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Sample records for current-induced magnetic vortex

  1. Direct observation of current-induced motion of a 3D vortex domain wall in cylindrical nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Yurii P.

    2017-05-08

    The current-induced dynamics of 3D magnetic vortex domain walls in cylindrical Co/Ni nanowires are revealed experimentally using Lorentz microscopy and theoretically using micromagnetic simulations. We demonstrate that a spin-polarized electric current can control the reversible motion of 3D vortex domain walls, which travel with a velocity of a few hundred meters per second. This finding is a key step in establishing fast, high-density memory devices based on vertical arrays of cylindrical magnetic nanowires.

  2. Magnetic vortex racetrack memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Liwei D.; Jin, Yongmei M.

    2017-02-01

    We report a new type of racetrack memory based on current-controlled movement of magnetic vortices in magnetic nanowires with rectangular cross-section and weak perpendicular anisotropy. Data are stored through the core polarity of vortices and each vortex carries a data bit. Besides high density, non-volatility, fast data access, and low power as offered by domain wall racetrack memory, magnetic vortex racetrack memory has additional advantages of no need for constrictions to define data bits, changeable information density, adjustable current magnitude for data propagation, and versatile means of ultrafast vortex core switching. By using micromagnetic simulations, current-controlled motion of magnetic vortices in cobalt nanowire is demonstrated for racetrack memory applications.

  3. Nano magnetic vortex wall guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Y. Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A concept of nano magnetic vortex wall guide is introduced. Two architectures are proposed. The first one is properly designed superlattices while the other one is bilayer nanostrips. The concept is verified by micromagnetic simulations. Both guides can prevent the vortex core in a magnetic vortex wall from colliding with sample surface so that the information stored in the vortex core can be preserved during its transportation from one location to another one through the guides.

  4. Current-induced switching in a magnetic insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, Can Onur; Quindeau, Andy; Pai, Chi-Feng; Mann, Maxwell; Caretta, Lucas; Tang, Astera S.; Onbasli, Mehmet C.; Ross, Caroline A.; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2016-11-01

    The spin Hall effect in heavy metals converts charge current into pure spin current, which can be injected into an adjacent ferromagnet to exert a torque. This spin-orbit torque (SOT) has been widely used to manipulate the magnetization in metallic ferromagnets. In the case of magnetic insulators (MIs), although charge currents cannot flow, spin currents can propagate, but current-induced control of the magnetization in a MI has so far remained elusive. Here we demonstrate spin-current-induced switching of a perpendicularly magnetized thulium iron garnet film driven by charge current in a Pt overlayer. We estimate a relatively large spin-mixing conductance and damping-like SOT through spin Hall magnetoresistance and harmonic Hall measurements, respectively, indicating considerable spin transparency at the Pt/MI interface. We show that spin currents injected across this interface lead to deterministic magnetization reversal at low current densities, paving the road towards ultralow-dissipation spintronic devices based on MIs.

  5. Spin torque and critical currents for magnetic vortex nano-oscillator in nanopillars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guslienko, K Y; Gonzalez, J [Dpto. Fisica de Materiales, Universidad del Pais Vasco, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); Aranda, G R, E-mail: sckguslk@ehu.es [Centro de Fisica de Materiales UPV/EHU-CSIC, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain)

    2011-04-01

    We calculated the main dynamic parameters of the spin polarized current induced magnetic vortex oscillations in nanopillars, such as the range of current density, where vortex steady oscillations exist, the oscillation frequency and orbit radius. We accounted for both the non-linear vortex frequency and non-linear vortex damping. To describe the vortex excitations by the spin polarized current we used a generalized Thiele approach to motion of the vortex core as a collective coordinate. All the calculation results are represented via the free layer sizes, saturation magnetization, and the Gilbert damping. Predictions of the developed model can be checked experimentally.

  6. Current induced magnetization reversal in spin valves with Heusler alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoshima, K. [Science and Technical Reserch Laboratories, Japan Broadcasting Corporation, 1-10-11 Kinuta Setagaya, Tokyo 157-8510 (Japan)]. E-mail: aoshima.k-ia@nhk.or.jp; Funabashi, N. [Science and Technical Reserch Laboratories, Japan Broadcasting Corporation, 1-10-11 Kinuta Setagaya, Tokyo 157-8510 (Japan); Machida, K. [Science and Technical Reserch Laboratories, Japan Broadcasting Corporation, 1-10-11 Kinuta Setagaya, Tokyo 157-8510 (Japan); Miyamoto, Y. [Science and Technical Reserch Laboratories, Japan Broadcasting Corporation, 1-10-11 Kinuta Setagaya, Tokyo 157-8510 (Japan); Kuga, K. [Science and Technical Reserch Laboratories, Japan Broadcasting Corporation, 1-10-11 Kinuta Setagaya, Tokyo 157-8510 (Japan); Kawamura, N. [Science and Technical Reserch Laboratories, Japan Broadcasting Corporation, 1-10-11 Kinuta Setagaya, Tokyo 157-8510 (Japan)

    2007-03-15

    Current induced magnetization reversal using current-perpendicular-to-plane (CPP) spin valves devises with Co{sub 2}MnGe, Co{sub 2}FeSi, and Co{sub 75}Fe{sub 25} alloys were investigated. Film stacks of Si/SiO{sub 2}/Cu/IrMn/Heusler-pinned-layer/Cu/Heusler-free-layer were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering followed by post-annealing. Saturation magnetization (B {sub s}) of Co{sub 2}MnGe, Co{sub 2}FeSi, and Co{sub 75}Fe{sub 25} are 12.7, 14.0, and 25 kg, respectively and magnetoresistance (MR) ratios of spin valves with the Co{sub 2}MnGe, Co{sub 2}FeSi, and Co{sub 75}Fe{sub 25} are 3.6%, 3.5%, and 2.2%, respectively. The B {sub s} values and MR ratios obtained for Co{sub 2}MnGe and Co{sub 2}FeSi spin valves were smaller and larger, respectively, than those obtained for Co{sub 75}Fe{sub 25}. We speculated that the large MR ratios could be attributed to larger spin polarization of Heusler alloys. J {sub c0} of Co{sub 2}MnGe, Co{sub 2}FeSi, and Co{sub 75}Fe{sub 25} spin valves were 1.6x10{sup 7}, 2.7x10{sup 7}, and 5.1x10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The thermal factors of Co{sub 2}MnGe, Co{sub 2}FeSi, and Co{sub 75}Fe{sub 25} were 65, 48, and 55, respectively. Using the Heusler alloys, we successfully reduced the intrinsic critical current without degrading the thermal factor.

  7. Current-induced magnetic switching of a single molecule magnet on a spin valve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiao [Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics and Computational Materials Physics Laboratory, School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Zheng-Chuan, E-mail: wangzc@ucas.ac.cn [Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics and Computational Materials Physics Laboratory, School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zheng, Qing-Rong [Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics and Computational Materials Physics Laboratory, School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhu, Zheng-Gang [Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics and Computational Materials Physics Laboratory, School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); School of Electronics, Electric and Communication Engineering, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Su, Gang, E-mail: gsu@ucas.ac.cn [Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics and Computational Materials Physics Laboratory, School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2015-04-17

    The current-induced magnetic switching of a single-molecule magnet (SMM) attached on the central region of a spin valve is explored, and the condition for the switching current is derived. Electrons flowing through the spin valve will interact with the SMM via the s–d exchange interaction, producing the spin accumulation that satisfies the spin diffusion equation. We further describe the spin motion of the SMM by a Heisenberg-like equation. Based on the linear stability analysis, we obtain the critical current from two coupled equations. The results of the critical current versus the external magnetic field indicate that one can manipulate the magnetic state of the SMM by an external magnetic field. - Highlights: • We theoretically study the current-induced magnetic switching of the SMM. • We describe the spin motion of the SMM by a Heisenberg-like equation. • We describe the spin accumulation by the spin diffusion equation. • We obtain the critical current by the linear stability analysis. • Our approach can be easily extended to other SMMs.

  8. Current-induced magnetization dynamics in disordered itinerant ferromagnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tserkovnyak, Y.; Skadsem, H.J.; Brataas, A.; Bauer, G.E.W.

    2006-01-01

    Current-driven magnetization dynamics in ferromagnetic metals is studied in a self-consistent adiabatic local-density approximation in the presence of spin-conserving and spin-dephasing impurity scattering. Based on a quantum kinetic equation, we derive Gilbert damping and spin-transfer torques ente

  9. Novel magnetic wire fabrication process by way of nanoimprint lithography for current induced magnetization switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsukasa Asari

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanoimprint lithography (NIL is an effective method to fabricate nanowire because it does not need expensive systems and this process is easier than conventional processes. In this letter, we report the Current Induced Magnetization Switching (CIMS in perpendicularly magnetized Tb-Co alloy nanowire fabricated by NIL. The CIMS in Tb-Co alloy wire was observed by using current pulse under in-plane external magnetic field (HL. We successfully observed the CIMS in Tb-Co wire fabricated by NIL. Additionally, we found that the critical current density (Jc for the CIMS in the Tb-Co wire fabricated by NIL is 4 times smaller than that fabricated by conventional lift-off process under HL = 200Oe. These results indicate that the NIL is effective method for the CIMS.

  10. Compensation of the magnetization current induced sextupole error at LHC injection field by short lumped permanent sextupole magnets, incorporated into the end configuration of superconducting dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Asner, A

    1985-01-01

    Compensation of the magnetization current induced sextupole error at LHC injection field by short lumped permanent sextupole magnets, incorporated into the end configuration of superconducting dipoles

  11. An eddy current-induced magnetic plucking for piezoelectric energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Nam Ho; Baek, Yoon Su

    2016-04-01

    Frequency up-conversion is a very efficient method of energy harvesting in order to overcome low, non-periodic, or altered ambient vibration. In order to perform frequency up-conversion and transference of mechanical energy without contact, an eddy current-induced magnetic drag force is used. In this paper, we present a novel configuration of eddy current-induced magnetic plucking for piezoelectric energy harvesting. Our method consists of two permanent magnets, a piezoelectric beam, and a copper disk piece. We design our harvesting method to achieve loading, sudden release, and free vibration using the actuation of the piezoelectric beam through the magnetic mutual coupling between the magnet and copper disk piece. We present the principle of magnetic drag force-generation, characterize the energy harvesting performance of our harvesting method, and demonstrate our harvesting method’s capability of frequency up-conversion and transference of mechanical energy without contact under low, non-periodic, or altered ambient vibration. To that end, we describe the calculation of magnetic drag force with various geometric dimensions and material properties, model of the piezoelectric cantilever beam, comparison between estimation response and measured experiment response, and the measured voltage and power responses.

  12. Effects of surface anisotropy on magnetic vortex core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V., E-mail: engraver@univ.net.ua [Taras Shevchenko National University of Kiev, 01601 Kiev (Ukraine); Sheka, Denis D. [Taras Shevchenko National University of Kiev, 01601 Kiev (Ukraine); Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Gaididei, Yuri [Institute for Theoretical Physics, 03143 Kiev (Ukraine)

    2014-06-01

    The vortex core shape in the three dimensional Heisenberg magnet is essentially influenced by a surface anisotropy. We predict that depending of the surface anisotropy type there appears barrel- or pillow-shaped deformation of the vortex core along the magnet thickness. Our theoretical study is well confirmed by spin–lattice simulations. - Highlights: • The shape of magnetic vortex core is essentially influenced by SA (surface anisotropy). • We predict barrel- or pillow-shaped deformation of the vortex depending on SA. • The variational approach fully describes the vortex core deformation. • We performed spin–lattice simulations to detect SA influence on the vortex core.

  13. Effect of Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction on magnetic vortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. Luo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya (DM interaction on the vortex in magnetic microdisk was investigated by micro-magnetic simulation based on the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation. Our results show that the DM interaction modifies the size of the vortex core, and also induces an out-of-plane magnetization component at the edge and inside the disk. The DM interaction can destabilizes one vortex handedness, generate a bias field to the vortex core and couple the vortex polarity and chirality. This DM-interaction-induced coupling can therefore provide a new way to control vortex polarity and chirality.

  14. Superconducting vortex pinning with artificial magnetic nanostructures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velez, M.; Martin, J. I.; Villegas, J. E.; Hoffmann, A.; Gonzalez, E. M.; Vicent, J. L.; Schuller, I. K.; Univ. de Oviedo-CINN; Unite Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales; Univ. Paris-Sud; Univ.Complutense de Madrid; Univ. California at San Diego

    2008-11-01

    This review is dedicated to summarizing the recent research on vortex dynamics and pinning effects in superconducting films with artificial magnetic structures. The fabrication of hybrid superconducting/magnetic systems is presented together with the wide variety of properties that arise from the interaction between the superconducting vortex lattice and the artificial magnetic nanostructures. Specifically, we review the role that the most important parameters in the vortex dynamics of films with regular array of dots play. In particular, we discuss the phenomena that appear when the symmetry of a regular dot array is distorted from regularity towards complete disorder including rectangular, asymmetric, and aperiodic arrays. The interesting phenomena that appear include vortex-lattice reconfigurations, anisotropic dynamics, channeling, and guided motion as well as ratchet effects. The different regimes are summarized in a phase diagram indicating the transitions that take place as the characteristic distances of the array are modified respect to the superconducting coherence length. Future directions are sketched out indicating the vast open area of research in this field.

  15. Current-induced magnetization switching with a spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Stefan

    2008-03-01

    In present data storage applications magnetic nanostructures are switched by external magnetic fields. Due to their non-local character, however, cross-talk between adjacent nanomagnets may occur. An elegant method to circumvent this problem is magnetization switching by spin-polarized currents, as observed in GMR,1] as well as in TMR,2] studies. However, the layered structures of these devices do not provide any insight to the details of the spatial distribution of the switching processes. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (SP-STM) is a well-established tool to reveal the magnetic structure of surfaces at spatial resolution down to the atomic scale. Besides, SP-STM takes advantage of a perfect TMR junction consisting of an isolating vacuum barrier separating two magnetic electrodes, which are represented by the foremost tip atom and the sample. Our experiments demonstrate that SP-STM serves as a tool to manipulate the switching behavior of uniaxial superparamagnetic nanoislands,3]. Furthermore, we show how SP-STM can be used to switch the magnetization of quasistable magnetic nanoislands at low temperature (T=31,). Besides its scientific relevance to investigate the details of current-induced magnetization switching (CIMS), this technique opens perspectives for future data storage technologies based on SP-STM. [1] J. A. Katine et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 3149 (2000). [2] Y. Liu et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 2871 (2003). [3] S. Krause et al., Science 317, 1537 (2007).

  16. Current induced domain wall motion in nanostripes with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Su Jung; Tan, Reasmey P.; Chun, Byong Sun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Keun, E-mail: ykim97@korea.ac.k [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    We report micromagnetic modeling results of current induced domain wall (DW) motion in magnetic devices with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy by solving the Landau-Lifschitz-Gilbert equation including adiabatic and non-adiabatic terms. A nanostripe model system with dimensions of 500 nm (L)x25 nm (W)x5 nm (H) was selected for calculating the DW motion and its width, as a function of various parameters such as non-adiabatic contribution, anisotropy constant (K{sub u}), saturation magnetization (M{sub s}), and temperature (T). The DW velocity was found to increase when the values of K{sub u} and T were increased and the M{sub s} value decreased. In addition, a reduction of the domain wall width could be achieved by increasing K{sub u} and lowering M{sub s} values regardless of the non-adiabatic constant value.

  17. Observation of Vortex Patterns in a Magnetized Dusty Plasma System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Feng; YE Maofu; WANG Long; LIU Yanhong

    2007-01-01

    Vortex patterns of dust particles have been observed in a magnetized dusty plasma system. The formation mechanism of two-dimensional (2D) vortex patterns has been investigated by analysing the forces acting on dust particles and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in a 2D confined magnetized dusty plasma. It has been found that with a weak confining electric field and a strong magnetic field, the particles' trajectories will form a vortex shape. The simulation results agree with our experimental observations. In our experiments, vortex patterns can be induced via circular rotation of particles by changing the rf (radio-frequency) power in a magnetized dusty plasma.

