WorldWideScience

Sample records for curved crystal gamma-ray

  1. Analysis of rocking curve measurements of LiF flight crystals for the objective crystal spectrometer on SPECTRUM-X-GAMMA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halm, I.; Wiebicke, H.-J.; Geppert, U.R.M.E.

    1993-01-01

    The Objective Crystal Spectrometer on the SPECTRUM-X-GAMMA satellite will use three types of natural crystals LiF(220), Si(111), RAP(001), and a multilayer structure providing high-resolution X- ray spectroscopy of Fe, S, O, and C line regions of bright cosmic X-ray sources. 330 - 360 LiF(220......) crystals of dimensions approximately 23 × 63 mm2 are required to cover one side of a large (1000 × 600 mm2) panel, which is to be mounted in front of one of two high throughput X- ray telescopes. Rocking curves of 441 LiF(220) crystals measured by using an expanded Cu - Kα2 beam were analyzed to select...... the main parameters of the rocking curve averaged over all crystals can be improved at least by a factor of 1.6 both in full width half maximum and peak reflectivity....

  2. Curved crystals for high-resolution focusing of X and gamma rays through a Laue lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, Vincenzo; Bellucci, Valerio; Camattari, Riccardo; Neri, Ilaria

    2013-08-01

    Crystals with curved diffracting planes have been investigated as high-efficiency optical components for the realization of a Laue lens for satellite-borne experiments in astrophysics. At Sensor and Semiconductor Laboratory (Ferrara, Italy) a research and development plan to implement Si and Ge curved crystals by surface grooving technique has been undertaken. The method of surface grooving allows obtaining Si and Ge curved crystals with self-standing curvature, i.e., with no need for external bending device, which is a mandatory issue in satellite-borne experiments. Si and Ge grooved crystals have been characterized by X-ray diffraction at ESRF and ILL to prove their functionality for a high-reflectivity Laue lens.

  3. Crystal glass used for X ray and gamma radiation shielding - Part two

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonio Filho, Joao

    2007-01-01

    Crystal glass has been widely used as shielding material in gamma radiation sources as well as x-ray generating equipment to replace the plumbiferous glass, in order to minimize exposure to individuals. However, properties of the radiation attenuation of crystal glass commercially available in Brazil, for the different types of energy are not known. For this reason, this work was carried out aiming to determine the radiation attenuation, transmission curves and Half Value Layer. In this work, ten plates of crystal glass, with dimensions of 20 cm x 20 cm and range of thicknesses from 0.5 to 2.0 cm, were used. The plates were X-ray irradiated with potential constants of 60, 80, 110, 150 kV and gamma radiation of 60 Co. Analysis in the properties of the 60 Co radiation attenuation of barite plaster and barite concrete commercially available in Brazil were also carried out. The curves of attenuation and of transmission were obtained for crystal glass, barite plaster and barite concrete (mGy/mA.min) at 1 meter as a function of thickness. The thickness equivalent of a half value layer and deci value layer of crystal glass for all types of radiation and energies studied was also determined. (author)

  4. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Light Curves as Probes of Magnetospheric Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    The large number of gamma-ray pulsars discovered by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope since its launch in 2008 dwarfs the handful that were previously known. The variety of observed light curves makes possible a tomography of both the ensemble-averaged field structure and the high-energy emission regions of a pulsar magnetosphere. Fitting the gamma-ray pulsar light curves with model magnetospheres and emission models has revealed that most of the high-energy emission, and the particles acceleration, takes place near or beyond the light cylinder, near the current sheet. As pulsar magnetosphere models become more sophisticated, it is possible to probe magnetic field structure and emission that are self-consistently determined. Light curve modeling will continue to be a powerful tool for constraining the pulsar magnetosphere physics.

  5. Gamma-Ray Light Curves from Pulsar Magnetospheres with Finite Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, A. K.; Kalapotharakos, C.; Kazanas, D.; Contopoulos, I.

    2012-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope has provided an unprecedented database for pulsar emission studies that includes gamma-ray light curves for over 100 pulsars. Modeling these light curves can reveal and constrain the geometry of the particle accelerator, as well as the pulsar magnetic field structure. We have constructed 3D magnetosphere models with finite conductivity, that bridge the extreme vacuum and force-free solutions used in previous light curves modeling. We are investigating the shapes of pulsar gamma-ray light curves using these dissipative solutions with two different approaches: (l) assuming geometric emission patterns of the slot gap and outer gap, and (2) using the parallel electric field provided by the resistive models to compute the trajectories and . emission of the radiating particles. The light curves using geometric emission patterns show a systematic increase in gamma-ray peak phase with increasing conductivity, introducing a new diagnostic of these solutions. The light curves using the model electric fields are very sensitive to the conductivity but do not resemble the observed Fermi light curves, suggesting that some screening of the parallel electric field, by pair cascades not included in the models, is necessary

  6. Influence of UV Photo-Transfer on Post Irradiated Double Sulphate Poly-Crystals By Gamma And X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-kolaly, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Solid state thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetry has for many years been the pre-eminent method for quantifying ionizing radiation dose. In this work, thermoluminescence characteristics of the double sulphate (Li Cs So 4 ) poly-crystals have been studied after exposure to different doses from X and gamma radiation. The glue curves showed TL response of three peaks at 75,125,250 degree. The structure of the glue peaks due to X-rays is quite different from that due to gamma rays. UV exposure yields a regeneration of the TL peaks for the post irradiated samples for X or gamma radiation with some changes in the peaks structure especially the third peak. For the post X-ray irradiated crystals, the area under the third glow peak (III) increased linearly with the integrated time of UV exposures till about 30 min. after which no changes were observed; while , for the post gamma-irradiated crystals two linear regions were observed

  7. Characterization of barite and crystal glass as attenuators in X-ray and gamma radiation shieldings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Junior, Airton Tavares de

    2005-03-01

    Aiming to determine the barium sulphate (BaSO 4 ) ore and crystal glass attenuation features, both utilized as shieldings against ionizing X and gamma radiations in radiographic installations, a study of attenuation using barite plaster and barite concrete was carried out, which are used, respectively, on wall coverings and in block buildings. The crystal glass is utilized in screens and in windows. To do so, ten plates of barite plaster and three of barite concrete with 900 cm 2 and with an average thickness ranging from 1 to 5 cm, and three plates of crystal glass with 323 cm 2 and with thicknesses of 1, 2 and 4 cm were analyzed. The samples were irradiated with X-rays with potentials of 60, 80, 110 and 150 kilovolts, and also with 60 Co gamma rays. Curves of attenuation were obtained for barite plaster and barite concrete (mGy/mA.min) and (mGy/h), both at 1 meter, as a function of thickness and curve of transmission through barite plaster and barite concrete as a function of the thickness. The equivalent thicknesses of half and tenth value layers for barite plaster, barite concrete and crystal glass for all X-Ray energies were also determined. (author)

  8. Gamma-ray Burst X-ray Flares Light Curve Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubain, Jonisha

    2018-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous explosions in the Universe. These electromagnetic explosions produce jets demonstrated by a short burst of prompt gamma-ray emission followed by a broadband afterglow. There are sharp increases of flux in the X-ray light curves known as flares that occurs in about 50% of the afterglows. In this study, we characterized all of the X-ray afterglows that were detected by the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT), whether with flares or without. We fit flares to the Norris function (Norris et al. 2005) and power laws with breaks where necessary (Racusin et al. 2009). After fitting the Norris function and power laws, we search for the residual pattern detected in prompt GRB pulses (Hakkila et al. 2014, 2015, 2017), that may indicate a common signature of shock physics. If we find the same signature in flares and prompt pulses, it provides insight into what causes them, as well as, how these flares are produced.

  9. X-ray characterization of curved crystals for hard x-ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffagni, Elisa; Bonnini, Elisa; Ferrari, Claudio; Virgilli, Enrico; Frontera, Filippo

    2015-05-01

    Among the methods to focus photons the diffraction in crystals results as one of the most effective for high energy photons. An assembling of properly oriented crystals can form a lens able to focus x-rays at high energy via Laue diffraction in transmission geometry; this is a Laue lens. The x-ray diffraction theory provides that the maximum diffraction efficiency is achieved in ideal mosaic crystals, but real mosaic crystals show diffraction efficiencies several times lower than the ideal case due to technological problems. An alternative and convenient approach is the use of curved crystals. We have recently optimized an efficient method based on the surface damage of crystals to produce self-standing uniformly curved Si, GaAs and Ge tiles of thickness up to 2-3 mm and curvature radii R down to a few meters. We show that, for curved diffracting planes, such crystals have a diffraction efficiency nearly forty times higher than the diffraction efficiency of perfect similar flat crystals, thus very close to that of ideal mosaic crystals. Moreover, in an alternative configuration where the diffracting planes are perpendicular to the curved ones, a focusing effect occurs and will be shown. These results were obtained for several energies between 17 and 120 keV with lab sources or at high energy facilities such as LARIX at Ferrara (Italy), ESRF at Grenoble (France), and ANKA at Karlsruhe (Germany).

  10. Crystal glass and barite used for x ray and gamma radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonio Filho, Joao

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Crystal glass, barite plaster and barite concrete has been widely used as shielding material in gamma radiation sources as well as x-ray generating equipment to replace the plumbiferous glass and in the wall covering, in order to minimize exposure to individuals. However, properties of the radiation attenuation of crystal glass commercially available in Brazil, for the different types of energy are not known. For this reason, this work was carried out aiming to determine the radiation attenuation, transmission curves and Half Value Layer. In this work, ten plates of crystal glass, with dimensions of 20 cm x 20 cm and range of thicknesses from 0.5 to 2.0 cm, and ten plates of barite plaster and five plates of barite concrete, with dimensions of 20 x 20 cm 2 and range of thicknesses from 1,0 to 5,0 cm, were used. The plates were X-ray irradiated with potential constants of 60, 80, 110, 150 kV and gamma radiation of 60 Co. Analysis in the properties of the 60 Co radiation attenuation of barite plaster and barite concrete commercially available in Brazil were also carried out. The curves of attenuation and of transmission were obtained for crystal glass, barite plaster and barite concrete (mGy/m A.min) at 1 meter as a function of thickness. The thickness equivalent of a half value layer and deci value layer of crystal glass for all types of radiation and energies studied was also determined. Although their use permits the dimensioning of the armor covering for external x-radiation whit precision and safety without elevating the cost of protection. (author)

  11. Efficiency curves of NIRR-1 gamma-ray spectrometry system at near ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The full-energy peak efficiency curves of the gamma-ray spectrometry for use with the Nigeria Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1) have been determined by both theoretical and experimental at two source-detector positions for routine neutron activation analysis. Standard gamma ray sources were used to determine the efficiency ...

  12. Crystal diffraction lens telescope for focusing nuclear gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smither, R.K.; Fernandez, P.B.; Graber, T.; Faiz, M.

    1996-08-01

    A crystal diffraction lens was constructed at Argonne National Laboratory for use as a telescope to focus nuclear gamma rays. It consisted of 600 single crystals of germanium arranged in 8 concentric rings. The mounted angle of each crystal was adjusted to intercept and diffract the incoming gamma rays with an accuracy of a few arc sec. The performance of the lens was tested in two ways. In one case, the gamma rays were focused on a single medium size germanium detector. In the second case, the gamma rays were focused on the central germanium detector of a 3 x 3 matrix of small germanium detectors. The efficiency, image concentration and image quality, and shape were measured. The tests performed with the 3 x 3 matrix detector system were particularly interesting. The wanted radiation was concentrated in the central detector. The 8 other detectors were used to detect the Compton scattered radiation, and their energy was summed with coincident events in the central detector. This resulted in a detector with the efficiency of a large detector (all 9 elements) and the background of a small detector (only the central element). The use of the 3 x 3 detector matrix makes it possible to tell if the source is off axis and, if so, to tell in which direction. The crystal lens acts very much like a simple convex lens for visible light. Thus if the source is off to the left then the image will focus off to the right illuminating the detector on the right side: telling one in which direction to point the telescope. Possible applications of this type of crystal lens to balloon and satellite experiments will be discussed

  13. Multi-messenger Light Curves from Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Internal Shock Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustamante, Mauricio [Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics (CCAPP), The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Heinze, Jonas; Winter, Walter [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Murase, Kohta, E-mail: bustamanteramirez.1@osu.edu, E-mail: walter.winter@desy.de, E-mail: jonas.heinze@desy.de, E-mail: murase@psu.edu [Center for Particle and Gravitational Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA16802 (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are promising as sources of neutrinos and cosmic rays. In the internal shock scenario, blobs of plasma emitted from a central engine collide within a relativistic jet and form shocks, leading to particle acceleration and emission. Motivated by present experimental constraints and sensitivities, we improve the predictions of particle emission by investigating time-dependent effects from multiple shocks. We produce synthetic light curves with different variability timescales that stem from properties of the central engine. For individual GRBs, qualitative conclusions about model parameters, neutrino production efficiency, and delays in high-energy gamma-rays can be deduced from inspection of the gamma-ray light curves. GRBs with fast time variability without additional prominent pulse structure tend to be efficient neutrino emitters, whereas GRBs with fast variability modulated by a broad pulse structure can be inefficient neutrino emitters and produce delayed high-energy gamma-ray signals. Our results can be applied to quantitative tests of the GRB origin of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, and have the potential to impact current and future multi-messenger searches.

  14. Multi-messenger light curves from gamma-ray bursts in the internal shock model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustamante, Mauricio [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics (CCAPP); Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Murase, Kohta [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Center for Particle and Gravitational Astrophysics; Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Astronomy and Astrophysics; Winter, Walter [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are promising as sources of neutrinos and cosmic rays. In the internal shock scenario, blobs of plasma emitted from a central engine collide within a relativistic jet and form shocks, leading to particle acceleration and emission. Motivated by present experimental constraints and sensitivities, we improve the predictions of particle emission by investigating time-dependent effects from multiple shocks. We produce synthetic light curves with different variability timescales that stem from properties of the central engine. For individual GRBs, qualitative conclusions about model parameters, neutrino production efficiency, and delays in high-energy gamma rays can be deduced from inspection of the gamma-ray light curves. GRBs with fast time variability without additional prominent pulse structure tend to be efficient neutrino emitters, whereas GRBs with fast variability modulated by a broad pulse structure tend to be inefficient neutrino emitters and produce delayed high-energy gamma-ray signals. Our results can be applied to quantitative tests of the GRB origin of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, and have the potential to impact current and future multi-messenger searches.

  15. Room temperature X- and gamma-ray detectors using thallium bromide crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Hitomi, K; Shoji, T; Suehiro, T; Hiratate, Y

    1999-01-01

    Thallium bromide (TlBr) is a compound semiconductor with wide band gap (2.68 eV) and high X- and gamma-ray stopping power. The TlBr crystals were grown by the horizontal travelling molten zone (TMZ) method using purified material. Two types of room temperature X- and gamma-ray detectors were fabricated from the TlBr crystals: TlBr detectors with high detection efficiency for positron annihilation gamma-ray (511 keV) detection and TlBr detectors with high-energy resolution for low-energy X-ray detection. The detector of the former type demonstrated energy resolution of 56 keV FWHM (11%) for 511 keV gamma-rays. Energy resolution of 1.81 keV FWHM for 5.9 keV was obtained from the detector of the latter type. In order to analyze noise characteristics of the detector-preamplifier assembly, the equivalent noise charge (ENC) was measured as a function of the amplifier shaping time for the high-resolution detector. This analysis shows that parallel white noise and 1/f noise were dominant noise sources in the detector...

  16. Gamma-ray relative energy response of Ce: YAG crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianhua; Zhang Chuanfei; Hu Mengchun; Peng Taiping; Wang Zhentong; Tang Dengpan; Zhao Guangjun

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-ray relative energy response of Ce: YAG crystal, which is important for pulsed γ-ray measurement, was studied in this work.The Ce: YAG crystal, which was developed at Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, was aligned point by point with γ-rays scattered from an industrial 60 Co line source. The γ-ray relative energy response was calculated using the mass attenuation coefficient. The results show that the numerical calculation method of γ-ray relative energy response is reliable, and the experimental method with multi-energy point γ-ray by Compton scattering is also feasible, that can be used for checking up correctness of the numerical calculation results. (authors)

  17. Digested livestock wastewater treatment using gamma-ray irradiation and struvite crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tak Hyun; Lee, Sang Ryul; Nam, Youn Ku; Lee, Myun Joo

    2009-01-01

    Livestock wastewater generally contains high strength of organics (COD), ammonia nitrogen (NH 4 + -N), phosphate phosphorus (PO 4 3- -P) and suspended solids. It is very difficult to treat by conventional wastewater treatment techniques. In this study, struvite crystallization was carried out to treat the digested livestock wastewater. 1.0 :1.2 :1.2 was determined as an optimal NH 4 + :Mg 2+ : PO 4 3- mol ratio of struvite crystallization. For the digested livestock wastewater, COD, NH 4 + -N and PO 4 3- -P removal efficiencies by struvite crystallization were 72.4%, 98.9%, and 74.8%, respectively. Gamma-ray irradiation was carried out prior to struvite crystallization of livestock wastewater. The enhancement of struvite crystallization efficiency could be obtained by the pretreatment of gamma-ray irradiation due to the decrease of COD, NH 4 + -N and PO 4 3- -P concentration

  18. Design parameters of transmission curved crystal spectrometer for hard X-ray diagnoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Feng; Cao Leifeng; Zhou Weimin; Zhao Zongqing; Gu Yuqiu; Yan Yonghong; Wei Lai; Xiao Shali

    2013-01-01

    The high resolving measurement of hard X-ray spectra generated in laser-produced plasma is usually performed using a cylindrically curved crystal spectrometer. In this paper, theoretical analysis and numerical simulation are performed to investigate the dependence of the energy range and resolving power on various design parameters, including crystal bending radius, source to crystal standoff distance, source size, location of the detector, etc. The investigation provides a means to design and develop cylindrically transmission curved crystal spectrometer which is used in hard X-ray diagnostics. The results show that crystal bending radius has a great influence on energy range of spectra and resolving power, and the separation between the spectral lines increases with the distance behind the focal circle faster than the line width, resulting in increased resolving power with distance. (authors)

  19. Comparison of X-ray and gamma-ray dose-response curves for pink somatic mutations in Tradescantia clone 02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underbrink, A.G.; Kellerer, A.M.; Mills, R.E.; Sparrow, A.H.; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, N.Y.

    1976-01-01

    Microdosimetric data indicate that the mean specific energy, xi, produced by individual charged particles from X rays and gamma rays is different for the two radiation qualities by nearly a factor of two. In order to test whether this influences the initial, linear component in the dose-effect relations, a comparison was made between dose-response curves for pink somatic mutations in Tradescantia clone 02 stamen hairs following X and gamma irradiations. Absorbed doses ranged from 2.66 to 300 rad. The results are in agreement with predictions made on the basis of microdosimetric data. At low doses gamma rays are substantially less effective than X rays. The RBE of gamma rays vs. X rays at low doses was approximately 0.6, a value lower than those usually reported in other experimental systems. (orig.) [de

  20. X-ray spectroscopic study of high-temperature plasmas by curved crystal spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Shigeru.

    1983-07-01

    Extensive studies have been carried out on the structure of X-ray spectra from the highly stripped ions of first transition elements and their behavior in high temperature plasma, using a high resolution crystal spectrometer. Calculation was made on the design and the use of a curved crystal spectrometer for plasma diagnostics. A Johann type crystal spectrometer for measuring X-ray lines was constructed on the basis of the calculation. The characteristics of curved crystals of LiF, Ge and quartz used for the measurement of Kα lines from first transition elements were investigated. Vacuum sparks have been formed for producing high temperature plasma which emits X-ray lines from highly stripped ions. Two different structures of vacuum spark plasma were shown, that is, thermalized point plasma and extended plasma associated with non-thermal electrons. The X-ray lines from the extended plasma, those associated with the K shell from the point plasma and the Kα lines of Ti through Zn from the point plasma have been observed. (Kako, I.)

  1. Environmental studies on X- and {gamma}-irradiated LiCsSO{sub 4} crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassem, M.E

    2003-09-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics of LiCsSO{sub 4} crystal have been studied after exposure to different doses of X and {gamma} radiations. The glow curves showed TL response of three peaks at 75 deg. C, 125 deg. C and 250 deg. C. The structure of the glow peaks due to X-rays is quite different from that due to {gamma}-rays. UV exposure yields a regeneration of the TL peaks for the post-irradiated samples with X- or {gamma}-radiation with some changes in the peak structure especially the third peak. For the post-X-ray irradiated crystals, the area under the third glow peak (PK III) increased linearly with the integrated time of UV exposure till about 30 min after which no changes were observed; while, for the post-{gamma}-irradiated crystals, two linear regions were observed. The models of the TL response for the post-irradiated samples as a result of exposure to UV are discussed.

  2. BiI{sub 3} single crystal for room-temperature gamma ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, T., E-mail: saito.tatsuya125@canon.co.jp [Frontier Research Center, Canon Inc., 3-30-2, Shimomaruko, Ohta-ku, Tokyo 146-8501 (Japan); Iwasaki, T. [Frontier Research Center, Canon Inc., 3-30-2, Shimomaruko, Ohta-ku, Tokyo 146-8501 (Japan); Kurosawa, S.; Yoshikawa, A. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe), Tohoku University, 6-6-10 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Den, T. [Frontier Research Center, Canon Inc., 3-30-2, Shimomaruko, Ohta-ku, Tokyo 146-8501 (Japan)

    2016-01-11

    BiI{sub 3} single crystals were grown by the physical vapor transport method. The repeated sublimation of the starting material reduced impurities in the BiI{sub 3} single crystal to sub-ppm levels. The detector was fabricated by depositing Au electrodes on both surfaces of the 100-μm-thick BiI{sub 3} single crystal platelet. The resistivity of the BiI{sub 3} single crystal was increased by post-annealing in an iodine atmosphere (ρ=1.6×10{sup 11} Ω cm). Pulse height spectroscopy measurements showed clear peaks in the energy spectrum of alpha particles or gamma rays. It was estimated that the mobility-lifetime product was μ{sub e}τ{sub e}=3.4–8.5×10{sup −6} cm{sup 2}/V and the electron–hole pair creation energy was 5.8 eV. Our results show that BiI{sub 3} single crystals are promising candidates for detectors used in radiographic imaging or gamma ray spectroscopy.

  3. A Correlation Between the Intrinsic Brightness and Average Decay Rate of Gamma-Ray Burst X-Ray Afterglow Light Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racusin, J. L.; Oates, S. R.; De Pasquale, M.; Kocevski, D.

    2016-01-01

    We present a correlation between the average temporal decay (alpha X,avg, greater than 200 s) and early-time luminosity (LX,200 s) of X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts as observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. Both quantities are measured relative to a rest-frame time of 200 s after the gamma-ray trigger. The luminosity â€" average decay correlation does not depend on specific temporal behavior and contains one scale-independent quantity minimizing the role of selection effects. This is a complementary correlation to that discovered by Oates et al. in the optical light curves observed by the Swift Ultraviolet Optical Telescope. The correlation indicates that, on average, more luminous X-ray afterglows decay faster than less luminous ones, indicating some relative mechanism for energy dissipation. The X-ray and optical correlations are entirely consistent once corrections are applied and contamination is removed. We explore the possible biases introduced by different light-curve morphologies and observational selection effects, and how either geometrical effects or intrinsic properties of the central engine and jet could explain the observed correlation.

  4. Solid state structural investigations of the bis(chalcone) compound with single crystal X-ray crystallography, DFT, gamma-ray spectroscopy and chemical spectroscopy methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakalı, Gül; Biçer, Abdullah; Eke, Canel; Cin, Günseli Turgut

    2018-04-01

    A bis(chalcone), (2E,6E)-2,6-bis((E)-3phenylallidene)cyclohexanone, was characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR, FTIR, UV-Vis spectroscopy, gamma-ray spectroscopy and single crystal X- ray structural analysis. The optimized molecular structure of the compound is calculated using DFT/B3LYP with 6-31G (d,p) level. The calculated geometrical parameters are in good agreement with the experimental data obtained from our reported X-ray structure. The powder and single crystal compounds were gama-irradiated using clinical electron linear accelerator and 60Co gamma-ray source, respectively. Spectral studies (1H NMR, 13C NMR, FTIR and UV-Vis) of powder chalcone compound were also investigated before and after irradiation. Depending on the irradiation notable changes were observed in spectral features powder sample. Single crystal X-ray diffraction investigation shows that both unirradiated and irradiated single crystal samples crystallizes in a orthorhombic crystal system in the centrosymmetric space group Pbcn and exhibits an C-H..O intramolecular and intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The crystal packing is stabilised by strong intermolecular bifurcate C-H..O hydrogen bonds and π…π stacking interactions. The asymmetric unit of the title compound contains one-half of a molecule. The other half of the molecule is generated with (1-x,y,-3/2-z) symmetry operator. The molecule is almost planar due to having π conjugated system of chalcones. However, irradiated single crystal compound showed significant changes lattice parameters, crystal volume and density. According to results of gamma-ray spectroscopy, radioactive elements of powder compound which are 123Sb(n,g),124Sb,57Fe(g,p),56Mn, 55Mn(g,n), and 54Mn were determined using photoactivation analysis. However, the most intensive gamma-ray energy signals are 124Sb.

  5. Multiwavelength Study of Gamma-Ray Bright Blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Daria; Larionov, V. M.; Hagen-Thorn, V. A.; Jorstad, S. G.; Marscher, A. P.; Troitskii, I. S.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate total intensity radio images of 6 gamma-ray bright blazars (BL Lac, 3C 279, 3C 273, W Com, PKS 1510-089, and 3C 66A) and their optical and gamma-ray light curves to study connections between gamma-ray and optical brightness variations and changes in the parsec-scale radio structure. We use high-resolution maps obtained by the BU group at 43 GHz with the VLBA, optical light curves constructed by the St.Petersburg State U. (Russia) team using measurements with the 0.4 m telescope of St.Petersburg State U. (LX200) and the 0.7 m telescope of the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory (AZT-8), and gamma-ray light curves, which we have constructed with data provided by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Over the period from August 2008 to November 2009, superluminal motion is found in all 6 objects with apparent speed ranging from 2c to 40c. The blazars with faster apparent speeds, 3C 273, 3C 279, PKS 1510-089, and 3C 66A, exhibit stronger variability of the gamma-ray emission. There is a tendency for sources with sharply peaked gamma-ray flares to have faster jet speed than sources with gamma-ray light curves with no sharp peaks. Gamma-ray light curves with sharply peaked gamma-ray flares possess a stronger gamma-ray/optical correlations. The research at St.Petersburg State U. was funded by the Minister of Education and Science of the Russian Federation (state contract N#P123). The research at BU was funded in part by NASA Fermi Guest Investigator grant NNX08AV65G and by NSF grant AST-0907893. The VLBA is an instrument of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  6. Influence of Gamma-Ray Irradiation on Absorption and Fluorescent Spectra of Nd:YAG and Yb:YAG Laser Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Dun-Lu; ZHANG Qing-Li; XIAO Jing-Zhong; LUO Jian-Qiao; JIANG Hai-He; YIN Shao-Tang

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the influence of gamma-ray irradiation on the absorption and fluorescent spectra of Nd3+ : Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG) and Yb3+ :Y3Al5O12 (Yb:YAG) crystals grown by the Czochralski method. Two additional absorption (AA) bands induced by gamma-ray irradiation appear at 255nm and 340nm. The former is eontributed due to Fe3+ impurity, the latter is due to Fe2+ ions and F-type colour centres. The intensity of the excitation and emission spectra as well as the fluorescent lifetime of Nd:YAG crystal decrease after the irradiation of 100 Mrad gamma-ray. In contrast, the same dose irradiation does not impair the fluorescent properties of Yb: YA G crystal. These results indicate that Yb: YA G crystal possesses the advantage over Nd: YA G crystal that has better reliability for applications in harsh radiant environment.

  7. Compact TXRF system using doubly curved crystal optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z.W.

    2000-01-01

    Doubly curved crystal optics can provide large collection solid angle from a small x-ray source but were difficult to be fabricated in the past. The recent innovative doubly curved crystal optic technology provides accurate bending figure of thin crystal and produces high performance doubly curved crystal optics. The high quality doubly curved crystal can increase the intensity of the primary beam significantly for total reflection x-ray fluorescence application based on a low power x-ray source. In this report, toroidal Si(220) crystals are used to focused Cu Kα and Mo Kα x-rays from low power compact x-ray tubes that have maximum power setting at 50 kV and 1 mA. With a slit aperture to control the convergent angle, a fan Cu Kα1 beam with 15 degree x 0.2 degree convergent angles is obtained for TXRF excitation. Similarly, a fan Mo Kα1 beam with 6 degree x 0.1 degree convergent angles is used for high energy excitation. Si wafer based TXRF samples will be prepared and measured using this technique and the experimental data. (author)

  8. Dose-response calibration curves of {sup 137}Cs gamma rays for dicentric chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Wol Soon; Oh, Su Jung; Jeong, Soo Kyun; Yang, Kwang Mo [Dept. of Research center, Dong Nam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Min Ho [Dept. of Microbiology, Dong A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Recently, the increased threat of radiologically industrial accident such as radiation nondestructive inspection or destruction of nuclear accident by natural disaster such as Fukushima accident requires a greater capacity for cytogenetic biodosimetry, which is critical for clinical triage of potentially thousands of radiation-exposed individuals. Dicentric chromosome aberration analysis is the conventional means of assessing radiation exposure. Dose–response calibration curves for {sup 13}'7Cs gamma rays have been established for unstable chromosome aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes in many laboratories of international biodosimetry network. In this study, therefore, we established dose– response calibration curves of our laboratory for {sup 137}Cs gamma raysaccording to the IAEA protocols for conducting the dicentric chromosome assay We established in vitro dose–response calibration curves for dicentric chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes for{sup 13}'7Cs gamma rays in the 0 to 5 Gy range, using the maximum likelihood linear-quadratic model, Y = c+αD+βD2. The estimated coefficients of the fitted curves were within the 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and the curve fitting of dose–effect relationship data indicated a good fit to the linear-quadratic model. Hence, meaningful dose estimation from unknown sample can be determined accurately by using our laboratory’s calibration curve according to standard protocol.

  9. Modeling Phase-Aligned Gamma-Ray and Radio Millisecond Pulsar Light Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, C.; Johnson, T.; Harding, A.

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of the first eight gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope, this population has been steadily expanding. Four of the more recent detections, PSR J00340534, PSR J1939+2134 (B1937+21; the first MSP ever discovered), PSR J1959+2048 (B1957+20; the first discovery of a black widow system), and PSR J2214+3000, exhibit a phenomenon not present in the original discoveries: nearly phase-aligned radio and gamma-ray light curves (LCs). To account for the phase alignment, we explore models where both the radio and gamma-ray emission originate either in the outer magnetosphere near the light cylinder or near the polar caps. Using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique to search for best-fit model parameters, we obtain reasonable LC fits for the first three of these MSPs in the context of altitude-limited outer gap (alOG) and two-pole caustic (alTPC) geometries (for both gamma-ray and radio emission). These models differ from the standard outer gap (OG)/two-pole caustic (TPC) models in two respects: the radio emission originates in caustics at relatively high altitudes compared to the usual conal radio beams, and we allow both the minimum and maximum altitudes of the gamma-ray and radio emission regions to vary within a limited range (excluding the minimum gamma-ray altitude of the alTPC model, which is kept constant at the stellar radius, and that of the alOG model, which is set to the position-dependent null charge surface altitude). Alternatively, phase-aligned solutions also exist for emission originating near the stellar surface in a slot gap scenario (low-altitude slot gap (laSG) models). We find that the alTPC models provide slightly better LC fits than the alOG models, and both of these give better fits than the laSG models (for the limited range of parameters considered in the case of the laSG models). Thus, our fits imply that the phase-aligned LCs are likely of caustic origin, produced in the outer magnetosphere, and

  10. Dose Rate and Mass Attenuation Coefficients of Gamma Ray for Concretes

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Latif, A A; Kansouh, W A; El-Sayed, F H

    2003-01-01

    This work is concerned with the study of the leakage gamma ray dose and mass attenuation coefficients for ordinary, basalt and dolomite concretes made from local ores. Concretes under investigation were constructed from gravel, basalt and dolomite ores, and then reconstructed with the addition of 3% steel fibers by weight. Measurements were carried out using a collimated beam from sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma ray source and sodium iodide (3x3) crystal with the genie 2000 gamma spectrometer. The obtained fluxes were transformed to gamma ray doses and displayed in the form of gamma ray dose rates distribution. The displayed curves were used to estimate the linear attenuation coefficients (mu), the relaxation lengths (lambda), half value layer (t sub 1 /2) and tenth value layer (t sub 1 /10). Also, The total mass attenuation coefficients of gamma ray have been calculated to the concerned concretes using XCOM (version 3.1) program and database elements cross sections from Z=1 to 100 at energies from 10 keV to 100 MeV. In...

  11. Effects of gamma ray irradiation on the struvite crystallization of livestock wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Byeong Hak; Jo, Seong Hui; Lee, Myun Joo; Kim, Tak Hyun

    2010-01-01

    The struvite crystallization was applied to remove NH 4 + in livestock wastewater. The ammonium ions can be very toxic to the aquatic creatures. In this experiments, the livestock wastewater from Gongju livestock wastewater treatment plant was used. The behaviors of various parameters such as pH, mole ratio of Mg 2+ : NH 4 + : PO 4 3- and reaction temperature for struvite crystallization of livestock wastewater and the effect of gamma ray irradiation were evaluated. As results, for the pH variation, the NH 4 + removal efficiency showed the highest, 88%, at pH 9 ∼ 9.25. The removal efficiency of NH 4 + , Mg 2+ and PO 4 3- was showed highest when same molar ratio of Mg 2+ and PO 4 3- were applied. The NH 4 + removal efficiency showed 82% at 7 .deg. C, and 90% at 30 .deg. C, with temperature. When the wastewater was irradiated with 20 kGy of gamma ray, NH 4 + was removed as much as 83%

  12. Modelling gamma-ray light curves of phase-aligned millisecond pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shan; Zhang, Li; Li, Xiang; Jiang, Zejun

    2018-04-01

    Three gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs), PSR J1939+2134, PSR J1959+2048, and PSR J0034-0534, have been confirmed to have a common feature of phase-aligned in radio and gamma-ray bands. With a geometric (two-pole caustic) model and a physical outer gap model (revised 3D outer gap model) in a three dimensional (3D) retarded magnetic dipole with a perturbation magnetic field, the observed features of these MSPs are studied. In order to obtained the best-fitting model parameters, the Markov chain Monte Carlo technique is used and reasonable GeV band light curves for three MSPs are given. Our calculations indicate that MSPs emit high energy photons with smaller inclination angles (α ≈ 10°-50°), larger view angles (ζ ≈ 65°-100°), and smaller perturbation factor (ɛ ≈ -0.15-0.1). Note that the factor ɛ, describing the strength of the perturbed magnetic field, is all less than zero in these two models, so the magnetic field caused by current-induced play a leading role in the pulsed location of MSPs.

  13. The host galaxy and optical light curve of the gamma-ray burst GRB 980703

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holland, S.; Fynbo, J.P.U.; Hjorth, J.

    2001-01-01

    We present deep HST/STIS and ground-based photometry of the host galaxy of the gamma-ray burst GRB 980703 taken 17, 551, 710, and 716 days after the burst. We find that the host is a blue, slightly over-luminous galaxy with V-gal = 23.00 +/-0.10, (V - R)(gal) = 0.43 +/-0.13, and a centre...... 980703 with any special features in the host. The host galaxy appears to be a typical example of a compact star forming galaxy similar to those found in the Hubble Deep Field North. The R-band light curve of the optical afterglow associated with this gamma-ray burst is consistent with a single power...

  14. Characterization of barite and crystal glass as attenuators in X-ray and gamma radiation shieldings; Caracterizacao da barita e do vidro cristal como atenuadores na blindagem das radiacoes X e gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida Junior, Airton Tavares de

    2005-03-15

    Aiming to determine the barium sulphate (BaSO{sub 4}) ore and crystal glass attenuation features, both utilized as shieldings against ionizing X and gamma radiations in radiographic installations, a study of attenuation using barite plaster and barite concrete was carried out, which are used, respectively, on wall coverings and in block buildings. The crystal glass is utilized in screens and in windows. To do so, ten plates of barite plaster and three of barite concrete with 900 cm{sup 2} and with an average thickness ranging from 1 to 5 cm, and three plates of crystal glass with 323 cm{sup 2} and with thicknesses of 1, 2 and 4 cm were analyzed. The samples were irradiated with X-rays with potentials of 60, 80, 110 and 150 kilovolts, and also with {sup 60}Co gamma rays. Curves of attenuation were obtained for barite plaster and barite concrete (mGy/mA.min) and (mGy/h), both at 1 meter, as a function of thickness and curve of transmission through barite plaster and barite concrete as a function of the thickness. The equivalent thicknesses of half and tenth value layers for barite plaster, barite concrete and crystal glass for all X-Ray energies were also determined. (author)

  15. Light Curve and SED Modeling of the Gamma-Ray Binary 1FGL J1018.6–5856: Constraints on the Orbital Geometry and Relativistic Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Hongjun; Romani, Roger W., E-mail: hjan@chungbuk.ac.kr [Department of Physics/KIPAC, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    We present broadband spectral energy distributions and light curves of the gamma-ray binary 1FGL J1018.6−5856 measured in the X-ray and the gamma-ray bands. We find that the orbital modulation in the low-energy gamma-ray band is similar to that in the X-ray band, suggesting a common spectral component. However, above a GeV the orbital light curve changes significantly. We suggest that the GeV band contains significant flux from a pulsar magnetosphere, while the X-ray to TeV light curves are dominated by synchrotron and Compton emission from an intrabinary shock (IBS). We find that a simple one-zone model is inadequate to explain the IBS emission, but that beamed Synchrotron-self Compton radiation from adiabatically accelerated plasma in the shocked pulsar wind can reproduce the complex multiband light curves, including the variable X-ray spike coincident with the gamma-ray maximum. The model requires an inclination of ∼50° and an orbital eccentricity of ∼0.35, consistent with the limited constraints from existing optical observations. This picture motivates searches for pulsations from the energetic young pulsar powering the wind shock.

  16. Methods for fitting of efficiency curves obtained by means of HPGe gamma rays spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Vanderlei

    2002-01-01

    The present work describes a few methodologies developed for fitting efficiency curves obtained by means of a HPGe gamma-ray spectrometer. The interpolated values were determined by simple polynomial fitting and polynomial fitting between the ratio of experimental peak efficiency and total efficiency, calculated by Monte Carlo technique, as a function of gamma-ray energy. Moreover, non-linear fitting has been performed using a segmented polynomial function and applying the Gauss-Marquardt method. For the peak area obtainment different methodologies were developed in order to estimate the background area under the peak. This information was obtained by numerical integration or by using analytical functions associated to the background. One non-calibrated radioactive source has been included in the curve efficiency in order to provide additional calibration points. As a by-product, it was possible to determine the activity of this non-calibrated source. For all fittings developed in the present work the covariance matrix methodology was used, which is an essential procedure in order to give a complete description of the partial uncertainties involved. (author)

  17. CENTRAL ENGINE MEMORY OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND SOFT GAMMA-RAY REPEATERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.; Zhang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bursts of γ-rays generated from relativistic jets launched from catastrophic events such as massive star core collapse or binary compact star coalescence. Previous studies suggested that GRB emission is erratic, with no noticeable memory in the central engine. Here we report a discovery that similar light curve patterns exist within individual bursts for at least some GRBs. Applying the Dynamic Time Warping method, we show that similarity of light curve patterns between pulses of a single burst or between the light curves of a GRB and its X-ray flare can be identified. This suggests that the central engine of at least some GRBs carries “memory” of its activities. We also show that the same technique can identify memory-like emission episodes in the flaring emission in soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs), which are believed to be Galactic, highly magnetized neutron stars named magnetars. Such a phenomenon challenges the standard black hole central engine models for GRBs, and suggest a common physical mechanism behind GRBs and SGRs, which points toward a magnetar central engine of GRBs

  18. Structure in the early afterglow light curve of the gamma-ray burst of 29 March 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Makoto; Kato, Taichi; Ishioka, Ryoko; Yamaoka, Hitoshi; Monard, Berto; Nogami, Daisaku; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Sugie, Atsushi; Takahashi, Susumu

    2003-06-19

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are energetic explosions that for 0.01-100 s are the brightest gamma-ray sources in the sky. Observations of the early evolution of afterglows are expected to provide clues about the nature of the bursts, but their rapid fading has hampered such studies; some recent rapid localizations of bursts have improved the situation. Here we report an early detection of the very bright afterglow of the burst of 29 March 2003 (GRB030329). Our data show that, even early in the afterglow phase, the light curve shows unexpectedly complicated structures superimposed on the fading background.

  19. Multi-Band Light Curves from Two-Dimensional Simulations of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFadyen, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of gamma-ray burst outflows is inherently multi-dimensional. 1.) We present high resolution two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamics simulations of GRBs in the afterglow phase using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Using standard synchrotron radiation models, we compute multi-band light curves, from the radio to X-ray, directly from the 2D hydrodynamics simulation data. We will present on-axis light curves for both constant density and wind media. We will also present off-axis light curves relevant for searches for orphan afterglows. We find that jet breaks are smoothed due to both off-axis viewing and wind media effects. 2.) Non-thermal radiation mechanisms in GRB afterglows require substantial magnetic field strengths. In turbulence driven by shear instabilities in relativistic magnetized gas, we demonstrate that magnetic field is naturally amplified to half a percent of the total energy (epsilon B = 0.005). We will show high resolution three dimensional relativistic MHD simulations of this process as well as particle in cell (PIC) simulations of mildly relativistic collisionless shocks.

  20. Effect of UV on the post irradiated Li Cs S O{sub 4} crystal by X and gamma radiation. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassem, M E [On Leave, Alexandria University, Faculty of Science, PHysics Department. Alexandria (Egypt); EL-Kolaly, M A [On Leave, Radiation Protection Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt); Al-Houty, L I [University of Qatar, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 2713, Doha (Qatar)

    1996-03-01

    Thermoluminescence characteristics of Li Cs S O{sub 4} crystal have been studied after exposure to different doses of X and Gamma-Radiations. The glow curves showed TL response of Three peaks at 75,125 and 250 degree C. The structure of the glow peaks due to X-rays is quite different from that due to gamma-rays. UV exposure yields regeneration of the TL peaks for the post irradiated samples with X or Gamma-radiation with some changes in the peaks`s structure especially the third peak. For the post X-ray irradiated crystals, the area under the third glow peak (PK III) increased with integrated time of UV exposure till about 30 min after which no changes were observed; while, for the post gamma-irradiated crystals, two linear regions were observed. The models of the TL response for the post irradiated samples as a result to UV are discussed. 5 figs.

  1. Gamma ray detecting device using dislocation-free crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vali, V.; Chang, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a γ-ray detector. It comprises: a dislocation-free single crystal having an input surface and a transmission surface at opposite ends thereof; an active shield surrounding the crystal and functioning as an anticoincidence counter; and γ-ray detector means disposed adjacent the transmission surface of the crystal for receiving and detecting γ-rays of a predetermined wavelength incident on the input surface of the crystal at a specific Bragg angle and transmitted through the crystal

  2. Thermoluminescence response of a mixed ternary alkali halide crystals exposed to gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez M, R.; Perez S, R.; Vazquez P, G.; Riveros, H.; Gonzalez M, P.

    2014-08-01

    Ionic crystals, mainly alkali halide crystals have been the subject of intense research for a better understanding of the luminescence properties of defects induced by ionizing radiation. The defects in crystals can be produced in appreciable concentration due to elastic stresses, radiation, and addition of impurities. These defects exhibit remarkable thermoluminescence properties. This work is concerned with the Tl properties of a ternary alkali halide crystal after being irradiated with gamma and beta rays. It has been found that the Tl glow peak of the crystal follows a rule of average associated to the Tl Temperatures of the components of the mixture, similarly to the response of europium doped binary mixed crystals KCl x KBr 1-x and KBr x RbBr 1-x . (Author)

  3. Thermoluminescence response of a mixed ternary alkali halide crystals exposed to gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez M, R.; Perez S, R. [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Apdo. Postal 5-088, 83190 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Vazquez P, G.; Riveros, H. [UNAM, Instituto de Fisica, Apdo. Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Gonzalez M, P., E-mail: mijangos@cifus.uson.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    Ionic crystals, mainly alkali halide crystals have been the subject of intense research for a better understanding of the luminescence properties of defects induced by ionizing radiation. The defects in crystals can be produced in appreciable concentration due to elastic stresses, radiation, and addition of impurities. These defects exhibit remarkable thermoluminescence properties. This work is concerned with the Tl properties of a ternary alkali halide crystal after being irradiated with gamma and beta rays. It has been found that the Tl glow peak of the crystal follows a rule of average associated to the Tl Temperatures of the components of the mixture, similarly to the response of europium doped binary mixed crystals KCl{sub x}KBr{sub 1-x} and KBr{sub x}RbBr{sub 1-x}. (Author)

  4. Surface-treated self-standing curved crystals as high-efficiency elements for X- and γ-ray optics: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnini, Elisa; Buffagni, Elisa; Zappettini, Andrea; Doyle, Stephen; Ferrari, Claudio

    2015-06-01

    The efficiency of a Laue lens for X- and γ-ray focusing in the energy range 60-600 keV is closely linked to the diffraction efficiency of the single crystals composing the lens. A powerful focusing system is crucial for applications like medical imaging and X-ray astronomy where wide beams must be focused. Mosaic crystals with a high density, such as Cu or Au, and bent crystals with curved diffracting planes (CDPs) are considered for the realization of a focusing system for γ-rays, owing to their high diffraction efficiency in a predetermined angular range. In this work, a comparison of the efficiency of CDP crystals and Cu and Au mosaic crystals was performed on the basis of the theory of X-ray diffraction. Si, GaAs and Ge CDP crystals with optimized thicknesses and moderate radii of curvature of several tens of metres demonstrate comparable or superior performance with respect to the higher atomic number mosaic crystals generally used. In order to increase the efficiency of the lens further, a stack of several CDP crystals is proposed as an optical element. CDP crystals were obtained by a surface-damage method, and a stack of two surface-damaged bent Si crystals was prepared and tested. Rocking curves of the stack were performed with synchrotron radiation at 19 keV to check the lattice alignment: they exhibited only one diffraction peak.

  5. The Prompt-afterglow Connection in Gamma-ray Bursts: a Comprehensive Statistical Analysis of Swift X-ray Light-curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margutti, R.; Zaninoni, E.; Bernardini, M. G.; Chincarini, G.; Pasotti, F.; Guidorzi, C.; Angelini, Lorella; Burrows, D. N.; Capalbi, M.; Evans, P. A.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We present a comprehensive statistical analysis of Swift X-ray light-curves of Gamma- Ray Bursts (GRBs) collecting data from more than 650 GRBs discovered by Swift and other facilities. The unprecedented sample size allows us to constrain the rest-frame X-ray properties of GRBs from a statistical perspective, with particular reference to intrinsic time scales and the energetics of the different light-curve phases in a common rest-frame 0.3-30 keV energy band. Temporal variability episodes are also studied and their properties constrained. Two fundamental questions drive this effort: i) Does the X-ray emission retain any kind of "memory" of the prompt ?-ray phase? ii) Where is the dividing line between long and short GRB X-ray properties? We show that short GRBs decay faster, are less luminous and less energetic than long GRBs in the X-rays, but are interestingly characterized by similar intrinsic absorption. We furthermore reveal the existence of a number of statistically significant relations that link the X-ray to prompt ?-ray parameters in long GRBs; short GRBs are outliers of the majority of these 2-parameter relations. However and more importantly, we report on the existence of a universal 3-parameter scaling that links the X-ray and the ?-ray energy to the prompt spectral peak energy of both long and short GRBs: E(sub X,iso)? E(sup 1.00+/-0.06)(sub ?,iso) /E(sup 0.60+/-0.10)(sub pk).

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE X-RAY LIGHT CURVE OF THE {gamma} Cas-LIKE B1e STAR HD 110432

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Myron A. [Catholic University of America, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lopes de Oliveira, Raimundo [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Av. Marechal Rondon s/n, 49100-000 Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil); Motch, Christian, E-mail: msmith@stsci.edu [Observatoire Astronomique, Universite de Strasbourg, CNRS UMR 7550, 11 rue de l' Universite, F-67000 Strasbourg (France)

    2012-08-10

    HD 110432 (BZ Cru; B1Ve) is the brightest member of a small group of '{gamma} Cas analogs' that emit copious hard X-ray flux, punctuated by ubiquitous 'flares'. To characterize the X-ray time history of this star, we made a series of six RXTE multi-visit observations in 2010 and an extended observation with the XMM-Newton in 2007. We analyzed these new light curves along with three older XMM-Newton observations from 2002 to 2003. Distributed over five months, the RXTE observations were designed to search for long X-ray modulations over a few months. These observations indeed suggest the presence of a long cycle with P Almost-Equal-To 226 days and an amplitude of a factor of two. We also used X-ray light curves constructed from XMM-Newton observations to characterize the lifetimes, strengths, and interflare intervals of 1615 flare-like events in the light curves. After accounting for false positive events, we infer the presence of 955 (2002-2003) and 386 (2007) events we identified as flares. Similarly, as a control we measured the same attributes for an additional group of 541 events in XMM-Newton light curves of {gamma} Cas, which, after a similar correction, yielded 517 flares. We found that the flare properties of HD 110432 are mostly similar to our control group. In both cases the distribution of flare strengths are best fit with log-linear relations. Both the slopes of these distributions and the flaring frequencies themselves exhibit modest fluctuations. We discovered that some flares in the hard X-ray band of HD 110432 were weak or unobserved in the soft band and vice versa. The light curves also occasionally show rapid curve drop-offs that are sustained for hours. We discuss the existence of the long cycle and these flare properties in the backdrop of two rival scenarios to produce hard X-rays, a magnetic star-disk interaction, and the accretion of blobs onto a secondary white dwarf.

  7. Coloration dependence in the thermoluminescence properties of the double doped NaCl single crystals under gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Mejorada, G.; Gelover-Santiago, A.L.; Frias, D.

    2006-01-01

    In this work the behaviour of calcium manganese doped NaCl single crystals under gamma irradiation is reported. Various single crystals of NaCl doped with Ca and Mn have been irradiated at different doses with ionising radiation. The production of defects has been correlated to the increase in the intensity of the thermo luminescent glow curve as a function of doses. The glow curves intensity as a function of doses shows the potential use of these materials as dosimeters. Optical properties of such crystals after irradiation with gamma rays have also been studied; results have shown their potentiality as a good detector and optical store memory devices. Since the creations of colour centres by photons with energy less than the band gap energy has been detected also in ns 2 -ion doped alkali halides. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Calibration of sodium iodide crystal (NaI) gamma ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azwah Jaafar; Juhari Yusof

    2005-01-01

    Sodium Iodide crystal gamma ray detector are widely used to detect leak in the pipeline linkage study, the complete mixing substances in of industrial processes, to measure the river and stream discharges and other usage in estuary and coastal sediment studies. These instruments are more sensitive as compared to other types of counters like Geiger Muller or plastic scintillation component. This calibration is to ensure the correct voltage for each detector. The characteristics of detector are different from each other. Once the operating voltage (HV) is determined it can be used effectively to measure the radiation in the application of nuclear techniques. (Author)

  9. Curved crystal x-ray optics for monochromatic imaging with a clinical source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingölbali, Ayhan; MacDonald, C A

    2009-04-01

    Monochromatic x-ray imaging has been shown to increase contrast and reduce dose relative to conventional broadband imaging. However, clinical sources with very narrow energy bandwidth tend to have limited intensity and field of view. In this study, focused fan beam monochromatic radiation was obtained using doubly curved monochromator crystals. While these optics have been in use for microanalysis at synchrotron facilities for some time, this work is the first investigation of the potential application of curved crystal optics to clinical sources for medical imaging. The optics could be used with a variety of clinical sources for monochromatic slot scan imaging. The intensity was assessed and the resolution of the focused beam was measured using a knife-edge technique. A simulation model was developed and comparisons to the measured resolution were performed to verify the accuracy of the simulation to predict resolution for different conventional sources. A simple geometrical calculation was also developed. The measured, simulated, and calculated resolutions agreed well. Adequate resolution and intensity for mammography were predicted for appropriate source/optic combinations.

  10. BiI3 Crystals for High Energy Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nino, Juan C. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Baciak, James [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Johns, Paul [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Sulekar, Soumitra [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Totten, James [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Nimmagadda, Jyothir [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2017-04-12

    BiI3 had been investigated for its unique properties as a layered compound semiconductor for many decades. However, despite the exceptional atomic, physical, and electronic properties of this material, good resolution gamma ray spectra had never been reported for BiI3. The shortcomings that previously prevented BiI3 from reaching success as a gamma ray sensor were, through this project, identified and suppressed to unlock the performance of this promising compound. Included in this work were studies on a number of methods which have, for the first time, enabled BiI3 to exhibit spectral performance rivaling many other candidate semiconductors for room temperature gamma ray sensors. New approaches to crystal growth were explored that allow BiI3 spectrometers to be fabricated with up to 2.2% spectral resolution at 662 keV. Fundamental studies on trap states, dopant incorporation, and polarization were performed to enhance performance of this compound. Additionally, advanced detection techniques were applied to display the capabilities of high quality BiI3 spectrometers. Overall, through this work, BiI3 has been revealed as a potentially transformative material for nuclear security and radiation detection sciences.

  11. Properties of a large NaI(Tl) spectrometer for the energy measurement of high-energy gamma rays on the Gamma Ray Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, E.B.; Finman, L.C.; Hofstadter, R.; Lepetich, J.E.; Lin, Y.C.; Mattox, J.R.; Nolan, P.L.; Parks, R.; Walker, A.H.

    1986-01-01

    A large NaI(T1) spectrometer is expected to play a crucial role in the measurement of the energy spectra from an all-sky survey of high-energy celestial gamma rays on the Gamma Ray Observatory. The crystal size and requirements of space flight have resulted in a novel crystal-packaging and optics combination. The structure of this spectrometer and the operating characteristics determined in a test program using high energy positrons are described

  12. Temperature dependence of CsI(Tl) gamma-ray excited scintillation characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Gamma-ray excited emission spectrum, absolute scintillation yield, rise and decay time constants, and thermoluminescence emissions of CsI(Tl) were measured at -100 to +50 C, for crystals from 4 different vendors. The thermoluminescence glow curves were the only property that varied significantly from crystal to crystal; room temperature operation in current mode could be susceptible to temperature fluctuations. The CsI(Tl) emission spectrum has emission bands peaking around 400 and 560 nm; the former band disappears between -50 and -75 C. The RT absolute scintillation yield was calculated to be 65,500±4,100 photons/MeV. The two primary decay time constants increases about exponentially with inverse temperature. An ultra-fast decay component was confirmed. Applications are discussed

  13. Gamma ray camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.-H.; Robbins, C.D.

    1979-01-01

    An Anger gamma ray camera is improved by the substitution of a gamma ray sensitive, proximity type image intensifier tube for the scintillator screen in the Anger camera. The image intensifier tube has a negatively charged flat scintillator screen, a flat photocathode layer, and a grounded, flat output phosphor display screen, all of which have the same dimension to maintain unit image magnification; all components are contained within a grounded metallic tube, with a metallic, inwardly curved input window between the scintillator screen and a collimator. The display screen can be viewed by an array of photomultipliers or solid state detectors. There are two photocathodes and two phosphor screens to give a two stage intensification, the two stages being optically coupled by a light guide. (author)

  14. Temporal Evolution of the Gamma-ray Burst Afterglow Spectrum for an Observer: GeV–TeV Synchrotron Self-Compton Light Curve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukushima, Takuma; Fujita, Yutaka [Department of Earth and Space Science, Osaka University, Osaka, 560-0043 (Japan); To, Sho; Asano, Katsuaki, E-mail: fukushima@vega.ess.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: fujita@vega.ess.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: tosho@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: asanok@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2017-08-01

    We numerically simulate the gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow emission with a one-zone time-dependent code. The temporal evolutions of the decelerating shocked shell and energy distributions of electrons and photons are consistently calculated. The photon spectrum and light curves for an observer are obtained taking into account the relativistic propagation of the shocked shell and the curvature of the emission surface. We find that the onset time of the afterglow is significantly earlier than the previous analytical estimate. The analytical formulae of the shock propagation and light curve for the radiative case are also different from our results. Our results show that even if the emission mechanism is switching from synchrotron to synchrotron self-Compton, the gamma-ray light curves can be a smooth power law, which agrees with the observed light curve and the late detection of a 32 GeV photon in GRB 130427A. The uncertainty of the model parameters obtained with the analytical formula is discussed, especially in connection with the closure relation between spectral index and decay index.

  15. Measurement of Gamma-ray Energy Spectrum According to Temperature Variation Using a Fiber-Optic Radiation Sensor Based on YSO:Ce Crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, H.; Yoo, W. J.; Shin, S. H.; Jang, J. S.; Kim, J. S.; Kwon, G.; Lee, D. E.; Jang, K. W.; Lee, B. [BK21 Plus Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Konkuk University, Chungju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    As an alternative to conventional radiation detectors, various fiber-optic radiation sensors (FORSs) have been investigated for gamma-ray monitoring because of their various desirable advantages, such as their small sensing volume, substantial flexibility, remote operation, ability to make real-time measurement, and immunity to high electromagnetic interference. In general, the basic principle of a radiation detection using scintillators is to measure the scintillating light signals generated from the interactions between the scintillators and the radiations. To measure gamma-ray, the inorganic scintillators used in the FORS should have some properties, such as high atomic material, high light yields, fast decay time, high density, and high stopping power. For these reasons, a cerium-doped lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO:Ce) crystal has been introduced as a promising scintillator in various radiation sensor applications. According to the recent studies, however, LYSO:Ce crystal is impossible to be applied in high-temperature conditions because it serves the fluctuations of its light yields with the temperature variation (i.e., thermosluminescence). In this study, to obtain gamma-ray energy spectra by measuring scintillating light signals emitted from the scintillators in high-temperature conditions, we first fabricated an FORS system using various inorganic scintillator crystals and then evaluated the light yields of each inorganic scintillator. As a promising scintillator for use in high-temperature conditions, a cerium-doped yttrium orthosilicate (YSO:Ce) crystal was selected and evaluated its thermal property according to the elevated temperature up to 300 .deg. C. We fabricated an FORS using inorganic scintillator and an optical fiber bundle. To select an adequate scintillator to apply in high-temperature conditions, the gamma-ray energy spectra were obtained by using four kinds of inorganic scintillators. From the experimental results, we selected YSO

  16. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Studies With GLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, D.J.; /NASA, Goddard

    2011-11-23

    Some pulsars have their maximum observable energy output in the gamma-ray band, offering the possibility of using these high-energy photons as probes of the particle acceleration and interaction processes in pulsar magnetospheres. After an extended hiatus between satellite missions, the recently-launched AGILE mission and the upcoming Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) will allow gamma-ray tests of the theoretical models developed based on past discoveries. With its greatly improved sensitivity, better angular resolution, and larger energy reach than older instruments, GLAST LAT should detect dozens to hundreds of new gamma-ray pulsars and measure luminosities, light curves, and phase-resolved spectra with unprecedented resolution. It will also have the potential to find radio-quiet pulsars like Geminga, using blind search techniques. Cooperation with radio and X-ray pulsar astronomers is an important aspect of the LAT team's planning for pulsar studies.

  17. Gamma-ray pulsar physics: gap-model populations and light-curve analyses in the Fermi era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierbattista, M.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis research focusses on the study of the young and energetic isolated ordinary pulsar population detected by the Fermi gamma-ray space telescope. We compared the model expectations of four emission models and the LAT data. We found that all the models fail to reproduce the LAT detections, in particular the large number of high E objects observed. This inconsistency is not model dependent. A discrepancy between the radio-loud/radio-quiet objects ratio was also found between the observed and predicted samples. The L γ α E 0.5 relation is robustly confirmed by all the assumed models with particular agreement in the slot gap (SG) case. On luminosity bases, the intermediate altitude emission of the two pole caustic SG model is favoured. The beaming factor f Ω shows an E dependency that is slightly visible in the SG case. Estimates of the pulsar orientations have been obtained to explain the simultaneous gamma and radio light-curves. By analysing the solutions we found a relation between the observed energy cutoff and the width of the emission slot gap. This relation has been theoretically predicted. A possible magnetic obliquity α alignment with time is rejected -for all the models- on timescale of the order of 10 6 years. The light-curve morphology study shows that the outer magnetosphere gap emission (OGs) are favoured to explain the observed radio-gamma lag. The light curve moment studies (symmetry and sharpness) on the contrary favour a two pole caustic SG emission. All the model predictions suggest a different magnetic field layout with an hybrid two pole caustic and intermediate altitude emission to explain both the pulsar luminosity and light curve morphology. The low magnetosphere emission mechanism of the polar cap model, is systematically rejected by all the tests done. (author) [fr

  18. The self-absorption effect of gamma rays in 239Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiaohua Hsu

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear materials assay with gamma-ray spectrum measurement is a well-established method for safeguards. However, for a thick source, the self-absorption of characteristic low-energy gamma rays has been a handicap to accurate assay. The author has carried out Monte Carlo simulations to study this effect using the 239 Pu α-decay gamma-ray spectrum as an example. The thickness of a plutonium metal source can be considered a function of gamma-ray intensity ratios. In a practical application, gamma-ray intensity ratios can be obtained from a measured spectrum. With the help of calculated curves, scientists can find the source thickness and make corrections to gamma-ray intensities, which then lead to an accurate quantitative determination of radioactive isotopes in the material

  19. Perfect-crystal x-ray optics to treat x-ray coherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2007-01-01

    X-ray diffraction of perfect crystals, which serve as x-ray monochromator and collimator, modifies coherence properties of x-ray beams. From the time-dependent Takagi-Taupin equations that x-ray wavefields obey in crystals, the reflected wavefield is formulated as an integral transform of a general incident wavefield with temporal and spatial inhomogeneity. A reformulation of rocking-curve profiles from the field solution of the Takagi-Taupin equations allows experimental evaluation of the mutual coherence function of x-ray beam. The rigorous relationship of the coherence functions between before and after reflection clarifies how the coherence is transferred by a crystal. These results will be beneficial to developers of beamline optics for the next generation synchrotron sources. (author)

  20. Very high-energy gamma rays from gamma-ray bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Paula M

    2007-05-15

    Very high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy has undergone a transformation in the last few years, with telescopes of unprecedented sensitivity having greatly expanded the source catalogue. Such progress makes the detection of a gamma-ray burst at the highest energies much more likely than previously. This paper describes the facilities currently operating and their chances for detecting gamma-ray bursts, and reviews predictions for VHE gamma-ray emission from gamma-ray bursts. Results to date are summarized.

