. Inactivation of the hassallidin (an antifungal cyclic peptide) biosynthetic gene cluster through a deletion event and a natural mutation of the buoyancy-permitting gvpG gas vesicle gene were documented. The genome contains a large number of genes encoding restriction-modification systems. Two novel excision elements were found in the nifH gene that is required for nitrogen fixation. Genome analysis demonstrated that this strain invests heavily in the production of bioactive compounds and restriction-modification systems. This well-annotated genome provides a platform for future studies on the ecology and biology of these important bloom-forming cyanobacteria.

  11. Inactivation of nitrate reductase alters metabolic branching of carbohydrate fermentation in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xiao; Kumaraswamy, G Kenchappa; Zhang, Shuyi; Gates, Colin; Ananyev, Gennady M; Bryant, Donald A; Dismukes, G Charles

    2016-05-01

    To produce cellular energy, cyanobacteria reduce nitrate as the preferred pathway over proton reduction (H2 evolution) by catabolizing glycogen under dark anaerobic conditions. This competition lowers H2 production by consuming a large fraction of the reducing equivalents (NADPH and NADH). To eliminate this competition, we constructed a knockout mutant of nitrate reductase, encoded by narB, in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. As expected, ΔnarB was able to take up intracellular nitrate but was unable to reduce it to nitrite or ammonia, and was unable to grow photoautotrophically on nitrate. During photoautotrophic growth on urea, ΔnarB significantly redirects biomass accumulation into glycogen at the expense of protein accumulation. During subsequent dark fermentation, metabolite concentrations--both the adenylate cellular energy charge (∼ATP) and the redox poise (NAD(P)H/NAD(P))--were independent of nitrate availability in ΔnarB, in contrast to the wild type (WT) control. The ΔnarB strain diverted more reducing equivalents from glycogen catabolism into reduced products, mainly H2 and d-lactate, by 6-fold (2.8% yield) and 2-fold (82.3% yield), respectively, than WT. Continuous removal of H2 from the fermentation medium (milking) further boosted net H2 production by 7-fold in ΔnarB, at the expense of less excreted lactate, resulting in a 49-fold combined increase in the net H2 evolution rate during 2 days of fermentation compared to the WT. The absence of nitrate reductase eliminated the inductive effect of nitrate addition on rerouting carbohydrate catabolism from glycolysis to the oxidative pentose phosphate (OPP) pathway, indicating that intracellular redox poise and not nitrate itself acts as the control switch for carbon flux branching between pathways.

  12. Role of Two Cell Wall Amidases in Septal Junction and Nanopore Formation in the Multicellular Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Bornikoel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Filamentous cyanobacteria have developed a strategy to perform incompatible processes in one filament by differentiating specialized cell types, N2-fixing heterocysts and CO2-fixing, photosynthetic, vegetative cells. These bacteria can be considered true multicellular organisms with cells exchanging metabolites and signaling molecules via septal junctions, involving the SepJ and FraCD proteins. Previously, it was shown that the cell wall lytic N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanine amidase, AmiC2, is essential for cell–cell communication in Nostoc punctiforme. This enzyme perforates the septal peptidoglycan creating an array of nanopores, which may be the framework for septal junction complexes. In Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, two homologs of AmiC2, encoded by amiC1 and amiC2, were identified and investigated in two different studies. Here, we compare the function of both AmiC proteins by characterizing different Anabaena amiC mutants, which was not possible in N. punctiforme, because there the amiC1 gene could not be inactivated. This study shows the different impact of each protein on nanopore array formation, the process of cell–cell communication, septal protein localization, and heterocyst differentiation. Inactivation of either amidase resulted in significant reduction in nanopore count and in the rate of fluorescent tracer exchange between neighboring cells measured by FRAP analysis. In an amiC1 amiC2 double mutant, filament morphology was affected and heterocyst differentiation was abolished. Furthermore, the inactivation of amiC1 influenced SepJ localization and prevented the filament-fragmentation phenotype that is characteristic of sepJ or fraC fraD mutants. Our findings suggest that both amidases are to some extent redundant in their function, and describe a functional relationship of AmiC1 and septal proteins SepJ and FraCD.

  13. Genetics of the Blue Light-Dependent Signal Cascade That Controls Phototaxis in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Yuki; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Ren, Shukun; Hori, Koichi; Masuda, Shinji

    2017-03-01

    The Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 can move on a solid surface in response to light, a phenomenon called phototaxis. Although many of the photoreceptors involved in phototaxis have been identified, the mechanisms that regulate directional motility of Synechocystis are not well understood. Previous studies showed that a mutant lacking the blue light-using flavin (BLUF) photoreceptor PixD exhibits negative phototaxis under conditions where the wild type responds positively. PixD interacts with the pseudo-response regulator-like protein PixE in a light-dependent manner, suggesting that this intermolecular interaction is important for phototaxis regulation, although genetic evidence has been lacking. To gain further insight into phototaxis regulation by PixD-PixE signaling, we constructed the deletion mutants ΔPixE and ΔPixD-ΔPixE, and characterized their phenotypes, which matched those of the wild type (positive phototaxis). Because ΔPixD exhibited negative phototaxis, PixE must function downstream of PixD. Under intense blue light (>100 μmol m-2 s-1; 470 nm) the wild type exhibited negative phototaxis, but ΔPixD-PixE exhibited positive phototaxis toward low-intensity blue light (∼0.8 μmol m-2 s-1; 470 nm). These results suggest that an unknown light-sensing system(s), that is necessary for directional cell movement, can be activated by low-intensity blue light; on the other hand, PixD needs high-intensity blue light to be activated. We also isolated spontaneous mutants that compensated for the pixE deletion. Genome-wide sequencing of the mutants revealed that the uncharacterized gene sll2003 regulates positive and negative phototaxis in response to light intensity. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Genome-derived insights into the biology of the hepatotoxic bloom-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 90

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hao

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyanobacteria can form massive toxic blooms in fresh and brackish bodies of water and are frequently responsible for the poisoning of animals and pose a health risk for humans. Anabaena is a genus of filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacteria commonly implicated as a toxin producer in blooms in aquatic ecosystems throughout the world. The biology of bloom-forming cyanobacteria is poorly understood at the genome level. Results Here, we report the complete sequence and comprehensive annotation of the bloom-forming Anabaena sp. strain 90 genome. It comprises two circular chromosomes and three plasmids with a total size of 5.3 Mb, encoding a total of 4,738 genes. The genome is replete with mobile genetic elements. Detailed manual annotation demonstrated that almost 5% of the gene repertoire consists of pseudogenes. A further 5% of the genome is dedicated to the synthesis of small peptides that are the products of both ribosomal and nonribosomal biosynthetic pathways. Inactivation of the hassallidin (an antifungal cyclic peptide biosynthetic gene cluster through a deletion event and a natural mutation of the buoyancy-permitting gvpG gas vesicle gene were documented. The genome contains a large number of genes encoding restriction-modification systems. Two novel excision elements were found in the nifH gene that is required for nitrogen fixation. Conclusions Genome analysis demonstrated that this strain invests heavily in the production of bioactive compounds and restriction-modification systems. This well-annotated genome provides a platform for future studies on the ecology and biology of these important bloom-forming cyanobacteria.

  15. LexA protein of cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 exhibits in vitro pH-dependent and RecA-independent autoproteolytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arvind; Kirti, Anurag; Rajaram, Hema

    2015-02-01

    The LexA protein of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 exhibits a RecA-independent and alkaline pH-dependent autoproteolytic cleavage. The autoproteolytic cleavage of Anabaena LexA occurs at pH 8.5 and above, stimulated by the addition of Ca(2+) and in the temperature range of 30-57°C. Mutational analysis of Anabaena LexA protein indicated that the cleavage occurred at the peptide bond between Ala-84 and Gly-85, and optimal cleavage required the presence of Ser-118 and Lys-159, as also observed for LexA protein of Escherichia coli. Cleavage of Anabaena LexA was affected upon deletion of three amino acids, (86)GLI. These three amino acids are unique to all cyanobacterial LexA proteins predicted to be cleavable. The absence of RecA-dependent cleavage at physiological pH, which has not been reported for other bacterial LexA proteins, is possibly due to the absence of RecA interacting sites on Anabaena LexA protein, corresponding to the residues identified in E. coli LexA, and low cellular levels of RecA in Anabaena. Exposure to SOS-response inducing stresses, such as UV-B and mitomycin C neither affected the expression of LexA in Anabaena nor induced cleavage of LexA in either Anabaena 7120 or E. coli overexpressing Anabaena LexA protein. Though the LexA may be acting as a repressor by binding to the LexA box in the vicinity of the promoter region of specific gene, their derepression may not be via proteolytic cleavage during SOS-inducing stresses, unless the stress induces increase in cytoplasmic pH. This could account for the regulation of several carbon metabolism genes rather than DNA-repair genes under the regulation of LexA in cyanobacteria especially during high light induced oxidative stress.

  16. HupW Protease Specifically Required for Processing of the Catalytic Subunit of the Uptake Hydrogenase in the Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. Strain PCC 7120

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Pia; Devine, Ellenor; Stensjö, Karin

    2012-01-01

    The maturation process of [NiFe] hydrogenases includes a proteolytic cleavage of the large subunit. We constructed a mutant of Nostoc strain PCC 7120 in which hupW, encoding a putative hydrogenase-specific protease, is inactivated. Our results indicate that the protein product of hupW selectively cleaves the uptake hydrogenase in this cyanobacterium. PMID:22020512

  17. Insights into the physiology and ecology of the brackish-water-adapted cyanobacterium Nodularia spumigena sp. CCY9414 based on a genome-transcriptome analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voß, B.; Bolhuis, H.; Fewer, D.; Kopf, M.; Möke, F.; Haas, F.; El-Shehawy, R.; Hayes, P.; Bergman, B.; Sivonen, K.; Dittmann, E.; Scanlan, D.J.; Hagemann, M.; Stal, L.J.; Hess, W.R.

    2013-01-01

    Nodularia spumigena is a filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacterium that dominates the annual late summer cyanobacterial blooms in the Baltic Sea. But N. spumigena also is common in brackish water bodies worldwide, suggesting special adaptation allowing it to thrive at moderate salinities. A draft geno

  18. Proteomic profiles of five strains of oxygenic photosynthetic cyanobacteria of the genus Cyanothece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aryal, Uma K.; Callister, Stephen J.; McMahon, Benjamin H.; McCue, Lee Ann; Brown, Joseph N.; Stockel, Jana; Liberton, Michelle L.; Mishra, Sujata; Zhang, Xiaohui; Nicora, Carrie D.; Angel, Thomas E.; Koppenaal, David W.; Smith, Richard D.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Sherman, Louis A.

    2014-07-03

    Members of the cyanobacterial genus Cyanothece exhibit considerable variation in physiological and biochemical characteristics. The comparative assessment of the genomes and the proteomes has the potential to provide insights on differences among Cyanothece strains. By applying Sequedex (http://sequedex.lanl.gov), an annotationindependent method for ascribing gene functions, we confirmed significant speciesspecific differences of functional genes in different Cyanothece strains, particularly in Cyanothece PCC7425. Using a shotgun proteomics approach based on prefractionation and tandem mass spectrometry, we detected ~28-48% of the theoretical Cyanothece proteome depending on the strain. The expression of a total of 642 orthologous proteins was observed in all five Cyanothece strains. These shared orthologous proteins showed considerable correlations in their protein abundances across different Cyanothece strains. Functional classification indicated that the majority of proteins involved in central metabolic functions such as amino acid, carbohydrate, protein and RNA metabolism, photosynthesis, respiration and stress responses were observed to a greater extent in the core proteome, whereas proteins involved in membrane transport, iron acquisition, regulatory functions, flagellar motility and chemotaxis were observed to a greater extent in the unique proteome. Considerable differences were evident across different Cyanothece strains. Notably, the analysis of Cyanothece PCC7425, which showed the highest number of unique proteins (682),

  19. Structural characterization of the protein cce_0567 from Cyanothece 51142, a metalloprotein associated with nitrogen fixation in the DUF683 family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchko, Garry W.; Robinson, Howard; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2009-03-11

    The genome of many cyanobacacteria contain the sequence for a small protein (<100 amino acids) with a commom "domain of unknown function" grouped into the DUF683 protein family. While the biological function of DUF683 is still not known, their genomic location within nitrogen fixation clusters suggests that DUF683 proteins may play a role in the process. The diurnal cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. PCC 51142 contains a gene for a protein that fall into the DUF683 family, cce_0567 (78 aa, 9.0 kDa). In an effort to elucidate the biochemical role DUF683 proteins may play in nitrogen fixation, we have determined the first crystal structure for a protein in this family, cce_0567, to 1.84 Å resolution. Cce_0567 crystallized in space group P21 with two protein molecules and one Ni2+ cation per asymmetric unit. The protein is composed of two α-helices from residues P11 to G41 (α1) and L49-E74 (α2) with the second α-helix containing a short 310-helix (Y46 - N48). A four-residue linker (L42 - D45) between the helices allows them to form an anti-parallel bundle that cross over each other towards their termini. In solution it is likely that two molecules of cce_0567 form a rod-like dimer by the stacking interactions of ~1/2 of the protein. Histidine-36 is highly conserved in all known DUF683 proteins and the N2 nitrogen of the H36 side chain of each molecule in the dimer coordinate with Ni2+ in the crystal structure. The divalent cation Ni2+ was titrated into 15N-labelled cce_0567 and chemical shift perturbations were observed only in the 1H-15N HSQC spectra for residues at, or near, the site of Ni2+ binding observed in the crystal structure. There was no evidence for an increase in the size of cce_0567 upon binding Ni2+, even in large molar excess of Ni2+, indicating that a metal was not required for dimer formation. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that cce_0567 was extremely robust, with a melting temperature of ~62ºC that was reversible.

  20. Structural characterization of the protein cce_0567 from Cyanothece 51142, a metalloprotein associated with nitrogen fixation in the DUF683 family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchko, Garry W; Robinson, Howard; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2009-04-01

    The genomes of many cyanobacteria contain the sequence for a small protein with a common "Domain of Unknown Function" grouped into the DUF683 protein family. While the biological function of DUF683 is still not known, their genomic location within nitrogen fixation clusters suggests that DUF683 proteins may play a role in the process. The diurnal cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. PCC 51142 contains a gene for a protein that falls into the DUF683 family, cce_0567 (78 aa, 9.0 kDa). In an effort to elucidate the biochemical role DUF683 proteins may play in nitrogen fixation, we have determined the first crystal structure for a protein in this family, cce_0567, to 1.84 A resolution. Cce_0567 crystallized in space group P2(1) with two protein molecules and one Ni(2+) cation per asymmetric unit. The protein is composed of two alpha-helices, residues P11 to G41 (alpha1) and L49-E74 (alpha2), with the second alpha-helix containing a short 3(10)-helix (Y46-N48). A four-residue linker (L42-D45) between the helices allows them to form an anti-parallel bundle and cross over each other towards their termini. In solution it is likely that two molecules of cce_0567 form a rod-like dimer by the stacking interactions of approximately 1/2 of the protein. Histidine-36 is highly conserved in all known DUF683 proteins and the N2 nitrogen of the H36 side chain of each molecule in the dimer is coordinated with Ni(2+) in the crystal structure. The divalent cation Ni(2+) was titrated into (15)N-labeled cce_0567 and chemical shift perturbations were observed only in the (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra for residues at, or near, the site of Ni(2+) binding observed in the crystal structure. There was no evidence for an increase in the size of cce_0567 upon binding Ni(2+), even in large molar excess of Ni(2+), indicating that a metal was not required for dimer formation. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that cce_0567 was extremely robust, with a melting temperature of approximately 62 degrees C

  1. Structural Characterization of the Protein cce_0567 from Cyanothece 51142, a Metalloprotein Associated with Nitrogen Fixation in the DUF683 Family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchko, G.; Robinson, H; Addlagatta, A

    2009-01-01

    The genomes of many cyanobacteria contain the sequence for a small protein with a common 'Domain of Unknown Function' grouped into the DUF683 protein family. While the biological function of DUF683 is still not known, their genomic location within nitrogen fixation clusters suggests that DUF683 proteins may play a role in the process. The diurnal cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. PCC 51142 contains a gene for a protein that falls into the DUF683 family, cce 0567 (78 aa, 9.0 kDa). In an effort to elucidate the biochemical role DUF683 proteins may play in nitrogen fixation, we have determined the first crystal structure for a protein in this family, cce 0567, to 1.84 A resolution. Cce 0567 crystallized in space group P2(1) with two protein molecules and one Ni(2+) cation per asymmetric unit. The protein is composed of two alpha-helices, residues P11 to G41 (alpha1) and L49-E74 (alpha2), with the second alpha-helix containing a short 3(10)-helix (Y46-N48). A four-residue linker (L42-D45) between the helices allows them to form an anti-parallel bundle and cross over each other towards their termini. In solution it is likely that two molecules of cce 0567 form a rod-like dimer by the stacking interactions of approximately 1/2 of the protein. Histidine-36 is highly conserved in all known DUF683 proteins and the N2 nitrogen of the H36 side chain of each molecule in the dimer is coordinated with Ni(2+) in the crystal structure. The divalent cation Ni(2+) was titrated into (15)N-labeled cce 0567 and chemical shift perturbations were observed only in the (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra for residues at, or near, the site of Ni(2+) binding observed in the crystal structure. There was no evidence for an increase in the size of cce 0567 upon binding Ni(2+), even in large molar excess of Ni(2+), indicating that a metal was not required for dimer formation. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that cce 0567 was extremely robust, with a melting temperature of approximately 62

  2. ΔpH-dependent non-photochemical quenching (qE) of excited chlorophylls in the photosystem II core complex of the freshwater cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp PCC 7942.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatakis, Kostas; Papageorgiou, George C

    2014-08-01

    Light-induced and lumen acidity-dependent quenching (qE) of excited chlorophylls (Chl) in vivo has been amply documented in plants and algae, but not in cyanobacteria, using primarily the saturation pulse method of quenching analysis which is applied to continuously illuminated samples. This method is unsuitable for cyanobacteria because the background illumination elicits in them a very large Chl a fluorescence signal, due to a state 2 to state 1 transition, which masks fluorescence changes due to other causes. We investigated the qE problem in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 using a kinetic method (Chl a fluorescence induction) with which qE can be examined before the onset of the state 2 to state 1 transition and the attendant rise of Chl a fluorescence. Our results confirm the existence of a qE mechanism that operates on excited Chls a in Photosystem II core complexes of cyanobacteria.

  3. Low temperature delays timing and enhances the cost of nitrogen fixation in the unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brauer, Verena S.; Stomp, Maayke; Rosso, Camillo; van Beusekom, Sebastiaan A. M.; Emmerich, Barbara; Stal, Lucas J.; Huisman, Jef

    2013-01-01

    Marine nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria are largely confined to the tropical and subtropical ocean. It has been argued that their global biogeographical distribution reflects the physiologically feasible temperature range at which they can perform nitrogen fixation. In this study we refine this line of

  4. Low temperature delays timing and enhances the cost of nitrogen fixation in the unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brauer, Verena S.; Stomp, Maayke; Rosso, Camillo; van Beusekom, Sebastiaan A. M.; Emmerich, Barbara; Stal, Lucas J.; Huisman, Jef

    2013-01-01

    Marine nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria are largely confined to the tropical and subtropical ocean. It has been argued that their global biogeographical distribution reflects the physiologically feasible temperature range at which they can perform nitrogen fixation. In this study we refine this line of

  5. NrrA directly regulates expression of the fraF gene and antisense RNAs for fraE in the heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehira, Shigeki; Ohmori, Masayuki

    2014-05-01

    The heterocystous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 grows as linear multicellular filaments that can contain hundreds of cells. Heterocysts, which are specialized cells for nitrogen fixation, are regularly intercalated among photosynthetic vegetative cells, and these cells are metabolically dependent on each other. Thus, multicellularity is essential for diazotrophic growth of heterocystous cyanobacteria. In Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, the fraF gene, which is required to limit filament length, is induced by nitrogen deprivation. The fraF transcripts extend to the fraE gene, which lies on the opposite DNA strand and could possess dual functionality, mRNAs for fraF and antisense RNAs for fraE. In the present study, we found that NrrA, a nitrogen-regulated response regulator, directly regulated expression of fraF. Induction of fraF by nitrogen deprivation was abolished by the nrrA disruption. NrrA specifically bound to the promoter region of fraF, and recognized an inverted repeat sequence. Thus, it is concluded that NrrA controls expression of mRNAs for fraF and antisense RNAs for fraE in response to nitrogen deprivation.

  6. The hypothetical protein 'All4779', and not the annotated 'Alr0088' and 'Alr7579' proteins, is the major typical single-stranded DNA binding protein of the cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirti, Anurag; Rajaram, Hema; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA binding (SSB) proteins are essential for all DNA-dependent cellular processes. Typical SSB proteins have an N-terminal Oligonucleotide-Binding (OB) fold, a Proline/Glycine rich region, followed by a C-terminal acidic tail. In the genome of the heterocystous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120, alr0088 and alr7579 are annotated as coding for SSB, but are truncated and have only the OB-fold. In silico analysis of whole genome of Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 revealed the presence of another ORF 'all4779', annotated as a hypothetical protein, but having an N-terminal OB-fold, a P/G-rich region and a C-terminal acidic tail. Biochemical characterisation of all three purified recombinant proteins revealed that they exist either as monomer or dimer and bind ssDNA, but differently. The All4779 bound ssDNA in two binding modes i.e. (All4779)35 and (All4779)66 depending on salt concentration and with a binding affinity similar to that of Escherichia coli SSB. On the other hand, Alr0088 bound in a single binding mode of 50-mer and Alr7579 only to large stretches of ssDNA, suggesting that All4779, in all likelihood, is the major typical bacterial SSB in Anabaena. Overexpression of All4779 in Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 led to enhancement of tolerance to DNA-damaging stresses, such as γ-rays, UV-irradiation, desiccation and mitomycinC exposure. The tolerance appears to be a consequence of reduced DNA damage or efficient DNA repair due to increased availability of All4779. The ORF all4779 is proposed to be re-annotated as Anabaena ssb gene.

  7. The hypothetical protein 'All4779', and not the annotated 'Alr0088' and 'Alr7579' proteins, is the major typical single-stranded DNA binding protein of the cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anurag Kirti

    Full Text Available Single-stranded DNA binding (SSB proteins are essential for all DNA-dependent cellular processes. Typical SSB proteins have an N-terminal Oligonucleotide-Binding (OB fold, a Proline/Glycine rich region, followed by a C-terminal acidic tail. In the genome of the heterocystous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120, alr0088 and alr7579 are annotated as coding for SSB, but are truncated and have only the OB-fold. In silico analysis of whole genome of Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 revealed the presence of another ORF 'all4779', annotated as a hypothetical protein, but having an N-terminal OB-fold, a P/G-rich region and a C-terminal acidic tail. Biochemical characterisation of all three purified recombinant proteins revealed that they exist either as monomer or dimer and bind ssDNA, but differently. The All4779 bound ssDNA in two binding modes i.e. (All477935 and (All477966 depending on salt concentration and with a binding affinity similar to that of Escherichia coli SSB. On the other hand, Alr0088 bound in a single binding mode of 50-mer and Alr7579 only to large stretches of ssDNA, suggesting that All4779, in all likelihood, is the major typical bacterial SSB in Anabaena. Overexpression of All4779 in Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 led to enhancement of tolerance to DNA-damaging stresses, such as γ-rays, UV-irradiation, desiccation and mitomycinC exposure. The tolerance appears to be a consequence of reduced DNA damage or efficient DNA repair due to increased availability of All4779. The ORF all4779 is proposed to be re-annotated as Anabaena ssb gene.

  8. Exploring the size limit of protein diffusion through the periplasm in cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 using the 13 kDa iLOV fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Chen; Risoul, Véronique; Latifi, Amel; Christie, John M; Zhang, Cheng-Cai

    2013-09-01

    In the filamentous heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7120, vegetative cells and heterocysts are interdependent on each other and engaged in exchanges of metabolites for survival when grown under diazotrophic conditions. In this organism, the periplasm appears to be continuous along each filament, with a shared outer membrane; however, barriers exist preventing free diffusion of the fluorescent protein GFP (27 kDa) targeted into the periplasmic space. Here we expressed a smaller fluorescent protein iLOV (≈ 13 kDa) fused to the All3333 (a putative homologue of NrtA) signal sequence corresponding to those recognized by the TAT protein translocation system, which exports iLOV to the periplasm of either heterocysts or vegetative cells. Fluorescence microscopy and immunoblot analysis indicated that the iLOV protein is translocated into the periplasm of the producing cell and properly processed, but does not diffuse to neighboring cells via the periplasm. Thus, periplasmic barriers appear to block diffusion of molecules with a size of 13 kDa, the minimum size tested thus far. Assuming that the physical barrier is the peptidoglycan sacculus, its pores might allow diffusion of molecules within the size range between the PatS pentapeptide and iLOV, thus between 0.53 kDa and 13 kDa.

  9. GroEL of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain L-31 exhibits GroES and ATP-independent refolding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potnis, Akhilesh A; Rajaram, Hema; Apte, Shree K

    2016-03-01

    The nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena L-31 has two Hsp60 proteins, 59 kDa GroEL coded by the second gene of groESL operon and 61 kDa Cpn60 coded by cpn60 gene. Anabaena GroEL formed stable higher oligomer (>12-mer) in the presence of K(+) and prevented thermal aggregation of malate dehydrogenase (MDH). Using three protein substrates (MDH, All1541 and green fluorescent protein), it was found that the refolding activity of Anabaena GroEL was lower than that of Escherichia coli GroEL, but independent of both GroES and ATP. This correlated with in vivo data. GroEL exhibited ATPase activity which was enhanced in the presence of GroES and absence of a denatured protein, contrary to that observed for bacterial GroEL. However, a significant role for ATP could not be ascertained during in vitro folding assays. The monomeric Cpn60 exhibited much lower refolding activity than GroEL, unaffected by GroES and ATP. In vitro studies revealed inhibition of the refolding activity of Anabaena GroEL by Cpn60, which could be due to their different oligomeric status. The role of GroES and ATP may have been added during the course of evolution from the ancient cyanobacteria to modern day bacteria enhancing the refolding ability and ensuring wider scope of substrates for GroEL.

  10. The glucosylglycerol-degrading enzyme GghA is involved in acclimation to fluctuating salinities by the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Friedrich; Pade, Nadin; Klähn, Stephan; Hess, Wolfgang R; Hagemann, Martin

    2017-09-01

    The ggpS gene, which encodes the key enzyme for the synthesis of the compatible solute glucosylglycerol (GG), has a promoter region that overlaps with the upstream-located gene slr1670 in the cyanobacterium Synechocystissp. PCC 6803. Like ggpS, the slr1670 gene is salt-induced and encodes a putative glucosylhydrolase. A mutant strain with a slr1670 deletion was generated and found to be unable to adapt the internal GG concentrations in response to changes in external salinities. Whereas cells of the wild-type reduced the internal pool of GG when exposed to gradual and abrupt hypo-osmotic treatments, or when the compatible solute trehalose was added to the growth medium, the internal GG pool of ∆slr1670 mutant cells remained unchanged. These findings indicated that the protein Slr1670 is involved in GG breakdown. The biochemical activity of this GG-hydrolase enzyme was verified using recombinant Slr1670 protein, which split GG into glucose and glycerol. These results validate that Slr1670, which was named GghA, acts as a GG hydrolase. GghA is involved in GG turnover in fluctuating salinities, and similar proteins are found in the genomes of other GG-synthesizing cyanobacteria.

  11. Spectroscopic analysis of the dark relaxation process of a photocycle in a sensor of blue light using FAD (BLUF) protein Slr1694 of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Koji; Masuda, Shinji; Ono, Taka-Aki

    2005-01-01

    Slr1694 is a BLUF (sensor of blue light using flavin adenine dinucleotide) protein and a putative photoreceptor in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. Illumination of Slr1694 induced a signaling light state concurrent with a red shift in the UV-visible absorption of flavin, and formation of the bands from flavin and apo-protein in the light-minus-dark Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectrum. Replacement of Tyr8 with phenylalanine abolished these changes. The light state relaxed to the ground dark state, during which the FTIR bands decayed monophasically. These bands were classifiable into three groups according to their decay rates. The C4=O stretching bands of a flavin isoalloxazine ring had the highest decay rate, which corresponded to that of the absorption red shift. The result indicated that the hydrogen bonding at C4=O is responsible for the UV-visible red shift, consistent with the results of density functional calculation. All FTIR bands and the red shift decayed at the same slower rate in deuterated Slr1694. These results indicated that the dark relaxation from the light state is limited by proton transfer. In contrast, a constrained light state formed under dehydrated conditions decayed much more slowly with no deuteration effects. A photocycle mechanism involving the proton transfer was proposed.

  12. The use of NH4(+) rather than NO3(-) affects cell stoichiometry, C allocation, photosynthesis and growth in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. UTEX LB 2380, only when energy is limiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Zuoxi; Giordano, Mario

    2017-02-01

    The assimilation of N-NO3(-) requires more energy than that of N-NH4(+) . This becomes relevant when energy is limiting and may impinge differently on cell energy budget depending on depth, time of the day and season. We hypothesize that N-limited and energy-limited cells of the oceanic cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. differ in their response to the N source with respect to growth, elemental stoichiometry and carbon allocation. Under N limitation, cells retained almost absolute homeostasis of elemental and organic composition, and the use of NH4(+) did not stimulate growth. When energy was limiting, however, Synechococcus grew faster in NH4(+) than in NO3(-) and had higher C (20%), N (38%) and S (30%) cell quotas. Furthermore, more C was allocated to protein, whereas the carbohydrate and lipid pool size did not change appreciably. Energy limitation also led to a higher photosynthetic rate relative to N limitation. We interpret these results as an indication that, under energy limitation, the use of the least expensive N source allowed a spillover of the energy saved from N assimilation to the assimilation of other nutrients. The change in elemental stoichiometry influenced C allocation, inducing an increase in cell protein, which resulted in a stimulation of photosynthesis and growth. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. CalA, a Cyanobacterial AbrB Protein, Interacts with the Upstream Region of hypC and Acts as a Repressor of Its Transcription in the Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. Strain PCC 7120▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agervald, Åsa; Zhang, Xiaohui; Stensjö, Karin; Devine, Ellenor; Lindblad, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The filamentous, heterocystous, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 may contain, depending on growth conditions, up to two hydrogenases directly involved in hydrogen metabolism. HypC is one out of at least seven auxiliary gene products required for synthesis of a functional hydrogenase, specifically involved in the maturation of the large subunit. In this study we present a protein, CalA (Alr0946 in the genome), belonging to the transcription regulator family AbrB, which in protein-DNA assays was found to interact with the upstream region of hypC. Transcriptional investigations showed that calA is cotranscribed with the downstream gene alr0947, which encodes a putative protease from the abortive infection superfamily, Abi. CalA was shown to interact specifically not only with the upstream region of hypC but also with its own upstream region, acting as a repressor on hypC. The bidirectional hydrogenase activity was significantly downregulated when CalA was overexpressed, demonstrating a correlation with the transcription factor, either direct or indirect. In silico studies showed that homologues to both CalA and Alr0947 are highly conserved proteins within cyanobacteria with very similar physical organizations of the corresponding structural genes. Possible functions of the cotranscribed downstream protein Alr0947 are presented. In addition, we present a three-dimensional (3D) model of the DNA binding domain of CalA and putative DNA binding mechanisms are discussed. PMID:20023111

  14. Mutation of sepJ reduces the intercellular signal range of a hetN-dependent paracrine signal, but not of a patS-dependent signal, in the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, Orion S; Videau, Patrick; Callahan, Sean M

    2014-12-01

    Formation and maintenance of a periodic pattern of nitrogen-fixing cells called heterocysts by the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is dependent on regulators encoded by patS and hetN. In this study, genetic mosaic filaments that consisted of cells engineered to produce one of the developmental regulators flanked by target cells capable of reporting the activity of the developmental regulator were used to investigate the intercellular movement of patS- and hetN-dependent activity. We provide evidence that hetN encodes a paracrine signal with a signal range of several cells. The signal that moved between cells did not include the C-terminus of the annotated HetN protein as indicated by similar signal ranges from source cells expressing either hetN-YFP or hetN alone, despite a lack of intercellular exchange of the HetN-YFP fusion protein. Deletion of sepJ, which has been shown to encode a component of intercellular channels, caused a significant decrease in the signal range of hetN expressed from source cells but not of patS. These results are consistent with symplastic transport of a paracrine hetN-dependent signal between vegetative cells of Anabaena.

  15. Open reading frame ssr2016 is required for antimycin A-sensitive photosystem I-driven cyclic electron flow in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yeremenko, N.; Jeanjean, R.; Prommeenate, P.; Krasikov, V.; Nixon, P.J.; Vermaas, W.F.J.; Havaux, M.; Matthijs, H.C.P.

    2005-01-01

    Open reading frame ssr2016 encodes a protein with substantial sequence similarities to PGR5 identified as a component of the antimycin A-sensitive ferredoxin:plastoquinone reductase (FQR) in PSI cyclic photophosphorylation in Arabidopsis thaliana. We studied cyclic electron flow in Synechocystis sp.

  16. Bioinformatic evaluation of L-arginine catabolic pathways in 24 cyanobacteria and transcriptional analysis of genes encoding enzymes of L-arginine catabolism in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pistorius Elfriede K

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background So far very limited knowledge exists on L-arginine catabolism in cyanobacteria, although six major L-arginine-degrading pathways have been described for prokaryotes. Thus, we have performed a bioinformatic analysis of possible L-arginine-degrading pathways in cyanobacteria. Further, we chose Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 for a more detailed bioinformatic analysis and for validation of the bioinformatic predictions on L-arginine catabolism with a transcript analysis. Results We have evaluated 24 cyanobacterial genomes of freshwater or marine strains for the presence of putative L-arginine-degrading enzymes. We identified an L-arginine decarboxylase pathway in all 24 strains. In addition, cyanobacteria have one or two further pathways representing either an arginase pathway or L-arginine deiminase pathway or an L-arginine oxidase/dehydrogenase pathway. An L-arginine amidinotransferase pathway as a major L-arginine-degrading pathway is not likely but can not be entirely excluded. A rather unusual finding was that the cyanobacterial L-arginine deiminases are substantially larger than the enzymes in non-photosynthetic bacteria and that they are membrane-bound. A more detailed bioinformatic analysis of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 revealed that three different L-arginine-degrading pathways may in principle be functional in this cyanobacterium. These are (i an L-arginine decarboxylase pathway, (ii an L-arginine deiminase pathway, and (iii an L-arginine oxidase/dehydrogenase pathway. A transcript analysis of cells grown either with nitrate or L-arginine as sole N-source and with an illumination of 50 μmol photons m-2 s-1 showed that the transcripts for the first enzyme(s of all three pathways were present, but that the transcript levels for the L-arginine deiminase and the L-arginine oxidase/dehydrogenase were substantially higher than that of the three isoenzymes of L-arginine decarboxylase. Conclusion The evaluation of 24

  17. High cell-specific rates of nitrogen and carbon fixation by the cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon sp. at low temperatures in the Baltic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svedén, Jennie B; Adam, Birgit; Walve, Jakob; Nahar, Nurun; Musat, Niculina; Lavik, Gaute; Whitehouse, Martin J; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Ploug, Helle

    2015-12-01

    Aphanizomenon is a widespread genus of nitrogen (N2)-fixing cyanobacteria in lakes and estuaries, accounting for a large fraction of the summer N2-fixation in the Baltic Sea. However, information about its cell-specific carbon (C)- and N2-fixation rates in the early growth season has not previously been reported. We combined various methods to study N2-fixation, photosynthesis and respiration in field-sampled Baltic Sea Aphanizomenon sp. during early summer at 10°C. Stable isotope incubations at in situ light intensities during 24 h combined with cell-specific secondary ion mass spectrometry showed an average net N2-fixation rate of 55 fmol N cell(-1) day(-1). Dark net N2-fixation rates over a course of 12 h were 20% of those measured in light. C-fixation, but not N2-fixation, was inhibited by high ambient light intensities during daytime. Consequently, the C:N fixation ratio varied substantially over the diel cycle. C- and N2-fixation rates were comparable to those reported for Aphanizomenon sp. in August at 19°C, using the same methods. High respiration rates (23% of gross photosynthesis) were measured with (14)C-incubations and O2-microsensors, and presumably reflect the energy needed for high N2-fixation rates. Hence, Aphanizomenon sp. is an important contributor to N2-fixation at low in situ temperatures in the early growth season.