  18. Currents induced in anatomic models of the human for uniform and nonuniform power frequency magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, O P; Kang, G; Wu, D; Lazzi, G

    2001-02-01

    We have used the quasi-static impedance method to calculate the currents induced in the nominal 2 x 2 x 3 and 6 mm resolution anatomically based models of the human body for exposure to magnetic fields at 60 Hz. Uniform magnetic fields of various orientations and magnitudes 1 or 0.417 mT suggested in the ACGIH and ICNIRP safety guidelines are used to calculate induced electric fields or current densities for the various glands and organs of the body including the pineal gland. The maximum 1 cm(2) area-averaged induced current densities for the central nervous system tissues, such as the brain and the spinal cord, were within the reference level of 10 mA/m(2) as suggested in the ICNIRP guidelines for magnetic fields (0.417 mT at 60 Hz). Tissue conductivities were found to play an important role and higher assumed tissue conductivities gave higher induced current densities. We have also determined the induced current density distributions for nonuniform magnetic fields associated with two commonly used electrical appliances, namely a hair dryer and a hair clipper. Because of considerably higher magnetic fields for the latter device, higher induced electric fields and current densities were calculated.

  19. The mechanism of vortex switching in magnetic nanodots under circular magnetic field. II. The dynamics of spin plaquette with vortex

    CERN Document Server

    Kovalev, A S

    2003-01-01

    A plaquette spin system in a vortex configuration is considered analytically and numerically to treat theoretically the vortex switching in magnetic nanodots due to the action of external circular magnetic field. The initial (linear) stage of the switching is analyzed. The analytical results obtained confirm the numerical data on the plaquette dynamics. Both the numerical analysis and the analytical consideration of the initial activation stage show the importance of taking into account the system azimuthal modes. At the frequencies of these modes the most rapid amplification of the vortex energy and the total out-of-plane magnetization occurs. The growth of the modes amplitudes gives rise to a parametrical activation of the low-frequency symmetric mode, and in turn causes the vortex switching. The results obtained provide a qualitative explanation of the numerical data on vortex switching in large-sized magnetic systems and may be used in experiments on guided effect on vortex polarization in magnetic nanodo...

  20. Dynamically controlled energy dissipation for fast magnetic vortex switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, R.; Berezovsky, J.

    2017-09-01

    Manipulation of vortex states in magnetic media provides new routes towards information storage and processing technology. The typical slow relaxation times (˜100 ns) of magnetic vortex dynamics may present an obstacle to the realization of these applications. Here, we investigate how a vortex state in a ferromagnetic microdisk can be manipulated in a way that translates the vortex core while enhancing energy dissipation to rapidly damp the vortex dynamics. We use time-resolved differential magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy to measure the motion of the vortex core in response to applied magnetic fields. We first map out how the vortex core becomes sequentially trapped by pinning sites as it translates across the disk. After applying a fast magnetic field step to translate the vortex from one pinning site to another, we observe long-lived dynamics of the vortex as it settles to the new equilibrium. We then demonstrate how the addition of a short (magnetic field pulse can induce additional energy dissipation, strongly damping the long-lived dynamics. A model of the vortex dynamics using the Thiele equation of motion explains the mechanism behind this effect.

  1. Effects of Surface Anisotropy on Magnetic Vortex Core

    OpenAIRE

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V.; Sheka, Denis D.; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Gaididei, Yuri

    2013-01-01

    The vortex core shape in the three dimensional Heisenberg magnet is essentially influenced by a surface anisotropy. We predict that depending of the surface anisotropy type there appears barrel- or pillow-shaped deformation of the vortex core along the magnet thickness. Our theoretical study is well confirmed by spin-lattice simulations.

  2. Current induced magnetization switching in Co/Cu/Ni-Fe nanopillar with orange peel coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aravinthan, D.; Daniel, M. [Centre for Nonlinear Dynamics, School of Physics, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli - 620 024 (India); Sabareesan, P. [Centre for Nonlinear Science and Engineering, School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, SASTRA University, Thanjavur - 613 401 (India)

    2015-07-15

    The impact of orange peel coupling on spin current induced magnetization switching in a Co/Cu/Ni-Fe nanopillar device is investigated by solving the switching dynamics of magnetization of the free layer governed by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert-Slonczewski (LLGS) equation. The value of the critical current required to initiate the magnetization switching is calculated analytically by solving the LLGS equation and verified the same through numerical analysis. Results of numerical simulation of the LLGS equation using Runge-Kutta fourth order procedure shows that the presence of orange peel coupling between the spacer and the ferromagnetic layers reduces the switching time of the nanopillar device from 67 ps to 48 ps for an applied current density of 4 × 10{sup 12}Am{sup −2}. Also, the presence of orange peel coupling reduces the critical current required to initiate switching, and in this case, from 1.65 × 10{sup 12}Am{sup −2} to 1.39 × 10{sup 12}Am{sup −2}.

  3. Current induced magnetization switching in Co/Cu/Ni-Fe nanopillar with orange peel coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Aravinthan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The impact of orange peel coupling on spin current induced magnetization switching in a Co/Cu/Ni-Fe nanopillar device is investigated by solving the switching dynamics of magnetization of the free layer governed by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert-Slonczewski (LLGS equation. The value of the critical current required to initiate the magnetization switching is calculated analytically by solving the LLGS equation and verified the same through numerical analysis. Results of numerical simulation of the LLGS equation using Runge-Kutta fourth order procedure shows that the presence of orange peel coupling between the spacer and the ferromagnetic layers reduces the switching time of the nanopillar device from 67 ps to 48 ps for an applied current density of 4 × 1012Am−2. Also, the presence of orange peel coupling reduces the critical current required to initiate switching, and in this case, from 1.65 × 1012Am−2 to 1.39 × 1012Am−2.

  4. Distinct magnetic signatures of fractional vortex configurations in multiband superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, R. M. da [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciência dos Materiais, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire, s/n, 50670-901 Recife-PE (Brazil); Milošević, M. V.; Peeters, F. M. [Departement Fysica, Universiteit Antwerpen, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Domínguez, D. [Centro Atómico Bariloche, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche, Río Negro (Argentina); Aguiar, J. Albino, E-mail: albino@df.ufpe.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire, s/n, 50670-901 Recife-PE (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciência dos Materiais, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire, s/n, 50670-901 Recife-PE (Brazil)

    2014-12-08

    Vortices carrying fractions of a flux quantum are predicted to exist in multiband superconductors, where vortex core can split between multiple band-specific components of the superconducting condensate. Using the two-component Ginzburg-Landau model, we examine such vortex configurations in a two-band superconducting slab in parallel magnetic field. The fractional vortices appear due to the band-selective vortex penetration caused by different thresholds for vortex entry within each band-condensate, and stabilize near the edges of the sample. We show that the resulting fractional vortex configurations leave distinct fingerprints in the static measurements of the magnetization, as well as in ac dynamic measurements of the magnetic susceptibility, both of which can be readily used for the detection of these fascinating vortex states in several existing multiband superconductors.

  5. Current induced perpendicular-magnetic-anisotropy racetrack memory with magnetic field assistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Klein, J.-O.; Chappert, C.; Ravelosona, D. [IEF, University of Paris-Sud, Orsay 91405 (France); UMR8622, CNRS, Orsay 91405 (France); Zhao, W. S., E-mail: weisheng.zhao@u-psud.fr [IEF, University of Paris-Sud, Orsay 91405 (France); UMR8622, CNRS, Orsay 91405 (France); Electronics and Information Engineering School, University of Beihang, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2014-01-20

    High current density is indispensable to shift domain walls (DWs) in magnetic nanowires, which limits the using of racetrack memory (RM) for low power and high density purposes. In this paper, we present perpendicular-magnetic-anisotropy (PMA) Co/Ni RM with global magnetic field assistance, which lowers the current density for DW motion. By using a compact model of PMA RM and 40 nm design kit, we perform mixed simulation to validate the functionality of this structure and analyze its density potential. Stochastic DW motion behavior has been taken into account and statistical Monte-Carlo simulations are carried out to evaluate its reliability performance.

  6. Vortex formation in magnetic narrow rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, J. A. C.

    2002-03-01

    Underlying the current interest in magnetic elements is the possibility such systems provide both for the study of fundamental phenomena in magnetism (such as domain wall trapping and spin switching) and for technological applications, such as high density magnetic storage or magnetic random access memories (MRAM). One key issue is to control the magnetic switching precisely. To achieve this one needs first to have a well defined and reproducible remanent state, and second the switching process itself must be simple and reproducible. Among the many studied geometries, rings are shown to exhibit several advantages over other geometries, in that they show relatively simple stable magnetic states at remanence, with fast and simple magnetisation switching mechanisms. This is borne out of our systematic investigation of the magnetic properties of epitaxial and polycrystalline Co rings, where both the static, dynamic and transport properties have been studied. Magnetic measurements and micromagnetic simulations show that for appropriate ring structures a two step switching process occurs at high fields, indicating the existence of two different stable states. In addition to the vortex state, which occurs at intermediate fields, we have identified a new bi-domain state, which we term the `onion state', corresponding to opposite circulation of the magnetisation in each half of the ring. The magnetic elements were fabricated using a new technique based on the pre-patterning of Si ring structures and subsequent epitaxial growth of Cu/Co/Cu sandwich films on top of the Si elements. This technique has allowed the growth of epitaxial fcc Co(001) structures and in contrast to conventional lithographic methods, no damage to the magnetic layer structure is introduced by the patterning process [1,2]. We have studied the magnetic switching properties of arrays of narrow Co(100) epitaxial ring magnets, with outer diameters between 1 μm and 2 μm, varying inner diameters and varying

  7. Magnetic vortex nucleation/annihilation in artificial-ferrimagnet microdisks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapa, Pavel N.; Ding, Junjia; Phatak, Charudatta; Pearson, John E.; Jiang, J. S.; Hoffmann, Axel; Novosad, Valentine

    2017-08-01

    The topological nature of the magnetic-vortex state gives rise to peculiar magnetization reversal observed in magnetic microdisks. Interestingly, magnetostatic and exchange, energies which, drive this reversal can be effectively controlled in artificial ferrimagnet heterostructures composed of rare-earth and transition metals. [Py(t)/Gd(t)]25 (t = 1 or 2 nm) superlattices demonstrate a pronounced change of the magnetization and exchange stiffness in a 10-300 K temperature range as well as very small magnetic anisotropy. Due to these properties, the magnetization of cylindrical microdisks composed of these artificial ferrimagnets can be transformed from the vortex to uniformly magnetized states in a permanent magnetic field by changing the temperature. We explored the behavior of magnetization in 1.5-μm [Py(t)/Gd(t)]25 (t = 1 or 2 nm) disks at different temperatures and magnetic fields and observed that due to the energy barrier separating vortex and uniformly magnetized states, the vortex nucleation and annihilation occur at different temperatures. This causes the temperature dependences of the magnetization in these Py/Gd disks to demonstrate a unique hysteretic behavior in a narrow temperature range. It was discovered that for the [Py(2 nm)/Gd(2 nm)]25 microdisks, the vortex can be metastable within a certain temperature range.

  8. Supersonic Vortex Gerdien Arc with Magnetic Thermal Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterberg, F.

    1988-02-01

    Temperatures up to ~ 5 x 104 oK have been obtained with water vortex Gerdien arcs, and temperatures of ~ 105oK have been reached in hydrogen plasma arcs with magnetic thermal insulation through an externally applied strong magnetic field. It is suggested that a further increase in arc temperatures up to 106oK can conceivably be attained by a combination of both techniques, using a Gerdien arc with a supersonic hydrogen gas vortex.

  9. Magnetism near Vortex Cores of Cuprate Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. C.; Prudchenko, K.; Launspach, B.; Ruiz, E. J.; Boekema, C.

    2005-03-01

    We examined muon-spin-resonance (μSR) vortex data of Bi2212, Tl2223, and YBCO to search for antiferromagnetism (AF) near the vortex cores. [1] Field distributions were obtained from μSR data using Maximum-Entropy analysis. The grainboundary and vortex signals were fitted by Gaussian and Lorentzian curves, the latter suggestive of extra AF ordering. Narrow Gaussians fit the grainboundary signals well, independent of temperature. For T B17 (2003) 3436.

  10. Magnetic response of holographic Lifshitz superconductors: Vortex and Droplet solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lala, Arindam, E-mail: arindam.lala@bose.res.in

    2014-07-30

    In this paper a holographic model of s-wave superconductor with anisotropic Lifshitz scaling has been considered. In the presence of an external magnetic field our holographic model exhibits both vortex and droplet solutions. Based on analytic methods we have shown that the anisotropy has no effect on the vortex and droplet solutions whereas it may affect the condensation. Our vortex solution closely resembles the Ginzburg–Landau theory and a relation between the upper critical magnetic field and superconducting coherence length has been speculated from this comparison. Using Sturm–Liouville method, the effect of anisotropy on the critical parameters in insulator/superconductor phase transitions has been analyzed.

  11. Temperature effect on vortex-core reversals in magnetic nanodots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bosung; Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Lee, Jehyun; Kim, Sang-Koog, E-mail: sangkoog@snu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Creative Research Initiative Center for Spin Dynamics and Spin-Wave Devices, Nanospinics Laboratory, Research Institute of Advanced Materials, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-07

    We studied the temperature effect on vortex-core reversals in soft magnetic nanodots by micromagnetic numerical calculations within a framework of the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert scheme. It was determined that vortex-core-switching events at non-zero temperatures occur stochastically, and that the threshold field strength increases with temperature for a given field frequency. The mechanism of core reversals at elevated temperatures is the same as that of vortex-antivortex-pair-mediated core reversals found at the zero temperature. The reversal criterion is also the out-of-plane component of a magnetization dip that should reach −p, which is to say, m{sub z,dip} = −p, where p is the original polarization, p = +1 (−1), for the upward (downward) core. By this criterion, the creation of a vortex-antivortex pair accompanies complete vortex-antivortex-annihilation-mediated core reversals, resulting in the maximum excess of the exchange energy density, ΔE{sub ex}{sup cri} ≈ 15.4 ± 0.2 mJ/cm{sup 3}. This work provides the underlying physics of vortex-core reversals at non-zero temperatures, and potentiates the real application of vortex random access memory operating at elevated temperatures.

  12. Riemannian geometrical constraints on magnetic vortex filaments in plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    de Andrade, L. C. Garcia

    2005-01-01

    Two theorems on the Riemannian geometrical constraints on vortex magnetic filaments acting as dynamos in (MHD) flows are presented. The use of Gauss-Mainard-Codazzi equations allows us to investigate in detail the influence of curvature and torsion of vortex filaments in the MHD dynamos. This application follows closely previous applications to Heisenberg spin equation to the investigations in magnetohydrostatics given by Schief (Plasma Physics J. 10, 7, 2677 (2003)). The Lorentz force on vor...

  13. Spin Hall effect mediated current-induced deterministic switching in all-metallic perpendicularly magnetized Pt/Co/Pt trilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    P, Vineeth Mohanan; Ganesh, K. R.; Kumar, P. S. Anil

    2017-09-01

    A magnetic field free current-induced deterministic switching is demonstrated in a perpendicularly magnetized all-metallic Pt/Co/Pt thin film system with a small tilt in anisotropy axis. We realized this in devices where the ultrathin Co layer was grown using an oblique angle sputter deposition technique that had resulted in a small tilt of magnetic anisotropy from the film normal. By performing out-of-plane magnetization hysteresis measurements under bias magnetic field applied along various in-plane directions the tilt angle was estimated to be around 3 .3∘ (±0 .3∘ ). A deterministic current-induced magnetization switching could be achieved when the in-plane current was applied perpendicular to the anisotropy tilt axis, but the switching was stochastic when the current was applied in the direction of the tilt (in the tilt plane). By preparing Pt/Co/Pt stacks with unequal top and bottom Pt thickness, sufficient spin-orbit torque (SOT) could be applied to switch the magnetization of the Co layer at current densities as low as 1.5 ×107 A/cm2. The switching phase diagram (SPD) constructed by plotting the critical current density versus applied in-plane magnetic field (HxIB) confirms spin Hall effect based SOT mechanism to be responsible for the magnetization switching. The asymmetry observed in the SPD (about HxIB=0 ) is in agreement with the macrospin simulations and it suggests that the tilt in the magnetic anisotropy from the film normal makes the switching deterministic even without an in-plane magnetic field bias.

  14. Electron vortex magnetic holes: A nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haynes, C.T.; Burgess, D.; Camporeale, E.; Sundberg, T.

    2015-01-01

    We report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron vortex magnetic

  15. Vortex-antivortex nucleation in magnetically nanotextured superconductors: Magnetic-field-driven and thermal scenarios

    OpenAIRE

    Milosevic, M. V; Peeters, F. M.

    2005-01-01

    Within the Ginzburg-Landau formalism, we predict two novel mechanisms of vortex-antivortex nucleation in a magnetically nanostructured superconductor. Although counterintuitive, nucleation of vortex-antivortex pairs can be activated in a superconducting (SC) film covered by arrays of submicron ferromagnets (FMs) when exposed to an external homogeneous magnetic field. In another scenario, we predict the thermal induction of vortex-antivortex configurations in SC/FM samples. This phenomenon lea...