  1. Gamma-ray detection with an UV-enhanced photodiode and scintillation crystals emitting at short wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, G.A.

    1997-01-01

    A low-noise ion implanted photodiode with high spectral response in the deep blue/UV region has been tested as read-out device for scintillation crystals with matching emission spectra (YAP(Ce), GSO(Ce), BGO and CsI(Tl)). This gamma-ray detector concept is attractive in many industrial applications where compactness, reliability and ambient temperature operation are important. The results show that the amount of detected scintillation light energy falls rapidly off as the wavelength of the scintillation light decreases. It is concluded that the dynamic spectral response of the photodiode, due to increasing carrier collection times, is considerably less than the DC response at short wavelengths. The diode is not useful in pulse mode operation with scintillation crystals emitting at wavelengths below about 400 nm. For read-out of CsI(Tl) with 661.6 keV gamma-radiation, however, the photodiode concept shows better energy resolution (7.1%) than other detectors. (orig.)

  2. Studies of weak capture-gamma-ray resonances via coincidence techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Rowland, C; Champagne, A E; Dummer, A K; Fitzgerald, R; Harley, E C T; Mosher, J; Runkle, R

    2002-01-01

    A method for measuring weak capture-gamma-ray resonances via gamma gamma-coincidence counting techniques is described. The coincidence apparatus consisted of a large-volume germanium detector and an annular NaI(Tl) crystal. The setup was tested by measuring the weak E sub R =227 keV resonance in sup 2 sup 6 Mg(p,gamma) sup 2 sup 7 Al. Absolute germanium and NaI(Tl) counting efficiencies for a range of gamma-ray energies and for different detector-target geometries are presented. Studies of the gamma-ray background in our spectra are described. Compared to previous work, our method improves the detection sensitivity for weak capture-gamma-ray resonances by a factor of approx 100. The usefulness of the present technique for investigations of interest to nuclear astrophysics is discussed.

  3. gamma. -relaxation process in crystallizable polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mindiyarov, Kh G; Zelenev, Yu V; Bartenev, G M [Birskij Gosudarstvennyj Pedagogicheskij Inst. (USSR)

    1975-07-01

    In the present paper, with the aid of radiothermoluminescence technique ..gamma..-relaxation processes are investigated, which are conditioned by molecular mobility and are associated with defects in the crystalline structure of polymers PEh, PP, and elastomers PIB, NK, SKD, SKI exposed to ..gamma..-rays of Co/sup 60/ at a dose rate of 1 Mrad. The shape of the thermoluminescence curve, i.e. the luminescence intensity in the ..cap alpha.. - ..gamma..-maxima, their relationship, position with respect to temperature are strongly dependent on the degree of crystallinity, on the thermal and mechanical prehistory. In highly crystalline samples of PEh and PP ..cap alpha..-maximum may be absent. Dependence has been studied of the luminescence intensity in the ..cap alpha..- and ..gamma..-maxima (Isub(..cap alpha..)/Isub(..gamma..)) on the crystallization temperature; the curve passes through the minimum when the crystallization rate is maximum. The relationship Isub(..gamma..)re of crystallinity degree.

  4. Imaging of gamma-Irradiated Regions of a Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoi, Danut; McClure, Steven; Johnston, Allan; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2004-01-01

    A holographic technique has been devised for generating a visible display of the effect of exposure of a photorefractive crystal to gamma rays. The technique exploits the space charge that results from trapping of electrons in defects induced by gamma rays. The technique involves a three-stage process. In the first stage, one writes a holographic pattern in the crystal by use of the apparatus shown in Figure 1. A laser beam of 532-nm wavelength is collimated and split into signal and reference beams by use of a polarizing beam splitter. On its way to the crystal, the reference beam goes through a two-dimensional optical scanner that contains two pairs of lenses (L1y, L2y and L1x,L2x) and mirrors M1 and M2, which can be rotated by use of micrometer drives to make fine adjustments. The signal beam is sent through a spatial light modulator that imposes the holographic pattern, then through two imaging lenses L(sub img) on its way to the crystal. An aperture is placed at the common focus of lenses Limg to suppress high-order diffraction from the spatial light modulator. The hologram is formed by interference between the signal and reference beams. A camera lens focuses an image of the interior of the crystal onto a charge-coupled device (CCD). If the crystal is illuminated by only the reference beam once the hologram has been formed, then an image of the hologram is formed on the CCD: this phenomenon is exploited to make visible the pattern of gamma irradiation of the crystal, as described next. In the second stage of the process, the crystal is removed from the holographic apparatus and irradiated with rays at a dose of about 100 krad. In the third stage of the process, the crystal is remounted in the holographic apparatus in the same position as in the first stage and illuminated with only the reference beam to obtain the image of the hologram as modified by the effect of the rays. The orientations of M1 and M2 can be adjusted slightly, if necessary, to maximize the

  5. TL glow curve analysis of UV, beta and gamma induced limestone collected from Amarnath holy cave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Dubey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports themoluminescence glow curve analysis of UV (ultraviolet, β (beta and γ (gamma induced limestone collected from Amarnath holy cave. The collected natural sample was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD technique and crystallite size calculated by Scherer's formula. Surface morphology and particle size was calculated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM study. Effect of annealing temperature on collected lime stone examined by TL glow curve study. The limestone was irradiated by UV radiation (254 nm source and the TL glow curve recorded for different UV exposure time. For beta irradiation Sr90 source was used and is shows intense peak at 256 °C with a shoulder peak at higher temperature range. For gamma radiation Co60 source and TL glow curve recorded for different doses of gamma. The kinetic parameters calculation was performed for different glow curve by computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD technique. The chemical composition of natural limestone was analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS.

  6. Dynamical neutron diffraction by curved crystals in the Laue geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albertini, G.; Melone, S.; Lagomarsino, S.; Mazkedian, S.; Puliti, P.; Rustichelli, F.

    1977-01-01

    The Taupin dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction by deformed crystals which was previously extended to the neutron diffraction by curved crystals in the Bragg geometry, is applied to calculate neutron diffraction patterns in the Laue geometry. The theoretical results are compared with experimental data on curved silicon crystals. The agreement is quite satisfactory. In the second part a simple model recently presented to describe neutron diffraction properties in the Bragg case is extended to the Laue case. The predictions of such a model are in satisfactory agreement with the rigorous theory and the experimental results. (author)

  7. The hidden X-ray breaks in afterglow light curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curran, P. A.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Horst, A. J. van der; Starling, R. L. C.

    2008-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) afterglow observations in the Swift era have a perceived lack of achromatic jet breaks compared to the BeppoSAX, or pre-Swift era. Specifically, relatively few breaks, consistent with jet breaks, are observed in the X-ray light curves of these bursts. If these breaks are truly missing, it has serious consequences for the interpretation of GRB jet collimation and energy requirements, and the use of GRBs as standard candles.Here we address the issue of X-ray breaks which are possibly 'hidden' and hence the light curves are misinterpreted as being single power-laws. We show how a number of precedents, including GRB 990510 and GRB 060206, exist for such hidden breaks and how, even with the well sampled light curves of the Swift era, these breaks may be left misidentified. We do so by synthesising X-ray light curves and finding general trends via Monte Carlo analysis. Furthermore, in light of these simulations, we discuss how to best identify achromatic breaks in afterglow light curves via multi-wavelength analysis

  8. Gamma ray generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

    2014-05-27

    An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

  9. Gamma ray detector for solar maximum mission (SMM) of NASA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, W.; Brichzin, K.; Sach, E.

    1981-06-01

    For NASA's Project Solar Maximum Mission-SMM (launch 14.2.80) a Gamma Ray Detector was developed, manufactured and tested to measure solar high energetic Gamma rays and Neutron fluxes within the energy range 10-160 MeV, 4,43 MeV amd 2,23 MeV. The main components of the sensor are 7 NaI crystals 3 x 3 and a CsI crystal 30 cm diameter x 7,5 cm. The rejection of charged particles is done by two plasitc scintillators and 4 CsI-shields. From the beginning of the mission the experiment is working fully successfull. (orig.) [de

  10. CONSTRAINTS ON THE EMISSION GEOMETRIES AND SPIN EVOLUTION OF GAMMA-RAY MILLISECOND PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, T. J. [National Research Council Research Associate, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC 20001 (United States); Venter, C. [Centre for Space Research, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, Private Bag X6001, 2520 Potchefstroom (South Africa); Harding, A. K.; Çelik, Ö.; Ferrara, E. C. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Guillemot, L. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l' Environnement, LPCE UMR 6115 CNRS, F-45071 Orléans Cedex 02 (France); Smith, D. A.; Hou, X. [Centre d' Études Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, IN2P3/CNRS, Université Bordeaux 1, BP120, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Den Hartog, P. R. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Lande, J. [Twitter Inc., 1355 Market Street 900, San Francisco, CA 94103 (United States); Ray, P. S., E-mail: tyrel.j.johnson@gmail.com, E-mail: Christo.Venter@nwu.ac.za, E-mail: ahardingx@yahoo.com [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are a growing class of gamma-ray emitters. Pulsed gamma-ray signals have been detected from more than 40 MSPs with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The wider radio beams and more compact magnetospheres of MSPs enable studies of emission geometries over a broader range of phase space than non-recycled radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars. We have modeled the gamma-ray light curves of 40 LAT-detected MSPs using geometric emission models assuming a vacuum retarded-dipole magnetic field. We modeled the radio profiles using a single-altitude hollow-cone beam, with a core component when indicated by polarimetry; however, for MSPs with gamma-ray and radio light curve peaks occurring at nearly the same rotational phase, we assume that the radio emission is co-located with the gamma rays and caustic in nature. The best-fit parameters and confidence intervals are determined using a maximum likelihood technique. We divide the light curves into three model classes, with gamma-ray peaks trailing (Class I), aligned (Class II), or leading (Class III) the radio peaks. Outer gap and slot gap (two-pole caustic) models best fit roughly equal numbers of Class I and II, while Class III are exclusively fit with pair-starved polar cap models. Distinguishing between the model classes based on typical derived parameters is difficult. We explore the evolution of the magnetic inclination angle with period and spin-down power, finding possible correlations. While the presence of significant off-peak emission can often be used as a discriminator between outer gap and slot gap models, a hybrid model may be needed.

  11. CONSTRAINTS ON THE EMISSION GEOMETRIES AND SPIN EVOLUTION OF GAMMA-RAY MILLISECOND PULSARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, T. J.; Venter, C.; Harding, A. K.; Çelik, Ö.; Ferrara, E. C.; Guillemot, L.; Smith, D. A.; Hou, X.; Kramer, M.; Den Hartog, P. R.; Lande, J.; Ray, P. S.

    2014-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are a growing class of gamma-ray emitters. Pulsed gamma-ray signals have been detected from more than 40 MSPs with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The wider radio beams and more compact magnetospheres of MSPs enable studies of emission geometries over a broader range of phase space than non-recycled radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars. We have modeled the gamma-ray light curves of 40 LAT-detected MSPs using geometric emission models assuming a vacuum retarded-dipole magnetic field. We modeled the radio profiles using a single-altitude hollow-cone beam, with a core component when indicated by polarimetry; however, for MSPs with gamma-ray and radio light curve peaks occurring at nearly the same rotational phase, we assume that the radio emission is co-located with the gamma rays and caustic in nature. The best-fit parameters and confidence intervals are determined using a maximum likelihood technique. We divide the light curves into three model classes, with gamma-ray peaks trailing (Class I), aligned (Class II), or leading (Class III) the radio peaks. Outer gap and slot gap (two-pole caustic) models best fit roughly equal numbers of Class I and II, while Class III are exclusively fit with pair-starved polar cap models. Distinguishing between the model classes based on typical derived parameters is difficult. We explore the evolution of the magnetic inclination angle with period and spin-down power, finding possible correlations. While the presence of significant off-peak emission can often be used as a discriminator between outer gap and slot gap models, a hybrid model may be needed

  12. Dust reddening and extinction curves toward gamma-ray bursts at z > 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolmer, J.; Greiner, J.; Krühler, T.; Schady, P.; Ledoux, C.; Tanvir, N. R.; Levan, A. J.

    2018-01-01

    Context. Dust is known to be produced in the envelopes of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, the expanded shells of supernova (SN) remnants, and in situ grain growth within the interstellar medium (ISM), although the corresponding efficiency of each of these dust formation mechanisms at different redshifts remains a topic of debate. During the first Gyr after the Big Bang, it is widely believed that there was not enough time to form AGB stars in high numbers, hence the dust at this epoch is expected to be purely from SNe or subsequent grain growth in the ISM. The time period corresponding to z 5-6 is thus expected to display the transition from SN-only dust to a mixture of both formation channels as is generally recognized at present. Aims: Here we aim to use afterglow observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) at redshifts larger than z > 4 to derive host galaxy dust column densities along their line of sight and to test if a SN-type dust extinction curve is required for some of the bursts. Methods: We performed GRB afterglow observations with the seven-channel Gamma-Ray Optical and Near-infrared Detector (GROND) at the 2.2 m MPI telescope in La Silla, Chile (ESO), and we combined these observations with quasi-simultaneous data gathered with the XRT telescope on board the Swift satellite. Results: We increase the number of measured AV values for GRBs at z > 4 by a factor of 2-3 and find that, in contrast to samples at mostly lower redshift, all of the GRB afterglows have a visual extinction of AV different scenarios. For the first time we also report a photometric redshift of zphot = 7.88-0.94+0.75 for GRB 100905A, making it one of the most distant GRBs known to date.

  13. Thermal neutron detector and gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing a single material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowe, Ashley; Burger, Arnold; Lukosi, Eric

    2017-05-02

    A combined thermal neutron detector and gamma-ray spectrometer system, including: a detection medium including a lithium chalcopyrite crystal operable for detecting thermal neutrons in a semiconductor mode and gamma-rays in a scintillator mode; and a photodetector coupled to the detection medium also operable for detecting the gamma rays. Optionally, the detection medium includes a .sup.6LiInSe.sub.2 crystal. Optionally, the detection medium comprises a compound formed by the process of: melting a Group III element; adding a Group I element to the melted Group III element at a rate that allows the Group I and Group III elements to react thereby providing a single phase I-III compound; and adding a Group VI element to the single phase I-III compound and heating; wherein the Group I element includes lithium.

  14. Gamma-Ray Emission in Dissipative Pulsar Magnetospheres: from Theory to Fermi Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalapotharakos, Konstantinos; Harding, Alice K.; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2014-01-01

    We compute the patterns of gamma-ray emission due to curvature radiation in dissipative pulsar magnetospheres. Our ultimate goal is to construct macrophysical models that are able to reproduce the observed gamma-ray light curve phenomenology recently published in the Second Fermi Pulsar Catalog. We apply specific forms of Ohm's law on the open field lines using a broad range for the macroscopic conductivity values that result in solutions ranging, from near-vacuum to near-force-free. Using these solutions, we generate model gamma-ray light curves by calculating realistic trajectories and Lorentz factors of radiating particles under the influence of both the accelerating electric fields and curvature radiation reaction. We further constrain our models using the observed dependence of the phase lags between the radio and gamma-ray emission on the gamma-ray peak separation. We perform a statistical comparison of our model radio-lag versus peak-separation diagram and the one obtained for the Fermi standard pulsars. We find that for models of uniform conductivity over the entire open magnetic field line region, agreement with observations favors higher values of this parameter. We find, however, significant improvement in fitting the data with models that employ a hybrid form of conductivity, specifically, infinite conductivity interior to the light cylinder and high but finite conductivity on the outside. In these models the gamma-ray emission is produced in regions near the equatorial current sheet but modulated by the local physical properties. These models have radio lags near the observed values and statistically best reproduce the observed light curve phenomenology. Additionally, they also produce GeV photon cut-off energies.

  15. Observations of the highest energy gamma-rays from gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingus, Brenda L.

    2001-01-01

    EGRET has extended the highest energy observations of gamma-ray bursts to GeV gamma rays. Such high energies imply the fireball that is radiating the gamma-rays has a bulk Lorentz factor of several hundred. However, EGRET only detected a few gamma-ray bursts. GLAST will likely detect several hundred bursts and may extend the maximum energy to a few 100 GeV. Meanwhile new ground based detectors with sensitivity to gamma-ray bursts are beginning operation, and one recently reported evidence for TeV emission from a burst

  16. A COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS OF SWIFT/X-RAY TELESCOPE DATA. IV. SINGLE POWER-LAW DECAYING LIGHT CURVES VERSUS CANONICAL LIGHT CURVES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR A UNIFIED ORIGIN OF X-RAYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Enwei; Lue Houjun; Hou Shujin; Zhang Binbin; Zhang Bing

    2009-01-01

    By systematically analyzing the Swift/XRT light curves detected before 2009 July, we find 19 light curves that monotonously decay as a single power law (SPL) with an index of 1 ∼ 1.7 from tens (or hundreds) of seconds to ∼10 5 s post the gamma-ray burst (GRB) trigger. They are apparently different from the canonical light curves characterized by a shallow-to-normal decay transition. We compare the observations of the prompt gamma rays and the X-rays for these two samples of GRBs (SPL vs. canonical). No statistical difference is found in the prompt gamma-ray properties for the two samples. The X-ray properties of the two samples are also similar, although the SPL sample tends to have a slightly lower neutral hydrogen absorption column for the host galaxies and a slightly larger energy release compared with the canonical sample. The SPL X-ray Telescope (XRT) light curves in the burst frame gradually merge into a conflux, and their luminosities at 10 5 s are normally distributed at log L/ergs s -1 = 45.6 ± 0.5. The normal decay segment of the canonical XRT light curves has the same feature. Similar to the normal decay segment, the SPL light curves satisfy the closure relations and therefore can be roughly explained with external shock models. In the scenario that the X-rays are the afterglows of the GRB fireball, our results indicate that the shallow decay would be due to energy injection into the fireball and the total energy budget after injection for both samples of GRBs is comparable. More intriguing, we find that a prior X-ray emission model proposed by Yamazaki is more straightforward to interpret the observed XRT data. We show that the zero times (T 0 ) of the X-rays are 10 2 -10 5 s prior to the GRB trigger for the canonical sample, and satisfy a log-normal distribution. The negligible T 0 's of the SPL sample are consistent with being the tail of T 0 distributions at low end, suggesting that the SPL sample and the canonical sample may be from a same

  17. Gamma ray energy tracking in GRETINA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I. Y.

    2011-10-01

    The next generation of stable and exotic beam accelerators will provide physics opportunities to study nuclei farther away from the line of stability. However, these experiments will be more demanding on instrumentation performance. These come from the lower production rate for more exotic beams, worse beam impurities, and large beam velocity from the fragmentation and inverse reactions. Gamma-ray spectroscopy will be one of the most effective tools to study exotic nuclei. However, to fully exploit the physics reach provided by these new facilities, better gamma-ray detector will be needed. In the last 10 years, a new concept, gamma-ray energy tracking array, was developed. Tracking arrays will increase the detection sensitivity by factors of several hundred compared to current arrays used in nuclear physics research. Particularly, the capability of reconstructing the position of the interaction with millimeters resolution is needed to correct the Doppler broadening of gamma rays emitted from high velocity nuclei. GRETINA is a gamma-ray tracking array which uses 28 Ge crystals, each with 36 segments, to cover ¼ of the 4 π of the 4 π solid angle. The gamma ray tracking technique requires detailed pulse shape information from each of the segments. These pulses are digitized using 14-bit 100 MHz flash ADCs, and digital signal analysis algorithms implemented in the on-board FPGAs provides energy, time and selection of pulse traces. A digital trigger system, provided flexible trigger functions including a fast trigger output, and also allows complicated trigger decisions to be made up to 20 microseconds. Further analyzed, carried out in a computer cluster, determine the energy, time, and three-dimensional positions of all gamma-ray interactions in the array. This information is then utilized, together with the characteristics of Compton scattering and pair-production processes, to track the scattering sequences of the gamma rays. GRETINA construction is completed in

  18. Probing Intrinsic Properties of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts with Gravitational Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xilong; Messenger, Christopher; Heng, Ik Siong

    2017-11-03

    Progenitors of short gamma-ray bursts are thought to be neutron stars coalescing with their companion black hole or neutron star, which are one of the main gravitational wave sources. We have devised a Bayesian framework for combining gamma-ray burst and gravitational wave information that allows us to probe short gamma-ray burst luminosities. We show that combined short gamma-ray burst and gravitational wave observations not only improve progenitor distance and inclination angle estimates, they also allow the isotropic luminosities of short gamma-ray bursts to be determined without the need for host galaxy or light-curve information. We characterize our approach by simulating 1000 joint short gamma-ray burst and gravitational wave detections by Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo. We show that ∼90% of the simulations have uncertainties on short gamma-ray burst isotropic luminosity estimates that are within a factor of two of the ideal scenario, where the distance is known exactly. Therefore, isotropic luminosities can be confidently determined for short gamma-ray bursts observed jointly with gravitational waves detected by Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo. Planned enhancements to Advanced LIGO will extend its range and likely produce several joint detections of short gamma-ray bursts and gravitational waves. Third-generation gravitational wave detectors will allow for isotropic luminosity estimates for the majority of the short gamma-ray burst population within a redshift of z∼1.

  19. Calculation Analysis of Calibration Factors of Airborne Gamma-ray Spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jun; Zhu Jinhui; Xie Honggang; He Qinglin

    2009-01-01

    To determine the calibration factors of an airborne gamma-ray spectrometer measuring large area gamma-ray emitting source at deferent flying height, a series of Monte Carlo simulations were drawn. Response energy spectrums of NaI crystals in airplane caused by nature-decay-series calibration-pads, and calibration factors on different heights above Cs-137 plane source, were obtained. The calculated results agreed with the experimental data well. (authors)

  20. Doubly curved imaging Bragg crystal spectrometer for X-ray astronomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrnak, B. P.; Christensen, Finn Erland; Westergaard, Niels Jørgen Stenfeldt

    1985-01-01

    An X-ray spectrometer which is sensitive in the 0.5-7-keV energy range and is intended for use onboard astronomical satellites has been studied. The Bragg reflected rays from a doubly bent crystal positioned downstream of the focal plane of a grazing-incidence concentrator are focused along the a...

  1. Implications of the Early X-Ray Afterglow Light Curves of Swift GRBs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granot, Jonathan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Konigl, Arieh; /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Chicago U., EFI; Piran, Tsvi; /Hebrew U.

    2006-01-17

    According to current models, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are produced when the energy carried by a relativistic outflow is dissipated and converted into radiation. The efficiency of this process, {epsilon}{sub {gamma}}, is one of the critical factors in any GRB model. The X-ray afterglow light curves of Swift GRBs show an early stage of flattish decay. This has been interpreted as reflecting energy injection. When combined with previous estimates, which have concluded that the kinetic energy of the late ({approx}> 10 hr) afterglow is comparable to the energy emitted in {gamma}-rays, this interpretation implies very high values of {epsilon}{sub {gamma}}, corresponding to {approx}> 90% of the initial energy being converted into {gamma}-rays. Such a high efficiency is hard to reconcile with most models, including in particular the popular internal-shocks model. We re-analyze the derivation of the kinetic energy from the afterglow X-ray flux and re-examine the resulting estimates of the efficiency. We confirm that, if the flattish decay arises from energy injection and the pre-Swift broad-band estimates of the kinetic energy are correct, then {epsilon}{sub {gamma}} {approx}> 0.9. We discuss various issues related to this result, including an alternative interpretation of the light curve in terms of a two-component outflow model, which we apply to the X-ray observations of GRB 050315. We point out, however, that another interpretation of the flattish decay--a variable X-ray afterglow efficiency (e.g., due to a time dependence of afterglow shock microphysical parameters)--is possible. We also show that direct estimates of the kinetic energy from the late X-ray afterglow flux are sensitive to the assumed values of the shock microphysical parameters and suggest that broad-band afterglow fits might have underestimated the kinetic energy (e.g., by overestimating the fraction of electrons that are accelerated to relativistic energies). Either one of these possibilities implies a

  2. CeBr3 as a room-temperature, high-resolution gamma-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guss, Paul; Reed, Michael; Yuan Ding; Reed, Alexis; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2009-01-01

    Cerium bromide (CeBr 3 ) has become a material of interest in the race for high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at room temperature. This investigation quantified the potential of CeBr 3 as a room-temperature, high-resolution gamma-ray detector. The performance of CeBr 3 crystals was compared to other scintillation crystals of similar dimensions and detection environments. Comparison of self-activity of CeBr 3 to cerium-doped lanthanum tribromide (LaBr 3 :Ce) was performed. Energy resolution and relative intrinsic efficiency were measured and are presented.

  3. CsI(Tl)-photodiode detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Fioretto, E; Viesti, G; Cinausero, M; Zuin, L; Fabris, D; Lunardon, M; Nebbia, G; Prete, G

    2000-01-01

    We report on the performances of CsI(Tl)-photodiode detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy applications. Light output yield and energy resolution have been measured for different crystals and read-out configurations.

  4. DISCOVERY OF GAMMA-RAY PULSATIONS FROM THE TRANSITIONAL REDBACK PSR J1227-4853

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, T. J. [College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Ray, P. S.; Cheung, C. C. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Roy, J.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Stappers, B. W. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Harding, A. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Pletsch, H. J.; Fort, S. [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Deneva, J. [National Research Council Research Associate, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC 20001 (United States); Kerr, M., E-mail: tyrel.j.johnson@gmail.com, E-mail: Paul.Ray@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: jayanta.roy@manchester.ac.uk [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, Epping NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2015-06-10

    The 1.69 ms spin period of PSR J1227−4853 was recently discovered in radio observations of the low-mass X-ray binary XSS J12270−4859 following the announcement of a possible transition to a rotation-powered millisecond pulsar state, inferred from decreases in optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray flux from the source. We report the detection of significant (5σ) gamma-ray pulsations after the transition, at the known spin period, using ∼1 year of data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The gamma-ray light curve of PSR J1227−4853 can be fit by one broad peak, which occurs at nearly the same phase as the main peak in the 1.4 GHz radio profile. The partial alignment of light-curve peaks in different wavebands suggests that at least some of the radio emission may originate at high altitude in the pulsar magnetosphere, in extended regions co-located with the gamma-ray emission site. We folded the LAT data at the orbital period, both pre- and post-transition, but find no evidence for significant modulation of the gamma-ray flux. Analysis of the gamma-ray flux over the mission suggests an approximate transition time of 2012 November 30. Continued study of the pulsed emission and monitoring of PSR J1227−4853, and other known redback systems, for subsequent flux changes will increase our knowledge of the pulsar emission mechanism and transitioning systems.

  5. Gamma-ray tracking: Characterisation of the AGATA symmetric prototype detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boston, A.J.; Boston, H.C.; Cresswell, J.R.; Dimmock, M.R.; Nelson, L.; Nolan, P.J.; Rigby, S.; Lazarus, I.; Simpson, J.; Medina, P.; Santos, C.; Parisel, C.

    2007-01-01

    Each major technical advance in gamma-ray detection devices has resulted in significant new insights into the structure of atomic nuclei. The next major step in gamma-ray spectroscopy involves achieving the goal of a 4pi ball of Germanium detectors by using the technique of gamma-ray energy tracking in electrically segmented Germanium crystals. The resulting spectrometer will have an unparalleled level of detection power for nuclear electromagnetic radiation. Collaborations have been established in Europe (AGATA) [J. Simpson, Acta Phys. Pol. B 36 (2005) 1383. ] and the USA (GRETA/GRETINA) to build gamma-ray tracking spectrometers. This paper discusses the performance of the AGATA (Advanced Gamma Tracking Array) symmetric prototype detectors that have been tested at University of Liverpool. The use of a fully digital data acquisition system has allowed detector charge pulse shapes from a selection of well defined photon interaction positions to be analysed, yielding important information on the position sensitivity of the detector

  6. Gamma-ray tracking: Characterisation of the AGATA symmetric prototype detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boston, A.J. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: ajboston@liv.ac.uk; Boston, H.C. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Cresswell, J.R. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Dimmock, M.R. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Nelson, L. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Nolan, P.J. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Rigby, S. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Lazarus, I. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Simpson, J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Medina, P. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, Strasbourg BP28 67037 (France); Santos, C. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, Strasbourg BP28 67037 (France); Parisel, C. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, Strasbourg BP28 67037 (France)

    2007-08-15

    Each major technical advance in gamma-ray detection devices has resulted in significant new insights into the structure of atomic nuclei. The next major step in gamma-ray spectroscopy involves achieving the goal of a 4pi ball of Germanium detectors by using the technique of gamma-ray energy tracking in electrically segmented Germanium crystals. The resulting spectrometer will have an unparalleled level of detection power for nuclear electromagnetic radiation. Collaborations have been established in Europe (AGATA) [J. Simpson, Acta Phys. Pol. B 36 (2005) 1383. ] and the USA (GRETA/GRETINA) to build gamma-ray tracking spectrometers. This paper discusses the performance of the AGATA (Advanced Gamma Tracking Array) symmetric prototype detectors that have been tested at University of Liverpool. The use of a fully digital data acquisition system has allowed detector charge pulse shapes from a selection of well defined photon interaction positions to be analysed, yielding important information on the position sensitivity of the detector.

  7. GRB 081029: A Gamma-Ray Burst with a Multi-Component Afterglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Stephen T.; De Pasquale, Massimiliano; Mao, Jirong; Sakamoto, Takanori; Schady, Patricia; Covino, Stefano; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Jin, Zhi-Ping; D'Avanzo, Paolo; Antonelli, Angelo; hide

    2012-01-01

    We present an analysis of the unusual optical light curve of the gamma-ray burst GRB 081029, a long-soft burst with a redshift of z = 3.8479. We combine X-ray and optical observations from the Swift X-Ray Telescope and the Swift Ultra Violet/Optical Telescope with ground-based optical and infrared data obtained using the REM, ROTSE, and CTIO 1.3-m telescopes to construct a detailed data set extending from 86 s to approx.100,000 s after the BAT trigger. Our data covers a wide energy range, from 10 keV to 0.77 eV (1.24 A to 16000 A). The X-ray afterglow shows a shallow initial decay followed by a rapid decay starting at about 18,000 s. The optical and infrared afterglow, however, shows an uncharacteristic rise at about 3000 s that does not correspond to any feature in the X-ray light curve. Our data are not consistent with synchrotron radiation from a jet interacting with an external medium, a two-component jet, or continuous energy injection from the central engine. We find that the optical light curves can be broadly explained by a collision between two ejecta shells within a two-component jet. A growing number of gamma-ray burst afterglows are consistent with complex jets, which suggests that some (or all) gamma-ray burst jets are complex and will require detailed modelling to fully understand them.injection

  8. GRB 081029: A Gamma-Ray Burst with a Multi-Component Afterglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Stephen T.; DePasquale, Massimiliano; Mao, Jirong; Sakamoto, Taka; Shady, Patricia; Covino, Stefano; Yi-Zhong, Fan; Zhi-Ping, Jin; D'Avanzo, Paolo; Antonelli, Angelo; hide

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of the unusual optical light curve of the gamma-ray burst GRB 081029, a long-soft burst with a redshift of z = 3.8479. We combine X-ray and optical observations from the Swift X-Ray Telescope and the Swift UltraViolet Optical Telescope with ground-based optical and infrared data obtained using the REM and ROTSE telescopes to construct a detailed data set extending from 86 s to approx. 100000 s after the BAT trigger. Our data cover a wide energy range, from 10 keV to 0.77 eV (1.24 A to 16000 A). The X-ray afterglow shows a shallow initial decay followed by a rapid decay starting at about 18000 s. The optical and infrared afterglow, however, shows an uncharacteristic rise at about 5000 s that does not correspond to any feature in the X-ray light curve. Our data are not consistent with synchrotron radiation from a jet interacting with an external medium, a two-component jet, or continuous energy injection from the central engine. We find that the the optical light curves can be broadly explained by a collision between two ejecta shells within a two-component jet. A growing number of gamma-ray burst afterglows are consistent with complex jets, which suggests that some (or all) gamma-ray burst jets are complex and will require detailed modelling to fully understand them.

  9. GRB 081029: A GAMMA-RAY BURST WITH A MULTI-COMPONENT AFTERGLOW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Stephen T.; Sakamoto, Takanori [Astrophysics Science Division, Code 660.1, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Goddard Space Flight Centre, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); De Pasquale, Massimiliano; Schady, Patricia [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Mao, Jirong; Covino, Stefano; Jin, Zhi-Ping; D' Avanzo, Paolo; Chincarini, Guido [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via Emilio Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Saint Lucia) (Italy); Fan, Yi-Zhong [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Antonelli, Angelo; D' Elia, Valerio; Fiore, Fabrizio [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via de Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone (Roma) (Italy); Pandey, Shashi Bhushan [Randall Laboratory of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church St, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States); Cobb, Bethany E., E-mail: Stephen.T.Holland@nasa.gov [Department of Physics, The George Washington University, 725 21st St NW, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2012-01-20

    We present an analysis of the unusual optical light curve of the gamma-ray burst GRB 081029, a long-soft burst with a redshift of z = 3.8479. We combine X-ray and optical observations from the Swift X-Ray Telescope and the Swift UltraViolet/Optical Telescope with ground-based optical and infrared data obtained using the REM, ROTSE, and CTIO 1.3 m telescopes to construct a detailed data set extending from 86 s to {approx}100000 s after the BAT trigger. Our data cover a wide energy range from 10 keV to 0.77 eV (1.24 A-16000 A). The X-ray afterglow shows a shallow initial decay followed by a rapid decay starting at about 18000 s. The optical and infrared afterglow, however, shows an uncharacteristic rise at about 3000 s that does not correspond to any feature in the X-ray light curve. Our data are not consistent with synchrotron radiation from a jet interacting with an external medium, a two-component jet, or continuous energy injection from the central engine. We find that the optical light curves can be broadly explained by a collision between two ejecta shells within a two-component jet. A growing number of gamma-ray-burst afterglows are consistent with complex jets, which suggests that some (or all) gamma-ray-burst jets are complex and will require detailed modeling to fully understand them.

  10. Broadband x-ray properties of the gamma-ray binary 1FGL J1018.6-5856

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    An, Hongjun; Bellm, Eric; Bhalerao, Varun

    2015-01-01

    -ray study of An et al. using ~400 days of Swift data, but is consistent with a new gamma-ray solution reported in 2014. The light curve folded on the new period is qualitatively similar to that reported previously, having a spike at phase 0 and broad sinusoidal modulation. The X-ray flux enhancement...

  11. Gamma-ray burst theory after Swift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piran, Tsvi; Fan, Yi-Zhong

    2007-05-15

    Afterglow observations in the pre-Swift era confirmed to a large extend the relativistic blast wave model for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Together with the observations of properties of host galaxies and the association with (type Ic) SNe, this has led to the generally accepted collapsar origin of long GRBs. However, most of the afterglow data was collected hours after the burst. The X-ray telescope and the UV/optical telescope onboard Swift are able to slew to the direction of a burst in real time and record the early broadband afterglow light curves. These observations, and in particular the X-ray observations, resulted in many surprises. While we have anticipated a smooth transition from the prompt emission to the afterglow, many observed that early light curves are drastically different. We review here how these observations are changing our understanding of GRBs.

  12. Attenuation of Reactor Gamma Radiation and Fast Neutrons Through Large Single-Crystal Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.

    2009-01-01

    A generalized formula is given which, for neutron energies in the range 10-4< E< 10 eV and gamma rays with average energy 2 MeV , permits calculation of the transmission properties of several single crystal materials important for neutron scattering instrumentation. A computer program Filter was developed which permits the calculation of attenuation of gamma radiation, nuclear capture, thermal diffuse and Bragg-scattering cross-sections as a function of materials constants, temperature and neutron energy. The applicability of the deduced formula along with the code checked from the obtained agreement between the calculated and experimental neutron transmission through various single-crystals A feasibility study for use of Si, Ge, Pb, Bi and sapphire is detailed in terms of optimum crystal thickness, mosaic spread and cutting plane for efficient transmission of thermal reactor neutrons and for rejection of the accompanying fast neutrons and gamma rays.

  13. Correlation between X-ray and high energy gamma-ray emission form Cygnus X-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weekes, T.C.; Danaher, S.; Fegan, D.J.; Porter, N.A.

    1981-01-01

    In May-June 1980, the 4.8 hour modulated X-ray flux from Cygnus X-3 underwent a significant change in the shape of the light curve; this change correlates with the peak in the high-energy (E > 2 x 10 12 eV) gamma ray emission at the same epoch. (orig.)

  14. Scintillation response of CsI: Tl crystal under neutron, gamma, alpha particles and beta excitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Maria da Conceicao Costa; Madi Filho, Tufic; Lopes, Valdir Maciel; Berretta, Jose Roberto; Cardenas, Jose Patricio Nahuel, E-mail: macoper@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Among the converters of X and gamma radiation in light photons, known as scintillators, the one which is the most efficient emits photons with a wavelength near 400 nm. Particularly, among them, the cesium iodine doped with thallium (CsI:Tl) crystal is that which matches better between the light emission spectrum (peak at 540 nm) and the quantum sensitivity curve of the photodiodes and CCD (Charge Coupled Device). This explains the renewed interest in using this crystal as scintillator. Although the CsI:Tl crystal is commercially available, its local development would give the possibility to obtain it in different geometric configurations and coupling. Moreover, there is a special interest in studying new conditions that will alter the properties of this crystal in order to achieve a optimal level of its functional characteristics. Having an efficient national scintillator with low cost is a strategic opportunity to study the response of a detector applied to different types of radiation. The crystal of cesium iodide activated with thallium (CsI:Tl) has a high gamma detection efficiency per unit volume. In this paper, the CsI:Tl crystal, grown by the vertical Bridgman technique in evacuated silica ampoules and with the purpose of use as radiation detectors, is described. To evaluate the scintillator, measures of the thallium distribution in the crystal volume were taken, with overall efficiency score. The scintillator response was studied through gamma radiation from sources of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, {sup 22}Na, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 131}I and {sup 99m}Tc; the beta radiation from source of {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y, alpha particles from {sup 241}Am source and the scintillator response to neutrons from Am/Be source. The energetic resolution for {sup 137}Cs gamma rays (662 keV) was 10%. The results showed the validity of using the CsI:Tl crystal developed in our laboratory, in many applications in the area of radiation detectors. (author)

  15. Performance of A Compact Multi-crystal High-purity Germanium Detector Array for Measuring Coincident Gamma-ray Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Chris [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Daigle, Stephen [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Buckner, Matt [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Erikson, Luke E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Runkle, Robert C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stave, Sean C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Champagne, Art [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Cooper, Andrew [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Downen, Lori [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Glasgow, Brian D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kelly, Keegan [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Sallaska, Anne [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-02-18

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a 14-crystal array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors housed in a single cryostat. The array was used to measure the astrophysical S-factor for the 14N(p,γ)15O* reaction for several transition energies at an effective center of mass energy of 163 keV. Owing to the segmented nature of the MARS detector, the effect of gamma-ray summing was greatly reduced in comparison to past experiments which utilized large, single-crystal detectors. The new S-factor values agree within the uncertainties with the past measurements. Details of the analysis and detector performance will be presented.

  16. Performance of a compact multi-crystal high-purity germanium detector array for measuring coincident gamma-ray emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Chris; Daigle, Stephen; Buckner, Matt [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Erikson, Luke E.; Runkle, Robert C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Stave, Sean C., E-mail: Sean.Stave@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Champagne, Arthur E.; Cooper, Andrew; Downen, Lori [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Glasgow, Brian D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Kelly, Keegan; Sallaska, Anne [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2015-05-21

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a 14-crystal array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors housed in a single cryostat. The array was used to measure the astrophysical S-factor for the {sup 14}N(p,γ){sup 15}O{sup ⁎} reaction for several transition energies at an effective center-of-mass energy of 163 keV. Owing to the granular nature of the MARS detector, the effect of gamma-ray summing was greatly reduced in comparison to past experiments which utilized large, single-crystal detectors. The new S-factor values agree within their uncertainties with the past measurements. Details of the analysis and detector performance are presented.

  17. Analyzing power of AGATA triple clusters for gamma-ray linear polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizzeti, P.G.; Sona, P.; Melon, B.; Bizzeti-Sona, A.M.; Perego, A. [Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento di Fisica, Firenze (Italy); INFN, Firenze (Italy); Michelagnoli, C.; Lunardi, S.; Mengoni, D.; Recchia, F. [INFN, Padova (Italy); Universita di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica, Padova (Italy); Bazzacco, D.; Farnea, E.; Menegazzo, R.; Ur, C.A. [INFN, Padova (Italy); De Angelis, G.; Gottardo, A.; Napoli, D.R.; Sahin, E.; Valiente-Dobon, J.J. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, INFN, Padova (Italy); Gadea, A. [University of Valencia, IFIC, CSIC, Valencia (Spain); Nannini, A. [INFN, Firenze (Italy)

    2015-04-01

    We have investigated the ability of AGATA triple clusters to measure the linear polarization of gamma rays, exploiting the azimuthal-angle dependence of the Compton scattering differential cross section. To this aim, partially polarized gamma rays have been produced by Coulomb excitation of the first excited state of {sup 104}Pd and {sup 108}Pd, which decay to the ground state by emission of gamma rays of 555.8 keV and 433.9 keV, respectively. Pulse-shape analysis and gamma-ray tracking techniques have been used to determine the position and time sequence of the interaction points inside the germanium crystals. Anisotropies in the detection efficiency have been taken into account using 661.6 keV gammas from a {sup 137}Cs radioactive source. We obtain an average analyzing power of 0.451(34) at 433.9 keV and 0.484(24) at 555.8 keV. (orig.)

  18. Nanodefect formation in LiF crystals under gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mussaeva, M.A.; Ibragimova, Eh.M.; Kalanov, M.U.; Muminov, M.I.

    2006-01-01

    One studied the spectra of absorption and of photoluminescence, microhardness and performed X-ray structure analysis of gamma-irradiated LiF crystals in a shutdown reactor and in 60 Co source when gamma-radiation dose rate was equal to 7.65 Gy/s. In addition to formation of point and combined radiation defects one detected the presence of the gamma-irradiation induced 28 nm size nanoparticles of LiOH phase in Li sublattice. Formation of defects is shown to occur more efficiently in a shutdown reactor in contrast to 60 Co source [ru

  19. Measuring the x-ray resolving power of bent potassium acid phthalate diffraction crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haugh, M. J.; Jacoby, K. D.; Wu, M.; Loisel, G. P.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents the results from measuring the X-ray resolving power of a curved potassium acid phthalate (KAP(001)) spectrometer crystal using two independent methods. It is part of a continuing effort to measure the fundamental diffraction properties of bent crystals that are used to study various characteristics of high temperature plasmas. Bent crystals like KAP(001) do not usually have the same diffraction properties as corresponding flat crystals. Models that do exist to calculate the effect of bending the crystal on the diffraction properties have simplifying assumptions and their accuracy limits have not been adequately determined. The type of crystals that we measured is being used in a spectrometer on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The first technique for measuring the crystal resolving power measures the X-ray spectral line width of the characteristic lines from several metal anodes. The second method uses a diode X-ray source and a double crystal diffractometer arrangement to measure the reflectivity curve of the KAP(001) crystal. The width of that curve is inversely proportional to the crystal resolving power. The measurement results are analyzed and discussed

  20. Measuring the x-ray resolving power of bent potassium acid phthalate diffraction crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haugh, M. J., E-mail: haughmj@nv.doe.gov; Jacoby, K. D. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Wu, M.; Loisel, G. P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    This report presents the results from measuring the X-ray resolving power of a curved potassium acid phthalate (KAP(001)) spectrometer crystal using two independent methods. It is part of a continuing effort to measure the fundamental diffraction properties of bent crystals that are used to study various characteristics of high temperature plasmas. Bent crystals like KAP(001) do not usually have the same diffraction properties as corresponding flat crystals. Models that do exist to calculate the effect of bending the crystal on the diffraction properties have simplifying assumptions and their accuracy limits have not been adequately determined. The type of crystals that we measured is being used in a spectrometer on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The first technique for measuring the crystal resolving power measures the X-ray spectral line width of the characteristic lines from several metal anodes. The second method uses a diode X-ray source and a double crystal diffractometer arrangement to measure the reflectivity curve of the KAP(001) crystal. The width of that curve is inversely proportional to the crystal resolving power. The measurement results are analyzed and discussed.

  1. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the rocking curves measured for MoKα X-ray characteristic lines in the double-crystal nondispersive scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchenkov, N. V.; Chukhovskii, F. N.; Blagov, A. E.

    2015-01-01

    The rocking curves (RCs) for MoK α1 and MoK α2 characteristic X-ray lines have been experimentally and theoretically studied in the nondispersive scheme of an X-ray double-crystal TPC-K diffractometer. The results of measurements and theoretical calculations of double-crystal RCs for characteristic X-rays from tubes with a molybdenum anode and different widths of slits show that a decrease in the slit width leads to an increase in the relative contribution of the MoK α2 -line RC in comparison with the intensity of the tails of the MoK α1 -line RC. It is shown that the second peak of the MoK α2 line becomes increasingly pronounced in the tail of the MoK α1 -line RC with a decrease in the slit width. Two plane-parallel Si plates (input faces (110), diffraction vector h 〈220〉) were used as a monochromator crystal and a sample. The results of measuring double-crystal RCs are in good agreement with theoretical calculations

  2. A position sensitive gamma-ray detector which employs photodiode and CsI (T1) crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, A.J.; Graham, G.; Hopkins, C.J.; Ramsden, D.; Lei, M.

    1987-01-01

    A compact CsI(Tl)/photodiode gamma-ray detector is described which is capable of locating the point of interaction of incident gamma-ray photons in the spectral region around 1 MeV. Laboratory tests are used to quantify both the spectral and positional resolutions of the detectors. Their likely application in space gamma-ray astronomy is also discussed

  3. Large-surface-area diamond (111) crystal plates for applications in high-heat-load wavefront-preserving X-ray crystal optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Antipov, Sergey; Butler, James E; Kolyadin, Alexander V; Katrusha, Andrey

    2016-09-01

    Fabrication and results of high-resolution X-ray topography characterization of diamond single-crystal plates with large surface area (10 mm × 10 mm) and (111) crystal surface orientation for applications in high-heat-load X-ray crystal optics are reported. The plates were fabricated by laser-cutting of the (111) facets of diamond crystals grown using high-pressure high-temperature methods. The intrinsic crystal quality of a selected 3 mm × 7 mm crystal region of one of the studied samples was found to be suitable for applications in wavefront-preserving high-heat-load crystal optics. Wavefront characterization was performed using sequential X-ray diffraction topography in the pseudo plane wave configuration and data analysis using rocking-curve topography. The variations of the rocking-curve width and peak position measured with a spatial resolution of 13 µm × 13 µm over the selected region were found to be less than 1 µrad.

  4. Hardness ratio evolutionary curves of gamma-ray bursts expected by the curvature effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Y.-P.; Su, C.-Y.; Fan, J. H.; Gupta, A. C.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) pulses with a fast rise and an exponential decay phase, assumed to arise from relativistically expending fireballs, and found that the curvature effect influences the evolutionary curve of the corresponding hardness ratio (hereafter HRC). We find, due to the curvature effect, the evolutionary curve of the pure hardness ratio (when the background count is not included) would peak at the very beginning of the curve, and then would undergo a drop-to-rise-to-decay phase. In the case of the raw hardness ratio (when the background count is included), the curvature effect would give rise to several types of evolutionary curve, depending on the hardness of a burst. For a soft burst, an upside down pulse of its raw HRC would be observed; for a hard burst, its raw HRC shows a pulselike profile with a sinkage in its decaying phase; for a very hard burst, the raw HRC possesses a pulselike profile without a sinkage in its decaying phase. For a pulselike raw HRC as shown in the case of the hard and very hard bursts, its peak would appear in advance of that of the corresponding light curve, which was observed previously in some GRBs. For illustration, we have studied here the HRC of GRB 920216, GRB 920830, and GRB 990816 in detail. The features of the raw HRC expected in the hard burst are observed in these bursts. A fit to the three bursts shows that the curvature effect alone could indeed account for the predicted characteristics of HRCs. In addition, we find that the observed hardness ratio tends to be harder at the beginning of the pulses than what the curvature effect could predict and be softer at the late time of the pulses. We believe this is an evidence showing the existence of intrinsic hard-to-soft radiation which might be due to the acceleration-to-deceleration mode of shocks

  5. Flexible X-ray detector based on sliced lead iodide crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hui; Gao, Xiuying [College of Optoelectronic Technology, Chengdu University of Information Technology, Chengdu (China); Department of Materials Science, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Zhao, Beijun [Department of Materials Science, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Yang, Dingyu; Wangyang, Peihua; Zhu, Xinghua [College of Optoelectronic Technology, Chengdu University of Information Technology, Chengdu (China)

    2017-02-15

    A promising flexible X-ray detector based on inorganic semiconductor PbI{sub 2} crystal is reported. The sliced crystals mechanically cleaved from an as-grown PbI{sub 2} crystal act as the absorber directly converting the impinging X-ray photons to electron hole pairs. Due to the ductile feature of the PbI{sub 2} crystal, the detector can be operated under a highly curved state with the strain on the top surface up to 1.03% and still maintaining effective detection performance. The stable photocurrent and fast response were obtained with the detector repeated bending to a strain of 1.03% for 100 cycles. This work presents an approach for developing efficient and cost-effective PbI{sub 2}-based flexible X-ray detector. Photocurrent responses of the flexible PbI{sub 2} X-ray detector with the strain on the top surface up to 1.03% proposed in this work with the cross sectional structure and curved detector photograph as insets. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Gamma ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fichtel, C.E.

    1975-01-01

    The first certain detection of celestial high energy gamma rays came from a satellite experiment flown on the third Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO-111). A Gamma ray spark chamber telescope with substantively greater sensitivity and angular resolution (a few degrees) flown on the second Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS-II) has now provided a better picture of the gamma ray sky, and particularly the galactic plane and pulsars. This paper will summarize the present picture of gamma ray astronomy as it has developed at this conference from measurements made with experiments carried out on balloons, those remaining on the ground, and ones flown on satellites. (orig.) [de

  7. Pulsed Gamma-Rays From PSR J2021 3651 with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdo, Aous A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, Marco; Atwood, William B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, Guido; Bastieri, Denis; Battelino, Milan; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Berenji, Bijan; Bloom, Elliott D.; Bogaert, G.; Borgland, Anders W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, Thompson H.

    2009-01-01

    We report the detection of pulsed gamma-rays from the young, spin-powered radio pulsar PSR J2021+3651 using data acquired with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly GLAST). The light curve consists of two narrow peaks of similar amplitude separated by 0.468 ± 0.002 in phase. The first peak lags the maximum of the 2 GHz radio pulse by 0.162 ± 0.004 ± 0.01 in phase. The integral gamma-ray photon flux above 100 MeV is (56 ± 3 ± 11) x 10 -8 cm -2 s -1 . The photon spectrum is well-described by an exponentially cut-off power law of the form dF/dE = kE -# Gamma#e (-E/E c ) where the energy E is expressed in GeV. The photon index is Γ = 1.5 ± 0.1 ± 0.1 and the exponential cut-off is E c = 2.4 ± 0.3 ± 0.5 GeV. The first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The integral photon flux of the bridge is approximately 10% of the pulsed emission, and the upper limit on off-pulse gamma-ray emission from a putative pulsar wind nebula is -2 but a poorly constrained magnetic geometry. Re-analysis of Chandra data enhanced the significance of the weak X-ray pulsations, and the first peak is roughly phase-aligned with the first gamma-ray peak. We discuss the emission region and beaming geometry based on the shape and spectrum of the gamma-ray light curve combined with radio and X-ray measurements, and the implications for the pulsar distance. Gamma-ray emission from the polar cap region seems unlikely for this pulsar.

  8. GRB 090313 AND THE ORIGIN OF OPTICAL PEAKS IN GAMMA-RAY BURST LIGHT CURVES: IMPLICATIONS FOR LORENTZ FACTORS AND RADIO FLARES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melandri, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Mundell, C. G.; Guidorzi, C.; Bersier, D.; Steele, I. A.; Smith, R. J.; De Ugarte Postigo, A.; Pooley, G.; Yoshida, M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gorosabel, J.; Kubanek, P.; Sota, A.; JelInek, M.; Gomboc, A.; Bremer, M.; Winters, J. M.; De Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; GarcIa-Appadoo, D.

    2010-01-01

    We use a sample of 19 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that exhibit single-peaked optical light curves to test the standard fireball model by investigating the relationship between the time of the onset of the afterglow and the temporal rising index. Our sample includes GRBs and X-ray flashes for which we derive a wide range of initial Lorentz factors (40 e and show that values derived from the early time light-curve properties are consistent with published typical values derived from other afterglow studies. We produce expected radio light curves by predicting the temporal evolution of the expected radio emission from forward and reverse shock components, including synchrotron self-absorption effects at early time. Although a number of GRBs in this sample do not have published radio measurements, we demonstrate the effectiveness of this method in the case of Swift GRB 090313, for which millimetric and centimetric observations were available, and conclude that future detections of reverse-shock radio flares with new radio facilities such as the EVLA and ALMA will test the low-frequency model and provide constraints on magnetic models.

  9. Basics of Gamma Ray Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinnett, Jacob [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Venkataraman, Ram [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-13

    The objective of this training is to explain the origin of x-rays and gamma rays, gamma ray interactions with matter, detectors and electronics used in gamma ray-spectrometry, and features of a gamma-ray spectrum for nuclear material that is safeguarded.

  10. Method of incident low-energy gamma-ray direction reconstruction in the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray space telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kheymits, M D; Leonov, A A; Zverev, V G; Galper, A M; Arkhangelskaya, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Yurkin, Yu T; Bakaldin, A V; Suchkov, S I; Topchiev, N P; Dalkarov, O D

    2016-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray space-based telescope has as its main goals to measure cosmic γ-ray fluxes and the electron-positron cosmic-ray component produced, theoretically, in dark-matter-particles decay or annihilation processes, to search for discrete γ-ray sources and study them in detail, to examine the energy spectra of diffuse γ-rays — both galactic and extragalactic — and to study gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and γ-rays from the active Sun. Scientific goals of GAMMA-400 telescope require fine angular resolution. The telescope is of a pair-production type. In the converter-tracker, the incident gamma-ray photon converts into electron-positron pair in the tungsten layer and then the tracks are detected by silicon- strip position-sensitive detectors. Multiple scattering processes become a significant obstacle in the incident-gamma direction reconstruction for energies below several gigaelectronvolts. The method of utilising this process to improve the resolution is proposed in the presented work. (paper)

  11. Effect of Co-60 gamma radiation on optical, dielectric and mechanical properties of strontium L-ascorbate hexahydrate NLO crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dileep, M. S.; Suresh Kumar, H. M.

    2018-04-01

    A potentially useful nonlinear optical semi-organic single crystal of strontium L-ascorbate hexahydrate (SLAH) was grown by solution growth slow evaporation technique at room temperature. The grown crystal is semi transparent, yellowish in color with monoclinic crystal system having space group P21 and is stable up to 198 °C. Further, SLAH crystals were irradiated with gamma rays produced by 60Co with different doses of 10 KGy, 30 KGy and 50 KGy at room temperature and then studied the effect of gamma-rays on dielectric properties, optical absorption, microhardness and SHG efficiency. The absorption study reveals that the absorbance of the grown crystal is appeared to be low throughout the visible region with a lower cutoff wavelength of 277 nm and these parameters are not affected upon gamma irradiation. The luminescence intensity of the crystal is also not affected by the irradiation. There is noticeable changes were observed in dielectric properties and hardness of the materials for different doses of gamma irradiation. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency of the grown crystal is 0.54 times that of the KDP crystal and is decreased moderately by increasing the dosage of gamma irradiation.

  12. Enhanced gamma ray sensitivity in bismuth triiodide sensors through volumetric defect control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johns, Paul M.; Baciak, James E.; Nino, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    Some of the more attractive semiconducting compounds for ambient temperature radiation detector applications are impacted by low charge collection efficiency due to the presence of point and volumetric defects. This has been particularly true in the case of BiI_3, which features very attractive properties (density, atomic number, band gap, etc.) to serve as a gamma ray detector, but has yet to demonstrate its full potential. We show that by applying growth techniques tailored to reduce defects, the spectral performance of this promising semiconductor can be realized. Gamma ray spectra from >100 keV source emissions are now obtained from high quality Sb:BiI_3 bulk crystals with limited concentrations of defects (point and extended). The spectra acquired in these high quality crystals feature photopeaks with resolution of 2.2% at 662 keV. Infrared microscopy is used to compare the local microstructure between radiation sensitive and non-responsive crystals. This work demonstrates that BiI_3 can be prepared in melt-grown detector-grade samples with superior quality and can acquire the spectra from a variety of gamma ray sources.

  13. An efficiency study of a high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marti Climent, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    A review of the different curves for the efficiency fit of a high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer was made. These curves are used to fit the efficiency of our detector system. In order to study the goodness of the different fits various standards were used, and the ICRP GAM-83 exercise results were employed. (author)

  14. Natural background gamma-ray spectrum. List of gamma-rays ordered in energy from natural radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimiya, Tsutomu [Japan Radioisotope Association, Tokyo (Japan); Narita, Tsutomu; Kitao, Kensuke

    1998-03-01

    A quick index to {gamma}-rays and X-rays from natural radionuclides is presented. In the list, {gamma}-rays are arranged in order of increasing energy. The list also contains {gamma}-rays from radioactive nuclides produced in a germanium detector and its surrounding materials by interaction with cosmic neutrons, as well as direct {gamma}-rays from interaction with the neutrons. Artificial radioactive nuclides emitting {gamma}-rays with same or near energy value as that of the natural {gamma}-rays and X-rays are also listed. In appendix, {gamma}-ray spectra from a rock, uranium ore, thorium, monazite and uraninite and also background spectra obtained with germanium detectors placed in iron or lead shield have been given. The list is designed for use in {gamma}-ray spectroscopy under the conditions of highly natural background, such as in-situ environmental radiation monitoring or low-level activity measurements, with a germanium detector. (author)

  15. The application of X-ray, γ-ray and neutron diffraction to the characterization of single crystal perfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freund, A.; Schneider, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    The work is divided into the following three chapters: 1) diffraction by perfect and imperfect crystals, 2) experimental apparatus (describing gamma ray, X-ray and neutron diffractometers), 3) application of diffraction methods to the development of neutron monochromators. (WBU) [de

  16. X-RAY PULSATIONS FROM THE RADIO-QUIET GAMMA-RAY PULSAR IN CTA 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caraveo, P. A.; De Luca, A.; Marelli, M.; Bignami, G. F.; Ray, P. S.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Kanbach, G.

    2010-01-01

    Prompted by the Fermi-LAT discovery of a radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar inside the CTA 1 supernova remnant, we obtained a 130 ks XMM-Newton observation to assess the timing behavior of this pulsar. Exploiting both the unprecedented photon harvest and the contemporary Fermi-LAT timing measurements, a 4.7σ single-peak pulsation is detected, making PSR J0007+7303 the second example, after Geminga, of a radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar also seen to pulsate in X-rays. Phase-resolved spectroscopy shows that the off-pulse portion of the light curve is dominated by a power-law, non-thermal spectrum, while the X-ray peak emission appears to be mainly of thermal origin, probably from a polar cap heated by magnetospheric return currents, pointing to a hot spot varying throughout the pulsar rotation.

  17. X-ray diffraction characteristics of curved monochromators for sychrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeuf, A.; Rustichelli, F.; Mazkedian, S.; Puliti, P.; Melone, S.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical study is presented concerning the diffraction characteristics of curved monochromators for X-ray synchrotron radiation used at the laboratories of Hamburg, Orsay and Stanford. The investigation was performed by extending to the X-ray case a simple model recently developed and fruitfully employed to describe the neutron diffraction properties of curved monochromators. Several diffraction patterns were obtained corresponding to different monochromator materials (Ge, Si) used by the different laboratories, for different reflecting planes (111), (220), asymmetry angles, X-ray wave-lengths (Mo Kα, Cu Kα, Cr Kα) and curvature radii. The results are discussed in physical terms and their implications on the design of curved monochromators for synchrotron radiation are presented. In particular, the study shows that all the monochromators used in the different laboratories should behave practically as perfect crystals and therefore should have a very low integrated reflectivity corresponding to an optimized wavelength passband Δlambda/lambda approximately 10 -4 . The gain that can be obtained by increasing the curvature, by introducing a gradient in the lattice spacing or by any other kind of imperfection is quite limited and much lower than the desirable value. The adopted model can help in obtaining a possible moderate gain in intensity by also taking into consideration other parameters, such as crystal material, reflecting plane, asymmetry of the reflection and X-ray wavelength. (Auth.)