  18. Mutations of Cytochrome b559 and PsbJ on and near the QC Site in Photosystem II Influence the Regulation of Short-Term Light Response and Photosynthetic Growth of the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jine-Yung; Chiu, Yi-Fang; Ortega, José M; Wang, Hsing-Ting; Tseng, Tien-Sheng; Ke, Shyue-Chu; Roncel, Mercedes; Chu, Hsiu-An

    2016-04-19

    The characteristic features of two types of short-term light adaptations of the photosynthetic apparatus of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, state transition and blue-green light-induced fluorescence quenching, were compared in wild-type and cytochrome b559 and PsbJ mutant cells with mutations on and near the QC site in photosystem II (PSII). All mutant cells grew photoautotrophically and assembled stable PSII. Thermoluminescence emission experiments showed a decrease in the stability of the S3QB(-)/S2QB(-) charge pairs in the A16FJ, S28Aβ, and V32Fβ mutant cells. When dark-adapted wild-type and mutant cells were illuminated by medium-intensity blue light, the increase in the PSII fluorescence yield (indicating a transition to state 1) was more prominent in mutant than wild-type cells. Strong blue-light conditions induced a quenching of fluorescence corresponding to nonphotochemical fluorescence quenching (NPQ). The extension of NPQ decreased significantly in the mutants, and the kinetics appeared to be affected. When similar measures were repeated on an orange carotenoid protein (OCP)-deficient background, little or no quenching was observed, which confirms that the decrease in fluorescence under strong blue light corresponded to the OCP-dependent NPQ. Immunoblot results showed that the attenuated effect of blue light-induced NPQ in mutant cells was not due to a lack of OCP. Photosynthetic growth and biomass production were greater for A16FJ, S28Aβ, and V32Fβ mutant cells than for wild-type cells under normal growth conditions. Our results suggest that mutations of cytochrome b559 and PsbJ on and near the QC site of PSII may modulate the short-term light response in cyanobacteria.

  19. The antisense RNA As1_flv4 in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 prevents premature expression of the flv4-2 operon upon shift in inorganic carbon supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhut, Marion; Georg, Jens; Klähn, Stephan; Sakurai, Isamu; Mustila, Henna; Zhang, Pengpeng; Hess, Wolfgang R; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2012-09-28

    The functional relevance of natural cis-antisense transcripts is mostly unknown. Here we have characterized the association of three antisense RNAs and one intergenically encoded noncoding RNA with an operon that plays a crucial role in photoprotection of photosystem II under low carbon conditions in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Cyanobacteria show strong gene expression dynamics in response to a shift of cells from high carbon to low levels of inorganic carbon (C(i)), but the regulatory mechanisms are poorly understood. Among the most up-regulated genes in Synechocystis are flv4, sll0218, and flv2, which are organized in the flv4-2 operon. The flavodiiron proteins encoded by this operon open up an alternative electron transfer route, likely starting from the Q(B) site in photosystem II, under photooxidative stress conditions. Our expression analysis of cells shifted from high carbon to low carbon demonstrated an inversely correlated transcript accumulation of the flv4-2 operon mRNA and one antisense RNA to flv4, designated as As1_flv4. Overexpression of As1_flv4 led to a decrease in flv4-2 mRNA. The promoter activity of as1_flv4 was transiently stimulated by C(i) limitation and negatively regulated by the AbrB-like transcription regulator Sll0822, whereas the flv4-2 operon was positively regulated by the transcription factor NdhR. The results indicate that the tightly regulated antisense RNA As1_flv4 establishes a transient threshold for flv4-2 expression in the early phase after a change in C(i) conditions. Thus, it prevents unfavorable synthesis of the proteins from the flv4-2 operon.

  20. The nitrogen-regulated response regulator NrrA controls cyanophycin synthesis and glycogen catabolism in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Deng; Yang, Chen

    2014-01-24

    The cellular metabolism in cyanobacteria is extensively regulated in response to changes of environmental nitrogen availability. Multiple regulators are involved in this process, including a nitrogen-regulated response regulator NrrA. However, the regulatory role of NrrA in most cyanobacteria remains to be elucidated. In this study, we combined a comparative genomic reconstruction of NrrA regulons in 15 diverse cyanobacterial species with detailed experimental characterization of NrrA-mediated regulation in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The reconstructed NrrA regulons in most species included the genes involved in glycogen catabolism, central carbon metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, and protein degradation. A predicted NrrA-binding motif consisting of two direct repeats of TG(T/A)CA separated by an 8-bp A/T-rich spacer was verified by in vitro binding assays with purified NrrA protein. The predicted target genes of NrrA in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 were experimentally validated by comparing the transcript levels and enzyme activities between the wild-type and nrrA-inactivated mutant strains. The effect of NrrA deficiency on intracellular contents of arginine, cyanophycin, and glycogen was studied. Severe impairments in arginine synthesis and cyanophycin accumulation were observed in the nrrA-inactivated mutant. The nrrA inactivation also resulted in a significantly decreased rate of glycogen degradation. Our results indicate that by directly up-regulating expression of the genes involved in arginine synthesis, glycogen degradation, and glycolysis, NrrA controls cyanophycin accumulation and glycogen catabolism in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. It is suggested that NrrA plays a role in coordinating the synthesis and degradation of nitrogen and carbon reserves in cyanobacteria.

  1. The Nitrogen-regulated Response Regulator NrrA Controls Cyanophycin Synthesis and Glycogen Catabolism in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Deng; Yang, Chen

    2014-01-01

    The cellular metabolism in cyanobacteria is extensively regulated in response to changes of environmental nitrogen availability. Multiple regulators are involved in this process, including a nitrogen-regulated response regulator NrrA. However, the regulatory role of NrrA in most cyanobacteria remains to be elucidated. In this study, we combined a comparative genomic reconstruction of NrrA regulons in 15 diverse cyanobacterial species with detailed experimental characterization of NrrA-mediated regulation in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The reconstructed NrrA regulons in most species included the genes involved in glycogen catabolism, central carbon metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, and protein degradation. A predicted NrrA-binding motif consisting of two direct repeats of TG(T/A)CA separated by an 8-bp A/T-rich spacer was verified by in vitro binding assays with purified NrrA protein. The predicted target genes of NrrA in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 were experimentally validated by comparing the transcript levels and enzyme activities between the wild-type and nrrA-inactivated mutant strains. The effect of NrrA deficiency on intracellular contents of arginine, cyanophycin, and glycogen was studied. Severe impairments in arginine synthesis and cyanophycin accumulation were observed in the nrrA-inactivated mutant. The nrrA inactivation also resulted in a significantly decreased rate of glycogen degradation. Our results indicate that by directly up-regulating expression of the genes involved in arginine synthesis, glycogen degradation, and glycolysis, NrrA controls cyanophycin accumulation and glycogen catabolism in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. It is suggested that NrrA plays a role in coordinating the synthesis and degradation of nitrogen and carbon reserves in cyanobacteria. PMID:24337581

  2. Regulation of glutamine synthetase activity in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 by the nitrogen source: effect of ammonium.

    OpenAIRE

    Mérida, A; Candau, P; Florencio, F J

    1991-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase activity from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 is regulated as a function of the nitrogen source available in the medium. Addition of 0.25 mM NH4Cl to nitrate-grown cells promotes a clear short-term inactivation of glutamine synthetase, whose enzyme activity decreases to 5 to 10% of the initial value in 25 min. The intracellular levels of glutamine, determined under various conditions, taken together with the results obtained with azaserine (an inhibitor of transamidases...

  3. Sll0528, a Site-2-Protease, Is Critically Involved in Cold, Salt and Hyperosmotic Stress Acclimation of Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijin Lei

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Site-2-proteases (S2Ps mediated proteolysis of transmembrane transcriptional regulators is a conserved mechanism to regulate transmembrane signaling. The universal presence of S2P homologs in different cyanobacterial genomes suggest conserved and fundamental functions, though limited data has been available. Here we provide the first evidence that Sll0528, a site-2-protease in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is crucial for salt, cold and hyperosmotic stress acclimation. Remarkable induction of sll0528 gene expression was observed under salt, cold and hyperosmotic stress, much higher than induction of the other three S2Ps. Knock-out of sll0528 gene in wild type Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 increased their sensitivity to salt, cold and hyperosmotic stress, as revealed by retarded growth, reduced pigments and disrupted photosystems. The sll0528 gene was induced to a much smaller extent by high light and mixotrophic growth with glucose. Similar growth responses of the sll0528 knockout mutant and wild type under high light and mixotrophic growth indicated that sll0528 was dispensable for these conditions. Recombinant Sll0528 protein could cleave beta-casein into smaller fragments. These results together suggest that the Sll0528 metalloprotease plays a role in the stress response and lays the foundation for further investigation of its mechanism, as well as providing hints for the functional analysis of other S2Ps in cyanobacteria.

  4. Identification of the light-independent phosphoserine pathway as an additional source of serine in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemke, Friederike; Baier, Antje; Knoop, Henning; Kern, Ramona; Jablonsky, Jiri; Beyer, Gabriele; Volkmer, Thomas; Steuer, Ralf; Lockau, Wolfgang; Hagemann, Martin

    2015-05-01

    L-serine is one of the proteinogenic amino acids and participates in several essential processes in all organisms. In plants, the light-dependent photorespiratory and the light-independent phosphoserine pathways contribute to serine biosynthesis. In cyanobacteria, the light-dependent photorespiratory pathway for serine synthesis is well characterized, but the phosphoserine pathway has not been identified. Here, we investigated three candidate genes for enzymes of the phosphoserine pathway in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Only the gene for the D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase is correctly annotated in the genome database, whereas the 3-phosphoserine transaminase and 3-phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP) proteins are incorrectly annotated and were identified here. All enzymes were obtained as recombinant proteins and showed the activities necessary to catalyse the three-step phosphoserine pathway. The genes coding for the phosphoserine pathway were found in most cyanobacterial genomes listed in CyanoBase. The pathway seems to be essential for cyanobacteria, because it was impossible to mutate the gene coding for PSP in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 or in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. A model approach indicates a 30-60% contribution of the phosphoserine pathway to the overall serine pool. Hence, this study verified that cyanobacteria, similar to plants, use the phosphoserine pathway in addition to photorespiration for serine biosynthesis. © 2015 The Authors.

  5. Nitrogen availability and electron transport control the expression of glnB gene (encoding PII protein) in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Domínguez, M; Florencio, F J

    1997-12-01

    The glnB gene from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 that encodes the PII protein has been cloned by heterologous hybridization using the corresponding glnB gene from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942. An ORF of 336 nucleotides appeared that potentially coded for a protein of 112 amino acid residues (M(r) 12,397). The deduced amino acid sequence revealed a high identity (higher than 80%) with its cyanobacterial counterparts and a basal level of identity (close to 60%) with other PII proteins. A single mRNA of about 680 nucleotides was found under all growth conditions studied. glnB gene expression was specifically activated under nitrogen deprivation (a 10-fold increase respect to nitrogen-replete conditions). No differences in glnB mRNA levels were observed when using nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources. Amount of glnB mRNA decreased to undetectable levels when transferring cells to the dark, but effect was avoided by adding glucose to the culture medium. Primer extension analysis and band-shift assays indicated that expression of the glnB gene, elevated under nitrogen deprivation, might lie under the control of the nitrogen transcriptional regulator NtcA, although constitutive levels of expression were also detected from a sigma 70-dependent Escherichia coli-like promoter.

  6. The Multiple Functions of Common Microbial Carbon Polymers, Glycogen and PHB, during Stress Responses in the Non-Diazotrophic Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damrow, Ramon; Maldener, Iris; Zilliges, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Classical microbial carbon polymers such as glycogen and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) have a crucial impact as both a sink and a reserve under macronutrient stress conditions. Most microbial species exclusively synthesize and degrade either glycogen or PHB. A few bacteria such as the phototrophic model organism Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 surprisingly produce both physico-chemically different polymers under conditions of high C to N ratios. For the first time, the function and interrelation of both carbon polymers in non-diazotrophic cyanobacteria are analyzed in a comparative physiological study of single- and double-knockout mutants (ΔglgC; ΔphaC; ΔglgC/ΔphaC), respectively. Most of the observed phenotypes are explicitly related to the knockout of glycogen synthesis, highlighting the metabolic, energetic, and structural impact of this process whenever cells switch from an active, photosynthetic 'protein status' to a dormant 'glycogen status'. The carbon flux regulation into glycogen granules is apparently crucial for both phycobilisome degradation and thylakoid layer disassembly in the presence of light. In contrast, PHB synthesis is definitely not involved in this primary acclimation response. Moreover, the very weak interrelations between the two carbon-polymer syntheses indicate that the regulation and role of PHB synthesis in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is different from glycogen synthesis.

  7. Effects of PII deficiency on expression of the genes involved in ammonium utilization in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatani, Nobuyuki; Omata, Tatsuo

    2006-06-01

    The Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 mutant deficient in PII protein (the glnB gene product) was found to express glutamine synthetase activity at levels several times higher than the wild-type strain. There was no significant difference in nitrate reductase activity levels between the two strains, and the nitrite reductase levels were somewhat lower in the mutant than in the wild-type strain. The higher glutamine synthetase activity in the mutant was ascribed to higher expression levels of the glutamine synthetase genes (glnA and glnN), which belong to the regulon controlled by NtcA, a Crp-family transcription regulator. Examination of the effects of PII deficiency on other NtcA-regulated genes revealed that the transcript levels of amt1 (encoding an ammonium permease) and gifB (encoding an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase) were increased, whereas that of gifA (a homolog of gifB, encoding another glutamine synthetase inhibitor) was decreased, with those of nirA, nrtC, icd, sigE (rpoD2-V), nblA and ntcA being unaffected. Unlike the Synechococcus elongatus strain PCC 7942, induction or repression of the NtcA-regulated genes proceeded normally in the PII-deficient mutant upon nitrogen depletion. The altered steady-state expression levels of glnA, glnN, amt1, gifA and gifB in the PII-deficient mutant suggested that Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 has a mechanism for regulation of the subset of the NtcA-regulated genes related directly to ammonium assimilation.

  8. A novel ATP-binding cassette transporter is responsible for resistance to viologen herbicides in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosecka, Jana; Orlov, Artem V; Fantin, Yuri S; Zinchenko, Vladislav V; Babykin, Michael M; Tichy, Martin

    2009-08-01

    The charged quaternary ammonium compounds--methyl, ethyl and benzyl viologens--generate reactive oxygen species in photosynthetic cells. Three independent methyl viologen-resistant spontaneous mutants of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 were identified, in which the conserved R115 residue of the Slr1174 protein was replaced with G115, L115 and C115. The Slr1174 protein of the DUF990 family is related to the permease subunit of an ABC-2-type transporter and its R115 mutation was found to be solely responsible for the observed methyl viologen resistance. Bioinformatic analysis showed that in various bacterial genomes, two genes encoding another permease subunit and the ATPase component of an ATP-binding cassette transporter form putative operons with slr1174 orthologs, suggesting that the protein products of these genes may form functional transporters. The corresponding genes in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, i.e. slr0610 for the permease and slr1901 for the ATPase, did not form such an operon. However, insertional inactivation of any slr1174, slr0610 or slr1901 genes in both the wild-type and the R115-resistant mutant resulted in increased sensitivity to methyl, ethyl and benzyl viologens; moreover, single- and double-insertion mutants did not differ in their viologen sensitivity. Our data suggest that Slr1901, Slr1174 and Slr0610 form a heteromeric ATP-binding cassette-type viologen exporter, in which each component is critical for viologen extrusion. Because the greatest increase in mutant sensitivity was observed in the case of ethyl viologen, the three proteins have been named EvrA (Slr1901), EvrB (Slr1174) and EvrC (Slr0610). This is the first report of a function for a DUF990 family protein.

  9. Molecular characterization of Alr1105 a novel arsenate reductase of the diazotrophic cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120 and decoding its role in abiotic stress management in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sarita; Shrivastava, Alok K; Rai, Rashmi; Rai, Lal Chand

    2013-11-01

    This paper constitutes the first report on the Alr1105 of Anabaena sp. PCC7120 which functions as arsenate reductase and phosphatase and offers tolerance against oxidative and other abiotic stresses in the alr1105 transformed Escherichia coli. The bonafide of 40.8 kDa recombinant GST+Alr1105 fusion protein was confirmed by immunoblotting. The purified Alr1105 protein (mw 14.8 kDa) possessed strong arsenate reductase (Km 16.0 ± 1.2 mM and Vmax 5.6 ± 0.31 μmol min⁻¹ mg protein⁻¹) and phosphatase activity (Km 27.38 ± 3.1 mM and Vmax 0.077 ± 0.005 μmol min⁻¹ mg protein⁻¹) at an optimum temperature 37 °C and 6.5 pH. Native Alr1105 was found as a monomeric protein in contrast to its homologous Synechocystis ArsC protein. Expression of Alr1105 enhanced the arsenic tolerance in the arsenate reductase mutant E. coli WC3110 (∆arsC) and rendered better growth than the wild type W3110 up to 40 mM As (V). Notwithstanding above, the recombinant E. coli strain when exposed to CdCl₂, ZnSO₄, NiCl₂, CoCl₂, CuCl₂, heat, UV-B and carbofuron showed increase in growth over the wild type and mutant E. coli transformed with the empty vector. Furthermore, an enhanced growth of the recombinant E. coli in the presence of oxidative stress producing chemicals (MV, PMS and H₂O₂), suggested its protective role against these stresses. Appreciable expression of alr1105 gene as measured by qRT-PCR at different time points under selected stresses reconfirmed its role in stress tolerance. Thus the Alr1105 of Anabaena sp. PCC7120 functions as an arsenate reductase and possess novel properties different from the arsenate reductases known so far.

  10. Heme oxygenase 2 of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is induced under a microaerobic atmosphere and is required for microaerobic growth at high light intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Mete; Kang, Ilgu; Beale, Samuel I

    2010-01-01

    Cyanobacteria, red algae, and cryptomonad algae utilize phycobilin chromophores that are attached to phycobiliproteins to harvest solar energy. Heme oxygenase (HO) in these organisms catalyzes the first step in phycobilin formation through the conversion of heme to biliverdin IXalpha, CO, and iron. The Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 genome contains two open reading frames, ho1 (sll1184) and ho2 (sll1875), whose products have in vitro HO activity. We report that HO2, the protein encoded by ho2, was induced in the cells growing under a microaerobic atmosphere [0.2% (v/v) O(2)], whereas HO1 was constitutively expressed under both aerobic and microaerobic atmospheres. Light intensity did not have an effect on the expression of both the HOs. Cells, in which ho2 was disrupted, were unable to grow microaerobically at a light intensity of 40 micromol m(-2) s(-1), but did grow microaerobically at 10 micromol m(-2) s(-1) light intensity. These cells grew normally aerobically at both light intensities. Comparative analysis of complete cyanobacterial genomes revealed that possession of two HOs is common in cyanobacteria. In phylogenetic analysis of their amino acid sequences, cyanobacterial HO1 and HO2 homologs formed distinct clades. HO sequences of cyanobacteria that have only one isoform were most similar to HO1 sequences. We propose that HO2 might be the more ancient HO homolog that functioned under low O(2) tension, whereas the derived HO1 can better accommodate increased O(2) tension in the environment.

  11. Disruption of the ndhF1 gene affects Chl fluorescence through state transition in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, resulting in apparent high efficiency of photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Takako; Harada, Tetsuyuki; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Sonoike, Kintake

    2013-07-01

    In Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, the disruption of the ndhF1 gene (slr0844), which encodes a subunit of one of the NDH-1 complexes (NDH-1L complex) serving for respiratory electron transfer, causes the largest change in Chl fluorescence induction kinetics among the kinetics of 750 disruptants searched in the Fluorome, the cyanobacterial Chl fluorescence database. The cause of the explicit phenotype of the ndhF1 disruptant was examined by measurements of the photosynthetic rate, Chl fluorescence and state transition. The results demonstrate that the defects in respiratory electron transfer obviously have great impact on Chl fluorescence in cyanobacteria. The inactivation of NDH-1L complexes involving electron transfer from NDH-1 to plastoquinone (PQ) would result in the oxidation of the PQ pool, leading to the transition to State 1, where the yield of Chl fluorescence is high. Apparently, respiration, although its rate is far lower than that of photosynthesis, could affect Chl fluorescence through the state transition as leverage. The disruption of the ndhF1 gene caused lower oxygen-evolving activity but the estimated electron transport rate from Chl fluorescence measurements was faster in the mutant than in the wild-type cells. The discrepancy could be ascribed to the decreased level of non-photochemical quenching due to state transition. One must be cautious when using the Chl fluorescence parameter to estimate photosynthesis in mutants defective in state transition.

  12. Effect of Different Broad Waveband Lights on Membrane Lipids of a Cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp., as Determined by UPLC-QToF-MS and Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimpio Montero

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Differential profile of membrane lipids and pigments of a Synechococcus sp. cyanobacterial strain cells exposed to blue, green, red and white light are determined by means of liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry or diode array detection. Raman and ATR-IR spectra of intact cells under the diverse light wavebands are also reported. Blue light cells exhibited an increased content of photosynthetic pigments as well as specific species of membrane glycerolipids as compared to cells exposed to other wavebands. The A630/A680 ratio indicated an increased content of phycobilisomes (PBS in the blue light-exposed cells. Some differences in the protein conformation between the four light waveband-exposed cells were deduced from the variable absorbance at specific wavenumbers in the FT-Raman and ATR-FTIR spectra, in particular bands assigned to amide I and amide II. Bands from 1180 to 950 cm−1 in the ATR-FTIR spectrum suggest degraded outer membrane polysaccharide in the blue light-exposed cells.

  13. Characterization and responses to environmental cues of a photosynthetic antenna-deficient mutant of the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leganés, Francisco; Martínez-Granero, Francisco; Muñoz-Martín, M Ángeles; Marco, Eduardo; Jorge, Alberto; Carvajal, Laura; Vida, Teresa; González-Pleiter, Miguel; Fernández-Piñas, Francisca

    2014-07-01

    The cyanobacterial phycobilisome (PBS) is a giant pigment-protein complex which harvests light energy for photosynthesis and comprises two structures: a core and peripheral rods. Most studies on PBS structure and function are based on mutants of unicellular strains. In this report, we describe the phenotypic and genetic characterization of a transposon mutant of the filamentous Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, denoted LC1, which cannot synthesize the phycobiliprotein phycocyanin (PC), the main component of the rods; in this mutant, the transposon had inserted into the cpcB gene (orf alr0528) which putatively encodes PC-β chain. Mutant LC1 was able to synthesize phycoerythrocyanin (PEC), a phycobiliprotein (PBP) located at the terminal region of the rods; but in the absence of PC, PEC did not attach to the PBSs that only retained the allophycocyanin (APC) core; ferredoxin: NADP+-oxidoreductase (FNR) that is associated with the PBS in the wild type, was not found in isolated PBSs from LC1. The performance of the mutant exposed to different environmental conditions was evaluated. The mutant phenotype was successfully complemented by cloning and transfer of the wild type complete cpc operon to mutant LC1. Interestingly, LC1 compensated its mutation by significantly increasing the number of its core-PBS and the effective quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry; this feature suggests a more efficient energy conversion in the mutant which may be useful for biotechnological applications.

  14. CO2 Biofixation by the Cyanobacterium Spirulina sp. LEB 18 and the Green Alga Chlorella fusca LEB 111 Grown Using Gas Effluents and Solid Residues of Thermoelectric Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Vaz, Bruna; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira; de Morais, Michele Greque

    2016-01-01

    The concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere has increased from 280 to 400 ppm in the last 10 years, and the coal-fired power plants are responsible for approximately 22 % of these emissions. The burning of fossil fuel also produces a great amount of solid waste that causes serious industrial and environmental problems. The biological processes become interesting alternative in combating pollution and developing new products. The objective of this study was to evaluate the CO2 biofixation potential of microalgae that were grown using gaseous effluents and solid residues of thermoelectric origin. The microalgae Chlorella fusca LEB 111 presented higher rate of CO2 biofixation (42.8 %) (p Spirulina sp. LEB 18. The values for the CO2 biofixation rates and the kinetic parameters of Spirulina and Chlorella cells grown using combustion gas did not differ significantly from those of cells grown using CO2 and a carbon source in the culture media. These microalgae could be grown using ash derived from coal combustion, using the minerals present in this residue as the source of the essential metals required for their growth and the CO2 derived from the combustion gas as their carbon source.

  15. Resistance, accumulation and transformation of selenium by the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 after exposure to inorganic Se{sup VI} or Se{sup IV}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouget, B.; Avoscan, L.; Collins, R.; Carriere, M. [Lab. Pierre Suee, CEA-CNRS UMR 9956, CEA/Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Sarret, G. [Environmental Geochemistry Group, LGIT, Univ. of Grenoble and CNRS, Grenoble (France)

    2005-07-01

    Our purpose was to investigate the ability of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, a photosynthetic prokaryote isolated from fresh water, to resist, incorporate and reduce the oxidized forms of selenium including selenite and selenate, the major selenium species present in aquatic systems. Selenium speciation and the chemical intermediates during selenium transformation were determined by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The possible internalisation pathways involving selenium and the metabolic fate of selenate and selenite were examined. Selenate metabolism seemed to proceed via the sulfate reduction pathway resulting in the formation of the R-Se-H, R-Se-R and R-Se-Se-R species. The transformation of selenate to toxic amino acids may explain the high sensitivity of Synechocystis to selenate. Several mechanisms of selenium reduction seem to complete during selenite assimilation. A specific mechanism may transform internalised selenite into selenide and, subsequently induce the biosynthesis of selenoproteins. A non-specific mechanism may interfere with thiols, such as glutathione in the cell cytoplasm, or with proteins in the periplasm of the bacteria, notably thioredoxins. Several hypotheses concerning the complex transformation of selenium in Synechocystis could therefore be proposed. (orig.)

  16. Essential Role of Glutathione in Acclimation to Environmental and Redox Perturbations in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 68031[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Jeffrey C.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2010-01-01

    Glutathione, a nonribosomal thiol tripeptide, has been shown to be critical for many processes in plants. Much less is known about the roles of glutathione in cyanobacteria, oxygenic photosynthetic prokaryotes that are the evolutionary precursor of the chloroplast. An understanding of glutathione metabolism in cyanobacteria is expected to provide novel insight into the evolution of the elaborate and extensive pathways that utilize glutathione in photosynthetic organisms. To investigate the function of glutathione in cyanobacteria, we generated deletion mutants of glutamate-cysteine ligase (gshA) and glutathione synthetase (gshB) in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Complete segregation of the ΔgshA mutation was not achieved, suggesting that GshA activity is essential for growth. In contrast, fully segregated ΔgshB mutants were isolated and characterized. The ΔgshB strain lacks reduced glutathione (GSH) but instead accumulates the precursor compound γ-glutamylcysteine (γ-EC). The ΔgshB strain grows slower than the wild-type strain under favorable conditions and exhibits extremely reduced growth or death when subjected to conditions promoting oxidative stress. Furthermore, we analyzed thiol contents in the wild type and the ΔgshB mutant after subjecting the strains to multiple environmental and redox perturbations. We found that conditions promoting growth stimulate glutathione biosynthesis. We also determined that cellular GSH and γ-EC content decline following exposure to dark and blue light and during photoheterotrophic growth. Moreover, a rapid depletion of GSH and γ-EC is observed in the wild type and the ΔgshB strain, respectively, when cells are starved for nitrate or sulfate. PMID:20935175

  17. Functional analysis of the iron-stress induced CP 43' polypeptide of PS II in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, S; Samson, G; Bruce, D; Huner, N P; Laudenbach, D E

    1995-07-01

    Under conditions of iron-stress, the Photosystem II associated chlorophyll a protein complex designated CP 43', which is encoded by the isiA gene, becomes the major pigment-protein complex in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942. The isiB gene, which is located immediately downstream of isiA, encodes the protein flavodoxin, which can functionally replace ferredoxin under conditions of iron stress. We have constructed two cyanobacterial insertion mutants which are lacking (i) the CP 43' apoprotein (designated isiA (-)) and (ii) flavodoxin (designated isiB (-)). The function of CP 43' was studied by comparing the cell characteristics, PS II functional absorption cross-sections and Chl a fluorescence parameters from the wild-type, isiA (-) and isiB (-) strains grown under iron-stressed conditions. In all strains grown under iron deprivation, the cell number doubling time was maintained despite marked changes in pigment composition and other cell characteristics. This indicates that iron-starved cells remained viable and that their altered phenotype suggests an adequate acclimation to low iron even in absence of CP 43' and/or flavodoxin. Under both iron conditions, no differences were detected between the three strains in the functional absorption crossection of PS II determined from single turnover flash saturation curves of Chl a fluorescence. This demonstrates that CP 43' is not part of the functional light-harvesting antenna for PS II. In the wild-type and the isiB (-) strain grown under iron-deficient conditions, CP 43' was present in the thylakoid membrane as an uncoupled Chl-protein complex. This was indicated by (1) an increase of the yield of prompt Chl a fluorescence (Fo) and (2) the persistence after PS II trap closure of a fast fluorescence decay component showing a maximum at 685 nm.

  18. Functional characterization of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 pst1 and pst2 gene clusters reveals a novel strategy for phosphate uptake in a freshwater cyanobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Frances D; Mazard, Sophie; Humphreys, Lee; Scanlan, David J

    2010-07-01

    Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 possesses two putative ABC-type inorganic phosphate (P(i)) transporters with three associated P(i)-binding proteins (PBPs), SphX (encoded by sll0679), PstS1 (encoded by sll0680), and PstS2 (encoded by slr1247), organized in two spatially discrete gene clusters, pst1 and pst2. We used a combination of mutagenesis, gene expression, and radiotracer uptake analyses to functionally characterize the role of these PBPs and associated gene clusters. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) demonstrated that pstS1 was expressed at a high level in P(i)-replete conditions compared to sphX or pstS2. However, a P(i) stress shift increased expression of pstS2 318-fold after 48 h, compared to 43-fold for pstS1 and 37-fold for sphX. A shift to high-light conditions caused a transient increase of all PBPs, whereas N stress primarily increased expression of sphX. Interposon mutagenesis of each PBP demonstrated that disruption of pstS1 alone caused constitutive expression of pho regulon genes, implicating PstS1 as a major component of the P(i) sensing machinery. The pstS1 mutant was also transformation incompetent. (32)P(i) radiotracer uptake experiments using pst1 and pst2 deletion mutants showed that Pst1 acts as a low-affinity, high-velocity transporter (K(s), 3.7 + or - 0.7 microM; V(max), 31.18 + or - 3.96 fmol cell(-1) min(-1)) and Pst2 acts as a high-affinity, low-velocity system (K(s), 0.07 + or - 0.01 microM; V(max), 0.88 + or - 0.11 fmol cell(-1) min(-1)). These P(i) ABC transporters thus exhibit differences in both kinetic and regulatory properties, the former trait potentially dramatically increasing the dynamic range of P(i) transport into the cell, which has potential implications for our understanding of the ecological success of this key microbial group.

  19. Mutational analysis of photosystem I polypeptides in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Targeted inactivation of psaI reveals the function of psaI in the structural organization of psaL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Q.; Hoppe, D.; Chitnis, V. P.; Odom, W. R.; Guikema, J. A.; Chitnis, P. R.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    We cloned, characterized, and inactivated the psaI gene encoding a 4-kDa hydrophobic subunit of photosystem I from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The psaI gene is located 90 base pairs downstream from psaL, and is transcribed on 0.94- and 0.32-kilobase transcripts. To identify the function of PsaI, we generated a cyanobacterial strain in which psaI has been interrupted by a gene for chloramphenicol resistance. The wild-type and the mutant cells showed comparable rates of photoautotrophic growth at 25 degrees C. However, the mutant cells grew slower and contained less chlorophyll than the wild-type cells, when grown at 40 degrees C. The PsaI-less membranes from cells grown at either temperature showed a small decrease in NADP+ photoreduction rate when compared to the wild-type membranes. Inactivation of psaI led to an 80% decrease in the PsaL level in the photosynthetic membranes and to a complete loss of PsaL in the purified photosystem I preparations, but had little effect on the accumulation of other photosystem I subunits. Upon solubilization with nonionic detergents, photosystem I trimers could be obtained from the wild-type, but not from the PsaI-less membranes. The PsaI-less photosystem I monomers did not contain detectable levels of PsaL. Therefore, a structural interaction between PsaL and PsaI may stabilize the association of PsaL with the photosystem I core. PsaL in the wild-type and PsaI-less membranes showed equal resistance to removal by chaotropic agents. However, PsaL in the PsaI-less strain exhibited an increased susceptibility to proteolysis. From these data, we conclude that PsaI has a crucial role in aiding normal structural organization of PsaL within the photosystem I complex and the absence of PsaI alters PsaL organization, leading to a small, but physiologically significant, defect in photosystem I function.

  20. 具异型胞蓝细菌Anabaena sp. PCC 71 20 质膜和%Isolation of Plasma and Thylakoid Membranes from the Heterocystous Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李斌; 徐冬一; 赵进东

    2001-01-01

    利用水溶性多聚体双相法分离蓝细菌Anabaena sp. PCC 7120质膜和类囊体膜两种膜系统.吸收光谱分析表明,质膜相和类囊体膜相的主要色素分别为类胡萝卜素和叶绿素.SDS_ 凝胶电泳显示这两种膜系统蛋白组成有很大差别.这种分离方法容易操作,对研究蓝细菌的膜蛋白和膜脂非常有用.

  1. Preparation of Polyclonal Antibody of Allophycocyanin Protein in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp.Strain PCC 6803%集胞藻6803藻胆体别藻蓝蛋白多克隆抗体的制备

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈李萍; 杜玲瑜; 马为民; 王全喜

    2012-01-01

    Phycobilisome is the major accessory light-harvesting supramolecular complexes, which is composed of core and peripheral rods. Furthermore,the core contains several cylindrical protein assemblies that mainly consist of allophycocyanin,and is involved in the transfer of light energy to the reaction centers of photosystems. In this study,the apcA gene was amplified from the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. The expression plasmid pET-32a(+)-apcA was constructed and transformed into BL21(DE3)pLysS,and the expression of ApcA protein was induced by IPTG. After purification by His-tag,the recombinant protein pET-ApcA was used to immunize Japanese White Rabbit to obtain the polyclonal antibody. The titer of the polyclonal antibody was detected by ELISA and its specificity was analyzed by immunoblotting. The titer of polyclonal antibody was found to be up to 1 ∶ 1 025 000,and thus possessed a high specificity. A polyclonal allophycocyanin antibody of Synechocystis 6803 was successfully obtained in this study,and it will further help in understanding the important roles of core of cyanobacterial phycobilisome during light energy transfer by using biochemical strategy.%藻胆体是蓝藻细胞主要的捕光天线色素超分子复合体,主要由核心体和外围的杆两部分组成,核心体主要由别藻蓝蛋白组装而成,参与光能向光合作用反应中心的传递.该研究通过PCR扩增出集胞藻6803别藻蓝蛋白a亚基(ApcA)编码基因apcA,构建表达质粒pET-32a(+)-apcA,并将其转入大肠杆菌BL21(DE3)pLysS菌株中;通过IPTG诱导表达重组蛋白,并利用组氨酸标签将可溶性目的蛋白进行亲和纯化后,免疫日本大耳白兔,从而获得多克隆抗体.间接ELISA法揭示ApcA抗体效价可高达1∶1025000;蛋白免疫印迹确定该抗体具有高度特异性.表明该研究成功制备了集胞藻6803藻胆体别藻蓝蛋白多克隆抗体,为进一步研究藻胆体的核心体在光能

  2. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 271076 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rotein Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51472 MSNLVSKSFLLLVEDSDEDFTAFLRFSQPFLKEHSVKRCRNGEETIQFLERVETAPYSDISRFPTVIILDLNLSGVDGREILIRIQENPQWQKIPTLIFSSSNDPRDINFCYQHGAKSYILKPMDISHLKKTIQMLWEYWFNIVVLPSK ...