  16. Vortex State in Sub-100 nm Magnetic Nanodots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshchin, Igor V.

    2006-03-01

    Magnetism of nanostructured magnets, which size is comparable to or smaller than ferromagnetic domain size, offers a great potential for new physics. Detailed knowledge of magnetization reversal and possible magnetic configurations in magnetic nanostructures is essential for high-density magnetic memory. Many theoretical and experimental studies are focused on a magnetic vortex which in addition to a circular in-plane configuration of spins has a core, - the region with out-of-plane magnetization. We present a quantitative study of the magnetic vortex state and the vortex core in sub-100 nm magnetic dots. Arrays of single-layer and bilayer nanodots covering over 1 cm^2 are fabricated using self-assembled nanopores in anodized alumina. This method allows good control over the dot size and periodicity. Magnetization measurements performed using SQUID, VSM, and MOKE indicate a transition from a vortex to a single domain state for the Fe dots. This transition is studied as a function of the magnetic field and dots size. Micromagnetic and Monte Carlo simulations confirm the experimental observations. Thermal activation and exchange bias strongly affect the vortex nucleation field and have a much weaker effect on the vortex annihilation field. Direct imaging of magnetic moments in sub-100 nm dots is extremely difficult and has not been reported yet. Polarized grazing incidence small angle neutron scattering measurements allow dot imaging in reciprocal space. Quantitative analysis of such measurements performed on 65 nm Fe dots yields the vortex core size of ˜15 nm, in good agreement with the 14 nm obtained from the simulations. This work is done in collaboration with Chang-Peng Li, Zhi-Pan Li, S. Roy, S. K. Sinha, (UCSD), Xavier Batlle (U. Barcelona), R. K. Dumas, Kai Liu, (UC Davis), S. Park, R. Pynn, M. R. Fitzsimmons (LANL), J. Mejia Lopez (Pontificia U. Catolica de Chile), D. Altbir, (U. de Santiago de Chile), A. H. Romero (Cinvestav-Unidad Queretaro), and Ivan K

  17. Ubiquitous Solar Eruptions Driven by Magnetized Vortex Tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Kitiashvili, I N; Lele, S K; Mansour, N N; Wray, A A

    2013-01-01

    The solar surface is covered by high-speed jets transporting mass and energy into the solar corona and feeding the solar wind. The most prominent of these jets have been known as spicules. However, the mechanism initiating these eruptions events is still unknown. Using realistic numerical simulations we find that small-scale eruptions are produced by ubiquitous magnetized vortex tubes generated by the Sun's turbulent convection in subsurface layers. The swirling vortex tubes (resembling tornadoes) penetrate into the solar atmosphere, capture and stretch background magnetic field, and push surrounding material up, generating quasiperiodic shocks. Our simulations reveal a complicated high-speed flow patterns, and thermodynamic and magnetic structure in the erupting vortex tubes. We found that the eruptions are initiated in the subsurface layers and are driven by the high-pressure gradients in the subphotosphere and photosphere, and by the Lorentz force in the higher atmosphere layers.

  18. The eddy current induced in the pulsed bump magnet for the CSNS/RCS injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Jin-Xing; KANG Wen; HUO Li-Hua; HAO Yao-Dou; WANG Lei

    2011-01-01

    The injecton pulsed bending bump magnets of Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) in China Spallar tion Neutron Source (CSNS) consist of four horizontal bending (BH) magnets and four vertical bending (BV)magnets. The BH magnets are operated at a repetition rate of 25 Hz and are excited with a trapezoid rectangle waveform with about 1.6 milliseconds duration. The eddy current is induced in BH magnets and in the end plates it is expected to be large, so the heat generation is of our great concern. In this paper, the eddy current loss of the BH magnet has been investigated and calculated by using a coupling method of 3D electromagnetic and thermal analysis. The accuracy of the analysis is confirmed by testing the prototype BH magnet. The end plate temperature of the BH magnet provided with slit cuts has been decreased obviously and met the requirements.

  19. Mechanically-Assisted Current-Induced Switching of the Magnetic Moment in a Torsional Oscillator

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Liufei; Jaafar, Reem; Chudnovsky, Eugene M.

    2014-01-01

    Switching of the direction of the magnetic moment in a nanomagnet is studied within a modified Slonczewski's model that permits torsional oscillations of the magnet. We show that the latter may inhibit or assist the magnetization switching, depending on parameters. Three regimes have been studied: the switching by torsional oscillations alone, the switching by the spin-polarized current with torsional oscillations permitted, and the magnetization switching by the current combined with the mec...

  20. Interface-Enhanced Spin-Orbit Torques and Current-Induced Magnetization Switching of Pd /Co /AlOx Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Garello, Kevin; Avci, Can Onur; Gabureac, Mihai; Gambardella, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic heterostructures that combine large spin-orbit torque efficiency, perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, and low resistivity are key to developing electrically controlled memory and logic devices. Here, we report on vector measurements of the current-induced spin-orbit torques and magnetization switching in perpendicularly magnetized Pd /Co /AlOx layers as a function of Pd thickness. We find sizable dampinglike (DL) and fieldlike (FL) torques, on the order of 1 mT per 107 A /cm2 , which have different thicknesses and magnetization angle dependencies. The analysis of the DL torque efficiency per unit current density and the electric field using drift-diffusion theory leads to an effective spin Hall angle and spin-diffusion length of Pd larger than 0.03 and 7 nm, respectively. The FL spin-orbit torque includes a significant interface contribution, is larger than estimated using drift-diffusion parameters, and, furthermore, is strongly enhanced upon rotation of the magnetization from the out-of-plane to the in-plane direction. Finally, taking advantage of the large spin-orbit torques in this system, we demonstrate bipolar magnetization switching of Pd /Co /AlOx layers with a similar current density to that used for Pt /Co layers with a comparable perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

  1. Imprinting superconducting vortex footsteps in a magnetic layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisbois, Jérémy; Motta, Maycon; Avila, Jonathan I; Shaw, Gorky; Devillers, Thibaut; Dempsey, Nora M; Veerapandian, Savita K P; Colson, Pierre; Vanderheyden, Benoît; Vanderbemden, Philippe; Ortiz, Wilson A; Nguyen, Ngoc Duy; Kramer, Roman B G; Silhanek, Alejandro V

    2016-06-06

    Local polarization of a magnetic layer, a well-known method for storing information, has found its place in numerous applications such as the popular magnetic drawing board toy or the widespread credit cards and computer hard drives. Here we experimentally show that a similar principle can be applied for imprinting the trajectory of quantum units of flux (vortices), travelling in a superconducting film (Nb), into a soft magnetic layer of permalloy (Py). In full analogy with the magnetic drawing board, vortices act as tiny magnetic scribers leaving a wake of polarized magnetic media in the Py board. The mutual interaction between superconducting vortices and ferromagnetic domains has been investigated by the magneto-optical imaging technique. For thick Py layers, the stripe magnetic domain pattern guides both the smooth magnetic flux penetration as well as the abrupt vortex avalanches in the Nb film. It is however in thin Py layers without stripe domains where superconducting vortices leave the clearest imprints of locally polarized magnetic moment along their paths. In all cases, we observe that the flux is delayed at the border of the magnetic layer. Our findings open the quest for optimizing magnetic recording of superconducting vortex trajectories.

  2. In-plane current induced domain wall nucleation and its stochasticity in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy Hall cross structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, P.; Murapaka, C.; Lim, G. J.; Lew, W. S.

    2015-11-01

    Hall cross structures in magnetic nanowires are commonly used for electrical detection of magnetization reversal in which a domain wall (DW) is conventionally nucleated by a local Oersted field. In this letter, we demonstrate DW nucleation in Co/Ni perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowire at the magnetic Hall cross junction. The DWs are nucleated by applying an in-plane pulsed current through the nanowire without the need of a local Oersted field. The change in Hall resistance, detected using anomalous Hall effect, is governed by the magnetic volume switched at the Hall junction, which can be tuned by varying the magnitude of the applied current density and pulse width. The nucleated DWs are driven simultaneously under the spin transfer torque effect when the applied current density is above a threshold. The possibility of multiple DW generation and variation in magnetic volume switched makes nucleation process stochastic in nature. The in-plane current induced stochastic nature of DW generation may find applications in random number generation.

  3. In-plane current induced domain wall nucleation and its stochasticity in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy Hall cross structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sethi, P.; Murapaka, C.; Lim, G. J.; Lew, W. S., E-mail: wensiang@ntu.edu.sg [School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

    2015-11-09

    Hall cross structures in magnetic nanowires are commonly used for electrical detection of magnetization reversal in which a domain wall (DW) is conventionally nucleated by a local Oersted field. In this letter, we demonstrate DW nucleation in Co/Ni perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowire at the magnetic Hall cross junction. The DWs are nucleated by applying an in-plane pulsed current through the nanowire without the need of a local Oersted field. The change in Hall resistance, detected using anomalous Hall effect, is governed by the magnetic volume switched at the Hall junction, which can be tuned by varying the magnitude of the applied current density and pulse width. The nucleated DWs are driven simultaneously under the spin transfer torque effect when the applied current density is above a threshold. The possibility of multiple DW generation and variation in magnetic volume switched makes nucleation process stochastic in nature. The in-plane current induced stochastic nature of DW generation may find applications in random number generation.

  4. Probing current-induced magnetic fields in Au|YIG heterostructures with low-energy muon spin spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqeel, A.; Vera-Marun, I. J.; Salman, Z.; Prokscha, T.; Suter, A.; van Wees, B. J.; Palstra, T. T. M.

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the depth dependence of current-induced magnetic fields in a bilayer of a normal metal (Au) and a ferrimagnetic insulator (Yttrium Iron Garnet—YIG) by using low energy muon spin spectroscopy (LE-μSR). This allows us to explore how these fields vary from the Au surface down to the buried Au|YIG interface, which is relevant to study physics like the spin-Hall effect. We observed a maximum shift of 0.4 G in the internal field of muons at the surface of Au film which is in close agreement with the value expected for Oersted fields. As muons are implanted closer to the Au|YIG interface, the shift is strongly suppressed, which we attribute to the dipolar fields present at the Au|YIG interface. Combining our measurements with modeling, we show that dipolar fields caused by the finite roughness of the Au|YIG interface consistently explain our observations. Our results, therefore, gauge the limits on the spatial resolution and the sensitivity of LE-μSR to the roughness of the buried magnetic interfaces, a prerequisite for future studies addressing current induced fields caused by the spin-accumulations due to the spin-Hall effect.

  5. Experimental investigation of magnetic anisotropy in spin vortex discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garraud, N., E-mail: ngarraud@ufl.edu; Arnold, D. P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    We present experimental 2D vector vibrating sample magnetometer measurements to demonstrate the shape anisotropy effects occurring in micrometer-diameter supermalloy spin vortex discs. Measurements made for different disc sizes and orientations confirm the out-of-plane susceptibility is several orders of magnitude smaller than the in-plane susceptibility. These results validate with a high certitude that spin vortices with high diameter to thickness ratio retain in-plane-only magnetization, even when subjected to fields in the out-of-plane direction. These results contribute to further computational simulations of the dynamics of spin vortex structures in colloidal suspensions where external fields may be applied in any arbitrary direction.

  6. Self-assembled magnetic nanospheres with three-dimensional magnetic vortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min-Kwan; Dhak, Prasanta; Lee, Ha-Youn; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Lee, Jehyun; Kim, Sang-Koog, E-mail: sangkoog@snu.ac.kr [National Creative Research Initiative Center for Spin Dynamics and Spin-Wave Devices, Nanospinics Laboratory, Research Institute of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Kyoungsuk; Chu, Arim; Nam, Ki Tae; Kim, Miyoung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyun Soon [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Dong-A University, Busan 604-714 (Korea, Republic of); Aizawa, Shinji [Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tanigaki, Toshiaki [Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hitachi, Ltd., Central Research Laboratory, Hatoyama, Saitama 350-0395 (Japan); Shindo, Daisuke [Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-12-08

    We report the electron holography images of spin configurations in peculiar assemblies of soft magnetic nanoparticles in single-, double-, triple-, or quadruple-sphere geometrical arrangements, in which each particle has a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic-vortex structure. Micromagnetic numerical calculations reveal that the uniqueness of the nanoparticles' 3D vortex structure plays a crucial role in their assembly, especially in terms of the contrasting contributions of the exchange and dipolar interactions to their binding energies. The results represent physical insights into the assembly of 3D-vortex-structure magnetic nanoparticles in different geometrical configurations and offer a practical means of controlling those assemblies.

  7. Merging of aircraft vortex trails - Similarities to magnetic field merging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the phenomenological and formal similarities between the merging of aircraft vortex trails and the merging of magnetic field lines in a plasma. High-resolution photographs are shown of smoke trails from the wing tips of an airplane. These photographs show that the two vortex trails merge together downstream of the aircraft in a way similar to the merging of oppositely directed magnetic field lines in a plasma. Although there are some differences, this correspondence is apparently related to the fact that the vorticity equation in a fluid has the same mathematical form as the magnetic field equation in an MHD plasma. In both cases the merging proceeds at a rate considerably faster than would be predicted from classical estimates of the viscosity and resistivity. The enhanced merging rate in the fluid case appears to result from turbulence that increases the diffusion rate in the merging region.

  8. Pulse-Current-Induced Switching of Ta/CoFeB/MgO with Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yu-Ming; Rehm, Laura; Wolf, Georg; Kent, Andrew D.

    2015-03-01

    We study current-induced switching of thin magnetic layers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy using in-plane currents and the spin-Hall effect in the quasi-static (swept current) and pulsed-current regimes. Our aim is to investigate the dynamics and efficiency of spin-transfer switching. The layer stacks consists of β-Ta(5nm)/Co40Fe40B20(0.8nm)/MgO(2nm)/Ta(2nm) layers on oxidized silicon substrates. Hall bar structures with dimensions of 15 × 180 μm2 and cross shaped devices with width of 6 μm are investigated with DC transport and pulse measurement, respectively. In DC transport experiments, we could switch the magnetization states reproducibly by varying the in-plane field and current. In pulsed experiments, we measured the dependence of the switching probability on pulse amplitude and duration in the presence of an in-plane field. A histogram analysis indicates the existence of intermediate states and suggests incoherent magnetization switching. Nearly 100% switching probability could be achieved at high enough pulse amplitude of 25.5 MA/cm2 with 10 ns pulse duration and an applied field of ~120 mT. Supported by SRC-INDEX program.

  9. Analysis of Magnetization Switching via Vortex Formation in Soft Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIMIAN, M.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper illustrates quasi-static magnetization switching via vortex formation in soft magnetic nanoparticles of various shapes and sizes. The research is motivated by the rapid development of novel alternatives to the current paradigm of magnetic recording, which approaches its fundamental limits. The study is performed by using NMAG simulation environment which is a finite-element micro-magnetic simulation package based on Python scripts running on a Linux virtual machine. Various shapes and sizes are considered in this analysis of hysteresis phenomena and vortex formations in nanoparticles subject to different orientations of the magnetic field.

  10. Vortex Crystals with Chiral Stripes in Itinerant Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Ryo; Hayami, Satoru; Barros, Kipton; Chern, Gia-Wei; Motome, Yukitoshi; Batista, Cristian D.

    2016-10-01

    We study noncoplanar magnetic ordering in frustrated itinerant magnets. For a family of Kondo square lattice models with classical local moments, we find that a double-Q noncoplanar vortex crystal has lower energy than the single-Q helical order expected from the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interaction when the lattice symmetry dictates four global maxima in the bare magnetic susceptibility. By expanding in the small Kondo exchange and the degree of noncoplanarity, we demonstrate that this noncoplanar state arises from a Fermi surface instability occurring in independent sections connected by two ordering wave vectors.

  11. Current-induced spin-orbit torque magnetization switching in a MnGa/Pt film with a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Reza; Suzuki, Kazuya Z.; Sasaki, Yuta; Bainsla, Lakhan; Mizukami, Shigemi

    2016-12-01

    Current-induced magnetization switching is demonstrated in a micron sized Hall bar consisting of Pt-capped ultrathin ferrimagnetic MnGa films. The films showed a low magnetization M s ≃ 150 kA/m and a large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) field μ 0HK\\text{eff} ≃ 2.5 T, indicating a PMA thickness t product K\\text{u}\\text{eff}t ≃ 0.47 mJ/m2, which is relatively larger than those reported for other material films with PMA. Magnetization switching induced by an in-plane electrical current was examined with the application of an in-plane magnetic field. The phase diagram of the switching current vs the in-plane magnetic field is qualitatively consistent with that of the torque due to the spin-Hall effect in the Pt layer.

