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Sample records for cutaneous injection-related infection

  1. Vaccinations against cutaneous Leishmania infection.

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    Kronenberg, K; Brosch, S; Von Stebut, E

    2008-04-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is an endemic disease with increasing incidence, even in Europe. Recently, it has attracted more attention due to reactivation in immunocompromised hosts, e.g. in the context of HIV. Therapeutic options range from topical treatment to systemic therapy for more complex cases. A vaccine does not exist at present. Despite of several attempts, vaccine generation has proven to be difficult even though protective immunity against this obligate intracellular protozoan parasite is dependent on the development of antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells capable of releasing IFN?. IFN?, in turn, activates phagocytic host cells to generate oxidative radicals and to eliminate the parasite. This review will describe the basic immunology leading to the development of protective immunity in infected individuals. In addition, the authors will focus on highlighting the different approaches utilized for vaccine development and describe what a efficient vaccine may consist of. Combined intensive research in the fields of basic parasitology and immunology may allow for the generation of an efficacious vaccine against this important human pathogen in the near future.

  2. Cutaneous manifestations of Helicobacter cinaedi infection.

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    Shimizu, Satoko; Inokuma, Daisuke; Watanabe, Mika; Sakai, Toshiya; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tsuchiya, Kikuo; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2013-03-27

    Helicobacter cinaedi causes gastroenteritis and bacter-aemia, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. Although cellulitis is sometimes reported to accompany infection by this pathogen, the cutaneous manifestations are poorly understood. To clarify the characteristic cutaneous features, 47 cases of H. cinaedi bacteraemia experienced at Sapporo City General Hospital as nosocomial infection were retrospectively evaluated. Thirty-four percent (16 cases) of the patients showed cutaneous lesions. They all had sudden onset of erythemas accompanied by high temperature. The most common cutaneous manifestations were found to be superficial cellulitis, which results in painful erythemas or infiltrated erythematous plaques on the extremities. These skin lesions can be an early clinical indicator of H. cinaedi bacteraemia in the setting of nosocomial infection.

  3. Cutaneous mixed infections in AIDS.

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    Piérard, G E; Piérard-Franchimont, C; Estrada, J A; Rurangirwa, A; Dosal, F L

    1990-02-01

    We report a new case of mixed infection occurring at the same site of the skin in a human immune deficiency virus-positive patient. Hyperkeratotic and crusted erosions contained fusospirochetal organisms, Cryptococcus neoformans, and another unidentified fungus.

  4. [Cutaneous nocardiosis as an opportunistic infection].

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    Bogaard, H J; Erkelens, G W; Faber, W R; de Vries, P J

    2004-03-13

    A 46-year-old man who had been treated with azathioprine and budesonide for Crohn's disease for the past eight years developed a purulent skin condition on the right ring finger. Despite surgical drainage and treatment with amoxicillin and flucloxacillin, the condition spread itself over the hand and lower arm, partly per continuum and partly in jumps. The patient did not feel ill and there were no systemic symptoms. Ultimately, Nocardia asteroides was cultured from the wound and complete cure was achieved after 8 months' treatment with co-trimoxazole. Infections with Nocardia spp. are rare but may occur more often and run a more fulminant course in patients under treatment with immunosuppressants. Cutaneous nocardiosis generally has a characteristic lymphogenous spreading pattern, but an atypical picture with pustules, pyoderma, cellulitis or abscess formation is also possible. In non-cutaneous nocardiosis there is usually pneumonia or lung abscess, possibly with secondary haematogenous spread to the central nervous system or skin. Culturing Nocardia requires more time than usual but can be promoted by special culture media. Treatment of the infection with co-trimoxazole is the method of choice and is almost always successful in cases of cutaneous nocardiosis.

  5. Mycobacterium fortuitum cutaneous infection from amateur tattoo.

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    Suvanasuthi, Saroj; Wongpraparut, Chanisada; Pattanaprichakul, Penvadee; Bunyaratavej, Sumanas

    2012-06-01

    A case of cutaneous Mycobacterium fortuitum infection after receiving an amateur tattoo is reported. A few days after tattooing, an otherwise healthy 25-year-old Thai male presented with multiple discrete erythematous papules confined to the tattoo area. He was initially treated with topical steroid and oral antihistamine without improvement. Skin biopsy was carried out, and the histopathology showed mixed cell granuloma with a foreign body reaction (tattoo color pigments). The acid-fast bacilli stain was positive. The tissue culture grew M. fortuitum two weeks later. He was treated with clarithromycin 1,000 mg/day and ciprofloxacin 1,000 mg/day for 10 months with complete response. From the clinical aspect, tattoo-associated rapidly growing mycobacterium infection might be difficult to differentiate from the pigment-based skin reactions. Skin biopsy for histopathology and tissue culture for Mycobacterium probably will be needed in arriving at the diagnosis.

  6. Cutaneous Mycobacterium abscessus Infection Associated with Mesotherapy Injection

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    Pranee Wongkitisophon

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Non-tuberculous mycobacterial skin infections have an increasing incidence. In immunocompetent patients, they usually follow local trauma. We present a case of cutaneous Mycobacterium abscessus infection following mesotherapy. The lesions were successfully treated with a combination of clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and doxycycline. Atypical mycobacterial infection should be suspected in patients who develop late-onset skin and soft tissue infection after cutaneous injury, injection, and surgical intervention, particularly if they do not respond to conventional antibiotic treatment.

  7. Primary Cutaneous Chrysosporium Infection following Ear Piercing: A Case Report

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    Poonkiat Suchonwanit

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Chrysosporium is a large genus of saprophytic fungi that is commonly found in the soil. Infection caused by this organism is rare in humans and typically occurs in immunocompromised patients. Primary cutaneous Chrysosporium infection is relatively rare and has been reported in a heart transplant patient. The prognosis is usually favorable, but very poor in the setting of persistent profound immunosuppression. We herein report a case of primary cutaneous Chrysosporium infection following ear piercing in an immunocompetent patient. It is important for clinicians to consider this condition in patients with slow-onset skin and soft tissue infection following cutaneous injury, even in an immunocompetent setting.

  8. Mycobacterium marinum cutaneous infections acquired from occupations and hobbies.

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    Kullavanijaya, P; Sirimachan, S; Bhuddhavudhikrai, P

    1993-07-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTB) infections are not commonly diagnosed in Thailand. The dissertation of reported cases among 10 published reports of 44 cases within 20 years revealed only six cases of cutaneous infections in which M. marinum was not included. The proven cases of M. marinum infection were studied at the Institute of Dermatology, Bangkok from 1981 to 1990. The clinical data, histopathology, tuberculin test, chest x-ray, and treatments were recorded. M. marinum skin infection accounted for 18 cases (81.8% of NTB skin infection), 10 men and 8 women. A history of preceding trauma occurred in 11 cases (61.1%), most of which were negligible wounds or minor abrasions. Twelve cases (66.7%) were in contact with organisms in their occupations and hobbies associated with fish and water exposure. Eighteen cases of M. marinum cutaneous infection acquired from occupations and hobbies were reported. The term "M. marinum cutaneous infection" or "M. marinum granuloma" instead of swimming pool granuloma or fish tank granuloma was proposed. According to this study, cotrimoxazole was the most appropriate drug for the treatment of M. marinum cutaneous infection.

  9. Primary cutaneous plasmablastic lymphoma revealing clinically unsuspected HIV infection*

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    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Abbade, Luciana P. Fernandes; Guiotoku, Marcelo Massaki; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    Plasmablastic lymphoma is a rare subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma more frequently diagnosed in immunosuppressed patients, mainly HIV-infected. Primary cutaneous plasmablastic lymphoma is extremely rare, and in this patient it was the first clinical manifestation of unsuspected HIV-infection. PMID:27579749

  10. Cutaneous Mycobacterium massiliense infection associated with cupping therapy.

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    Lee, S Y; Sin, J I; Yoo, H K; Kim, T S; Sung, K Y

    2014-12-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous organisms that are now seen as emerging human pathogens. NTM infections are very difficult to diagnose and treat, therefore a high index of clinical suspicion is needed for diagnosis. Cutaneous NTM infections have been primarily reported associated with previous invasive procedures. We report the case of a healthy 59-year-old woman who developed recurring abdominal skin lesions caused by Mycobacterium massiliense after she underwent noninvasive cupping therapy. We identified the pathogen using a PCR assay targeting the erm(41) gene of the bacterium. The patient was treated successfully by en bloc excision and long-term antibiotic treatment. This case shows that cutaneous infection with M. massiliense may occur in an immunocompetent person without an antecedent invasive procedure.

  11. [Sporotrichoid cutaneous infection by Mycobacterium haemophilum in an AIDS patient].

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    Cameselle, D; Hernández, J; Francès, A; Montenegro, T; Cañas, F; Borrego, L

    2007-04-01

    We report a case of primary cutaneous infection by Mycobacterium haemophilum after the bite of an aquarium fish in a severely immunodepressed AIDS patient. Clinical features consisted in nodular and ulcerative lesions that followed a sporotrichoid pattern. Histological study of nodular lesions showed a granulomatous dermatitis with numerous acid-fast bacilli. The mycobacterium was identified 3 months later by genetic hybridization from a cultive in solid medium. Combined therapy with isoniazid, rifampin, clarithromycin, ethambutol, amikacin and ciprofloxacin resulted in complete resolution of the lesions. Infection by Mycobacterium haemophilum is a rare mycobacteriosis that usually affects immunodepressed patients. The most common clinical manifestations are cutaneous lesions but the development of sporotrichoid nodular lymphangitis is exceptional.

  12. Cutaneous Paecilomyces lilacinus infections in immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients

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    Shahindokht Bassiri-Jahromi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Paecilomyces is a genus of saprophytic fungus that has been associated, in rare instances, with human disease. We report two cases in which Paecilomyces lilacinus was isolated from cutaneous and subcutaneous lesions in an immunocompromised and an immunocompetent host. The first case was a subcutaneous infection due to P. lilacinus in a patient with a renal transplant and diabetes mellitus. The second case was an immunocompetent young woman who developed a cutaneous infection, with no identified predisposing factors. A biopsy from each patient provided an initial diagnosis of fungal elements in the tissues under examination and multiple positive fungal cultures were obtained from the tissue biopsy samples. Both microscopic and macroscopic examinations of the biopsy revealed the presence of P. lilacinus. Each of the two cases was successfully treated with oral ketoconazole (200 mg/day and itraconazole. We also review previously reported cases in which the clinical history and response to therapy were noted.

  13. CUTANEOUS MYCOBACTERIUM MARINUM INFECTION DIAGNOSED BY PCR-RFLP ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-jie; WANG Hong-sheng; TAO Shi-qin; WU Qin-xue; LIU Wei-da

    2009-01-01

    Objective To identify Mycobacterium marinum (M. marinum) inducing misdiagnosis and treatment failure.Methods The lesional specimen of patient with cutaneous M. marinum were cultivated on Lwenstein-Jensen medium. The isolate was identified by biochemical tests and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the hsp65 gene.Results Smooth and non-pigmented colonies were noted after incubation at 32 ℃ for 2 weeks. The isolate was acid-fast bacilli and confirmed as M. marinum by biochemical tests and PCR-RFLP.Conclusion For a correct diagnosis of cutaneous M. marinum infection, it is crucial for clinicians to have a high index of suspicion, obtain the history of exposure and trauma and understand growth characteristics of the organism. Compared with conventional biochemical techniques, PCR-RFLP analysis is a more rapid, accurate and reliable method for mycobacterial identification to species level.

  14. Asymptomatic infection with American cutaneous leishmaniasis: epidemiological and immunological studies

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    Andrade-Narvaez, Fernando J; Loría-Cervera, Elsy Nalleli; Sosa-Bibiano, Erika I; Van Wynsberghe, Nicole R

    2016-01-01

    American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) is a major public health problem caused by vector-borne protozoan intracellular parasites from the genus Leishmania, subgenera Viannia and Leishmania. Asymptomatic infection is the most common outcome after Leishmania inoculation. There is incomplete knowledge of the biological processes explaining the absence of signs or symptoms in most cases while other cases present a variety of clinical findings. Most studies of asymptomatic infection have been conducted in areas of endemic visceral leishmaniasis. In contrast, asymptomatic ACL infection has been neglected. This review is focused on the following: (1) epidemiological studies supporting the existence of asymptomatic ACL infection and (2) immunological studies conducted to understand the mechanisms responsible for controlling the parasite and avoiding tissue damage. PMID:27759762

  15. Asymptomatic infection with American cutaneous leishmaniasis: epidemiological and immunological studies

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    Fernando J Andrade-Narvaez

    Full Text Available American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL is a major public health problem caused by vector-borne protozoan intracellular parasites from the genus Leishmania, subgenera Viannia and Leishmania. Asymptomatic infection is the most common outcome after Leishmania inoculation. There is incomplete knowledge of the biological processes explaining the absence of signs or symptoms in most cases while other cases present a variety of clinical findings. Most studies of asymptomatic infection have been conducted in areas of endemic visceral leishmaniasis. In contrast, asymptomatic ACL infection has been neglected. This review is focused on the following: (1 epidemiological studies supporting the existence of asymptomatic ACL infection and (2 immunological studies conducted to understand the mechanisms responsible for controlling the parasite and avoiding tissue damage.

  16. Disseminated infection due to Saksenaea vasiformis secondary to cutaneous mucormycosis.

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    Gómez-Camarasa, Cristina; Rojo-Martín, María Dolores; Miranda-Casas, Consuelo; Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Aliaga-Martínez, Luis; Labrador-Molina, José Miguel; Navarro-Marí, José María

    2014-02-01

    Mucormycosis is an uncommon opportunistic fungal infection caused by Zygomycetes. It usually affects immunocompromised, diabetic and trauma patients with infected wounds. We report a case of disseminated infection secondary to facial cutaneous mucormycosis caused by Saksenaea vasiformis in a diabetic patient who had a farming accident causing him severe head injury. The patient was treated with a combination of surgical debridement and antifungal therapy with liposomal amphotericin B, but he had a slow and fatal outcome. In cases of tissue necrosis following trauma involving wound contact with soil (i.e., potential fungal contamination), testing for the presence of Zygomycetes fungi such as S. vasiformis in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients is crucial. The reason is that this infection usually has a rapid progression and may be fatal if appropriate treatment is not administered.

  17. Frequency of Cutaneous Fungal Infections and Azole Resistance of the Isolates in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

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    Omid Raiesi; Mansour Siavash; Faezeh Mohammadi; Javaher Chabavizadeh; Behzad Mahaki; Mehrnoush Maherolnaghsh; Parvin Dehghan

    2017-01-01

    Background: Diabetic patients are more susceptible to cutaneous fungal infections. The higher blood sugar levels cause increasing the cutaneous fungal infections in these patients. The main objective of this study was to find the frequency of fungal infections among cutaneous lesions of diabetic patients and to investigate azole antifungal agent susceptibility of the isolates. Materials and Methods: In this study, type 1diabetes (n = 78) and type 2 diabetes (n = 44) comprised 47 cases (38.5%)...

  18. First Cases of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania (Viannia) naiffi Infection in Surinam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P.A.M. van Thiel; T. van Gool; P.A. Kager; A. Bart

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis in Surinam is generally caused by infection by Leishmania guyanensis. We report three cases of infection with Leishmania (Viannia) naiffi, a Leishmania species not described from Surinam before. Treatment with pentamidine proved to be effective

  19. Diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis: Co-infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV

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    Chaudhary Raju

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a disease caused by intracellular protozoal parasites belonging to the genus Leishmania. Immune suppression caused by HIV infection is an important factor for atypical presentation and widespread progression of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Diffuse (disseminated cutaneous leishmaniasis and HIV co-infection is emerging as an extremely serious new disease. A 38-year-old HIV-positive man presented with a 12-month history of a progressive papule and nodular eruptions on face and extremities with infiltrations of nasal and oral mucosa. We report the case due to its atypical, widespread muco-cutaneous presentation masquerading as lepromatous leprosy.

  20. Reflectance confocal microscopy for cutaneous infections and infestations.

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    Cinotti, E; Perrot, J L; Labeille, B; Cambazard, F

    2016-05-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a high-resolution emerging imaging technique that allows non-invasive diagnosis of several cutaneous disorders. A systematic review of the literature on the use of RCM for the study of infections and infestations has been performed to evaluate the current use of this technique and its possible future applications in this field. RCM is particularly suitable for the identification of Sarcoptes scabies, Demodex folliculorum, Ixodes, Dermatophytes and Candida species in the clinical practice and for the follow-up after treatment. The cytopathic effect of herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus and molluscipoxvirus is also detectable by this imaging technique even in a pre-vesicular stage. In addition, thanks to its non-invasiveness, RCM allows pathophysiological studies.

  1. Chronic cutaneous varicella zoster virus infection complicating dermatomyositis.

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    Hoesly, Fridolin J; Sluzevich, Jason C

    2014-04-01

    Chronic cutaneous varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection has not been previously reported or characterized as a complication of dermatomyositis. Two patients with non-malignancy-associated dermatomyositis, treated with long-term prednisone and methotrexate, developed persistent, painless ulcers ultimately established to be secondary to chronic VZV. The absence of pain or a history suggestive of acute VZV, and the lack of characteristic histopathology, resulted in a lengthy delay in diagnosis. Polymerase chain reaction and tissue immunohistochemistry were positive for VZV, and treatment with valacyclovir resulted in complete clearance. Diagnostic testing for VZV should thus be considered in the evaluation of ulcerative lesions in patients with dermatomyositis. The increased incidence of acute VZV in combination with the nature and duration of immunosuppressive treatment in this patient population may be contributory.

  2. [Cutaneous Malassezia infections and Malassezia associated dermatoses: An update].

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    Nenoff, P; Krüger, C; Mayser, P

    2015-06-01

    The lipophilic yeast fungus Malassezia (M.) spp. is the only fungal genus or species which is part of the physiological human microbiome. Today, at least 14 different Malassezia species are known; most of them can only be identified using molecular biological techniques. As a facultative pathogenic microorganism, Malassezia represents the causative agent both of superficial cutaneous infections and of blood stream infections. Pityriasis versicolor is the probably most frequent infection caused by Malassezia. Less common, Malassezia folliculitis occurs. There is only an episodic report on Malassezia-induced onychomycosis. Seborrhoeic dermatitis represents a Malassezia-associated inflammatory dermatosis. In addition, Malassezia allergenes should be considered as the trigger of "Head-Neck"-type atopic dermatitis. Ketoconazole possesses the strongest in vitro activity against Malassezia, and represents the treatment of choice for topical therapy of pityriasis versicolor. Alternatives include other azole antifungals but also the allylamine terbinafine and the hydroxypyridone antifungal agent ciclopirox olamine. "Antiseborrhoeic" agents, e.g. zinc pyrithione, selenium disulfide, and salicylic acid, are also effective in pityriasis versicolor. The drug of choice for oral treatment of pityriasis versicolor is itraconazole; an effective alternative represents fluconazole. Seborrhoeic dermatitis is best treated with topical medication, including topical corticosteroids and antifungal agents like ketoconazole or sertaconazole. Calcineurin inhibitors, e.g. pimecrolimus and tacrolimus, are reliable in seborrhoeic dermatitis, however are used off-label.

  3. Post-traumatic course complicated by cutaneous infection with Absidia corymbifera.

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    Seguin, P; Musellec, H; Le Gall, F; Chevrier, S; Le Bouquin, V; Malledant, Y

    1999-10-01

    Cutaneous mucormycosis is a rare but serious infection in trauma patients. Reported here is the case of a young patient with cutaneous mucormycosis due to Absidia corymbifera probably caused by a soil-contaminated wound. Despite daily surgical debridement and amphotericin B therapy, cure could be achieved only by amputation of the lower limb.

  4. Comparison of the infectivity of Trypanosoma cruzi insect-derived metacyclic trypomastigotes after mucosal and cutaneous contaminative challenges

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    Christopher Steven Eickhoff

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi infects humans when infected triatomine vector excreta contaminate breaks in skin or mucosal surfaces. T. cruzi insect-derived metacyclic trypomastigotes (IMT invade through gastric mucosa after oral challenges without any visible inflammatory changes, while cutaneous and conjunctival infections result in obvious local physical signs. In this study we compared the infectivity of T. cruzi IMT in mice after cutaneous and oral contaminative challenges simulating natural infections. The 50% infective dose (ID50 for oral challenge was 100 fold lower than the ID50for cutaneous challenge, indicating that oral mucosal transmission is more efficient than cutaneous transmission.

  5. Cutaneous Fusarium infection in a renal transplant recipient: a case report

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    Singh J Chandra

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Fungal infections in the immunocompromised host are fairly common. Of the mycoses, Fusarium species are an emerging threat. Fusarium infections have been reported in solid organ transplants, with three reports of the infection in patients who had received renal transplants. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of an isolated cutaneous lesion as the only form of infection. Case presentation We report the case of a 45-year-old South Indian man who presented with localized cutaneous Fusarium infection following a renal transplant. Conclusion In an immunocompromised patient, even an innocuous lesion needs to be addressed with the initiation of prompt treatment.

  6. Rapidly progressive cutaneous Rhizopus microsporus infection presenting as Fournier's gangrene in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia.

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    Durand, C M; Alonso, C D; Subhawong, A P; Kwiatkowski, N P; Showel, M; Carroll, K C; Marr, K A

    2011-08-01

    Members of the genus Rhizopus within the class Zygomycetes can cause devastating opportunistic infections. Cutaneous disease arising from direct inoculation of fungal spores has the potential to disseminate widely. Here, we describe a dramatic case of cutaneous Rhizopus infection involving the penis in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia. Despite aggressive surgical debridement, systemic antifungal therapy, and donor lymphocyte infusion, the infection was ultimately fatal. This case illustrates the unique diagnostic and therapeutic challenges in the clinical management of cutaneous Rhizopus infection.

  7. Polymerase chain reaction-based molecular diagnosis of cutaneous infections in dermatopathology.

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    Swick, Brian L

    2012-12-01

    Conventional methods, including microscopy, culture, and serologic studies, are a mainstay in the diagnosis of cutaneous infection. However, owing to limitations associated with these techniques, such as low sensitivity for standard microscopy and in the case of culture delay in diagnosis, polymerase chain-reaction based molecular techniques have taken on an expanding role in the diagnosis of infectious processes in dermatopathology. In particular, these assays are a useful adjunct in the diagnosis of cutaneous tuberculosis, atypical mycobacterial infection, leprosy, Lyme disease, syphilis, rickettsioses, leishmaniasis, and some fungal and viral infections. Already in the case of tuberculosis and atypical mycobacterial infection, standardized polymerase chain-reaction assays are commonly used for diagnostic purposes. With time, additional molecular-based techniques will decrease in cost and gain increased standardization, thus delivering rapid diagnostic confirmation for many difficult-to-diagnose cutaneous infections from standard formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens.

  8. [Cutaneous and oral manifestations in HIV-infected children and adults--169 cases].

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    Mihalache, Doina; Luca, V; Nicolau, Cristina; Teodorescu, Irina; Prisăcariu, L J; Macovei, Simona

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate cutaneous and oral manifestations in infected HIV patients. We retrospectively analyzed 169 cases admitted in Infectiouse Disease Department of Iaşi in 2001-2002 period. Cutaneous and oral manifestations were: candidiasis (99 cases), herpes virus infectious (36 cases), scabies and straphylococcal/streptococcal skin disease (26 cases), prurigo nodularis, psoriasis and verruca vulgaris (9 cases). Children of 0-13 year old group was 75.73 percent. Classification of HIV infection was related with CD4 count for 166 cases. Twelve cases with oral pharyngitis candidiasis, scabies and streptococcal skin diseases was 2-3 recurrent episodes of manifestations. Etiotrop treatment was associated with HAART therapy. Cutaneous and oral manifestations are occurred frequently in HIV infected patients, with a various etiology, but the severity, persistence and its evolution did not evaluate.

  9. Seroprevalence of cutaneous human papillomaviruses (HPVs) among men in the multinational HPV Infection in Men study.

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    Rahman, Shams; Pierce Campbell, Christine M; Waterboer, Tim; Rollison, Dana E; Ingles, Donna J; Torres, B Nelson; Michel, Angelika; Sudenga, Staci L; Pawlita, Michael; Villa, Luisa L; Lazcano Ponce, Eduardo; Borenstein, Amy R; Wang, Wei; Giuliano, Anna R

    2016-12-01

    Data on cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) seroprevalence are primarily derived from skin cancer case-control studies. Few studies have reported the seroprevalence of cutaneous HPV among healthy men. This study investigated the seroprevalence of cutaneous HPV types and associated risk factors among men residing in Brazil, Mexico and the USA. Six hundred men were randomly selected from the HPV Infection in Men study. Archived serum specimens were tested for antibodies against 14 cutaneous HPV genotypes, β-HPV types (5/8/12/14/17/22/23/24/38/48), α-HPV 27, γ-HPV 4, µ-HPV1 and ν-HPV 41 using a glutathione S-transferase L1-based multiplex serology assay. Risk factor data were collected by a questionnaire. Binomial proportions were used to estimate seroprevalence, and logistic regression to examine factors associated with seropositivity. Overall, 65.4 % of men were seropositive to ≥1 of the 14 cutaneous HPV types, and 39.0 % were positive for ≥1 β-HPV types. Seroprevalence was 8.9, 30.9, 28.6 and 9.4 % for α-HPV 27, γ-HPV 4, µ-HPV 1 and ν-HPV 41, respectively. In multivariate analyses, seropositivity for any cutaneous HPV type was associated with higher education [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.75; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.08-2.83], and seropositivity of any β-HPV type was significantly associated with increasing age (AOR 1.72; 95 % CI 1.12-2.63, for men aged 31-44 years vs men aged 18-30 years). Other factors associated with various type-specific cutaneous HPV seropositivity included country, circumcision and lifetime number of male sexual partners. These data indicate that exposure to cutaneous HPV is common. Future studies are needed to assess the role of cutaneous HPV in diseases.

  10. Cutaneous fungal infection in a renal transplantation patient due to a rare fungus belonging to order Pleosporales

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    S Galipothu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infections are being increasingly reported from immuno-compromised as well as immuno-competent patients. Transplant patients are on long term immunosuppressive therapy which makes them highly vulnerable to opportunistic fungal infections .These infections can be cutaneous or systemic. Several fungi have been reported to be the culprits such as Candida spp., Aspergillus spp., C. neoformans, P. carinii, and zygomycetes group of fungi. Cutaneous infections are most commonly caused by Pityriasis (tinea versicolor, dermatophytes, and candida sp but these days the demtiaceous fungi are becoming more frequently reported .Here we report a case of post renal transplant cutaneous infection caused by dematiaceous fungus belonging to the order Pleosporales

  11. Cutaneous Human Papillomavirus Infection and Development of Subsequent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin

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    Shalaka S. Hampras

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV infection in the development of subsequent cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC is unknown. Pathologically confirmed cases of SCC (n=150 enrolled in a previously conducted case-control study were included in a retrospective cohort study to examine the association of cutaneous HPV at the time of SCC diagnosis with the risk of subsequent SCC development. Data on HPV seropositivity, HPV DNA in eyebrow hairs (EB and SCC tumors were available from the parent study. Incidence of subsequent SCC was estimated using person-years of follow up. Cox Proportional Hazards ratios were estimated to evaluate the associations of both, HPV seropositivity and HPV DNA positivity with subsequent SCC. The five year cumulative incidence of subsequent SCC was 72%. Seropositivity to cutaneous HPV was not associated with the risk of subsequent SCC (HR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.41–1.67. Any beta HPV infection in EB was associated with reduced risk (HR = 0.30, 95% CI = 0.11–0.78 of subsequent SCC among cases who were positive for beta HPV DNA in tumor tissue. Infection with beta HPV type 2 (HR = 0.32, 95% CI = 0.12–0.86 in EB was associated with reduced risk of subsequent SCC among HPV DNA positive SCCs. In conclusion, beta HPV infection was inversely associated with the risk of subsequent SCC.

  12. Co-infection of Bovine Papillomavirus and feline-associated Papillomavirus in bovine cutaneous warts.

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    da Silva, M A R; Carvalho, C C R; Coutinho, L C A; Reis, M C; de Aragão Batista, M V; de Castro, R S; Dos Anjos, F B R; de Freitas, A C

    2012-12-01

    The diversity of papillomavirus (PV) found in bovine cutaneous warts from Brazilian cattle was evaluated using the PCR technique with the utilization of consensus primers MY09/11 and by PCR using Bovine Papillomavirus (BPV) type-specific primers followed by sequencing. Eleven cutaneous warts from 6 cattle herds were selected. Six warts were positive for the presence of PV. The presence of BPV types 1, 2, 3, 6 and feline sarcoid-associated PV (FeSarPV) in cutaneous wart lesions, as well as the presence of co-infections, was found. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that FeSarPV is described co-infecting a cutaneous wart in Brazil. The present study confirms the previous finding of FeSarPV infecting cattle. These results show the necessity of more studies to investigate the diversity of PV in cattle, its diversity and the possibility of co-infection in cattle and other animals. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Successful treatment of Balamuthia mandrillaris amoebic infection with extensive neurological and cutaneous involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Dalila Y; Seas, Carlos; Bravo, Francisco; Legua, Pedro; Ramos, Cesar; Cabello, Alfonso M; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2010-07-15

    Granulomatous amoebic encephalitis caused by Balamuthia mandrillaris is an uncommon infection for which there is no optimal therapy. We describe a young, female patient who presented with extensive cutaneous and neurological involvement and who recovered after receiving prolonged treatment with miltefosine, fluconazole, and albendazole.

  14. Autosomal recessive chronic granulomatous disease presenting with cutaneous dermatoses and ocular infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, L C M; Manson, A L; Hardman, C; Carton, J; Seneviratne, S L; Ninis, N

    2013-04-01

    Dermatoses such as eczematous dermatitis and cutaneous infection are recognized presentations of primary immunodeficiency (PID). However, atopic dermatitis affects approximately 10% of infants, and cutaneous infections are not uncommon in children, therefore the challenge for the dermatologist is to distinguish the few patients that have PID from the many that do not. We report on a 6-year-old girl who was ultimately diagnosed with autosomal recessive chronic granulomatous disease (AR-CGD) after presenting to various hospitals with dermatitis, scalp plaques recalcitrant to treatment, and recurrent infections over a 3-year period, and describe some aspects of her diagnosis and management. This report highlights the importance of considering rare disorders such as AR-CGD in the differential diagnosis of recurrent or recalcitrant dermatological infections in children.

  15. The spectrum of cutaneous infection in diabetic patients with hepatitis C virus infection: A single-center study from Egypt

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    Mohamed A El-Khalawany

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Hepatitis-C virus (HCV infection and diabetes mellitus (DM have a significant association with skin disorders. Aims: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of HCV infection on the pattern of cutaneous infections among diabetic patients. Methods and Material: A prospective study included diabetic patients who attended Al-Hussein University hospital, Cairo during the period from 2008 to 2010. Patients were examined for skin infections, and investigated for HCV infection. Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS (version 11.5. Results: The study included 163 patients (102 males and 61 females with a mean age of 46.2 ± 4.83 years. Ninety five patients (58.3% were HCV+ve (group A while 68 patients (41.8% were HCV-ve (group B. Skin infections in group A included fungal (48.4%, viral (26.3%, bacterial (22.1% and parasitic (3.2% while in group B, the spectrum included bacterial (41.2%, fungal (39.7%, viral (11.7% and parasitic (7.4%. Onychomycosis was the commonest infection in group A (25.2% compared with folliculitis in group B (19.1%. Cutaneous infections in HCV+ patients were more characterized by increased severity, aggressive course, resistance to treatment and rapid relapse. Conclusions: HCV infection has a significant impact in increasing and changing the spectrum of skin infections in diabetic patients. Severe and resistant infections in diabetics could be an important sign of HCV infection.

  16. Cutaneous periocular Habronema infection in a dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Debbie A; Smith, Chris D; Greiner, Ellis C; Wiedner, Ellen; Abbott, Jeffrey; Marsella, Rosanna; Nunnery, Catherine

    2010-10-01

    A 6-year-old castrated dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius) presented with a non-healing, severely pruritic, ulcerative fibrotic plaque located at the medial canthus. Histological examination of surgical biopsies identified degenerating nematode larvae within eosinophilic granulomas. Treatment involved repeated debridement of the lesion, injectable ivermectin and anti-inflammatory therapies, and injectable and topical antibiotics. A specially constructed mask with goggles to prevent the camel from continuing to self-traumatize the eye and lesion was also placed. Full recovery occurred approximately 1 month after diagnosis. Because of the location of the lesion, time of year, the gross and microscopic characteristics of the lesion, the presence of a likely nematode larva and the response to treatment, a diagnosis of cutaneous habronemiasis was made.

  17. Frequency of Cutaneous Fungal Infections and Azole Resistance of the Isolates in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

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    Omid Raiesi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic patients are more susceptible to cutaneous fungal infections. The higher blood sugar levels cause increasing the cutaneous fungal infections in these patients. The main objective of this study was to find the frequency of fungal infections among cutaneous lesions of diabetic patients and to investigate azole antifungal agent susceptibility of the isolates. Materials and Methods: In this study, type 1diabetes (n = 78 and type 2 diabetes (n = 44 comprised 47 cases (38.5% with diabetic foot ulcers and 75 cases (61.5% with skin and nail lesions were studied. Fungal infection was confirmed by direct examination and culture methods. Antifungal susceptibility testing by broth microdilution method was performed according to the CLSI M27-A and M38-A references. Results: Out of 122 diabetic patients, thirty (24.5% were affected with fungal infections. Frequency of fungal infection was 19.1% in patients with diabetic foot ulcer and 28% of patients with skin and nail lesions. Candida albicans and Aspergillus flavus were the most common species isolated from thirty patients with fungal infection, respectively. Susceptibility testing carried out on 18 representative isolates (13 C. albicans, five C. glabrata revealed that 12 isolates (10 C. albicans and two C. glabrata isolates (66.6% were resistant (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] ≥64 mg/ml to fluconazole (FCZ. Likewise, eight isolates (80% of Aspergillus spp. were resistant (MIC ≥4 mg/ml, to itraconazole. Conclusion: Our finding expands current knowledge about the frequency of fungal infections in diabetic patients. We noted the high prevalence of FCZ-resistant Candida spp., particularly in diabetic foot ulcers. More attention is important in diabetic centers about this neglected issue.

  18. Frequency of Cutaneous Fungal Infections and Azole Resistance of the Isolates in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiesi, Omid; Siavash, Mansour; Mohammadi, Faezeh; Chabavizadeh, Javaher; Mahaki, Behzad; Maherolnaghsh, Mehrnoush; Dehghan, Parvin

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic patients are more susceptible to cutaneous fungal infections. The higher blood sugar levels cause increasing the cutaneous fungal infections in these patients. The main objective of this study was to find the frequency of fungal infections among cutaneous lesions of diabetic patients and to investigate azole antifungal agent susceptibility of the isolates. In this study, type 1diabetes (n = 78) and type 2 diabetes (n = 44) comprised 47 cases (38.5%) with diabetic foot ulcers and 75 cases (61.5%) with skin and nail lesions were studied. Fungal infection was confirmed by direct examination and culture methods. Antifungal susceptibility testing by broth microdilution method was performed according to the CLSI M27-A and M38-A references. Out of 122 diabetic patients, thirty (24.5%) were affected with fungal infections. Frequency of fungal infection was 19.1% in patients with diabetic foot ulcer and 28% of patients with skin and nail lesions. Candida albicans and Aspergillus flavus were the most common species isolated from thirty patients with fungal infection, respectively. Susceptibility testing carried out on 18 representative isolates (13 C. albicans, five C. glabrata) revealed that 12 isolates (10 C. albicans and two C. glabrata isolates) (66.6%) were resistant (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] ≥64 mg/ml) to fluconazole (FCZ). Likewise, eight isolates (80%) of Aspergillus spp. were resistant (MIC ≥4 mg/ml), to itraconazole. Our finding expands current knowledge about the frequency of fungal infections in diabetic patients. We noted the high prevalence of FCZ-resistant Candida spp., particularly in diabetic foot ulcers. More attention is important in diabetic centers about this neglected issue.

  19. Cutaneous amebiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimsza, M E; Berg, R A

    1983-04-01

    An infant with cutaneous amebiasis of the vulva and amebic liver abscess is described. Epidemiologic investigations and serologic studies were crucial in establishing the diagnosis. The vulvar amebic ulcers responded dramatically to metronidazole therapy. Cutaneous amebiasis is a rare complication of Entamoeba histolytica infection which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of perineovulvar or penile ulcers. Cutaneous amebiasis may also occur on the abdominal wall surrounding a draining hepatic abscess, colostomy site, or laparotomy incision.

  20. Premature delivery due to intrauterine Candida infection that caused neonatal congenital cutaneous candidiasis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Fumitake; Okubo, Tomoharu; Yasuo, Tadahiro; Mori, Taisuke; Iwasa, Koichi; Iwasaku, Kazuhiro; Kitawaki, Jo

    2013-01-01

    Congenital cutaneous candidiasis is a very rare disease with less than 100 cases published in the medical literature. Neonates having this disease present with systemic skin lesions caused by intrauterine Candida infections. We present a case of threatened premature delivery due to Candida chorioamnionitis, which caused both maternal postpartum endometritis and neonatal congenital cutaneous candidiasis. A 34-year-old woman who was admitted for fetal membrane bulging at 20 weeks of gestation underwent McDonald cervical cerclage. We diagnosed threatened premature delivery due to intrauterine infection; therefore, we terminated the gestation by cesarean section at 24 weeks of gestation. Fungi-like yeast was detected in infantile gastric juice. Histopathological findings of the placenta revealed that Candida albicans mycelium invaded the placenta, chorioamniotic membrane and umbilical cord.

  1. Chronic infection due to Fusarium oxysporum mimicking lupus vulgaris: case report and review of cutaneous involvement in fusariosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereiro, M; Abalde, M T; Zulaica, A; Caeiro, J L; Flórez, A; Peteiro, C; Toribio, J

    2001-01-01

    A 67-year-old female presented with a 20-year-old lesion involving the right ear and preauricular area mimicking tuberculous lupus. Fusarium oxysporum infection was confirmed by biopsy studies and cultures. The biopsy specimen showed an unusually extensive dermal invasion with fungal hyphae. This is an uncommon clinical presentation for Fusarium infection in a healthy patient. When referred to us, the patient had received antifungal therapy with itraconazole without any benefit. Improvement was obtained with fluconazole therapy. The spectrum of cutaneous involvement related to Fusarium spp. includes toxic reactions, colonization, superficial indolent infection, deep cutaneous or subcutaneous infections and disseminated infection.

  2. Chronic cutaneous ulcers secondary to Haemophilus ducreyi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, Trisha N; Bhatti, Deepak; De Boer, Jim C; Stratov, Ivan; Spelman, Denis W

    2010-03-15

    Haemophilus ducreyi is a well recognised causative agent of genital ulcers and chancroid. We report two unusual cases of non-sexually transmitted H. ducreyi infection leading to chronic lower limb ulcers. Both patients were Australian expatriates visiting Australia from the Pacific Islands--one from Papua New Guinea and the other from Vanuatu.

  3. Common cutaneous dermatophyte infections of the skin and nails

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    structures including the keratinized layers of the skin, hair and nails. Subcutaneous ... pre-pubertal children, whereas adolescents and adults are more likely to develop ... Atypical, generalized, or invasive dermatophyte infections are routinely .... Systemic therapy with griseofulvin was the drug of choice in treating Tinea ...

  4. Cutaneous Ulcer as Leading Symptom of Systemic Cytomegalovirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard F. Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus (CMV infection rarely manifests with skin ulcerations. We describe a case report of a 64-year-old woman with chronic immunosuppression for treatment of mixed connective tissue disease, presenting with new onset leg ulcerations after a recent change in immunosuppressive regimen. She subsequently developed fulminant hepatitis, encephalopathy, and pancytopenia and was found to have severe systemic CMV viremia. Skin ulcer biopsy was positive by immunohistochemical staining for CMV infected endothelial cells. Both systemic disease and skin ulcer rapidly improved after stopping immunosuppression and administering intravenous ganciclovir. New onset skin ulcers in an immunosuppressed individual, especially with recent changes in immunosuppressive regimen, should raise the suspicion of reactivation of CMV.

  5. Is Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis preferentially restricted to the cutaneous lesions of naturally infected dogs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Maria de Fátima; Schubach, Armando de O; Schubach, Tânia M P; Serra, Cathia M B; Pereira, Sandro A; Figueiredo, Fabiano B; Confort, Eliame Mouta; Quintella, Leonardo P; Marzochi, Mauro C A

    2005-08-01

    Nineteen dogs naturally infected with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis were studied in order to determine the presence of the parasite outside cutaneous lesions. Eleven (57.9%) animals showed single cutaneous or mucosal lesions and eight (42.1%) presented two or three lesions. Twenty-eight active lesions were biopsied. Isolation in culture and characterization by enzyme electrophoresis were possible in 100% of cases and amastigote forms were visualized upon histopathological examination in three samples (n=25, 12%). Isolation of the parasite in culture from peripheral blood and intact skin fragments obtained from the scapular region was negative in all animals, as was the histopathological analysis of skin from this region. Serological reactivity determined by an immunofluorescent antibody test and/or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was demonstrated in 15 animals. The results obtained suggest that L. braziliensis preferentially remains at the site of lesion, in contrast to the systemic distribution of parasites observed in dogs infected with L. (Leishmania) chagasi. A better understanding of this aspect may help direct diagnostic and control strategies applicable to areas characterized by the simultaneous occurrence of the cutaneous and visceral forms of leishmaniasis, as is the case for the Municipality of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

  6. Cryoglobulinaemia in Egyptian Patients with Extrahepatic Cutaneous Manifestations of Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doaa Salah Hegab

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatitis C is a global major health problem with extremely variable extrahepatic manifestations. Mixed cryoglobulinaemia (MC shows a striking association with hepatitis C virus (HCV infection, and it is sometimes asymptomatic. The skin is a frequently involved target organ in MC. Objective. To investigate the prevalence of cryoglobulinaemia in a sample of Egyptian patients with cutaneous manifestations of chronic HCV infection and to correlate its presence with clinical criteria and liver function tests. Methods. One hundred and eighteen patients with skin manifestations of chronic compensated hepatitis C were included. Venous blood was tested for liver function tests and serum cryoglobulins. Results. Twelve patients (10.169% were positive for serum cryoglobulins (2 with pruritus, 4 with vasculitic lesions, 3 with livedo reticularis, one with oral lichen, one with chronic urticaria, and another with Schamberg’s disease. Vasculitic lesions and livedo reticularis of the legs showed higher prevalence in cryoglobulin-positive than in cryoglobulin-negative patients. Presence of serum cryoglobulins did not relate to patients’ demographic or laboratory findings. Conclusions. Fortunately, MC is not markedly prevalent among Egyptians with cutaneous lesions of chronic hepatitis C, and cryopositivity was commonly, but not exclusively, detected with cutaneous vasculitis and livedo reticularis. Laboratory testing for cryoglobulins in every HCV patient is advisable for earlier MC detection and management.

  7. Cryoglobulinaemia in Egyptian Patients with Extrahepatic Cutaneous Manifestations of Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegab, Doaa Salah; Sweilam, Mohammed Abd El Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Background. Hepatitis C is a global major health problem with extremely variable extrahepatic manifestations. Mixed cryoglobulinaemia (MC) shows a striking association with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, and it is sometimes asymptomatic. The skin is a frequently involved target organ in MC. Objective. To investigate the prevalence of cryoglobulinaemia in a sample of Egyptian patients with cutaneous manifestations of chronic HCV infection and to correlate its presence with clinical criteria and liver function tests. Methods. One hundred and eighteen patients with skin manifestations of chronic compensated hepatitis C were included. Venous blood was tested for liver function tests and serum cryoglobulins. Results. Twelve patients (10.169%) were positive for serum cryoglobulins (2 with pruritus, 4 with vasculitic lesions, 3 with livedo reticularis, one with oral lichen, one with chronic urticaria, and another with Schamberg's disease). Vasculitic lesions and livedo reticularis of the legs showed higher prevalence in cryoglobulin-positive than in cryoglobulin-negative patients. Presence of serum cryoglobulins did not relate to patients' demographic or laboratory findings. Conclusions. Fortunately, MC is not markedly prevalent among Egyptians with cutaneous lesions of chronic hepatitis C, and cryopositivity was commonly, but not exclusively, detected with cutaneous vasculitis and livedo reticularis. Laboratory testing for cryoglobulins in every HCV patient is advisable for earlier MC detection and management.

  8. Isolation of bacteria causing secondary bacterial infection in the lesions of cutaneous leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziaie Hengameh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL is a parasitic disease characterized by single or multiple ulcerations. Secondary bacterial infection is one of the complications of the disease that can increase the tissue destruction and the resulting scar. Objective: To effectively determine the incidence of real secondary bacteria infection in cutaneous leishmaniasis, we designed the current study. Methods and Materials: This was a cross-sectional study performed in Skin Diseases and Leishmaniasis Research Centre, Isfahan, Iran. In this study, 854 patients with confirmed CL were enrolled. Samples were taken from all the patients. Sterile swaps were achieved for the ulcer exudates and scraping was used for nonulcerated lesions. All the samples were transferred to tryptic soy broth medium. After 24 h of incubation in 37°C, they were transferred to eosin methylene blue agar (EBM and blood agar. Laboratory tests were used to determine the species of bacteria. All of the collected data were analyzed by SPSS software and chi-square. Results: Among 854 patients with confirmed cutaneous leishmaniasis, 177 patients (20.7% had positive cultures for secondary bacterial infection. Bacteria isolated from the lesions were as follows: Staphylococcus aureus - 123 cases (69.4%, coagulase negative Staphylococcus - 41 cases (23.1%, E. coil - 7 cases (3.9%, Proteus - 3 cases (1.7% and Klebsiella - 3 cases (1.7%. Conclusions: The incidence of secondary bacterial infection in lesions of CL was 20.7%. The most common isolated pathogen was Staphylococcus aureus . The incidence of secondary bacterial infection was significantly more in the ulcerated lesions as compared with nonulcerated lesions ( P = 0.00001.

  9. Molecular characterization of leishmania infection from naturally infected sand flies caught in a focus of cutaneous leishmaniasis (eastern iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Akhoundi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania major is a serious and increasing problem affecting many rural areas of 17 out of 31 provinces in Iran. Little is known about sand fly fauna and leishmaniases in Eastern Iran and no study has been carried out in Sarbisheh County. The aim of this study was to determine sand flies composition and probable Leishmania infection to find the probable vectors of leishmaniasis in Sarbisheh district.Sand flies were caught using both sticky papers and CDC light traps in August 2010. They were identified morphologically and analyzed for Leishmania infection by amplification of ITS-rDNA.Totally, 842 specimens were caught and 8 species recorded. They belonged to the genera Phlebotomus and Sergentomyia: P. (Phlebotomus papatasi, P. (Paraphlebotomus sergenti, P. (Pa. caucasicus, P. (Pa. mongolensis, P. (Pa. jacusieli, S. (Sergentomyia dentata, S. (Se. sintoni and S. (Sintonius clydei. All collected females were processed for Leishmania DNA detection by PCR amplifying of Internal Transcribed Spacer1 (partial sequence, 5.8S (complete sequence and ITS2 (partial sequence fragments. Thirteen females were positive for Leishmania DNA. The sequencing of the 430 bp amplicons indicated that 9 P. papatasi and 3 females belonging to the Caucasicus group carried L. major DNA whereas one P. sergenti carried L. tropica DNA.Phlebotomus papatasi and P. sergenti are, like in several places, the probable vectors of cutaneous leishmaniases in this emerging or unknown focus of cutaneous leishmaniases.

  10. Cutaneous Manifestations Of Hepatitis B And C Virus Infections : A Study Of 100 Cases

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    Kochhar Atul Mohan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection with hepatitis viruses, especially B and C, is a major public health problem in many countries. One hundred consecutive patients with these infections were studied for cutaneous abnormalities. Females were more commonly affected. Recurrent/chronic vascular changes (92% , urticaria (72%, leucocytoclastic vasculitis (36%, erythema nodosum (28%, Gianotti-Crosti syndrome (12%, lichen planus (8%, pyoderma gangrenosum (2 patients and dermatomyositis like syndrome (1 patient were the prominent cutaneous abnormalities noted in patients with hepatitis B. Likewise, the prominent skin abnormalities notes in hepatitis â€" C Patients were vascular changes (82.2%, chronic urticaria (60.0%, xerosis of skin (56.6%, leucocytoclastic vasculitis (40%, erythema multiforme (23.3%, Sjogren’s syndrome (13.2%, recurrent erythema nodosum (19.8% and Behcet’s syndrome in a single case. Extensive subcutaneous fat atrophy of the face in one case and diffuse hyperpigmentation in 5 cases were the two interesting features noted in out patients, which have not been reported earlier. The pertinent literature is briefly reviewed in the light of above findings.

  11. Surgical management of cutaneous infection caused by atypical mycobacteria after penetrating injury: the hidden dangers of horticulture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, J; Smith, C; Childs, P A; Holland, A J

    1997-02-01

    We identified two patients in a 12-month period who presented with cutaneous infection and secondary lymph node involvement from atypical mycobacterial infection after minor gardening injuries. One patient had a coinfection with Nocardia asteroides. Both patients required multiple surgical interventions, despite appropriate antibiotic therapy, before resolution of the disease. The course of the infection was characterized by chronic relapses with complete healing at 12 to 18 months after the original injury. The identification and management of this clinical problem are reviewed.

  12. Neutrophils are dispensable in the modulation of T cell immunity against cutaneous HSV-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hor, Jyh Liang; Heath, William R.; Mueller, Scott N.

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils rapidly infiltrate sites of inflammation during peripheral infection or tissue injury. In addition to their well described roles as pro-inflammatory phagocytes responsible for pathogen clearance, recent studies have demonstrated a broader functional repertoire including mediating crosstalk between innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Specifically, neutrophils have been proposed to mediate antigen transport to lymph nodes (LN) to modulate T cell priming and to influence T cell migration to infected tissues. Using a mouse model of cutaneous herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection we explored potential contributions of neutrophils toward anti-viral immunity. While a transient, early influx of neutrophils was triggered by dermal scarification, we did not detect migration of neutrophils from the skin to LN. Furthermore, despite recruitment of neutrophils into LN from the blood, priming and expansion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was unaffected following neutrophil depletion. Finally, we found that neutrophils were dispensable for the migration of effector T cells into infected skin. Our study suggests that the immunomodulatory roles of neutrophils toward adaptive immunity may be context-dependent, and are likely determined by the type of pathogen and anatomical site of infection. PMID:28112242

  13. A rare case: Spontaneous cutaneous fistula of infected splenic hydatid cyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kemal Kismet; Ali Haldun Ozcan; Mehmet Zafer Sabuncuoglu; Cem Gencay; Bulent Kilicoglu; Ceyda Turan; Mehmet Ali Akkus

    2006-01-01

    Hydatid disease is caused by the larval stage of the genus Echinococcus. Live hydatid cysts can rupture into physiologic channels, free body cavities or adjacent organs. Although hydatid disease can develop anywhere in the human body, the liver is the most frequently involved organ, followed by the lungs. Cysts of the spleen are unusual. There are only five case reports of spontaneous cutaneous fistulization of liver hydatid cysts in the literature. But there isn't any report about cutaneous fistula caused by splenic hydatid cyst. We report a first case of spontaneous cutaneous fistula of infected splenic hydatid cyst.A 43-year-old man was admitted to our Emergency Service with abdominal pain and fluid drainage from the abdominal wall. He has been suffering from a reddish swelling on the abdominal wall skin for four months.After a white membrane had been protruded out from his abdominal wall, he was admitted to our Emergency Service. On physical examination, a white membrane was seen to protrude out from the 2cm× 1cm skin defect on the left superolateral site of the umblicus. Large,complex, cystic and solid mass of 9.5 cm-diameter was located in the spleen on ultrasonographic examination.At operation, partial cystectomy and drainage was performed. After the operation, he was given a dosage of 10 mg/kg per day of albendazole, divided into three doses. He was discharged on the postoperative 10th d.It should be kept in mind that splenic hydatid cysts can cause such a rare complication.

  14. An Innovative Field-Applicable Molecular Test to Diagnose Cutaneous Leishmania Viannia spp. Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldarriaga, Omar A.; Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Porrozzi, Renato; Baldeviano, Gerald C.; Lescano, Andrés G.; de Los Santos, Maxy B.; Fernandez, Olga L.; Saravia, Nancy G.; Costa, Erika; Melby, Peter C.; Travi, Bruno L.

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous and mucosal leishmaniasis is widely distributed in Central and South America. Leishmania of the Viannia subgenus are the most frequent species infecting humans. L. (V.) braziliensis, L. (V.) panamensis are also responsible for metastatic mucosal leishmaniasis. Conventional or real time PCR is a more sensitive diagnostic test than microscopy, but the cost and requirement for infrastructure and trained personnel makes it impractical in most endemic regions. Primary health systems need a sensitive and specific point of care (POC) diagnostic tool. We developed a novel POC molecular diagnostic test for cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Viannia) spp. Parasite DNA was amplified using isothermal Recombinase Polymerase Amplification (RPA) with primers and probes that targeted the kinetoplast DNA. The amplification product was detected by naked eye with a lateral flow (LF) immunochromatographic strip. The RPA-LF had an analytical sensitivity equivalent to 0.1 parasites per reaction. The test amplified the principal L. Viannia species from multiple countries: L. (V.) braziliensis (n = 33), L. (V.) guyanensis (n = 17), L. (V.) panamensis (n = 9). The less common L. (V.) lainsoni, L. (V.) shawi, and L. (V.) naiffi were also amplified. No amplification was observed in parasites of the L. (Leishmania) subgenus. In a small number of clinical samples (n = 13) we found 100% agreement between PCR and RPA-LF. The high analytical sensitivity and clinical validation indicate the test could improve the efficiency of diagnosis, especially in chronic lesions with submicroscopic parasite burdens. Field implementation of the RPA-LF test could contribute to management and control of cutaneous and mucosal leishmaniasis. PMID:27115155

  15. An Innovative Field-Applicable Molecular Test to Diagnose Cutaneous Leishmania Viannia spp. Infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar A Saldarriaga

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous and mucosal leishmaniasis is widely distributed in Central and South America. Leishmania of the Viannia subgenus are the most frequent species infecting humans. L. (V. braziliensis, L. (V. panamensis are also responsible for metastatic mucosal leishmaniasis. Conventional or real time PCR is a more sensitive diagnostic test than microscopy, but the cost and requirement for infrastructure and trained personnel makes it impractical in most endemic regions. Primary health systems need a sensitive and specific point of care (POC diagnostic tool. We developed a novel POC molecular diagnostic test for cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Viannia spp. Parasite DNA was amplified using isothermal Recombinase Polymerase Amplification (RPA with primers and probes that targeted the kinetoplast DNA. The amplification product was detected by naked eye with a lateral flow (LF immunochromatographic strip. The RPA-LF had an analytical sensitivity equivalent to 0.1 parasites per reaction. The test amplified the principal L. Viannia species from multiple countries: L. (V. braziliensis (n = 33, L. (V. guyanensis (n = 17, L. (V. panamensis (n = 9. The less common L. (V. lainsoni, L. (V. shawi, and L. (V. naiffi were also amplified. No amplification was observed in parasites of the L. (Leishmania subgenus. In a small number of clinical samples (n = 13 we found 100% agreement between PCR and RPA-LF. The high analytical sensitivity and clinical validation indicate the test could improve the efficiency of diagnosis, especially in chronic lesions with submicroscopic parasite burdens. Field implementation of the RPA-LF test could contribute to management and control of cutaneous and mucosal leishmaniasis.

  16. Evaluation of healing of infected cutaneous wounds treated with different energy densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Nicole R. S.; Cangussú, Maria C. T.; N. dos Santos, Jean; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.

    2011-03-01

    We aimed assess the effects of different energy densities of the association of red/IR laser light on the healing of cutaneous wounds infected Staphylococcus aureus. Background: Wound infection is the most common complication on healing wounds and cause both vascular and cellular responses on the tissue. Several therapeutics is used for improving wound healing including the use of different light sources, such as the Laser. Some energy densities present positive photobiological effects on the healing process. Material and Methods: 24 young adult male Wistar rats, under general anesthesia, had their dorsum shaven, cleaned and a 1 x 1cm cutaneous wound created with a scalpel and left without no suturing or dressings. The wounds were infected with Staphylococcus aureus and were randomly divided in 8 subgroups of 3 animals in each: Control, Group 10J/cm2, Group 20J/cm2, and Group 30J/cm2, 7 and 14 days each group. Laser phototherapy was carried out with a diode (λ680nm/790nm, P= 30mW/40mW, CW, Laser, Ø = 3mm, PD=424mW/cm2 and 566mW/cm2, t=11.8/ 8.8 sec, E=0.35J) and started immediately after surgery and repeated at every other day during 7 days. Laser light was applied on 4 points around wounded area. The animals were killed at either 8th or 15th day after contamination. Specimens were taken, routinely cut and processed to wax, stained and underwent histological analysis. The results were statistically analyzed. Results: Both 20 and 30J/cm2 caused intense collagen deposition at the end of the experimental time. But, when 20 J/cm2 was used the fibers were also well organized. Conclusion: Our results indicate that irradiated subjects showed improved wound healing being the 20 J/cm2 the energy the caused better histological response.

  17. Decreased effect of glucantime in cutaneous leishmaniasis complicated with secondary bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Sadeghian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glucantime is regarded as the first-line treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL; however, failure to treatment is a problem in many cases. Aim: The aim was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of glucantime in CL complicated with secondary bacterial infection compared to uncomplicated lesions. Methods: This experimental study was performed in Skin Diseases and Leishmaniasis Research Center, Isfahan, Iran. A total of 161 patients enrolled in the study had CL confirmed by positive smear of lesions. All the patients were treated with systemic glucantime for 3 weeks and followed for 2 months. Response to treatment was defined as loss of infiltration, reepithelization, and negative smear. Depending on the results of bacterial cultures, the lesions were divided into two groups and the efficacy of glucantime was compared. Results: A total of 123 patients (76.4% were negative, and 38 patients (23.6% were positive for secondary bacterial infection. In groups with negative bacterial culture response to treatment was 65% (80 patients and in the other positive group, it was 31.6% (12 patients, with a difference (χ2 = 13.77, P < 0.01. Conclusion: Therapeutic effect of glucantime showed a decrease in CL lesions with secondary bacterial infection. Therefore, in the cases of unresponsiveness to treatment, the lesions should be evaluated for bacterial infection, before repeating the treatment.

  18. [Osteo-cutaneous Mycobacterium marinum infection of the elbow and reconstruction with radial collateral artery perforator-based propeller flap].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabert, P-E; Lievain, L; Vallée, A; Joly, P; Auquit Auckbur, I

    2016-08-01

    Mycobacterium marinum is an atypical and non-tuberculosis mycobacterium that mainly leads to cutaneous infections. Infections occur through inoculation of the organism through injury to the skin in the presence of contaminated water or fish. The patient often presents with unspecific symptoms and the evolution, in the absence of adequate treatment, is characterized by an expansion of the cutaneous lesion and a spread to deep structures. Infections of tendon sheaths and joints are described, rarely osteomyelitis. Sure diagnosis is hard to obtain and is established from the medical history and microbiological examination. There are no specific therapeutic guidelines. Double or triple antibiotherapy is often effective and should be continued several months after complete resolution of clinical signs. Surgical debridement is required in cases of invasive or resistant infections. We report the case of a young immunocompetent fishmonger with a rare osteocutaneous M. marinum infection of the elbow. Treatment included large surgical excision of infected skin and bone areas and a triple antibiotics administration. Reconstruction have been ensured by a radial collateral artery perforator-based propeller flap, satisfying appropriates functional and cosmetical concerns of this anatomical region. Surgery and appropriate antibiotics treatment were effective and allowed healing of an invasive cutaneous and bone M. marinum infection.