  3. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 45732 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _11607 Cyanothece sp. CCY0110 MGNASTFGRMSLTVFDRGNQRSWPLVNLVSIINTNQDPKLNRDFFQAYISPNFGLMNYDQQVLFTQGNQETTRVNFTGVFQQFFEEETELDLVVVIESCTAGSNEVERCRTVPEPSNQLALIFLVFFKSIWGLFSRIMKQIIQFTR ...

  4. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 436965 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1563 Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 MTVQKTDANGTQTAETQKTTTANKTTTRSSRSTATEEKQSSALSVKDKASTSTQGIQLITEPGLLPGNRPVEASHLKVVSTYKSVGGSRPVVASGMEISSTLTISGQRPIMVSHLHVSETYTVMGNRPVAPNDIDDPALLMGYLD ...

  5. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 141435 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ein Cyanothece sp. PCC 7424 MYQNILVALDNSPTSEEVFHTALMLAKCFNAQLMLLHVLSPEAPDSPINFAPYATSYDIVIVEKYQREWEKFKQDSLDKLKTLAEQANEQGIKTNYAQYYGSPGRLICDQATQSKADLIVMGRRGHSTLNELFLGSVSSYVIHHSHCCIHLVQS ...

  6. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 118936 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s Cyanothece sp. CCY0110 MISPLLIIASITLVVAISINTIFKSDYGWFNRLRRPQWLTFEWAIPFIWIFVFIGGVYSAYQLWIKQPGTTRTWLLMAGYFLLEILVMAYTPVMCKLRSLQVGTIIGATGFFWGLILAVLVWPLSQESVFLLLPYLLWSPIGTYVTWAMISLNPLDK ...

  7. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 120802 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available drobiopterin synthase Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 MNPPHQWTIYKEFRFEAAHRLPHHQGKCSRLHGHSWVGRVYVSRDRLHETGPQQGMVMDFGEISAYLDPLVENFLDHYYLNETTGLESPTSEAIAQWIFEKLEAAKLPGLCMVEIRETCTSGAQYRRSNE ...

  8. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 276014 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rotein Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51472 MDWAFPSHTTPYSGHQSPLILGVDGNEDNLLLLTYIIRRMGCTLMTANNGNCVFSLVRDYQPSLILLDIILPGLSGIEVIKQLKKDQTTKNIPIIAVTGFVHPQKRDYLLEIGCQDCIIKPYLLEEVEIMVSRFVTQHYSLALAQKCR ...

  9. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 380889 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4347 Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 MDHFFQFEQEFVESLHCIPMIVRLKLDTCGVKLKLMHWNQFTSEEKKVLVNMACETPEEVKLYRNFLQTLVTEKTGIPAKTLPIDDNPPWLNNEKIPEEIQKKAAEFNKEITLQQWDKLSPLQRFALIKLSRPSHENSNFYPALEEFDL ...

  10. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 435829 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3658 Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 MSCSIQIPALSMTSVTPPNVNQQTIELAPSYNIPIILILMAIATLLIQPWVSLPLALFGLFLLLQTVTIRLQFTATALDVYRSDQRIRSFPYSEWQNWKIFWQPIPILFYFKEVNSIHFLPIIFDPQTLNVCLERFCNFDKMEEMG ...

  11. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 448175 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ining protein Cyanothece sp. PCC 7424 MKKAQLVLTFFFSFLLAVFVSFNLVVDSAMAFSGPVSESCIDLELSGSILSANCETANGYYEKASINLDEVIGNLDGMLSWDSQNFSQTCEDISLEKRYSITFPILMATCQEAIGGENYMATEVYLDDHIFNVNGTLFYN ...

  12. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 209938 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _00595 Cyanothece sp. CCY0110 MRLCYAFKWNLLNSLIQLRCPYVNHISTEELAIWLEDKNRPDPLLLDARSPLEYTISHLQGAYLIPHDLPKIEPLIHCSNASPIITYCSVGYRSAILAQRLQKMGYEKVFNLKGSIFLWFSEHRPVFCGEKIVSFIHPLNLFWSFWL ...

  13. 蓝细菌鱼腥藻7120混合营养培养的生长和生理特征%Growth and Physiological Features of Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp.Strain PCC 7120 in a Glucose-Mixotrophic Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    喻国策; 施定基; 蔡昭铃; 丛威; 欧阳藩

    2011-01-01

    Mixotrophic growth is one potential mode for mass culture of microalgae and cyanobacteria particularly suitable for the production of high value bioactive compounds and fine chemicals. The typical heterocystous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 was grown in the presence of exogenous glucose in light. Glucose improved the cell growth evidently, the maximal specific growth rate under mixotrophic condition (0.38 d-1) being 1.6-fold of that of photoautotrophic growth. Mixotrophy caused a variation in cellular pigment composition, increasing the content of chlorophyll a and decreasing the contents of carotenoid and phycobiliprotein relative to chlorophyll a. Fluorescence emission from photosystem Ⅱ (PSⅡ) relative to photosystem Ⅰ was enhanced in mixotrophic cells, implying an increased energy distribution in PSII. Glucokinase (EC 2.7.1.2) activity was further induced in the presence of glucose. The mixotrophic culture was scaled up in a 15 L airlift photobioreactor equipped with an inner and an outer light source. A modified Monod model incorporating the specific growth rate and the average light intensity in the reactor was developed to describe cell growth appropriately. The understanding of mixotrophic growth and relevant physiological features ofAnabaena sp. PCC 7120 would be meaningful for cultivation and exploitation of this important cyanobacterial strain.

  14. Interaction of the Nitrogen Regulatory Protein GlnB (PII) with Biotin Carboxyl Carrier Protein (BCCP) Controls Acetyl-CoA Levels in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauf, Waldemar; Schmid, Katharina; Gerhardt, Edileusa C M; Huergo, Luciano F; Forchhammer, Karl

    2016-01-01

    The family of PII signal transduction proteins (members GlnB, GlnK, NifI) plays key roles in various cellular processes related to nitrogen metabolism at different functional levels. Recent studies implied that PII proteins may also be involved in the regulation of fatty acid metabolism, since GlnB proteins from Proteobacteria and from Arabidopsis thaliana were shown to interact with biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). In case of Escherichia coli ACCase, this interaction reduces the kcat of acetyl-CoA carboxylation, which should have a marked impact on the acetyl-CoA metabolism. In this study we show that the PII protein of a unicellular cyanobacterium inhibits the biosynthetic activity of E. coli ACC and also interacts with cyanobacterial BCCP in an ATP and 2-oxoglutarate dependent manner. In a PII mutant strain of Synechocystis strain PCC 6803, the lacking control leads to reduced acetyl-CoA levels, slightly increased levels of fatty acids and formation of lipid bodies as well as an altered fatty acid composition.

  15. in-silico analysis suggests alterations in the function of XisA protein as a possible mechanism of butachlor toxicity in the nitrogen fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shilpi; Singh, Prem Pal

    2013-01-01

    Butachlor, a commonly used herbicide adversely affects the nitrogen fixing capability of Anabaena, an acclaimed nitrogen fixer in the Indian paddy fields. The nitrogen fixation in Anabaena is triggered by the excision of nifD element by xisA gene leading to rearrangement of nifD forming nifHDK operon in the heterocyst of Anabaena sp. PCC7120. Functional elucidation adjudged through in-silico analysis revealed that xisA belongs to integrase family of tyrosine recombinase. The predicted functional partners with XisA protein that have shown cooccurence with this protein in a network are mainly hypothetical proteins with unknown functions except psaK1 whose exact function in photosystem I is not yet known. The focus of this study was to find out the relation between XisA and butachlor using in-silico approaches. The XisA protein was modeled and its active sites were identified. Docking studies revealed that butachlor binds at the active site of XisA protein hampering its excision ability vis-à-vis nif genes in Anabaena sp. PCC7120. This study reveals that butachlor is not directly involved in hampering the nitrogen fixing ability of Anabaena sp. PCC7120 but by arresting the excision ability of XisA protein necessary for the functioning of nif gene and nitrogen fixation.

  16. Engineering of photosynthetic mannitol biosynthesis from CO2 in a cyanobacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jacob Hedemand; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    d-Mannitol (hereafter denoted mannitol) is used in the medical and food industry and is currently produced commercially by chemical hydrogenation of fructose or by extraction from seaweed. Here, the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 was genetically modified to photosynthetically...... concentration of 1.1gmannitolL(-1) and a production rate of 0.15gmannitolL(-1)day(-1). This system may be useful for biosynthesis of valuable sugars and sugar derivatives from CO2 in cyanobacteria....

  17. A Feed-Forward Loop Consisting of the Response Regulator RpaB and the Small RNA PsrR1 Controls Light Acclimation of Photosystem I Gene Expression in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadowaki, Taro; Nagayama, Ryuta; Georg, Jens; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka; Wilde, Annegret; Hess, Wolfgang R; Hihara, Yukako

    2016-04-01

    Since cyanobacteria need to decrease PSI content to avoid absorption of excess light energy, down-regulation of PSI gene expression is one of the key characteristics of the high-light (HL) acclimation response. The transcriptional regulator RpaB and the small RNA PsrR1 (photosynthesis regulatory RNA1) have been suggested to be the two most critical factors for this response in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. In this study, we found that the HLR1 DNA-binding motif, the recognition sequence for RpaB, is highly conserved in the core promoter region of the psrR1 gene among cyanobacterial species. Gel mobility shift assay revealed that RpaB binds to the HLR1 sequence of psrR1 in vitro. RNA gel blot analysis together with chromatin affinity purification (ChAP) analysis suggested that PSI genes are activated and the psrR1 gene is repressed by the binding of RpaB under low-light (LL) conditions. A decrease in DNA binding affinity of RpaB occurs within 5 min after the shift from LL to HL conditions, leading to the prompt decrease in PSI promoter activity together with derepression of psrR1 gene expression. Accumulating PsrR1 molecules then prevent translation from pre-existing PSI transcripts. By this dual repression at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, rapid and strict down-regulation of PSI expression under HL is secured. Our findings suggest that RpaB and PsrR1 constitute a feed-forward loop for the regulation of PSI gene expression to achieve a rapid acclimation response to the damaging HL conditions.

  18. N-terminal processing of membrane-targeted MnSOD and formation of multiple active superoxide dismutase dimers in the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Prashanth S; Rajaram, Hema; Apte, Shree K

    2013-10-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 expresses a 30 kDa manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) comprising a hydrophobic region (signal peptide + linker peptide) attached to a catalytic unit. Bioinformatics predicted cleavage of the signal peptide at (25)CQPQ by signal peptidase and of the linker peptide by an Arg-C-like protease at the Arg52/Arg59 residue. The three predicted forms of MnSOD were immunodetected in Anabaena, with the 30 kDa MnSOD found exclusively in the membrane and the shorter 27 and 24 kDa forms found both in the membrane and soluble fractions. The corresponding sodA gene was truncated for (a) the first eight residues, or, (b) the signal peptide, or (c) the entire hydrophobic region, or (d) the Arg52/Arg59 residues were modified to serine. Overexpression of these MnSOD variants in recombinant Anabaena strains revealed that (a) the 30 kDa membrane-targeted MnSOD was cleaved by membrane-localized signal peptidase either during or after its transport through the membrane to release the 27 kDa form, either in the cytosol or in the periplasmic/thylakoid lumen, (b) the 27 kDa form was further cleaved to the 24 kDa form by Arg-C-like protease, both in the cytosol and in the periplasmic/thylakoid lumen, (c) deletion of signal peptide localized the MnSOD forms in the cytosol, and (d) alteration of the signal/linker peptide cleavage sites interfered with MnSOD localization and processing. Homo/heterodimerization of the 24 and 27 kDa forms of MnSOD and the cytosolic iron-dependent SOD results in multiple SOD activities, from a single MnSOD gene (sodA), in different cellular compartments of Anabaena.

  19. 集胞藻胞外聚合物(EPS)与氯霉素的相互作用%Interaction between Chloramphenicol and the Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付庆龙; 张道勇; 牟书勇; 潘响亮

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional excitation emission matrix (EEM ) fluorescence spectroscopy was used to examine the interaction between chloramphenicol ( CAP) and the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from Synechocystis sp. The results showed that there were six particular fluorescence peaks in the spectra of EPS. Peak A (EX/EM =205/304) , peak B (EX/EM =230/302) , peak C (EJEm = 235/354) and peak D (EX/EM =260/372) represented the protein-like fluorescence substances, and the other two peaks at ExIEm = 275/446 (peak E) and EX/EM =350/452 (peak F) reflected the humic-like fluorophores. With the exception of peak F, all the fluorescence peaks could be significantly quenched by CAP. This indicated that the fluorophores material can play a role with CAP, but not between CAP and those reflected by peak F. The reaction between CAP and the fluorophores in EPS was a static process, and formed stable EPS-CAP complexes. The effective quenching and binding constants for fluorophores of EPS were 3. 28-4. 49 and 4. 54-8. 13, respectively. The strong combination of EPS to CAP implied that EPS may play an important role in the transfer and transformation of CAP in aquatic environments.%通过利用激发-发射矩阵(EEM)荧光光谱,研究蓝藻集胞藻EPS(胞外聚合物)与CAP(氯霉素)的相互作用.结果表明:EPS含有6个峰,其中峰A(Ex/Em=205/304)、峰B(Ex/Em=230/302)、峰C(Ex/Em=235/354)和峰D(Ex/Em=260/372)为类蛋白峰,峰E(Ex/Em=275/446)和峰F(Ex/Em=350/452)为类腐殖质峰.除峰F外,其他各峰都能被CAP猝灭,说明它们所代表的物质能够与CAP发生作用;而峰F则几乎不被CAP猝灭,即荧光峰F不与CAP发生作用.CAP与EPS中荧光基团的反应属于静态猝灭,生成稳定的不发荧光的EPS-CAP络合物,其有效猝灭常数为3.28~4.49,结合常数为4.54~8.13.EPS与CAP强的络合作用意味着环境中普遍存在的EPS可能深刻地影响CAP在水环境中的迁移与转化.

  20. Photoacclimation of cultured strains of the cyanobacterium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bañares-España, E.; Kromkamp, J.C.; López-Rodas, V.; Costas, E.; Flores-Moya, A.

    2013-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa forms blooms that can consist of colonies. We have investigated how M.aeruginosa acclimatizes to changing light conditions such as can occur during blooms. Three different strains were exposed to two irradiance levels: lower (LL) and higher (HL) than the

  1. Cylindrocyclophanes with Proteasome Inhibitory Activity from the Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlipala, George E.; Sturdy, Megan; Krunic, Aleksej; Lantvit, Daniel D.; Shen, Qi; Porter, Kyle; Swanson, Steven M.; Orjala, Jimmy

    2010-01-01

    Material collected from a parkway in the city of Chicago afforded the isolation of a Nostoc species (UIC 10022A). The extract of this strain displayed significant inhibition of the 20S proteasome as well as antiproliferative activity against HT29, MCF7, NCI-H460, and SF268 cancer cell lines. A standardized dereplication protocol allowed for the rapid identification of three known (11-13) and nine new (1-9) chlorinated cylindrocyclophanes from less than 100 mg of organic extract. Scale-up isolation of 1-9 and 11-13 from a larger extract was guided by LC-UV-MS data. In addition, KBr enrichment of the culture media afforded the isolation of a brominated cylindrocyclophane (10). Biological evaluation of 1-5, 9, and 10-13 revealed a large range of activity against the 20S proteasome and allowed the determination of preliminary structure-activity relationships (SAR) of the cylindrocyclophane pharmacophore. PMID:20825206

  2. Identification of the replication origins from Cyanothece ATCC 51142 and their interactions with the DnaA protein: from in silico to in vitro studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He eHuang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on the complete genome of Cyanothece ATCC 51142, the oriCs of both the circular and linear chromosomes in Cyanothece ATCC 51142 have been predicted by utilizing a web-based system Ori-Finder. Here, we provide the experimental supports for the results of Ori-Finder to identify the origins of replication of Cyanothece ATCC 51142 and their interactions with initiator protein DnaA . The two replication origins are both composed of three characteristically arranged DnaA boxes, and an AT-rich stretch, and the oriC in circular chromosome is followed by the dnaN gene. The dnaA gene is located downstream of the origin of circular chromosome and expresses a typical DnaA protein that follows the division into four domains (I, II, III, IV, as with other members of the DnaA protein family. Here, we report the purification of DnaA (IV and characterize the interaction of the purified protein with the replication origins, in order to offer experimental supports for the prediction. Combined with experimental validation, we identified the oriCs of Cyanothece ATCC 51142. The results of EMSA and DNase I footprint assay demonstrate that the C-terminal domain of Cyanothece ATCC 51142 DnaA protein specifically binds the oriCs of both the circular and linear chromosomes, and DNase I footprint assay demonstrates that DnaA (IV has a hypersensitive affinity interaction with DnaA boxes in both oriCs. The results also confirm the results predicted by Ori-Finder.

  3. Ecological genomics of the newly discovered diazotrophic filamentous cyanobacterium ESFC-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everroad, C.; Bebout, B.; Bebout, L. E.; Detweiler, A. M.; Lee, J.; Mayali, X.; Singer, S. W.; Stuart, R.; Weber, P. K.; Woebken, D.; Pett-Ridge, J.

    2014-12-01

    Cyanobacteria-dominated microbial mats played a key role in the evolution of the early Earth and provide a model for exploring the relationships between ecology, evolution and biogeochemistry. A recently described nonheterocystous filamentous cyanobacterium, strain ESFC-1, has been shown to be a major diazotroph year round in the intertidal microbial mat system at Elkhorn Slough, CA, USA. Based on phylogenetic analyses of the 16s RNA gene, ESFC-1 appears to belong to a unique, genus-level divergence within the cyanobacteria. Consequently, the draft genome sequence of this strain has been determined. Here we report features of this genome, particularly as they relate to the ecological functions and capabilities of strain ESFC-1. One striking feature of this cyanobacterium is the apparent lack of a functional bi-directional hydrogenase typically expected to be found within a diazotroph; consortia- and culture-based experiments exploring the metabolic processes of ESFC-1 also indicate that this hydrogenase is absent. Co-culture studies with ESFC-1 and some of the dominant heterotrophic members within the microbial mat system, including the ubiquitous Flavobacterium Muricauda sp., which often is found associated with cyanobacteria in nature and in culture collections worldwide, have also been performed. We report on these species-species interactions, including materials exchange between the cyanobacterium and heterotrophic bacterium. The combination of genomics with culture- and consortia-based experimental research is a powerful tool for understanding microbial processes and interactions in complex ecosystems.

  4. Role of manganese in protection against oxidative stress under iron starvation in cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Manish Singh; Srivastava, Meenakshi; Verma, Ekta; Mishra, Arun Kumar

    2015-06-01

    The cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 was grown in presence and absence of iron to decipher the role of manganese in protection against the oxidative stress under iron starvation and growth, manganese uptake kinetics, antioxidative enzymes, lipid peroxidation, electrolyte leakage, thiol content, total peroxide, proline and NADH content was investigated. Manganese supported the growth of cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120 under iron deprived conditions where maximum uptake rate of manganese was observed with lower K(m) and higher V(max) values. Antioxidative enzymes were also found to be elevated in iron-starved conditions. Estimation of lipid peroxidation and electrolyte leakage depicted the role of manganese in stabilizing the integrity of the membrane which was considered as the prime target of oxygen free radicals in oxidative stress. The levels of total peroxide, thiol, proline and NADH content, which are the representative of oxidative stress response in Anabaena 7120, were also showed increasing trends in iron starvation. Hence, the results discerned, clearly suggested the role of manganese in protection against the oxidative stress in cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120 under iron starvation either due to its antioxidative properties or involvement as cofactor in a number of antioxidative enzymes.

  5. Effects of Cylindrospermopsin Producing Cyanobacterium and Its Crude Extracts on a Benthic Green Alga-Competition or Allelopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    B-Béres, Viktória; Vasas, Gábor; Dobronoki, Dalma; Gonda, Sándor; Nagy, Sándor Alex; Bácsi, István

    2015-10-30

    Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) is a toxic secondary metabolite produced by filamentous cyanobacteria which could work as an allelopathic substance, although its ecological role in cyanobacterial-algal assemblages is mostly unclear. The competition between the CYN-producing cyanobacterium Chrysosporum (Aphanizomenon) ovalisporum, and the benthic green alga Chlorococcum sp. was investigated in mixed cultures, and the effects of CYN-containing cyanobacterial crude extract on Chlorococcum sp. were tested by treatments with crude extracts containing total cell debris, and with cell debris free crude extracts, modelling the collapse of a cyanobacterial water bloom. The growth inhibition of Chlorococcum sp. increased with the increasing ratio of the cyanobacterium in mixed cultures (inhibition ranged from 26% to 87% compared to control). Interestingly, inhibition of the cyanobacterium growth also occurred in mixed cultures, and it was more pronounced than it was expected. The inhibitory effects of cyanobacterial crude extracts on Chlorococcum cultures were concentration-dependent. The presence of C. ovalisporum in mixed cultures did not cause significant differences in nutrient content compared to Chlorococcum control culture, so the growth inhibition of the green alga could be linked to the presence of CYN and/or other bioactive compounds.

  6. Effects of Cylindrospermopsin Producing Cyanobacterium and Its Crude Extracts on a Benthic Green Alga—Competition or Allelopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    B-Béres, Viktória; Vasas, Gábor; Dobronoki, Dalma; Gonda, Sándor; Nagy, Sándor Alex; Bácsi, István

    2015-01-01

    Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) is a toxic secondary metabolite produced by filamentous cyanobacteria which could work as an allelopathic substance, although its ecological role in cyanobacterial-algal assemblages is mostly unclear. The competition between the CYN-producing cyanobacterium Chrysosporum (Aphanizomenon) ovalisporum, and the benthic green alga Chlorococcum sp. was investigated in mixed cultures, and the effects of CYN-containing cyanobacterial crude extract on Chlorococcum sp. were tested by treatments with crude extracts containing total cell debris, and with cell debris free crude extracts, modelling the collapse of a cyanobacterial water bloom. The growth inhibition of Chlorococcum sp. increased with the increasing ratio of the cyanobacterium in mixed cultures (inhibition ranged from 26% to 87% compared to control). Interestingly, inhibition of the cyanobacterium growth also occurred in mixed cultures, and it was more pronounced than it was expected. The inhibitory effects of cyanobacterial crude extracts on Chlorococcum cultures were concentration-dependent. The presence of C. ovalisporum in mixed cultures did not cause significant differences in nutrient content compared to Chlorococcum control culture, so the growth inhibition of the green alga could be linked to the presence of CYN and/or other bioactive compounds. PMID:26528991

  7. Fractionation and identification of metalloproteins from a marine cyanobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, James P; Scanlan, David J; Blindauer, Claudia A

    2012-04-01

    Trace metals are essential for the growth of marine cyanobacteria, being required for key cellular processes such as photosynthesis and respiration. Despite this, the metalloproteomes of marine cyanobacteria are at present only poorly defined. In this study, we have probed the major cobalt, iron, manganese, and nickel-binding proteins in the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. WH8102 by using two different fractionation approaches combined with peptide mass fingerprinting. For the identification of intact metalloproteins, multidimensional native chromatography was used to fractionate the proteome, followed by inorganic mass spectrometry to identify metal-enriched fractions. This approach led to the detection of nickel superoxide dismutase together with its predicted cofactor. We also explored the utility of immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) to isolate subpopulations of proteins that display affinity for a particular metal ion. We conclude that low-resolution 2D liquid chromatography is a viable fractionation technique to correlate relatively low-abundance metal ions with their few cellular destinations (e.g. Ni), but challenges remain for more abundant metals with multiple destinations such as iron. IMAC has been shown as a useful pre-fractionation technique to screen for proteins with metal-binding capacity, and may become a particularly valuable tool for the identification of metal-trafficking proteins.

  8. Construction of a cyanobacterium synthesizing cyclopropane fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Shuntaro; Shiraiwa, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Iwane

    2016-09-01

    Microalgae have received much attention as a next-generation source of biomass energy. However, most of the fatty acids (FAs) from microalgae are multiply unsaturated; thus, the biofuels derived from them are fluid, but vulnerable to oxidation. In this study, we attempted to synthesize cyclopropane FAs in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 by expressing the cfa gene for cyclopropane FA synthase from Escherichia coli with the aim of producing FAs that are fluid and stable in response to oxidization. We successfully synthesized cyclopropane FAs in Synechocystis with a yield of ~30% of total FAs. Growth of the transformants was altered, particularly at low temperatures, but photosynthesis and respiration were not significantly affected. C16:1(∆9) synthesis in the desA(-)/desD(-) strain by expression of the desC2 gene for sn-2 specific ∆9 desaturase positively affected growth at low temperatures via promotion of various cellular processes, with the exceptions of photosynthesis and respiration. Estimation of the apparent activities of desaturases suggested that some acyl-lipid desaturases might recognize the lipid side chain.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Limnobacter sp. Strain CACIAM 66H1, a Heterotrophic Bacterium Associated with Cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Fábio Daniel Florêncio; Lima, Alex Ranieri Jerônimo; Moraes, Pablo Henrique Gonçalves; Siqueira, Andrei Santos; Dall'Agnol, Leonardo Teixeira; Baraúna, Anna Rafaella Ferreira; Martins, Luisa Carício; Oliveira, Karol Guimarães; de Lima, Clayton Pereira Silva; Nunes, Márcio Roberto Teixeira; Vianez-Júnior, João Lídio Silva Gonçalves; Gonçalves, Evonnildo Costa

    2016-05-19

    Ecological interactions between cyanobacteria and heterotrophic prokaryotes are poorly known. To improve the genomic studies of heterotrophic bacterium-cyanobacterium associations, the draft genome sequence (3.2 Mbp) of Limnobacter sp. strain CACIAM 66H1, found in a nonaxenic culture of Synechococcus sp. (cyanobacteria), is presented here.

  10. Designing and creating a modularized synthetic pathway in cyanobacterium Synechocystis enables production of acetone from carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Haifeng; Zhang, Yanping; Li, Yin; Ma, Yanhe

    2012-07-01

    Ketones are a class of important organic compounds. As the simplest ketone, acetone is widely used as solvents or precursors for industrial chemicals. Presently, million tonnes of acetone is produced worldwide annually, from petrochemical processes. Here we report a biotechnological process that can produce acetone from CO(2), by designing and creating a modularized synthetic pathway in engineered cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The engineered Synechocystis cells are able to produce acetone (36.0 mgl(-1) culture medium) using CO(2) as the sole carbon source, thus opens the gateway for biosynthesis of ketones from CO(2).

  11. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 323015 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available QTLLSISWETKMLQWEYDPADGEIRAMIEFPLEDSTLTEKQFYRCLSGLVEMVDTIALPRLITVMQSGQDPGDLGNLSNLEAGERLLLTLQEEAPGLLDVLEKAMEARKRRGYPSQPD ... ...7425_0242 Cyanothece sp. PCC 7425 MAVTLQQIANYLDQRSLRYQLQTEHGRILTGVTADHADYLLIVIQLDEDGEFFKLFAPDVLAGVKEHRYKEAIL

  12. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 376249 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available an8802_3498 Cyanothece sp. PCC 8802 MSNQLIPVICGLLSCAIIAENAQAANLIINGGFETGTLSGWNTAGVVQATLVNPPCCNFGGIGSYIAGFNAGDLSPNGILSQSYNTIIGASYLLQFDYGTFSNASVSQSIFIELDGAAGISSVLNTSILLKVSIFPVKIVL ...

  13. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 410205 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n8802_2290 Cyanothece sp. PCC 8802 MAHNFLMEAGRWTIEGNWLERNEMPIPVKGRSIIAWSQDNWFTMVTKLVFPDQDRPEISYQYRGRLDGEERQYTYVLQQSLLGKVEGEGWIGPESIIQRYWVLGDRQRRSGFETFHRVNDNIYYLSSGILAGHYLTSTMEATLERQS ...

  14. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 436971 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0_05974 Cyanothece sp. CCY0110 MTAQKTDANGTQTSETQKTTTANKTTTRSSRSTATEEKKTSALSVKDKASTSTQGIQLITEPGLLPGNRPVEASHLKVVSTYKSVGGSRPVVASGMDISSTLTISGHRPIMVSHLQVSETYTVMGNRPVAPNDIDDPALLMGYLD ...

  15. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 209614 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0_26547 Cyanothece sp. CCY0110 MSHWLEHSVQIEVDAPIELVWGLWSDLEQMPKWMKWIDSVKVLDEDPELSRWKLASGGFEFTWLSKILKVIPYQIIQWESVDGLPNRGAIRFYDRQGSSIVRLSVAYDIPGWLGKLMDNLFLGRIVESTIMADLERFRDYAMKAKESN ...

  16. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 360188 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 110_31440 Cyanothece sp. CCY0110 MPCVWASLSVAATKLKEIDTDNEIANSLLFELETAVHLTESFDKIWSSIYWNKSRKKTRVRVTITLTKLAQSIFDHITESIKLFDELCEQQEQLQTIEITNDWLEIHCCIARAKRTFDQYHYKLIKPLPLFEYLEKMKSHELP ...

  17. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 324054 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 472DRAFT_2939 Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51472 MKISLIFLTLPLLFLITLLSSCNRSDFSNSIKSQSLIKQNNSQNSINLNQTCTNKKVGYQVNYPQDWQ...TNSGNVMNDCQVFDPTYAKVPEQTESISKAIYLRVEENAPFDLISQENVGEQHLSKQTLTIDSYQAVAVESKSTGRAMLPKGQRNYSYIVDLGDRTLIATTYDVPDNNYAKNKQILDSMLKTIEFNNNELK ...

  18. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 58548 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 822_6468 Cyanothece sp. PCC 7822 MKPDSYEPLEWYDLKLLILPKFLYLIFLTINFSSSVFASPENLAKAQPHQQKRISPRSCDLNQIENFLNQHLEQSPDLISPLTIIAKNLKVDKKFISRYFRDLCQKIVAKRLSYKKDCYLDSLKQCCNEVEQVTKMLFKQGEYPTED ...

  19. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 363166 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available an8802_1301 Cyanothece sp. PCC 8802 MRGQNWYIALLIGLMCLIRFSLSAVGYADPLWLMEQLSISSDSNLQMPYIIRVWAIRDIALAVIVALANRDSVKTLLLACIAIDATDIISAHLSGVAGLFSASETWSLKLTAIAALVPELIALVLLTIHKTKATFQWTKIRKPAN ...

  20. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 373777 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 110_32280 Cyanothece sp. CCY0110 MRYLIPTILSFWIGAIITLLIGVITKAIFDYTLLWFDFILLGGILASTMLTAYLLYFDNPVASQLNAVSKIMVDHGFNYSDWCKVEKQIKERNLIDAIVALPHSDSSKLQNNRAQITLLLSQNYSDFQFTLTFPTKVALLRLKRKT ...

  1. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 172035975 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 150 ... putative Iojap-related protein Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 MTHYENTIANYSSNLTVIENTSDQQIQNLALTIAEAADDRKGSD...ITILKVTEISYLTDYFVIVTGFSRTQVKAIAEAIEEKVYQTHQQVPRQTEGKNDGNWVLQDFGDVIVHIFLPEEREFYNLEAFWGHAERLEFSSLEVTQSSRL

  2. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 36660 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 02_2092 Cyanothece sp. PCC 8802 MNLPSFLWLWKIAAWSMGLSLTCYAILGLSGGWIFYRRQQGANRPQWLRPFHYTMGGIMVGLVLLLLIIGLIGTIGHYGSLGHSVHLVAGLLTVILVLISAMSATQMSPQRPWVRSLHITTNIILFFAFAFVGLTGWSVVQKYLP ...

  3. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 325694 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 7425_2098 Cyanothece sp. PCC 7425 MPQNWSPEAREAARQRILKNKPWEKSTGPKTEAGKFIVSFNAAKEGLRFSNPLLRHAARKAAKEQLDEQSREQVRRIVLEFVKLKKEAPALLLDALDYGYRGDRGSLQCPYCEGRYLTKKGFTGCYQTGRQRWFCKDCRKTFSL ...

  4. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 164616 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 20820 Cyanothece sp. CCY0110 MRKKFVLLVLTLLLAATSQNASWAGEILEKIKETGVITAGTRKDAIPFAYINDEGEWVGYSIDVLEIIRQDIEKKLGKP...IQLKLVEVTPQNRFDKVKNREIDIECASSTFTWEREEMVDFSVSYFASGTKIFRKKGSDLGTIDSLAGRRIGVIPNTTNEQAIKIQQPAAILVPIKDRNEGLEKLNNG

  5. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 375895 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available an7425_0023 Cyanothece sp. PCC 7425 MGKWRWRGTFLLSIISAIAPLWAQCAEYQGKNIDGLVFSGQAFSYSLGGLYSAQVKFEQNDAILKFVNGSQLRLRLDSETITDLSNIQGYVKPPLFSLGLYTPDITDYSPLMRSPSPYAGQWRIDINSPSVNPSLFPAKHE ...

  6. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 495548120 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1612:454 ... NUDIX hydrolase Cyanothece sp. CCY0110 MSTEKELPIYLQQNLFYRGRKFNFDVNKLRLPNGVEGNWECIRHPGGALAVPITKEG...QLVLVKQYRFAVEKRILEFPAGTLEVNEEADLTIKREIQEETGYEAKKWDYLGKFPLAPGYSDEYIYAFLAQELEKSEKPPEQDDDEDIEVFLMSFEEFEKAILSGKIIDGKTIASFFMAKLFLDKN

  7. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 88973 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 822_3848 Cyanothece sp. PCC 7822 MVVSKNWVYQRKFLQLTYNKEVNEYFRDIDDEELDTLNQPRKIAKRACLILPSDTQNMALIKMNTFWYVVQRIQDKPAVMGMTKGEYDQQFKYRPEIHFYFRQDPEAVPDGYAAEEFVETLCDNEVDIDPYLDIIDRNLELFGI ...

  8. Flocculation properties of several microalgae and a cyanobacterium species during ferric chloride, chitosan and alkaline flocculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, Sanjaya; Muylaert, Koenraad; Karki, Tika Bahadur; Foubert, Imogen; Henderson, Rita K; Vandamme, Dries

    2016-11-01

    Flocculation holds great potential as a low-cost harvesting method for microalgae biomass production. Three flocculation methods (ferric chloride, chitosan, and alkaline flocculation) were compared in this study for the harvesting of 9 different freshwater and marine microalgae and one cyanobacterium species. Ferric chloride resulted in a separation efficiency greater than 90% with a concentration factor (CF) higher than 10 for all species. Chitosan flocculation worked generally very well for freshwater microalgae, but not for marine species. Alkaline flocculation was most efficient for harvesting of Nannochloropsis, Chlamydomonas and Chlorella sp. The concentration factor was highly variable between microalgae species. Generally, minimum flocculant dosages were highly variable across species, which shows that flocculation may be a good harvesting method for some species but not for others. This study shows that microalgae and cyanobacteria species should not be selected solely based on their productivity but also on their potential for low-cost separation.