  18. A novel gamma-ray detector with submillimeter resolutions using a monolithic MPPC array with pixelized Ce:LYSO and Ce:GGAG crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, T., E-mail: katou.frme.8180@asagi.waseda.jp [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Ohkubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Kataoka, J.; Nakamori, T.; Miura, T.; Matsuda, H.; Kishimoto, A. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Ohkubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Sato, K.; Ishikawa, Y.; Yamamura, K.; Nakamura, S.; Kawabata, N. [Solid State Division, Hamamatsu Photonics K. K., 1126-1, Ichino-cho, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka (Japan); Ikeda, H. [ISAS/JAXA, 3-1-1, Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa (Japan); Yamamoto, S. [Kobe City College of Technology, 8-3, Gakuenhigashimati, Nishi-ku, Kobe-shi, Hyougo 651-2194 (Japan); Kamada, K. [Materials Research Laboratory, Furukawa Co., Ltd., 1-25-13, Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0856 (Japan)

    2013-01-21

    We have developed a large-area monolithic Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) array consisting of 4×4 channels with a three-side buttable package. Each channel has a photosensitive area of 3×3 mm{sup 2} and 3600 Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes (APDs). For typical operational gain of 7.5×10{sup 5} at +20 °C, gain fluctuation over the entire MPPC device is only ±5.6%, and dark count rates (as measured at the 1 p.e. level) amount to ≤400kcps per channel. We first fabricated a gamma-ray camera consisting of the MPPC array with one-to-one coupling to a Ce-doped (Lu,Y){sub 2}(SiO{sub 4})O (Ce:LYSO) crystal array (4×4 array of 3×3×10 mm{sup 3} crystals). Energy and time resolutions of 11.5±0.5% (FWHM at 662 keV) and 493±22ps were obtained, respectively. When using the charge division resistor network, which compiles signals into four position-encoded analog outputs, the ultimate positional resolution is estimated as 0.19 mm in both X and Y directions, while energy resolution of 10.2±0.4% (FWHM) was obtained. Finally, we fabricated submillimeter Ce:LYSO and Ce-doped Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 12} (Ce:GGAG) scintillator matrices each consisting of 1.0×1.0, 0.7×0.7 and 0.5×0.5 mm{sup 2} pixels, to further improve the spatial resolution. In all types of Ce:LYSO and Ce:GGAG matrices, each crystal was clearly resolved in the position histograms when irradiated by a {sup 137}Cs source. The energy resolutions for 662 keV gamma-rays for each Ce:LYSO and Ce:GGAG scintillator matrix were ≤14.3%. These results suggest excellent potential for its use as a high spatial medical imaging device, particularly in positron emission tomography (PET). -- Highlights: ► We developed a newly designed large-area monolithic MPPC array. ► We obtained fine gain uniformity, and good energy and time resolutions when coupled to the LYSO scintillator. ► We fabricated gamma-ray camera consisting of the MPPC array and submillimeter pixelized LYSO and GGAG scintillators. ► In

  19. Millennial-scale climate variability recorded by gamma logging curve in Chaidam Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Linwang; Chen Ye; Liu Zechun

    2000-01-01

    Using a natural gamma-ray logging curve of Dacan-1 core to inverse paleo-climate changes in Chaidam Basin, the process of environmental change of the past 150,000 years has been revealed. He in rich events and D-O cycles were identified, and can be matched well with those recorded in Greedland ice core. It suggests that the GR curve can identify tectonic and climatic events, is a sensitive proxy indicator of environmental and climatic changes

  20. Effect of gamma rays on crystalline materials during irradiation in a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaenko, V.A.; Karpukhin, V.I.; Gordeev, V.G.

    1995-01-01

    The article presents and discusses the results of experiments to determine the effect of gamma rays on the change in the properties of diamond, graphite, and structural steel. The materials were irradiated in a VVER type reactor. For diamonds, the effect on the annealing of defects was investigated. As gamma ray intensity increased, the crystal lattice expansion and defect concentration increased. Graphite lattice expansion and the mechanical properties of structural steel were also examined. Graphite lattice expansion increased with increased neutron flux and decreased irradiation temperature. Changes in the impact toughness of structural steel correlated precisely to the gamma ray flux in the experiments. 6 refs., 3 figs

  1. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the rocking curves measured for Mo K α X-ray characteristic lines in the double-crystal nondispersive scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchenkov, N. V.; Chukhovskii, F. N.; Blagov, A. E.

    2015-03-01

    The rocking curves (RCs) for Mo K α1 h Mo K α2 characteristic X-ray lines have been experimentally and theoretically studied in the nondispersive scheme of an X-ray double-crystal TPC-K diffractometer. The results of measurements and theoretical calculations of double-crystal RCs for characteristic X-rays from tubes with a molybdenum anode and different widths of slits show that a decrease in the slit width leads to an increase in the relative contribution of the Mo K α2-line RC in comparison with the intensity of the tails of the Mo K α1-line RC. It is shown that the second peak of the Mo K α2 line becomes increasingly pronounced in the tail of the Mo K α1-line RC with a decrease in the slit width. Two plane-parallel Si plates (input faces {110}, diffraction vector h ) were used as a monochromator crystal and a sample. The results of measuring double-crystal RCs are in good agreement with theoretical calculations.

  2. X-ray echoes from gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermer, C.D.; Hurley, K.C.; Hartmann, D.H.

    1991-01-01

    The identification of an echo of reflected radiation in time histories of gamma-ray burst spectra can provide important information about the existence of binary companions or accretion disks in gamma-ray burst systems. Because of the nature of Compton scattering, the spectrum of the echo will be attenuated at gamma-ray energies compared with the spectrum of the primary burst emission. The expected temporal and spectral signatures of the echo and a search for such echoes are described, and implications for gamma-ray burst models are discussed. 35 refs

  3. The Gamma-ray Sky with Fermi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David

    2012-01-01

    Gamma rays reveal extreme, nonthermal conditions in the Universe. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been exploring the gamma-ray sky for more than four years, enabling a search for powerful transients like gamma-ray bursts, novae, solar flares, and flaring active galactic nuclei, as well as long-term studies including pulsars, binary systems, supernova remnants, and searches for predicted sources of gamma rays such as dark matter annihilation. Some results include a stringent limit on Lorentz invariance derived from a gamma-ray burst, unexpected gamma-ray variability from the Crab Nebula, a huge gamma-ray structure associated with the center of our galaxy, surprising behavior from some gamma-ray binary systems, and a possible constraint on some WIMP models for dark matter.

  4. Applied gamma-ray spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Dams, R; Crouthamel, Carl E

    1970-01-01

    Applied Gamma-Ray Spectrometry covers real life application of the gamma-ray and the devices used in their experimental studies. This book is organized into 9 chapters, and starts with discussions of the various decay processes, the possible interaction mechanisms of gamma radiation with matter, and the intrinsic and extrinsic variables, which affect the observed gamma-ray and X-ray spectra. The subsequent chapters deal with the properties and fabrication of scintillation detectors, semiconductor detectors, and proportional gas counters. These chapters present some of the most widely utilized

  5. Pulsed Gamma-Rays From PSR J2021 3651 with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, Marco; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, William B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Battelino, Milan; /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, Bijan; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, Elliott D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bogaert, G.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Borgland, Anders W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Burnett, Thompson H.; /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Columbia U. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /LPCE, Orleans /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /ASI, Rome /NRAO, Charlottesville /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Pavia U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Cruz /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Manchester U. /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; /more authors..

    2011-11-30

    We report the detection of pulsed gamma-rays from the young, spin-powered radio pulsar PSR J2021+3651 using data acquired with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly GLAST). The light curve consists of two narrow peaks of similar amplitude separated by 0.468 {+-} 0.002 in phase. The first peak lags the maximum of the 2 GHz radio pulse by 0.162 {+-} 0.004 {+-} 0.01 in phase. The integral gamma-ray photon flux above 100 MeV is (56 {+-} 3 {+-} 11) x 10{sup -8} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. The photon spectrum is well-described by an exponentially cut-off power law of the form dF/dE = kE{sup -{Gamma}}e{sup (-E/E{sub c})} where the energy E is expressed in GeV. The photon index is {Gamma} = 1.5 {+-} 0.1 {+-} 0.1 and the exponential cut-off is E{sub c} = 2.4 {+-} 0.3 {+-} 0.5 GeV. The first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The integral photon flux of the bridge is approximately 10% of the pulsed emission, and the upper limit on off-pulse gamma-ray emission from a putative pulsar wind nebula is < 10% of the pulsed emission at the 95% confidence level. Radio polarization measurements yield a rotation measure of RM = 524 {+-} 4 rad m{sup -2} but a poorly constrained magnetic geometry. Re-analysis of Chandra data enhanced the significance of the weak X-ray pulsations, and the first peak is roughly phase-aligned with the first gamma-ray peak. We discuss the emission region and beaming geometry based on the shape and spectrum of the gamma-ray light curve combined with radio and X-ray measurements, and the implications for the pulsar distance. Gamma-ray emission from the polar cap region seems unlikely for this pulsar.

  6. Collimatorless imaging of gamma rays with help of gamma-ray tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Marel, J V D

    2001-01-01

    In many gamma-ray detector systems that are built for imaging purposes Compton scattered photons are suppressed as much as possible. However, the information from photons that scattered inside a detector system can be used to reconstruct the tracks of the photons with help of gamma-ray tracking. Estimates of the incident directions of the photons can be made and an image can be created. Examples of potential applications for this technique are the use as a gamma-camera in medical imaging (e.g. SPECT) or as a detector for PET. Due to the omission of collimators, much higher detection efficiencies can be achieved, reducing the doses required for an image. A gamma-ray tracking method, called backtracking, has been developed for nuclear spectroscopy. The method tracks gamma-rays originating from a point source in the center of a spherical detector system consisting of position-sensitive germanium detectors. This method can also be used as a tracking technique for imaging of an unknown source distribution. With he...

  7. GPU-based prompt gamma ray imaging from boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Do-Kun; Jung, Joo-Young; Suk Suh, Tae; Jo Hong, Key; Sil Lee, Keum

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to perform the fast reconstruction of a prompt gamma ray image using a graphics processing unit (GPU) computation from boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) simulations. Methods: To evaluate the accuracy of the reconstructed image, a phantom including four boron uptake regions (BURs) was used in the simulation. After the Monte Carlo simulation of the BNCT, the modified ordered subset expectation maximization reconstruction algorithm using the GPU computation was used to reconstruct the images with fewer projections. The computation times for image reconstruction were compared between the GPU and the central processing unit (CPU). Also, the accuracy of the reconstructed image was evaluated by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results: The image reconstruction time using the GPU was 196 times faster than the conventional reconstruction time using the CPU. For the four BURs, the area under curve values from the ROC curve were 0.6726 (A-region), 0.6890 (B-region), 0.7384 (C-region), and 0.8009 (D-region). Conclusions: The tomographic image using the prompt gamma ray event from the BNCT simulation was acquired using the GPU computation in order to perform a fast reconstruction during treatment. The authors verified the feasibility of the prompt gamma ray image reconstruction using the GPU computation for BNCT simulations

  8. Horizontal Ampoule Growth and Characterization of Mercuric Iodide at Controlled Gas Pressures for X-Ray and Gamma Ray Spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, S.; McGregor Elsa; Ariesanti Bridget Corcoran

    2004-01-01

    The project developed a new method for producing high quality mercuric iodide crystals of x-ray and gamma spectrometers. Included are characterization of mercuric iodide crystal properties as a function of growth environment and fabrication and demonstration of room-temperature-operated high-resolution mercuric iodide spectrometers

  9. Optical observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjorth, J.; Pian, E.; Fynbo, J.P.U.

    2004-01-01

    We briefly review the status and recent progress in the field of optical observations of gamma-ray burst afterglows. We will focus on the fundamental observational evidence for the relationship between gamma-ray bursts and the final evolutionary phases of massive stars. In particular, we will address (i) gamma-ray burst host galaxies, (ii) optically dark gamma-ray burst afterglows, (iii) the gamma-ray burst-supernova connection, and (iv) the relation between X-ray flashes, gamma-ray bursts, and supernovae

  10. The Gamma-ray Universe through Fermi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Gamma rays, the most powerful form of light, reveal extreme conditions in the Universe. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and its smaller cousin AGILE have been exploring the gamma-ray sky for several years, enabling a search for powerful transients like gamma-ray bursts, novae, solar flares, and flaring active galactic nuclei, as well as long-term studies including pulsars, binary systems, supernova remnants, and searches for predicted sources of gamma rays such as dark matter annihilation. Some results include a stringent limit on Lorentz invariance derived from a gamma-ray burst, unexpected gamma-ray variability from the Crab Nebula, a huge ga.nuna-ray structure associated with the center of our galaxy, surprising behavior from some gamma-ray binary systems, and a possible constraint on some WIMP models for dark matter.

  11. Factors influencing in situ gamma-ray measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loonstra, E. H.; van Egmond, F. M.

    2009-04-01

    Introduction In situ passive gamma-ray sensors are very well suitable for mapping physical soil properties. In order to make a qualitative sound soil map, high quality input parameters for calibration are required. This paper will focus on the factors that affect the output of in situ passive gamma-ray sensors, the primary source, soil, not taken into account. Factors The gamma-ray spectrum contains information of naturally occurring nuclides 40K, 238U and 232Th and man-made nuclides like 137Cs, as well as the total count rate. Factors that influence the concentration of these nuclides and the count rate can be classified in 3 categories. These are sensor design, environmental conditions and operational circumstances. Sensor design The main elements of an in situ gamma-ray sensor that influence the outcome and quality of the output are the crystal and the spectrum analysis method. Material and size of the crystal determine the energy resolution. Though widely used, NaI crystals are not the most efficient capturer of gamma radiation. Alternatives are BGO and CsI. BGO has a low peak resolution, which prohibits use in cases where man-made nuclides are subject of interest. The material is expensive and prone to temperature instability. CsI is robust compared to NaI and BGO. The density of CsI is higher than NaI, yielding better efficiency, especially for smaller crystal sizes. More volume results in higher energy efficiency. The reduction of the measured spectral information into concentration of radionuclides is mostly done using the Windows analysis method. In Windows, the activities of the nuclides are found by summing the intensities of the spectrum found in a certain interval surrounding a peak. A major flaw of the Windows method is the limited amount of spectral information that is incorporated into the analysis. Another weakness is the inherent use of ‘stripping factors' to account for contributions of radiation from nuclide A into the peak of nuclide B. This

  12. Biological dose estimation for accidental supra-high dose gamma-ray exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.; Yan, X.K.; Du, J.; Wang, Z.D.; Zhang, X.Q.; Zeng, F.G.; Zhou, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    To correctly estimate the biological dose of victims accidentally exposed to a very high dose of 60 Co gamma-ray, a new dose-effect curve of chromosomal dicentrics/multicentrics and rings in the supra-high dose range was established. Peripheral blood from two healthy men was irradiated in vitro with doses of 60 Co gamma-rays ranging from 6 to 22 Gy at a dose rate of 2.0 Gy/min. Lymphocytes were concentrated, cultured and harvested at 52 h, 68 h and 72 h. The numbers of dic + r were counted. The dose-effect curves were established and validated using comparisons with doses from the Tokai-mura accident and were then applied to two victims of supra-high dose exposure accident. The results indicated that there were no significant differences in chromosome aberration frequency among the different culture times from 52 h to 72 h. The 6-22 Gy dose-effect curve was fitted to a linear quadratic model Y = -2.269 + 0.776D - 7.868 x l0 -3 D 2 . Using this mathematic model, the dose estimates were similar to data from Tokai-mura which were estimated by PCC ring. Whole body average doses of 9.7 Gy and 18.1 Gy for two victims in the Jining accident were satisfactorily given. We established and successfully applied a new dose-effect curve of chromosomal dicentrics plus ring (dic + r) after 6-22 Gy γ-irradiation from a supra-high dose 60 Co gamma-ray accident.

  13. Radio Flares from Gamma-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopač, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Kobayashi, S.; Virgili, F. J.; Harrison, R.; Japelj, J.; Guidorzi, C.; Melandri, A.; Gomboc, A.

    2015-06-01

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks (RSs) in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy, and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parameterization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. and Melandri et al. in which the typical frequency of the RS was suggested to lie at radio rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct RS radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1-1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later optical peaks, high isotropic energies, lower circumburst medium densities, and at observing frequencies that are less prone to synchrotron self-absorption effects—typically above a few GHz. Given recent detections of polarized prompt gamma-ray and optical RS emission, we suggest that detection of polarized radio/millimeter emission will unambiguously confirm the presence of low-frequency RSs at early time.

  14. RADIO FLARES FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopač, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Kobayashi, S.; Virgili, F. J.; Harrison, R.; Japelj, J.; Gomboc, A.; Guidorzi, C.; Melandri, A.

    2015-01-01

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks (RSs) in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy, and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parameterization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. and Melandri et al. in which the typical frequency of the RS was suggested to lie at radio rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct RS radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1–1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later optical peaks, high isotropic energies, lower circumburst medium densities, and at observing frequencies that are less prone to synchrotron self-absorption effects—typically above a few GHz. Given recent detections of polarized prompt gamma-ray and optical RS emission, we suggest that detection of polarized radio/millimeter emission will unambiguously confirm the presence of low-frequency RSs at early time

  15. Lunar based gamma ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haymes, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    Gamma ray astronomy represents the study of the universe on the basis of the electromagnetic radiation with the highest energy. Gamma ray astronomy provides a crucial tool for the understanding of astronomical phenomena, taking into account nucleosynthesis in supernovae, black holes, active galaxies, quasars, the sources of cosmic rays, neutron stars, and matter-antimatter annihilation. Difficulties concerning the conduction of studies by gamma ray astronomy are related to the necessity to perform such studies far from earth because the atmosphere is a source of gamma rays. Studies involving the use of gamma ray instruments in earth orbit have been conducted, and more gamma ray astronomy observations are planned for the future. Imperfections of studies conducted in low earth orbit could be overcome by estalishing an observatory on the moon which represents a satellite orbiting at 60 earth radii. Details concerning such an observatory are discussed. 5 references

  16. Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    This photograph shows the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (GRO) being deployed by the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis during the STS-37 mission in April 1991. The GRO reentered Earth atmosphere and ended its successful mission in June 2000. For nearly 9 years, the GRO Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), designed and built by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), kept an unblinking watch on the universe to alert scientists to the invisible, mysterious gamma-ray bursts that had puzzled them for decades. By studying gamma-rays from objects like black holes, pulsars, quasars, neutron stars, and other exotic objects, scientists could discover clues to the birth, evolution, and death of stars, galaxies, and the universe. The gamma-ray instrument was one of four major science instruments aboard the Compton. It consisted of eight detectors, or modules, located at each corner of the rectangular satellite to simultaneously scan the entire universe for bursts of gamma-rays ranging in duration from fractions of a second to minutes. In January 1999, the instrument, via the Internet, cued a computer-controlled telescope at Las Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, within 20 seconds of registering a burst. With this capability, the gamma-ray experiment came to serve as a gamma-ray burst alert for the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and major gound-based observatories around the world. Thirty-seven universities, observatories, and NASA centers in 19 states, and 11 more institutions in Europe and Russia, participated in the BATSE science program.

  17. X-Ray-Driven Gamma Emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, J. J.; Karamian, S. A.; Rivlin, L. A.; Zadernovsky, A. A.

    2001-01-01

    X-ray-driven gamma emission describes processes that may release nuclear energy in a 'clean' way, as bursts of incoherent or coherent gamma rays without the production of radioactive by-products. Over the past decade, studies in this area, as a part of the larger field of quantum nucleonics, have gained tremendous momentum. Since 1987 it has been established that photons could trigger gamma emission from a long-lived metastable nuclear excited state of one nuclide and it appears likely that triggering in other isotopes will be demonstrated conclusively in the near future. With these experimental results have come new proposals for the creation of collective and avalanche-like incoherent gamma-ray bursts and even for the ultimate light source, a gamma-ray laser. Obviously, many applications would benefit from controlled bursts of gamma radiation, whether coherent or not. This paper reviews the experimental results and concepts for the production of gamma rays, driven by externally produced X-rays

  18. Isolation of cell cycle-dependent gamma ray-sensitive Chinese hamster ovary cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamato, T.D.; Weinstein, R.; Giaccia, A.; Mackenzie, L.

    1983-01-01

    A technique for the isolation of gamma ray-sensitive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell mutants is described, which uses nylon cloth replica plating and photography with dark-field illumination to directly monitor colonies for growth after gamma irradiation. Two gamma ray-sensitive mutants were isolated using this method. One of these cells (XR-1) had a two-slope survival curve: an initial steep slope and then a flattening of the curve at about 10% survival. Subsequently, it was found that this cell is sensitive to gamma irradiation in G1, early S, and late G2 phases of the cell cycle, whereas in the resistant phase (late S phase) its survival approaches that of the parental cells. The D37 in the sensitive G1 period is approximately 30 rads, compared with 300 rads of the parental cell. This mutant cell is also sensitive to killing by the DNA breaking agent, bleomycin, but is relatively insensitive to UV light and ethyl methane sulfonate, suggesting that the defect is specific for agents that produce DNA strand breakage

  19. Young gamma-ray pulsar: from modeling the gamma-ray emission to the particle-in-cell simulations of the global magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Gabriele; Kalapotharakos, Constantions; Timokhin, Andrey; Kust Harding, Alice; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2016-04-01

    Accelerated charged particles flowing in the magnetosphere produce pulsar gamma-ray emission. Pair creation processes produce an electron-positron plasma that populates the magnetosphere, in which the plasma is very close to force-free. However, it is unknown how and where the plasma departs from the ideal force-free condition, which consequently inhibits the understanding of the emission generation. We found that a dissipative magnetosphere outside the light cylinder effectively reproduces many aspects of the young gamma-ray pulsar emission as seen by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, and through particle-in-cell simulations (PIC), we started explaining this configuration self-consistently. These findings show that, together, a magnetic field structure close to force-free and the assumption of gamma-ray curvature radiation as the emission mechanism are strongly compatible with the observations. Two main issues from the previously used models that our work addresses are the inability to explain luminosity, spectra, and light curve features at the same time and the inconsistency of the electrodynamics. Moreover, using the PIC simulations, we explore the effects of different pair multiplicities on the magnetosphere configurations and the locations of the accelerating regions. Our work aims for a self-consistent modeling of the magnetosphere, connecting the microphysics of the pair-plasma to the global magnetosphere macroscopic quantities. This direction will lead to a greater understanding of pulsar emission at all wavelengths, as well as to concrete insights into the physics of the magnetosphere.

  20. Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Astrophysics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    During the last decades, various classes of radio-loud active galactic nuclei have been established as sources of high-energy radiation extending over a very broad range from soft gamma-rays (photon energies E~MeV) up to very-high-energy gamma-rays (E>100 GeV). These include blazars of different types, as well as young and evolved radio galaxies. The observed gamma-ray emission from such implies efficient particle acceleration processes taking place in highly magnetized and relativistic jets produced by supermassive black holes, processes that have yet to be identified and properly understood. In addition, nearby starforming and starburst galaxies, some of which host radio-quiet Seyfert-type nuclei, have been detected in the gamma-ray range as well. In their cases, the observed gamma-ray emission is due to non-thermal activity in the interstellar medium, possibly including also a contribution from accretion disks and nuclear outflows. Finally, the high-energy emission from clusters of galaxies remains elusive...

  1. Scintillating Organic–Inorganic Layered Perovskite-type Compounds and the Gamma-ray Detection Capabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Kawano, Naoki; Koshimizu, Masanori; Okada, Go; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Yanagida, Takayuki; Asai, Keisuke

    2017-01-01

    We investigated scintillation properties of organic–inorganic layered perovskite-type compounds under gamma-ray and X-ray irradiation. A crystal of the hybrid compounds with phenethyl amine (17 × 23 × 4 mm) was successfully fabricated by the poor-solvent diffusion method. The bulk sample showed superior scintillation properties with notably high light yield (14,000 photons per MeV) under gamma-rays and very fast decay time (11 ns). The light yield was about 1.4 time higher than that of common...

  2. Gravitational Waves versus X and Gamma Ray Emission in a Short Gamma-Ray Burst

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, F. G.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, Remo

    2012-01-01

    The recent progress in the understanding the physical nature of neutron star equilibrium configurations and the first observational evidence of a genuinely short gamma-ray burst, GRB 090227B, allows to give an estimate of the gravitational waves versus the X and Gamma-ray emission in a short gamma-ray burst.

  3. Gamma-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermsen, W.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented from an analysis of the celestial gamma-ray fine-scale structure based on over half of the data which may ultimately be available from the COS-B satellite. A catalogue consisting of 25 gamma-ray sources measured at energies above 100 MeV is presented. (Auth.)

  4. Development of software for the determination of gamma ray detection efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Antonio C.O. da; Genezini, Frederico A.; Zahn, Guilherme S.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma spectrometry is frequently used as a tool in analytical chemistry or environmental analyses. The efficiency of the detection setup is one of most important steps of the analyses, but users don't always calculate their own efficiency curve because this procedure is not trivial, and therefore they adapt their measurement geometry to work in a setup that has been previously calibrated, which will often cause limitations. In order to solve this problem, a software was developed that helps a non-experienced user to compute the detection efficiency curve and to determine the detection efficiency at a given gamma-ray energy. (author)

  5. Equipment for x- and gamma ray radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Nasir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab Razak Hamzah; Abd Aziz Mohamed; Mohammad Pauzi Ismail

    2004-01-01

    The following topics related to the equipment for x - and gamma ray radiography are discussed in this chapter. The topics are x-ray source for Industrial Radiography: properties of x-ray, generation of x-ray, mechanism of x-ray production, x-ray equipment, power supply, distribution of x-ray intensity along the tube: gamma ray source for Industrial Radiography: properties of gamma rays, gamma ray sources, gamma ray projectors on cameras, source changing. Care of Radiographic Equipments: Merits and Demerits of x and Gamma Rays

  6. TOWARD IDENTIFYING THE UNASSOCIATED GAMMA-RAY SOURCE 1FGL J1311.7-3429 WITH X-RAY AND OPTICAL OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kataoka, J.; Takahashi, Y.; Maeda, K. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Yatsu, Y.; Kawai, N. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, Ohokayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Urata, Y.; Tsai, A. [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Chung-Li 32054, Taiwan (China); Cheung, C. C. [National Research Council Research Associate, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC 20001 (United States); Totani, T.; Makiya, R. [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hanayama, H.; Miyaji, T., E-mail: kataoka.jun@waseda.jp [Ishigakijima Astronomical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 1024-1 Arakawa, Ishigaki, Okinawa, 907-0024 (Japan)

    2012-10-01

    We present deep optical and X-ray follow-up observations of the bright unassociated Fermi-LAT gamma-ray source 1FGL J1311.7-3429. The source was already known as an unidentified EGRET source (3EG J1314-3431, EGR J1314-3417), hence its nature has remained uncertain for the past two decades. For the putative counterpart, we detected a quasi-sinusoidal optical modulation of {Delta}m {approx} 2 mag with a period of {approx_equal}1.5 hr in the Rc, r', and g' bands. Moreover, we found that the amplitude of the modulation and peak intensity changed by {approx}>1 mag and {approx}0.5 mag, respectively, over our total six nights of observations from 2012 March to May. Combined with Swift UVOT data, the optical-UV spectrum is consistent with a blackbody temperature, kT {approx_equal} 1 eV and the emission volume radius R{sub bb} {approx_equal} 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} d{sub kpc} km (d{sub kpc} is the distance to the source in units of 1 kpc). In contrast, deep Suzaku observations conducted in 2009 and 2011 revealed strong X-ray flares with a light curve characterized with a power spectrum density of P(f) {proportional_to} f {sup -2.0{+-}0.4}, but the folded X-ray light curves suggest an orbital modulation also in X-rays. Together with the non-detection of a radio counterpart, and significant curved spectrum and non-detection of variability in gamma-rays, the source may be the second 'radio-quiet' gamma-ray emitting millisecond pulsar candidate after 1FGL J2339.7-0531, although the origin of flaring X-ray and optical variability remains an open question.

  7. Gamma-ray burst polarimeter (GAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihara, Tatehiro; Murakami, Toshio; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Gunji, Shuichi; Kubo, Shin

    2013-01-01

    The gamma-ray burst polarimeter (GAP: GAmma-ray burst Polarimeter), which had been almost handcrafted by scientists, has succeeded in working normally in interplanetary space, and in detecting the polarization of the gamma-ray from a mysterious astronomical object 'gamma-ray burst'. It is the first result of the detectors in the world exclusively aiming at detecting gamma-ray polarization. We mainly describe the hardware of our GAP equipment and show the method of preparing equipment to work in the cosmic space with a tight budget. The mechanical structure, the electronic circuits, the software on the equipment, the data analysis on the earth, and the scientific results gained by the observation just over one year, are presented after explaining the principle of gamma-ray polarization detection. Our design to protect equipment against mechanical shock and cosmic radiation may provide useful information for future preparation of compact satellite. (J.P.N.)

  8. Neutron Capture Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Neutron Capture Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1969-11-15

    Experimental capabilities in the field of neutron capture gamma-ray spectroscopy have expanded greatly in the last few years; this has been due in large part to the advent of high-quality Ge(Li) detectors, improvements in electronic data processing, and improvements in bent-crystal spectrometers. Previously unsuspected phenomena, such as the '5. 5-MeV1 anomaly, have appeared and new research tools, such as neutron guide tubes, have been brought into use. Equally exciting developments have occurred in the theory of neutron capture. Complex spectra have yielded to analysis after account had been taken of such effects as vibration, rotation and Coriolis forces, and the theoretical prediction of capture spectra seems to be a future possibility. In view of the International Atomic Energy Agency's close interest in this subject and the need for an international exchange of ideas to analyse and study the latest developments, the organizers of the Symposium felt that work on neutron capture gamma-ray spectroscopy had achieved such valuable and significant results that the time had come for this information to be presented, examined and discussed internationally.

  9. Neutron Capture Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Neutron Capture Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    Experimental capabilities in the field of neutron capture gamma-ray spectroscopy have expanded greatly in the last few years; this has been due in large part to the advent of high-quality Ge(Li) detectors, improvements in electronic data processing, and improvements in bent-crystal spectrometers. Previously unsuspected phenomena, such as the '5. 5-MeV1 anomaly, have appeared and new research tools, such as neutron guide tubes, have been brought into use. Equally exciting developments have occurred in the theory of neutron capture. Complex spectra have yielded to analysis after account had been taken of such effects as vibration, rotation and Coriolis forces, and the theoretical prediction of capture spectra seems to be a future possibility. In view of the International Atomic Energy Agency's close interest in this subject and the need for an international exchange of ideas to analyse and study the latest developments, the organizers of the Symposium felt that work on neutron capture gamma-ray spectroscopy had achieved such valuable and significant results that the time had come for this information to be presented, examined and discussed internationally

  10. Structural Characterization of Doped GaSb Single Crystals by X-ray Topography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honnicke, M.G.; Mazzaro, I.; Manica, J.; Benine, E.; M da Costa, E.; Dedavid, B. A.; Cusatis, C.; Huang, X. R.

    2009-09-13

    We characterized GaSb single crystals containing different dopants (Al, Cd and Te), grown by the Czochralski method, by x-ray topography and high angular resolution x-ray diffraction. Lang topography revealed dislocations parallel and perpendicular to the crystal's surface. Double-crystal GaSb 333 x-ray topography shows dislocations and vertical stripes than can be associated with circular growth bands. We compared our high-angular resolution x-ray diffraction measurements (rocking curves) with the findings predicted by the dynamical theory of x-ray diffraction. These measurements show that our GaSb single crystals have a relative variation in the lattice parameter ({Delta}d/d) on the order of 10{sup -5}. This means that they can be used as electronic devices (detectors, for example) and as x-ray monochromators.

  11. Is dark matter visible by galactic gamma rays?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The EGRET excess in the diffuse galactic gamma ray data above 1 GeV shows all features expected from dark matter WIMP annihilation: (a) It is present and has the same spectrum in all sky directions, not just in the galactic plane. (b) The intensity of the excess shows the 1/2 profile expected for a flat rotation curve outside ...

  12. Depth of interaction detection for {gamma}-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerche, Ch.W. [Instituto de Aplicaciones de las Tecnologias de la Informacion y de las Comunicaciones Avanzadas, (UPV) Camino de Vera s/n, E46022 (Spain)], E-mail: lerche@ific.uv.es; Doering, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, D52425 Juelich (Germany); Ros, A. [Institute de Fisica Corpuscular (CSIC-UV), 22085, Valencia E46071 (Spain); Herrero, V.; Gadea, R.; Aliaga, R.J.; Colom, R.; Mateo, F.; Monzo, J.M.; Ferrando, N.; Toledo, J.F.; Martinez, J.D.; Sebastia, A. [Instituto de Aplicaciones de las Tecnologias de la Informacion y de las Comunicaciones Avanzadas, (UPV) Camino de Vera s/n, E46022 (Spain); Sanchez, F.; Benlloch, J.M. [Institute de Fisica Corpuscular (CSIC-UV), 22085, Valencia E46071 (Spain)

    2009-03-11

    A novel design for an inexpensive depth of interaction capable detector for {gamma}-ray imaging has been developed. The design takes advantage of the strong correlation between the width of the scintillation light distribution in monolithic crystals and the interaction depth of {gamma}-rays. We present in this work an inexpensive modification of the commonly used charge dividing circuits which enables the instantaneous and simultaneous computation of the second order moment of light distribution. This measure provides a good estimate for the depth of interaction and does not affect the determination of the position centroids and the energy release of {gamma}-ray impact. The method has been tested with a detector consisting of a monolithic LSO block sized 42x42x10mm{sup 3} and a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube H8500 from Hamamatsu. The mean spatial resolution of the detector was found to be 3.4mm for the position centroids and 4.9mm for the DOI. The best spatial resolutions were observed at the center of the detector and yielded 1.4mm for the position centroids and 1.9mm for the DOI.

  13. Crystal quality analysis and improvement using x-ray topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maj, J.; Goetze, K.; Macrander, A.; Zhong, Y.; Huang, X.; Maj, L.

    2008-01-01

    The Topography X-ray Laboratory of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory operates as a collaborative effort with APS users to produce high performance crystals for APS X-ray beamline experiments. For many years the topography laboratory has worked closely with an on-site optics shop to help ensure the production of crystals with the highest quality, most stress-free surface finish possible. It has been instrumental in evaluating and refining methods used to produce high quality crystals. Topographical analysis has shown to be an effective method to quantify and determine the distribution of stresses, to help identify methods that would mitigate the stresses and improve the Rocking curve, and to create CCD images of the crystal. This paper describes the topography process and offers methods for reducing crystal stresses in order to substantially improve the crystal optics.

  14. GaAs radiovoltaic cell enhanced by Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} crystal for the development of new gamma microbatteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zheng-Rong [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 29 General Road, Jiangning District, Nanjing 211106 (China); Tang, Xiao-Bin, E-mail: tangxiaobin@nuaa.edu.cn [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 29 General Road, Jiangning District, Nanjing 211106 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Material and Technology for Energy Conversion, Nanjing 211106 (China); Liu, Yun-Peng [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 29 General Road, Jiangning District, Nanjing 211106 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Material and Technology for Energy Conversion, Nanjing 211106 (China); Xu, Zhi-Heng; Yuan, Zi-Cheng; Liu, Kai; Chen, Wang [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 29 General Road, Jiangning District, Nanjing 211106 (China)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • A new gamma/GaAs multi-level structure radiovoltaic microbattery is proposed. • The properties of the new GaAs/YSO radiovoltaic cell was discussed. • The cell with Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} crystal can provide higher power and current output. • The irradiation resistance of Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} crystal under X-ray excitation was studied. - Abstract: The design of a new gamma/GaAs multi-level structure radiovoltaic microbattery enhanced by an Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} (YSO) crystal is proposed. By introducing the YSO crystal in the GaAs radiovoltaic cell, the output power from the cell was significantly improved. We focus on the enhancement mechanisms of performance output in one level of a multi-level structure. The radioluminescence spectra of the YSO crystal revealed its fluorescence in the wavelength range of approximately 300–700 nm. Light at the exact wavelength would normally be totally absorbed by the GaAs photovoltaic material. The radiovoltaic cells were tested using an X-ray tube to simulate the gamma rays emitted by a gamma-radioactive source. Experimental investigation showed that the YSO crystal can increase the cell output power. The output power of the new GaAs/YSO radiovoltaic cell was enhanced by more than four times compared to that of the conventional GaAs radiovoltaic cell. In addition, considering the importance of the YSO crystal in the new GaAs/YSO radiovoltaic cell, the irradiation resistance of the YSO crystal under X-ray excitation was also analysed.

  15. Gamma ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillier, R.

    1984-01-01

    The book reviews the development of gamma ray astronomy over the past twenty five years. A large section of the book is devoted to the problems of background radiation and the design of detectors. Gamma rays from the sun, the galactic disc, the galaxy, and extra galactic sources; are also discussed. (U.K.)

  16. Impact of intense x-ray pulses on a NaI(Tl)-based gamma camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppert, W. J. C.; van der Velden, S.; Steenbergen, J. H. L.; de Jong, H. W. A. M.

    2018-03-01

    In SPECT/CT systems x-ray and γ-ray imaging is performed sequentially. Simultaneous acquisition may have advantages, for instance in interventional settings. However, this may expose a gamma camera to relatively high x-ray doses and deteriorate its functioning. We studied the NaI(Tl) response to x-ray pulses with a photodiode, PMT and gamma camera, respectively. First, we exposed a NaI(Tl)-photodiode assembly to x-ray pulses to investigate potential crystal afterglow. Next, we exposed a NaI(Tl)-PMT assembly to 10 ms LED pulses (mimicking x-ray pulses) and measured the response to flashing LED probe-pulses (mimicking γ-pulses). We then exposed the assembly to x-ray pulses, with detector entrance doses of up to 9 nGy/pulse, and analysed the response for γ-pulse variations. Finally, we studied the response of a Siemens Diacam gamma camera to γ-rays while exposed to x-ray pulses. X-ray exposure of the crystal, read out with a photodiode, revealed 15% afterglow fraction after 3 ms. The NaI(Tl)-PMT assembly showed disturbances up to 10 ms after 10 ms LED exposure. After x-ray exposure however, responses showed elevated baselines, with 60 ms decay-time. Both for x-ray and LED exposure and after baseline subtraction, probe-pulse analysis revealed disturbed pulse height measurements shortly after exposure. X-ray exposure of the Diacam corroborated the elementary experiments. Up to 50 ms after an x-ray pulse, no events are registered, followed by apparent energy elevations up to 100 ms after exposure. Limiting the dose to 0.02 nGy/pulse prevents detrimental effects. Conventional gamma cameras exhibit substantial dead-time and mis-registration of photon energies up to 100 ms after intense x-ray pulses. This is due PMT limitations and due to afterglow in the crystal. Using PMTs with modified circuitry, we show that deteriorative afterglow effects can be reduced without noticeable effects on the PMT performance, up to x-ray pulse doses of 1 nGy.

  17. The X-ray Telescope for the SWIFT Gamma-Ray Burst Mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, A.; Abbey, A.F.; Beardmore, A.; Mukerjee, K.; Osborne, J.P.; Watson, D.J.; Willingale, R.; Burrows, D. N.; Hill, J. E.; Nousek, J.A.; Miles, B.J.; Mori, K.; Morris, D.C.; Zugger, M.; Chincarini, G.; Campana, S.; Citterio, O.; Moretti, A.; Tagliaferri, G.; Bosworth, J.

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray Telescope (XRT) for the SWIFT mission, built by the international consortium from Pennsylvania State University (United States), University of Leicester (UK) and Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy), is already installed on the SWIFT spacecraft. The XRT has two key functions on SWIFT; to determine locations of GRBs to better than 5 arc seconds within 100 seconds of initial detection of a burst and to measure spectra and light curves of the X-ray afterglow over around four orders of magnitude of decay in the afterglow intensity. This paper summarises the XRT performance, operating modes and sensitivity for the detection of prompt and extended X-ray afterglows from gamma-ray bursts. The performance characteristics have been determined from data taken during the ground calibration campaign at MPE's Panter facility in September 2002

  18. Space instrumentation for gamma-ray astronomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teegarden, B.J

    1999-02-11

    The decade of the 1990s has witnessed a renaissance in the field of gamma-ray astronomy. The seminal event was the launch of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) in April 1991. There have been a flood of major discoveries from CGRO including breakthroughs in gamma-ray bursts, annihilation radiation, and blazars. The Italian SAX satellite was launched in April 1996. Although not primarily a gamma-ray mission, it has added a new dimension to our understanding of gamma-ray bursts. Along with these new discoveries a firm groundwork has been laid for missions and new technology development that should maintain a healthy and vigorous field throughout most of the next decade. These include the ESA INTEGRAL mission (INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory, to be launched in mid-2001) and the NASA GLAST mission (Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope) with a likely launch in the middle of the next decade. These two missions will extend the observational capabilities well beyond those of CGRO. New technologies (to gamma-ray astronomy), such as cooled germanium detectors, silicon strip detectors, and CdTe detectors are planned for these new missions. Additional promising new technologies such as CdZnTe strip detectors, scintillator fibers, and a gamma-ray lens for future gamma-ray astronomy missions are under development in laboratories around the world.

  19. Space instrumentation for gamma-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teegarden, B.J.

    1999-01-01

    The decade of the 1990s has witnessed a renaissance in the field of gamma-ray astronomy. The seminal event was the launch of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) in April 1991. There have been a flood of major discoveries from CGRO including breakthroughs in gamma-ray bursts, annihilation radiation, and blazars. The Italian SAX satellite was launched in April 1996. Although not primarily a gamma-ray mission, it has added a new dimension to our understanding of gamma-ray bursts. Along with these new discoveries a firm groundwork has been laid for missions and new technology development that should maintain a healthy and vigorous field throughout most of the next decade. These include the ESA INTEGRAL mission (INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory, to be launched in mid-2001) and the NASA GLAST mission (Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope) with a likely launch in the middle of the next decade. These two missions will extend the observational capabilities well beyond those of CGRO. New technologies (to gamma-ray astronomy), such as cooled germanium detectors, silicon strip detectors, and CdTe detectors are planned for these new missions. Additional promising new technologies such as CdZnTe strip detectors, scintillator fibers, and a gamma-ray lens for future gamma-ray astronomy missions are under development in laboratories around the world

  20. AG, TL, and IRSL dosimetric properties in X-ray irradiated HPHT diamond crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil-Tolano, M.I. [Programa de Posgrado, Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, A. P. 5-088, Hermosillo, Sonora, 83190, Mexico (Mexico); Melendrez, R.; Lancheros-Olmos, J.C.; Soto-Puebla, D.; Chernov, V.; Pedroza-Montero, M.; Barboza-Flores, M. [Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, A. P. 5-088, Hermosillo, Sonora, 83190, Mexico (Mexico); Castaneda, B. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, Blvd. Luis Encinas y Rosales S/N, Hermosillo, Sonora, 83000, Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    HPHT diamonds have been studied for several years for their potential in different applications. In previous studies it has been found that the thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves of ''as-grown'' HPHT diamonds are non-reproducible. In this work, we study the afterglow (AG), thermoluminescent (TL), and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) response of commercial samples of synthetic HPHT type-Ib diamond crystals exposed to X-ray irradiation (0.75 mA, 35 kV) at a dose rate of 0.624 Gy/s, after a high gamma ({sup 60}Co) dose irradiation of 500 kGy followed by a thermal treatment at 1073 K for 1 h in nitrogen atmosphere. Deconvolution of the TL glow curves shows four peaks, located around 379, 509, 561, and 609 K. The crystals exhibit evident AG recorded for 300 s immediately after X-ray irradiation, due to the thermal emptying of the traps responsible for the low-temperature TL peaks (below 400 K). The stimulation of irradiated crystals with 870-nm light, creates pronounced OSL and destroys all TL peaks with the exception of the high-temperature peak at 609 K. The dose responses of the integrated AG, TL, and OSL are linear in the range of 0.6-5 Gy and saturated at higher doses. The reproducibility of AG, TL, and OSL measurements is about 5%. The fading in the first hour of storage in dark conditions at RT of TL signal of HPHT diamond is mainly associated to the emptying of the traps responsible for the 379-K TL peaks. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. BROADBAND X-RAY PROPERTIES OF THE GAMMA-RAY BINARY 1FGL J1018.6–5856

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Hongjun; Bellm, Eric; Fuerst, Felix; Harrison, Fiona A.; Bhalerao, Varun; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Tomsick, John A.; Christensen, Finn E.; Hailey, Charles J.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.

    2015-01-01

    We report on NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Swift observations of the gamma-ray binary 1FGL J1018.6–5856. We measure the orbital period to be 16.544 ± 0.008 days using Swift data spanning 1900 days. The orbital period is different from the 2011 gamma-ray measurement which was used in the previous X-ray study of An et al. using ∼400 days of Swift data, but is consistent with a new gamma-ray solution reported in 2014. The light curve folded on the new period is qualitatively similar to that reported previously, having a spike at phase 0 and broad sinusoidal modulation. The X-ray flux enhancement at phase 0 occurs more regularly in time than was previously suggested. A spiky structure at this phase seems to be a persistent feature, although there is some variability. Furthermore, we find that the source flux clearly correlates with the spectral hardness throughout all orbital phases, and that the broadband X-ray spectra measured with NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Swift are well fit with an unbroken power-law model. This spectrum suggests that the system may not be accretion-powered

  2. Gamma-ray detectors for breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mark B.; Goode, Allen R.; Majewski, Stan; Steinbach, Daniela; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Wojcik, Randolph F.; Farzanpay, Farzin

    1997-07-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer of American women and is the leading cause of cancer-related death among women aged 15 - 54; however recent years have shown that early detection using x-ray mammography can lead to a high probability of cure. However, because of mammography's low positive predictive value, surgical or core biopsy is typically required for diagnosis. In addition, the low radiographic contrast of many nonpalpable breast masses, particularly among women with radiographically dense breasts, results in an overall rate of 10% to 25% for missed tumors. Nuclear imaging of the breast using single gamma emitters (scintimammography) such as (superscript 99m)Tc, or positron emitters such as F-18- fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) for positron emission tomography (PET), can provide information on functional or metabolic tumor activity that is complementary to the structural information of x-ray mammography, thereby potentially reducing the number of unnecessary biopsies and missed cancers. This paper summarizes recent data on the efficacy of scintimammography using conventional gamma cameras, and describes the development of dedicated detectors for gamma emission breast imaging. The detectors use new, high density crystal scintillators and large area position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs). Detector design, imaging requirements, and preliminary measured imaging performance are discussed.

  3. Smooth Optical Self-similar Emission of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipunov, Vladimir; Simakov, Sergey; Gorbovskoy, Evgeny; Vlasenko, Daniil, E-mail: lipunov2007@gmail.com [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Universitetsky prospect, 13, 119992, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-08-10

    We offer a new type of calibration for gamma-ray bursts (GRB), in which some class of GRB can be marked and share a common behavior. We name this behavior Smooth Optical Self-similar Emission (SOS-similar Emission) and identify this subclasses of GRBs with optical light curves described by a universal scaling function.

  4. Smoothing technology of gamma-ray spectrometry data based on matched filtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Min; Ge Liangquan

    2009-01-01

    Traditional method of smoothness of gamma-ray spectrometry data gives rise to aberration of spectra curves easily. The article improve convolution sliding transformation using idea of matched filtering. Gauss adding the exponential function instead of Gauss function is used as converting function. The improved method not only suppresses statistical fluctuation mostly but also keeps feature of spectra curves. Instance verified superiority of this new method. (authors)

  5. Formation and evaluation of convex-curved crystals of lithium fluoride for use in analyzing x-ray spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellick, B.O.

    1976-01-01

    Lithium fluoride as received from the vendor in boule form is 38 x 38 x 13 mm thick. This block is cleaved to wafers of the desired thickness, x-ray-evaluated for ''d'' spacing and greatest intensity, bent to the required radius, and then acid-etched to remove foreign material. The diffraction and dispersion characteristics of a wafer are analyzed using well-collimated tungsten x rays that strike the crystal and are diffracted onto no-screen x-ray film. If the crystal is satisfactory, it is mounted in a spectrogoniometer and rotated through an x-ray beam while a detector is set at the optimized angle for the diffracted x rays. The average intensity across the length of the crystal is recorded by multichannel scaling. Any imperfections appear as peaks or dips compared to the average intensity. The crystal next goes to a 10-channel, filter-fluorescer x-ray unit that compares zero-order intensity to diffracted Kα and Kβ intensity. Counts for 100-s intervals are taken in groups of three and averaged. Correction factors for instrument geometry, air, pinhole diameter at zero order, Kα-Kβ, barometric pressure, temperature, etc., are added to the efficiency calculations to obtain the crystal efficiency (epsilon) vs keV data. The crystal is mounted in the spectrograph or spectrometer and calibrated to either the detector or film plane by using direct radiation with proper x-ray filters or absorbers. The crystal is then ready for use

  6. X-ray and gamma-ray response of a 2 '' x 2 '' LaBr3 : Ce scintillation detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quarati, F.; Bos, A. J. J.; Brandenburg, S.; Dathy, C.; Dorenbos, P.; Kraft, S.; Ostendorf, R. W.; Ouspenski, V.; Owens, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Advances in material growth techniques have recently made large volume LaBr3:Ce crystals commercially available. These scintillators are currently being assessed by ESA for use as remote sensing gamma-ray spectrometers on future planetary missions. In addition to their superior scintillation

  7. Apparatus for gamma ray radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Masatoshi; Enomoto, Shigemasa; Oga, Hiroshi

    1979-01-01

    This is the standard of Japan Non-Destructive Inspection Society, NDIS 1101-79, which stipulates on the design, construction and testing method of the apparatuses for gamma ray radiography used for taking industrial radiograms. The gamma ray apparatuses stipulated in this standard are those containing sealed radioactive isotopes exceeding 100 μCi, which emit gamma ray. The gamma ray apparatuses are classified into three groups according to their movability. The general design conditions, the irradiation dose rate and the sealed radiation sources for the gamma ray apparatuses are stipulated. The construction of the gamma ray apparatuses must be in accordance with the notification No. 52 of the Ministry of Labor, and safety devices and collimators must be equipped. The main bodies of the gamma ray apparatuses must pass the vibration test, penetration test, impact test and shielding efficiency test. The method of each test is described. The attached equipments must be also tested. The tests according to this standard are carried out by the makers of the apparatuses. The test records must be made when the apparatuses have passed the tests, and the test certificates are attached. The limit of guarantee by the endurance test must be clearly shown. The items to be shown on the apparatuses are stipulated. (Kako, I.)

  8. Gamma ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broomhead, Laurent.

    1980-01-01

    The nuclear gamma astronomy is presented, in particular the Gamma Ray Observatory, an enormous eight tonnes machine fitted with gamma telescopes, scheduled for launching around 1985. It is thereby hoped to study the natural nuclear reactions which occur when stars explode [fr

  9. Synchrotron measurement of the 3D shape of X-ray reflections from the {gamma}/{gamma}{sup '}-microstructure of nickel-base superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epishin, Alexander; Link, Thomas; Ulbricht, Alexander; Bansal, Mamta [Technical Univ. of Berlin (Germany). Inst. of Material Science and Technology; Zizak, Ivo [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin for Materials and Energy BESSY II, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    The 3D shape of X-ray reflections from the {gamma}/{gamma}{sup '}-microstructure of a nickel-base superalloy was investigated using synchrotron X-ray radiation and a position sensitive area detector. The measurements were performed on the 4{sup th} generation single-crystal nickel-base superalloy TMS138. The results show that X-ray reflections from non-cubic crystallographic planes have a complex 3D shape which changes during rafting. The 3D intensity distributions contain information about the spacing of the planes and their orientation as well. Whereas h00 reflections show the usual splitting into a {gamma}{sup '} and one {gamma}-subreflection, the hh0 and hhh reflections show two and three {gamma}-peaks respectively, resulting from the different types of {l_brace}100{r_brace} matrix channels. Therefore, these 3D diffraction measurements supply additional information about the spatial distribution of microstrains. (orig.)

  10. Cosmic gamma-ray burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagami, Takamasa

    1985-01-01

    Ballon experiments for searching gamma-ray burst were carried out by employing rotating-cross modulation collimators. From a very long observation of total 315 hours during 1975 to 1979, three gamma-ray intensity anomalies were observed which were speculated as a gamma-ray burst. As for the first gamma-ray intensity anomaly observed in 1975, the burst source could be located precisely but the source, heavenly body, could not be specified. Gamma-ray burst source estimation was made by analyzing distribution of burst source in the celestial sphere, burst size distribution, and burst peak. Using the above-mentioned data together with previously published ones, apparent inconsistency was found between the observed results and the adopted theory that the source was in the Galaxy, and this inconsistency was found due to the different time profiles of the burst observed with instruments of different efficiency. It was concluded by these analysis results that employment of logN - logP (relation between burst frequency and burst count) was better than that of logN - logS (burst size) in the examination of gamma-ray burst because the former was less uncertain than the latter. Analyzing the author's observed gamma-ray burst data and the related published data, it was clarified that the burst distribution was almost P -312 for the burst peak value larger than 10 -6 erg/cm 2 .sec. The author could indicate that the calculated celestial distribution of burst source was consistent with the observed results by the derivation using the logN - logP relationship and that the burst larger than 10 -6 erg/cm 2 .sec happens about one thousand times a year, about ten times of the previous value. (Takagi, S.)

  11. CURVE LSFIT, Gamma Spectrometer Calibration by Interactive Fitting Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: CURVE and LSFIT are interactive programs designed to obtain the best data fit to an arbitrary curve. CURVE finds the type of fitting routine which produces the best curve. The types of fitting routines available are linear regression, exponential, logarithmic, power, least squares polynomial, and spline. LSFIT produces a reliable calibration curve for gamma ray spectrometry by using the uncertainty value associated with each data point. LSFIT is intended for use where an entire efficiency curve is to be made starting at 30 KeV and continuing to 1836 KeV. It creates calibration curves using up to three least squares polynomial fits to produce the best curve for photon energies above 120 KeV and a spline function to combine these fitted points with a best fit for points below 120 KeV. 2 - Method of solution: The quality of fit is tested by comparing the measured y-value to the y-value calculated from the fitted curve. The fractional difference between these two values is printed for the evaluation of the quality of the fit. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem - Maxima of: 2000 data points calibration curve output (LSFIT) 30 input data points 3 least squares polynomial fits (LSFIT) The least squares polynomial fit requires that the number of data points used exceed the degree of fit by at least two

  12. Gamma-Ray Astronomy Technology Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades gamma-ray observations have become a valuable tool for studying the universe. Progress made in diverse 8re1lS such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), nucleosynthesis, and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) has complimented and enriched our astrophysical understanding in many ways. We present an overview of current and future planned space y-ray missions and discussion technology needs for- the next generation of space gamma-ray instruments.

  13. GRAP, Gamma-Ray Level-Scheme Assignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklyn, C.B.

    2002-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: An interactive program for allocating gamma-rays to an energy level scheme. Procedure allows for searching for new candidate levels of the form: 1) L1 + G(A) + G(B) = L2; 2) G(A) + G(B) = G(C); 3) G(A) + G(B) = C (C is a user defined number); 4) L1 + G(A) + G(B) + G(C) = L2. Procedure indicates intensity balance of feed and decay of each energy level. Provides for optimization of a level energy (and associated error). Overall procedure allows for pre-defining of certain gamma-rays as belonging to particular regions of the level scheme, for example, high energy transition levels, or due to beta- decay. 2 - Method of solution: Search for cases in which the energy difference between two energy levels is equal to a gamma-ray energy within user-defined limits. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Maximum number of gamma-rays: 999; Maximum gamma ray energy: 32000 units; Minimum gamma ray energy: 10 units; Maximum gamma-ray intensity: 32000 units; Minimum gamma-ray intensity: 0.001 units; Maximum number of levels: 255; Maximum level energy: 32000 units; Minimum level energy: 10 units; Maximum error on energy, intensity: 32 units; Minimum error on energy, intensity: 0.001 units; Maximum number of combinations: 6400 (ca); Maximum number of gamma-ray types : 127

  14. Observation of solar gamma-ray by Hinotori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimori, Masato; Okudaira, Kiyoaki; Hirashima, Yo; Kondo, Ichiro.

    1982-01-01

    The solar gamma-ray emitted by solar flare was observed. The gamma-ray is the electromagnetic radiation with the energy more than 300 keV. The line gamma-ray intensity and the time profile were observed. The gamma-ray detector CsI (Tl) was loaded on Hinotori, and the observed gamma-ray was analyzed by a multi-channel analyzer. The observed line gamma-ray was the radiation from Fe-56 and Ne-20. The line gamma-ray from C-12 and O-16 was also seen. These gamma-ray is the direct evidence of the nuclear reaction on the sun. The observed spectrum suggested the existence of the lines from Mg-24 and Si-28. The intensity of the 2.22 MeV gamma-line was small. This fact showed that the origin of this line was different from other nuclear gamma-ray. Two kinds of hard X-ray bursts were detected. The one was impulsive burst, and the other was gradual burst. There was no time difference between the hard X-ray and the gamma-ray of the impulsive burst. The impulsive burst may be explained by the beam model. The delay of time profile in the high energy gamma-ray of the gradual burst was observed. This means that the time when accelerated electrons cause bremsstrahlung depends on the electron energy. The long trapping of electrons at the top of magnetic loop is suggested. (Kato, T.)

  15. Relativistic motion in gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krolik, J.H.; Pier, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    Three fundamental problems affect models of gamma-ray bursts, i.e., the energy source, the ability of high-energy photons to escape the radiation region, and the comparative weakness of X-ray emission. It is indicated that relativistic bulk motion of the gamma-ray-emitting plasma generically provides a solution to all three of these problems. Results show that, if the plasma that produces gamma-ray bursts has a bulk relativistic velocity with Lorentz factor gamma of about 10, several of the most troubling problems having to do with gamma-ray bursts are solved. 42 refs

  16. Methods for fitting of efficiency curves obtained by means of HPGe gamma rays spectrometers; Metodos de ajuste de curvas de eficiencia obtidas por meio de espectrometros de HPGe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Vanderlei

    2002-07-01

    The present work describes a few methodologies developed for fitting efficiency curves obtained by means of a HPGe gamma-ray spectrometer. The interpolated values were determined by simple polynomial fitting and polynomial fitting between the ratio of experimental peak efficiency and total efficiency, calculated by Monte Carlo technique, as a function of gamma-ray energy. Moreover, non-linear fitting has been performed using a segmented polynomial function and applying the Gauss-Marquardt method. For the peak area obtainment different methodologies were developed in order to estimate the background area under the peak. This information was obtained by numerical integration or by using analytical functions associated to the background. One non-calibrated radioactive source has been included in the curve efficiency in order to provide additional calibration points. As a by-product, it was possible to determine the activity of this non-calibrated source. For all fittings developed in the present work the covariance matrix methodology was used, which is an essential procedure in order to give a complete description of the partial uncertainties involved. (author)

  17. Highlights of GeV Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Because high-energy gamma rays are primarily produced by high-energy particle interactions, the gamma-ray survey of the sky by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope offers a view of sites of cosmic ray production and interactions. Gamma-ray bursts, pulsars, pulsar wind nebulae, binary sources, and Active Galactic Nuclei are all phenomena that reveal particle acceleration through their gamma-ray emission. Diffuse Galactic gamma radiation, Solar System gamma-ray sources, and energetic radiation from supernova remnants are likely tracers of high-energy particle interactions with matter and photon fields. This paper will present a broad overview of the constantly changing sky seen with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi spacecraft.

  18. Localization of Gamma-Ray Bursts Using the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M.S.; Goldstein, A.; Meegan, C.A.; Paciesas, W.S.; Preece, R.D.; Wilson-Hodge, C.A.; Gibby, M.H.; Greiner, J.; Gruber, D.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R.M.; Pelassa, V.; Xiong, S.; Yu, H-F.; Bhat, P.N.; Burgess, J.M.; Byrne, D.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Giles, M.M.; Guiriec, S.; van der Horst, A.J.; von Kienlin, A.; McBreen, S.; McGlynn, S.; Tierney, D.; Zhang, B..B.

    2015-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the

  19. Gamma-Ray Lenses for Astrophysics-and the Gamma-Ray Imager Mission GRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wunderer, C. B.; Ballmoos, P. V.; Barriere, N.

    2009-01-01

    Observations of the gamma-ray sky reveal the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe. While at lower wavebands the observed emission is generally dominated by thermal processes, the gamma-ray sky provides us with a view on the non-thermal Universe. Here particles are acc...

  20. 'Jet breaks' and 'missing breaks' in the X-Ray afterglow of Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Shlomo; De Rújula, Alvaro

    2008-01-01

    The X-ray afterglows (AGs) of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and X-Ray Flashes (XRFs) have, after the fast decline phase of their prompt emission, a temporal behaviour varying between two extremes. A large fraction of these AGs has a 'canonical' light curve which, after an initial shallow-decay 'plateau' phase, 'breaks smoothly' into a fast power-law decline. Very energetic GRBs, contrariwise, appear not to have a 'break', their AG declines like a power-law from the start of the observations. Breaks and 'missing breaks' are intimately related to the geometry and deceleration of the jets responsible for GRBs. In the frame of the 'cannonball' (CB) model of GRBs and XRFs, we analyze the cited extreme behaviours (canonical and pure power-law) and intermediate cases spanning the observed range of X-ray AG shapes. We show that the entire panoply of X-ray light-curve shapes --measured with Swift and other satellites-- are as anticipated, on very limpid grounds, by the CB model. We test the expected correlations between the...

  1. Dual-Energy Semiconductor Detector of X-rays and Gamma Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brodyn, M.S.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the major types of ionizing radiation detectors, their advantages and disadvantages are presented. Application of ZnSe-based semiconductor detector in high temperature environment is substantiated. Different forms of ZnSe-based detector samples and double-crystal scheme for registration of X- and gamma rays in a broad energy range were used . Based on the manufactured simulator device, the study sustains the feasibility of the gamma quanta recording by a high-resistance ZnSe-based detector operating in a perpulse mode.