  19. Analysis of Tp53 Codon 72 Polymorphisms, Tp53 Mutations, and HPV Infection in Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    Loeb, Keith R.; Asgari, Maryam M; Hawes, Stephen E.; Qinghua Feng; Stern, Joshua E.; Mingjun Jiang; Argenyi, Zsolt B.; Ethel-Michele de Villiers; Kiviat, Nancy B.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-melanoma skin cancers are one of the most common human malignancies accounting for 2-3% of tumors in the US and represent a significant health burden. Epidemiology studies have implicated Tp53 mutations triggered by UV exposure, and human papilloma virus (HPV) infection to be significant causes of non-melanoma skin cancer. However, the relationship between Tp53 and cutaneous HPV infection is not well understood in skin cancers. In this study we assessed the association of HPV ...

  20. Characterization of the Skin Microbiota in Italian Stream Frogs (Rana italica) Infected and Uninfected by a Cutaneous Parasitic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Ermanno; Rossi, Roberta; Fidati, Laura; Paracucchi, Romina; Scargetta, Silvia; Montalbani, Elena; Franzetti, Andrea; La Porta, Gianandrea; Fagotti, Anna; Simonceli, Francesca; Cenci, Giovanni; Di Rosa, Ines

    2015-01-01

    In human and wildlife populations, the natural microbiota plays an important role in health maintenance and the prevention of emerging infectious diseases. In amphibians, infectious diseases have been closely associated with population decline and extinction worldwide. Skin symbiont communities have been suggested as one of the factors driving the different susceptibilities of amphibians to diseases. The activity of the skin microbiota of amphibians against fungal pathogens, such as Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, has been examined extensively, whereas its protective role towards the cutaneous infectious diseases caused by Amphibiocystidium parasites has not yet been elucidated in detail. In the present study, we investigated, for the first time, the cutaneous microbiota of the Italian stream frog (Rana italica) and characterized the microbial assemblages of frogs uninfected and infected by Amphibiocystidium using the Illumina next-generation sequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragments. A total of 629 different OTUs belonging to 16 different phyla were detected. Bacterial populations shared by all individuals represented only one fifth of all OTUs and were dominated by a small number of OTUs. Statistical analyses based on Bray-Curtis distances showed that uninfected and infected specimens had distinct cutaneous bacterial community structures. Phylotypes belonging to the genera Janthinobacterium, Pseudomonas, and Flavobacterium were more abundant, and sometimes almost exclusively present, in uninfected than in infected specimens. These bacterial populations, known to exhibit antifungal activity in amphibians, may also play a role in protection against cutaneous infectious diseases caused by Amphibiocystidium parasites.

  1. Transcriptome patterns from primary cutaneous Leishmania braziliensis infections associate with eventual development of mucosal disease in humans.

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    Ana Claudia Maretti-Mira

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Localized Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (LCL and Mucosal Leishmaniasis (ML are two extreme clinical forms of American Tegumentary Leishmaniasis that usually begin as solitary primary cutaneous lesions. Host and parasite factors that influence the progression of LCL to ML are not completely understood. In this manuscript, we compare the gene expression profiles of primary cutaneous lesions from patients who eventually developed ML to those that did not. METHODS: Using RNA-seq, we analyzed both the human and Leishmania transcriptomes in primary cutaneous lesions. RESULTS: Limited number of reads mapping to Leishmania transcripts were obtained. For human transcripts, compared to ML patients, lesions from LCL patients displayed a general multi-polarization of the adaptive immune response and showed up-regulation of genes involved in chemoattraction of innate immune cells and in antigen presentation. We also identified a potential transcriptional signature in the primary lesions that may predict long-term disease outcome. CONCLUSIONS: We were able to simultaneously sequence both human and Leishmania mRNA transcripts in primary cutaneous leishmaniasis lesions. Our results suggest an intrinsic difference in the immune capacity of LCL and ML patients. The findings correlate the complete cure of L. braziliensis infection with a controlled inflammatory response and a balanced activation of innate and adaptive immunity.

  2. Joint spatial time-series epidemiological analysis of malaria and cutaneous leishmaniasis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegboye, O A; Al-Saghir, M; Leung, D H Y

    2017-03-01

    Malaria and leishmaniasis are among the two most important health problems of many developing countries especially in the Middle East and North Africa. It is common for vector-borne infectious diseases to have similar hotspots which may be attributed to the overlapping ecological distribution of the vector. Hotspot analyses were conducted to simultaneously detect the location of local hotspots and test their statistical significance. Spatial scan statistics were used to detect and test hotspots of malaria and cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in Afghanistan in 2009. A multivariate negative binomial model was used to simultaneously assess the effects of environmental variables on malaria and CL. In addition to the dependency between malaria and CL disease counts, spatial and temporal information were also incorporated in the model. Results indicated that malaria and CL incidence peaked at the same periods. Two hotspots were detected for malaria and three for CL. The findings in the current study show an association between the incidence of malaria and CL in the studied areas of Afghanistan. The incidence of CL disease in a given month is linked with the incidence of malaria in the previous month. Co-existence of malaria and CL within the same geographical area was supported by this study, highlighting the presence and effects of environmental variables such as temperature and precipitation. People living in areas with malaria are at increased risk for leishmaniasis infection. Local healthcare authorities should consider the co-infection problem by recommending systematic malaria screening for all CL patients.

  3. Cutaneous cytomegalovirus infection in a child with hyper IgE and specific defects in antibody response to protein vaccines

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    Shahrzad Fallah

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus (CMV infection is a common opportunistic systemic infection in immunocompromised patients, but skin involvement is rare. Herein, we report a 10 year-old girl from consanguineous parents who was referred to our center because of disseminated maculopapular rash. She had history of upper and lower respiratory tract infections. In immunological studies, increased serum IgE level and decreased responses to tetanus and diphtheria were detected. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR examination of bronchoalveolar lavage and serum sample revealed the presence of CMV. Early diagnosis of cutaneous CMV and appropriate treatment are the key actions in management of patients with underlying immunodeficiencies to avoid further complications.

  4. Successful Use of Posaconazole to Treat Invasive Cutaneous Fungal Infection in a Liver Transplant Patient on Sirolimus

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    Randah Dahlan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungi are an important and common cause of cutaneous infections affecting solid organ transplant recipients. These infections can represent a primary site of infection with the potential for dissemination, or a manifestation of metastatic infection. The high morbidity and mortality associated with these infections necessitates urgent therapy with antifungal drugs; however, the interaction between these drugs and immunosuppressive therapies can be a major limitation because of drug toxicity. A case of soft tissue infection of the toe caused by Fusarium chlamydosporum and Candida guilliermondii in a liver transplant patient on sirolimus, who was successfully treated with the new antifungal agent posaconazole, is described. The pharmacokinetic interactions of sirolimus and the new triazoles, and their impact on treatment choices are briefly discussed.

  5. Cutaneous zygomycosis.

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    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Vázquez-González, Denisse; Tirado-Sánchez, Andrés; Ponce-Olivera, Rosa María

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous zygomycosis is a fungal infection caused by zygomycetes that affects the skin. It occurs in uncontrolled diabetic patients and immunosuppressed individuals. It has 2 clinical forms: primary cutaneous zygomycosis and secondary cutaneous zygomycosis. The first is characterized by necrotic lesions and the fungus is usually inoculated by trauma. If diagnosed early, it generally has a good prognosis. Secondary zygomycosis is usually a complication and extension of the rhinocerebral variety that starts as a palpebral fistula and progresses to a necrotic lesion with a poor prognosis. The diagnosis is made by identification of the fungus by direct KOH examination, culture, and biopsy. Treatment for the primary disease is surgical debridement plus amphotericin B. The secondary type is treated with amphotericin B and/or posaconazole.

  6. Cutaneous leishmaniasis: An emerging infection in a non-endemic area and a brief update

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    Rastogi V

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here the emergence of a new focus of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL due to Leishmania tropica (L. tropica in the Ajmer city of Rajasthan, India, a previously non-endemic area. Between January-February 2006, 13 new indigenously acquired cases of CL were diagnosed among the patients attending the Skin and STD department, JLN Hospital, Ajmer. The diagnosis was based on clinical presentation, demonstration of amastigotes (LT bodies in Giemsa stained smear of the lesion and response to intralesional / local anti-leishmanial drug therapy. In addition, culture of the promastigote forms of L. tropica from the lesion was successfully attempted in four of the smear negatives cases. By retrospective analysis, 23 new indigenous cases of CL have been diagnosed in the same setting during the period January 2004 - December 2005, based on clinical and therapeutic response alone. There was no clear-cut history of sandfly bite and travel outside the district or state to endemic area in any of the cases. However, all of them came from a common residential area (famous dargah of Ajmer and the peak incidence was seen in January, four months after the famous Urs fair of Ajmer, the location was urban and the lesions were characteristic of L. tropica. Therefore, the disease is suspected to be anthroponotic. These features are suggestive of a common mode of transmission, source and/or vector signalling introduction of this infection into a non-endemic area.

  7. Mixed Cutaneous Infection Caused by Mycobacterium szulgai and Mycobacterium intermedium in a Healthy Adult Female: A Rare Case Report.

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    Singh, Amresh Kumar; Marak, Rungmei S K; Maurya, Anand Kumar; Das, Manaswini; Nag, Vijaya Lakshmi; Dhole, Tapan N

    2015-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTMs) are ubiquitous and are being increasingly reported as human opportunistic infection. Cutaneous infection caused by mixed NTM is extremely rare. We encountered the case of a 46-year-old female, who presented with multiple discharging sinuses over the lower anterior abdominal wall (over a previous appendectomy scar) for the past 2 years. Microscopy and culture of the pus discharge were done to isolate and identify the etiological agent. Finally, GenoType Mycobacterium CM/AS assay proved it to be a mixed infection caused by Mycobacterium szulgai and M. intermedium. The patient was advised a combination of rifampicin 600 mg once daily, ethambutol 600 mg once daily, and clarithromycin 500 mg twice daily to be taken along with periodic follow-up based upon clinical response as well as microbiological response. We emphasize that infections by NTM must be considered in the etiology of nonhealing wounds or sinuses, especially at postsurgical sites.

  8. Multiple bovine papillomavirus infections associated with cutaneous papillomatosis in brazilian cattle herds

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    Marlise Pompeo Claus

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous papillomatosis is a pathological condition commonly found in cattle and is characterized by the presence of benign proliferative tumors caused by bovine papillomavirus (BPV infection. While multiple infections with human papillomavirus (HPV are common in healthy and immunodeficient humans, studies with the aim of identifying mixed infections are still sporadic in veterinary medicine. The aim of this study is to describe the occurrence of multiple BPV infections in cattle affected by cutaneous papillomatosis. Fifteen skin warts were collected from at least two diverse anatomical regions of six bovines with papillomatosis belonging to three cattle herds from the Paraná state in Brazil. The BPV types present in the skin wart samples were determined by a PCR assay performed with the FAP primer pair for partial L1 gene amplification followed by direct sequencing or by cloning and sequencing of the inserts. Sequence analysis of the obtained amplicons allowed the identification of four characterized BPV types (BPV-1, -2, -6, and -8 and three previously described putative new BPV types (BPV/BR-UEL3, BPV/BR-UEL4, and BPV/BR-UEL5. Double infections were identified in four (A, B, D, and E of the six animals included in this study. In this work, the strategy adopted to evaluate skin warts from diverse anatomical sites of the same animal allowed the identification of multiple infections with two or three different BPV types. The analysis of four animals belonging to a single cattle herd also showed the presence of six different viral types. These results clearly suggest that both multiple papillomaviral infection and a high viral diversity can be as frequent in cattle as in human beings.A papilomatose cutânea é comumente observada nos rebanhos bovinos e caracterizada pela presença de tumores proliferativos benignos causados pela infecção pelo papilomavírus bovino (BPV. Enquanto a infecção múltipla pelo papilomavírus humano (HPV é um

  9. Differential Gene Expression and Infection Profiles of Cutaneous and Mucosal Leishmania braziliensis Isolates from the Same Patient

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    Alves-Ferreira, Eliza V. C.; Toledo, Juliano S.; De Oliveira, Arthur H. C.; Ferreira, Tiago R.; Ruy, Patricia C.; Pinzan, Camila F.; Santos, Ramon F.; Boaventura, Viviane; Rojo, David; López-Gonzálvez, Ángelez; Rosa, Jose C.; Barbas, Coral; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Barral, Aldina; Cruz, Angela K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Leishmaniasis is a complex disease in which clinical outcome depends on factors such as parasite species, host genetics and immunity and vector species. In Brazil, Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis is a major etiological agent of cutaneous (CL) and mucosal leishmaniasis (MCL), a disfiguring form of the disease, which occurs in ~10% of L. braziliensis-infected patients. Thus, clinical isolates from patients with CL and MCL may be a relevant source of information to uncover parasite factors contributing to pathogenesis. In this study, we investigated two pairs of L. (V.) braziliensis isolates from mucosal (LbrM) and cutaneous (LbrC) sites of the same patient to identify factors distinguishing parasites that migrate from those that remain at the primary site of infection. Methodology/Principal Findings We observed no major genomic divergences among the clinical isolates by molecular karyotype and genomic sequencing. RT-PCR revealed that the isolates lacked Leishmania RNA virus (LRV). However, the isolates exhibited distinct in vivo pathogenesis in BALB/c mice; the LbrC isolates were more virulent than the LbrM isolates. Metabolomic analysis revealed significantly increased levels of 14 metabolites in LbrC parasites and 31 metabolites in LbrM parasites that were mainly related to inflammation and chemotaxis. A proteome comparative analysis revealed the overexpression of LbrPGF2S (prostaglandin f2-alpha synthase) and HSP70 in both LbrC isolates. Overexpression of LbrPGF2S in LbrC and LbrM promastigotes led to an increase in infected macrophages and the number of amastigotes per cell at 24–48 h post-infection (p.i.). Conclusions/Significance Despite sharing high similarity at the genome structure and ploidy levels, the parasites exhibited divergent expressed genomes. The proteome and metabolome results indicated differential profiles between the cutaneous and mucosal isolates, primarily related to inflammation and chemotaxis. BALB/c infection revealed that

  10. Differential Gene Expression and Infection Profiles of Cutaneous and Mucosal Leishmania braziliensis Isolates from the Same Patient.

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    Eliza V C Alves-Ferreira

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is a complex disease in which clinical outcome depends on factors such as parasite species, host genetics and immunity and vector species. In Brazil, Leishmania (Viannia braziliensis is a major etiological agent of cutaneous (CL and mucosal leishmaniasis (MCL, a disfiguring form of the disease, which occurs in ~10% of L. braziliensis-infected patients. Thus, clinical isolates from patients with CL and MCL may be a relevant source of information to uncover parasite factors contributing to pathogenesis. In this study, we investigated two pairs of L. (V. braziliensis isolates from mucosal (LbrM and cutaneous (LbrC sites of the same patient to identify factors distinguishing parasites that migrate from those that remain at the primary site of infection.We observed no major genomic divergences among the clinical isolates by molecular karyotype and genomic sequencing. RT-PCR revealed that the isolates lacked Leishmania RNA virus (LRV. However, the isolates exhibited distinct in vivo pathogenesis in BALB/c mice; the LbrC isolates were more virulent than the LbrM isolates. Metabolomic analysis revealed significantly increased levels of 14 metabolites in LbrC parasites and 31 metabolites in LbrM parasites that were mainly related to inflammation and chemotaxis. A proteome comparative analysis revealed the overexpression of LbrPGF2S (prostaglandin f2-alpha synthase and HSP70 in both LbrC isolates. Overexpression of LbrPGF2S in LbrC and LbrM promastigotes led to an increase in infected macrophages and the number of amastigotes per cell at 24-48 h post-infection (p.i..Despite sharing high similarity at the genome structure and ploidy levels, the parasites exhibited divergent expressed genomes. The proteome and metabolome results indicated differential profiles between the cutaneous and mucosal isolates, primarily related to inflammation and chemotaxis. BALB/c infection revealed that the cutaneous isolates were more virulent than the mucosal

  11. First report of Warileya rotundipennis (Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) naturally infected with Leishmania (Viannia) in a focus of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Mabel; Ferro, Cristina; Rosales-Chilama, Mariana; Rubiano, Luisa; Delgado, Marcela; Cossio, Alexandra; Gómez, Maria Adelaida; Ocampo, Clara; Saravia, Nancy Gore

    2015-01-01

    The expansion of transmission of cutaneous leishmaniasis from sylvatic ecosystems into peri-urban and domestic settings has occurred as sand flies have adapted to anthropogenic environmental modifications. Assessment of the intradomiciliary presence of sand flies in households of the settlement “La Cabaña”, in the Department of Risaralda, Colombia, revealed an abundance of Warileya rotundipennis. This unexpected observation motivated further analyses to evaluate the participation of this species in the transmission of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Collections using CDC light traps were conducted during two consecutive nights in May and August 2011. The total of 667 sand flies collected were classified into five species: W. rotundipennis (n = 654; 98.05%), Nyssomyia trapidoi (n = 7; 1.04%); Lutzomyia (Helcocyrtomyia) hartmanni (n = 3; 0.44%); Lutzomyia lichyi (n = 2; 0.29%) and Psychodopygus panamensis (n = 1; 0.14%). The striking predominance of W. rotundipennis within households during both wet (May) and dry (August) seasons, anthropophilic behavior demonstrated by human blood in 95.23% (60/63) evaluable blood-engorged specimens, and natural infection (5/168–3%) with genetically similar parasites of the Leishmania (Viannia) subgenus observed in a patient in this community, support the involvement of W. rotundipennis in the domestic transmission of cutaneous leishmaniasis in “La Cabaña”. PMID:25917717

  12. Clotrimazole/betamethasone diproprionate: a review of costs and complications in the treatment of common cutaneous fungal infections.

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    Greenberg, H L; Shwayder, Tor A; Bieszk, Nella; Fivenson, David P

    2002-01-01

    The use of antifungal/corticosteroid combinations as topical therapy for dermatophytoses has been criticized as being less effective, more expensive, and the cause of more adverse cutaneous reactions than antifungal monotherapy. The combination of clotrimazole and betamethasone diproprionate (Lotrisone) is a mix of an azole antifungal and a high-potency corticosteroid, and is one of the most widely prescribed of these combinations. Our objective was to describe the beneficial and deleterious effects of Lotrisone in the treatment of common cutaneous fungal infections and its relative cost-effectiveness. We did a literature review documenting clinical trial data and adverse reactions to Lotrisone and collected a cost analysis of topical antifungal prescribing data over a 2-month period from a large midwestern staff-model health maintenance organization (HMO). Lotrisone is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of tinea pedis, tinea cruris, and tinea corporis in adults and children more than 12 years of age. Treatment is limited to 2 weeks in the groin area and 4 weeks on the feet. The most concerning adverse effects of Lotrisone were reported in children and included treatment failure, striae distensae, hirsuitism, and growth retardation. This combination was also reported to have decreased efficacy in clearing candidal and Trichophyton infections as compared to single-agent antifungals. Lotrisone was considerably more expensive than clotrimazole alone and was found to account for more than 50% of topical antifungal expenditures as prescribed by primary care physicians, but only 7% of topical antifungals prescribed by dermatologists. We found that Lotrisone was shown to have the potential to induce many steroid-related side effects and to be less cost effective than antifungal monotherapy. This combination should be used judiciously in the treatment of cutaneous fungal infections and may not be appropriate for use in children.

  13. [Therapeutic efficacies of neticonazole (SS717) cream and solution in experimental cutaneous Candida albicans infection of guinea pigs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maebashi, K; Itoyama, T; Uchida, K; Yamaguchi, H; Asaoka, T; Iwasa, A

    1993-10-01

    The therapeutic efficacies of 1% neticonazole (SS717) cream and solution on experimental cutaneous Candida albicans infection produced in prednisolone-treated guinea pigs were compared with those of 1% bifonazole (BFZ). Active preparations or blank vehicles were applied once daily for 3 consecutive days starting 5 days postinfection. Therapeutic effects were assessed on the basis of viable counts recovered from the infected loci 9 days postinfection. In animals treated with SS 717 or BFZ cream, a significant mycological improvement was observed when compared to untreated controls. A significant therapeutic efficacy of a SS717 cream compared to cream vehicle was also noted, while there was no significant difference in the recovery of Candida between the untreated control group and the cream vehicle-treated groups. The mycological result of the SS717 solution treated group was significantly superior to those of the untreated control group, the solution vehicle-treated group and the BFZ solution-treated group. The treatment with a solution vehicle or a BFZ solution appeared to lower, though not to a significant level, viable counts at the infected loci. These results led us to the conclusion that both SS717 cream and solution preparations exhibited significantly superior activity to that of BFZ in experimental cutaneous candidasis of guinea pigs.

  14. Parasitological Confirmation and Analysis of Leishmania Diversity in Asymptomatic and Subclinical Infection following Resolution of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Chilama, Mariana; Gongora, Rafael E.; Valderrama, Liliana; Jojoa, Jimena; Alexander, Neal; Rubiano, Luisa C.; Cossio, Alexandra; Adams, Emily R.; Saravia, Nancy G.; Gomez, María Adelaida

    2015-01-01

    Background The contribution of individuals with subclinical infection to the transmission and endemicity of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is unknown. Immunological evidence of exposure to Leishmania in residents of endemic areas has been the basis for defining the human population with asymptomatic infection. However, parasitological confirmation of subclinical infection is lacking. Methods We investigated the presence and viability of Leishmania in blood and non-invasive mucosal tissue samples from individuals with immunological evidence of subclinical infection in endemic areas for CL caused by Leishmania (Viannia) in Colombia. Detection of Leishmania kDNA was conducted by PCR-Southern Blot, and parasite viability was confirmed by amplification of parasite 7SLRNA gene transcripts. A molecular tool for genetic diversity analysis of parasite populations causing persistent subclinical infection based on PCR amplification and sequence analysis of an 82bp region between kDNA conserved blocks 1 and 2 was developed. Principal Findings Persistent Leishmania infection was demonstrated in 40% (46 of 114) of leishmanin skin test (LST) positive individuals without active disease; parasite viability was established in 59% of these (27 of 46; 24% of total). Parasite burden quantified from circulating blood monocytes, nasal, conjunctival or tonsil mucosal swab samples was comparable, and ranged between 0.2 to 22 parasites per reaction. kDNA sequences were obtained from samples from 2 individuals with asymptomatic infection and from 26 with history of CL, allowing genetic distance analysis that revealed diversity among sequences and clustering within the L. (Viannia) subgenus. Conclusions Our results provide parasitological confirmation of persistent infection among residents of endemic areas of L. (Viannia) transmission who have experienced asymptomatic infection or recovered from CL, revealing a reservoir of infection that potentially contributes to the endemicity and

  15. Parasitological Confirmation and Analysis of Leishmania Diversity in Asymptomatic and Subclinical Infection following Resolution of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis.

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    Mariana Rosales-Chilama

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of individuals with subclinical infection to the transmission and endemicity of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL is unknown. Immunological evidence of exposure to Leishmania in residents of endemic areas has been the basis for defining the human population with asymptomatic infection. However, parasitological confirmation of subclinical infection is lacking.We investigated the presence and viability of Leishmania in blood and non-invasive mucosal tissue samples from individuals with immunological evidence of subclinical infection in endemic areas for CL caused by Leishmania (Viannia in Colombia. Detection of Leishmania kDNA was conducted by PCR-Southern Blot, and parasite viability was confirmed by amplification of parasite 7SLRNA gene transcripts. A molecular tool for genetic diversity analysis of parasite populations causing persistent subclinical infection based on PCR amplification and sequence analysis of an 82bp region between kDNA conserved blocks 1 and 2 was developed.Persistent Leishmania infection was demonstrated in 40% (46 of 114 of leishmanin skin test (LST positive individuals without active disease; parasite viability was established in 59% of these (27 of 46; 24% of total. Parasite burden quantified from circulating blood monocytes, nasal, conjunctival or tonsil mucosal swab samples was comparable, and ranged between 0.2 to 22 parasites per reaction. kDNA sequences were obtained from samples from 2 individuals with asymptomatic infection and from 26 with history of CL, allowing genetic distance analysis that revealed diversity among sequences and clustering within the L. (Viannia subgenus.Our results provide parasitological confirmation of persistent infection among residents of endemic areas of L. (Viannia transmission who have experienced asymptomatic infection or recovered from CL, revealing a reservoir of infection that potentially contributes to the endemicity and transmission of disease. kDNA genotyping

  16. Prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi infection in a series of 98 primary cutaneous lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponzoni, Maurilio; Ferreri, Andrés J M; Mappa, Silvia; Pasini, Elisa; Govi, Silvia; Facchetti, Fabio; Fanoni, Daniele; Tucci, Alessandra; Vino, Arianna; Doglioni, Claudio; Berti, Emilio; Dolcetti, Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi has been variably associated with different forms of primary cutaneous lymphoma. Differences in prevalence rates among reported studies could be a result of geographic variability or heterogeneity in the molecular approaches that have been employed. In the present study, we investigated the prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato DNA in diagnostic tissue samples from fresh cutaneous biopsies of 98 primary cutaneous lymphomas and 19 normal skin controls. Three different polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocols targeting the hbb, flagellin, and Osp-A genes were used. Direct sequencing of both sense and antisense strands of purified PCR products confirmed the specificity of the amplified fragments. Sequence specificity was assessed using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool, and MultAlin software was used to investigate the heterogeneity of target gene sequences across the different samples. Borrelia DNA was not detected in 19 controls, 23 cases of follicular lymphoma, 31 cases of extranodal marginal zone lymphoma, or 30 cases of mycosis fungoides. A single case of 14 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cases was positive for B. burgdorferi. This study does not support a pathogenic role of B. burgdorferi in primary cutaneous B- and T-cell lymphomas from areas nonendemic for this microorganism and the consequent rationale for the adoption of antibiotic therapy in these patients.

  17. The role of inflammatory, anti-inflammatory, and regulatory cytokines in patients infected with cutaneous leishmaniasis in Amazonas State, Brazil.

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    Espir, Thaís Tibery; Figueira, Luanda de Paula; Naiff, Maricleide de Farias; da Costa, Allyson Guimarães; Ramalho-Ortigão, Marcelo; Malheiro, Adriana; Franco, Antonia Maria Ramos

    2014-01-01

    The authors discuss in this paper the role of inflammatory, anti-inflammatory, and regulatory cytokines in patients infected with different species of Leishmania in Amazonas State, Brazil. A comparative analysis was made of serum concentrations of these cytokines in the peripheral blood of 33 patients infected with cutaneous leishmaniasis. The isolates were identified as Leishmania guyanensis, L. naiffi, and L. amazonensis. Most (64%) of the patients were male ranging in age from 18 to 58 years. Protein expression profiles of IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-17 cytokines were shown to vary significantly between infected and noninfected (control group) individuals and according to the Leishmania species. Infection caused by L. guyanensis accounted for 73% of the cases and patients with this parasite also showed higher concentrations of IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-17 when compared to infection by L. amazonensis. Patients with infection caused by L. naiffi showed higher concentration of the cytokines analyzed when compared to uninfected patients; however, there was no statistically significant difference with the other species analyzed.

  18. The Role of Inflammatory, Anti-Inflammatory, and Regulatory Cytokines in Patients Infected with Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Amazonas State, Brazil

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    Thaís Tibery Espir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors discuss in this paper the role of inflammatory, anti-inflammatory, and regulatory cytokines in patients infected with different species of Leishmania in Amazonas State, Brazil. A comparative analysis was made of serum concentrations of these cytokines in the peripheral blood of 33 patients infected with cutaneous leishmaniasis. The isolates were identified as Leishmania guyanensis, L. naiffi, and L. amazonensis. Most (64% of the patients were male ranging in age from 18 to 58 years. Protein expression profiles of IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-17 cytokines were shown to vary significantly between infected and noninfected (control group individuals and according to the Leishmania species. Infection caused by L. guyanensis accounted for 73% of the cases and patients with this parasite also showed higher concentrations of IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-17 when compared to infection by L. amazonensis. Patients with infection caused by L. naiffi showed higher concentration of the cytokines analyzed when compared to uninfected patients; however, there was no statistically significant difference with the other species analyzed.

  19. Natural infection of North African gundi (Ctenodactylus gundi) by Leishmania tropica in the focus of cutaneous leishmaniasis, Southeast Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousslimi, Nadia; Ben-Ayed, Soumaya; Ben-Abda, Imène; Aoun, Karim; Bouratbine, Aïda

    2012-06-01

    North African gundis (Ctenodactylus gundi) were trapped in the Leishmania (L.) tropica focus of cutaneous leishmaniasis, situated in southeast Tunisia and evaluated for Leishmania infection by real-time kinetoplast DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Species identification was performed by internal transcribed spacer one (ITS1)-PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis of the 7SL RNA gene. Real-time PCR on blood was positive in 6 of 13 (46.2%) tested gundis. Leishmania tropica was identified in five infected gundis and Leishmania major in one specimen. Alignments of the ITS-1 DNA sequences and 7S-HRM curves analysis indicated that similar genotypes were present in humans, a sandfly, and gundis from the same region suggesting a potential role of this rodent as reservoir host of L. tropica in southeast Tunisia.

  20. Cutaneous sarcoids in captive African lions associated with feline sarcoid-associated papillomavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbell, G M B; Young, S; Munday, J S

    2011-11-01

    Solitary and multiple cutaneous and mucocutaneous masses were identified in 5 of 24 captive African lions (Panthera leo) over a 6-month-period. All masses were surgically excised, and all were histologically similar to equine and feline sarcoids. DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. Polymerase chain reaction amplified DNA sequences that had been previously detected in feline sarcoids and clinically normal bovine skin. All lions had been fed a diet that included bovine carcasses that had not been skinned. Since the cessation of feeding bovine carcasses with cutaneous lesions, no additional skin lesions have been observed within any of the lions. Herein is described the clinical, gross, and histopathological findings of sarcoids in 5 captive lions. As the causative papillomavirus most likely has a bovine definitive host, it is hypothesized that the lions were exposed to the virus by feeding on bovine carcasses with skin still attached.

  1. The multifunctional LigB adhesin binds homeostatic proteins with potential roles in cutaneous infection by pathogenic Leptospira interrogans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry A Choy

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is a potentially fatal zoonotic disease in humans and animals caused by pathogenic spirochetes, such as Leptospira interrogans. The mode of transmission is commonly limited to the exposure of mucous membrane or damaged skin to water contaminated by leptospires shed in the urine of carriers, such as rats. Infection occurs during seasonal flooding of impoverished tropical urban habitats with large rat populations, but also during recreational activity in open water, suggesting it is very efficient. LigA and LigB are surface localized proteins in pathogenic Leptospira strains with properties that could facilitate the infection of damaged skin. Their expression is rapidly induced by the increase in osmolarity encountered by leptospires upon transition from water to host. In addition, the immunoglobulin-like repeats of the Lig proteins bind proteins that mediate attachment to host tissue, such as fibronectin, fibrinogen, collagens, laminin, and elastin, some of which are important in cutaneous wound healing and repair. Hemostasis is critical in a fresh injury, where fibrinogen from damaged vasculature mediates coagulation. We show that fibrinogen binding by recombinant LigB inhibits fibrin formation, which could aid leptospiral entry into the circulation, dissemination, and further infection by impairing healing. LigB also binds fibroblast fibronectin and type III collagen, two proteins prevalent in wound repair, thus potentially enhancing leptospiral adhesion to skin openings. LigA or LigB expression by transformation of a nonpathogenic saprophyte, L. biflexa, enhances bacterial adhesion to fibrinogen. Our results suggest that by binding homeostatic proteins found in cutaneous wounds, LigB could facilitate leptospirosis transmission. Both fibronectin and fibrinogen binding have been mapped to an overlapping domain in LigB comprising repeats 9-11, with repeat 11 possibly enhancing binding by a conformational effect. Leptospirosis

  2. Comparison of the immune profile of nonhealing cutaneous Leishmaniasis patients with those with active lesions and those who have recovered from infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ajdary, S; Alimohammadian, M H; Eslami, M B

    2000-01-01

    Th1-type cellular immune responses play a critical role in protection against infection with Leishmania parasites, whereas activation of Th2-type cells results in progressive disease. Cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major is often a self-healing disease; however, persistent nonhealing...

  3. Development of a Murine Infection Model with Leishmania killicki, Responsible for Cutaneous Leishmaniosis in Algeria: Application in Pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddaikra, Naouel; Kherachi Djenad, Ihcene; Benbetka, Sihem; Benikhlef, Razika; Aït-Oudhia, Khatima; Moulti-Mati, Farida; Oury, Bruno; Sereno, Denis; Harrat, Zoubir

    2016-01-01

    In Algeria, Leishmania infantum, Leishmania major, and Leishmania killicki (Leishmania tropica) are responsible for cutaneous leishmaniosis. We established a murine model of L. killicki infection to investigate its infective capacity, some immunophysiopathological aspects, and its suitability for pharmacological purposes. Following the injection of L. major or L. killicki metacyclic promastigotes in the ear dermis of BALB/c mice, the course of infection was followed. The infection with L. killicki caused slower lesion formation than with L. major. The presence of L. killicki or L. major DNA and parasites was detected in the ear dermis and in lymph nodes, spleen, and liver. Lesions induced by L. killicki were nonulcerative in their aspect, whereas those caused by L. major were highly ulcerative and necrotic, which matches well with the lesion phenotype reported in humans for L. killicki and L. major, respectively. The treatment of L. killicki lesions by injection of Glucantime® significantly reduced the lesion thickness and parasite burden. Ear dermal injection of BALB/c mice constitutes a model to study lesions physiopathology caused by L. killicki and presents interest for in vivo screening of new compounds against this pathogen, emerging in Algeria. PMID:26949705

  4. Mixed Cutaneous Infection Caused by Mycobacterium szulgai and Mycobacterium intermedium in a Healthy Adult Female: A Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amresh Kumar Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTMs are ubiquitous and are being increasingly reported as human opportunistic infection. Cutaneous infection caused by mixed NTM is extremely rare. We encountered the case of a 46-year-old female, who presented with multiple discharging sinuses over the lower anterior abdominal wall (over a previous appendectomy scar for the past 2 years. Microscopy and culture of the pus discharge were done to isolate and identify the etiological agent. Finally, GenoType Mycobacterium CM/AS assay proved it to be a mixed infection caused by Mycobacterium szulgai and M. intermedium. The patient was advised a combination of rifampicin 600 mg once daily, ethambutol 600 mg once daily, and clarithromycin 500 mg twice daily to be taken along with periodic follow-up based upon clinical response as well as microbiological response. We emphasize that infections by NTM must be considered in the etiology of nonhealing wounds or sinuses, especially at postsurgical sites.

  5. Development of a Murine Infection Model with Leishmania killicki, Responsible for Cutaneous Leishmaniosis in Algeria: Application in Pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddaikra, Naouel; Kherachi Djenad, Ihcene; Benbetka, Sihem; Benikhlef, Razika; Aït-Oudhia, Khatima; Moulti-Mati, Farida; Oury, Bruno; Sereno, Denis; Harrat, Zoubir

    2016-01-01

    In Algeria, Leishmania infantum, Leishmania major, and Leishmania killicki (Leishmania tropica) are responsible for cutaneous leishmaniosis. We established a murine model of L. killicki infection to investigate its infective capacity, some immunophysiopathological aspects, and its suitability for pharmacological purposes. Following the injection of L. major or L. killicki metacyclic promastigotes in the ear dermis of BALB/c mice, the course of infection was followed. The infection with L. killicki caused slower lesion formation than with L. major. The presence of L. killicki or L. major DNA and parasites was detected in the ear dermis and in lymph nodes, spleen, and liver. Lesions induced by L. killicki were nonulcerative in their aspect, whereas those caused by L. major were highly ulcerative and necrotic, which matches well with the lesion phenotype reported in humans for L. killicki and L. major, respectively. The treatment of L. killicki lesions by injection of Glucantime® significantly reduced the lesion thickness and parasite burden. Ear dermal injection of BALB/c mice constitutes a model to study lesions physiopathology caused by L. killicki and presents interest for in vivo screening of new compounds against this pathogen, emerging in Algeria.

  6. Development of a Murine Infection Model with Leishmania killicki, Responsible for Cutaneous Leishmaniosis in Algeria: Application in Pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naouel Eddaikra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Algeria, Leishmania infantum, Leishmania major, and Leishmania killicki (Leishmania tropica are responsible for cutaneous leishmaniosis. We established a murine model of L. killicki infection to investigate its infective capacity, some immunophysiopathological aspects, and its suitability for pharmacological purposes. Following the injection of L. major or L. killicki metacyclic promastigotes in the ear dermis of BALB/c mice, the course of infection was followed. The infection with L. killicki caused slower lesion formation than with L. major. The presence of L. killicki or L. major DNA and parasites was detected in the ear dermis and in lymph nodes, spleen, and liver. Lesions induced by L. killicki were nonulcerative in their aspect, whereas those caused by L. major were highly ulcerative and necrotic, which matches well with the lesion phenotype reported in humans for L. killicki and L. major, respectively. The treatment of L. killicki lesions by injection of Glucantime® significantly reduced the lesion thickness and parasite burden. Ear dermal injection of BALB/c mice constitutes a model to study lesions physiopathology caused by L. killicki and presents interest for in vivo screening of new compounds against this pathogen, emerging in Algeria.

  7. Expansion of gd T cells in patients infected with cutaneous leishmaniasis with and without glucantime therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haideh Darabi

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of gd T cells in patients with active cutaneous leishmaniasis, with or without glucantime therapy, was investigated. Twenty patients with local cutaneous leishmaniasis including glucantime-treated (n=10 and untreated (n=10 patients were selected. The controls were healthy individuals (n=10 living in endemic areas. Whole blood was obtained and the T cell subpopulations were analyzed by flow cytometry. Significantly more gd CD3+ T cells were observed in untreated patients (15.9% ± 5.9, when compared with glucantime-treated patients (4.6% ± 1.4 and controls (5.3% ± 2.3. On the other hand, when the percentages of ab CD3+ T-cells were analyzed different results were obtained. A significant increase in ab T cells was seen in glucantime-treated patients (62.4% ± 7.6, when compared to the untreated patients (55.7% ± 5.5 and controls (55.1% ± 9.6. The percentage of total CD3+ T cells was statistically greater in both glucantime-treated (68.8% ± 7.4 and untreated patients (73.4% ± 5.9 when compared to the controls (61% ± 10.3. These results are consistent with previous results on the expansion of gdT cells during the course of cutaneous leishmaniasis. They also indicate that glucantime therapy can reverse the expansion of gdT cells and as a result increase the percentages of ab CD3+ T cells.

  8. Cutaneous lesions associated with coronavirus-induced vasculitis in a cat with feline infectious peritonitis and concurrent feline immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Martha J; Silkstone, Malcolm A; Kipar, Anja M

    2005-08-01

    This report describes a clinical case of feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) with multisystemic involvement, including multiple nodular cutaneous lesions, in a cat that was co-infected with feline coronavirus and feline immunodeficiency virus. The skin lesions were caused by a pyogranulomatous-necrotising dermal phlebitis and periphlebitis. Immunohistology demonstrated the presence of coronavirus antigen in macrophages within these lesions. The pathogenesis of FIP involves a viral associated, disseminated phlebitis and periphlebitis which can arise at many sites. Target organs frequently include the eyes, abdominal organs, pleural and peritoneal membranes, and central nervous tissues, but cutaneous lesions have not previously been reported.

  9. [Cutaneous leishmaniasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enk, C D; Gardlo, K; Hochberg, M; Ingber, A; Ruzicka, T

    2003-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease caused by an obligate intracellular protozoa, Leishmania, which resides in macrophages. The parasite is transmitted by an infected female sandfly. The incidence of cutaneous leishmaniasis approaches 2 million new cases per year with 90% of the cases occurring in the "Old World", while the "New World" accounts for the rest. Infection may be restricted to the skin with development of characteristic ulcers, or may affect the mucous membranes in its mucocutaneous form. The clinical diagnosis is verified by the presence of amastigotes in slit-skin smears. Therapeutic modalities include systemic treatments such as the pentavalent antimony compound sodium stibogluconate, liposomal formulations of amphotericin B, oral ketoconazole or itraconazole, as well as topical paromomycin sulphate, local heat, freezing with liquid nitrogen, or photodynamic therapy. An effective vaccine is not available.

  10. Skin biopsy: a pillar in the identification of cutaneous Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Solis, Alejandro; Herrera González, Norma Estela; Cazarez, Fernando; Mercadillo Pérez, Patricia; Olivera Diaz, Hiram Olivera; Escobar-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Cortés Ortíz, Ileana; González González, Heleodora; Reding-Bernal, Arturo; Sabido, Raúl Cícero

    2012-08-21

    The present study aimed to establish the frequency and clinical characteristics of cutaneous tuberculosis among Mexican adult patients. Ninety-five patients with clinically compatible lesions to cutaneous tuberculosis participated in the study. All patients were HIV negative and none of them had previous anti-TB treatment. A skin biopsy was taken from every patient suspected of having tuberculosis, and a histopathologic examination was performed as follows: Ziehl-Neelsen staining; culturing of mycobacteria by Löwenstein-Jensen (L-J) medium; Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube detection via BACTEC (MGIT-360); and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with the sequence of insertion IS6110 for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Tuberculosis was confirmed in 65 out of 95 cases (68.4%). Identified lesions were scrofuloderma (42 cases, 64.6%); lupus vulgaris (12 cases, 18.4%); warty tuberculosis (six cases, 9.2%); and papulonecrotic tuberculoid (five cases; 7.7%). The Ziehl-Neelsen staining was positive for acid fast bacilli in nine cases (13.8%) and 48 patients were positive for the PCR amplification (73.8%). All skin biopsies resulted positive for tuberculosis. A positive clinical response to the specific treatment was considered a confirmation for tuberculosis. The noninfectious etiology corresponded to 30 cases (31.6%). Tuberculosis in developing countries is still an important cause of skin lesions which must be studied via histopathological examination and culture due to their low bacillary load. A PCR test is necessary to obtain faster confirmation of the disease and to establish an early, specific and effective treatment.

  11. First report of natural infection in hedgehogs with Leishmania major, a possible reservoir of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás-Pérez, Míriam; Khaldi, Mourad; Riera, Cristina; Mozo-León, Denis; Ribas, Alexis; Hide, Mallorie; Barech, Ghania; Benyettou, Meryam; Seghiri, Kamel; Doudou, Souad; Fisa, Roser

    2014-07-01

    We report here the first known cases of natural infection of hedgehogs with Leishmania major. Cutaneous leishmaniasis is an important public health problem in the area of M'sila, a semi-arid province in Algeria's northern Sahara, where two species of hedgehog live, Atelerix algirus and Paraechinus aethiopicus. The aim of this research was to survey Leishmania infection in these hedgehogs and evaluate whether they were reservoir hosts of Leishmania in an endemic zoonotic focus of leishmaniasis. Serological and molecular methods were used to determine the presence of Leishmania in 24 hedgehogs caught directly by hand and identified at species level as 19 A. algirus and 5 P. aethiopicus. Specific anti-Leishmania antibodies were detected in 29.2% of individuals by Western blot and in 26.3% by ELISA. The real-time PCR performed in spleen, ear and blood samples detected Leishmania spp. DNA in 12.5% of the individuals, one A. algirus and two P. aethiopicus. Three skin and two spleen samples of these animals were found to be parasitized and were identified by molecular test as L. major. Considering our results, it is suggested that hedgehogs have a potential epidemiological role as reservoir hosts of L. major.

  12. Cutaneous mucormycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiada, Anna; Petrikkos, George

    2013-01-01

    Mucormycosis is an invasive fungal infection caused by fungi of the order Mucorales, mainly affecting immunocompromised patients. Cutaneous mucormycosis is the third most common clinical form of the disease, after pulmonary and rhino-cerebral. The usual factors predisposing to this infection are hematological malignancies and diabetes mellitus, but a significant proportion of patients are immunocompetent. The agents of mucormycosis are ubiquitous in nature and are transmitted to the skin by direct inoculation, as a result of various types of trauma. These include needle sticks, stings and bites by animals, motor vehicle accidents, natural disasters, and burn injuries. The typical presentation of mucormycosis is the necrotic eschar, but it can present with various other signs. The infection can be locally invasive and penetrate into the adjacent fat, muscle, fascia, and bone, or become disseminated. Diagnosis is difficult because of the nonspecific findings of mucormycosis. Biopsy and culture should be performed. The treatment of mucormycosis is multimodal and consists of surgical debridement, use of antifungal drugs (amphotericin B and posaconazole), and reversal of underlying risk factors, when possible. Mortality rates, although lower than in other forms of the disease, are significant, ranging from 4% to 10% when the infection is localized.

  13. Cutaneous mucormycosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrejón-Pérez, Ana Daniela; Welsh, Esperanza C.; Miranda, Ivett; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Welsh, Oliverio

    2017-01-01

    Cutaneous mucormycosis is an emerging fungal infection caused by opportunistic fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota. It is frequent in poorly controlled diabetic patients and individuals with immunosuppression. It is usually acquired by direct inoculation through trauma. The clinical presentation is nonspecific, but an indurated plaque that rapidly evolves to necrosis is a common finding. Diagnosis should be confirmed by demonstration of the etiological agent and new molecular diagnostic tools have recently been described. It is an invasive life-threatening disease and in order to improve survival, a prompt diagnosis and multidisciplinary management should be provided. The treatment of choice is amphotericin B, but new azoles, such as posaconazole and isavuconazole, must be considered.

  14. Cutaneous infection with Alternaria triticina in a Bilateral lung transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Vela, M C; Armesto, S; Unda-Villafuerte, F; Val-Bernal, J F

    2014-10-01

    We report the case of a 60-year-old man who was receiving immunosuppressive therapy for a bilateral lung transplant and presented with a crusted, violaceous plaque on the left hand. Based on histopathology and microbiological culture the patient was diagnosed with infection by Alternaria species. Treatment with itraconazole led to complete resolution of the skin lesion. Forty months later he developed four reddish, nodular, skin lesions on the left leg. Analysis of a biopsy from one of these lesions using histopathologic and molecular techniques identified a mold that shared 98% homology with a strain of Alternaria triticina. Alternaria species belong to a group of dematiaceous fungi that cause opportunistic infections in humans. The incidence of these infections is increasing, mainly in transplant centers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a human infection caused by A. triticina. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  15. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Local Heat Therapy Versus Intravenous Sodium Stibogluconate for the Treatment of Cutaneous Leishmania Major Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Dermatotrophic Leishmania species such as L. major, L. tropica , and L. mexicana are thermosensitive with higher temperatures limiting amastigote replication...Wahid M, Bismullah M, Quinnell RJ, et al. (2005) Efficacy of thermotherapy to treat cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania tropica in Kabul...A Randomized Controlled Trial of Local Heat Therapy Versus Intravenous Sodium Stibogluconate for the Treatment of Cutaneous Leishmania major

  16. Cutaneous bacterial infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes in infants and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larru, Beatriz; Gerber, Jeffrey S

    2014-04-01

    Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (SSSIs) are among the most common bacterial infections in children. The medical burden of SSSIs, particularly abscesses, has increased nationwide since the emergence of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. SSSIs represent a wide spectrum of disease severity. Prompt recognition, timely institution of appropriate therapy, and judicious antimicrobial use optimize patient outcomes. For abscesses, incision and drainage are paramount and might avoid the need for antibiotic treatment in uncomplicated cases. If indicated, empiric antimicrobial therapy should target Streptococcus pyogenes for nonpurulent SSSIs, such as uncomplicated cellulitis, and S aureus for purulent SSSIs such as abscesses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Concomitant Infection with Leishmania donovani and L. major in Single Ulcers of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Patients from Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Babiker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Sudan human leishmaniasis occurs in different clinical forms, that is, visceral (VL, cutaneous (CL, mucocutaneous (ML, and post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL. Clinical samples from 69 Sudanese patients with different clinical manifestations were subjected to a PCR targeting the cytochrome oxidase II (COII gene for Leishmania species identification. Mixed infections were suspected due to multiple overlapping peaks presented in some sequences of the COII amplicons. Cloning these amplicons and alignment of sequences from randomly selected clones confirmed the presence of two different Leishmania species, L. donovani and L. major, in three out of five CL patients. Findings were further confirmed by cloning the ITS gene. Regarding other samples no significant genetic variations were found in patients with VL (62 patients, PKDL (one patient, or ML (one patient. The sequences clustered in a single homogeneous group within L. donovani genetic group, with the exception of one sequence clustering with L. infantum genetic group. Findings of this study open discussion on the synergetic/antagonistic interaction between divergent Leishmania species both in mammalian and vector hosts, their clinical implications with respect to parasite fitness and response to treatment, and the route of transmission with respect to vector distribution and or adaptation.

  18. Molecular identification of Leishmania tropica infections in patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis from an endemic central of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Gilda; Hajimohammadi, Bahador; Jafari, Abbas Ali; Mirzaei, Farzaneh; Gholamrezai, Mostafa; Anvari, Hossein; Khamesipour, Ali

    2014-12-01

    The most common form of the disease is cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) which is a public health and social problem in many countries especially Iran. In endemic areas where other diseases with similar clinical symptoms occur, definitive diagnosis of CL is very important. The detection and identification of Leishmania in infected patients is crucial for achieving a correct treatment and prognosis. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive study in terms of geographical distribution and molecular identification of Leishmania tropica isolates in central of Iran. This study was performed between 2010 and 2011, during which 218 CL suspected patients referred to Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in Yazd, Iran for confirmation were examined. After microscopic analysis, DNA extraction was performed for identification. The molecular target region was ITS1 gene. Results showed that out of 218 isolates, 102 (46.8%) samples were positive for Leishman body using molecular assay. After PCR-RFLP, analysis identified 50 (49.01%) samples as L. major and 52 (50.98%) as L. tropica. Two samples showed a different pattern that were reported as unknown. Among L. tropica, six different isolates were identified in this endemic area. Finally, this study showed heterozygosity among L. tropica isolates in this endemic area such as some other studies from the world. This heterozygosity among the strains may suggest a sexual recombination or genetic exchange between strains.

  19. The role of natural killer cells in the early period of infection in murine cutaneous leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.D. Laurenti

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the role of natural killer (NK cells during the early period of Leishmania infection, BALB/c mice were selectively and permanently depleted of NK cells by injection with 90Sr and subsequently infected with Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis (HSJD-1 strain. 90Sr is known to selectively deplete NK cells, leaving an intact T- and B-cell compartment and preserving the ability to produce both interferon alpha and IL-2. This method of depletion has advantages when compared with depletion using anti-NK cell monoclonal antibodies because the effect is permanent and neither activates complement nor provokes massive cell death. In the present study, after one month of treatment with 90Sr, the depletion of NK cells was shown by a more than ten-fold reduction in the cytotoxic activity of these cells: 2 x 106 spleen cells from NK-depleted animals were required to reach the same specific lysis of target cells effected by 0.15 x 106 spleen cells from normal control animals. The histopathology of the skin lesion at 7 days after Leishmania infection showed more parasites in the NK cell-depleted group. This observation further strengthens a direct role of NK cells during the early period of Leishmania infection.

  20. Cutaneous infection caused by Macrophomina phaseolina in a child with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Ashok; Wickes, Brian L; Romanelli, Anna M; Debelenko, Larisa; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E; Sutton, Deanna A; Thompson, Elizabeth H; Fothergill, Annette W; Rinaldi, Michael G; Hayden, Randall T; Shenep, Jerry L

    2009-06-01

    We report a case of Macrophomina phaseolina skin infection in an immunocompromised child with acute myeloid leukemia, which was treated successfully with posaconazole without recurrence after a hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The fungus was identified by DNA sequencing using both the internal transcribed spacer and D1/D2 region of the 28S ribosomal DNA gene.

  1. Cutaneous Infection Caused by Macrophomina phaseolina in a Child with Acute Myeloid Leukemia▿

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan, Ashok; Wickes, Brian L.; Romanelli, Anna M.; Debelenko, Larisa; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Sutton, Deanna A.; Thompson, Elizabeth H.; Fothergill, Annette W.; Rinaldi, Michael G.; Hayden, Randall T.; Shenep, Jerry L.

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of Macrophomina phaseolina skin infection in an immunocompromised child with acute myeloid leukemia, which was treated successfully with posaconazole without recurrence after a hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The fungus was identified by DNA sequencing using both the internal transcribed spacer and D1/D2 region of the 28S ribosomal DNA gene.

  2. Cutaneous Infection Caused by Macrophomina phaseolina in a Child with Acute Myeloid Leukemia▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Ashok; Wickes, Brian L.; Romanelli, Anna M.; Debelenko, Larisa; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Sutton, Deanna A.; Thompson, Elizabeth H.; Fothergill, Annette W.; Rinaldi, Michael G.; Hayden, Randall T.; Shenep, Jerry L.

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of Macrophomina phaseolina skin infection in an immunocompromised child with acute myeloid leukemia, which was treated successfully with posaconazole without recurrence after a hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The fungus was identified by DNA sequencing using both the internal transcribed spacer and D1/D2 region of the 28S ribosomal DNA gene. PMID:19386841

  3. Cutaneous infection caused by Mycobacterium avium after an aesthetic abdominoplasty: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Rodrigues

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports an extremely rare complication followinga cosmetic abdominoplasty. A skin infection caused byMycobacterium avium was manifested as multiple skin nodules inthe abdominal flap that were clinically and surgically treated. Theauthors report the case and its clinical course, and present acorrelation with the literature.

  4. Natural and ion-exchanged illite clays reduce bacterial burden and inflammation in cutaneous meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Caitlin C; Kilbourne, Jacquelyn; Haydel, Shelley E

    2016-01-01

    Discoveries associated with antibacterial activity of hydrated clays necessitate assessments of in vivo efficacy, practical use and safety. Surface properties of clays can lead to variations in the composition and abundance of bound compounds or ions, thus affecting antibacterial activity. Since exchangeable metal ions released from the clay surface are responsible for in vitro antibacterial activity, we evaluated the in vivo antibacterial efficacy of four natural clays (one illite clay, two montmorillonite clays and one kaolinite clay) and three ion-exchanged, antibacterial clays against superficial, cutaneous meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in mice. Superficial, cutaneous wounds on the back of SKH1-Elite mice were generated and subsequently infected with MRSA. Following twice daily applications of a hydrated clay poultice to infected wounds for 7  days, we observed significant differences in the in vivo antibacterial efficacy between different types of clays. The natural and ion-exchanged illite clays performed best, as measured by bacterial load, inflammatory response and gross wound morphology with significant decreases in bacterial viability and dermatitis. Topical application of kaolinite clay was the least effective, resulting in the lowest decrease in bacterial load and exhibiting severe dermatitis. These data suggest that specific types of clays may offer a complementary and integrative strategy for topically treating MRSA and other cutaneous infections. However, since natural clays exhibit in vitro antibacterial variability and vary vastly in surface chemistries, adsorptive/absorptive characteristics and structural composition, the properties and characteristics of illite clays could aid in the development of standardized and customized aluminosilicates for topical infections.

  5. Cutaneous leishmaniasis in western Venezuela caused by infection with Leishmania venezuelensis and L. braziliensis variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfante-Garrido, R; Meléndez, E; Barroeta, S; de Alejos, M A; Momen, H; Cupolillo, E; McMahon-Pratt, D; Grimaldi, G

    1992-01-01

    Between 1975 and 1987, epidemiological studies were carried out in several rural and urban communities in the central part of western Venezuela, especially in the state of Lara. 115 positive cultures were obtained from human cases and identified by their reactivity patterns to a cross-panel of specific monoclonal antibodies using a radioimmune binding assay; 53 were Leishmania venezuelensis and 62 were L. braziliensis. Most of these stocks were also characterized by isoenzyme electrophoresis, which confirmed the identification of the L. venezuelensis isolates. The enzyme electrophoretic profiles of the L. braziliensis isolates, however, revealed two populations with distinct electromorphs, one related to the World Health Organization L. braziliensis reference strain while the other population appeared to be a hybrid between L. braziliensis and L. guyanensis. L. braziliensis variants showed the widest geographical distribution, and were found in 7 states: Districto Federal (Caracas); Lara (Barquisimeto, Crespo, Iribarren, Jimenez, Morán, Palavecino, Torres, Urdaneta); Nueva Esparta (Margarita); Portuguesa (Las Cruces, Rio Amarillo); Trujillo (Cuicas); Yaracuy (Agua Fria, Cambural, Guaremal); and Zulia (Zipa-Yare). L. venezuelensis was found in the following endemic regions: Lara (Barquisimeto, Iribarren, Jimenez, Morán); Merida (Zéa); and Yaracuy (Campos Elias), showing that this parasite has a much wider geographical distribution than was initially recognized and that both these species can occur simultaneously within the same endemic region. Five isolates of L. braziliensis were made from infected donkeys (Equus asinus) in Urdaneta, Lara State, suggesting a possible domestic reservoir of L. braziliensis.

  6. Cutaneous and diphtheritic avian poxvirus infection in a nestling Southern Giant Petrel (Macronectes giganteus) from Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie; Green, David Earl; Converse, K.A.; Docherty, D.E.; Thiel, T.; Geisz, H.N.; Fraser, William R.; Patterson-Fraser, Donna L.

    2008-01-01

    The Southern giant petrel (Macronectes giganteus) is declining over much of its range and currently is listed as vulnerable to extinction by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Island-specific breeding colonies near Palmer Station, Antarctica, have been monitored for over 30 years, and because this population continues to increase, it is critically important to conservation. In austral summer 2004, six diseased giant petrel chicks were observed in four of these colonies. Diseased chicks were 6a??9 weeks old and had multiple proliferative nodules on their bills and skin. One severely affected chick was found dead on the nest and was salvaged for necropsy. Histopathological examination of nodules from the dead chick revealed epithelial cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy with numerous eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusions (B??llinger bodies). A poxvirus was isolated from multiple nodules. Poxviral infection has not been reported in this species, and the reason for its emergence and its potential impact on the population are not yet known.