  9. Lysis of a Single Cyanobacterium for Whole Genome Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard N. Zare

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial species from natural environments, exhibiting a great degree of genetic diversity that has yet to be characterized, pose a specific challenge to whole genome amplification (WGA from single cells. A major challenge is establishing an effective, compatible, and controlled lysis protocol. We present a novel lysis protocol that can be used to extract genomic information from a single cyanobacterium of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 known to have multilayer cell wall structures that resist conventional lysis methods. Simple but effective strategies for releasing genomic DNA from captured cells while retaining cellular identities for single-cell analysis are presented. Successful sequencing of genetic elements from single-cell amplicons prepared by multiple displacement amplification (MDA is demonstrated for selected genes (15 loci nearly equally spaced throughout the main chromosome.

  10. Diacylglycerolipids isolated from a thermophile cyanobacterium from the Euganean hot springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcolongo, Gabriele; de Appolonia, Francesca; Venzo, Alfonso; Berrie, Christopher P; Carofiglio, Tommaso; Ceschi Berrini, Cristina

    2006-07-10

    The Phormidium sp. ETS-05 thermophile blue-green alga is one of the most typical and widespread species of cyanobacteria of the thermal muds of the Euganean hot springs, the therapeutic properties of which have been known since ancient times. The polar diacylglycerolipids of this cyanobacterium consists of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, digalactosyldiacylglycerol, sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol. We have isolated and purified these four diacylglycerolipids from ETS-05, and then analysed them for their quantitative and structural features and fatty acid contents. The monogalactosyldiacylglycerol and digalactosyldiacylglycerol show a marked presence of polyunsaturated fatty acids, of which C18 : 4 is the most common. We propose that these glycoglycerolipids can be used as markers for monitoring the thermal mud colonisation process.

  11. Introduction of a synthetic CO₂-fixing photorespiratory bypass into a cyanobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Patrick M; Zarzycki, Jan; Niyogi, Krishna K; Kerfeld, Cheryl A

    2014-04-01

    Global photosynthetic productivity is limited by the enzymatic assimilation of CO2 into organic carbon compounds. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), the carboxylating enzyme of the Calvin-Benson cycle, poorly discriminates between CO2 and O2, leading to photorespiration and the loss of fixed carbon and nitrogen. With the advent of synthetic biology, it is now feasible to design, synthesize, and introduce biochemical pathways in vivo. We engineered a synthetic photorespiratory bypass based on the 3-hydroxypropionate bi-cycle into the model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus elongatus sp. PCC 7942. The heterologously expressed cycle is designed to function as both a photorespiratory bypass and an additional CO2-fixing pathway, supplementing the Calvin-Benson cycle. We demonstrate the function of all six introduced enzymes and identify bottlenecks to be targeted in subsequent bioengineering. These results have implications for efforts to improve photosynthesis and for the "green" production of high value products of biotechnological interest.

  12. Control of Branchionus sp. and Amoeba sp. in cultures of Arthrospira sp. Control de Branchionus sp. y Amoeba sp. en cultivos de Arthrospira sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Méndez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cultivation of cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. has been developed in many countries for the production of proteins, pigments and other compounds. Outdoor mass cultures are often affected by biological contamination, drastically reducing productivity as far as bringing death. This study evaluates the control of Branchionus sp. and Amoeba sp. with two chemical compounds: urea (U and ammonium bicarbonate (AB, in laboratory conditions and outdoor mass culture of Arthrospira sp. The lethal concentration 100 (LC100 at 24 h for Branchionus sp. and Amoeba sp. determined was of 60-80 mg L-1 (U and 100-150 mg L-1 (AB. The average effective inhibition concentration for 50% of the population (IC50 in Arthrospira sp., after 72 h, was 80 mg L-1 (U and 150 mg L-1 (AB. The application of doses of 60 mg L-1 (U or 100 mg L-1 (AB in the outdoor mass culture of this contaminated microalga, completely inhibited grazing and did not affect the growth of Arthrospira sp. but rather promoted rapid recovery of algal density at levels prior to infestation. These compounds provided an economical and effective control of predators in cultures of Arthrospira sp.El cultivo de la cianobacteria Arthrospira sp. ha sido desarrollado en muchos países para la obtención de proteínas, pigmentos y otros compuestos. Cultivo que a nivel industrial se ve afectado frecuentemente por contaminación biológica, reduciendo drásticamente la productividad hasta causar la muerte. Este estudio evalúa el control de Branchionus sp. y de Amoeba sp. con dos compuestos químicos, la urea (U y bicarbonato de amonio (AB en cultivos de Arthrospira sp. La concentración letal 100 (LC100 determinada a las 24 h para Branchionus sp. y Amoeba sp. fue de 60-80 mg L-1 (U y 100-150 mg L-1 (AB. La concentración media de inhibición efectiva, después de 72 h, para el 50% de la población (IC50 en Arthrospira fue de 80 mg L-1 (U y 150 mg L-1 (AB. La aplicación de dosis de 60 mg L-1 (U ó 100 mg L-1 (AB en

  13. Photosystem I from the unusual cyanobacterium Gloeobacter violaceus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mangels, D.; Kruip, J.; Berry, S.; Rögner, M.; Boekema, E.J.; Koenig, F.

    2002-01-01

    Photosystem I (PS I) from the primitive cyanobacterium Gloeobacter violaceus has been purified and characterised. Despite the fact that the isolated complexes have the same subunit composition as complexes from other cyanobacteria, the amplitude of flash-induced absorption difference spectra

  14. Photosystem I from the unusual cyanobacterium Gloeobacter violaceus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mangels, D.; Kruip, J.; Berry, S.; Rögner, M.; Boekema, E.J.; Koenig, F.

    2002-01-01

    Photosystem I (PS I) from the primitive cyanobacterium Gloeobacter violaceus has been purified and characterised. Despite the fact that the isolated complexes have the same subunit composition as complexes from other cyanobacteria, the amplitude of flash-induced absorption difference spectra indicat

  15. Structure of plastocyanin from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lars; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager; Harris, Pernille

    2006-01-01

    Plastocyanin from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis was heterologously produced in E. coli and purified. Plate-like crystals were obtained by crystallisation in 1.15 M trisodium citrate and 7.67 mM sodium borate buffer pH 8.5. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P212121...

  16. Lactate dehydrogenase in the cyanobacterium Microcystis PCC7806

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moezelaar, R.; Teixeira, de M.J.; Stal, L.J.

    1995-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Microcystis PCC7806 was found to possess an NAD-dependent lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27) which catalyzes the reduction of pyruvate to l-lactate. The enzyme required fructose 1,6-bisphosphate for activity and displayed positive cooperativity towards pyruvate. Lactate was not

  17. Development of a quantitative SRM-based proteomics method to study iron metabolism of Synechocystis sp PCC 6803

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vuorijoki, L.; Isojärvi, J.; Kallio, P.; Kouvonen, P.; Aro, E.M.; Corthals, G.L.; Jones, P.R.; Muth-Pawlak, D.

    2016-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (S. 6803) is a well-established model species in oxygenic photosynthesis research and a potential host for biotechnological applications. Despite recent advances in genome sequencing and microarray techniques applied in systems biology, quantitative prot

  18. Arabinogalactan proteins occur in the free-living cyanobacterium genus Nostoc and in plant-Nostoc symbioses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Owen; Taylor, Oliver; Adams, David G; Knox, J Paul

    2012-10-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGP) are a diverse family of proteoglycans associated with the cell surfaces of plants. AGP have been implicated in a wide variety of plant cell processes, including signaling in symbioses. This study investigates the existence of putative AGP in free-living cyanobacterial cultures of the nitrogen-fixing, filamentous cyanobacteria Nostoc punctiforme and Nostoc sp. strain LBG1 and at the symbiotic interface in the symbioses between Nostoc spp. and two host plants, the angiosperm Gunnera manicata (in which the cyanobacterium is intracellular) and the liverwort Blasia pusilla (in which the cyanobacterium is extracellular). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblotting, and immunofluorescence analyses demonstrated that three AGP glycan epitopes (recognized by monoclonal antibodies LM14, MAC207, and LM2) are present in free-living Nostoc cyanobacterial species. The same three AGP glycan epitopes are present at the Gunnera-Nostoc symbiotic interface and the LM2 epitope is detected during the establishment of the Blasia-Nostoc symbiosis. Bioinformatic analysis of the N. punctiforme genome identified five putative AGP core proteins that are representative of AGP classes found in plants. These results suggest a possible involvement of AGP in cyanobacterial-plant symbioses and are also suggestive of a cyanobacterial origin of AGP.

  19. Ecology and Physiology of the Pathogenic Cyanobacterium Roseofilum reptotaenium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie L. Richardson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Roseofilum reptotaenium is a gliding, filamentous, phycoerythrin-rich cyanobacterium that has been found only in the horizontally migrating, pathogenic microbial mat, black band disease (BBD on Caribbean corals. R. reptotaenium dominates the BBD mat in terms of biomass and motility, and the filaments form the mat fabric. This cyanobacterium produces the cyanotoxin microcystin, predominately MC-LR, and can tolerate high levels of sulfide produced by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB that are also associated with BBD. Laboratory cultures of R. reptotaenium infect coral fragments, suggesting that the cyanobacterium is the primary pathogen of BBD, but since this species cannot grow axenically and Koch’s Postulates cannot be fulfilled, it cannot be proposed as a primary pathogen. However, R. reptotaenium does play several major pathogenic roles in this polymicrobial disease. Here, we provide an overview of the ecology of this coral pathogen and present new information on R. reptotaenium ecophysiology, including roles in the infection process, chemotactic and other motility responses, and the effect of pH on growth and motility. Additionally, we show, using metabolomics, that exposure of the BBD microbial community to the cyanotoxin MC-LR affects community metabolite profiles, in particular those associated with nucleic acid biosynthesis.

  20. Characterization of the relA/spoT homologue slr1325 (syn-rsh) of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp.PCC6803%集胞藻PCC6803中relA/spoT同源基因syn-rsh(slr1325)的鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    缪小刚; 刘惠玲; 宁德刚

    2011-01-01

    [目的]四磷酸或五磷酸鸟苷(Guanosine 3′,5′-bispyrophosphate,(p)ppGpp)是细菌在遭遇环境胁迫时细胞产生应激反应的信号分子,(p)ppGpp由其合成酶RelA或具有合成酶或水解酶双重催化功能的RelA/SpoT合成.本文证明了集胞藻PCC6803(Synechocystis sp.)中唯一编码RelA/SpoT同源蛋白(命名为Syn-RSH)的基因slr1325(syn-rsh)的功能.[方法]通过互补试验证明syn-rsh表达产物的生物学功能;以纤维素薄层层析检测不同条件下Escherichia coli(p)ppGpp合成缺陷突变株及集胞藻PCC6803细胞中的(p)ppGpp.[结果]诱导Syn-RSH表达可使(p)ppGpp合成酶和水解酶基因缺失的E.coli突变株回复野生型表型,并在细胞中积累一定水平的ppGpp;在实验室培养条件下,集胞藻PCC6803细胞中可检测到低水平的ppGpp,氨基酸饥饿可诱导ppGpp水平升高并维持在相应水平.[结论]Syn-RSH具有(p)ppGpp合成酶和水解酶的双重功能,(p)ppGpp是集胞藻PCC6803在实验室生长条件下细胞生长所必需的.

  1. Morphological Studies of Synechocystis sp. UNIWG under Polyhydroxyalkanoate Accumulating Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yew, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Some cyanobacteria are capable of producing polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA, among which is the unicellular Synechocystis sp. Here, we report the identification and preliminary characterization of a newly isolated strain of Synechocystis sp. UNIWG that is capable of accumulating unusually high number of PHA granules. This cyanobacterium was isolated from oil-contaminated brackish water sample from Wadi Gaza, Palestine. Surprisingly, Nile Blue A staining of PHA-accumulating cells failed to reveal the accumulated PHA granules. Ultrastructural analysis of Synechocystis sp. UNIWG cells grown under nitrogen limiting conditions revealed the presence of up to 17 electron-transparent granules in the cell cytoplasm. Gas chromatography analysis further revealed that these cells contain up to 14 wt% poly(3-hydroxybutyrate of the cell dry weight. Ultrastructural analysis also revealed that Synechocystis sp. UNIWG cells from the growth phase were covered with a dense layer of pilus like structures. However, these pilus-like structures were not observed in cells from the PHA-accumulation phase. The possible roles of these pilus-like structures and PHA accumulation for the survival of this cyanobacterium is discussed here.

  2. Biosynthesis of 130-kilodalton mosquito larvicide in the cyanobacterium Agmenellum quadruplicatum PR-6.

    OpenAIRE

    Angsuthanasombat, C; Panyim, S

    1989-01-01

    The 130-kilodalton mosquito larvicidal gene, cloned from Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis, was introduced into the cyanobacterium Agmenellum quadruplicatum PR-6 by plasmid transformation. Transformed cells synthesized 130-kilodalton delta-endotoxin protein and showed mosquito larvicidal activity. Results demonstrate a potential use of a cyanobacterium for biological control of mosquitoes.

  3. Biosynthesis of 130-kilodalton mosquito larvicide in the cyanobacterium Agmenellum quadruplicatum PR-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angsuthanasombat, C; Panyim, S

    1989-09-01

    The 130-kilodalton mosquito larvicidal gene, cloned from Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis, was introduced into the cyanobacterium Agmenellum quadruplicatum PR-6 by plasmid transformation. Transformed cells synthesized 130-kilodalton delta-endotoxin protein and showed mosquito larvicidal activity. Results demonstrate a potential use of a cyanobacterium for biological control of mosquitoes.

  4. The Psb32 Protein Aids in Repairing Photodamaged Photosystem Ⅱ in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kimberly M. Wegener; Stefan Bennewitz; Ralf Oelmüller; Himadri B. Pakrasi

    2011-01-01

    Photosystem Ⅱ (PSⅡ),a membrane protein complex,catalyzes the photochemical oxidation of water to molecular oxygen.This enzyme complex consists of approximately 20 stoichiometric protein components.However,due to the highly energetic reactions it catalyzes as part of its normal activity,PSⅡ is continuously damaged and repaired.With advances in protein detection technologies,an increasing number of sub-stoichiometric PSⅡ proteins have been identified,many of which aid in the biogenesis and assembly of this protein complex.Psb32 (SⅡ1390) has previously been identified as a protein associated with highly active purified PSⅡ preparations from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp.PCC 6803.To investigate its function,the subcellular localization of Psb32 and the impact of deletion of the psb32 gene on PSⅡ were analyzed.Here,we show that Psb32 is an integral membrane protein,primarily located in the thylakoid membranes.Although not required for cell viability,Psb32 protects cells from oxidative stress and additionally confers a selective fitness advantage in mixed culture experiments.Specifically,Psb32 protects PSⅡ from photodamage and accelerates its repair.Thus,the data suggest that Psb32 plays an important role in minimizing the effect of photoinhibition on PSⅡ.

  5. Shuttle cloning vectors for the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans.

    OpenAIRE

    Gendel, S; Straus, N; Pulleyblank, D; Williams, J

    1983-01-01

    Hybrid plasmids capable of acting as shuttle cloning vectors in Escherichia coli and the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans R2 were constructed by in vitro ligation. DNA from the small endogenous plasmid of A. nidulans was combined with two E. coli vectors, pBR325 and pDPL13, to create vectors containing either two selectable antibiotic resistance markers or a single marker linked to a flexible multisite polylinker. Nonessential DNA was deleted from the polylinker containing plasmid pPLAN B2 t...

  6. TonB-Dependent Utilization of Dihydroxamate Xenosiderophores in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babykin, Michael M; Obando, Tobias S A; Zinchenko, Vladislav V

    2017-09-12

    In Gram-negative bacteria, transport of ferric siderophores through outer membrane is a complex process that requires specific outer membrane transporters and energy-transducing TonB-ExbB-ExbD system in the cytoplasmic membrane. The genome of the non-siderophore-producing cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 encodes all putative components of the siderophore-mediated iron uptake system. So far, there has been no experimental evidence for the existence of such a pathway in this organism. On the contrary, its reductive iron uptake pathway has been studied in detail. We demonstrate that Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is capable of using dihydroxamate xenosiderophores, either ferric schizokinen (FeSK) or a siderophore of the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 (SAV), as the sole source of iron. Inactivation of the tonB gene or the exbB1-exbD1 gene cluster resulted in an inability to utilize these siderophores. At the same time, the inactivation of the feoB gene encoding FeoB plasma membrane ferrous iron transporter, or one of the futB or futC genes encoding permease and ATPase subunit of FutABC ferric iron transporter, did not impair the ability of cells to utilize FeSK or SAV as the sole source of iron for growth. Our data suggest that cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is capable of acquiring iron-siderophore complexes in a TonB-dependent manner without iron reduction in the periplasm.

  7. Chlorophyll f-driven photosynthesis in a cavernous cyanobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, Lars; Brejnrod, Asker; Schliep, Martin; Sørensen, Søren J; Larkum, Anthony W D; Kühl, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Chlorophyll (Chl) f is the most recently discovered chlorophyll and has only been found in cyanobacteria from wet environments. Although its structure and biophysical properties are resolved, the importance of Chl f as an accessory pigment in photosynthesis remains unresolved. We found Chl f in a cyanobacterium enriched from a cavernous environment and report the first example of Chl f-supported oxygenic photosynthesis in cyanobacteria from such habitats. Pigment extraction, hyperspectral microscopy and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated the presence of Chl a and f in unicellular cyanobacteria found in enrichment cultures. Amplicon sequencing indicated that all oxygenic phototrophs were related to KC1, a Chl f-containing cyanobacterium previously isolated from an aquatic environment. Microsensor measurements on aggregates demonstrated oxygenic photosynthesis at 742 nm and less efficient photosynthesis under 768- and 777-nm light probably because of diminished overlap with the absorption spectrum of Chl f and other far-red absorbing pigments. Our findings suggest the importance of Chl f-containing cyanobacteria in terrestrial habitats.

  8. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 230037 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ng protein Cyanothece sp. PCC 7424 MADFILDAQGGILTGTNEADLISFAVNITGQINSLEGNDTIQSLGGNSVTGTQIILANQGDDLISSASTGGFLTTIEAYGGQGNDTVVGGNFNDT...LYGSEGFDTIQGGGGDDSIGGGLQTASQTSDLADTIDGGEGNDIIFGNLGIDTLVGNIGNDTVFGGRDGDSIDGGLDNDSLVGGEGADTITGGTGNDT...LVGGLQTSSQTGDLADNLNGGLGNDVIFGNLGNDTLIGDIGDDILFGGRDNDTLSGGANNDSLVGGEGA...DTITGDEGDDTIRGGLQTASQSDDLADSLNGGLGNDLIFGNLGNDTLLGDIGDDILFGGIDNDSIDGGADQDSLVGGENIDTITGGAGNDTIIGGLQSGDQSNDEADN...INGGVGNDSILGNIGVDTLLGDAGNDIIFGGRDNDSIDGGTENDSLIGGEGTDTLVGGNGNDTIIGGLQTADQSGDQGDTITGGDGNDSILGNSGVDTLLGDGGNDALFGGRDNDT

  9. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 218438738 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase SDR Cyanothece sp. PCC 7424 MSYTKKVAVVTGANRGLGFETCRQLAKNGIQVILTSRDED...KGLVAIEKLKSEKLKVAYYPLDVTYPESIDLLAKFIKDNYGRLDILVNNAGVLLGSSEDSSIFNAKIDTIRKSLETNVYGALQVCQTLIPLMKLHNYGRVVNVSSGMG

  10. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 220910524 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 076 ... oligosaccharide biosynthesis protein Alg14-like protein Cyanothece sp. PCC 7425 MKLLLVCNPGGHFATMYALKK...FWSQHSRTWVTYRHFDTLELENQGEVVCWVLKQEAREGLRALINFVQAIGIIWRKRPELVISTGAGLAVPFIAAAKLLGVRTVFIESISRTRELSLSGKLVYPLVDELYVQWPECRKRYPRSQYRGVVL

  11. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 307155026 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 610 ... hypothetical protein Cyan7822_5254 Cyanothece sp. PCC 7822 MSHSSPNPLNDYGEEFEQDLAKAEQALEKLKQRYALILEQSQ...RQAELHEQRSLSEQAWQNHPTPELEVELRQIEAQIQELQLTLESALLSSDDLKRLFWQGLRSGLLSELFWQIVRFGGIGIIIGWILKSCSK

  12. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 501591918 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DGITTDSRYINPGEIFLALRGNTFDGHDFANIAVDKGAIALIVDHHISVKSTKQIPQIQVKDTLLAYQQVAHWWREQLTIPVIAITGSVGKTTTKELISAVLSNYGIV...-acetylmuramoyl-tripeptide--D-alanyl-D-alanine ligase Cyanothece sp. PCC 8801 MSFQVNFRKFRKIFSANLNSEIDVIDDFLI

  13. Functional role of PilA in iron acquisition in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob J Lamb

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria require large quantities of iron to maintain their photosynthetic machinery; however, in most environments iron is present in the form of insoluble iron oxides. Whether cyanobacteria can utilize these sources of iron, and the potential molecular mechanisms involved remains to be defined. There is increasing evidence that pili can facilitate electron donation to extracellular electron acceptors, like iron oxides in non-photosynthetic bacteria. In these organisms, the donation of electrons to iron oxides is thought to be crucial for maintaining respiration in the absence of oxygen. Our study investigates if PilA1 (major pilin protein may also provide a mechanism to convert insoluble ferric iron into soluble ferrous iron. Growth experiments supported by spectroscopic data of a strain deficient in pilA1 indicate that the presence of the pilA1 gene enhances the ability to grow on iron oxides. These observations suggest a novel function of PilA1 in cyanobacterial iron acquisition.

  14. Changes in membrane lipids and carotenoids during light acclimation in a marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Olimpio Montero; Alberto Sánchez-Guijo; Luis M Lubián; Gonzalo Martínez-Rodríguez

    2012-09-01

    Time course of carotenoid and membrane lipid variation during high light (HL) acclimation (about 85 mol m−2 s−1), after transfer from low light (LL) (5–10 μmol m−2 s−1), was determined in a marine Synechococcus strain. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to diode array detector (DAD) or electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was used for compound separation and detection. Myxoxanthophyll rose within a time interval of 8 h to 24 h after the onset of exposure to HL. -carotene content started to decrease after 4 h of the onset of exposure to HL. Zeaxanthin content rose with exposure to HL, but it was only significant after 24 h of exposure. Carotenoid changes are in agreement with a coordinated activity of the enzymes of the myxoxanthophyll biosynthetic pathway, with no rate-limiting intermediate steps. Lipid analysis showed all species with a C18:3/C16:0 composition increased their content, the changes of PG(18:3/16:0) and MGDG(18:3/16:0) being primarily significant. Major lipid changes were also found to occur within 24 h. These changes might suggest reduction and reorganization of the thylakoid membrane structure. Hypotheses are also drawn on the role played by lipid molecule shape and their possible effect in membrane fluidity and protein accommodation.

  15. Protein Network Signatures Associated with Exogenous Biofuels Treatments in Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Guangsheng; Chen, Lei; Wang, Jiangxin; Qiao, Jianjun; Zhang, Weiwen

    2014-01-01

    Although recognized as a promising microbial cell factory for producing biofuels, current productivity in cyanobacterial systems is low. To make the processes economically feasible, one of the hurdles, which need to be overcome is the low tolerance of hosts to toxic biofuels. Meanwhile, little information is available regarding the cellular responses to biofuels stress in cyanobacteria, which makes it challenging for tolerance engineering. Using large proteomic datasets of Synechocystis under various biofuels stress and environmental perturbation, a protein co-expression network was first constructed and then combined with the experimentally determined protein-protein interaction network. Proteins with statistically higher topological overlap in the integrated network were identified as common responsive proteins to both biofuels stress and environmental perturbations. In addition, a weighted gene co-expression network analysis was performed to distinguish unique responses to biofuels from those to environmental perturbations and to uncover metabolic modules and proteins uniquely associated with biofuels stress. The results showed that biofuel-specific proteins and modules were enriched in several functional categories, including photosynthesis, carbon fixation, and amino acid metabolism, which may represent potential key signatures for biofuels stress responses in Synechocystis. Network-based analysis allowed determination of the responses specifically related to biofuels stress, and the results constituted an important knowledge foundation for tolerance engineering against biofuels in Synechocystis.

  16. Effect of Selected Plant Extracts and D- and L-Lysine on the Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lurling, M; Van Oosterhout, F

    2014-01-01

    We tested extracts from Fructus mume, Salvia miltiorrhiza and Moringa oleifera as well as L-lysine and D-Lysine as curative measures to rapidly suppress the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa NIVA-CYA 43...

  17. Mössbauer study of cobalt and iron in the cyanobacterium (blue green alga)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambe, Shizuko

    1990-07-01

    Mössbauer emission and absorption studies have been performed on cobalt and iron in the cyanobacterium (blue-green alga). The Mössbauer spectrum of the cyanobacterium cultivated with57Co is decomposed into two doublets. The parameters of the major doublet are in good agreement with those of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B12) labeled with57Co. The other minor doublet has parameters close to those of Fe(II) coordinated with six nitrogen atoms. These suggest that cobalt is used for the biosynthesis of vitamin B12 or its analogs in the cyanobacterium. The spectra of the cyanobacterium grown with57Fe show that iron is in the high-spin trivalent state and possibly in the form of ferritin, iron storage protein.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Microcystis aeruginosa CACIAM 03, a Cyanobacterium Isolated from an Amazonian Freshwater Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Wendel Oliveira; Lima, Alex Ranieri Jerônimo; Moraes, Pablo Henrique Gonçalves; Siqueira, Andrei Santos; Aguiar, Délia Cristina Figueira; Baraúna, Anna Rafaella Ferreira; Martins, Luisa Carício; Fuzii, Hellen Thais; de Lima, Clayton Pereira Silva; Vianez-Júnior, João Lídio Silva Gonçalves; Nunes, Márcio Roberto Teixeira; Dall'Agnol, Leonardo Teixeira

    2016-01-01

    Given its toxigenic potential, Microcystis aeruginosa is an important bloom-forming cyanobacterium. Here, we present a draft genome and annotation of the strain CACIAM 03, which was isolated from an Amazonian freshwater environment. PMID:27856592

  19. Novel surface associated polyphosphate bodies sequester uranium in the filamentous, marine cyanobacterium, Anabaena torulosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Celin; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2013-12-01

    A filamentous, heterocystous, nitrogen-fixing marine cyanobacterium, Anabaena torulosa, has been shown to harbour surface associated, acid soluble polyphosphate bodies. Uranium immobilization by such polyphosphate bodies, reported in cyanobacteria for the first time, demonstrates a novel uranium sequestration phenomenon.

  20. Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakrasi, Himadri B. [Washington University

    2015-01-29

    The potential for developing commercially viable microbial H2-production systems as a renewable source of biofuel has been limited by the need for an anaerobic environment to enable photobiological H2-production in capable bacterial and algal species. In this project, we have shown that the cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 has the capacity for highly efficient H2-production under natural aerobic conditions. The marine cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 has a diurnal metabolic cycle; photosynthesis and carbon fixation occur during daylight hours and then at night, high rates of respiration create a suboxic intracellular environment that enables O2-sensitive processes to occur, including N2-fixation and H2-production. We developed a two-stage approach to monitor H2-production by Cyanothece 51142. In the first stage, we grew the bacteria aerobically in an alternating 12 hour light/dark cycle. A second ‘incubation’ stage was then carried out in which we took cells from the end of a 12 hour light growth period and incubated them in air-tight vials for a further 12 hours under continuous illumination. Analysis of the headspace in the vial revealed high specific rates of H2-production (>150 μmol of H2 per mg chlorophyll per hour) during this incubation period. Furthermore, the rate of H2-production could be enhanced by growing the cells in the presence of high levels of CO2 or glycerol. We also confirmed that H2-production was mediated by the nitrogenase system found in these Cyanothece cells. Interestingly, in the absence of molecular N2, nitrogenase systems channel all available electrons towards H2-production. Accordingly, when we incubated glycerol-supplemented Cyanothece 51142 cells in the absence of N2, the rate of H2-production increased up to 467 μmol of H2 per mg chlorophyll per hour, which is an order of magnitude greater than those rates previously observed in other wild type H2 producing model photosynthetic microorganisms under anaerobic

  1. Halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica contains NapA-type Na+/H+ antiporters with novel ion specificity that are involved in salt tolerance at alkaline pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wutipraditkul, Nuchanat; Waditee, Rungaroon; Incharoensakdi, Aran; Hibino, Takashi; Tanaka, Yoshito; Nakamura, Tatsunosuke; Shikata, Masamitsu; Takabe, Tetsuko; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2005-08-01

    Aphanothece halophytica is a halotolerant alkaliphilic cyanobacterium which can grow at NaCl concentrations up to 3.0 M and at pH values up to 11. The genome sequence revealed that the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 contains five putative Na+/H+ antiporters, two of which are homologous to NhaP of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and three of which are homologous to NapA of Enterococcus hirae. The physiological and functional properties of NapA-type antiporters are largely unknown. One of NapA-type antiporters in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 has been proposed to be essential for the survival of this organism. In this study, we examined the isolation and characterization of the homologous gene in Aphanothece halophytica. Two genes encoding polypeptides of the same size, designated Ap-napA1-1 and Ap-napA1-2, were isolated. Ap-NapA1-1 exhibited a higher level of homology to the Synechocystis ortholog (Syn-NapA1) than Ap-NapA1-2 exhibited. Ap-NapA1-1, Ap-NapA1-2, and Syn-NapA1 complemented the salt-sensitive phenotypes of an Escherichia coli mutant and exhibited strongly pH-dependent Na+/H+ and Li+/H+ exchange activities (the highest activities were at alkaline pH), although the activities of Ap-NapA1-2 were significantly lower than the activities of the other polypeptides. Only one these polypeptides, Ap-NapA1-2, complemented a K+ uptake-deficient E. coli mutant and exhibited K+ uptake activity. Mutagenesis experiments suggested the importance of Glu129, Asp225, and Asp226 in the putative transmembrane segment and Glu142 in the loop region for the activity. Overexpression of Ap-NapA1-1 in the freshwater cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 enhanced the salt tolerance of cells, especially at alkaline pH. These findings indicate that A. halophytica has two NapA1-type antiporters which exhibit different ion specificities and play an important role in salt tolerance at alkaline pH.

  2. Evolving interactions between diazotrophic cyanobacterium and phage mediate nitrogen release and host competitive ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coloma, Sebastián; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between nitrogen-fixing (i.e. diazotrophic) cyanobacteria and their viruses, cyanophages, can have large-scale ecosystem effects. These effects are mediated by temporal alterations in nutrient availability in aquatic systems owing to the release of nitrogen and carbon sources from cells lysed by phages, as well as by ecologically important changes in the diversity and fitness of cyanobacterial populations that evolve in the presence of phages. However, ecological and evolutionary feedbacks between phages and nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria are still relative poorly understood. Here, we used an experimental evolution approach to test the effect of interactions between a common filamentous, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium (Nodularia sp.) and its phage on cellular nitrogen release and host properties. Ecological, community-level effects of phage-mediated nitrogen release were tested with a phytoplankton bioassay. We found that cyanobacterial nitrogen release increased significantly as a result of viral lysis, which was associated with enhanced growth of phytoplankton species in cell-free filtrates compared with phage-resistant host controls in which lysis and subsequent nutrient release did not occur after phage exposure. We also observed an ecologically important change among phage-evolved cyanobacteria with phage-resistant phenotypes, a short-filamentous morphotype with reduced buoyancy compared with the ancestral long-filamentous morphotype. Reduced buoyancy might decrease the ability of these morphotypes to compete for light compared with longer, more buoyant filaments. Together, these findings demonstrate the potential of cyanobacteria–phage interactions to affect ecosystem biogeochemical cycles and planktonic community dynamics. PMID:28083116

  3. Dependence of the cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus on hydrogen peroxide scavenging microbes for growth at the ocean's surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Jeffrey Morris

    Full Text Available The phytoplankton community in the oligotrophic open ocean is numerically dominated by the cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus, accounting for approximately half of all photosynthesis. In the illuminated euphotic zone where Prochlorococcus grows, reactive oxygen species are continuously generated via photochemical reactions with dissolved organic matter. However, Prochlorococcus genomes lack catalase and additional protective mechanisms common in other aerobes, and this genus is highly susceptible to oxidative damage from hydrogen peroxide (HOOH. In this study we showed that the extant microbial community plays a vital, previously unrecognized role in cross-protecting Prochlorococcus from oxidative damage in the surface mixed layer of the oligotrophic ocean. Microbes are the primary HOOH sink in marine systems, and in the absence of the microbial community, surface waters in the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean accumulated HOOH to concentrations that were lethal for Prochlorococcus cultures. In laboratory experiments with the marine heterotroph Alteromonas sp., serving as a proxy for the natural community of HOOH-degrading microbes, bacterial depletion of HOOH from the extracellular milieu prevented oxidative damage to the cell envelope and photosystems of co-cultured Prochlorococcus, and facilitated the growth of Prochlorococcus at ecologically-relevant cell concentrations. Curiously, the more recently evolved lineages of Prochlorococcus that exploit the surface mixed layer niche were also the most sensitive to HOOH. The genomic streamlining of these evolved lineages during adaptation to the high-light exposed upper euphotic zone thus appears to be coincident with an acquired dependency on the extant HOOH-consuming community. These results underscore the importance of (indirect biotic interactions in establishing niche boundaries, and highlight the impacts that community-level responses to stress may have in the ecological and evolutionary outcomes for co

  4. Heterologous expression of an algal hydrogenase in a heterocystous cyanobacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorsten Heidorn; Peter Lindblad [Dept. of Physiological Botany, Uppsala University, Villavogen 6, SE-752 36 Uppsala, (Sweden)

    2006-07-01

    For the expression of an active algal [FeFe] hydrogenase in the heterocystous cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme A TCC 29133 the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hydrogenase gene hydA1 and the accessory genes hydEF and hydG are to be introduced into the cyanobacteria cells. The genes were amplified by PCR from EST clones, cloned into the cloning vector pBluescript SK+ and sequenced. An expression vector for multi-cistronic cloning, based on pSCR202, was constructed and for a functional test GFP was inserted as a reporter gene. The GFP construct was transformed into Nostoc punctiforme A TCC 29133 by electroporation and expression of GFP was visualized by fluorescence microscopy. (authors)

  5. Genetic manipulation of a cyanobacterium for heavy metal detoxivication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, P.; Cannon, G.; Heinhorst, S.

    1995-12-31

    Increasing heavy metal contamination of soil and water has produced a need for economical and effective methods to reduce toxic buildup of these materials. Biological systems use metallothionein proteins to sequester such metals as Cu, Cd, and Zn. Studies are underway to genetically engineer a cyanobacteria strain with increased ability for metallothionein production and increased sequestration capacity. Cyanobacteria require only sunlight and CO{sub 2}. Vector constructs are being developed in a naturally competent, unicellular cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans R2. Closed copies of a yeast copper metallothionein gene have been inserted into a cyanobacterial shuttle vector as well as a vector designed for genomic integration. Transformation studies have produced recombinant cyanobacteria from both of these systems, and work is currently underway to assess the organism`s ability to withstand increasing Cu, Cd, and Zn concentrations.

  6. Utility of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 glutaredoxin A as a platform to study high-resolution mutagenesis of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaff, David B; Sutton, Roger B

    2013-01-01

    Glutaredoxin from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is a small protein, containing only 88 amino acids, that participates in a large number of redox reactions, serving both as an electron donor for enzyme-catalyzed reductions and as a regulator of diverse metabolic pathways. The crystal structures of glutaredoxins from several species have been solved, including the glutaredoxin A isoform from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. We have utilized the small size of Synechocystis glutaredoxin A and its propensity to form protein crystals that diffract to high resolution to explore a long-standing question in biochemistry; i.e., what are the effects of mutations on protein structure and function? Taking advantage of these properties, we have initiated a long-term educational project that would examine the structural and biochemical changes in glutaredoxin as a function of single-point mutational replacements. Here, we report some of the mutational effects that we have observed to date.