  2. Gamma ray astronomy with COS-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanenburg, B.N.

    1981-01-01

    Observational results in the field of gamma-ray astronomy that have been obtained to date with the COS-B satellite are discussed and questions raised by these observations are summarized. Following a brief review of the instrumental characteristics of COS-B and the extent of COS-B gamma-ray coverage of the sky, particular attention is given to the questions raised by the discovery of many unidentified gamma-ray sources with no apparent optical, X-ray or radio counterparts and the detection of high-energy gamma radiation from the quasar 3C 273, which suggests the role of gamma-ray emission in the creation of other radiation

  3. Inverse Compton gamma-rays from pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morini, M.

    1983-01-01

    A model is proposed for pulsar optical and gamma-ray emission where relativistic electrons beams: (i) scatter the blackbody photons from the polar cap surface giving inverse Compton gamma-rays and (ii) produce synchrotron optical photons in the light cylinder region which are then inverse Compton scattered giving other gamma-rays. The model is applied to the Vela pulsar, explaining the first gamma-ray pulse by inverse Compton scattering of synchrotron photons near the light cylinder and the second gamma-ray pulse partly by inverse Compton scattering of synchrotron photons and partly by inverse Compton scattering of the thermal blackbody photons near the star surface. (author)

  4. Planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy: the effects of hydrogen absorption cross-section of the gamma-ray spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapides, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    The gamma-ray spectroscopy of planet surfaces is one of several possible methods that are useful in determining the elemental composition of planet surfaces from orbiting spacecraft. This has been demonstrated on the Apollos 15 and 16 missions as well as the Soviet Mars-5 mission. Planetary gamma-ray emission is primarily the result of natural radioactive decay and cosmic-ray and solar-flare-induced nuclear reactions. Secondary neutron reactions play a large role in the more intense gamma-ray emission. The technique provides information on the elemental composition of the top few tens of centimeters of the planet surface. Varying concentrations of hydrogen and compositional variations that alter the macroscopic thermal-neutron absorption cross section have a significant effect on the neutron flux in the planet surface and therefore also on the gamma-ray emission from the surface. These effects have been systematically studied for a wide range of possible planetary compositions that include Mercury, the moon, Mars, the comets, and the asteroids. The problem of the Martian atmosphere was also investigated. The results of these calculations, in which both surface neutron fluxes and gamma-ray emission fluxes were determined, were used to develop general procedures for obtaining planet compositions from the gamma-ray spectrum. Several changes have been suggested for reanalyzing the Apollos 15 and 16 gamma-ray results. In addition, procedures have been suggested that can be applied to neutron-gamma techniques in mineral and oil exploration

  5. Gamma-ray induced doppler broadening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    The ultra high resolving power of the GAMS4 double-flat crystal spectrometer (M.S. Dewey et al Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 284 (1989) 151.) has been used to observe the Doppler broadening of gamma-rays emitted by nuclei recoiling at speeds as low as 10 -6 c. Such recoils may be induced by the previous emission of gamma-radiation following thermal neutron capture. If the population mechanism of an excited state is known (or can be approximated) and the slowing down mechanism can be modeled, then this technique can be used to extract the lifetime of excited nuclear states. The combination of this technique and the neutron capture reaction allows the study of states which cannot necessarily be accessed by other means. This has allowed the resolution of a number of long standing questions in low-spin nuclear structure. The basis of the technique is discussed and a number of examples given

  6. Influence of gamma radiation and impurity atoms on the photoconductivity of GeS single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madatov, R.S.; Alekperov, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    Wide opportunities for using of layered semiconductors, particularly in optoelectronics have generated considerable interest to them. Recently it was created the unique device from GeS for the storage of solar energy. The investigated GeS 1 -xNd x S single crystals were grown by the Bridgman method. The samples were irradiated by gamma-quanta and was conducted to install 60Co at room temperature. Irradiation of p-GeS 1 -xNd x S single crystals by small doses of gamma rays increases the photoconductivity on 40%

  7. Gamma Ray Bursts-Afterglows and Counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Gerald J

    1998-01-01

    Several breakthrough discoveries were made last year of x-ray, optical and radio afterglows and counterparts to gamma-ray bursts, and a redshift has been associated with at least one of these. These discoveries were made possible by the fast, accurate gamma-ray burst locations of the BeppoSAX satellite. It is now generally believed that the burst sources are at cosmological distances and that they represent the most powerful explosions in the Universe. These observations also open new possibilities for the study of early star formation, the physics of extreme conditions and perhaps even cosmology. This session will concentrate on recent x-ray, optical and radio afterglow observations of gamma-ray bursts, associated redshift measurements, and counterpart observations. Several review and theory talks will also be presented, along with a summary of the astrophysical implications of the observations. There will be additional poster contributions on observations of gamma-ray burst source locations at wavelengths other than gamma rays. Posters are also solicited that describe new observational capabilities for rapid follow-up observations of gamma-ray bursts.

  8. About cosmic gamma ray lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Roland

    2017-06-01

    Gamma ray lines from cosmic sources convey the action of nuclear reactions in cosmic sites and their impacts on astrophysical objects. Gamma rays at characteristic energies result from nuclear transitions following radioactive decays or high-energy collisions with excitation of nuclei. The gamma-ray line from the annihilation of positrons at 511 keV falls into the same energy window, although of different origin. We present here the concepts of cosmic gamma ray spectrometry and the corresponding instruments and missions, followed by a discussion of recent results and the challenges and open issues for the future. Among the lessons learned are the diffuse radioactive afterglow of massive-star nucleosynthesis in 26Al and 60Fe gamma rays, which is now being exploited towards the cycle of matter driven by massive stars and their supernovae; large interstellar cavities and superbubbles have been recognised to be of key importance here. Also, constraints on the complex processes making stars explode as either thermonuclear or core-collapse supernovae are being illuminated by gamma-ray lines, in this case from shortlived radioactivities from 56Ni and 44Ti decays. In particular, the three-dimensionality and asphericities that have recently been recognised as important are enlightened in different ways through such gamma-ray line spectroscopy. Finally, the distribution of positron annihilation gamma ray emission with its puzzling bulge-dominated intensity disctribution is measured through spatially-resolved spectra, which indicate that annihilation conditions may differ in different parts of our Galaxy. But it is now understood that a variety of sources may feed positrons into the interstellar medium, and their characteristics largely get lost during slowing down and propagation of positrons before annihilation; a recent microquasar flare was caught as an opportunity to see positrons annihilate at a source.

  9. X-ray dosimetry of TlGaSe2 single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerimova, E.M.; Mustafaeva, S.N.; Mamedbeili, S.D.; Jabarov, J.N.; Iskenderova, P.M.; Kazimov, S.B.

    2002-01-01

    TlGaSe 2 compound belongs to group of layered semiconductors of A 3 B 3 C 2 6 -type. Photoelectric and optical properties of TlGaSe 2 single crystals were investigated in detail. Influence of gamma-, electron and neutron radiation on photoelectric properties of TlGaSe 2 single crystals is investigated too. The present work deals with experimental results relative to X-ray dosimetric characteristics of TlGaSe 2 crystals at 300 K. X-ray conductivity and X-ray dosimetric characteristic measurements are carried out in low load resistance regime. The source of X-ray radiation is the installation of X-ray diffraction analysis (URS-55a) with the BCV-2(Cu). Intensity of X-ray radiation (E) is regulated by measurement with current variation in tube at each given value of X-ray radiation dose E (R/min) are measured by crystal dosimeter DRGZ-02. X-ray conductivity coefficients K σ characterising X-ray sensitivity of investigated crystals are determined as the relative change of conductivity under X-ray radiation a per dose. There have been determined values of characteristic coefficients of TlGaSe 2 single crystal X-ray conductivity at different values of accelerating voltage (V a ) on the tube and corresponding doses of X-ray radiation. Analysis of obtained data showed that X-ray conductivity coefficients K σ in studied crystals are regularly decreased (from 0.276 to 0.033) as with the rise of dose (E=0.75-78.0 R/min) as with the increase of values of V a on X-ray tube (V a =254-50 keV). One of the possible reasons of observed regularities is that X-ray conductivity in investigated crystals, especially at comparatively low V a is due predominantly to radiation of thin layer of crystal. In this case with the rise of radiation intensity there have been started to prevail the mechanism of surface quadratic recombination which leads to observed decrease of X-ray conductivity. With the rise of accelerating potential 'effective hardness' is increased, as a result of which there

  10. Simultaneous and separate, low background counting of beta rays and gamma rays using the phoswich principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayhugh, M.R.; Utts, B.K.; Shoffner, B.M.

    1978-01-01

    A phoswich constructed using thin calcium fluoride optically coupled to a thicker sodium iodide crystal and operated with pulse shape analysis equipment can be used as an efficient low background counting assembly. Low background in the beta ray counting channel is achieved by judicious choice of pure materials in the assembly and by operating the analysis equipment so as to reject background events which occur simultaneously in the sodium iodide crystal. Careful survey of construction materials and methods has resulted in reducing beta ray counting background to 0.6 c/min for a 2-inch diameter assembly. The radioactivity of typical building materials will be discussed. A pulse shape analyzer has been constructed which provides separately adjusted time windows and separate output information for the beta ray and gamma ray channels. The dual channel capability combined with the low beta ray background reduces the sample counting time significantly for typical laboratory samples. (author)

  11. Lunar occultations for gamma-ray source measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, David G.; Hughes, E. B.; Nolan, Patrick L.

    1990-01-01

    The unambiguous association of discrete gamma-ray sources with objects radiating at other wavelengths, the separation of discrete sources from the extended emission within the Galaxy, the mapping of gamma-ray emission from nearby galaxies and the measurement of structure within a discrete source cannot presently be accomplished at gamma-ray energies. In the past, the detection processes used in high-energy gamma-ray astronomy have not allowed for good angular resolution. This problem can be overcome by placing gamma-ray detectors on the moon and using the horizon as an occulting edge to achieve arcsec resolution. For purposes of discussion, this concept is examined for gamma rays above 100 MeV for which pair production dominates the detection process and locally-generated nuclear gamma rays do not contribute to the background.

  12. SEARCH FOR GAMMA-RAYS FROM THE UNUSUALLY BRIGHT GRB 130427A WITH THE HAWC GAMMA-RAY OBSERVATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeysekara, A. U. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Alfaro, R. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México D. F. (Mexico); Alvarez, C.; Arceo, R. [CEFyMAP, Universidad Autónoma de Chiapas, Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas (Mexico); Álvarez, J. D.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Cotti, U.; De León, C. [Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Solares, H. A. Ayala [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI (United States); Barber, A. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Baughman, B. M.; Braun, J. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Bautista-Elivar, N. [Universidad Politécnica de Pachuca, Municipio de Zempoala, Hidalgo (Mexico); BenZvi, S. Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Rosales, M. Bonilla; Carramiñana, A. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico); Caballero-Mora, K. S. [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México D. F. (Mexico); Castillo, M.; Cotzomi, J. [Facultad de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Ciudad Universitaria, Puebla (Mexico); De la Fuente, E., E-mail: dirk.lennarz@gatech.edu [Departamento de Física, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Exactas e Ingenierías, Universidad de Guadalajara, Guadalajara (Mexico); Collaboration: HAWC collaboration; and others

    2015-02-20

    The first limits on the prompt emission from the long gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A in the >100 GeV energy band are reported. GRB 130427A was the most powerful burst ever detected with a redshift z ≲ 0.5 and featured the longest lasting emission above 100 MeV. The energy spectrum extends at least up to 95 GeV, clearly in the range observable by the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory, a new extensive air shower detector currently under construction in central Mexico. The burst occurred under unfavorable observation conditions, low in the sky and when HAWC was running 10% of the final detector. Based on the observed light curve at MeV-GeV energies, eight different time periods have been searched for prompt and delayed emission from this GRB. In all cases, no statistically significant excess of counts has been found and upper limits have been placed. It is shown that a similar GRB close to zenith would be easily detected by the full HAWC detector, which will be completed soon. The detection rate of the full HAWC detector may be as high as one to two GRBs per year. A detection could provide important information regarding the high energy processes at work and the observation of a possible cut-off beyond the Fermi Large Area Telescope energy range could be the signature of gamma-ray absorption, either in the GRB or along the line of sight due to the extragalactic background light.

  13. Future prospects for. gamma. -ray astronomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fichtel, C [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (USA). Goddard Space Flight Center

    1981-06-30

    As ..gamma..-ray astronomy moves from the discovery to the exploratory phase, the promise of ..gamma..-ray astrophysics noted by theorists in the late 1940s and 1950s is beginning to be realized. In the future, satellites should carry instruments that will have over an order of magnitude greater sensitivity than those flown thus far, and, for at least some portions of the ..gamma..-ray energy range, these detectors will also have substantially improved energy and angular resolution. The information to be obtained from these experiments should greatly enhance our knowledge of several astrophysical phenomena including the very energetic and nuclear processes associated with compact objects, astrophysical nucleosynthesis, solar particle acceleration, the chemical composition of the planets and other bodies of the Solar System, the structure of our Galaxy, the origin and dynamic pressure effects of the cosmic rays, high energy particles and energetic processes in other galaxies especially active ones, and the degree of matter-antimatter symmetry of the Universe. The ..gamma..-ray results of the forthcoming programs such as Gamma-I, the Gamma Ray Observatory, the ..gamma..-ray burst network, Solar Polar, and very high energy ..gamma..-ray telescopes on the ground will almost certainly provide justification for more sophisticated telescopes. These advanced instruments might be placed on the Space Platform currently under study by N.A.S.A.

  14. A comparative study of LaBr3(Ce(3+)) and CeBr3 based gamma-ray spectrometers for planetary remote sensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrev, A; Mitrofanov, I; Owens, A; Quarati, F; Benkhoff, J; Bakhtin, B; Fedosov, F; Golovin, D; Litvak, M; Malakhov, A; Mokrousov, M; Nuzhdin, I; Sanin, A; Tretyakov, V; Vostrukhin, A; Timoshenko, G; Shvetsov, V; Granja, C; Slavicek, T; Pospisil, S

    2016-08-01

    The recent availability of large volume cerium bromide crystals raises the possibility of substantially improving gamma-ray spectrometer limiting flux sensitivities over current systems based on the lanthanum tri-halides, e.g., lanthanum bromide and lanthanum chloride, especially for remote sensing, low-level counting applications or any type of measurement characterized by poor signal to noise ratios. The Russian Space Research Institute has developed and manufactured a highly sensitive gamma-ray spectrometer for remote sensing observations of the planet Mercury from the Mercury Polar Orbiter (MPO), which forms part of ESA's BepiColombo mission. The Flight Model (FM) gamma-ray spectrometer is based on a 3-in. single crystal of LaBr3(Ce(3+)) produced in a separate crystal development programme specifically for this mission. During the spectrometers development, manufacturing, and qualification phases, large crystals of CeBr3 became available in a subsequent phase of the same crystal development programme. Consequently, the Flight Spare Model (FSM) gamma-ray spectrometer was retrofitted with a 3-in. CeBr3 crystal and qualified for space. Except for the crystals, the two systems are essentially identical. In this paper, we report on a comparative assessment of the two systems, in terms of their respective spectral properties, as well as their suitability for use in planetary mission with respect to radiation tolerance and their propensity for activation. We also contrast their performance with a Ge detector representative of that flown on MESSENGER and show that: (a) both LaBr3(Ce(3+)) and CeBr3 provide superior detection systems over HPGe in the context of minimally resourced spacecraft and (b) CeBr3 is a more attractive system than LaBr3(Ce(3+)) in terms of sensitivities at lower gamma fluxes. Based on the tests, the FM has now been replaced by the FSM on the BepiColombo spacecraft. Thus, CeBr3 now forms the central gamma-ray detection element on the MPO spacecraft.

  15. Radio Observations of Gamma-ray Novae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linford, Justin D.; Chomiuk, L.; Ribeiro, V.; project, E.-Nova

    2014-01-01

    Recent detection of gamma-ray emission from classical novae by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope surprised many in the astronomical community. We present results from radio observations, obtained using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), of three gamma-ray novae: Mon2012, Sco2012, and Del2013. Radio observations allow for the calculation of ejecta masses, place limits on the distances, and provide information about the gamma-ray emission mechanism for these sources.

  16. Shielding system for the detection of radioisotopes gamma-rays emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento Filho, V.F. do

    1983-01-01

    A shielding system for detection of radioisotopes gamma-rays emitters in samples of big volumes (plants, animals, soils) is presented. The detection between the beaker Marinelli and the glass tube (inside of the scintillator crystal well) is compared. The beaker Marinelli method allows a drastic reduction in the time detection of the sample. (M.A.C.) [pt

  17. The Gamma-Ray Imager GRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderer, Cornelia B.; GRI Collaboration

    2008-03-01

    Observations of the gamma-ray sky reveal the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe. While at lower wavebands the observed emission is generally dominated by thermal processes, the gamma-ray sky provides us with a view on the non-thermal Universe. Here particles are accelerated to extreme relativistic energies by mechanisms which are still poorly understood, and nuclear reactions are synthesizing the basic constituents of our world. Cosmic accelerators and cosmic explosions are major science themes that are addressed in the gamma-ray regime. ESA's INTEGRAL observatory currently provides the astronomical community with a unique tool to investigate the sky up to MeV energies and hundreds of sources, new classes of objects, extraordinary views of antimatter annihilation in our Galaxy, and fingerprints of recent nucleosynthesis processes have been discovered. NASA's GLAST mission will similarly take the next step in surveying the high-energy ( GeV) sky, and NuSTAR will pioneer focusing observations at hard X-ray energies (to 80 keV). There will be clearly a growing need to perform deeper, more focused investigations of gamma-ray sources in the 100-keV to MeV regime. Recent technological advances in the domain of gamma-ray focusing using Laue diffraction and multilayer-coated mirror techniques have paved the way towards a gamma-ray mission, providing major improvements compared to past missions regarding sensitivity and angular resolution. Such a future Gamma-Ray Imager will allow the study of particle acceleration processes and explosion physics in unprecedented detail, providing essential clues on the innermost nature of the most violent and most energetic processes in the Universe.

  18. Are PSR 0656+14, PSR 0950+08, and PSR 1822-09 gamma ray pulsars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lawrence E.; Hartmann, Dieter H.

    1993-01-01

    The possible discovery of three new gamma-ray pulsars PSR 0656+14, PSR 0950+08, and PSR 1822-09 (Ma, Lu, Yu, and Young, 1993) in data obtained with the COS-B experiment is reinvestigated using a refined technique for pulsar light curve analysis. The results of this study do not confirm the previously claimed gamma-ray pulsar nature of any of these pulsars. Even when using the standard epoch folding technique in conjunction with energy-dependent acceptance cones, we do not detect pulsed gamma-ray emission from these sources. We suspect that insufficient position accuracy is the cause for the discrepancy between our results and those of Ma et al. (1993). We do not rule out that any one of the three candidates, or all of them, is in fact a gamma-ray pulsar, but their spin properties must differ from those derived by Ma et al. (1993). More work is needed to determine the correct high-energy properties of these three sources.

  19. Forming a constant density medium close to long gamma-ray burst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marle, A.J.; Langer, N.; Achterberg, A; Garia-Segura, G.

    2006-01-01

    Aims. The progenitor stars of long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are thought to be Wolf-Rayet stars, which generate a massive and energetic wind. Nevertheless, about 25 percent of all GRB afterglows light curves indicate a constant density medium close to the exploding star. We explore various ways to

  20. DISCOVERY OF AN ULTRACOMPACT GAMMA-RAY MILLISECOND PULSAR BINARY CANDIDATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Albert K. H.; Jin, Ruolan; Yen, T.-C.; Tam, P. H. T.; Lin, L. C. C. [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Hu, C.-P. [Graduate Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Jhongli 32001, Taiwan (China); Hui, C. Y.; Park, S. M. [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Takata, J.; Cheng, K. S. [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Kim, C. L., E-mail: akong@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-20

    We report multi-wavelength observations of the unidentified Fermi object 2FGL J1653.6-0159. With the help of high-resolution X-ray observations, we have identified an X-ray and optical counterpart to 2FGL J1653.6-0159. The source exhibits a periodic modulation of 75 minutes in the optical and possibly also in the X-ray. We suggest that 2FGL J1653.6-0159 is a compact binary system with an orbital period of 75 minutes. Combining the gamma-ray and X-ray properties, 2FGL J1653.6-0159 is potentially a black-widow-/redback-type gamma-ray millisecond pulsar (MSP). The optical and X-ray light curve profiles show that the companion is mildly heated by the high-energy emission and that the X-rays are from intrabinary shock. Although no radio pulsation has yet been detected, we estimated that the spin period of the MSP is ∼ 2 ms based on a theoretical model. If pulsation can be confirmed in the future, 2FGL J1653.6-0159 will become the first ultracompact rotation-powered MSP.

  1. Observation of gamma-ray bursts with GINGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Toshio; Fujii, Masami; Nishimura, Jun

    1989-01-01

    Gamma-ray Burst Detector System (GBD) on board the scientific satellite 'GINGA' which was launched on Feb. 5, 1987, was realized as an international cooperation between ISAS and LANL. It has recorded more than 40 Gamma-Ray Burst candidates during 20 months observation. Although many observational evidences were accumulated in past 20 years after the discovery of gamma-ray burst by LANL scientists, there are not enough evidence to determine the origin and the production mechanism of the gamma-ray burst. GBD consists of a proportional counter and a NaI scintillation counter so that it became possible to observe energy spectrum of the gamma-ray burst with high energy resolution over wide range of energy (1.5-380 keV) together with high time resolution. As the result of observation, the following facts are obtained: (1) A large fraction of observed gamma-ray bursts has a long X-ray tail after the harder part of gamma-ray emission has terminated. (2) Clear spectral absorption features with harmonic in energy was observed in some of the energy spectrum of gamma-ray bursts. These evidences support the hypothesis that the strongly magnetized neutron star is the origin of gamma-ray burst. (author)

  2. Gamma ray astronomy from satellites and balloons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenfelder, V.

    1986-01-01

    A survey is given of gamma ray astronomy topics presented at the Cosmic Ray Conference. The major conclusions at the Cosmic Ray Conference in the field of gamma ray astronomy are given. (1) MeV-emission of gamma-ray bursts is a common feature. Variations in duration and energy spectra from burst to burst may explain the discrepancy between the measured log N - log S dependence and the observed isotropy of bursts. (2) The gamma-ray line at 1.809 MeV from Al(26) is the first detected line from a radioactive nucleosynthesis product. In order to understand its origin it will be necessary to measure its longitude distribution in the Milky Way. (3) The indications of a gamma-ray excess found from the direction of Loop I is consistent with the picture that the bulk of cosmic rays below 100 GeV is produced in galactic supernova remnants. (4) The interpretation of the large scale distribution of gamma rays in the Milky Way is controversial. At present an extragalactic origin of the cosmic ray nuclei in the GeV-range cannot be excluded from the gamma ray data. (5) The detection of MeV-emission from Cen A is a promising step towards the interesting field of extragalactic gamma ray astronomy

  3. Developing a Laue Lens for Nuclear Astrophysics: The Challenge of Focusing Soft Gamma-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriere, Nicolas

    Soft gamma rays provide a unique window on the high-energy Universe, especially for studying nuclear astrophysics through nuclear line emission. However, the sensitivity of state-of-the-art gamma-ray telescopes is severely limited by the intense instrumental background when flown in space. A solution is to decouple the photon collection area from the photon detection area. Focusing source photons from a large collection area onto a small detector volume would dramatically improve the signal-to-noise ratio, and hence provide the long awaited sensitivity leap in this challenging energy band. Laue crystal diffraction can be utilized to focus soft gamma rays when configured in a Laue lens. While this technology has been demonstrated on balloon flights, the type of crystals used and the process of assembling many crystals into a lens have not been optimized yet. We propose to address all the technical aspects of the construction of a scientifically exploitable Laue lens in order to bring this technology to TRL-6. To this end, two small prototypes representative of the diversity of Laue lenses will be built and tested in relevant environments, leveraging the work accomplished under a previous APRA grant. This project will establish the real performances, the cost, and the construction duration of a full-scale lens, allowing us to propose a Laue lens telescope for suborbital or satellite missions.

  4. NEW FERMI-LAT EVENT RECONSTRUCTION REVEALS MORE HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA RAYS FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwood, W. B. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Baldini, L. [Universita di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bregeon, J.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Sgro, C.; Tinivella, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bruel, P. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Chekhtman, A. [Center for Earth Observing and Space Research, College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Cohen-Tanugi, J. [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Universite Montpellier 2, CNRS/IN2P3, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Drlica-Wagner, A.; Omodei, N.; Rochester, L. S.; Usher, T. L. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Granot, J. [Department of Natural Sciences, The Open University of Israel, 1 University Road, P.O. Box 808, Ra' anana 43537 (Israel); Longo, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Razzaque, S. [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Zimmer, S., E-mail: melissa.pesce.rollins@pi.infn.it, E-mail: nicola.omodei@stanford.edu, E-mail: granot@openu.ac.il [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-09-01

    Based on the experience gained during the four and a half years of the mission, the Fermi-LAT Collaboration has undertaken a comprehensive revision of the event-level analysis going under the name of Pass 8. Although it is not yet finalized, we can test the improvements in the new event reconstruction with the special case of the prompt phase of bright gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), where the signal-to-noise ratio is large enough that loose selection cuts are sufficient to identify gamma rays associated with the source. Using the new event reconstruction, we have re-analyzed 10 GRBs previously detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) for which an X-ray/optical follow-up was possible and found four new gamma rays with energies greater than 10 GeV in addition to the seven previously known. Among these four is a 27.4 GeV gamma ray from GRB 080916C, which has a redshift of 4.35, thus making it the gamma ray with the highest intrinsic energy ({approx}147 GeV) detected from a GRB. We present here the salient aspects of the new event reconstruction and discuss the scientific implications of these new high-energy gamma rays, such as constraining extragalactic background light models, Lorentz invariance violation tests, the prompt emission mechanism, and the bulk Lorentz factor of the emitting region.

  5. X-ray and gamma radiography devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Nassir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab. Razak Hamzah; Abd. Aziz Mohamed; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail

    2008-01-01

    When we are using this technique, we also must familiar with the device and instrument that used such as gamma projector, crawler, x-ray tubes and others. So this chapter discussed detailed on device used for radiography work. For the x-ray and gamma, their characteristics are same but the source to produce is a big different. X-ray produced from the machine meanwhile, gamma produce from the source such as Co-60 and IR-192. Both are electromagnetic waves. So, the reader can have some knowledge on what is x-ray tube, discrete x-ray and characteristic x-ray, how the machine works and how to control a machine, what is source for gamma emitter, how to handle the projector and lastly difference between x-ray and gamma. Of course this cannot be with the theory only, so detailed must be learned practically.

  6. A BaF2-BGO detector for high-energy gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bargholtz, C.; Ritzen, B.; Tegner, P.E.

    1989-01-01

    A scintillation detector has been developed for gamma rays with energy between a few hundred keV and approximately 100 MeV. The detector comprises a BaF 2 and a BGO crystal giving it good timing properties and a reasonably good energy resolution in combination with compact size. (orig.)

  7. X-Ray Study of Variable Gamma-Ray Pulsar PSR J2021+4026

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H. H.; Takata, J.; Hu, C.-P.; Lin, L. C. C.; Zhao, J.

    2018-04-01

    PSR J2021+4026 showed a sudden decrease in the gamma-ray emission at the glitch that occurred around 2011 October 16, and a relaxation of the flux to the pre-glitch state at around 2014 December. We report X-ray analysis results of the data observed by XMM-Newton on 2015 December 20 in the post-relaxation state. To examine any change in the X-ray emission, we compare the properties of the pulse profiles and spectra at the low gamma-ray flux state and at the post-relaxation state. The phase-averaged spectra for both states can be well described by a power-law component plus a blackbody component. The former is dominated by unpulsed emission and probably originated from the pulsar wind nebula as reported by Hui et al. The emission property of the blackbody component is consistent with the emission from the polar cap heated by the back-flow bombardment of the high-energy electrons or positrons that were accelerated in the magnetosphere. We found no significant change in the X-ray emission properties between two states. We suggest that the change of the X-ray luminosity is at an order of ∼4%, which is difficult to measure with the current observations. We model the observed X-ray light curve with the heated polar cap emission, and we speculate that the observed large pulsed fraction is owing to asymmetric magnetospheric structure.

  8. TU-FG-BRB-07: GPU-Based Prompt Gamma Ray Imaging From Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S; Suh, T; Yoon, D; Jung, J; Shin, H; Kim, M [The catholic university of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to perform the fast reconstruction of a prompt gamma ray image using a graphics processing unit (GPU) computation from boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) simulations. Methods: To evaluate the accuracy of the reconstructed image, a phantom including four boron uptake regions (BURs) was used in the simulation. After the Monte Carlo simulation of the BNCT, the modified ordered subset expectation maximization reconstruction algorithm using the GPU computation was used to reconstruct the images with fewer projections. The computation times for image reconstruction were compared between the GPU and the central processing unit (CPU). Also, the accuracy of the reconstructed image was evaluated by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results: The image reconstruction time using the GPU was 196 times faster than the conventional reconstruction time using the CPU. For the four BURs, the area under curve values from the ROC curve were 0.6726 (A-region), 0.6890 (B-region), 0.7384 (C-region), and 0.8009 (D-region). Conclusion: The tomographic image using the prompt gamma ray event from the BNCT simulation was acquired using the GPU computation in order to perform a fast reconstruction during treatment. The authors verified the feasibility of the prompt gamma ray reconstruction using the GPU computation for BNCT simulations.

  9. Processing of gamma-ray spectrometric logs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umiastowski, K.; Dumesnil, P.

    1984-10-01

    CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) has developped a gamma-ray spectrometric tool, containing an analog-to-digital converter. This new tool permits to perform very precise uranium logs (natural gamma-ray spectrometry), neutron activation logs and litho-density logs (gamma-gamma spectrometric logs). Specific processing methods were developped to treate the particular problems of down-hole gamma-ray spectrometry. Extraction of the characteristic gamma-ray peak, even if they are superposed on the background radiation of very high intensity, is possible. This processing methode enables also to obtain geological informations contained in the continuous background of the spectrum. Computer programs are written in high level language for SIRIUS (VICTOR) and APOLLO computers. Exemples of uranium and neutron activation logs treatment are presented [fr

  10. A link between prompt optical and prompt gamma-ray emission in gamma-ray bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestrand, W T; Wozniak, P R; Wren, J A; Fenimore, E E; Sakamoto, T; White, R R; Casperson, D; Davis, H; Evans, S; Galassi, M; McGowan, K E; Schier, J A; Asa, J W; Barthelmy, S D; Cummings, J R; Gehrels, N; Hullinger, D; Krimm, H A; Markwardt, C B; McLean, K; Palmer, D; Parsons, A; Tueller, J

    2005-05-12

    The prompt optical emission that arrives with the gamma-rays from a cosmic gamma-ray burst (GRB) is a signature of the engine powering the burst, the properties of the ultra-relativistic ejecta of the explosion, and the ejecta's interactions with the surroundings. Until now, only GRB 990123 had been detected at optical wavelengths during the burst phase. Its prompt optical emission was variable and uncorrelated with the prompt gamma-ray emission, suggesting that the optical emission was generated by a reverse shock arising from the ejecta's collision with surrounding material. Here we report prompt optical emission from GRB 041219a. It is variable and correlated with the prompt gamma-rays, indicating a common origin for the optical light and the gamma-rays. Within the context of the standard fireball model of GRBs, we attribute this new optical component to internal shocks driven into the burst ejecta by variations of the inner engine. The correlated optical emission is a direct probe of the jet isolated from the medium. The timing of the uncorrelated optical emission is strongly dependent on the nature of the medium.

  11. Stellar Sources of Gamma-ray Bursts

    OpenAIRE

    Luchkov, B. I.

    2011-01-01

    Correlation analysis of Swift gamma-ray burst coordinates and nearby star locations (catalog Gliese) reveals 4 coincidences with good angular accuracy. The random probability is 4\\times 10^{-5}, so evidencing that coincident stars are indeed gamma-ray burst sources. Some additional search of stellar gamma-ray bursts is discussed.

  12. 1012 - 1015 eV interaction deduced from energy spectra of gamma-ray and hadrons at airplane altitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    1978-01-01

    The present paper deals with the latest results of the spectral measurements of high energy cosmic ray performed on an airplane with an emulsion chamber. The hadronic component together with the gamma-ray component were observed in the region of gamma energy not smaller than 30 GeV and gamma energy sum not larger than 40 TeV. It was observed that the integral spectra of hadronic showers showed less steep power than those obtained at mountain stations. On the other hand, the integral spectra of gamma-ray in the energy region from 40 GeV to 40 TeV showed steeper power than those of hadronic component. The zenith angle distributions of hadrons and gamma-ray were inspected, and it was confirmed that the observed distributions were well reproduced by the theoretical curves with the appropriate attenuation length. (Yoshimori, M.)

  13. Pulse shape analysis for the gamma-ray tracking detector Agata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olariu, A.

    2007-10-01

    Agata is the European project for a 4π gamma-ray tracking array of 180 Ge detectors and is expected to have a detection sensitivity higher by 3 orders of magnitude than that of the present generation of gamma spectrometers. The trajectories of the photons inside a Ge crystal are reconstituted, which allows the determination of the initial energy of the incident photons as the total energy deposited along the track. The sequence of a γ-ray scattering process is too fast compared with the time resolution of the detector to be measured electronically, so tracking algorithms are necessary. Gamma-ray tracking detectors are operating in position sensitive mode it means that Ge crystal are segmented in order to facilitate the localization of the gamma interactions. It is possible to improve the position resolution by using the information conveyed by the shape of the detector signal. The task of the PSA (Pulse Shape Analysis) algorithm is to analyze this signal and extract the number of interactions, the position and the energy of each interaction. PSA algorithms rely on a basis of reference signals given by single interactions and that are obtained through an experimental characterization of the detector with scanning systems. The matrix method is a new PSA algorithm that consists in fitting linearly the detector signal with a set of calculated signals. We have tested this method with both simulated and measured signals. In the case of simulated single interactions the position resolution is 1.4 mm which is within Agata's specifications. For measured signals we have obtained mean positional errors of 3.2 mm at the front end of the detector an 4.8 mm at the back end

  14. Physical constraints on models of gamma-ray bursters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, R.I.

    1985-01-01

    This report deals with the constraints that can be placed on models of gamma-ray burst sources based on only the well-established observational facts and physical principles. The premise is developed that the very hard x-ray and gamma-ray continua spectra are well-established aspects of gamma-ray bursts. Recent theoretical work on gamma-ray bursts are summarized with emphasis on the geometrical properties of the models. Constraints on the source models which are implied by the x-ray and gamma-ray spectra are described. The allowed ranges for the luminosity and characteristic dimension for gamma-ray burst sources are shown. Some of the deductions and inferences about the nature of the gamma-ray burst sources are summarized. 67 refs., 3 figs

  15. Microwave-gamma ray water in crude monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paap, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    A microwave-gamma ray water-in-crude monitoring system measures the percent quantity of fresh water or salt water in crude oil flowing in a pipe line. The system includes a measuring cell arranged with the pipe line so that the crude oil flows through the measuring cell. A microwave transmitter subsystem and a gamma ray source are arranged with the measuring cell so that microwave energy and gamma rays are transmitted through the measuring cell. A microwave receiving subsystem and a gamma ray detector provide signals corresponding to received microwave energy and to the received gamma rays, respectively. Apparatus connected to the microwave receiver and to the gamma ray detector provides an indication of the percentage of water in the crude oil

  16. In-flight observation of long duration gamma-ray glows by aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochkin, Pavlo; (Lex) van Deursen, A. P. J.; de Boer, Alte; Bardet, Michiel; Allasia, Cedric; Boissin, Jean Francois; Ostgaard, Nikolai

    2017-04-01

    The Gamma-Ray Glow is a long-lasting (several seconds to minutes) X- and gamma radiation presumably originated from high-electric field of thunderclouds. Such glows were previously observed by aircraft, balloons, and from the ground. When detected on ground with other particles, i.e. electrons and neutrons, they are usually called Thunderstorm Ground Enhancements (TGEs). Their measured spectra are often consistent with Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche (RREA) mechanism. That is why RREA is a commonly accepted explanation for their existence. The gamma-ray glows are observed to be interrupted by lightning discharge, which terminates the high-electric field region. In January 2016 an Airbus A340 factory test aircraft was performing intentional flights through thunderstorms over Northern Australia. The aircraft was equipped with a dedicated in-flight lightning detection system called ILDAS (http://ildas.nlr.nl). The system also contained two scintillation detectors each with 38x38 mm cylinder LaBr3 crystals. While being at 12 km altitude the system detected a gamma-ray flux enhancement 30 times the background counts. It lasted for 20 seconds and was abruptly terminated by a lightning flash. The flash hit the aircraft and its parameters were recorded with 10 ns sampling time including gamma radiation. Ground-based lightning detection network WWLLN detected 4 strikes in the nearby region, all in association with the same flash. The ILDAS system recorded the time-resolved spectrum of the glow. In 6 minutes, after making a U-turn, the aircraft passed the same glow region. Smaller gamma-ray enhancement was again detected. In this presentation we will show the mapped event timeline including airplane, gamma-ray glow, WWLLN, and cloud data. We will discuss the glow's properties, i.e. intensity and differential spectrum, and its possible origin. This result will also be compared to previously reported observations.

  17. Remote planetary geochemical exploration with the NEAR X-ray/gamma-ray spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trombka, J.I.; Boynton, W.V.; Brueckner, J.; Squyres, S.; Clark, P.E.; Starr, R.; Evans, L.G.; Floyd, S.R.; McClanahan, T.P.; Goldsten, J.; Mcnutt, R.; Schweitzer, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    The X-ray/gamma-ray spectrometer (XGRS) instrument onboard the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft will map asteroid 433 Eros in the 0.2 keV to 10 MeV energy region. Measurements of the discrete line X-ray and gamma-ray emissions in this energy domain can be used to obtain both qualitative and quantitative elemental composition maps of the asteroid surface. The NEAR X-ray/gamma-ray spectrometer (XGRS) was turned on for the first time during the week of 7 April 1996. Rendezvous with Eros 433 is expected during December 1998. Observations of solar X-ray spectra during both quiescent and active periods have been made. A gamma-ray transient detection system has been implemented and about three gamma-ray transient events a week have been observed which are associated with either gamma-ray bursts or solar flares

  18. Activation of wine bentonite with gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goranov, N.; Antonov, M.

    1997-01-01

    The action of gamma rays on wine bentonite as well as influence of its adsorption and technologic qualities on the composition and stability of wines against protein darkening and precipitation has been studied. The experiments were carried out with wine bentonite produced in the firm Bentonite and irradiated with doses of 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 MR. White and red wines have been treated with irradiated bentonite under laboratory conditions at 1.0 g/dm 3 . All samples are treated at the same conditions. The flocculation rate of the sediment was determined visually. Samples have been taken 24 h later from the cleared wine layers. The following parameters have been determined: clarification, filtration rate, phenolic compounds, calcium, colour intensity, total extracted substances, etc. The volume of the sediment has been determined also. The control samples have been taken from the same unirradiated wines. The results showed better and faster clarification in on the third, the 20th and the 24th hours with using of gamma-irradiated at doses 0.8 and 1.0 MR. The sediment was the most compact and its volume - the smallest compared to the samples treated with bentonite irradiated with doses of 0.6 and 0.4 MR. This ensures a faster clarification and better filtration of treated wines. The bentonite activated with doses of 0.8 and 1.0 MR adsorbs the phenolic compounds and the complex protein-phenolic molecules better. In the same time it adsorbs less extracted substances compared to untreated bentonite and so preserves all organoleptic properties of wine. The irradiated bentonite adsorbs less the monomers of anthocyan compounds which ensures brighter natural colour of wine. The gamma-rays activation consolidates calcium in the crystal lattice of bentonite particles and in this way eliminates the formation of crystal precipitates

  19. Advantages of GSO Scintillator in Imaging and Law Level Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sharaf, J

    2002-01-01

    The single GSO crystal is an excellent scintillation material featuring a high light yield and short decay time for gamma-ray detection. Its performance characteristics were investigated and directly compared to those of BGO. For this purpose, the two scintillators are cut into small crystals of approximately 4*4*10 mm sup 3 and mounted on a PMT. Energy resolution, detection efficiency and counting precision have been measured for various photon energies. In addition to this spectroscopic characterization, the imaging performance of GSO was studied using a scanning rig. The modulation transfer function was calculated and the spatial resolution evaluated by measurements of the detector's point spread function. It is shown that there exists some source intensity for which the two scintillators yield identical precision for identical count time. Below this intensity, the GSO is superior to the BGO detector. The presented properties of GSO suggest potential applications of this scintillator in gamma-ray spectrosc...

  20. Multifrequency Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst

    OpenAIRE

    Greiner, J.

    1995-01-01

    Neither a flaring nor a quiescent counterpart to a gamma-ray burst has yet been convincingly identified at any wavelength region. The present status of the search for counterparts of classical gamma-ray bursts is given. Particular emphasis is put on the search for flaring counterparts, i.e. emission during or shortly after the gamma-ray emission.

  1. Gamma-rays from deep inelastic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, F.S.

    1981-01-01

    My objective in this talk is to consider the question: 'What can be learned about deep inelastic collisions (DIC) from studying the associated gamma-rays'. First, I discuss the origin and nature of the gamma-rays from DIC, then the kinds of information gamma-ray spectra contain, and finally come to the combination of these two subjects. (orig./HSI)

  2. Soft x-ray emission from gamma-ray bursts observed with ginga

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Atsumasa; Murakami, Toshio; Itoh, Masayuki

    1989-01-01

    The soft X-ray emission of gamma-ray bursts below 10 keV provides information about size, location, and emission mechanism. The Gamma-ray Burst Detector (GBD) on board Ginga, which consists of a proportional counter and a scintillation detector, covers an energy range down to 1.5 keV with 63 cm 2 effective area. In several of the observed gamma-ray bursts, the intensity of the soft X-ray emission showed a longer decay time of 50 to 100s after the higher energy gamma-ray emission had ended. Although we cannot rule out other models, such as bremsstrahlung and thermal cyclotron types, due to poor statistics, the soft X-ray spectra are consistent with a blackbody of 1 to 2 keV in the late phase of the gamma-ray bursts. This enables us to estimate the size of the blackbody responsible for the X-ray emission. (author)

  3. The high intensity {gamma}-ray source (HI{gamma}S) and recent results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonchev, A.P. [Duke University and TUNL, Triangle University Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 0308 (United States)]. E-mail: tonchev@tunl.duke.edu; Boswell, M. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and TUNL, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Howell, C.R. [Duke University and TUNL, Triangle University Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 0308 (United States); Karwowski, H.J. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and TUNL, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Kelley, J.H. [North Carolina State University and TUNL, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Tornow, W. [Duke University and TUNL, Triangle University Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 0308 (United States); Wu, Y.K. [Duke University and Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0319 (United States)

    2005-12-15

    The high intensity {gamma}-ray source (HI{gamma}S) utilizes intra-cavity backscattering of free electron laser photons from the Duke electron storage ring to produce a unique monoenergetic beam of high-flux {gamma}-rays with high polarization and selectable energy resolution. At present, {gamma}-ray beams with energies from 2 to 58 MeV are available with intensities as high as 10{sup 5}-5 x 10{sup 6} {gamma}/s, energy spreads of 3% or better, and nearly 100% linear polarization. The quality and intensity of the {gamma}-ray beams at HI{gamma}S are responsible for the unprecedented performance of this facility in a broad range of research programs in nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics and nuclear applications. Recent results from excitation of isomeric states in ({gamma}, n) reactions and parity assignments of dipole states determined via the ({gamma}, {gamma}') reaction are presented.

  4. Crystal growth and thermoluminescence response of NaZr2(PO4)3 at high gamma radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordóñez-Regil, E.; Contreras-Ramírez, A.; Fernández-Valverde, S.M.; González-Martínez, P.R.; Carrasco-Ábrego, H.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •NaZr 2 (PO 4 ) 3 exposed to gamma doses of 10, 30 and 50 MGy. •Gamma radiation produced growth of the crystal size of the NZP. •Morphology changes were reversible by heating. •Linear relationship between the thermoluminescence and the applied gamma dose. •This property could be useful for high-level gamma dosimetry. -- Abstract: This work describes the synthesis and characterization of NaZr 2 (PO 4 ) 3 . The stability of this material under high doses of gamma radiation was investigated in the range of 10–50 MGy. Samples of unaltered and gamma irradiated NaZr 2 (PO 4 ) 3 were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and thermoluminescence. The results showed that while functional groups were not affected by the gamma irradiation, morphology changes were observed with increasing doses of gamma irradiation. The morphology of the non-irradiated compound is agglomerated flakes; however, irradiation at 10 MGy splits the flakes inducing the formation of well-defined cubes. Gamma irradiation induced the crystal size of the NaZr 2 (PO 4 ) 3 to grow. The heat treatment (973 K) of samples irradiated at 50 MGy resulted in the recovery of the original morphology. Furthermore, the thermoluminescence analysis of the irradiated compound is reported

  5. Gamma-ray Output Spectra from 239 Pu Fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullmann, John

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray multiplicities, individual gamma-ray energy spectra, and total gamma energy spectra following neutron-induced fission of 239 Pu were measured using the DANCE detector at Los Alamos. Corrections for detector response were made using a forward-modeling technique based on propagating sets of gamma rays generated from a paramaterized model through a GEANT model of the DANCE array and adjusting the parameters for best fit to the measured spectra. The results for the gamma-ray spectrum and multiplicity are in general agreement with previous results, but the measured total gamma-ray energy is about 10% higher. A dependence of the gamma-ray spectrum on the gamma-ray multplicity was also observed. Global model calculations of the multiplicity and gamma energy distributions are in good agreement with the data, but predict a slightly softer total-energy distribution

  6. X-ray and. gamma. -ray sources: a comparison of their characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, A K [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1979-11-01

    A comparison of the various source characteristics, in particular the available fluxes of radiation in the X-ray/..gamma..-ray region from (1) high power rotary anode X-ray generators, (2) radioactive ..gamma..-ray sources and (3) high energy electron storage rings is presented. Some of the specific characteristics and possible applications of synchrotron radiation as a source are discussed in detail, together with problems associated with the monochromatization of the continuous radiation in the X-ray/..gamma..-ray region. The new high energy machines PEP at Stanford, the 8 GeV storage ring CESR at Cornell and the PETRA storage ring in Hamburg, which will soon come into operation provide a spectrum of high intensity radiation reaching well above h..gamma..sub(photon)=100 keV. The possibilities of using ondulators (wigglers), and laser-electron scattering for constructing high repetition rate tunable ..gamma..-ray sources are also discussed. Finally the potentials of using the powerful spontaneous emission of ..gamma..-quanta by relativistic channeled particles are mentioned.

  7. Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellizza, L. J.

    Gamma-ray bursts are the brightest transient sources in the gamma-ray sky. Since their discovery in the late 1960s, the investigation of the astrophysical sys- tems in which these phenomena take place, and the physical mechanisms that drive them, has become a vast and prolific area of modern astrophysics. In this work I will briefly describe the most relevant observations of these sources, and the models that describe their nature, emphasizing on the in- vestigations about the progenitor astrophysical systems. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  8. Effects of ionizing radiation on struvite crystallization of livestock wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tak- Hyun; Nam, Yun-Ku; Joo Lim, Seung

    2014-01-01

    Livestock wastewater is generally very difficult to be treated by conventional wastewater treatment techniques because it contains high-strength organics (COD), ammonium (NH 4 + ), phosphate (PO 4 3− ) and suspended solids. Struvite crystallization has been recently studied for the simultaneous removal of NH 4 + and PO 4 3− . In this study, gamma ray irradiation was carried out prior to struvite crystallization of the anaerobically digested livestock wastewater. The effects of gamma ray irradiation on the struvite crystallization of livestock wastewater were investigated. As a result, gamma ray irradiation can decrease the concentration of COD, NH 4 + and PO 4 3− contained in the livestock wastewater. This results in not only an enhancement of the struvite crystallization efficiency but also a decrease in the chemical demands for the struvite crystallization of livestock wastewater. - Highlights: • Gamma ray was applied prior to struvite crystallization of livestock wastewater. • Gamma ray resulted in an enhancement of struvite crystallization efficiency. • This is due to the decrease of COD concentration by gamma ray irradiation

  9. Design and Performance of the GAMMA-400 Gamma-Ray Telescope for Dark Matter Searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galper, A. M.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Fradkin, M. I.; Gusakov, Yu V.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is designed to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons (+) positrons, which can be produced by annihilation or decay of the dark matter particles, as well as to survey the celestial sphere in order to study point and extended sources of gamma-rays, measure energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, gamma-ray bursts, and gamma-ray emission from the Sun. GAMMA-400 covers the energy range from 100 MeV to 3000 GeV. Its angular resolution is approximately 0.01deg (E(sub gamma) greater than 100 GeV), the energy resolution approximately 1% (E(sub gamma) greater than 10 GeV), and the proton rejection factor approximately 10(exp 6). GAMMA-400 will be installed on the Russian space platform Navigator. The beginning of observations is planned for 2018.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of gamma ray tomography for image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guedes, Karlos A.N.; Moura, Alex; Dantas, Carlos; Melo, Silvio; Lima, Emerson, E-mail: karlosguedes@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Meric, Ilker [University of Bergen (Norway)

    2015-07-01

    The Monte Carlo simulations of known density and shape object was validate with Gamma Ray Tomography in static experiments. An aluminum half-moon piece placed inside a steel pipe was the MC simulation test object that was also measured by means of gamma ray transmission. Wall effect of the steel pipe due to irradiation geometry in a single pair source-detector tomography was evaluated by comparison with theoretical data. MCNPX code requires a defined geometry to each photon trajectory which practically prevents this usage for tomography reconstruction simulation. The solution was found by writing a program in Delphi language to create input files automation code. Simulations of tomography data by automated MNCPX code were carried out and validated by experimental data. Working in this sequence the produced data needed a databank to be stored. Experimental setup used a Cesium-137 isotopic radioactive source (7.4 × 109 Bq), and NaI(Tl) scintillation detector of (51 × 51) × 10−3 m crystal size coupled to a multichannel analyzer. A stainless steel tubes of 0,154 m internal diameter, 0.014 m thickness wall. The results show that the MCNPX simulation code adapted to automated input file is useful for generating a matrix data M(θ,t), of a computerized gamma ray tomography for any known density and regular shape object. Experimental validation used RMSE from gamma ray paths and from attenuation coefficient data. (author)

  11. Energy- and time-resolved detection of prompt gamma-rays for proton range verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verburg, Joost M; Riley, Kent; Bortfeld, Thomas; Seco, Joao

    2013-10-21

    In this work, we present experimental results of a novel prompt gamma-ray detector for proton beam range verification. The detection system features an actively shielded cerium-doped lanthanum(III) bromide scintillator, coupled to a digital data acquisition system. The acquisition was synchronized to the cyclotron radio frequency to separate the prompt gamma-ray signals from the later-arriving neutron-induced background. We designed the detector to provide a high energy resolution and an effective reduction of background events, enabling discrete proton-induced prompt gamma lines to be resolved. Measuring discrete prompt gamma lines has several benefits for range verification. As the discrete energies correspond to specific nuclear transitions, the magnitudes of the different gamma lines have unique correlations with the proton energy and can be directly related to nuclear reaction cross sections. The quantification of discrete gamma lines also enables elemental analysis of tissue in the beam path, providing a better prediction of prompt gamma-ray yields. We present the results of experiments in which a water phantom was irradiated with proton pencil-beams in a clinical proton therapy gantry. A slit collimator was used to collimate the prompt gamma-rays, and measurements were performed at 27 positions along the path of proton beams with ranges of 9, 16 and 23 g cm(-2) in water. The magnitudes of discrete gamma lines at 4.44, 5.2 and 6.13 MeV were quantified. The prompt gamma lines were found to be clearly resolved in dimensions of energy and time, and had a reproducible correlation with the proton depth-dose curve. We conclude that the measurement of discrete prompt gamma-rays for in vivo range verification of clinical proton beams is feasible, and plan to further study methods and detector designs for clinical use.

  12. High resolution monochromatic X-ray imaging system based on spherically bent crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Lehecka, T.; Obenschain, S.; Bodner, S.; Pawley, C.; Gerber, K.; Sethian, J.; Brown, C. M.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.; Holland, G.

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a new X-ray imaging system based on spherically curved crystals. It is designed and used for diagnostics of targets ablatively accelerated by the Nike KrF laser. The imaging system is used for plasma diagnostics of the main target and for characterization of potential backlighters. A spherically curved quartz crystal (2d=6.687 A, R=200 mm) is used to produce monochromatic backlit images with the He-like Si resonance line (1865 eV) as the source of radiation. The spatial resolution of the X-ray optical system is 3-4 μm. Time resolved backlit monochromatic images of CH planar targets driven by the Nike facility have been obtained with 6-7 μm spatial resolution

  13. Thermal neutron capture gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuli, J.K.

    1983-01-01

    The energy and intensity of gamma rays as seen in thermal neutron capture are presented. Only those (n,α), E = thermal, reactions for which the residual nucleus mass number is greater than or equal to 45 are included. These correspond to evaluations published in Nuclear Data Sheets. The publication source data are contained in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). The data presented here do not involve any additional evaluation. Appendix I lists all the residual nuclides for which the data are included here. Appendix II gives a cumulated index to A-chain evaluations including the year of publication. The capture gamma ray data are given in two tables - the Table 1 is the list of all gamma rays seen in (n,#betta#) reaction given in the order of increasing energy; the Table II lists the gamma rays according to the nuclide

  14. The feasibility study of BGO crystal applied to natural gamma ray spectral logging in deep wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wen; Zhang Jingyi

    1992-01-01

    The experimental research on the feasibility of BGO crystal application to natural gamma ray spectral logging was performed under laboratory conditions. The natural radioactive standard sources and heater case were used to simulate the realistic logging environment. The experimental results of BGO detector show that the spectrum stabilization can be effectively realized, and the temperature effect of energy resolution has no obvious impact on spectrum analysis when the temperature of detector ranging from 20 degree C to 60 degree C. The temperature effect of the output pulse height is the main cause of the system error in spectrum analysis, which will surely be reduced in realistic logging by the low temperature gradient. The experimental results of CsI(Na) detector support this conclusion. A suggestion for further work is proposed at the end of this paper

  15. The feasibility study of BGO crystal applied to natural gamma ray spectral logging in deep wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Li; Jingyi, Zhang [Qinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Chongfan, He; Jingying, Liao [Shanghai Silicate Institute (China)

    1992-09-01

    The experimental research on the feasibility of BGO crystal application to natural gamma ray spectral logging was performed under laboratory conditions. The natural radioactive standard sources and heater case were used to simulate the realistic logging environment. The experimental results of BGO detector show that the spectrum stabilization can be effectively realized, and the temperature effect of energy resolution has no obvious impact on spectrum analysis when the temperature of detector ranging from 20 degree C to 60 degree C. The temperature effect of the output pulse height is the main cause of the system error in spectrum analysis, which will surely be reduced in realistic logging by the low temperature gradient. The experimental results of CsI(Na) detector support this conclusion. A suggestion for further work is proposed at the end of this paper.

  16. The Animated Gamma-ray Sky Revealed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenier, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been observing the sky in gamma-rays since August 2008. In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage (20 MeV-300 GeV) and angular resolution, the wide field of view of the Large Area Telescope enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and of the whole sky every three hours. It has revealed a very animated sky with bright gamma-ray bursts flashing and vanishing in minutes, powerful active galactic nuclei flaring over hours and days, many pulsars twinkling in the Milky Way, and X-ray binaries shimmering along their orbit. Most of these variable sources had not been seen by the Fermi predecessor, EGRET, and the wealth of new data already brings important clues to the origin of the high-energy emission and particles powered by the compact objects. The telescope also brings crisp images of the bright gamma-ray emission produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the interstellar medium, thus allowing to measure the cosmic nuclei and electron spectra across the Galaxy, to weigh interstellar clouds, in particular in the dark-gas phase. The telescope sensitivity at high energy will soon provide useful constraints on dark-matter annihilations in a variety of environments. I will review the current results and future prospects of the Fermi mission.

  17. Fieldable computer system for determining gamma-ray pulse-height distributions, flux spectra, and dose rates from Little Boy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, C.E.; Lucas, M.C.; Tisinger, E.W.; Hamm, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    Our system consists of a LeCroy 3500 data acquisition system with a built-in CAMAC crate and eight bismuth-germanate detectors 7.62 cm in diameter and 7.62 cm long. Gamma-ray pulse-height distributions are acquired simultaneously for up to eight positions. The system was very carefully calibrated and characterized from 0.1 to 8.3 MeV using gamma-ray spectra from a variety of radioactive sources. By fitting the pulse-height distributions from the sources with a function containing 17 parameters, we determined theoretical repsonse functions. We use these response functions to unfold the distributions to obtain flux spectra. A flux-to-dose-rate conversion curve based on the work of Dimbylow and Francis is then used to obtain dose rates. Direct use of measured spectra and flux-to-dose-rate curves to obtain dose rates avoids the errors that can arise from spectrum dependence in simple gamma-ray dosimeter instruments. We present some gamma-ray doses for the Little Boy assembly operated at low power. These results can be used to determine the exposures of the Hiroshima survivors and thus aid in the establishment of radation exposure limits for the nuclear industry

  18. Sample analysis using gamma ray induced fluorescent X-ray emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sood, B S; Allawadhi, K L; Gandhi, R; Batra, O P; Singh, N [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Nuclear Science Labs.

    1983-01-01

    A non-destructive method for the analysis of materials using gamma ray-induced fluorescent x-ray emission has been developed. In this method, special preparation of very thin samples in which the absorption of the incident gamma rays and the emitted fluorescent x-rays is negligible, is not needed, and the absorption correction is determined experimentally. A suitable choice of the incident gamma ray energies is made to minimise enhancement effects through selective photoionization of the elements in the sample. The method is applied to the analysis of a typical sample of the soldering material using 279 keV and 59.5 keV gamma rays from /sup 203/Hg and /sup 241/Am radioactive sources respectively. The results of the analysis are found to agree well with those obtained from the chemical analysis.

  19. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF THE FLARING GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR 3C 66A IN 2008 OCTOBER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Buehler, R.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bonamente, E.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.

    2011-01-01

    The BL Lacertae object 3C 66A was detected in a flaring state by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and VERITAS in 2008 October. In addition to these gamma-ray observations, F-GAMMA, GASP-WEBT, PAIRITEL, MDM, ATOM, Swift, and Chandra provided radio to X-ray coverage. The available light curves show variability and, in particular, correlated flares are observed in the optical and Fermi-LAT gamma-ray band. The resulting spectral energy distribution can be well fitted using standard leptonic models with and without an external radiation field for inverse Compton scattering. It is found, however, that only the model with an external radiation field can accommodate the intra-night variability observed at optical wavelengths.

  20. The beginning of gamma-ray astronomy with Fermi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paneque, D.

    2008-01-01

    The Fermi observatory is designed to perform gamma-ray astronomy in the energy range 20 MeV to 300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 10 keV to 30 MeV. Fermi was successfully launched on June 11 (2008) from the Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral. The main instrument of Fermi is the Large Area Telescope (LAT), which provides break-through high-energy measurements using techniques typically used in particle detectors for collider experiments. The LAT consists of 16 identical towers in a four-by-four grid, each one containing a pair conversion tracker and a hodoscopic crystal calorimeter, all covered by a segmented plastic scintillator anti-coincidence shield. The LAT is currently monitoring the GeV gamma-ray sky with rather uniform exposure (covering 20% of the sky at any instant and the entire sky on a timescale of a few hours) and a sensitivity ∼ 30 times better than its predecessor, EGRET. The large performance improvement of LAT opens a new and important window on a wide variety of high-energy astrophysical phenomena, as well as potential to discover/study non-conventional physics. In the talk I will report the instrument performance, the mission status and science opportunities and will present some results derived from the first months of operation, which includes astronomical telegrams on AGN flares, 2 GCN circulars on LAT-detected GRBs and the monitoring of some selected sources (22 blazars and 1 high mass X-ray Binary). (author)

  1. ICIT contribution to JET gamma-ray diagnostics enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soare, S.; Curuia, M.; Zoita, V.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Gamma-ray emission of tokamak plasmas is the result of the interaction of fast ions (fusion reaction products, including alpha particles, NBI ions, ICRH-accelerated ions) with main plasma impurities (e.g., carbon, beryllium). Gamma-ray diagnostics involve both gamma-ray imaging (cameras) and gamma-ray spectrometry (spectrometers). For the JET tokamak, gamma-ray diagnostics have been used to provide information on the characteristics of the fast ion population in plasmas. Two gamma-ray diagnostics enhancements project have been launched by JET and the MEdC/EURATOM Association has agreed to lead both of them with ICIT as projects leader. (authors)

  2. A fast, high light output scintillator for gamma ray and neutron detection. Fifth Semi-Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Entine, Gerald; Kanai, S.; Shah, M.S.; Leonard Cirignano, M.S.; Jarek Glodo; Van Loef, Edgar V.

    2003-01-01

    In view of the attractive properties of RbGd2Br7:Ce for gamma-ray and thermal neutron detection, and the lack of larger volume crystals, the goal of the Phase I project was to perform a rigorous investigation of the crystal growth of this exciting material and explore its capabilities for gamma-ray and thermal neutron detection. The Phase I research was very successful. All technical objectives were met and in many cases exceeded expectations. We were able to produce large (>1 cm3) RbGd2Br7:Ce crystals with excellent scintillation properties and demonstrated the possibility to detect thermal neutrons. As far as we are aware, our Phase I experiment was the first to demonstrate thermal neutron detection with RbGd2Br7:Ce. Clearly, the feasibility of the proposed research was adequately proven. The Phase II research builds on the successful results obtained during Phase I. Phase II will initially focus on optimizing the RbGd2Br7:Ce growth process to produce high quality, larger volume RbGd2Br7:Ce crystals. We will continue to use the versatile Bridgman technique. During this process, crystal growth parameters will be adjusted for optimal growth conditions. Our goal is to produce high quality RbGd2Br7:Ce crystals of size 1 inch x 1 inch x 1 inch (∼16 cm3). We will work on packaging aspects that allow efficient light collection and prevent crystal degradation. We will study and measure emission spectra, light yield, scintillation decay, energy and time resolution. The effects of variation in Ce concentration on the scintillation properties of RbGd2Br7:Ce will be examined in detail. Comprehensive gamma-ray spectroscopic and imaging studies will be conducted. Also, optimization of RbGd2Br7:Ce for thermal neutron detection will be addressed. Our initial studies will determine the optimal geometry of the RbGd2Br7:Ce crystals for neutron detection. For thermal neutron detection experiments, we will produce large area, thin samples in order to minimize gamma-ray sensitivity

  3. Gamma-ray burst observations: the present situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedrenne, G.

    1984-01-01

    Recent results in gamma ray burst investigations concerning the spectral variability on a short time scale, precise locations, and the discovery of optical flashes in gamma ray burst positions on archival plates are presented. The implications of optical and X-ray observations of gamma ray burst error boxes are also discussed. 72 references

  4. Response of CZT drift-strip detector to X- and gamma rays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Gerward, Leif

    2001-01-01

    The drift-strip method for improving the energy response of a CdZnTe (CZT) detector to hard X- and gamma rays is discussed. Results for a 10 x 10 x 3 mm(3) detector crystal demonstrate a remarkable improvement of the energy resolution. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) is 2.18 keV (3.6%), 2...

  5. Predicting supernova associated to gamma-ray burst 130427a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Ruffini, R.; Kovacevic, M.; Bianco, C. L.; Enderli, M.; Muccino, M.; Penacchioni, A. V.; Pisani, G. B.; Rueda, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    Binary systems constituted by a neutron star and a massive star are not rare in the universe. The Induced Gravitational Gamma-ray Burst (IGC) paradigm interprets Gamma-ray bursts as the outcome of a neutron star that collapses into a black hole due to the accretion of the ejecta coming from its companion massive star that underwent a supernova event. GRB 130427A is one of the most luminous GRBs ever observed, of which isotropic energy exceeds 1054 erg. And it is within one of the few GRBs obtained optical, X-ray and GeV spectra simultaneously for hundreds of seconds, which provides an unique opportunity so far to understand the multi-wavelength observation within the IGC paradigm, our data analysis found low Lorentz factor blackbody emission in the Episode 3 and its X-ray light curve overlaps typical IGC Golden Sample, which comply to the IGC mechanisms. We consider these findings as clues of GRB 130427A belonging to the IGC GRBs. We predicted on GCN the emergence of a supernova on May 2, 2013, which was later successfully detected on May 13, 2013.