  7. Cutaneous human papillomavirus types detected on the surface of male external genital lesions: A case series within the HPV Infection in Men Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce Campbell, Christine M.; Messina, Jane L.; Stoler, Mark H.; Jukic, Drazen M.; Tommasino, Massimo; Gheit, Tarik; Rollison, Dana E.; Sichero, Laura; Sirak, Bradley A.; Ingles, Donna J.; Abrahamsen, Martha; Lu, Beibei; Villa, Luisa L.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cutaneous human papillomaviruses (HPVs) may be associated with cutaneous epithelial lesions and non-melanoma skin cancers. No study has systematically evaluated the presence of genus beta [β]-HPV in male genital skin or external genital lesions (EGLs). Objectives To examine cutaneous β-HPV types detected on the surface of EGLs in men and describe their presence prior to EGL development. Study design A retrospective case series was conducted among 69 men with pathologically confirmed EGLs (n=72) who participated in the HPV Infection in Men Study. Archived exfoliated cells collected from the surface of each EGL and normal genital skin specimens 6–12 months preceding EGL development were tested for β-HPV DNA using a type-specific multiplex genotyping assay. Results β-HPV DNA was detected on 61.1% of all EGLs, with types 38 (16.7%), 5 (15.3%), and 12 (12.5%) most commonly identified. HPV prevalence differed across pathological diagnoses, with the largest number of β-HPV types detected on condylomas. Most β-HPV types were detected on normal genital skin prior to EGL development, though the prevalence was lower on EGLs compared to preceding normal genital skin. Conclusions EGLs and the normal genital skin of men harbor a large number of β-HPV types; however, it appears that β-HPVs are unrelated to EGL development in men. Despite evidence to support a causal role in skin carcinogenesis at UVR-exposed sites, cutaneous HPV appears unlikely to cause disease at the UVR-unexposed genitals. PMID:24210970

  8. Prevalence of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Carrying Panton-Valentine Leukocidin Gene in Cutaneous Infections in the City of Isfahan

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    Mohammad Reza Pourmand

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is a major cause of Nosocomial and community infections that are becoming increasingly difficult to combat, because of emerging resistance to all classes of antibiotics. Moreover Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL is an important virulence factor in S. aureus and causes white blood cell destruction, necrosis and accelerated apoptosis. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of PVL-positive MRSA in cutaneous infections, for epidemiological purposes and also to determine antibiotic resistance of the isolates.Methods: Collectively, 56 isolates of S. aureus were obtained from Isfahan University of Medical sciences affiliated hospitals and confirmed with biochemical tests (coagulase, mannitol fermentation, and DNase. Then polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used to detect pvl gene. Coagulase gene was used as internal control. The antibiotic susceptibility of all isolates to methicillin was determined using disk diffusion method.Results: Out of 56 isolates 14.3% were PVL positive that 37.5% were from abscess and 62.5% were from wound. Among all of these isolates 67.8% were MRSA and also 75% of PVL-positive isolates were MRSA.Conclusion: The prevalence of PVL positive MRSA in cutaneous isolates is high. Future works are necessary for a more complete understanding of distribution of these virulent isolates in nasal carriers to decrease the risk of infections.

  9. Assessment of β-lapachone loaded in lecithin-chitosan nanoparticles for the topical treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis in L. major infected BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Esther; Schwartz, Juana; Larrea, Esther; Conde, Iosune; Font, Maria; Sanmartín, Carmen; Irache, Juan Manuel; Espuelas, Socorro

    2015-11-01

    Patients affected by cutaneous leishmaniasis need a topical treatment which cures lesions without leaving scars. Lesions are produced not only by the parasite but also by an uncontrolled and persistent inflammatory immune response. In this study, we proposed the loading of β-lapachone (β-LP) in lecithin-chitosan nanoparticles (NP) for targeting the drug to the dermis, where infected macrophages reside, and promote wound healing. Although the loading of β-LP in NP did not influence the drug antileishmanial activity it was critical to achieve important drug accumulation in the dermis and permeation through the skin. When topically applied in Leishmania major infected BALB/c mice, β-LP NP achieved no parasite reduction but they stopped the lesion progression. Immuno-histopathological assays in CL lesions and quantitative mRNA studies in draining lymph nodes confirmed that β-LP exhibited anti-inflammatory activity leading to the down-regulation of IL-1β and COX-2 expression and a decrease of neutrophils infiltrate. Cutaneous leishmaniasis often leaves patients with unsightly scars due to the body's inflammatory response to the infection. The authors in this paper described topical treatment using β-lapachone (β- LP) loaded in lecithin-chitosan nanoparticles (NP) in an animal model. Results confirmed the reduction of inflammatory response without affecting the parasite killing efficacy. These findings would pave way for further clinical testing in the near future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cutaneous signs of piety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, V; Al Aboud, Khalid

    2014-07-01

    It is important for dermatologists to be aware of cutaneous changes related to religious practices to help in their recognition and management. The anatomic location of cutaneous lesions associated with friction from praying varies based on religious practice. Allergic contact dermatitis from products and substances commonly used in worshipping also vary by religion. Some religious practices may render individuals prone to infections that manifest on the skin. Tattoos of godly figures also may adorn the body. Religious practices also have been implicated in cases of urticaria, köbnerization, and leukoderma. This article reviews the clinical presentation of some of the most common cutaneous changes that occur in individuals who practice the following religions: Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism, and Sikhism.

  11. Testing of four Leishmania vaccine candidates in a mouse model of infection with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, the main causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the New World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salay, G; Dorta, M L; Santos, N M; Mortara, R A; Brodskyn, C; Oliveira, C I; Barbiéri, C L; Rodrigues, M M

    2007-09-01

    We evaluated whether four recombinant antigens previously used for vaccination against experimental infection with Leishmania (Leishmania) major could also induce protective immunity against a challenge with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, the species responsible for 90% of the 28,712 annual cases of cutaneous and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis recorded in Brazil during the year of 2004. Initially, we isolated the homolog genes encoding four L. (V.) braziliensis antigens: (i) homologue of receptor for activated C kinase, (ii) thiol-specific antioxidant, (iii) Leishmania elongation and initiation factor, and (iv) L. (L.) major stress-inducible protein 1. At the deduced amino acid level, all four open reading frames had a high degree of identity with the previously described genes of L. (L.) major being expressed on promastigotes and amastigotes of L. (V.) braziliensis. These genes were inserted into the vector pcDNA3 or expressed as bacterial recombinant proteins. After immunization with recombinant plasmids or proteins, BALB/c mice generated specific antibody or cell-mediated immune responses (gamma interferon production). After an intradermal challenge with L. (V.) braziliensis infective promastigotes, no significant reduction on the lesions was detected. We conclude that the protective immunity afforded by these four vaccine candidates against experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. (L.) major could not be reproduced against a challenge with L. (V.) braziliensis. Although negative, we consider our results important since they suggest that studies aimed at the development of an effective vaccine against L. (V.) braziliensis, the main causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the New World, should be redirected toward distinct antigens or different vaccination strategies.

  12. Testing of Four Leishmania Vaccine Candidates in a Mouse Model of Infection with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, the Main Causative Agent of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in the New World▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salay, G.; Dorta, M. L.; Santos, N. M.; Mortara, R. A.; Brodskyn, C.; Oliveira, C. I.; Barbiéri, C. L.; Rodrigues, M. M.

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated whether four recombinant antigens previously used for vaccination against experimental infection with Leishmania (Leishmania) major could also induce protective immunity against a challenge with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, the species responsible for 90% of the 28,712 annual cases of cutaneous and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis recorded in Brazil during the year of 2004. Initially, we isolated the homolog genes encoding four L. (V.) braziliensis antigens: (i) homologue of receptor for activated C kinase, (ii) thiol-specific antioxidant, (iii) Leishmania elongation and initiation factor, and (iv) L. (L.) major stress-inducible protein 1. At the deduced amino acid level, all four open reading frames had a high degree of identity with the previously described genes of L. (L.) major being expressed on promastigotes and amastigotes of L. (V.) braziliensis. These genes were inserted into the vector pcDNA3 or expressed as bacterial recombinant proteins. After immunization with recombinant plasmids or proteins, BALB/c mice generated specific antibody or cell-mediated immune responses (gamma interferon production). After an intradermal challenge with L. (V.) braziliensis infective promastigotes, no significant reduction on the lesions was detected. We conclude that the protective immunity afforded by these four vaccine candidates against experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. (L.) major could not be reproduced against a challenge with L. (V.) braziliensis. Although negative, we consider our results important since they suggest that studies aimed at the development of an effective vaccine against L. (V.) braziliensis, the main causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the New World, should be redirected toward distinct antigens or different vaccination strategies. PMID:17626159

  13. Cutaneous loxoscelism

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    Purohit S

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of spider bitea presenting as cutaneous loxoscelism is reported. The clinical features and management of spider bite are highlighted and the relevant literature has been reviewed

  14. Cutaneous actinomycosis: A rare case

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    Metgud S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous actinomycosis is a rare presentation. Here we present a case of cutaneous actinomycosis with no history of trauma or systemic dissemination. The isolate was identified as Actinomyces viscosus by standard methods. The isolate was found to be penicillin resistant by Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method. Therefore, the patient was treated with cotrimoxazole and improved. Thus, this case highlights the importance of isolation and susceptibility testing in actinomycotic infection. The sinuses have healed, and the patient has recovered.

  15. [Epidemiological aspects of cutaneous mycosis of HIV-infected patients in the National Referral Center of Burkina Faso, West Africa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zida, A; Sawadogo, P M; Diallo, I; Tapsoba, H; Bazie, Z; Drabo, Y J; Guiguemde, T R

    2016-06-01

    Our study aimed to analyze the epidemiological aspects of cutaneous mycosis in people living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV). This is a descriptive study of 382 patients living with HIV. Following an investigation into the risk factors, mycological samples have been performed. Each sample underwent direct examination and cultivation for the identification of fungal species. The Blastese test is used for the identification of Candida albicans. One hundred and six (106) of the 382 people living with human immunodeficiency virus undergo a mycological collection of which 76 gave a positive result. The overall prevalence of cutaneous mycosis was 19.9 %. It was significantly higher in women and in patients who had a CD4 count ≤500/mm3. C. albicans and Trichophyton rubrum were the most isolated species with 22.4 and 19.8 % of all fungal species isolated, respectively. Cutaneous mycoses are common among people living with human immunodeficiency virus and whose CD4 count ≤ 500/mm(3). Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Cutaneous sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, N J; King, C M

    1998-11-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-organ granulomatous disorder of unknown cause. Skin sarcoidosis occurs in about 25% of patients with systemic disease and may also arise in isolation. A wide range of clinical presentations of cutaneous sarcoidosis is recognised. The diagnosis rests on the presence of non-caseating granulomas on skin biopsy and the exclusion of other granulomatous skin disease. The treatment and overall prognosis of cutaneous sarcoidosis is primarily dependent on the degree of systemic involvement. In patients with aggressive disease limited to the skin immunosuppressive therapy may be indicated.

  17. Cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis co-infection in dogs from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: evaluation by specific PCR and RFLP-PCR assays

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    Marize Quinhones Pires

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction During a diagnostic evaluation of canine visceral leishmaniasis (VL, two of seventeen dogs were found to be co-infected by Leishmania (Viannia braziliensis and Leishmania (Leishmania chagasi. Methods Specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism-PCR (RFLP-PCR assays were performed. Results PCR assays for Leishmania subgenus identification followed by RFLP-PCR analysis in biopsies from cutaneous lesions and the spleen confirmed the presence of Leishmania (Viannia braziliensis and Leishmania (Leishmania chagasi in those fragments. Conclusions This report reinforces the importance of using serological and molecular techniques in the epidemiological surveillance of canine populations in endemic areas in which both diseases are known to co-exist. In such cases, a reassessment of the control measures is required.

  18. Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Christopher J W; Januszkiewicz, Janek S

    2002-03-01

    Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma is a rare soft-tissue sarcoma with negligible metastatic potential, but local recurrence rates after surgical excision have ranged from 14 percent to 42 percent. Unlike other sarcomas, guidelines for the optimal surgical excision margin of cutaneous leiomyosarcoma are not clearly defined in the existing literature. A review of local experience with this condition revealed eight patients over 12 years, none of whom developed local recurrence or distant metastases. This is despite poor prognostic factors in seven patients and excision margins ranging from 1 to 27 mm. These findings are compared with previously published data, and conclusions are drawn based on analysis of the collective results. Complete surgical excision with a narrow margin is recommended, and patients should be observed for a minimum of 5 years after surgery.

  19. Cutaneous histoplasmosis disclosing an HIV-infection Histoplasmose cutânea reveladora de infecção pelo HIV

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    Silvio Alencar Marques

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Histoplasmosis is a systemic mycosis endemic in extensive areas of the Americas. The authors report on an urban adult male patient with uncommon oral-cutaneous lesions proven to be histoplasmosis. Additional investigation revealed unnoticed HIV infection with CD4+ cell count of 7/mm3. The treatment was performed with amphotericin B, a 2065 mg total dose followed by itraconazole 200mg/daily plus antiretroviral therapy with apparent cure. Histoplasmosis is an AIDS-defining opportunistic disease process; therefore, its clinical diagnosis must drive full laboratory investigation looking for unnoted HIV-infection.Histoplasmose é infecção sistêmica endêmica em extensas áreas do continente Americano. Os autores relatam caso de paciente do sexo masculino, de zona urbana com lesões cutâneas e mucosas incomuns de histoplasmose. Investigação adicional posterior revelou infecção subjacente pelo HIV com contagem de células CD4 de 7/mm3. O tratamento foi realizado com anfotericina B, dose total de 2065 mg, seguido por itraconazol 200 mg/dia associado à terapêutica antirretroviral com cura aparente do quadro. Histoplasmose é enfermidade oportunística definidora da síndrome de imunodeficiência adquirida, portanto, diagnóstico clinico de histoplasmose implica em investigação laboratorial de infecção subjacente pelo HIV.

  20. Natural Leishmania (Viannia) spp. infections in phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) from the Brazilian Amazon region reveal new putative transmission cycles of American cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Adelson Alcimar Almeida; Dos Santos, Thiago Vasconcelos; Jennings, Yara Lúcia Lins; Ishikawa, Edna Aoba Yassui; Barata, Iorlando da Rocha; Silva, Maria das Graças Soares; Lima, José Aprígio Nunes; Shaw, Jeffrey; Lainson, Ralph; Silveira, Fernando Tobias

    2016-01-01

    In Amazonian Brazil the etiological agents of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) belong to at least seven Leishmania species but little is known about the putative phlebotomine sand fly vectors in different biomes. In 2002-2003 a survey of the phlebotomine fauna was undertaken in the "Floresta Nacional do Tapajós", Belterra municipality, in the lower Amazon region, western Pará State, Brazil, where we recently confirmed the presence of a putative hybrid parasite, L. (V.) guyanensis × L. (V.) shawi shawi. Sand flies were collected from Centers for Disease Control (CDC) light traps, Shannon traps and by aspiration on tree bases. Females were dissected and attempts to isolate any flagellate infections were made by inoculating homogenized midguts into Difco B(45) medium. Isolates were characterized by monoclonal antibodies and isoenzyme electrophoresis. A total of 9,704 sand flies, belonging to 68 species or subspecies, were collected. Infections were found in the following sand flies: L. (V.) naiffi with Psychodopygus hirsutus hirsutus (1) and Ps. davisi (2); and L. (V.) shawi shawi with Nyssomyia whitmani (3) and Lutzomyia gomezi (1). These results provide strong evidence of new putative transmission cycles for L. (V.) naiffi and L. (V.) s. shawi.

  1. The experimental chemotherapy of leishmaniasis, VI. The development of rodent models for cutaneous infection with L. major and L. mexicana amazonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, E R; Peters, W; Robinson, B L

    1980-06-01

    Two models have been established of leishmanial infections in random-bred TFW albino mice, one with Leishmania major LV39 and the other with L. mexicana amazonensis LV38. These parasites produce consistent lesions when injected subcutaneously a short distance anterior to the base of the tail. Consistent infections could not be produced in the mice with other lines of the L. mexicana group of skin-dwelling protozoa, nor with a line of L. braziliensis guyanensis (LV475). The development of procedures for the maintenance of these parasites, the routine infection of mice and drug testing are described. L. major inocula consist of 1--5 X 10(6) promastigotes derived from NNN culture. L. m. amazonensis inocula contain approximately 10(7) amastigotes obtained from lesions in hamsters. The effects of drugs on the rodent lesions are assessed by two methods. Method A provides a simple lesion score from 0 to 3 made when lesions in control animals begin to reach maximum development (about six weeks after infection). Method B summates earlier 'mean lesion scores' to provide a graphic analysis of doses giving 50 and 90% lesion suppression at the end of seven weeks after the start of treatment which is for five consecutive days (SD 50 and SD90). The activities of several compounds used for the treatment of human leishmanial infections (organic antimonials, diamidines, amphotericin B and primaquine) are compared in mice infected with L. major LV39, L. m. amazonensis LV78 and 'L. infantum LV9' (the latter as reported earlier). It is concluded that the rodent models provide a good parallel with the response to these compounds in man. The visceral organism is significantly more responsive to Pentostam and Glucantime than are L. major or L. m. amazonensis. Primaquine is active only against 'L. infantum LV9'. All three parasites in mice respond to Berenil, but not to pentamidine which is used in the treatment of kala-azar. Amphotericin B is effective against cutaneous and visceral

  2. Refining criteria for diagnosis of cutaneous infections caused by herpes viruses through correlation of morphology with molecular pathology

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    Böer Almut

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infections of the skin by herpes viruses do not always present themselves in typical fashion. Early diagnosis, however, is crucial for appropriate treatment. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR allows diagnosis and differential diagnosis of herpes virus infections, but the method is not yet available in large parts of the world, where diagnosis is made based on morphology alone. AIM: To refine criteria for the diagnosis of herpes virus infections of the skin by way of correlation of clinical and histopathologic findings with results of PCR studies. METHODS: We studied 75 clinically diagnosed patients of "zoster," "varicella," and "herpes simplex", to correlate clinical and histopathological findings with results of PCR studies on paraffin embedded biopsy specimens. RESULTS: Clinical suspicion of infection by herpes viruses was confirmed by histopathology in 37% of the cases and by PCR studies in 65% of the cases. Zoster was frequently misdiagnosed as infection with herpes simplex viruses (30%. When diagnostic signs of herpes virus infection were encountered histopathologically, PCR confirmed the diagnosis in 94%. By way of correlation with results of PCR studies, initial lesions of herpes virus infections could be identified to have a distinctive histopathological pattern. Herpetic folliculitis appeared to be a rather common finding in zoster, it occurring in 28% of the cases. CONCLUSION: We conclude that correlation of clinical and histopathological features with results of PCR studies on one and the same paraffin embedded specimen permits identification of characteristic morphologic patterns and helps to refine criteria for diagnosis both clinically and histopathologically.

  3. Severe cutaneous human papilloma virus infection associated with Natural Killer cell deficiency following stem cell transplantation for severe combined immunodeficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamili, Qurat-ul-Ain; Seeborg, Filiz O; Saxena, Kapil; Nicholas, Sarah K; Banerjee, Pinaki P; Angelo, Laura S; Mace, Emily M; Forbes, Lisa R; Martinez, Caridad; Wright, Teresa S; Orange, Jordan S.; Hanson, Imelda Celine

    2016-01-01

    Capsule Summary The authors identify Natural Killer cell deficiency in post-transplant severe combined immunodeficiency patients who developed severe human papilloma virus infections as a long term complication. PMID:25159470

  4. What is the best strategy for enhancing the effects of topically applied ozonated oils in cutaneous infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardi, I; Burgassi, S; Paccagnini, E; Gentile, M; Bocci, V; Travagli, V

    2013-01-01

    Owing to diabetes, atherosclerosis, and ageing, there are several million patients undergoing skin lesions degenerated into infected ulcers with very little tendency to heal and implying a huge socioeconomical cost. Previous medical experience has shown that the daily application of ozonated oil eliminates the infection and promotes a rapid healing. The purpose of the study is the optimization of the antimicrobial effect of ozonated oils by testing in vitro four bacterial species and one yeast without or in the presence of different amounts of human serum. The results obtained suggest that a gentle and continuous removal of debris and exudate is an essential condition for the potent bactericidal effect of ozonated oils. In fact, even small amounts of human serum inactivate ozone derivatives and protect bacteria. The application of ozonated oil preparations is very promising in a variety of skin and mucosal infections. Moreover, ozonated oils are far less expensive than antibiotic preparations.

  5. What Is the Best Strategy for Enhancing the Effects of Topically Applied Ozonated Oils in Cutaneous Infections?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Zanardi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to diabetes, atherosclerosis, and ageing, there are several million patients undergoing skin lesions degenerated into infected ulcers with very little tendency to heal and implying a huge socioeconomical cost. Previous medical experience has shown that the daily application of ozonated oil eliminates the infection and promotes a rapid healing. The purpose of the study is the optimization of the antimicrobial effect of ozonated oils by testing in vitro four bacterial species and one yeast without or in the presence of different amounts of human serum. The results obtained suggest that a gentle and continuous removal of debris and exudate is an essential condition for the potent bactericidal effect of ozonated oils. In fact, even small amounts of human serum inactivate ozone derivatives and protect bacteria. The application of ozonated oil preparations is very promising in a variety of skin and mucosal infections. Moreover, ozonated oils are far less expensive than antibiotic preparations.

  6. Cutaneous manifestations of viral hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Ahmed; Said, Adnan

    2015-02-01

    There are several extrahepatic cutaneous manifestations associated with hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus infection. Serum sickness and polyarteritis nodosa are predominantly associated with hepatitis B infection, whereas mixed cryoglobulinemia associated vasculitis and porphyria cutanea tarda are more frequently seen in hepatitis C infection. The clinico-pathogenic associations of these skin conditions are not completely defined but appear to involve activation of the host immune system including the complement system. Management of the aforementioned cutaneous manifestations of viral hepatitis is often similar to that done in cases without viral hepatitis, with control of immune activation being a key strategy. In cases associated with hepatitis B and C, control of viral replication with specific antiviral therapy is also important and associated with improvement in most of the associated clinical manifestations.

  7. Cutaneous Leishmaniasis with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talat, Humaira; Attarwala, Sharmeen; Saleem, Mubasshir

    2014-05-01

    Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) is a vector borne disease caused by various species of the Leishmania parasite. CL is endemic in the province of Balochistan in Pakistan. In certain instances a Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-related immunocompromised is associated with atypical clinical presentation and occurrence of reactivated lesions of CL. Such presentations respond poorly to the standard treatment and frequent relapses are noted. We are reporting three cases of localized and disseminated CL due to Leishmania tropica which responded to meglumine antimoniate. Due to the fact that CL is endemic in Balochistan, we did not consider HIV infection as a causative organism. It was their presentation with history of weight loss and fever that prompted Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) tests for HIV, which turned out to be positive. CL is becoming visible as an opportunistic infection associated with HIV/AIDS and may even be the first symptom in HIV positive patients in an endemic area.

  8. Cutaneous mucormycosis postcosmetic surgery

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    Al-Tarrah, Khaled; Abdelaty, Mahmoud; Behbahani, Ahmad; Mokaddas, Eman; Soliman, Helmy; Albader, Ahdi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Mucormycosis is a rare, aggressive, and life-threatening infection that is caused by organisms belonging to the order Mucorales. It is usually acquired through direct means and virtually always affects immunocompromised patients with the port of entry reflecting the site of infection, in this case, cutaneous. Unlike other mucormycoses, patients affected by Apophysomyces elegans (A elegans) are known to be immunocompetent. This locally aggressive disease penetrates through different tissue plains invading adjacent muscles, fascia, and even bone causing extensive morbidity and may prove fatal if treated inadequately. Cutaneous mucormycosis is associated with disruption of cutaneous barriers such as trauma. However, rarely, it may be iatrogenic. No cases have been previously reported postcosmetic surgery, especially one that is so commonly performed, lipofilling. Case Report: The patient is a, previously healthy, 41-year-old middle-eastern female who was admitted to the plastic surgery department 17 days after undergoing cosmetic surgery. She suffered from extensive tissue inflammation and necrosis in both gluteal regions. Following admission, she was initially started on empirical antimicrobial therapy which was changed to an antifungal agent, voriconazole, when preliminary microbiological results showed filamentous fungi. This was discontinued and liposomal amphotericin B was commenced when further mycological analysis identified A elegans. Furthermore, she underwent a total of 10 sessions of extensive debridement to the extent that portions of the sacrum and left femoral head became exposed. Her clinical status and wounds improved with the appropriate management and she remained an inpatient for 62 days. Subsequently, she had defects in both gluteal regions which required reconstructive surgery. Conclusion: A elegans is an uncommon cause of iatrogenic cutaneous mucormycosis. A high index of clinical suspicion is required, especially in the

  9. Taxonomy and epidemiology Mucor irregularis, agent of chronic cutaneous mucormycosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, X.L.; Najafzadeh, M.J.; Dolatabadi, S.; Ran, Y.P.; Gerrits van den Ende, A.H.G.; Shen, Y.N.; Li, C.Y.; Xi, L.Y.; Hao, F.; Zhang, Q.Q.; Li, R.Y.; Hu, Z.M.; Lu, G.; Wang, J.J.; Drogari-Apiranthitou, M.; Klaassen, C.; Meis, J.F.; Hagen, F.; Liu, W.D.; de Hoog, G.S.

    2013-01-01

    Mucormycosis usually presents as a progressive infection with significant angio-invasion. Mucormycosis due to Mucor irregularis (formerly Rhizomucor variabilis var. variabilis), however, is exceptional in causing chronic cutaneous infection in immunocompetent humans, ultimately leading to severe mor

  10. Cutaneous findings in five cases of malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jignesh B Vaishnani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is an infectious disease caused by protozoa of the genus Plasmodium. Cutaneous lesions in malaria are rarely reported and include urticaria, angioedema, petechiae, purpura, and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC. Here, five malaria cases associated with cutaneous lesions have been described. Out of the five cases of malaria, two were associated with urticaria and angioedema, one case was associated with urticaria, and other two were associated with reticulated blotchy erythema with petechiae. Most of the cutaneous lesions in malaria were nonspecific and reflected the different immunopathological mechanism in malarial infection.

  11. Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    intracellular amastigotes are usually abundant. Diagnosis The different parasitologic techniques for confirming Leishmania infection are variously...effective, depending on whether the syndrome under examination is oligoparasitic or polyparasitic. A confirmed parasitologic diagnosis is es- tablished by

  12. First description of Leishmania (Viannia) infection in Evandromyia saulensis, Pressatia sp. and Trichophoromyia auraensis (Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) in a transmission area of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Acre state, Amazon Basin, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo-Pereira, Thais de; Pita-Pereira, Daniela de; Boité, Mariana Côrtes; Melo, Myllena; Costa-Rego, Taiana Amancio da; Fuzari, Andressa Alencastre; Brazil, Reginaldo Peçanha; Britto, Constança

    2017-01-01

    Studies on the sandfly fauna to evaluate natural infection indexes are still limited in the Brazilian Amazon, a region with an increasing incidence of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Here, by using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction directed to Leishmania kDNA and hybridisation, we were able to identify L. (Viannia) subgenus in 12 out of 173 sandflies captured in the municipality of Rio Branco, Acre state, revealing a positivity of 6.94%. By sequencing the Leishmania 234 bp-hsp70 amplified products from positive samples, infection by L. (V.) braziliensis was confirmed in five sandflies: one Evandromyia saulensis, three Trichophoromyia auraensis and one Pressatia sp. The finding of L. (Viannia) DNA in two Ev. saulensis corresponds to the first record of possible infection associated with this sandfly. Moreover, our study reveals for the first time in Brazil, Th. auraensis and Pressatia sp. infected by L. (Viannia) parasites.

  13. First description of Leishmania (Viannia) infection in Evandromyia saulensis, Pressatia sp. and Trichophoromyia auraensis (Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) in a transmission area of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Acre state, Amazon Basin, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo-Pereira, Thais; de Pita-Pereira, Daniela; Boité, Mariana Côrtes; Melo, Myllena; da Costa-Rego, Taiana Amancio; Fuzari, Andressa Alencastre; Brazil, Reginaldo Peçanha; Britto, Constança

    2017-01-01

    Studies on the sandfly fauna to evaluate natural infection indexes are still limited in the Brazilian Amazon, a region with an increasing incidence of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Here, by using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction directed to Leishmania kDNA and hybridisation, we were able to identify L. (Viannia) subgenus in 12 out of 173 sandflies captured in the municipality of Rio Branco, Acre state, revealing a positivity of 6.94%. By sequencing the Leishmania 234 bp-hsp70 amplified products from positive samples, infection by L. (V.) braziliensis was confirmed in five sandflies: one Evandromyia saulensis, three Trichophoromyia auraensis and one Pressatia sp. The finding of L. (Viannia) DNA in two Ev. saulensis corresponds to the first record of possible infection associated with this sandfly. Moreover, our study reveals for the first time in Brazil, Th. auraensis and Pressatia sp. infected by L. (Viannia) parasites. PMID:28076470

  14. Cutaneous granulomas in ataxia telangiectasia and other primary immunodeficiencies: Reflection of inappropriate immune regulation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.Y.T. Chiam (L. Y T); M.M.M. Verhagen (Mijke); A. Haraldsson (Ásgeir); N.M. Wulffraat (Nico); G.J.A. Driessen (Gertjan); M.G. Netea (Mihai); C.M.R. Weemaes (Corry); M.M.B. Seyger (Marieke); M. van Deuren (Marcel)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Non-infective cutaneous granulomas with unknown pathogenesis occur in various primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) including ataxia telangiectasia (A-T). Objective: To find a common immunological denominator in these cutaneous granulomas. Methods: The dermatological and immunolo

  15. NK Cell Activity Differs between Patients with Localized and Diffuse Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Infected with Leishmania mexicana: A Comparative Study of TLRs and Cytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañeda-Guzmán, Isabel Cristina; Salaiza-Suazo, Norma; Fernández-Figueroa, Edith A.; Carrada-Figueroa, Georgina; Aguirre-García, Magdalena; Becker, Ingeborg

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania mexicana causes localized (LCL) or diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis (DCL). The cause of dissemination in DCL remains unknown, yet NK cells possibly play a role in activating leishmanicidal mechanisms during innate and adaptive immune responses. We had previously shown that Leishmania lipophosphoglycan (LPG) is a ligand for TLR2, activating human NK cells. We have now analyzed NK cells in LCL and DCL patients. NK numbers and effector mechanisms differed drastically between both groups of patients: DCL patients showed reduced NK cell numbers; diminished IFN-γ and TNF-α production; and lower TLR2, TLR1, and TLR6 expression as compared to LCL patients. The altered protein expression found in NK cells of DCL patients correlated with their down-regulation of IFN-γ gene expression in LPG-stimulated and non-stimulated cells as compared to LCL patients. NK cell response was further analyzed according to gender, age, and disease evolution in LCL patients showing that female patients produced higher IFN-γ levels throughout the disease progression, whereas TLR2 expression diminished in both genders with prolonged disease evolution and age. We furthermore show the activation pathway of LPG binding to TLR2 and demonstrated that TLR2 forms immunocomplexes with TLR1 and TLR6. In addition to the reduced NK cell numbers in peripheral blood, DCL patients also showed reduced NK cell numbers in the lesions. They were randomly scattered within the lesions, showing diminished cytokine production, which contrasts with those of LCL lesions, where NK cells produced IFN-γ and TNF-α and were found within organized granulomas. We conclude that in DCL patients the reduced NK-cell numbers and their diminished activity, evidenced by low TLR expression and low cytokine production, are possibly involved in the severity of the disease. Our results provide new information on the contribution of NK cells in Leishmania infections of the human host. PMID:25397678

  16. NK cell activity differs between patients with localized and diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis infected with Leishmania mexicana: a comparative study of TLRs and cytokines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Cristina Cañeda-Guzmán

    Full Text Available Leishmania mexicana causes localized (LCL or diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis (DCL. The cause of dissemination in DCL remains unknown, yet NK cells possibly play a role in activating leishmanicidal mechanisms during innate and adaptive immune responses. We had previously shown that Leishmania lipophosphoglycan (LPG is a ligand for TLR2, activating human NK cells. We have now analyzed NK cells in LCL and DCL patients. NK numbers and effector mechanisms differed drastically between both groups of patients: DCL patients showed reduced NK cell numbers; diminished IFN-γ and TNF-α production; and lower TLR2, TLR1, and TLR6 expression as compared to LCL patients. The altered protein expression found in NK cells of DCL patients correlated with their down-regulation of IFN-γ gene expression in LPG-stimulated and non-stimulated cells as compared to LCL patients. NK cell response was further analyzed according to gender, age, and disease evolution in LCL patients showing that female patients produced higher IFN-γ levels throughout the disease progression, whereas TLR2 expression diminished in both genders with prolonged disease evolution and age. We furthermore show the activation pathway of LPG binding to TLR2 and demonstrated that TLR2 forms immunocomplexes with TLR1 and TLR6. In addition to the reduced NK cell numbers in peripheral blood, DCL patients also showed reduced NK cell numbers in the lesions. They were randomly scattered within the lesions, showing diminished cytokine production, which contrasts with those of LCL lesions, where NK cells produced IFN-γ and TNF-α and were found within organized granulomas. We conclude that in DCL patients the reduced NK-cell numbers and their diminished activity, evidenced by low TLR expression and low cytokine production, are possibly involved in the severity of the disease. Our results provide new information on the contribution of NK cells in Leishmania infections of the human host.

  17. Cutaneous leismaniasis with unusual appearance: Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Havva Erdem; İlteriş Oğuz Topal; Ümran Yıldırım

    2009-01-01

    Leishmaniasis, is a disease that is transmitted by infected sand flies when they suck the blood of mammals. It is estimated that more than 1.5 million new cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) cases occur throughout the world every year and the disease is endemic in southern and southeastern Turkey. Cutaneous leishmaniasis presents a spectrum of manifestations both clinically and histologically. As is in our case, histopathology can be more important than clinical examination.The diagnosis is made by ...

  18. Corynebacterium ulcerans cutaneous diphtheria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Luke S P; Leslie, Asuka; Meltzer, Margie; Sandison, Ann; Efstratiou, Androulla; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2015-09-01

    We describe the case of a patient with cutaneous diphtheria caused by toxigenic Corynebacterium ulcerans who developed a right hand flexor sheath infection and symptoms of sepsis such as fever, tachycardia, and elevated C-reactive protein, after contact with domestic cats and dogs, and a fox. We summarise the epidemiology, clinical presentation, microbiology, diagnosis, therapy, and public health aspects of this disease, with emphasis on improving recognition. In many European countries, C ulcerans has become the organism commonly associated with cutaneous diphtheria, usually seen as an imported tropical disease or resulting from contact with domestic and agricultural animals. Diagnosis relies on bacterial culture and confirmation of toxin production, with management requiring appropriate antimicrobial therapy and prompt administration of antitoxin, if necessary. Early diagnosis is essential for implementation of control measures and clear guidelines are needed to assist clinicians in managing clinical diphtheria. This case was a catalyst to the redrafting of the 2014 national UK interim guidelines for the public health management of diphtheria, released as final guidelines in March, 2015. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. New silica nanostructure for the improved delivery of topical antibiotics used in the treatment of staphylococcal cutaneous infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Ghitulica, Cristina Daniela; Voicu, Georgeta; Huang, Keng-Shiang; Yang, Chih-Hui; Ficai, Anton; Vasile, Bogdan Stefan; Grumezescu, Valentina; Bleotu, Coralia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen

    2014-03-25

    In this paper, we report the synthesis, characterization (FT-IR, XRD, BET, HR-TEM) and bioevaluation of a novel γ-aminobutiric acid/silica (noted GABA-SiO₂ or γ-SiO₂) hybrid nanostructure, for the improved release of topical antibiotics, used in the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections. GABA-SiO₂ showed IR bands which were assigned to Si-O-Si (stretch mode). The XRD pattern showed a broad peak in the range of 18-30° (2θ), indicating an amorphous structure. Based on the BET analysis, estimations about surface area (438.14 m²/g) and pore diameters (4.76 nm) were done. TEM observation reveals that the prepared structure presented homogeneity and an average size of particles not exceeding 10nm. The prepared nanostructure has significantly improved the anti-staphylococcal activity of bacitracin and kanamycin sulfate, as demonstrated by the drastic decrease of the minimal inhibitory concentration of the respective antibiotics loaded in the GABA-SiO₂ nanostructure. These results, correlated with the high biocompatibility of this porous structure, are highlighting the possibility of using this carrier for the local delivery of the antimicrobial substances in lower active doses, thus reducing their cytotoxicity and side-effects.

  20. Cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DongFuhui

    2004-01-01

    The cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome is named that, the cutaneous nerve's functional disorder caused by some chronic entrapment, moreover appears a series of nerve's feeling obstacle,vegetative nerve function obstacle, nutrition obstacle, even motor function obstacle in various degree.

  1. [Female patient with cutaneous anthrax in Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gyssens, I.C.J.; Weyns, D.; Kullberg, B.J.; Ursi, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    A 23-year-old Turkish woman was admitted with an infection of the left thumb. The clinical picture was typical for cutaneous anthrax. Microbiological tests confirmed the diagnosis 'infection by Bacillus anthracis'. She recovered when treated with penicillin, although later tests revealed that the ba

  2. Devastating posttraumatic primary cutaneous mucormycosis in a diabetic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poongodi Lakshmi Santhana Kumarasamy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucorales are saprophytic fungi causing mucormycosis, which is a life threatening infection manifested as rhinocerebral, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, cutaneous, and disseminated forms. The cutaneous form is further divided into primary and secondary forms. The major risk factors include uncontrolled diabetes mellitus with or without ketoacidosis, other forms of metabolic acidosis, and trauma. We report here a case of primary cutaneous mucormycosis caused by Rhizopus oryzae, in a diabetic after a road traffic accident.

  3. Cutaneous mucormycosis in advanced HIV disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, José; Ridolfi, Felipe; Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Varon, Andrea; Lamas, Cristiane C

    Angionvasive mucormycosis is an emerging fungal disease known to affect mainly diabetics or subjects with profound neutropenia. Infection usually occurs through the inhalation route, but cutaneous inoculation may occur after trauma or burns. However, mucormycosis remains unusual in HIV infection. We report a fatal case of cutaneous mucormycosis due to Rhizopus arrhizus involving the scalp following herpes zoster infection. The patient was a 42-year-old man with advanced AIDS failing on salvage antiretroviral therapy. The fungus was diagnosed on the basis of histopathology and culture. Our case emphasizes the need to consider mucormycosis in the differential diagnosis of necrotic cutaneous lesions in patients with late-stage HIV disease. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Cutaneous mucormycosis in advanced HIV disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Moreira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Angionvasive mucormycosis is an emerging fungal disease known to affect mainly diabetics or subjects with profound neutropenia. Infection usually occurs through the inhalation route, but cutaneous inoculation may occur after trauma or burns. However, mucormycosis remains unusual in HIV infection. We report a fatal case of cutaneous mucormycosis due to Rhizopus arrhizus involving the scalp following herpes zoster infection. The patient was a 42-year-old man with advanced AIDS failing on salvage antiretroviral therapy. The fungus was diagnosed on the basis of histopathology and culture. Our case emphasizes the need to consider mucormycosis in the differential diagnosis of necrotic cutaneous lesions in patients with late-stage HIV disease.

  5. Cutaneous anthrax cases leading compartment syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Parlak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus anthracis is the causative agent of anthrax. Anthrax is a zoonotic disease with three clinical forms. Clinical forms are skin, gastrointestinal and inhalational anthrax. Cutaneous anthrax is 95% of the cases. Cutaneous anthrax frequently defines itself. Clinical presentation of anthrax may be severe and complicated in some cases. There may seem complications like meningitis, septic shock and compartment syndrome. Compartment Syndrome is a rare complication of cutaneous anthrax and it is life threatening. Physicians working in the endemic area should be aware of this form. In this study, three cases were shown which developed compartment syndrome following cutaneous anthrax. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2013;3(4: 214-217

  6. Dichotomy of the T cell response to Leishmania antigens in patients suffering from cutaneous leishmaniasis; absence or scarcity of Th1 activity is associated with severe infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaafar, A; Kharazmi, A; Ismail, A

    1995-01-01

    The T cell response was studied in 25 patients suffering from cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major with severe (n = 10) and mild (n = 15) disease manifestations. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from the patients were activated by sonicates of Leishmania promastigotes (LMP...

  7. Cutaneous varicella zoster virus infection following zoster vaccination: report of post-vaccination herpes zoster skin infection and literature review of zoster vaccination efficacy and guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiff, Katherine M; Cohen, Philip R

    2017-06-15

    BackgroundHerpes zoster vaccine is currently recommended in the United States for immune competent individuals ≥60 years. The efficacy of the herpes zoster vaccine decreases with age and with time following vaccination.PurposeAn elderly man with herpes zoster following vaccination is described. The guidelines for vaccination and issues regarding re-vaccination are reviewed. PubMed was used to search the following terms: efficacy, elderly, herpes zoster, herpes zoster incidence, herpes zoster recurrence, and vaccination. The papers and relevant citations were reviewed. The clinical features of a patient with post-vaccination herpes zoster skin infection are presented; in addition, vaccine efficacy and guidelines are reviewed.ResultsA 91-year-old man, vaccinated for herpes zoster 10 years earlier, presented with crusted erosions on his face corresponding to the area innervated by the ophthalmic division of the left trigeminal nerve. Evaluation using polymerase chain reaction confirmed the diagnosis of herpes zoster.ConclusionsHerpes zoster vaccine decreases in efficacy with both age and number of years following vaccination. Therefore, booster shots or revaccination in the older population may be of benefit.

  8. Cutaneous myiasis from Dermatobia hominis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guse, S T; Tieszen, M E

    1997-08-01

    We present a case report of cutaneous myiasis in a foreign traveler who was infected by Dermatobia hominis while visiting South America. This patient developed a painful furuncular lesion on the anterior scalp and noted that the lesion drained a serosanguinous fluid for more than a month before definitive treatment. Invasion of mammalian tissue by the larval forms of D. hominis typically results in the formation of a classic furuncular lesion. For persons who present with a lesion that contains a central draining stoma located on an exposed body surface, the diagnosis of myiasis should always be considered. In addition to the case report, we present a discussion of furuncular myiasis and describe the peculiar life cycle of the human botfly. We also describe the various therapies that may be employed for treating cutaneous myiasis, including surgical extraction of the larva and asphyxiation of the larva by application of petroleum jelly or other fat derivatives to the central stoma or breathing aperture.

  9. Acute primary cutaneous Nocardia asteroides infection in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus. Case report Infecção primária cutânea aguda por Nocardia asteroides em paciente com lupus eritematoso sistêmico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge O. Lopes

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of acute primary cutaneous infection of traumatic origin caused by Nocardia asteroides, appeared as cellulitis in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus. Diagnosis was established by direct examination and cultures from aspirate specimens. The clinical forms of Nocardia infections that affect the skin, reported in Rio Grande do Sul and Uruguay, are discussed.Relatamos um caso de infecção primária cutânea aguda de origem traumática, causada por Nocardia asteroides, que manifestou-se como celulite em paciente com lupus eritematoso sistêmico. O diagnóstico foi feito pelo exame direto e cultivos do aspirado da lesão. São discutidas as formas clínicas das infecções por Nocardia que afetam a pele, relatadas no Rio Grande do Sul e no Uruguai.

  10. Periorbital cellulitis due to cutaneous anthrax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Grant; Starks, Victoria; Vrcek, Ivan; Gilliland, Connor

    2015-12-01

    Virgil's plague of the ancient world, Bacillus anthracis, is rare in developed nations. Unfortunately rural communities across the globe continue to be exposed to this potentially lethal bacterium. Herein we report a case of periorbital cutaneous anthrax infection in a 3-year-old girl from the rural area surrounding Harare, Zimbabwe with a brief review of the literature.

  11. Reactive Oxygen Species and Nitric Oxide in Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Fátima Horta; Bárbara Pinheiro Mendes; Eric Henrique Roma; Fátima Soares Motta Noronha; Juan Pereira Macêdo; Luciana Souza Oliveira; Myrian Morato Duarte; Leda Quercia Vieira

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis affects millions of people around the world. Several species of Leishmania infect mouse strains, and murine models closely reproduce the cutaneous lesions caused by the parasite in humans. Mouse models have enabled studies on the pathogenesis and effector mechanisms of host resistance to infection. Here, we review the role of nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and peroxynitrite (ONOO−) in the control of parasites by macrophages, which are both the host c...

  12. Cutaneous manifestations of chikungunya fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetharam, K A; Sridevi, K; Vidyasagar, P

    2012-01-01

    Chikungunya fever, a re-emerging RNA viral infection produces different cutaneous manifestations in children compared to adults. 52 children with chikungunya fever, confirmed by positive IgM antibody test were seen during 2009-2010. Pigmentary lesions were common (27/52) followed by vesiculobullous lesions (16/52) and maculopapular lesions (14/52). Vesiculobullous lesions were most common in infants, although rarely reported in adults. Psoriasis was exacerbated in 4 children resulting in more severe forms. In 2 children, guttate psoriasis was observed for the first time.

  13. Disseminated histoplasmosis with oral and cutaneous manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Vidyanath

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Histoplasmosis is a systemic mycotic infection caused by the dimorphic fungus, Histoplasma capsulatum. Systemic histoplasmosis has emerged as an important opportunistic infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV patients and those in endemic areas. Reported cases of histoplasmosis have been low in India with less than 50 cases being reported. We are reporting a case of disseminated histoplasmosis with oral and cutaneous involvement in an HIV seronegative patient.

  14. Cutaneous metastases presenting as genital ulcer disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Vasuki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous metastasis from an internal organ malignancy is rare and as, the presenting sign of malignancy is an uncommon phenomenon. Their presence, signals a poor prognosis. We report a case of 50-year-old female who was referred to sexually transmitted diseases - out patient department, with complaints of multiple genital ulcers to rule out sexually transmitted infections. After thorough evaluation, she was found to be a case of carcinoma cervix with metastatic squamous cell carcinomatous deposits on external genitalia. This case was unique because of relatively asymptomatic nature of internal malignancy and atypical presentation of carcinoma cervix as cutaneous metastasis.

  15. Cutaneous leismaniasis with unusual appearance: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havva Erdem

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis, is a disease that is transmitted by infected sand flies when they suck the blood of mammals. It is estimated that more than 1.5 million new cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL cases occur throughout the world every year and the disease is endemic in southern and southeastern Turkey. Cutaneous leishmaniasis presents a spectrum of manifestations both clinically and histologically. As is in our case, histopathology can be more important than clinical examination.The diagnosis is made by clinical examination and histopathology as well as demonstrating the parasites in the smears obtained from the lesion .In this article, we aimed to present of CL cases with atipic appearance.

  16. Infecção cutânea rara por Acinetobacter baumannii em imunocompetente: relato de um caso Rare cutaneous infection by Acinetobacter baumannii in an immunocompetent patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Vitoriano Cirino

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available O Acinetobacter baumanni é patógeno oportunista antigamente considerado de baixa virulência. Atualmente está envolvido em processos infecciosos que acometem pacientes imunocomprometidos,grandes queimados e pacientes em unidades de terapia intensiva que fazem uso de ventilação mecânica. Esse relato de caso chama atenção para infecção cutânea rara por essa bactéria em paciente imunocompetente.Acinetobacter baumannii is an oportunistic pathogen that used to be considered as having low virulence; however, it is currently known to be involved in infectious processes in patients with immunosuppression, large burns and those under mechanical ventilation in intensive care units. This case report emphasizes the possibility of cutaneous infection by A. baumanni in immunocompetent patients.

  17. Cutaneous leishmaniasis: diagnostic pitfall. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmae EL Hatimi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cutaneous Leishmaniasis is a parasitic infection encountered in our daily dermatologic practice. Case report: We present a case of 57 year-old man of Moroccan origin, with erythematous squamous and indurated plaque on the abdomen, treated as sarcoidosis with corticosteroids with no improvement. Discussion: Cutaneous Leishmaniasis is endemic in 88 countries. Aside from its classical presentation it can manifest in multiple different ways. In our case, the diagnostic of Erysipeloide Leishmaniasis was corrected on the basis of the skin smear and the histopathological examination. Our observation is particular in its clinical presentation and location. To our knowledge it is the first Moroccan case. Conclusion: Even in endemic countries it is worth reporting unusual forms and locations of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in order to avoid inappropriate diagnosis and management.

  18. Sporadic cutaneous infections due to nontuberculous mycobacteria: a retrospective study of 37 cases%散发性皮肤非结核分枝杆菌感染37例回顾研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金江; 贾军; 丁晓岚; 陈雪; 孙青苗; 徐健楠; 薛晨红; 杜娟; 蔡林

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To study the clinical and pathological characteristics of sporadic cutaneous in-fections due to nontuberculous mycobacteria ( NTM) , and investigate the diagnostic criteria and therapeu-tic principal. Methods:Totally 37 cases of sporadic cutaneous infections due to NTM were confirmed in the Department of Dermatology, Peking University People's Hospital from January 2000 to March 2014. The microbiologic and clinical data were reviewed, and their skin biopsy specimens were reassessed. Re-sults:Of all the 37 patients, 30 cases were Mycobacterium marinum infection, 6 were Mycobacterium ab-scessus infection, and one was Mycobacterium chelonea and Mycobacterium fortuitum infection. Identifica-tion of mycobacterial species by analysis of hsp65 gene in tissue DNA was more sensitive than traditional bacterial culture. The most common risk factors were traumatic injuries ( 21 of 37 ) and aquarium or fish-related job (21 of 37). One case of Mycobacterium abscessus infection occurred after autologous fat filling. Nodule and plaque were most common lesions in Mycobacterium marinum infection. Twenty-four of the 30 cases of Mycobacterium marinum infection presented with multiple lesions or sporotrichoid spread lesions. Ulceration, papules, abscess, and purulent discharge were observed in cases of Mycobac-terium abscessus infection. Infective granuloma was most common histopathological appearance. For the treatment of Mycobacterium marinum infection, rifampin, ethambutol, and clarithromycin were commonly used (combination of two antibiotics, or three antibiotics), with the cure rate 90. 00%. Four of the six Mycobacterium abscessus infections cases were cured, and one patient died. Conclusion:The most com-mon species of sporadic cutaneous infections due to NTM is Mycobacterium marinum. Traumatic injuries, aquarium or fish-related job, and cosmetic surgeries are common risk factors. Mycobacterium marinum in-fection often presents with nodules, plaques, and sometimes

  19. Primary Cutaneous Histoplasmosis Masquerading as Lepromatous Leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Poonam; Aggarwal, Radhika; Kaushal, Seema

    2017-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a genus of dimorphic fungi having various varieties of which the commonest one causing infection is Histoplasma capsulatum known to cause histoplasmosis. It has a varied disease spectrum ranging from an acute infection to chronic disease especially in lungs, disseminated disease and cutaneous disorder. Histoplasma capsulatum usually causes subclinical infection and serious infections only manifest in immunocompromised patients. Frank cases of infection are seen in pulmonary histoplasmosis. The spores of these organisms are seen to be strongly associated with droppings of birds and bats. A combination of these droppings and some soil types provide for an excellent environment for the proliferation of spores. Pulmonary histoplasmosis and disseminated disease are very common in AIDS patients and are a great cause of morbidity and mortality in these patients. Primary cutaneous histoplasmosis is very rare and occurs due to penetrating injuries. Once diagnosis is made, the lesions respond very well to oral itraconazole, fluconazole or amphotericicn B. We report a rare case of Cutaneous Histoplasmosis (CHP) in a 70-year-old male with complaints of multiple nodules all over his body in a HIV seronegative and otherwise immunocompetent patient. PMID:28273974

  20. Naevus Lipomatosus Cutaneous Superficialis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanan C

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Naevus lipomatosus cutaneous superficialis (NLCS in an eighteen year old female is reported. She had asymptomatic nodules and plaques on her lower back since birth. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology

  1. Nevus lipomatosus cutaneous superficialis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Gustavo de Sá Menezes; Cavalcanti, Silvana Maria de Morais; Herênio, Alzinira Souza; Teixeira, Márcia Almeida Galvão; de Alencar, Eliane Ruth Barbosa; Gonçalves, Sergio Paulo Mendes

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of nevus lipomatosus cutaneous superficialis of Hoffman-Zurhelle (NCLS), with multiple lesions, in a ten-year-old child. The NLCS is considered rare. The classical clinical presentation is characterized by multiple skin-colored or yellowish papules and nodules, which can have a linear distribution. Histologically, it is characterized by the presence of mature ectopic adipocytes in the dermis. The main therapeutic option is surgical excision. The classical Nevus lipomatosus cutaneous superficialis is reported in this case.

  2. Taxonomy and epidemiology of Mucor irregularis, agent of chronic cutaneous mucormycosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, X.L.; Najafzadeh, M.J.; Dolatabadi, S.; Ran, Y.P.; van den Ende, A.H.G.G.; Shen, Y.N.; Li, C.Y.; Xi, L.Y.; Hao, F.; Zhang, Q.Q.; Li, R.Y.; Hu, Z.M.; Lu, G.X.; Wang, J.J.; Drogari-Apiranthitou, M.; Klaassen, C.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Hagen, F.; Liu, W.D.; de Hoog, G.S.

    2013-01-01

    Mucormycosis usually presents as a progressive infection with significant angio-invasion. Mucormycosis due to Mucor irregularis (formerly Rhizomucor variabilis var. variabilis), however, is exceptional in causing chronic cutaneous infection in immunocompetent humans, ultimately leading to severe mor

  3. Cutaneous lesions in new born

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    Sachdeva Meenakshi

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Five hundred unselected newborn babies delivered in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Unit II of SGBT Hospital attached to Government Medical College, Amritsar during April 2000 to October 2000 were examined for cutaneous lesions daily for the first five days after birth. Different cutaneous lesions were seen in 474(94. 8% newborns. The physiological skin changes observed in order of frequency were Epstein pearls in 305(61%, Mongolian spot in 301(60. 2%, superficial cutaneous desquamation in 200(40%, icterus in 128(25. 6%, milia in 119(23. 8%, sebaceous gland hyperplasia in 107 (21. 4%, occipital alopecia in 94(18. 8%, lanugo in 72(14. 4%, peripheral cyanosis in 47(9. 4%, breast hypertrophy in 29(5. 8% and miniature puberty in 28(5. 6% newborns. Of the transient non-infective skin diseases, erythema toxicum neonatorum was observed most commonly in 105(21 %, followed by miliaria rubra in 103(20. 6% and acne neonatorum in 27(5. 4% newborns. The naevi and other developmental defects in the descending order were salmon patch in 69(13. 8%, congenital melanocytic noevi in 10(2%, accessory tragi in 3(0.6%, spina bifida in 2(0.4%, hydrocephalus in 1(0.2% and poliosis in 1(0.2% newborns. Cradle cap was the only dermatitis observed in 50(10% newborns. One (0.2% case each of Harlequin ichthyosis and labial cyst was seen.

  4. Diagnosis of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis by Multiplex PCR

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    M Heiat

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Annually, more than 14 million people are reported to be infected with Leishmaniasis all over the world. In Iran, this disease is seen in the form of cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis, of which the cutaneous form is more wide spread. In recent years, cutaneous leishmaniaisis is diagnosed by PCR utilizing specific primers in order to amplify different parasite genes including ribosomal RNA genes, kinetoplast DNA or tandem repeating sequences. The aim of this research was to detect early stage cutaneous leishmaniasis using Multiplex-PCR technique. Methods: In this study, 67 samples were prepared from patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis. DNA was extracted with phenolchloroform. Each specimen was analyzed using two different pairs of PCR primers. The sensitivity of each PCR was optimized on pure Leishmania DNA prior to use for diagnosis. Two standard parasites L. major and L. tropica were used as positive control. Results: DNA amplification fragments were two 115 bp and 683 bp for AB and UL primers, respectively. The sensitivity of two primers was not equal for detection of L. major and L. tropica. The sensivity of PCR with AB primer was 35 cells, while that for UL primer was 40 cells. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that PCR is a sensitive diagnostic assay for cutaneous leishmaniasis and could be employed as the new standard for routine diagnosis when species identification is not required. However, the ability to identify species is especially important in prognosis of the disease and in deciding appropriate therapy, especially in regions where more than one type of species and disease are seen by clinicians.

  5. Cutaneous vasculitides: Clinico-pathological correlation

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    Gupta Suruchi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cutaneous vasculitis presents as a mosaic of clinical and histological findings. Its pathogenic mechanisms and clinical manifestations are varied. Aims: To study the epidemiological spectrum of cutaneous vasculitides as seen in a dermatologic clinic and to determine the clinico-pathological correlation. Methods: A cohort study was conducted on 50 consecutive patients clinically diagnosed as cutaneous vasculitis in the dermatology outdoor; irrespective of age, sex and duration of the disease. Based on the clinical presentation, vasculitis was classified according to modified Gilliam′s classification. All patients were subjected to a baseline workup consisting of complete hemogram, serum-creatinine levels, serum-urea, liver function tests, chest X-ray, urine (routine and microscopic examination besides antistreptolysin O titer, Mantoux test, cryoglobulin levels, antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibodies and hepatitis B and C. Histopathological examination was done in all patients while immunofluorescence was done in 23 patients. Results: Out of a total of 50 patients diagnosed clinically as cutaneous vasculitis, 41 were classified as leukocytoclastic vasculitis, 2 as Heinoch−Schonlein purpura, 2 as urticarial vasculitis and one each as nodular vasculitis, polyarteritis nodosa and pityriasis lichenoid et varioliforme acuta. Approximately 50% of the patients had a significant drug history, 10% were attributed to infection and 10% had positive collagen workup without any overt manifestations, while 2% each had Wegener granulomatosis and cryoglobulinemia. No cause was found in 26% cases. Histopathology showed features of vasculitis in 42 patients. Only 23 patients could undergo direct immunofluorescence (DIF, out of which 17 (73.9% were positive for vasculitis. Conclusions: Leukocytoclastic vasculitis was the commonest type of vaculitis presenting to the dermatology outpatient department. The workup of patients with cutaneous vasculitis

  6. Two cases of erythema induratum of Bazin – a rare cutaneous manifestation of tuberculosis

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    Sebastian von Huth

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis remains a global disease burden, counting more than 9 million new cases per year. Tuberculosis is caused by infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis-complex. Though most commonly affecting the lungs, any organ can become a site of tuberculous infection. Cutaneous tuberculosis is rare, representing 1-2% of all cases of tuberculosis. There are numerous different cutaneous manifestations of tuberculosis. We describe two cases of erythema induratum of Bazin, a so-called tuberculid manifestation of cutaneous TB. Both cases are patients from endemic areas. In the cases presented, there were no signs of other organs affected, and cutaneous lesions disappeared during anti-tuberculous treatment.

  7. Two cases of erythema induratum of Bazin - a rare cutaneous manifestation of tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Huth, Sebastian; Øvrehus, Anne Lindebo; Lindahl, Kim Hein

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a global disease burden, counting more than 9 million new cases per year. Tuberculosis is caused by infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis-complex. Though most commonly affecting the lungs, any organ can become a site of tuberculous infection. Cutaneous tuberculosis is rare......, representing 1-2% of all cases of tuberculosis. There are numerous different cutaneous manifestations of tuberculosis. We describe two cases of erythema induratum of Bazin, a so-called tuberculid manifestation of cutaneous TB. Both cases are patients from endemic areas. In the cases presented, there were...... no signs of other organs affected, and cutaneous lesions disappeared during anti-tuberculous treatment....