  12. Magnetic field induced optical vortex beam rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Shuai; Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Bao-Sen

    2015-01-01

    Light with orbital angular momentum (OAM) has drawn a great deal of attention for its important applications in the fields of precise optical measurements and high capacity optical communications. Here we adopt a method to study the rotation of a light beam, which is based on magnetic field induced circular birefringence in warm 87Rb atomic vapor. The dependence of the rotation angle to the intensity of the magnetic field makes it appropriate for weak magnetic field measurement. We derive a detail theoretical description that is in well agreement with the experimental observations. The experiment shows here provides a new method for precise measurement of magnetic field intensity and expands the application of OAM-carrying light.

  13. Vortex configuration in the presence of local magnetic field and locally applied stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissberg, Shai; Kremen, Anna; Shperber, Yishai; Kalisky, Beena

    2017-02-01

    Vortex configuration is determined by the repulsive interaction, which becomes dominant with increasing vortex density, by the pinning potential, and by other considerations such as the local magnetic fields, currents flowing in the sample, or as we showed recently, by local stress applied on the sample. In this work we describe different ways to control vortex configuration using scanning SQUID microscopy.

  14. Phase locking of vortex cores in two coupled magnetic nanopillars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiyuan Zhu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Phase locking dynamics of the coupled vortex cores in two identical magnetic spin valves induced by spin-polarized current are studied by means of micromagnetic simulations. Our results show that the available current range of phase locking can be expanded significantly by the use of constrained polarizer, and the vortices undergo large orbit motions outside the polarization areas. The effects of polarization areas and dipolar interaction on the phase locking dynamics are studied systematically. Phase locking parameters extracted from simulations are discussed by theoreticians. The dynamics of vortices influenced by spin valve geometry and vortex chirality are discussed at last. This work provides deeper insights into the dynamics of phase locking and the results are important for the design of spin-torque nano-oscillators.

  15. Magnetic field and temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity in type-II superconducting films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, G; Leo, A; Cirillo, C; Attanasio, C; Nigro, A; Pace, S

    2009-06-24

    We study the vortex dynamics in the instability regime induced by high dissipative states well above the critical current in Nb superconducting strips. The magnetic field and temperature behavior of the critical vortex velocity corresponding to the observed dynamic instability is ascribed to intrinsic non-equilibrium phenomena. The Larkin-Ovchinnikov (LO) theory of electronic instability in high velocity vortex motion has been applied to interpret the temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity. The magnetic field dependence of the vortex critical velocity shows new features in the low-field regime not predicted by LO.

  16. Magnetic field and temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity in type-II superconducting films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimaldi, G; Leo, A; Cirillo, C; Attanasio, C; Nigro, A; Pace, S [CNR-INFM Laboratorio Regionale SuperMat, Via Salvador Allende, I-84081 Baronissi (Italy)], E-mail: grimaldi@sa.infn.it

    2009-06-24

    We study the vortex dynamics in the instability regime induced by high dissipative states well above the critical current in Nb superconducting strips. The magnetic field and temperature behavior of the critical vortex velocity corresponding to the observed dynamic instability is ascribed to intrinsic non-equilibrium phenomena. The Larkin-Ovchinnikov (LO) theory of electronic instability in high velocity vortex motion has been applied to interpret the temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity. The magnetic field dependence of the vortex critical velocity shows new features in the low-field regime not predicted by LO.

  17. Irreversible Magnetization Deep in the Vortex-Liquid State of a 2D Superconductor at High Magnetic Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Maniv, T.; Zhuravlev, V.; Wosnitza, J.; Hagel, J.

    2004-01-01

    The remarkable phenomenon of weak magnetization hysteresis loops, observed recently deep in the vortex-liquid state of a nearly two-dimensional (2D) superconductor at low temperatures, is shown to reflect the existence of an unusual vortex-liquid state, consisting of collectively pinned crystallites of easily sliding vortex chains.

  18. The universal criterion for switching a magnetic vortex core in soft magnetic nanodots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.-S.; Kim, S.-K.; Yu, Y.-S.; Choi, Y.-S.; Guslienko, K. Y.; Jung, H.; Fischer, P.

    2008-10-01

    The universal criterion for ultrafast vortex core switching between core-up and -down vortex bi-states in soft magnetic nanodots was empirically investigated by micromagnetic simulations and combined with an analytical approach. Vortex-core switching occurs whenever the velocity of vortex core motion reaches a critical value, which is {nu}{sub c} = 330 {+-} 37 m/s for Permalloy, as estimated from numerical simulations. This critical velocity was found to be {nu}{sub c} = {eta}{sub c}{gamma} {radical}A{sub ex} with A{sub ex} the exchange stiffness, {gamma} the gyromagnetic ratio, and an estimated proportional constant {eta}{sub c} = 1.66 {+-} 0.18. This criterion does neither depend on driving force parameters nor on the dimension or geometry of the magnetic specimen. The phase diagrams for the vortex core switching criterion and its switching time with respect to both the strength and angular frequency of circular rotating magnetic fields were derived, which offer practical guidance for implementing vortex core switching into future solid state information storage devices.

  19. Electron vortex magnetic holes: a nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    CERN Document Server

    Haynes, Christopher T; Camporeale, Enrico; Sundberg, Torbjorn

    2014-01-01

    We report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional PIC simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron vortex magnetic holes (EVMHs), have circular cross-section. The magnetic field depression is associated with a diamagnetic azimuthal current provided by a population of trapped electrons in petal-like orbits. The trapped electron population provides a mean azimuthal velocity and since trapping preferentially selects high pitch angles, a perpendicular temperature anisotropy. The structures arise out of initial perturbations in the course of the turbulent evolution of the plasma, and are stable over at least 100 electron gyroperiods. We have verified the model for the EVMH by carrying out test particle and PIC simulations of isolated structures in a uniform plasma. It is found that (quasi-)stable structures can be formed provided that there is ...

  20. Vortex states in a non-Abelian magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, Predrag

    2016-08-01

    A type-II superconductor survives in an external magnetic field by admitting an Abrikosov lattice of quantized vortices. This is an imprint of the Aharonov-Bohm effect created by the Abelian U(1) gauge field. The simplest non-Abelian analog of such a gauge field, which belongs to the SU(2) symmetry group, can be found in topological insulators. Here we discover a superconducting ground state with a lattice of SU(2) vortices in a simple two-dimensional model that presents an SU(2) "magnetic" field (invariant under time reversal) to attractively interacting fermions. The model directly captures the correlated topological insulator quantum well, and approximates one channel for instabilities on the Kondo topological insulator surface. Due to its simplicity, the model might become amenable to cold atom simulations in the foreseeable future. The vitality of low-energy vortex states born out of SU(2) magnetic fields is promising for the creation of incompressible vortex liquids with non-Abelian fractional excitations.

  1. Magnetic vortex chirality determination via local hysteresis loops measurements with magnetic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coïsson, Marco; Barrera, Gabriele; Celegato, Federica; Manzin, Alessandra; Vinai, Franco; Tiberto, Paola

    2016-07-18

    Magnetic vortex chirality in patterned square dots has been investigated by means of a field-dependent magnetic force microscopy technique that allows to measure local hysteresis loops. The chirality affects the two loop branches independently, giving rise to curves that have different shapes and symmetries as a function of the details of the magnetisation reversal process in the square dot, that is studied both experimentally and through micromagnetic simulations. The tip-sample interaction is taken into account numerically, and exploited experimentally, to influence the side of the square where nucleation of the vortex preferably occurs, therefore providing a way to both measure and drive chirality with the present technique.

  2. Nanoscale switch for vortex polarization mediated by Bloch core formation in magnetic hybrid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlhüter, Phillip; Bryan, Matthew Thomas; Warnicke, Peter; Gliga, Sebastian; Stevenson, Stephanie Elizabeth; Heldt, Georg; Saharan, Lalita; Suszka, Anna Kinga; Moutafis, Christoforos; Chopdekar, Rajesh Vilas; Raabe, Jörg; Thomson, Thomas; Hrkac, Gino; Heyderman, Laura Jane

    2015-08-01

    Vortices are fundamental magnetic topological structures characterized by a curling magnetization around a highly stable nanometric core. The control of the polarization of this core and its gyration is key to the utilization of vortices in technological applications. So far polarization control has been achieved in single-material structures using magnetic fields, spin-polarized currents or spin waves. Here we demonstrate local control of the vortex core orientation in hybrid structures where the vortex in an in-plane Permalloy film coexists with out-of-plane maze domains in a Co/Pd multilayer. The vortex core reverses its polarization on crossing a maze domain boundary. This reversal is mediated by a pair of magnetic singularities, known as Bloch points, and leads to the transient formation of a three-dimensional magnetization structure: a Bloch core. The interaction between vortex and domain wall thus acts as a nanoscale switch for the vortex core polarization.

  3. Effect of a pinning field on the critical current density for current-induced domain wall motion in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooba, Ayaka; Fujimura, Yuma; Takahashi, Kota; Komine, Takashi; Sugita, Ryuji

    2012-09-01

    In this study, the effect of a pinning field on the critical current density for current-induced domain wall motion in nanowires with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy was investigated using micromagnetic simulations. In order to estimate the pinning field in notched nanowires, we conducted wall energy calculations for nanowires with various saturation magnetizations. The pinning field increased as the notch size increased. The pinning field decreased as the saturation magnetization decreased. As a result, the decreased in the pinning field causes the reduction of the critical current density. Therefore, a significant reduction of the critical current density can be obtained by decreasing the saturation magnetization, even if wall pinning occurs.

  4. Creating superfluid vortex rings in artificial magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Rashi; Busch, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Artificial gauge fields are versatile tools that allow the dynamics of ultracold atoms in Bose-Einstein condensates to be influenced. Here we discuss a method of artificial gauge field generation stemming from the evanescent fields of the curved surface of an optical nanofiber. The exponential decay of the evanescent fields leads to large gradients in the generalized Rabi frequency and therefore to the presence of geometric vector and scalar potentials. By solving the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in the presence of the artificial gauge fields originating from the fundamental Hybrid mode (HE11) mode of the fiber, we show that vortex rings can be created in a controlled manner. We also calculate the magnetic fields resulting from the higher order HE21, Transverse electric mode (TE01), and Transverse magnetic mode (TM01) and compare them to the fundamental HE11 mode.

  5. Vortex domain structures and dc current dependence of magneto-resistances in magnetic tunnel junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Hong-Xiang; Lu Qing-Feng; Zhao Su-Fen; Zhang Xie-Qun; Feng Jia-Feng; Han Xiu-Feng

    2004-01-01

    Microfabrication and the magneto-transport characteristics of the magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with a spin-valve-type structure of Ta (5nm)/Ni7gFe21 (25nm)/Ir22Mn78 (12nm)/Co75Fe25 (4nm)/Al(0.8nm) oxide/Co75Fe25(4nm)/Ni7gFe21 (20nm)/Ta(5nm) were investigated in this paper. A series of experimental data measured with a MTJ was used to verify a magnon-assisted tunnelling model and theory. Furthermore, a micromagnetics simulation shows that the butterfly-like vortex domain structures can be formed under a current-induced Oersted field, which decreases the net magnetization values of the ferromagnetic electrodes under a large dc current (i.e., in high voltage regimes). It is one of the main reasons for the tunnel magnetoresistance ratios to decrease significantly at high voltage biasing.

  6. Off-centred immobile magnetic vortex under influence of spin-transfer torque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravchuk, Volodymyr P; Sheka, Denis D; Gaididei, Yuri [Institute for Theoretical Physics, 03143 Kiev (Ukraine); Mertens, Franz G, E-mail: vkravchuk@bitp.kiev.ua [Physics Institute, University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2011-07-20

    Formation of the 'dip' structure which foregoes switching of magnetic vortex polarity is studied numerically in magnetic nanodisc. A new method based on influence of the spin-transfer torque is used. The method allows one to obtain the dip structure for immobile vortex which significantly improves studying accuracy in comparison with the case of moving vortex. Free out-of-plane vortices as well as in-plane vortices pinned on hole defects are considered. It is shown that the process of the dip formation is different for free and pinned vortices and direction of the dip does not directly depend on the vortex polarity.

  7. Classical understanding of electron vortex beams in a uniform magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yeong Deok; Choi, Taeseung

    2017-04-01

    Recently, interesting observations on electron vortex beams have been made. We propose a classical model that shows vortex-like motion due to suitably-synchronized motion of each electron's cyclotron motion in a uniform magnetic field. It is shown that some basic features of electron vortex beams in a uniform magnetic field, such as azimuthal currents, the relation between energy and kinetic angular momentum, and the parallel-axis theorem are understandable by using this classical model. We also show that the time-dependence of kinetic angular momentum of electron vortex beams could be understood as an effect of a specific nonuniform distribution of classical electrons.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Tripolar Vortex in Dusty Plasma with Sheared Flow and Sheared Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Ge; Chen Yinhua; Tan Liwei

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a study we have made of one class of coherent structures of the tripolar vortex. Considering the sheared flow and sheared magnetic field which are common in the thermonuclear plasma and space plasma, we have simulated the dynamics of the tripolar vortex.The results show that the tripolar vortex is largely stable in most cases, but a strongly sheared magnetic field will make the structure less stable, and lead it to decays into single vortices with the large space scale. These results are consistent with findings from former research about the dipolar vortex.

  9. Magnetic vortex chirality determination via local hysteresis loops measurements with magnetic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Coïsson; Gabriele Barrera; Federica Celegato; Alessandra Manzin; Franco Vinai; Paola Tiberto

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic vortex chirality in patterned square dots has been investigated by means of a field-dependent magnetic force microscopy technique that allows to measure local hysteresis loops. The chirality affects the two loop branches independently, giving rise to curves that have different shapes and symmetries as a function of the details of the magnetisation reversal process in the square dot, that is studied both experimentally and through micromagnetic simulations. The tip-sample interaction ...

  10. Spin-dynamics simulations of vortex precession in 2-D magnetic dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depondt, Ph., E-mail: depondt@insp.jussieu.fr [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, UMR 7588 CNRS, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Levy, J.-C.S., E-mail: jean-claude.levy@univ-paris-diderot.fr [Materiaux et Phenomenes Quantiques, Universite Denis Diderot, UMR 7162 CNRS, 75013 Paris (France)

    2011-10-31

    Highlights: → Vortex precession was simulated in two-dimensional magnetic dots of finite size. → A simple qualitative explanation of the observed behaviors is proposed, including seemingly erratic ones. → Pinning of the vortex motion, unconnected with defects, is also observed and an explanation thereof provided. -- Abstract: Vortex precession was simulated in two-dimensional magnetic dots. The Landau-Lifshitz equation with exchange and dipolar interactions was integrated at a low temperature with initial conditions consisting in a single vortex situated aside from the central position. This vortex precesses around the center of the sample and either can be expelled or converges towards the center. These relaxation processes are systematically studied. A simple qualitative explanation of the observed behaviors is proposed, including seemingly somewhat erratic ones. Intrinsic pinning of the vortex motion, unconnected with defects, is also observed and an explanation thereof provided.

  11. Classical understanding of electron vortex beams in a uniform magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Yeong Deok [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Woosuk University, Wanju, Cheonbuk, 565-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Taeseung, E-mail: tschoi@swu.ac.kr [Division of Applied Food System, College of Natural Science, Seoul Women' s University, Seoul 139-774 (Korea, Republic of); School of Computational Sciences, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, Seoul 130-012 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-25

    Recently, interesting observations on electron vortex beams have been made. We propose a classical model that shows vortex-like motion due to suitably-synchronized motion of each electron's cyclotron motion in a uniform magnetic field. It is shown that some basic features of electron vortex beams in a uniform magnetic field, such as azimuthal currents, the relation between energy and kinetic angular momentum, and the parallel-axis theorem are understandable by using this classical model. We also show that the time-dependence of kinetic angular momentum of electron vortex beams could be understood as an effect of a specific nonuniform distribution of classical electrons. - Highlights: • A classical model for electron vortex beams is proposed. • The basic features of azimuthal currents could be understood by using this model. • The kinetic angular momentum of electron vortex beams is intuitively understandable.