  6. GAMMA RAYS FROM TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA SN 2014J

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churazov, E.; Sunyaev, R.; Grebenev, S.; Isern, J.; Bikmaev, I.; Bravo, E.; Chugai, N.; Jean, P.; Knödlseder, J.; Lebrun, F.; Kuulkers, E.

    2015-01-01

    The whole set of INTEGRAL observations of Type Ia supernova SN 2014J, covering the period 19–162 days after the explosion, has been analyzed. For spectral fitting the data are split into early and late periods covering days 19–35 and 50–162, respectively, optimized for 56 Ni and 56 Co lines. As expected for the early period, much of the gamma-ray signal is confined to energies below ∼200 keV, while for the late period it is strongest above 400 keV. In particular, in the late period, 56 Co lines at 847 and 1248 keV are detected at 4.7σ and 4.3σ, respectively. The light curves in several representative energy bands are calculated for the entire period. The resulting spectra and light curves are compared with a subset of models. We confirm our previous finding that the gamma-ray data are broadly consistent with the expectations for canonical one-dimensional models, such as delayed detonation or deflagration models for a near-Chandrasekhar mass white dwarf. Late optical spectra (day 136 after the explosion) show rather symmetric Co and Fe line profiles, suggesting that, unless the viewing angle is special, the distribution of radioactive elements is symmetric in the ejecta

  7. Found: A Galaxy's Missing Gamma Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Recent reanalysis of data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has resulted in the first detection of high-energy gamma rays emitted from a nearby galaxy. This discovery reveals more about how supernovae interact with their environments.Colliding Supernova RemnantAfter a stellar explosion, the supernovas ejecta expand, eventually encountering the ambient interstellar medium. According to models, this generates a strong shock, and a fraction of the kinetic energy of the ejecta is transferred into cosmic rays high-energy radiation composed primarily of protons and atomic nuclei. Much is still unknown about this process, however. One open question is: what fraction of the supernovas explosion power goes into accelerating these cosmic rays?In theory, one way to answer this is by looking for gamma rays. In a starburst galaxy, the collision of the supernova-accelerated cosmic rays with the dense interstellar medium is predicted to produce high-energy gamma rays. That radiation should then escape the galaxy and be visible to us.Pass 8 to the RescueObservational tests of this model, however, have beenstumped by Arp 220. This nearby ultraluminous infrared galaxy is the product of a galaxy merger ~700 million years ago that fueled a frenzy of starbirth. Due to its dusty interior and extreme levels of star formation, Arp 220 has long been predicted to emit the gamma rays produced by supernova-accelerated cosmic rays. But though weve looked, gamma-ray emission has never been detected from this galaxy until now.In a recent study, a team of scientists led by Fang-Kun Peng (Nanjing University) reprocessed 7.5 years of Fermi observations using the new Pass 8 analysis software. The resulting increase in resolution revealed the first detection of GeV emission from Arp 220!Acceleration EfficiencyGamma-ray luminosity vs. total infrared luminosity for LAT-detected star-forming galaxies and Seyferts. Arp 220s luminosities are consistent with the scaling relation. [Peng et al. 2016

  8. Specialised software utilities for gamma-ray spectrometry. Computer codes to IAEA-TECDOC-1275

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-03-01

    A Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Software Utilities for Gamma-Ray Spectrometry' was initiated by the International Atomic Energy Agency in 1996. In the CRP several basic applications of nuclear data handling were assayed which also dealt with the development of PC computer codes for various spectrometric purposes. This CD-ROM contains the following computer codes, produced under the CRP: ANGES, a program for the user controlled analysis of gamma-ray spectra from HPGe detectors; NUCL M AN, a program for the generation of gamma-ray libraries (using new, evaluated data) for specific applications; TRUE C OINC, a program to calculate true coincidence corrections; VOLUME, a program to calculate the full-energy peak efficiency calibration curve for homogeneous cylindrical sample geometries including self-attenuation correction; WINDIMEN, a program for the library driven analysis of gamma-ray spectra and for the quantification of radionuclide contents in the sample. RESFIT and DPPUNFOL, a set of programs for the definition of the detector resolution function and for unfolding of experimental annihilation spectra; MLMTEST, a program for the analysis of low-level NaI-spectra together with an extensive library of example reference spectra as well as a spectrum synthesizer

  9. Effect of potassium-salt muds on gamma ray, and spontaneous potential measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, J.W.; Raymer, L.L.

    1976-01-01

    Interpretations of the gamma ray and Spontaneous Potential curves generally assume the presence of sodium chloride as the dominant salt in both the formation water and the mud filtrate. However, potassium-salt muds are increasingly being used by the oil industry. The potassium cation is significantly different from the sodium cation in its radioactive and electrochemical properties. Natural potassium contains a radioactive isotope which emits gamma rays. Thus, the presence of potassium salts in the mud system may contribute to Gamma-Ray tool response. Since the Gamma Ray is used quantitatively in many geological sequences as an indicator of clay content, a way to correct for the effect of potassium in the mud column is desirable. Correction methods and charts based on laboratory measurements and field observations are presented. The effect of temperature on the resistivity of potassium muds is also briefly discussed. From data available, it appears to be similar to that for NaCl muds. On the bases of field observations and laboratory work, the electrochemical properties of potassium-chloride and potassium-carbonate muds and mud filtrates are discussed. Activity relationships are proposed, and the influence of these salts on the SP component potentials--namely, the liquid-junction, membrane, and bi-ionic potentials--is described. Several field examples are presented

  10. Uranium enrichment measurements without calibration using gamma rays above 100 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhter, Wayne D.; Lanier, Robert G.; Hayden, Catherine F.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The verification of UF6 shipping cylinders is an important activity in routine safeguards inspections. Current measurement methods using either sodium-iodide or high-purity germanium detectors requires calibrations that are not always appropriate for field measurements, because of changes in geometry or container wall thickness. The introduction of the MGAU code demonstrated the usefulness of intrinsically calibrated measurements for inspections. MGAU uses the 100-keV region of the uranium gamma-ray spectrum. The thick walls of UF6 shipping cylinders preclude the routine use of MGAU for these measurements. We have developed a uranium enrichment measurement method for measurements using high- purity germanium detectors, which do not require calibration and uses uranium gamma rays above 100 keV. The method uses seven gamma rays from U-235 and U-238 to determine their relative detection efficiency intrinsically and with an additional gamma ray from U-234 the relative abundance of these three uranium isotopes. The method uses a function that describes the basic physical processes that predominately determine the relative detection efficiency curve, These are the detector efficiency, the absorption by the cylinder wall, and the self-absorption by the UF6 contents. We will describe this model and its performance on various uranium materials and detector types. (author)

  11. MONTE CARLO RADIATION TRANSFER SIMULATIONS OF PHOTOSPHERIC EMISSION IN LONG-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzati, Davide [Department of Physics, Oregon State University, 301 Weniger Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States)

    2016-10-01

    We present MCRaT, a Monte Carlo Radiation Transfer code for self-consistently computing the light curves and spectra of the photospheric emission from relativistic, unmagnetized jets. We apply MCRaT to a relativistic hydrodynamic simulation of a long-duration gamma-ray burst jet, and present the resulting light curves and time-dependent spectra for observers at various angles from the jet axis. We compare our results to observational results and find that photospheric emission is a viable model to explain the prompt phase of long-duration gamma-ray bursts at the peak frequency and above, but faces challenges when reproducing the flat spectrum below the peak frequency. We finally discuss possible limitations of these results both in terms of the hydrodynamics and the radiation transfer and how these limitations could affect the conclusions that we present.

  12. The detection of a change point in periodic gamma ray data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard, F.; De Jager, O.C.; Schultz, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    We present a method which can identify the start- and end times of a periodic burst of gamma rays. The assumption is that the periodic light curve has power in the fundamental harmonic and that the noise (i.e. cosmic ray) contribution is relatively high. No a priori knowledge of the burst properties is required. The significance of such a burst is also estimated, provided that the total number of events in the entire data set to be analysed is given beforehand. (orig.)

  13. Dependence on incident angle of solid state detector response to gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanishi, Hirokuni; Yamaguchi, Satarou; Yamaguchi, Takayuki; Ueki, Kohtaro

    2002-01-01

    The shape and size of a NaI(Tl) scintillator that should maximize response variation with γ-ray incident angle was estimated by analytical model calculation. It proved that, even for gamma rays of energy exceeding 1 MeV, a slab detector measuring 50 cm x 50 cm x 5 cm thick should present a ratio of at least 4 between maximum and minimum responses against incidence at different angles. For a sample case of 60 keV gamma rays, estimation of the incident angle dependence by means of Monte Carlo simulation agreed well with experiment using a CZT detector. The counts from photo-electric peak varied with incident angle roughly along a sine curve. The foregoing finding served as basis for proposing a practical direction finder for γ-ray source operating on the principle of determining the source direction from variations in count with incident angle. (author)

  14. Gamma-Ray Emission from Galaxy Clusters : DARK MATTER AND COSMIC-RAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzke, Anders

    The quest for the first detection of a galaxy cluster in the high energy gamma-ray regime is ongoing, and even though clusters are observed in several other wave-bands, there is still no firm detection in gamma-rays. To complement the observational efforts we estimate the gamma-ray contributions from both annihilating dark matter and cosmic-ray (CR) proton as well as CR electron induced emission. Using high-resolution simulations of galaxy clusters, we find a universal concave shaped CR proton spectrum independent of the simulated galaxy cluster. Specifically, the gamma-ray spectra from decaying neutral pions, which are produced by CR protons, dominate the cluster emission. Furthermore, based on our derived flux and luminosity functions, we identify the galaxy clusters with the brightest galaxy clusters in gamma-rays. While this emission is challenging to detect using the Fermi satellite, major observations with Cherenkov telescopes in the near future may put important constraints on the CR physics in clusters. To extend these predictions, we use a dark matter model that fits the recent electron and positron data from Fermi, PAMELA, and H.E.S.S. with remarkable precision, and make predictions about the expected gamma-ray flux from nearby clusters. In order to remain consistent with the EGRET upper limit on the gamma-ray emission from Virgo, we constrain the minimum mass of substructures for cold dark matter halos. In addition, we find comparable levels of gamma-ray emission from CR interactions and dark matter annihilations without Sommerfeld enhancement.

  15. Evolution of the polarization of the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB030329.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Jochen; Klose, Sylvio; Reinsch, Klaus; Schmid, Hans Martin; Sari, Re'em; Hartmann, Dieter H; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Rau, Arne; Palazzi, Eliana; Straubmeier, Christian; Stecklum, Bringfried; Zharikov, Sergej; Tovmassian, Gaghik; Bärnbantner, Otto; Ries, Christoph; Jehin, Emmanuel; Henden, Arne; Kaas, Anlaug A; Grav, Tommy; Hjorth, Jens; Pedersen, Holger; Wijers, Ralph A M J; Kaufer, Andreas; Park, Hye-Sook; Williams, Grant; Reimer, Olaf

    2003-11-13

    The association of a supernova with GRB030329 strongly supports the 'collapsar' model of gamma-ray bursts, where a relativistic jet forms after the progenitor star collapses. Such jets cannot be spatially resolved because gamma-ray bursts lie at cosmological distances; their existence is instead inferred from 'breaks' in the light curves of the afterglows, and from the theoretical desire to reduce the estimated total energy of the burst by proposing that most of it comes out in narrow beams. Temporal evolution of the polarization of the afterglows may provide independent evidence for the jet structure of the relativistic outflow. Small-level polarization ( approximately 1-3 per cent) has been reported for a few bursts, but its temporal evolution has yet to be established. Here we report polarimetric observations of the afterglow of GRB030329. We establish the polarization light curve, detect sustained polarization at the per cent level, and find significant variability. The data imply that the afterglow magnetic field has a small coherence length and is mostly random, probably generated by turbulence, in contrast with the picture arising from the high polarization detected in the prompt gamma-rays from GRB021206 (ref. 18).

  16. Neutron detection gamma ray sensitivity criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Mace, Emily K.; Stephens, Daniel L.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2011-01-01

    The shortage of 3 He has triggered the search for effective alternative neutron detection technologies for national security and safeguards applications. Any new detection technology must satisfy two basic criteria: (1) it must meet a neutron detection efficiency requirement, and (2) it must be insensitive to gamma-ray interference at a prescribed level, while still meeting the neutron detection requirement. It is the purpose of this paper to define measureable gamma ray sensitivity criteria for neutron detectors. Quantitative requirements are specified for: intrinsic gamma ray detection efficiency and gamma ray absolute rejection. The gamma absolute rejection ratio for neutrons (GARRn) is defined, and it is proposed that the requirement for neutron detection be 0.9 3 He based neutron detector is provided showing that this technology can meet the stated requirements. Results from tests of some alternative technologies are also reported.

  17. Measurement of rocking curve wings at high x-ray energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, D.; Hastings, J.; Moulin, H.; Siddons, D.P.; Garrett, R.F.; Nachaliel, E.; Dilmanian, F.A.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements done recently at the NSLS have indicated that the level of intensity found in the wings of diffraction peaks from silicon at higher x-ray energies (>20keV) far exceeds the value which would be predicted based on the dynamical theory. We have measured Si(220) double crystal rocking curves at the 40keV fundamental and harmonics with various crystal scattering geometries: Bragg-Bragg, Laue-Bragg, Laue-Lauel. The comparison of the Bragg and Laue case diffraction geometries was done to determine scattering volume effects. Comparisons with dynamical theory calculations will be discussed. These measurements have been carried out in order to assess the level of harmonic contamination which will be present from a double crystal monochromator being designed for the X17 Superconducting Wiggler Beamline

  18. Evaluation of gamma-ray intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Yasukazu; Inoue, Hikaru; Hoshi, Masaharu; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Iwata, Yosei.

    1980-04-01

    Relative intensities and intensities per decay of gamma rays were evaluated for 16 nuclides, 22 Na, 24 Na, 46 Sc, 54 Mn, 60 Co, 85 Sr, 88 Y, 95 Nb, sup(108m)Ag, 134 Cs, 133 Ba, 139 Ce, sup(180m)Hf, 198 Au, 203 Hg and 207 Bi. For most of these nuclides disintegration rates can be determined by means of β-γ or X-γ coincidence method. Since decay schemes of these nuclides are established, intensities per decay of strong gamma rays were accurately evaluated by using weak beta-ray branching ratios, relative gamma-ray intensities and internal conversion coefficients. Half-lives of the nuclides were also evaluated. Use of the nuclides, therefore, are recommended for precision intensity calibration of the detectors. (author)

  19. A comparative study of LaBr{sub 3}(Ce{sup 3+}) and CeBr{sub 3} based gamma-ray spectrometers for planetary remote sensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozyrev, A., E-mail: kozyrev@mx.iki.rssi.ru; Mitrofanov, I.; Bakhtin, B.; Fedosov, F.; Golovin, D.; Litvak, M.; Malakhov, A.; Mokrousov, M.; Nuzhdin, I.; Sanin, A.; Tretyakov, V.; Vostrukhin, A. [Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IKI), 84/32 Profsoyuznaya St., Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Owens, A.; Benkhoff, J. [European Space Agency, ESTEC, Keplerlaan, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Quarati, F. [AP, RST, FAME, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Gonitec BV, J. Bildersstraat 60, 2596 EJ Den Haag (Netherlands); Timoshenko, G.; Shvetsov, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, Dubna, Moscow Region 141980 (Russian Federation); Granja, C.; Slavicek, T.; Pospisil, S. [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, 12800 Prague 2 (Czech Republic)

    2016-08-15

    The recent availability of large volume cerium bromide crystals raises the possibility of substantially improving gamma-ray spectrometer limiting flux sensitivities over current systems based on the lanthanum tri-halides, e.g., lanthanum bromide and lanthanum chloride, especially for remote sensing, low-level counting applications or any type of measurement characterized by poor signal to noise ratios. The Russian Space Research Institute has developed and manufactured a highly sensitive gamma-ray spectrometer for remote sensing observations of the planet Mercury from the Mercury Polar Orbiter (MPO), which forms part of ESA’s BepiColombo mission. The Flight Model (FM) gamma-ray spectrometer is based on a 3-in. single crystal of LaBr{sub 3}(Ce{sup 3+}) produced in a separate crystal development programme specifically for this mission. During the spectrometers development, manufacturing, and qualification phases, large crystals of CeBr{sub 3} became available in a subsequent phase of the same crystal development programme. Consequently, the Flight Spare Model (FSM) gamma-ray spectrometer was retrofitted with a 3-in. CeBr{sub 3} crystal and qualified for space. Except for the crystals, the two systems are essentially identical. In this paper, we report on a comparative assessment of the two systems, in terms of their respective spectral properties, as well as their suitability for use in planetary mission with respect to radiation tolerance and their propensity for activation. We also contrast their performance with a Ge detector representative of that flown on MESSENGER and show that: (a) both LaBr{sub 3}(Ce{sup 3+}) and CeBr{sub 3} provide superior detection systems over HPGe in the context of minimally resourced spacecraft and (b) CeBr{sub 3} is a more attractive system than LaBr{sub 3}(Ce{sup 3+}) in terms of sensitivities at lower gamma fluxes. Based on the tests, the FM has now been replaced by the FSM on the BepiColombo spacecraft. Thus, CeBr{sub 3} now forms

  20. Maximum likelihood positioning for gamma-ray imaging detectors with depth of interaction measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, Ch.W.; Ros, A.; Monzo, J.M.; Aliaga, R.J.; Ferrando, N.; Martinez, J.D.; Herrero, V.; Esteve, R.; Gadea, R.; Colom, R.J.; Toledo, J.; Mateo, F.; Sebastia, A.; Sanchez, F.; Benlloch, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The center of gravity algorithm leads to strong artifacts for gamma-ray imaging detectors that are based on monolithic scintillation crystals and position sensitive photo-detectors. This is a consequence of using the centroids as position estimates. The fact that charge division circuits can also be used to compute the standard deviation of the scintillation light distribution opens a way out of this drawback. We studied the feasibility of maximum likelihood estimation for computing the true gamma-ray photo-conversion position from the centroids and the standard deviation of the light distribution. The method was evaluated on a test detector that consists of the position sensitive photomultiplier tube H8500 and a monolithic LSO crystal (42mmx42mmx10mm). Spatial resolution was measured for the centroids and the maximum likelihood estimates. The results suggest that the maximum likelihood positioning is feasible and partially removes the strong artifacts of the center of gravity algorithm.

  1. Maximum likelihood positioning for gamma-ray imaging detectors with depth of interaction measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerche, Ch.W. [Grupo de Sistemas Digitales, ITACA, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, 46022 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: lerche@ific.uv.es; Ros, A. [Grupo de Fisica Medica Nuclear, IFIC, Universidad de Valencia-Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, 46980 Paterna (Spain); Monzo, J.M.; Aliaga, R.J.; Ferrando, N.; Martinez, J.D.; Herrero, V.; Esteve, R.; Gadea, R.; Colom, R.J.; Toledo, J.; Mateo, F.; Sebastia, A. [Grupo de Sistemas Digitales, ITACA, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Sanchez, F.; Benlloch, J.M. [Grupo de Fisica Medica Nuclear, IFIC, Universidad de Valencia-Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, 46980 Paterna (Spain)

    2009-06-01

    The center of gravity algorithm leads to strong artifacts for gamma-ray imaging detectors that are based on monolithic scintillation crystals and position sensitive photo-detectors. This is a consequence of using the centroids as position estimates. The fact that charge division circuits can also be used to compute the standard deviation of the scintillation light distribution opens a way out of this drawback. We studied the feasibility of maximum likelihood estimation for computing the true gamma-ray photo-conversion position from the centroids and the standard deviation of the light distribution. The method was evaluated on a test detector that consists of the position sensitive photomultiplier tube H8500 and a monolithic LSO crystal (42mmx42mmx10mm). Spatial resolution was measured for the centroids and the maximum likelihood estimates. The results suggest that the maximum likelihood positioning is feasible and partially removes the strong artifacts of the center of gravity algorithm.

  2. High resolution monochromatic X-ray imaging system based on spherically bent crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Lehecka, T.; Obenschain, S.; Bodner, S.; Pawley, C.; Gerber, K.; Sethian, J.; Brown, C.M.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.; Holland, G.

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a new X-ray imaging system based on spherically curved crystals. It is designed and used for diagnostics of targets ablatively accelerated by the Nike KrF laser [1,2]. The imaging system is used for plasma diagnostics of the main target and for characterization of potential backlighters. A spherically curved quartz crystal (2d=6.687 Angstrom, R=200mm) is used to produce monochromatic backlit images with the He-like Si resonance line (1865 eV) as the source of radiation. The spatial resolution of the X-ray optical system is 3 endash 4 μm. Time resolved backlit monochromatic images of CH planar targets driven by the Nike facility have been obtained with 6 endash 7 μm spatial resolution. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  3. Local gamma ray events as tests of the antimatter theory of gamma ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofia, S.; Wilson, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    Nearby examples of the antimatter 'chunks' postulated by Sofia and Van Horn to explain the cosmic gamma ray bursts may produce detectable gamma ray events when struck by solar system meteoroids. These events would have a much shorter time scale and higher energy spectrum than the bursts already observed. In order to have a reasonably high event rate, the local meteoroid population must extend to a distance from the Sun of the order of 0.1 pc, but the required distance could become much lower if the instrumental threshold is improved. The expected gamma ray flux for interaction of the antimatter bodies with the solar wind is also examined, and found to be far below present instrumental capabilities. (Auth.)

  4. Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Meszaros, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma-rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day ,last typically lOs of seconds and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  5. REVEALING TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PHYSICS WITH COSMIC RATES AND NUCLEAR GAMMA RAYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Beacom, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) remain mysterious despite their central importance in cosmology and their rapidly increasing discovery rate. The progenitors of SNe Ia can be probed by the delay time between progenitor birth and explosion as SNe Ia. The explosions and progenitors of SNe Ia can be probed by MeV nuclear gamma rays emitted in the decays of radioactive nickel and cobalt into iron. We compare the cosmic star formation and SN Ia rates, finding that their different redshift evolution requires a large fraction of SNe Ia to have large delay times. A delay-time distribution of the form t -α with α = 1.0 ± 0.3 provides a good fit, implying that 50% of SNe Ia explode more than ∼1 Gyr after progenitor birth. The extrapolation of the cosmic SN Ia rate to z = 0 agrees with the rate we deduce from catalogs of local SNe Ia. We investigate prospects for gamma-ray telescopes to exploit the facts that escaping gamma rays directly reveal the power source of SNe Ia and uniquely provide tomography of the expanding ejecta. We find large improvements relative to earlier studies by Gehrels et al. in 1987 and Timmes and Woosley in 1997 due to larger and more certain SN Ia rates and advances in gamma-ray detectors. The proposed Advanced Compton Telescope, with a narrow-line sensitivity ∼60 times better than that of current satellites, would, on an annual basis, detect up to ∼100 SNe Ia (3σ) and provide revolutionary model discrimination for SNe Ia within 20 Mpc, with gamma-ray light curves measured with ∼10σ significance daily for ∼100 days. Even more modest improvements in detector sensitivity would open a new and invaluable astronomy with frequent SN Ia gamma-ray detections.

  6. Discoveries by the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Fermi is a large space gamma-ray mission developed by NASA and the DOE with major contributions from France, Germany, Italy, Japan and Sweden. It was launched in June 2008 and has been performing flawlessly since then. The main instrument is the Large Area Telescope (LAT) operating in the 20 MeV to 300 GeV range and a smaller monitor instrument is the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) operating in the 8 keV to 40 MeV range. New findings are occurring every week. Some of the key discoveries are: 1) Discovery of many new gamma-ray pulsars, including gamma-ray only and millisecond pulsars. 2) Detection of high energy gamma-ray emission from globular clusters, most likely due to summed emission from msec pulsars. 3) Discovery of delayed and extended high energy gamma-ray emission from short and long gamma-ray busts. 4) Detection of approximately 250 gamma-ray bursts per year with the GBM instrument. 5) Most accurate measurement of the cosmic ray electron spectrum between 30 GeV and 1 TeV, showing some excess above the conventional diffusion model. The talk will present the new discoveries and their implications.

  7. Feasibility study of gamma-ray medical radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alyassin, Abdalmajeid M.; Maqsoud, Hamza A.; Mashat, Ahmad M.; Al-Mohr, Al-Sayed; Abdulwajid, Subhan

    2013-01-01

    This research explores the feasibility of using gamma-ray radiography in medical imaging. We will show that gamma-ray medical radiography has the potential to provide alternative diagnostic medical information to X-ray radiography. Approximately one Ci Am-241 radioactive source which emits mono-energetic 59.5 keV gamma rays was used. Several factors that influence the feasibility of this study were tested. They were the radiation source uniformity, image uniformity, and image quality parameters such as contrast, noise, and spatial resolution. In addition, several gamma-ray and X-ray images were acquired using humanoid phantoms. These images were recorded on computed radiography image receptors and displayed on a standard monitor. Visual assessments of these images were then conducted. The Am-241 radioactive source provided relatively uniform radiation exposure and images. Image noise and image contrast were mainly dependent on the exposure time and source size, whereas spatial resolution was dependent on source size and magnification factor. The gamma-ray humanoid phantom images were of lower quality than the X-ray images mainly due to the low radioactivity used and not enough exposure time. Nevertheless, the gamma-ray images displayed most of the main structures contained in the humanoid phantoms. Higher exposure rates and thus lower exposure times were estimated for different pure Am-241 source sizes that are hypothesized to provide high quality images similar to X-ray images. For instance, a 10 mm source size of pure Am-241 with 7 s exposure time should produce images similar in contrast and noise to X-ray images. This research paves the way for the production and usage of a highly radioactive Am-241 source with the potential to lead to the feasibility of acceptable quality medical gamma-ray radiography. - Highlights: ► Characterized the performance of gamma-ray radiography. ► Displayed medical images of humanoid phantoms using gamma radiography. ► Am-241

  8. Gamma-ray transients and related astrophysical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lingenfelter, R.E.; Hudson, H.S.; Worrall, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    The workshop covered the study of the explosive phenomena responsible for the various gamma ray transients. X-ray burster observations and theories were also reviewed with emphasis on their relationship to gamma ray bursts. Recent observational data, particularly from the SMM, HEAO, and VENERA satellites made the workshop especially timely. Major headings include: gamma-ray transients, x-ray bursts, solar transients, and instrumental concepts. Individual items from the workshop were prepared separately for the data base

  9. Performance of CdZnTe coplanar-grid gamma-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luke, P.N.; Eissler, E.E.

    1995-11-01

    CdZnTe crystals grown using the high-pressure Bridgman method exhibit many properties that are desirable for radiation detector fabrication, such as high resistivity, stable operation, relative ease of processing, and the availability of large volume crystals. However, as is common with other compound semi-conductor materials, currently available CdZnTe crystals have poor charge transport characteristics. This seriously the spectral performance of detectors, especially in gamma-ray detection. The coplanar-grid detection technique was recently developed to address such charge collection problems. This technique was first demonstrated using a 5 mm cube CdZnTe detector, and a dramatic improvement in spectral response has been achieved. These early results verified the effectiveness of this technique and suggested that large-volume gamma-ray detectors with high energy resolution can be realized. To further the development of such detectors, it is important to understand the various factors that affect detector performance. The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of material properties on the spectral performance of CdZnTe coplanar-grid detectors. Theoretical spectral response is to show the level of performance that can be achieved given the typical carrier mobility-lifetime (μτ) properties of present-day materials. Nonuniformity in the charge transport properties of the material, which could limit the energy resolution of the detectors, has been studied experimentally and some of the results are presented here

  10. Cosmic gamma-ray background radiation. Current understandings and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    The cosmic gamma-ray background radiation is one of the most fundamental observables in the gamma-ray band. Although the origin of the cosmic gamma-ray background radiation has been a mystery for a long time, the Fermi gamma-ray space telescope has recently measured it at 0.1-820 GeV and revealed that the cosmic GeV gamma-ray background is composed of blazars, radio galaxies, and star-forming galaxies. However, Fermi still leaves the following questions. Those are dark matter contribution, origins of the cosmic MeV gamma-ray background, and the connection to the IceCube TeV-PeV neutrino events. In this proceeding, I will review the current understandings of the cosmic gamma-ray background and discuss future prospects of cosmic gamma-ray background radiation studies. (author)

  11. GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM TWO BLAZARS BEHIND THE GALACTIC PLANE: B2013+370 AND B2023+336

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kara, E.; Errando, M.; Aliu, E.; Mukherjee, R.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Richards, J. L.; Böttcher, M.; Fortin, P.; Halpern, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    B2013+370 and B2023+336 are two blazars at low-galactic latitude that were previously proposed to be the counterparts for the EGRET unidentified sources 3EG J2016+3657 and 3EG J2027+3429. Gamma-ray emission associated with the EGRET sources has been detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, and the two sources, 1FGL J2015.7+3708 and 1FGL J2027.6+3335, have been classified as unidentified in the 1 year catalog. This analysis of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data collected during 31 months reveals that the 1FGL sources are spatially compatible with the blazars and are significantly variable, supporting the hypothesis of extragalactic origin for the gamma-ray emission. The gamma-ray light curves are compared with 15 GHz radio light curves from the 40 m telescope at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory. Simultaneous variability is seen in both bands for the two blazar candidates. The study is completed with the X-ray analysis of 1FGL J2015.7+3708 using Swift observations that were triggered in 2010 August by a Fermi-detected flare. The resulting spectral energy distribution shows a two-component structure typical of blazars. We also identify a second source in the field of view of 1FGL J2027.6+3335 with similar characteristics to the known LAT pulsars. This study gives solid evidence favoring blazar counterparts for these two unidentified EGRET and Fermi sources, supporting the hypothesis that a number of unidentified gamma-ray sources at low-galactic latitudes are indeed of extragalactic origin.

  12. Improved yield of high resolution mercuric iodide gamma-ray spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerrish, V.; van den Berg, L.

    1990-01-01

    Mercuric iodide (HgI 2 ) exhibits properties which make it attractive for use as a solid state nuclear radiation detector. The wide bandgap (E g = 2.1 eV) and low dark current allow room temperature operation, while the high atomic number provides a large gamma-ray cross section. However, poor hole transport has been a major limitation in the routine fabrication of high-resolution spectrometers using this material. This paper presents the results of gamma-ray response and charge transport parameter measurements conducted during the past year at EG ampersand G/EM on 96 HgI 2 spectrometers. The gamma-ray response measurements reveal that detector quality is correlated with the starting material used in the crystal growth. In particular, an increased yield of high-resolution spectrometers was obtained from HgI 2 which was synthesized by precipitation from an aqueous solution, as opposed to using material from commercial vendors. Data are also presented which suggest that better spectrometer performance is tied to improved hole transport. Finally, some initial results on a study of detector uniformity reveal spatial variations which may explain why the correlation between hole transport parameters and spectrometer performance is sometimes violated. 6 refs., 3 figs

  13. Gamma-Ray Interactions for Reachback Analysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Myers, Steven Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-02

    This presentation is a part of the DHS LSS spectroscopy training course and presents an overview of the following concepts: identification and measurement of gamma rays; use of gamma counts and energies in research. Understanding the basic physics of how gamma rays interact with matter can clarify how certain features in a spectrum were produced.

  14. Development of gallium arsenide gamma spectrometric detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Kuru, I.

    1975-03-01

    GaAs semiconductor material has been considered to be a suitable material for gamma-ray spectrometer operating at room temperature since it has a wid-band gap, larger than that of silicon and germanium. The basic objective of this work is to develop a GaAs gamma-ray spectrometric detector which could be used for gamma spectrometric measurement of uranium and plutonium in nuclear fuel safeguards. Liquid phase epitaxial techniques using iron (Fe) as dopant have been developed in making high purity GaAs crystals suitable for gamma-ray spectrometer operating at room temperature. Concentration of Fe in the epitaxial crystal was controlled by initial growth temperature. The best quality epitaxial crystal was obtained under the following conditions: starting temperature is about 800degC, the proportion of Fe to Ga solvent is 1 to 300. Carrier concentration of epitaxial crystals grown distributed in the ranges of 10 12 cm -3 to 10 14 cm -3 at room temperature. The thickness of the crystals ranged from 38 μm to 120 μm. Au-GaAs surface barrier detector was made of epitaxial crystal. Some of the detector were encapsulated in a can with a 50 μm Be window by welding a can to the detector holder. The detector with high energy resolution and good charge collecting characteristics was selected by alpha spectrometry at room temperature. Energy resolution of the detector for gamma-rays up to about 200 keV was very good at room temperature operation. The best energy resolutions taken with a GaAs detector were 3 keV (fwhm) and 3.8 keV for 241 Am 59.6 keV and 57 Co 122 keV, respectively, at room temperature. In order to study the applicability of the detector for nuclear safeguards, the measurements of 235 U gamma-ray spectrum have been carried out at room temperature. It was clarified that the gamma-ray spectrum of enriched U sample could be measured in high resolution with GaAs detector at room temperature, and that the content of 235 U in enriched U sources could be determined by

  15. Performance of the prototype LaBr{sub 3} spectrometer developed for the JET gamma-ray camera upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigamonti, D., E-mail: davide.rigamonti@mib.infn.it; Nocente, M.; Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini,” Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola,” CNR, Milano (Italy); Muraro, A.; Giacomelli, L.; Cippo, E. P.; Tardocchi, M. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola,” CNR, Milano (Italy); Perseo, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini,” Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Boltruczyk, G.; Gosk, M.; Korolczuk, S.; Mianowski, S.; Zychor, I. [Narodowe Centrum Badań Jądrowych (NCBJ), 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Fernandes, A.; Pereira, R. C. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Figueiredo, J. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); EUROfusion Programme Management Unit, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); Kiptily, V. [Culham Science Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham (United Kingdom); Murari, A. [EUROfusion Programme Management Unit, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Universita’ di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Padova (Italy); Collaboration: EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    In this work, we describe the solution developed by the gamma ray camera upgrade enhancement project to improve the spectroscopic properties of the existing JET γ-ray camera. Aim of the project is to enable gamma-ray spectroscopy in JET deuterium-tritium plasmas. A dedicated pilot spectrometer based on a LaBr{sub 3} crystal coupled to a silicon photo-multiplier has been developed. A proper pole zero cancellation network able to shorten the output signal to a length of 120 ns has been implemented allowing for spectroscopy at MHz count rates. The system has been characterized in the laboratory and shows an energy resolution of 5.5% at E{sub γ} = 0.662 MeV, which extrapolates favorably in the energy range of interest for gamma-ray emission from fast ions in fusion plasmas.

  16. Gamma-ray spectrometry applied to down-hole logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumesnil, P.; Umiastowsky, K.

    1983-11-01

    Gamma-ray spectrometry permits to improve the accuracy of natural gamma, gamma-gamma and neutron-gamma geophysical measurements. The probe developed at Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay allows down-hole gamma-ray spectrometry. Among others, this probe can be applied to the uranium content determination by selective natural gamma method, down-hole determination of the ash content in the coal by gamma-gamma selective method and elemental analysis by neutron-gamma method. For the calibration and an exact interpretation of the measurements it is important to know the gamma-ray and neutron characteristics of the different kinds of rocks considered as probabilistic variables

  17. Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS): a new balloon-borne experiment for gamma-ray line astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teegarden, B.J.; Cline, T.L.; Gehrels, N.; Porreca, G.; Tueller, J.; Leventhal, M.; Huters, A.F.; Maccallum, C.J.; Stang, P.D.; Sandia Labs., Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy is a relatively new field that holds great promise for further understanding of high energy astrophysical processes. When the high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer (GRSE) was removed from the GRO payload, a balloon program was initiated to permit continued development and improvement of instrumentation in this field, as well as continued scientific observations. The Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS) is one of the experiments selected as part of this program. The instrument contains a number of new and innovative features that are expected to produce a significant improvement in source location accuracy and sensitivity over previous balloon and satellite experiments

  18. High-energy gamma-ray emission in compact binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerutti, Benoit

    2010-01-01

    Four gamma-ray sources have been associated with binary systems in our Galaxy: the micro-quasar Cygnus X-3 and the gamma-ray binaries LS I +61 degrees 303, LS 5039 and PSR B1259-63. These systems are composed of a massive companion star and a compact object of unknown nature, except in PSR B1259-63 where there is a young pulsar. I propose a comprehensive theoretical model for the high-energy gamma-ray emission and variability in gamma-ray emitting binaries. In this model, the high-energy radiation is produced by inverse Compton scattering of stellar photons on ultra-relativistic electron-positron pairs injected by a young pulsar in gamma-ray binaries and in a relativistic jet in micro-quasars. Considering anisotropic inverse Compton scattering, pair production and pair cascade emission, the TeV gamma-ray emission is well explained in LS 5039. Nevertheless, this model cannot account for the gamma-ray emission in LS I +61 degrees 303 and PSR B1259-63. Other processes should dominate in these complex systems. In Cygnus X-3, the gamma-ray radiation is convincingly reproduced by Doppler-boosted Compton emission of pairs in a relativistic jet. Gamma-ray binaries and micro-quasars provide a novel environment for the study of pulsar winds and relativistic jets at very small spatial scales. (author)

  19. Gamma ray emission from pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvati, M.; Massaro, E.

    1978-01-01

    A model for the production of gamma rays in a pulsar environment is presented, together with numerical computations fitted to the observations of PSR 0833-45. It is assumed that the primary particles are accelerated close to the star surface and then injected along the open field lines, which cause them to emit curvature radiation. The equation describing the particles' braking is integrated exactly up to the first order in the pulsar rotational frequency, and the transfer problem for the curvature photons is solved with the aberration, the Doppler shif, and the pair production absorption being taken into account. The latter effect is due not only to the transverse component of the magnetic field, but also to the electric field induced by the rotation. The synchrotron radiation emitted by the secondary particles is also included, subject to the 'on-the-spot' approximation. It is found that the observed gamma rays originate in the innermost regions of the magnetosphere, where the open lines' bundle is narrow and the geometrical beaming is effective. As shown by the computed pulse profiles, the duty cycle turns out to be equal to a few percent, comparable to the one of PSR 0833-45. The averaged spectra indicate that a substantial fraction of the primary photons do outlive the interaction with the magnetisphere; furthermore, the agreement in shape with the observational curves suggests that the acceleration output is fiarly close to a monoenergetic beam of particles. (orig.) [de

  20. VHE Gamma-ray Supernova Remnants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, Stefan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-01-22

    Increasing observational evidence gathered especially in X-rays and {gamma}-rays during the course of the last few years support the notion that Supernova remnants (SNRs) are Galactic particle accelerators up to energies close to the ''knee'' in the energy spectrum of Cosmic rays. This review summarizes the current status of {gamma}-ray observations of SNRs. Shell-type as well as plerionic type SNRs are addressed and prospect for observations of these two source classes with the upcoming GLAST satellite in the energy regime above 100 MeV are given.

  1. The sub-energetic gamma-ray burst GRB 031203 as a cosmic analogue to the nearby GRB 980425.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderberg, A M; Kulkarni, S R; Berger, E; Fox, D W; Sako, M; Frail, D A; Gal-Yam, A; Moon, D S; Cenko, S B; Yost, S A; Phillips, M M; Persson, S E; Freedman, W L; Wyatt, P; Jayawardhana, R; Paulson, D

    2004-08-05

    Over the six years since the discovery of the gamma-ray burst GRB 980425, which was associated with the nearby (distance approximately 40 Mpc) supernova 1998bw, astronomers have debated fiercely the nature of this event. Relative to bursts located at cosmological distance (redshift z approximately 1), GRB 980425 was under-luminous in gamma-rays by three orders of magnitude. Radio calorimetry showed that the explosion was sub-energetic by a factor of 10. Here we report observations of the radio and X-ray afterglow of the recent GRB 031203 (refs 5-7), which has a redshift of z = 0.105. We demonstrate that it too is sub-energetic which, when taken together with the low gamma-ray luminosity, suggests that GRB 031203 is the first cosmic analogue to GRB 980425. We find no evidence that this event was a highly collimated explosion viewed off-axis. Like GRB 980425, GRB 031203 appears to be an intrinsically sub-energetic gamma-ray burst. Such sub-energetic events have faint afterglows. We expect intensive follow-up of faint bursts with smooth gamma-ray light curves (common to both GRB 031203 and 980425) to reveal a large population of such events.

  2. Pulse-shape discrimination of high-energy neutrons and gamma rays in NaI(Tl)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Share, G.H.; Kurfess, J.D.; Theus, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    Pulse-shape discrimination can be used to separate neutron and gamma-ray interactions depositing energies up to in excess of 50 MeV in NaI(Tl) crystals. The secondary alpha particles, deuterons and protons produced in the neutron interactions are also resolvable. (Auth.)

  3. Properties of gamma-ray burst progenitor stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pawan; Narayan, Ramesh; Johnson, Jarrett L

    2008-07-18

    We determined some basic properties of stars that produce spectacular gamma-ray bursts at the end of their lives. We assumed that accretion of the outer portion of the stellar core by a central black hole fuels the prompt emission and that fall-back and accretion of the stellar envelope later produce the plateau in the x-ray light curve seen in some bursts. Using x-ray data for three bursts, we estimated the radius of the stellar core to be approximately (1 - 3) x 10(10) cm and that of the stellar envelope to be approximately (1 - 2) x 10(11) cm. The density profile in the envelope is fairly shallow, with rho approximately r(-2) (where rho is density and r is distance from the center of the explosion). The rotation speeds of the core and envelope are approximately 0.05 and approximately 0.2 of the local Keplerian speed, respectively.

  4. Gamma-rays from decaying dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertone, G. [Paris-6 Univ., 75 (France). Inst. d' Astrophysique; Buchmueller, W.; Covi, L.; Ibarra, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2007-10-15

    We study the prospects for detecting gamma-rays from decaying Dark Matter (DM), focusing in particular on gravitino DM in R-parity breaking vacua. Given the substantially different angular distribution of the predicted gamma-ray signal with respect to the case of annihilating DM, and the relatively poor (of order 0.1 ) angular resolution of gamma-ray detectors, the best strategy for detection is in this case to look for an exotic contribution to the gamma-ray flux at high galactic latitudes, where the decaying DM contribution would resemble an astrophysical extragalactic component, similar to the one inferred by EGRET observations. Upcoming experiments such as GLAST and AMS-02 may identify this exotic contribution and discriminate it from astrophysical sources, or place significant constraints on the mass and lifetime of DM particles. (orig.)

  5. Study of X-rays and nuclear gamma -rays in muonic thallium

    CERN Document Server

    Backe, H; Jahnke, U; Kankeleit, E; Pearce, R M; Petitjean, C; Schellenberg, L; Schneuwly, H; Schröder, W U; Walter, H K; Zehnder, A

    1972-01-01

    Energies and intensities of muonic X-rays, nuclear gamma -rays and mu -capture gamma -rays were measured in natural muonic thallium with Ge (Li) detectors. The absolute intensities of higher mu X-rays were reproduced by a cascade calculation starting with a statistical population at n=20 including K-, L- and M-conversion. The electron screening effect was deduced from energies of higher mu X-rays. Eight prompt nuclear gamma -rays were found. This excitation explains the anomalous intensity ratios of the 2p-1s and 3d-2p fine structure components. From the nuclear gamma -rays of the first excited states were deduced: the magnetic h.f. splittings, muonic isomer shifts E2/M1 mixing ratios and the half-life in the presence of the muon in /sup 205/Tl. Evidence for a magnetic nuclear polarization was found. An isotope shift of Delta E=10.35+or-0.25 keV was measured for the 1s/sub 1/2/ state which is compared with data from optical spectroscopy. From an analysis of the time distribution of delayed gamma -rays from mu...

  6. gamma. -ray. Present status and problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okudaira, K [Rikkyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1975-01-01

    As ..gamma..-ray advances straightly through space, the study on cosmic ..gamma..-ray will give the information concerning the origin directly. However, the intensity is weak, and the avoidance of background is a serious problem. The wide-spread components were studied by OSO-3. The intensity of the galactic disc component around 100 MeV was reported as (3.4+-1.0)x10/sup -5/ photons (cm/sup 2/, radian, sec)/sup -1/ by OSO-3 and 0.2x10/sup -4/ photons (cm/sup 2/, radian sec)/sup -1/ by SAS-2, and corresponds to the calculated ..gamma.. yield from ..pi../sup 0/. The strong disc component, so-called galactic center region, has been observed, and is due to the mixture of ..gamma..-ray from ..pi../sup 0/ and inverse Compton ..gamma..-ray. A peak at 476+-24 KeV was found as well as the continuous component. Special care must be taken for the observation of isotropic component, since it is hardly distinguished from the background. It is considered that the isotropic component is due to the inverse Compton scattering of 3/sup 0/K radiation in super-galactic space and the contribution from outer galaxy. The nearest point source of ..gamma..-ray is the sun. Among the other point sources, the crab nebula is the most reliable one. The energy flux of pulse component showed the spectrum of E/sup -1/. ..gamma..-ray bursts were observed by man-made satellites Vela-5 and 6. Theoretical explanation is still incomplete regarding the bursts. (Kato, T.).

  7. SYSTEMATIC STUDY OF GAMMA-RAY-BRIGHT BLAZARS WITH OPTICAL POLARIZATION AND GAMMA-RAY VARIABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Ryosuke; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Kanda, Yuka; Shiki, Kensei; Kawabata, Miho; Nakaoka, Tatsuya; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Takata, Koji; Ui, Takahiro [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Madejski, Greg M. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, 2575 Sand Hill Road M/S 29, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Uemura, Makoto; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Kawabata, Koji S.; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Ohsugi, Takashi [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Schinzel, Frank K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Moritani, Yuki [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Sasada, Mahito [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Yamanaka, Masayuki, E-mail: itoh@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp, E-mail: itoh@hp.phys.titech.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, Okamoto, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501 (Japan); and others

    2016-12-10

    Blazars are highly variable active galactic nuclei that emit radiation at all wavelengths from radio to gamma rays. Polarized radiation from blazars is one key piece of evidence for synchrotron radiation at low energies, and it also varies dramatically. The polarization of blazars is of interest for understanding the origin, confinement, and propagation of jets. However, even though numerous measurements have been performed, the mechanisms behind jet creation, composition, and variability are still debated. We performed simultaneous gamma-ray and optical photopolarimetry observations of 45 blazars between 2008 July and 2014 December to investigate the mechanisms of variability and search for a basic relation between the several subclasses of blazars. We identify a correlation between the maximum degree of optical linear polarization and the gamma-ray luminosity or the ratio of gamma-ray to optical fluxes. Since the maximum polarization degree depends on the condition of the magnetic field (chaotic or ordered), this result implies a systematic difference in the intrinsic alignment of magnetic fields in parsec-scale relativistic jets between different types of blazars (flat-spectrum radio quasars vs. BL Lacs) and consequently between different types of radio galaxies (FR I versus FR II).

  8. Gamma-ray spectroscopy on irradiated fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terremoto, Luis Antonio Albiac

    2009-01-01

    The recording of gamma-ray spectra along an irradiated fuel rod allows the fission products to be qualitatively and quantitatively examined. Among all nondestructive examinations performed on irradiated fuel rods by gamma-ray spectroscopy, the most comprehensive one is the average burnup measurement, which is quantitative. Moreover, burnup measurements by means of gamma-ray spectroscopy are less time-consuming and waste-generating than burnup measurements by radiochemical, destructive methods. This work presents the theoretical foundations and experimental techniques necessary to measure, using nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy, the average burnup of irradiated fuel rods in a laboratory equipped with hot cells. (author)

  9. GAMMA RAYS FROM STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storm, Emma M.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission, presumably from non-thermal processes connected to the acceleration of cosmic-ray nuclei and electrons. The detection of gamma rays from starburst galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity. Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 μm) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star-forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study, we apply the functional relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities of galaxies derived by the Fermi Collaboration to a sample of the best candidate galaxy clusters for detection in gamma rays in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with star formation in galaxy clusters. We find that several clusters have predicted gamma-ray emission from star formation that are within an order of magnitude of the upper limits derived in Ackermann et al. based on non-detection by Fermi-LAT. Given the current gamma-ray limits, star formation likely plays a significant role in the gamma-ray emission in some clusters, especially those with cool cores. We predict that both Fermi-LAT over the course of its lifetime and the future Cerenkov Telescope Array will be able to detect gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies in clusters.

  10. Multilayer x-ray mirrors for the objective crystal spectrometer on the Spectrum Roentgen Gamma satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Louis, E.; Spiller, E.; Abdali, S.

    1995-01-01

    with Kr+- and Ar+- ions of 300, 500, and 1000 eV. We examined the effect of different polishing parameters on the smoothening of the Co- and Ni-layers. The in-situ reflectivity of lambda equals 3.16 nm during deposition and the ex-situ grazing incidence reflectivity of Cu-K(alpha ) radiation (lambda...... multiplied by 6 cm2 Si (111) crystals for the Objective Crystal Spectrometer on the Russian Spectrum Rontgen Gamma satellite. The coatings on the flight crystals have a period Lambda of 3.95 plus or minus 0.02 nm and a reflectivity of more than 8% averaged over s- and p-polarization over the entire...

  11. Magnetars in Ultra-Long Gamma-Ray Bursts and GRB 111209A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gompertz, B.; Fruchter, A., E-mail: bgompertz@stsci.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2017-04-10

    Supernova 2011kl, associated with the ultra-long gamma-ray burst (ULGRB) 111209A, exhibited a higher-than-normal peak luminosity, placing it in the parameter space between regular supernovae and super-luminous supernovae. Its light curve can only be matched by an abnormally high fraction of {sup 56}Ni that appears inconsistent with the observed spectrum, and as a result it has been suggested that the supernova, and by extension the gamma-ray burst, are powered by the spin-down of a highly magnetized millisecond pulsar, known as a magnetar. We investigate the broadband observations of ULGRB 111209A and find two independent measures that suggest a high density circumburst environment. However, the light curve of the GRB afterglow shows no evidence of a jet break (the steep decline that would be expected as the jet slows due to the resistance of the external medium) out to three weeks after trigger, implying a wide jet. Combined with the high isotropic energy of the burst, this implies that only a magnetar with a spin period of ∼1 ms or faster can provide enough energy to power both ULGRB 111209A and Supernova 2011kl.

  12. High-resolution monochromatic x-ray imaging system based on spherically bent crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Lehecka, T.; Obenschain, S.; Bodner, S.; Pawley, C.; Gerber, K.; Sethian, J.; Brown, C.M.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.; Holland, G.

    1998-01-01

    We have developed an improved x-ray imaging system based on spherically curve crystals. It is designed and used for diagnostics of targets ablatively accelerated by the Nike KrF laser. A spherically curved quartz crystal (2d=6.687 Angstrom, R=200 mm) has been used to produce monochromatic backlit images with the He-like Si resonance line (1865 eV) as the source of radiation. The spatial resolution of the x-ray optical system is 1.7 μm in selected places and 2 - 3 μm over a larger area. Time-resolved backlit monochromatic images of polystyrene planar targets driven by the Nike facility have been obtained with a spatial resolution of 2.5 μm in selected places and 5 μm over the focal spot of the Nike laser. copyright 1998 Optical Society of America

  13. Upgrade of the JET gamma-ray cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soare, S.; Curuia, M.; Anghel, M.; Constantin, M.; David, E.; Craciunescu, T.; Falie, D.; Pantea, A.; Tiseanu, I.; Kiptily, V.; Prior, P.; Edlington, T.; Griph, S.; Krivchenkov, Y.; Loughlin, M.; Popovichev, S.; Riccardo, V; Syme, B.; Thompson, V.; Lengar, I.; Murari, A.; Bonheure, G.; Le Guern, F.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The JET gamma-ray camera diagnostics have already provided valuable information on the gamma-ray imaging of fast ion in JET plasmas. The applicability of gamma-ray imaging to high performance deuterium and deuterium-tritium JET discharges is strongly dependent on the fulfilment of rather strict requirements for the characterisation of the neutron and gamma-ray radiation fields. These requirements have to be satisfied within very stringent boundary conditions for the design, such as the requirement of minimum impact on the co-existing neutron camera diagnostics. The JET Gamma-Ray Cameras (GRC) upgrade project deals with these issues with particular emphasis on the design of appropriate neutron/gamma-ray filters ('neutron attenuators'). Several design versions have been developed and evaluated for the JET GRC neutron attenuators at the conceptual design level. The main design parameter was the neutron attenuation factor. The two design solutions, that have been finally chosen and developed at the level of scheme design, consist of: a) one quasi-crescent shaped neutron attenuator (for the horizontal camera) and b) two quasi-trapezoid shaped neutron attenuators (for the vertical one). The second design solution has different attenuation lengths: a short version, to be used together with the horizontal attenuator for deuterium discharges, and a long version to be used for high performance deuterium and DT discharges. Various neutron-attenuating materials have been considered (lithium hydride with natural isotopic composition and 6 Li enriched, light and heavy water, polyethylene). Pure light water was finally chosen as the attenuating material for the JET gamma-ray cameras. The neutron attenuators will be steered in and out of the detector line-of-sight by means of an electro-pneumatic steering and control system. The MCNP code was used for neutron and gamma ray transport in order to evaluate the effect of the neutron attenuators on the neutron field of the

  14. Egret observations of the extragalactic gamma-ray emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sreekumar, P.; Bertsch, D.L.; Dingus, B.L.

    1998-01-01

    The all-sky survey in high-energy gamma rays (E > 30 MeV) carried out by EGRET aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory provides a unique opportunity to examine in detail the diffuse gamma-ray emission. The observed diffuse emission has a Galactic component arising from cosmic-ray interactions wi...

  15. Sensitivity of Gamma-Ray Detectors to Polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Yadigaroglu, I. -A.

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the largest gamma-ray detector to date, EGRET, does not have useful polarization sensitivity. We have explored here some improved approaches to analyzing gamma-ray pair production events, leading to important gains in sensitivity to polarization. The performance of the next generation gamma-ray instrument GLAST is investigated using a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of the complete detector.

  16. Bulk density calculations from prompt gamma ray yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, A.A.; Nagadi, M.M.; Al-Amoudi, O.S.B.; Maslehuddin, M.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The gamma ray yield from a Prompt Gamma ray Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) setup is a linear function of element concentration and neutron flux in a the sample with constant bulk density. If the sample bulk density varies as well, then the element concentration and the neutron flux has a nonlinear correlation with the gamma ray yield [1]. The measurement of gamma ray yield non-linearity from samples and a standard can be used to estimate the bulk density of the samples. In this study the prompt gamma ray yield from Blast Furnace Slag, Fly Ash, Silica Fumes and Superpozz cements samples have been measured as a function of their calcium and silicon concentration using KFUPM accelerator-based PGNAA setup [2]. Due to different bulk densities of the blended cement samples, the measured gamma ray yields have nonlinear correlation with calcium and silicon concentration of the samples. The non-linearity in the yield was observed to increase with gamma rays energy and element concentration. The bulk densities of the cement samples were calculated from ratio of gamma ray yield from blended cement and that from a Portland cement standard. The calculated bulk densities have good agreement with the published data. The result of this study will be presented

  17. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgaard, Jens

    A new method - Noise Adjusted Singular Value Decomposition, NASVD - for processing gamma-ray spectra has been developed as part of a Ph.D. project. By using this technique one is able to decompose a large set of data - for example from airborne gamma-ray surveys - into a few spectral components....... By knowing the spectral components and their amplitudes in each of the measured spectra one is able to extract more information from the data than possible with the methods used otherwise....

  18. Cadium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) Gamma Ray Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    William Quam

    2001-01-01

    This report describes CZT crystals and their use in large arrays for generation of gamma ray spectra. Laboratory spectra will be shown together with spectra accumulated by various battery powered portable instruments (see Appendix A). One of these portable instruments was specifically constructed to minimize power consumption and yet provide reasonable isotope identification capability. Detailed data will be presented covering gamma energy resolution, gamma peak shapes, system background, and detector efficiency. Nearly all data were taken with very small crystals of CZT; cubes 5 mm on a side. A few spectra will be presented from cylindrical crystals of about the same size (see Appendix A). The small crystal size leads to low counting rates and extended counting times for reliable isotope identification. We have addressed this problem by using arrays of CZT crystals, initially two crystals and, at present, arrays of eight crystals. Data will be shown relating spectral parameters for these two arrays. System MDA is one way of combining resolution, efficiency, and background that will enable direct comparison of various detector types for individual isotope identification. We have calculated the MDA for an early dual crystal array and the current eight crystal array. Data derived from each array will be presented. In addition, it is possible to extrapolate the MDA methodology to much larger arrays. A 32-crystal array is under construction and extrapolations to 256 and 1024 crystals are considered possible. Estimated MDA values for these larger arrays are also presented. Several 8-crystal arrays have been constructed and versions have been incorporated into portable instruments. Descriptions of these small instruments are given covering physical size, weight, and general configuration. These instruments have been tested for shock and temperature effects and data will be presented on the results of these tests. The MDA concept will also allow extrapolation to large

  19. Multiple Gamma-Ray Detection Capability of a CeBr3 Detector for Gamma Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Naqvi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The newly developed cerium tribromide (CeBr3 detector has reduced intrinsic gamma-ray activity with gamma energy restricted to 1400–2200 keV energy range. This narrower region of background gamma rays allows the CeBr3 detector to detect more than one gamma ray to analyze the gamma-ray spectrum. Use of multiple gamma-ray intensities in elemental analysis instead of a single one improves the accuracy of the estimated results. Multigamma-ray detection capability of a cylindrical 75 mm × 75 mm (diameter × height CeBr3 detector has been tested by analyzing the chlorine concentration in water samples using eight chlorine prompt gamma rays over 517 to 8578 keV energies utilizing a D-D portable neutron generator-based PGNAA setup and measuring the corresponding minimum detection limit (MDC of chlorine. The measured MDC of chlorine for gamma rays with 517–8578 keV energies varies from 0.07 ± 0.02 wt% to 0.80 ± 0.24. The best value of MDC was measured to be 0.07 ± 0.02 wt% for 788 keV gamma rays. The experimental results are in good agreement with Monte Carlo calculations. The study has shown excellent detection capabilities of the CeBr3 detector for eight prompt gamma rays over 517–8578 keV energy range without significant background interference.

  20. Observational techniques of gamma rays astronomy in low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, J.M. da.

    1982-02-01

    Due to the absorption of great part of the gamma-ray spectrum of cosmic origin, by the earth's atmosphere at heights above 20Km, gamma-ray astronomy achieved its full development only after the advent of the space age. Ballons and satellites are the space vehicles which have been used to transport gamma-ray telescopes to observational heights in the atmosphere, or out of it. The results of these experiments can determine the sources, the energy spectra and the intensities of the cosmic gamma-rays, and provide other important information of astrophysical interest. The detection of gamma-rays of cosmic origin is very difficult. The observational techniques used in gamma-ray astronomy are dependent on the energy range of the gamma-rays which one desires to detect. The most common telescopes of low energy gamma-ray astronomy (50KeV - 20MeV) use NaI(Tl) scintillators, or germanium diodes, as principal detectors, surrounded by an active shield (anticoincidence) of organic or inorganic scintillators. (Author) [pt

  1. Possible galactic origin of. gamma. -ray bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manchanda, R K; Ramsden, D [Southampton Univ. (UK). Dept. of Physics

    1977-03-31

    It is stated that extragalactic models for the origin of non-solar ..gamma..-ray bursts include supernova bursts in remote galaxies, and the collapse of the cores of active stars, whilst galactic models are based on flare stars, thermonuclear explosions in neutron stars and the sudden accretion of cometary gas on to neutron stars. The acceptability of any of these models may be tested by the observed size spectrum of the ..gamma..-ray bursts. The extragalactic models predict a power law spectrum with number index -1.5, whilst for the galactic models the number index will be -1. Experimental data on ..gamma..-ray bursts is, however, still meagre, and so far only 44 confirmed events have been recorded by satellite-borne instruments. The number spectrum of the observed ..gamma..-ray bursts indicates that the observed distribution for events with an energy < 10/sup -4/ erg/cm/sup 2/ is flat; this makes the choice of any model completely arbitrary. An analysis of the observed ..gamma..-ray events is here presented that suggests very interesting possibilities for their origin. There appears to be a preferred mean energy for ..gamma..-ray bursts; some 90% of the recorded events show a mean energy between 5 x 10/sup -5/ and 5 x 10/sup -4/ erg/cm/sup 2/, contrary to the predicted characteristics of the number spectrum of various models. A remarkable similarity is found between the distribution of ..gamma..-ray bursts and that of supernova remnants, suggesting a genetic relationship between the two and the galactic origin of the ..gamma..-ray bursts, and the burst source could be identified with completely run down neutron stars, formed during supernova explosions.

  2. Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marisaldi, Martino; Fuschino, Fabio; Labanti, Claudio; Tavani, Marco; Argan, Andrea; Del Monte, Ettore; Longo, Francesco; Barbiellini, Guido; Giuliani, Andrea; Trois, Alessio; Bulgarelli, Andrea; Gianotti, Fulvio; Trifoglio, Massimo

    2013-08-01

    Lightning and thunderstorm systems in general have been recently recognized as powerful particle accelerators, capable of producing electrons, positrons, gamma-rays and neutrons with energies as high as several tens of MeV. In fact, these natural systems turn out to be the highest energy and most efficient natural particle accelerators on Earth. Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) are millisecond long, very intense bursts of gamma-rays and are one of the most intriguing manifestation of these natural accelerators. Only three currently operative missions are capable of detecting TGFs from space: the RHESSI, Fermi and AGILE satellites. In this paper we review the characteristics of TGFs, including energy spectrum, timing structure, beam geometry and correlation with lightning, and the basic principles of the associated production models. Then we focus on the recent AGILE discoveries concerning the high energy extension of the TGF spectrum up to 100 MeV, which is difficult to reconcile with current theoretical models.