  8. Onychomadesis Following Cutaneous Vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damevska, Katerina; Gocev, Gorgi; Pollozahani, Nora; Nikolovska, Suzana; Neloska, Lence

    2017-04-01

    , cardiac, pulmonary, and abdominal exams were normal. Diclofenac was discontinued due to a clinical suspicion of drug-induced cutaneous vasculitis. The rash resolved in 2 weeks without treatment, leaving post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Four weeks later, she presented with painless, palpable grooves on all 10 fingernails (Figure 2). The grooves were 3 to 4 mm in width, at a similar distance from the proximal nail fold. There were no signs of periungual inflammation. The patient denied any recent history of trauma, unusual activities, or chemical exposure. Routine serum biochemistry and hematology results were normal. Repeated potassium hydroxide preparations and fungal cultures of the nail clippings were negative. A diagnosis of Beau lines and onychomadesis was made. Nail changes were tolerable and did not require any specific treatment. During the follow up, the Beau lines advanced with the linear growth of the nails and disappeared (Figure 3 and 4). Four fingernails developed complete nail shedding (onychomadesis). No toenail alterations were observed in this period. A complete recovery of the nail plate surface was observed after 4 months. The nail matrix epithelium is formed by highly proliferating cells that differentiate and keratinize to produce the nail plate. The nail matrix epithelium is very susceptible to toxic noxae, and acute damage results in a defective nail plate formation. Nail matrix arrest is a term used to describe a temporary inhibition of the nail matrix proliferation that can present as Beau lines and onychomadesis (8). The width of Beau lines relates to the duration of the etiological agent. As the nail adheres firmly to the nail bed, the onychomadesis remains latent for several weeks before leading to temporary shedding (8,9). There are several proposed etiological mechanisms for NMA. NMA associated with fever, severe infection, and major medical illnesses can be explained by an inflammation of the matrix, periungual tissues, or digital blood

  9. Cutaneous histiocytosis syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, S S; Spraker, M K

    1985-11-01

    Cutaneous histiocytosis may take two principal forms. It is either a benign proliferative process or a relentless, progressive process with a poor prognosis. In histiocytic medullary reticulosis, histiocytes demonstrate nuclear atypia and the outcome is uniformly fatal. Benign cephalic histiocytosis X causes lesions similar to those of histiocytosis X, but Langerhans' cells are absent. In congenital self-healing histiocytosis X, the Letterer-Siwe-like cutaneous infiltrate contains Langerhans' cells, but the lesions heal spontaneously without treatment. The nodular cutaneous lesions of juvenile xanthogranuloma appear in infancy and resolve without treatment; however, the higher percentage (10%) of associated ocular lesions may lead to glaucoma and blindness. In histiocytosis X, the cutaneous lesions show a marked proliferation of Langerhans' cells, with prognosis dependent on the patient's age and the extent of organ dysfunction. Patients who survive the acute form of the disease may develop diabetes insipidus, growth retardation, pulmonary fibrosis, and biliary cirrhosis. A subtle immunologic defect has been identified in patients with histiocytosis X, yet the pathogenesis of the disease is still speculative. Familial disease occurring in early infancy should be differentiated from complete or partial immunodeficiency syndromes. Guidelines for evaluating patients with cutaneous histiocytosis are reviewed.

  10. Cutaneous metastases of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaro, M; Serrano, M L; Allende, I; Ratón, J A; Acebo, E; Diaz-Perez, J L

    2009-12-01

    Cutaneous metastases are an unusual finding that may present as the first sign of an internal neoplasia. A case of cutaneous metastases of hepatocellular carcinoma, which may often involve other organs but very rarely metastases to the skin, is reported.

  11. Cutaneous Manifestations of Toxoplasmosis: a Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Although toxoplasmosis is one of the most widely spread infections in the world, types that involve the skin are extremely rare. However, skin lesions are not specific; moreover, they are quite diverse, which makes the diagnosis of cutaneous toxoplasmosis rather difficult. Thus, differential diagnosis should include a number of other diseases. We present a case of a 43-year-old immunocompetent man with multiple livid erythematous papules and nodules with yellowish discharge that involved the ...

  12. Update on cutaneous calciphylaxis

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    Uwe Wollina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calciphylaxis is a devastating disorder with a mortality rate of 80% due to sepsis and organ failure. Hallmarks of this rare disease are arteriolar media calcification, thrombotic cutaneous ischemia, and necrotic ulcerations. Different mechanisms of vascular calcification can lead to calciphylaxis. Early diagnosis by deep cutaneous ulcer biopsy is most important for prognosis. Here, dermatologists play a significant role although treatment usually needs an interdisciplinary approach. Surgical procedures had been the cornerstone of treatment in the past including parathyroidectomy, but recently new medical treatments emerged aiming to normalize disturbances of minerals to reduce the serum concentration of sodium phosphate and to prevent precipitation and calcification. Multimodal therapy is warranted but only aggressive surgical debridement of cutaneous ulcers has shown significant outcome improvement.

  13. Cutaneous Scar Prevention and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shaqsi, Sultan; Al-Bulushi, Taimoor

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous scarring is common after trauma, surgery and infection and occurs when normal skin tissue is replaced by fibroblastic tissue during the healing process. The pathophysiology of scar formation is not yet fully understood, although the degree of tension across the wound edges and the speed of cell growth are believed to play central roles. Prevention of scars is essential and can be achieved by attention to surgical techniques and the use of measures to reduce cell growth. Grading and classifying scars is important to determine available treatment strategies. This article presents an overview of the current therapies available for the prevention and treatment of scars. It is intended to be a practical guide for surgeons and other health professionals involved with and interested in scar management. PMID:26909210

  14. Treatment Approaches for Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

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    Sema Aytekin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL is a widespread tropical infection caused by numerous different species of Leishmania protozoa. In our country, CL is due frequently to L. major and L. tropica. Its clinical presentation is extremely diverse. Treatment of CL aims to prevent mucosal invasion, to accelerate the healing of skin lesions, and avoid disfiguring scar. Local and physical treatment modalities including topical paromomycin, cryotherapy, localized controlled heat, carbon dioxide laser therapy, or pentavalant antimonals can be effective against. Intralesional antimonals are still the drug of choice may patients. WHO recommends an injection of drug under edges of the lesions and the entire lesion until the surface has blanched. Parenteral antimonials are useful for large, persistent or recurrent lesions. Combinations with other drugs such as allopurinol, pentoxifylline must be used for antimony unresponsive lesions.

  15. Cutaneous histiocytosis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, M B; Bergeron, J A

    1986-02-15

    Multifocal cutaneous histiocytic lesions were recognized in 9 dogs. Clinically, the dogs had multiple erythematous plaques or nodules in the skin (1 to 5 cm diameter). Histologically, the lesions were comprised of dermal or pannicular infiltrates of large histiocytic cells, with varying numbers of other inflammatory cells intermixed. By electron microscopy, the cells resembled those of canine cutaneous histiocytoma. The lesions seemed to wax and wane and appeared in new sites, regardless of treatment. The dogs ranged in age from 2 to 13 years; 7 dogs were under 6 years of age. Both sexes and various breeds were represented. An infectious agent could not be identified.

  16. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biazar, Cyrus; Sigges, Johanna; Patsinakidis, Nikolaos

    2013-01-01

    In this prospective, cross-sectional, multicenter study, we assessed clinical and laboratory characteristics from patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) using the Core Set Questionnaire of the European Society of Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus (EUSCLE). 1002 (768 females, 234 males...... included gender, age at onset of disease, LE-specific and LE-nonspecific skin lesions, photosensitivity, laboratory features, and the criteria of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) for the classification of systemic lupus erythematosus. The mean age at onset of disease was 43.0±15.7 years...

  17. Primary cutaneous leiomysarcoma

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    Shubhangi Vinayak Agale

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary cutaneous leiomyosarcoma of the skin is a rare soft tissue neoplasm, accounting for about 2-3% of all superficial soft tissue sarcomas. It arises between the ages of 50 and 70 years, and shows a greater predilection for the lower extremities. Clinically, it presents with solitary, well-circumscribed nodule and, microscopically, consists of fascicles of spindle-shaped cells with "cigar-shaped" nuclei. Local recurrence is known in this tumor. We document a case of primary cutaneous leiomyosarcoma in a 77-year-old man and discuss the histological features and immunohistochemical profile of this uncommon neoplasm.

  18. Primary cutaneous mucormycosis: guide to surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losee, Joseph E; Selber, Jesse; Vega, Stephen; Hall, Caroline; Scott, Glynis; Serletti, Joseph M

    2002-10-01

    Mucormycosis is the most acute, fulminate, and fatal of all fungal infections in humans. It presents most frequently in immunocompromised patients, but can occur in healthy patients in the presence of often-insignificant trauma. Surgical management of primary cutaneous mucormycosis is almost always required. Case reports of surgical treatment for primary cutaneous mucormycosis are reported in the literature; however, the extent of debridement required for cure is unclear and no uniform plan of treatment has been suggested. To date, no clinical guidelines exist to assist the clinician in the surgical management of this disease. This article reviews the literature, reports on two clinical cases, and submits clinical guidelines designed to assist the clinician in the surgical management of primary cutaneous mucormycosis. Because of the infrequent and potentially fatal nature of the diagnosis, a high index of suspicion and a low threshold for wound biopsy must be maintained. Wound cultures are grossly inadequate and should not be relied on for a false sense of security. It is recommended that, for the early diagnosis of cutaneous mucormycosis, chemotherapy and surgical debridement of grossly necrotic tissue be performed at the earliest possible time. The debrided wound is monitored for the resolution of surrounding erythema and induration before definitive reconstruction. In the case of delayed diagnosis and/or advanced or rapidly progressive disease, surgical debridement of all involved tissue, in addition to chemotherapy, is warranted.

  19. Prevalence of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Ramshir, Iran; an Epidemiological Study

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    Vazirianzadeh B.* PhD,

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Aims Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a prevalent parasitological disease with diverse clinical manifestations in Iran. Therefore, the present retrospective study carried out to describe the demographic features of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Ramshir, Iran. Materials & Methods This descriptive study was performed on 136 cutaneous leishmaniasis patients whose data were recorded in the Ramshir health center during 2006-9. Demographic information of patients including age, sex, habitat and sites of lesions, month and years of incidence were recorded. The data were analyzed by SPSS 16 software. Findings Totally 79 patients (58.1% resided in urban areas and the born to 9 years (49.3% was recognized as the most infected age group. Hands (41.2% had the highest rates of cutaneous leishmaniasis lesions followed by face (36.0% and foot (22.8%. The maximum number of cutaneous leishmaniasis lesions was reported in March. Conclusion As cutaneous leishmaniasis in Ramshir seemed to be an endemic rural type, the appropriate preventing measures regarding to the rural cutaneous leishmaniasis should be considered to decrease incidence of the disease in the region.

  20. The Cutaneous Rabbit Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flach, Rudiger; Haggard, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    In the cutaneous rabbit effect (CRE), a tactile event (so-called attractee tap) is mislocalized toward an adjacent attractor tap. The effect depends on the time interval between the taps. The authors delivered sequences of taps to the forearm and asked participants to report the location of one of the taps. The authors replicated the original CRE…

  1. Primaty Cutaneous Histoplasmosis

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    Nair S

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A 29-year old woman presented with diffuse swelling of the base of the right thumb along with ulceration. X-ray indicated bony damage. Histopathology showed PAS positive intracellular organisms suggestive of histoplasmosis. We are reporting a very rare case of primary cutaneous histoplasmosis from this part of the country.

  2. CUTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF CHRONIC RENAL FAILURE AND RENAL TRANSPLANTATION

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    R. Suganya Gnanadeepam

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The kidney and the skin are the two large networks of the body with abundant blood supply associated with various cutaneous manifestations. This study aims to detect the various cutaneous manifestations and its incidence in patients with chronic renal failure and renal transplantation. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was done for a period of 1 year from January 2016 to December 2016 at Nephrology OPD ward and Medicine wards, Government KAPV Medical College Hospital, Trichy. During this period, 100 patients who had the presence of skin manifestations were selected and studied (80 renal failure patients and 20 renal transplantation patients. RESULTS Most of the specific cutaneous manifestations of chronic renal failure and renal transplantation were noted in this study. Pruritus and xerosis were the most common manifestations noted in chronic renal failure while infections was commonly noted in renal transplantation patients. CONCLUSION Pruritus and xerosis were the most common among the specific cutaneous manifestations in chronic renal failure followed by nail abnormalities and pigmentary changes. Cutaneous manifestations of renal transplantation were mostly due to infections of which fungal infection is the most common followed by viral infection.

  3. Prophylactic immunization against experimental leishmaniasis. III. Protection against fatal Leishmania tropica infection induced by irradiated promastigotes involves Lyt-1/sup +/2/sup -/ T cells that do not mediate cutaneous DTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liew, F.Y.; Howard, J.G.; Hale, C.

    1984-01-01

    Protective immunity against fatal L. tropica infection in genetically vulnerable BALB/c mice can be induced by prophylactic immunization with irradiated promastigotes even when heat-killed. Such immunity is adoptively transferable transiently into intact or durably into sub-lethally irradiated (200 or 550 rad) syngeneic recipients by splenic T but not B cells. The effector T cells are of the Lyt-1/sup +/2/sup -/ phenotype, devoid of demonstrable cytotoxic activity. The immune splenic T cell population expresses specific helper activity for antibody synthesis. A causal role for helper T cells in this capacity, however, seems unlikely, because it was shown that antibody does not determine the protective immunity against L. tropica. The immunized donors show no detectable cutaneous DTH or its early memory recall in response to live or killed promastigotes or a soluble L. tropica antigen preparation. Spleen, lymph node, and peritoneal exudate cells from protectively immunized donors similarly fail to transfer DTH locally or systemically. These cells also lack demonstrable suppressive activity against the expression or induction of DTH to L. tropica. Thus, protection against L. tropica induced by prophylactic i.v. immunization with irradiated promastigotes appears to be conferred by Lyt-1/sup +/2/sup -/ T cells that are distinguishable from T cells mediating either both DTH and T help, or cytotoxicity.

  4. Cutaneous leishmaniasis: immune responses in protection and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Phillip; Novais, Fernanda O

    2016-09-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a major public health problem and causes a range of diseases from self-healing infections to chronic disfiguring disease. Currently, there is no vaccine for leishmaniasis, and drug therapy is often ineffective. Since the discovery of CD4(+) T helper 1 (TH1) cells and TH2 cells 30 years ago, studies of cutaneous leishmaniasis in mice have answered basic immunological questions concerning the development and maintenance of CD4(+) T cell subsets. However, new strategies for controlling the human disease have not been forthcoming. Nevertheless, advances in our knowledge of the cells that participate in protection against Leishmania infection and the cells that mediate increased pathology have highlighted new approaches for vaccine development and immunotherapy. In this Review, we discuss the early events associated with infection, the CD4(+) T cells that mediate protective immunity and the pathological role that CD8(+) T cells can have in cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  5. In Vitro Infectivity of Leishmania major Isolated from Patients with Different Clinical Forms of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis and Its Association with Parasite Zymodems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Sarkari

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: The aim of this study was to characterize the Leishmania parasites isolated from cuta­neous leishmaniasis (CL patients in Fars Province in Iran and to compare the potential infectivity of the isolates in macrophage cell line. Moreover, attempt was made to find out the association between parasite infectivity and their zymodems. "nMethods: Twenty samples were taken from the skin lesion of CL patients. The samples were cultured in biphasic media followed by mass cultivation in RPMI medium. Each isolate was tested for the ac­tivity of the 5 enzymes including glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI, malate dehydrogenase (MDH, nucleoside hydrolase 1& 2 (NH1 & NH2, and phosphoglucomutase (PGM.   The enzymatic profiles of the isolates were compared with WHO reference strains. Specific PCR (primers: LIN17 & LIN R4 and RAPD-PCR were used as complementary methods for characterization of the isolates. "nResults:  Isoenzyme electrophoresis showed that all of the isolates were L. major. PCR with LIN17 and LIN R4 and RAPD-PCR with AB-07 primers further determined the isolates as L. major. Results of macrophage infectivity experiment, using J774 cell line, showed that the most virulent isolates were related to Z1 with 63% macrophage infectivity rate. A well correlation was found between the infec­tivity rate of the isolates and type of ulcer. Those isolates with high infectivity rate were involved in more severe, ulcerative or erythmatose lesions in CL patients. "nConclusion: The most invasive isolates might be a good candidate for immunological studies and for vaccine development.

  6. Primary cutaneous nocardiosis: A case study and review

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    Inamadar A

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Primary cutaneous nocardiosis is an uncommon entity. It usually occurs among immunocompetent but occupationally predisposed individuals. AIM: To study clinical profile of patients with primary cutaneous nocardiosis in a tertiary care hospital and to review the literature. METHODS: The records of 10 cases of primary cutaneous nocardiosis were analyzed for clinical pattern, site of involvement with cultural study and response to treatment. RESULTS: All the patients were agricultural workers (nine male except one housewife. The commonest clinical type was mycetoma. Unusual sites like the scalp and back were involved in two cases. Culture was positive in six cases with N. brasiliensis being commonest organism. N. nova which was previously unreported cause of lymphocutaneous nocardiosis, was noted in one patient, who had associated HIV infection. All the patients responded to cotrimaxazole. CONCLUSION: Mycetoma is the commonest form of primary cutaneous nocardiosis and responds well to cotrimoxazole.

  7. Cutaneous Manifestations of Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases in Children

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    Athar Moin

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency and nature of cutaneous alterations associated with PIDs. This article is a cross-sectional study at the department of allergy and clinical immunology of children’s medical center conducted between December 5, 2001 and April 20, 2002. The subjects included pediatric patients with a diagnosis of PID and dermatological diagnoses were made by a dermatologist. Two hundred and ten patients were studied They consisted of 68 cases of humoral deficiency, 22 cases of cellular and combined deficiencies, 57 cases of phagocytic defects and 63 cases of other PIDs. In 67 cases (31.8% the cutaneous alterations preceded and were the basis for clinical immunological diagnosis. Overall cutaneous alterations were infections in 99 cases and eczematous dermatitis in 27 cases. Our findings support the results of other studies that most PIDs have cutaneous features which being their typical aspects are highly suggestive for the diagnosis of PIDs.

  8. [Tungiasis and cutaneous larva migrans: unpleasant travel souvenirs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmeier, Hermann

    2009-12-01

    Tungiasis (sand flea disease) and cutaneous larva migrans (creeping eruption) are parasitic skin diseases in which the infectious agents only temporarily invade human skin. The parasites die in situ and eventually are eliminated by tissue repair mechanisms. Both diseases are zoonoses. Humans only accidentally become a host for animal hookworm larvae (resulting in cutaneous larva migrans), but get infected with Tunga penetrans as frequent as domestic animals. In travelers to tropical and subtropical regions tungiasis and cutaneous larva migrans are the most common imported skin diseases. The diagnosis is made clinically. In tungiasis the clinical manifestations depend on the stage of the disease. Intense local inflammation and bacterial superinfection are common. Cutaneous larva migrans is treated orally with ivermectin or albendazole. A repellent based on coconut oil effectively prevents penetration of sand fleas.

  9. A case of rheumatic fever with acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis and nephrotic syndrome caused by a cutaneous infection with beta-hemolytic streptococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Sauer Mikkelsen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A middle-aged patient of Greenlandic origin was referred for skin infection of the leg. An initial minor trauma of the skin of the distal right lower extremity was complicated by bullous erysipelas which cultured positive for group A β-hemolytic streptococci (GABHS. The clinical condition deteriorated and necrotizing fasciitis developed despite relevant surgical and antibiotic treatment. Approximately 3 weeks later, the patient developed arthralgia, impaired renal function with azotemia, hypertension and severe nephrotic syndrome with periorbital and peripheral edema. A kidney biopsy demonstrated endocapillary glomerulonephritis. Concomitantly, carditis with chest pain, moderately reduced left ventricular ejection fraction and mitral regurgitation were noted. The patient had no signs of pharyngitis in the whole period. The patient thus contracted poststreptococ glomerulonephritis and furthermore she fulfilled the criteria of acute rheumatic fever following a GABHS skin infection. We suggest a possible relation between a virulent GABHS clone causing NF and ARF.

  10. Cutaneous anthrax in Southeast Anatolia of Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Recep; Sula, Bilal; Devecı, Ozcan; Tekin, Alicem; Bozkurt, Fatma; Ucmak, Derya; Kaya, Şafak; Bekcibasi, Muhammed; Erkan, Mehmet Emin; Ayaz, Celal; Hosoglu, Salih

    2015-03-01

    Anthrax is a rare disease cause by Bacillus anthracis, a Gram-positive, rod-shaped endospore-forming capsuled bacterium. Anthrax is manifest in three primary forms: cutaneous, respiratory, and gastrointestinal. Cutaneous anthrax accounts for approximately 95% of all cases of anthrax in humans. In the present study, we evaluated the clinical diagnosis and treatment of cutaneous anthrax, a rare disease that nonetheless remains a serious healthcare problem in developing countries. The complete medical records of patients diagnosed with cutaneous anthrax between January 2001 and December 2012 were examined in a retrospective manner. Cutaneous anthrax was diagnosed by the identification of typical anthrax lesions and/or the presence of Gram-positive-capsuled bacillus after staining with Gram stain and methylen blue in pathology samples obtained from these lesions and the presence of characteristic scarring with a history of severe swelling, black eschar, and positive response to treatment form the basis of diagnosis in cases where cultures were negative for the presence of bacillus. A total of 58 patients were admitted to the hospital with cutaneous anthrax between January 2001 and December 2012. This included 32 (55.2%) males and 26 (44.8%) females, with an age range of 15-82 years and a mean age of 38 ± 13.8 years. The incubation period for the infection ranged between 1 and 20 d (mean 3.7 ± 1.4 d). The most common symptoms at the time of hospital referral were swelling, redness, and black eschar of the skin. The most common lesion site was the hand and fingers (41.3%). Isolated of bacteria was used to diagnose the disease in six cases (23.8%), detection of Gram-positive bacillus in samples of characteristic lesion material was used in seven (28.5%) cases, and the presence of a characteristic lesion was the sole diagnostic criteria in 45 (77.6%) cases. Treatment consisted of penicillin G (12 cases), ampicillin-sulbactam (30 cases), Cefazolin (12 cases), or

  11. Radiotherapy for cutaneous cancers with xeroderma pigmentosum; Radiotherapie des cancers cutanes au cours du xeroderma pigmentosum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Salah, H.; Bahri, M.; Turki, H.; Abdelmoula, M.; Frikha, M.; Daoud, J. [Service de radiotherapie, CHU Habib-Bourguiba, route Majida-Bouleila, 3029 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose. - To analyze the therapeutic results of cutaneous cancers on xeroderma pigmentosum through a series of 15 patients treated by radiotherapy. Patients and methods. - Between 1993 and 2006, 15 patients with xeroderma pigmentosum and having cutaneous cancers were treated in the Radiotherapy Department of university hospital Habib-Bourguiba of Sfax in Tunisia. Seventy-three percent of the cases occurred in male patients and the mean age of appearance of the first tumour was 18.2 years. Tumour histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 74% of the cases. The total number of cutaneous tumours was 84. Ten patients had a surgical resection. Four patients did not respond to chemotherapy. The modality of irradiation was decided according to the size, thickness and localization of the tumour. The dose of radiotherapy was 60 Gy or equivalent with classic irradiation. Results. - The total number of lesions treated with radiotherapy was 64. Forty-three lesions were treated with contact-therapy, ten with brachytherapy and 11 with cobalt-therapy. The following acute complications were observed: cutaneous infection (53.3% of patients), radio-epithelitis (80% of patients) and necroses (33.3% of patients). Evaluation after treatment showed a clinical complete remission in 73% of the cases. Late effects were noted in seven cases: telangiectasia and cutaneous atrophy. A recurrence in the irradiated zone was observed in one case. A nodal metastasis was observed in two cases. Another patient presented lung metastases. After a median follow up of 37.2 months, four patients died, seven are alive with cutaneous cancer and four are alive with complete remission. Conclusion. - Radiotherapy is a possible and effective therapeutic alternative. Dose and methods are not defined for xeroderma pigmentosum. (authors)

  12. Cutaneous Manifestations of Toxoplasmosis: a Case Report

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    Marina Sonya

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Although toxoplasmosis is one of the most widely spread infections in the world, types that involve the skin are extremely rare. However, skin lesions are not specific; moreover, they are quite diverse, which makes the diagnosis of cutaneous toxoplasmosis rather difficult. Thus, differential diagnosis should include a number of other diseases. We present a case of a 43-year-old immunocompetent man with multiple livid erythematous papules and nodules with yellowish discharge that involved the skin of the body and the extremities. By using electro-chemiluminescence immunoassay, immunoglobulin G antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii were detected in the serum, confirming the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis. The treatment with pyrimethamine and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole led to complete resolution of skin lesions. In conclusion, although rare in the dermatological practice, cutaneous toxoplasmosis should be considered in all patients presenting with lymphadenopathy, non-specific skin eruptions, especially nodular and colliquative, blood eosinophilia and histological findigs revealing abundant eosinophilic inflitrations.

  13. CUTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH DIABETES MELLITUS

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    Satish

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM refers to a group of common metabolic disorders that share the phenotype of hyperglycemia. The metabolic dysregulation associated with DM causes secondary pathophysiologic changes in multiple organ systems that impose a tremendous burden on the individual with diabetes and on the health care system. AIM: of the study was to evaluate presence and prevalence of common dermatoses in patients. 250 cases of D.M. with various cutaneous manifestations attending in and outpatient department of Dr. D. Y. Patil medical hospital were evaluated. Detailed history was taken as per proforma and patient investigated. Maximum incidence was seen between 40-70 yrs. of age and in middle class. Fungal infection constituted highest number which included dermatophytosis, candidiasis and pityriasis versicolor. No cutaneous reactions to therapy for diabetes were encountered in the present study.

  14. A 27-Year-Old Severely Immunosuppressed Female with Misleading Clinical Features of Disseminated Cutaneous Sporotrichosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Atiyah; Mudenda, Victor; Lakhi, Shabir; Ngalamika, Owen

    2016-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subacute or chronic granulomatous mycosis caused by fungus of the Sporothrix schenckii complex. It is considered to be a rare condition in most parts of the world. It mostly causes cutaneous infection but can also cause multisystemic disease. Unlike most deep cutaneous mycoses which have a primary pulmonary focus, it is usually caused by direct inoculation of the fungus into the skin causing a classical linear, lymphocutaneous nodular eruption. However, atypical presentations of the condition can occur especially in immunosuppressed individuals. We report the case of a severely immunosuppressed female who presented with disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis which was initially diagnosed and treated as disseminated cutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. PMID:26881148

  15. [Cutaneous tuberculosis: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisero, Elsa; Luque, Graciela; Melillo, Karina; Favier, María Inés; Zapata, Alejandra; Cuello, María Soledad

    2014-06-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It is not very frequent and particularly difficult to diagnose. It incidence ranges between 1.5 and 4% of all extrapulmonary tuberculosis, according to bibliography. The clinic presentations depend on the arrival via of the bacillus to the skin, the patient's immune state and the environment. We show a cutaneous tuberculosis on a child with chronic dermatologic lesions, with torpid evolution, without response to treatments; the skin biopsy showed caseous granulomas. The aim is to show a patient with an infrequent clinic presentation of this disease, to emphasize the importance of an early recognition and treatment, avoiding the appearance of complications and sequels.

  16. Cutaneous mercury granuloma

    OpenAIRE

    Kalpana A Bothale; Mahore, Sadhana D.; Sushil Pande; Trupti Dongre

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous mercury granuloma is rarely encountered. Clinically it may pose difficulty in diagnosis. Here, we report a 23-year-old male presented with erythematous, nodular lesions over the forearm and anterior aspect of chest wall. Metallic mercury in tissue sections appear as dark black, opaque, spherical globules of varying size and number. They are surrounded by granulomatous foreign-body reaction. It is composed of foreign body giant cells and mixed inflammatory infiltrate composed of hist...

  17. A study of the treatment of cutaneous fungal infection in animal model using photoactivated composite of methylene blue and gold nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Abeer Attia; Noaman, Islam; El-Elsayyad, Hasan; El-Mashad, Noha; Soliman, Mona

    2016-09-01

    Onychomycosis is a widespread public health problem, in which T. rubrum and T. mentagrophytes is the commenest causative organisms. Current medical therapy has many drawbacks and side effects. Methylene blue (m.b) photodynamic therapy (pdt) proved efficacy but with lengthy sessions. Optimizing methylene blue photodynamic therapy by combination of methylene blue photosensitizer and gold nanoparticles (aunps) in a composite as gold nanoparticles are efficient delivery systems and efficient enhancers of photosensitizers for antifungal photodynamic therapy. Eighty newzealand rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) were used and categorized in eight equal groups as follows; healthy and infection control, composite photodynamic therapy and five comparative groups. Photodynamic therapy was initiated at day three to five post inoculation, for four sessions forty eight hours apart. Each group divided and light exposure at two fluencies; 80J and 100J. All groups were investigated macroscopically and microscopically (histopathology and scanning electron microscope) also flowcytometry assessment for cell death and X-ray analysis for gold nanoparticles accumulation in brain and liver tissues were determined. Recovery from infection approaching 96% in gold nanoparticles+light group, around 40% in methylene blue photodynamic therapy and 34% in composite photodynamic therapy. The observed findings confirmed by apparent decrease of apoptosis, however small amounts of gold nanoparticles detected in brain and liver. Light stimulated gold nanoparticles is a promising tool in treatment of onychomycosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Vaccines and vaccination strategies against human cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okwor, Ifeoma; Uzonna, Jude

    2009-05-01

    One might think that the development of a vaccine against cutaneous leishmaniasis would be relatively straightforward because the type of immune response required for protection is known and natural immunity occurs following recovery from primary infection. However, there is as yet no effective vaccine against the disease in humans. Although vaccination in murine studies has yielded promising results, these vaccines have failed miserably when tested in primates or humans. The reasons behind these failures are unknown and remain a major hurdle for vaccine design and development against cutaneous leishmaniasis. In contrast, recovery from natural, deliberate or experimental infections results in development of long-lasting immunity to re-infection. This so called infection-induced resistance is the strongest anti-Leishmania immunity known. Here, we briefly review the different approaches to vaccination against cutaneous leishmaniasis and argue that vaccines composed of genetically modified (attenuated) parasites, which induce immunity akin to infection-induced resistance, may provide best protection against cutaneous leishmaniasis in humans.

  19. A Proven Case of Cutaneous Rhizopus Infection Presenting with Severe Limb Pain Very Soon after Induction Treatment in a Patient with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

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    Mehmet Sezgin Pepeler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective and Importance. Invasive mucormycosis may complicate the course of patients with hematologic malignancies and has a very high mortality rate. Early diagnosis and aggressive approach combined with surgical and medical treatment have paramount importance for cure. Clinical Presentation. We report here a case of a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with a subcutaneous mass lesion which was sampled by an ultrasound guided needle biopsy. The pathology showed microorganisms with aseptate hyphae with wide, irregular walls and more or less branching with highly vertical angles which suggested a mold infection. The specimen was also cultured where Rhizopus spp. grew. Conclusion. Posaconazole 200 mg QID was commenced. She recovered from neutropenia and pain on day 20 of treatment. After 4 courses of hyper-CVAD chemotherapy, the remaining soft tissue mass was removed surgically and she underwent allogeneic HSCT from a full matched sibling donor under secondary prophylaxis.

  20. [Cutaneous alternariosis and its diagnosis in an inmunocompromised patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín Montín, I; Camacho Fernández, M; Rubio Rubio, J M; Herrera, A

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a cutaneous alternariosis is described. This is a strange opportunist infection with less than 100 cases. The patient was not VIH although inmunocompromised due to several factors: Malabsorption Syndrome, megaloblastic anemia secondary to gastrectomy and distal pancreatomy with gastrodigiunostomia due to gastric adenocarcinoma four years ago; splenectomied in the same operation, long treatment with hydantoin, and corticosteroids. The patient was managed in the internal medicine unit due to a problematic respiratory infection with cardiac rhythm disorder and progressive debility in lower limbs, together with cutaneous lesions in which "alternaria sp" was isolated by culture. After beginning treatment with oral itraconazole, his evolution was excellent. The main interest consists in the rareness and the original presentation of the cutaneous alternariosis in this case.

  1. Cutavirus in Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Sarah; Fridholm, Helena; Vinner, Lasse

    2017-01-01

    A novel human protoparvovirus related to human bufavirus and preliminarily named cutavirus has been discovered. We detected cutavirus in a sample of cutaneous malignant melanoma by using viral enrichment and high-throughput sequencing. The role of cutaviruses in cutaneous cancers remains to be in......A novel human protoparvovirus related to human bufavirus and preliminarily named cutavirus has been discovered. We detected cutavirus in a sample of cutaneous malignant melanoma by using viral enrichment and high-throughput sequencing. The role of cutaviruses in cutaneous cancers remains...

  2. Cutavirus in Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Sarah; Fridholm, Helena; Vinner, Lasse

    2017-01-01

    A novel human protoparvovirus related to human bufavirus and preliminarily named cutavirus has been discovered. We detected cutavirus in a sample of cutaneous malignant melanoma by using viral enrichment and high-throughput sequencing. The role of cutaviruses in cutaneous cancers remains to be in......A novel human protoparvovirus related to human bufavirus and preliminarily named cutavirus has been discovered. We detected cutavirus in a sample of cutaneous malignant melanoma by using viral enrichment and high-throughput sequencing. The role of cutaviruses in cutaneous cancers remains...

  3. Worldwide cutaneous malignant melanoma incidences analyzed by sex, age, and skin type over time (1955–2007): Is HPV infection of androgenic hair follicular melanocytes a risk factor for developing melanoma exclusively in people of European-ancestry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Stephen J.; Subramanian, Madhan; Godar, Dianne E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) incidence has been increasing in an exponential manner in certain populations around the world for over 7 decades. To help illuminate the etiology, we performed worldwide temporal (1955–2007) CMM incidence analysis by sex, age (0–14, 15–29, 30–49, 50–69, 70–85+), and skin type on 6 continents using data from the International Agency for Research on Cancer. We observe an exponential increase in the CMM incidence over time and an increase of about 2 orders of magnitude between age groups 0–14 and 15–29 exclusively in European-ancestry populations around the world independent of skin type (I–III or III–IV). Other populations like the Chinese (III-IV) had much lower CMM incidences that either remained stable or temporally decreased but did not display a dramatic increase between the youngest age groups. The dramatic increase in the incidence between the youngest age groups found only in European-ancestry populations suggests one of the most important risk factors for CMM may be developing androgenic hair, the occurrence of which appears to correlate with the distribution of CMM over male and female body sites. Besides that potential new risk factor, the increasing CMM incidence with increasing age, known not to be from cumulative UV doses, may be associated with age-related changes to skin, i.e., thinning epidermis causing lower vitamin D3 levels, and hair, i.e., whitening from higher reactive oxygen species. The temporal exponential increasing CMM incidence in European-ancestry populations may be due to Human Papilloma Virus infection of follicular hair melanocytes, found in CMM biopsies. PMID:27588159

  4. Cutaneous Manifestations in Renal Transplant Recipients

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    Fatma Elif Demirgüneş

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: This study is designed to determine the prevalence and the clinical spectrum of skin diseases in renal transplant recipients (RTRs.Material and Method: In this study RTRs who were referred to our department between 2005 and 2007 for dermatologic examination were evaluated. Dermatologic investigation included direct clinical observation and culture or histolopathological investigation when indicated. Patients were divided into three groups: group A, post-transplantation periods £1 year; group B, post-transplantation periods of 1-5 years; and group C, post-transplantation periods >5 years. Results: In this study 88 (M=50, F=38 RTRs were evaluated. The mean age was 37 ± 12 years and the median interval since transplantation was 38.5 months (range=1 month-27 years. Over a 2-year period 298 cutaneous manifestations were identified. Ninety-five immunosuppressive (IS drug-related manifestations were observed in 58 (%65.9 patients and the most common one was acneiform eruption (n=23. Forty (45.5% patients developed cutaneous viral infections, consisting of verruca vulgaris (n=29, herpes zoster (n=9, herpes simplex (n=5, molluscum (n=2 and varicella (n=1 infections. Superficial fungal infections were observed in 35(39.2% patients, most common lesions were dermatophytosis (n = 23 and pityriasis versicolor (n=17. Bacterial infections were observed in 14 (%16 patients, folliculitis was present in 12 of them. Premalignant and malignant lesions were identified in 12 (%13.6 patients, consisting of actinic keratoses (n=9, basal cell carcinoma (n=2, squamous cell carcinoma (n=1 and Kaposi's sarcoma (n=1. There were more premalignant and malignant lesions in patients receiving azathioprine (p=0.002. Cutaneous viral infections were more common in group C (p=0.023 and IS drug-related manifestations were more common in group A (p=0.003. Conclusion: Most common cutaneous manifestation among RTRs was IS drug-related and seen in early post

  5. Cutaneous Mucormycosis in a Diabetic Patient following Traditional Dressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Ahmadinejad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous mucormycosis is a rare manifestation of an aggressive fungal infection. Early diagnosis and treatment are vitally important in improving outcome. We report an unusual case presenting with progressive necrotizing fasciitis due to mucormycosis following trauma and dressing by man-made herbal agents.

  6. [Adhesive cutaneous pharmaceutical forms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafiţanu, E; Matei, I; Mungiu, O C; Pavelescu, M; Mîndreci, I; Apostol, I; Ionescu, G

    1989-01-01

    The adhesive cutaneous pharmaceutical forms aimed to local action release the drug substance in view of a dermatological, traumatological, antirheumatic, cosmetic action. Two such preparations were obtained and their stability, consistency and pH were determined. The "in vitro" tests of their bioavailability revealed the dynamics of calcium ions release according to the associations of each preparation. The bioavailability determined by evaluating the pharmacological response demonstrated the antiinflammatory action obtained by the association of calcium ions with the components extracted from poplar muds. The therapeutical efficiency of the studied preparations has proved in the treatment of some sport injuries.

  7. Chronic zosteriform cutaneous leishmaniasis

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    Omidian M

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous leishmanasis (CL may present with unusual clinical variants such as acute paronychial, annular, palmoplantar, zosteriform, erysipeloid, and sporotrichoid. The zosteriform variant has rarely been reported. Unusual lesions may be morphologically attributed to an altered host response or owing to an atypical strain of parasites in these lesions. We report a patient with CL in a multidermatomal pattern on the back and buttock of a man in Khozestan province in the south of Iran. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of multidermatomal zosteriform CL. It was resistant to conventional treatment but responded well to a combination of meglumine antimoniate, allopurinol, and cryotherapy.

  8. [Cutaneous histiocytosis X].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, J; Metz, G; Lechner, W

    1980-09-01

    Histiocytosis X comprises three clinical entities whose common substrate is a localized or systemic proliferation of atypical histiocytes. On the basis of the age of manifestation, acuity of the clinical course and organ involvement Abt-Letterer-Siwe's disease, Hand-Schüller-Christian's disease and eosinophilic granuloma can be differentiated from each other, although transitional varieties of these syndromes are possible. Not infrequently oligosymptomatic forms are misinterpreted, especially when the skin is the only involved organ. In the following case report cutaneous histiocytosis X will be discussed in terms of its clinical expression. Electron-microscopy has proved to be the best methods to make the diagnosis of such atypical cases.

  9. Pure cutaneous histiocytosis X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaña-García, M

    1986-03-01

    A 38-month-old boy presented with nodules in the skin of the genital region present for 2 1/2 years. These later spread to the skin of the trunk, head, and extremities. A complete clinical workup could not reveal involvement in any other organ sites and biopsy of one of the cutaneous lesions was diagnosed as histiocytosis X. Because the child was in generally good condition, no treatment was given. Follow-up revealed that the disease had remained limited to the skin, where 15% of the lesions disappeared spontaneously.

  10. Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis. Relation to systemic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotti, T M; Comacchi, C; Ghersetich, I

    1999-01-01

    Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis (CNV) is a complex multisystem disease generally involving the skin and mucous membranes, often accompanied by renal, gastrointestinal, pericardial, neurological, and articular signs and symptoms. CNV may be idiopatical or occur in association with a drug, infection, or underlying disease. CNV has been shown in patients with chronic infections (viral, bacterial, protozoa, helminthic), serum sickness, a variety of collagen vascular diseases (systemic lupus erythematous, Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, Behçet's disease) hyperglobulinemic states, cryoglobulinemia, bowel bypass syndrome, ulcerative colitis, cystic fibrosis, primary biliary cirrhosis and HIV infection. Association with malignancies is not frequent. Lymphoproliferative disorders (Hodgkin's disease, mycosis fungoides, lymphosarcoma, adult T-cell leukemia, multiple mieloma) and solid tumors (lung cancer, colon carcinoma, renal, prostate, head and neck cancer and breast cancer) may be associated with CNV. Whenever possible, treatment is directed at the elimination of the cause. In other cases after adequate laboratory screening local and systemic therapy are recommended.

  11. Poliarterite nodosa cutânea na infância com gangrena digital e possível associação com o estreptococo beta-hemolítico do grupo a: relato de caso e revisão de literatura Cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa in children presenting with digital gangrene and possible association with group a beta hemolytic streptococcus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Silva Marins

    2008-04-01

    the cutaneous PAN in the childhood may be associated to streptococcal infection and, for this reason, a special care should be given for those under 10 years old due to the high risk of self amputation.

  12. Primary cutaneous mucormycosis in an immunocompetent patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paduraru, Mihai; Moreno-Sanz, Carlos; Olalla Gallardo, Jose Maria

    2016-08-16

    Mucormycosis is most common in immunocompromised patients, but it can also occur in healthy hosts, most frequently as primary cutaneous mucormycosis (PCM) and predominantly as a result of skin trauma. We present an uncommon case of PCM in a healthy, young man with no previous history of local trauma. Despite rapid progression of the infection, the patient was successfully treated through surgical intervention and by administering liposomal amphotericin B and posaconazole. He made a full recovery without the need for skin grafting. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Cutaneous and systemic complications associated with tattooing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluger, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    Tattooing can result in a wide variety of complications, whose prevalence and incidence remain still unclear. Hypersensitivity reactions (or allergies) to tattoo pigments are currently the most common complication on a tattoo, however they are not predictable. Infections are nowadays directly related to the lack of asepsis and hygiene during the tattooing procedure or during the healing phase. Patients with a known cutaneous disease should be warned of a potential risk of localization of their disease to the tattoo. A skin eruption restricted to a tattoo may reveal sarcoidosis. Patients with chronic conditions and/or impaired immunity should discuss with their physician about the possibility and when to have a tattoo.

  14. Reactive Oxygen Species and Nitric Oxide in Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fátima Horta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous leishmaniasis affects millions of people around the world. Several species of Leishmania infect mouse strains, and murine models closely reproduce the cutaneous lesions caused by the parasite in humans. Mouse models have enabled studies on the pathogenesis and effector mechanisms of host resistance to infection. Here, we review the role of nitric oxide (NO, reactive oxygen species (ROS, and peroxynitrite (ONOO− in the control of parasites by macrophages, which are both the host cells and the effector cells. We also discuss the role of neutrophil-derived oxygen and nitrogen reactive species during infection with Leishmania. We emphasize the role of these cells in the outcome of leishmaniasis early after infection, before the adaptive Th-cell immune response.

  15. Two cases of cutaneous cryptococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiujiao, Xia; Ai'e, Xu

    2005-07-01

    We report two cases of cutaneous cryptococcosis in male patients without underlying disease. Case 1 had a granulomatous mass on his right neck, gradually enlarging for 3 months. After the mass was debrided surgically in a hospital, the incision wound gradually developed into a severe ulceration. Mycological examination revealed Cryptococcus neoformans infection. It was significant that histopathology of both pre-surgery granuloma and post-surgery ulceration revealed thick-walled spores with thick capsule. Chest X-ray revealed a shadow in the left lower lung. After treatment with amphotec for 21 days, the lesion healed. Case 2 had an approximately 2 x 2 cm solitary dull nodule on his right thigh, which had been present for 8 months. Mycological examination confirmed that the lesion was caused by C. neoformans. The patient's ratio of peripheral blood CD4(+) cell was slightly reduced. After 14 days of treatment with oral fluconazole, followed by oral itraconazole for 2 months, mycological and clinical cure were achieved. The two isolates were identified as C. neoformans var. gattii serotype C and C. neoformans var. grubii serotype A.

  16. Primary cutaneous aspergillosis and idiopathic bone marrow aplasia*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Karina Colossi; Pires, Mario Cezar; Kakizaki, Priscila; Chartuni, Juliana Cabral Nunes; Valente, Neusa Yuriko Sakai

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 9-year-old boy with idiopathic bone marrow aplasia and severe neutropenia, who developed skin ulcers under cardiac monitoring electrodes. The diagnosis of primary cutaneous aspergillosis was made after the second biopsy and culture. Imaging investigation did not reveal internal fungal infection. The child was treated, but did not improve and died 3 months after admission. The report highlights and discusses the preventable risk of aspergillus skin infection in immunocompromised patients. PMID:27438213

  17. Primary cutaneous aspergillosis and idiopathic bone marrow aplasia*

    OpenAIRE

    Furlan, Karina Colossi; Pires,Mario Cezar; Kakizaki,Priscila; Chartuni, Juliana Cabral Nunes; Valente,Neusa Yuriko Sakai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: We describe the case of a 9-year-old boy with idiopathic bone marrow aplasia and severe neutropenia, who developed skin ulcers under cardiac monitoring electrodes. The diagnosis of primary cutaneous aspergillosis was made after the second biopsy and culture. Imaging investigation did not reveal internal fungal infection. The child was treated, but did not improve and died 3 months after admission. The report highlights and discusses the preventable risk of aspergillus skin infection...

  18. [Cutaneous diphtheria after a minor injury in Sri Lanka].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, L; Mechlin, A; Schultz, E S

    2016-02-01

    Cutaneous dipththeria is an infectious bacterial disease endemic in tropical regions, but rarely diagnosed in Germany. Following travel in Sri Lanka, a 60-year-old German presented to our dermatological clinic with a skin ulcer and extensive erythematous erosive edema of his left foot. Corynebacterium diphtheriae was isolated from a swab of the lesion. There were no clinical signs of toxic diphtheria. The patient was treated with penicillin G and erythromycin, followed by a slow healing of the lesion. The isolated strain could be identified as toxigenic C. diphtheriae mitis. Due to increased travel activity, dermatologists should have uncommon infections like cutaneous diphtheria in mind.

  19. Cutaneous zygomycosis due to Saksenaea vasiformis in an immunocompetent host

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    Baradkar V

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Saksenaea vasiformis is an emerging zygomycete species, most often associated with cutaneous, subcutaneous and rhino- orbito-cerebral infections. Herein, we report a case of cutaneous zygomycosis of face caused by Saksenaea vasiformis in a 54-year-old immunocompetent female. The diagnosis was carried out by microscopy using KOH mount, Gram staining, Gomori′s methenamine silver staining, hemotoxylin and eosin staining and culture on Sabouraud′s Dextrose agar without actidione. Slide cultures were put up on Czapek Dox agar, which showed typical flask-shaped sporangium with rhizoids. The patient was treated successfully with intravenous amphotericin B.

  20. Cutaneous ulceration: an unusual complication of intravenous pentamidine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognia, J L

    1991-01-01

    Pentamidine is one of two agents currently used to treat infections with Pneumocystis carinii. The intramuscular route of administration is associated with cutaneous side effects such as dermal necrosis, sterile abscesses and ulcer formation at the injection site, while urticaria may develop near the site of intravenous drug infusion. This is a report of a renal transplant patient with Pneumocystis pneumonia who developed chemical cellulitis and ulceration following the extravasation of intravenous pentamidine into the soft tissues of the left hand and forearm. The area healed slowly over 7 weeks, but there was a residual loss of cutaneous sensation. In a review of the literature no report of a similar case was found.

  1. Cutaneous zygomycosis: A possible postoperative complication in immunocompetent individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilak Ragini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungi in the class of zygomycetes usually produce serious infections in diabetics and immunocompromised hosts. Cutaneous zygomycosis is a less common form, with an unpredictable extent of anatomical involvement and clinical course. Here, we report two cases of primary cutaneous zygomycosis as postoperative complications in otherwise healthy females. Zygomycosis was suspected and specimens from the surgical debridement were examined by microbiological and histopathological studies for confirming the clinical diagnosis. Rapid diagnosis, liposomal amphotericin B, and proper debridement of affected tissue are necessary to avoid a fatal outcome.

  2. Cutaneous Granulomas in Dolphins Caused by Novel Uncultivated Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, Raquel; Bossart, Gregory D.; St. Leger, Judy A.; Dalton, Leslie M.; Reif, John S.; Schaefer, Adam M.; McCarthy, Peter J.; Fair, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous granulomas in dolphins were believed to be caused by Lacazia loboi, which also causes a similar disease in humans. This hypothesis was recently challenged by reports that fungal DNA sequences from dolphins grouped this pathogen with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. We conducted phylogenetic analysis of fungi from 6 bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) with cutaneous granulomas and chains of yeast cells in infected tissues. Kex gene sequences of P. brasiliensis from dolphins showed 100% homology with sequences from cultivated P. brasiliensis, 73% with those of L. loboi, and 93% with those of P. lutzii. Parsimony analysis placed DNA sequences from dolphins within a cluster with human P. brasiliensis strains. This cluster was the sister taxon to P. lutzii and L. loboi. Our molecular data support previous findings and suggest that a novel uncultivated strain of P. brasiliensis restricted to cutaneous lesions in dolphins is probably the cause of lacaziosis/lobomycosis, herein referred to as paracoccidioidomycosis ceti. PMID:27869614

  3. Genotype comparisons of strains of Candida albicans from patients with cutaneous candidiasis and vaginal candidiasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHE Xiao-dong; WANG Xue-jun; FU Mei-hua; SHEN Yong-nian; LIU Wei-da

    2008-01-01

    Background It is uncertain whether genotypes of Candida albicans (C. Albicans) are associated with colonizing body locations or variant conditions of infection. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there are significant associations between strain genotypes and body sites of infection and to determine the potential pathogenesis of cutaneous candidiasis at multiple locations.Methods A total of 151 strains of C. Albicans were isolated from 74 infant patients with cutaneous candidiasis and 61 female patients with vaginal candidiasis. Patients were grouped according to the body sites and underlying conditions of infection. Genolypes were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the 25S rDNA and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of ALT repeals digested with EcoRI and Clal.Results Ten genotypes were detected. There were significant differences in genotype frequencies between the two groups. However, we found no clear association between genotypes and the sites of cutaneous infection or the underlying conditions of vaginal candidiasis (VVC). In addition, strains of C. Albicans from multiple cutaneous locations of the same patient had identical genotypes.Conclusions Populations of C. Albicans from patients with cutaneous and vaginal candidiasis were genetically different. However, the lack of genetic difference between strains from different body sites with cutaneous infections or from different underlying conditions for VVC suggests no evidence of genotype selection for different skin surfaces or patients with different underlying conditions for VVC.

  4. Cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa: A rare isolated cutaneous vasculitis

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    Praveen Kumar A Subbanna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa (CPAN is a rare form of cutaneous vasculitis that involves small and medium sized arteries of the dermis and subcutaneous tissue without systemic involvement. It presents with tender subcutaneous nodules, digital gangrene, livedo reticularis and subcutaneous ulcerations. The diagnosis is by skin biopsy and characteristic pathologic feature is a leukocytoclastic vasculitis in the small to medium-sized arterioles of the dermis. We report a rare case of benign cutaneous PAN in a 14-year-old girl who presented with history of fever, subcutaneous nodules with cutaneous ulcer and digital gangrene. The skin biopsy showed leukocytoclastic vasculitis with fibrinoid necrosis in the dermal vessels. She received treatment with steroids and lesions resolved completely over a period of month.

  5. Cutaneous larva migrans

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    Aleksandra Wieczorek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction . Cutaneous larva migrans (CLM is a tropical zoonosis, caused by parasites, usually Ancylostoma braziliense. Humans are an accidental host. Polish patients with CLM are usually tourists visiting tropical and subtropical countries. The first symptoms do not always appear as creeping eruptions, which complicates the diagnosis. Objective. To present the case of a man with CLM after returning from Thailand to Poland and associated diagnostic difficulties. Case report. We present a case of a 28-year-old man who returned to Poland from Thailand. The first symptoms appeared as disseminated pruritic papules. No improvement after treatment with corticosteroids and antihistamines was observed. The diagnosis was established after the appearance of serpentine erythemas and improvement after albendazole therapy. Conclusions. In the case of returnees from exotic countries suffering from raised, pruritic rashes, and no improvement after treatment with corticosteroids and antihistamines, parasitic etiology should be considered.

  6. Disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis in an immunocompetent adult

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    Manoj Harnalikar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Histoplasmosis, a systemic mycosis caused by the dimorphic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum var capsulatum and Histoplasma capsulatum var duboisii is endemic to many parts of the world. The clinical manifestations range from acute or chronic pulmonary infection to a progressive disseminated disease. After initial exposure to the fungus, the infection is self-limited and restricted to the lungs in 99% of healthy individuals. The remaining 1%, however, progress to either disseminated or chronic disease involving the lungs, liver, spleen, lymph nodes, bone marrow or rarely, the skin and mucous membranes. Mucocutaneous histoplasmosis is frequently reported in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS, but it is rare in immunocompetent hosts. A 60-year-old male presented with asymptomatic swelling of the hard palate and crusted papules and nodules over the extremities, face and trunk. Clinically, the diagnoses of cutaneous cryptococcosis versus histoplasmosis was considered in this patient. A chest X-ray revealed hilar lymphadenopathy. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV was nonreactive. Skin biopsy revealed multiple tiny intracellular round yeast forms with a halo in the mid-dermis. Culture of the skin biopsy in Sabouraud′s dextrose agar showed colonies of Histoplasma capsulatum. Despite an investigation including no evidence of underlying immunosuppression was found, he was started on IV amphotericin-B (0.5 mg/kg/day. However, the patient succumbed to his disease 2 days after presentation. We report a rare case of disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis in an immunocompetent individual.

  7. Disseminated cryptococcosis manifested as a single tumor in an immunocompetent patient, similar to the cutaneous primary forms*

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Amaral, Danielle Mechereffe; Rocha, Ritha de Cássia Capelato; Carneiro, Luiz Euribel Prestes; Vasconcelos, Dewton Moraes; de Abreu, Marilda Aparecida Milanez Morgado

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is a fungal infection caused by Cryptococcus neoformans that tends to affect immunocompromised individuals. The fungi are mostly acquired by inhalation, which leads to an initial pulmonary infection. Later, other organs - such as the central nervous system and the skin - can be affected by hematogenous spread. In addition, cutaneous contamination can occur by primary inoculation after injuries (primary cutaneous cryptococcosis), whose diagnosis is defined based on the absence of systemic involvement. The clinical presentation of cutaneous forms typically vary according to the infection mode. We report an unusual case of disseminated cryptococcosis in an immunocompetent patient with cutaneous lesions similar to those caused by primary inoculation. This clinical picture leads us to question the definition of primary cutaneous cryptococcosis established in the literature. PMID:28300886

  8. Radiotherapy of cutaneous lymphomas; Radiotherapie des lymphomes cutanes

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    Kirova, Y.M.; Piedbois, Y.; Pan, Q.; Guo, J.P.; Le Bourgeois, J.P. [Hopital Henri-Mondor, 94 - Creteil (France). Dept. de cancerologie

    1999-03-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of cutaneous lymphomas. In the treatment of Mycosis fungoides, total skin electron beam radiation therapy is efficient for patients with limited and superficial forms of the disease. Radiotherapy is also efficient for the locally advanced forms of non-epidermo-tropic lymphomas. The palliative radiotherapy is indicated for advanced, nodular and treatment resistant forms of cutaneous lymphomas and for voluminous lymphadenopathies. (authors)

  9. Cutaneous manifestations in renal failure patients: A case series

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    Banerjee S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous involvement in renal disease is due to a host of factors ranging from metabolic disturbances to immunosuppressive drugs. Herein we report a series of six cases of renal failure with varied cutaneous manifestations ranging from infections to neoplasms due to prolonged immunosuppression. Our first case had cutaneous cryptococcosis where skin lesions gave a clue to the diagnosis of altered sensorium and underlying meningitis. The second case initially presented with florid warts and was treated successfully but later presented with an explosive recurrence of skin lesions due to malignant transformation. Our third case had basal cell carcinoma over the presternal region that was successfully treated with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy. Our fourth case had diabetic nephropathy that presented with septicemia and purpura fulminans. The last case had cutaneous manifestations of drug therapy because of heparin infusion. To conclude, cutaneous manifestations in patients with renal failure are varied and a high degree of suspicion is needed for early diagnosis and aggressive treatment to effectively combat mortality and morbidity.

  10. Eight cases of feline cutaneous leishmaniasis in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, K E; Porter, B F; Logan, K S; Hoffman, R J; Snowden, K F

    2010-11-01

    Leishmaniasis is a zoonotic disease caused by intracellular Leishmania protozoa that are transmitted by sandflies. The disease occurs in 3 forms: cutaneous, mucocutaneous, and visceral. Cutaneous leishmaniasis has been reported in cats in Europe and South America and in 1 cat from Texas. Leishmania mexicana is endemic in Texas and has been reported to cause cutaneous lesions in humans. This article describes the pathology of 8 biopsy cases of feline cutaneous leishmaniasis presented to the Texas Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory over a 3.5-year period. The median age of the cats was 3 years; each was presented with nodular, ulcerative lesions on the pinnae and less commonly on the muzzle and periorbital skin. Histologically, the lesions were nodular to diffuse histiocytic dermatitis with numerous amastigotes (2-4 μm) within macrophages and occasionally within the interstitium. Organisms were often contained within round, clear, intracellular vacuoles. In areas of necrosis, organisms were also free within the interstitium. The overlying epidermis was hyperkeratotic, hyperplastic, and often ulcerated. The organisms were not argyrophilic (Gomori methenamine silver), reacted poorly with periodic acid-Schiff reagent, and were inconsistently basophilic with Giemsa. Although not readily visible histologically, kinetoplasts were evident in amastigotes in cytologic preparations. The lesions were similar to those described for cutaneous L. mexicana infection in humans. In 5 of the 8 cats, Leishmania mexicana DNA was amplified from paraffin-embedded tissue by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced.

  11. Proteome Profiling of Human Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Lesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Santos, Claire; Attarha, Sanaz; Saini, Ravi Kanth; Boaventura, Viviane; Costa, Jackson; Khouri, Ricardo; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Brodskyn, Cláudia Ida; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we used proteomics and biological network analysis to evaluate the potential biological processes and components present in the identified proteins of biopsies from cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) patients infected by Leishmania braziliensis in comparison with normal skin. We identified 59 proteins differently expressed in samples from infected and normal skin. Biological network analysis employing identified proteins showed the presence of networks that may be involved in the cell death mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. After immunohistochemical analyses, the expression of caspase-9, caspase-3, and granzyme B was validated in the tissue and positively correlated with the lesion size in CL patients. In conclusion, this work identified differentially expressed proteins in the inflammatory site of CL, revealed enhanced expression of caspase-9, and highlighted mechanisms associated with the progression of tissue damage observed in lesions. PMID:25207817

  12. Cutaneous hamartoma with pagetoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piérard-Franchimont, C; Dosal, F L; Estrada, J A; Piérard, G E

    1991-04-01

    We report an unusual cutaneous hamartoma with pagetoid cells characterized by the presence of intraepidermal cells resembling Toker's cells of the nipple. These cells were EMA positive and could be related to the histogenesis of some Paget's disease.

  13. [Ocular metastasis of cutaneous melanoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, F; Balansard, B; Conrath, J; Forzano, O; Ridings, B

    2004-02-01

    We report a case of vitreal metastases from cutaneous melanoma. We describe the clinical findings and the histological aspects of the lesions, which allows us to discuss the diagnosis of masquerade syndrome and highlight the diagnostic importance of vitreous biopsy.