  7. Expression of holo-proteorhodopsin in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Que; van der Steen, Jeroen B; Dekker, Henk L; Ganapathy, Srividya; de Grip, Willem J; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2016-05-01

    Retinal-based photosynthesis may contribute to the free energy conversion needed for growth of an organism carrying out oxygenic photosynthesis, like a cyanobacterium. After optimization, this may even enhance the overall efficiency of phototrophic growth of such organisms in sustainability applications. As a first step towards this, we here report on functional expression of the archetype proteorhodopsin in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Upon use of the moderate-strength psbA2 promoter, holo-proteorhodopsin is expressed in this cyanobacterium, at a level of up to 10(5) molecules per cell, presumably in a hexameric quaternary structure, and with approximately equal distribution (on a protein-content basis) over the thylakoid and the cytoplasmic membrane fraction. These results also demonstrate that Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has the capacity to synthesize all-trans-retinal. Expressing a substantial amount of a heterologous opsin membrane protein causes a substantial growth retardation Synechocystis, as is clear from a strain expressing PROPS, a non-pumping mutant derivative of proteorhodopsin. Relative to this latter strain, proteorhodopsin expression, however, measurably stimulates its growth. Copyright © 2016 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Isolation and purification of an axenic diazotrophic drought-tolerant cyanobacterium, Nostoc commune, from natural cyanobacterial crusts and its utilization for field research on soils polluted with radioisotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Jun; Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Nishi, Yasuaki

    2012-08-01

    Nitrogen fixation and drought tolerance confer the ability to grow on dry land, and some terrestrial cyanobacteria exhibit these properties. These cyanobacteria were isolated in an axenic form from Nostoc commune clusters and other sources by modifying the method used to isolate the nitrogen-fixing and drought-tolerant cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. HK-01. Of these cyanobacteria, N. commune, which is difficult to isolate and purify, uses polysaccharides to maintain water, nitrogen fertilizers for nitrogen fixation, and can live in extreme environments because of desiccation tolerance. In this study, we examined the use of N. commune as biosoil for space agriculture and possible absorption of radioisotopes ((134)Cs, (137)Cs). This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability: from Natural to Artificial.

  9. Adaptation of a Cyanobacterium to a Biochemically Rich Environment in Experimental Evolution as an Initial Step toward a Chloroplast-Like State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shingo; Miyazaki, Mikako; Takikawa, Go; Sakurai, Takahiro; Kashiwagi, Akiko; Sueyoshi, Makoto; Matsumoto, Yusuke; Kiuchi, Ayako; Mori, Kotaro; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplasts originated from cyanobacteria through endosymbiosis. The original cyanobacterial endosymbiont evolved to adapt to the biochemically rich intracellular environment of the host cell while maintaining its photosynthetic function; however, no such process has been experimentally demonstrated. Here, we show the adaptation of a model cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, to a biochemically rich environment by experimental evolution. Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 does not grow in a biochemically rich, chemically defined medium because several amino acids are toxic to the cells at approximately 1 mM. We cultured the cyanobacteria in media with the toxic amino acids at 0.1 mM, then serially transferred the culture, gradually increasing the concentration of the toxic amino acids. The cells evolved to show approximately the same specific growth rate in media with 0 and 1 mM of the toxic amino acid in approximately 84 generations and evolved to grow faster in the media with 1 mM than in the media with 0 mM in approximately 181 generations. We did not detect a statistically significant decrease in the autotrophic growth of the evolved strain in an inorganic medium, indicating the maintenance of the photosynthetic function. Whole-genome resequencing revealed changes in the genes related to the cell membrane and the carboxysome. Moreover, we quantitatively analyzed the evolutionary changes by using simple mathematical models, which evaluated the evolution as an increase in the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) and estimated quantitative characteristics of the evolutionary process. Our results clearly demonstrate not only the potential of a model cyanobacterium to adapt to a biochemically rich environment without a significant decrease in photosynthetic function but also the properties of its evolutionary process, which sheds light of the evolution of chloroplasts at the initial stage. PMID:24874568

  10. Global Proteomics Reveal an Atypical Strategy for Carbon/Nitrogen Assimilation by a Cyanobacterium Under Diverse Environmental Perturbations*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, Kimberly M.; Singh, Abhay K.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Elvitigala, Thanura; Welsh, Eric A.; Keren, Nir; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Ghosh, Bijoy K.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2010-01-01

    Cyanobacteria, the only prokaryotes capable of oxygenic photosynthesis, are present in diverse ecological niches and play crucial roles in global carbon and nitrogen cycles. To proliferate in nature, cyanobacteria utilize a host of stress responses to accommodate periodic changes in environmental conditions. A detailed knowledge of the composition of, as well as the dynamic changes in, the proteome is necessary to gain fundamental insights into such stress responses. Toward this goal, we have performed a large-scale proteomic analysis of the widely studied model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 under 33 different environmental conditions. The resulting high-quality dataset consists of 22,318 unique peptides corresponding to 1955 proteins, a coverage of 53% of the predicted proteome. Quantitative determination of protein abundances has led to the identification of 1198 differentially regulated proteins. Notably, our analysis revealed that a common stress response under various environmental perturbations, irrespective of amplitude and duration, is the activation of atypical pathways for the acquisition of carbon and nitrogen from urea and arginine. In particular, arginine is catabolized via putrescine to produce succinate and glutamate, sources of carbon and nitrogen, respectively. This study provides the most comprehensive functional and quantitative analysis of the Synechocystis proteome to date, and shows that a significant stress response of cyanobacteria involves an uncommon mode of acquisition of carbon and nitrogen. PMID:20858728

  11. Sucrose secreted by the engineered cyanobacterium and its fermentability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yangkai; Luo, Quan; Liang, Feiyan; Lu, Xuefeng

    2016-10-01

    The unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 (Syn7942), synthesizes sucrose as the only compatible solute under salt stress. A series of engineered Syn7942 strains for sucrose production were constructed. The overexpression of the native sps (encoding a natively fused protein of sucrose phosphate synthase SPS and sucrose phosphate phosphatase SPP) in Syn7942 wild type caused a 93% improvement of sucrose productivity. The strain FL130 co-overexpressing sps and cscB (encoding a sucrose transporter) exhibited a 74% higher extracellular sucrose production than that overexpressing cscB only. Both results showed the significant improvement of sucrose productivity by the double functional protein SPS-SPP. Afterwards, FL130 was cultivated under a modified condition, and the cell-free culture medium containing 1.5 g L-1 sucrose was pre-treated with an acid hydrolysis technique. Cultivated with the neutralized hydrolysates as the starting media, two widely used microorganisms, Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, showed a comparable growth with that in the control media supplemented with glucose. These results clearly demonstrated that the cell-free culture of sucrose-secreting cyanobacteria can be applied as starting media in microbial cultivation.

  12. Ribulose diphosphate carboxylase of the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terekhova, I.V.; Chernyad' ev, I.I.; Doman, N.G.

    1986-11-20

    The ribulose diphosphate (RDP) carboxylase activity of the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis is represented by two peaks when a cell homogenate is centrifuged in a sucrose density gradient. In the case of differential centrifugation (40,000 g, 1 h), the activity of the enzyme was distributed between the supernatant liquid (soluble form) and the precipitate (carboxysomal form). From the soluble fraction, in which 80-95% of the total activity of the enzyme is concentrated, electrophoretically homogeneous RDP carboxylase was isolated by precipitation with ammonium sulfate and centrifugation in a sucrose density gradient. The purified enzyme possessed greater electrophoretic mobility in comparison with the RDP carboxylase of beans Vicia faba. The molecular weight of the enzyme, determined by gel filtration, was 450,000. The enzyme consists of monotypic subunits with a molecular weight of 53,000. The small subunits were not detected in electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel in the presence of SDS after fixation and staining of the gels by various methods.

  13. ADAPTIVE RESPONSES OF CYANOBACTERIUM PLECTONEMA BORYANUM TO HERBICIDE BUTACHLOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishav Kumar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The Present paper deals with the herbicide Butachlor (5,10 ,20,40 and 80ppm-induced changes in physiological and biochemical parameters related to photosynthesis and defense systems in paddy field cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum grown under laboratory conditions. Growth and photosynthetic pigments, i.e., chlorophyll a and carotenoids were adversely affected by Butachlor treatment and the inhibition was found to be dose dependent. The toxic effect of Butachlor was more pronounced protein; however, a considerable reduction in chlorophyll a, and carotenoids was also noticed. Furthermore, Butachlor with increasing doses accelerated the formation of active oxygen species, i.e., O2- and H2O2, in cells progressively. As a consequence of active oxygen species (AOS generation in Butachlor -treated cells, the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD and peroxidase (POD was enhanced considerably. Besides the accelerated action of enzymatic defense systems, Protein damage also showed an increasing trend with the rising concentration of Butachlor (5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 ppm.

  14. Export of Extracellular Polysaccharides Modulates Adherence of the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, ML; Allen, R; Luo, YQ; Curtiss, R

    2013-09-10

    The field of cyanobacterial biofuel production is advancing rapidly, yet we know little of the basic biology of these organisms outside of their photosynthetic pathways. We aimed to gain a greater understanding of how the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 (Synechocystis, hereafter) modulates its cell surface. Such understanding will allow for the creation of mutants that autoflocculate in a regulated way, thus avoiding energy intensive centrifugation in the creation of biofuels. We constructed mutant strains lacking genes predicted to function in carbohydrate transport or synthesis. Strains with gene deletions of slr0977 (predicted to encode a permease component of an ABC transporter), slr0982 (predicted to encode an ATP binding component of an ABC transporter) and slr1610 (predicted to encode a methyltransferase) demonstrated flocculent phenotypes and increased adherence to glass. Upon bioinformatic inspection, the gene products of slr0977, slr0982, and slr1610 appear to function in O-antigen (OAg) transport and synthesis. However, the analysis provided here demonstrated no differences between OAg purified from wild-type and mutants. However, exopolysaccharides (EPS) purified from mutants were altered in composition when compared to wild-type. Our data suggest that there are multiple means to modulate the cell surface of Synechocystis by disrupting different combinations of ABC transporters and/or glycosyl transferases. Further understanding of these mechanisms may allow for the development of industrially and ecologically useful strains of cyanobacteria. Additionally, these data imply that many cyanobacterial gene products may possess as-yet undiscovered functions, and are meritorious of further study.

  15. Binding characteristics of copper and cadmium by cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang Linchuan [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Zhou Chen; Cai Peng [Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agricultural Resources and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Chen Wenli [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Rong Xingmin; Dai Ke; Liang Wei [Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agricultural Resources and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Gu Jidong [Department of Ecology and Biodiversity, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Huang Qiaoyun, E-mail: qyhuang@mail.hzau.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agricultural Resources and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} The carboxyl groups play a vital role in the binding of Cu(II) and Cd(II) to S. platensis cells. {yields} Ion exchange and complexation are the dominating mechanism for Cu(II) and Cd(II) adsorption. {yields} XAFS analysis provided evidence for the inner-sphere complexation of Cu by carboxyl ligands and showed that Cu is complexed by two 5-membered chelate rings on S. platensis surface. - Abstract: Cyanobacteria are promising biosorbent for heavy metals in bioremediation. Although sequestration of metals by cyanobacteria is known, the actual mechanisms and ligands involved are not very well understood. The binding characteristics of Cu(II) and Cd(II) by the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis were investigated using a combination of chemical modifications, batch adsorption experiments, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. A significant increase in Cu(II) and Cd(II) binding was observed in the range of pH 3.5-5.0. Dramatical decrease in adsorption of Cu(II) and Cd(II) was observed after methanol esterification of the nonliving cells demonstrating that carboxyl functional groups play an important role in the binding of metals by S. platensis. The desorption rate of Cu(II) and Cd(II) from S. platensis surface was 72.7-80.7% and 53.7-58.0% by EDTA and NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}, respectively, indicating that ion exchange and complexation are the dominating mechanisms for Cu(II) and Cd(II) adsorption. XAFS analysis provided further evidence on the inner-sphere complexation of Cu by carboxyl ligands and showed that Cu is complexed by two 5-membered chelate rings on S. platensis surface.

  16. Antagonistic interactions between filamentous heterotrophs and the cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svercel, Miroslav; Saladin, Bianca; van Moorsel, Sofia J; Wolf, Sarah; Bagheri, Homayoun C

    2011-09-13

    Little is known about interactions between filamentous heterotrophs and filamentous cyanobacteria. Here, interactions between the filamentous heterotrophic bacteria Fibrella aestuarina (strain BUZ 2) and Fibrisoma limi (BUZ 3) with an axenic strain of the autotrophic filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum (SAG 25.82) were studied in mixed cultures under nutrient rich (carbon source present in medium) and poor (carbon source absent in medium) conditions. F. aestuarina BUZ 2 significantly reduced the cyanobacterial population whereas F. limi BUZ 3 did not. Physical contact between heterotrophs and autotroph was observed and the cyanobacterial cells showed some level of damage and lysis. Therefore, either contact lysis or entrapment with production of extracellular compounds in close vicinity of host cells could be considered as potential modes of action.The supernatants from pure heterotrophic cultures did not have an effect on Nostoc cultures. However, supernatant from mixed cultures of BUZ 2 and Nostoc had a negative effect on cyanobacterial growth, indicating that the lytic compounds were only produced in the presence of Nostoc.The growth and survival of tested heterotrophs was enhanced by the presence of Nostoc or its metabolites, suggesting that the heterotrophs could utilize the autotrophs and its products as a nutrient source. However, the autotroph could withstand and out-compete the heterotrophs under nutrient poor conditions. Our results suggest that the nutrients in cultivation media, which boost or reduce the number of heterotrophs, were the important factor influencing the outcome of the interplay between filamentous heterotrophs and autotrophs. For better understanding of these interactions, additional research is needed. In particular, it is necessary to elucidate the mode of action for lysis by heterotrophs, and the possible defense mechanisms of the autotrophs.

  17. Antagonistic interactions between filamentous heterotrophs and the cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Sarah

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about interactions between filamentous heterotrophs and filamentous cyanobacteria. Here, interactions between the filamentous heterotrophic bacteria Fibrella aestuarina (strain BUZ 2 and Fibrisoma limi (BUZ 3 with an axenic strain of the autotrophic filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum (SAG 25.82 were studied in mixed cultures under nutrient rich (carbon source present in medium and poor (carbon source absent in medium conditions. Findings F. aestuarina BUZ 2 significantly reduced the cyanobacterial population whereas F. limi BUZ 3 did not. Physical contact between heterotrophs and autotroph was observed and the cyanobacterial cells showed some level of damage and lysis. Therefore, either contact lysis or entrapment with production of extracellular compounds in close vicinity of host cells could be considered as potential modes of action. The supernatants from pure heterotrophic cultures did not have an effect on Nostoc cultures. However, supernatant from mixed cultures of BUZ 2 and Nostoc had a negative effect on cyanobacterial growth, indicating that the lytic compounds were only produced in the presence of Nostoc. The growth and survival of tested heterotrophs was enhanced by the presence of Nostoc or its metabolites, suggesting that the heterotrophs could utilize the autotrophs and its products as a nutrient source. However, the autotroph could withstand and out-compete the heterotrophs under nutrient poor conditions. Conclusions Our results suggest that the nutrients in cultivation media, which boost or reduce the number of heterotrophs, were the important factor influencing the outcome of the interplay between filamentous heterotrophs and autotrophs. For better understanding of these interactions, additional research is needed. In particular, it is necessary to elucidate the mode of action for lysis by heterotrophs, and the possible defense mechanisms of the autotrophs.

  18. Trade-Off between Growth and Carbohydrate Accumulation in Nutrient-Limited Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 Studied by Integrating Transcriptomic and Proteomic Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have a strong potential for biofuel production due to their ability to accumulate large amounts of carbohydrates. Nitrogen (N) stress can be used to increase the content of carbohydrates in the biomass, but it is expected to reduce biomass productivity. To study this trade-off between carbohydrate accumulation and biomass productivity, we characterized the biomass productivity, biomass composition as well as the transcriptome and proteome of the cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PC...

  19. SP. Pescado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Gendre

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Nell'occhiello di un articolo dal titolo Il Peru dei de[Jini rosa e de/la grande pioggia si legge: "da una partenza  in aereo al «pescado»  che ti  sfamera."1 Questa parola spagnola, giustamente chiusa tra caporali, a noi pare molto interes­ sante, perche, nonostante l'apparenza, non ha nulla da spartire sotto i1 profilo se­ mantico con l'it. pescato. lnfatti, tutti i piu importanti dizionari della lingua italiana, di ieri e di oggi, etimologici e non 2, registrano  accanto a pescata,  ii lemma pescato, 3 ma lo spiegano come "quantita di pesce catturato nel corso di una battuta o di una stagione di pesca",4 mentre lo sp. pescado  indica i1 "pesce (solo nel senso di: pesGe pescato da mangiare [...]".s

  20. Enhanced resistance to UV-B radiation in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 (Cyanophyceae) by repeated exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hongjie; Li, Dunhai

    2014-07-01

    In natural habitats, organisms especially phytoplankton are not always continuously subjected to ultraviolet-B radiation (UVBR). By simulation of the natural situation, the N2-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 was subjected to UV-B exposure and recovery cycles. A series of morphological and physiological changes were observed in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 under repeated UVBR when compared with controls. Such as the breakage of filaments, intervals between heterocysts, heterocyst frequency, total carbohydrate, and carotenoids were increased, while the nitrogenase activity and photosynthetic activity were inhibited by repeated UVBR; however, these activities could recover when UV-B stress was removed. Unexpectedly, the over-compensatory growth was observed at the end of the second round of exposure and recovery cycle. Our results showed that discontinuous UVBR could increase the growth rate and the tolerance as well as repair capacity of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. These results indicate that moderate UVBR may increase the growth of cyanobacteria in natural habitats.

  1. Effect of Selected Plant Extracts and D- and L-Lysine on the Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lurling, M.F.L.L.W.; Oosterhout, J.F.X.

    2014-01-01

    We tested extracts from Fructus mume, Salvia miltiorrhiza and Moringa oleifera as well as L-lysine and D-Lysine as curative measures to rapidly suppress the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa NIVA-CYA 43. We tested these compounds under similar conditions to facilitate comparisons. We hypothesize

  2. Isolation, characterization and localization of extracellular polymeric substances from the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis strain MMG-9

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, M.; Moerdijk-Poortvliet, T.C.W.; Wijnholds, A.; Stal, L.J.; Hasnain, S.

    2014-01-01

    Arthrospira platensis is a cyanobacterium known for its nutritional value and secondary metabolites. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are an important trait of most cyanobacteria, including A. platensis. Here, we extracted and analysed different fractions of EPS from a locally isolated strai

  3. Isolation, characterization and localization of extracellular polymeric substances from the cyanobacterium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, M.; Wijnholds, A.; Stal, L.J.; Hasnain, S.

    2014-01-01

    Arthrospira platensis is a cyanobacterium known for its nutritional value and secondary metabolites. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are an important trait of most cyanobacteria, including A. platensis. Here, we extracted and analysed different fractions of EPS from a locally isolated strai

  4. Horizontal transfer of the nitrogen fixation gene cluster in the cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, H.; Severin, I.; Confurius-Guns, V.; Wollenzien, U.I.A.; Stal, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    The filamentous, non-heterocystous cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes is a cosmopolitan organism, known to build microbial mats in a variety of different environments. Although most of these cyanobacterial mats are known for their capacity to fix dinitrogen, M. chthonoplastes has not been ass

  5. Draft Genome Assembly of a Filamentous Euendolithic (True Boring) Cyanobacterium, Mastigocoleus testarum Strain BC008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, Brandon S; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2016-01-28

    Mastigocoleus testarum strain BC008 is a model organism used to study marine photoautotrophic carbonate dissolution. It is a multicellular, filamentous, diazotrophic, euendolithic cyanobacterium ubiquitously found in marine benthic environments. We present an accurate draft genome assembly of 172 contigs spanning 12,700,239 bp with 9,131 annotated genes with an average G+C% of 37.3.

  6. Highly plastic genome of Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806, a ubiquitous toxic freshwater cyanobacterium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frangeul, L.; Quillardet, P.; Castets, A.M.; Humbert, J.F.; Matthijs, H.C.P.; Cortez, D.; Tolonen, A.; Zhang, C.C.; Gribaldo, S.; Kehr, J.C.; Zilliges, Y.; Ziemert, N.; Becker, S.; Talla, E.; Latifi, A.; Billault, A.; Lepelletier, A.; Dittmann, E.; Bouchier, C.; Tandeau de Marsac, N.

    2008-01-01

    Background The colonial cyanobacterium Microcystis proliferates in a wide range of freshwater ecosystems and is exposed to changing environmental factors during its life cycle. Microcystis blooms are often toxic, potentially fatal to animals and humans, and may cause environmental problems. There ha

  7. Nostoc PCC7524, a cyanobacterium which contains five sequence-specific deoxyribonucleases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reaston, J.; Duybesteyn, M.G.C.; Waard, Adrian de

    Five nucleotide sequence-specific deoxyribonucleases present in cell-free extracts of the filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc PCC7524 have been purified and characterized. One of these enzymes, designated Nsp(7524)I cleaves at a new kind of nucleotide sequence i.e. 5'-PuCATG λ Py-3'. The other four

  8. Horizontal transfer of the nitrogen fixation gene cluster in the cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, H.; Severin, I.; Confurius-Guns, V.; Wollenzien, U.I.A.; Stal, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    The filamentous, non-heterocystous cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes is a cosmopolitan organism, known to build microbial mats in a variety of different environments. Although most of these cyanobacterial mats are known for their capacity to fix dinitrogen, M. chthonoplastes has not been

  9. Insights into the Physiology and Ecology of the Brackish-Water-Adapted Cyanobacterium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voss, B.; Bolhuis, H.; Fewer, D.P.; Kopf, M.; Möke, F.; Haas, F.; El-Shehawy, R.; Hayes, P.; Bergman, B.; Sivonen, K.; Dittmann, E.; Scanlan, D.J.; Hagemann, M.; Stal, L.J.; Hess, W.R.

    2013-01-01

    Nodularia spumigena is a filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacterium that dominates the annual late summer cyanobacterial blooms in the Baltic Sea. But N. spumigena also is common in brackish water bodies worldwide, suggesting special adaptation allowing it to thrive at moderate salinities. A draft geno

  10. Highly plastic genome of Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806, a ubiquitous toxic freshwater cyanobacterium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frangeul, L.; Quillardet, P.; Castets, A.M.; Humbert, J.F.; Matthijs, H.C.P.; Cortez, D.; Tolonen, A.; Zhang, C.C.; Gribaldo, S.; Kehr, J.C.; Zilliges, Y.; Ziemert, N.; Becker, S.; Talla, E.; Latifi, A.; Billault, A.; Lepelletier, A.; Dittmann, E.; Bouchier, C.; Tandeau de Marsac, N.

    2008-01-01

    Background The colonial cyanobacterium Microcystis proliferates in a wide range of freshwater ecosystems and is exposed to changing environmental factors during its life cycle. Microcystis blooms are often toxic, potentially fatal to animals and humans, and may cause environmental problems. There ha

  11. Horizontal transfer of the nitrogen fixation gene cluster in the cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, H.; Severin, I.; Confurius-Guns, V.; Wollenzien, U.I.A.; Stal, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    The filamentous, non-heterocystous cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes is a cosmopolitan organism, known to build microbial mats in a variety of different environments. Although most of these cyanobacterial mats are known for their capacity to fix dinitrogen, M. chthonoplastes has not been ass

  12. Food quality of detritus derived from the filamentous cyanobacterium Oscillatoria limnetica for Daphnia galeata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Repka, S.; Van der Vlies, M.; Vijverberg, J.

    1998-01-01

    Detritus derived from the filamentous cyanobacterium Oscillatoria limnetica was fed to Daphnia galeata. Detritus supported growth and reproduction comparable to that on the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus. The live filaments of O.limnetica were, however, of lower food quality. Biochemical parameters

  13. Hydrogen sulfide can inhibit and enhance oxygenic photosynthesis in a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klatt, Judith M.; Haas, Sebastian; Yilmaz, Pelin; de Beer, Dirk; Polerecky, Lubos

    2015-01-01

    We used microsensors to investigate the combinatory effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and light on oxygenic photosynthesis in biofilms formed by a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs. We found that photosynthesis was both positively and negatively affected by H2S: (i) H2S accelerated the recovery of

  14. Hydrogen sulfide can inhibit and enhance oxygenic photosynthesis in a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klatt, Judith M.; Haas, Sebastian; Yilmaz, Pelin; de Beer, Dirk; Polerecky, Lubos

    We used microsensors to investigate the combinatory effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and light on oxygenic photosynthesis in biofilms formed by a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs. We found that photosynthesis was both positively and negatively affected by H2S: (i) H2S accelerated the recovery of

  15. The potential of cyanobacterium Schizothrix vaginata ISC108 in biodegradation of crude oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Safari

    2014-05-01

    Conclusions: It was found that cyanobacterium Schizothrix vaginata ISC108 has great potential in biodegradation of crude oil. Therefore, since oil is a product toxic to biological systems and is one of the main pollutants of bioecosystem, it has a great potential to be used as an indicator to eliminate pollution in contaminated areas.

  16. Effect of Selected Plant Extracts and D- and L-Lysine on the Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lurling, M.; Van Oosterhout, F.

    2014-01-01

    We tested extracts from Fructus mume, Salvia miltiorrhiza and Moringa oleifera as well as L-lysine and D-Lysine as curative measures to rapidly suppress the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa NIVA-CYA 43. We tested these compounds under similar conditions to facilitate comparisons. We

  17. Influence of Extractive Solvents on Lipid and Fatty Acids Content of Edible Freshwater Algal and Seaweed Products, the Green Microalga Chlorella kessleri and the Cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmila Vavra Ambrozova

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Total lipid contents of green (Chlorella pyrenoidosa, C, red (Porphyra tenera, N; Palmaria palmata, D, and brown (Laminaria japonica, K; Eisenia bicyclis, A; Undaria pinnatifida, W, WI; Hizikia fusiformis, H commercial edible algal and cyanobacterial (Spirulina platensis, S products, and autotrophically cultivated samples of the green microalga Chlorella kessleri (CK and the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis (SP were determined using a solvent mixture of methanol/chloroform/water (1:2:1, v/v/v, solvent I and n-hexane (solvent II. Total lipid contents ranged from 0.64% (II to 18.02% (I by dry weight and the highest total lipid content was observed in the autotrophically cultivated cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis. Solvent mixture I was found to be more effective than solvent II. Fatty acids were determined by gas chromatography of their methyl esters (% of total FAMEs. Generally, the predominant fatty acids (all results for extractions with solvent mixture I were saturated palmitic acid (C16:0; 24.64%–65.49%, monounsaturated oleic acid (C18:1(n-9; 2.79%–26.45%, polyunsaturated linoleic acid (C18:2(n-6; 0.71%–36.38%, α-linolenic acid (C18:3(n-3; 0.00%–21.29%, γ-linolenic acid (C18:3(n-6; 1.94%–17.36%, and arachidonic acid (C20:4(n-6; 0.00%–15.37%. The highest content of ω-3 fatty acids (21.29% was determined in Chlorella pyrenoidosa using solvent I, while conversely, the highest content of ω-6 fatty acids (41.42% was observed in Chlorella kessleri using the same solvent.

  18. Insights into the physiology and ecology of the brackish-water-adapted Cyanobacterium Nodularia spumigena CCY9414 based on a genome-transcriptome analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Voss

    Full Text Available Nodularia spumigena is a filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacterium that dominates the annual late summer cyanobacterial blooms in the Baltic Sea. But N. spumigena also is common in brackish water bodies worldwide, suggesting special adaptation allowing it to thrive at moderate salinities. A draft genome analysis of N. spumigena sp. CCY9414 yielded a single scaffold of 5,462,271 nucleotides in length on which genes for 5,294 proteins were annotated. A subsequent strand-specific transcriptome analysis identified more than 6,000 putative transcriptional start sites (TSS. Orphan TSSs located in intergenic regions led us to predict 764 non-coding RNAs, among them 70 copies of a possible retrotransposon and several potential RNA regulators, some of which are also present in other N2-fixing cyanobacteria. Approximately 4% of the total coding capacity is devoted to the production of secondary metabolites, among them the potent hepatotoxin nodularin, the linear spumigin and the cyclic nodulapeptin. The transcriptional complexity associated with genes involved in nitrogen fixation and heterocyst differentiation is considerably smaller compared to other Nostocales. In contrast, sophisticated systems exist for the uptake and assimilation of iron and phosphorus compounds, for the synthesis of compatible solutes, and for the formation of gas vesicles, required for the active control of buoyancy. Hence, the annotation and interpretation of this sequence provides a vast array of clues into the genomic underpinnings of the physiology of this cyanobacterium and indicates in particular a competitive edge of N. spumigena in nutrient-limited brackish water ecosystems.

  19. Inactivation of agmatinase expressed in vegetative cells alters arginine catabolism and prevents diazotrophic growth in the heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnat, Mireia; Flores, Enrique

    2014-10-01

    Arginine decarboxylase produces agmatine, and arginase and agmatinase are ureohydrolases that catalyze the production of ornithine and putrescine from arginine and agmatine, respectively, releasing urea. In the genome of the filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, ORF alr2310 putatively encodes an ureohydrolase. Cells of Anabaena supplemented with [(14) C]arginine took up and catabolized this amino acid generating a set of labeled amino acids that included ornithine, proline, and glutamate. In an alr2310 deletion mutant, an agmatine spot appeared and labeled glutamate increased with respect to the wild type, suggesting that Alr2310 is an agmatinase rather than an arginase. As determined in cell-free extracts, agmatinase activity could be detected in the wild type but not in the mutant. Thus, alr2310 is the Anabaena speB gene encoding agmatinase. The ∆alr2310 mutant accumulated large amounts of cyanophycin granule polypeptide, lacked nitrogenase activity, and did not grow diazotrophically. Growth tests in solid media showed that agmatine is inhibitory for Anabaena, especially under diazotrophic conditions, suggesting that growth of the mutant is inhibited by non-metabolized agmatine. Measurements of incorporation of radioactivity from [(14) C]leucine into macromolecules showed, however, a limited inhibition of protein synthesis in the ∆alr2310 mutant. Analysis of an Anabaena strain producing an Alr2310-GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion showed expression in vegetative cells but much less in heterocysts, implying compartmentalization of the arginine decarboxylation pathway in the diazotrophic filaments of this heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium.

  20. The Redox Potential of the Plastoquinone Pool of the Cyanobacterium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurmans, R.M.; Schuurmans, J.M.; Bekker, M.; Kromkamp, J.C.; Matthijs, H.C.P.; Hellingwerf, K.J.

    2014-01-01

    A method is presented for rapid extraction of the total plastoquinone (PQ) pool from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 cells that preserves the in vivo plastoquinol (PQH(2)) to -PQ ratio. Cells were rapidly transferred into ice-cold organic solvent for instantaneous extraction of the cellular PQ plu

  1. Genomic Survey and Biochemical Analysis of Recombinant Candidate Cyanobacteriochromes Reveals Enrichment for Near UV/Violet Sensors in the Halotolerant and Alkaliphilic Cyanobacterium Microcoleus IPPAS B353.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung Mi; Jeoung, Sae Chae; Song, Ji-Young; Kupriyanova, Elena V; Pronina, Natalia A; Lee, Bong-Woo; Jo, Seong-Whan; Park, Beom-Seok; Choi, Sang-Bong; Song, Ji-Joon; Park, Youn-Il

    2015-11-20

    Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs), which are exclusive to and widespread among cyanobacteria, are photoproteins that sense the entire range of near-UV and visible light. CBCRs are related to the red/far-red phytochromes that utilize linear tetrapyrrole (bilin) chromophores. Best characterized from the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and the multicellular heterocyst forming filamentous cyanobacteria Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 and Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, CBCRs have been poorly investigated in mat-forming, nonheterocystous cyanobacteria. In this study, we sequenced the genome of one of such species, Microcoleus IPPAS B353 (Microcoleus B353), and identified two phytochromes and seven CBCRs with one or more bilin-binding cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase, adenylyl cyclase and FhlA (GAF) domains. Biochemical and spectroscopic measurements of 23 purified GAF proteins from phycocyanobilin (PCB) producing recombinant Escherichia coli indicated that 13 of these proteins formed near-UV and visible light-absorbing covalent adducts: 10 GAFs contained PCB chromophores, whereas three contained the PCB isomer, phycoviolobilin (PVB). Furthermore, the complement of Microcoleus B353 CBCRs is enriched in near-UV and violet sensors, but lacks red/green and green/red CBCRs that are widely distributed in other cyanobacteria. We hypothesize that enrichment in short wavelength-absorbing CBCRs is critical for acclimation to high-light environments where this organism is found.

  2. Plasmid Stability in Dried Cells of the Desert Cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis and its Potential for GFP Imaging of Survivors on Earth and in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billi, Daniela

    2012-06-01

    Two GFP-based plasmids, namely pTTQ18-GFP-pDU1mini and pDUCA7-GFP, of about 7 kbp and 15 kbp respectively, able to replicate in Chroococcidiopsis sp. CCMEE 029 and CCMEE 123, were developed. Both plasmids were maintained in Chroococcidiopsis cells after 18 months of dry storage as demonstrated by colony PCR, plasmid restriction analysis, GFP imaging and colony-forming ability under selection of dried transformants; thus suggesting that strategies employed by this cyanobacterium to stabilize dried chromosomal DNA, must have protected plasmid DNA. The suitability of pDU1mini-plasmid for GFP tagging in Chroococcidiopsis was investigated by using the RecA homolog of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. After 2 months of dry storage, the presence of dried cells with a GFP-RecASyn distribution resembling that of hydrated cells, supported its capability of preventing desiccation-induced genome damage, whereas the rewetted cells with filamentous GFP-RecASyn structures revealed sub-lethal DNA damage. The long-term stability of plasmid DNA in dried Chroococcidiopsis has implication for space research, for example when investigating the recovery of dried cells after Martian and space simulations or when developing life support systems based on phototrophs with genetically enhanced stress tolerance and stored in the dry state for prolonged periods.

  3. FLAVODIIRON2 and FLAVODIIRON4 Proteins Mediate an Oxygen-Dependent Alternative Electron Flow in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 under CO2-Limited Conditions1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimakawa, Ginga; Shaku, Keiichiro; Nishi, Akiko; Hayashi, Ryosuke; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Katsuhiko; Makino, Amane; Miyake, Chikahiro

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to elucidate the molecular mechanism of an alternative electron flow (AEF) functioning under suppressed (CO2-limited) photosynthesis in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Photosynthetic linear electron flow, evaluated as the quantum yield of photosystem II [Y(II)], reaches a maximum shortly after the onset of actinic illumination. Thereafter, Y(II) transiently decreases concomitantly with a decrease in the photosynthetic oxygen evolution rate and then recovers to a rate that is close to the initial maximum. These results show that CO2 limitation suppresses photosynthesis and induces AEF. In contrast to the wild type, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 mutants deficient in the genes encoding FLAVODIIRON2 (FLV2) and FLV4 proteins show no recovery of Y(II) after prolonged illumination. However, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 mutants deficient in genes encoding proteins functioning in photorespiration show AEF activity similar to the wild type. In contrast to Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 has no FLV proteins with high homology to FLV2 and FLV4 in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. This lack of FLV2/4 may explain why AEF is not induced under CO2-limited photosynthesis in S. elongatus PCC 7942. As the glutathione S-transferase fusion protein overexpressed in Escherichia coli exhibits NADH-dependent oxygen reduction to water, we suggest that FLV2 and FLV4 mediate oxygen-dependent AEF in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 when electron acceptors such as CO2 are not available. PMID:25540330

  4. Evolution of Anabaenopeptin Peptide Structural Variability in the Cyanobacterium Planktothrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entfellner, Elisabeth; Frei, Mark; Christiansen, Guntram; Deng, Li; Blom, Jochen; Kurmayer, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are frequently involved in the formation of harmful algal blooms wherein, apart from the toxic microcystins, other groups of bioactive peptides are abundant as well, such as anabaenopeptins (APs). The APs are synthesized nonribosomally as cyclic hexapeptides with various amino acids at the exocyclic position. We investigated the presence and recombination of the AP synthesis gene cluster (apnA-E) through comparing 125 strains of the bloom-forming cyanobacterium Planktothrix spp., which were isolated from numerous shallow and deep water habitats in the temperate and tropical climatic zone. Ten ecologically divergent strains were purified and genome sequenced to compare their entire apnA-E gene cluster. In order to quantify apn gene distribution patterns, all the strains were investigated by PCR amplification of 2 kbp portions of the entire apn gene cluster without interruption. Within the 11 strains assigned to P. pseudagardhii, P. mougeotii, or P. tepida (Lineage 3), neither apnA-E genes nor remnants were observed. Within the P. agardhii/P. rubescens strains from shallow waters (Lineage 1, 52 strains), strains both carrying and lacking apn genes occurred, while among the strains lacking the apnA-E genes, the presence of the 5′end flanking region indicated a gene cluster deletion. Among the strains of the more derived deep water ecotype (Lineage 2, 62 strains), apnA-E genes were always present. A high similarity of apn genes of the genus Planktothrix when compared with strains of the genus Microcystis suggested its horizontal gene transfer during the speciation of P. agardhii/P. rubescens. Genetic analysis of the first (A1-) domain of the apnA gene, encoding synthesis of the exocyclic position of the AP molecule, revealed four genotype groups that corresponded with substrate activation. Groups of genotypes were either related to Arginine only, the coproduction of Arginine and Tyrosine or Arginine and Lysine, or even the coproduction of Arginine

  5. Domain organization of photosystem II in membranes of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803 investigated by electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folea, I. Mihaela; Zhang, Pengpeng; Aro, Eva-Mari; Boekema, Egbert J.