  12. Electron vortex magnetic holes: A nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Christopher T.; Burgess, David; Camporeale, Enrico; Sundberg, Torbjorn

    2015-01-01

    We report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron vortex magnetic holes (EVMHs), have circular cross-section. The magnetic field depression is associated with a diamagnetic azimuthal current provided by a population of trapped electrons in petal-like orbits. The trapped electron population provides a mean azimuthal velocity and since trapping preferentially selects high pitch angles, a perpendicular temperature anisotropy. The structures arise out of initial perturbations in the course of the turbulent evolution of the plasma, and are stable over at least 100 electron gyroperiods. We have verified the model for the EVMH by carrying out test particle and PIC simulations of isolated structures in a uniform plasma. It is found that (quasi-)stable structures can be formed provided that there is some initial perpendicular temperature anisotropy at the structure location. The properties of these structures (scale size, trapped population, etc.) are able to explain the observed properties of magnetic holes in the terrestrial plasma sheet. EVMHs may also contribute to turbulence properties, such as intermittency, at short scale lengths in other astrophysical plasmas.

  13. Electron vortex magnetic holes: A nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynes, Christopher T., E-mail: c.t.haynes@qmul.ac.uk; Burgess, David; Sundberg, Torbjorn [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Camporeale, Enrico [Multiscale Dynamics, Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica (CWI), Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    We report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron vortex magnetic holes (EVMHs), have circular cross-section. The magnetic field depression is associated with a diamagnetic azimuthal current provided by a population of trapped electrons in petal-like orbits. The trapped electron population provides a mean azimuthal velocity and since trapping preferentially selects high pitch angles, a perpendicular temperature anisotropy. The structures arise out of initial perturbations in the course of the turbulent evolution of the plasma, and are stable over at least 100 electron gyroperiods. We have verified the model for the EVMH by carrying out test particle and PIC simulations of isolated structures in a uniform plasma. It is found that (quasi-)stable structures can be formed provided that there is some initial perpendicular temperature anisotropy at the structure location. The properties of these structures (scale size, trapped population, etc.) are able to explain the observed properties of magnetic holes in the terrestrial plasma sheet. EVMHs may also contribute to turbulence properties, such as intermittency, at short scale lengths in other astrophysical plasmas.

  14. Magnetic vortex dynamics on a picosecond timescale in a hexagonal permalloy pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, J.-H.; Kim, D.-H.; Mesler, B.; Moon, J.-H.; Lee, K.-J.; Anderson, E. H.; Fischer, P.

    2009-12-02

    We have observed a motion of magnetic vortex core in a hexagonal Permalloy pattern by means of Soft X-ray microscopy. Pump-probe stroboscopic observation on a picosecond timescale has been carried out after exciting a ground state vortex structure by an external field pulse of 1 ns duration. Vortex core is excited off from the center position of the hexagonal pattern but the analysis of the core trajectory reveals that the motion is nongyrotropic.

  15. Contrasting vortex-gyration dispersions for different lattice bases in one-dimensional magnetic vortex arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dong-Soo; Jeong, Han-Byeol; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2013-09-01

    We performed micromagnetic numerical and analytical calculations in studying the effects of change in the primitive unit cells of one-dimensional (1D) vortex arrays on collective vortex-gyration dispersion. As the primitive basis, we consider alternating constituent materials (NiMnSb vs. Permalloy) and alternating dimensions including constituent disk diameter and thickness. In the simplest case, that of one vortex-state disk of given dimensions and single material in the primitive cell, only a single branch of collective vortex-gyration dispersion appears. By contrast, two constituent disks' different alternating materials, thicknesses, and diameters yield characteristic two-branch dispersions, the band widths and gaps of which differ in each case. This work offers not only an efficient means of manipulating collective vortex-gyration band structures but also a foundation for the development of a rich variety of 1D or 2D magnonic crystals and their band structures based on dipolar-coupled-vortex arrays.

  16. Nanoscale magnetization of a single vortex in d-wave superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharchuk, I.; Januzaj, A.; Safonchik, M.; Traito, K. B.; Lähderanta, E.

    2017-01-01

    A finite-size scaling of the nanoscale magnetization m on size averaging R of a single vortex in d-wave bulk superconductor is developed using quasiclassical Eilenberger equations. Nanoscaling is anchoring around the linear London approximation for bulk superconductors. Comparing the results with those obtained in local nonlinear approach demonstrated the importance of the nonlocal contribution. Temperature dependences of two-point correlation function χ(T , R 1 , R 2) = m(T , R 2) / m(0 , R 2) - m(T , R 1) / m(0 , R 1) with R2 > R1 and one-point function χ(T, R1 → ∞, R2) are calculated. It is found that χ(T, R1, R2), R2 > R1, is a nonmonotonous function of temperature and changes sign at high temperatures. This nonmonotonous temperature dependence can be understood as a result of competition between various effects i) Volovik effect and nonlocal corrections to superconducting electron density dominating in low temperature range, and ii) current-induced suppression of the order parameter dominating at high temperatures. The introduced nonmagnetic disorder greatly suppresses the low temperature nonlocal and nonlinear effects, leaving the order parameter effects to prevail in the whole temperature range. Nonlocal pairing and tunneling effects are investigated at the superconductor - normal metal border by considering a d-wave superconducting dot (d-dot) inside a normal diffusive metal. These effects result in a suppression of the supercurrent in the vortex core and are essential in nanodots with relatively small sizes. At sizes larger than a temperature dependent characteristic length the nanoscale physics transforms into bulk solution.

  17. Creating superfluid vortex rings in artificial magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Sachdeva, Rashi

    2016-01-01

    Artificial gauge fields are versatile tools that allow to influence the dynamics of ultracold atoms in Bose-Einstein condensates. Here we discuss a method of artificial gauge field generation stemming from the evanescent fields of the curved surface of an optical nanofibre. The exponential decay of the evanescent fields leads to large gradients in the generalized Rabi frequency and therefore to the presence of geometric vector and scalar potentials. By solving the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in the presence of the artificial gauge fields originating from the fundamental HE$_{11}$ mode of the fibre, we show that vortex rings can be created in a controlled manner. We also calculate the magnetic fields resulting from the higher order HE$_{21}$, TE$_{01}$, and TM$_{01}$ modes and compare them to the fundamental HE$_{11}$ mode.

  18. Manipulation of magnetic vortex parameters in disk-on-disk nanostructures with various geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim E. Stebliy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanostructures in the form of a sandwich consisting of two permalloy (Py disks with diameters of 600 and 200 nm separated by a nonmagnetic interlayer are studied. Magnetization reversal of the disk-on-disk nanostructures depends on the distance between centers of the small and big disks and on orientation of an external magnetic field applied during measurements. It is found that manipulation of the magnetic vortex chirality and the trajectory of the vortex core in the big disk is only possible in asymmetric nanostructures. Experimentally studied peculiarities of a motion path of the vortex core and vortex parameters by the magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE magnetometer are supported by the magnetic force microscopy imaging and micromagnetic simulations.

  19. Wide range tuning of resonant frequency for a vortex core in a regular triangle magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakata, Satoshi; Tanaka, Terumitsu; Kiseki, Kohei; Matsuyama, Kimihide; Kimura, Takashi

    2013-12-20

    A magnetic vortex structure stabilized in a micron or nano-sized ferromagnetic disk has a strong potential as a unit cell for spin-based nano-electronic devices because of negligible magnetostatic interaction and superior thermal stability. Moreover, various intriguing fundamental physics such as bloch point reversal and symmetry breaking can be induced in the dynamical behaviors in the magnetic vortex. The static and dynamic properties of the magnetic vortex can be tuned by the disk dimension and/or the separation distance between the disks. However, to realize these modifications, the preparations of other devices with different sample geometries are required. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that, in a regular-triangle Permalloy dot, the dynamic properties of a magnetic vortex are greatly modified by the application of the in-plane magnetic field. The obtained wide range tunability based on the asymmetric position dependence of the core potential provides attractive performances in the microwave spintronic devices.

  20. The eddy current induced in the pulsed bump magnet for the CSNS/RCS injection%The eddy current induced in the pulsed bump magnet for the CSNS/RCS injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋金星; 康文; 霍丽华; 郝耀斗; 王磊

    2011-01-01

    The injecton pulsed bending bump magnets of Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) in China Spalla- tion Neutron Source (CSNS) consist of four horizontal bending (BH) magnets and four vertical bending (BV) magnets. The BH magnets are operated at a repetition rat

  1. Statistical Behavior of Formation Process of Magnetic Vortex State in Ni80Fe20 Nanodisks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Keisuke, Yamada; Kasai, Shinya

    2011-01-14

    Magnetic vortices in magnetic nanodots, which are characterized by an in-plane (chirality) and an out-of-plane (polarity) magnetizations, have been intensively attracted because of their high potential for technological application to data storage and memory scheme as well as their scientific interest for an understanding of fundamental physics in magnetic nanostructures. Complete understanding of the formation process of vortex state in magnetic vortex systems is very significant issue to achieve storage and memory technologies using magnetic vortices and understand intrinsic physical properties in magnetic nanostructures. In our work, we have statistically investigated the formation process of vortex state in permalloy (Py, Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}) nanodisks through the direct observation of vortex structure utilizing a magnetic transmission soft X-ray microscopy (MTXM) with a high spatial resolution down to 20 nm. Magnetic imaging in Py nanodots was performed at the Fe L{sub 3} (707 eV) absorption edge. Figure 1 shows in-plane and out-of-plane magnetic components observed in 40 nm thick nanodot arrays with different dot radius of r = 500 and 400 nm, respectively. Vortex chirality, either clockwise (CW) or counter-clockwise (CCW), and polarity, either up or down, are clearly visible in both arrays. To investigate the statistical behavior in formation process of the vortex state, the observation of vortex structure at a remanant state after saturation of nanodots by an external magnetic field of 1 kOe has been repeatedly performed over 100 times for each array. The typical MTXM images of vortex chirality taken in two successive measurements together with their overlapped images in nanodot arrays of r = 500 and 400 nm are displayed in Fig. 2. Within the statistical measurement, the formation process of chirality of either CW or CCW is quite stochastic in each nanodot. Similar behavior is also witnessed in the formation of vortex polarity observed in consecutive

  2. Vortex configuration in the presence of local magnetic field and locally applied stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wissberg, Shai; Kremen, Anna; Shperber, Yishai; Kalisky, Beena, E-mail: beena@biu.ac.il

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • We discuss different ways to determine vortex configuration using a scanning SQUID. • We determined the vortex configuration by approaching the sample during cooling. • We observed an accumulation of vortices when contact was made with the sample. • We show how we can manipulate local vortex configuration using contact. - Abstract: Vortex configuration is determined by the repulsive interaction, which becomes dominant with increasing vortex density, by the pinning potential, and by other considerations such as the local magnetic fields, currents flowing in the sample, or as we showed recently, by local stress applied on the sample. In this work we describe different ways to control vortex configuration using scanning SQUID microscopy.

  3. Magnetic field stimulated enhancement of the barrier for vortex penetration in bended bridges of thin TaN films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilin, Konstantin, E-mail: konstantin.ilin@kit.edu; Siegel, Michael, E-mail: michael.siegel@kit.edu

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Critical state in mesoscopic superconducting TaN structures has been studied. • Suppression of the current crowding by magnetic field has been investigated. • Maximum of critical current of bended TaN bridges is at non-zero magnetic field. • The critical current of 90° bended bridges increases by 37% in magnetic field. • Significant bulk pinning is in ultra-thin TaN mesoscopic structures. - Abstract: An increase of the supercurrent density in the vicinity of sharp bends of mesoscopic superconducting strips (the current crowding) leads to a decrease of the potential barrier for vortex penetration and thus to a decrease of the measured critical current I{sub C} of the strip in comparison to the de-pairing critical current. However, it has been shown that the Meissner currents induced by an external magnetic field of appropriate direction reduce the effect of current crowding resulting in an increase of the measured I{sub C} of superconducting mesoscopic structures with bends. We performed a detailed experimental investigation of the dependence of critical current on magnetic field in straight and bended bridges made from thin TaN films. Indeed, in the case of bridges with bends, the critical current reaches a maximum at non-zero magnetic fields which value increases with an increase of the angle of bends.

  4. Nonmonotonic effects of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy on current-driven vortex wall motions in magnetic nanostripes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yuan-Chang; Lei, Hai-Yang; Hu, Jing-Guo

    2015-09-01

    In a magnetic nanostripe, the effects of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) on the current-driven horizontal motion of vortex wall along the stripe and the vertical motion of the vortex core are studied by micromagnetic simulations. The results show that the horizontal and vertical motion can generally be monotonously enhanced by PMA. However, when the current is small, a nonmonotonic phenomenon for the horizontal motion is found. Namely, the velocity of the horizontal motion firstly decreases and then increases with the increase of the PMA. We find that the reason for this is that the PMA can firstly increase and then decrease the confining force induced by the confining potential energy. In addition, the PMA always enhances the driving force induced by the current. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11247026 and 11374253).

  5. Finite Element Treatment of Vortex States in 3D Cubic Superconductors in a Tilted Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lin; Cai, Chuanbing

    2017-03-01

    The time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations have been solved numerically by a finite element analysis for superconducting samples with a cubic shape in a tilted magnetic field. We obtain different vortex patterns as a function of the external magnetic field. With a magnetic field not parallel to the x- or y-axis, the vortices attempt to change their orientation accordingly. Our analysis of the corresponding changes in the magnetic response in different directions can provide information not only about vorticity but also about the three-dimensional vortex arrangement, even about the very subtle changes for the superconducting samples with a cubic shape in a tilted magnetic field.

  6. Twist, writhe and energy from the helicity of magnetic perturbed vortex filaments

    OpenAIRE

    de Andrade, Luiz Carlos Garcia

    2007-01-01

    The twist and writhe numbers and magnetic energy of an orthogonally perturbed vortex filaments are obtained from the computation of the magnetic helicity of geodesic and abnormal magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) vortex filament solutions. Twist is computed from a formula recently derived by Berger and Prior [J. Phys. A 39 (2006) 8321] and finally writhe is computed from the theorem that the helicity is proportional to the sum of twist and writhe. The writhe number is proportional to the total tors...

  7. Magnetic response of holographic Lifshitz superconductors:Vortex and Droplet solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Lala, Arindam

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a holographic model of $s$-wave superconductor with anisotropic Lifshitz scaling has been considered. In the presence of an external magnetic field our holographic model exhibits both vortex and droplet solutions. Based on analytic methods we have shown that the anisotropy has no effects on the vortex and droplet solutions whereas it may affect the condensation. Our vortex solution closely resembles with the Ginzburg-Landau theory and a relation between the upper critical magnetic field and superconducting coherence length has been speculated from this comparison. Using Sturm-Liouville method the effects of anisotropy on the critical parameters in insulator/superconductor phase transitions has been analyzed.

  8. Vortex and characteristics of prestrained type-II deformable superconductors under magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zeling; Wang, Xingzhe; Zhou, Youhe

    2016-04-01

    Based on the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL) theory and the linear deformation theory, we present a numerical investigation of magnetic vortex characteristics of a type-II deformable superconductor with prestrain. The effect of prestrain on the wave function, vortex dynamics and energy density of a superconducting film is analyzed by solving the nonlinear TDGL equations in the presence of magnetic field. The results show that the prestrain has a remarkable influence on the magnetic vortex distribution and the vortex dynamics, as well as value of wave function of the superconductor. The different prestrains, i.e., pre-given compression and tension strains, result in dissimilar characteristics on a half-plane of deformable superconductor in an applied magnetic field, and the vortex distribution and entrance in a two dimensional superconducting film. The studies demonstrated that the compression prestrain may speed up the vortexes entering into the region of the superconducting film and increases the vortex number in comparison with those of free-prestrain case, while the tension prestrain shows the reversal features. The energy density and spectrum in the superconductor are further demonstrated numerically and discussed. The present investigation is an attempt to give insight into the superconductivity and electromagnetic characteristics taking into account the elastic deformation in superconductors.

  9. Periodic vortex pinning by regular structures in Nb thin films: magnetic vs. structural effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Maria Isabel; Jonsson-Akerman, B. Johan; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2001-03-01

    The defects present in a superconducting material can lead to a great variety of static and dynamic vortex phases. In particular, the interaction of the vortex lattice with regular arrays of pinning centers such as holes or magnetic dots gives rise to commensurability effects. These commensurability effects can be observed in the magnetoresistance and in the critical current dependence with the applied field. In recent years, experimental results have shown that there is a dependence of the periodic pinning effect on the properties of the vortex lattice (i.e. vortex-vortex interactions, elastic energy and vortex velocity) and also on the dots characteristics (i.e. dot size, distance between dots, magnetic character of the dot material, etc). However, there is not still a good understanding of the nature of the main pinning mechanisms by the magnetic dots. To clarify this important issue, we have studied and compared the periodic pinning effects in Nb films with rectangular arrays of Ni, Co and Fe dots, as well as the pinning effects in a Nb film deposited on a hole patterned substrate without any magnetic material. We will discuss the differences on pinning energies arising from magnetic effects as compared to structural effects of the superconducting film. This work was supported by NSF and DOE. M.I. Montero acknowledges postdoctoral fellowship by the Secretaria de Estado de Educacion y Universidades (Spain).