  14. Systemic diseases with cutaneous manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, S R; Taboada, J

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to briefly discuss the following cutaneous manifestations of selected systemic diseases: poxvirus; feline leukemia virus (FeLV); feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV); herpesvirus; calcivirus; pseudorabies; plague; tularemia; toxoplasmosis; leishmania; hypothyroidism; hyperthyroidism; hyperadrenocorticism; diabetes mellitus; acromegaly; thallium poisoning; pancreatic disease; hypereosinophilic syndrome; mucopolysaccharidosis; and pansteatitis. Recognition of these cutaneous signs may help alert the clinician to the possibility of an internal disorder so that the appropriate diagnostic tests can be considered.

  15. Cryptococcal meningitis with secondary cutaneous involvement in an immunocompetent host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Saadia; Rahman, Atiya; Herekar, Fivzia; Masood, Sadia

    2013-09-16

    Cryptococcosis is a potentially fatal fungal disease caused by variants of Cryptococcus neoformans species.  The respiratory tract is the usual portal of entry, with a peculiar predilection to invade the central nervous system.  The skin can be secondarily involved in disseminated infection or be exceptionally involved as primary cutaneous infection by inoculation.  The disease is mostly seen in immunodeficiency states.  The diagnosis is frequently unsuspected in immunocompetent patients. We report a case of disseminated cryptococcal meningitis in an immunocompetent young adult. The cutaneous eruption prompted the accurate diagnosis.  The patient, a 20-year-old female, had fever, cough, headache and intractable vomiting for the past two months and was being managed as a case of tuberculous meningitis. Two weeks after starting antituberculous treatment she developed umbilicated papules on the head and neck region. Necessary laboratory workup identified C. neoformans in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and skin specimens.  The titers of cryptococcal antigen were measured in CSF and serum for diagnostic and prognostic purposes.  Anti-fungal treatment resulted in regression of the cutaneous lesions and resolution of systemic complaints. The case highlights the need for high degree of suspicion, especially in healthy young adults, in the diagnosis of cryptococcosis. The cutaneous eruptions can be the first manifestation or a diagnostic clue of enormous significance.

  16. Fatal cutaneous mucormycosis after kidney transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davuodi, Setareh; Manshadi, Seyed Ali Dehghan; Salehi, Mohammad Reza; Yazdi, Farhad; Khazravi, Mona; Fazli, Jafar Taghizade

    2015-02-01

    Mucormycosis is an uncommon opportunistic infection that is caused by Mucorales from the Zygomycetes class. Patients with severe immunodeficiency admitted to the hospital are at greatest risk for developing this infection. Mucormycosis usually is transmitted in humans by inhalation or inoculation of spores in the skin or mucous membranes. A 66-year-old man developed a surgical wound infection at 1 week after kidney transplant that did not improve despite broad-spectrum antibiotics and debridement. He was transferred to our hospital 45 days after transplant and had fever and a large purulent wound that was surrounded by a black necrotizing margin. Immunosuppressive drugs were discontinued and the dosage of prednisolone was decreased. Massive debridement was performed but was incomplete because he had full-thickness abdominal wall necrosis. Histopathology showed broad fungal hyphae without septation, consistent with the diagnosis of mucormycosis. Despite antifungal therapy with amphotericin B and additional debridement, the patient died of septic shock at 52 days after kidney transplant. Cutaneous fungal infections should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any nonhealing infected wound that does not respond to broad-spectrum antibiotics, especially in patients with predisposing risk factors such as transplant.

  17. Platelet gel for healing cutaneous chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crovetti, Giovanni; Martinelli, Giovanna; Issi, Marwan; Barone, Marilde; Guizzardi, Marco; Campanati, Barbara; Moroni, Marco; Carabelli, Angelo

    2004-04-01

    Wound healing is a specific host immune response for restoration of tissue integrity. Experimental studies demonstrated an alteration of growth factors activity due to their reduced synthesis, increased degradation and inactivation. In wound healing platelets play an essential role since they are rich of alpha-granules growth factors (platelet derived growth factor--PDGF; transforming growth factor-beta--TGF-beta; vascular endothelial growth factor--VEGF). Topical use of platelet gel (PG), hemocomponent obtained from mix of activated platelets and cryoprecipitate, gives the exogenous and in situ adding of growth factors (GF). The hemocomponents are of autologous or homologous origin. We performed a technique based on: multicomponent apheretic procedure to obtain plasma rich platelet and cryoprecipitate; manual processing in an open system, in sterile environment, for gel activation. Every step of the gel synthesis was checked by a quality control programme. The therapeutic protocol consists of the once-weekly application of PG. Progressive reduction of the wound size, granulation tissue forming, wound bed detersion, regression and absence of infective processes were considered for evaluating clinical response to hemotherapy. 24 patients were enrolled. They had single or multiple cutaneous ulcers with different ethiopathogenesis. Only 3 patients could perform autologous withdrawal; in the others homologous hemocomponent were used, always considering suitability and traceability criteria for transfusional use of blood. Complete response was observed in 9 patients, 2 were subjected to cutaneous graft, 4 stopped treatment, 9 had partial response and are still receiving the treatment. In each case granulation tissue forming increased following to the first PG applications, while complete re-epithelization was obtained later. Pain was reduced in every treated patient. Topical haemotherapy with PG may be considered as an adjuvant treatment of a multidisciplinary process

  18. Genotyping of cutaneous melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glitza, Isabella C; Davies, Michael A

    2014-09-01

    Until recently, treatment options for patients with metastatic melanoma were very limited. This landscape has evolved dramatically since the discovery of activating mutations in the BRAF gene in ~45% of cutaneous melanomas. Vemurafenib, dabrafenib, and trametinib have all received regulatory approval for the treatment of metastatic melanoma patients with a BRAF(V600) mutation. Based on the necessity to document the presence of a BRAF(V600) mutation to prescribe these agents, molecular testing is now the standard of care in this disease. However, the options and rationale for testing are evolving rapidly due to an improved understanding of the molecular drivers and heterogeneity of melanoma. Such testing may identify rational combinatorial approaches to prevent or overcome resistance for the approved BRAF inhibitors. In addition, new clinical strategies have been identified for a number of other molecular changes that are detected in this disease, including somatic changes in NRAS, PTEN, CDKN2A, and c-KIT, among others. This review summarizes the current understanding of the genetic landscape of mutations in melanoma, their associations with clinicopathological features, and their implications for clinical testing and treatment.

  19. A case report of cutaneous larva migrans in a Mexican population of high marginalization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Isaac Aguirre Maldonadoa; Silvia Cruz Duartea; Felipe Gonzlez Velzqueza; Alfonso Alexander Aguilerab

    2014-01-01

    The creeping verminous dermatitis or cutaneous larva migrans is a parasitosis caused by percutaneous penetration and migration of larval nematode parasites characterized by producing one or more serpiginous erythematous, indurated, raised and pruritic lesion. The most common cause of cutaneous larva migrans is the Ancylostoma braziliense located in warm climate zones. In the present study, authors reported a case of cutaneous larva migrans with a characteristic clinical picture: erythematous-papular and vesicular lesion and serpiginous path, with progressive, and pruritic growth and it shown that a living area with immigration, tropical weather conditions and poverty may lead to this common infection.

  20. A case report of cutaneous larva migrans in a Mexican population of high marginalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Aguirre Maldonadoa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The creeping verminous dermatitis or cutaneous larva migrans is a parasitosis caused by percutaneous penetration and migration of larval nematode parasites characterized by producing one or more serpiginous erythematous, indurated, raised and pruritic lesion. The most common cause of cutaneous larva migrans is the Ancylostoma braziliense located in warm climate zones. In the present study, authors reported a case of cutaneous larva migrans with a characteristic clinical picture: erythematous-papular and vesicular lesion and serpiginous path, with progressive, and pruritic growth and it shown that a living area with immigration, tropical weather conditions and poverty may lead to this common infection.

  1. A case report of cutaneous larva migrans in a Mexican population of high marginalization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Isaac; Aguirre; Maldonadoa; Silvia; Cruz; Duartea; Felipe; Gonzlez; Velzqueza; Alfonso; Alexander; Aguilerab

    2014-01-01

    The creeping verminous dermatitis or cutaneous larva migrans is a parasitosis caused by percutaneous penetration and migration of larval nematode parasites characterized by producing one or more serpiginous erythematous,indurated,raised and pruritic lesion.The most common cause of cutaneous larva migrans is the Ancytostoma braziliensc located in warm climate zones.In the present study,authors reported a case of cutaneous larva migrans with a characteristic clinical picture:erythematous-papnlar and vesicular lesion and serpiginous path,with progressive,and pruritic growth and it shown that a living area with immigration,tropical weather conditions and poverty may lead to this common infection.

  2. [Oral cancer surgery and oral cutaneous fistulas: risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Gyl Henrique A; Crivelaro, André Luiz Soares; de Oliveira, Benedito Valdecir; Pedruzzi, Paola Andrea G; de Freitas, Rosyane Rena

    2010-04-01

    To quantify the oral cutaneous fistulae after surgery and to identify possible risk factors. A retrospective study, interesting patients that were submitted to surgery, with a two years minimum post-operative follow up. The considered variables were: sex, concomitant diseases, tabacco and alcohol use, the anesthesic and pulmonary risks, clinical stage, cervical linphadenectomy, pre or postoperative radiotherapy, accidents during the surgery, wound infection and or hematoma, pulmonary infection, surgery and reconstruction extension. In 159 patients, oral cutaneous fistulae occurred in 48 patients (30,3%): Patients stage T1 in 26,6 %,T2 in 1,8 %,T3 in 16%, and T4 in 40,3% (p=0,0138). The cases N+ developed fistulae in 22.9%, (N2c with 42,8%, (p=0,0136), those with preoperative radiotherapy in 63,6% (p=0,0346) Those with wound infection in 47,3% (p=0,0146), and those with wound deiscense in 53,7 % (p=0,0030). The fistulae rate was of 60% in the regional mucocutaneous flaps reconstruction cases, 39,2% in the myocutaneous ones and 12,5% of microsurgery ones (p=0,0286). The general rate of oral cutaneous fistulae was 30,3%. The significant factors were: T stage, cervical linphadenectomy, pre or postoperative radiotherapy, wound infection and deiscense, and the use of flaps.

  3. Cutaneous anthrax (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthrax is caused by the bacteria Bacillus anthracis . While anthrax commonly affects hoofed animals such as sheep and goats, humans may get sick from anthrax, too. The most common type of anthrax infection ...

  4. Cutaneous Larva Migrans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medication may clear the infection within a week. Ivermectin 12 mg or albendazole 400 mg are used ... by the American Osteopathic College of Dermatology. Community Search Search » Sign In Sign In securely Haven't ...

  5. Cutaneous manifestations in patients with chronic renal failure on hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udayakumar P

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic renal failure (CRF presents with an array of cutaneous manifestations. Newer changes are being described since the advent of hemodialysis, which prolongs the life expectancy, giving time for these changes to manifest. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of dermatologic problems among patients with chronic renal failure (CRF undergoing hemodialysis. Methods: One hundred patients with CRF on hemodialysis were examined for cutaneous changes. Results: Eighty-two per cent patients complained of some skin problem. However, on examination, all patients had at least one skin lesion attributable to CRF. The most prevalent finding was xerosis (79%, followed by pallor (60%, pruritus (53% and cutaneous pigmentation (43%. Other cutaneous manifestations included Kyrle′s disease (21%; fungal (30%, bacterial (13% and viral (12% infections; uremic frost (3%; purpura (9%; gynecomastia (1%; and dermatitis (2%. The nail changes included half and half nail (21%, koilonychia (18%, onychomycosis (19%, subungual hyperkeratosis (12%, onycholysis (10%, splinter hemorrhages (5%, Mees′ lines (7%, Muehrcke′s lines (5% and Beau′s lines (2%. Hair changes included sparse body hair (30%, sparse scalp hair (11% and brittle and lusterless hair (16%. Oral changes included macroglossia with teeth markings (35%, xerostomia (31%, ulcerative stomatitis (29%, angular cheilitis (12% and uremic breath (8%. Some rare manifestations of CRF like uremic frost, gynecomastia and pseudo-Kaposi′s sarcoma were also observed. Conclusions: CRF is associated with a complex array of cutaneous manifestations caused either by the disease or by treatment. The commonest are xerosis and pruritus and the early recognition of cutaneous signs can relieve suffering and decrease morbidity.

  6. First case of cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis in Suriname.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ricardo V P F; Kent, Alida D; Adams, Emily R; van der Veer, Charlotte; Sabajo, Leslie O A; Mans, Dennis R A; de Vries, Henry J C; Schallig, Henk D F H; Lai A Fat, Rudy F M

    2012-05-01

    The main causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in Suriname is Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis. This case report presents a patient infected with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, a species never reported before in Suriname. This finding has clinical implications, because L. braziliensis has a distinct clinical phenotype characterized by mucocutaneous leishmaniasis, a more extensive and destructive form of CL that requires different treatment. Clinicians should be aware that chronic cutaneous ulcers in patients from the Guyana region could be caused by L. braziliensis.

  7. Successful Treatment of Cutaneous Botryomycosis with a Combination of Minocycline and Topical Heat Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaya Ishibashi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous botryomycosis is a chronic focal infection characterized by a granulomatous inflammatory response to bacterial pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus. Treatment requires antibiotic therapy and may also require surgical debridement. We employed topical heat therapy and oral minocycline. The lesions became flattened and pigmented after 1 month. We consider that this simple treatment can be an effective and harmless complementary therapy for cutaneous botryomycosis.

  8. Cutaneous mucormycosis secondary to penetrative trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahoor, Bilal; Kent, Stephen; Wall, Daryl

    2016-07-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare but serious sequelae of penetrating trauma [1-5]. In spite of aggressive management, mortality remains high due to dissemination of infection. We completed a review of literature to determine the most optimal treatment of cutaneous mucormycosis which occurs secondary to penetrating trauma. We completed a review regarding the management of mucormycosis in trauma patients. We selected a total of 36 reports, of which 18 were case-based, for review. Surgical debridement is a primary predictor of improved outcomes in the treatment of mucormycosis [3,6,7]. Anti-fungal therapy, especially lipid soluble formulation of Amphotericin B, is helpful as an adjunct or when surgical debridement has been maximally achieved. Further research is needed to fully evaluate the impact of topical dressings; negative pressure wound therapy is helpful. An aggressive and early surgical approach, even at the expense of disfigurement, is necessary to reduce mortality in the setting of cutaneous mucormycosis that results from penetrating trauma [4,8,9]. Anti-fungal therapy and negative pressure wound therapy are formidable adjuncts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mucocutaneous manifestations of helminth infections: Nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupi, Omar; Downing, Christopher; Lee, Michael; Pino, Livia; Bravo, Francisco; Giglio, Patricia; Sethi, Aisha; Klaus, Sidney; Sangueza, Omar P; Fuller, Claire; Mendoza, Natalia; Ladizinski, Barry; Woc-Colburn, Laila; Tyring, Stephen K

    2015-12-01

    In the 21st century, despite increased globalization through international travel for business, medical volunteerism, pleasure, and immigration/refugees into the United States, there is little published in the dermatology literature regarding the cutaneous manifestations of helminth infections. Approximately 17% of travelers seek medical care because of cutaneous disorders, many related to infectious etiologies. This review will focus on the cutaneous manifestations of helminth infections and is divided into 2 parts: part I focuses on nematode infections, and part II focuses on trematode and cestode infections. This review highlights the clinical manifestations, transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of helminth infections. Nematodes are roundworms that cause diseases with cutaneous manifestations, such as cutaneous larval migrans, onchocerciasis, filariasis, gnathostomiasis, loiasis, dracunculiasis, strongyloidiasis, ascariasis, streptocerciasis, dirofilariasis, and trichinosis. Tremadotes, also known as flukes, cause schistosomiasis, paragonimiasis, and fascioliasis. Cestodes (tapeworms) are flat, hermaphroditic parasites that cause diseases such as sparganosis, cysticercosis, and echinococcus.

  10. Primary cutaneous aspergillosis due to Aspergillus flavus: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qiang-qiang; LI Li; ZHU Min; ZHANG Chao-ying; WANG Jia-jun

    2005-01-01

    @@ Infections caused by opportunistic organisms which have been known as etiologic agents of disease become more and more frequent.Aspergillus spp. is one of the agents. Fungi of aspergillus genus are widely distributed in nature, particularly in the soil and in the decomposed vegetation. They are frequent opportunist pathogens in immunocompromised patients. The most frequent causative organisms that cause cutaneous aspergillosis are A.fumigatus and A.flavus.1-3 In this report, we present a case of primary cutaneous aspergillosis manifested by ulceration of the shank due to A. flavus. The patient had no deficiency of immunological status and severe disease associated with fungal infection. Excellent response was shown to anti-fungal therapy.

  11. Aspects of cutaneous ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalziel, K L

    1991-09-01

    'Ageing is a multistep, multifaceted, time-dependent phenomenon characterized by the decreased ability of a system to respond to exogenous and endogenous stress from either physical, chemical or biologic agents'. Cutaneous ageing provides a visible model of the interaction between endogenous (intrinsic) factors and exogenous (extrinsic) factors. In skin, the principal extrinsic-factor is ultraviolet light (UV) which is responsible for the constellation of changes termed photoageing. In recent years, much interest has been directed towards defining the ageing processes in skin and excellent comprehensive reviews have been compiled. This review aims to highlight several areas of developing knowledge, and focuses on the potential importance of environmental changes as they influence skin ageing and carcinogenesis. Repeated reference to the effects of UV on the skin are inevitable in any review of skin ageing and this is scarcely surprising as the skin contains many cells as well as subcellular and extracellular chromophores which are capable of absorbing energy within the UV spectrum. Cellular chromophores include among others keratinocytes, melanocytes, Langerhans cells, dermal fibroblasts and mast cells. Subcellular chromophores include keratin, melanin, collagen, elastin and a number of proteins, lipids and steroids (such as vitamin D). Urocanic acid, a photoisomerization product of the amino-acid histidine, may provide some limited photoprotection and some believe it to be important in UV induced immunosuppression. Understanding events at the molecular and biochemical level has unfortunately not been paralleled by clinical advances and the common, troublesome skin-problems of old age such as cancer, xerosis and pruritus remain a major cause of morbidity and yet are poorly explained.

  12. Three Cases of Oropharyngeal Tularemia with Non spesific Cutaneous Findings

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    Özgül Muştu Koryürek

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tularemia is a zoonotic infection caused by Francisella tularensis. Oropharyngeal tularemia is the most common form of disease in our country, which spreads by intake of contaminated water or food. We presented 3 oropharengeal tularemia cases with cutaneous signs. The patients with oral and/or pharangeal ulcers or sore throat, especially when the disease does not respond to beta lactam antibiotics, the skin of patient must be examined carefully and tularemia must be one of the differantial diagnosis.

  13. Cutaneous Scar Prevention and Management: Overview of current therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Sultan Al-Shaqsi; Taimoor Al-Bulushi

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous scarring is common after trauma, surgery and infection and occurs when normal skin tissue is replaced by fibroblastic tissue during the healing process. The pathophysiology of scar formation is not yet fully understood, although the degree of tension across the wound edges and the speed of cell growth are believed to play central roles. Prevention of scars is essential and can be achieved by attention to surgical techniques and the use of measures to reduce cell growth. Grading a...

  14. Cutaneous Plasmacytosis with Perineural Involvement

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    Elizabeth A. Brezinski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Importance. Cutaneous and systemic plasmacytosis are rare conditions of unknown etiology with characteristic red-brown skin lesions and a mature polyclonal plasma cell infiltrate within the dermis. Perineural plasma cell infiltrates may be a histologic clue to the diagnosis of cutaneous plasmacytosis. Observations. Our patient had a five-year history of persistent reddish-brown plaques on the neck and trunk without systemic symptoms. Histologic examination showed dermal perivascular and perineural plasma cells with excess lambda light chain expression. Due to decreased quality of life caused by his skin lesions, he was placed on a chemotherapeutic regimen with bortezomib. Conclusions and Relevance. The patient was diagnosed with cutaneous plasmacytosis based on classic histopathology results with a recently characterized pattern of perineural involvement. Bortezomib therapy was initiated to manage his skin eruption, which has not been previously described as a treatment for this chronic condition.

  15. Bacterial toxins fuel disease progression in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev-Olsen, Andreas; Krejsgaard, Thorbjørn; Lindahl, Lise M

    2013-01-01

    In patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) bacterial infections constitute a major clinical problem caused by compromised skin barrier and a progressive immunodeficiency. Indeed, the majority of patients with advanced disease die from infections with bacteria, e.g., Staphylococcus aureus...

  16. Pharmacokinetic of antimony in mice with cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borborema, Samanta E.T.; Nascimento, Nanci do [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares IPEN/CNEN-SP, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Biologia Molecular]. E-mails: samanta@usp.br; nnascime@ipen.br; Andrade Junior, Heitor F. de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares IPEN/CNEN-SP, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Biologia Molecular; Instituto de Medicina Tropical de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); E-mail: hfandrad@usp.br; Osso Junior, Joao A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares IPEN/CNEN-SP, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Radiofarmacia]. E-mail: jaosso@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) remains a major world health problem, with about 1.5 million new cases each year. Caused by protozoa Leishmania, in South America, this infection can vary from a chronic skin ulcer, to an erosive mucosal disease and severe facial disfigurement. Pentavalent antimony (Sb{sup +5}) as sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam) or meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime) are main drugs for treating most forms of human leishmaniasis. For six decades, despite the recent developments, the effective therapy to cutaneous leishmaniasis has been based on long parenteral courses of such drugs, even though these are fairly costly, toxic and inconvenient to use, without adequate knowledge on their pharmacokinetics or mechanism of action. Pharmacokinetics studies could be based on bioactive traceable drugs, usually with radioactive isotopes, but antimony radioisotopes are unavailable commercially. Neutron irradiation is a powerful tool in the analysis of mineral content of samples, for antimony, there are at least two main isotopes that could be formed after neutron irradiation in nuclear reactor. The aim of the present study was to construct antimony salts with those radioisotopes to obtain tracers to compare the pharmacokinetic and the tissue distribution of neutron irradiated meglumine antimoniate in healthy and cutaneous leishmaniasis experimentally infected mice. Meglumine antimoniate, (Glucantime, Aventis, S.P, Brazil), was neutron irradiated inside the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor (IPEN/CNEN-SP), producing two radioisotopes {sup 122}Sb and {sup 124}Sb. Its biodistribution was verified in BALB/c mice experimentally infected with Leishmania (Leishmania) Amazonensis, which received a single intraperitoneal dose of the drug. At different times after injection, the tissues and blood were excised and activity measured in a NaI (Tl) scintillation counter. Compared with the healthy mice, experimentally infected mice had significantly lower maximum concentration of antimony

  17. Unusual Presentation of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis: Ocular Leishmaniasis

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    Masoud Doroodgar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The leishmaniases are parasitic diseases that are transmitted to humans by infected female sandflies. Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL is one of 3 main forms of the disease. CL is the most common form of the disease and is endemic in many urban and rural parts of Iran and usually caused by two species of Leishmania: L. major and L. tropica. We report a case of unusual leishmaniasis with 25 lesions on exposed parts of the body and right eyelid involvement (ocular leishmaniasis. The patient was a 75-year-old male farmer referred to health care center in Aran va Bidgol city. The disease was diagnosed by direct smear, culture, and PCR from the lesions. PCR was positive for Leishmania major.

  18. Pattern of cutaneous manifestations in diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyal Abhishek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus affects individuals of all ages and socioeconomic status. Skin is affected by the acute metabolic derangements as well as by chronic degenerative complications of diabetes. Aims: To evaluate the prevalence of skin manifestations in patients with diabetes mellitus. To analyze the prevalence and pattern of skin disorders among diabetic patients from this region of Western Himalayas. Materials and Methods: One hundred consecutive patients with the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and having skin lesions, either attending the diabetic clinic or admitted in medical wards were included in this study. Results: The common skin disorders were: x0 erosis (44%, diabetic dermopathy (36%, skin tags (32%, cutaneous infections (31%, and seborrheic keratosis (30%. Conclusion: Skin is involved in diabetes quite often and the manifestations are numerous. High prevalence of xerosis in our diabetic population is perhaps due to cold and dry climatic conditions in the region for most of the time in the year.

  19. Unusual Presentation of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis: Ocular Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroodgar, Masoud; Doroodgar, Moein

    2017-01-01

    The leishmaniases are parasitic diseases that are transmitted to humans by infected female sandflies. Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is one of 3 main forms of the disease. CL is the most common form of the disease and is endemic in many urban and rural parts of Iran and usually caused by two species of Leishmania: L. major and L. tropica. We report a case of unusual leishmaniasis with 25 lesions on exposed parts of the body and right eyelid involvement (ocular leishmaniasis). The patient was a 75-year-old male farmer referred to health care center in Aran va Bidgol city. The disease was diagnosed by direct smear, culture, and PCR from the lesions. PCR was positive for Leishmania major. PMID:28210511

  20. "Pure" cutaneous histiocytosis-X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, S L; Botero, F; Hurwitz, S; Pearson, H A

    1981-11-15

    The case histories of two young children who experienced skin rashes involving various areas of the body are reported. The diagnosis of pure cutaneous histiocytosis-X was established after extensive studies revealed no other organ involvement. The patients were treated with oral corticosteroids. Currently, both children are in good health, show no evidence of disease, and have been followed over a four-to-five-year period. Therapy with corticosteroids may not be indicated with pure cutaneous histiocytosis-X unless there is evidence of extracutaneous dissemination or rapid progression of the disease.

  1. [Necrotizing fasciitis caused by cutaneous mucormycosis. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telich-Tarriba, José Eduardo; Pérez-Ortíz, Andric Christopher; Telich-Vidal, José

    2012-01-01

    Mucormycosis are opportunistic infections with high morbidity and mortality caused by fungi of the class Zygomycetes, they mainly affect diabetic and immunocompromised patients. In up to 20% of all cases the main infection is localized in the skin, with a great number of them presenting in healthy patients that have suffered from severe trauma or burns. Zygomycetes tend to invade arteries, which leads to thrombosis and generates wide necrotic areas; this favors the progress of the infection and invasion of deep tissues. Up to 24% of primary cutaneous mucormycosis can be complicated with necrotizing fasciitis. We present the case of a 52 year-old male that received the clinical diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis. The patient received wide spectrum antibiotics and was submitted to extensive debridement of the wound bed; transoperative biopsy revealed the presence of zygomycetes in the tissues and the diagnosis of primary cutaneous zygomycosis was made. Antifungal treatment with amphotericin B was initiated and two weeks later autologous skin grafts were applied over the wounds. A high index of suspicion is needed to diagnose cutaneous zygomycosis, therefore it should always be considered amongst the differentials of necrotic wounds that do not respond to standard treatment. The rapid evolution of the disease remarks the importance of biopsying the wound bed early and treating aggressively.

  2. Cutaneous cancer and xeroderma pigmentosum; Cancer cutane et xeroderma pigmentosum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Salah, H.; Bahri, M.; Mnejja, W.; Siala, W.; Daoud, J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Habib-Bourguiba, Service de Radiotherapie Carcinologique, Sfax (Tunisia); Sallemi, T. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Habib-Bourguiba, Service d' Anatomie Pathologique, Sfax (Tunisia); Turki, H. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Habib-Bourguiba, Service de Dermatologie, Sfax (Tunisia)

    2007-11-15

    The cutaneous cancer at the patients affected by xeroderma pigmentosum is characterized by its multifocal character and its strong radiosensitivity. A premature care and a regular follow-up for life of these patients is indispensable for the detection and the treatment of new hurts. The precautionary measures are also important by the school eviction. (N.C.)

  3. Cutaneous Mycoses among Rice Farmers in Anambra State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chito Clare Ekwealor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rice grain is one of the world's most important food crops, and its cultivation is a major occupation in Anambra State, Nigeria. These rice farmers are exposed to various agents that predispose them to cutaneous mycoses. The aim of this work was to screen rice farmers for lesions suggestive of cutaneous mycoses and to isolate and identify fungal agents associated with the infection. This survey was carried out between November 2009 and June 2011 in Anambra State, Nigeria. Clinical samples collected from 201 farmers with lesions suggestive of cutaneous mycoses were processed and the organisms identified. Questionnaires were used to obtain other necessary data and were statistically analyzed. Of the 2,580 rice farmers screened, 201 (7.79% showed positive lesions. Organisms recovered included Microsporum audouinii, Microsporum ferrugineum, Trichophyton megnini, Trichophyton tonsurans, Trichophyton rubrum, Aspergillus terrus, Aspergillus candidus, Aspergillus scleriotorum, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Scopulariopsis sp., Chrysosporium sp., Eupenicillium javanicum, Fusarium sp., Penicillium aculeatum, and Penicillium pinophilum. At the end of this work, onychomycosis was observed to be the most prevalent with nondermatophyte molds now becoming very important agents of cutaneous mycoses among rice farmer.

  4. AN OUTBREAK OF CUTANEOUS ANTHRAX IN TRIBAL AREAS OF VISAKHAPATNAM

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    G. Ajay Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Anthrax is a disease of herbivorous animals. Humans incidentally acquire the cutaneous disease by handling infected dead animals and their products. Sporadic cases of human anthrax have been reported from Southern India. METHODS Fifteen tribal men, one woman, one child from various places near Paderu presented with painless ulcers associated with vesiculation and oedema of the surrounding skin on the extremities without any constitutional symptoms. There was a history of slaughtering and consumption of a dead goat ten days - 2 weeks prior to the development of skin lesions. Three days later another 19 members came from the same area with same complaints. Clinically, cutaneous anthrax was suspected and smears, swabs, and punch biopsies were taken for culture and identification by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR. All the cases were treated with intravenous antibiotics followed by oral antibiotics. Appropriate health authorities were alerted and proper control measures were employed. RESULTS Smears from the cutaneous lesions of some patients were found to be positive for Bacillus anthracis and this was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. All the cases responded to antibiotics. CONCLUSION We report thirty six cases of cutaneous anthrax in a non-endemic district, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh.

  5. Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Does My Child Need? How to Safely Give Acetaminophen Is It a Cold or the Flu? Is the Flu Vaccine a Good Idea for Your Family? Too Late for the Flu Vaccine? Common Childhood Infections Can Chronic Ear Infections Cause Long-Term Hearing Loss? Chickenpox Cold Sores Common Cold Diarrhea Fever and ...

  6. Cytotoxic T cells mediate pathology and metastasis in cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda O Novais

    Full Text Available Disease progression in response to infection can be strongly influenced by both pathogen burden and infection-induced immunopathology. While current therapeutics focus on augmenting protective immune responses, identifying therapeutics that reduce infection-induced immunopathology are clearly warranted. Despite the apparent protective role for murine CD8⁺ T cells following infection with the intracellular parasite Leishmania, CD8⁺ T cells have been paradoxically linked to immunopathological responses in human cutaneous leishmaniasis. Transcriptome analysis of lesions from Leishmania braziliensis patients revealed that genes associated with the cytolytic pathway are highly expressed and CD8⁺ T cells from lesions exhibited a cytolytic phenotype. To determine if CD8⁺ T cells play a causal role in disease, we turned to a murine model. These studies revealed that disease progression and metastasis in L. braziliensis infected mice was independent of parasite burden and was instead directly associated with the presence of CD8⁺ T cells. In mice with severe pathology, we visualized CD8⁺ T cell degranulation and lysis of L. braziliensis infected cells. Finally, in contrast to wild-type CD8⁺ T cells, perforin-deficient cells failed to induce disease. Thus, we show for the first time that cytolytic CD8⁺ T cells mediate immunopathology and drive the development of metastatic lesions in cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  7. Cutaneous, mucocutaneous and neurocutaneous cysticercosis

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    Arora P

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous cysticerci are often a pointer to the involvement of internal organs. A series of 33 patients including 5 vegetarians, between 10 to 48 years age, were investigated. Almost half the patients presented with cutaneous cysts of less than one month duration or were unaware of it. In the, other the duration varied upto 10 years. Cutaneous cysts were present in the case&Mental retardation, diminished vision and flashes of lights were, recorded in one case each, raised intracranial tension in 11 and seizures in 29 patients. Four, of the 6 patients with solitary cysts had no involvement of the internal- organs, whereas all the 27 patients with multiple had in nt of brain. Trunk was the commonest site in 16 patients. The other sites involved were scalp, eyelids, face, tongue neck, breast and limbs. Stool examination -for tapeworm segments/ eggs was positive in 2,calcification was seen on X-ray examination of skull in one and of soft tissues in 3, CT scan of skull was suggestive of cysticerci in 27 and skin biopsy for cysticercosis was confirmatory in all the 33 patients. Four patients with a solitary cutaneous cyst were treated by excision. One patients with neurocutaneous cysts was treated with albendazole without response. Out of 16patients with mucocutaneous and neurocutaneous cysticercosis treated with praziquantel, one did not respond. 7 responded partially and 8 had complete relief.

  8. Ultraviolet light and cutaneous lupus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, Marc; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light is one of the major factors known to trigger cutaneous disease activity in (systemic) lupus erythematosus patients. UV light, UVB in particular, is a potent inducer of apoptosis. Currently, disturbed clearance of apoptotic cells is one of the concepts explaining th

  9. Ultraviolet light and cutaneous lupus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, Marc; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light is one of the major factors known to trigger cutaneous disease activity in (systemic) lupus erythematosus patients. UV light, UVB in particular, is a potent inducer of apoptosis. Currently, disturbed clearance of apoptotic cells is one of the concepts explaining th

  10. Vitiligo associated with cutaneous amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar V

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo is known to be associated with a variety of dermatoses and systemic diseases. We describe a case of vitiligo developing in a patient having cutaneous amyloidosis. To our knowledge this is the first report of its kind in the literature.

  11. TUBERCULOUS SIALO-CUTANEOUS FISTULA

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    Bapi Lal

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Tuberculosis of the parotid gland is a rare clinica l entity. We present a case of parotid gland tuberculosis that presented with a sial o-cutaneous fistula. This case was successfully treated with antituberculous drugs onl y without any surgical excision.

  12. Multiple Cutaneous (pre)-Malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J.T. van der Leest (Robert)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The three most common cutaneous malignancies are derived from melanocytes and keratinocytes (ordered in decreasing aggressiveness): melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC). This thesis focuses only on these three types of cancer and their

  13. Vacuum enhanced cutaneous biopsy instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    A syringe-like disposable cutaneous biopsy instrument equipped with a tubular blade at its lower end, and designed so that a vacuum is created during use, said vacuum serving to retain undeformed a plug of tissue cut from a patient's skin.

  14. “Malignant Cutaneous Ulcer”

    OpenAIRE

    Sundriyal, Deepak; Kotwal, Sumedha

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is an aggressive malignancy and the rich vascular supply enables it to metastasize early via haematogenous route. Skin lesions are a late manifestation of the disease. Clinicians should be aware of cutaneous presentation of RCC while evaluating a case of unknown primary with skin lesions.

  15. Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome: cutaneous manifestations*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Stolf, Hamilton Ometto; Polizel, Juliana Ocanha; Munhoz, Tânia; Brandão, Marcela Calixto; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome is the current name for clinical manifestations of diseases previously known as “infantile systemic hyalinosis” and “juvenile hyaline fibromatosis”. The authors report representative clinical cases of each one of the above subtypes with emphasis on cutaneous manifestations and difficulties for early diagnosis in this syndrome, essentially of multidisciplinary approach. PMID:27192526

  16. Cutaneous Metastases From Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafyllou, Stamatina; Georgia, Doulami; Gavriella-Zoi, Vrakopoulou; Dimitrios, Mpistarakis; Stulianos, Katsaragakis; Theodoros, Liakakos; Georgios, Zografos; Dimitrios, Theodorou

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present 2 rare cases of cutaneous metastases originated from adenocarcinoma of the gastro-esophageal junction, thus, underline the need for early diagnosis and possible treatment of suspicious skin lesions among patients with esophageal malignancy. Metastatic cancer to the skin originated from internal malignancies, mostly lung cancer, breast cancer, and colorectal cancer, constitute 0.5 to 9% of all metastatic cancers.5,8,15 Skin metastases, mainly from squamous cell carcinomas of the esophagus, are rarely reported. Cutaneous metastasis is a finding indicating progressiveness of the disease.17 More precisely, median survival is estimated approximately 4.7 months.2,14 This study is a retrospective review of 2 cases of patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and a review of the literature. Two patients aged 60 and 32 years old, respectively, underwent esophagectomy. Both pathologic reports disclosed adenocarcinoma of the gastro-esophageal junction staged T3 N2 M0 (stage IIIB). During follow-up time, the 2 patients were diagnosed with cutaneous metastases originated from the primary esophageal tumor 11 and 4 months after surgery, respectively. The first patient is alive 37 months after diagnosis, while the second one died 16 months after surgery. Cutaneous metastasis caused by esophageal adenocarcinoma is possible. Therefore, follow-up of patients who were diagnosed with esophageal malignancy and underwent esophagectomy is mandatory in order to reveal early surgical stages. PMID:25785344

  17. Parasitic Diseases With Cutaneous Manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Mark M; Phillips, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic diseases result in a significant global health burden. While often thought to be isolated to returning travelers, parasitic diseases can also be acquired locally in the United States. Therefore, clinicians must be aware of the cutaneous manifestations of parasitic diseases to allow for prompt recognition, effective management, and subsequent mitigation of complications. This commentary also reviews pharmacologic treatment options for several common diseases.

  18. Cases of cutaneous diphtheria in New Zealand: implications for surveillance and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Ann; McLean, Margot; Hingston, David; Eddie, Barbara; Short, Pat; Jones, Mark

    2012-02-24

    Diphtheria is an acute bacterial illness caused by toxigenic strains of Corynebacterium diphtheriae (C. diphtheriae). We describe two epidemiologically-linked cases of skin infections from which toxigenic C. diphtheriae was isolated, and discuss implications for diphtheria surveillance and management in New Zealand. A public health investigation was undertaken to identify and manage close contacts of the index case. National and international guidelines on the surveillance and management of cutaneous diphtheria were reviewed, and data on toxigenic C. diphtheriae isolates identified in New Zealand from 1987-2009 were examined. The index case was an adult male who developed a cutaneous infection after being tattooed in Samoa. A wound swab taken from the infected tattoo grew a toxigenic strain of C. diphtheriae (var gravis). A secondary case of toxigenic cutaneous diphtheria was identified in a household contact. Instances of respiratory diphtheria associated with toxigenic cutaneous lesions have been reported in the literature. The review of surveillance data revealed inconsistencies in the notification of toxigenic strains of C. diphtheriae isolated from cutaneous sites. These cases are an important reminder that diphtheria remains a threat in New Zealand. All cases with toxigenic C. diphtheriae isolated from a clinical specimen, regardless of the site of infection, should be notified to a Medical Officer of Health.

  19. 逆行腓肠神经营养血管蒂带薄层肌肉岛状皮瓣修复胫骨慢性骨感染缺损创面%Treatment of the wound of bone defect and exposure in chronic infection of tibia with the myofascial and cutaneous island flap pedicled with collateral vessel nourished by retrograde sural nerve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    覃松; 喻忠斌; 夏晓枫; 车彪; 刘骏; 王凯

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨逆行腓肠神经营养血管蒂带薄层肌肉岛状皮瓣修复胫骨慢性骨感染缺损创面的方法及临床疗效。方法应用腓肠神经营养血管蒂岛状筋膜肌皮瓣逆行转位修复12例胫骨慢性骨髓炎后骨缺损并骨外露患者,皮肤软组织缺损为9~16 cm2。结果12例均获得随访,时间16~72个月。12例转移肌皮瓣均一期存活,伤口愈合时间14~21 d。1例肌皮瓣静脉回流障碍,行网状打孔并以肝素钠溶液冲洗网孔1周后皮瓣成活;1例皮瓣边缘部分坏死,经换药3周后愈合;所有感染均治愈。结论应用腓肠神经营养血管蒂岛状筋膜肌皮瓣逆行转位修复胫骨慢性骨髓炎后骨缺损并骨外露疗效理想。%Objective To explore the therapeutic effects of myofascial and cutaneous island flap pedicled with collat-eral vessel nourished by retrograde sural nerve for the wound of bone defect and exposure in chronic infection of tibia. Methods 12 cases of tibia chronic osteomyelitis combined with bone defect and exposure were treated with myofas-cial and cutaneous island flap pedicled with collateral vessel nourished by retrograde sural nerve. The area of the tis-sue defect ranged from 9 cm2 to 16 cm2 . Results 12 cases were followed up for 16 ~72 months. All flaps survived after operation and the flaps had survived within 14 to 21 days. 1 flap with venous drainage barriers survived by net punching and heparin sodium solution flushing mesh flaps in a week, 1 flap with margin necrosis was healed with dressing change after 3 weeks;all infections were cured. Conclusions Treatment of bone defect and exposure in tibi-a with the myofascial and cutaneous island flap pedicled with collateral vessel nourished by retrograde sural nerve is an effective technique.

  20. Recurrent cutaneous abscesses in two Italian family members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Cantisani

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Environmental mycobacteria are the causative factors of an increasing number of infections worldwide. Cutaneous infections as a result of such mycobacteria are often misdiagnosed, and their treatment is difficult since they can show in vivo and in vitro multidrug resistance. Absence of pathognomonic clinical signs and variable histological findings often delay diagnosis. We report a case of localized recurrent soft tissue swelling by Mycobacterium marinum in 2 members of the same family. The cases are being reported for their uncommon clinical presentation and the associated etiological agent. Patients recovered completely following therapy with rifampicin 600 mg plus isoniazide 300 mg daily for 45 days.

  1. A case report of cutaneous larva migrans in Argentina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Javier Bava; Lucia G Gonzalez; Celeste M Seley; Gisela P Lpez; Alcides Troncoso

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous larva migrans (CLM) represents the most common tropically acquired dermatosis. CLM is caused by infection with hookworm larvae in tropical and sub-tropical areas, and people who have a history of foreign travel and of walking barefoot on sandy soil or beaches are at a high risk of getting infected with it. The diagnosis is usually made on the basis of the typical appearance of the lesion, intense itching and history of foreign travel. CLM is a common parasitic skin disease that can be easily prevented by wearing 'protective' footwear. A case of CLM is described in this article.

  2. A case report of cutaneous larva migrans in Argentina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Javier; Bava; Lucia; G; Gonzalez; Celeste; M; Seley; Gisela; P; Lopez; Alcides; Troncoso

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous larva migrans(CLM) represents the most common tropically acquired dermatosis.CLM is caused by infection with hookworm larvae in tropical and sub-tropical areas,and people who have a history of foreign travel and of walking barefoot on sandy soil or beaches are at a high risk of getting infected with it.The diagnosis is usually made on the basis of the typical appearance of the lesion,intense itching and history of foreign travel.CLM is a common parasitic skin disease that can be easily prevented by wearing ’protective’ footwear.A case of CLM is described in this article.

  3. A 27-Year-Old Severely Immunosuppressed Female with Misleading Clinical Features of Disseminated Cutaneous Sporotrichosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atiyah Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sporotrichosis is a subacute or chronic granulomatous mycosis caused by fungus of the Sporothrix schenckii complex. It is considered to be a rare condition in most parts of the world. It mostly causes cutaneous infection but can also cause multisystemic disease. Unlike most deep cutaneous mycoses which have a primary pulmonary focus, it is usually caused by direct inoculation of the fungus into the skin causing a classical linear, lymphocutaneous nodular eruption. However, atypical presentations of the condition can occur especially in immunosuppressed individuals. We report the case of a severely immunosuppressed female who presented with disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis which was initially diagnosed and treated as disseminated cutaneous Kaposi’s sarcoma.

  4. Isolated cutaneous involvement in a child with nodal anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibhu Mendiratta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is a common childhood T-cell and B-cell neoplasm that originates primarily from lymphoid tissue. Cutaneous involvement can be in the form of a primary extranodal lymphoma, or secondary to metastasis from a non-cutaneous location. The latter is uncommon, and isolated cutaneous involvement is rarely reported. We report a case of isolated secondary cutaneous involvement from nodal anaplastic large cell lymphoma (CD30 + and ALK + in a 7-year-old boy who was on chemotherapy. This case is reported for its unusual clinical presentation as an acute febrile, generalized papulonodular eruption that mimicked deep fungal infection, with the absence of other foci of systemic metastasis.

  5. Anthrax Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Daniel A.; Hicks, Caitlin W.; Cui, Xizhong; Li, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis infection is rare in developed countries. However, recent outbreaks in the United States and Europe and the potential use of the bacteria for bioterrorism have focused interest on it. Furthermore, although anthrax was known to typically occur as one of three syndromes related to entry site of (i.e., cutaneous, gastrointestinal, or inhalational), a fourth syndrome including severe soft tissue infection in injectional drug users is emerging. Although shock has been described with cutaneous anthrax, it appears much more common with gastrointestinal, inhalational (5 of 11 patients in the 2001 outbreak in the United States), and injectional anthrax. Based in part on case series, the estimated mortalities of cutaneous, gastrointestinal, inhalational, and injectional anthrax are 1%, 25 to 60%, 46%, and 33%, respectively. Nonspecific early symptomatology makes initial identification of anthrax cases difficult. Clues to anthrax infection include history of exposure to herbivore animal products, heroin use, or clustering of patients with similar respiratory symptoms concerning for a bioterrorist event. Once anthrax is suspected, the diagnosis can usually be made with Gram stain and culture from blood or surgical specimens followed by confirmatory testing (e.g., PCR or immunohistochemistry). Although antibiotic therapy (largely quinolone-based) is the mainstay of anthrax treatment, the use of adjunctive therapies such as anthrax toxin antagonists is a consideration. PMID:21852539

  6. Cutaneous involvement in the deep mycoses: A review. Part II -Systemic mycoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Zuber, J E; Navarrete-Dechent, C; Bonifaz, A; Fich, F; Vial-Letelier, V; Berroeta-Mauriziano, D

    2016-12-01

    In the second part of this review on the deep mycoses, we describe the main systemic mycoses-paracoccidioidomycosis, coccidioidomycosis, histoplasmosis, mucormycosis, and cryptococcosis-and their cutaneous manifestations. Skin lesions are only occasionally seen in deep systemic mycoses either directly, when the skin is the route of entry for the fungus, or indirectly, when the infection has spread from a deeper focus. These cutaneous signs are often the only clue to the presence of a potentially fatal infection. As with the subcutaneous mycoses, early diagnosis and treatment is important, but in this case, even more so.

  7. Pancytopenia and cutaneous cryptococcosis as an indicator disease of acquired immune deficiency syndrome

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    R Khuraijam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of pancytopenia and cutaneous cryptococcosis in a young girl with no complaints of fever, headache and vomiting. Fine-needle aspiration cytology and further investigation for pancytopenia revealed presence of Cryptococcus in skin and bone marrow aspirates. Fungal cultures of the skin aspirates, blood and bone marrow confirmed cryptococcal infection. Counselling and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV test revealed the status of the patient to be retropositive. Although meningitis is the commonest manifestation of cryptococcosis among HIV-infected patients, rare cutaneous manifestation with pancytopenia but with no meningeal signs indicate the HIV status in an endemic area of penicilliosis, Manipur.

  8. Cutaneous Aspergillus ustus in a lung transplant recipient: emergence of a new opportunistic fungal pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagefi, Parsia A; Cosimi, A Benedict; Ginns, Leo C; Kotton, Camille N

    2008-01-01

    Opportunistic fungal infections remain a significant complication in immunosuppressed patients, especially those having undergone solid-organ transplantation. We report a 39-year-old patient who represents the second case of cutaneous Aspergillus ustus infection in a solid-organ transplant recipient, and the first documented case after lung transplantation. The patient's cutaneous lower extremity aspergillosis responded to a combination of intravenous liposomal amphotericin B, caspofungin and topical terbinafine cream, with a concomitant reduction in immunosuppression. A. ustus is an emerging opportunistic fungal pathogen in transplant recipients.

  9. Sporotrichoid-Like Spread of Cutaneous Mycobacterium chelonae in an Immunocompromised Patient

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    Daria Marley Kemp

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium chelonae is a rapidly growing mycobacterium found in water and soil that can cause local cutaneous infections in immunocompetent hosts but more frequently affects immunocompromised patients. Typically, patients will present with painful subcutaneous nodules of the joints or soft tissues from traumatic inoculation. However, exhibiting a sporotrichoid-like pattern of these nodules is uncommon. Herein, we report a case of sporotrichoid-like distribution of cutaneous Mycobacterium chelonae in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus on significant immunosuppressive medications. Clinicians treating immunocompromised patients should be cognizant of their propensity to develop unusual infections and atypical presentations.

  10. Toxigenic cutaneous diphtheria in a returned traveller.

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    Abdul Rahim, Nur R; Koehler, Ann P; Shaw, Doug D; Graham, Caitlin R

    2014-12-31

    Diphtheria is rarely reported in Australia. A case of cutaneous diphtheria was reported to the South Australian Department for Health and Ageing in April 2013 in an Australian-born 18-year-old female following travel in India. The case presented with a skin ulcer on her toe. Toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae was isolated from a swab of the lesion. The case was treated with antibiotics. The public health response included infection control advice, assessing the case and household contacts for organism carriage and providing antimicrobial chemoprophylaxis to contacts. Although cutaneous diphtheria is not included as part of the Australian communicable disease surveillance case definition, this may be an oversight as international evidence demonstrates that it is a source of organism transmission and can potentially result in outbreaks among susceptible populations. This formed the rationale for the public health response to this particular case. The protocol for the public health management of diphtheria in South Australia has since been revised to include cutaneous lesions caused by the toxigenic strain of the organism as part of the surveillance case definition. This work is copyright. You may download, display, print and reproduce the whole or part of this work in unaltered form for your own personal use or, if you are part of an organisation, for internal use within your organisation, but only if you or your organisation do not use the reproduction for any commercial purpose and retain this copyright notice and all disclaimer notices as part of that reproduction. Apart from rights to use as permitted by the Copyright Act 1968 or allowed by this copyright notice, all other rights are reserved and you are not allowed to reproduce the whole or any part of this work in any way (electronic or otherwise) without first being given the specific written permission from the Commonwealth to do so. Requests and inquiries concerning reproduction and rights are to be sent

  11. Cutaneous sporotrichosis as an occupational disease: Case report

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    César Bimbi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Subcutaneous mycoses are not rare in Latin America. In Brazil, sporotrichosis was once almost exclusively found in rural areas, but in recent years it changed its profile and has been more frequent among urban adults. Cutaneous sporotrichosis is acquired from saprophytic dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenckii usually found in soil, vegetation, and especially decaying organic matter in tropical, subtropical, and humid environments through cutaneous inoculation. The fungus abundantly grows on dead wood. Sporotrichosis is a health hazard present in florists, gardeners and other urban professions in contact with plants and the infection is increasingly seen as an occupational disease. The patient had been hurt in the finger by a thorn of Bouganvillea tree and a primary ulcer started.

  12. Geographical distribution of cutaneous leishmaniasis and sand flies in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakila, Ashraf; Bilqees, Fatima Mujib; Salim, Azra; Moinuddin, Moinuddin

    2006-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is found in all the four provinces of Pakistan; these are NWFP, Balochistan, Sindh and Punjab. In Balochistan the areas from where the patients came are Uthal, Quetta and Ormara. The highest number of patients came from Quetta and least from Ormara. The patients included in this study were from the Mangopir and Chakewara, areas of Karachi. The infection is endemic in this country and the recent epidemics in the Dadu District and Nawabshah indicate its importance in the locality. The sand fly vector is found in all four provinces of Pakistan that are listed here. It is quite obvious that presence of leishmaniasis indicates the presence of sand flies and cutaneous leishmaniasis is more common.

  13. Infections

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    Virginia Vanzzini Zago

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a retrospective, and descriptive study about the support that the laboratory of microbiology aids can provide in the diagnosis of ocular infections in patients whom were attended a tertiary-care hospital in México City in a 10-year-time period. We describe the microbiological diagnosis in palpebral mycose; in keratitis caused by Fusarium, Aspergillus, Candida, and melanized fungi; endophthalmitis; one Histoplasma scleritis and one mucormycosis. Nowadays, ocular fungal infections are more often diagnosed, because there is more clinical suspicion and there are easy laboratory confirmations. Correct diagnosis is important because an early medical treatment gives a better prognosis for visual acuity. In some cases, fungal infections are misdiagnosed and the antifungal treatment is delayed.

  14. Cutaneous mucormycosis and motor vehicle accidents: Findings from an Australian case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Paul R; Suthananthan, Arul E; Rajan, Ruben; Pryce, Todd M; Sieunarine, Kishore; Gardam, Dianne J; Heath, Christopher H

    2014-11-01

    Cutaneous disease is the third most frequent manifestation of mucormycosis. The clinical manifestations of and subsequent mortality due to cutaneous mucormycosis are dependent on the mode of acquisition and the host immune status. Here, we describe the epidemiology, clinical presentation, microbiology, and outcomes of 16 cutaneous mucormycosis infections managed in an Australian tertiary hospital over a 15-year period. The proportion with localized (56%), deep (38%), and disseminated (6%) cutaneous disease as well as the overall mortality (25%) were consistent with findings reported in the published literature. Two novel forms of hospital-acquired infection were reported following a sacral pressure sore and insertion of a foreign body during a bone graft procedure. The majority of patients were immunocompetent (75%) and/or suffered trauma (56%) with associated environmental contamination. A novel finding was that motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) accounted for 78% of all trauma-related cases, suggesting MVAs should receive greater recognition as a potential precipitant of cutaneous mucormycosis. Aggressive decontamination and debridement of devitalized tissue following trauma is therefore likely to play an important role in the prevention of this rare but potentially devastating infection. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Cutaneous manifestations of human toxocariasis.

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    Gavignet, Béatrice; Piarroux, Renaud; Aubin, François; Millon, Laurence; Humbert, Philippe

    2008-12-01

    Human toxocariasis is a parasitic disease characterized by the presence of larvae of the genus Toxocara in human tissues. T canis and T cati, the adult roundworms of which are found in dog and cat intestines, respectively, are the most common causative agents of the disease. Toxocaral larvae usually cause two severe syndromes: visceral larva migrans and ocular larva migrans, depending on the location of the larvae. Two other syndromes, covert toxocariasis and common toxocariasis, which are less typical and not as severe, have also been described. During the last two decades, cutaneous manifestations such as chronic urticaria, chronic pruritus, and miscellaneous eczema, in patients with Toxocara antibodies, have been studied by different authors. In some cases, these cutaneous manifestations are the only signs indicating the presence of the disease, and they are cured after antihelmintic treatment when there is good patient compliance. In this review, we focus on these particular skin manifestations regarding their clinical description, diagnosis, and treatment.

  16. Multiple isolated cutaneous plexiform schwannomas

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    Enas A. S. Attia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plexiform schwannoma is a rare neurogenic tumor, arising from skin and subcutaneous tissue. The presence of multiple schwannomas suggests a possible association with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2. A 50-year old male patient presented with multiple papulo-nodular cutaneous lesions on both arms and forearms. Histopathological examination revealed a dermal multinodular pattern of well-circumscribed masses of closely packed cells, with peripheral myxoid tissue, well-encapsulated in a thin collagenous capsule. S-100 immunohistochemical staining was diffusely and strongly positive. Neuron-specific enolase was positive, confirming a neural tissue tumor. An audiogram and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI of cerebro-pontine angle showed no detected abnormality, excluding acoustic neuroma. Thus, we present a case of multiple bilateral isolated cutaneous plexiform schwannomas, not associated with NF2. Multiple plexiform schwannomas is a very rare entity, distinct from neurofibromatosis (NF, and being confined to the dermis is even more rarely reported.

  17. Carcinoma in cutaneous Lichen Planus

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    Rahul Shetty

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoma occurring in the cutaneous lesions of Lichen Planus though rarely mentioned in literature does occur and should be kept in mind while treating such lesions. We report a 16 year female who developed a squamous cell carcinoma in a long standing verrucous lichen planus in the lower leg. This case is being presented to indicate the possibility of malignant transformation of cutaneous lichen planus to carcinoma, especially in the hypertrophic forms and the need to have an early diagnosis so that it can be treated in the initial stages. A high degree of suspicion should be present whenever we come across a non healing lesion in a patient with lichen planus. A few markers, which may give us a clue for increased chances of malignant transformation in these cases is presented.

  18. Polymyxin B-Induced Diffuse Cutaneous Hyperpigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiry, Sandeep; Choudhury, Shouvik; Mukherjee, Ayan; Bhunya, Prajesh Kiran; Bala, Moumita

    2017-02-01

    Polymyxin B is a polypeptide-antibiotic, primarily used for resistant Gram-negative infections, first obtained from bacterium Bacillus polymyxa in the late 1940s. Antibiotic spectrum are restricted to mainly gram negative bacterias like Enterobacter, E. coli, Klebsiella, Salmonella, Pasteurella, Bordetella, Shigella; and particularly organisms like Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, which are extremely potent to acquire antibiotic resistance. Side effects include neurotoxicity and acute renal tubular necrosis. Here, we present a rare case of skin hyper-pigmentation in a 65-year-old elderly male of Indian origin, diagnosed as a case of Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) Klebsiella pneumonia, treated with intravenous antibiotics. The manifestations were observed after 4 days of Polymyxin B therapy initiation. All other concomitant drugs, infections, or immunologic disorders that, could have caused this symptom, were carefully excluded. An objective causality assessment reveals that, the cutaneous hyperpigmentation was possibly associated with Polymyxin B therapy, though further studies may be needed to explain the underlying mechanism.

  19. Cutaneous metastasis in anorectal adenocarcinoma

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    Krishnendra Varma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous metastasis in anorectal adenocarcinoma is a rare entity. Here, we report the case of a 40-year-old female who presented with yellowish-brown, irregular, solid, elevated rashes over the pubis with a recent history off palliative colostomy for anorectal adenocarcinoma. Clinically, we suspected metastasis that was proved on biopsy. We report this case due to the rare presenting site (i.e., perineum of a metastatic adenocarcinoma.

  20. Cutaneous and mucosal pain syndromes

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    Siddappa K

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The cutaneous and mucosal pain syndromes are characterized by pain, burning sensation, numbness or paraesthesia of a particular part of the skin or mucosal surface without any visible signs. They are usually sensory disorders, sometimes with a great deal of psychologic overlay. In this article various conditions have been listed and are described. The possible causative mechanisms are discussed when they are applicable and the outline of their management is described.

  1. Pathophysiology of cutaneous lupus erythematosus

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    Achtman, Jordan C; Werth, Victoria P.

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) encompasses the complex interactions between genetics, the environment, and cells and their products. Recent data have provided enhanced understanding of these interactions and the mechanism by which they cause disease. A number of candidate genes have been identified which increase the risk of developing CLE. Ultraviolet radiation, the predominant environmental exposure associated with CLE, appears to initiate CLE lesion formation by...