  3. Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marisaldi, Martino; Fuschino, Fabio; Labanti, Claudio; Tavani, Marco; Argan, Andrea; Del Monte, Ettore; Longo, Francesco; Barbiellini, Guido; Giuliani, Andrea; Trois, Alessio; Bulgarelli, Andrea; Gianotti, Fulvio; Trifoglio, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Lightning and thunderstorm systems in general have been recently recognized as powerful particle accelerators, capable of producing electrons, positrons, gamma-rays and neutrons with energies as high as several tens of MeV. In fact, these natural systems turn out to be the highest energy and most efficient natural particle accelerators on Earth. Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) are millisecond long, very intense bursts of gamma-rays and are one of the most intriguing manifestation of these natural accelerators. Only three currently operative missions are capable of detecting TGFs from space: the RHESSI, Fermi and AGILE satellites. In this paper we review the characteristics of TGFs, including energy spectrum, timing structure, beam geometry and correlation with lightning, and the basic principles of the associated production models. Then we focus on the recent AGILE discoveries concerning the high energy extension of the TGF spectrum up to 100 MeV, which is difficult to reconcile with current theoretical models

  4. Prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kern, J.

    1996-01-01

    The paper deals with a brief description of the principles of prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA), with the detection of gamma-rays, the PGAA project at SINQ and with the expected performances. 8 figs., 3 tabs., 10 refs

  5. Prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kern, J [Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. de Physique

    1996-11-01

    The paper deals with a brief description of the principles of prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA), with the detection of gamma-rays, the PGAA project at SINQ and with the expected performances. 8 figs., 3 tabs., 10 refs.

  6. Gamma-Ray Bursts: 4th Huntsville Symposium. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meegan, C.A.; Preece, R.D.; Koshut, T.M.

    1998-01-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the Fourth Huntsville Gamma-Ray Bursts Symposium held in September, 1997 in Huntsville, Alabama, USA. This conference occurred at a crucial time in the history of the gamma-ray burst research. In early 1997, 30 years after the detection of the first gamma-ray burst by the Vela satellites, counterparts to bursts were finally detected at optical and radio wavelengths. The symposium attracted about 200 scientists from 16 countries. Some of the topics discussed include gamma-ray burst spectra, x-ray observations, optical observations, radio observations, host galaxies, shocks and afterglows and models of gamma-ray bursts. There were 183 papers presented, out of these, 16 have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database

  7. The supernova-gamma-ray burst-jet connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, Jens

    2013-06-13

    The observed association between supernovae and gamma-ray bursts represents a cornerstone in our understanding of the nature of gamma-ray bursts. The collapsar model provides a theoretical framework for this connection. A key element is the launch of a bipolar jet (seen as a gamma-ray burst). The resulting hot cocoon disrupts the star, whereas the (56)Ni produced gives rise to radioactive heating of the ejecta, seen as a supernova. In this discussion paper, I summarize the observational status of the supernova-gamma-ray burst connection in the context of the 'engine' picture of jet-driven supernovae and highlight SN 2012bz/GRB 120422A--with its luminous supernova but intermediate high-energy luminosity--as a possible transition object between low-luminosity and jet gamma-ray bursts. The jet channel for supernova explosions may provide new insights into supernova explosions in general.

  8. Catalog of gamma-rays unplaced in radioactive decay schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Tsutomu; Kitao, Kensuke.

    1991-03-01

    A catalog is made for gamma-rays emitted in decay of radioactive nuclides but not placed in their decay schemes. It consists of two tables. In Table 1, the number of these unplaced gamma-ray components by a nuclide is given together with the fraction of total intensity of these gamma-rays to that of all observed gamma-rays. In Table 2, the unplaced gamma-rays are arranged in order of increasing energy. Each line of this table contains the gamma-ray energy, intensity, nuclide identification, and energies and intensities of the most prominent gamma-rays from the decay of the radionuclides. This catalog is a compilation from Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) maintained by National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory, of at February 1990. (author)

  9. Gamma rays from pulsar outer gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, J.; Romani, R.W.; Cheng Ho

    1993-01-01

    We describe a gamma ray pulsar code which computes the high energy photon emissivities from vacuum gaps in the outer magnetosphere, after the model outlined by Cheng, Ho and Ruderman (1986) and Ho (1989). Pair-production due to photon-photon interactions and radiation processes including curvature, synchrotron and inverse Compton processes are computed with an iterative scheme which converges to self-consistent photon and particle distributions for a sampling of locations in the outer magnetosphere. We follow the photons from these distributions as they propagate through the pulsar magnetosphere toward a distant observer. We include the effects of relativistic aberration, time-of-flight delays and reabsorption by photon-photon pair-production to determine an intensity map of the high energy pulsar emission on the sky. Using data from radio and optical observations to constrain the geometry of the magnetosphere as well as the possible observer viewing angles, we derive light curves and phase dependent spectra which can be directly compared to data from the Compton Observatory. Observations for Crab, Vela and the recently identified gamma ray pulsars Geminga, PSR1706-44 aNd PSR 1509-58 will provide important tests of our model calculations, help us to improve our picture of the relevant physics at work in pulsar magnetospheres and allow us to comment on the implications for future pulsar discoveries

  10. Near stellar sources of gamma-ray bursts

    OpenAIRE

    Luchkov, B. I.; Markin, P. D.

    2012-01-01

    Correlation analysis of gamma-ray burst coordinates and nearby stars, registered on 2008-2011, revealed 5 coincidences with angular accuracy better than 0.1 degree. The random probability is $7\\times 10^{-7}$, so evidencing that coincident stars are indeed gamma-ray burst sources. The proposed method should be continued in order to provide their share in common balance of cosmic gamma-ray bursts.

  11. Gamma rays from the interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloemen, J.B.G.M.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis describes new gamma-ray views on cosmic rays and the interstellar medium. The author describes the COS-B data base and the pre-launch and in-flight calibration data used for all analyses. Diffuse galactic gamma radiation (> 50 MeV) may be either a result of cosmic-ray-matter interactions, or of the cosmic-ray electrons with the interstellar radiation field (mainly at optical and infrared wavelengths), through the inverse-Compton process. A detailed comparison between the gamma-ray observations of the large complex of interstellar clouds in Orion and Monoceros and the CO and HI surveys of this region is given. It gives insight into the cloud penetration of cosmic rays and in the relation between CO detections and molecular hydrogen column densities. Next, the radial distribution of gamma rays in the Galaxy is studied, as well as the galactic centre (more precisely, the central 400 pc), which contains a large concentration of CO molecules. The H 2 /CO abundance and the cosmic-ray density in the galactic centre are discussed and compared to the findings for the galactic disk. In various analyses in this thesis a likelihood-ratio method is applied for parameter estimation and hypothesis testing. A general description of this method is added as an appendix. (Auth.)

  12. Review of GRANAT observations of gamma-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terekhov, O.; Denissenko, D.; Sunyaev, R.

    1995-01-01

    The GRANAT observatory was launched into a high apogee orbit on 1 December, 1989. Three instruments onboard GRANAT - PHEBUS, WATCH and SIGMA are able to detect gamma-ray bursts in a very broad energy range from 6 keV up to 100 MeV. Over 250 gamma-ray bursts were detected. We discuss the results...... of the observations of the time histories and spectral evolution of the detected events provided by the different instruments in different energy ranges. Short Gamma-Ray Bursts ( 2 s) events. Evidence of the existence...... of four differently behaving componenents in gamma-ray burst spectra is discussed. Statistical properties of the gamma-ray burst sources based on the 5 years of observations with (∼ 10−6 erg/cm2) sensitivity as well as the results of high sensitivity (∼ 10−8 erg/cm2) search for Gamma-Ray Bursts within...

  13. Ultra-high energy cosmic rays and prompt TeV gamma rays from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    physics pp. 789-792. Ultra-high energy cosmic rays and prompt. TeV gamma rays from gamma ray bursts ... The origin of the observed ultra-high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) events with ... are proton and electron rest mass, respectively.

  14. Gamma ray induced sensitization in CaSO4:Dy and competing trap model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagpal, J.S.; Kher, R.K.; Gangadharan, P.

    1979-01-01

    Gamma ray induced sensitization in CaSO 4 :Dy has been compared (by measurement of TL glow curves) for different temperatures during irradiation (25 0 , 120 0 and 250 0 C). Enhanced sensitization at elevated temperatures seems to support the competing trap model for supralinearity and sensitization in CaSO 4 :Dy. (author)

  15. Portable gamma and thermal neutron probe using a 6LiI(Eu) crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carneiro, Clemente J.G.; Araujo, Geraldo P.; Milian, Felix M.; Barbosa, Jurandir C.; Garcia, Fermin; Oliveira, Arno H.; Silva, Mario R.S.; Penna, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    Europium-activated lithium-6 iodide is a scintillator used for gamma and neutron counting. A portable detection system was built based on this scintillator. This system has three modules: the scintillator, a 10 m liquid light guide, and a Hamamatsu photon counting head H9319 used as a light pulse digitizer. Data transfer, measurement time and other necessary adjustment can be controlled by software from the PC through the RS-232C interface. The scintillator, a crystal of 6 LiI(Eu), is a small cylinder with 3 mm diameter and 40 mm length completely sealed in an aluminum tube coupled to the light guide. The small size of the scintillator increases the neutron/gamma count ratio, since 2 to 3 mm of thickness of this crystal absorbs all thermal neutrons. Intensities of X and gamma rays, and thermal neutrons can be recorded for time intervals of 10 ms to 1 s storing up to 10000 countings. The system was calibrated for measuring radiation doses for validating numerical models in dosimetry. Two characteristic reinforce this application, measurements can be done at several meters away from the radiation source and also inside of water. In addition, it was used to build nuclear probes based on Compton scattering or neutron moderation in porous media by attaching an AmBe source to the top of the aluminum tube. Tests were done to determine the reproducibility of counting rates. Background counting was measured at several temperatures to verify the influence of dark current of PMT. Sealed AmBe, low activity Am, and X rays sources were used for studies of radiation counting statistics. X rays apparatus was used to correlate counting rates measured with the 6 LiI(Eu) detection system and doses measured with an ionization chamber at several distances from the X ray source. (author)

  16. Effects of gamma-ray radiation on activity and apoptosis of rat cardiomyocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Shunying; Jiang Changsheng; Chen Guowei; Duan Haifeng; Wang Rongliang; Wu Bin; Guo Zikuan; Wang Lisheng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: It is reported that radiation-induced myocardial degeneration in the rat is preceded by changes in capillary structure and function. The aim of the present study is to investigate direct effect of gamma ray radiation on activity and apoptosis of cultured rat cardiomyocytes in vitro. Methods: The study was performed using primary cell cultures of cardiomyocytes isolated from hearts of now-born rats. After being cultured for 72h in vitro, cardiomyocytes were irradiated with single dose of 5 Gy, 10 Gy, 20 Gy of gamma ray respectively. At 48h post-irradiation, the concentration of LDH in the supernatant of cell culture was tested using methods introduced by International Federation of clinical chemistry (IFCC), and apoptosis was determined with flow cytometry. The viability of myocytes was determined with crystal violet test and MTT test at 48h and 120h post-irradiation respectively. Results: LDH concentration in the supernatant of cell culture of cardiomyocytes were increased significantly with the irradiation dose augment. Flow cytometry confirmed the induction of apoptosis in response to different gamma ray doses irradiation at 48h after irradiation. The viable cardiomyocytes irradiated by gamma ray were significantly declined at 120h after irradiation compared to un-irradiated cells, however there were no significant difference between two groups at 48h post-irradiation. Dose-effect relationship was demonstrated between cardiomyocyte apoptosis, viability and irradiation dose in the study. Conclusion: The study demonstrates gamma ray radiation can cause direct damage to cultured cardiomyocytes, including inhibiting activity and inducing apoptosis of cardiomyocytes in vitro, which shows dose effect relationship. The mechanism of gamma ray irradiation induced injury to cardiomyocytes should be investigated further. (authors)

  17. Pocket PC-based portable gamma-ray spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamontip Ploykrachang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A portable gamma-ray spectrometer based on a Pocket PC has been developed. A 12-bit pipeline analog-to-digitalconverter (ADC associated with an implemented pulse height histogram function on field programmable gate array (FPGAoperating at 15 MHz is employed for pulse height analysis from built-in pulse amplifier. The system, which interfaces withthe Pocket PC via an enhanced RS-232 serial port under the microcontroller facilitation, is utilized for spectrum acquisition,display and analysis. The pulse height analysis capability of the system was tested and it was found that the ADC integralnonlinearity of ±0.45% was obtained with the throughput rate at 160 kcps. The overall system performance was tested usinga PIN photodiode-CsI(Tl crystal coupled scintillation detector and gamma standard radioactive sources of Cs-137 andCo-60. Low cost and the compact system size as a result of the implemented logical function are also discussed.

  18. Physics and astrophysics with gamma-ray telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenbroucke, J. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    In the past few years gamma-ray astronomy has entered a golden age. A modern suite of telescopes is now scanning the sky over both hemispheres and over six orders of magnitude in energy. At {approx}TeV energies, only a handful of sources were known a decade ago, but the current generation of ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and VERITAS) has increased this number to nearly one hundred. With a large field of view and duty cycle, the Tibet and Milagro air shower detectors have demonstrated the promise of the direct particle detection technique for TeV gamma rays. At {approx}GeV energies, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has increased the number of known sources by nearly an order of magnitude in its first year of operation. New classes of sources that were previously theorized to be gamma-ray emitters have now been confirmed observationally. Moreover, there have been surprise discoveries of GeV gamma-ray emission from source classes for which no theory predicted it was possible. In addition to elucidating the processes of high-energy astrophysics, gamma-ray telescopes are making essential contributions to fundamental physics topics including quantum gravity, gravitational waves, and dark matter. I summarize the current census of astrophysical gamma-ray sources, highlight some recent discoveries relevant to fundamental physics, and describe the synergetic connections between gamma-ray and neutrino astronomy. This is a brief overview intended in particular for particle physicists and neutrino astronomers, based on a presentation at the Neutrino 2010 conference in Athens, Greece. I focus in particular on results from Fermi (which was launched soon after Neutrino 2008), and conclude with a description of the next generation of instruments, namely HAWC and the Cherenkov Telescope Array.

  19. X-Ray Spectral Characteristics of Ginga Gamma-Ray Bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohmayer, T.E.; Fenimore, E.E.; Murakami, T.; Yoshida, A.

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the spectral characteristics of a sample of bright gamma-ray bursts detected with the gamma-ray burst sensors aboard the satellite Ginga. This instrument employed a proportional and scintillation counter to provide sensitivity to photons in the 2 endash 400 keV region and as such provided a unique opportunity to characterize the largely unexplored X-ray properties of gamma-ray bursts. The photon spectra of the Ginga bursts are well described by a low-energy slope, a bend energy, and a high-energy slope. In the energy range where they can be compared, this result is consistent with burst spectral analyses obtained from the BATSE experiment aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. However, below 20 keV we find evidence for a positive spectral number index in approximately 40% of our burst sample, with some evidence for a strong rolloff at lower energies in a few events. There is a correlation (Pearson's r = -0.62) between the low-energy slope and the bend energy. We find that the distribution of spectral bend energies extends below 10 keV. There has been some concern in cosmological models of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that the bend energy covers only a small dynamic range. Our result extends the observed dynamic range, and, since we observe bend energies down to the limit of our instrument, perhaps observations have not yet limited the range. The Ginga trigger range was virtually the same as that of BATSE, yet we find a different range of fit parameters. One possible explanation might be that GRBs have two break energies, one often in the 50 endash 500 keV range and the other near 5 keV. Both BATSE and Ginga fit with only a single break energy, so BATSE tends to find breaks near the center of its energy range, and we tend to find breaks in our energy range. The observed ratio of energy emitted in the X-rays relative to the gamma rays can be much larger than a few percent and, in fact, is sometimes larger than unity. The average for our 22 bursts

  20. Handbook on Mobile Gamma-ray Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Helle Karina; Korsbech, Uffe C C

    2003-01-01

    Basic physics and mathematics for Airborne and Car-borne Gamma-ray Spectrometry supplemented with practical examples and methods for advanced data processing......Basic physics and mathematics for Airborne and Car-borne Gamma-ray Spectrometry supplemented with practical examples and methods for advanced data processing...

  1. Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory for the observation of early photons from gamma-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, I H; Brandt, Søren; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl

    2013-01-01

    One of the least documented and understood aspects of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is the rise phase of the optical light curve. The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) is an effort to address this question through extraordinary opportunities presented by a series of space missions including a small s...

  2. Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (uffo) for Observation of Early Photons from Gamma Ray Bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, I. H.; Ahmad, S.; Barrillon, P.

    2013-01-01

    One of the least documented and understood aspects of gamma-ray bursts (GRB) is the rise phase of the optical light curve. The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) is an effort to address this question through extraordinary opportunities presented by a series of space missions including a small sp...

  3. Swift: A gamma ray burst MIDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthelmy, Scott

    2001-01-01

    Swift is a first of its kind multiwavelength transient observatory for gamma-ray burst astronomy. It has the optimum capabilities for the next breakthroughs in determining the origin of gamma-ray bursts and their afterglows as well as using bursts to probe the early Universe. Swift will also perform the first sensitive hard X-ray survey of the sky. The mission is being developed by an international collaboration and consists of three instruments, the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), the X-ray Telescope (XRT), and the Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT). The BAT, a wide-field gamma-ray detector, will detect ∼1 gamma-ray burst per day with a sensitivity 5 times that of BATSE. The sensitive narrow-field XRT and UVOT will be autonomously slewed to the burst location in 20 to 70 seconds to determine 0.3-5.0 arcsec positions and perform optical, UV, and X-ray spectrophotometry. On-board measurements of redshift will also be done for hundreds of bursts. Swift will incorporate superb, low-cost instruments using existing flight-spare hardware and designs. Strong education/public outreach and follow-up programs will help to engage the public and astronomical community. Swift has been selected by NASA for development and launch in late 2003

  4. A comprehensive radio view of the extremely bright gamma-ray burst 130427A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Horst, A.J.; Paragi, Z.; de Bruyn, A.G.; Granot, J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wiersema, K.; Starling, R.L.C.; Curran, P.A.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Rowlinson, A.; Anderson, G.A.; Fender, R.P.; Yang, J.; Strom, R.G.

    2014-01-01

    GRB 130427A was extremely bright as a result of occurring at low redshift whilst the energetics were more typical of high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We collected well-sampled light curves at 1.4 and 4.8 GHz of GRB 130427A with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT); and we obtained

  5. A comprehensive radio view of the extremely bright gamma-ray burst 130427A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Horst, A. J.; Paragi, Z.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Granot, J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wiersema, K.; Starling, R. L. C.; Curran, P. A.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Rowlinson, A.; Anderson, G. A.; Fender, R. P.; Yang, J.; Strom, R. G.

    GRB 130427A was extremely bright as a result of occurring at low redshift whilst the energetics were more typical of high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We collected well-sampled light curves at 1.4 and 4.8 GHz of GRB 130427A with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT); and we obtained

  6. Gamma-ray lasers or grasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, G.V.H.; George, E.P.; Hora, H.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for controlling the emission and direction of gamma rays from excited nuclei contained in a sample source of suitable geometry having its major axis parallel to the proposed direction of gamma ray emission, comprising subjecting said sample source to thermal or dynamic polarization at temperatures approaching absolute zero in the presence of a strong magnetic field, and when a pulse of coherent gamma radiation is required along said major axis rotating the active nuclei through 90 0 by employing a short pulse of radio frequency oscillations in an auxilliary coil around the sample source

  7. Gamma ray astronomy and the origin of galactic cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabici, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration operating at expanding supernova remnant shells is by far the most popular model for the origin of galactic cosmic rays. Despite the general consensus received by the model, an unambiguous and conclusive proof of the supernova remnant hypothesis is still missing. In this context, the recent developments in gamma ray astronomy provide us with precious insights into the problem of the origin of galactic cosmic rays, since production of gamma rays is expected both during the acceleration of cosmic rays at supernova remnant shocks and during their subsequent propagation in the interstellar medium. In particular, the recent detection of a number of supernova remnants at TeV energies nicely fits with the model, but it still does not constitute a conclusive proof of it, mainly due to the difficulty of disentangling the hadronic and leptonic contributions to the observed gamma ray emission. The main goal of my research is to search for an unambiguous and conclusive observational test for proving (or disproving) the idea that supernova remnants are the sources of galactic cosmic rays with energies up to (at least) the cosmic ray knee. Our present comprehension of the mechanisms of particle acceleration at shocks and of the propagation of cosmic rays in turbulent magnetic fields encourages beliefs that such a conclusive test might come from future observations of supernova remnants and of the Galaxy in the almost unexplored domain of multi-TeV gamma rays. (author)

  8. Librarian driven analysis of gamma ray spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondrashov, V.; Petersone, I.

    2002-01-01

    For a set of a priori given radionuclides extracted from a general nuclide data library, the authors use median estimates of the gamma-peak areas and estimates of their errors to produce a list of possible radionuclides matching gamma ray line(s). The identification of a given radionuclide is obtained by searching for a match with the energy information of a database. This procedure is performed in an interactive graphic mode by markers that superimpose, on the spectral data, the energy information and yields provided by a general gamma ray data library. This library of experimental data includes approximately 17,000 gamma ray energy lines related to 756 known gamma emitter radionuclides listed by the ICRP. (author)

  9. X-ray crystal imagers for inertial confinement fusion experiments (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Lehecka, T.; Obenschain, S.; Pawley, C.; Brown, C.M.; Seely, J.

    1999-01-01

    We report on our continued development of high resolution monochromatic x-ray imaging system based on spherically curved crystals. This system can be extensively used in the relevant experiments of the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program. The system is currently used, but not limited to diagnostics of the targets ablatively accelerated by the Nike KrF laser. A spherically curved quartz crystal (2d=6.68703 Angstrom, R=200mm) has been used to produce monochromatic backlit images with the He-like Si resonance line (1865 eV) as the source of radiation. Another quartz crystal (2d=8.5099 Angstrom, R=200mm) with the H-like Mg resonance line (1473 eV) has been used for backlit imaging with higher contrast. The spatial resolution of the x-ray optical system is 1.7 μm in selected places and 2 - 3 μm over a larger area. A second crystal with a separate backlighter was added to the imaging system. This makes it possible to make use of all four strips of the framing camera. Time resolved, 20x magnified, backlit monochromatic images of CH planar targets driven by the Nike facility have been obtained with spatial resolution of 2.5 μm in selected places and 5 μm over the focal spot of the Nike laser. We are exploring the enhancement of this technique to the higher and lower backlighter energies. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  10. New stage in high-energy gamma-ray studies with GAMMA-400 after Fermi-LAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topchiev N.P.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fermi-LAT has made a significant contribution to the study of high-energy gamma-ray diffuse emission and the observations of 3000 discrete sources. However, one third of all gamma-ray sources (both galactic and extragalactic are unidentified, the data on the diffuse gamma-ray emission should be clarified, and signatures of dark matter particles in the high-energy gamma-ray range are not observed up to now. GAMMA-400, the currently developing gamma-ray telescope, will have angular (∼0.01∘ at 100 GeV and energy (∼1% at 100 GeV resolutions in the energy range of 10–1000 GeV which are better than Fermi-LAT (as well as ground gamma-ray telescopes by a factor of 5–10. It will observe some regions of the Universe (such as the Galactic Center, Fermi Bubbles, Crab, Cygnus, etc. in a highly elliptic orbit (without shading the telescope by the Earth continuously for a long time. It will allow us to identify many discrete sources, to clarify the structure of extended sources, to specify the data on the diffuse emission, and to resolve gamma rays from dark matter particles.

  11. Fermi LAT Detection of Pulsed Gamma-Rays From the Vela-Like Pulsars PSR J1048-5832 and PSR J2229+6114

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A.A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Federal City Coll.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Baring, M.G.; /Rice U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Columbia U. /IASF, Milan /Milan Polytechnic /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /George Mason U. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /LPCE, Orleans /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /UC, Santa Cruz /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /INFN, Trieste /Arecibo Observ. /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; /more authors..

    2012-03-29

    We report the detection of {gamma}-ray pulsations ({ge}0.1 GeV) from PSR J2229+6114 and PSR J1048-5832, the latter having been detected as a low-significance pulsar by EGRET. Data in the {gamma}-ray band were acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, while the radio rotational ephemerides used to fold the {gamma}-ray light curves were obtained using the Green Bank Telescope, the Lovell telescope at Jodrell Bank, and the Parkes Telescope. The two young radio pulsars, located within the error circles of the previously unidentified EGRET sources 3EG J1048-5840 and 3EG J2227+6122, present spin-down characteristics similar to the Vela pulsar. PSR J1048-5832 shows two sharp peaks at phases 0.15 {+-} 0.01 and 0.57 {+-} 0.01 relative to the radio pulse confirming the EGRET light curve, while PSR J2229+6114 presents a very broad peak at phase 0.49 {+-} 0.01. The {gamma}-ray spectra above 0.1 GeV of both pulsars are fit with power laws having exponential cutoffs near 3 GeV, leading to integral photon fluxes of (2.19 {+-} 0.22 {+-} 0.32) x 10{sup -7} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for PSR J1048-5832 and (3.77 {+-} 0.22 {+-} 0.44) x 10{sup -7} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for PSR J2229+6114. The first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. PSR J1048-5832 is one of the two LAT sources which were entangled together as 3EG J1048-5840. These detections add to the growing number of young {gamma}-ray pulsars that make up the dominant population of GeV {gamma}-ray sources in the Galactic plane.

  12. Bright x-ray flares in gamma-ray burst afterglows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, D N; Romano, P; Falcone, A; Kobayashi, S; Zhang, B; Moretti, A; O'brien, P T; Goad, M R; Campana, S; Page, K L; Angelini, L; Barthelmy, S; Beardmore, A P; Capalbi, M; Chincarini, G; Cummings, J; Cusumano, G; Fox, D; Giommi, P; Hill, J E; Kennea, J A; Krimm, H; Mangano, V; Marshall, F; Mészáros, P; Morris, D C; Nousek, J A; Osborne, J P; Pagani, C; Perri, M; Tagliaferri, G; Wells, A A; Woosley, S; Gehrels, N

    2005-09-16

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows have provided important clues to the nature of these massive explosive events, providing direct information on the nearby environment and indirect information on the central engine that powers the burst. We report the discovery of two bright x-ray flares in GRB afterglows, including a giant flare comparable in total energy to the burst itself, each peaking minutes after the burst. These strong, rapid x-ray flares imply that the central engines of the bursts have long periods of activity, with strong internal shocks continuing for hundreds of seconds after the gamma-ray emission has ended.

  13. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, X-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, J.; Colosimo, A. M.; Anwand, W.; Boatner, L. A.; Wagner, A.; Stepanov, P. S.; Trinh, T. T.; Liedke, M. O.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Cowan, T. E.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-08-01

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of ZnO single crystals were studied by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL) techniques. XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. It also provided bulk luminescence measurements that were not affected by surface states. The origin of a green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was then investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials. The measurements showed a single positron decay curve with a 175 ps lifetime component that was attributed to Zn vacancies passivated by hydrogen. Both oxygen vacancies and hydrogen-decorated Zn vacancies were suggested to contribute to the green emission. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE. This study reports the first application of GIPS to semiconductors, and it reveals the great benefits of the XRIL technique for the study of emission and scintillation properties of materials.

  14. Variable-metric diffraction crystals for x-ray optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smither, R.K.; Fernandez, P.B.

    1992-01-01

    A variable-metric (VM) crystal is one in which the spacing between the crystalline planes changes with position in the crystal. This variation can be either parallel to the crystalline planes or perpendicular to the crystalline planes of interest and can be produced by either introducing a thermal gradient in the crystal or by growing a crystal made of two or more elements and changing the relative percentages of the two elements as the crystal is grown. A series of experiments were performed in the laboratory to demonstrate the principle of the variable-metric crystal and its potential use in synchrotron beam lines. One of the most useful applications of the VM crystal is to increase the number of photons per unit bandwidth in a diffracted beam without losing any of the overall intensity. In a normal synchrotron beam line that uses a two-crystal monochromator, the bandwidth of the diffracted photon beam is determined by the vertical opening angle of the beam which is typically 0.10--0.30 mrad or 20--60 arcsec. When the VM crystal approach is applied, the bandwidth of the beam can be made as narrow as the rocking curve of the diffracting crystal, which is typically 0.005--0.050 mrad or 1--10 arcsec. Thus a very large increase of photons per unit bandwidth (or per unit energy) can be achieved through the use of VM crystals. When the VM principle is used with bent crystals, new kinds of x-ray optical elements can be generated that can focus and defocus x-ray beams much like simple lenses where the focal length of the lens can be changed to match its application. Thus both large magnifications and large demagnifications can be achieved as well as parallel beams with narrow bandwidths

  15. NO CORRELATION BETWEEN HOST GALAXY METALLICITY AND GAMMA-RAY ENERGY RELEASE FOR LONG-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levesque, Emily M.; Kewley, Lisa J.; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Berger, Edo

    2010-01-01

    We compare the redshifts, host galaxy metallicities, and isotropic (E γ,iso ) and beaming-corrected (E γ ) gamma-ray energy release of 16 long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) at z γ,iso , or E γ . These results are at odds with previous theoretical and observational predictions of an inverse correlation between gamma-ray energy release and host metallicity, as well as the standard predictions of metallicity-driven wind effects in stellar evolutionary models. We consider the implications that these results have for LGRB progenitor scenarios, and discuss our current understanding of the role that metallicity plays in the production of LGRBs.

  16. Polarization of the prompt gamma-ray emission from the gamma-ray burst of 6 December 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburn, Wayne; Boggs, Steven E

    2003-05-22

    Observations of the afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have revealed that they lie at cosmological distances, and so correspond to the release of an enormous amount of energy. The nature of the central engine that powers these events and the prompt gamma-ray emission mechanism itself remain enigmatic because, once a relativistic fireball is created, the physics of the afterglow is insensitive to the nature of the progenitor. Here we report the discovery of linear polarization in the prompt gamma-ray emission from GRB021206, which indicates that it is synchrotron emission from relativistic electrons in a strong magnetic field. The polarization is at the theoretical maximum, which requires a uniform, large-scale magnetic field over the gamma-ray emission region. A large-scale magnetic field constrains possible progenitors to those either having or producing organized fields. We suggest that the large magnetic energy densities in the progenitor environment (comparable to the kinetic energy densities of the fireball), combined with the large-scale structure of the field, indicate that magnetic fields drive the GRB explosion.

  17. Secondary gamma-ray data for shielding calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyasaka, Sunichi

    1979-01-01

    In deep penetration transport calculations, the integral design parameters is determined mainly by secondary particles which are produced by interactions of the primary radiation with materials. The shield thickness and the biological dose rate at a given point of a bulk shield are determined from the contribution from secondary gamma rays. The heat generation and the radiation damage in the structural and shield materials depend strongly on the secondary gamma rays. In this paper, the status of the secondary gamma ray data and its further problems are described from the viewpoint of shield design. The secondary gamma-ray data in ENDF/B-IV and POPOP4 are also discussed based on the test calculations made for several shield assemblies. (author)

  18. X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Radiation Detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Disclosed is a semiconductor radiation detector for detecting X-ray and / or gamma-ray radiation. The detector comprises a converter element for converting incident X-ray and gamma-ray photons into electron-hole pairs, at least one cathode, a plurality of detector electrodes arranged with a pitch...... (P) along a first axis, a plurality of drift electrodes, a readout circuitry being configured to read out signals from the plurality of detector electrodes and a processing unit connected to the readout circuitry and being configured to detect an event in the converter element. The readout circuitry...... is further configured to read out signals from the plurality of drift electrodes, and the processing unit is further configured to estimate a location of the event along the first axis by processing signals obtained from both the detector electrodes and the drift electrodes, the location of the event along...

  19. Effect of ultraviolet and gamma rays on the activity of delta-endotoxin protein crystals of Bacillus thuringiensis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burges, H.D.; Hillyer, S.; Chanter, D.O.

    1975-01-01

    Sensitive bioassays with larvae of Pieris brassicae revealed no reduction of insecticidal activity as a result of severe gamma or ultraviolet irradiation of crystals of Bacillus thuringiensis (serotype V). The measured response was the inhibition of larval feeding by the crystals over exposure periods short enough for the presence of live spores not to influence feeding. The results were analyzed using a logistic model. (U.S.)

  20. A study on gamma rays from electrochemical cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Seung Ai

    1993-01-01

    The energies and intensities of gamma rays emitted from 3 cells with Pd-cathodes of φ 1mm x 10mm, φ 2mm x 20mm, φ 1mm x 10mm were determined using HPGe-detector system and compared with Pd-neutron capture model. Very strong gamma rays of 512keC, 622keC, 1051keC and 8 more important ones were found to be identical with characteristic gamma rays of 106 Pd and 109 Pd. It is likely that the neutron capture reaction, A PD(n, γ) A+1 Pd, occurred in the cell and the neutrons came from the fusion reaction of two deutrons. It is necessary, however, to retest the model since another strong 84keV-gamma rays do not belong to any A+1 Pd-gamma spectra and two important 106 Pd-gamma rays 717keV, 1046KeV were not detected. Total amount of emitted gamma rays was large when the size of the Pd-cathod was large. Its depedence on the time of measurement and the preheating period did not have any regularities. Thus the replication is not an easy thing. (Author)

  1. An X-ray perspective on a gamma-ray mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Niels

    2003-01-01

    The most recent astrophysics mission of ESA is INTEGRAL, a mission dedicated to gamma-ray astronomy (Winkler et al. 2003). INTEGRAL carries two gamma-ray instruments: the imager, IBIS, and the spectrometer, SPI, and in addition an optical monitor, OMC, and an X-ray monitor, JEM-X. INTEGRAL is an ...... is an observatory mission with 70% of the observation time available to the general astronomical community through a peer-reviewed selection process. This paper describes the INTEGRAL mission primarily as seen from the JEM-X perspective....

  2. Constraints on the galactic distribution of cosmic rays from the COS-B gamma-ray data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    The velocity information of the HI and CO observations is used as a distance indicator to ascertain the spatial distribution of the interstellar gas. Using this distance information, the galacto-centric distribution of the gamma-ray emissivity (the production rate per H atom) is determined for three gamma-ray energy ranges from a correlation study of the gamma-ray intensity maps and the gas-tracer maps for selected galacto-centric distance intervals, taking into account the expected IC contribution and pointlike gamma-ray sources. On the assumption that unresolved gamma-ray point sources do not contribute significantly to the observed gamma-ray emission, the gamma-ray emissivity is proportional to the Cosmic ray density and, more specifically, the energy dependence can be used to study separately the distribution of Cosmic ray electrons and nuclei: whereas the emission for the 300 MeV - 5 GeV range is dominated by π 0 -decay, the 70 MeV - 150 MeV range has a large electron bremsstrahlung contribution

  3. Numerical simulations on efficiency and measurement of capabilities of BGO detectors for high energy gamma ray

    CERN Document Server

    Wen Wan Xin

    2002-01-01

    The energy resolution and time resolution of two phi 75 x 100 BGO detectors for high energy gamma ray newly made were measured with sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs and sup 6 sup 0 Co resources. The two characteristic gamma rays of high energy emitted from the thermal neutron capture of germanium in BGO crystal were used for the energy calibration of gamma spectra. The intrinsic photopeak efficiency, single escape probability and double escape probabilities of BGO detectors in photon energy range of 4-30 MeV are numerically calculated with GEANT code. The real count response and count ratio of the uniformly distributed incident photons in energy range of 0-30 MeV are also calculated. The distortion of gamma spectra caused by the photon energy loss extension to lower energy in detection medium is discussed

  4. THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE SHOCKED STELLAR WIND OF PULSAR GAMMA-RAY BINARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabalza, V.; Paredes, J. M. [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, E08028 Barcelona (Spain); Bosch-Ramon, V., E-mail: vzabalza@am.ub.es [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2011-12-10

    Gamma-ray-loud X-ray binaries are binary systems that show non-thermal broadband emission from radio to gamma rays. If the system comprises a massive star and a young non-accreting pulsar, their winds will collide producing broadband non-thermal emission, most likely originated in the shocked pulsar wind. Thermal X-ray emission is expected from the shocked stellar wind, but until now it has neither been detected nor studied in the context of gamma-ray binaries. We present a semi-analytic model of the thermal X-ray emission from the shocked stellar wind in pulsar gamma-ray binaries, and find that the thermal X-ray emission increases monotonically with the pulsar spin-down luminosity, reaching luminosities of the order of 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}. The lack of thermal features in the X-ray spectrum of gamma-ray binaries can then be used to constrain the properties of the pulsar and stellar winds. By fitting the observed X-ray spectra of gamma-ray binaries with a source model composed of an absorbed non-thermal power law and the computed thermal X-ray emission, we are able to derive upper limits on the spin-down luminosity of the putative pulsar. We applied this method to LS 5039, the only gamma-ray binary with a radial, powerful wind, and obtain an upper limit on the pulsar spin-down luminosity of {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}. Given the energetic constraints from its high-energy gamma-ray emission, a non-thermal to spin-down luminosity ratio very close to unity may be required.

  5. THE ORIGIN OF GAMMA RAYS FROM GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, K. S.; Chernyshov, D. O.; Dogiel, V. A.; Hui, C. Y.; Kong, A. K. H.

    2010-01-01

    Fermi has detected gamma-ray emission from eight globular clusters (GCs). It is commonly believed that the energy sources of these gamma rays are millisecond pulsars (MSPs) inside GCs. Also it has been standard to explain the spectra of most Fermi Large Area Telescope pulsars including MSPs resulting from the curvature radiation (CR) of relativistic electrons/positrons inside the pulsar magnetosphere. Therefore, gamma rays from GCs are expected to be the collection of CR from all MSPs inside the clusters. However, the angular resolution is not high enough to pinpoint the nature of the emission. In this paper, we calculate the gamma rays produced by the inverse Compton (IC) scattering between relativistic electrons/positrons in the pulsar wind of MSPs in the GCs and background soft photons including cosmic microwave/relic photons, background star lights in the clusters, the galactic infrared photons, and the galactic star lights. We show that the gamma-ray spectrum from 47 Tucanae can be explained equally well by upward scattering of either the relic photons, the galactic infrared photons, or the galactic star lights, whereas the gamma-ray spectra from the other seven GCs are best fitted by the upward scattering of either the galactic infrared photons or the galactic star lights. We also find that the observed gamma-ray luminosity is correlated better with the combined factor of the encounter rate and the background soft photon energy density. Therefore, the IC scattering may also contribute to the observed gamma-ray emission from GCs detected by Fermi in addition to the standard CR process. Furthermore, we find that the emission region of high-energy photons from GCs produced by the IC scattering is substantially larger than the cores of GCs with a radius >10 pc. The diffuse radio and X-rays emitted from GCs can also be produced by the synchrotron radiation and IC scattering, respectively. We suggest that future observations including radio, X-rays, and gamma rays

  6. Systematization of efficiency correction for gamma-ray disk sources with semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatani, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    Full energy peak efficiency correction for disk sources has been systematically studied using the mapping method with two high-purity germanium detectors and two low-energy photon spectrometers. The following are found using only single-line (i.e., no coincidence summing loses) γ-rays: (1) The efficiency distributions on a plane parallel to the entrance window of semiconductor detectors is in perfect accord with Gaussian curves inside the circumference of the cylindrical Ge crystal, however, they deviate from the curves outside the circumference. (2) The width parameters of the Gaussian function fitted to the efficiency distributions have a systematic relationship with γ-ray energy. (3) The mapping method is of practical use and has satisfactory accuracy

  7. The early X-ray afterglows of optically bright and dark Gamma-Ray Bursts

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yi-Qing

    2006-01-01

    A systematical study on the early X-ray afterglows of both optically bright and dark gamma-ray bursts (B-GRBs and D-GRBs) observed by Swift has been presented. Our sample includes 25 GRBs. Among them 13 are B-GRBs and 12 are D-GRBs. Our results show that the distributions of the X-ray afterglow fluxes ($F_{X}$), the gamma-ray fluxes ($S_{\\gamma}$), and the ratio ($R_{\\gamma, X}$) for both the D-GRBs and B-GRBs are similar. The differences of these distributions for the two kinds of GRBs shoul...

  8. Gamma ray bursts observed with WATCH‐EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    The WATCH wide field x‐ray monitor has the capability of independently locating bright Gamma Ray Bursts to 1° accuracy. We report the preliminary positions of 12 Gamma Ray Bursts observed with the WATCH monitor flown on the ES spacecraft EURECA during its 11 month mission. Also the recurrence...

  9. Technology Needs for Gamma Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Gamma ray astronomy is currently in an exciting period of multiple missions and a wealth of data. Results from INTEGRAL, Fermi, AGILE, Suzaku and Swift are making large contributions to our knowledge of high energy processes in the universe. The advances are due to new detector and imaging technologies. The steps to date have been from scintillators to solid state detectors for sensors and from light buckets to coded aperture masks and pair telescopes for imagers. A key direction for the future is toward focusing telescopes pushing into the hard X-ray regime and Compton telescopes and pair telescopes with fine spatial resolution for medium and high energy gamma rays. These technologies will provide finer imaging of gamma-ray sources. Importantly, they will also enable large steps forward in sensitivity by reducing background.

  10. Claire: first light of a gamma-ray lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halloin, H.

    2003-12-01

    At the high energy boundary of the observed electromagnetic spectrum, γ-ray astrophysics provides a unique probe to study the most energetic phenomena in the Universe. New γ-rays instruments have to be developed in order to reach the sensitivity and the angular resolution needed to compare theoretical predictions with observational data. γ-rays focusing appears now to be a promising way to overcome the actual issue. The CLAIRE project is dedicated to demonstrating the interest of a γ-ray lens for nuclear astrophysics, as well as measuring the performance of such an instrument and compare them to the theoretical predictions. According to the laws of γ-rays diffraction in crystal, the first lens for nuclear astrophysics has been developed. Due to mechanical and observational constraints, the energy bandwidth is a few keV broad and centered at 170 keV. The lens itself is made of about 560 germanium crystals, mounted on 8 concentric rings. The tuning of this lens in the laboratory has required the development of specific system and procedures. Besides, the data collected during this tuning has allowed the determination of various crystal characteristics, which have been used for numerical simulations of the γ-ray lens. Then, the gamma ray lens principle has also been tested by ground based measurements and by an observation of the Crab Nebula during a stratospheric flight. Ground based measurements, in the laboratory and with a source at a long distance, has allowed the determination of the diffraction efficiency as well as the angular response. These results, in agreement with the numerical expectations, demonstrate the validity of the γ-ray lens principles. Moreover, the CLAIRE gondola was launched in June 2001 and was recovered after about 5 hours and a half at an altitude of 41 km. Data analysis has led to a 3σ detection of the diffracted signal, corresponding to about 33 collected photons during an effective observation time of 1 h and 12 mn. The results

  11. A study of gamma-ray bursts and a new detector for gamma-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, J.N.

    1979-09-01

    Three gamma-ray experiments flown on balloons between August 1975 and August 1976 are described in detail. The successful Transatlantic balloon flight enabled a rate of 3 bursts year -1 with energies > 7 x 10 -7 ergs cm -2 to be established. This result is discussed in the light of other work. The choice of γ-ray detector for optimum sensitivity is presented. In addition various techniques for determining the arrival direction of gamma-ray bursts are compared. A new balloon borne γ-ray burst telescope is proposed. The design, testing and results of the beam calibration of a new drift chamber detector system for high energy (> 50 MeV) γ-rays are presented. A projected angular resolution of 0.8 0 was obtained at 300 MeV. Techniques for the measurement of γ-ray energies are discussed in relation to this instrument. Finally the use of drift chambers in an integrated free flying satellite is illustrated, and the expected performance is presented. (author)

  12. UNVEILING THE NATURE OF THE UNIDENTIFIED GAMMA-RAY SOURCES. III. GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR-LIKE COUNTERPARTS AT LOW RADIO FREQUENCIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaro, F.; Funk, S. [SLAC National Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); D' Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Giroletti, M. [INAF Istituto di Radioastronomia, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Masetti, N. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Tosti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Nori, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Bologna, viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    About one-third of the {gamma}-ray sources listed in the second Fermi Large Area Telescope catalog (2FGL) have no firmly established counterpart at lower energies and so are classified as unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs). Here, we propose a new approach to find candidate counterparts for the UGSs based on the 325 MHz radio survey performed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope in the northern hemisphere. First, we investigate the low-frequency radio properties of blazars, the largest known population of {gamma}-ray sources; then we search for sources with similar radio properties combining the information derived from the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) with those of the NRAO Very Large Array Sky Survey. We present a list of candidate counterparts for 32 UGSs with at least one counterpart in the WENSS. We also performed an extensive research in the literature to look for infrared and optical counterparts of the {gamma}-ray blazar candidates selected using the low-frequency radio observations to confirm their nature. On the basis of our multifrequency research, we identify 23 new {gamma}-ray blazar candidates out of the 32 UGSs investigated. Comparison with previous results on the UGSs is also presented. Finally, we speculate on the advantages of using low-frequency radio observations to associate UGSs and to search for {gamma}-ray pulsar candidates.

  13. Contribution to gamma ray transport calculation in heterogeneous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdet, L.

    1985-04-01

    This thesis presents the development of gamma transport calculation codes in three dimension heterogeneous geometries. These codes allow us to define the protection against gamma-rays or verify their efficiency. The laws that govern the interactions of gamma-rays with matters are briefly revised. A library with the all necessary constants for these codes is created. TRIPOLI-2, a code that treats in exact way the neutron transport in matters using Monte-Carlo method, has been adapted to deal with the transport of gamma-rays in matters as well. TRINISHI, a code which considers only one collision, has been realized to treat heterogeneous geometries containing voids. Elaborating a formula that calculates the albedo for gamma-ray reflection (the code ALBANE) allows us to solve the problem of gamma-ray reflection on plane surfaces. NARCISSE-2 deals with gamma-rays that suffer only one reflection on the inner walls of any closed volume (rooms, halls...) [fr

  14. The effect of heat treatment on the thermoluminescence of naturally-occurring calcites and their use as a gamma-ray dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engin, Birol; Gueven, Olgun

    2000-01-01

    The feasibility of using naturally-occurring calcite for gamma-ray dosimetry was investigated. Anneal treatment above 350 deg. C increased the sensitivity of all radiation-induced TL peaks except the glow peaks above 300 deg. C. On the other hand, annealing in air, at a temperature of 700 deg. C caused a collapse in the TL sensitivity. The increase in TL efficiency was found to depend on the annealing temperature and time. Heating at 600 deg. C for 5 h and quenching in ambient air are the optimum conditions for TL sensitivity enhancement in the calcite materials investigated. These results are explained using the energy scheme of the pre-dose model of and in terms of the impurity rearrangements in the crystal lattice induced by heating. It was found that the values of the kinetic parameters E, s and b for TL glow peaks remained unchanged for annealed samples. The TL dose-response curves for stable dosimetric peaks of annealed and unannealed calcite samples could be fitted to the same linear mathematical function. This implies that the annealing process probably does not change the nature of the trapping centers except the low temperature TL peaks at 125 and 160 deg. C of flowstone. The TL dosimetric parameters of calcite samples annealed, including glow curves, fading characteristics, dose-responses, dose-rate responses and energy responses, have also been studied in detail. The response to gamma-rays of annealed calcite samples was found to be linear from 0.05 to 10 4 Gy. The lower limit of observable doses for each calcite sample was about 0.05 Gy. This offers the possibility of applying the investigated materials for gamma-ray dosimetry within this useful range. These dosimeters can be used in various applications, such as, in industries related to chemical technology (polymerization), food processing and in determining the dose received by the patient during medical examination and treatment

  15. Pulser injection with subsequent removal for gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartwell, J.K.; Goodwin, S.G.; Johnson, L.O.; Killian, E.W.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a module for use with a gamma-ray spectroscopy system. The system includes a gamma-ray detector for detecting gamma-ray events and producing a signal representing the gamma-ray events, a converter responsive to the detector and capable of converting the signal to a spectrum, a storage memory responsive to the converter and capable of storing the spectrum at address locations in memory, and a pulser capable of injecting pulses into the signal produced by the detector. The module comprises: means for generating a logic pulse for controlling the pulser, the controlling means adapted for coupling to the pulser; means for generating separation of events logic to isolate the components of a combined gamma-ray---pulse spectrum, the separation of events logic means adapted for coupling to the converter and the storage memory with the capability of storing pulses at address locations in the storage memory separate from the gamma-ray events; means for receiving an imitating signal from the converter to generate a plurality of operations by the module; means for tracking variations in a gamma-ray---pulse spectrum brought on by external parameter changes; and means for interfacing with commercially developed gamma-ray spectrometry equipment

  16. Gamma-ray astronomy and cosmic-ray origin theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, V.L.

    1973-01-01

    A theory of the origin of cosmic radiation is discussed in light of the advances made in gamma-ray astronomy. Arguments against metagalactic models for the origin of cosmic rays are emphasized. (U.S.)

  17. Prompt gamma-ray analysis of steel slag in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, Akhtar Abbas; Garwan, Muhammad Ahmad; Nagadi, Mahmoud Mohammad; Rehman, Khateeb-ur; Raashid, Mohammad; Masalehuddin Mohiuddin, Mohammad; Al-Amoudi, Omar Saeed Baghabra

    2009-01-01

    Blast furnace slag (BFS) is added to Portland cement concrete to increase its durability, particularly its corrosion resistance. Monitoring the concentration of BFS in concrete for quality control purposes is desired. In this study, the concentration of BFS in concrete was measured by utilizing an accelerator-based prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) setup. The optimum size of the BFS cement concrete specimen that produces the maximum intensity of gamma rays at the detector location was calculated through Monte Carlo simulations. The simulation results were experimentally validated through the gamma-ray yield measurement from BFS cement concrete specimens having different radii. The concentration of BFS in the cement concrete specimens was assessed through calcium and silicon gamma-ray yield measurement from cement concrete specimens containing 5 to 80 wt% BFS. The yield of calcium gamma rays decreases with increasing BFS concentration in concrete while the yield of silicon gamma rays increases with increasing BFS concentration in concrete. The calcium-to-silicon gamma-ray yield ratio has an inverse relation with BFS concentration in concrete. (author)

  18. CdZnTe and CdTe materials for X-ray and gamma ray radiation detector applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szeles, Csaba

    2004-01-01

    Good detection efficiency and high energy-resolution make Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe) and Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detectors attractive in many room temperature X-ray and gamma-ray detection applications such as medical and industrial imaging, industrial gauging and non-destructive testing, security and monitoring, nuclear safeguards and non-proliferation, and astrophysics. Advancement of the crystal growth and device fabrication technologies and the reduction of bulk, interface and surface defects in the devices are crucial for the widespread practical deployment of Cd 1-x Zn x Te-based detector technology. Here we review the effects of bulk, interface and surface defects on charge transport, charge transport uniformity and device performance and the progress in the crystal growth and device fabrication technologies aiming at reducing the concentration of harmful defects and improving Cd 1-x Zn x Te detector performance. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Portable gamma and thermal neutron probe using a {sup 6}LiI(Eu) crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carneiro, Clemente J.G.; Araujo, Geraldo P.; Milian, Felix M.; Barbosa, Jurandir C.; Garcia, Fermin [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz (UESC), Ilheus, BA (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas em Ciencias e Tecnologias das Radiacoes (CPqCTR); Oliveira, Arno H.; Silva, Mario R.S.; Penna, Rodrigo [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (DEN-UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    Europium-activated lithium-6 iodide is a scintillator used for gamma and neutron counting. A portable detection system was built based on this scintillator. This system has three modules: the scintillator, a 10 m liquid light guide, and a Hamamatsu photon counting head H9319 used as a light pulse digitizer. Data transfer, measurement time and other necessary adjustment can be controlled by software from the PC through the RS-232C interface. The scintillator, a crystal of {sup 6}LiI(Eu), is a small cylinder with 3 mm diameter and 40 mm length completely sealed in an aluminum tube coupled to the light guide. The small size of the scintillator increases the neutron/gamma count ratio, since 2 to 3 mm of thickness of this crystal absorbs all thermal neutrons. Intensities of X and gamma rays, and thermal neutrons can be recorded for time intervals of 10 ms to 1 s storing up to 10000 countings. The system was calibrated for measuring radiation doses for validating numerical models in dosimetry. Two characteristic reinforce this application, measurements can be done at several meters away from the radiation source and also inside of water. In addition, it was used to build nuclear probes based on Compton scattering or neutron moderation in porous media by attaching an AmBe source to the top of the aluminum tube. Tests were done to determine the reproducibility of counting rates. Background counting was measured at several temperatures to verify the influence of dark current of PMT. Sealed AmBe, low activity Am, and X rays sources were used for studies of radiation counting statistics. X rays apparatus was used to correlate counting rates measured with the {sup 6}LiI(Eu) detection system and doses measured with an ionization chamber at several distances from the X ray source. (author)

  20. Interstellar medium structure and content and gamma ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebrun, F.

    1982-05-01

    A general description of gamma-ray astronomy is presented with special emphasis on the study of diffuse gamma-ray emission. This is followed by a collection of reflections and observations on the structure and the gas and dust content of the local interstellar medium. Results of gamma-ray observations on the local interstellar medium are given. The last part is devoted to the whole of the galactic gamma-ray emission and its interpretation [fr

  1. Gamma Ray Tomographic Scan Method for Large Scale Industrial Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Jin Ho; Jung, Sung Hee; Kim, Jong Bum; Park, Jang Geun

    2011-01-01

    The gamma ray tomography systems have been used to investigate a chemical process for last decade. There have been many cases of gamma ray tomography for laboratory scale work but not many cases for industrial scale work. Non-tomographic equipment with gamma-ray sources is often used in process diagnosis. Gamma radiography, gamma column scanning and the radioisotope tracer technique are examples of gamma ray application in industries. In spite of many outdoor non-gamma ray tomographic equipment, the most of gamma ray tomographic systems still remained as indoor equipment. But, as the gamma tomography has developed, the demand on gamma tomography for real scale plants also increased. To develop the industrial scale system, we introduced the gamma-ray tomographic system with fixed detectors and rotating source. The general system configuration is similar to 4 th generation geometry. But the main effort has been made to actualize the instant installation of the system for real scale industrial plant. This work would be a first attempt to apply the 4th generation industrial gamma tomographic scanning by experimental method. The individual 0.5-inch NaI detector was used for gamma ray detection by configuring circular shape around industrial plant. This tomographic scan method can reduce mechanical complexity and require a much smaller space than a conventional CT. Those properties make it easy to get measurement data for a real scale plant

  2. Crystal growth and thermoluminescence response of NaZr{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} at high gamma radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordóñez-Regil, E., E-mail: eduardo.ordonez@inin.gob.mx [Depto. de Química, Gerencia de Ciencias Básicas, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, CP 11801 México D.F. (Mexico); Contreras-Ramírez, A., E-mail: aida.contreras@inin.gob.mx [Depto. de Química, Gerencia de Ciencias Básicas, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, CP 11801 México D.F. (Mexico); Depto. de Tecnología de Materiales, Gerencia de Ciencias Aplicadas, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, CP 11801 México D.F. (Mexico); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Unidad Académica el Cerrillo, Piedras Blancas, AP 2-139, CP 50000 Toluca Estado de México (Mexico); Fernández-Valverde, S.M., E-mail: suilma.fernandez@inin.gob.mx [Depto. de Química, Gerencia de Ciencias Básicas, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, CP 11801 México D.F. (Mexico); González-Martínez, P.R., E-mail: pedro.gonzalez@inin.gob.mx [Depto. de Física, Gerencia de Ciencias Básicas, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, CP 11801 México D.F. (Mexico); Carrasco-Ábrego, H., E-mail: hector.carrasco@inin.gob.mx [Depto. Aceleradores, Gerencia de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, CP 11801 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •NaZr{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} exposed to gamma doses of 10, 30 and 50 MGy. •Gamma radiation produced growth of the crystal size of the NZP. •Morphology changes were reversible by heating. •Linear relationship between the thermoluminescence and the applied gamma dose. •This property could be useful for high-level gamma dosimetry. -- Abstract: This work describes the synthesis and characterization of NaZr{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}. The stability of this material under high doses of gamma radiation was investigated in the range of 10–50 MGy. Samples of unaltered and gamma irradiated NaZr{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and thermoluminescence. The results showed that while functional groups were not affected by the gamma irradiation, morphology changes were observed with increasing doses of gamma irradiation. The morphology of the non-irradiated compound is agglomerated flakes; however, irradiation at 10 MGy splits the flakes inducing the formation of well-defined cubes. Gamma irradiation induced the crystal size of the NaZr{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} to grow. The heat treatment (973 K) of samples irradiated at 50 MGy resulted in the recovery of the original morphology. Furthermore, the thermoluminescence analysis of the irradiated compound is reported.

  3. Programs and procedures for assessing quality of spectral gamma-ray borehole data for the UGTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conaway, J.G.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the procedures and computer programs used to process spectral gamma-ray borehole logging data in the UGTA (UnderGround Test Area) program at the NTS (Nevada Test Site) to assess data quality. These programs and procedures were used to analyze data from five boreholes in the UGTA program. Development of these computer programs and procedures required considerable effort and the primary purpose of this report is to provide continuity with future activities related to spectral gamma-ray borehole logging in the UGTA program. This is especially important because of the long time interval between cessation of logging in April, 1996 and the next round of activity, which has not yet occurred. This report should also be useful if any quality control issues arise regarding past or forthcoming spectral gamma-ray log analyses. In the characterization work underway at the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area, the logging contractor, Western Atlas, agreed to identify five artificial nuclides based on their gamma-ray signatures. Those nuclides are 60 Co, 106 Ru, 125 Sb, 134 Cs, and 137 Cs. In the case of 106 Ru, which is not a gamma emitter, any detected gamma rays come from the daughter nuclide 106 Rh which has a half-life of 30 s. With such a short half-life, 106 Rh can be considered to be in equilibrium with 106 Ru under most conditions so the result is the same as if the gamma rays were emitted by the 106 Ru. The Western Atlas spectral gamma-ray curve plots from a given borehole present detailed qualitative information on the apparent distribution of natural and artificial nuclides with depth in the borehole. The computer programs and procedures described in this report were used to provide a quality analysis of the contractor's processed data and to work with the contractor to validate and/or refine their existing automatic processing. This was done using a procedure that was developed and tested successfully in earlier work at the NTS; the revised

  4. Specialized software utilities for gamma ray spectrometry. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1996-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-03-01

    A Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Software Utilities for Gamma Ray Spectrometry was initiated by the International Atomic Energy Agency in 1996 for a three year period. In the CRP several basic applications of nuclear data handling were assayed which also dealt with the development of PC computer codes for various spectrometric purposes. The CRP produced several software packages: for the analysis of low level NaI spectra; user controlled analysis of gamma ray spectra from HPGe detectors; a set of routines for the definition of the detector resolution function and for the unfolding of experimental annihilation spectra; a program for the generation of gamma ray libraries for specific applications; a program to calculate true coincidence corrections; a program to calculate full-energy peak efficiency calibration curve for homogenous cylindrical sample geometries including self-attenuation correction; and a program for the library driven analysis of gamma ray spectra and for the quantification of radionuclide content in samples. In addition, the CRP addressed problems of the analysis of naturally occurring radioactive soil material gamma ray spectra, questions of quality assurance and quality control in gamma ray spectrometry, and verification of the expert system SHAMAN for the analysis of air filter spectra obtained within the framework of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. This TECDOC contains 10 presentations delivered at the meeting with the description of the software developed. Each of the papers has been indexed separately

  5. PROBING EXTRAGALACTIC DUST THROUGH NEARBY GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, S. L.; Li Aigen

    2010-01-01

    The quantities and wavelength dependencies of the dust extinction along the lines of sight toward 33 nearby gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with redshifts z V derived from the Drude approach is generally larger by a factor of ∼2-5 than that inferred by assuming a SMC-type template extinction law. Consistent with previous studies, the extinction-to-gas ratio is mostly smaller than that of the MW, and does not seem to correlate with the shape of the extinction curve. It is shown that the standard silicate-graphite interstellar grain model closely reproduces the extinction curves of all 33 GRBs host galaxies. For these 33 bursts at z < 2, we find no evidence for the evolution of the dust extinction, dust sizes, and relative abundances of silicate to graphite on redshifts.

  6. High resolution phoswich gamma-ray imager utilizing monolithic MPPC arrays with submillimeter pixelized crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, T.; Kataoka, J.; Nakamori, T.; Kishimoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Sato, K.; Ishikawa, Y.; Yamamura, K.; Kawabata, N.; Ikeda, H.; Kamada, K.

    2013-05-01

    We report the development of a high spatial resolution tweezers-type coincidence gamma-ray camera for medical imaging. This application consists of large-area monolithic Multi-Pixel Photon Counters (MPPCs) and submillimeter pixelized scintillator matrices. The MPPC array has 4 × 4 channels with a three-side buttable, very compact package. For typical operational gain of 7.5 × 105 at + 20 °C, gain fluctuation over the entire MPPC device is only ± 5.6%, and dark count rates (as measured at the 1 p.e. level) amount to acrylic light guide measuring 1 mm thick, and with summing operational amplifiers that compile the signals into four position-encoded analog outputs being used for signal readout. Spatial resolution of 1.1 mm was achieved with the coincidence imaging system using a 22Na point source. These results suggest that the gamma-ray imagers offer excellent potential for applications in high spatial medical imaging.

  7. Comparison of total experimental and theoretical absolute γ-ray detection efficiencies of a cylindrical NaI(Tl) crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uosif, M.A.; El-Taher, A.

    2005-01-01

    A new fit function has been developed to calculate theoretically the absolute gamma ray detection efficiencies (ηTh) of a cylindrical NaI(Tl) crystal, for calculating the absolute efficiency at any interesting gamma energy in the energy range between 10 and 1300 keV and distance between 0 and 8 cm. The total absolute gamma ray detection efficiencies have been calculated for five detectors, four are 2x2 and one is 3x 3 inches NaI(Tl) crystal at different distances. The absolute efficiency of the different detectors was calculated at the specific energy of the standard sources for each measuring distances. In this calculation, experimental (ηExp) and theoretical (ηTh) have been calculated. The uncertainties of efficiency calibration have been calculated also for quality control. Measurements were performed with calibrated point source. Gamma-ray energies under consideration were 0.356, 0.662, 1.17 and 1.33 MeV. The differences between (ηExp) and (ηTh) at these energies are 1.30E-06, 7.99E-05, 2.29E-04 and 2.42E-04 respectively. The results obtained on the basis of (ηExp) and (ηTh) seem to be in very good agreement

  8. Multiwavelength Observations of the Blazar BL Lacertae: A New Fast TeV Gamma-Ray Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysekara, A. U.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Brantseg, T.; Brose, R.; Buchovecky, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Daniel, M. K.; Falcone, A.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Gillanders, G. H.; Gunawardhana, I.; Hütten, M.; Hanna, D.; Hervet, O.; Holder, J.; Hughes, G.; Humensky, T. B.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kar, P.; Kertzman, M.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Lin, T. T. Y.; McArthur, S.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; O’Brien, S.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Petrashyk, A.; Pohl, M.; Pueschel, E.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Rulten, C.; Sadeh, I.; Santander, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Wakely, S. P.; Weinstein, A.; Wells, R. M.; Wilcox, P.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.; The VERITAS Collaboration; Jorstad, S. G.; Marscher, A. P.; Lister, M. L.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Pushkarev, A. B.; Savolainen, T.; Agudo, I.; Molina, S. N.; Gómez, J. L.; Larionov, V. M.; Borman, G. A.; Mokrushina, A. A.; Tornikoski, M.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Chamani, W.; Enestam, S.; Kiehlmann, S.; Hovatta, T.; Smith, P. S.; Pontrelli, P.