    2008-01-01

    The supramolecular organization of photosystem II (PSII) complexes in the photosynthetic membrane of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803 was studied by electron microscopy. After mild detergent solubilization, crystalline PSII arrays were extracted in which dimeric PSII particles associate in mult

  6. Global Proteomics Reveal An Atypical Strategy for Carbon/Nitrogen Assimilation by a Cyanobacterium Under Diverse Environmental Perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegener, Kimberly M.; Singh, Abhay K.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Elvitigala, Thanura R.; Welsh, Eric A.; Keren, Nir S.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Ghosh, Bijoy K.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2010-12-01

    Cyanobacteria, the only prokaryotes capable of oxygenic photosynthesis, are present in diverse ecological niches and play crucial roles in global carbon and nitrogen cycles. To proliferate in nature, cyanobacteria utilize a host of stress responses to accommodate periodic changes in environmental conditions. A detailed knowledge of the composition of, as well as the dynamic changes in, the proteome is necessary to gain fundamental insights into such stress responses. Toward this goal, we have performed a largescale proteomic analysis of the widely studied model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 under 33 different environmental conditions. The resulting high-quality dataset consists of 22,318 unique peptides corresponding to 1,955 proteins, a coverage of 53% of the predicted proteome. Quantitative determination of protein abundances has led to the identification of 1,198 differentially regulated proteins. Notably, our analysis revealed that a common stress response under various environmental perturbations, irrespective of amplitude and duration, is the activation of atypical pathways for the acquisition of carbon and nitrogen from urea and arginine. In particular, arginine is catabolized via putrescine to produce succinate and glutamate, sources of carbon and nitrogen, respectively. This study provides the most comprehensive functional and quantitative analysis of the Synechocystis proteome to date, and shows that a significant stress response of cyanobacteria involves an uncommon mode of acquisition of carbon and nitrogen. Oxygenic phototrophic prokaryotes, the progenitors of the chloroplast, are crucial to global oxygen production and worldwide carbon and nitrogen cycles. These microalgae are robust organisms capable carbon neutral biofuel production. Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has historically been a model cyanobacterium for photosynthetic research and is emerging as a promising biofuel platform. Cellular responses are severely modified by environmental

  7. Cluster of genes that encode positive and negative elements influencing filament length in a heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino-Puerto, Victoria; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique

    2013-09-01

    The filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria perform oxygenic photosynthesis in vegetative cells and nitrogen fixation in heterocysts, and their filaments can be hundreds of cells long. In the model heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, the genes in the fraC-fraD-fraE operon are required for filament integrity mainly under conditions of nitrogen deprivation. The fraC operon transcript partially overlaps gene all2395, which lies in the opposite DNA strand and ends 1 bp beyond fraE. Gene all2395 produces transcripts of 1.35 kb (major transcript) and 2.2 kb (minor transcript) that overlap fraE and whose expression is dependent on the N-control transcription factor NtcA. Insertion of a gene cassette containing transcriptional terminators between fraE and all2395 prevented production of the antisense RNAs and resulted in an increased length of the cyanobacterial filaments. Deletion of all2395 resulted in a larger increase of filament length and in impaired growth, mainly under N2-fixing conditions and specifically on solid medium. We denote all2395 the fraF gene, which encodes a protein restricting filament length. A FraF-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein accumulated significantly in heterocysts. Similar to some heterocyst differentiation-related proteins such as HglK, HetL, and PatL, FraF is a pentapeptide repeat protein. We conclude that the fraC-fraD-fraE←fraF gene cluster (where the arrow indicates a change in orientation), in which cis antisense RNAs are produced, regulates morphology by encoding proteins that influence positively (FraC, FraD, FraE) or negatively (FraF) the length of the filament mainly under conditions of nitrogen deprivation. This gene cluster is often conserved in heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria.

  8. Integrative analysis of large scale expression profiles reveals core transcriptional response and coordination between multiple cellular processes in a cyanobacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharyya-Pakrasi Maitrayee

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyanobacteria are the only known prokaryotes capable of oxygenic photosynthesis. They play significant roles in global biogeochemical cycles and carbon sequestration, and have recently been recognized as potential vehicles for production of renewable biofuels. Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has been extensively used as a model organism for cyanobacterial studies. DNA microarray studies in Synechocystis have shown varying degrees of transcriptome reprogramming under altered environmental conditions. However, it is not clear from published work how transcriptome reprogramming affects pre-existing networks of fine-tuned cellular processes. Results We have integrated 163 transcriptome data sets generated in response to numerous environmental and genetic perturbations in Synechocystis. Our analyses show that a large number of genes, defined as the core transcriptional response (CTR, are commonly regulated under most perturbations. The CTR contains nearly 12% of Synechocystis genes found on its chromosome. The majority of genes in the CTR are involved in photosynthesis, translation, energy metabolism and stress protection. Our results indicate that a large number of differentially regulated genes identified in most reported studies in Synechocystis under different perturbations are associated with the general stress response. We also find that a majority of genes in the CTR are coregulated with 25 regulatory genes. Some of these regulatory genes have been implicated in cellular responses to oxidative stress, suggesting that reactive oxygen species are involved in the regulation of the CTR. A Bayesian network, based on the regulation of various KEGG pathways determined from the expression patterns of their associated genes, has revealed new insights into the coordination between different cellular processes. Conclusion We provide here the first integrative analysis of transcriptome data sets generated in a cyanobacterium. This

  9. Growth of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in acetate-free medium when co-cultured with alginate-encapsulated, acetate-producing strains of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therien, Jesse B; Zadvornyy, Oleg A; Posewitz, Matthew C; Bryant, Donald A; Peters, John W

    2014-01-01

    The model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii requires acetate as a co-substrate for optimal production of lipids, and the addition of acetate to culture media has practical and economic implications for algal biofuel production. Here we demonstrate the growth of C. reinhardtii on acetate provided by mutant strains of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Optimal growth conditions for co-cultivation of C. reinhardtii with wild-type and mutant strains of Synechococcus sp. 7002 were established. In co-culture, acetate produced by a glycogen synthase knockout mutant of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 was able to support the growth of a lipid-accumulating mutant strain of C. reinhardtii defective in starch production. Encapsulation of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 using an alginate matrix was successfully employed in co-cultures to limit growth and maintain the stability. The ability of immobilized strains of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 to produce acetate at a level adequate to support the growth of lipid-accumulating strains of C. reinhartdii offers a potentially practical, photosynthetic alternative to providing exogenous acetate into growth media.

  10. Environmental Factors Influencing Blooms of a Neurotoxic Stigonematalan Cyanobacterium Responsible for Avian Vacuolar Myelinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    killing waterbirds and raptors , to an epiphytic cyanobacterium which grows primarily on nonindigenous submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV). Water- birds...intramyelinic edema, in the organisms’ CNS tissue, most commonly the brain (Thomas et al. 1998). AVM-afflicted birds display erratic behavior ; clinical symptoms... feeding trials. Gavage trials with a methanol extract of the hydrilla-UCB demonstrated that extract would cause clinical symptoms and AVM lesions in

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of the Toxic Bloom-Forming Cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon flos-aquae NIES-81

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Huansheng; Shimura, Yohei; Masanobu, Kawachi; Yin, Yanbin

    2014-01-01

    Aphanizomenon flos-aquae is a toxic filamentous cyanobacterium that causes water blooms in freshwaters across the globe. We present the draft genome sequence of the A. flos-aquae strain NIES-81, which was determined by 454 pyrosequencing technology. The draft genome is ~5.7 Mb, containing 5,802 predicted protein-coding genes and 58 RNA genes, with a G+C content of 38.5%.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of the Toxic Bloom-Forming Cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon flos-aquae NIES-81.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huansheng; Shimura, Yohei; Masanobu, Kawachi; Yin, Yanbin

    2014-02-13

    Aphanizomenon flos-aquae is a toxic filamentous cyanobacterium that causes water blooms in freshwaters across the globe. We present the draft genome sequence of the A. flos-aquae strain NIES-81, which was determined by 454 pyrosequencing technology. The draft genome is ~5.7 Mb, containing 5,802 predicted protein-coding genes and 58 RNA genes, with a G+C content of 38.5%.

  13. Anoxygenic Photosynthesis Controls Oxygenic Photosynthesis in a Cyanobacterium from a Sulfidic Spring

    OpenAIRE

    Klatt, Judith M.; Al-Najjar, Mohammad A. A.; Yilmaz, Pelin; Lavik, Gaute; de Beer, Dirk; Polerecky, Lubos

    2015-01-01

    Before the Earth's complete oxygenation (0.58 to 0.55 billion years [Ga] ago), the photic zone of the Proterozoic oceans was probably redox stratified, with a slightly aerobic, nutrient-limited upper layer above a light-limited layer that tended toward euxinia. In such oceans, cyanobacteria capable of both oxygenic and sulfide-driven anoxygenic photosynthesis played a fundamental role in the global carbon, oxygen, and sulfur cycle. We have isolated a cyanobacterium, Pseudanabaena strain FS39,...

  14. Proteome-Wide Analysis and Diel Proteomic Profiling of the Cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis PCC 8005

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis has a long history of use as a food supply and it has been used by the European Space Agency in the MELiSSA project, an artificial microecosystem which supports life during long-term manned space missions. This study assesses progress in the field of cyanobacterial shotgun proteomics and light/dark diurnal cycles by focusing on Arthrospira platensis. Several fractionation workflows including gel-free and gel-based protein/peptide fractionat...

  15. Regulation of Three Nitrogenase Gene Clusters in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413

    OpenAIRE

    Teresa Thiel; Pratte, Brenda S.

    2014-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 fixes nitrogen under aerobic conditions in specialized cells called heterocysts that form in response to an environmental deficiency in combined nitrogen. Nitrogen fixation is mediated by the enzyme nitrogenase, which is very sensitive to oxygen. Heterocysts are microxic cells that allow nitrogenase to function in a filament comprised primarily of vegetative cells that produce oxygen by photosynthesis. A. variabilis is unique among...

  16. Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa response to pentachlorophenol and comparison with that of the microalga Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais, Paulo; Stoichev, Teodor; Basto, M Clara P; Ramos, V; Vasconcelos, V M; Vasconcelos, M Teresa S D

    2014-04-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) effects on a strain of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa were investigated at laboratory scale. This is the first systematic ecotoxicity study of the effects of PCP on an aquatic cyanobacterium. The microalga Chlorella vulgaris was studied in the same conditions as the cyanobacterium, in order to compare the PCP toxicity and its removal by the species. The cells were exposed to environmental levels of PCP during 10 days, in Fraquil culture medium, at nominal concentrations from 0.01 to 1000 μg L(-1), to the cyanobacterium, and 0.01 to 5000 μg L(-1), to the microalga. Growth was assessed by area under growth curve (AUC, optical density vs time) and chlorophyll a content (chla). The toxicity profiles of the two species were very different. The calculated effective concentrations EC20 and EC50 were much lower to M. aeruginosa, and its growth inhibition expressed by chla was concentration-dependent while by AUC was not concentration-dependent. The cells might continue to divide even with lower levels of chla. The number of C. vulgaris cells decreased with the PCP concentration without major impact on the chla. The effect of PCP on M. aeruginosa is hormetic: every concentration studied was toxic except 1 μg L(-1), which promoted its growth. The legal limit of PCP set by the European Union for surface waters (1 μg L(-1)) should be reconsidered since a toxic cyanobacteria bloom might occur. The study of the removal of PCP from the culture medium by the two species is an additional novelty of this work. M. aeruginosa could remove part of the PCP from the medium, at concentrations where toxic effects were observed, while C. vulgaris stabilized it.

  17. Proteomic and cellular views of Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 adaptation to nitrogen depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschoenmaeker, Frédéric; Facchini, Raphaël; Leroy, Baptiste; Badri, Hanène; Zhang, C-C; Wattiez, Ruddy

    2014-06-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes that play a crucial role in the Earth's nitrogen and carbon cycles. Nitrogen availability is one of the most important factors in cyanobacterial growth. Interestingly, filamentous non-diazotrophic cyanobacteria, such as Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005, have developed survival strategies that enable them to adapt to nitrogen deprivation. Metabolic studies recently demonstrated a substantial synthesis and accumulation of glycogen derived from amino acids during nitrogen starvation. Nevertheless, the regulatory mechanism of this adaptation is poorly understood. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first proteomic and cellular analysis of Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 under nitrogen depletion. Label-free differential proteomic analysis indicated the global carbon and nitrogen reprogramming of the cells during nitrogen depletion as characterized by an upregulation of glycogen synthesis and the use of endogenous nitrogen sources. The degradation of proteins and cyanophycin provided endogenous nitrogen when exogenous nitrogen was limited. Moreover, formamides, cyanates and urea were also potential endogenous nitrogen sources. The transporters of some amino acids and alternative nitrogen sources such as ammonium permease 1 were induced under nitrogen depletion. Intriguingly, although Arthrospira is a non-diazotrophic cyanobacterium, we observed the upregulation of HetR and HglK proteins, which are involved in heterocyst differentiation. Moreover, after a long period without nitrate, only a few highly fluorescent cells in each trichome were observed, and they might be involved in the long-term survival mechanism of this non-diazotrophic cyanobacterium under nitrogen deprivation.

  18. In silico characterization and transcriptomic analysis of nif family genes from Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shilpi; Shrivastava, Alok Kumar

    2017-03-14

    In silico approaches in conjunction with morphology, nitrogenase activity, and qRT-PCR explore the impact of selected abiotic stressor such as arsenic, salt, cadmium, copper, and butachlor on nitrogen fixing (nif family) genes of diazotrophic cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120. A total of 19 nif genes are present within the Anabaena genome that is involved in the process of nitrogen fixation. Docking studies revealed the interaction between these nif gene-encoded proteins and the selected abiotic stressors which were further validated through decreased heterocyst frequency, fragmentation of filaments, and downregulation of nitrogenase activity under these stresses indicating towards their toxic impact on nitrogen fixation potential of filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120. Another appealing finding of this study is even though having similar binding energy and similar interacting residues between arsenic/salt and copper/cadmium to nif-encoded proteins, arsenic and cadmium are more toxic than salt and copper for nitrogenase activity of Anabaena which is crucial for growth and yield of rice paddy and soil reclamation.

  19. Adaptation strategies of the sheathed cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula to ultraviolet-B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Sikha; Rath, Jnanendra; Adhikary, Siba Prasad

    2011-02-01

    Lyngbya majuscula is a dominant organism in the east coast of India forming characteristic mat in dried saline soils simultaneously exposed to solar radiation of the tropics. Studies on the growth response, changes in the spectral properties of the methanolic extract and protein profile of this estuarine sheathed cyanobacterium to UV-B revealed existence of effective adaptation mechanism to withstand prolonged UV-B radiation. Carotenoids along with MAAs of the organism was increased with increase in UV irradiation. Increase in thickness of the mucilaginous sheath layer as well as cellular carbohydrate content was observed upon exposure to prolonged UV-B dose. Induction of 21 and 33 kDa low molecular weight proteins, and a 99 kDa protein together with formation of distinct multilayered sheath embedding trichomes with granulated cells were the adaptive features of the organism to cope with UV-B stress. The organism was considerably revived after incubating the irradiated cells in mineral medium under florescent light and in the dark suggesting existence of photoreactivation and dark repair in this cyanobacterium. However more experiments are needed to establish the existence of photoreactivation and dark repair mechanism in the studied cyanobacterium.

  20. Biochemical analysis of three putative KaiC clock proteins from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 suggests their functional divergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegard, Anika; Dörrich, Anja K; Deinzer, Hans-Tobias; Beck, Christian; Wilde, Annegret; Holtzendorff, Julia; Axmann, Ilka M

    2013-05-01

    Cyanobacteria have been shown to have a circadian clock system that consists mainly of three protein components: KaiA, KaiB and KaiC. This system is well understood in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, for which robust circadian oscillations have been shown. Like many other cyanobacteria, the chromosome of the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 contains additional kaiC and kaiB gene copies besides the standard kaiABC gene cluster. The respective gene products differ significantly in their amino acid sequences, especially in their C-terminal regions, suggesting different functional characteristics. Here, phosphorylation assays of the three Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 KaiC proteins revealed that KaiC1 phosphorylation depends on KaiA, as is well documented for the Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 KaiC protein, whereas KaiC2 and KaiC3 autophosphorylate independently of KaiA. This was confirmed by in vivo protein-protein interaction studies, which demonstrate that only KaiC1 interacts with KaiA. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the three different Kai proteins form only homomeric complexes in vivo. As only KaiC1 phosphorylation depends on KaiA, a prerequisite for robust oscillations, we suggest that the kaiAB1C1 gene cluster in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 controls circadian timing in a manner similar to the clock described in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942.

  1. Hierridin B Isolated from a Marine Cyanobacterium Alters VDAC1, Mitochondrial Activity, and Cell Cycle Genes on HT-29 Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Freitas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hierridin B was isolated from a marine cyanobacterium Cyanobium sp. strain and induced cytotoxicity selectively in HT-29 adenocarcinoma cells. The underlying molecular mechanism was not yet elucidated. Methods: HT-29 cells were exposed to the IC50 concentration of hierridin B (100.2 μM for 48 h. Non-targeted proteomics was performed using 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. The mRNA expression of apoptotic and cell cycle genes were analyzed by real-time PCR. Automated quantification of 160 cytoplasm and mitochondrial parameter was done by fluorescence microscopy using CellProfiler software. Results: Proteomics identified 21 significant different proteins, which belonged to protein folding/synthesis and cell structure amongst others. Increase of VDAC1 protein responsible for formation of mitochondrial channels was confirmed by mRNA expression. A 10-fold decrease of cytoskeleton proteins (STMN1, TBCA provided a link to alterations of the cell cycle. CCNB1 and CCNE mRNA were decreased two-fold, and P21CIP increased 10-fold, indicative of cell cycle arrest. Morphological analysis of mitochondrial parameter confirmed a reduced mitochondrial activity. Conclusion: Hierridin B is a potential anticancer compound that targets mitochondrial activity and function.

  2. Structure of the cyanobactin oxidase ThcOx from Cyanothece sp. PCC 7425, the first structure to be solved at Diamond Light Source beamline I23 by means of S-SAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, Andrew F.; Mann, Greg; Houssen, Wael E.; Mykhaylyk, Vitaliy; Duman, Ramona; Thomas, Louise; Jaspars, Marcel; Wagner, Armin; Naismith, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Determination of protein crystal structures requires that the phases are derived independently of the observed measurement of diffraction intensities. Many techniques have been developed to obtain phases, including heavy-atom substitution, molecular replacement and substitution during protein expression of the amino acid methionine with selenomethionine. Although the use of selenium-containing methionine has transformed the experimental determination of phases it is not always possible, either because the variant protein cannot be produced or does not crystallize. Phasing of structures by measuring the anomalous diffraction from S atoms could in theory be almost universal since almost all proteins contain methionine or cysteine. Indeed, many structures have been solved by the so-called native sulfur single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (S-SAD) phasing method. However, the anomalous effect is weak at the wavelengths where data are normally recorded (between 1 and 2 Å) and this limits the potential of this method to well diffracting crystals. Longer wavelengths increase the strength of the anomalous signal but at the cost of increasing air absorption and scatter, which degrade the precision of the anomalous measurement, consequently hindering phase determination. A new instrument, the long-wavelength beamline I23 at Diamond Light Source, was designed to work at significantly longer wavelengths compared with standard synchrotron beamlines in order to open up the native S-SAD method to projects of increasing complexity. Here, the first novel structure, that of the oxidase domain involved in the production of the natural product patellamide, solved on this beamline is reported using data collected to a resolution of 3.15 Å at a wavelength of 3.1 Å. The oxidase is an example of a protein that does not crystallize as the selenium variant and for which no suitable homology model for molecular replacement was available. Initial attempts collecting anomalous diffraction data for native sulfur phasing on a standard macromolecular crystallography beamline using a wavelength of 1.77 Å did not yield a structure. The new beamline thus has the potential to facilitate structure determination by native S-SAD phasing for what would previously have been regarded as very challenging cases with modestly diffracting crystals and low sulfur content. PMID:27841750

  3. Structure of the cyanobactin oxidase ThcOx from Cyanothece sp. PCC 7425, the first structure to be solved at Diamond Light Source beamline I23 by means of S-SAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, Andrew F; Mann, Greg; Houssen, Wael E; Mykhaylyk, Vitaliy; Duman, Ramona; Thomas, Louise; Jaspars, Marcel; Wagner, Armin; Naismith, James H

    2016-11-01

    Determination of protein crystal structures requires that the phases are derived independently of the observed measurement of diffraction intensities. Many techniques have been developed to obtain phases, including heavy-atom substitution, molecular replacement and substitution during protein expression of the amino acid methionine with selenomethionine. Although the use of selenium-containing methionine has transformed the experimental determination of phases it is not always possible, either because the variant protein cannot be produced or does not crystallize. Phasing of structures by measuring the anomalous diffraction from S atoms could in theory be almost universal since almost all proteins contain methionine or cysteine. Indeed, many structures have been solved by the so-called native sulfur single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (S-SAD) phasing method. However, the anomalous effect is weak at the wavelengths where data are normally recorded (between 1 and 2 Å) and this limits the potential of this method to well diffracting crystals. Longer wavelengths increase the strength of the anomalous signal but at the cost of increasing air absorption and scatter, which degrade the precision of the anomalous measurement, consequently hindering phase determination. A new instrument, the long-wavelength beamline I23 at Diamond Light Source, was designed to work at significantly longer wavelengths compared with standard synchrotron beamlines in order to open up the native S-SAD method to projects of increasing complexity. Here, the first novel structure, that of the oxidase domain involved in the production of the natural product patellamide, solved on this beamline is reported using data collected to a resolution of 3.15 Å at a wavelength of 3.1 Å. The oxidase is an example of a protein that does not crystallize as the selenium variant and for which no suitable homology model for molecular replacement was available. Initial attempts collecting anomalous diffraction data for native sulfur phasing on a standard macromolecular crystallography beamline using a wavelength of 1.77 Å did not yield a structure. The new beamline thus has the potential to facilitate structure determination by native S-SAD phasing for what would previously have been regarded as very challenging cases with modestly diffracting crystals and low sulfur content.

  4. Two-Step Separation of Nostotrebin 6 from Cultivated Soil Cyanobacterium (Nostoc sp. by High Performance Countercurrent Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Cheel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available High performance countercurrent chromatography (HPCCC was successfully applied for the separation of nostotrebin 6 from cultivated soil cyanobacteria in a two-step operation. A two-phase solvent system composed of n-hexane–ethyl acetate–methanol–water (4:5:4:5, v/v/v/v was employed for the HPCCC separation. In the first-step operation, its neutral upper phase was used as stationary phase and its basic lower phase (1% NH3 in lower phase was employed as mobile phase at a flow rate of 1 mL/min. In the second operation step, its neutral upper phase was used as stationary phase, whereas both its neutral lower phase and basic lower phase were employed as mobile phase with a linear gradient elution at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min. The revolution speed and temperature of the separation column were 1,000 rpm and 30 °C, respectively. Using HPCCC followed by clean-up on Sephadex LH-20 gel, 4 mg of nostotrebin 6 with a purity of 99% as determined by HPLC/DAD-ESI-HRMS was obtained from 100 mg of crude extract. The chemical identity of the isolated compound was confirmed by comparing its spectroscopic data (UV, ESI-HRMS, ESI-HRMS2 with those of an authentic standard and data available in the literature.

  5. The influence of acetyl phosphate on DspA signalling in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mullineaux Conrad W

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dspA (hik33 gene, coding for a putative sensory histidine kinase, is conserved in plastids (ycf26 and cyanobacteria. It has been linked with a number of different stress responses in cyanobacteria. Results We constructed an insertional mutant of dspA (ycf26 in Synechocystis 6803. We found little phenotypic effect during nitrogen starvation. However, when the mutation was combined with deletion of the pta gene coding for phosphotransacetylase, a more significant phenotype was observed. Under nitrogen starvation, the pta/dspA double mutant degrades its phycobilisomes less than the wild type and still has about half of its chlorophyll-protein complexes. Conclusion Our data indicates that acetyl-phosphate-dependent phosphorylation of response regulator(s overlaps with DspA-dependent signalling of the degradation of chlorophyll-protein complexes (and to a lesser extent phycobilisomes in Synechocystis 6803.

  6. Dynamic changes in gene expression of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 in response to nitrogen starvation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krasikov, V.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis we exploit the fast moving field of microarray analysis, from its early rise till a first valuable product. A newly developed microarray platform for Synechocystis permits whole-genome transcriptomics of cyanobacteria exposed to environmental stress. This brings new insights into the

  7. NADPH-Thioredoxin Reductase C Mediates the Response to Oxidative Stress and Thermotolerance in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Riego, Ana M; Mata-Cabana, Alejandro; Galmozzi, Carla V; Florencio, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    NADPH-thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC) is a bimodular enzyme composed of an NADPH-thioredoxin reductase and a thiioredoxin domain extension in the same protein. In plants, NTRC has been described to be involved in the protection of the chloroplast against oxidative stress damage through reduction of the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (2-Cys Prx) as well as through other functions related to redox enzyme regulation. In cyanobacteria, the Anabaena NTRC has been characterized in vitro, however, nothing was known about its in vivo function. In order to study that, we have generated the first knockout mutant strain (ΔntrC), apart from the previously described in Arabidopsis. Detailed characterization of this strain reveals a differential sensitivity to oxidative stress treatments with respect to the wild-type Anabaena strain, including a higher level of ROS (reactive oxygen species) in normal growth conditions. In the mutant strain, different oxidative stress treatments such as hydrogen peroxide, methyl-viologen or high light irradiance provoke an increase in the expression of genes related to ROS detoxification, including AnNTRC and peroxiredoxin genes, with a concomitant increase in the amount of AnNTRC and 2-Cys Prx. Moreover, the role of AnNTRC in the antioxidant response is confirmed by the observation of a pronounced overoxidation of the 2-Cys Prx and a time-delay recovery of the reduced form of this protein upon oxidative stress treatments. Our results suggest the participation of this enzyme in the peroxide detoxification in Anabaena. In addition, we describe the role of Anabaena NTRC in thermotolerance, by the appearance of high molecular mass AnNTRC complexes, showing that the mutant strain is more sensitive to high temperature treatments.

  8. NADPH-Thioredoxin Reductase C Mediates the Response to Oxidative Stress and Thermotolerance in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp PCC7120

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Riego, Ana M.; Mata-Cabana, Alejandro; Galmozzi, CarlaV.; Florencio, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    NADPH-thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC) is a bimodular enzyme composed of an NADPH-thioredoxin reductase and a thiioredoxin domain extension in the same protein. In plants, NTRC has been described to be involved in the protection of the chloroplast against oxidative stress damage through reduction of t

  9. NADPH-thioredoxin reductase C mediates the response to oxidative stress and thermotolerance in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA MARÍA SÁNCHEZ-RIEGO

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available NTRC (NADPH-thioredoxin reductase C is a bimodular enzyme composed of an NADPH-thioredoxin reductase and a thioredoxin domain extension in the same protein. In plants, NTRC has been described to be involved in the protection of the chloroplast against oxidative stress damage through reduction of the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (2-Cys Prx as well as through other functions related to redox enzyme regulation. In cyanobacteria, the Anabaena NTRC has been characterized in vitro, however nothing was known about its in vivo function. In order to study that, we have generated the first knockout mutant strain (∆ntrC, apart from the previously described in Arabidopsis. Detailed characterization of this strain reveals a differential sensitivity to oxidative stress treatments with respect to the wild-type Anabaena strain, including a higher level of ROS (reactive oxygen species in normal growth conditions. In the mutant strain, different oxidative stress treatments such as hydrogen peroxide, methyl-viologen or high light irradiance provoke an increase in the expression of genes related to ROS detoxification, including AnNTRC and peroxiredoxin genes, with a concomitant increase in the amount of AnNTRC and 2-Cys Prx. Moreover, the role of AnNTRC in the antioxidant response is confirmed by the observation of a pronounced overoxidation of the 2-Cys Prx and a time-delay recovery of the reduced form of this protein upon oxidative stress treatments. Our results suggest the participation of this enzyme in the peroxide detoxification in Anabaena. In addition, we describe the role of Anabaena NTRC in thermotolerance, by the appearance of high molecular mass AnNTRC complexes, showing that the mutant strain is more sensitive to high temperature treatments.

  10. Actinobacteria associated with the marine sponges Cinachyra sp., Petrosia sp., and Ulosa sp. and their culturability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shams Tabrez; Takagi, Motoki; Shin-ya, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Actinobacteria associated with 3 marine sponges, Cinachyra sp., Petrosia sp., and Ulosa sp., were investigated. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed that actinobacterial diversity varied greatly and that Ulosa sp. was most diverse, while Cinachyra sp. was least diverse. Culture-based approaches failed to isolate actinobacteria from Petrosia sp. or Ulosa sp., but strains belonging to 10 different genera and 3 novel species were isolated from Cinachyra sp.

  11. The CyAbrB transcription factor CalA regulates the iron superoxide dismutase in Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agervald, Asa; Baebprasert, Wipawee; Zhang, Xiaohui; Incharoensakdi, Aran; Lindblad, Peter; Stensjö, Karin

    2010-10-01

    In the present investigation the results of induced over-production of the CyAbrB transcription factor CalA (Cyanobacterial AbrB-like, annotated as Alr0946) in the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 were analysed. The CalA overexpression strain showed a bleaching phenotype with lower growth rate and truncated filaments 2 days after induction of overexpression. The phenotype was even more pronounced when illumination was increased from 35 to 125 µmol m(-2) s(-1). Using gel-based quantitative proteomics, the induced overexpression of CalA was shown to downregulate the abundance of FeSOD, one of two types of superoxide dismutases in Nostoc sp. PCC 7120. The change in protein abundance was also accompanied by lower transcript as well as activity levels. Purified recombinant CalA from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 was shown to interact with the promoter region of alr2938, encoding FeSOD, indicating a transcriptional regulation of FeSOD by CalA. The bleaching phenotype is in line with a decreased tolerance against oxidative stress and indicates that CalA is involved in regulation of cellular responses in which FeSOD has an important and specific function in the filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120. © 2010 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Complementation of Cobalamin Auxotrophy in Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7002 and Validation of a Putative Cobalamin Riboswitch In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Adam A; Liu, Zhenfeng; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Li, Zhongkui; Bryant, Donald A

    2016-10-01

    The euryhaline cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 has an obligate requirement for exogenous vitamin B12 (cobalamin), but little is known about the roles of this compound in cyanobacteria. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that only the terminal enzyme in methionine biosynthesis, methionine synthase, requires cobalamin as a coenzyme in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. Methionine synthase (MetH) catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from N(5)-methyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate to l-homocysteine during l-methionine synthesis and uses methylcobalamin as an intermediate methyl donor. Numerous bacteria and plants alternatively employ a cobalamin-independent methionine synthase isozyme, MetE, that catalyzes the same methyl transfer reaction as MetH but uses N(5)-methyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate directly as the methyl donor. The cobalamin auxotrophy of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 was complemented by using the metE gene from the closely related cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 73109, which possesses genes for both methionine synthases. This result suggests that methionine biosynthesis is probably the sole use of cobalamin in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. Furthermore, a cobalamin-repressible gene expression system was developed in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 that was used to validate the presence of a cobalamin riboswitch in the promoter region of metE from Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 73109. This riboswitch acts as a cobalamin-dependent transcriptional attenuator for metE in that organism. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 is a cobalamin auxotroph because, like eukaryotic marine algae, it uses a cobalamin-dependent methionine synthase (MetH) for the final step of l-methionine biosynthesis but cannot synthesize cobalamin de novo Heterologous expression of metE, encoding cobalamin-independent methionine synthase, from Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 73109, relieved this auxotrophy and enabled the construction of a truly autotrophic

  13. Polyhydroxybutyrate particles in Synechocystis sp PCC 6803: facts and fiction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsang, TK; Roberson, RW; Vermaas, WFJ

    2013-09-20

    Transmission electron microscopy has been used to identify poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) granules in cyanobacteria for over 40 years. Spherical inclusions inside the cell that are electron-transparent and/or slightly electron-dense and that are found in transmission electron micrographs of cyanobacteria are generally assumed to be PHB granules. The aim of this study was to test this assumption in different strains of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Inclusions that resemble PHB granules were present in strains lacking a pair of genes essential for PHB synthesis and in wild-type cells under conditions that no PHB granules could be detected by fluorescence staining of PHB. Indeed, in these cells PHB could not be demonstrated chemically by GC/MS either. Based on the results gathered, it is concluded that not all the slightly electron-dense spherical inclusions are PHB granules in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. This result is potentially applicable to other cyanobacteria. Alternate assignments for these inclusions are discussed.

  14. Halotolerant Cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica Contains a Betaine Transporter Active at Alkaline pH and High Salinity

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Aphanothece halophytica is a halotolerant alkaliphilic cyanobacterium which can grow in media of up to 3.0 M NaCl and pH 11. This cyanobacterium can synthesize betaine from glycine by three-step methylation using S-adenosylmethionine as a methyl donor. To unveil the mechanism of betaine uptake and efflux in this alkaliphile, we isolated and characterized a betaine transporter. A gene encoding a protein (BetTA. halophytica) that belongs to the betaine-choline-carnitine transporter (BCCT) famil...

  15. Backbone dynamics of reduced plastocyanin from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis: Regions involved in electron transfer have enhanced mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, L.X.; Hass, M.A.S.; Vierick, N.;

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics of the backbone of the electron-transfer protein plastocyanin from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis were determined from the N-15 and C-13(alpha) R-1 and R-2) relaxation rates and steady-state [H-1]-N-15 and [H-1]-C-13 nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) using the model-free appr......The dynamics of the backbone of the electron-transfer protein plastocyanin from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis were determined from the N-15 and C-13(alpha) R-1 and R-2) relaxation rates and steady-state [H-1]-N-15 and [H-1]-C-13 nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) using the model...