  2. Cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Fukumi

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous symptoms are observed in 25%-60% of polyarteritis nodosa (PN) patients. On the other hand, cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa (CPN) is designated for the cutaneous limited form of PN and demonstrates benign prognosis. However, there has been much debate on whether or not CPN can progress to PN. Although CPN lesions are fundamentally limited to skin, some CPN cases show extracutaneous symptoms such as peripheral neuropathy and myalgia. According to PN diagnostic criteria, a disease with both cutaneous and at least one extracutaneous symptom with appropriate histopathological findings can be diagnosed as PN. The same is true according to diagnostic criteria established by American College of Rheumatology (ACR). In addition, there are no specific diagnostic criteria for CPN. In this study, CPN cases were retrospectively collected from multiple Japanese clinics, and analyzed for detailed clinical and histopathological manifestations, in order to redefine the clinical entity of CPN and to propose appropriate diagnostic criteria for CPN and PN. According to the CPN description in Rook's Textbook of Dermatology, one of global standard textbooks, we collected 22 cases with appropriate histopathological findings. Of the 22 cases, none progressed to PN or death during the follow-up period, 32% had peripheral neuropathy, and 27% had myalgia. Regarding extracutaneous symptoms with CPN, 17 dermatological specialists in vasculitis sustained the opinion that CPN can be accompanied by peripheral neuropathy and myalgia, but these symptoms are limited to the same area as skin lesions. Based on these results, we devised new drafts for CPN and PN diagnostic criteria. Our study shows the efficacy of these criteria, and most dermatologists recognized that our new diagnostic criteria for CPN and PN are appropriate at the present time. In conclusion, this study suggests that CPN does not progress to PN, and introduces new drafts for CPN and PN diagnostic criteria. (*English

  3. Newly recognized cutaneous drug eruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callen, Jeffrey P

    2007-04-01

    Many new drugs are entering the marketplace and although some cutaneous reactions might be noted in the preclinical evaluation, some of the reactions, particularly those that are rare, will not be noted until the drugs enter widespread use. In addition, distinctive reactions may occur, as is the case with epidermal growth factor-receptor inhibitors. Careful observation and evaluation might result in a better understanding of "naturally" occurring skin disease.

  4. Unusual presentation of cutaneous leiomyoma

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    Sapnashree Bhaskar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we report a case of leiomyoma cutis because of its rarity and unusual presentation. The case presented with a solitary leiomyoma lesion which was painless. However, the adjacent normal appearing area was tender. A biopsy of the lesion as well as of a portion of the adjacent normal appearing area was taken, which confirmed the diagnosis of cutaneous leiomyoma. This may suggest the dormant nature of the disease which has not yet become apparent.

  5. Unusual Presentation of Cutaneous Leiomyoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, Sapnashree; Jaiswal, Ashok K; Madhu, SM; Santosh, KV

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we report a case of leiomyoma cutis because of its rarity and unusual presentation. The case presented with a solitary leiomyoma lesion which was painless. However, the adjacent normal appearing area was tender. A biopsy of the lesion as well as of a portion of the adjacent normal appearing area was taken, which confirmed the diagnosis of cutaneous leiomyoma. This may suggest the dormant nature of the disease which has not yet become apparent. PMID:25484434

  6. Immunogenetics of cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Aimee O; Arkin, Lisa M; Prahalad, Sampath

    2016-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the prototypic autoimmune condition, often affecting multiple organ systems, including the skin. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) is distinct from SLE and may be skin limited or associated with systemic disease. Histopathologically, the hallmark of lupus-specific manifestations of SLE and CLE is an interface dermatitis. The cause of SLE and CLE is likely multifactorial and may include shared genetic factors. In this review, we will discuss the genetic findings related to the cutaneous manifestations of SLE and isolated CLE, with a particular focus on the lupus-specific CLE subtypes. Several major histocompatibility complex and nonmajor histocompatibility complex genetic polymorphisms have been identified which may contribute to the cutaneous manifestations of SLE and to CLE. Most of these genetic variants are associated with mechanisms attributed to the pathogenesis of SLE, including pathways involved in interferon and vitamin D regulation and ultraviolet light exposure. Although there is overlap between the genetic factors associated with SLE and CLE, there appear to be unique genetic factors specific for CLE. Improved understanding of the genetics of CLE may lead to the creation of targeted therapies, improving outcomes for patients with this challenging dermatologic condition.

  7. Cutaneous Chromatophoromas in Captive Snakes.

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    Muñoz-Gutiérrez, J F; Garner, M M; Kiupel, M

    2016-11-01

    Chromatophoromas are neoplasms arising from pigment-bearing cells (chromatophores) of the dermis. While isolated cases have been reported in the literature, the prevalence and biological behavior of chromatophoromas in snakes are unknown. Forty-two chromatophoromas were identified among 4663 submissions (0.9%) to a private diagnostic laboratory in a 16-year period. The most commonly affected snakes were colubrids (23 cases, 55%) and vipers (8 cases, 19%). The San Francisco garter snake was the most commonly affected species (6 cases; 14% of all affected snake species and 3.7% of all garter snake submissions). No sex predilection was found. The age of 28 snakes ranged from 5 to 27 years. Single cutaneous chromatophoromas were most commonly observed and presented as pigmented cutaneous masses or plaques along any body segment. Euthanasia or death due to progressive neoplastic disease or metastasis was reported in 8 (19%) and 4 (10%) cases, respectively. The survival time of 4 animals ranged from 4 to 36 months. Microscopically, xanthophoromas, iridophoromas, melanocytic neoplasms, and mixed chromatophoromas were identified, with melanocytic neoplasms being most common. Microscopic examination alone was generally sufficient for the diagnosis of chromatophoroma, but immunohistochemistry for S-100 and PNL-2 may be helpful for diagnosing poorly pigmented cases. Moderate to marked nuclear atypia appears to be consistently present in cutaneous chromatophoromas with a high risk of metastasis, while mitotic count, lymphatic invasion, the level of infiltration, and the degree of pigmentation or ulceration were not reliable predictors of metastasis.

  8. Cutaneous manifestations of internal malignancy

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    A Ayyamperumal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many malignancies affecting the internal organs display cutaneous manifestations which may be either specific (tumor metastases or nonspecific lesions. Aims: The study is aimed at determining the frequency and significance of cutaneous manifestations among patients with internal malignancy. Materials and Methods: 750 cases of proven internal malignancy, who attended a cancer chemotherapy center in South India, were studied. Specific infiltrates were confirmed by histopathology, fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC and marker studies. Results: Out of the 750 patients with internal malignancy, skin changes were seen in a total of 52 (6.93% patients. Conclusion: Cutaneous metastases (specific lesions were seen in 20 patients (2.66%: contiguous in 6 (0.8%, and non-contiguous in 14 (1.86%. Nonspecific skin changes were seen in 32 patients (4.26%. None of our patients presented with more than one type of skin lesions. Herpes zoster was the most common nonspecific lesion noticed in our patients, followed by generalized pruritus, multiple eruptive seborrheic keratoses, bullous disorder, erythroderma, flushing, purpura, pyoderma gangrenosum, insect bite allergy and lichenoid dermatitis.

  9. Ampullary carcinoma with cutaneous metastasis

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    I-Ting Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater is a rare gastrointestinal tumor. Additionally, cutaneous metastasis from such an internal malignancy is also uncommon. We reported the case of a 55-year-old man afflicted with ampullary carcinoma with cutaneous metastasis. The patient did not undergo the standard Whipple procedure but received chemotherapy due to apparent left neck lymph node metastasis noted by initial PET/CT imaging. The skin metastasis presented as a left neck infiltrating purpuric lesion, which was confirmed by skin biopsy approximately one year after the patient's disease was first diagnosed. Thereafter, the patient received further chemotherapy pursuant to his course of medical management. Skin metastasis usually represents a poor patient prognosis. In these cases, treatment of cutaneous metastasis typically includes systemic chemotherapy and local management such as radiation therapy or tumor excision. And when choosing a chemotherapy regimen for the ampullary cancer, the histological subtypes (intestinal or pancreatobiliary should be comprehensively considered. In our review of the literature, the intestinal type seems to have less distant lymph node metastasis, advanced local invasion, as well as recurrence than pancreatobiliary type of ampullary cancer.

  10. [Cutaneous adverse effects of TNFalpha antagonists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Failla, V; Sabatiello, M; Lebas, E; de Schaetzen, V; Dezfoulian, B; Nikkels, A F

    2012-01-01

    The TNFalpha antagonists, including adalimumab, etanercept and infliximab, represent a class of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs. Although cutaneous adverse effects are uncommon, they are varied. There is no particular risk profile to develop cutaneous adverse effects. The principal acute side effects are injection site reactions and pruritus. The major long term cutaneous side effects are infectious and inflammatory conditions. Neoplastic skin diseases are exceptional. The association with other immunosuppressive agents can increase the risk of developing cutaneous adverse effects. Some adverse effects, such as lupus erythematosus, require immediate withdrawal of the biological treatment, while in other cases temporary withdrawal is sufficient. The majority of the other cutaneous adverse effects can be dealt without interrupting biologic treatment. Preclinical and clinical investigations revealed that the new biologics, aiming IL12/23, IL23 and IL17, present a similar profile of cutaneous adverse effects, although inflammatory skin reactions may be less often encountered compared to TNFalpha antagonists.

  11. A STUDY OF AETIOLOGICAL FACTORS IN THE OCCURRENCE OF CUTANEOUS VASCULITIS IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE IN NORTH KERALA

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    Praveen Malayath

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Cutaneous vasculitis is a condition caused by various aetiologies. They can be primary or secondary. Cutaneous lesions maybe a pointer to systemic diseases. So, it is important to identify the various aetiological factors in the occurrence of the various types of cutaneous vasculitis. The patterns and the various aetiologies of cutaneous vasculitis in Kerala is not well documented in the existing literature. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study is a cross-sectional descriptive study of patients with a clinical diagnosis of cutaneous small vessel vasculitis admitted in Medicine and Dermatology Wards of Calicut, Government Medical College during January 2013 to December 2013. A detailed history and clinical examination of patients along with histopathological examination of skin biopsy was done. RESULTS Out of the 70 cases of cutaneous vasculitis studied, idiopathic cutaneous small vessel vasculitis was the most common type followed by Henoch-Schonlein purpura. The most common aetiology identified was drugs followed by infections. No aetiological factor was identified in 42.8% of the cases. CONCLUSION An aetiological association could be found in 57.8% of cases. The causes identified include drugs, infections, malignancy, connective tissue disorder associated, chronic systemic diseases and Behcet’s disease in decreasing order of frequency.

  12. Cutaneous manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

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    Al Roujayee Abdulaziz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD has many extraintestinal manifestations, and skin lesions are one of the most frequently described extraintestinal findings. Reports indicate an incidence of cutaneous manifestations ranging from 2 to 34%, Cutaneous manifestations are usually related to the activity of the bowel disease but may have an independent course. In this review we aim to address the various cutaneous manifestations associated with IBD, their impact on the disease course, and the treatment options available.

  13. Disseminated cutaneous leishmaniasis after visceral disease in a patient with AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calza, Leonardo; D'Antuono, Antonietta; Marinacci, Ginevra; Manfredi, Roberto; Colangeli, Vincenzo; Passarini, Beatrice; Orioli, Roberto; Varoli, Ornella; Chiodo, Francesco

    2004-03-01

    Leishmaniasis is emerging as a common and serious opportunistic disease for patients with HIV infection. Almost all cases of HIV-Leishmania coinfection have been described in Mediterranean countries and they occur with various clinical presentations, ranging from typical visceral forms to asymptomatic or atypical cases, including cutaneous and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis. Pentavalent antimony compounds have been the mainstays of antileishmanial therapy for half a century and new lipid formulations of amphotericin B seem reliable, but the most effective treatment remains unknown. We describe a patient who was HIV infected and an intravenous drug user, with an unusual disseminated cutaneous leishmaniasis, after an initial visceral disease and after a 13-month maintenance treatment with liposomal amphotericin. The severe concurrent immunosuppression probably played an essential role in leading to this atypical cutaneous form, characterized by diffuse, nonulcerated, nonscabby maculopapular lesions.

  14. Detection of HTLV-I proviral sequences in CD30-positive large cell cutaneous T-cell lymphomas.

    OpenAIRE

    Anagnostopoulos, I.; Hummel, M.; Kaudewitz, P.; Herbst, H; Braun-Falco, O.; Stein, H

    1990-01-01

    To investigate the possibility that cutaneous T-cell lymphomas of large cell type may be associated with human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I infection in nonendemic regions, tissue samples from six cases of large cell cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and four cases of small cell cutaneous T-cell lymphoma were screened for the presence of integrated proviral human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I DNA. Combined use of Southern blot hybridization and enzymatic DNA amplification revealed hu...

  15. Cutaneous dermatomyositis in the era of biologicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Natalie A; Vleugels, Ruth Ann; Callen, Jeffrey P

    2016-01-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) is a systemic inflammatory condition characterized by cutaneous and muscle findings, in addition to potential involvement of other organ systems. A distinct subtype of DM exists that is categorized by cutaneous findings with absent or minimal muscle involvement, referred to as clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis or dermatomyositis sine myositis. A variety of topical, immunosuppressive, and immunomodulatory therapies have been utilized to treat cutaneous DM. The advent of biological agents including tumor necrosis factor-α antagonists, intravenous immunoglobulin, rituximab, and others has allowed for the use of these agents with varying degrees of success for the treatment of cutaneous DM.

  16. Serum adenosine deaminase activity in cutaneous anthrax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunnetcioglu, Mahmut; Karadas, Sevdegul; Aslan, Mehmet; Ceylan, Mehmet Resat; Demir, Halit; Oncu, Mehmet Resit; Karahocagil, Mustafa Kasım; Sunnetcioglu, Aysel; Aypak, Cenk

    2014-07-06

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity has been discovered in several inflammatory conditions; however, there are no data associated with cutaneous anthrax. The aim of this study was to investigate serum ADA activity in patients with cutaneous anthrax. Sixteen patients with cutaneous anthrax and 17 healthy controls were enrolled. We measured ADA activity; peripheral blood leukocyte, lymphocyte, neutrophil, and monocyte counts; erythrocyte sedimentation rate; and C reactive protein levels. Serum ADA activity was significantly higher in patients with cutaneous anthrax than in the controls (panthrax.

  17. Cutaneous histoplasmosis in renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, N Z; Augustine, J J; Gerstenblith, M R

    2014-10-01

    Cutaneous histoplasmosis is a rare entity, although it can be seen in a substantial portion of renal transplant recipients with disseminated disease. The prognosis of disseminated disease is worse than isolated cutaneous involvement, and significant delays in diagnosis are reported. We reviewed reports of cutaneous histoplasmosis with and without dissemination in the setting of renal transplantation to examine incidence, timing of diagnosis, clinical features, and prognosis. Remarkable morphologic variability and the non-specific appearance of skin findings suggest that tissue culture is required for definitive diagnosis. Cutaneous lesions represent an easily accessible source for early diagnosis.

  18. Remote Cutaneous Breast Carcinoma Metastasis Mimicking Dermatitis

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    Annakan V Navaratnam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous metastases from primary internal malignancies are an uncommon presentation. Cutaneous metastases are more frequently seen in breast cancer than in any other visceral malignancy in women. Medical practitioners should be vigilant of the possibility of unusual presentations of metastatic disease in breast cancer patients with lobular carcinoma presenting as cutaneous lesions mimicking benign dermatological conditions. Herein, we present a case of a 75-year-old woman presenting with cutaneous lobular breast carcinoma metastases on her anterior right leg, which had previously been misdiagnosed as dermatitis for 9 years.

  19. Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Interactions between biofilms and the environment. FEMS Microbiol Rev. 1997;20:291–303. 4. Webb LX, Wagner W, Carroll D, et al. Osteomyelitis and...treatment of osteomyelitis . Biomed Mater. 2008;3: 034114. 6. Gristina AG. Biomaterial-centered infection: microbial adhesion versus tissue integration...vertebral osteomyelitis . Spine. 2007;32: 2996–3006. 15. Beckham JD, Tuttle K, Tyler KL. Reovirus activates transforming growth factor ß and bone

  20. Epidemiology and management of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised hosts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C.A.P. Leenders (Alexander)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractFungal infections in man usually are divided into three categories based upon their major pathophysiological characteristics: superficial and cutaneous, subcutaneous and, systemic infections. The last category consists of two separate entities. First there are the so called "endemic

  1. Cutaneous blastomycosis. An imported case with good response to itraconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Morales, Diana; Morales, Neredi; Mercadillo, Patricia; González, Gloria M; Hernández-Hernández, Francisca; Araiza, Javier; Vázquez-González, Denisse

    2016-01-01

    Blastomycosis is a subacute or chronic deep mycosis caused by a dimorphic fungus called Blastomyces dermatitidis, which generally produces a pulmonary form of the disease and, to a lesser extent, extra-pulmonary forms such as cutaneous, osteoarticular and genitourinary, among others. Cutaneous blastomycosis is the second clinical presentation in frequency. It is considered as primary when it begins by inoculation of the fungus due to traumas, and secondary when the lung fails to contain the infection. We present the case of a 57 year-old male who had a 5 year-history of an irregularly shaped verrucous infiltrative plaque related to and insect bite and posterior trauma due to the manipulation of the lesion. B. dermatitidis was identified using direct examination, stains, isolation in culture media, histopathology, and molecular studies. An antifungal susceptibility test was performed using method M38-A2 (CLSI). Clinical and mycological cure was achieved with itraconazole. This cutaneous blastomycosis case acquired in the United States (Indianapolis) is rather interesting and looks quite similar to other mycoses such as coccidioidomycosis or sporotrichosis. The presented case shows one of the multiple issues concerning migration between neighboring countries. Copyright © 2014 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. [Cutaneous leishmaniasis in France: towards the end of injectable therapy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffet, P A; Morizot, G

    2003-01-01

    Today no drug likely to be efficient on the majority of human-infecting species, well tolerated, and easy to administer is available for the treatment of human cutaneous leishmaniasis. But recent progress has been made. Efficient against visceral leishmaniasis, orally administered miltefosine may supplant pentavalent antimonials for the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis acquired in the New World. Right now, the reference treatment is still parenteral pentavalent antimonials 20 mg Sbv/kg/d for a duration that may probably be reduced from 20 to 10 days. The benefit/risk ratio of pentamidine still compares well with that of pentavalent antimonials for the treatment of lesions due to species belonging to the L. panamensis/L. guyanensis/L. shawi group. Pentamidine, which is easier to handle than antimonials, remains the reference treatment for cases from areas where these species predominate. Oral fluconazole is an improvement, readily available for cases from L. major foci. If its efficacy is confirmed in other foci and against other species, mechanisms will have to be implemented to make this therapeutic improvement affordable to poor patients in endemic countries. The development of an efficient and well tolerated topical treatment is still warranted. A new formulation of aminosidine is currently under evaluation. One can hope that the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis will soon become simpler, both for patients and doctors. For the benefits of this simplification to be rapidly affordable to all patients, the pharmaceutical and clinical research outlay must be maintained.

  3. Interventions for cutaneous molluscum contagiosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wouden, Johannes C; van der Sande, Renske; Kruithof, Emma J; Sollie, Annet; van Suijlekom-Smit, Lisette Wa; Koning, Sander

    2017-05-17

    Molluscum contagiosum is a common skin infection that is caused by a pox virus and occurs mainly in children. The infection usually resolves within months in people without immune deficiency, but treatment may be preferred for social and cosmetic reasons or to avoid spreading the infection. A clear evidence base supporting the various treatments is lacking.This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2006, and updated previously in 2009. To assess the effects of specific treatments and management strategies, including waiting for natural resolution, for cutaneous, non-genital molluscum contagiosum in people without immune deficiency. We updated our searches of the following databases to July 2016: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and LILACS. We searched six trial registers and checked the reference lists of included studies and review articles for further references to relevant randomised controlled trials. We contacted pharmaceutical companies and experts in the field to identify further relevant randomised controlled trials. Randomised controlled trials of any treatment of molluscum contagiosum in people without immune deficiency. We excluded trials on sexually transmitted molluscum contagiosum and in people with immune deficiency (including those with HIV infection). Two review authors independently selected studies, assessed methodological quality, and extracted data from selected studies. We obtained missing data from study authors where possible. We found 11 new studies for this update, resulting in 22 included studies with a total of 1650 participants. The studies examined the effects of topical (20 studies) and systemic interventions (2 studies).Among the new included studies were the full trial reports of three large unpublished studies, brought to our attention by an expert in the field. They all provided moderate-quality evidence for a lack of effect of 5% imiquimod compared to vehicle (placebo) on

  4. An unusual ulcer: A case of cutaneous mucormycosis caused by Rhizopus oryzae

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    Bradley J. Gardiner

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycoses are high-mortality infections feared by clinicians worldwide. They predominantly affect immunocompromised hosts and are associated with a spectrum of disease. We describe a case of cutaneous mucormycosis caused by Rhizopus oryzae in a patient with multiple risk factors cured with complete surgical excision and a short course of antifungal therapy.

  5. Comparison of Proinflammatory Gene Expression in Lesions Caused by either Burn Injuries or Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    OpenAIRE

    Akhzari; Rezvan; Zolhavarieh; Moafi

    2016-01-01

    Background Leishmaniasis is a worldwide disease prevalent in tropical and sub-tropical countries in the world. Characterization of inflammatory responses produced in cutaneous Leishmaniasis has not yet been completed. The current study aims to assess and compare pro-inflammatory cytokines between burning injuries and Leishmania infection. Methods the specific primers were designed for 10 proinflammatory genes including CCL4, CCL3,...

  6. Many faces of cutaneous leishmaniasis

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    Bari Arfan Ul

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL is known for its clinical diversity and increasing numbers of new and rare variants of the disease are being reported these days. Aim: The aim of this descriptive study was to look for and report the atypical presentations of this common disease occurring in Pakistan. Methods: The study was carried out in three hospitals (MH, Rawalpindi; PAF Hospital, Sargodha; and CMH, Muzaffarabad from 2002 to 2006. Military and civilian patients of all ages, both males and females, belonging to central and north Punjab province and Kashmir were included in the study. Clinical as well as parasitological features of cutaneous leishmaniasis were studied. The unusual lesions were photographed and categorized accordingly using simple descriptive statistics. Results: Out of 718 patients of cutaneous leishmaniasis, 41 (5.7% had unusual presentations. The commonest among unusual morphologies was lupoid leishmaniasis 14 (34.1%, followed by sporotrichoid 5 (12.1%, paronychial 3 (7.3%, lid leishmaniasis 2 (4.9%, psoriasiform 2 (4.9%, mycetoma-like 2 (4.9%, erysipeloid 2 (4.9%, chancriform 2 (4.9%, whitlow 1 (2.4%, scar leishmaniasis 1 (2.4%, DLE-like 1 (2.4%, ′squamous cell carcinoma′-like 1 (2.4%, zosteriform 1 (2.4%, eczematous 1 (2.4%, verrucous 1 (2.4%, palmar/plantar 1 (2.4% and mucocutaneous 1 (2.4%. Conclusion: In Pakistan, an endemic country for CL, the possibility of CL should be kept in mind while diagnosing common dermatological diseases like erysipelas, chronic eczema, herpes zoster, paronychia; and uncommon disorders like lupus vulgaris, squamous cell carcinoma, sporotrichosis, mycetoma and other deep mycoses.

  7. Targeted therapies for cutaneous melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, Damien; McArthur, Grant

    2014-06-01

    Melanoma is resistant to cytotoxic therapy, and treatment options for advanced disease have been limited historically. However, improved understanding of melanoma driver mutations, particularly those involving the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, has led to the development of targeted therapies that are effective in this previously treatment-refractory disease. In cutaneous melanomas with BRAF V600 mutations the selective RAF inhibitors, vemurafenib and dabrafenib, and the MEK inhibitor, trametinib, have demonstrated survival benefits. Early signals of efficacy have also been demonstrated with MEK inhibitors in melanomas with NRAS mutations, and KIT inhibitors offer promise in melanomas driven through activation of their target receptor.

  8. Cutaneous Leishmaniasis with Unusual Presentation

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    N Bagherani

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available "nThis case report states a 25-year-old woman, residing in the city of Dezfool, Khuzestan Province, south of Iran with the diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis in June 2008. Her skin lesion had de­veloped from 8 months earlier as a nodule on her left arm, 1×3 cm in diameter. Because of sever­ity of the lesion, we prescribed meglumine antimoniate intralesionally with giving up her breast feeding. After 6 months follow-up, no recurrence was seen.

  9. Mechanics of cutaneous wound rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Digendranath; Gupta, Anurag

    2016-11-07

    A cutaneous wound may rupture during healing as a result of stretching in the skin and incompatibility at the wound-skin interface, among other factors. By treating both wound and skin as hyperelastic membranes, and using a biomechanical framework of interfacial growth, we study rupturing as a problem of cavitation in nonlinear elastic materials. We obtain analytical solutions for deformation and residual stress field in the skin-wound configuration while emphasizing the coupling between wound rupture and wrinkling in the skin. The solutions are analyzed in detail for variations in stretching environment, healing condition, and membrane stiffness.

  10. Drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callen, J P

    2010-08-01

    Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) is a subset of cutaneous lupus erythematosus with unique immunologic and clinical features. The first description dates back to 1985 when a series of five patients were found to have hydrochlorothiazide-induced SCLE. Since that time, at least 40 other drugs have been implicated in the induction of SCLE.

  11. Primary cutaneous histoplasmosis in a skin scrape cytology

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    Anadi Roychowdhury

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Histoplasmosis refers to an infection caused by histoplasma capsulatum, a dimorphic fungus. We report a rare case of cutaneous histoplasmosis in an immunocompromised patient. The diagnosis was made by the cytopathologic examination of skin scraping smear, which showed numerous intracellular and extracellular periodic acid-schiff positive rounded yeast cells. The patient showed dramatic response with itraconazole and amphotericin B. We opine that skin scrape cytology can be useful in establishing the diagnosis of the disease, specially when the other facilities are not readily available.

  12. Disseminated cryptococcosis with cutaneous involvement in an immunocompetent patient*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacht, Gabriely Lessa; de Lima, Alexandre Moretti; Perdomo, Yuri Chiarelli; Boigues, Rafaela Suguimoto; Takita, Luiz Carlos; Hans Filho, Günter

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is a fungal infection of opportunistic behavior that is unusual in immunocompetent patients. We report a rare case of disseminated cryptococcosis with cutaneous involvement in an immunocompetent individual. During hospitalization, Cryptococcus gattii was isolated from skin lesions, lung and spinal fluid. The diagnosis of disseminated cryptococcosis was confirmed and treatment was established. The patient showed improvement. Due to the probable clinical severity of the disease and the possibility that skin lesions may be the first manifestation of this illness, prompt diagnosis must be established and treatment provided. PMID:28099613

  13. Sporotrichosis in Iran: A mini review of reported cases in patients suspected to cutaneous leishmaniasis

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    shahram mahmoudi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sporotrichosis is a chronic subcutaneous fungal infection with global distribution. It is a rare fungal infection with nine reported cases in Iran, including eight humans and one animal, within the past 30 years. Among the human cases, seven were of the fixed cutaneous type of sporotrichosis and one had sporotrichoid lymphocutaneous. The reported patients were within the age range of 23-60 years, and six of them were female. The most frequent sites of infection were forearms and hands, as well as the face and legs. In addition, the majority of the cases had previously been suspected of leishmaniasis and received treatment. Sporotrichosis is not a well-known condition in Iran and is often misdiagnosed and erroneously treated for other cutaneous parasitic or bacterial infections with similar clinical manifestations. Therefore, sporotrichosis should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of nodular-ulcerative skin lesions.

  14. Comorbidity of Leishmania major with cutaneous sarcoidosis

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    Hamideh Moravvej

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: leishmaniasis infection might manifest as sarcoidosis; on the other hand, some evidences propose an association between sarcoidosis and leishmaniasis. Most of the times, it is impossible to discriminate idiopathic sarcoidosis from leishmaniasis by conventional histopathologic exam. Aim: We performed a cross-sectional study to examine the association of sarcoidosis with leishmaniasis in histopathologically diagnosed sarcoidal granuloma biopsy samples by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Materials and Methods: We examined paraffin-embedded skin biopsy samples obtained from patients with clinical and histopathological diagnosis as naked sarcoidal granuloma, referred to Skin Research Center of Shaheed Beheshti Medical University from January 2001 to March 2010, in order to isolate Leishmania parasite. The samples were reassessed by an independent dermatopathologist. DNA extracted from all specimens was analyzed by the commercially available PCR kits (DNPTM Kit, CinnaGen, Tehran, Iran to detect endemic Leishmania species, namely leishmania major (L. major. Results: L. major was positive in PCR of Eight out of twenty-five examined samples. Conclusion: Cutaneous leishmaniasis may be misinterpreted as sarcoidosis; in endemic areas, when conventional methods fail to detect Leishmania parasite, PCR should be utilized in any granulomatous skin disease compatible with sarcoidosis, regardless of the clinical presentation or histopathological interpretation.

  15. Self-healing juvenile cutaneous mucinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołodziejczyk, Beata; Gazda, Agnieszka; Hernik, Elżbieta; Szczygielska, Izabela; Rutkowska-Sak, Lidia; Koprowska, Marta Legatowicz

    2017-01-01

    Girl, aged 4 years old, began the disease with pain of the lower extremities, fever up to 38°C and signs of upper airway infection. Then the patient developed oedema and redness of the whole face, thickened skin, subcutaneous nodular foldings of the frontal, occipital, cervical and axillary regions, extensor areas of the joints; fine, hard whitish nodules in the frontal region and over interphalangeal joints of the hands, pruritus; oedemas of the ankles, knees and joints of the hands, cervical lymphadenopathy and hepatomegaly. Blood tests at the moment of the diagnosis revealed elevation of markers of inflammation as ESR and CRP, leukocytosis, thrombocytosis, hypoalbuminemia, and hyper-alfa-2-globulinemia. Histopathological examination of the skin biopsy specimen and subcutaneous tissue revealed myxoid subcutaneous tissue located under the dermis and a section consisting of myxoid mesenchymal tissue with inflammatory infiltration by histiocytic cells. The presence of acid mucopolysaccharides in fields of the myxoid tissue was also observed. The self-healing juvenile cutaneous mucinosis (SJCM) was diagnosed.

  16. Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in North Africa: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In North African countries, cutaneous leishmaniasis transmission has been increasing since the 1980s, with a significant increase in the incidence of cases and a spread of the geographical distribution. The disease currently represents a major public health problem with a productivity gap and an impediment for development, which results in dramatic socioeconomic and psycho-sanitary impacts. The incidence is more than thousands of cases every year in Algeria, Libya, Morocco, and Tunisia. In Egypt, only a few dozen cases per year are reported, mainly in the Sinai Peninsula. Three Leishmania species, associated with distinct eco-epidemiological and clinical patterns, are involved, namely Leishmania infantum, L. major, and L. tropica. However, L. major is by far the most frequent in Algeria, Libya, and Tunisia, with more than 90% of the registered cases. It is mainly encountered in rural areas under semi-arid, arid and Saharan climates. Leishmania tropica is more prevalent in Morocco, reaching 30–40% of isolates in some districts. Much data is still missing concerning the risk factors of the infection and the lesion development, as well as vector and reservoir ecology and behavior. The knowledge of such parameters, following multidisciplinary and integrated approaches, is crucial for better management and control of the disease, that also faces a lack of resources and efficient control measures.

  17. Trichophoromyia auraensis is a putative vectorComments about the finding of Trichophoromyia auraensis (Mangabeira 1942) sandfly specimens infected by Leishmania (Viannia) parasites in Acre stateA new sandfly in the subgenus Nyssomyia (Diptera, Psychodidae) from the Amazon Basin of BrazilThe known geographical distribution of sandflies in the state of Acre, Brazil (Diptera: Psychodidae)Studies on the sandfly fauna (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) from transmission areas of American cutaneous leishmaniasis in state of Acre, BrazilDevelopment and validation of PCR-based assays for diagnosis of American cutaneous leishmaniasis and identification of the parasite speciesFirst description of Leishmania (Viannia) infection in Evandromyia saulensis, Pressatia sp. and Trichophoromyia auraensis (Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) in a transmission area of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Acre state, Amazon Basin, BrazilSand fly fauna (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) in an area of leishmaniasis transmission in the municipality of Rio Branco, state of Acre, BrazilIdentification of naturally infected Lutzomyia intermedia and Lutzomyia migonei with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis in Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) revealed by a PCR multiplex non-isotopic hybridization assayNotas sobre os flebotomíneos do estado do Acre, com a descrição de duas espécies novas (Diptera, Psychodidae)Description of Trichophoromyia ruifreitasi, a new phlebotomine species (Diptera, Psychodidae) from Acre state, Brazilian AmazonEpidemiologia da Leishmaniose Tegumentar e descrição das populações de flebotomíneos no município de Acrelândia, Acre, BrasilPhlebotomine sandfly (Diptera: Psychodidae) diversity and their Leishmania DNA in a hot spot of American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis human cases along the Brazilian border with Peru and BoliviaDescription of a new phlebotomine species (Diptera: Psychodidae, Phlebotominae) and new records of sand flies from the state of Acre, Northern BrazilNatural Leishmania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teles, Carolina Bioni Garcia; Pessoa, Felipe Arley Costa; Medeiros, Jansen Fernandes; Camargo, Luís Marcelo Aranha

    2017-07-01

    The sandfly Trichophoromyia auraensis has recently evolved as a proven vector of Leishmania (Viannia) endemic to state of Acre in the north of Brazil. This note is intended to propose a correction in the report of the first occurrence of natural infection of Leishmania (Viannia) in this species. We and the other scientific groups reinforced that Tr. auraensis is a possible vector involved in the transmission of American cutaneous leishmaniasis in Acre, Brazil.

  18. Cutaneous fistulization of the hydatid disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahce, Zeynep Sener; Akbulut, Sami; Aday, Ulas; Demircan, Firat; Senol, Ayhan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aim: To provide an overview of the medical literature on cutaneous fistulization in patients with hydatid disease (HD). Methods: According to PRISMA guidelines a literature search was made in PubMed, Medline, Google Scholar, and Google databases were searched using keywords to identify articles related to cutaneous fistulization of the HD. Keywords used were hydatid disease, hydatid cyst, cutaneous fistulization, cysto-cutaneous fistulization, external rupture, and external fistulization. The literature search included case reports, review articles, original articles, and meeting presentations published until July 2016 without restrictions on language, journal, or country. Articles and abstracts containing adequate information, such as age, sex, cyst size, cyst location, clinical presentation, fistula opening location, and management, were included in the study, whereas articles with insufficient clinical and demographic data were excluded. We also present a new case of cysto-cutaneous fistulization of a liver hydatid cyst. Results: The literature review included 38 articles (32 full text, 2 abstracts, and 4 unavailable) on cutaneous fistulization in patients with HD. Among the 38 articles included in the study, 22 were written in English, 13 in French, 1 in German, 1 in Italian, and 1 in Spanish. Forty patients (21 males and 19 females; mean age ± standard deviation, 54.0 ± 21.5 years; range, 7–93 years) were involved in the study. Twenty-four patients had cysto-cutaneous fistulization (Echinococcus granulosus); 10 had cutaneous fistulization (E multilocularis), 3 had cysto-cutaneo-bronchio-biliary fistulization, 2 had cysto-cutaneo-bronchial fistulization; and 1 had cutaneo-bronchial fistulization (E multilocularis). Twenty-nine patients were diagnosed with E granulosis and 11 had E multilocularis detected by clinical, radiological, and/or histopathological examinations. Conclusion: Cutaneous fistulization is a rare complication of HD

  19. Cutaneous sporotrichosis: Unusual clinical presentations

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    Mahajan Vikram

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Three unusual clinical forms of sporotrichosis described in this paper will be a primer for the clinicians for an early diagnosis and treatment, especially in its unusual presentations. Case 1, a 52-year-old man, developed sporotrichosis over pre-existing facial nodulo-ulcerative basal cell carcinoma of seven-year duration, due to its contamination perhaps from topical herbal pastes and lymphocutaneous sporotrichosis over right hand/forearm from facial lesion/herbal paste. Case 2, a 25-year-old woman, presented with disseminated systemic-cutaneous, osteoarticular and possibly pleural (effusion sporotrichosis. There was no laboratory evidence of tuberculosis and treatment with anti-tuberculosis drugs (ATT did not benefit. Both these cases were diagnosed by histopathology/culture of S. schenckii from tissue specimens. Case 3, a 20-year-old girl, had multiple intensely pruritic, nodular lesions over/around left knee of two-year duration. She was diagnosed clinically as a case of prurigo nodularis and histologically as cutaneous tuberculosis, albeit, other laboratory investigations and treatment with ATT did not support the diagnosis. All the three patients responded well to saturated solution of potassium iodide (SSKI therapy. A high clinical suspicion is important in early diagnosis and treatment to prevent chronicity and morbidity in these patients. SSKI is fairly safe and effective when itraconazole is not affordable/ available.

  20. Cutaneous signs of classical dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auriemma, M; Capo, A; Meogrossi, G; Amerio, P

    2014-10-01

    Idiopathic immune myopathies (IIM) are an heterogeneous group of autoimmune muscle disorders characterized by progressive muscle involvement. Dermatomyositis (DM) is the most common form of IIM. It is a multisystem disorder characterized by symmetric proximal, extensor, inflammatory myopathy, vascular involvement and a characteristic cutaneous eruption. Six types of DM have been identified: idiopathic, juvenile (JDM), cancer-related other autoimmune diseases-related, iatrogenic DM and amyopathic DM. Cutaneous manifestations of DM are the most important aspect of this disease and can precede from several months to years muscle or systemic involvement. Three groups of signs have been described: pathognomonic, highly characteristic and compatible. Although differences exist among the different clinical presentation of skin lesions, they share common histological findings including the presence of interface dermatitis with epidermal atrophy, basement membrane degeneration, vacuolar alteration of basal keratinocytes, and dermal changes consisting of interstitial mucin deposition and a sparse lymphocytic infiltrate. DM is a serious disease; the correct evaluation of any skin lesion suggesting an early diagnosis is of utmost importance. Skin signs may, also, represent a marker of treatment efficacy even though systemic symptoms worsening may not always be followed by more severe skin lesions.

  1. Drug-induced cutaneous vasculitides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiga, E; Verdelli, A; Bonciani, D; Bonciolini, V; Quintarelli, L; Volpi, W; Fabbri, P; Caproni, M

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous vasculitides (CV) can be idiopathic or secondary to several triggers, including drugs, which account for up to 30% of all the cases of CV. Several drugs can induce CV, including some medications commonly used in dermatology, including minocycline, and several new drugs, such as anti-TNF agents. Different pathomecanisms are involved in the development of drug-induced CV, including the formation and deposition of immune complexes, the induction of neutrophil apoptosis, the formation of neoantigens between the drugs and proteins from the host, the shift of the immune response, and others. Although the diagnosis is difficult, because the clinical picture of drug-induced CV is in general indistinguishable from that of other forms of CV, it is important to recognize such entities in order to correctly manage the patient. Anamnesis, diagnostic algorithms to assess the likelihood of the association between a drug and a cutaneous reaction, skin biopsy and laboratory testing (including the search for antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) are useful tools to make a diagnosis of drug-induced CV. About the therapy, while in idiopathic vasculitides the treatment is usually more aggressive and long-lasting, very often requiring a maintenance therapy with immunosuppressive drugs, in drug-induced CV the discontinuation of the suspected drug alone is usually enough to achieve complete remission, making the prognosis usually very good.

  2. Creeping eruption of the hand in an Iranian patient: Cutaneous larva migrans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabihollah Shahmoradi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous larva migrans (CLM, a serpiginous cutaneous eruption is the most commonly acquired tropical dermatosis. It is caused by infection with hookworm larvae in tropical and sub-tropical areas, and people who have a history of travel in these countries. The most frequent location of CLM is the distal lower extremities or buttocks. We describe a case of 57-year-old Iranian female patient with CLM of hand (unusual site without traveling to endemic countries that was successfully treated with oral albendazole. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of CLM in Iran.

  3. Specific cutaneous manifestations of internal malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, R P

    1986-01-01

    In summary, carcinoma is the most frequent cancer that metastasizes to the skin; lung cancer in men and breast cancer in women. Clinically distinctive patterns of cutaneous metastasis of epithelial origin include alopecia neoplastica, pulsatile nodules, Sister Mary Joseph's nodules, morpheaform, and cellulitis-like lesions. Biopsying these lesions reveals adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, or anaplastic carcinoma. The type of histologic pattern seen can be a clue to the organ of origin giving rise to the cutaneous metastasis. Skin that is damaged allows for circulating malignant cells, often of epithelial or leukemic origin, to lodge and proliferate locally (inflammatory oncotaxis). The commonest form of leukemia to affect the skin of elderly males is chronic lymphocytic leukemia. However, when leukemia involves the mucous membranes, acute myeloid leukemia (acute monocytic and acute myelomonocytic leukemia) is the most likely diagnosis. When papules, nodules, or plaques develop on the head, neck, or torso in a middle-aged male accompanied by lymphadenopathy, there must be a high index of suspicion that these lesions are metastatic lymphomatous deposits. Definitive histologic diagnosis on a skin biopsy specimen is difficult. In this situation, it is best to rely on histologic patterns seen in lymphoid tissue along with cellular marker studies. An elderly patient having bone pain, anemia, elevated blood calcium level, and renal failure along with purplish or skin-colored nodules and plaques on the trunk has a good chance of having multiple myeloma. Biopsying these lesions is most certain to reveal atypical plasma cells, and blood immunoelectrophoresis will demonstrate characteristic monoclonal gammopathy. There are two malignancies seen in children under 3 years of age that often times affect the skin in a characteristic fashion. Letterer-Siwe disease, which is distinguished from other histocytic disorders by its cell of origin, the Langerhans cell, clinically

  4. Comparative assessment of a DNA and protein Leishmania donovani gamma glutamyl cysteine synthetase vaccine to cross-protect against murine cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. major or L. mexicana infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, S A; Alawa, J; Doro, B; Henriquez, F L; Roberts, C W; Nok, A; Alawa, C B I; Alsaadi, M; Mullen, A B; Carter, K C

    2012-02-08

    Leishmaniasis is a major health problem and it is estimated that 12 million people are currently infected. A vaccine which could cross-protect people against different Leishmania spp. would facilitate control of this disease as more than one species of Leishmania may be present. In this study the ability of a DNA vaccine, using the full gene sequence for L. donovani gamma glutamyl cysteine synthetase (γGCS) incorporated in the pVAX vector (pVAXγGCS), and a protein vaccine, using the corresponding recombinant L. donovani γGCS protein (LdγGCS), to protect against L. major or L. mexicana infection was evaluated. DNA vaccination gave transient protection against L. major and no protection against L. mexicana despite significantly enhancing specific antibody titres in vaccinated infected mice compared to infected controls. Vaccination with the LdγGCS protected against both species but only if the protein was incorporated into non-ionic surfactant vesicles for L. mexicana. The results of this study indicate that a L. donovani γGCS vaccine could be used to vaccinate against more than one Leishmania species but only if the recombinant protein is used.

  5. Prevalência da infecção canina em áreas endêmicas de leishmaniose tegumentar americana, do município de Paracambi, Estado do Rio de Janeiro, no período entre 1992 e 1993 Prevalence of canine infection from endemic areas of American cutaneous leishmaniasis in Paracambi District, Rio de Janeiro State, between 1992 and 1993

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginelza Peres Lima dos Santos

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available No município de Paracambi, Estado do Rio de Janeiro, foi realizado um inquérito epidemiológico sobre a leishmaniose tegumentar americana na população canina residente em áreas endêmicas rural e semiurbana. Foram cadastrados 179 cães e 138 (77,1% foram examinados, segundo seus aspectos clínicos e desenvolvimento de hipersensibilidade tardia ao antígeno Imunoleish® e respostas sorológicas à reação de imunofluorescência indireta e ao ensaio imunoenzimático. Dos 9 (6,5.% animais portadores de lesões/cicatrizes suspeitas, 66,7% foram causadas por Leishmania sp; 44,4% produziram infecção em hamsters e apresentaram crescimento em meio de cultura, compatíveis com o comportamento de Leishmania do complexo braziliensis. A caracterização molecular (análises isoenzimáticas e do perfil de restrição do KDNA identificou 2 amostras como similares à Leishmania (Viannia braziliensis. A prevalência da infecção canina observada através do teste cutâneo, RIFI e ELISA foi, respectivamente, 10,1%, 16,7% e 27,8%. A presença das formas clínica/subclínica da LTA na população canina associada à infecção humana sugere que o cão pode atuar como possível fonte de infecção, assim como na disseminação da doença.In the district of Paracambi, State of Rio de Janeiro an epidemiological survey for American tegumentary leishmaniasis in canine population was carried out in endemic localities. A total of 179 dogs was registered and 138 (77.1% examined for their clinical aspects, development of delayed hypersensitivity (DHS with Imunoleish® antigen and serological responses by indirect immunofluorescent reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In 9 (6.5% dogs with active cutaneous lesions or suspect scars, 66.7% were caused by Leishmania sp; 44.4% produced infection in hamsters and showed growth in culture media, which was considered to be compatible with the species of Leishmania braziliensis complex. The molecular

  6. Cutaneous HIV-associated Kaposi sarcoma: a potential setting for management by clinical observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatrous, Surget V; Grisoli, Stratton B; Riahi, Ryan R; Cohen, Philip R

    2017-06-15

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a malignancy of viral etiology whose course ranges from cutaneous limited lesions to fulminant disease with multi-organ involvement. Four clinical variants of the disease exist: classic, endemic, iatrogenic, and epidemic. Iatrogenic and epidemic variants of Kaposi sarcoma develop in the setting of immune suppression. Transplant recipients who develop iatrogenic KS typically demonstrate improvement of lesions following de-escalation of immunosuppressive therapy. Similarly, HIV-infected patients who begin highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) experience immune reconstitution, which can induce KS regression. We describe two patients with varying clinical outcomes of cutaneous-limited HIV-associated KS after immune reconstitution with HAART. We propose that immune reconstitution with HAART, followed by clinical and radiographic surveillance for disease progression, may be an appropriate initial management strategy for limited cutaneous HIV-associated KS. In patients with more extensive disease at presentation or failure of HAART alone, antineoplastic therapy should be instituted.

  7. Primary cutaneous mucormycosis caused by Mucor irregularis in an elderly person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Sayaka; Okubo, Yuko; Katano, Azusa; Sano, Ayako; Uezato, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kenzo

    2015-02-01

    Primary cutaneous mucormycosis is a rare but often lethal severe fungal infection, which usually occurs in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of primary cutaneous mucormycosis caused by Mucor irregularis in an elderly patient. Seven months after the surgical dissection of the involved skin, cutaneous mucormycosis recurred at the peripheral edge of the skin graft. Shortly subsequent to the administration of liposomal amphotericin B, the remaining skin lesion was excised again. M. irregularis is rarely but increasingly reported as a cause of mucormycosis in immunocompetent individuals, especially in Asian farmers. M. irregularis may be largely disseminated in the soils of Asia and thus the trivial trauma at the time of farm work may be a trigger for the onset. These cases tend to leave severe cosmetic damage even in healthy individuals, although the vital prognosis is not affected. © 2014 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  8. [Niacin deficiency and cutaneous immunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Sugita, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Niacin, also known as vitamin B3, is required for the synthesis of coenzymes, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP). Niacin binds with G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 109A on cutaneous Langerhans cells and causes vasodilation with flushing in head and neck area. Niacin deficiency due to excessive alcohol consumption, certain drugs or inadequate uptake in diet causes pellagra, a photosensitivity dermatitis. Recently several studies have revealed the mechanism of photosensitivity in niacin deficiency, which may pave a way for new therapeutic approaches. The expression level of prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES) is up-regulated in the skin of both pellagra patients and niacin deficient pellagra mouse models. In addition, pellagra is mediated through prostaglandin E₂-EP4 (PGE₂-EP4) signaling via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in keratinocytes. In this article, we have reviewed the role of niacin in immunity and the mechanism of niacin deficiency-induced photosensitivity.

  9. Occupationally Acquired American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

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    Maria Edileuza Felinto de Brito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report two occupationally acquired cases of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL: one accidental laboratory autoinoculation by contaminated needlestick while handling an ACL lesion sample, and one acquired during field studies on bird biology. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays of patient lesions were positive for Leishmania, subgenus Viannia. One isolate was obtained by culture (from patient 2 biopsy samples and characterized as Leishmania (Viannia naiffi through an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA with species-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs and by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE. Patients were successfully treated with N-methyl-glucamine. These two cases highlight the potential risks of laboratory and field work and the need to comply with strict biosafety procedures in daily routines. The swab collection method, coupled with PCR detection, has greatly improved ACL laboratory diagnosis.

  10. Cutaneous tuberculosis, tuberculosis verrucosa cutis

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    Nilamani Mohanty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous tuberculosis because of its variability in presentation, wider differential diagnosis, and difficulty in obtaining microbiological confirmation continues to be the most challenging to diagnose for dermatologists in developing countries. Despite the evolution of sophisticated techniques such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR and enzyme-linked-immunosorbent serologic assay (ELISA, the sensitivity of new methods are not better than the isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosum in culture. Even in the 21 st century, we rely on methods as old as the intradermal reaction purified protein derivative standard test and therapeutic trials, as diagnostic tools. We describe a case which has been diagnosed and treated as eczema by renowned physicians for 2 years. Incisional biopsy showed the presence of well-defined granulomas and ZN staining of the biopsy specimen showed the presence of acid fast bacilli; a trial of ATT (antitubercular therapy for 6 months lead to permanent cure of the lesion.

  11. Occupationally Acquired American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felinto de Brito, Maria Edileuza; Andrade, Maria Sandra; de Almeida, Éricka Lima; Medeiros, Ângela Cristina Rapela; Werkhäuser, Roberto Pereira; de Araújo, Ana Isabele Freitas; Brandão-Filho, Sinval Pinto; Paiva de Almeida, Alzira Maria; Gomes Rodrigues, Eduardo Henrique

    2012-01-01

    We report two occupationally acquired cases of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL): one accidental laboratory autoinoculation by contaminated needlestick while handling an ACL lesion sample, and one acquired during field studies on bird biology. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays of patient lesions were positive for Leishmania, subgenus Viannia. One isolate was obtained by culture (from patient 2 biopsy samples) and characterized as Leishmania (Viannia) naiffi through an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) with species-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE). Patients were successfully treated with N-methyl-glucamine. These two cases highlight the potential risks of laboratory and field work and the need to comply with strict biosafety procedures in daily routines. The swab collection method, coupled with PCR detection, has greatly improved ACL laboratory diagnosis. PMID:23227369

  12. Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping of cutaneous warts in Greek children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannaki, Maria; Kakourou, Talia; Theodoridou, Maria; Syriopoulou, Vassiliki; Kabouris, Marios; Louizou, Eirini; Chrousos, George

    2013-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) infects the squamous epithelium of the skin and produces common warts, plantar warts, and flat warts, which occur commonly on the hands, face, and feet. The objective of this study was to determine the presence of HPV in warts in children in order to associate the virus with the disease. Sixty-eight children with clinically diagnosed cutaneous warts were recruited. Skin biopsy samples were examined and DNA was extracted using a commercially available kit. To distinguish between the HPV types, we used a specific pair of primers to amplify the HPV DNA. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of the L1 region was followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and Luminex xMAP technology. HPV 57 was the predominant type in our study, although the detection of the high-risk HPV type 16 in 33% of our positive samples indicates the presence of mucosal high-risk HPV types in the skin of children. It seems that the newly introduced Luminex assay maximized the discrimination of genotypes even in the case of multiple HPV infections. Or findings also suggest the presence of high-risk HPV types in cutaneous warts. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania infantum in Southern Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shimol, Shalom; Sagi, Orli; Horev, Amir; Avni, Yonat Shemer; Ziv, Mati; Riesenberg, Klaris

    2016-12-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) caused by Leishmania major is common in southern Israel, while Leishmania infantum (sub-strain of L. donovani, causing zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis) infections were rarely reported in Israel and only in other regions. We report the first case of L. infantum infection in southern Israel, presented atypically as CL in an immunosuppressed 47-year old male. The patient was treated with liposomal amphotericin-B and recovered, without extra-cutaneous complications. Diagnosis of L. infantum CL was confirmed by microscopic identification of amastigotes in Gimsa-stained smear of skin lesion, positive blood serology and a positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the internal transcribed spacer 1 genes (ITS1) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (ITS1 PCR-RFLP). We also review the medical literature on old-world CL caused by L. infantum. Multiple L. donovani/infantum CL cases were identified in the literature search. These can be divided schematically to two: 1) In several endemic countries, L. infantum strains are the main causative agents of CL; 2) In other regions, CL is almost exclusively caused by L. major or L. tropica, while L. donovani strains CL cases were reported sporadically or as imported disease.

  14. [Livedo-like cutaneous sarcoidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duboys, S; Cante, V; Monégier du Sorbier, C; Guillet, G

    2016-05-01

    The cutaneous signs of sarcoidosis are extremely polymorphous and may be classified under several different headings. Herein, we report the case of a 51-year-old female patient presenting bilateral livedo of the knees accompanied by systemic signs with polyarthralgia, impaired general state of health, weight loss, and a sensation of dyspnoea. Skin biopsy revealed giant-cell granuloma around the dermal vessels, with no caseous necrosis. Histopathological examination of the patient's blood vessels revealed no abnormalities. Laboratory tests showed high levels of angiotensin converting enzyme (1.5×ULN), bilateral mediastinal adenomegaly and incipient pulmonary fibrosis. Systemic sarcoidosis was diagnosed on the basis of the overall clinical and laboratory picture. The patient subsequently presented hepatic involvement and hypercalcaemia associated with the sarcoidosis; systemic corticosteroid therapy (prednisone) was initiated, with slow dose-reduction. The outcome was favourable with a return to normal laboratory values, regression of the adenomegaly and subsidence of the livedo. The literature contains reports of a number of cases of livedo heralding sarcoidosis. The majority of such cases involved young or middle-aged female patients of Asian origin presenting systemic sarcoidosis, with a high frequency of ocular and neural involvement. Livedo could be accounted for by the specific disposition of granulomas around the arterioles, resulting in disturbance of local blood flow, which was probably associated with the mechanical compression of vessels and with the micro-thrombi noted at histology. Livedo may be considered a clinical sign of cutaneous sarcoidosis. Laboratory tests to screen for sarcoidosis may be proposed in the exploration of atypical livedo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Zinc Sulphate in the Treatment of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis: an in Vitro and Animal Study

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    Rafid A Najim

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of zinc sulphate both in vitro and in an animal model against both strains of old world cutaneous leishmaniasis. The in vitro sensitivities of promastigotes and axenic amastigotes of both Leishmania major and L. tropica to zinc sulphate was determined, the LD50 calculated and compared to the standard treatment for cutaneous leishmaniasis pentavalent antimony compounds. The results show that the two forms of both strains were sensitive to zinc sulphate and their respective LD50 were lower compared to the pentavalent antimony compound. Furthermore the sensitivities of the forms of both strains were tested using a simple slide method and compared to results of the standard method. To confirm this result, zinc sulphate was administered orally to mice infected with cutaneous leishmaniasis both therapeutically and prophylactically. Results showed that oral zinc sulphate was effective in both treatment and prophylaxis for cutaneous leishmaniasis. These results encourage the use of oral zinc sulphate in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis clinically.

  16. Cutaneous T cell lymphoma mimicking cutaneous histiocytosis: differentiation by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, S J; McCormick, D; McInnes, E; Dunn, J K; Dobson, J M; McConnell, I

    2000-07-01

    A two-year-old, neutered female cross-bred labrador had multiple cutaneous nodules, biopsies of which revealed pathological changes consistent with cutaneous histiocytosis. During a period of one month the dog developed multicentric lymphadenopathy, a retrobulbar mass and masses within the quadriceps and cervical muscles. Fine needle aspiration cytology of the cutaneous nodules and lymph nodes and histological examination of the cutaneous nodules and muscle masses suggested the presence of lymphoblastic lymphoma. A definitive diagnosis of CD8+ T cell lymphoma was achieved by immunophenotyping the tumour cells by flow cytometry.

  17. Cutaneous manifestations of systemic tropical parasitic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Neil F; Kovarik, Carrie L

    2009-01-01

    Tropical diseases continue to cause significant health problems in developing nations. An overview of illnesses with notable cutaneous findings caused by protozoans and helminthes is provided. The role of the health care provider in disease management is described.

  18. Cutaneous manifestations of dermatomyositis and their management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callen, Jeffrey P

    2010-06-01

    Dermatomyositis is a condition with pathognomonic and characteristic cutaneous lesions. This article describes the skin manifestations observed in patients with dermatomyositis, their differential diagnosis, their relationship to internal disease (particularly malignancy), and their management.

  19. Follicular infundibulum tumour presenting as cutaneous horn

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    Jayaraman M

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumour of follicular infundibulum is an organoid tumour with a plate like growth attached to the epidermis with connection from the follicular epithelium. We are reporting such a case unusually presenting as cutaneous horn.

  20. Primary cutaneous mucormycosis in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P C; Satterwhite, T K; Monheit, J E; Parks, D

    1987-04-01

    Primary cutaneous mucormycosis in trauma patients has been rarely reported. We describe three cases occurring in noncompromised hosts and review the literature. Prompt diagnosis and aggressive treatment with vigorous local care and appropriate antibiotics are recommended.

  1. Cutaneous Angiosarcoma of Head and Neck

    OpenAIRE

    Rita Vora; Gopikrishnan Anjaneyan; Rajat Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous angiosarcoma is a rare aggressive tumor of capillary and lymphatic endothelial cell origin. Cutaneous angiosarcoma of the head and neck regions seems to be a distinctive neoplasm with characteristic clinicopathologic features that differ from angiosarcoma in other anatomic locations. Angiosarcoma, regardless of their setting, has a bad prognosis. We presented here a case of 80 years old male, with multiple nontender grouped purple to red hemorrhagic vesicular and bullous lesions ove...

  2. Cutaneous pseudovasculitis, antiphospholipid syndrome and obstetric misadventure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayaparan, A S; Lowe, S A

    2015-09-01

    We present two women with severe obstetric complications from antiphospholipid (aPL) syndrome associated with a rare dermatological manifestation, cutaneous pseudovasculitis. Both of these women developed a rash on the palmar aspect of the hands during the post partum period, with histology consistent with microthrombotic disease, despite anticoagulation. Cutaneous pseudovasculitis appears to be a maternal manifestation of aPL coagulopathy, possibly reflecting the severity of the underlying pregnancy pathology.

  3. Cutaneous Findings in Patients with Acromegaly

    OpenAIRE

    Akoglu, Gulsen; Metin, Ahmet; Emre, Selma; Ersoy, Reyhan; Cakir, Bekir

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acromegaly is a systemic syndrome caused by overproduction of growth hormone. The syndrome affects cutaneous, endocrine, cardiovascular, skeletal, and respiratory systems. Cutaneous manifestations of acromegaly are various, usually being the first presenting findings of the disease. Methods: Dermatological examinations of 49 patients of acromegaly who were followed-up at a tertiary referral hospital.Results: The study included 27 (55.1%) female and 22 (44.9%) male patients. The on...

  4. Uncommon cutaneous manifestations of lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascaro, J M; Herrero, C; Hausmann, G

    1997-01-01

    Cutaneous manifestations of lupus erythematosus (LE) are, usually, characteristic enough to permit an easy diagnosis. However, some patients may present less typical lesions, associated or not to the classic ones. Therefore, irrespectively of the variety of LE (acute, subacute and chronic), in absence of the typical butterfly rash, erythematosquamous papules or plaques, or any of the characteristic cutaneous alterations, it is important (even though not always easy) to recognize the uncommon and/or atypical changes of the skin.