    2018-04-01

    Combined with measurements made by very-long-baseline interferometry, the observations of fast TeV gamma-ray flares probe the structure and emission mechanism of blazar jets. However, only a handful of such flares have been detected to date, and only within the last few years have these flares been observed from lower-frequency-peaked BL Lac objects and flat-spectrum radio quasars. We report on a fast TeV gamma-ray flare from the blazar BL Lacertae observed by the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS). with a rise time of ∼2.3 hr and a decay time of ∼36 min. The peak flux above 200 GeV is (4.2 ± 0.6) × 10‑6 photon m‑2 s‑1 measured with a 4-minute-binned light curve, corresponding to ∼180% of the flux that is observed from the Crab Nebula above the same energy threshold. Variability contemporaneous with the TeV gamma-ray flare was observed in GeV gamma-ray, X-ray, and optical flux, as well as in optical and radio polarization. Additionally, a possible moving emission feature with superluminal apparent velocity was identified in Very Long Baseline Array observations at 43 GHz, potentially passing the radio core of the jet around the time of the gamma-ray flare. We discuss the constraints on the size, Lorentz factor, and location of the emitting region of the flare, and the interpretations with several theoretical models that invoke relativistic plasma passing stationary shocks.

  9. Applications of Monte Carlo simulations of gamma-ray spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    A short, convenient computer program based on the Monte Carlo method that was developed to generate simulated gamma-ray spectra has been found to have useful applications in research and teaching. In research, we use it to predict spectra in neutron activation analysis (NAA), particularly in prompt gamma-ray NAA (PGNAA). In teaching, it is used to illustrate the dependence of detector response functions on the nature of gamma-ray interactions, the incident gamma-ray energy, and detector geometry

  10. Investigation of LaBr3:Ce probe for gamma-ray spectroscopy and dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghraby, Ahmed M.; Alzimami, K. S.; Alkhorayef, M. A.; Alsafi, K. G.; Ma, A.; Alfuraih, A. A.; Alghamdi, A. A.; Spyrou, N. M.

    2014-02-01

    The main thrust of this work is the investigation of performance of relatively new commercial LaBr3:Ce probe (Inspector 1000™ with LaBr3:Ce crystal) for gamma-ray spectroscopy and dosimetry measurements in comparison to LaCl3:Ce and NaI:Tl scintillators. The crystals were irradiated by a wide range of energies (57Co, 22Na, 18F, 137Cs and 60Co). The study involved recording of detected spectra and measurement of energy resolution, photopeak efficiency, internal radioactivity measurements as well as dose rate. The Monte Carlo package, Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) was used to validate the experiments. Overall results showed very good agreement between the measurements and the simulations. The LaBr3:Ce crystal has excellent energy resolution, energy resolutions of (3.37±0.05)% and (2.98±0.07)% for a 137Cs 662 keV and a 60Co 1332 keV gamma-ray point sources respectively, were recorded. The disadvantage of the lanthanum halide scintillators is their internal radioactivity. Inspector 1000™ with LaBr3:Ce scintillator has shown an accurate and quick dose measurements at Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Units which allows accurate assessment of the radiation dose received by staff members compared to the use of electronic personal dosimeters (EPD).

  11. Gamma ray spectroscopy and timing using LSO and PIN photodiodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.; Melcher, C.L.; Manente, R.A.

    1994-11-01

    The high density, high light output, and short decay time of LSO (lutetium orthosilicate, Lu 2 SiO 5 :Ce) make it an attractive scintillator for gamma ray spectroscopy. The low cost, small size, high quantum efficiency, and ruggedness of silicon photodiodes make them attractive photodetectors for this same application, although their high noise (Compared to a photomultiplier tube) reduces their appeal. In this work the authors measure the gamma ray energy resolution, timing accuracy, and conversion factor from gamma energy to number of electron-hole pairs produced with a 3 x 3 x 22 mm 3 LSO scintillator crystal read out with a 3 x 3 mm 2 silicon PIN photodiode. When the detector is excited with 511 keV photons, a photopeak centered at 1,940 e - with 149 keV fwhm is observed and a timing signal with 35 ns fwhm jitter is produced. When the detector is excited with 1,275 keV photons, a photopeak centered at 4,910 e - with 149 keV fwhm is observed and a timing signal with 25 ns fwhm jitter is produced. While these performance measures are inferior to those obtained with photomultiplier tubes, they are acceptable for some applications

  12. Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Fishman, G. J.; Bhat, P. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; Kippen, R. M.; vonKienlin, A.; Dwyer, J. R.; hide

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation explores the relationship between Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGF) and lightning. Using data from the World-Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), and the gamma ray observations from Fermi's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), the study reviews any causal relationship between TGFs and lightning. The conclusion of the study is that the TGF and lightning are simultaneous with out a causal relationship.

  13. An industrial radiography exposure device based on measurement of transmitted gamma-ray intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polee, C; Chankow, N; Srisatit, S; Thong-Aram, D

    2015-01-01

    In film radiography, underexposure and overexposure may happen particularly when lacking information of specimen material and hollowness. This paper describes a method and a device for determining exposure in industrial gamma-ray radiography based on quick measurement of transmitted gamma-ray intensity with a small detector. Application software was developed for Android mobile phone to remotely control the device and to display counting data via Bluetooth communication. Prior to film exposure, the device is placed behind a specimen to measure transmitted intensity which is inversely proportional to the exposure. Unlike in using the conventional exposure curve, correction factors for source decay, source-to- film distance, specimen thickness and kind of material are not needed. The developed technique and device make radiographic process economic, convenient and more reliable. (paper)

  14. Cellular response to low Gamma-ray doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzanares A, E; Vega C, H R; Leon, L.C. de . [Unidades Academicas de Estudios Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, A.P. 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico); Rebolledo D, O; Radillo J, F [Facultad de Ciencias Biologicas y Agropecuarias de la Universidad de Colima, Colima (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    Lymphocytes, obtained from healthy donors, were exposed to a low strength gamma-ray field to determine heat shock protein expression in function of radiation dose. Protein identification was carried out using mAb raised against Hsp70 and Hsc70.Hsp70 protein was detected after lymphocyte irradiation. In all cases, an increasing trend of relative amounts of Hsp70 in function to irradiation time was observed. After 1.25 c Gy gamma-ray dose, lymphocytes expressed Hsp70 protein, indicating a threshold response to gamma rays. (Author)

  15. Cellular response to low Gamma-ray doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzanares A, E.; Vega C, H.R.; Leon, L.C. de; Rebolledo D, O.; Radillo J, F.

    2002-01-01

    Lymphocytes, obtained from healthy donors, were exposed to a low strength gamma-ray field to determine heat shock protein expression in function of radiation dose. Protein identification was carried out using mAb raised against Hsp70 and Hsc70.Hsp70 protein was detected after lymphocyte irradiation. In all cases, an increasing trend of relative amounts of Hsp70 in function to irradiation time was observed. After 1.25 c Gy gamma-ray dose, lymphocytes expressed Hsp70 protein, indicating a threshold response to gamma rays. (Author)

  16. Gamma-ray burst spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teegarden, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    A review of recent results in gamma-ray burst spectroscopy is given. Particular attention is paid to the recent discovery of emission and absorption features in the burst spectra. These lines represent the strongest evidence to date that gamma-ray bursts originate on or near neutron stars. Line parameters give information on the temperature, magnetic field and possibly the gravitational potential of the neutron star. The behavior of the continuum spectrum is also discussed. A remarkably good fit to nearly all bursts is obtained with a thermal-bremsstrahlung-like continuum. Significant evolution is observed of both the continuum and line features within most events

  17. Gamma-ray Imaging Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, K; Mihailescu, L; Nelson, K; Valentine, J; Wright, D

    2006-10-05

    In this document we discuss specific implementations for gamma-ray imaging instruments including the principle of operation and describe systems which have been built and demonstrated as well as systems currently under development. There are several fundamentally different technologies each with specific operational requirements and performance trade offs. We provide an overview of the different gamma-ray imaging techniques and briefly discuss challenges and limitations associated with each modality (in the appendix we give detailed descriptions of specific implementations for many of these technologies). In Section 3 we summarize the performance and operational aspects in tabular form as an aid for comparing technologies and mapping technologies to potential applications.

  18. TRIPLICATE SODIUM IODIDE GAMMA RAY MONITORS FOR THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couture, A.

    2011-09-20

    This technical report contains recommendations from the Analytical Development (AD) organization of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for a system of triplicate Sodium Iodide (NaI) detectors to be used to monitor Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) content of the Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS) output of the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process. These detectors need to be gain stabilized with respect to temperature shifts since they will be installed on top of Tank 41 at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This will be accomplished using NaI crystals doped with the alpha-emitting isotope, Americium-241({sup 241}Am). Two energy regions of the detector output will be monitored using single-channel analyzers (SCAs), the {sup 137}Cs full-energy {gamma}-ray peak and the {sup 241}Am alpha peak. The count rate in the gamma peak region will be proportional to the {sup 137}Cs content in the DSS output. The constant rate of alpha decay in the NaI crystal will be monitored and used as feedback to adjust the high voltage supply to the detector in response to temperature variation. An analysis of theoretical {sup 137}Cs breakthrough curves was used to estimate the gamma activity expected in the DSS output during a single iteration of the process. Count rates arising from the DSS and background sources were predicted using Microshield modeling software. The current plan for shielding the detectors within an enclosure with four-inch thick steel walls should allow the detectors to operate with the sensitivity required to perform these measurements. Calibration, testing, and maintenance requirements for the detector system are outlined as well. The purpose of SCIX is to remove and concentrate high-level radioisotopes from SRS salt waste resulting in two waste streams. The concentrated high-level waste containing {sup 137}Cs will be sent to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for vitrification and the low-level DSS will be sent to the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF

  19. Gamma-ray imaging spectrometer (GRIS): a new balloon-borne experiment for gamma-ray line astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teegarden, B.J.; Cline, T.L.; Gehrels, N.; Porreca, G.; Tueller, J.; Leventhal, M.; Huters, A.F.; MacCallum, C.J.; Stang, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy is a relatively new field that holds great promise for further understanding of high energy astrophysical processes. Preliminary results such as the annihilation radiation from the galactic center, the 26 Al line from the galactic plane and cyclotron lines from neutron stars may well be just the initial discoveries of a rich and as yet undeveloped field. When the high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer (GRSE) was removed from the GRO payload NASA decided to initiate a balloon program to permit continued development and improvement of instrumentation in this field, as well as continued scientific observations. The Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS) is one of the experiments selected as part of this program. The instrument contains a number of new and innovative features that are expected to produce a significant improvement in source location accuracy and sensitivity over previous balloon and satellite experiments. 6 refs., 2 figs

  20. SIMULATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURST JETS IN A STRATIFIED EXTERNAL MEDIUM: DYNAMICS, AFTERGLOW LIGHT CURVES, JET BREAKS, AND RADIO CALORIMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Colle, Fabio; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico [TASC, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Granot, Jonathan [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Lopez-Camara, Diego [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ap. 70-543, 04510 D.F. (Mexico)

    2012-05-20

    The dynamics of gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets during the afterglow phase is most reliably and accurately modeled using hydrodynamic simulations. All published simulations so far, however, have considered only a uniform external medium, while a stratified external medium is expected around long duration GRB progenitors. Here, we present simulations of the dynamics of GRB jets and the resulting afterglow emission for both uniform and stratified external media with {rho}{sub ext}{proportional_to}r{sup -k} for k = 0, 1, 2. The simulations are performed in two dimensions using the special relativistic version of the Mezcal code. Common to all calculations is the initiation of the GRB jet as a conical wedge of half-opening angle {theta}{sub 0} = 0.2 whose radial profile is taken from the self-similar Blandford-McKee solution. The dynamics for stratified external media (k = 1, 2) are broadly similar to those derived for expansion into a uniform external medium (k = 0). The jet half-opening angle is observed to start increasing logarithmically with time (or radius) once the Lorentz factor {Gamma} drops below {theta}{sup -1}{sub 0}. For larger k values, however, the lateral expansion is faster at early times (when {Gamma} > {theta}{sup -1}{sub 0}) and slower at late times with the jet expansion becoming Newtonian and slowly approaching spherical symmetry over progressively longer timescales. We find that, contrary to analytic expectations, there is a reasonably sharp jet break in the light curve for k = 2 (a wind-like external medium), although the shape of the break is affected more by the viewing angle (for {theta}{sub obs} {<=} {theta}{sub 0}) than by the slope of the external density profile (for 0 {<=} k {<=} 2). Steeper density profiles (i.e., increasing k values) are found to produce more gradual jet breaks while larger viewing angles cause smoother and later appearing jet breaks. The counterjet becomes visible as it becomes sub-relativistic, and for k = 0 this results

  1. Event-sequence time series analysis in ground-based gamma-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barres de Almeida, U.; Chadwick, P.; Daniel, M.; Nolan, S.; McComb, L.

    2008-01-01

    The recent, extreme episodes of variability detected from Blazars by the leading atmospheric Cerenkov experiments motivate the development and application of specialized statistical techniques that enable the study of this rich data set to its furthest extent. The identification of the shortest variability timescales supported by the data and the actual variability structure observed in the light curves of these sources are some of the fundamental aspects being studied, that answers can bring new developments on the understanding of the physics of these objects and on the mechanisms of production of VHE gamma-rays in the Universe. Some of our efforts in studying the time variability of VHE sources involve the application of dynamic programming algorithms to the problem of detecting change-points in a Poisson sequence. In this particular paper we concentrate on the more primary issue of the applicability of counting statistics to the analysis of time-series on VHE gamma-ray astronomy.

  2. Gamma-ray pulsars: Emission zones and viewing geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Roger W.; Yadigaroglu, I.-A.

    1995-01-01

    There are now a half-dozen young pulsars detected in high-energy photons by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO), showing a variety of emission efficiencies and pulse profiles. We present here a calculation of the pattern of high-energy emission on the sky in a model which posits gamma-ray production by charge-depleted gaps in the outer magnetosphere. This model accounts for the radio to gamma-ray pulse offsets of the known pulsars, as well as the shape of the high-energy pulse profiles. We also show that about one-third of emitting young radio pulsars will not be detected due to beaming effects, while approximately 2.5 times the number of radio-selected gamma-ray pulsars will be viewed only high energies. Finally we compute the polarization angle variation and find that the previously misunderstood optical polarization sweep of the Crab pulsar arises naturally in this picture. These results strongly support an outer magnetosphere location for the gamma-ray emission.

  3. CAMAC gamma ray scanning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, C.E.; Pratt, J.C.; Shunk, E.R.

    1981-01-01

    A flexible gamma-ray scanning system, based on a LeCroy 3500 multichannel analyzer and CAMAC modules, is described. The system is designed for making simultaneous passive and active scans of objects of interest to nuclear safeguards. The scanner is a stepping-motor-driven carriage; the detectors, a bismuth-germanate scintillator and a high-purity germanium detector. A total of sixteen peaks in the two detector-produced spectra can be integrated simultaneously, and any scan can be viewed during data acquisition. For active scanning, the 2615-keV gamma-ray line from a 232 U source and the 4439-keV gamma-ray line from 9 Be(α,n) 12 C were selected. The system can be easily reconfigured to accommodate up to seven detectors because it is based on CAMAC modules and FORTRAN. The system is designed for field use and is easily transported. Examples of passive and active scans are presented

  4. Population Studies of Radio and Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alice K; Gonthier, Peter; Coltisor, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    Rotation-powered pulsars are one of the most promising candidates for at least some of the 40-50 EGRET unidentified gamma-ray sources that lie near the Galactic plane. Since the end of the EGRO mission, the more sensitive Parkes Multibeam radio survey has detected mere than two dozen new radio pulsars in or near unidentified EGRET sources, many of which are young and energetic. These results raise an important question about the nature of radio quiescence in gamma-ray pulsars: is the non-detection of radio emission a matter of beaming or of sensitivity? The answer is very dependent on the geometry of the radio and gamma-ray beams. We present results of a population synthesis of pulsars in the Galaxy, including for the first time the full geometry of the radio and gamma-ray beams. We use a recent empirically derived model of the radio emission and luminosity, and a gamma-ray emission geometry and luminosity derived theoretically from pair cascades in the polar slot gap. The simulation includes characteristics of eight radio surveys of the Princeton catalog plus the Parkes MB survey. Our results indicate that EGRET was capable of detecting several dozen pulsars as point sources, with the ratio of radio-loud to radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars increasing significantly to about ten to one when the Parkes Survey is included. Polar cap models thus predict that many of the unidentified EGRET sources could be radio-loud gamma- ray pulsars, previously undetected as radio pulsars due to distance, large dispersion and lack of sensitivity. If true, this would make gamma-ray telescopes a potentially more sensitive tool for detecting distant young neutron stars in the Galactic plane.

  5. Influence of gamma-ray irradiation on 6H-SiC MOSFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshima, Takeshi; Yoshikawa, Masahito; Itoh, Hisayoshi; Nashiyama, Isamu; Okada, Sohei

    1998-01-01

    Enhancement-type n-channel MOSFETs were fabricated on 6H-SiC epitaxial films using pyrogenic or dry oxidation process. Oxide-trapped charges and interface traps produced in 6H-Sic MOSFETs by gamma-ray irradiation are evaluated from changes in the subthreshold-current curve. The net numbers of radiation-induced-oxide-trapped charges and interface traps depend on the oxidation process. The 6H-SiC MOSFETs exhibit higher radiation resistance than Si MOSFETs. (author)

  6. XRF 100316D/SN 2010bh and the nature of gamma-ray burst supernovae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cano, Z.; Bersier, D.; Guidorzi, C.; Kobayashi, S.; Levan, A.J.; Tanvir, N.R.; Wiersema, K.; D'Avanzo, P.; Fruchter, A.S.; Garnavich, P.; Gomboc, A.; Gorosabel, J.; Kasen, D.; Kopač, D.; Margutti, R.; Mazzali, P.A.; Melandri, A.; Mundell, C.G.; Nugent, P.E.; Pian, E.; Smith, R.J.; Steele, I.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Woosley, S.E.

    2011-01-01

    We present ground-based and Hubble Space Telescope optical and infrared observations of Swift XRF 100316D/SN 2010bh. It is seen that the optical light curves of SN 2010bh evolve at a faster rate than the archetype gamma-ray burst supernova (GRB-SN) 1998bw, but at a similar rate to SN 2006aj, an SN

  7. AGIS -- the Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krennrich, Frank

    2009-05-01

    The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System, AGIS, is envisioned to become the follow-up mission of the current generation of very high energy gamma-ray telescopes, namely, H.E.S.S., MAGIC and VERITAS. These instruments have provided a glimpse of the TeV gamma-ray sky, showing more than 70 sources while their detailed studies constrain a wealth of physics and astrophysics. The particle acceleration, emission and absorption processes in these sources permit the study of extreme physical conditions found in galactic and extragalactic TeV sources. AGIS will dramatically improve the sensitivity and angular resolution of TeV gamma-ray observations and therefore provide unique prospects for particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. This talk will provide an overview of the science drivers, scientific capabilities and the novel technical approaches that are pursued to maximize the performance of the large array concept of AGIS.

  8. Gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Allafort, A; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bouvier, A; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Cannon, A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Çelik, Ö; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Luca, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Frailis, M; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashi, K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Horan, D; Itoh, R; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, T J; Khangulyan, D; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lee, S-H; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Naumann-Godo, M; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Pierbattista, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Romani, R W; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Schalk, T L; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Troja, E; Uchiyama, Y; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Wang, P; Wood, K S; Yang, Z; Ziegler, M

    2011-02-11

    A young and energetic pulsar powers the well-known Crab Nebula. Here, we describe two separate gamma-ray (photon energy greater than 100 mega-electron volts) flares from this source detected by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The first flare occurred in February 2009 and lasted approximately 16 days. The second flare was detected in September 2010 and lasted approximately 4 days. During these outbursts, the gamma-ray flux from the nebula increased by factors of four and six, respectively. The brevity of the flares implies that the gamma rays were emitted via synchrotron radiation from peta-electron-volt (10(15) electron volts) electrons in a region smaller than 1.4 × 10(-2) parsecs. These are the highest-energy particles that can be associated with a discrete astronomical source, and they pose challenges to particle acceleration theory.

  9. Gamma-ray flares from the Crab nebula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdo, A.A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Casandjian, J.M.; Grenier, I.A.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Tibaldo, L.

    2011-01-01

    A young and energetic pulsar powers the well-known Crab Nebula. Here, we describe two separate gamma-ray (photon energy greater than 100 mega-electron volts) flares from this source detected by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The first flare occurred in February 2009 and lasted approximately 16 days. The second flare was detected in September 2010 and lasted approximately 4 days. During these outbursts, the gamma-ray flux from the nebula increased by factors of four and six, respectively. The brevity of the flares implies that the gamma rays were emitted via synchrotron radiation from peta-electron-volt (10 15 electron volts) electrons in a region smaller than 1.4 * 10 -2 parsecs. These are the highest-energy particles that can be associated with a discrete astronomical source, and they pose challenges to particle acceleration theory. (authors)

  10. Very high energy gamma-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weekes, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    Current interest in gamma-ray astronomy at energies above 100 GeV comes from the identification of Cygnus X-3 and other X-ray binaries as sources. In addition there are reports of emission from radio pulsars and a variety of other objects. The statistical significance of many of the observations is not high and many reported effects await confirmation, but there are a sufficient number of independent reports that very high energy gamma-ray astronomy must now be considered to have an observational basis. The observations are summarized with particular emphasis on those reported since 1980. The techniques used - the detection of small air showers using the secondary photons and particles at ground level - are unusual and are described. Future prospects for the field are discussed in relation to new ground-based experiments, satellite gamma-ray studies and proposed neutrino astronomy experiments. (orig.) With 296 refs

  11. Aircraft gamma-ray spectrometry in snow-water equivalent measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuittinen, R.; Vironmaeki, J.

    1979-01-01

    During the winter periods 1976-1977 and 1977-1978 the Hydrological Office at the National Board of Waters and the Geological Survey of Finland carried out a joint study to evaluate usefuluess of gamma-ray spectrometry in snow-water equivalent measurement. A multichannel gamma-ray spectrometer was fitted in a DC-3 aircraft. Fourteen snow courses were operated using both the gravimetric method and the gamma-ray method. The snow courses were located in southern Finland in forest, swamp and agricultural land. The results shows that the gamma ray method can be considered suitable for use in Finnish conditions and the accuracy of the gamma-ray method is almost of the same magnitude as the accuracy of the gravimetric method. (Auth.)

  12. Aircraft gamma-ray spectrometry in snow-water equivalent measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuittinen, R [National Board of Waters (Finland); Vironmaeki, J [Geological Survey of Finland

    1979-01-01

    During the winter periods 1976-1977 and 1977-1978 the Hydrological Office at the National Board of Waters and the Geological Survey of Finland carried out a joint study to evaluate usefuluess of gamma-ray spectrometry in snow-water equivalent measurement. A multichannel gamma-ray spectrometer was fitted in a DC-3 aircraft. Fourteen snow courses were operated using both the gravimetric method and the gamma-ray method. The snow courses were located in southern Finland in forest, swamp and agricultural land. The results shows that the gamma ray method can be considered suitable for use in Finnish conditions and the accuracy of the gamma-ray method is almost of the same magnitude as the accuracy of the gravimetric method.

  13. Aircraft gamma-ray spectrometry in snow-water equivalent measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuittinen, R; Vironmaeki, J

    1979-01-01

    During the winter periods of 1976 to 1977 and 1977 to 1978, the Hydrological Office at the National Boards of Waters and the Geological Survey of Finland carried out a joint study to evaluate usefulness of gamma-ray spectrometry in snowwater equivalent measurement. A multichannel gamma-ray spectrometry was fitted out in a DC-3 aircraft. Fourteen snow courses were operated using gravimetric method and gamma-ray method. The snow courses were located in southern Finland in forest, swamp and agricultural land. The results show that the gamma ray method can be considered suitable for use in Finnish conditions and the accuracy of the gamma-ray method is almost of the same magnitude of the accuracy of the gravimetric method.

  14. Gamma-ray-burst beaming and gravitational-wave observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Holz, Daniel E

    2013-11-01

    Using the observed rate of short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) it is possible to make predictions for the detectable rate of compact binary coalescences in gravitational-wave detectors. We show that the nondetection of mergers in the existing LIGO/Virgo data constrains the beaming angles and progenitor masses of gamma-ray bursts, although these limits are fully consistent with existing expectations. We make predictions for the rate of events in future networks of gravitational-wave observatories, finding that the first detection of a neutron-star-neutron-star binary coalescence associated with the progenitors of short GRBs is likely to happen within the first 16 months of observation, even in the case of only two observatories (e.g., LIGO-Hanford and LIGO-Livingston) operating at intermediate sensitivities (e.g., advanced LIGO design sensitivity, but without signal recycling mirrors), and assuming a conservative distribution of beaming angles (e.g., all GRBs beamed within θ(j) = 30°). Less conservative assumptions reduce the waiting time until first detection to a period of weeks to months, with an event detection rate of >/~10/yr. Alternatively, the compact binary coalescence model of short GRBs can be ruled out if a binary is not seen within the first two years of operation of a LIGO-Hanford, LIGO-Livingston, and Virgo network at advanced design sensitivity. We also demonstrate that the gravitational wave detection rate of GRB triggered sources (i.e., those seen first in gamma rays) is lower than the rate of untriggered events (i.e., those seen only in gravitational waves) if θ(j)≲30°, independent of the noise curve, network configuration, and observed GRB rate. The first detection in gravitational waves of a binary GRB progenitor is therefore unlikely to be associated with the observation of a GRB.

  15. Supernova sheds light on gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On 29 March the HETE-II satellite detected the most violent explosion in the universe to date - an enormous burst of gamma rays. Observers across the world recorded and studied the event. It appears to prove that gamma ray bursts originate in supernovae (1 page)

  16. AGILE: A gamma-ray mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavani, M.; Caraveo, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Perotti, F.; Vercellone, S.; Barbiellini, G.; Budini, G.; Longo, F.; Prest, M.; Vallazza, E.; Cocco, V.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Pittori, C.; Costa, E.; Feroci, M.; Lapshov, I.; Morelli, E.; Rubini, A.; Soffitta, P.

    2000-01-01

    AGILE is an innovative, cost-effective gamma-ray mission selected by the Italian Space Agency for a Program of Small Scientific Missions. The AGILE gamma-ray imaging detector (GRID, made of a Silicon tracker and CsI Mini-Calorimeter) is designed to detect and image photons in the 30 MeV-50 GeV energy band with good sensitivity and very large field of view (FOV ∼3 sr). The X-ray detector, Super-AGILE, sensitive in the 10-40 keV band and integrated on top of the GRID gamma-ray tracker will provide imaging (1-3 arcmin) and moderate spectroscopy. For selected sky areas, AGILE might achieve a flux sensitivity (above 100 MeV) better than 5x10 -8 ph cm 2 s -1 at the completion of its scientific program. AGILE will operate as an Observatory open to the international community and is planned to be operational during the year 2002 for a nominal 2-year mission. It will be an ideal 'bridge' between EGRET and GLAST, and the only mission entirely dedicated to high-energy astrophysics above 30 MeV during that period

  17. Microstructural characterization of porous materials by X-ray microtomography and gamma ray transmission techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Anderson Camargo

    2006-01-01

    This work presents the application of the X-ray microtomography and gamma ray transmission techniques for the microstructure characterization of different kinds of materials. Total porosity, pore size distribution and the two point correlation functions were measured. The two point correlation function, which allows the reconstruction of 3D models, was carried out for two samples. Seven ceramic tablets of Alumina (Al 2 O 3 ), seven tablets of Boron Carbide (B 4 C), three samples of sedimentary rocks and one sample of Titanium foam were analyzed. The experimental set up for the Gamma Ray Transmission technique consisted of: a 2'' x 2'' crystal NaI(Tl) detector, an 241 Am radioactive source (59,53 keV, 100 mCi), an automatic micrometric table for the sample XZ movement and standard gamma spectrometry electronics. Two microtomography systems were used: a Fein Focus system, constituted by an X-ray tube, operated at 160 kV and 0.3 to 1.1 mA, a CCD camera and the movement sample system, and a Skyscan system, model 1072, with a X-ray tube operated at 100 kV and 100μA, and a CCD camera. The ceramic tablets, analyzed by the gamma ray transmission technique presented results for most of the porosities data with smaller confidence intervals and inside the intervals supplied by the tablets manufacturer. The Titanium porous sample was analyzed by the two techniques, its microtomography images achieved a resolution of 17μm, obtained employing the Fein Focus system. For both techniques, this sample showed high porosity, which allows its application for this purpose. The sandstones samples were analyzed by the Skyscan system, achieving resolutions of 19μm, 11μm and 3.8μm for each sample, respectively. The resolutions of 11μm and 3.8μm were the ones that generated better 2D sections for the respective samples and, consequently, more reliable porosities. The 3.8μm resolution was the one that best quantified the pore size distribution data, showing information not shown by

  18. Design Study for Direction Variable Compton Scattering Gamma Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kii, T.; Omer, M.; Negm, H.; Choi, Y. W.; Kinjo, R.; Yoshida, K.; Konstantin, T.; Kimura, N.; Ishida, K.; Imon, H.; Shibata, M.; Shimahashi, K.; Komai, T.; Okumura, K.; Zen, H.; Masuda, K.; Hori, T.; Ohgaki, H.

    2013-03-01

    A monochromatic gamma ray beam is attractive for isotope-specific material/medical imaging or non-destructive inspection. A laser Compton scattering (LCS) gamma ray source which is based on the backward Compton scattering of laser light on high-energy electrons can generate energy variable quasi-monochromatic gamma ray. Due to the principle of the LCS gamma ray, the direction of the gamma beam is limited to the direction of the high-energy electrons. Then the target object is placed on the beam axis, and is usually moved if spatial scanning is required. In this work, we proposed an electron beam transport system consisting of four bending magnets which can stick the collision point and control the electron beam direction, and a laser system consisting of a spheroidal mirror and a parabolic mirror which can also stick the collision point. Then the collision point can be placed on one focus of the spheroid. Thus gamma ray direction and collision angle between the electron beam and the laser beam can be easily controlled. As the results, travelling direction of the LCS gamma ray can be controlled under the limitation of the beam transport system, energy of the gamma ray can be controlled by controlling incident angle of the colliding beams, and energy spread can be controlled by changing the divergence of the laser beam.

  19. Analytical applications of neutron capture gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstrom, R.M.; Paul, R.L.; Anderson, D.L.; Paul, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    Field and industrial applications of neutron capture gamma-ray spectrometry with isotopic sources or neutron generators are economically important. Geochemical exploration in boreholes is done routinely with neutron probes. Coal and ores are assayed with analyzers adjacent to a conveyor belt in dozens of industrial facilities. The use of capture gamma rays for explosives detection has been described in the literature, both for scanning airline baggage and for characterizing obsolete munitions; a packaged system for the latter is available commercially. Generalizations are drawn from the history of the field, and predictions are made about the future usefulness of capture gamma rays. (author)

  20. Analysis of Gafchromic EBT3 film calibration irradiated with gamma rays from different systems: Gamma Knife and Cobalt-60 unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Mohsen; Geraily, Ghazale; Shirazi, Alireza; Esfahani, Mahbod; Teimouri, Javad

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, Gafchromic films are used as an advanced instrument for dosimetry systems. The EBT3 films are a new generation of Gafchromic films. Our main interest is to compare the response of the EBT3 films exposed to gamma rays provided by the Theratron 780C as a conventional radiotherapy system and the Leksell Gamma Knife as a stereotactic radiotherapy system (SRS). Both systems use Cobalt-60 sources, thus using the same energy. However, other factors such as source-to-axis distance, number of sources, dose rate, direction of irradiation, shape of phantom, the field shape of radiation, and different scatter contribution may influence the calibration curve. Calibration curves for the 2 systems were measured and plotted for doses ranging from 0 to 40 Gy at the red and green channels. The best fitting curve was obtained with the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. Also, the component of dose uncertainty was obtained for any calibration curve. With the best fitting curve for the EBT3 films, we can use the calibration curve to measure the absolute dose in radiation therapy. Although there is a small deviation between the 2 curves, the p-value at any channel shows no significant difference between the 2 calibration curves. Therefore, the calibration curve for each system can be the same because of minor differences. The results show that with the best fitting curve from measured data, while considering the measurement uncertainties related to them, the EBT3 calibration curve can be used to measure the unknown dose both in SRS and in conventional radiotherapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. GRB 110205A: ANATOMY OF A LONG GAMMA-RAY BURST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gendre, B.; Stratta, G.; Atteia, J. L.; Klotz, A.; Boër, M.; Colas, F.; Vachier, F.; Kugel, F.; Rinner, C.; Laas-Bourez, M.; Strajnic, J.

    2012-01-01

    The Swift burst GRB 110205A was a very bright burst visible in the Northern Hemisphere. GRB 110205A was intrinsically long and very energetic and it occurred in a low-density interstellar medium environment, leading to delayed afterglow emission and a clear temporal separation of the main emitting components: prompt emission, reverse shock, and forward shock. Our observations show several remarkable features of GRB 110205A: the detection of prompt optical emission strongly correlated with the Burst Alert Telescope light curve, with no temporal lag between the two; the absence of correlation of the X-ray emission compared to the optical and high-energy gamma-ray ones during the prompt phase; and a large optical re-brightening after the end of the prompt phase, that we interpret as a signature of the reverse shock. Beyond the pedagogical value offered by the excellent multi-wavelength coverage of a gamma-ray burst with temporally separated radiating components, we discuss several questions raised by our observations: the nature of the prompt optical emission and the spectral evolution of the prompt emission at high energies (from 0.5 keV to 150 keV); the origin of an X-ray flare at the beginning of the forward shock; and the modeling of the afterglow, including the reverse shock, in the framework of the classical fireball model.

  2. SU-G-IeP4-12: Performance of In-111 Coincident Gamma-Ray Counting: A Monte Carlo Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahlka, R; Kappadath, S; Mawlawi, O [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The decay of In-111 results in a non-isotropic gamma-ray cascade, which is normally imaged using a gamma camera. Creating images with a gamma camera using coincident gamma-rays from In-111 has not been previously studied. Our objective was to explore the feasibility of imaging this cascade as coincidence events and to determine the optimal timing resolution and source activity using Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: GEANT4 was used to simulate the decay of the In-111 nucleus and to model the gamma camera. Each photon emission was assigned a timestamp, and the time delay and angular separation for the second gamma-ray in the cascade was consistent with the known intermediate state half-life of 85ns. The gamma-rays are transported through a model of a Siemens dual head Symbia “S” gamma camera with a 5/8-inch thick crystal and medium energy collimators. A true coincident event was defined as a single 171keV gamma-ray followed by a single 245keV gamma-ray within a specified time window (or vice versa). Several source activities (ranging from 10uCi to 5mCi) with and without incorporation of background counts were then simulated. Each simulation was analyzed using varying time windows to assess random events. The noise equivalent count rate (NECR) was computed based on the number of true and random counts for each combination of activity and time window. No scatter events were assumed since sources were simulated in air. Results: As expected, increasing the timing window increased the total number of observed coincidences albeit at the expense of true coincidences. A timing window range of 200–500ns maximizes the NECR at clinically-used source activities. The background rate did not significantly alter the maximum NECR. Conclusion: This work suggests coincident measurements of In-111 gamma-ray decay can be performed with commercial gamma cameras at clinically-relevant activities. Work is ongoing to assess useful clinical applications.

  3. Summary of existing information on gamma-ray and X-ray attenuation coefficients of solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, K.; Gerward, Leif

    2002-01-01

    Accurate values of X-ray and gamma-ray attenuation coefficients of different chemicals are required in spectrometry as well as in many other scientific, engineering and medical disciplines involving photon radiation. The current state of knowledge of experimental and theoretical gamma-ray and X-r......-ray attenuation coefficients in aqueous solutions of salts is presented and exemplified by recent work. The results presented provide a basis for studying X-ray and gamma-ray photon interactions with ions in solution (hydrated ions) rather than ion compounds in solid form....

  4. Guidelines for radioelement mapping using gamma ray spectrometry data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-07-01

    The purpose of the report is to provide an up-to-date review on the use of gamma ray spectrometry for radioelement mapping and, where appropriate, provide guidelines on the correct application of the method. It is a useful training guide for those new to the method. It gives a broad coverage of all aspects of the gamma ray method and provides a comprehensive list of references. The report gives an overview of the theoretical background to radioactivity and the gamma ray spectrometric method followed by a review of the application of the method to mapping the radiation environment. A brief outline is presented of the principles of radioactivity, the interaction of gamma rays with matter, instrumentation applied to the measurement of gamma rays, and the quantities and units in contemporary use in gamma ray spectrometry. This is followed by a review of the fundamentals of gamma ray spectrometry, and its application to ground and airborne mapping. Covered are also all aspects of the calibration and data processing procedures required for estimating the ground concentrations of the radioelements. The procedures required for the recovery of older survey data are also presented as well as an overview of data presentation and integration for mapping applications

  5. Gamma-ray Emission from Globular Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak-Hin T. Tam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, the data obtained using the Large Area Telescope (LAT aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has provided new insights on high-energy processes in globular clusters, particularly those involving compact objects such as MilliSecond Pulsars (MSPs. Gamma-ray emission in the 100 MeV to 10 GeV range has been detected from more than a dozen globular clusters in our galaxy, including 47 Tucanae and Terzan 5. Based on a sample of known gammaray globular clusters, the empirical relations between gamma-ray luminosity and properties of globular clusters such as their stellar encounter rate, metallicity, and possible optical and infrared photon energy densities, have been derived. The measured gamma-ray spectra are generally described by a power law with a cut-off at a few gigaelectronvolts. Together with the detection of pulsed γ-rays from two MSPs in two different globular clusters, such spectral signature lends support to the hypothesis that γ-rays from globular clusters represent collective curvature emission from magnetospheres of MSPs in the clusters. Alternative models, involving Inverse-Compton (IC emission of relativistic electrons that are accelerated close to MSPs or pulsar wind nebula shocks, have also been suggested. Observations at >100 GeV by using Fermi/LAT and atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes such as H.E.S.S.-II, MAGIC-II, VERITAS, and CTA will help to settle some questions unanswered by current data.

  6. Generation of laser Compton gamma-rays using Compact ERL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shizuma, Toshiyuki; Hajima, Ryoichi; Nagai, Ryoji; Hayakawa, Takehito; Mori, Michiaki; Seya, Michio

    2015-01-01

    Nondestructive isotope-specific assay system using nuclear resonance fluorescence has been developed at JAEA. In this system, intense, mono-energetic laser Compton scattering (LCS) gamma-rays are generated by combining an energy recovery linac (ERL) and laser enhancement cavity. As technical development for such an intense gamma-ray source, we demonstrated generation of LCS gamma-rays using Compact ERL (supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology) developed in collaboration with KEK. We also measured X-ray fluorescence for elements near iron region by using mono-energetic LCS gamma-rays. In this presentation, we will show results of the experiment and future plan. (author)

  7. Gamma ray lines from a universal extra dimension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertone, Gianfranco; Jackson, C. B.; Shaughnessy, Gabe; Tait, Tim M.P.; Vallinotto, Alberto

    2012-03-01

    Indirect Dark Matter searches are based on the observation of secondary particles produced by the annihilation or decay of Dark Matter. Among them, gamma-rays are perhaps the most promising messengers, as they do not suffer deflection or absorption on Galactic scales, so their observation would directly reveal the position and the energy spectrum of the emitting source. Here, we study the detailed gamma-ray energy spectrum of Kaluza--Klein Dark Matter in a theory with 5 Universal Extra Dimensions. We focus in particular on the two body annihilation of Dark Matter particles into a photon and another particle, which produces monochromatic photons, resulting in a line in the energy spectrum of gamma rays. Previous calculations in the context of the five dimensional UED model have computed the line signal from annihilations into \\gamma \\gamma, but we extend these results to include \\gamma Z and \\gamma H final states. We find that these spectral lines are subdominant compared to the predicted \\gamma \\gamma signal, but they would be important as follow-up signals in the event of the observation of the \\gamma \\gamma line, in order to distinguish the 5d UED model from other theoretical scenarios.

  8. Gamma ray auto absorption correction evaluation methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gugiu, Daniela; Roth, Csaba; Ghinescu, Alecse

    2010-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is a well established nuclear technique, suited to investigate the microstructural or elemental composition and can be applied to studies of a large variety of samples. The work with large samples involves, beside the development of large irradiation devices with well know neutron field characteristics, the knowledge of perturbing phenomena and adequate evaluation of correction factors like: neutron self shielding, extended source correction, gamma ray auto absorption. The objective of the works presented in this paper is to validate an appropriate methodology for gamma ray auto absorption correction evaluation for large inhomogeneous samples. For this purpose a benchmark experiment has been defined - a simple gamma ray transmission experiment, easy to be reproduced. The gamma ray attenuation in pottery samples has been measured and computed using MCNP5 code. The results show a good agreement between the computed and measured values, proving that the proposed methodology is able to evaluate the correction factors. (authors)

  9. Prompt gamma-ray imaging for small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Libai

    Small animal imaging is recognized as a powerful discovery tool for small animal modeling of human diseases, which is providing an important clue to complete understanding of disease mechanisms and is helping researchers develop and test new treatments. The current small animal imaging techniques include positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission tomography (SPECT), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound (US). A new imaging modality called prompt gamma-ray imaging (PGI) has been identified and investigated primarily by Monte Carlo simulation. Currently it is suggested for use on small animals. This new technique could greatly enhance and extend the present capabilities of PET and SPECT imaging from ingested radioisotopes to the imaging of selected non-radioactive elements, such as Gd, Cd, Hg, and B, and has the great potential to be used in Neutron Cancer Therapy to monitor neutron distribution and neutron-capture agent distribution. This approach consists of irradiating small animals in the thermal neutron beam of a nuclear reactor to produce prompt gamma rays from the elements in the sample by the radiative capture (n, gamma) reaction. These prompt gamma rays are emitted in energies that are characteristic of each element and they are also produced in characteristic coincident chains. After measuring these prompt gamma rays by surrounding spectrometry array, the distribution of each element of interest in the sample is reconstructed from the mapping of each detected signature gamma ray by either electronic collimations or mechanical collimations. In addition, the transmitted neutrons from the beam can be simultaneously used for very sensitive anatomical imaging, which provides the registration for the elemental distributions obtained from PGI. The primary approach is to use Monte Carlo simulation methods either with the specific purpose code CEARCPG, developed at NC State University or with the general purpose

  10. Radon gamma-ray spectrometry with YAP:Ce scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Plastino, W; De Notaristefani, F

    2002-01-01

    The detection properties of a YAP:Ce scintillator (YAlO sub 3 :Ce crystal) optically coupled to a Hamamatsu H5784 photomultiplier with standard bialkali photocathode have been analyzed. In particular, the application to radon and radon-daughters gamma-ray spectrometry was investigated. The crystal response has been studied under severe extreme conditions to simulate environments of geophysical interest, particularly those found in geothermal and volcanic areas. Tests in water up to a temperature of 100 deg.C and in acids solutions such as HCl (37%), H sub 2 SO sub 4 (48%) and HNO sub 3 (65%) have been performed. The measurements with standard radon sources provided by the National Institute for Metrology of Ionizing Radiations (ENEA) have emphasized the non-hygroscopic properties of the scintillator and a small dependence of the light yield on temperature and HNO sub 3. The data collected in this first step of our research have pointed out that the YAP:Ce scintillator can allow high response stability for rad...

  11. Fuzzy correlations of gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, D.H.; Linder, E.V.; Blumenthal, G.R.

    1991-01-01

    The origin of gamma-ray bursts is not known, both in the sense of the nature of the source emitting the radiation and literally, the position of the burst on the sky. Lacking unambiguously identified counterparts in any wavelength band studied to date, statistical approaches are required to determine the burster distance scale. Angular correlation analysis is one of the most powerful tools in this regard. However, poor detector resolution gives large localization errors, effectively beam smearing the positions. The resulting fuzzy angular correlation function is investigated and the generic isotropization that smearing induces on any intrinsic clustering is discussed. In particular, the extent to which gamma-ray burst observations by the BATSE detector aboard the Gamma-Ray Observatory might recover an intrinsic source correlation is investigated. 16 refs

  12. Saccharification of gamma-ray and alkali pretreated lignocellulosics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begum, A.; Choudhury, N.

    1988-01-01

    Enzymic saccharification of gamma ray and alkali pretreated sawdust, rice straw, and sugar cane bagasse showed higher release of reducing sugar from pretreated substrates. By gamma ray treatment alone (500 kGy) reducing sugar release of 2.8, 9.2, and 10 g/l was obtained from 7.5% (w/v) sawdust, rice straw, and bagasse and the same substrates showed reducing sugar release of 4.2, 30, and 20 g/l respectively when treated with alkali (0.1 g/g). Combination of gamma ray with alkali treatment further increased the reducing sugar release to 10.2, 33, and 36 g/l from sawdust, rice straw, and bagasse respectively. The effects of gamma ray and alkali treatment on saccharification varied with the nature of the substrate

  13. Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory: Fast Response Space Missions for Early Time Phase of Gamma Ray Bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, I.H.; Ahmad, S.; Barrillon, P.

    2013-01-01

    One of the unexplored domains in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is the early time phase of the optical light curve. We have proposed Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) to address this question through extraordinary opportunities presented by a series of small space missions. The UFFO...

  14. Gamma-ray emission profile measurements during JET ICRH discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howarth, P.J.A. [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom); Adams, J.M.; Bond, D.S.; Watkins, N. [AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom); Jarvis, O.N.; Marcus, F.B.; Sadler, G.; Belle, P. van [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-12-31

    Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating (ICRH) that is tuned to minority fuel ions can induce an energy diffusion of the heated species and create high energy tail temperatures of {approx} 1 MeV. The most energetic of these accelerated minority ions can undergo nuclear reactions with impurity Be and C that produces {gamma}-ray emission from the decay of the excited product nuclei. This RF-induced {gamma}-ray emission has been recorded using the JET neutron emission profile diagnostic which is capable of distinguishing neutrons and {gamma}-rays. Appropriate data processing has enabled the RF-induced {gamma}-ray emission signals to be isolated from the {gamma}-ray emission signals associated with neutron interactions in the material surrounding the profile monitor. The 2-d {gamma}-ray emission profiles show that virtually all the radiation originates from the low field side of the RF resonance layer, as expected from RF-induced pitch angle diffusion. The emission profiles indicate the presence of a small population of resonant {sup 3}He ions that possess orbits lying near the passing-trapped boundary. (author) 6 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Gamma-ray multiplicity distribution in ternary fission of {sup 252}Cf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandel, M [Department of Nuclear Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, Bratislava (Slovakia); Kliman, J [Department of Nuclear Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, Bratislava (Slovakia); Krupa, L [Department of Nuclear Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, Bratislava (Slovakia); Morhac, M [Department of Nuclear Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, Bratislava (Slovakia); Hamilton, J H [Department of Physics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Kormicki, J [Department of Physics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Ramayya, A V [Department of Physics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Hwang, J K [Department of Physics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Luo, Y X [Department of Physics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Fong, D [Department of Physics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Gore, P [Department of Physics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Akopian, G M Ter; Oganessian, Yu Ts; Rodin, A M; Fomichev, A S; Popeko, G S; Daniel, A V [Flerov Laboratory for Nuclear Reactions, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Rasmussen, J O; Macchiavelli, A O [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Stoyer, M A [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Donangelo, R [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Cole, J D [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2002-12-01

    From multiparameter data obtained at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the integral characteristics of the prompt {gamma}-ray emission were extracted for tripartition of {sup 252}Cf with He, Be and C being the third light charged particle. We used multifold {gamma}-ray coincidence spectra for the determination of {gamma}-ray multiplicities assuming a Gaussian distribution for {gamma}-ray multiplicity. The multiplicity distribution characteristics, i.e. mean multiplicity and its dispersion were obtained by minimizing with respect to the calculated values of probabilities of multifold {gamma}-ray coincidences using a combinatoric method. Comparison with the known experimental data from binary fission was made. Further, we investigated dependencies of the mean {gamma}-ray multiplicity on the kinetic energy of the light charged particle. The mean {gamma}-ray multiplicity for He ternary fission is found to increase rapidly with increasing kinetic energy of He in the region less than 11 MeV and then decrease slowly with increasing kinetic energy of He. The anomalous behaviour of {gamma}-ray emission is discussed. The mean {gamma}-ray multiplicity was determined for the first time for Be and C ternary fission. For Be, the {gamma}-ray multiplicity as a function of kinetic energy was obtained as well.

  16. Prompt Gamma Ray Spectroscopy for process monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoller, W.H.; Holmes, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Prompt Gamma Ray Spectroscopy (PGRS) is a very powerful analytical technique able to measure many metallic, contamination problem elements. The technique involves measurement of gamma rays that are emitted by nuclei upon capturing a neutron. This method is sensitive not only to the target element but also to the particular isotope of that element. PGRS is capable of measuring dissolved metal ions in a flowing system. In the field, isotopic neutron sources are used to produce the desired neutron flux ( 252 Cf can produce neutron flux of the order of 10 8 neutrons/cm 2 --sec.). Due to high penetrating power of gamma radiation, high efficiency gamma ray detectors can be placed in an appropriate geometry to maximize sensitivity, providing real-time monitoring with low detection level capabilities

  17. Continued Development of a Soft Gamma-Ray Concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloser, Peter

    We propose to continue our development of a concept for a soft gamma-ray (E > 100 keV) concentrator using thin-film multilayer structures. Alternating layers of low- and high-density materials will channel soft gamma-ray photons via total external reflection. A suitable arrangement of bent structures will then concentrate the incident radiation to a point. Gamma-ray optics made in this way offer the potential for soft gamma-ray telescopes with focal lengths of less than 10 m, removing the need for formation flying spacecraft and opening the field up to balloon-borne instruments. Under previous APRA funding we have been investigating methods for efficiently producing such multilayer structures and modeling their performance. We now propose to pursue magnetron sputtering (MS) techniques to quickly produce structures with the required smoothness and thickness, to measure their channeling efficiency and compare with calculations, and to design a "lens" with optimized bandpass and throughput and predict its scientific performance. If successful, this work will confirm that this innovative optics concept is suitable for a balloon-born soft gamma-ray telescope with unprecedented sensitivity.

  18. Development of Monte Carlo decay gamma-ray transport calculation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Satoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Kawasaki, Nobuo [Fujitsu Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kume, Etsuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    In the DT fusion reactor, it is critical concern to evaluate the decay gamma-ray biological dose rates after the reactor shutdown exactly. In order to evaluate the decay gamma-ray biological dose rates exactly, three dimensional Monte Carlo decay gamma-ray transport calculation system have been developed by connecting the three dimensional Monte Carlo particle transport calculation code and the induced activity calculation code. The developed calculation system consists of the following four functions. (1) The operational neutron flux distribution is calculated by the three dimensional Monte Carlo particle transport calculation code. (2) The induced activities are calculated by the induced activity calculation code. (3) The decay gamma-ray source distribution is obtained from the induced activities. (4) The decay gamma-rays are generated by using the decay gamma-ray source distribution, and the decay gamma-ray transport calculation is conducted by the three dimensional Monte Carlo particle transport calculation code. In order to reduce the calculation time drastically, a biasing system for the decay gamma-ray source distribution has been developed, and the function is also included in the present system. In this paper, the outline and the detail of the system, and the execution example are reported. The evaluation for the effect of the biasing system is also reported. (author)

  19. Fermi Large Area Telescope Bright Gamma-ray Source List

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Ajello, M.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Band, D.L.; /NASA, Goddard /NASA, Goddard; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Bechtol, K.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bignami, G.F.; /Pavia U.; Bloom, Elliott D.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Burnett, Thompson H.; /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /ASDC, Frascati /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NASA, Goddard /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /ASDC, Frascati /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Pavia U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /UC, Santa Cruz /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /NASA, Goddard; /more authors..

    2009-05-15

    Following its launch in 2008 June, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) began a sky survey in August. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi in three months produced a deeper and better resolved map of the {gamma}-ray sky than any previous space mission. We present here initial results for energies above 100 MeV for the 205 most significant (statistical significance greater than {approx}10{sigma}) {gamma}-ray sources in these data. These are the best characterized and best localized point-like (i.e., spatially unresolved) {gamma}-ray sources in the early mission data.

  20. The LASL gamma-ray burst astronomy program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klebesadel, R.W.; Evans, W.D.; Laros, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst observations performed by LASL began with the identification and initial report of the phenomenon from data acquired by the Vela satellites. The Vela instruments have recorded responses to 73 gamma-ray bursts over a ten-year interval, and are continuing to contribute toward these observations. Similar instrumentation was included aboard the NRL SOLRAD 11 spacecraft. These performed well but suffered an early demise. Recently, the LASL gamma-ray burst astronomy program has been enhanced through the implementation of experiments aboard the Pioneer Venus Orbiter and ISEF-C spacecraft. Both of these experiments are continuing to contribute data vital to trigonometric directional analyses. (orig.)

  1. Astrophysical applications of Delbrück scattering: Dust scattered gamma radiation from gamma ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunwar, B.; Bhadra, A.; Gupta, S.K. Sen

    2014-01-01

    A preliminary, and perhaps the first, study of astrophysical applications of Delbrück scattering in a gamma-ray emitting celestial object like a gamma-ray burst (GRB) has been made. At energies≥100 MeV the elastic scattering of gamma-ray photons off the molecular dust surrounding the GRB site is dominated by Delbrück scattering. Expressions for Delbrück-scattered gamma-ray flux as a function of time has been obtained for a few selected energies by assuming a simple model of GRB. These are compared with Compton-scattered flux. At certain situations, interestingly, the former is found to exceed the latter for the first few milliseconds of the burst. The issue of detectability of Delbrück-scattered gamma-ray echo from the cloud of a GRB is discussed. Although it is observed that the detection of such an echo is not within the capability of the presently operating gamma-ray missions such as Fermi LAT, a rough estimate shows that one can be optimistic that future generation gamma-ray telescopes might be able to see such photons' contribution to the total flux. - Highlights: ► Astrophysical application of Delbrück scattering in a GRB has been made. ► Initially, the Delbrück scattering may dominate the scattering of GeV γ-rays. ► The issue of detectability of such radiations is discussed

  2. Single-crystal filters for attenuating epithermal neutrons and gamma rays in reactor beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rustad, B.M.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Bahnsen, A.

    1965-01-01

    Cross section of representative samples of bismuth and quartz were measured at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures over neutron energy range of 0.0007 to 2.0 ev to obtain data for design of single-crystal 32-cm bismuth filters for attenuating fast neutrons and γ-rays in reactor beams; filters may...

  3. X-ray and gamma ray waveguide, cavity and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vali, V.; Krogstad, R.S.; Willard, H.R.

    1978-01-01

    An x-ray and gamma ray waveguide, cavity, and method for directing electromagnetic radiation of the x-ray, gamma ray, and extreme ultraviolet wavelengths are described. A hollow fiber is used as the waveguide and is manufactured from a material having an index of refraction less than unity for these wavelengths. The internal diameter of the hollow fiber waveguide and the radius of curvature for the waveguide are selectively predetermined in light of the wavelength of the transmitted radiation to minimize losses. The electromagnetic radiation is obtained from any suitable source ad upon introduction into the waveguide is transmitted along a curvilinear path. The waveguide may be formed as a closed loop to create a cavity or may be used to direct the electromagnetic radiation to a utilization site

  4. Proceedings of the workshop on multiple prompt gamma-ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebihara, Mitsuru; Hatsukawa, Yuichi; Oshima, Masumi

    2006-10-01

    The workshop on 'Multiple Prompt Gamma-ray Analysis' was held on March 8, 2006 at Tokai. It is based on a project, 'Developments of real time, non-destructive ultra sensitive elemental analysis using multiple gamma-ray detections and prompt gamma ray analysis and its application to real samples', one of the High priority Cooperative Research Programs performed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency and the University of Tokyo. In this workshop, the latest results of the Multiple Prompt Gamma ray Analysis (MPGA) study were presented, together with those of Neutron Activation Analysis with Multiple Gamma-ray Detection (NAAMG). The 9 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  5. Recent achievements in the field of gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Tan; Dai Zigao

    2001-01-01

    Recent progresses in the field of gamma-ray bursts is briefly introduced. Gamma-ray bursts are the most energetic explosion since the Big Bang of the universe. Within a few tens of seconds, the energy released in gamma-ray bursts could be several hundred times larger than that released form the sun in its whole life (about 10 billion years). The authors will first briefly discuss the observational facts, based on which the authors will discuss the standard fireball model, the dynamical behavior and evolution of gamma-ray bursts and their afterglows. Then, various observational phenomena that contradict the standard model are given and the importance of these post-standard effects are pointed out. The questions related to the energy source of gamma-ray bursts are still unanswered, and other important questions also remain to be solved

  6. A high energy gamma ray astronomy experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofstadter, R.

    1988-01-01

    The author describes work involving NASA's Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO). GRO exemplifies the near zero principle because it investigates new gamma ray phenomena by relying on the space program to take us into the region of zero interference above the earth's atmosphere. In its present form GRO has four experiments

  7. Gamma-ray emission from internal shocks in novae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P.; Dubus, G.; Jean, P.; Tatischeff, V.; Dosne, C.

    2018-04-01

    Context. Gamma-ray emission at energies ≥100 MeV has been detected from nine novae using the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), and can be explained by particle acceleration at shocks in these systems. Eight out of these nine objects are classical novae in which interaction of the ejecta with a tenuous circumbinary material is not expected to generate detectable gamma-ray emission. Aim. We examine whether particle acceleration at internal shocks can account for the gamma-ray emission from these novae. The shocks result from the interaction of a fast wind radiatively-driven by nuclear burning on the white dwarf with material ejected in the initial runaway stage of the nova outburst. Methods: We present a one-dimensional model for the dynamics of a forward and reverse shock system in a nova ejecta, and for the associated time-dependent particle acceleration and high-energy gamma-ray emission. Non-thermal proton and electron spectra are calculated by solving a time-dependent transport equation for particle injection, acceleration, losses, and escape from the shock region. The predicted emission is compared to LAT observations of V407 Cyg, V1324 Sco, V959 Mon, V339 Del, V1369 Cen, and V5668 Sgr. Results: The ≥100 MeV gamma-ray emission arises predominantly from particles accelerated up to 100 GeV at the reverse shock and undergoing hadronic interactions in the dense cooling layer downstream of the shock. The emission rises within days after the onset of the wind, quickly reaches a maximum, and its subsequent decrease reflects mostly the time evolution of the wind properties. Comparison to gamma-ray data points to a typical scenario where an ejecta of mass 10-5-10-4 M⊙ expands in a homologous way with a maximum velocity of 1000-2000 km s-1, followed within a day by a wind with a velocity values of which result in the majority of best-fit models having gamma-ray spectra with a high-energy turnover below 10 GeV. Our typical model is able to account for the main

  8. Towards a global network of gamma-ray detector calibration facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijs, Marco; Koomans, Ronald; Limburg, Han

    2016-09-01

    Gamma-ray logging tools are applied worldwide. At various locations, calibration facilities are used to calibrate these gamma-ray logging systems. Several attempts have been made to cross-correlate well known calibration pits, but this cross-correlation does not include calibration facilities in Europe or private company calibration facilities. Our aim is to set-up a framework that gives the possibility to interlink all calibration facilities worldwide by using `tools of opportunity' - tools that have been calibrated in different calibration facilities, whether this usage was on a coordinated basis or by coincidence. To compare the measurement of different tools, it is important to understand the behaviour of the tools in the different calibration pits. Borehole properties, such as diameter, fluid, casing and probe diameter strongly influence the outcome of gamma-ray borehole logging. Logs need to be properly calibrated and compensated for these borehole properties in order to obtain in-situ grades or to do cross-hole correlation. Some tool providers provide tool-specific correction curves for this purpose. Others rely on reference measurements against sources of known radionuclide concentration and geometry. In this article, we present an attempt to set-up a framework for transferring `local' calibrations to be applied `globally'. This framework includes corrections for any geometry and detector size to give absolute concentrations of radionuclides from borehole measurements. This model is used to compare measurements in the calibration pits of Grand Junction, located in the USA; Adelaide (previously known as AMDEL), located in Adelaide Australia; and Stonehenge, located at Medusa Explorations BV in the Netherlands.

  9. Gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Wijers, Ralph A M J; Woosley, Stan

    2012-01-01

    Cosmic gamma ray bursts (GRBs) have fascinated scientists and the public alike since their discovery in the late 1960s. Their story is told here by some of the scientists who participated in their discovery and, after many decades of false starts, solved the problem of their origin. Fourteen chapters by active researchers in the field present a detailed history of the discovery, a comprehensive theoretical description of GRB central engine and emission models, a discussion of GRB host galaxies and a guide to how GRBs can be used as cosmological tools. Observations are grouped into three sets from the satellites CGRO, BeppoSAX and Swift, and followed by a discussion of multi-wavelength observations. This is the first edited volume on GRB astrophysics that presents a fully comprehensive review of the subject. Utilizing the latest research, Gamma-ray Bursts is an essential desktop companion for graduate students and researchers in astrophysics.

  10. The First Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ackermann, M.; et al., [Unknown; van der Horst, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy (gsim 20 MeV) γ-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected

  11. A silicon photomultiplier readout for time of flight neutron spectroscopy with {gamma}-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietropaolo, A.; Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' G. Occhialini' ' and CNISM, Universita Degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, 20126 Milano (Italy); Festa, G.; Andreani, C.; De Pascale, M. P.; Reali, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Centro NAST, Universita degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133, Roma (Italy); Grazzi, F. [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi-Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Madonna del Piano n.10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Schooneveld, E. M. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    The silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) is a recently developed photosensor used in particle physics, e.g., for detection of minimum ionizing particles and/or Cherenkov radiation. Its performance is comparable to that of photomultiplier tubes, but with advantages in terms of reduced volume and magnetic field insensitivity. In the present study, the performance of a gamma ray detector made of an yttrium aluminum perovskite scintillation crystal and a SiPM-based readout is assessed for use in time of flight neutron spectroscopy. Measurements performed at the ISIS pulsed neutron source demonstrate the feasibility of {gamma}-detection based on the new device.