  10. X-ray imaging of vortex cores in confined magnetic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, P; Im, M -Y; Kasai, S; Yamada, K; Ono, T; Thiaville, A

    2011-02-11

    Cores of magnetic vortices in micron-sized NiFe disk structures, with thicknesses between 150 and 50 nm, were imaged and analyzed by high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy. A decrease of the vortex-core radius was observed from approximately 38 to 18 nm with decreasing disk thickness. By comparing with full three-dimensional micromagnetic simulations showing the well-known barrel structure, we obtained excellent agreement, taking into account instrumental broadening and a small perpendicular anisotropy. The proven magnetic spatial resolution of better than 25 nm was sufficient to identify a negative dip close to the vortex core, originating from stray fields of the core. Magnetic vortex structures can serve as test objects for evaluating sensitivity and spatial resolution of advanced magnetic microscopy techniques.

  11. Vortex magnetic structure in circularly magnetized microwires as deduced from magneto-optical Kerr measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Yurii P.

    2014-02-14

    The magneto-optic Kerr effect has been employed to determine the magnetization process and estimate the domain structure of microwires with circular magnetic anisotropy. The diameter of microwires was 8 μm, and pieces 2 cm long were selected for measurements. The analysis of the local surface longitudinal and transverse hysteresis loops has allowed us to deduce a vortex magnetic structure with axial core and circular external shell. Moreover, a bamboo-like surface domain structure is confirmed with wave length of around 10 to 15 μm and alternating chirality in adjacent circular domains. The width of the domain wall is estimated to be less than 3 μm. Finally, closure domain structures with significant helical magnetization component are observed extending up to around 1000 μm from the end of the microwire.

  12. Propagation of Vortex Electron Wave Functions in a Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Gallatin, Gregg M

    2012-01-01

    The physics of coherent beams of photons carrying axial orbital angular momentum (OAM) is well understood and such beams, sometimes known as vortex beams, have found applications in optics and microscopy. Recently electron beams carrying very large values of axial OAM have been generated. In the absence of coupling to an external electromagnetic field the propagation of such vortex electron beams is virtually identical mathematically to that of vortex photon beams propagating in a medium with a homogeneous index of refraction. But when coupled to an external electromagnetic field the propagation of vortex electron beams is distinctly different from photons. Here we use the exact path integral solution to Schrodingers equation to examine the time evolution of an electron wave function carrying axial OAM. Interestingly we find that the nonzero OAM wave function can be obtained from the zero OAM wave function, in the case considered here, simply by multipling it by an appropriate time and position dependent pref...

  13. Scanning Kerr microscopy study of current-induced switching in Ta/CoFeB/MgO films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrant, C. J.; Hicken, R. J.; Hao, Qiang; Xiao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Ta/CoFeB/MgO trilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy are expected to play a key role in the next generation of current and electric field switched memory and logic devices. In this study, we combine scanning Kerr microscopy with electrical transport measurements to gain insight into the underlying mechanisms of current-induced switching within such devices. We find switching to be a stochastic, domain-wall-driven process, the speed of which is strongly dependent on the switching current. Kerr imaging shows domain nucleation at one edge of the device, which modeling reveals is likely assisted by the out-of-plane component of the Oersted field. Further domain growth, leading to magnetization reversal, may still be dominated by spin torques, but the Oersted field provides an additional mechanism with which to control the switching process.

  14. Local modification of the magnetic vortex-core velocity by gallium implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langner, Hauke H., E-mail: hlangner@physnet.uni-hamburg.de; Vogel, Andreas; Beyersdorff, Björn [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Zentrum für Mikrostrukturforschung, Universität Hamburg, Jungiusstr. 11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany); Weigand, Markus [Max-Planck-Institut für Intelligente Systeme, Heisenbergstraße 3, 70596 Stuttgart (Germany); Frömter, Robert; Peter Oepen, Hans; Meier, Guido [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Zentrum für Mikrostrukturforschung, Universität Hamburg, Jungiusstr. 11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-03-14

    The dynamics of magnetic vortices in microsquares with local modifications of magnetic parameters and thickness are investigated. By implanting gallium ions with focussed ion beam into permalloy thin-film elements, we have locally tailored their magnetic properties and the layer thickness. The vortex of the Landau domain pattern of a square is resonantly excited to a gyrotropic motion and crosses regions with and without implantation. With time-resolved scanning transmission x-ray microscopy, we observe an abrupt change in the vortex velocity close to the borders between the two regions.

  15. Magnetic vortex state and multi-domain pattern in electrodeposited hemispherical nanogranular nickel films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samardak, Alexander; Sukovatitsina, Ekaterina; Ognev, Alexey; Stebliy, Maksim; Davydenko, Alexander; Chebotkevich, Ludmila [Laboratory of Thin Film Technologies, School of Natural Sciences, Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Keun Kim, Young [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nasirpouri, Forough [Department of Physics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Janjan, Seyed-Mehdi [Faculty of Materials Engineering, Sahand University of Technology, Tabriz 51335-1996 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nasirpouri, Farzad, E-mail: nasirpouri@sut.ac.ir [Faculty of Materials Engineering, Sahand University of Technology, Tabriz 51335-1996 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Magnetic states of nickel nanogranular films were studied in two distinct structures of individual and agglomerated granules electrodeposited on n-type Si(1 1 1) surface from a modified Watts bath at a low pH of 2. Magnetic force microscopy and micromagnetic simulations revealed three-dimensional out-of-plane magnetic vortex states in stand-alone hemispherical granules and their arrays, and multi-domain patterns in large agglomerates and integrated films. Once the granules coalesce into small chains or clusters, the coercivity values increased due to the reduction of inter-granular spacing and strengthening of the magnetostatic interaction. Further growth leads to the formation of a continuous granulated film which strongly affected the coercivity and remanence. This was characterized by the domain wall nucleation and propagation leading to a stripe domain pattern. Magnetoresistance measurements as a function of external magnetic field are indicative of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) for the continuous films electrodeposited on Si substrate. - Highlights: • Magnetic states of electrodeposited nickel in isolated spherical and agglomerated nanogranules, and a continuous film. • Preferential magnetization reversal mechanism in isolated granules is vortex state. • Micromagnetic simulations confirm the three-dimensional vortex. • Transition between the vortex state and multi-domain magnetic pattern causes a significant decrease in the coercive force. • Continuous nickel films electrodeposited on silicon substrate exhibit AMR whose magnitude increases with the film thickness.

  16. Chirality selection in the vortex state of magnetic nanodisks with a screw dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rößler U. K.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural defects in magnetic crystalline materials may locally change magnetic properties and can significantly influence the behavior of magnetic nanostructures. E.g., surface-induced Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions can strongly affect vortex structures in magnetic nanodisks causing a chirality selection. Near lattice defects, the spin-orbit interactions induce local antisymmetric Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange and cause effective anisotropies, which can result in spin canting. Broken inversion symmetry near a defect leads to locally chiral exchange. We present a phenomenological approach for dislocation-induced Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya couplings. As an example we investigate effects of a screw dislocation at the center of a magnetic nanodisk with a vortex state. By numerical calculations on vortex profiles we analyze equilibrium parameters of the vortex as functions of applied magnetic field and the material and geometrical parameters. It is proposed that magnetic nanodisks with defects provide a suitable experimental setting to study induced chirality by spin-orbit effects.

  17. Spontaneous Magnetization through Non-Abelian Vortex Formation in Rotating Dense Quark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Vinci, Walter; Nitta, Muneto

    2012-01-01

    When a color superconductor of high density QCD is rotating, super- fluid vortices are inevitably created along the rotation axis. In the color-flavor locked phase realized at the asymptotically large chemical potential, there appear non-Abelian vortices carrying both circulations of superfluid and color magnetic fluxes. A family of solutions has a degeneracy characterized by the Nambu-Goldtone modes CP2, associ- ated with the color-flavor locked symmetry spontaneously broken in the vicinity of the vortex. In this paper, we study electromagnetic coupling of the non-Abelian vortices and find that the degeneracy is removed with the induced effective potential. We obtain one stable vortex solu- tion and a family of metastable vortex solutions, both of which carry ordinary magnetic fluxes in addition to color magnetic fluxes. We dis- cuss quantum mechanical decay of the metastable vortices by quantum tunneling, and compare the effective potential with the other known po- tentials, the quantum mechanically induced...

  18. Quantum magnetic flux lines, BPS vortex zero modes, and one-loop string tension shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Izquierdo, A.; Mateos Guilarte, J.; de la Torre Mayado, M.

    2016-08-01

    Spectral heat kernel/zeta function regularization procedures are employed in this paper to control the divergences arising from vacuum fluctuations of Bogomolnyi-Prasad-Sommerfield vortices in the Abelian Higgs model. Zero modes of vortex fluctuations are the source of difficulties appearing when the standard Gilkey-de Witt expansion is the tool used in the calculations of one-loop shifts of vortex masses and string tensions. A modified GdW expansion is developed to diminish the impact of the infrared divergences due to the vortex zero modes of fluctuation. With this new technique at our disposal we compute the one-loop vortex mass shifts in the planar AHM and the quantum corrections to the string tension of the magnetic flux tubes living in three dimensions. In both cases it is observed that weak repulsive forces surge between these classically noninteracting topological defects caused by vacuum quantum fluctuations.

  19. Magnetisation reversal in cylindrical nickel nanobars involving magnetic vortex structure: A micromagnetic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barpanda, Prabeer, E-mail: prabeer.barpanda@u-picardie.f [Laboratoire de Reactivite et Chimie des Solides, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, 33 rue Saint Leu, Amiens Cedex 80039 (France); Department of Chemistry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H 3J5 (Canada)

    2011-03-15

    A three-dimensional, Fast-Fourier-Transformed (3D-FFT) micromagnetic simulation was employed to study the magnetization reversal mechanisms in cylindrical nickel nanobars possessing magnetic vortices. Individual Ni nanobars of height 150-250 nm with aspect ratio varying from 2.1 to 2.5 were considered, all of them supporting magnetic vortices domains. Magnetization reversal in these nanobars involves the vortex-creation-annihilation (VCA) mechanism with an inversion symmetry feature observed mid-way during reversal process. The effect of incidence angle of externally applied field on overall magnetization reversal process is examined in detail. The corresponding variations in coercivity, squareness, exchange energy and vortex parameters are described by the micromagnetic study that can shed insights for building practical Ni nanobars magnetic nanostructures/devices.

  20. Magnetization switching of a metallic nanomagnet via current-induced surface spin-polarization of an underlying topological insulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Urmimala; Dey, Rik; Pramanik, Tanmoy; Ghosh, Bahniman; Register, Leonard F.; Banerjee, Sanjay K. [Microelectronics Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    We consider a thermally stable, metallic nanoscale ferromagnet (FM) subject to spin-polarized current injection and exchange coupling from the spin-helically locked surface states of a topological insulator (TI) to evaluate possible non-volatile memory applications. We consider parallel transport in the TI and the metallic FM, and focus on the efficiency of magnetization switching as a function of transport between the TI and the FM. Transport is modeled as diffusive in the TI beneath the FM, consistent with the mobility in the TI at room temperature, and in the FM, which essentially serves as a constant potential region albeit spin-dependent except in the low conductivity, diffusive limit. Thus, it can be captured by drift-diffusion simulation, which allows for ready interpretation of the results. We calculate switching time and energy consumed per write operation using self-consistent transport, spin-transfer-torque (STT), and magnetization dynamics calculations. Calculated switching energies and times compare favorably to conventional spin-torque memory schemes for substantial interlayer conductivity. Nevertheless, we find that shunting of current from the TI to a metallic nanomagnet can substantially limit efficiency. Exacerbating the problem, STT from the TI effectively increases the TI resistivity. We show that for optimum performance, the sheet resistivity of the FM layer should be comparable to or larger than that of the TI surface layer. Thus, the effective conductivity of the FM layer becomes a critical design consideration for TI-based non-volatile memory.

  1. Magnetization switching of a metallic nanomagnet via current-induced surface spin-polarization of an underlying topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Urmimala; Dey, Rik; Pramanik, Tanmoy; Ghosh, Bahniman; Register, Leonard F.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2015-04-01

    We consider a thermally stable, metallic nanoscale ferromagnet (FM) subject to spin-polarized current injection and exchange coupling from the spin-helically locked surface states of a topological insulator (TI) to evaluate possible non-volatile memory applications. We consider parallel transport in the TI and the metallic FM, and focus on the efficiency of magnetization switching as a function of transport between the TI and the FM. Transport is modeled as diffusive in the TI beneath the FM, consistent with the mobility in the TI at room temperature, and in the FM, which essentially serves as a constant potential region albeit spin-dependent except in the low conductivity, diffusive limit. Thus, it can be captured by drift-diffusion simulation, which allows for ready interpretation of the results. We calculate switching time and energy consumed per write operation using self-consistent transport, spin-transfer-torque (STT), and magnetization dynamics calculations. Calculated switching energies and times compare favorably to conventional spin-torque memory schemes for substantial interlayer conductivity. Nevertheless, we find that shunting of current from the TI to a metallic nanomagnet can substantially limit efficiency. Exacerbating the problem, STT from the TI effectively increases the TI resistivity. We show that for optimum performance, the sheet resistivity of the FM layer should be comparable to or larger than that of the TI surface layer. Thus, the effective conductivity of the FM layer becomes a critical design consideration for TI-based non-volatile memory.

  2. Direct observation of the thermal demagnetization of magnetic vortex structures in nonideal magnetite recorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almeida, Trevor P.; Muxworthy, Adrian R.; Kovács, András

    2016-01-01

    heating is achieved through the construction and examination of magnetic-induction maps. Stepwise demagnetization of the remanence-induced Fe3O4 particle upon heating to above the Curie temperature, performed in a similar fashion to bulk thermal demagnetization measurements, revealed that its vortex state......The thermal demagnetization of pseudo-single-domain (PSD) magnetite (Fe3O4) particles, which govern the magnetic signal in many igneous rocks, is examined using off-axis electron holography. Visualization of a vortex structure held by an individual Fe3O4 particle (~250nm in diameter) during in situ...

  3. Current induced magnetic flux response in frustrated three-band superconductors as a bulk probe of broken time reversal symmetry (BTRS) ground states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yerin, Yuriy; Omelyanchouk, Alexander [Verkin Inst. for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering. 61103 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Drechsler, Stefan-Ludwig; Brink, Jeroen van den; Efremov, Dmitriy [Inst. for Theorretical Solid State Physics at the Leibniz Inst. for Solid State an Materials Research, IFW-Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Within the Ginzburg-Landau formalism we provide a classification of all possible ground states (GS) of a three-band superconductor (3BSC) where either frustrated states with BTRS or a single non-BTRS GS with unconventional/conventional s-wave symmetry, respectively, exist. The necessary condition for a BTRS GS in general cannot be reduced to a ''-''sign of the product of all interband couplings (IBC) valid in the case of 3 equivalent bands with repulsive equal IBC, only. It corresponds to a maximal IBC frustration. We show that with increasing diversity of the parameter space this frustration is reduced and the regions of possible BTRS GS start to shrink. We track possible evolutions of a BTRS GS of a 3BSC based doubly-connected system in an external magnetic field. Depending on its parameters, a magnetic flux can induce various current density leaps, connected with adiabatic or non-adiabatic transitions from BTRS to non-BTRS states and vice versa. The current induced magnetic flux response of samples with a doubly-connected geometry e.g. as a thin tube provides a suitable experimental tool for the detection of BTRS GS.