  16. Genome erosion in a nitrogen-fixing vertically transmitted endosymbiotic multicellular cyanobacterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Ran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An ancient cyanobacterial incorporation into a eukaryotic organism led to the evolution of plastids (chloroplasts and subsequently to the origin of the plant kingdom. The underlying mechanism and the identities of the partners in this monophyletic event remain elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To shed light on this evolutionary process, we sequenced the genome of a cyanobacterium residing extracellularly in an endosymbiosis with a plant, the water-fern Azolla filiculoides Lam. This symbiosis was selected as it has characters which make it unique among extant cyanobacterial plant symbioses: the cyanobacterium lacks autonomous growth and is vertically transmitted between plant generations. Our results reveal features of evolutionary significance. The genome is in an eroding state, evidenced by a large proportion of pseudogenes (31.2% and a high frequency of transposable elements (approximately 600 scattered throughout the genome. Pseudogenization is found in genes such as the replication initiator dnaA and DNA repair genes, considered essential to free-living cyanobacteria. For some functional categories of genes pseudogenes are more prevalent than functional genes. Loss of function is apparent even within the 'core' gene categories of bacteria, such as genes involved in glycolysis and nutrient uptake. In contrast, serving as a critical source of nitrogen for the host, genes related to metabolic processes such as cell differentiation and nitrogen-fixation are well preserved. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first finding of genome degradation in a plant symbiont and phenotypically complex cyanobacterium and one of only a few extracellular endosymbionts described showing signs of reductive genome evolution. Our findings suggest an ongoing selective streamlining of this cyanobacterial genome which has resulted in an organism devoted to nitrogen fixation and devoid of autonomous growth. The cyanobacterial symbiont of Azolla

  17. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 292588 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YP_003887625.1 1117:5103 1118:3515 43988:689 497965:335 response regulator receiver... protein Cyanothece sp. PCC 7822 MNNQTHSPKGKVLIADDDEDSRLLLNVLLSEEGWQVCEAKDGQETLSKVSQESPDILILDNRMPELSGTEVYQYLRQKNTNLAIILITAYPDLEQLAASLGITYFLNKPFNFSDLFDLMNLAYKSLNK ...

  18. New anabaenopeptins, potent carboxypeptidase-A inhibitors from the cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon flos-aquae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, M; Suzuki, S; Itou, Y; Kodani, S; Ishida, K

    2000-09-01

    Anabaenopeptins I (1) and J (2), two new ureido bond-containing cyclic peptides, were isolated from the cultured cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (NIES-81) as potent carboxypeptidase-A (CPA) inhibitors. The gross structures of 1 and 2 were established by spectroscopic analysis, including the 2D NMR techniques. The absolute configurations of 1 and 2 were determined by spectral and chemical methods. Anabaenopeptins I and J inhibited CPA with IC(50) values of 5.2 and 7.6 ng/mL, respectively.

  19. Deciphering the mechanisms against oxidative stress in developing and mature akinetes of the cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon ovalisporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan-Levy, Ruth N; Hadas, Ora; Sukenik, Assaf

    2015-07-01

    Cells of filamentous cyanobacteria of the orders Nostocales and Stigonematales can differentiate into dormant forms called akinetes. Akinetes play a key role in the survival, abundance and distribution of the species, contributing an inoculum for their perennial blooms. In the cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon ovalisporum, potassium deficiency triggers the formation of akinetes. Here we present experimental evidence for the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during akinete development in response to potassium deficiency. The function of ROS as a primer signal for akinete differentiation was negated. Nevertheless, akinetes acquired protective mechanisms against oxidative damage during their differentiation and maintained them as they matured, giving akinetes advantages enabling survival in harsh conditions.

  20. Microcystin congeners contribute to toxicity in the halophilic cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwakarma Rashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aphanothece halophytica is an extremely saline cyanobacterium. This study investigates the toxic nature of the organism and presents the first report of hepatotoxic cyclic heptapeptide microcystin analogs. The activity of the crude extract was investigated in mice. Results showed acute toxicity with mice death at about 4 h. Histopathological examination indicated massive alveolar hemorrhage and extensive congestion in liver cells. Increases in the levels of serum enzymes, i.e., AST (aspartate aminotransferase, ALT (alanine aminotransferase and LDH (lactate dehydrogenase, provide further evidence of cell injury. An ELISA-based immunological detection kit confirmed the presence of microcystin analogs.

  1. Integrated OMICS guided engineering of biofuel butanol-tolerance in photosynthetic Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongji; Ren, Xiaoyue; Wang, Jiangxin; Song, Zhongdi; Shi, Mengliang; Qiao, Jianjun; Tian, Xiaoxu; Liu, Jie; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Weiwen

    2013-07-25

    Photosynthetic cyanobacteria have been recently proposed as a 'microbial factory' to produce butanol due to their capability to utilize solar energy and CO2 as the sole energy and carbon sources, respectively. However, to improve the productivity, one key issue needed to be addressed is the low tolerance of the photosynthetic hosts to butanol. In this study, we first applied a quantitative transcriptomics approach with a next-generation RNA sequencing technology to identify gene targets relevant to butanol tolerance in a model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The results showed that 278 genes were induced by the butanol exposure at all three sampling points through the growth time course. Genes encoding heat-shock proteins, oxidative stress related proteins, transporters and proteins involved in common stress responses, were induced by butanol exposure. We then applied GC-MS based metabolomics analysis to determine the metabolic changes associated with the butanol exposure. The results showed that 46 out of 73 chemically classified metabolites were differentially regulated by butanol treatment. Notably, 3-phosphoglycerate, glycine, serine and urea related to general stress responses were elevated in butanol-treated cells. To validate the potential targets, we constructed gene knockout mutants for three selected gene targets. The comparative phenotypic analysis confirmed that these genes were involved in the butanol tolerance. The integrated OMICS analysis provided a comprehensive view of the complicated molecular mechanisms employed by Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 against butanol stress, and allowed identification of a series of potential gene candidates for tolerance engineering in cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

  2. Homology modeling, docking studies and functional analysis of various azoreductase accessory interacting proteins of Nostoc sp.PCC7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philem, Priyadarshini Devi; Adhikari, Samrat

    2012-01-01

    Azo dyes have become a threat to public health because of its toxicity and carcinogenicity. Azoreductase enzyme plays a pivotal role in the degradation of azodyes released by industrial effluents and other resources. The degradation pathway has to be studied in detail for increasing the activity of azoreductase and for better degradation of azo dyes. But the data available on cyanobacterial azoreductase enzyme and its degradation pathway are still very less. Therefore the present work explored the azoreductase pathway of the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC7120 for better understanding of the degradation pathway and the other accessory interacting proteins involved. The accessory interacting proteins of azoreductase from cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC7120 were obtained from STRING database. The proteins do not have a comprehensive three dimensional structure and are hypothetical. The secondary structure and functional analysis indicated that the proteins are all soluble proteins, without disulphide bonds and have alpha helices only. The structural prediction and docking study showed that alr2106, alr1063 and alr2326 have best docking result which tally with the STRING database confidence score and thus these proteins could possibly enhance the azoreductase activity and better dye degradation. These results will pave way for further increase in azoreductase activity and for better understanding of the dye degradation pathway.

  3. Pleiotropic effect of sigE over-expression on cell morphology, photosynthesis and hydrogen production in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osanai, Takashi; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Iijima, Hiroko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Sato, Mayuko; Tanaka, Kan; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Saito, Kazuki; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2013-11-01

    Over-expression of sigE, a gene encoding an RNA polymerase sigma factor in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, is known to activate sugar catabolism and bioplastic production. In this study, we investigated the effects of sigE over-expression on cell morphology, photosynthesis and hydrogen production in this cyanobacterium. Transmission electron and scanning probe microscopic analyses revealed that sigE over-expression increased the cell size, possibly as a result of aberrant cell division. Over-expression of sigE reduced respiration and photosynthesis activities via changes in gene expression and chlorophyll fluorescence. Hydrogen production under micro-oxic conditions is enhanced in sigE over-expressing cells. Despite these pleiotropic phenotypes, the sigE over-expressing strain showed normal cell viability under both nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-depleted conditions. These results provide insights into the inter-relationship among metabolism, cell morphology, photosynthesis and hydrogen production in this unicellular cyanobacterium.

  4. A Nostoc punctiforme sugar transporter necessary to establish a Cyanobacterium-plant symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Martin; Picossi, Silvia; Campbell, Elsie L; Meeks, John C; Flores, Enrique

    2013-04-01

    In cyanobacteria-plant symbioses, the symbiotic nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium has low photosynthetic activity and is supplemented by sugars provided by the plant partner. Which sugars and cyanobacterial sugar uptake mechanism(s) are involved in the symbiosis, however, is unknown. Mutants of the symbiotically competent, facultatively heterotrophic cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme were constructed bearing a neomycin resistance gene cassette replacing genes in a putative sugar transport gene cluster. Results of transport activity assays using (14)C-labeled fructose and glucose and tests of heterotrophic growth with these sugars enabled the identification of an ATP-binding cassette-type transporter for fructose (Frt), a major facilitator permease for glucose (GlcP), and a porin needed for the optimal uptake of both fructose and glucose. Analysis of green fluorescent protein fluorescence in strains of N. punctiforme bearing frt::gfp fusions showed high expression in vegetative cells and akinetes, variable expression in hormogonia, and no expression in heterocysts. The symbiotic efficiency of N. punctiforme sugar transport mutants was investigated by testing their ability to infect a nonvascular plant partner, the hornwort Anthoceros punctatus. Strains that were specifically unable to transport glucose did not infect the plant. These results imply a role for GlcP in establishing symbiosis under the conditions used in this work.

  5. Cellular and functional specificity among ferritin-like proteins in the multicellular cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Martin; Sandh, Gustaf; Nenninger, Anja; Oliveira, Paulo; Stensjö, Karin

    2014-03-01

    Ferritin-like proteins constitute a remarkably heterogeneous protein family, including ferritins, bacterioferritins and Dps proteins. The genome of the filamentous heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme encodes five ferritin-like proteins. In the present paper, we report a multidimensional characterization of these proteins. Our phylogenetic and bioinformatics analyses suggest both structural and physiological differences among the ferritin-like proteins. The expression of these five genes responded differently to hydrogen peroxide treatment, with a significantly higher rise in transcript level for Npun_F3730 as compared with the other four genes. A specific role for Npun_F3730 in the cells tolerance against hydrogen peroxide was also supported by the inactivation of Npun_F3730, Npun_R5701 and Npun_R6212; among these, only the ΔNpun_F3730 strain showed an increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide compared with wild type. Analysis of promoter-GFP reporter fusions of the ferritin-like genes indicated that Npun_F3730 and Npun_R5701 were expressed in all cell types of a diazotrophic culture, while Npun_F6212 was expressed specifically in heterocysts. Our study provides the first comprehensive analysis combining functional differentiation and cellular specificity within this important group of proteins in a multicellular cyanobacterium. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Indirect Interspecies Regulation: Transcriptional and Physiological Responses of a Cyanobacterium to Heterotrophic Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Ryan S.; Thiel, Vera; Sadler, Natalie C.; Kim, Young-Mo; Chrisler, William B.; Hill, Eric A.; Romine, Margaret F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alexander S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanisms by which microbes interact in communities remain poorly understood. Here, we interrogated specific interactions between photoautotrophic and heterotrophic members of a model consortium to infer mechanisms that mediate metabolic coupling and acclimation to partnership. This binary consortium was composed of a cyanobacterium, Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1, which supported growth of an obligate aerobic heterotroph, Meiothermus ruber strain A, by providing organic carbon, O2, and reduced nitrogen. Species-resolved transcriptomic analyses were used in combination with growth and photosynthesis kinetics to infer interactions and the environmental context under which they occur. We found that the efficiency of biomass production and resistance to stress induced by high levels of dissolved O2 increased, beyond axenic performance, as a result of heterotrophic partnership. Coordinated transcriptional responses transcending both species were observed and used to infer specific interactions resulting from the synthesis and exchange of resources. The cyanobacterium responded to heterotrophic partnership by altering expression of core genes involved with photosynthesis, carbon uptake/fixation, vitamin synthesis, and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS). IMPORTANCE This study elucidates how a cyanobacterial primary producer acclimates to heterotrophic partnership by modulating the expression levels of key metabolic genes. Heterotrophic bacteria can indirectly regulate the physiology of the photoautotrophic primary producers, resulting in physiological changes identified here, such as increased intracellular ROS. Some of the interactions inferred from this model system represent putative principles of metabolic coupling in phototrophic-heterotrophic partnerships. PMID:28289730

  7. Novel thermostable glycosidases in the extracellular matrix of the terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc commune.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsy, Fatthy Mohamed; Kuzuha, Satomi; Takani, Yayoi; Sakamoto, Toshio

    2008-10-01

    The cyanobacterium Nostoc commune is adapted to the terrestrial environment and forms a visible colony in which the cells are embedded in extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs), which play a crucial role in the extreme desiccation tolerance of this organism. When natural colonies were immersed in water, degradation of the colonies occurred within 2 days and N. commune cells were released into the water. The activities that hydrolyze glycoside bonds in various N. commune fractions were examined using artificial nitrophenyl-linked sugars as substrates. A beta-D-glucosidase purified from the water-soluble fraction was resistant to 20 min of boiling. The beta-D-glucosidase, with a molecular mass of 20 kDa, was identified as a cyanobacterial fasciclin protein based on its N-terminal amino-acid sequence. The 36-kDa major protein in the water-soluble fraction was purified, and the N-terminal amino-acid sequence of the protein was found to be identical to that of the water-stress protein (WspA) of N. commune. This WspA protein also showed heat-resistant beta-D-galactosidase activity. The fasciclin protein and WspA in the extracellular matrix may play a role in the hydrolysis of the EPSs surrounding the cells, possibly as an aid in the dispersal of cells, thus expanding the colonies of this cyanobacterium.

  8. Crucial Role of Extracellular Polysaccharides in Desiccation and Freezing Tolerance in the Terrestrial Cyanobacterium Nostoc commune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaru, Yoshiyuki; Takani, Yayoi; Yoshida, Takayuki; Sakamoto, Toshio

    2005-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Nostoc commune is adapted to the terrestrial environment and has a cosmopolitan distribution. In this study, the role of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) in the desiccation tolerance of photosynthesis in N. commune was examined. Although photosynthetic O2 evolution was not detected in desiccated colonies, the ability of the cells to evolve O2 rapidly recovered after rehydration. The air-dried colonies contained approximately 10% (wt/wt) water, and field-isolated, natural colonies with EPS were highly water absorbent and were rapidly hydrated by atmospheric moisture. The cells embedded in EPS in Nostoc colonies were highly desiccation tolerant, and O2 evolution was not damaged by air drying. Although N. commune was determined to be a mesophilic cyanobacterium, the cells with EPS were heat tolerant in a desiccated state. EPS could be removed from cells by homogenizing colonies with a blender and filtering with coarse filter paper. This treatment to remove EPS did not damage Nostoc cells or their ability to evolve O2, but O2 evolution was significantly damaged by desiccation treatment of the EPS-depleted cells. Similar to the EPS-depleted cells, the laboratory culture strain KU002 had only small amount of EPS and was highly sensitive to desiccation. In the EPS-depleted cells, O2 evolution was also sensitive to freeze-thaw treatment. These results strongly suggest that EPS of N. commune is crucial for the stress tolerance of photosynthesis during desiccation and during freezing and thawing. PMID:16269775

  9. Bouillonamide: A Mixed Polyketide–Peptide Cytotoxin from the Marine Cyanobacterium Moorea bouillonii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lik Tong Tan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The tropical marine cyanobacterium, Moorea bouillonii, has gained recent attention as a rich source of bioactive natural products. Continued chemical investigation of this cyanobacterium, collected from New Britain, Papua New Guinea, yielded a novel cytotoxic cyclic depsipeptide, bouillonamide (1, along with previously reported molecules, ulongamide A and apratoxin A. Planar structure of bouillonamide was established by extensive 1D and 2D NMR experiments, including multi-edited HSQC, TOCSY, HBMC, and ROESY experiments. In addition to the presence of α-amino acid residues, compound 1 contained two unique polyketide-derived moieties, namely a 2-methyl-6-methylamino-hex-5-enoic acid (Mmaha residue and a unit of 3-methyl-5-hydroxy-heptanoic acid (Mhha. Absolute stereochemistry of the α-amino acid units in bouillonamide was determined mainly by Marfey’s analysis. Compound 1 exhibited mild toxicity with IC50’s of 6.0 µM against the neuron 2a mouse neuroblastoma cells.

  10. Dynamics of the Toxin Cylindrospermopsin and the Cyanobacterium Chrysosporum (Aphanizomenon ovalisporum in a Mediterranean Eutrophic Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Fadel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Chrysosporum ovalisporum is a cylindrospermopsin toxin producing cyanobacterium that was reported in several lakes and reservoirs. Its growth dynamics and toxin distribution in field remain largely undocumented. Chrysosporum ovalisporum was reported in 2009 in Karaoun Reservoir, Lebanon. We investigated the factors controlling the occurrence of this cyanobacterium and vertical distribution of cylindrospermopsin in Karaoun Reservoir. We conducted bi-weekly sampling campaigns between May 2012 and August 2013. Results showed that Chrysosporum ovalisporum is an ecologically plastic species that was observed in all seasons. Unlike the high temperatures, above 26 °C, which is associated with blooms of Chrysosporum ovalisporum in Lakes Kinneret (Israel, Lisimachia and Trichonis (Greece and Arcos Reservoir (Spain, Chrysosporum ovalisporum in Karaoun Reservoir bloomed in October 2012 at a water temperature of 22 °C during weak stratification. Cylindrospermopsin was detected in almost all water samples even when Chrysosporum ovalisporum was not detected. Chrysosporum ovalisporum biovolumes and cylindrospermopsin concentrations were not correlated (n = 31, r2 = −0.05. Cylindrospermopsin reached a maximum concentration of 1.7 µg L−1. The vertical profiles of toxin concentrations suggested its possible degradation or sedimentation resulting in its disappearance from the water column. The field growth conditions of Chrysosporum ovalisporum in this study revealed that it can bloom at the subsurface water temperature of 22 °C increasing the risk of its development and expansion in lakes located in temperate climate regions.

  11. Sp(2) Renormalization

    CERN Document Server

    Lavrov, Peter M

    2010-01-01

    The renormalization of general gauge theories on flat and curved space-time backgrounds is considered within the Sp(2)-covariant quantization method. We assume the existence of a gauge-invariant and diffeomorphism invariant regularization. Using the Sp(2)-covariant formalism one can show that the theory possesses gauge invariant and diffeomorphism invariant renormalizability to all orders in the loop expansion and the extended BRST symmetry after renormalization is preserved. The advantage of the Sp(2)-method compared to the standard Batalin-Vilkovisky approach is that, in reducible theories, the structure of ghosts and ghosts for ghosts and auxiliary fields is described in terms of irreducible representations of the Sp(2) group. This makes the presentation of solutions to the master equations in more simple and systematic way because they are Sp(2)- scalars.

  12. Sp(2) renormalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrov, Peter M., E-mail: lavrov@tspu.edu.r [Department of Mathematical Analysis, Tomsk State Pedagogical University, Kievskaya St. 60, Tomsk 634061 (Russian Federation)

    2011-08-11

    The renormalization of general gauge theories on flat and curved space-time backgrounds is considered within the Sp(2)-covariant quantization method. We assume the existence of a gauge-invariant and diffeomorphism invariant regularization. Using the Sp(2)-covariant formalism one can show that the theory possesses gauge-invariant and diffeomorphism invariant renormalizability to all orders in the loop expansion and the extended BRST-symmetry after renormalization is preserved. The advantage of the Sp(2) method compared to the standard Batalin-Vilkovisky approach is that, in reducible theories, the structure of ghosts and ghosts for ghosts and auxiliary fields is described in terms of irreducible representations of the Sp(2) group. This makes the presentation of solutions to the master equations in more simple and systematic way because they are Sp(2)-scalars.

  13. A stable, reusable, and highly active photosynthetic bioreactor by bio-interfacing an individual cyanobacterium with a mesoporous bilayer nanoshell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Yang, Xiao-Yu; Deng, Zhao; Wang, Li; Hu, Zhi-Yi; Tian, Ge; Ying, Guo-Liang; Shen, Ling; Zhang, Ming-Xi; Su, Bao-Lian

    2015-05-06

    An individual cyanobacterium cell is interfaced with a nanoporous biohybrid layer within a mesoporous silica layer. The bio-interface acts as an egg membrane for cell protection and growth of outer shell. The resulting bilayer shell provides efficient functions to create a single cell photosynthetic bioreactor with high stability, reusability, and activity.

  14. Diurnal expression of hetR and diazocyte development in the filamentous non-heterocystous cyanobacterium Trichodesmium erythraeum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Shehawy, R.; Lugomela, C.; Ernst, A.; Bergman, B.

    2003-01-01

    The marine non-heterocystous cyanobacterium Trichodesmium fixes atmospheric N2 aerobically in light. In situ immunolocalization/light microscopy of NifH revealed that lighter, non-granulated cell regions observed correspond to the nitrogenase-containing diazocyte clusters in Trichodesmium IMS101. Th

  15. A comparison of fermentation in the cyanobacterium Microcystis PCC7806 grown under a light/dark cycle and continuous light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moezelaar, R.; Stal, L.J.

    1997-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Microcystis PCC7806, grown under continuous light, fermented endogenously stored glycogen to equimolar amounts of acetate and ethanol when incubated anaerobically in the dark. In addition, H-2, CO2 and some L-lactate were produced. This fermentation pattern differed from that disp

  16. Pulsed nitrogen supply induces dynamic changes in the amino acid compositionand microcystin production of the harmful cyanobacterium Planktothrix agardhii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Waal, D.B.; Ferreruela, G.; Tonk, L.; Van Donk, E.; Huisman, J.; Visser, P.M.; Matthijs, H.C.P.

    2010-01-01

    Planktothrix agardhii is a widespread harmful cyanobacterium of eutrophic waters, and can produce the hepatotoxins [Asp3]microcystin-LR and [Asp3]microcystin-RR. These two microcystin variants differ in their first variable amino acid position, which is occupied by either leucine (L) or arginine (R)

  17. Pulsed nitrogen supply induces dynamic changes in the amino acid composition and microcystin production of the harmful cyanobacterium Planktothrix agardhii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Waal, D.B.; Ferreruela, G.; Tonk, L.; van Donk, E.; Huisman, J.; Visser, P.M.; Matthijs, H.C.P.

    2010-01-01

    Planktothrix agardhii is a widespread harmful cyanobacterium of eutrophic waters, and can produce the hepatotoxins [Asp3]microcystin-LR and [Asp3]microcystin-RR. These two microcystin variants differ in their first variable amino acid position, which is occupied by either leucine (L) or arginine (R)

  18. Effects of the cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii on feeding and life-history characteristics of the grazer Daphnia magna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soares, M.C.S.; Lürling, M.F.L.L.W.; Panosso, R.; Huszar, V.M.

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were used to test the hypothesis that feeding and growth of the zooplankton grazer Daphnia magna will decrease with increasing proportions of the cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii in the diet (mixed feeds with the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus). A strain of C.

  19. Cloning of a third nitrate reductase gene from the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans R2 using a shuttle cosmid library

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhlemeier, C.J.; Teeuwsen, V.J.P.; Janssen, M.J.T.; Arkel, G.A. van

    1984-01-01

    A strategy for gene cloning in the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans R2 was developed which made use of a gene library constructed in a shuttle cosmid vector. The method involved phenotypic complementation of mutants with pooled cosmid DNA. The development of the procedure and its application to the

  20. Development of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 as a Phototrophic Cell Factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuzhong Zhang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae play profound roles in ecology and biogeochemistry. One model cyanobacterial species is the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. This species is highly amenable to genetic modification. Its genome has been sequenced and many systems biology and molecular biology tools are available to study this bacterium. Recently, researchers have put significant efforts into understanding and engineering this bacterium to produce chemicals and biofuels from sunlight and CO2. To demonstrate our perspective on the application of this cyanobacterium as a photosynthesis-based chassis, we summarize the recent research on Synechocystis 6803 by focusing on five topics: rate-limiting factors for cell cultivation; molecular tools for genetic modifications; high-throughput system biology for genome wide analysis; metabolic modeling for physiological prediction and rational metabolic engineering; and applications in producing diverse chemicals. We also discuss the particular challenges for systems analysis and engineering applications of this microorganism, including precise characterization of versatile cell metabolism, improvement of product rates and titers, bioprocess scale-up, and product recovery. Although much progress has been achieved in the development of Synechocystis 6803 as a phototrophic cell factory, the biotechnology for “Compounds from Synechocystis” is still significantly lagging behind those for heterotrophic microbes (e.g., Escherichia coli.

  1. Development of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 as a phototrophic cell factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi; You, Le; Liu, Dianyi; Hollinshead, Whitney; Tang, Yinjie J; Zhang, Fuzhong

    2013-08-13

    Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) play profound roles in ecology and biogeochemistry. One model cyanobacterial species is the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. This species is highly amenable to genetic modification. Its genome has been sequenced and many systems biology and molecular biology tools are available to study this bacterium. Recently, researchers have put significant efforts into understanding and engineering this bacterium to produce chemicals and biofuels from sunlight and CO2. To demonstrate our perspective on the application of this cyanobacterium as a photosynthesis-based chassis, we summarize the recent research on Synechocystis 6803 by focusing on five topics: rate-limiting factors for cell cultivation; molecular tools for genetic modifications; high-throughput system biology for genome wide analysis; metabolic modeling for physiological prediction and rational metabolic engineering; and applications in producing diverse chemicals. We also discuss the particular challenges for systems analysis and engineering applications of this microorganism, including precise characterization of versatile cell metabolism, improvement of product rates and titers, bioprocess scale-up, and product recovery. Although much progress has been achieved in the development of Synechocystis 6803 as a phototrophic cell factory, the biotechnology for "Compounds from Synechocystis" is still significantly lagging behind those for heterotrophic microbes (e.g., Escherichia coli).

  2. RNA-Seq analysis provides insights for understanding photoautotrophic polyhydroxyalkanoate production in recombinant Synechocystis Sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyok-Sean Lau

    Full Text Available The photosynthetic cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. strain 6803, is a potential platform for the production of various chemicals and biofuels. In this study, direct photosynthetic production of a biopolymer, polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA, in genetically engineered Synechocystis sp. achieved as high as 14 wt%. This is the highest production reported in Synechocystis sp. under photoautotrophic cultivation conditions without the addition of a carbon source. The addition of acetate increased PHA accumulation to 41 wt%, and this value is comparable to the highest production obtained with cyanobacteria. Transcriptome analysis by RNA-seq coupled with real-time PCR was performed to understand the global changes in transcript levels of cells subjected to conditions suitable for photoautotrophic PHA biosynthesis. There was lower expression of most PHA synthesis-related genes in recombinant Synechocystis sp. with higher PHA accumulation suggesting that the concentration of these enzymes is not the limiting factor to achieving high PHA accumulation. In order to cope with the higher PHA production, cells may utilize enhanced photosynthesis to drive the product formation. Results from this study suggest that the total flux of carbon is the possible driving force for the biosynthesis of PHA and the polymerizing enzyme, PHA synthase, is not the only critical factor affecting PHA-synthesis. Knowledge of the regulation or control points of the biopolymer production pathways will facilitate the further use of cyanobacteria for biotechnological applications.

  3. Environmental and nutritional factors affecting geosmin synthesis by Anabaena sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadoun, I M; Schrader, K K; Blevins, W T

    2001-04-01

    A cyanobacterium isolated from a source-water reservoir during a spring odor and taste episode and identified as Anabaena sp. consistently produced geosmin during laboratory culture on modified BG-11 liquid medium. Maximal geosmin/biomass occurred at 20 degrees C and a light intensity of 17 microE/m2/s; geosmin/chla values directly correlated with increasing light intensity (r2 = 0.95, P geosmin synthesis; at 17 microE/m2/s, increasing temperature stimulates chla production (to 25 degrees C) while repressing geosmin synthesis (above 20 degrees C). Nutritional factors promoting biomass, chla, and geosmin synthesis by Anabaena sp. were also investigated. For cultures grown at 17 microE/m2/s and 20 degrees C for 20 days, both ammonium-N and nitrate-N generally enhanced the growth of Anabaena sp. Nitrate-N promoted more chla production (r2 = 0.99) than ammonium-N. Geosmin synthesis was directly correlated with ammonium-N concentrations (r2 = 0.89), with low nitrate-N (123.5 micrograms/l) favoring maximal geosmin production (2.8 micrograms/l). Increasing nitrate-N concentrations promoted a three-fold increase in chla content with geosmin synthesis decreased by two-fold. Geosmin/mg biomass was directly related to ammonium-N concentration; high nitrate-N levels suppressed geosmin production. No geosmin was detected at or below 118 micrograms phosphate-phosphorus/l. Geosmin, dry weight biomass, and chla production were correlated with increasing phosphorus (P) concentration (r2 = 0.76, 0.96 and 0.98, respectively). No geosmin was detected when copper was present in growth media at or above 6.92 micrograms Cu2+/l (CuSO4.5H2O). Dry weight biomass and chla production were negatively correlated with Cu2+ ion concentrations.

  4. Rôles respectifs des isoformes de ferrédoxine-NADP-oxydoréductase dans la cyanobactérie Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    OpenAIRE

    Korn, Anja

    2010-01-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, ferredoxin:NADP oxidoreductase (FNR) provides NADPH for CO2 assimilation, but it also utilizes NADPH to provide reduced ferredoxin (Fd). The cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 contains two FNR isoforms, a small (FNRS, 34 kDa) and a large one (FNRL, 46 kDa) that is associated with the phycobilisome (PBS), a light-harvesting complex. We purified a PBS subcomplex comprising FNRL (FNRL-PC) and compared the enzymatic properties of FNRL-PC to FNRS. FNRL-PC ...

  5. FLAVODIIRON2 and FLAVODIIRON4 proteins mediate an oxygen-dependent alternative electron flow in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 under CO2-limited conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimakawa, Ginga; Shaku, Keiichiro; Nishi, Akiko; Hayashi, Ryosuke; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Katsuhiko; Makino, Amane; Miyake, Chikahiro

    2015-02-01

    This study aims to elucidate the molecular mechanism of an alternative electron flow (AEF) functioning under suppressed (CO2-limited) photosynthesis in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Photosynthetic linear electron flow, evaluated as the quantum yield of photosystem II [Y(II)], reaches a maximum shortly after the onset of actinic illumination. Thereafter, Y(II) transiently decreases concomitantly with a decrease in the photosynthetic oxygen evolution rate and then recovers to a rate that is close to the initial maximum. These results show that CO2 limitation suppresses photosynthesis and induces AEF. In contrast to the wild type, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 mutants deficient in the genes encoding FLAVODIIRON2 (FLV2) and FLV4 proteins show no recovery of Y(II) after prolonged illumination. However, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 mutants deficient in genes encoding proteins functioning in photorespiration show AEF activity similar to the wild type. In contrast to Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 has no FLV proteins with high homology to FLV2 and FLV4 in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. This lack of FLV2/4 may explain why AEF is not induced under CO2-limited photosynthesis in S. elongatus PCC 7942. As the glutathione S-transferase fusion protein overexpressed in Escherichia coli exhibits NADH-dependent oxygen reduction to water, we suggest that FLV2 and FLV4 mediate oxygen-dependent AEF in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 when electron acceptors such as CO2 are not available. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakrasi, Himadri B. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-01-29

    The potential for developing commercially viable microbial H2-production systems as a renewable source of biofuel has been limited by the need for an anaerobic environment to enable photobiological H2-production in capable bacterial and algal species. In this project, we have shown that the cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 has the capacity for highly efficient H2-production under natural aerobic conditions. The marine cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 has a diurnal metabolic cycle; photosynthesis and carbon fixation occur during daylight hours and then at night, high rates of respiration create a suboxic intracellular environment that enables O2-sensitive processes to occur, including N2-fixation and H2-production. We developed a two-stage approach to monitor H2-production by Cyanothece 51142. In the first stage, we grew the bacteria aerobically in an alternating 12 hour light/dark cycle. A second ‘incubation’ stage was then carried out in which we took cells from the end of a 12 hour light growth period and incubated them in air-tight vials for a further 12 hours under continuous illumination. Analysis of the headspace in the vial revealed high specific rates of H2-production (>150 μmol of H2 per mg chlorophyll per hour) during this incubation period. Furthermore, the rate of H2-production could be enhanced by growing the cells in the presence of high levels of CO2 or glycerol. We also confirmed that H2-production was mediated by the nitrogenase system found in these Cyanothece cells. Interestingly, in the absence of molecular N2, nitrogenase systems channel all available electrons towards H2-production. Accordingly, when we incubated glycerol-supplemented Cyanothece 51142 cells in the absence of N2, the rate of H2-production increased up to 467 μmol of H2 per mg

  7. A bioelectrochemical approach to characterize extracellular electron transfer by Synechocystis sp. PCC6803.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Cereda

    Full Text Available Biophotovoltaic devices employ photosynthetic organisms at the anode of a microbial fuel cell to generate electrical power. Although a range of cyanobacteria and algae have been shown to generate photocurrent in devices of a multitude of architectures, mechanistic understanding of extracellular electron transfer by phototrophs remains minimal. Here we describe a mediatorless bioelectrochemical device to measure the electrogenic output of a planktonically grown cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. Light dependent production of current is measured, and its magnitude is shown to scale with microbial cell concentration and light intensity. Bioelectrochemical characterization of a Synechocystis mutant lacking Photosystem II demonstrates conclusively that production of the majority of photocurrent requires a functional water splitting aparatus and electrons are likely ultimately derived from water. This shows the potential of the device to rapidly and quantitatively characterize photocurrent production by genetically modified strains, an approach that can be used in future studies to delineate the mechanisms of cyanobacterial extracellular electron transport.

  8. Single-cell confocal spectrometry of a filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc at room and cryogenic temperature. Diversity and differentiation of pigment systems in 311 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Kana; Itoh, Shigeru

    2012-08-01

    The fluorescence spectrum at 298 and 40 K and the absorption spectrum at 298 K of each cell of the filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. was measured by single-cell confocal laser spectroscopy to study the differentiation of cell pigments. The fluorescence spectra of vegetative (veg) and heterocyst (het) cells of Nostoc formed separate groups with low and high PSII to PSI ratios, respectively. The fluorescence spectra of het cells at 40 K still contained typical PSII bands. The PSII/PSI ratio estimated for the veg cells varied between 0.4 and 1.2, while that of het cells varied between 0 and 0.22 even in the same culture. The PSII/PSI ratios of veg cells resembled each other more closely in the same filament. 'pro-het' cells, which started to differentiate into het cells, were identified from the small but specific difference in the PSII/PSI ratio. The allophycocyanin (APC)/PSII ratio was almost constant in both veg and het cells, indicating their tight couplings. Phycocyanin (PC) showed higher fluorescence in most het cells, suggesting the uncoupling from PSII. Veg cells seem to vary their PSI contents to give different PSII/PSI ratios even in the same culture, and to suppress the synthesis of PSII, APC and PC to differentiate into het cells. APC and PC are gradually liberated from membranes in het cells with the uncoupling from PSII. Single-cell spectrometry will be useful to study the differentiation of intrinsic pigments of cells and chloroplasts, and to select microbes from natural environments.

  9. The complete genome of a cyanobacterium from a soda lake reveals the presence of the components of CO2-concentrating mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupriyanova, Elena V; Cho, Sung Mi; Park, Youn-Il; Pronina, Natalia A; Los, Dmitry A

    2016-12-01

    At present geological epoch, the carbon concentrating mechanism (CCM) of cyanobacteria represents the obligatory tool for adaptation to low content of CO2 in the atmosphere and for the maintenance of sufficient photosynthetic activity. Functional CCM was found in modern cyanobacteria from different ecological niches. However, the presence of such mechanism in species that inhabit soda lakes is not obvious due to high content of inorganic carbon (C i) in the environment. Here we analyze CCM components that have been identified by sequencing of the whole genome of the alkaliphilic cyanobacterium Microcoleus sp. IPPAS B-353. The composition of the CCM components of Microcoleus is similar to that of 'model' β-cyanobacteria, freshwater and marine Synechococcus or Synechocystis spp. However, CahB1 protein of Microcoleus, which is the homolog of CcaA, the carboxysomal β-type carbonic anhydrase (CA) of β-cyanobacteria, appeared to be the only active CA located in cell envelopes. The conservative regions of CcmM, CahG (a homolog of archeal γ-CAs, Cam/CamH), and ChpX of Microcoleus possess single amino acid substitutions that may cause a lack of CA activities. Unlike model cyanobacteria, Microcoleus induces only one BicA-type bicarbonate transporter in response to C i limitation. The differences in the appearance of CCM components and in their characteristics between alkaliphilic Microcoleus and freshwater or marine cyanobacteria are described. The possible reasons for the maintenance of CCM components in cyanobacteria, which permanently live at high concentrations of C i in soda lakes, are discussed.