  5. Cutaneous mechanisms of isometric ankle force control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Julia T; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Leukel, Christian; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2013-07-01

    The sense of force is critical in the control of movement and posture. Multiple factors influence our perception of exerted force, including inputs from cutaneous afferents, muscle afferents and central commands. Here, we studied the influence of cutaneous feedback on the control of ankle force output. We used repetitive electrical stimulation of the superficial peroneal (foot dorsum) and medial plantar nerves (foot sole) to disrupt cutaneous afferent input in 8 healthy subjects. We measured the effects of repetitive nerve stimulation on (1) tactile thresholds, (2) performance in an ankle force-matching and (3) an ankle position-matching task. Additional force-matching experiments were done to compare the effects of transient versus continuous stimulation in 6 subjects and to determine the effects of foot anesthesia using lidocaine in another 6 subjects. The results showed that stimulation decreased cutaneous sensory function as evidenced by increased touch threshold. Absolute dorsiflexion force error increased without visual feedback during peroneal nerve stimulation. This was not a general effect of stimulation because force error did not increase during plantar nerve stimulation. The effects of transient stimulation on force error were greater when compared to continuous stimulation and lidocaine injection. Position-matching performance was unaffected by peroneal nerve or plantar nerve stimulation. Our results show that cutaneous feedback plays a role in the control of force output at the ankle joint. Understanding how the nervous system normally uses cutaneous feedback in motor control will help us identify which functional aspects are impaired in aging and neurological diseases.

  6. The case of diagnosis of imported cutaneous leishmaniasis in Zaporozhye

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    V. G. Savelyev

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Article presents the current data on the clinical and epidemiological issue of leishmaniasis. Methods and results. Leishmaniasis is endemic disease in 88 countries, mainly in tropical and subtropical climates. Probability of importation of American cutaneous leishmaniasis in our country is practically zero, but, given the rarity of this disease, we present own clinical observation of imported cutaneous leishmaniasis in Zaporozhye. At the beginning of the third millennium has greatly increased the urgency of tropical parasitic diseases, including leishmaniasis. According to WHO, the world's 14 million people are infected each year there is about 2 million new cases and about 350 million live in areas at risk. Leishmaniasis - a group of vector-borne protozoal disease in humans and animals characterized by lesions of the internal organs (visceral leishmaniasis or the skin and mucous membranes (cutaneous leishmaniasis, which is the vector mosquitoes. We present their own clinical observations of American cutaneous leishmaniasis imported. Patient S., 41 years was hospitalized in Zaporozhye Regional Clinical Hospital infectious on 07.17.2013, with suspected cutaneous leishmaniasis. From the history of the disease is known that for the first time in February 2013 the patient have got relative to blade area redness and bump that appeared above the skin, and had a magnitude of 2,3 mm brownish-red. To the doctor the patient has not addressed. After 1,5-2 months bump grew and he began to stand out ichor, which dries and formed a crust on top of the hump. Further small ulcers that did not bring discomfort and pain to the patient appeared. However, every month ulcer increased. In July, after vacation at sea, rose weeping sores and perifocal inflammation appeared. Ulcer size reached 2 cm in diameter. The patient first applied to the dermatologist at the beginning of July 2013. Dermatologist excluded secondary syphilis and tuberculosis skin and sent to an

  7. Epidemiology of superficial and cutaneous mycosis in 5500 suspected patients in Tehran

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    Ayatollah Nasrollahi Omran

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Identification of the determatophytosis species and superficial mycosis agents may be useful in directing the survey for environmental and animal sources of infection to educate the danger of acquiring infections from infected persons and other animals. Based on this background the identification of cutaneous mycosis distribution was the main purpose."n"nMethods: From March 2005 to Feb 2009 we examined 5500 patients suspected to superficial and cutaneous mycosis referred to medical mycology labs in Tehran, Iran for Medical Mycology examination. Skin, hair and nail sampling were taken by scraping from patients and collected for diagnosis. Diagnosis was confirmed by direct microscopy and culture according to the mycology routine laboratory methods."n"nResults: A total of 2271 cases (41.3% suffered from superficial and cutaneous mycosis. The most common infections were dermatophytosis 1279 cases (56.31%, Tinea Versicolor 356 cases (15.47%, Erythersma 283 cases (12.46%, cutaneous candidiosis 243 cases (10.7% and sacrophytic cutaneous mycosis 110 cases (4.83%. Tichophyton mentagrophytes was the most common etiological agent with 198 cases (41.56%. The most common clinical type of cutaneous candidiasis was

  8. Interventions for cutaneous molluscum contagiosum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wouden, Johannes C.; van der Sande, Renske; van Suijlekom-Smit, Lisette W. A.; Berger, Marjolein; Butler, Christopher; Koning, Sander

    2009-01-01

    Background Molluscum contagiosum is a common skin infection, caused by a pox virus. The infection will usually resolve within months in people with a normal immune system. Many treatments have been used for molluscum contagiosum but a clear evidence base supporting them is lacking. This is an

  9. Interventions for cutaneous molluscum contagiosum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wouden, Johannes C.; van der Sande, Renske; van Suijlekom-Smit, Lisette W. A.; Berger, Marjolein; Butler, Christopher; Koning, Sander

    2009-01-01

    Background Molluscum contagiosum is a common skin infection, caused by a pox virus. The infection will usually resolve within months in people with a normal immune system. Many treatments have been used for molluscum contagiosum but a clear evidence base supporting them is lacking. This is an update

  10. Gangrenous cutaneous mucormycosis caused by Rhizopus oryzae: a case report and review of primary cutaneous mucormycosis in China over Past 20 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, HouMin; Hwang, Sonia Kay; Zhou, Cheng; Du, Juan; Zhang, JianZhong

    2013-08-01

    Cutaneous mucormycosis is a rare opportunistic infection caused by zygomycetes that can be rapidly fatal if unrecognized. We describe the clinical, histopathological, fungal and molecular features of a case of gangrenous cutaneous mucormycosis. The patient presented with great necrosis on his right forearm at the site of detained intravenous cannula needle. He had type II diabetes and chronic renal insufficiency. KOH mount of black eschar showed many broad, aseptate fungal hyphae with right-angle branching. PAS staining of the tissue sample revealed similar broad hyphae in the dermis and cutis. Fungal culture and ITS sequence analysis identified this fungus as Rhizopus oryzae. As no organ involvement was detected, the patient was diagnosed with primary cutaneous mucormycosis. Considering the poor state of the patient, complete excision of the infectious tissue was performed without skin graft instead of amputation. At the same time, intravenous liposomal amphotericin B was given, starting from a small dosage and increased to a total dosage amount of 5.45 g. The wound recovered well with granulation. We emphasize that early recognition and prompt therapy including the control of the primary diseases were important. In this article, we also reviewed the features of primary cutaneous mucormycosis reported in China over the last 20 years.

  11. Exophiala spinifera as a cause of cutaneous phaeohyphomycosis: case study and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, John E; Sutton, Deanna A; Rubin, Adam; Wickes, Brian; De Hoog, G S; Kovarik, Carrie

    2009-02-01

    Exophiala spinifera has been reported as an agent of cutaneous disease 18 times in the literature. Clinical presentations of cutaneous lesions vary widely, including erythematous papules, verrucous plaques, and deep subcutaneous abscesses. The clinical distribution and course of disease are also variable, depending on the age and immune competency of the patient. Histologic appearance occurs in one of two patterns--phaeohyphomycosis or chromoblastomycosis. While E. spinifera appears to be susceptible to multiple antimicrobial agents in vitro, clinical experience with treatment modalities has been variable. Prior to the availability of sequencing methods, species identification was based on the histopathologic presentation in tissue and morphologic features of the fungus in culture. It is likely that E. spinifera cutaneous infections have been underreported due to its incorrect identification based on earlier methods. We report an additional case of E. spinifera phaeohyphomycosis, the first to be definitively identified by sequencing. In addition, we summarize the variable clinical, histopathologic, and morphologic features, as well as treatment responses described in previously reported cutaneous infections caused by E. spinifera.

  12. Corynebacterium striatum infecting a malignant cutaneous lesion: the emergence of an opportunistic pathogen Corynebacterium striatum infectando lesão cutânea maligna: a emergência de um patógeno oportunista

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Vargas Superti

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We described a case of a 27-year old male patient with skin and soft tissue infection of a neoplastic lesion caused by Corynebacterium striatum, an organism which has been rarely described as a human pathogen. Identification was confirmed by DNA sequencing. Successful treatment with penicillin was achieved. The role of the C. striatum as an emerging opportunistic pathogen is discussed.Descrevemos infecção de lesão neoplásica em paciente masculino de 27 anos, envolvendo pele e partes moles, causada por Corynebacterium striatum, um microrganismo raramente descrito como patógeno humano. A identificação foi confirmada por seqüenciamento de DNA. O paciente foi tratado com penicilina, com sucesso. O papel do C. striatum como patógeno oportunista é discutido.

  13. Influence of the treatment protocol upon the in vivo efficacy of cidofovir (HPMPC) and of acyclovir (ACV) formulations in topical treatment of cutaneous HSV-1 infection in hairless mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afouna, M I; Mehta, S C; Ghanem, A H; Higuchi, W I; Kern, E R; DeClercq, E; El-Shattawy, H H

    1999-05-01

    In recent studies we found that the topical effectiveness of acyclovir (ACV) formulations was a single-valued function of C-the target site free drug concentration. The topical efficacy was the same when the therapy was initiated 0, 1, or 2 days after intracutaneous herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) inoculation in hairless mice. The purpose of the present study was to examine the hypothesis that the topical effectiveness of cidofovir (HPMPC) would not be a single valued function of C and that it would be dependent upon when the therapy was initiated relative to the time of viral infection. Formulations of HPMPC and ACV in 95% DMSO as a vehicle were used. Hairless mice intracutaneously infected with HSV-1 were used, and 20 microL of the test formulation was topically applied twice a day. In protocol A, the treatment was continued until the fourth day after virus inoculation, whereas in protocol B the treatment was terminated on the day of virus inoculation. Treatment was initiated on various days ranging from day -6 to day 4, and the lesions were scored on day 5. Treatment of ACV according to protocol A proved efficacious whether started as early as 6 days before virus inoculation or later, whereas the efficacy of ACV was annihilated if applied following protocol B. For HPMPC, on the other hand, the in vivo efficacies were found to be strongly dependent on how early the therapy was initiated, and significant efficacy was observed even when the treatment was terminated on the day of virus inoculation. This difference was attributed to the virus-independent intracellular phosphorylation of HPMPC and slow clearance of its metabolites from the cell. It was also noted that, similar to ACV, for HPMPC the topical efficacy is likely to be a function of C for a fixed protocol. However, unlike for ACV, for HPMPC the efficacy was not a single-valued function of C.

  14. Hepatitis C and cutaneous alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Rita Fachinelli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available While most of those infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV are asymptomatic or only develop liver manifestations, a significant percentage evolves with autoimmune and lymphoproliferative disorders, resulting in a clinical condition called HCV syndrome. This work involving case studies of six patients with hepatitis C and varied skin manifestation aimed to report skin lesions occurring with HCV infection and its treatment. Skin manifestations in hepatitis C have been based on epidemiological studies. This justifies the need for studies that correlate HCV infection and its treatment with skin manifestations.

  15. Choroidal Metastases From Cutaneous Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Carmel L; Toy, Brian C; Kistler, Henry B; Moshfeghi, Darius M

    2016-05-01

    A 92-year-old man presented with months of progressive blurry vision, worsening acutely in his right eye. He denied pain, diplopia, or photopsias. His history was significant for multiple myeloma, prostate cancer, and malignant melanoma of his right shoulder treated with local excision. He had local recurrence with hepatic metastasis of the melanoma treated with radiation and chemotherapy. On examination, his visual acuity was counting fingers in the right eye and 20/60 in the left eye. Amsler grid testing demonstrated metamorphopsia in the right eye. Fundus exam of the right and left eyes revealed multiple, elevated, pigmented choroidal lesions, with associated subretinal fluid in the right macula. This appearance is consistent with hematogenous metastasis of cutaneous malignant melanoma to the choroid and associated serous fluid-causing metamorphopsia. The patient was enrolled in a clinical trial combining plasmid IL-12 with pembrolizumab (Keytruda; Merck, Whitehouse Station, NJ). He passed away 2 months after initial presentation to our clinic. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:497.].

  16. [Mechanisms of cutaneous drug reactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaillant, L

    2000-06-15

    Two main mechanisms, pharmacologic and immunoallergic, are responsible for cutaneous reactions to drugs. Pharmacologic mechanisms can be predictable (overdosage, cumulative or delayed toxicity, adverse effects) or unpredictable (idiosyncratic, intolerance, or anaphylactic reaction). Immunoallergic mechanisms can be mediated by IgE (some types of urticaria and anaphylactic shock), due to circulating immune complexes (leukocytoclastic vasculitis, serum sickness-type reactions) or mediated by lymphocytes (exanthema, Lyell's syndrome, fixed pigmented erythema, photosensitization). The diagnostic work-up varies according to the causative mechanism. When the reaction is predictable, the responsible drug can be identified according to the data in the present bibliography. When the reaction is immunologic, only the chronologic sequence of events can identify the responsible drug. The risk of recurrence with an identical or related molecule also varies according to the causative mechanism. For urticaria, diagnosis and the risk of recurrence differ according to whether the cause is allergic (mediated by IgE or urticarial vasculitis) or is pharmacologic (urticaria due to aspirin or to conversion enzyme inhibitors).

  17. Cryptococcosis mimicking cutaneous cellulitis in a patient suffering from rheumatoid arthritis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Probst Corina

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cryptococcus neoformans is an encapsulated yeast and the most frequent cryptococcal species found in humans. Cryptococcosis is considered an opportunistic infection as it affects mainly immunosuppressed individuals. In humans, C. neoformans causes three types of infections: pulmonary cryptococcosis, cryptococcal meningitis and wound or cutaneous cryptococcosis. Case Presentation An 81-year-old woman developed severe necrotizing cellulitis on her left arm without any preceding injury. The patient had been treated with systemic corticosteroids over twenty years for rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Skin biopsies of the wound area were initially interpreted as cutaneous vasculitis of unknown etiology. However, periodic acid Schiff staining and smear analysis later revealed structures consistent with Cryptococcus neoformans, and the infection was subsequently confirmed by culture. After the initiation of therapy with fluconazole 400 mg per day the general condition and the skin ulcers improved rapidly and the patient was discharged to a rehabilitation facility. Subsequently surgical debridement and skin grafting were performed. Conclusions Opportunistic infections such as cryptococcosis can clinically and histologically mimic cutaneous vasculitis and have to be investigated rigorously as a differential diagnosis in immunosuppressed patients.

  18. Bacterial toxins fuel disease progression in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willerslev-Olsen, Andreas; Krejsgaard, Thorbjørn; Lindahl, Lise M; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menne; Wasik, Mariusz A; Koralov, Sergei B; Geisler, Carsten; Kilian, Mogens; Iversen, Lars; Woetmann, Anders; Odum, Niels

    2013-08-14

    In patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) bacterial infections constitute a major clinical problem caused by compromised skin barrier and a progressive immunodeficiency. Indeed, the majority of patients with advanced disease die from infections with bacteria, e.g., Staphylococcus aureus. Bacterial toxins such as staphylococcal enterotoxins (SE) have long been suspected to be involved in the pathogenesis in CTCL. Here, we review links between bacterial infections and CTCL with focus on earlier studies addressing a direct role of SE on malignant T cells and recent data indicating novel indirect mechanisms involving SE- and cytokine-driven cross-talk between malignant- and non-malignant T cells.

  19. Bacterial Toxins Fuel Disease Progression in Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Woetmann

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL bacterial infections constitute a major clinical problem caused by compromised skin barrier and a progressive immunodeficiency. Indeed, the majority of patients with advanced disease die from infections with bacteria, e.g., Staphylococcus aureus. Bacterial toxins such as staphylococcal enterotoxins (SE have long been suspected to be involved in the pathogenesis in CTCL. Here, we review links between bacterial infections and CTCL with focus on earlier studies addressing a direct role of SE on malignant T cells and recent data indicating novel indirect mechanisms involving SE- and cytokine-driven cross-talk between malignant- and non-malignant T cells.

  20. Recurrent Coxsackievirus Infection in a Patient with Lamellar Ichthyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damsky, William E; Leventhal, Jonathan S; Khalil, David; Vesely, Matthew D; Craiglow, Brittany G; Milstone, Leonard M; Choate, Keith A

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of coxsackievirus (CV) A6 infection in a patient with lamellar ichthyosis followed by subsequent CV A8 infection within the same year. Atypical cutaneous features characterized the infection. This observation, combined with the rapidity with which reinfection occurred, suggests that the natural history of CV infection may be altered in patients with underlying ichthyoses.

  1. Cutaneous Tuberculosis Occurring After a Skin Cut in a Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkoc, Gulsen; Kepenekli Kadayifci, Eda; Karaaslan, Ayse; Atici, Serkan; Yakut, Nurhayat; Ocal Demir, Sevilya; Akbas, Gamze; Zeliha Cinel, Leyla; Soysal, Ahmet; Bakir, Mustafa

    2016-08-01

    Tuberculosis is a common problem in Turkey, and cutaneous tuberculosis is a rare form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Herein, the authors describe a case of cutaneous tuberculosis (lupus vulgaris) occurring after contact with a sheep. A 15-year-old boy was admitted to Marmara University School of Medicine Pendik Training and Research Hospital (Istanbul, Turkey) with delayed wound healing on the left index finger and left axillary lymphadenopathy. His medical history was unremarkable except for a wound incurred when he slaughtered a sheep 3 months before. One month after this injury, the patient developed enlargement of the left axillary lymph node on the side of the wounded extremity, and the wound turned a dark black color. The biopsy specimens obtained from the wounded skin and lymph nodes showed granulomatous reaction, but acid-fast bacilli (AFB) could not be shown with Ehrlich-Ziehl Neelsen staining. The patient tested positive in an interferon-gamma release assay. Computerized tomography scans of the thorax were normal, and early morning gastric lavage specimen was negative for AFB. The wound and axillary lymphadenopathy disappeared after institution of anti-tuberculosis therapy. Tuberculosis infection must be considered in chronic skin lesions with granulomatous reaction occurring in countries with high prevalence of tuberculosis.

  2. American cutaneous leishmaniasis: presentation and problems of patient management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey D. Chulay

    1988-12-01

    Full Text Available We report our experience with the diagnosis and treatment of 60 patients with American cutaneous leishmaniasis. They were infected in Panama (55, Brazil (4 or Colombia (I. Among 35 patients with a 3 week exposure in Panama, the mean maximum incubation period was 33 days (range 4-81 days. Diagnosis was delayed an average of 93 days after onset of skin lesions, due to the patient's delay in seeking medical attention (31 days, medical personnel's delay in considering the diagnosis (45 days, and the laboratory's delay in confirming the diagnosis (17 days. Forty-four patients (73% developed ulcers typical of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Sixteen additional patients (27% had atypical macular, papular, squamous, verrucous or acneiform skin lesions that were diagnosed only because leishmanial cultures were obtained. Of the 59 patients treated with pentavalent antimonial drugs, only 34 (58% were cured after the first course of treatment. Lesions which were at least 2 cm in diameter, ulcerated, or caused by Leishmania braziliensis were less likely to be cured after a single course of treatment than were lesions smaller than 2 cm, nonulcerated or caused by Leishmania mexicana or Leishmania donovani.

  3. Cutaneous Manifestations of Familial Transthyretin Amyloid Polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanoue, Julien; Wei, Nancy; Gorevic, Peter; Phelps, Robert G

    2016-10-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) is a rare inherited autosomal dominant form of systemic amyloidosis, which classically presents with severe motor, sensory, and autonomic dysfunction. Cutaneous involvement does not become clinically apparent until late stage symptomatic disease and is rarely reported in modern literature. Here, the authors review the clinical and histologic cutaneous findings of FAP previously described in the literature and report on 3 patients with unique genetic mutations (Thr60Ala and Gly6Ser; Trp41Leu; Glu89Gln) for which cutaneous involvement has not previously been described. Histologically, our patients showed variable amyloid deposition in the subcutaneous adipose tissue, papillary dermis, and dermal blood vessel walls. A review of the literature suggests cutaneous transthyretin deposition is an underrecognized feature of FAP that occurs early on in disease, even before neural involvement and related symptoms as seen in one of our patients. As such, a cutaneous punch biopsy can serve as quick, easy, and relatively noninvasive diagnostic tool in suspected cases.

  4. Synergic effect of combination of glycyrol and fluconazole against experimental cutaneous candidiasis due to Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhew, Zheong-Imm; Han, Yongmoon

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the anti-fungal activity of glycyrol, a coumarine isolated from licorice (Glycyrrhizae Radix), in a murine model of cutaneous candidiasis caused by Candida albicans. Compared to the infected sites, located on the mice's back, of the untreated control mice, the infected sites treated with glycyrol had reduced CFU (colony forming unit) values up to 60 and 85.5 % at 20 and 40 μg/mouse of glycyrol, respectively (P fluconazole (10 μg/mouse), demonstrating that the combination therapy is approximately 4 times more effective than fluconazole alone at 20 μg/mouse (P fluconazole alone at 40 μg/mouse (P fluconazole invade C. albicans more readily and attack fluconazole's target in the fungus membrane. In summary, our data indicate that glycyrol may contribute to the development of a novel agent that possesses antifungal activity against cutaneous candidiasis.

  5. Design of a portable imager for near-infrared visualization of cutaneous wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhaoqiang; Zhou, Jun; Dacy, Ashley; Zhao, Deyin; Kearney, Vasant; Zhou, Weidong; Tang, Liping; Hu, Wenjing

    2017-01-01

    A portable imager developed for real-time imaging of cutaneous wounds in research settings is described. The imager consists of a high-resolution near-infrared CCD camera capable of detecting both bioluminescence and fluorescence illuminated by an LED ring with a rotatable filter wheel. All external components are integrated into a compact camera attachment. The device is demonstrated to have competitive performance with a commercial animal imaging enclosure box setup in beam uniformity and sensitivity. Specifically, the device was used to visualize the bioluminescence associated with increased reactive oxygen species activity during the wound healing process in a cutaneous wound inflammation model. In addition, this device was employed to observe the fluorescence associated with the activity of matrix metalloproteinases in a mouse lipopolysaccharide-induced infection model. Our results support the use of the portable imager design as a noninvasive and real-time imaging tool to assess the extent of wound inflammation and infection.

  6. Leishmania tropica in rock hyraxes (Procavia capensis) in a focus of human cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmi-Frank, Dalit; Jaffe, Charles L; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Warburg, Alon; King, Roni; Svobodova, Milena; Peleg, Ofer; Baneth, Gad

    2010-05-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis, caused by Leishmania tropica, has recently emerged in urban and rural foci of central and northern Israel, and constitutes a major public health concern. Rock hyraxes (Procavia capensis), the suspected natural reservoir, were trapped in the cutaneous leishmaniasis urban focus of Maale Adumim in central Israel and evaluated for L. tropica infection by real-time kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and serology. Real-time PCR on blood and computerized western blot serology analysis was positive for L. tropica in 58% and 80%, respectively, of the hyraxes tested. Phylogenetic analysis of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 region indicated that similar genotypes were present in humans and hyraxes from the same habitat. The high rates of infection and exposure to L. tropica among hyraxes supports their involvement in the transmission cycle of this parasite, and their potential role as a reservoir for human disease.

  7. Proton pump inhibitor-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandholdt, L H; Laurinaviciene, R; Bygum, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) has been known in the literature since 1985 and is increasingly recognized.......Drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) has been known in the literature since 1985 and is increasingly recognized....

  8. Naevus lipomatosus cutaneous superficialis : Report of 2 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thappa D

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Two cases of naevus lipomatosus cutaneous superficialis (NLCS are reported. One of them was a case of multiple form of NLCS while other was having cutaneous lesions resembling solitary form of NLCS.

  9. Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin A (SEA) stimulates STAT3 activation and IL-17 expression in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev-Olsen, Andreas; Krejsgaard, Thorbjørn; Lindahl, Lise Maria;

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is characterized by proliferation of malignant T cells in a chronic inflammatory environment. With disease progression, bacteria colonize the compromised skin barrier and half of CTCL patients die of infection rather than from direct organ involvement by the malig...

  10. Spontaneous interleukin-5 production in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma lines is mediated by constitutively activated Stat3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette; Nissen, Mogens H; Gerwien, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides is a low-grade cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) of unknown etiology. In advanced stages of CTCL, a shift in cytokine profile from T(H)1 to T(H)2 is observed, which coincides with eosinophilia, high levels of immunoglobulin E, and increased susceptibility to bacterial infections....

  11. Spontaneous interleukin-5 production in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma lines is mediated by constitutively activated Stat3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette; Nissen, Mogens H; Gerwien, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides is a low-grade cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) of unknown etiology. In advanced stages of CTCL, a shift in cytokine profile from T(H)1 to T(H)2 is observed, which coincides with eosinophilia, high levels of immunoglobulin E, and increased susceptibility to bacterial infections...

  12. Cutaneous manifestations of hepatitis C in the era of new antiviral agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Simone; Garcovich; Matteo; Garcovich; Rodolfo; Capizzi; Antonio; Gasbarrini; Maria; Assunta; Zocco

    2015-01-01

    The association of chronic hepatitis C virus(HCV) infection with a wide spectrum of cutaneous manifestations has been widely reported in the literature, with varying strength of epidemiological association. Skin diseases which are certainly related with chronic HCV infection due to a strong epidemiological and pathogenetic association are mixed cryoglobulinemia, lichen planus and porphyria cutanea tarda. Chronic pruritus and necrolytic acral erythema are conditions that may share a possible association with HCV infection, while several immune-mediated inflammatory skin conditions, such as psoriasis, chronic urticaria and vitiligo, have been only anecdotally reported in the setting of chronic HCV infection. Traditional interferonbased treatment regimens for HCV infection are associated with substantial toxicity and a high-risk of immune-related adverse events, while the advent of new direct-acting antivirals with sustained virological response and improved tolerability will open the door for all-oral, interferon-free regimens. In the new era of these direct acting antivirals there will be hopefully a renewed interest in extra-hepatic manifestations of HCV infection. The aim of the present paper is to review the main cutaneous HCV-related disorders- mixed cryoglobulinemia, lichen planus, porphyria cutanea tarda and chronic pruritus- and to discuss the potential impact of new antiviral treatments on the course of these extrahepatic manifestations of chronic HCV infection.

  13. The Cutaneous Ciliated Cyst in Young Male: The Possibility of Ciliated Cutaneous Eccrine Cyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngjoon; Kim, Hyunjung

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous ciliated cyst was described as a painless cyst occurring on the lower limbs of women between the ages of 15 and 30 years. The cysts are typically lined by ciliated cuboidal to columnar epithelium with pseudostratified areas and focal squamous metaplasia is occasionally present. Immunohistochemical studies have demonstrated that the cysts are PR and ER positive, similar to the epithelia of the fallopian tubes. However, outliers of cutaneous ciliated cysts, including those in male patients and in unexpected locations such as the scalp, finger, and scapular area, have been reported. Thus, some hypotheses have been proposed including the Mullerian heterotopias, ciliated metaplasia of eccrine sweat glands, and embryonic remnants of the cloacal membrane. We report a rare case of cutaneous ciliated cyst on the left shoulder of a 7-year-old boy and this is the eighth case of cutaneous ciliated cyst in male patients. Moreover, through reviewing the articles, we try to propose the classification of the cutaneous ciliated cysts into the cutaneous Mullerian cysts and the ciliated cutaneous eccrine cysts. PMID:26491452

  14. The Cutaneous Ciliated Cyst in Young Male: The Possibility of Ciliated Cutaneous Eccrine Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjoon Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous ciliated cyst was described as a painless cyst occurring on the lower limbs of women between the ages of 15 and 30 years. The cysts are typically lined by ciliated cuboidal to columnar epithelium with pseudostratified areas and focal squamous metaplasia is occasionally present. Immunohistochemical studies have demonstrated that the cysts are PR and ER positive, similar to the epithelia of the fallopian tubes. However, outliers of cutaneous ciliated cysts, including those in male patients and in unexpected locations such as the scalp, finger, and scapular area, have been reported. Thus, some hypotheses have been proposed including the Mullerian heterotopias, ciliated metaplasia of eccrine sweat glands, and embryonic remnants of the cloacal membrane. We report a rare case of cutaneous ciliated cyst on the left shoulder of a 7-year-old boy and this is the eighth case of cutaneous ciliated cyst in male patients. Moreover, through reviewing the articles, we try to propose the classification of the cutaneous ciliated cysts into the cutaneous Mullerian cysts and the ciliated cutaneous eccrine cysts.

  15. Novel Cutaneous Manifestations of Pleuroparenchymal Fibroelastosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowther, Christopher M; Morrison, Annie O; Candelario, Nicole M; Khalafbeigi, Sheva; Cockerell, Clay J

    2016-10-01

    Pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (PPFE) is a rare progressive disease that manifests as parenchymal fibrosis of the upper lobe and pleura. Approximately 100 cases have been reported. Cutaneous manifestations of PPFE have not previously been described. Diagnosis is dependent on histologic identification of fibrosis with atypical elastic fibers, necessitating an invasive peripheral lung wedge biopsy.A 68-year-old male with a history of pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis presented with an asymptomatic, telangiectatic erythematous eruption on bilateral lower extremities. Biopsies demonstrated a subtle perivascular infiltrate with marked increase in atypical elastic fibers, similar to the elastosis in the patient's lungs.This is the first documented case of cutaneous manifestations in PPFE. Clinicians need to be aware that cutaneous eruptions clinically simulating telangiectasia macularis eruptiva perstans but lacking a mast cell infiltrate histologically, may have increased abnormal elastic fibers. Thus, early recognition of these lesions in patients with an undefined restrictive lung disorder, may facilitate the diagnosis of PPFE in some patients.

  16. Creation of a virtual cutaneous tissue bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFramboise, William A.; Shah, Sujal; Hoy, R. W.; Letbetter, D.; Petrosko, P.; Vennare, R.; Johnson, Peter C.

    2000-04-01

    Cellular and non-cellular constituents of skin contain fundamental morphometric features and structural patterns that correlate with tissue function. High resolution digital image acquisitions performed using an automated system and proprietary software to assemble adjacent images and create a contiguous, lossless, digital representation of individual microscope slide specimens. Serial extraction, evaluation and statistical analysis of cutaneous feature is performed utilizing an automated analysis system, to derive normal cutaneous parameters comprising essential structural skin components. Automated digital cutaneous analysis allows for fast extraction of microanatomic dat with accuracy approximating manual measurement. The process provides rapid assessment of feature both within individual specimens and across sample populations. The images, component data, and statistical analysis comprise a bioinformatics database to serve as an architectural blueprint for skin tissue engineering and as a diagnostic standard of comparison for pathologic specimens.

  17. Current approach to cutaneous mastocytosis in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamay, Zeynep; Özçeker, Deniz

    2016-09-01

    Mastocytosis is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by clonal proliferation and accumulation of mast cells in one of more organs which may lead to different clinical pictures. Pathological increase and activation of mast cells in various tissues can cause different clinical pictures. Cutaneous mastocytosis limited to the skin is the most typical clinical picture observed in children and systemic mastocytosis is very rare in the pediatric age group. The diagnosis of cutaneous mastocytosis is based on clinical findings, but is often delayed due to lack of clinical awareness of the disease and lack of its consideration in the differential diagnosis. This article focuses on the current diagnosis, management and treatment of cutaneous mastocytosis in children in order to increase awareness about this issue.

  18. Perforin expression in feline epitheliotropic cutaneous lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neta, Michal; Naigamwalla, Dinaz; Bienzle, Dorothee

    2008-11-01

    Cutaneous lymphomas are uncommon in people and companion animals. The tumors can be broadly categorized into epitheliotropic and nonepitheliotropic forms, which appear to have different biological behaviors. The present case describes a feline cutaneous epitheliotropic lymphoma. Masses in a 9-year-old cat were first identified on the tail. The cat was treated with chemotherapy, but additional skin masses developed on the flank, face, and ears. Local radiation induced transient tumor regression, but eventual dissemination prompted euthanasia 13 months after initial tumor appearance. Granular lymphocytes were consistently detected on blood smears, and histologically, the tumor involved the skin and superficial subcutis. Tumor lymphocytes expressed cluster of differentiation 3 (CD3) and perforin molecules, suggestive of a cytotoxic phenotype. Location, histopathological features, and perforin expression were similar to a distinct entity in human medicine designated primary cutaneous, CD8-positive, epidermotropic, cytotoxic, T-cell lymphoma.

  19. [Current diagnosis of cutaneous lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haust, M; Bonsmann, G; Kuhn, A

    2006-07-14

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) is a disease with different subtypes and the new classification system includes acute CLE (ACLE), subacute CLE (SCLE), chronic CLE (CCLE), and intermittent CLE (ICLE). The broad spectrum of skin involvement and the possibility of systemic organ manifestations at the beginning and during the course of CLE require specific diagnostic procedures. Clinical assessment of the cutaneous manifestations is necessary along with a detailed patient's history. The diagnosis of CLE is confirmed by histopathology and immunofluorescence microscopy. Selective laboratory screening and additional diagnostic procedures depending on clinical symptoms are recommended. Photoprovocation tests can be performed to assess photosensitivity in patients with CLE and to support the diagnosis. Recently, a scoring system for the activity of the cutaneous manifestations in CLE has been developed and is now evaluated in several clinical studies. In this review, the classification and the characteristic clinical criteria of the different CLE subtypes as well as the current diagnostic possibilities are emphasized.

  20. Cutaneous sarcoidosis: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu Suparna M, Joshi Shivani

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a Greek word (Sarco means flesh and Eido means type or like. Cutaneous sarcoidosis occurs in up to one third of patients with systemic sarcoidosis. This disease is characterised by the presence of non – caseating epitheloid cell granulomas in the skin. Cutaneous sarcoidosis presents as a diagnostic challenge to the dermatopathologists due to its varied presentations and almost identical histologic pictures. Hence, exclusion of infectious causes and compatibility with clinical and radiologic picture serve as significant criteria to come up to a diagnosis. Sometimes; skin lesions are the first manifestation of systemic sarcoidosis. This is not a contagious or allergic disease. There is a risk of development of systemic manifestations at a later date; for which a close follow up is a must. We are presenting a case of cutaneous sarcoidosis, which later on progress to sarcoidosis with systemic manifestations.

  1. Assessment of cutaneous drug delivery using microdialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreilgaard, Mads

    2002-01-01

    During the last decade microdialysis has been successfully applied to assess cutaneous drug delivery of numerous substances, indicating the large potential for bioequivalence/bioavailability evaluation of topical formulations. The technique has been shown to be minimally invasive and supply...... pharmacokinetic information directly in the target organ for cutaneous drug delivery with high temporal resolution without further intervention with the tissue after implantation. However, there are a few challenges that need to be addressed before microdialysis can be regarded as a generally applicable routine...... technique for cutaneous drug delivery assessments. Firstly, the technique is currently not suitable for sampling of highly lipophilic compounds and, secondly, more studies are desirable for elucidation of the variables associated with the technique to increase reproducibility. The present literature...

  2. Ovarian carcinoma presenting as cutaneous nasal metastasis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    António, Ana Marta; Alves, João Vitor; Goulão, João; Bártolo, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic ovarian cancer uncommonly presents with skin metastasis. When present, skin metastases of ovarian cancer are usually localized in the vicinity of the primary tumor. We report a case of a 58-year-old woman with a rapid growing erythematous, well-defined nodule localized on the left nasal ala. A skin biopsy was performed and histopathological and immunohistochemical findings were compatible with a cutaneous metastasis of adenocarcinoma. A systematic investigation revealed a bilateral ovarian cystadenocarcinoma associated with visceral dissemination, likely associated with nose cutaneous metastasis. We report a very uncommon case because of the presentation of ovarian carcinoma as cutaneous metastasis. To our knowledge, this atypical localization on the nose has not been described yet in the literature.

  3. Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum with Cutaneous Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nohad Hanbala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous metastases of rectal carcinoma is a rare event. It occurs in fewer than 4% of all patients with rectal cancer. When present, it typically signifies a disseminated disease with a poor prognosis. Early detection and proper diagnosis of metastatic rectal cancer can significantly alter treatment and prognosis. We report a 70-year-oldmale who underwent rectal resection with permanent colostomy for rectal adenocarcinoma since seven years. The patient recently developed multiple skin nodules, mainly in his face, scalp, and upper trunk, associated with itching. Fine needle aspiration cytology from a face nodule was done which revealed metastatic adenocarcinoma associated with severe inflammation. Cutaneous metastasis of rectaladenocarcinoma is an unusual event that presents mainly in the form of skin nodules and could be the first sign of metastasis. Early diagnosis of cutaneous metastasis in these patients is important because it can alter treatment and prognosis.

  4. Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus presenting as poikiloderma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hughes, R

    2012-02-01

    Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) is a recognised variant of lupus erythematosus (LE), which accounts for 10-15% of all cases of cutaneous LE, occurring most commonly in young to middle-aged white women. Diagnosis is based on the detection of anti-Ro\\/SS-A antibodies in the skin and serum, characteristic clinical and histological cutaneous involvement, and relatively mild systemic involvement. Several unusual variants of SCLE have been reported including erythrodermic SCLE, SCLE with vitiligo-like lesions, acral SCLE and bullous SCLE. Poikoilodermatous SCLE is a recognised but rare variant of SCLE. There are currently only two case reports, comprising five individual cases, in the literature. We present a case of SCLE in which the main clinical findings were an extensive photodistributed poikilodermatous rash and alopecia.

  5. Cutaneous Manifestations of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uva, Luís; Miguel, Diana; Pinheiro, Catarina; Freitas, João Pedro; Marques Gomes, Manuel; Filipe, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multiorgan autoimmune disease of unknown etiology with many clinical manifestations. The skin is one of the target organs most variably affected by the disease. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) established 11 criteria as a classificatory instrument to operationalise the definition of SLE in clinical trials. They were not intended to be used to diagnose individuals and do not do well in that capacity. Cutaneous lesions account for four of these 11 revised criteria of SLE. Skin lesions in patients with lupus may be specific or nonspecific. This paper covers the SLE-specific cutaneous changes: malar rash, discoid rash, photosensitivity, and oral mucosal lesions as well as SLE nonspecific skin manifestations, their pathophysiology, and management. A deeper thorough understanding of the cutaneous manifestations of SLE is essential for diagnosis, prognosis, and efficient management. Thus, dermatologists should cooperate with other specialties to provide optimal care of SLE patient. PMID:22888407

  6. Modern radiation therapy for primary cutaneous lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Lena; Dabaja, Bouthaina; Illidge, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases. They often remain localized, and they generally have a more indolent course and a better prognosis than lymphomas in other locations. They are highly radiosensitive, and radiation therapy is an important part of the treatment, eit...... meetings and analysis of available evidence. The guidelines represent an agreed consensus view of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group steering committee on the use of radiation therapy in primary cutaneous lymphomas in the modern era......., either as the sole treatment or as part of a multimodality approach. Radiation therapy of primary cutaneous lymphomas requires the use of special techniques that form the focus of these guidelines. The International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group has developed these guidelines after multinational...

  7. Pregnancy-Associated "Cutaneous Type" Pemphigus Vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The development of pemphigus, including pemphigus vulgaris (PV) and pemphigus foliaceus, during pregnancy is rare. PV manifests with mucosal and/or cutaneous erosions with flaccid bullae that are histologically characterized by suprabasilar acantholysis. In contrast, pemphigus foliaceus manifests with cutaneous-only involvement and superficial epidermal acantholysis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay specific for autoantibodies against desmoglein 1 and desmoglein 3 aids in the diagnosis and differentiation between pemphigus subtypes. High-dose systemic corticosteroids are first-line agents in management of PV, yet their potential long-term use raises complex management issues associated with pregnancy and fetal risk. Here we report a rare case of cutaneous-limited PV in association with pregnancy.

  8. Cutaneous manifestations in children with diabetes mellitus and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baselga Torres, E; Torres-Pradilla, M

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes are chronic diseases that affect people all over the world, and their incidence is increasing in both children and adults. Clinically, they affect a number of organs, including the skin. The cutaneous manifestations caused or aggravated by obesity and diabetes are varied and usually bear some relation to the time that has elapsed since the onset of the disease. They include soft fibromas, acanthosis nigricans, striae, xerosis, keratosis pilaris, plantar hyperkeratosis, fungal and bacterial skin infections, granuloma annulare, necrobiosis lipoidica, psoriasis, and atopic dermatitis. In this review article we present the skin changes found in children with diabetes mellitus and obesity and related syndromes and highlight the importance of the skin as a tool for establishing clinical suspicion and early diagnosis of systemic disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  9. Cutaneous anthrax in an unusual location: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Tugba; Koruk, Suda Tekin

    2015-12-01

    Cutaneous anthrax is well known, unlike anthrax of the lumbar region, which is not reported elsewhere. We present a case of anthrax of the lumbar region in a 50-year-old man. The infection was characterised by a wide, black eschar and oedema on an erythematous ground. After isolation of the Gram-positive bacilli from the skin lesions, prompt antibiotic treatment (intravenous sulbactam-ampicillin 1.5 g every six hours) was initiated. Following eradication of the bacilli after 14 days of antibiotic treatment, a split-thickness skin graft was applied. A diagnosis of anthrax depends on clinical suspicion. Early diagnosis, antibiotic and surgical treatment can facilitate the treatment and prevent development of complications.

  10. Cutaneous Scar Prevention and Management; Overview of current therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Al-Shaqsi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous scarring is common after trauma, surgery and infection and occurs when normal skin tissue is replaced by fibroblastic tissue during the healing process. The pathophysiology of scar formation is not yet fully understood, although the degree of tension across the wound edges and the speed of cell growth are believed to play central roles. Prevention of scars is essential and can be achieved by attention to surgical techniques and the use of measures to reduce cell growth. Grading and classifying scars is important to determine available treatment strategies. This article presents an overview of the current therapies available for the prevention and treatment of scars. It is intended to be a practical guide for surgeons and other health professionals involved with and interested in scar management.

  11. Cutaneous Scar Prevention and Management: Overview of current therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shaqsi, Sultan; Al-Bulushi, Taimoor

    2016-02-01

    Cutaneous scarring is common after trauma, surgery and infection and occurs when normal skin tissue is replaced by fibroblastic tissue during the healing process. The pathophysiology of scar formation is not yet fully understood, although the degree of tension across the wound edges and the speed of cell growth are believed to play central roles. Prevention of scars is essential and can be achieved by attention to surgical techniques and the use of measures to reduce cell growth. Grading and classifying scars is important to determine available treatment strategies. This article presents an overview of the current therapies available for the prevention and treatment of scars. It is intended to be a practical guide for surgeons and other health professionals involved with and interested in scar management.

  12. Cutaneous metastasis from gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma of unknown primary origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Ana Lucia Ariano; Corbett, Ana Maria França; Oliveira Filho, Jayme de; Nasser, Kassila da Rosa; Haddad, Natalie Nejem; Tebet, Ana Carolina Franco

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous metastasis is a rare manifestation of visceral malignancies that indicates primarily advanced disease. Due to its low incidence and similarity to other cutaneous lesions, it is not uncommon to have a delayed diagnosis and a shortened prognosis. We describe the case of a patient who presented with a cutaneous nodule in the sternal region as a first sign of malignancy.

  13. Problems in Cutaneous Communication from Psychophysics to Information Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmer, B. VonHaller; Clark, Leslie L., Ed.

    After reviewing the history of communication through the skin, this paper considers recent research into the problem of cutaneous stimulation induced both mechanically and electrically. The general demands of a cutaneous communication system are discussed, and four primary dimensions of cutaneous stimulation are summarized (locus, intensity,…

  14. Cutaneous metastasis from gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma of unknown primary origin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Ana Lucia Ariano; Corbett, Ana Maria França; de Oliveira Filho, Jayme; Nasser, Kassila da Rosa; Haddad, Natalie Nejem; Tebet, Ana Carolina Franco

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous metastasis is a rare manifestation of visceral malignancies that indicates primarily advanced disease. Due to its low incidence and similarity to other cutaneous lesions, it is not uncommon to have a delayed diagnosis and a shortened prognosis. We describe the case of a patient who presented with a cutaneous nodule in the sternal region as a first sign of malignancy. PMID:26375228

  15. Cutaneous endometriosis--Surgical presentations of a gynaecological condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, David T; Teh, Wan T

    2006-11-01

    Endometriosis is a common gynaecological condition; cutaneous endometriosis is a subtype of endometriosis. Although cutaneous endometriosis involving the abdominal wall is not common, preoperative diagnosis of cutaneous endometriosis can be easily mistaken for a suture granuloma, lipoma, abscess, cyst or hernia. We report two common surgical presentations of this gynaecological condition.

  16. Cutaneous malignancies in immunosuppressed organ transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda, Ivette M Sosa; Zubair, Adeel; Brewer, Jerry D

    2014-01-01

    During the past century, organ transplantation has delivered the miracle of life to more than 500,000 patients in need. Secondary malignancies have developed as an unforeseen consequence of intense immunosuppressive regimens. Cutaneous malignancies have been recognized as the most frequent cancer that arises post-transplantation. Among organ transplant recipients (OTRs), skin cancer is a substantial cause of morbidity and potential mortality. The authors discuss epidemiology and clinical presentation of cutaneous malignancies; associated risk factors; recommendation for the care of immunosuppressed OTRs, and emerging therapies on the horizon.

  17. Three eyelid localized cutaneous anthrax cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmer, Oktay; Karadag, Remzi; Bilgili, Serap Gunes; Gultepe, Bilge; Bayramlar, Huseyin; Karadag, Ayse Serap

    2014-12-01

    Anthrax is primarily seen in the developing countries, but it can be a worldwide medical concern due to bioterrorism threats. Palpebral anthrax is a rare form of cutaneous anthrax. Untreated cutaneous anthrax can be lethal. Patients with palpebral anthrax can develop complications including cicatrisation and ectropion. Thus, anthrax should be considered in differential diagnosis for patients presenting with preseptal cellulitis in high-risk regions. Herein, we report three anthrax cases (with different age) involving eyelids that were cured without any complications due to early diagnosis and treatment.

  18. Dermatoscopy in diagnosing maculopapular cutaneous mastocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popadić Mirjana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of cutaneous mastocytosis is based on the clinical finding of the pigmented macules or papules, positive Darier's sign and a dermal infiltrate composed of mast cells that can be better visualized by the use of special stains (Giemsa or Toluidine blue. Clinical, dermatoscopic and histopathological presentations of new appearing pigmented lesions in a female patient were presented. Dermatoscopic findings of pigment network-like structure combined with parallel pigmented lines and central reddish background in a adult patient with new appearing pigmented lesions should led us to searching for cutaneous mastocytosis.

  19. Lichenoid type cutaneous hyperpigmentation induced by nebivolol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Abdullah Nabi; Güney, Murat Can; Akçay, Murat; Keleş, Telat; Bozkurt, Engin

    2017-04-01

    Cutaneous hyperpigmentation is a common and well-defined side effect of many drugs, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, beta-blockers, and tetracyclines, but to the best of our knowledge there is no case of skin discoloration related to nebivolol in the literature. Presently described is lichenoid type cutaneous hyperpigmentation in a 46-year-old female patient. Hyperpigmentation emerged 3 months after initiating use of nebivolol and resolved after cessation of drug use. It was concluded that effect emerged as result of therapeutic doses of nebivolol.

  20. Cutaneous osteosarcoma arising from a burn scar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Min A.; Yi, Jaehyuck [Kyungpook National University, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kyungpook National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Chae, Jong Min [Kyungpook National University, Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Tumors that develop in old burn scars are usually squamous cell carcinomas. Sarcomas have also been reported, albeit rarely. To our knowledge, there has been only one case report of an extraskeletal osteosarcoma arising in a prior burn scar reported in the English-language literature, mainly discussing the clinicopathological features. Herein, we present a case of cutaneous osteosarcoma visualized as a mineralized soft-tissue mass arising from the scar associated with a previous skin burn over the back. This seems to be the first report describing the imaging features of a cutaneous osteosarcoma from an old burn scar. (orig.)

  1. Cutaneous toxoplasmosis in an immunosuppressed dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.S. Oliveira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A seven-year-old female spayed Schnauzer was presented with cutaneous ulcerated nodular lesions shortly after the beginning of an immunosuppressive treatment for immune-mediated hemolytic disease. Cytology was performed and a great number of neutrophils and banana-shaped organisms were observed. Biopsy showed a neutrophilic and histiocytic dermatitis and panniculitis with myriads of intralesional bradyzoites cysts and tachyzoites. PCR analysis was positive for Toxoplasma gondii and negative for Neospora caninum. Immunohistochemistry confirmed intralesional T. gondii antigens. This study reports a rare case of cutaneous toxoplasmosis in an immunosuppressed dog.

  2. Cutaneous chancroid in a visitor from Vanuatu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, William J H; Hannah, Rory C S; Le Cornec, Genevera M; Bletchly, Cheryl

    2008-05-01

    A 23-year-old woman from Vanuatu presented to an Australian hospital with a 3-week history of a non-healing ulcer on the lower leg. A swab was submitted for a multiplex polymerase chain reaction designed to investigate genital ulcerative conditions. Haemophilus ducreyi was detected and the gene product was subsequently sequenced, confirming the diagnosis of cutaneous chancroid. The lesion responded to intramuscular benzathine penicillin. This report adds further evidence that cutaneous chancroid should be considered in the evaluation of skin ulcers in the south Pacific.

  3. Cutaneous bacteria of the redback salamander prevent morbidity associated with a lethal disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew H Becker

    Full Text Available Chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd, is an infectious disease that causes population declines of many amphibians. Cutaneous bacteria isolated from redback salamanders, Plethodon cinereus, and mountain yellow-legged frogs, Rana muscosa, inhibit the growth of Bd in vitro. In this study, the bacterial community present on the skin of P. cinereus individuals was investigated to determine if it provides protection to salamanders from the lethal and sub-lethal effects of chytridiomycosis. When the cutaneous bacterial community was reduced prior to Bd exposure, salamanders experienced a significantly greater decrease in body mass, which is a symptom of the disease, when compared to infected individuals with a normal bacterial community. In addition, a greater proportion of infected individuals with a reduced bacterial community experienced limb-lifting, a behavior seen only in infected individuals. Overall, these results demonstrate that the cutaneous bacterial community of P. cinereus provides protection to the salamander from Bd and that alteration of this community can change disease resistance. Therefore, symbiotic microbes associated with this species appear to be an important component of its innate skin defenses.

  4. Sandfly Surveillance within an Emerging Epidemic Focus ofCutaneous Leishmaniasis in Southeastern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Yaghoobi-Ershadi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available "n "nBackground: Cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania major has become a hot topic in Iran. The objective of this study was to determine some ecological aspects of sand flies in the study area. "n "nMethods: Sand flies were collected biweekly from indoors and outdoors fixed places in the selected villages, using 30 sticky paper traps from the beginning to the end of the active season of 2006 in Kerman Province, south of Iran. The flies were mounted and identified. Some blood fed and gravid female sand flies of rodent burrows and indoors were dissected and examined microscopically for natural promastigote infection of Leishmania parasite during August to September. "n "nResults: In total, 2439 specimens comprising 8 species (3 Phlebotomus and 5 Sergentomyia were identified. The most common sand fly was P. papatasi and represented 87.1% of sand flies from indoors and 57.2% from outdoors. The activity of the species extended from April to end October. There are two peaks in the density curve of this species, one in June and the second in August. Natural promastigote infection was found in P. papatasi (12.7%. "n "nConclusion: Phlebotomus papatasi is considered as a probable vector among gerbils and to humans with a high percentage of promastigote infection in this new focus of cutaneous leishmaniasis. The Bahraman area which until recently was unknown as an endemic area seems now to represent a focus of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis transmission in Iran.

  5. Cutaneous bacteria of the redback salamander prevent morbidity associated with a lethal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Matthew H; Harris, Reid N

    2010-06-04

    Chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), is an infectious disease that causes population declines of many amphibians. Cutaneous bacteria isolated from redback salamanders, Plethodon cinereus, and mountain yellow-legged frogs, Rana muscosa, inhibit the growth of Bd in vitro. In this study, the bacterial community present on the skin of P. cinereus individuals was investigated to determine if it provides protection to salamanders from the lethal and sub-lethal effects of chytridiomycosis. When the cutaneous bacterial community was reduced prior to Bd exposure, salamanders experienced a significantly greater decrease in body mass, which is a symptom of the disease, when compared to infected individuals with a normal bacterial community. In addition, a greater proportion of infected individuals with a reduced bacterial community experienced limb-lifting, a behavior seen only in infected individuals. Overall, these results demonstrate that the cutaneous bacterial community of P. cinereus provides protection to the salamander from Bd and that alteration of this community can change disease resistance. Therefore, symbiotic microbes associated with this species appear to be an important component of its innate skin defenses.

  6. Primary cutaneous mucormycosis in infants and neonates: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Daniel; Notrica, David

    2002-11-01

    A case of angioinvasive cutaneous mucormycosis in a premature infant, eventually requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy, is described. The fungal infection began at the site of a brachial artery catheter that had been covered with an adhesive dressing in the left antecubital fossa. The infection progressed rapidly over a 5-day period, and a left arm amputation was required. Fungal hyphae were present at the margins of resection. The patient eventually had disseminated mucormycosis and died. A second case of cutaneous mucormycosis in another premature infant also is presented. This infant had the infection at an intravenous catheter site. Rapid initiation of surgical debridement of the wound and amphotericin B therapy resulted in patient survival. Eighteen reported cases of cutaneous mucormycosis in neonates were found and are reviewed. Prematurity, low birth weight, broad-spectrum antibiotics, corticosteroid therapy, and local trauma to the skin site were common risk factors. Only 7 of the 18 patients survived. Therapy consisted of local debridement and intravenous amphotericin B. High index of suspicion, early diagnosis, and rapid institution of therapy can improve survival rate. The key to prevention appears to be appropriate skin care. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  7. Interventions for cutaneous molluscum contagiosum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wouden, JC; Menke, J; Gajadin, S; Koning, S; Tasche, MJA; van Suijlekom-Smit, LWA; Berger, MY; Butler, CC

    2006-01-01

    Background Molluscum contagiosum is a common skin infection, caused by a virus, which will usually resolve within months in people with a normal immune system. Many treatments have been promoted for molluscum contagiosum but a clear evidence base supporting them is lacking. Objectives To assess the

  8. Interventions for cutaneous molluscum contagiosum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wouden, JC; Menke, J; Gajadin, S; Koning, S; Tasche, MJA; van Suijlekom-Smit, LWA; Berger, MY; Butler, CC

    2006-01-01

    Background Molluscum contagiosum is a common skin infection, caused by a virus, which will usually resolve within months in people with a normal immune system. Many treatments have been promoted for molluscum contagiosum but a clear evidence base supporting them is lacking. Objectives To assess the

  9. Cutaneous acquired toxoplasmosis in a child: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Andrew J; Buck, Andrew B; Love, Porcia B; Prose, Neil S; Selim, M Angelica

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous toxoplasmosis is a rare and diagnostically challenging entity. Today, the acquired form occurs predominantly in immunocompromised patients with human immunodeficiency virus or after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We report a case of cutaneous toxoplasmosis in a 6-year-old girl after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for immune-mediated encephalopathy, first manifesting at 16 months of age. In the post-transplant setting, she developed a rash consisting of approximately 8 scattered 3–4-mm round, erythematous macules and papules on her back, abdomen, and right shoulder. Sections from a biopsy of a lesion on the back revealed numerous spherules tightly packed within small cystic structures in the epidermis. The diagnosis of cutaneous toxoplasmosis was confirmed by an immunohistochemical stain for Toxoplasma gondii and polymerase chain reaction on the peripheral blood for the T. gondii genome. This case should raise awareness that acquired toxoplasmosis with cutaneous involvement can occur in the pediatric population, particularly in immunocompromised patients after stem cell transplantation. Early diagnosis and treatment of this life-threatening opportunistic infection may improve patient outcomes.

  10. Approach to cutaneous vasculitides with special emphasis on small vessel vasculitis: histopathology and direct immunofluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirkesen, Cuyan

    2017-01-01

    The present review will focus on recent publications in cutaneous vasculitides. Some histopathological and clinical features, such as papillary dermal edema, perivascular C3 deposition, clinically evident edema, and lesions above the waist, may point out renal or gastrointestinal involvement in Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP). HSP associated with familial Mediterranean fever differs from typical isolated HSP by showing no deposits of IgA, much younger age, and location of the lesions on the face or the trunk. Single-organ cutaneous small vessel vasculitis is a more restricted entity than hypersensitivity vasculitis and HSP. Because cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa and macular lymphocytic arteritis share some clinicopathologic features, the question is raised whether they are not two different entities. Several histopathological features defining IgG4-related disease are found in granuloma faciale and erythema elevatum diutinum, two localized chronic cutaneous vasculitis; however, in a recent series no diagnostic criteria for IgG4-related disease was detected in them. When a patient presents with skin lesions, in which necrotizing or leukocytoclastic vascuitis is confirmed histologically, irrespective of the size of the affected vessel, the possibility of systemic vasculitis, an infection, medication, or a systemic disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus must be searched before reaching definitive diagnosis.

  11. Gene expression profiling of cutaneous wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ena

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the sequence of events leading to wound repair has been described at the cellular and, to a limited extent, at the protein level this process has yet to be fully elucidated. Genome wide transcriptional analysis tools promise to further define the global picture of this complex progression of events. Study Design This study was part of a placebo-controlled double-blind clinical trial in which basal cell carcinomas were treated topically with an immunomodifier – toll-like receptor 7 agonist: imiquimod. The fourteen patients with basal cell carcinoma in the placebo arm of the trial received placebo treatment consisting solely of vehicle cream. A skin punch biopsy was obtained immediately before treatment and at the end of the placebo treatment (after 2, 4 or 8 days. 17.5K cDNA microarrays were utilized to profile the biopsy material. Results Four gene signatures whose expression changed relative to baseline (before wound induction by the pre-treatment biopsy were identified. The largest group was comprised predominantly of inflammatory genes whose expression was increased throughout the study. Two additional signatures were observed which included preferentially pro-inflammatory genes in the early post-treatment biopsies (2 days after pre-treatment biopsies and repair and angiogenesis genes in the later (4 to 8 days biopsies. The fourth and smallest set of genes was down-regulated throughout the study. Early in wound healing the expression of markers of both M1 and M2 macrophages were increased, but later M2 markers predominated. Conclusion The initial response to a cutaneous wound induces powerful transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory stimuli which may alert the host defense. Subsequently and in the absence of infection, inflammation subsides and it is replaced by angiogenesis and remodeling. Understanding this transition which may be driven by a change from a mixed macrophage population to predominately M2

  12. Topical treatments for cutaneous warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Chun Shing; Gibbs, Sam; Bennett, Cathy; Holland, Richard; Abbott, Rachel

    2012-09-12

    Viral warts are a common skin condition, which can range in severity from a minor nuisance that resolve spontaneously to a troublesome, chronic condition. Many different topical treatments are available. To evaluate the efficacy of local treatments for cutaneous non-genital warts in healthy, immunocompetent adults and children. We updated our searches of the following databases to May 2011: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (from 2005), EMBASE (from 2010), AMED (from 1985), LILACS (from 1982), and CINAHL (from 1981). We searched reference lists of articles and online trials registries for ongoing trials. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of topical treatments for cutaneous non-genital warts. Two authors independently selected trials and extracted data; a third author resolved any disagreements. We included 85 trials involving a total of 8815 randomised participants (26 new studies were included in this update). There was a wide range of different treatments and a variety of trial designs. Many of the studies were judged to be at high risk of bias in one or more areas of trial design.Trials of salicylic acid (SA) versus placebo showed that the former significantly increased the chance of clearance of warts at all sites (RR (risk ratio) 1.56, 95% CI (confidence interval) 1.20 to 2.03). Subgroup analysis for different sites, hands (RR 2.67, 95% CI 1.43 to 5.01) and feet (RR 1.29, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.55), suggested it might be more effective for hands than feet.A meta-analysis of cryotherapy versus placebo for warts at all sites favoured neither intervention nor control (RR 1.45, 95% CI 0.65 to 3.23). Subgroup analysis for different sites, hands (RR 2.63, 95% CI 0.43 to 15.94) and feet (RR 0.90, 95% CI 0.26 to 3.07), again suggested better outcomes for hands than feet. One trial showed cryotherapy to be better than both placebo and SA, but only for hand warts.There was no significant difference in cure rates between

  13. Mycobacterium chelonae infection of the parotid gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid S Shaaban

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium chelonae can cause numerous infections, including lung disease, local cutaneous disease, osteomyelitis, joint infections and ocular disease. With the exception of lung disease, these syndromes commonly develop after direct inoculation. The most common clinical presentation in immunocompetent individuals is skin and soft tissue infection. We present a case of M. chelonae infection of the parotid gland that was successfully treated with clarithromycin monotherapy. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of M. chelonae parotitis in an adult.