  4. Spin transfer driven resonant expulsion of a magnetic vortex core for efficient rf detector

    CERN Document Server

    Menshawy, Samh; Merazzo, Karla J; Vila, Laurent; Ferreira, Ricardo; Cyrille, Marie-Claire; Ebels, Ursula; Bortolotti, Paolo; Kermorvant, Julien; Cros, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Spin transfer magnetization dynamics have led to considerable advances in Spintronics, including opportunities for new nanoscale radiofrequency devices. Among the new functionalities is the radiofrequency(rf) detection using the spin diode rectification effect in spin torque nano-oscillators (STNOs). In this study, we focus on a new phenomenon, the resonant expulsion of a magnetic vortex in STNOs. This effect is observed when the excitation vortex radius, due to spin torques associated to rf currents, becomes larger than the actual radius of the STNO. This vortex expulsion is leading to a sharp variation of the voltage at the resonant frequency. Here we show that the detected frequency can be tuned by different parameters; furthermore, a simultaneous detection of different rf signals can be achieved by real time measurements with several STNOs having different diameters. This result constitutes a first proof-of-principle towards the development of a new kind of nanoscale rf threshold detector.

  5. Spectro-Polarimetric Properties of Small-Scale Plasma Eruptions Driven by Magnetic Vortex Tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Kitiashvili, Irina N

    2014-01-01

    Highly turbulent nature of convection on the Sun causes strong multi-scale interaction of subsurface layers with the photosphere and chromosphere. According to realistic 3D radiative MHD numerical simulations ubiquitous small-scale vortex tubes are generated by turbulent flows below the visible surface and concentrated in the intergranular lanes. The vortex tubes can capture and amplify magnetic field, penetrate into chromospheric layers and initiate quasi-periodic flow eruptions that generates Alfv\\'enic waves, transport mass and energy into the solar atmosphere. The simulations revealed high-speed flow patterns, and complicated thermodynamic and magnetic structures in the erupting vortex tubes. The spontaneous eruptions are initiated and driven by strong pressure gradients in the near-surface layers, and accelerated by the Lorentz force in the low chromosphere. In this paper, the simulation data are used to further investigate the dynamics of the eruptions, their spectro-polarimetric characteristics for the...

  6. Resonantly exited precession motion of three-dimensional vortex core in magnetic nanospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Koog; Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Lee, Jehyun; Lee, Ha-Youn; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Gaididei, Yuri; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Sheka, Denis D.

    2015-01-01

    We found resonantly excited precession motions of a three-dimensional vortex core in soft magnetic nanospheres and controllable precession frequency with the sphere diameter 2R, as studied by micromagnetic numerical and analytical calculations. The precession angular frequency for an applied static field HDC is given as ωMV = γeffHDC, where γeff = γ〈mΓ〉 is the effective gyromagnetic ratio in collective vortex dynamics, with the gyromagnetic ratio γ and the average magnetization component 〈mΓ〉 of the ground-state vortex in the core direction. Fitting to the micromagnetic simulation data for 〈mΓ〉 yields a simple explicit form of 〈mΓ〉 ≈ (73.6 ± 3.4)(lex/2R)2.20±0.14, where lex is the exchange length of a given material. This dynamic behavior might serve as a foundation for potential bio-applications of size-specific resonant excitation of magnetic vortex-state nanoparticles, for example, magnetic particle resonance imaging. PMID:26079895

  7. Resonantly excited precession motion of three-dimensional vortex core in magnetic nanospheres [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Koog; Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Lee, Jehyun; Lee, Ha-Youn; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Gaididei, Yuri; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P; Sheka, Denis D

    2015-01-01

    We found resonantly excited precession motions of a three-dimensional vortex core in soft magnetic nanospheres and controllable precession frequency with the sphere diameter 2R, as studied by micromagnetic numerical and analytical calculations. The precession angular frequency for an applied static field HDC is given as ωMV = γeffHDC, where γeff = γ〈mΓ〉 is the effective gyromagnetic ratio in collective vortex dynamics, with the gyromagnetic ratio γ and the average magnetization component 〈mΓ〉 of the ground-state vortex in the core direction. Fitting to the micromagnetic simulation data for 〈mΓ〉 yields a simple explicit form of 〈mΓ〉 ≈ (73.6 ± 3.4)(lex/2R)(2.20±0.14), where lex is the exchange length of a given material. This dynamic behavior might serve as a foundation for potential bio-applications of size-specific resonant excitation of magnetic vortex-state nanoparticles, for example, magnetic particle resonance imaging.

  8. Dynamical influence of vortex–antivortex pairs in magnetic vortex oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otxoa, R.M., E-mail: ro274@cam.ac.uk [Institut d' Electronique Fondamentale, UMR CNRS 8622, Univ. Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Hitachi Cambridge Laboratory, J. J. Thomson Avenue, CB3 OHE Cambridge (United Kingdom); Petit-Watelot, S. [Institut d' Electronique Fondamentale, UMR CNRS 8622, Univ. Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Institut Jean Lamour, UMR CNRS 7198, Univ. de Lorraine, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Manfrini, M.; Radu, I.P.; Thean, A. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Kim, Joo-Von; Devolder, T. [Institut d' Electronique Fondamentale, UMR CNRS 8622, Univ. Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2015-11-15

    We study the magnetization dynamics in a nanocontact magnetic vortex oscillators as function of temperature. Low temperature experiments reveal that the dynamics at low and high currents differ qualitatively. At low currents, we excite a temperature independent standard oscillation mode, consisting of a gyrotropic motion of a vortex about the nanocontact in the free layer. Above a critical current, a sudden jump in the frequency is observed, which occurs with a substantial increase of the frequency versus current slope factor. Using micromagnetic simulation and analytical modeling, we associate this new regime to the creation of a vortex–antivortex pair in the pinned layer of the spin valve. This pair gives an additional perpendicular spin torque component that alters the free layer vortex dynamics, which can be quantitatively accounted for by an analytical model. - Highlights: • We study the magnetization dynamics in a nanocontact magnetic vortex oscillators as function of temperature. • Electrical measurements reveal the existence of a vortex–antivortex pair in the pinnel layer above certain value of the injected current. • Micromagnetic simulations confirm qualitatively this scenario.

  9. The magnetic vortex gyration mediated by spin-polarized current in a confined off-centered nanocontact structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huanan; Li, Dongfei; Wang, Yaxin; Hua, Zhong

    2017-02-01

    We study the magnetic vortex dynamical behaviors in a confined off-centered nanocontact system through micromagnetic simulations. It is found that the vortex core could be pinned when the nanocontact is shifted to large enough distance from the center of the nanodisk. We also find that the position of nanocontact exerts great influence on the vortex core gyration, including trajectory, eigenfrequency, excitation time, and instantaneous velocity. The simulations show that it is possible to utilize the nanocontact position to change the total effective potential energy of the system so as to realize both the pinning of the vortex core and the controllability of vortex core gyration. The characteristic gyration in this system is advantageous to control the polarity switching and other dynamical behaviors of magnetic vortex.

  10. Ultrafast generation of skyrmionic defects with vortex beams: Printing laser profiles on magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Hiroyuki; Sato, Masahiro

    2017-02-01

    Controlling electric and magnetic properties of matter by laser beams is actively explored in the broad region of condensed matter physics, including spintronics and magneto-optics. Here we theoretically propose an application of optical and electron vortex beams carrying intrinsic orbital angular momentum to chiral ferro- and antiferromagnets. We analyze the time evolution of spins in chiral magnets under irradiation of vortex beams by using the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. We show that beam-driven nonuniform temperature leads to a class of ring-shaped magnetic defects, what we call skyrmion multiplex, as well as conventional skyrmions. We discuss the proper beam parameters and the optimal way of applying the beams for the creation of these topological defects. Our findings provide an ultrafast scheme of generating topological magnetic defects in a way applicable to both metallic and insulating chiral (anti-) ferromagnets.

  11. Micromagnetic simulation of vortex-antivortex magnetization in permalloy nano particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnama, B.; Muhammady, S.; Suharyana

    2017-02-01

    A process of vortex-antivortex magnetization reversal in a Permalloy nano particle with uniform polarity of magnetization has been investigated numerically. Micromagnetic simulation is performed using the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation. A short field pulse is applied in a film plane anti parallel to magnetization direction. Sequences of simulation of reversals mechanism are evaluated for thickness of nano particle. As the results in the case of thickness of 20 nm thin layer, magnetization reversal realizes through a creation-annihilation of Neel-Bloch wall pair. Contrarily, reversal mechanism via a creation-annihilation process of vortex-antivortex pair occurs for thickness of 60 nm thin layer. By analyzing barrier energy of the sample, we find that a maximum barrier energy reaches a threshold value (e.g., ∼ 2.6×106 erg/cm3 for Permalloy in this simulation).

  12. Moving magnetic tubes: fragmentation, vortex streets and the limit of the approximation of thin flux tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, M. C. M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Schüssler, M.

    2006-05-01

    Aims.We study the buoyant rise of magnetic flux tubes in a stratified layer over a range of Reynolds numbers (25 ⪉ Re ⪉ 2600) by means of numerical simulations. Special emphasis is placed on studying the fragmentation of the rising tube, its trailing wake and the formation of a vortex street in the high-Reynolds number regime. Furthermore, we evaluate the relevance of the thin flux tube approximation with regard to describing the evolution of magnetic flux tubes in the simulations. Methods: .We used the FLASH code, which has an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm, thus allowing the simulations to be carried out at high Reynolds numbers. Results: .The evolution of the magnetic flux tube and its wake depends on the Reynolds number. At Re up to a few hundred, the wake consists of two counter-rotating vortex rolls. At higher Re, the vortex rolls break up and the shedding of flux into the wake occurs in a more intermittent fashion. The amount of flux retained by the central portion of the tube increases with the field line twist (in agreement with previous literature) and with Re. The time evolution of the twist is compatible with a homologous expansion of the tube. The motion of the central portion of the tube in the simulations is very well described by the thin flux tube model whenever the effects of flux loss or vortex forces can be neglected. If the flux tube has an initial net vorticity, it undergoes asymmetric vortex shedding. In this case, the lift force accelerates the tube in such a way that an oscillatory horizontal motion is super-imposed on the vertical rise of the tube, which leaves behind a vortex street. This last result is in accordance with previous simulations reported in the literature, which were carried out at lower Reynolds number.

  13. Nonaxisymmetric Rossby vortex instability with toroidal magnetic fields in structured disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Cong [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the global nonaxisymmetric Rossby vortex instability (RVI) in a differentially rotating, compressible magnetized accretion disk with radial density structures. Equilibrium magnetic fields are assumed to have only the toroidal component. Using linear theory analysis, we show that the density structure can be unstable to nonaxisymmetric modes. We find that, for the magnetic field profiles we have studied, magnetic fields always provide a stabilizing effect to the unstable RVI modes. We discuss the physical mechanism of this stabilizing effect. The threshold and properties of the unstable modes are also discussed in detail. In addition, we present linear stability results for the global magnetorotational instability when the disk is compressible.

  14. Ultrafast magnetic vortex core switching driven by the topological inverse Faraday effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Katsuhisa; Ohe, Jun-ichiro; Tatara, Gen

    2012-09-21

    We present a theoretical discovery of an unconventional mechanism of inverse Faraday effect which acts selectively on topological magnetic structures. The effect, topological inverse Faraday effect, is induced by the spin Berry's phase of the magnetic structure when a circularly polarized light is applied. Thus a spin-orbit interaction is not necessary unlike that in the conventional inverse Faraday effect. We demonstrate by numerical simulation that topological inverse Faraday effect realizes ultrafast switching of a magnetic vortex within a switching time of 150 ps without magnetic field.

  15. Field (direction) dependence of AF magnetism in YBCO vortex states: A MaxEnt-muSR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boekema, C; Browne, M C [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, San Jose CA 95192-0106 (United States); Teichgraeber, C, E-mail: BoekemaC@aol.co [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley CA (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Muon-spin-resonance (muSR) data of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-delta} (YBCO) vortex states are analyzed to determine the field dependence of observed antiferromagnetism (AF). YBCO vortex states are investigated at low magnetic fields. Field distributions are obtained from uSR data using Maximum-Entropy (ME) analysis. Well below T{sub c}, the vortex signal in the magnetic field distribution is best fitted by a Lorentzian, indicating AF in and near the vortex cores. Earlier we reported that the field dependence of the YBCO AF Lorentzian width is approximately linear. ME-uSR analysis of c-axis-oriented YBCO data indicates a field-direction dependence, suggesting three-dimensional AF. The relevance of an AF presence in and near YBCO vortex cores to a potential magnetic origin of cuprate superconductivity is discussed.

  16. On quantum magnetic flux lines, BPS vortex zero modes, and one-loop string tension shifts

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso-Izquierdo, A; Mayado, M de la Torre

    2016-01-01

    Spectral heat kernel/zeta function regularization procedures are employed in this paper to control the divergences arising from vacuum fluctuations of Bogomolnyi-Prasad-Sommerfield vortices in the Abelian Higgs model. Zero modes of vortex fluctuations are the source of difficulties appearing when the standard Gilkey-de Witt expansion is performed. A modified GdW expansion is developed to diminish the impact of the infrared divergences due to the vortex zero modes. With this new technique at our disposal we compute the one-loop vortex mass shift in the planar AHM and the quantum corrections to the string tension of the magnetic flux tubes living in three dimensions. In both cases it is observed that weak repulsive forces surge between these classically non interacting topological defects caused by vacuum quantum fluctuations.

  17. Observation of coupled vortex gyrations by 70-ps-time and 20-nm-space- resolved full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hyunsung; Yu, Young-Sang; Lee, Ki-Suk; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Bocklage, Lars; Vogel, Andreas; Bolte, Markus; Meier, Guido; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2010-09-01

    We employed time-and space-resolved full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray microscopy to observe vortex-core gyrations in a pair of dipolar-coupled vortex-state Permalloy (Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}) disks. The 70 ps temporal and 20 nm spatial resolution of the microscope enabled us to simultaneously measure vortex gyrations in both disks and to resolve the phases and amplitudes of both vortex-core positions. We observed their correlation for a specific vortex-state configuration. This work provides a robust and direct method of studying vortex gyrations in dipolar-coupled vortex oscillators.

  18. Feasibility assessment of magnetic sensors for measurment of Hall current induced changes to the static magnetic field nearby a Hall thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozko, Zoe

    A Hall thruster is an electric propulsion device that produces thrust electrostatically by accelerating propellant to velocities 5 to 10 times higher than is achievable using conventional chemical thrusters. This is accomplished through the application of static, crossed electric and magnetic fields that are concentrated in a region close to the exit plane of the thruster. During operation an azimuthal plasma-electron current develops in the region where the electric and magnetic fields are concentrated. This embedded plasma current is referred to as the Hall current. The thrust produced from accelerating the propellant is transferred to a satellite or spacecraft through interaction between the Hall current and the magnetic coils used to produce the static magnetic field within the thruster. The Hall current can be calculated and the thrust can be determined in real time by measuring the magnetic field produced by the Hall current using sensors located external to the thruster. This work investigates the feasibility of placing magnetic sensors in the regions close to the exit of the thruster to measure the external magnetic field and correlate it to the Hall current. A finite element magnetic solver was used to identify several locations outside of the thrust plume and near the pole piece where the magnetic field magnitude changes by several Gauss in a background field level of ˜50 Gauss. Magnetic sensors based on the giant magnetoresistive effect were identified as acceptable with regard to sensitivity, and measurements made with these sensors in a simulated high background magnetic field environment demonstrated that changes of 0.5 Gauss could be easily measured. This work also presents the development of a thrust stand that will be useful in future work to demonstrate the overall concept. Special focus was directed to the design of the data acquisition system and in-vacuum calibration system used to make measurements with the thrust stand.

  19. Effect of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction on the magnetic vortex oscillator driven by spin-polarized current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shujun; Zhang, Senfu; Zhu, Qiyuan; Liu, Xianyin; Jin, Chendong; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Qingfang, E-mail: liuqf@lzu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2015-05-07

    By micromagnetic simulation, we investigated the dynamic of magnetic vortex driven by spin-polarized current in Permalloy nanodisks in the presence of interfacial/superficial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions (DMI). It is found that spin-polarized current can drive the vortex precession. In the presence of DMI, the oscillation frequency of the vortex is about 3 times higher than that of without DMI for the same nanodisk. Moreover, the linewidth is more narrow than that of without DMI when the radius of nanodisk is 50 nm. In addition, the vortex can support a higher current density than that of without DMI. Introduction of DMI in this system can provide a new way to design magnetic vortex oscillator.