  10. Nitrogen fixation (nif) genes of the cyanobacterium Anabaena species strain PCC 7120. The nifB-fdxN-nifS-nifU operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, M E; Haselkorn, R

    1989-11-15

    A second nitrogen fixation (nif) operon in the cyanobacterium (blue-green alga) Anabaena (Nostoc) sp. strain PCC 7120 has been identified and sequenced. It is located just upstream of the nifHDK operon and consists of four genes in the order nifB, fdxN, nifS, and nifU. The three nif genes were identified on the basis of their similarity with the corresponding genes from other diazotrophs. The fourth gene, fdxN, codes for a bacterial type ferredoxin (Mulligan, M. E., Buikema, W. J., and Haselkorn, R. (1988) J. Bacteriol. 167, 4406-4410). The four genes are probably transcribed as a single operon, but are expressed at a lower level than the nifHDK operon, and only after a developmentally induced DNA rearrangement occurs that excises a 55-kilobase pair element from within the fdxN gene (Golden, J. W., Mulligan, M. E., and Haselkorn, R. (1987) Nature 327, 526-529; Golden, J. W., Carrasco, C. D., Mulligan, M. E., Schneider, G. J., and Haselkorn, R. (1988) J. Bacteriol. 170, 5034-5041). The promoter for the nifB operon was located by primer extension. Comparison of the nifB 5'-flanking sequence with the nifH 5'-flanking sequence did not reveal any consensus base pairs that would define a nif promoter for Anabaena. The operon contains two instances of 7-base pair directly repeated sequences: seven copies of the repeated sequence are found between the nifB and fdxN genes and six copies are found between the nifS and nifU genes. The function of these repeats is unknown.

  11. Genetically modified cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum overproducing proline in response to salinity and osmotic stresses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Santosh Bhargava

    2006-06-01

    In the parent Nostoc muscorum an active proline oxidase enzyme is required to assimilate exogenous proline as a fixed nitrogen source. Cyanobacterial mutants, resistant to growth inhibitory action of proline analogue L-azetidine-2-carboxylate (Ac-R), were deficient in proline oxidase activity, and were over-accumulators of proline. Proline over-accumulation, resulting either from mutational acquisition of the Ac-R phenotype, or from salinity-induced uptake of exogenous proline, confirmed enhanced salinity/osmotic tolerance in the mutant strain. The nitrogenase activity and photosynthetic O2 evolution of the parent were sensitive to both salinity as well as osmotic stresses than of Ac-R mutant strain. In addition, the mutation to Ac-resistant phenotype showed no alteration in salinity inducible potassium transport system in the cyanobacterium

  12. Cadmium-mediated resistance to metals and antibiotics in a cyanobacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.P.; Pandey, A.K.

    1982-01-01

    Cadmium-resistant strains of the cyanobacterium Nostoc calcicola were isolated through the step-wise transfer of the organism to higher levels of the metal. One of the Cd-resistant strains (CDsup(r)-10) showed cross-resistance to antibiotics like neomycin (1 ..mu..g/ml), chloramphenicol (3 ..mu..g/ml) but not to streptomycin. The Cd-resistant strain also tolerated elevated levels of metals such as zinc 20 ppm) and mercury (1 ppm). The stability of the metal-resistance required the presence of Cd/sup 2 +/ ions in the growth medium. It is suggested that metal resistance may also be determined by gene(s) on the antibiotic resistance plasmids in cyanobacteria.

  13. Sacrolide A, a new antimicrobial and cytotoxic oxylipin macrolide from the edible cyanobacterium Aphanothece sacrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Oku

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Macroscopic gelatinous colonies of freshwater cyanobacterium Aphanothece sacrum, a luxury ingredient for Japanese cuisine, were found to contain a new oxylipin-derived macrolide, sacrolide A (1, as an antimicrobial component. The configuration of two chiral centers in 1 was determined by a combination of chiral anisotropy analysis and conformational analysis of different ring-opened derivatives. Compound 1 inhibited the growth of some species of Gram-positive bacteria, yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and fungus Penicillium chrysogenum, and was also cytotoxic to 3Y1 rat fibroblasts. Concern about potential food intoxication caused by accidental massive ingestion of A. sacrum was dispelled by the absence of 1 in commercial products. A manual procedure for degrading 1 in raw colonies was also developed, enabling a convenient on-site detoxification at restaurants or for personal consumption.

  14. Sacrolide A, a new antimicrobial and cytotoxic oxylipin macrolide from the edible cyanobacterium Aphanothece sacrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oku, Naoya; Matsumoto, Miyako; Yonejima, Kohsuke; Tansei, Keijiroh; Igarashi, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Macroscopic gelatinous colonies of freshwater cyanobacterium Aphanothece sacrum, a luxury ingredient for Japanese cuisine, were found to contain a new oxylipin-derived macrolide, sacrolide A (1), as an antimicrobial component. The configuration of two chiral centers in 1 was determined by a combination of chiral anisotropy analysis and conformational analysis of different ring-opened derivatives. Compound 1 inhibited the growth of some species of Gram-positive bacteria, yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and fungus Penicillium chrysogenum, and was also cytotoxic to 3Y1 rat fibroblasts. Concern about potential food intoxication caused by accidental massive ingestion of A. sacrum was dispelled by the absence of 1 in commercial products. A manual procedure for degrading 1 in raw colonies was also developed, enabling a convenient on-site detoxification at restaurants or for personal consumption.

  15. Phycobiliprotein accumulation in cyanobacterium Nostoc linckia and modification of antioxidant activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana VALUTA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with iron(III coordination compounds with Schiff bases as ligands and their impact on phycobiliprotein accumulation by cyanobacterium Nostoc linckia. Stimulatory effect depends on the applied dose and in case of three compounds, the concentration 20 mg/L was determined as one with moderate intensity. Lower concentrations resulted in an increase of the phycobiliprotein synthesis. There was found a significant positive correlation between phycobiliprotein content and ABTS (2.2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid assay values displayed by aqueous extracts from Nostoc linckia biomass cultivated in nutrient medium with these coordination compounds. Hence, it is possible to modify the antioxidant activity of Nostoc biomass by applying low concentrations of chemical stimuli.

  16. Composition and occurrence of lipid droplets in the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peramuna, Anantha; Summers, Michael L

    2014-12-01

    Inclusions of neutral lipids termed lipid droplets (LDs) located throughout the cell were identified in the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme by staining with lipophylic fluorescent dyes. LDs increased in number upon entry into stationary phase and addition of exogenous fructose indicating a role for carbon storage, whereas high-light stress did not increase LD numbers. LD accumulation increased when nitrate was used as the nitrogen source during exponential growth as compared to added ammonia or nitrogen-fixing conditions. Analysis of isolated LDs revealed enrichment of triacylglycerol (TAG), α-tocopherol, and C17 alkanes. LD TAG from exponential phase growth contained mainly saturated C16 and C18 fatty acids, whereas stationary phase LD TAG had additional unsaturated fatty acids characteristic of whole cells. This is the first characterization of cyanobacterial LD composition and conditions leading to their production. Based upon their abnormally large size and atypical location, these structures represent a novel sub-organelle in cyanobacteria.

  17. Heterologous expression of an algal hydrogenase in a hetero-cystous cyanobacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorsten Heidorn; Peter Lindblad [Dept. of Physiological Botany, Uppsala University, V illavagen 6, SE-752 36 Uppsala, (Sweden)

    2006-07-01

    For the expression of an active algal [FeFe] hydrogenase in the hetero-cystous cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme A TCC 29133 the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hydrogenase gene hydA1 and the accessory genes hydEF and hydG are to be introduced into the cyano-bacterial cells. The genes were amplified by PCR from EST clones, cloned into the cloning vector pBluescript SK+ and sequenced. An expression vector for multi-cistronic cloning, based on pSCR202, was constructed and for a functional test GFP was inserted as a reporter gene. The GFP construct was transformed into Nostoc punctiforme A TCC 29133 by electroporation and expression of GFP was visualized by fluorescence microscopy. (authors)

  18. Growth and biopigment accumulation of cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis at different light intensities and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Kulshreshtha, Jyoti; Singh, Gajendra Pal

    2011-01-01

    In order to find out optimum culture condition for algal growth, the effect of light irradiance and temperature on growth rate, biomass composition and pigment production of Spirulina platensis were studied in axenic batch cultures. Growth kinetics of cultures showed a wide range of temperature tolerance from 20 °C to 40 °C. Maximum growth rate, cell production with maximum accumulation of chlorophyll and phycobilliproteins were found at temperature 35 °C and 2,000 lux light intensity. But with further increase in temperature and light intensity, reduction in growth rate was observed. Carotenoid content was found maximum at 3,500 lux. Improvement in the carotenoid content with increase in light intensity is an adaptive mechanism of cyanobacterium S.platensis for photoprotection, could be a good basis for the exploitation of microalgae as a source of biopigments. PMID:24031731

  19. Genetic Basis for Geosmin Production by the Water Bloom-Forming Cyanobacterium, Anabaena ucrainica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongjie Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Geosmin is a common, musty-smelling sesquiterpene, principally produced by cyanobacteria. Anabaena ucrainica (Schhorb. Watanabe, a water bloom-forming cyanobacterium, is the geosmin producer responsible for odor problems in Dianchi and Erhai lakes in China. In this study, the geosmin synthase gene (geo of A. ucrainica and its flanking regions were identified and cloned by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and genome walking. The geo gene was found to be located in a transcription unit with two cyclic nucleotide-binding protein genes (cnb. The two cnb genes were highly similar and were predicted members of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP receptor protein/fumarate nitrate reductase regulator (Crp–Fnr family. Phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses implied that the evolution of the geosmin genes involved a horizontal gene transfer process in cyanobacteria. These genes showed a close relationship to 2-methylisoborneol genes in origin and evolution.

  20. Genotype × genotype interactions between the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis and its grazer, the waterflea Daphnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Veerle; Brusciotti, Silvia; van Gremberghe, Ineke; Vyverman, Wim; Vanoverbeke, Joost; De Meester, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Toxic algal blooms are an important problem worldwide. The literature on toxic cyanobacteria blooms in inland waters reports widely divergent results on whether zooplankton can control cyanobacteria blooms or cyanobacteria suppress zooplankton by their toxins. Here we test whether this may be due to genotype × genotype interactions, in which interactions between the large-bodied and efficient grazer Daphnia and the widespread cyanobacterium Microcystis are not only dependent on Microcystis strain or Daphnia genotype but are specific to genotype × genotype combinations. We show that genotype × genotype interactions are important in explaining mortality in short-time exposures of Daphnia to Microcystis. These genotype × genotype interactions may result in local coadaptation and a geographic mosaic of coevolution. Genotype × genotype interactions can explain why the literature on zooplankton–cyanobacteria interactions is seemingly inconsistent, and provide hope that zooplankton can contribute to the suppression of cyanobacteria blooms in restoration projects. PMID:25568039

  1. Sll1783, a monooxygenase associated with polysaccharide processing in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Hélder; Immerzeel, Peter; Gerber, Lorenz; Hörnaeus, Katarina; Lind, Sara Bergström; Pattanaik, Bagmi; Lindberg, Pia; Mamedov, Fikret; Lindblad, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Cyanobacteria play a pivotal role as the primary producer in many aquatic ecosystems. The knowledge on the interacting processes of cyanobacteria with its environment - abiotic and biotic factors - is still very limited. Many potential exocytoplasmic proteins in the model unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 have unknown functions and their study is essential to improve our understanding of this photosynthetic organism and its potential for biotechnology use. Here we characterize a deletion mutant of Synechocystis PCC 6803, Δsll1783, a strain that showed a remarkably high light resistance which is related with its lower thylakoid membrane formation. Our results suggests Sll1783 to be involved in a mechanism of polysaccharide degradation and uptake and we hypothesize it might function as a sensor for cell density in cyanobacterial cultures. © 2017 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  2. Sesquiterpenes of the geosmin-producing cyanobacterium Calothrix PCC 7507 and their toxicity to invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höckelmann, Claudia; Becher, Paul G; von Reuss, Stephan H; Jüttner, Friedrich

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of sesquiterpenes was investigated with the geosmin-producing cyanobacterium Calothrix PCC 7507. The essential oil obtained by vacuum destillation was studied in more detail by GC-MS methods and superposition with authentic compounds. Geosmin was the dominating compound while the other sesquiterpenes were minor components. Sesquiterpenes that have not been described before in cyanobacteria were isodihydroagarofuran, eremophilone and 6,11-epoxyisodaucane. Closed-loop stripping analysis revealed that most of the sesquiterpenes were found in the biomass of Calothrix, while eremophilone was mainly observed in the medium of the axenic culture. Eremophilone showed acute toxicity (LC50) against Chironomus riparius (insecta) at 29 microM and against Thamnocephalus platyurus (crustacea) at 22 microM. The compound was not toxic for Plectus cirratus (nematoda). 6,11-Epoxyisodaucane and isodihydroagarofuran exhibited no toxicity to invertebrates when applied in concentrations up to 100 microM.

  3. UV-B-induced Oxidative Damage and Protective Role of Exopolysaccharides in Desert Cyanobacterium Microcoleus vaginatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan-Zhou Chen; Gao-Hong Wang; Song Hong; An Liu; Cheng Li; Yong-Ding Liu

    2009-01-01

    UV-B-induced oxidative damage and the protective effect of exopolysaccharides (EPS) in Microcoleus vaginatus, a cyanobacterium isolated from desert crust, were investigated. After being irradiated with UV-B radiation, photosynthetic activity (Fv/Fm), cellular total carbohydrates, EPS and sucrose production of irradiated cells decreased, while reducing sugars, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, malondialdehyde (MDA) production and DNA strand breaks increased significantly. However, when pretreated with 100 mg/L exogenous EPS, EPS production in the culture medium of UV-B stressed cells decreased significantly; Fv/Fm, cellular total carbohydrates, reducing sugars and sucrose synthase (SS) activity of irradiated cells increased significantly, while ROS generation, MDA production and DNA strand breaks of irradiated cells decreased significantly. The results suggested that EPS exhibited a significant protective effect on DNA strand breaks and lipid peroxidation by effectively eliminating ROS induced by UV-B radiation in M. vaginatus.

  4. Network analysis of transcriptomics expands regulatory landscapes in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClure, Ryan S.; Overall, Christopher C.; McDermott, Jason E.; Hill, Eric A.; Markillie, Lye Meng; McCue, Lee Ann; Taylor, Ronald C.; Ludwig, Marcus; Bryant, Donald A.; Beliaev, Alexander S.

    2016-08-27

    Cyanobacterial regulation of gene expression must contend with a genome organization that lacks apparent functional context, as the majority of cellular processes and metabolic pathways are encoded by genes found at disparate locations across the genome. In addition, the fact that coordinated regulation of cyanobacterial cellular machinery takes place with significantly fewer transcription factors, compared to other Eubacteria, suggests the involvement of post-transcriptional mechanisms and regulatory adaptations which are not fully understood. Global transcript abundance from model cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 grown under 42 different conditions was analyzed using context-likelihood of relatedness. The resulting 903-gene network, which was organized into 11 modules, not only allowed classification of cyanobacterial responses to specific environmental variables but provided insight into the transcriptional network topology and led to the expansion of predicted regulons. When used in conjunction with genome sequence, the global transcript abundance allowed identification of putative post-transcriptional changes in expression as well as novel potential targets of both DNA binding proteins and asRNA regulators. The results offer a new perspective into the multi-level regulation that governs cellular adaptations of fast-growing physiologically robust cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 to changing environmental variables. It also extends a methodological knowledge-based framework for studying multi-scale regulatory mechanisms that operate in cyanobacteria. Finally, it provides valuable context for integrating systems-level data to enhance evidence-driven genomic annotation, especially in organisms where traditional context analyses cannot be implemented due to lack of operon-based functional organization.

  5. The effect of enhanced acetate influx on Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Kati; Vuorio, Eerika; Aro, Eva-Mari; Kallio, Pauli Tapio

    2017-02-02

    Acetate is a common microbial fermentative end-product, which can potentially be used as a supplementary carbon source to enhance the output of biotechnological production systems. This study focuses on the acetate metabolism of the photosynthetic cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 which is unable to grow on acetate as a sole carbon source but still can assimilate it via acetyl-CoA-derived metabolic intermediates. In order to gain insight into the acetate uptake, associated limitations and metabolic effects, a heterologous acetate transporter ActP from Escherichia coli was introduced into Synechocystis to facilitate the transport of supplemented acetate from the medium into the cell. The results show that enhanced acetate intake can efficiently promote the growth of the cyanobacterial host. The effect is apparent specifically under low-light conditions when the photosynthetic activity is low, and expected to result from increased availability of acetyl-CoA precursors, accompanied by changes induced in cellular glycogen metabolism which may include allocation of resources towards enhanced growth instead of glycogen accumulation. Despite the stimulated growth of the mutant, acetate is shown to suppress the activity of the photosynthetic apparatus, further emphasizing the contribution of glycolytic metabolism in the acetate-induced effect. The use of acetate by the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is at least partially restricted by the import into the cell. This can be improved by the introduction of a heterologous acetate transporter into the system, thereby providing a potential advantage by expanding the scope of acetate utilization for various biosynthetic processes.

  6. Temporal Gene Expression of the Cyanobacterium Arthrospira in Response to Gamma Rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badri, Hanène; Monsieurs, Pieter; Coninx, Ilse; Nauts, Robin; Wattiez, Ruddy; Leys, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    The edible cyanobacterium Arthrospira is resistant to ionising radiation. The cellular mechanisms underlying this radiation resistance are, however, still largely unknown. Therefore, additional molecular analysis was performed to investigate how these cells can escape from, protect against, or repair the radiation damage. Arthrospira cells were shortly exposed to different doses of 60Co gamma rays and the dynamic response was investigated by monitoring its gene expression and cell physiology at different time points after irradiation. The results revealed a fast switch from an active growth state to a kind of 'survival modus' during which the cells put photosynthesis, carbon and nitrogen assimilation on hold and activate pathways for cellular protection, detoxification, and repair. The higher the radiation dose, the more pronounced this global emergency response is expressed. Genes repressed during early response, suggested a reduction of photosystem II and I activity and reduced tricarboxylic acid (TCA) and Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycles, combined with an activation of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). For reactive oxygen species detoxification and restoration of the redox balance in Arthrospira cells, the results suggested a powerful contribution of the antioxidant molecule glutathione. The repair mechanisms of Arthrospira cells that were immediately switched on, involve mainly proteases for damaged protein removal, single strand DNA repair and restriction modification systems, while recA was not induced. Additionally, the exposed cells showed significant increased expression of arh genes, coding for a novel group of protein of unknown function, also seen in our previous irradiation studies. This observation confirms our hypothesis that arh genes are key elements in radiation resistance of Arthrospira, requiring further investigation. This study provides new insights into phasic response and the cellular pathways involved in the radiation resistance of

  7. Temporal Gene Expression of the Cyanobacterium Arthrospira in Response to Gamma Rays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanène Badri

    Full Text Available The edible cyanobacterium Arthrospira is resistant to ionising radiation. The cellular mechanisms underlying this radiation resistance are, however, still largely unknown. Therefore, additional molecular analysis was performed to investigate how these cells can escape from, protect against, or repair the radiation damage. Arthrospira cells were shortly exposed to different doses of 60Co gamma rays and the dynamic response was investigated by monitoring its gene expression and cell physiology at different time points after irradiation. The results revealed a fast switch from an active growth state to a kind of 'survival modus' during which the cells put photosynthesis, carbon and nitrogen assimilation on hold and activate pathways for cellular protection, detoxification, and repair. The higher the radiation dose, the more pronounced this global emergency response is expressed. Genes repressed during early response, suggested a reduction of photosystem II and I activity and reduced tricarboxylic acid (TCA and Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB cycles, combined with an activation of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP. For reactive oxygen species detoxification and restoration of the redox balance in Arthrospira cells, the results suggested a powerful contribution of the antioxidant molecule glutathione. The repair mechanisms of Arthrospira cells that were immediately switched on, involve mainly proteases for damaged protein removal, single strand DNA repair and restriction modification systems, while recA was not induced. Additionally, the exposed cells showed significant increased expression of arh genes, coding for a novel group of protein of unknown function, also seen in our previous irradiation studies. This observation confirms our hypothesis that arh genes are key elements in radiation resistance of Arthrospira, requiring further investigation. This study provides new insights into phasic response and the cellular pathways involved in the radiation

  8. Sorption and desorption studies of chromium(VI) from nonviable cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, V.K. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)], E-mail: vinodfcy@iitr.ernet.in; Rastogi, A. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)

    2008-06-15

    This communication presents results pertaining to the sorptive and desorptive studies carried out on chromium(VI) removal onto nonviable freshwater cyanobacterium (Nostoc muscorum) biomass. Influence of varying the conditions for removal of chromium(VI), such as the pH of aqueous solution, the dosage of biosorbent, the contact time with the biosorbent, the temperature for the removal of chromium, the effect of light metal ions and the adsorption-desorption studies were investigated. Sorption interaction of chromium on to cyanobacterial species obeyed both the first and the second-order rate equation and the experimental data showed good fit with both the Langmuir and freundlich adsorption isotherm models. The maximum adsorption capacity was 22.92 mg/g at 25 {sup o}C and pH 3.0. The adsorption process was endothermic and the values of thermodynamic parameters of the process were calculated. Various properties of the cyanobacterium, as adsorbent, explored in the characterization part were chemical composition of the adsorbent, surface area calculation by BET method and surface functionality by FTIR. Sorption-desorption of chromium into inorganic solutions and distilled water were observed and this indicated the biosorbent could be regenerated using 0.1 M HNO{sub 3} and EDTA with upto 80% recovery. The biosorbents were reused in five biosorption-desorption cycles without a significant loss in biosorption capacity. Thus, this study demonstrated that the cyanobacterial biomass N. muscorum could be used as an efficient biosorbent for the treatment of chromium(VI) bearing wastewater.

  9. Cellular responses and bioremoval of nonylphenol by the bloom-forming cyanobacterium Planktothrix agardhii 1113

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedeva, Nadezda; Zaytseva, Tatyana; Kuzikova, Irina

    2017-07-01

    Nonylphenol (NP) is extensively used in agricultural, industrial and household applications. Moreover, NP is the major breakdown product of the nonionic surfactants, nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEOs), the most widely used group of surfactants. Nonylphenol is persistent in the environment, highly toxic to aquatic organisms and is a potential endocrine disruptor. NP and NPEOs have been identified as priority hazardous substances under the Environmental Quality Standards Directive 2013/39/EU and are referred to in the list of substances of particular risk to the Baltic Sea. The toxicity of NP to the bloom-forming cyanobacterium Planktothrix agardhii 1113 isolated from the eastern Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea and the bioremoval of NP by P. agardhii were studied. NP in concentrations > 0.4 mg L- 1 suppressed cyanobacterial growth. The median effective concentration of NP for P. agardhii after 4 days of treatment (EC50) was 1.5 mg L- 1. The removal of NP from the culture medium was primarily due to abiotic processes and biodegradation by the cyanobacterium rather than sorption by the cells. NP significantly increased the photosynthetic pigments, extracellular proteins and soluble exopolysaccharides content. The cyanobacterial growth inhibition was accompanied by the increased synthesis of microcystin dm-RR and of the odorous metabolites, geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB), by P. agardhii 1113. NP also notably increased the microcystin released into the environment. Increased levels of extracellular proteins, soluble exopolysaccharides, microcystins and odorous metabolites may affect the microbial loop in aquatic ecosystems. An increased level of malondialdehyde (MDA) was indicative of the formation of free radicals in P. agardhii under NP stress, whereas increased levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH) and proline indicated the occurrence of a scavenging mechanism.

  10. All1371 is a polyphosphate-dependent glucokinase in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemke, Friederike; Beyer, Gabriele; Sawade, Linda; Saitov, Ali; Korte, Thomas; Maldener, Iris; Lockau, Wolfgang; Nürnberg, Dennis J; Volkmer, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    The polyphosphate glucokinases can phosphorylate glucose to glucose 6-phosphate using polyphosphate as the substrate. ORF all1371 encodes a putative polyphosphate glucokinase in the filamentous heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Here, ORF all1371 was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and its purified product was characterized. Enzyme activity assays revealed that All1371 is an active polyphosphate glucokinase that can phosphorylate both glucose and mannose in the presence of divalent cations in vitro. Unlike many other polyphosphate glucokinases, for which nucleoside triphosphates (e.g. ATP or GTP) act as phosphoryl group donors, All1371 required polyphosphate to confer its enzymic activity. The enzymic reaction catalysed by All1371 followed classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with kcat = 48.2 s(-1) at pH 7.5 and 28 °C and KM = 1.76 µM and 0.118 mM for polyphosphate and glucose, respectively. Its reaction mechanism was identified as a particular multi-substrate mechanism called the 'bi-bi ping-pong mechanism'. Bioinformatic analyses revealed numerous polyphosphate-dependent glucokinases in heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria. Viability of an Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 mutant strain lacking all1371 was impaired under nitrogen-fixing conditions. GFP promoter studies indicate expression of all1371 under combined nitrogen deprivation. All1371 might play a substantial role in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 under these conditions.

  11. Increased biomass production and glycogen accumulation in apcE gene deleted Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Ancy; Aikawa, Shimpei; Sasaki, Kengo; Matsuda, Fumio; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    The effect of phycobilisome antenna-truncation in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 on biomass production and glycogen accumulation have not yet been fully clarified. To investigate these effects here, the apcE gene, which encodes the anchor protein linking the phycobilisome to the thylakoid membrane, was deleted in a glucose tolerant strain of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Biomass production of the apcE-deleted strain under photoautotrophic and atmospheric air conditions was 1.6 times higher than that of strain PCC 6803 (1.32 ± 0.01 versus 0.84 ± 0.07 g cell-dry weight L(-1), respectively) after 15 days of cultivation. In addition, the glycogen content of the apcE-deleted strain (24.2 ± 0.7%) was also higher than that of strain PCC 6803 (11.1 ± 0.3%). Together, these results demonstrate that antenna truncation by deleting the apcE gene was effective for increasing biomass production and glycogen accumulation under photoautotrophic and atmospheric air conditions in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

  12. A data integration and visualization resource for the metabolic network of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maarleveld, Timo R; Boele, Joost; Bruggeman, Frank J; Teusink, Bas

    2014-03-01

    Data integration is a central activity in systems biology. The integration of genomic, transcript, protein, metabolite, flux, and computational data yields unprecedented information about the system level functioning of organisms. Often, data integration is done purely computationally, leaving the user with little insight in addition to statistical information. In this article, we present a visualization tool for the metabolic network of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, an important model cyanobacterium for sustainable biofuel production. We illustrate how this metabolic map can be used to integrate experimental and computational data for Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 systems biology and metabolic engineering studies. Additionally, we discuss how this map, and the software infrastructure that we supply with it, can be used in the development of other organism-specific metabolic network visualizations. In addition to the Python console package VoNDA (http://vonda.sf.net), we provide a working demonstration of the interactive metabolic map and the associated Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 genome-scale stoichiometric model, as well as various ready-to-visualize microarray data sets, at http://f-a-m-e.org/synechocytis.

  13. Identification of the n-1 fatty acid as an antibacterial constituent from the edible freshwater cyanobacterium Nostoc verrucosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oku, Naoya; Yonejima, Kohsuke; Sugawa, Takao; Igarashi, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Nostoc verrucosum occurs in cool, clear streams and its gelatinous colonies, called "ashitsuki," have been eaten in ancient Japan. Its ethanolic extract was found to inhibit the growth of Gram-positive bacteria and activity-guided fractionation yielded an unusual n-1 fatty acid, (9Z,12Z)-9,12,15-hexadecatrienoic acid (1), as one of the active principles. It inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus aureus at MIC 64 μg/mL.

  14. Main: SP8BFIBSP8AIB [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SP8BFIBSP8AIB S000183 16-Feb-2001 (last modified) seki One of SPBF binding site (SP...o (I.b.); SP8BF recognizes both SP8a and SP8b sequences; See also SP8BFIBSP8BIB (S000184); SP8BF activity is

  15. Main: SP8BFIBSP8BIB [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SP8BFIBSP8BIB S000184 16-Feb-2001 (last modified) seki One of SPBF binding site (SP...; SP8BF recognizes both SP8a and SP8b sequences; See also SP8BFIBSP8AIB (S000183); SP8BF activity is also fo

  16. Short Communication: Effects of temperature on growth, pigment composition and protein content of an Antarctic Cyanobacterium Nostoc commune

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RANJANA TRIPATHI

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Tripathi R, Dhuldhaj UP, Singh S. 2012. Short Communication: Effects of temperature on growth, pigment composition and protein content of an Antarctic Cyanobacterium Nostoc commune. Nusantara Bioscience 4: 134-137. Effect of temperature variation on biomass accumulation, pigment composition and protein content were studied for the cyanobacterium Nostoc commune, isolated from Antarctica. Results confirmed the psychrotrophic behavior (optimum growth temperature 25◦C of the cyanobacterium. Low temperature increased the duration of lag phase and exponential growth phase. Maximum increase in biomass was recorded on 24th day at 25◦C and on 12th day at 50C. The downshift from 25 to 5◦C had almost negligible effect on chl a content. Maximal protein content was recorded for cultures growing at 50C on 12th day. The carotenoids/chl a ratio was maximum (2.48 at 50C on 9th day. It remained almost constant for cultures growing at 5 and 350C. There was an induction in protein synthesis following downshift in temperature from 25 to 5◦C.

  17. Responses of a rice-field cyanobacterium Anabaena siamensis TISTR-8012 upon exposure to PAR and UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Rajesh P; Incharoensakdi, Aran; Madamwar, Datta

    2014-10-15

    The effects of PAR and UV radiation and subsequent responses of certain antioxidant enzymatic and non-enzymatic defense systems were studied in a rice field cyanobacterium Anabaena siamensis TISTR 8012. UV radiation resulted in a decline in growth accompanied by a decrease in chlorophyll a and photosynthetic efficiency. Exposure of cells to UV radiation significantly affected the differentiation of vegetative cells into heterocysts or akinetes. UV-B radiation caused the fragmentation of the cyanobacterial filaments conceivably due to the observed oxidative stress. A significant increase of reactive oxygen species in vivo and DNA strand breaks were observed in UV-B exposed cells followed by those under UV-A and PAR radiation, respectively. The UV-induced oxidative damage was alleviated due to an induction of antioxidant enzymatic/non-enzymatic defense systems. In response to UV irradiation, the studied cyanobacterium exhibited a significant increase in antioxidative enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase. Moreover, the cyanobacterium also synthesized some UV-absorbing/screening substances. HPLC coupled with a PDA detector revealed the presence of three compounds with UV-absorption maxima at 326, 331 and 345 nm. The induction of the biosynthesis of these UV-absorbing compounds was found under both PAR and UV radiation, thus suggesting their possible function as an active photoprotectant.

  18. Lab-Scale Study of the Calcium Carbonate Dissolution and Deposition by Marine Cyanobacterium Phormidium subcapitatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakis, S. G.; Dragoeva, E. G.; Lavrenyuk, T. I.; Rogochiy, A.; Gerasimenko, L. M.; McKay, D. S.; Brown, I. I.

    2006-01-01

    Suggestions that calcification in marine organisms changes in response to global variations in seawater chemistry continue to be advanced (Wilkinson, 1979; Degens et al. 1985; Kazmierczak et al. 1986; R. Riding 1992). However, the effect of [Na+] on calcification in marine cyanobacteria has not been discussed in detail although [Na+] fluctuations reflect both temperature and sea-level fluctuations. The goal of these lab-scale studies therefore was to study the effect of environmental pH and [Na+] on CaCO3 deposition and dissolution by marine cyanobacterium Phormidium subcapitatum. Marine cyanobacterium P. subcapitatum has been cultivated in ASN-III medium. [Ca2+] fluctuations were monitored with Ca(2+) probe. Na(+) concentrations were determined by the initial solution chemistry. It was found that the balance between CaCO3 dissolution and precipitation induced by P. subcapitatum grown in neutral ASN III medium is very close to zero. No CaCO3 precipitation induced by cyanobacterial growth occurred. Growth of P. subcapitatum in alkaline ASN III medium, however, was accompanied by significant oscillations in free Ca(2+) concentration within a Na(+) concentration range of 50-400 mM. Calcium carbonate precipitation occurred during the log phase of P. subcapitatum growth while carbonate dissolution was typical for the stationary phase of P. subcapitatum growth. The highest CaCO3 deposition was observed in the range of Na(+) concentrations between 200-400 mM. Alkaline pH also induced the clamping of P. subcapitatum filaments, which appeared to have a strong affinity to envelop particles of chemically deposited CaCO3 followed by enlargement of those particles size. EDS analysis revealed the presence of Mg-rich carbonate (or magnesium calcite) in the solution containing 10-100 mM Na(+); calcite in the solution containing 200 mM Na(+); and aragonite in the solution containing with 400 mM Na(+). Typical present-day seawater contains xxmM Na(+). Early (Archean) seawater was

  19. Parasitismo por Giardia sp. e Cryptosporidium sp. em Coendou villosus Parasitism by Giardia sp. and Cryptosporidium sp. in Coendou villosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Fabio Soares

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi verificar o possível parasitismo por Giardia sp. e Cryptosporidium sp. em amostras de fezes de ouriço-cacheiro (Coendou villosus. As amostras foram analisadas pelo método de centrífugo-flutuação com sulfato de zinco e apresentaram elevada infecção por cistos de Giardia sp. e por oocistos de Cryptosporidium sp., embora os animais não apresentassem sinal clínico decorrente disso.This research was aimed at verifing the possible parasitism by Giardia sp. and Cryptosporidium sp. in porcupine (Coendou villosus faeces samples. Samples were analyzed by the centrifugal-flotation method with zinc sulphate and showed high infection by cysts of Giardia sp. and by oocysts of Cryptosporidium sp., although the animals did not show any associated clinical sign.

  20. Comparative studies on two ferredoxins from the cyanobacterium Nostoc strain MAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, K G; Rogers, L J; Haslett, B G; Boulter, D; Cammack, R

    1978-06-15

    Two ferredoxins were isolated from the cyanobacterium Nostoc strain MAC grown autotrophically in the light or heterotrophically in the dark. In either case approximately three times as much ferredoxin I as ferredoxin II was obtained. Both ferredoxins had absorption maxima at 276, 282 (shoulder), 330, 423 and 465 nm in the oxidized state, and each possessed a single 2 Fe-2S active centre. Their isoelectric points were approx. 3.2. The midpoint redox potentials of the ferredoxins differed markedly; that of ferredoxin I was --350mV and that of ferredoxin II was --445mV, at pH 8.0. The midpoint potential of ferredoxin II was unusual in being pH dependent. Ferredoxin I was most active in supporting NADP+ photoreduction by chloroplasts, whereas ferredoxin II was somewhat more active in pyruvate decarboxylation by the phosphoroclastic system of Clostridum pasteurianum. Though the molecular weights of the ferredoxins determined by ultracentrifugation were the same within experimetnal error, the amino acid compositions showed marked differences. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of ferredoxins I and II were determined by means of an automatic sequencer. There are 11--12 differences between the sequences of the first 32 residues. It appears that the two ferredoxins have evolved separately to fulfil different roles in the organism.