  12. Simulation Study on Identifiability of UHE Gamma-ray Air Showers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Y.; Inoue, N.; Miyazawa, K.; Vankov, H.P.

    2008-01-01

    The chemical composition of Ultra-High-Energy (UHE) comic rays is one of unsolved mysteries, and its study will give us fruitful information on the origin and acceleration mechanism of UHE cosmic rays. Especially, a detection of UHE gamma-rays by hybrid experiments, such as AUGER and TA, will be a key to solve these questions. The characteristics of UHE gamma-ray showers have been studied by comparing the lateral and longitudinal structures of shower particles calculated with AIRES and our own simulation code, so far. There are apparent differences in a slope of lateral distribution (η) and a depth of shower maximum (Xmax) between gamma-ray and proton induced showers because UHE gamma-ray showers are affected by the LPM effect and the geomagnetic cascading process in an energy region of >10 19.5 eV. Different features between gamma-ray and proton showers are pointed out from the simulation study and an identifiability of gamma-ray showers from proton ones is also discussed by the method of Neural-Network-Analysis

  13. Simulation Study on Identifiability of UHE Gamma-ray Air Showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Y.; Inoue, N.; Miyazawa, K. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Vankov, H.P. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgaria Academy, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2008-01-15

    The chemical composition of Ultra-High-Energy (UHE) comic rays is one of unsolved mysteries, and its study will give us fruitful information on the origin and acceleration mechanism of UHE cosmic rays. Especially, a detection of UHE gamma-rays by hybrid experiments, such as AUGER and TA, will be a key to solve these questions. The characteristics of UHE gamma-ray showers have been studied by comparing the lateral and longitudinal structures of shower particles calculated with AIRES and our own simulation code, so far. There are apparent differences in a slope of lateral distribution ({eta}) and a depth of shower maximum (Xmax) between gamma-ray and proton induced showers because UHE gamma-ray showers are affected by the LPM effect and the geomagnetic cascading process in an energy region of >10{sup 19.5}eV. Different features between gamma-ray and proton showers are pointed out from the simulation study and an identifiability of gamma-ray showers from proton ones is also discussed by the method of Neural-Network-Analysis.

  14. Cosmic very high-energy {gamma}-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaga, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Physik, Muenchen (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The article gives a brief overview, aimed at nonspecialists, about the goals and selected recent results of the detection of very-high energy {gamma}-rays (energies above 100 GeV) with ground based detectors. The stress is on the physics questions, specially the origin of Galactic Cosmic Rays and the emission of TeV {gamma}-radiation from active galaxies. Moreover some particle-physics questions which are addressed in this area are discussed.

  15. Materials testing by computerized tomography with neutrons and gamma-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Ghobary, A M; Bakkoush, F A; Megahid, R M [Reactor and Neutron Physics Department, Nuclear Research Center, A.E.A., Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    The method of computerized tomography by fast neutrons and gamma-rays are used for inspecting and testing of materials by non-destructive technique. The transmission technique was applied using narrow collimated beams of reactor neutrons and gamma-ray. The neutron and gamma-rays transmitted through the object inspection were measured by means of a neutron gamma detector with Ne - 213 liquid organic scintillator. The undesired pulses of neutrons or gamma-rays are rejected from the transmitted beam by a discrimination technique based on the difference in the decay part of light pulse produced by recoil electrons or recoil protons. The transmitted neutrons or gamma-rays for different projections used to get the image of the section through the object investigated using the method of filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm. 8 figs.

  16. Experimental investigation of silicon photomultipliers as compact light readout systems for gamma-ray spectroscopy applications in fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nocente, M., E-mail: massimo.nocente@mib.infn.it; Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini,” Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola,” EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milano (Italy); Fazzi, A.; Lorenzoli, M.; Pirovano, C. [Dipartimento di Energia, CeSNEF, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy); Tardocchi, M. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola,” EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milano (Italy); Cazzaniga, C.; Rebai, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini,” Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Uboldi, C.; Varoli, V. [Dipartimento di Energia, CeSNEF, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    A matrix of Silicon Photo Multipliers has been developed for light readout from a large area 1 in. × 1 in. LaBr{sub 3} crystal. The system has been characterized in the laboratory and its performance compared to that of a conventional photo multiplier tube. A pulse duration of 100 ns was achieved, which opens up to spectroscopy applications at high counting rates. The energy resolution measured using radioactive sources extrapolates to 3%–4% in the energy range E{sub γ} = 3–5 MeV, enabling gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at good energy resolution. The results reported here are of relevance in view of the development of compact gamma-ray detectors with spectroscopy capabilities, such as an enhanced gamma-ray camera for high power fusion plasmas, where the use of photomultiplier is impeded by space limitation and sensitivity to magnetic fields.

  17. Discovery of Pulsed Gamma Rays from the Young Radio Pulsar PSR J1028-5819 with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Baring, Matthew G.; /Rice U.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, Elliott D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Burnett, Thompson H.; /Washington U., Seattle; Caliandro, G.A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /NASA, Goddard /UC, Santa Cruz /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Trieste /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; /more authors..

    2009-05-15

    Radio pulsar PSR J1028-5819 was recently discovered in a high-frequency search (at 3.1 GHz) in the error circle of the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) source 3EG J1027-5817. The spin-down power of this young pulsar is great enough to make it very likely the counterpart for the EGRET source. We report here the discovery of {gamma}-ray pulsations from PSR J1028-5819 in early observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. The {gamma}-ray light curve shows two sharp peaks having phase separation of 0.460 {+-} 0.004, trailing the very narrow radio pulse by 0.200 {+-} 0.003 in phase, very similar to that of other known {gamma}-ray pulsars. The measured {gamma}-ray flux gives an efficiency for the pulsar of {approx}10-20% (for outer magnetosphere beam models). No evidence of a surrounding pulsar wind nebula is seen in the current Fermi data but limits on associated emission are weak because the source lies in a crowded region with high background emission. However, the improved angular resolution afforded by the LAT enables the disentanglement of the previous COS-B and EGRET source detections into at least two distinct sources, one of which is now identified as PSR J1028-5819.

  18. Experimental determination of nuclear reaction rates (n,γ) by the gamma-rays capture spectrometry technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucatero, M.A.

    1976-01-01

    The technique of the gamma-rays capture spectrometry was used in the experimental determination of nuclear reaction rates of the type (n,γ). This technique consists in the incidence of a thermal neutrons collimated beam upon a sample, detecting the capture spectrum of gamma rays emitted at a solid fixed angle. In the determination of the efficiency curve intrinsic to the detection electronic system the reactions 199 Hg(n,γ) 200 Hg, 56 Fe(n,γ) 57 Fe and 63 Cu(n,γ) 64 Cu were used with the energy of the gamma rays capture of 5.976, 7.635 and 7.915 Mev respectively, through the irradiation of standard samples of Hg(175.3g), Fe(110.4g) and Cu(108.5g) of cylindrical geometry the two former and parallelepiped the latter. The problem concerning the corrections due to the thermal neutrons flux depression, the gammas auto-attenuation, and the geometric factor due to the cylindrical and parallelepiped geometry are involved in the data process. The experimental determination of the reaction 35 Cl(n,γ) 36 Cl rate was made through the observation of the gamma caputre of 6.111 Mev when a sample of CaCl 2 of cylindrical geometry was irradiated. This rate can be favorably compared with the reaction rate determined theoretically. (author)

  19. Gamma-ray production cross sections for MeV neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, Hideo; Harima, Yoshiko; Yamakoshi, Hisao; Sano, Yuji; Kobayashi, Tsuguyuki.

    1979-01-01

    Gamma-ray production cross section and spectra for 1- to 20-MeV neutrons were theoretically obtained, which were requested for heating calculations, for shielding design calculations, and for material damage estimates. Calculations were carried out for Al, Si, Ca, Fe, Ni, Cu, Nb, Ta, Au, and Pb, using a spin-dependent evaporation model without the parity conservation and including the dipole and quardupole gamma-ray transitions. The results were compared with the experimental data measured in ORNL to confirm the availability of this model in applications. In addition, the effects on the gamma-ray production cross section of the optical potential, level density, yrast level, and radiation width were investigated in detail. The conclusions are: 1) the use of the optical potential which gives the correct total reaction cross section is essential to gamma-ray production calculations, 2) the gamma-ray production cross section is not so sensitive to the choice of level density parameters, 3) the inclusion of yrast levels is necessary in dealing with the competition of the neutron and gamma-ray emissions from highly excited states, and 4) the Brink-Axel type's radiation width is unsuitable to be applied to radiative capture processes. (author)

  20. Neural network consistent empirical physical formula construction for neutron–gamma discrimination in gamma ray tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildiz, Nihat; Akkoyun, Serkan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Detector responses in neutron–gamma discrimination were estimated by neural networks. ► Novel consistent neural network empirical physical formulas (EPFs) were constructed for detector responses. ► The EPFs are of explicit mathematical functional form. ► The EPFs can be used to derive various physical functions relevant to neutron–gamma discrimination in gamma ray tracking. -- Abstract: Gamma ray tracking is an efficient detection technique in studying exotic nuclei which lies far from beta stability line. To achieve very powerful and extraordinary resolution ability, new detectors based on gamma ray tracking are currently being developed. To reach this achievement, the neutron–gamma discrimination in these detectors is also an important task. In this paper, by suitable layered feedforward neural networks (LFNNs), we have constructed novel and consistent empirical physical formulas (EPFs) for some highly nonlinear detector counts measured in neutron–gamma discrimination. The detector counts data used in the discrimination was actually borrowed from our previous paper. The counts used here had been originally measured versus the following parameters: energy deposited in the first interaction points, difference in the incoming direction of initial gamma rays, and finally figure of merit values of the clusters determined by tracking. The LFNN–EPFs are of explicit mathematical functional form. Therefore, by various suitable operations of mathematical analysis, these LFNN–EPFs can be used to derivate further physical functions which might be potentially relevant to neutron–gamma discrimination performance of gamma ray tracking.

  1. Simulating Gamma-Ray Emission in Star-forming Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfrommer, Christoph [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Pakmor, Rüdiger; Simpson, Christine M.; Springel, Volker, E-mail: cpfrommer@aip.de [Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-10-01

    Star-forming galaxies emit GeV and TeV gamma-rays that are thought to originate from hadronic interactions of cosmic-ray (CR) nuclei with the interstellar medium. To understand the emission, we have used the moving-mesh code Arepo to perform magnetohydrodynamical galaxy formation simulations with self-consistent CR physics. Our galaxy models exhibit a first burst of star formation that injects CRs at supernovae. Once CRs have sufficiently accumulated in our Milky Way–like galaxy, their buoyancy force overcomes the magnetic tension of the toroidal disk field. As field lines open up, they enable anisotropically diffusing CRs to escape into the halo and to accelerate a bubble-like, CR-dominated outflow. However, these bubbles are invisible in our simulated gamma-ray maps of hadronic pion-decay and secondary inverse-Compton emission because of low gas density in the outflows. By adopting a phenomenological relation between star formation rate (SFR) and far-infrared emission and assuming that gamma-rays mainly originate from decaying pions, our simulated galaxies can reproduce the observed tight relation between far-infrared and gamma-ray emission, independent of whether we account for anisotropic CR diffusion. This demonstrates that uncertainties in modeling active CR transport processes only play a minor role in predicting gamma-ray emission from galaxies. We find that in starbursts, most of the CR energy is “calorimetrically” lost to hadronic interactions. In contrast, the gamma-ray emission deviates from this calorimetric property at low SFRs due to adiabatic losses, which cannot be identified in traditional one-zone models.

  2. Simulating Gamma-Ray Emission in Star-forming Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfrommer, Christoph; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Simpson, Christine M.; Springel, Volker

    2017-10-01

    Star-forming galaxies emit GeV and TeV gamma-rays that are thought to originate from hadronic interactions of cosmic-ray (CR) nuclei with the interstellar medium. To understand the emission, we have used the moving-mesh code Arepo to perform magnetohydrodynamical galaxy formation simulations with self-consistent CR physics. Our galaxy models exhibit a first burst of star formation that injects CRs at supernovae. Once CRs have sufficiently accumulated in our Milky Way-like galaxy, their buoyancy force overcomes the magnetic tension of the toroidal disk field. As field lines open up, they enable anisotropically diffusing CRs to escape into the halo and to accelerate a bubble-like, CR-dominated outflow. However, these bubbles are invisible in our simulated gamma-ray maps of hadronic pion-decay and secondary inverse-Compton emission because of low gas density in the outflows. By adopting a phenomenological relation between star formation rate (SFR) and far-infrared emission and assuming that gamma-rays mainly originate from decaying pions, our simulated galaxies can reproduce the observed tight relation between far-infrared and gamma-ray emission, independent of whether we account for anisotropic CR diffusion. This demonstrates that uncertainties in modeling active CR transport processes only play a minor role in predicting gamma-ray emission from galaxies. We find that in starbursts, most of the CR energy is “calorimetrically” lost to hadronic interactions. In contrast, the gamma-ray emission deviates from this calorimetric property at low SFRs due to adiabatic losses, which cannot be identified in traditional one-zone models.

  3. Discovery of Pulsations from the Pulsar J0205 6449 in SNR 3C 58 with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, Marco; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, William B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, Bijan; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Blandford, Roger D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, Elliott D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, Anders W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bouvier, A.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Columbia U. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /NASA, Goddard /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /LPCE, Orleans /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Cruz /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Manchester U. /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; /more authors..

    2011-12-01

    We report the discovery of {gamma}-ray pulsations ({ge}0.1 GeV) from the young radio and X-ray pulsar PSR J0205 + 6449 located in the Galactic supernova remnant 3C 58. Data in the {gamma}-ray band were acquired by the Large Area Telescope aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly GLAST), while the radio rotational ephemeris used to fold {gamma}-rays was obtained using both the Green Bank Telescope and the Lovell telescope at Jodrell Bank. The light curve consists of two peaks separated by 0.49 {+-} 0.01 {+-} 0.01 cycles which are aligned with the X-ray peaks. The first {gamma}-ray peak trails the radio pulse by 0.08 {+-} 0.01 {+-} 0.01, while its amplitude decreases with increasing energy as for the other {gamma}-ray pulsars. Spectral analysis of the pulsed {gamma}-ray emission suggests a simple power law of index -2.1 {+-} 0.1 {+-} 0.2 with an exponential cutoff at 3.0{sub -0.7}{sup +1.1} {+-} 0.4 GeV. The first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The integral {gamma}-ray photon flux above 0.1 GeV is (13.7 {+-} 1.4 {+-} 3.0) x 10{sup -8} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which implies for a distance of 3.2 kpc and assuming a broad fan-like beam a luminosity of 8.3 x 10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1} and an efficiency {eta} of 0.3%. Finally, we report a 95% upper limit on the flux of 1.7 x 10{sup -8} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for off-pulse emission from the object.

  4. Swift pointing and gravitational-wave bursts from gamma-ray burst events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, Patrick J; Finn, Lee Samuel; Krishnan, Badri

    2003-01-01

    The currently accepted model for gamma-ray burst phenomena involves the violent formation of a rapidly rotating solar-mass black hole. Gravitational waves should be associated with the black-hole formation, and their detection would permit this model to be tested. Even upper limits on the gravitational-wave strength associated with gamma-ray bursts could constrain the gamma-ray burst model. This requires joint observations of gamma-ray burst events with gravitational and gamma-ray detectors. Here we examine how the quality of an upper limit on the gravitational-wave strength associated with gamma-ray bursts depends on the relative orientation of the gamma-ray-burst and gravitational-wave detectors, and apply our results to the particular case of the Swift Burst-Alert Telescope (BAT) and the LIGO gravitational-wave detectors. A result of this investigation is a science-based 'figure of merit' that can be used, together with other mission constraints, to optimize the pointing of the Swift telescope for the detection of gravitational waves associated with gamma-ray bursts

  5. Cosmic Connections:. from Cosmic Rays to Gamma Rays, Cosmic Backgrounds and Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusenko, Alexander

    2013-12-01

    Combined data from gamma-ray telescopes and cosmic-ray detectors have produced some new surprising insights regarding intergalactic and galactic magnetic fields, as well as extragalactic background light. We review some recent advances, including a theory explaining the hard spectra of distant blazars and the measurements of intergalactic magnetic fields based on the spectra of distant sources. Furthermore, we discuss the possible contribution of transient galactic sources, such as past gamma-ray bursts and hypernova explosions in the Milky Way, to the observed ux of ultrahigh-energy cosmicrays nuclei. The need for a holistic treatment of gamma rays, cosmic rays, and magnetic fields serves as a unifying theme for these seemingly unrelated phenomena.

  6. Janus probe, a detection system for high energy reactor gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; Kaiser, B.J.

    1980-03-01

    In reactor environments, gamma-ray spectra are continuous and the absolute magnitude as well as the general shape of the gamma continuum are of paramount importance. Consequently, conventional methods of gamma-ray detection are not suitable for in-core gamma-ray spectrometry. To meet these specific needs, a method of continuous gamma-ray spectrometry, namely Compton Recoil Gamma-Ray Spectrometry, was developed for in-situ observations of reactor environments. A new gamma-ray detection system has been developed which extends the applicability of Compton Recoil Gamma-Ray Spectrometry up to roughly 7 MeV. This detection system is comprised of two separate Si(Li) detectors placed face-to-face. Hence this new detection system is called the Janus probe. Also shown is the block diagram of pulse processing instrumentation for the Janus probe. This new gamma probe not only extends the upper energy limit of in-core gamma-ray spectrometry, but in addition possesses other fundamental advantages

  7. Intercomparison of gamma ray analysis software packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    The IAEA undertook an intercomparison exercise to review available software for gamma ray spectra analysis. This document describes the methods used in the intercomparison exercise, characterizes the software packages reviewed and presents the results obtained. Only direct results are given without any recommendation for a particular software or method for gamma ray spectra analysis

  8. Detection of gamma rays using scintillation optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. W.; Hong, S. B.

    2002-01-01

    Scintillating optical fibers have several advantages over other conventional materials used for radiation detection. We have used glass and plastic scintillating fibers to detect gamma rays emitted from 60 Co and 137 Cs, and beta rays from 90 Sr. The sensors are constructed of single strand or multi-strand fibers of 1 mm diameter. The glass scintillating fiber used contains cerium-activated lithium-silicate as scintillating material and the plastic scintillating fiber used is Bicron model BCF-12. In this paper, we report the pulse-height spectra obtained by both sensor types, and analyze them in the aspect of their usability for radiation detectors. Our investigation suggests that the glass fiber can be used to develop gamma ray detectors which will function in high and low gamma ray flux environments. Use of the sensor for the beta ray detection was not satisfactory. The plastic fiber sensor did not work satisfactorily for the weak gamma sources, but did produce somewhat promising results. The scintillating plastic fiber offers some feasibility as beta ray sensor material

  9. Mutagenic effectiveness and efficiency of EMS, DES and gamma-rays in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, M.L.H.; Bhan, A.K.

    1977-01-01

    Data on chlorophyll mutation frequency after treatment with EMS, DES and gamma-rays and sequential administration of gamma-rays and the two alkylating agents in three varieties of rice have been used to work out quantitatively the effectiveness and efficiency of each mutagen and combination treatment. For effectiveness, the order is EMS > DES and for efficiency it is EMS > DES > gamma-rays. In some sequential treatments (Gamma-rays + DES in 'IR8' and 'Basmati'; DES + gamma-rays in 'IR8' and 'Jhona'; Gamma-rays + EMS in 'IR8' and 'Basmati'; and EMS + gamma-rays in 'IR8', 'Jhona' and 'Basmati') mutation frequency is more than additive (synergistic) but these treatments are decisively less efficient because of their relatively high injurious effects in the M 1 generation. EMS induces more albinas than gamma-rays do. The mutational spectrum patterns induced by gamma-rays and DES are alike. In general, combination treatments tend to increase the frequency of albinas over other types of chlorophyll mutants. (orig.) [de

  10. Plutonium isotopic measurements by gamma-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, F.X.; Lemming, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    A nondestructive technique is described for calculating plutonium-238, plutonium-240, plutonium-241 and americium-241 relative to plutonium-239 from measured peak areas in the high resolution gamma-ray spectra of solid plutonium samples. Gamma-ray attenuation effects were minimized by selecting sets of neighboring peaks in the spectrum whose components are due to the different isotopes. Since the detector efficiencies are approximately the same for adjacent peaks, the accuracy of the isotopic ratios is dependent on the half-lives, branching intensities, and measured peak areas. The data presented describe the results obtained by analyzing gamma-ray spectra in the energy region from 120 to 700 keV. Most of the data analyzed were obtained from plutonium material containing 6 percent plutonium-240. Sample weights varied from 0.25 g to approximately 1.2 kg. The methods were also applied to plutonium samples containing up to 23 percent plutonium-240 with weights of 0.25 to 200 g. Results obtained by gamma-ray spectroscopy are compared to chemical analyses of aliquots taken from the bulk samples

  11. Energy spectrum of extragalactic gamma-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protheroe, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The result of Monte Carlo electron photon cascade calculations for propagation of gamma rays through regions of extragalactic space containing no magnetic field are given. These calculations then provide upper limits to the expected flux from extragalactic sources. Since gamma rays in the 10 to the 14th power eV to 10 to the 17th power eV energy range are of interest, interactions of electrons and photons with the 3 K microwave background radiation are considered. To obtain an upper limit to the expected gamma ray flux from sources, the intergalactic field is assumed to be so low that it can be ignored. Interactions with photons of the near-infrared background radiation are not considered here although these will have important implications for gamma rays below 10 to the 14th power eV if the near infrared background radiation is universal. Interaction lengths of electrons and photons in the microwave background radiation at a temperature of 2.96 K were calculated and are given.

  12. Self-powered neutron and gamma-ray flux detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, C.J.; Shields, R.B.; Lynch, G.F.; Cuttler, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    A new type of self-powered neutron detector was developed which is sensitive to both the neutron and gamma-ray fluxes. The emitter comprises two parts. The central emitter core is made of materials that generate high-energy electrons on exposure to neutrons. The outer layer acts as a gamma-ray/electron converter, and since it has a higher atomic number and higher back-scattering coefficient than the collector, increases the net outflow or emmission of electrons. The collector, which is around the emitter outer layer, is insulated from the outer layer electrically with dielectric insulation formed from compressed metal-oxide powder. The fraction of electrons given off by the emitter that is reflected back by the collector is less than the fraction of electrons emitted by the collector that is reflected back by the emitter. The thickness of the outer layer needed to achieve this result is very small. A detector of this design responds to external reactor gamma-rays as well as to neutron capture gamma-rays from the collector. The emitter core is either nickel, iron or titanium, or alloys based on these metals. The outer layer is made of platinum, tantalum, osmium, molybdenum or cerium. The detector is particularly useful for monitoring neutron and gamma ray flux intensities in nuclear reactor cores in which the neutron and gamma ray flux intensities are closely proportional, are unltimately related to the fission rate, and are used as measurements of nuclear reactor power. (DN)

  13. High energy gamma-ray production in nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinston, J.A.; Nifenecker, H.; Nifenecker, H.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental techniques used to study high energy gamma-ray production in nuclear reactions are reviewed. High energy photon production in nucleus-nucleus collisions is discussed. Semi-classical descriptions of the nucleus-nucleus gamma reactions are introduced. Nucleon-nucleon gamma cross sections are considered, including theoretical aspects and experimental data. High energy gamma ray production in proton-nucleus reactions is explained. Theoretical explanations of photon emission in nucleus-nucleus collisions are treated. The contribution of charged pion currents to photon production is mentioned

  14. Laser Compton Scattering Gamma Ray Induced Photo-Trasmutation

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Dazhi

    2004-01-01

    High brightness beams of gamma rays produced with laser Compton scattering have the potential to realize photo-transmutation through (γ,n) reaction, implying an efficient method to dispose long-lived fission products. Preliminary investigations have been carried out in understanding the feasibility of development of a transmutation facility to repose nuclear waste. A laser Compton scattering experimental setup based on a storage ring started to generate gamma-ray beams for studying the coupling of gamma photons and nuclear giant resonance. This paper demonstrates the dependency of nuclear transmutation efficiency on target dimensions and gamma ray features. 197Au sample was adopted in our experiment, and experimental results correspond to the theoretical estimations.

  15. Uranium measurement by airborne gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasty, R.L.

    1975-01-01

    In the airborne measurement of uranium, window type gamma-ray spectrometers are used and it is necessary to correct for scattered high energy radiation from thallium 208 in the thorium decay series. This radiation can be scattered in the crystal, in the ground, and in the air. A theory, analogous to the theory of radioactive decay, is developed; it can adequately explain the spectrum buildup in the uranium window for a point source of thorium oxide immersed to different depths in water and for a detector above the water. The theory is extended to predict the buildup as a function of altitude for detectors of different sizes and shows that errors in the airborne measurement of uranium can be significant if no allowance is made for radiation scattered in the ground and in the air

  16. A new population of ultra-long duration gamma-ray bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levan, A. J.; Brown, G. C.; Tunnicliffe, R. L. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Tanvir, N. R.; Starling, R. L. C.; Wiersema, K.; Page, K. L.; Wynn, G. A.; O' Brien, P. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Perley, D. A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Schulze, S. [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Chornock, R.; Malesani, D.; Watson, D.; Berger, E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hjorth, J. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Københaven Ø (Denmark); Cenko, S. B. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Fruchter, A. S. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD21218 (United States); Jakobsson, P. [Centre for Astrophysics and Cosmology, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhagi 5, IS-107 Reykjavk (Iceland); Bersier, D., E-mail: a.j.levan@warwick.ac.uk [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Egerton Wharf, Birkenhead CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); and others

    2014-01-20

    We present comprehensive multiwavelength observations of three gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with durations of several thousand seconds. We demonstrate that these events are extragalactic transients; in particular, we resolve the long-standing conundrum of the distance of GRB 101225A (the 'Christmas-day burst'), finding it to have a redshift z = 0.847 and showing that two apparently similar events (GRB 111209A and GRB 121027A) lie at z = 0.677 and z = 1.773, respectively. The systems show extremely unusual X-ray and optical light curves, very different from classical GRBs, with long-lasting, highly variable X-ray emission and optical light curves that exhibit little correlation with the behavior seen in the X-ray. Their host galaxies are faint, compact, and highly star-forming dwarf galaxies, typical of 'blue compact galaxies'. We propose that these bursts are the prototypes of a hitherto largely unrecognized population of ultra-long GRBs, which while observationally difficult to detect may be astrophysically relatively common. The long durations may naturally be explained by the engine-driven explosions of stars of much larger radii than normally considered for GRB progenitors, which are thought to have compact Wolf-Rayet progenitor stars. However, we cannot unambiguously identify supernova signatures within their light curves or spectra. We also consider the alternative possibility that they arise from the tidal disruption of stars by massive black holes and conclude that the associated timescales are only consistent with the disruption of compact stars (e.g., white dwarfs) by black holes of relatively low mass (<10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}).

  17. Gamma-ray bursts from black hole accretion disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strong, I.B.

    1975-01-01

    The suggestion was first made more than a year ago that gamma-ray bursts might originate in the neighborhood of black holes, based on some rather circumstantial evidence linking Cygnus X-1, the prime black-hole candidate, with two of the then-known gamma-ray bursts. Since then additional evidence makes the idea still more plausible. The evidence is summarized briefly, a physical model for production of gamma-ray bursts is given, and several of the more interesting consequences of such an origin are pointed out. (orig.) [de

  18. Computational techniques in gamma-ray skyshine analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, D.L.

    1988-12-01

    Two computer codes were developed to analyze gamma-ray skyshine, the scattering of gamma photons by air molecules. A review of previous gamma-ray skyshine studies discusses several Monte Carlo codes, programs using a single-scatter model, and the MicroSkyshine program for microcomputers. A benchmark gamma-ray skyshine experiment performed at Kansas State University is also described. A single-scatter numerical model was presented which traces photons from the source to their first scatter, then applies a buildup factor along a direct path from the scattering point to a detector. The FORTRAN code SKY, developed with this model before the present study, was modified to use Gauss quadrature, recent photon attenuation data and a more accurate buildup approximation. The resulting code, SILOGP, computes response from a point photon source on the axis of a silo, with and without concrete shielding over the opening. Another program, WALLGP, was developed using the same model to compute response from a point gamma source behind a perfectly absorbing wall, with and without shielding overhead. 29 refs., 48 figs., 13 tabs

  19. Magic gamma rays, extra-atmospheric source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolufer, P.

    2010-01-01

    Without the atmospheric layer, the cosmos radiation would kill every living, our planet would be like the moon. The cosmic gamma ray to collide with gases in land cover, as it is disintegrated. They are harmless, they form a cone of light that points to the cosmic source comes from. On April 25, 2009 was born on the island of Palma Magic II and Magic I the best observer of atmospheric gamma rays of low intensity. (Author)

  20. Gamma ray imager on the DIII-D tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, D. C., E-mail: pacedc@fusion.gat.com; Taussig, D.; Eidietis, N. W.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Watkins, M. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Cooper, C. M. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); Hollmann, E. M. [University of California-San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States); Riso, V. [State University of New York-Buffalo, 12 Capen Hall, Buffalo, New York 14260-1660 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    A gamma ray camera is built for the DIII-D tokamak [J. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] that provides spatial localization and energy resolution of gamma flux by combining a lead pinhole camera with custom-built detectors and optimized viewing geometry. This diagnostic system is installed on the outer midplane of the tokamak such that its 123 collimated sightlines extend across the tokamak radius while also covering most of the vertical extent of the plasma volume. A set of 30 bismuth germanate detectors can be secured in any of the available sightlines, allowing for customizable coverage in experiments with runaway electrons in the energy range of 1–60 MeV. Commissioning of the gamma ray imager includes the quantification of electromagnetic noise sources in the tokamak machine hall and a measurement of the energy spectrum of background gamma radiation. First measurements of gamma rays coming from the plasma provide a suitable testbed for implementing pulse height analysis that provides the energy of detected gamma photons.

  1. Comparison of modeled and measured performance of a GSO crystal as gamma detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parno, D.S.; Friend, M.; Mamyan, V.; Benmokhtar, F.; Camsonne, A.; Franklin, G.B.; Paschke, K.; Quinn, B.

    2013-01-01

    We have modeled, tested, and installed a large, cerium-activated Gd 2 SiO 5 crystal scintillator for use as a detector of gamma rays. We present the measured detector response to two types of incident photons: nearly monochromatic photons up to 40 MeV, and photons from a continuous Compton backscattering spectrum up to 200 MeV. Our GEANT4 simulations, developed to determine the analyzing power of the Compton polarimeter in Hall A of Jefferson Lab, reproduce the measured spectra well

  2. The measurement of gamma ray induced heating in a mixed neutron and gamma ray environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, H.K.

    1991-10-01

    The problem of measuring the gamma heating in a mixed DT neutron and gamma ray environment was explored. A new detector technique was developed to make this measurement. Gamma heating measurements were made in a low-Z assembly irradiated with 14-Mev neutrons and (n, n') gammas produced by a Texas Nuclear Model 9400 neutron generator. Heating measurements were made in the mid-line of the lattice using a proportional counter operating in the Continuously-varied Bias-voltage Acquisition mode. The neutron-induced signal was separated from the gamma-induced signal by exploiting the signal rise-time differences inherent to radiations of different linear energy transfer coefficient, which are observable in a proportional counter. The operating limits of this measurement technique were explored by varying the counter position in the low-Z lattice, hence changing the irradiation spectrum observed. The experiment was modelled numerically to help interpret the measured results. The transport of neutrons and gamma rays in the assembly was modelled using the one- dimensional radiation transport code ANISN/PC. The cross-section set used for these calculations was derived from the ENDF/B-V library using the code MC 2 -2 for the case of DT neutrons slowing down in a low-Z material. The calculated neutron and gamma spectra in the slab and the relevant mass-stopping powers were used to construct weighting factors which relate the energy deposition in the counter fill-gas to that in the counter wall and in the surrounding material. The gamma energy deposition at various positions in the lattice is estimated by applying these weighting factors to the measured gamma energy deposition in the counter at those locations

  3. AGIS: A Next-generation TeV Gamma-ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbroucke, Justin

    2010-05-01

    The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) is a next-generation array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes for gamma-ray astronomy in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV band. TeV astronomy has flourished in the last few years. Together with the extremely successful first year of the Fermi LAT telescope for GeV gamma-ray astronomy, we are now in a golden age of gamma-ray astronomy. AGIS seeks to continue the success of gamma-ray astronomy by discovering hundreds of new TeV sources and improving our understanding of known sources, as well as searching for signals from dark matter annihilation. AGIS will feature 36 Schwarzschild-Couder (SC) telescopes spanning 1 km2. The two-mirror SC design allows a wide field of view (8 deg diameter) and high-resolution (0.05 deg diameter) pixellation. I will present the science capabilities of the AGIS observatory as well as the technical design and current status of the project.

  4. The Supercritical Pile Gamma-Ray Burst Model: The GRB Afterglow Steep Decline and Plateau Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Joseph; Kazanas, D.; Mastichiadis, A.

    2013-01-01

    We present a process that accounts for the steep decline and plateau phase of the Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT) light curves, vexing features of gamma-ray burst (GRB) phenomenology. This process is an integral part of the "supercritical pile" GRB model, proposed a few years ago to account for the conversion of the GRB kinetic energy into radiation with a spectral peak at E(sub pk) is approx. m(sub e)C(exp 2). We compute the evolution of the relativistic blast wave (RBW) Lorentz factor Gamma to show that the radiation-reaction force due to the GRB emission can produce an abrupt, small (approx. 25%) decrease in Gamma at a radius that is smaller (depending on conditions) than the deceleration radius R(sub D). Because of this reduction, the kinematic criticality criterion of the "supercritical pile" is no longer fulfilled. Transfer of the proton energy into electrons ceases and the GRB enters abruptly the afterglow phase at a luminosity smaller by approx. m(sub p)/m(sub e) than that of the prompt emission. If the radius at which this slow-down occurs is significantly smaller than R(sub D), the RBW internal energy continues to drive the RBW expansion at a constant (new) Gamma and its X-ray luminosity remains constant until R(sub D) is reached, at which point it resumes its more conventional decay, thereby completing the "unexpected" XRT light curve phase. If this transition occurs at R is approx. equal to R(sub D), the steep decline is followed by a flux decrease instead of a "plateau," consistent with the conventional afterglow declines. Besides providing an account of these peculiarities, the model suggests that the afterglow phase may in fact begin before the RBW reaches R is approx. equal to R(sub D), thus providing novel insights into GRB phenomenology.

  5. Studies on the influences of. gamma. -ray irradiation upon food additives, (6). Radiolysis of monosodium glutamate due to. gamma. -ray irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, M [Shimonoseki Univ. of Fisheries, Yamaguchi (Japan); Gohya, Y; Ishio, S

    1981-08-01

    The effect of ..gamma..-ray irradiation on monosodium glutamate (MSG) in aqueous solution and in ''kamaboko'' was investigated to evaluate the rate of decomposition of MSG and to elucidate the safety of the decomposed products, under the concentration of 106.9 mmol/l aqueous solution and 1% content of MSG in ''kamaboko''. In aqueous solution, MSG was decomposed by ..gamma..-ray irradiation, and G value was estimated to be 1.24. The decomposition of MSG resulted from deamination reaction was estimated to be 40% of the total decomposition. Glutamic acid content decreased as the dose of ..gamma..-ray increased in MSG-enriched ''kamaboko'', while it increased as the dose of ..gamma..-ray increased in MSG-free ''kamaboko''. Glutamic acid was liberated from the protein in ''kamaboko'', therefore the apparent decomposition rate of MSG in ''kamaboko'' was regarded as lower than actual.

  6. Resistance to {gamma} irradiation of LaBr{sub 3}:Ce and LaCl{sub 3}:Ce single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normand, S. [CEA-Recherche Technologique, DETECS/SSTM CE Saclay F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette Cedex (France)]. E-mail: stephane.normand@cea.fr; Iltis, A. [Saint-Gobain Crystals, 104 Route de Larchant, 77140 St Pierre les Nemours (France); Bernard, F. [Saint-Gobain Crystals, 104 Route de Larchant, 77140 St Pierre les Nemours (France); Domenech, T. [CEA-Recherche Technologique, DETECS/SSTM CE Saclay F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette Cedex (France); Delacour, P. [CEA-Recherche Technologique, DETECS/SSTM CE Saclay F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2007-03-11

    LaBr{sub 3}:Ce (Brillance 380) and LaCl{sub 3}:Ce (Brillance 350) both exhibit a very good energy resolution and energy linearity response. They are also more sensitive to {gamma}-rays than NaI(Tl) detectors, due to their higher density. The aim of this work is to determine the behaviour of those new single crystals in comparison with NaI(Tl) under severe {gamma}-ray irradiation. Therefore we have irradiated three 25 by 25 mm cylinder crystals encapsulated in air-tight aluminium housing with {sup 60}Co beam. Crystals were tested as stand-alone material not to test the impact of radiation to our photomultiplier tube (PMT). Only encapsulated crystals (alone, without PMTs) were irradiated during several periods to achieve the final 3.4 kGy integrated dose. Intermediate measurements of {sup 137}Cs spectrum were done in order to evaluate the impact of the dose on the studied crystal performances. The radiation hardness of LaBr{sub 3}:Ce and LaCl{sub 3}:Ce was then compared to NaI(Tl). We show in this paper that up to 3.4 kGy no permanent modification of the energy resolution nor colour change is observed for LaBr{sub 3}:Ce and LaCl{sub 3}:Ce crystals. The light output also seems quite stable. This is in stark contrast with the behaviour of NaI:Tl which exhibits continuously decreasing light output, colour change and worsening of energy resolution for doses above 5 Gy.

  7. Characteristics of the telescope for high energy gamma-ray astronomy selected for definition studies on the Gamma Ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, E. B.; Hofstadter, R.; Rolfe, J.; Johansson, A.; Bertsch, D. L.; Cruickshank, W. J.; Ehrmann, C. H.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    The high energy gamma-ray telescope selected for definition studies on the Gamma Ray Observatory provides a substantial improvement in observational capability over earlier instruments. It will have about 20 times more sensitivity, cover a much broader energy range, have considerably better energy resolution and provide a significantly improved angular resolution. The design and performance are described.

  8. Gamma-ray emission profile measurements during JET ICRH discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, O N; Marcus, F B; Sadler, G; Van Belle, P [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Howarth, P J.A. [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom); Adams, J M; Bond, D S [UKAEA Harwell Lab. (United Kingdom). Energy Technology Div.

    1994-07-01

    Gamma-ray emission from plasma-impurity reactions caused by minority ICRH accelerating fuel ions to MeV energies has been measured using the JET neutron profile monitor. A successful data analysis technique has been used to isolate the RF-induced gamma-ray emission that was detected, enabling profiles of gamma-ray emission to be obtained. The 2-d gamma-ray emission profiles show that virtually all the radiation originates from the low field side of the RF resonance layer, as expected from RF-induced pitch angle diffusion. The emission profiles indicate the presence of a small population of resonant {sup 3}He ions that possess orbits lying near the passing-trapped boundary. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  9. High energy astrophysics with ground-based gamma ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aharonian, F; Buckley, J; Kifune, T; Sinnis, G

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in ground-based gamma ray astronomy have led to the discovery of more than 70 sources of very high energy (E γ ≥ 100 GeV) gamma rays, falling into a number of source populations including pulsar wind nebulae, shell type supernova remnants, Wolf-Rayet stars, giant molecular clouds, binary systems, the Galactic Center, active galactic nuclei and 'dark' (yet unidentified) galactic objects. We summarize the history of TeV gamma ray astronomy up to the current status of the field including a description of experimental techniques and highlight recent astrophysical results. We also discuss the potential of ground-based gamma ray astronomy for future discoveries and describe possible directions for future instrumental developments

  10. Development of the new gamma-ray calorimeter for the measurement of Pigmy Dipole Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikata, Mizuki; Nakamura, Takashi; Togano, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Yosuke

    2014-09-01

    A new γ-ray calorimeter CATANA (CAlorimeter for gamma γ-ray Transition in Atomic Nuclei at high isospin Asynmetry) has been developed to measure highly excited states like the pygmy dipole resonance and the giant dipole resonance. CATANA will be used with the SAMURAI spectrometer at RIBF. The excitation energy spectrum will be reconstructed combining the invariant mass of the reaction products measured by SAMURAI and γ-ray energies from CATANA. CATANA has focused on achieving a high detection efficiency. It is calculated as 56% for 1 MeV γ-rays from beam with a velocity of β = 0.6. The CATANA array consists of 200 CsI(Na) crystals and covers angles from 10 to 120 degrees along the beam axis. In this study, we have tested prototype crystals of CATANA to evaluate their performance. A position dependence of the light input have been measured and compared with a Monte-Carlo simulation based on GEANT4. In this talk, we will report the design of CATANA and the result of the tests and the simulation.

  11. β-ray irradiation effects in RbBr: Eu crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco B, J.M.; Rodriguez M, R.; Perez S, R.

    2006-01-01

    Defects induced by β-ray irradiation in RbBr: Eu 2+ crystals doped with a high concentration of Eu 2+ ions are studied by means of optical absorption (OA), thermoluminescence (TL), and optically stimulated TL (OSTL). The fading, dose, and optical bleaching effects on the TL glow curves of room temperature irradiated samples has been analyzed. OA indicates that irradiation of samples at room temperature induce the formation of F but not F z centers. The TL glow curves show peaks at 267, 303, and 403 K. The 267 K glow peak disappear in less than 1 s under blue light or infrared radiation photo bleaching. A high sensitivity to the ionizing radiation has been observed. These results confirm that this material is an efficient phosphor. (Author)

  12. FERMI-LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF THE EXCEPTIONAL GAMMA-RAY OUTBURSTS OF 3C 273 IN 2009 SEPTEMBER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bonamente, E.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.

    2010-01-01

    We present the light curves and spectral data of two exceptionally luminous gamma-ray outbursts observed by the Large Area Telescope experiment on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope from 3C 273 in 2009 September. During these flares, having a duration of a few days, the source reached its highest γ-ray flux ever measured. This allowed us to study, in some details, their spectral and temporal structures. The rise and the decay are asymmetric on timescales of 6 hr, and the spectral index was significantly harder during the flares than during the preceding 11 months. We also found that short, very intense flares put out the same time-integrated energy as long, less intense flares like that observed in 2009 August.

  13. Six Years of Gamma Ray Burst Observations with BeppoSAX

    OpenAIRE

    Frontera, Filippo

    2004-01-01

    I give a summary of the prompt X-/gamma-ray detections of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) with the BeppoSAX satellite and discuss some significant results obtained from the study of the prompt emission of these GRBs obtained with the BeppoSAX Gamma Ray Burst Monitor and Wide Field Cameras.

  14. X-ray and gamma-ray standards for detector calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    The IAEA established a Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on the Measurements and Evaluation of X- and Gamma-Ray Standards for Detector Efficiency Calibration in 1986 with the aim of alleviating the generation of such discrepancies. Within the framework of this CRP, representatives of nine research groups from six Member States and one international organization performed a number of precise measurements and systematic in-depth evaluations of the required decay data. They have also contributed to the development of evaluation methodology and measurement techniques, and stimulated a number of such studies at laboratories not directly involved in the IAEA project. The results of the work of the CRP, which was finished in 1990, are presented in this report. Recommended values of half-lives and photon emission probabilities are given for a carefully selected set of radionuclides that are suitable for detector efficiency calibration (X-rays from 5 to 90 keV and gamma-rays from 30 to about 3000 keV). Detector efficiency calibration for higher gamma-ray energies (up to 14 MeV) is also considered. The evaluation procedures used to obtain the recommended values and their estimated uncertainties are reported, and a summary of the remaining discrepancies is given. Refs and tabs

  15. Very high energy gamma ray astronomy from Hanle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitnis, Varsha R.

    2015-01-01

    Over a past decade very high energy (VHE) gamma ray astronomy has emerged as a major astronomical discipline. In India, we have a long tradition of experiments in this field. Few years ago, multi-institutional Himalayan Gamma Ray Observatory (HiGRO) collaboration was formed to set up VHE gamma rays experiments at Hanle, a high altitude location in Himalayas. HAGAR, the first phase of this collaboration is operational since 2008. HAGAR has successfully detected VHE gamma ray emission from some of the extragalactic objects like Mrk 421, Mrk 501 as well as galactic sources including Crab nebula/pulsar. Details of HAGAR telescope system and results obtained will be discussed. HiGRO is now gearing up for the next phase, i.e. 21 m diameter MACE telescope, which is being installed at Hanle at present. Details of MACE telescope system and future plans will be discussed. (author)

  16. Exploring the extreme gamma-ray sky with HESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sol, Helene

    2006-01-01

    The international HESS experiment. High Energy Stereoscopic System, fully operational since January 2004, is opening a new era for extreme gamma-ray astronomy. Located in Namibia, it is now the most sensitive detector for cosmic sources of very high energy (VHE) gamma-rays, in the tera-electron-volt (TeV) range. In July 2005, it had already more than double the number of sources detected at such energies, with the discovery of several active galactic nuclei (AGN), supernova remnants and plerions, a binary pulsar system, a microquasar candidate, and a sample of yet unidentified sources. HESS has also provide for the first time gamma-ray images of extended sources with the first astrophysical jet resolved in gamma-rays, and the first mapping of a shell supernova remnant, which proves the efficiency of in situ acceleration of particles up to 100 TeV and beyond

  17. Population Synthesis of Radio & Gamma-Ray Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Sara; Gonthier, P. L.; Harding, A. K.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the number of known gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in the Galactic disk has risen substantially thanks to confirmed detections by Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi). We have developed a new population synthesis of gamma-ray and radio MSPs in the galaxy which uses Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques to explore the large and small worlds of the model parameter space and allows for comparisons of the simulated and detected MSP distributions. The simulation employs empirical radio and gamma-ray luminosity models that are dependent upon the pulsar period and period derivative with freely varying exponents. Parameters associated with the birth distributions are also free to vary. The computer code adjusts the magnitudes of the model luminosities to reproduce the number of MSPs detected by a group of ten radio surveys, thus normalizing the simulation and predicting the MSP birth rates in the Galaxy. Computing many Markov chains leads to preferred sets of model parameters that are further explored through two statistical methods. Marginalized plots define confidence regions in the model parameter space using maximum likelihood methods. A secondary set of confidence regions is determined in parallel using Kuiper statistics calculated from comparisons of cumulative distributions. These two techniques provide feedback to affirm the results and to check for consistency. Radio flux and dispersion measure constraints have been imposed on the simulated gamma-ray distributions in order to reproduce realistic detection conditions. The simulated and detected distributions agree well for both sets of radio and gamma-ray pulsar characteristics, as evidenced by our various comparisons.

  18. Scene data fusion: Real-time standoff volumetric gamma-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnowski, Ross [Department of Nuclear Engineering, UC Berkeley, 4155 Etcheverry Hall, MC 1730, Berkeley, CA 94720, United States of America (United States); Haefner, Andrew; Mihailescu, Lucian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab - Applied Nuclear Physics, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720, United States of America (United States); Vetter, Kai [Department of Nuclear Engineering, UC Berkeley, 4155 Etcheverry Hall, MC 1730, Berkeley, CA 94720, United States of America (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab - Applied Nuclear Physics, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720, United States of America (United States)

    2015-11-11

    An approach to gamma-ray imaging has been developed that enables near real-time volumetric (3D) imaging of unknown environments thus improving the utility of gamma-ray imaging for source-search and radiation mapping applications. The approach, herein dubbed scene data fusion (SDF), is based on integrating mobile radiation imagers with real-time tracking and scene reconstruction algorithms to enable a mobile mode of operation and 3D localization of gamma-ray sources. A 3D model of the scene, provided in real-time by a simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) algorithm, is incorporated into the image reconstruction reducing the reconstruction time and improving imaging performance. The SDF concept is demonstrated in this work with a Microsoft Kinect RGB-D sensor, a real-time SLAM solver, and a cart-based Compton imaging platform comprised of two 3D position-sensitive high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. An iterative algorithm based on Compton kinematics is used to reconstruct the gamma-ray source distribution in all three spatial dimensions. SDF advances the real-world applicability of gamma-ray imaging for many search, mapping, and verification scenarios by improving the tractiblity of the gamma-ray image reconstruction and providing context for the 3D localization of gamma-ray sources within the environment in real-time.

  19. Dissecting the Gamma-Ray Background in Search of Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cholis, Ilias; Hooper, Dan; McDermott, Samuel D.

    2014-02-01

    Several classes of astrophysical sources contribute to the approximately isotropic gamma-ray background measured by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. In this paper, we use Fermi's catalog of gamma-ray sources (along with corresponding source catalogs at infrared and radio wavelengths) to build and constrain a model for the contributions to the extragalactic gamma-ray background from astrophysical sources, including radio galaxies, star-forming galaxies, and blazars. We then combine our model with Fermi's measurement of the gamma-ray background to derive constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section, including contributions from both extragalactic and galactic halos and subhalos. The resulting constraints are competitive with the strongest current constraints from the Galactic Center and dwarf spheroidal galaxies. As Fermi continues to measure the gamma-ray emission from a greater number of astrophysical sources, it will become possible to more tightly constrain the astrophysical contributions to the extragalactic gamma-ray background. We project that with 10 years of data, Fermi's measurement of this background combined with the improved constraints on the astrophysical source contributions will yield a sensitivity to dark matter annihilations that exceeds the strongest current constraints by a factor of ~ 5 - 10.

  20. Preliminary morphological and X-ray diffraction studies of the crystals of the DNA cetyltrimethylammonium salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osica, V D; Pyatigorskaya, T L; Polyvtsev, O F; Dembo, A T; Kliya, M O; Vasilchenko, V N; Verkin, B I; Sukharevskya, B Y

    1977-04-01

    Double-stranded DNA molecules (molecular weight 2.5 X 10(5) - 5 X 10(5) daltons) have been crystallized from water-salt solutions as cetyltrimethylammonium salts (CTA-DNA). Variation of crystallization conditions results in a production of different types of CTA-DNA crystals: spherulits, dendrites, needle-shaped and faceted rhombic crystals, the latter beeing up to 0.3 mm on a side. X-ray diffraction data indicate that DNA molecules in the crystals form a hexagonal lattice which parameters vary slightly with the morphological type of the crystal. Comparison of the melting curves of the DNA preparation before and after crystallization suggests that DNA molecules are partially fractionated in the course of crystallization. Crystals of the CTA-DNA-proflavine complex have also been obtained.

  1. MODELING THE GAMMA-RAY EMISSION IN THE GALACTIC CENTER WITH A FADING COSMIC-RAY ACCELERATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ruo-Yu; Wang, Xiang-Yu; Prosekin, Anton [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Chang, Xiao-Chuan, E-mail: ruoyu@mpi-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: xywang@nju.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2016-12-20

    Recent HESS observations of the ∼200 pc scale diffuse gamma-ray emission from the central molecular zone (CMZ) suggest the presence of a PeV cosmic-ray accelerator (PeVatron) located in the inner 10 pc region of the Galactic center. Interestingly, the gamma-ray spectrum of the point-like source (HESS J1745-290) in the Galactic center shows a cutoff at ∼10 TeV, implying a cutoff around 100 TeV in the cosmic-ray proton spectrum. Here we propose that the gamma-ray emission from the inner and the outer regions may be explained self-consistently by run-away protons from a single yet fading accelerator. In this model, gamma-rays from the CMZ region are produced by protons injected in the past, while gamma-rays from the inner region are produced by protons injected more recently. We suggest that the blast wave formed in a tidal disruption event (TDE) caused by the supermassive black hole (Sgr A*) could serve as such a fading accelerator. With typical parameters of the TDE blast wave, gamma-ray spectra of both the CMZ region and HESS J1745-290 can be reproduced simultaneously. Meanwhile, we find that the cosmic-ray energy density profile in the CMZ region may also be reproduced in the fading accelerator model when appropriate combinations of the particle injection history and the diffusion coefficient of cosmic rays are adopted.

  2. A triple-crystal phoswich detector with digital pulse shape discrimination for alpha/beta/gamma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Travis L.; Miller, William H.

    1999-01-01

    Researchers at the University of Missouri - Columbia have developed a three-crystal phoswich detector coupled to a digital pulse shape discrimination system for use in alpha/beta/gamma spectroscopy. Phoswich detectors use a sandwich of scintillators viewed by a single photomultiplier tube to simultaneously detect multiple types of radiation. Separation of radiation types is based upon pulse shape difference among the phosphors, which has historically been performed with analog circuitry. The system uses a GaGe CompuScope 1012, 12 bit, 10 MHz computer-based oscilloscope that digitally captures the pulses from a phoswich detector and subsequently performs pulse shape discrimination with cross-correlation analysis. The detector, based partially on previous phoswich designs by Usuda et al., uses a 10 mg/cm 2 thick layer of ZnS(Ag) for alpha detection, followed by a 0.254 cm CaF 2 (Eu) crystal for beta detection, all backed by a 2.54 cm NaI(Tl) crystal for gamma detection. Individual energy spectra and count rate information for all three radiation types are displayed and updated periodically. The system shows excellent charged particle discrimination with an accuracy of greater than 99%. Future development will include a large area beta probe with gamma-ray discrimination, systems for low-energy photon detection (e.g. Bremsstrahlung or keV-range photon emissions), and other health physics instrumentation

  3. Hopping conduction in gamma-irradiated InSe and InSe:Sn single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MUSTAFAEVA, S.N.; ISMAILOV, A.A.; ASADOV, M.M.

    2010-01-01

    Full text : The semiconductive InSe layer compound is characterized by a strong covalent bond inside the layers and a weak Van der Waals bonding between them. It was shown that across the layers of InSe single crystals at low temperatures (T ≤ 200 K) at direct current (dc) hopping conduction through localized states near the Fermi level takes place. The results of dc-conductivity of gamma-irradiated p-InSe and n-InSe : Sn layer single crystals have been presented in this work. ρ-InSe single crystal specimens grown by the Bridgman method were used in the experiments. Plates of the crystals under study were obtained by cleaving along the layers of single crystal ingots. The single-crystal InSe samples for electric measurements had the form of planar capacitors normal to the C axis of the crystals, with silver-paste electrodes. The thickness of the InSe samples was 300 mkm. Co 60 serves as the source of irradiation with energy of gamma-quantum equal to 1.3 MeV. The electric properties of non-irradiated and gamma-irradiated InSe crystals were measured under the same conditions. It is revealed that InSe and InSe : Sn (0.2 and 0.4 mole percent Sn) single crystals exhibit a variable range hopping conduction along a normal to their natural layers at temperatures T≤200 K in a dc electric field. From experimental data the parameters of localized states of p-InSe and n-InSe : Sn were calculated before and after gamma-irradiation. It is revealed that gamma-irradiation of p-InSe and n-InSe : Sn (0.2 and 0.4 mole percent Sn) single crystals leads to significant change of localized states parameters. After gamma-irradiation the density of states near the Fermi level increased, but their energy spread and the average jump distance decreased. The concentrations of radiated defects were estimated in p-InSe (5.18*10 1 7 sm - 3) and n-InSe : Sn (2.5*10 1 7 - 2.7*10 1 8 sm - 3) single crystals. The present results demonstrate that gamma-irradiation offers the possibility of tuning

  4. The goals of gamma-ray spectroscopy in high energy astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingenfelter, Richard E.; Higdon, James C.; Leventhal, Marvin; Ramaty, Reuven; Woosley, Stanford E.

    1990-01-01

    The use of high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy in astrophysics is discussed with specific attention given to the application of the Nuclear Astrophysics Explorer (NAE). The gamma-ray lines from nuclear transitions in radionucleic decay and positron annihilation permits the study of current sites, rates and models of nucleosynthesis, and galactic structure. Diffuse galactic emission is discussed, and the high-resolution observations of gamma-ray lines from discrete sites are also described. Interstellar mixing and elemental abundances can also be inferred from high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy of nucleosynthetic products. Compact objects can also be examined by means of gamma-ray emissions, allowing better understanding of neutron stars and the accreting black hole near the galactic center. Solar physics can also be investigated by examining such features as solar-flare particle acceleration and atmospheric abundances.

  5. Luminescence properties and gamma-ray response of the Ce and Ca co-doped (Gd,Y)F3 single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Kei; Yanagida, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Fukabori, Akihiro; Yoshikawa, Akira; Nikl, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The Ca0.5% and Ce1%, 3%, 7%, 10% co-doped Gd 0.5 Y 0.5 F 3 single crystals were grown by the μ-PD method. In the Ca0.5% and Ce3% co-doped sample, Ce 3+ -perturbed luminescence at 380 nm was observed with 32.4 ns photoluminescence decay time. The energy transfer in the sequence of the regular Ce 3+ → (Gd 3+ ) n → the perturbed Ce 3+ sites was evidenced through observation of decay time shortening of the regular Ce 3+ and Gd 3+ centers and the change between the Gd 3+ and Ce 3+ -perturbed emission intensity. The gamma-ray excited scintillation response of the Ca0.5%, Ce7% co-doped Gd 0.5 Y 0.5 F 3 sample was investigated with the help of the pulse height spectra and the light yield, energy resolution and non-proportionality was evaluated in the interval of energies of 59.4-1274 keV.

  6. Spatial distribution of reflected gamma rays by Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jehouani, A.; Merzouki, A.; Boutadghart, F.; Ghassoun, J.

    2007-01-01

    In nuclear facilities, the reflection of gamma rays of the walls and metals constitutes an unknown origin of radiation. These reflected gamma rays must be estimated and determined. This study concerns reflected gamma rays on metal slabs. We evaluated the spatial distribution of the reflected gamma rays spectra by using the Monte Carlo method. An appropriate estimator for the double differential albedo is used to determine the energy spectra and the angular distribution of reflected gamma rays by slabs of iron and aluminium. We took into the account the principal interactions of gamma rays with matter: photoelectric, coherent scattering (Rayleigh), incoherent scattering (Compton) and pair creation. The Klein-Nishina differential cross section was used to select direction and energy of scattered photons after each Compton scattering. The obtained spectra show peaks at 0.511 * MeV for higher source energy. The Results are in good agreement with those obtained by the TRIPOLI code [J.C. Nimal et al., TRIPOLI02: Programme de Monte Carlo Polycinsetique a Trois dimensions, CEA Rapport, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique.

  7. X and gamma ray backgroud observations in Antarctic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayanthi, U.B.

    1988-01-01

    Atmospheric X amd gamma rays are products of complex electromagnetic interation between charged particles and atmospheric constituents. The latitudinal dependence of the cosmic rays secondaries, auroral and South Atlantic Anomaly phenomena produce flux variations, especially the later temporal flux variations. We propose to discuss these variations in relevance to balloon flight observations of X and gamma ray atmospheric background at polar latitudes. (author) [pt

  8. Computers in activation analysis and gamma-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, B. S.; D' Agostino, M. D.; Yule, H. P. [eds.

    1979-01-01

    Seventy-three papers are included under the following session headings: analytical and mathematical methods for data analysis; software systems for ..gamma..-ray and x-ray spectrometry; ..gamma..-ray spectra treatment, peak evaluation; least squares; IAEA intercomparison of methods for processing spectra; computer and calculator utilization in spectrometer systems; and applications in safeguards, fuel scanning, and environmental monitoring. Separate abstracts were prepared for 72 of those papers. (DLC)

  9. Millisecond Pulsars at Gamma-Ray Energies: Fermi Detections and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2011-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has revolutionized the study of pulsar physics with the discovery of new populations of radio quiet and millisecond gamma-ray pulsars. The Fermi Large Area Telescope has so far discovered approx.20 new gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) by both folding at periods of known radio MSPs or by detecting them as gamma-ray sources that are followed up by radio pulsar searches. The second method has resulted in a phenomenally successful synergy, with -30 new radio MSPs (to date) having been discovered at Fermi unidentified source locations and the gamma-ray pulsations having then been detected in a number of these using the radio timing solutions. Many of the newly discovered MSPs may be suitable for addition to the collection of very stable MSPs used for gravitational wave detection. Detection of such a large number of MSPs was surprising, given that most have relatively low spin-down luminosity and surface field strength. I will discuss their properties and the implications for pulsar particle acceleration and emission, as well as their potential contribution to gamma-ray backgrounds and Galactic cosmic rays.

  10. In situ analysis of coal by scintillation gamma-ray spectrometry in deep boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrusciel, E.; Kopec, M.; Niewodniczanski, J.; Palka, K.W.; Kaczmarski, S.M.; Wojda, F.

    1987-01-01

    Neutron-gamma and gamma-gamma spectrometric loggings have been used for evaluation of coal seams. Interpretation of the logging curves was based on the method of spectrometric parameters i.e. the ratios of gamma-ray intensities recorded within two energy intervals, which depended strongly on a given parameter of coal, while the influence of other parameters is reduced. The boundaries of energy intervals were chosen by multiple correlation analysis of the results of point measurements and results of coal samples assessments. These energy intervals are later used in continuous borehole logging. Some of the coal parameters can be determined by both logging methods, other by one method only. The logging tools are described and examples of the determination of carbon, sulphur, iron, calcium, ash content, calorific value, density and moisture of coal are given. The agreement with the results of laboratory analyses seems quite satisfactory, especially when the calibration procedure was made for the same part of a coal basin. 13 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs. (author)

  11. Soft X-ray Calibration of the Co/C Multilayer Mirrors for the Objective Crystal Spectrometer on the Spectrum Röntgen-Gamma Satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, Salim; Tarrio, C.; Christensen, Finn Erland

    1996-01-01

    The objective crystal spectrometer (OXS) on the forthcoming Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma satellite is designed to carry three kinds of crystals: LiF(220), Si(111) and RAP(001), placed in front of the SODART telescope. Thirty six super polished (RMS roughness

  12. Comparison of modeled and measured performance of a GSO crystal as gamma detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parno, D.S., E-mail: dparno@uw.edu [Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Physics, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); University of Washington, Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics and Department of Physics, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Friend, M. [Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Physics, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Mamyan, V.; Benmokhtar, F. [Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Physics, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Camsonne, A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Franklin, G.B. [Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Physics, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Paschke, K. [University of Virginia, Department of Physics, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Quinn, B. [Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Physics, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2013-11-11

    We have modeled, tested, and installed a large, cerium-activated Gd{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} crystal scintillator for use as a detector of gamma rays. We present the measured detector response to two types of incident photons: nearly monochromatic photons up to 40 MeV, and photons from a continuous Compton backscattering spectrum up to 200 MeV. Our GEANT4 simulations, developed to determine the analyzing power of the Compton polarimeter in Hall A of Jefferson Lab, reproduce the measured s