  14. Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis complicating Takayasu's arteritis with a review of cutaneous manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, A R; Marafie, A A; Dajani, A I

    1985-06-01

    We report a case of a 32-year-old man with chronic active Takayasu's arteritis complicated by cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis. Symptoms of the early phase of his disease coexisted with complications of the late phase.

  15. Mycobacterium marinum Infection from Sea Monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaclyn LeBlanc

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of cutaneous Mycobacterium marinum infection acquired from Artemia nyos (sea monkeys is presented. The infection was unresponsive to initial antimicrobial therapies. A biopsy of a lesion revealed granulomatous inflammation with cultures that subsequently grew M marinum. A three-month course of clarithromycin provided complete resolution.

  16. Atypical Cutaneous Manifestations in Syphilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivars Lleó, M; Clavo Escribano, P; Menéndez Prieto, B

    2016-05-01

    Although the diversity of the clinical manifestations of syphilis is well-known, atypical presentations can also occur. Such atypical presentations are associated with a high risk of transmission as a result of diagnostic confusion and treatment delays owing to the disease's ability to mimic other common skin diseases, deviate from classic clinical presentations, and adopt unique forms. Cases of atypical syphilis have been described most frequently in patients with concomitant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Because the incidence of syphilis has been growing over recent years -particularly in patients with HIV co-infection- dermatologists need to be familiar with the less well-known clinical presentations of this venereal disease. Copyright © 2015 AEDV. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Diagnosis and management of cutaneous vasculitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Tracy V

    2014-04-01

    Cutaneous vasculitis in children is rare. Causes of cutaneous vasculitis are varied and are typically differentiated by the affected vessel size. A skin biopsy remains the gold standard for diagnosis but other causes for vasculitis, including systemic conditions, should be considered. This article discusses the childhood conditions commonly presenting with cutaneous vasculitis (leukocytoclastic vasculitis, cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa), biopsy recommendations and findings, and management and potential differential diagnoses, and includes a brief summary of other diseases that may include cutaneous symptoms as a constellation of other systemic findings.

  18. Effect of UV irradiation on cutaneous cicatrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Eva; Rossen, Kristian; Sorensen, Lars Tue

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on human cutaneous cicatrices. In this randomized, controlled study, dermal punch biopsy wounds served as a wound healing model. Wounds healed by primary or second intention and were randomized to postoperative solar UV...

  19. Cutaneous sporotrichosis. Intermittent treatment (pulses) with itraconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Fierro, Leonel; Saúl, Amado; Ponce, Rosa María

    2008-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous and exceptionally deep mycosis caused by a dimorphic fungus, Sporothrix schenckii. Itraconazole is a triazole derivative leading to good results in the treatment of sporotrichosis. Patients with cutaneous sporotrichosis proven with mycological tests (direct examination and culture) were enrolled. All patients underwent laboratory tests (at baseline and on a monthly basis) and received oral itraconazole 400 mg/day for one week with a 3-week break (pulses); thereafter the drug was administered as pulses until clinical and mycological cure was achieved. Five patients with sporotrichosis were enrolled, 4 with cutaneous lymphangitic form and one with fixed cutaneous form. Clinical and mycological cure was achieved in 4/5 cases (80%), with a mean number of pulses of 3.5. No patient had side effects and no laboratory test abnormalities occurred. Intermittent or pulsed itraconazole was effective in treating cutaneous sporotrichosis. It may be considered as a new treatment choice that entails an important reduction in total medication use.

  20. Multiple cutaneous histiocytosis in two dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, R N; Tisdall, C J

    1988-12-01

    Two cases of canine cutaneous histiocytosis are described. Diagnosis depended on overall consideration of clinical and histopathological features of the disease, as well as its response to anti-inflammatory therapy. No aetiological agent was visible using light and electron microscopy.

  1. Fibromodulin Enhances Angiogenesis during Cutaneous Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Zheng, PhD

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Altogether, we demonstrated that in addition to reducing scar formation, FMOD also promotes angiogenesis. As blood vessels organize and regulate wound healing, its potent angiogenic properties will further expand the clinical application of FMOD for cutaneous healing of poorly vascularized wounds.

  2. [Cutaneous malignant melanoma and the new drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieweg, Omgo E; Gallegos-Hernández, José Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of cutaneous melanoma has historically been essentially surgical. Much progress has been made in this area, and the resection margins have been established based on tumour depth. Candidates are also identified for lymphadenectomy, avoiding the morbidity of the procedure in patients who do not require it. But little progress has been made in systemic treatment, since the 70's when the use of dacarbazine was introduced for the treatment of patients with tumour progression or distant metastasis, with disappointing results. Despite this, Dacarbazine has been the most used drug to the present. Three years ago, two new drugs were introduced, one of them based on the target therapy and other one in the immunotherapy, offering, with the obtained results, an alternative in the treatment of cutaneous melanoma The objectives of this article are to show the pathways of these drugs, to describe the current role of surgery in cutaneous melanoma, with the arrival of these drugs, as well as to know the therapeutic alternatives that are emerging for the cutaneous melanoma based on scientific evidence.

  3. Human cutaneous anthrax, Georgia 2010-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kracalik, Ian; Malania, Lile; Tsertsvadze, Nikoloz; Manvelyan, Julietta; Bakanidze, Lela; Imnadze, Paata; Tsanava, Shota; Blackburn, Jason K

    2014-02-01

    We assessed the occurrence of human cutaneous anthrax in Georgia during 2010--2012 by examining demographic and spatial characteristics of reported cases. Reporting increased substantially, as did clustering of cases near urban centers. Control efforts, including education about anthrax and livestock vaccination, can be directed at areas of high risk.

  4. Primary localised cutaneous amyloidosis - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Britta; Schmidt, Grethe; Lauritzen, Anne Falensteen;

    2013-01-01

    Amyloidosis is defined as extracellular deposits of heterogenic, misfolded proteins, amyloid fibrils, in various tissues. The aim of our study was to review the literature and to evaluate the risk of developing systemic amyloidosis (SA) and the risk of local recurrence of primary localised...... cutaneous amyloidosis (PLCA). The method of treatment was compared to the risk of local recurrence....

  5. Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma arising in a smallpox scar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, Robert A.; Dannenberg, Hilde; Robertus, Jan-Lukas; van Ginkel, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma (CLM) is a very rare smooth muscle tumour that accounts for about 2-3% of all superficial soft tissue sarcomas. Although the development of various malignancies in scar tissue is well known, we report the first case of a CLM developing in a small pox scar. Case

  6. A rapidly enlarging cutaneous hemangioma in pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ma'ayeh, Marwan

    2014-06-18

    This is a case of a rapidly enlarging cutaneous pedunculated tumor on a patient\\'s thumb during her pregnancy. This was excised and identified as a hemangioma. A literature search identified a possible hormonal factor in causing an accelerated growth of this tumor.

  7. Human Cutaneous Anthrax, Georgia 2010–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kracalik, Ian; Malania, Lile; Tsertsvadze, Nikoloz; Manvelyan, Julietta; Bakanidze, Lela; Imnadze, Paata; Tsanava, Shota

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the occurrence of human cutaneous anthrax in Georgia during 2010–-2012 by examining demographic and spatial characteristics of reported cases. Reporting increased substantially, as did clustering of cases near urban centers. Control efforts, including education about anthrax and livestock vaccination, can be directed at areas of high risk. PMID:24447721

  8. Clinicopathological and molecular aspects of cutaneous Melanoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogenrieder, T.

    2009-01-01

    Clinicopathological and molecular aspects of cutaneous melanoma. Melanoma arises form the transformation of neural crest-derived melanocytes, the pigment cells of the skin, which reside in the basal layer of the epidermis. Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer and one of the most aggressive

  9. A rapidly enlarging cutaneous hemangioma in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwan Ma’ayeh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a case of a rapidly enlarging cutaneous pedunculated tumor on a patient’s thumb during her pregnancy. This was excised and identified as a hemangioma. A literature search identified a possible hormonal factor in causing an accelerated growth of this tumor.

  10. Mefloquine in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Correia Dalmo

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Three cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis were treated orally with a mefloquine dose of 4.2mg/kg/day for six days in the Teaching Hospital of the Faculdade de Medicina do Triângulo Mineiro, Uberaba, MG, Brazil. Three weeks later a new series was repeated. No patient was cured.

  11. Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma arising in a smallpox scar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, Robert A.; Dannenberg, Hilde; Robertus, Jan-Lukas; van Ginkel, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma (CLM) is a very rare smooth muscle tumour that accounts for about 2-3% of all superficial soft tissue sarcomas. Although the development of various malignancies in scar tissue is well known, we report the first case of a CLM developing in a small pox scar. Case p

  12. Short Communications Caecilians exhibit cutaneous respiration and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1987-10-22

    Oct 22, 1987 ... 1,06 and 54,5% of total CO2 production was eliminated cutaneously. ... reasons we examined oxygen consumption (V02), carbon dioxide ... Dierk. 1988,23(2) sample from the syringe was injected as a bolus into a gas.

  13. First molecular epidemiological study of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Libya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amro, Ahmad; Gashout, Aisha; Al-Dwibe, Hamida; Zahangir Alam, Mohammad; Annajar, Badereddin; Hamarsheh, Omar; Shubar, Hend; Schönian, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a major public health problem in Libya. The objective of this study was to investigate, for the first time, epidemiological features of CL outbreaks in Libya including molecular identification of parasites, the geographical distribution of cases and possible scenarios of parasite transmission. We studied 450 patients that came from 49 areas distributed in 12 districts in north-west Libya. The patients' ages ranged from 9 months to 87 years (median age 25 years); 54% of the cases were males. Skin scrapings spotted on glass slides were collected for molecular identification of causative agent. The ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) was amplified and subsequently characterized by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. In total, 195 samples were successfully identified of which 148 (75.9%) were Leishmania major, and 47 (24.1%) Leishmania tropica. CL cases infected with L. major were found in all CL areas whereas L. tropica cases came mainly from Al Jabal Al Gharbi (46.4%), Misrata (17.8%) and Tarhuna districts (10.7%). A trend of seasonality was noticed for the infections with L. major which showed a clear peak between November and January, but was less pronounced for infections by L. tropica. The first molecular study on CL in Libya revealed that the disease is caused by L. major and L. tropica and the epidemiological patterns in the different foci were the same as in other Mediterranean foci of CL.

  14. Common cutaneous disorders in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, R J

    1990-02-01

    Athletic activity may cause or aggravate skin disorders, which in turn may diminish athletic performance. Since many sporting activities necessitate prolonged exposure to the sun, athletes must avoid painful sunburn which will adversely affect their performance. Drugs and chemicals also may cause photoallergic and/or phototoxic reactions, including polymorphous light eruption and athletes should thus avoid photosensitising drugs and chemicals. The effects of chronic ultraviolet exposure include ageing, pigmentation and skin cancers. The most effective protection against excessive exposure to sunlight is the use of sunscreens, although inadequate application and poor protection in the UVA spectrum may diminish their effectiveness and contact allergies may create other problems. Viral, bacterial and fungal infections are common in athletes due to heat, friction and contact with others. Herpes simplex may be treated with any drying agents (e.g. alcohol) as they are as effective as more expensive topical agents such as acyclovir. Molluscum contagiosum may be spread by close contact or water contact and is treated by superficial incision, cryotherapy or standard wart varnishes. Plantar wart infection is transmitted by swimming pool decks, changing rooms and hand-to-hand from weights in gymnasiums. Plantar warts presenting with pain may be aggressively treated, by blunt dissection, but painless ones are best treated conservatively. Impetigo and folliculitis often develop after trauma. Antibiotics are effective against mild infections while abrasions and lacerations should be cleansed and dressed with occlusive dressings. Diphtheroid bacteria in moist footwear may produce pitted keratolysis and erythrasma. Tinea pedis is common in athletes and probably originates in swimming pools, gymnasium floors and locker rooms. Interdigital, dry-moccasin and pustular-midsole forms can be distinguished. The latter two forms respond to topical antifungal agents, while the interdigital

  15. Use of Oral Miltefosine for Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Canadian Soldiers Returning from Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoav Keynan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Old world cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL is caused by Leishmania major and Leishmania tropica, and is endemic to several Asian and Middle-Eastern countries where the rates of infection can be substantial. CL is one of the most common vector-transmitted parasitic infections in Afghanistan. Six cases of CL in Canadian soldiers returning from Afghanistan are reported in the present study. Their lesions did not improve with fluconazole therapy, and the organism demonstrated in vitro resistance. Oral miltefosine seemed effective.

  16. Bipolaris hawaiiensis as an emerging cause of cutaneous phaeohyphomycosis in an Antillean manatee Trichechus manatus manatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa Sidrim, José Júlio; Carvalho, Vitor Luz; Branco de Souza Collares Maia, Débora Castelo; Nogueira Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia; de Meirelles, Ana Carolina Oliveira; Negrão Silva, Cristine Pereira; de Aguiar Cordeiro, Rossana; Bezerra Moreira, José Luciano; de Jesus Pinheiro Gomes Bandeira, Tereza; Gadelha Rocha, Marcos Fábio

    2015-02-10

    Phaeohyphomycoses are emerging and opportunistic diseases caused by dematiaceous fungi that infect many animal species. This paper describes a case of cutaneous phaeohyphomycosis in an Antillean manatee Trichechus manatus manatus caused by Bipolaris hawaiiensis. Blackish skin lesions were observed in an Antillean manatee calf held captive in Brazil. Direct examination of skin scraping from the affected areas revealed the presence of dematious hyphae. Culture of skin fragments led to the isolation and subsequent identification of B. hawaiiensis as the etiologic agent. Treatment with itraconazole for 14 d was effective. Infections by Bipolaris spp. are rare in animals, and this is the first report of B. hawaiiensis in veterinary medicine.

  17. Surgical resection of a cutaneous nodule in the left foot caused by mycobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neiva Aparecida Grazziotin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nontuberculous mycobacteria are etiologic agents of opportunistic human infections. Although they usually affect superficial tissues, infections in bones and joints have been described. The contamination is associated with increased environmental exposure. With appropriate therapy, the cases usually progress to complete recovery of the patient. This study reports the case of a patient who developed a cutaneous nodule in her left foot acquired when her skin was punctured by a fish. The anatomopathological examination revealed chronic central suppurative granulomatous dermo-hypodermal inflammation. Furthermore, the screening for resistant acid-fast bacilli was positive.

  18. Positive immunostaining for feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) in a Sphinx cat with cutaneous lesions and bilateral panuveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Bianca S; Kerr, Moira E; Sandmeyer, Lynne S; Grahn, Bruce H

    2013-07-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a common, fatal, systemic disease of cats. This case report describes the antemortem diagnosis of FIP in a 2-year-old spayed female Sphinx cat that presented with a bilateral panuveitis and multiple papular cutaneous lesions. Histopathologically, the skin lesions were characterized by perivascular infiltrates of macrophages, neutrophils, with fewer plasma cells, mast cells, and small lymphocytes in the mid- to deep dermis. Immunohistochemistry for intracellular feline coronavirus (FeCoV) antigen demonstrated positive staining in dermal macrophages providing an antemortem diagnosis of a moderate, nodular to diffuse, pyogranulomatous perivascular dermatitis due to FIP infection. Obtaining an antemortem diagnosis of FIP can be a challenge and cutaneous lesions are rare in the disease. Recognition and biopsy of any cutaneous lesions in cats with panuveitis and suspected FIP can help establish an antemortem diagnosis of the disease.

  19. Neonatal cutaneous disseminated aspergillosis in a preterm extremely-low-birth-weight infant with favourable outcome at 3-year follow-up: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, P; Rizzollo, S; Monetti, C; Carbonara, C; Priolo, C; Mastretta, E; Barberis, L; Galletto, P; Cigna, P; Leonessa, M L; Sala, U; Gomirato, G; Mostert, M; Stronati, M; Ruffinazzi, G; Tzialla, C; Jacqz-Aigrain, E; Kaguelidou, F; Farina, D

    2012-05-01

    Invasive disseminated neonatal aspergillosis is an uncommon disease, with only scattered reports in literature in the last few years. Here we report on a 25-week gestational age, 730 g at birth preterm female infant who developed on day-of-life 10 multiple cutaneous exhulcerative lesions in her right arm, trunk and abdomen. Early recognition and diagnosis of these lesions as a due to cutaneous initial symptom of cutaneous disseminated aspergillosis, as well as prompt treatment with Liposomal amphotericin B + Itraconazole, secured successful recovery from the systemic infection. Skin lesions healed without any surgical treatment. The infant was discharged in good health. Long-term follow-up at three years of age revealed normality of all neurodevelopmental and cognitive parameters. To our knowledge, this is one of the very few cases of survival, free from sequelae, for a preterm infant affected by neonatal cutaneous disseminated aspergillosis.

  20. Skin Microvascular Thrombosis in Fusarium Infection in Two Early Biopsied Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Fan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium species cause rare and severe infections. Their incidence is increasing in immunocompromised patients but they are also observed in healthy hosts. Because of the rapid dissemination of infection and the frequent resistance of Fusarium species to antifungal drugs, histopathologic evidence of hyphae is very helpful to obtain the diagnosis rapidly. We report the clinical and pathological features of two patients with initial cutaneous lesions. Cutaneous early biopsies showed microvessel involvement with hyphae and thrombosis. Fusarium infection was confirmed by skin culture. Hyphae within a microvessel thrombus in the skin were highly suggestive of disseminated fungal infection. These pathological features enabled to establish an early diagnosis and to start efficient antifungal treatment. In early cutaneous biopsies of immunocompromised patients, the presence of cutaneous vessel thrombosis can suggest a fungal infection and may help to start specific therapy without delay for these life-threatening infections.

  1. Indoor wet cells harbour melanized agents of cutaneous infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lian, X.; de Hoog, G.S.

    2010-01-01

    The biota of black fungi in humid indoor environments was established using a protocol that consisted of non-selective and selective isolation procedures. In total, 113 samples were taken from bathrooms of residences in The Netherlands, Germany and Austria. Samples were processed either (i) directly

  2. Epidemiological features, clinical manifestation and laboratory findings of patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis in Genaveh County, Bushehr Province, Southern Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamid Kassiri; Ali Kasiri; Hossein Najafi; Masoud Lotfi; Elnaz Kasiri

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine the epidemiological features of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Genaveh County, Southern Iran.Methods:This descriptive study was conducted during 2004-2008. A questionnaire was completed for each case regarding age, gender, place of residence, the number and location of cutaneous leishmaniasis lesions etc. Suspected active lesions were scraped with a sterile blade and the samples smeared onto glass slides, fixed with methanol, stained with Giemsa and examined under a light microscope for the presence of amastigotes.Results:Totally, 135 cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis came to the health centers. The highest number of patients catching cutaneous leishmaniasis was found in 2006 (n=54). Most cases (56.3%) occurred during winter. The most highly infected age group was 1 to 10 years .The hands were the most affected parts of the body. About 54% of the patients had one lesion. The most cases (53.3%) occurred in rural areas.Concluions:It is important for the health authorities to take powerful actions to control cutaneous leishmaniasis. Meanwhile, It is significant to prepare quick treatment of cases.

  3. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia with histopathological features mimicking cutaneous gamma/delta T-cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Kash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of cutaneous Stenotrophomonas maltophilia infection which presented with clinical and histopathological findings that mimicked a gamma/delta (γδ T-cell lymphoma. In this case, tissue culture of the biopsy specimen was key to determining the diagnosis and allowing appropriate treatment with oral trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole and topical silvadene. A prompt complete resolution of lesions was observed following antibiotic treatment, with no recurrence of disease over the last 5 years, supporting an infectious rather than malignant etiology. In our patient, radiation therapy was indicated based on the misdiagnosis of γδ T-cell lymphoma, which was supported both clinically and histopathologically. However, tissue culture in this case avoided unnecessary radiation exposure and highlights the role of tissue culture in the evaluation of the biopsy of an undiagnosed cutaneous lesion.

  4. Disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: report of 23 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifaz, A; Chang, P; Moreno, K; Fernández-Fernández, V; Montes de Oca, G; Araiza, J; Ponce, R M

    2009-06-01

    Disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis is an opportunistic infection in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. We report a series of 23 cases (21 men, two women; median age 29 years) with disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis seen at two hospital centres. Most of the patients (21/23) were classified as stage C3. The most common dermatological findings were papules, crusting plaques, nodules and ulcers, mainly located on the face and chest. Of the 23 cases, 15 (65%) had pulmonary involvement. Amphotericin B and itraconazole were the main drugs used for treatment. Treatment response was variable: four of the patients were cured, six improved and remain stable, nine patients died, and four patients were lost to follow-up.

  5. Case report: Cutaneous amebiasis: the importance of molecular diagnosis of an emerging parasitic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morán, Patricia; Rojas, Liliana; Cerritos, René; Zermeño, Valeria; Valadez, Alicia; de Oca, Griselda Montes; Reyes, Miguel Ángel; González, Enrique; Partida, Oswaldo; Hernández, Eric; Nieves, Miriam; Portillo, Tobías; Gudiño, Marco; Ramiro, Manuel; Ximénez, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous amebiasis is the least common clinical form of human amebiasis in Mexico, sexual amebiasis was only occasionally observed before the late 1980s. However, in the last few decades, most of the documented cases of cutaneous amebiasis from around the world are sexually transmitted. We present two cases of sexually transmitted genital amebiasis. The molecular characterization of the Entamoeba species in the affected tissues underlines the importance of an etiological diagnosis using specific and sensitive techniques that avoid the rapid destruction of tissues and the irreversible sequelae to the anatomy and function of the affected organs. In addition, for those interested in the study of the human-amoebic disease relationship and its epidemiology, the detection of a new, mixed infection in an invasive case of amebiasis reveals new perspectives in the study of the extraordinarily complex host-parasite relationship in amebiasis.

  6. Cutaneous Amebiasis: The Importance of Molecular Diagnosis of an Emerging Parasitic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morán, Patricia; Rojas, Liliana; Cerritos, René; Zermeño, Valeria; Valadez, Alicia; de Oca, Griselda Montes; Reyes, Miguel Ángel; González, Enrique; Partida, Oswaldo; Hernández, Eric; Nieves, Miriam; Portillo, Tobías; Gudiño, Marco; Ramiro, Manuel; Ximénez, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous amebiasis is the least common clinical form of human amebiasis in Mexico, sexual amebiasis was only occasionally observed before the late 1980s. However, in the last few decades, most of the documented cases of cutaneous amebiasis from around the world are sexually transmitted. We present two cases of sexually transmitted genital amebiasis. The molecular characterization of the Entamoeba species in the affected tissues underlines the importance of an etiological diagnosis using specific and sensitive techniques that avoid the rapid destruction of tissues and the irreversible sequelae to the anatomy and function of the affected organs. In addition, for those interested in the study of the human-amoebic disease relationship and its epidemiology, the detection of a new, mixed infection in an invasive case of amebiasis reveals new perspectives in the study of the extraordinarily complex host-parasite relationship in amebiasis. PMID:23208883

  7. Disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis in a patient with AIDS: report of a case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Miriam Tomoko Mitsuno

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case report of disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis as the initial presentation of AIDS in a 24-year-old HIV-positive male patient. He presented multiple ulcerated skin lesions distributed over the face, thorax, legs and arms. Biopsy of one of the cutaneous lesions was suggestive of sporotrichosis and culture isolated Sporothrix schenckii. Itraconazole was started and the lesions progressively resolved after 15 days of medication. The patient was discharged with this medication but he did not return for follow-up. He died three months later in another hospital. Therapy of sporotrichosis in HIV-infected patients remains unclear and the response to therapy is variable. Itraconazole is highly concentrated in the skin and is one of the options for treatment of disseminated sporotrichosis.

  8. Cutaneous leukemic infiltration following varicella - a case of Wolf's isotopic response*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasileiro, Ana; Lencastre, André; João, Alexandre; Fidalgo, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Wolf's isotopic response designates the appearance of two subsequent unrelated dermatoses in the same anatomic location. We report the case of a 51-year-old man with a medical history of chronic lymphocytic leukemia without known extra-hematopoietic involvement. The patient developed a disseminated papulo-vesiculous eruption, diagnosed as varicella. Few days after recovering, an erythematous and violaceous papular dermatosis with histopathological examination compatible with leukemic infiltration appeared on the scars of previous herpetic lesions. Complete remission was obtained under systemic corticotherapy, without cutaneous recurrence or blastic transformation. Wolf's isotopic response is attributed to a localized immunologic imbalance following a certain stimulus. In this patient, herpetic infection acted as a local spur for inaugural cutaneous leukemic infiltration, with no impact on the prognosis for the underlying disease.

  9. Geographical Distribution of Leishmania Species of Human Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Fars Province, Southern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Akhoundi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The goal of this study was to know the identity of Leishmania species responsible of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL in Fars Province, southern Iran.Methods: Five counties of Shiraz, Firouz Abad, Ghir-Karzin, Farashband and Larestan were pros­pected. Forty-four patients exhibiting cutaneous lesions were selected. Samples collected on skin lesions were examined both microscopically (after Giemsa staining and molecularly (after PCR-RFLP.Results: On the 44 examined patients, 39 exhibit Leishmania sp. by microscopical examination, all confirmed by PCR. For five patients with negative microscopical examination, PCR was positive for three of them. Among these 42 positive samples, 3 (7% were infected by L. tropica and 39 (93% by L. major.Conclusions: Leishmania major is the most prevalent species in prospected area and L. tropica occurs in Shiraz and Ghir-Karzin counties.

  10. Concurrent cutaneous, visceral and ocular leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Viannia braziliensis in a kidney transplant patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gontijo Célia MF

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Although cases of leishmaniasis co-infection have been described in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients as well as those who have undergone organ transplants, to our knowledge, the present report is the first documented case of simultaneous cutaneous, visceral and ocular leishmaniasis due to Leishmania (Viannia braziliensis in a transplant patient. The patient had been using immunosuppressive drugs since receiving a transplanted kidney. The first clinical signs of leishmaniasis included fever, thoracic pain, hepatosplenomegaly, leucopenia and anemia. The cutaneous disease was revealed by the presence of amastigotes in the skin biopsy. After three months, the patient presented fever with conjunctive hyperemia, intense ocular pain and low visual acuity. Parasites isolated from iliac crest, aqueous humor and vitreous body were examined using a range of molecular techniques. The same strain of L. (V. braziliensis was responsible for the different clinical manifestations. The immunosuppressive drugs probably contributed to the dissemination of Leishmania.

  11. Cutaneous manifestations among Egyptian children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randa M. Youssef

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although almost all patients with T1DM eventually develop one or more skin manifestations, data on cutaneous manifestations of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM are scarce. They can be the first presenting sign, or even precede the diagnosis or develop from the long-term effects of diabetes. Objective: To detect the prevalence and spectrum of skin manifestations in children and adolescents with T1DM attending the DEMPU clinic, Cairo University and to investigate the effect of the disease duration on these dermatoses. Subjects and methods:Two hundred twenty-five children and adolescents with T1DM were examined for dermatological problems. Of them, 152 patients who had cutaneous manifestations with T1DM were included in this case-control study, 152 age and sex matched non diabetic patients were included as control group. A detailed dermatological examination was carried out by the dermatology team. Results: The overall prevalence of dermatologic manifestations was 67.56% (152 T1DM patients; 74 males and 78 females. The mean age of the patients was 8.38 ± 3.79 years and the mean diabetes duration was 2.80 ± 2.86 years. Cutaneous adverse effects related to insulin injections were the most common manifestation representing 28.9%, followed by cutaneous infections (bacterial, fungal and viral infections in 25%, allergic skin diseases in 19.1% and pruritus in 15.1% of patients with T1DM. Conclusion: Broad spectrums of dermatoses are common (67.56% in Egyptian patients with T1DM. Early referral to the dermatologist helps to detect skin complications of diabetes in these children and is essential for both prevention and management of these conditions.

  12. Cutaneous mucormycosis postcosmetic surgery: A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tarrah, Khaled; Abdelaty, Mahmoud; Behbahani, Ahmad; Mokaddas, Eman; Soliman, Helmy; Albader, Ahdi

    2016-07-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare, aggressive, and life-threatening infection that is caused by organisms belonging to the order Mucorales. It is usually acquired through direct means and virtually always affects immunocompromised patients with the port of entry reflecting the site of infection, in this case, cutaneous. Unlike other mucormycoses, patients affected by Apophysomyces elegans (A elegans) are known to be immunocompetent. This locally aggressive disease penetrates through different tissue plains invading adjacent muscles, fascia, and even bone causing extensive morbidity and may prove fatal if treated inadequately. Cutaneous mucormycosis is associated with disruption of cutaneous barriers such as trauma. However, rarely, it may be iatrogenic. No cases have been previously reported postcosmetic surgery, especially one that is so commonly performed, lipofilling. The patient is a, previously healthy, 41-year-old middle-eastern female who was admitted to the plastic surgery department 17 days after undergoing cosmetic surgery. She suffered from extensive tissue inflammation and necrosis in both gluteal regions. Following admission, she was initially started on empirical antimicrobial therapy which was changed to an antifungal agent, voriconazole, when preliminary microbiological results showed filamentous fungi. This was discontinued and liposomal amphotericin B was commenced when further mycological analysis identified A elegans. Furthermore, she underwent a total of 10 sessions of extensive debridement to the extent that portions of the sacrum and left femoral head became exposed. Her clinical status and wounds improved with the appropriate management and she remained an inpatient for 62 days. Subsequently, she had defects in both gluteal regions which required reconstructive surgery. A elegans is an uncommon cause of iatrogenic cutaneous mucormycosis. A high index of clinical suspicion is required, especially in the absence of clinical improvement despite

  13. Lessons from Cancer Immunoediting in Cutaneous Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Aris

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We will revisit the dual role of the immune system in controlling and enabling tumor progression, known as cancer immunoediting. We will go through the different phases of this phenomenon, exposing the most relevant evidences obtained from experimental models and human clinical data, with special focus on Cutaneous Melanoma, an immunogenic tumor per excellence. We will describe the different immunotherapeutic strategies employed and consider current models accounting for tumor heterogeneity. And finally, we will propose a rational discussion of the progress made and the future challenges in the therapeutics of Cutaneous Melanoma, taking into consideration that tumor evolution is the resulting from a continuous feedback between tumor cells and their environment, and that different combinatorial therapeutic approaches can be implemented according to the tumor stage.

  14. Cutaneous angiosarcoma of head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Vora

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous angiosarcoma is a rare aggressive tumor of capillary and lymphatic endothelial cell origin. Cutaneous angiosarcoma of the head and neck regions seems to be a distinctive neoplasm with characteristic clinicopathologic features that differ from angiosarcoma in other anatomic locations. Angiosarcoma, regardless of their setting, has a bad prognosis. We presented here a case of 80 years old male, with multiple nontender grouped purple to red hemorrhagic vesicular and bullous lesions over left lower cheek and upper neck area, with bilateral cervical lymph nodes since 1 month. Computed tomography thorax showed nodular opacities in the right upper and midzones. Excisional biopsy showed characterstic "dissection of collagen" with mild nuclear atypia. Immunohistochemistry showed tumor cell positive for CD-31 and Fli-1. Patient died within 1 month of presentation.

  15. Drug-induced cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurinaviciene, Rasa; Sandholdt, Linda Holm; Bygum, Anette

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An increasing number of drugs have been linked to drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (DI-SCLE). The recognition and management of DI-SCLE can be challenging, as the condition may be triggered by different classes of drugs after variable lengths of time. OBJECTIVES......: To determine the proportion of patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) whose drugs are an inducing or aggravating factor. MATERIALS & METHODS: We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients diagnosed with CLE at a dermatological department over a 21-year period. We registered clinical......, serological, and histological data with a focus on drug intake. RESULTS: Of 775 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of lupus erythematosus (LE) or suspected LE, a diagnosis of CLE could be confirmed in 448 patients. A total of 130 patients had a drug intake that could suggest DI-SCLE. In 88 cases, a drug...

  16. Focus on cutaneous and uveal melanoma specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandiani, Charlotte; Béranger, Guillaume E; Leclerc, Justine; Ballotti, Robert; Bertolotto, Corine

    2017-04-15

    Cutaneous melanoma (CM) and uveal melanoma (UM) derive from cutaneous and uveal melanocytes that share the same embryonic origin and display the same cellular function. However, the etiopathogenesis and biological behaviors of these melanomas are very different. CM and UM display distinct landscapes of genetic alterations and show different metastatic routes and tropisms. Hence, therapeutic improvements achieved in the last few years for the treatment of CM have failed to ameliorate the clinical outcomes of patients with UM. The scope of this review is to discuss the differences in tumorigenic processes (etiologic factors and genetic alterations) and tumor biology (gene expression and signaling pathways) between CM and UM. We develop hypotheses to explain these differences, which might provide important clues for research avenues and the identification of actionable vulnerabilities suitable for the development of new therapeutic strategies for metastatic UM. © 2017 Pandiani et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  17. A cutaneous mixed tumor in a dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    WATANABE, Ken-ichi; CHAMBERS, James K.; UCHIDA, Kazuyuki; NIBE, Kazumi; USHIO, Nanako; HORIUCHI, Noriyuki; KOBAYASHI, Yoshiyasu; NAKAYAMA, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    The atypical cutaneous tumor of a 9-year-old mixed breed female dog was examined. The tumor was well-demarcated and histologically composed of a trichoblastic area, tricholemmal area and apocrine glandular area. Neoplastic cells in trichoblastic area and tricholemmal area had PAS-positive granules in the cytoplasm and were positive for pan-cytokeratin, cytokeratin 5/6, 14 and 19 and p63. Neoplastic cells in trichoblastic area were also positive for cytokeratin 15 and CD34. Neoplastic cells in apocrine glandular area were positive for pan-cytokeratin and cytokeratin 7, 18 and 19. Myoepithelial cell proliferation with osteocartilaginous metaplasia was observed in this area. Since neoplastic cells showed multiphenotypic differentiation for hair follicles and apocrine glands, the present case was diagnosed as a cutaneous mixed tumor. PMID:28132963

  18. [Cutaneous tuberculosis. A study of 4 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iborra, C; Cambau, E; Lecomte, C; Grosset, J; Bricaire, F; Caumes, E

    1997-01-01

    The recent increase in the incidence of tuberculosis has led to the return of cutaneous forms of this disease. In addition, diagnosis can now be made rapidly using genoma amplification. Four cases of cutaneous tuberculosis are described in nonimmunosuppressed patients: two cases of lupus vulgaris, including one due to Mycobacterium africanum, and two others of gummas, including one associated with tuberculosis verrucosa. The diagnosis was suggested by epidemiological, clinical, histological and immunological findings and confirmed by culture of the bacilli in 3 cases and by genoma amplification in 1. These observations illustrate the difficulties encountered in determining the tuberculosis nature of skin lesions. The clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, the pathophysiology of this disease and the new interest in genoma amplification are discussed.

  19. Cutaneous mechanisms of isometric ankle force control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Jesper Lundbye; Leukel, Christian

    2013-01-01

    output. We used repetitive electrical stimulation of the superficial peroneal (foot dorsum) and medial plantar nerves (foot sole) to disrupt cutaneous afferent input in 8 healthy subjects. We measured the effects of repetitive nerve stimulation on (1) tactile thresholds, (2) performance in an ankle force......-matching and (3) an ankle position-matching task. Additional force-matching experiments were done to compare the effects of transient versus continuous stimulation in 6 subjects and to determine the effects of foot anesthesia using lidocaine in another 6 subjects. The results showed that stimulation decreased...... of transient stimulation on force error were greater when compared to continuous stimulation and lidocaine injection. Position-matching performance was unaffected by peroneal nerve or plantar nerve stimulation. Our results show that cutaneous feedback plays a role in the control of force output at the ankle...

  20. COEXISTENCE OF CUTANEOUS MUCORMYCOSIS AND SCROFULODERMA IN AN IMMUNODEFICIENT CHILD

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    Mahalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID is a genetic disorder characterised by the disturbed development of functional T cells and B cells caused by numerous genetic mutations. (1 These patients are extremely vulnerable to infectious diseases and early death. (1 A 1-year-old child, known case of SCID since 8 months of age, presented with septic shock. He had a swelling on the left hand for 1 month and over left hand, which was a prior site of IV cannulation and swelling over axilla since 6 months. The child received multiple blood transfusions, though no bone marrow transplant was done. We entertained a differential diagnosis of cutaneous tuberculosis, atypical mycobacterial infection, deep fungal infection and foreign body granuloma for the left hand nodule. We thought of scrofuloderma with lymphadenopathy as a diagnosis for the axillary lesion. Biopsy of the hand lesion-multiple broad aseptate hyphae with granulomatous infiltrates suggesting mucormycosis. FNAC of axillary lymph node-necrotising lymphadenitis with AFB positive. Chest X-ray HRCT-PCP Pneumonia. He was started on IV Amphotericin-B

  1. Cutaneous mucormycosis of the upper extremity in an immunocompetent host: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineberry, Kyle D; Boettcher, Adam K; Blount, Andrew L; Burgess, Scott D

    2012-04-01

    Cutaneous mucormycosis, a relatively common infection in immunocompromised patients, remains rare in the immunocompetent patient outside the setting of major trauma. We report a case of an immunocompetent patient who developed left upper extremity Rhizopus infection following arterial puncture. Treatment included surgical debridement, liposomal amphotericin B, and hyperbaric oxygen wound therapy; the patient recovered fully. A review of the literature of cases of upper extremity Mucor infection is included for context. We feel that a high degree of suspicion for Mucor infection is warranted in patients with the described risk factors who do not respond to first-line antibiotics. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Primary cutaneous amebiasis with a fatal outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Daraji, Wael Ismail; Husain, Ehab A; Ilyas, Mohammed; Robson, Alistair

    2008-08-01

    We report a fatal case of disseminated amebiasis in a young African woman, which initially presented with an ulcerated cutaneous lesion on the left flank. The causative organism was confirmed by examination of a wet drop preparation from the ulcer discharge and by skin biopsy. The patient was not immunosuppressed and was treated unsuccessfully with metronidazole. Postmortem examination revealed the presence of intestinal amebiasis complicated by a liver abscess.

  3. Cutaneous oxalosis after long-term hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, J G; Schwartz, S T; Reginato, A J

    1992-07-01

    A 27-year-old woman undergoing long-term hemodialysis developed cutaneous calcifications on her fingers. A skin biopsy specimen showed that the deposits were calcium oxalate. To our knowledge, only one previous article has reported pathologic and crystallographic studies on calcifications of the skin resulting from dialysis oxalosis. We speculate that vitamin C supplements, liberal tea consumption, an increased serum ionized calcium concentration, and the long duration of hemodialysis contributed to the production of these deposits.

  4. Knowledge, attitude, and practices related to cutaneous leishmaniasis in an endemic focus of cutaneous leishmaniasis, Southern Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bahador Sarkari; Asgari Qasem; Mohammad Reza Shafaf

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) of inhabitants of an endemic area in Fars province toward cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). Methods: The study was carried out in Lapui district in Fars province, south of Iran, one of the most important foci of CL in this province. Sample size (237 residents) was calculated based on population. House-to-house survey was done to collect the data regarding knowledge, attitudes, and practices of the inhabitants. The head of each household was interviewed by a trained staff to assess his/her KAP related to CL. A semi-structured KAP questionnaire was used for data collection.Results:Mean age of participants was 39 and more than half of the respondents were in the age group of 31-40. Males constituted 172 (72.5%) of subjects. Most of the respondents (84.3%) were literate. The majority of the study population (83%) had heard about Salak (local name for CL) and most of these respondents (91%) were aware that CL is presented with a cutaneous lesion. Nearly two-third of the participants (63.5%) stated the bite of mosquito (not specifically sandflies) for CL transmission. The respondents’ attitude regarding the treatment of CL was not satisfactory since only 48% believed that CL can be treated by medicine. A noticeable proportion of respondents (21%) believed in indigenous medicine for the treatment of CL. A small proportion of respondents (14%) stated that traditional healers are good at treating this disease. More than two-third (69%) of respondents believed that the disease is preventable although most of interviewees did not know about preventive measures. Conclusions: In this study, insufficient knowledge of community about infection nature, vector, transmission mode and preventive measures of CL, highlights the needs for a health education initiative to enhance the awareness of people about CL. This would improve inhabitants’ contribution in control program of CL in this area.

  5. Muscle metaboreceptor modulation of cutaneous active vasodilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, C. G.; Stephens, D. P.; Johnson, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Isometric handgrip exercise in hyperthermia has been shown to reduce cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) by inhibiting the cutaneous active vasodilator system. METHODS: To identify whether this response was initiated by muscle metaboreceptors, in seven subjects two 3-min bouts of isometric handgrip exercise in hyperthermia were performed, followed by 2 min of postexercise ischemia (PEI). An index of forearm skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry) was measured on the contralateral arm at an unblocked site and at a site at which adrenergic vasoconstrictor function was blocked via bretylium iontophoresis to reveal active cutaneous vasodilator function unambiguously. Sweat rate was measured via capacitance hygrometry, CVC was indexed from the ratio of skin blood flow to mean arterial pressure and was expressed as a percentage of maximal CVC at that site. In normothermia, neither isometric exercise nor PEI affected CVC (P > 0.05). RESULTS: The first bout of isometric handgrip exercise in hyperthermia reduced CVC at control sites and this reduction persisted through PEI (pre-exercise: 59.8 +/- 5.4, exercise: 49.8 +/- 4.9, PEI: 49.7 +/- 5.3% of maximum; both P vasodilator system, is primarily mediated by muscle metaboreceptors, whereas central command or muscle mechanoreceptors have less influence.

  6. CRYOSURGERY FOR TREATMENT OF CUTANEOUS WARTS

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    I Made Bagus Adhi Paramitha

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Minor surgery is a general surgical procedure that applied with minimally invasive procedures and short duration, done in a superficial or just the affected tissue.  This technique is normally only requires a local anaesthetic and only has minimal  risk or complications. There are many cases that could be dealt with minor surgery one is veruka. Veruka or known as cutaneous warts is a disease that is often complained in children and adults. Veruka being estimated to occur until over 10% in children and young adults. Largest incident occurred in range of age 12 to 16 years. Veruka occurs more frequently in women than men. The peak incidence occur of age 13 years on women and 14.5 years in males. Salicylic acid and cryosurgery therapy are two of the most frequently performed in the treatment of cutaneous warts. Salicylic acid is therapy  for cutaneous warts who recently had already started replaced by cryosurgery because it is relatively easy to do and faster recovery.  

  7. Congenital cutaneous histiocytosis in a piglet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hélie, P; Kiupel, M; Drolet, R

    2014-07-01

    A 2-week-old crossbred male piglet with numerous congenital, variably sized macules, plaques, and papules distributed all over the body was submitted for necropsy. Significant gross and histological lesions were restricted to the skin. On light microscopic examination, these cutaneous lesions corresponded to dermal and/or subcutaneous masses composed of spindle-shaped to round cells that multifocally contained hemosiderin; epidermotropism was not observed. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells were strongly positive for CD204; moderately positive for CD163, lysozyme, and vimentin; and negative for Mac 387, α-1-antitrypsin, S-100 protein and E-cadherin; frozen tissues were not available for CD1a and CD11c. Transmission electron microscopic examination of sections from formalin-fixed tissues did not reveal Birbeck's granules. The clinical, morphological, and immunohistochemical results were consistent with a congenital cutaneous histiocytosis of non-Langerhans cell origin. The condition most resembled juvenile xanthogranuloma in humans, a generally skin-limited non-Langerhans histiocytic disorder that can be congenital. Cutaneous and/or systemic histiocytic disorders are well characterized in dogs and have been described in cats, and a case with some similarities to ours has been reported in a neonatal piglet, but this is to our knowledge the first immunohistochemically supported report of histiocytosis in the pig and congenital histiocytosis in animals.

  8. Infiltrative Cutaneous Hemangiolipoma in a Goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica R. Collier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An approximately 4-year-old castrated male, Saanen cross goat presented to the Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital for evaluation and removal of a 22 cm × 22 cm, dark red, thickened, and crusted cutaneous lesion along the left ventrolateral thorax. An initial incisional biopsy performed approximately 8 weeks earlier was suspicious for cutaneous hemangiosarcoma. Surgical excision was deemed to be the most appropriate treatment option for this goat. A complete physical exam, complete blood count, and chemistry profile were performed and results were within normal limits. Thoracic radiographs and abdominal ultrasound were performed to rule out metastatic disease and comorbid conditions; no metastatic lesions or other abnormalities were observed. En bloc surgical excision of the affected skin was performed and the entire tissue was submitted for histopathology. A final diagnosis of cutaneous hemangiolipoma was reached upon extensive sectioning and histologic examination of the larger tissue specimen. The goat recovered well from surgery and has had no further complications up to 9 months postoperatively. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a hemangiolipoma in a goat and surgical excision for such lesions appears to be a viable treatment method.

  9. Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma arising in a smallpox scar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pol Robert A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma (CLM is a very rare smooth muscle tumour that accounts for about 2–3% of all superficial soft tissue sarcomas. Although the development of various malignancies in scar tissue is well known, we report the first case of a CLM developing in a small pox scar. Case presentation A 66-year-old man presented with a painless, slow-growing lump in a small pox scar on his left shoulder. Histological biopsies showed the lesion to be a primary, well-differentiated cutaneous leiomyosarcoma. A CT scan of the thorax was conducted, which showed no signs of metastases. The complete lesion was then surgically excised, and histopathological examination revealed a radically excised cutaneous type leiomyosarcoma After 13 months’ review the patient was doing well with no evidence of tumour recurrence. Conclusions This is the first report of a CLM arising in a small pox scar. Although the extended time interval between scarring and malignant changes makes it difficult to advise strict follow-up for patients with small pox scars, one should be aware that atypical changes and/or symptoms occurring in a small pox scar could potentially mean malignant transformation.

  10. Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma arising in a smallpox scar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pol, Robert A; Dannenberg, Hilde; Robertus, Jan-Lukas; van Ginkel, Robert J

    2012-07-16

    Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma (CLM) is a very rare smooth muscle tumour that accounts for about 2-3% of all superficial soft tissue sarcomas. Although the development of various malignancies in scar tissue is well known, we report the first case of a CLM developing in a small pox scar. A 66-year-old man presented with a painless, slow-growing lump in a small pox scar on his left shoulder. Histological biopsies showed the lesion to be a primary, well-differentiated cutaneous leiomyosarcoma. A CT scan of the thorax was conducted, which showed no signs of metastases. The complete lesion was then surgically excised, and histopathological examination revealed a radically excised cutaneous type leiomyosarcoma After 13 months' review the patient was doing well with no evidence of tumour recurrence. This is the first report of a CLM arising in a small pox scar. Although the extended time interval between scarring and malignant changes makes it difficult to advise strict follow-up for patients with small pox scars, one should be aware that atypical changes and/or symptoms occurring in a small pox scar could potentially mean malignant transformation.

  11. Cutaneous findings in patients with acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoglu, Gulsen; Metin, Ahmet; Emre, Selma; Ersoy, Reyhan; Cakir, Bekir

    2013-01-01

    Acromegaly is a systemic syndrome caused by overproduction of growth hormone. The syndrome affects cutaneous, endocrine, cardiovascular, skeletal, and respiratory systems. Cutaneous manifestations of acromegaly are various, usually being the first presenting findings of the disease. Forty-nine patients with acromegaly, followed-up at a tertiary referral hospital, underwent dermatological examination. There were 27 (55.1%) female and 22 (44.9%) male patients. The age at onset of the disease was older in females than males (P=0.045). Most patients had acral enlargements, large triangular nose, coarse face, thickened lower lip, and prognathism. Fourteen (28.6%) patients had multiple cherry angiomas, five (10.2%) had varicose veins in lower limbs, and two (4.1%) had psoriasis. In conclusion, a wide spectrum of cutaneous symptoms and features may be associated with acromegaly. Detailed dermatological examination of patients with acromegaly should be an essential component of systemic evaluation. Future prospective studies investigating the relationships between changes in skin signs, hormone levels, and response to treatments may help understand details of skin involvement in acromegaly.

  12. Chronic iritis associated with cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Jessica; Rodriguez, Alexis; Pearcy-Baluyot, Mischelle; Shahi, Sanjeet K

    2015-05-01

    Cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LCV) is a systemic condition that can be associated with iritis. LCV is characterized as a small-vessel vasculitis of the cutaneous area. The disease demonstrates purple lesions on the skin due to the destruction of small cutaneous blood vessels. These lesions are palpable and most often coalesce forming larger patches on the surface of the skin. During early stages of LCV, the disease can be undetected due to the infrequency and small size of the skin lesions. As such, the patient might go undiagnosed for years while having symptoms of LCV or iritis of unknown etiology. This article discusses the correlation seen with LCV and iritis. We report a case on a patient that presented to our clinic with a history of bilateral chronic iritis. After extensive laboratory testing, we concluded that the chronicity of her iritis was due to her LCV. The correlation between LCV and iritis was not evident for several years in our patient. We also discuss the correlation with systemic Sjogren's syndrome and LVC and how these two separate diseases are linked in many patients. We will illustrate the importance of serological testing, imaging, and skin lesion biopsy for the diagnosis of LCV.

  13. Cutaneous natural killer/T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radonich, Michael A; Lazova, Rossitza; Bolognia, Jean

    2002-03-01

    Lymphomas are classified as either Hodgkin's or non-Hodgkin's. The 2 subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that can present primarily in the skin are cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and cutaneous B-cell lymphoma, both of which tend to be low-grade malignant neoplasms. Recently another distinct subtype of lymphoma was discovered, the natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma, which can involve the skin in a primary or secondary fashion. The NK/T-cell subtype of lymphoma is characterized by the expression of the NK-cell antigen CD56. These CD56(+) lymphomas are further subdivided into nasal NK/T-cell lymphomas that commonly present as midfacial destructive disease and non-nasal NK/T-cell lymphomas that often arise in extranodal locations, including the skin. We report a case of aggressive NK-cell leukemia/lymphoma with numerous secondary cutaneous lesions and review the clinical and histopathologic spectrum of non-nasal CD56(+) lymphomas, with an emphasis on the dermatologic findings.

  14. Anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome: management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrona E

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Eleni Chrona,1,2 Georgia Kostopanagiotou,1 Dimitrios Damigos,3 Chrysanthi Batistaki1 1Second Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, “Attikon” Hospital, Athens, 2Department of Anesthesiology, General Hospital of “Ag. Panteleimon,” Piraeus, 3Department of Medical Psychology, Medical School of Ioannina, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece Abstract: Anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome (ACNES is a commonly underdiagnosed and undertreated chronic state of pain. This syndrome is characterized by the entrapment of the cutaneous branches of the lower thoracoabdominal intercostal nerves at the lateral border of the rectus abdominis muscle, which causes severe, often refractory, chronic pain. This narrative review aims to identify the possible therapeutic strategies for the management of the syndrome. Seventeen studies about ACNES therapy were reviewed; of them, 15 were case–control studies, case series, or case reports, and two were randomized controlled trials. The presently available management strategies for ACNES include trigger point injections (diagnostic and therapeutic, ultrasound-guided blocks, chemical neurolysis, and surgical ­neurectomy, in combination with systemic medication, as well as some emerging techniques, such as radiofrequency ablation and neuromodulation. An increased awareness of the syndrome and the use of specific diagnostic criteria for its recognition are required to facilitate an early and successful management. This review compiles the proposed ­management strategies for ACNES. Keywords: anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome, intercostal, neuralgia, management

  15. Cutaneous pancreatic metastasis: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, Hza

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal human cancers and continues to be a major unsolved health problem as we enter the 21st century. This is the case despite advances in imaging technology and surgical management. Indeed, 80-90% of pancreatic cancers are diagnosed either at the locally advanced stage or metastatic stage. Cutaneous metastases originating from pancreatic cancer are relatively rare. The most common site of cutaneous metastasis is the umbilicus, and it is known as the Sister Joseph's nodule. Very few patients have been reported with cutaneous lesions disclosing pancreatic carcinoma at sites other than the umbilical area. To our knowledge, there were no previous reports on cutaneous pancreatic metastasis in Egypt. This is a report of a patient with cutaneous pancreatic metastases at the neck, followed by a review of reported non-umbilical cutaneous metastases from pancreatic carcinoma in the literature.

  16. Meta-transcriptome Profiling of the Human-Leishmania braziliensis Cutaneous Lesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Stephen M.; Dillon, Laura A. L.; Carvalho, Lucas P.; Passos, Sara; Novais, Fernanda O.; Hughitt, V. Keith; Beiting, Daniel P.; Carvalho, Edgar M.; Scott, Phillip; El-Sayed, Najib M.

    2016-01-01

    Host and parasite gene expression in skin biopsies from Leishmania braziliensis-infected patients were simultaneously analyzed using high throughput RNA-sequencing. Biopsies were taken from 8 patients with early cutaneous leishmaniasis and 17 patients with late cutaneous leishmaniasis. Although parasite DNA was found in all patient lesions at the time of biopsy, the patients could be stratified into two groups: one lacking detectable parasite transcripts (PTNeg) in lesions, and another in which parasite transcripts were readily detected (PTPos). These groups exhibited substantial differences in host responses to infection. PTPos biopsies contained an unexpected increase in B lymphocyte-specific and immunoglobulin transcripts in the lesions, and an upregulation of immune inhibitory molecules. Biopsies without detectable parasite transcripts showed decreased evidence for B cell activation, but increased expression of antimicrobial genes and genes encoding skin barrier functions. The composition and abundance of L. braziliensis transcripts in PTPos lesions were surprisingly conserved among all six patients, with minimal meaningful differences between lesions from patients with early and late cutaneous leishmaniasis. The most abundant parasite transcripts expressed in lesions were distinct from transcripts expressed in vitro in human macrophage cultures infected with L. amazonensis or L. major. Therefore in vitro gene expression in macrophage monolayers may not be a strong predictor of gene expression in lesions. Some of the most highly expressed in vivo transcripts encoded amastin-like proteins, hypothetical genes, putative parasite virulence factors, as well as histones and tubulin. In summary, RNA sequencing allowed us to simultaneously analyze human and L. braziliensis transcriptomes in lesions of infected patients, and identify unexpected differences in host immune responses which correlated with active transcription of parasite genes. PMID:27631090

  17. A novel non-invasive diagnostic sampling technique for cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taslimi, Yasaman; Sadeghipour, Pardis; Habibzadeh, Sima; Mashayekhi, Vahid; Mortazavi, Hossien; Müller, Ingrid; Lane, Majella E; Kropf, Pascale; Rafati, Sima

    2017-07-01

    Accurate diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is important for chemotherapy and epidemiological studies. Common approaches for Leishmania detection involve the invasive collection of specimens for direct identification of amastigotes by microscopy and the culturing of promastigotes from infected tissues. Although these techniques are highly specific, they require highly skilled health workers and have the inherent risks of all invasive procedures, such as pain and risk of bacterial and fungal super-infection. Therefore, it is essential to reduce discomfort, potential infection and scarring caused by invasive diagnostic approaches especially for children. In this report, we present a novel non-invasive method, that is painless, rapid and user-friendly, using sequential tape strips for sampling and isolation of DNA from the surface of active and healed skin lesions of CL patients. A total of 119 patients suspected of suffering from cutaneous leishmaniasis with different clinical manifestations were recruited and samples were collected both from their lesions and from uninfected areas. In addition, 15 fungal-infected lesions and 54 areas of healthy skin were examined. The duration of sampling is short (less than one minute) and species identification by PCR is highly specific and sensitive. The sequential tape stripping sampling method is a sensitive, non-invasive and cost-effective alternative to traditional diagnostic assays and it is suitable for field studies as well as for use in health care centers.

  18. Periorbital mucinosis: a variant of cutaneous lupus erythematosus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Burgos, Adisbeth; Sánchez, Jorge L; Gonzalez-Chávez, José; Vega, Janelle; Justiniano, Hildamari

    2010-04-01

    Lupus erythematosus has a wide spectrum of cutaneous manifestations, including periorbital mucinosis. We report 3 cases of periorbital mucinosis occurring in association with other cutaneous signs of lupus erythematosus. Based on a review of the literature, periorbital mucinosis is a rare and not widely recognized clinical manifestation of the disease. Although unusual, familiarity with periorbital mucinosis as a manifestation of lupus erythematosus broadens our understanding of these entities and expands the spectrum of cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

  19. Cutaneous metastases from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poovaneswaran, Sangeetha; Paleri, Vinidh; Charlton, Fraser; Dobrowsky, Werner; Kelly, Charles

    2012-08-01

    The presence of cutaneous metastases in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN) is rare and associated with a dismal prognosis. It is vital to distinguish these lesions from direct invasion of the skin by SCCHN or primary cutaneous malignancies as the prognosis is vastly different and so is the management. In this case report, we present four cases of cutaneous metastases and also briefly review the literature pertaining to this phenomenon.

  20. Gender disparity between cutaneous and non-cutaneous manifestations of Lyme borreliosis.

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    Franc Strle

    Full Text Available Cutaneous manifestations of Lyme borreliosis in Europe include erythema migrans (EM and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans (ACA; the most common non-cutaneous manifestations are Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB and Lyme arthritis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the gender distribution of patients with these clinical manifestations of Lyme borreliosis. Data on gender were obtained from the clinical records of patients with Lyme borreliosis aged ≥15 years who had been evaluated at the University Medical Center Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia. Among 10,539 patients diagnosed with EM, 6,245 (59.3% were female and among 506 ACA patients 347 (68.6% were female. In contrast, among the 60 patients with Lyme arthritis only 15 (25% were female (p<0.0001 for the comparison of gender with EM or ACA and among the 130 patients with LNB only 51 (39.2% were females (p<0.0001for the comparison of gender with EM or ACA. Although the proportion that was female in the LNB group was greater than that of patients with Lyme arthritis, this difference did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.10. Although older individuals are more likely to be female in the general Slovenian population, the age of patients with cutaneous versus non-cutaneous manifestations was not the explanation for the observed differences in gender. In conclusion, patients with cutaneous manifestations of Lyme borreliosis were predominantly female, whereas those with non-cutaneous manifestations were predominantly male. This provocative finding is unexplained but may have direct relevance to the pathogenesis of Lyme borreliosis.