  20. Induced quantum numbers of a magnetic vortex at non-zero temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitenko, Yurii A. [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 14-b Metrologichna str., Kyiv 03143 (Ukraine)]. E-mail: yusitenko@bitp.kiev.ua; Gorkavenko, Volodymyr M. [Department of Physics, Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, 6 Academician Glushkov ave., Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine)]. E-mail: gorka@univ.kiev.ua

    2005-05-16

    The phenomenon of the finite-temperature induced quantum numbers in fermionic systems with topological defects is analyzed. We consider an ideal gas of two-dimensional relativistic massive electrons in the background of a defect in the form of a pointlike magnetic vortex with arbitrary flux. This system is found to acquire, in addition to fermion number, also orbital angular momentum, spin, and induced magnetic flux, and we determine the functional dependence of the appropriate thermal averages and correlations on the temperature, the vortex flux, and the continuous parameter of the boundary condition at the location of the defect. We find that non-negativeness of thermal quadratic fluctuations imposes a restriction on the admissible range of values of the boundary parameter. The long-standing problem of the adequate definition of total angular momentum for the system considered is resolved.

  1. Identification of the vortex glass phase by harmonics of the AC magnetic susceptibility

    OpenAIRE

    Adesso, M G; Polichetti, M.; Pace, S.

    2005-01-01

    We compared the AC magnetic susceptibility behaviour for the vortex glass phase and for the creep phenomena with an inhomogeneous pinning potential. The temperature dependence of the harmonics of the susceptibility have been numerically simulated with these two models, and we studied them as a function of the frequency, in terms of Cole-Cole plots. From our analysis we show that it is possible to distinguish between the two different phases, because of their clear differences in the Cole-Cole...

  2. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a current-vortex sheet at a 3D magnetic null

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyper, P. F.; Pontin, D. I.

    2013-03-01

    We report here, for the first time, an observed instability of a Kelvin-Helmholtz nature occurring in a fully three-dimensional (3D) current-vortex sheet at the fan plane of a 3D magnetic null point. The current-vortex layer forms self-consistently in response to foot point driving around the spine lines of the null. The layer first becomes unstable at an intermediate distance from the null point, with the instability being characterized by a rippling of the fan surface and a filamentation of the current density and vorticity in the shear layer. Owing to the 3D geometry of the shear layer, a branching of the current filaments and vortices is observed. The instability results in a mixing of plasma between the two topologically distinct regions of magnetic flux on either side of the fan separatrix surface, as flux is reconnected across this surface. We make a preliminary investigation of the scaling of the system with the dissipation parameters. Our results indicate that the fan plane separatrix surface is an ideal candidate for the formation of current-vortex sheets in complex magnetic fields and, therefore, the enhanced heating and connectivity change associated with the instabilities of such layers.

  3. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a current-vortex sheet at a 3D magnetic null

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyper, P. F. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Pontin, D. I. [Division of Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-15

    We report here, for the first time, an observed instability of a Kelvin-Helmholtz nature occurring in a fully three-dimensional (3D) current-vortex sheet at the fan plane of a 3D magnetic null point. The current-vortex layer forms self-consistently in response to foot point driving around the spine lines of the null. The layer first becomes unstable at an intermediate distance from the null point, with the instability being characterized by a rippling of the fan surface and a filamentation of the current density and vorticity in the shear layer. Owing to the 3D geometry of the shear layer, a branching of the current filaments and vortices is observed. The instability results in a mixing of plasma between the two topologically distinct regions of magnetic flux on either side of the fan separatrix surface, as flux is reconnected across this surface. We make a preliminary investigation of the scaling of the system with the dissipation parameters. Our results indicate that the fan plane separatrix surface is an ideal candidate for the formation of current-vortex sheets in complex magnetic fields and, therefore, the enhanced heating and connectivity change associated with the instabilities of such layers.

  4. Generation of Vortex Beams with Strong Longitudinally Polarized Magnetic Field by Using a Metasurface

    CERN Document Server

    Veysi, Mehdi; Capolino, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    A novel method of generation and synthesis of azimuthally E-polarized vortex beams is presented. Along the axis of propagation such beams have a strong longitudinally polarized magnetic field where ideally there is no electric field. We show how these beams can be constructed through the interference of Laguerre-Gaussian beams carrying orbital angular momentum. As an example, we present a metasurface made of double-split ring slot pairs and report a good agreement between simulated and analytical results. Both a high magnetic-to-electric-field contrast ratio and a magnetic field enhancement are achieved. We also investigate the metasurface physical constraints to convert a linearly polarized beam into an azimuthally E- polarized beam and characterize the performance of magnetic field enhancement and electric field suppression of a realistic metasurface. These findings are potentially useful for novel optical spectroscopy related to magnetic dipolar transitions and for optical manipulation of particles with sp...

  5. Acoustic-Wave-Induced Magnetization Switching of Magnetostrictive Nanomagnets from Single-Domain to Nonvolatile Vortex States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, Vimal; D'Souza, Noel; Bhattacharya, Dhritiman; Atkinson, Gary M.; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo; Atulasimha, Jayasimha

    2016-09-01

    We report manipulation of the magnetic states of elliptical cobalt magnetostrictive nanomagnets (of nominal dimensions ~ 340 nm x 270 nm x 12 nm) delineated on bulk 128{\\deg} Y-cut lithium niobate with Surface Acoustic Waves (SAWs) launched from interdigitated electrodes. Isolated nanomagnets that are initially magnetized to a single domain state with magnetization pointing along the major axis of the ellipse are driven into a vortex state by surface acoustic waves that modulate the stress anisotropy of these nanomagnets. The nanomagnets remain in the vortex state until they are reset by a strong magnetic field to the initial single domain state, making the vortex state non-volatile. This phenomenon is modeled and explained using a micromagnetic framework and could lead to the development of extremely energy efficient magnetization switching methodologies.

  6. Magnetic Radial Vortex Stabilization and Efficient Manipulation Driven by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction and Spin-Transfer Torque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siracusano, G.; Tomasello, R.; Giordano, A.; Puliafito, V.; Azzerboni, B.; Ozatay, O.; Carpentieri, M.; Finocchio, G.

    2016-08-01

    Solitons are very promising for the design of the next generation of ultralow power devices for storage and computation. The key ingredient to achieving this goal is the fundamental understanding of their stabilization and manipulation. Here, we show how the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction (IDMI) is able to lift the energy degeneracy of a magnetic vortex state by stabilizing a topological soliton with radial chirality, hereafter called radial vortex. It has a noninteger Skyrmion number S (0.5 wave emissions due to vortex-antivortex annihilations.

  7. Magnetic vortex evolution in self-assembled La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 nanoislands under in-plane magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zabaleta

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic vortex formation at room temperature and its evolution under in-plane magnetic field is studied in chemically grown self-assembled La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 nanoislands of less than 200 nm in width. We use variable field magnetic force microscopy and numerical simulations to confirm that the vortex state is ubiquitous in these square-base pyramid shape epitaxial La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 nanostructures, and that it requires in-plane magnetic fields below 40 kA/m to be annihilated.

  8. Fractional Matching Effect due to Pinning of the Vortex Lattice by an Array of Magnetic Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, O. M.; Montero, M. I.; Jönsson-Åkerman, B. J.; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2001-03-01

    We have investigated the pinning of magnetic flux quanta by rectangular arrays of nanoscaled magnetic dots. We measured the resistivity vs. magnetic field characteristics using a high magnetic field resolution of up to 0.1 G over the full field range ( 2 kG to 2 kG). By this we the appearance of minima at half and third integer values of the matching field. It is well known that a reconfiguration of the vortex lattice from a rectangular to a square type geometry occurs in rectangular arrays of magnetic dots when the magnetic field is increased over a threshold value H_r. If we lower the magnetic field after crossing H_r, we find that some of the minima at the full integer matching field are missing. This hysteretic behavior occurs only when Hr is exceeded before the subsequent decrease of the magnetic field. We present the experimental results and discuss preliminary models for the explanation of these observations. This work was supported by the grants NSF and DOE. Two of us acknowledge postdoctoral fellowships by the DAAD (Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst) (O.M.S.) and the Secretaria De Estado De Educacion Y Universidades (M.I.M.) respectively.

  9. Vortex zero modes, large flux limit and Ambjørn-Nielsen-Olesen magnetic instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognesi, Stefano; Chatterjee, Chandrasekhar; Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Konishi, Kenichi

    2014-10-01

    In the large flux limit vortices become flux tubes with almost constant magnetic field in the interior region. This occurs in the case of non-Abelian vortices as well, and the study of such configurations allows us to reveal a close relationship between vortex zero modes and the gyromagnetic instabilities of vector bosons in a strong background magnetic field discovered by Nielsen, Olesen and Ambjørn. The BPS vortices are exactly at the onset of this instability, and the dimension of their moduli space is precisely reproduced in this way. We present a unifying picture in which, through the study of the linear spectrum of scalars, fermions and W bosons in the magnetic field background, the expected number of translational, orientational, fermionic as well as semilocal zero modes is correctly reproduced in all cases.

  10. Vortex Zero Modes, Large Flux Limit and Ambj{\\o}rn-Nielsen-Olesen Magnetic Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Bolognesi, Stefano; Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Konishi, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    In the large flux limit vortices become flux tubes with almost constant magnetic field in the interior region. This occurs in the case of non-Abelian vortices as well, and the study of such configurations allows us to reveal a close relationship between vortex zero modes and the gyromagnetic instabilities of vector bosons in a strong background magnetic field discovered by Nielsen, Olesen and Ambj{\\o}rn. The BPS vortices are exactly at the onset of this instability, and the dimension of their moduli space is precisely reproduced in this way. We present a unifying picture in which, through the study of the linear spectrum of scalars, fermions and W bosons in the magnetic field background, the expected number of translational, orientational, fermionic as well as semilocal zero modes is correctly reproduced in all cases.

  11. Vortex liquid in magnetic-field-induced superconducting vacuum of quenched lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Braguta, V V; Chernodub, M N; Kotov, A Yu; Polikarpov, M I

    2013-01-01

    In the background of the strong magnetic field the vacuum is suggested to possess an electromagnetically superconducting phase characterised by the emergence of inhomogeneous quark-antiquark vector condensates which carry quantum numbers of the charged rho mesons. The rho-meson condensates are inhomogeneous due to the presence of the stringlike defects ("the rho vortices") which are parallel to the magnetic field (the superconducting vacuum phase is similar to the mixed Abrikosov phase of a type-II superconductor). In agreement with these expectations, we have observed the presence of the rho vortices in numerical simulations of the vacuum of the quenched two-color lattice QCD in strong magnetic field background. We have found that in the quenched QCD the rho vortices form a liquid. The transition between the usual (insulator) phase at low B and the superconducting vortex liquid phase at high B turns out to be very smooth, at least in the quenched QCD.

  12. Dynamic micromagnetic simulation of the magnetic spectrum of permalloy nanodot array with vortex state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Y.; Zhao, G. P.; Morvan, F. J.; Wu, S. Q.; Yue, M.

    2017-01-01

    Due to its potential applications in high-density magnetic storage and spin electronic devices, the ferromagnetic resonance absorption phenomenon has recently drawn much attention. By studying the influence of different materials with various shapes on this phenomenon, the new understandings gained could lead to other applications in the future. In this paper, dynamic magnetic susceptibilities of the vortex state in permalloy nanodot arrays have been investigated using a three-dimensional object oriented micromagnetic framework (OOMMF) code with a two-dimensional periodic boundary condition (2D-PBC) extension and compared with those of a single dot carefully. The resonance mode is excited in the vortex state of nanodot arrays by the microwave magnetic field perpendicular to the dot plane. In this case only radially symmetric spin wave modes can be excited. The influence of the geometric parameters on the resonance frequency has been studied systemically, including the dot radius, the number of repeating elements, and the dot distance. One can see that the resonance peak of the dot array is higher than that of a single dot because of the induced stronger magnetostatic coupling. A critical dot distance exists at which the dot array may be treated as a single dot. There is only one resonance peak for both the dot array and the single dot, as the radius changes.

  13. Magnetic-field-induced vortex-lattice transition in HgBa2CuO4 +δ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeongseop A.; Xin, Yizhou; Stolt, I.; Halperin, W. P.; Reyes, A. P.; Kuhns, P. L.; Chan, M. K.

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the 17O nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) quadrupolar spectrum of apical oxygen in HgBa2CuO4 +δ were performed over a range of magnetic fields from 6.4-30 T in the superconducting state. Oxygen-isotope-exchanged single crystals were investigated with doping corresponding to superconducting transition temperatures from 74 K underdoped, to 78 K overdoped. The apical oxygen site was chosen since its NMR spectrum has narrow quadrupolar satellites that are well separated from any other resonance. Nonvortex contributions to the spectra can be deconvolved in the time domain to determine the local magnetic field distribution from the vortices. Numerical analysis using Brandt's Ginzburg-Landau theory was used to find structural parameters of the vortex lattice, penetration depth, and coherence length as a function of magnetic field in the vortex solid phase. From this analysis we report a vortex structural transition near 15 T from an oblique lattice with an opening angle of 73∘ at low magnetic fields to a triangular lattice with 60∘ stabilized at high field. The temperature for onset of vortex dynamics has been identified from spin-spin relaxation. This is independent of the magnetic field at sufficiently high magnetic field similar to that reported for YBa2Cu3O7 and Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 +δ and is correlated with mass anisotropy of the material. This behavior is accounted for theoretically only in the limit of very high anisotropy.

  14. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a current-vortex sheet at a 3D magnetic null

    CERN Document Server

    Wyper, P F

    2013-01-01

    We report here, for the first time, an observed instability of a Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) nature occurring in a fully three-dimensional (3D) current-vortex sheet at the fan plane of a 3D magnetic null point. The current-vortex layer forms self-consistently in response to foot point driving around the spine lines of the null. The layer first becomes unstable at an intermediate distance from the null point, with the instability being characterized by a rippling of the fan surface and a filamentation of the current density and vorticity in the shear layer. Owing to the 3D geometry of the shear layer, a branching of the current filaments and vortices is observed. The instability results in a mixing of plasma between the two topologically distinct regions of magnetic flux on either side of the fan separatrix surface, as flux is reconnected across this surface. We make a preliminary investigation of the scaling of the system with the dissipation parameters. Our results indicate that the fan plane separatrix surface is...

  15. Zero modes of the generalized fermion-vortex system in a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chi-Ken; Seradjeh, Babak

    2014-06-01

    We show that Dirac fermions moving in two spatial dimensions with a generalized dispersion E ˜pN, subject to an external magnetic field and coupled to a complex scalar field carrying a vortex defect with winding number Q acquire N |Q| zero modes. This is the same as in the absence of the magnetic field. Our proof is based on selection rules in the Landau level basis that dictate the existence and the number of the zero modes. We show that the result is insensitive to the choice of geometry and is naturally extended to general field profiles, where we also derive a generalization of the Aharonov-Casher theorem. Experimental consequences of our results are briefly discussed.

  16. Magnetic studies in organic superconductors bis(tetramethyltetraselenafulvalene) perchlorate: Upper critical fields and vortex matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jeong Il

    A thermodynamic determination of the upper critical field Hc2 in the quasi-one dimensional molecular organic superconductor (TMTSF) 2ClO4 has been obtained for magnetic field accurately aligned along the in-plane, inter-chain direction by utilizing silicon cantilever magnetometer technology. This magnetically-measured upper critical field, simultaneously confirmed by electrical transport measurements, was found to well-exceed all paramagnetic limits known to date for spin singlet superconductors, strongly indicating that (TMTSF)2ClO4 is a spin triplet superconductor. Also, we were able to investigate novel structure in the upper critical field, where we observed that Hc2(T) has three different temperature regimes, characterized by an usual upturn at a temperature T* ˜ 0.2 K and a very unusual kink at a temperature T0 ˜ 1.04 K. In addition, the magnetic field-temperature superconducting vortex phase diagram of (TMTSF)2ClO4 has been obtained. The phase diagram showed a variety of vortex phases, including solid (Bragg lattice and disordered glass) and liquid (liquid-1 and liquid-2) subphases. A distinct irreversibility line was found, likely separating the solid from the liquid phase. Within the solid phase, we observed an unusual inverse transition driven by the pinning force, splitting the solid phase into a disordered glass and a Bragg lattice. Also, within the Bragg lattice, we observed a temperature-independent magnetic crossover line at low field (˜0.05 T), interpreted as possibly indicating the existence of multiple Tc's in (TMTSF)2X, further evidence for claiming this system to be a triplet superconductor.

  17. Chirality dependent pinning and depinning of magnetic vortex domain walls at nano-constrictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanan P, Vineeth; Kumar, P. S. Anil

    2017-01-01

    The implementation of magnetic domain wall (DW) based memory and logic devices critically depend on the control over DW assisted magnetization reversal processes. Here we investigate the magnetization reversal by DW injection, pinning and depinning at a geometrical constriction in permalloy nanowire (NW) driven by external in-plane magnetic field, using local electrical probes. The observations of two distinct depinning field values are identified with the help of micromagnetic simulations, as being due to vortex DWs of different chiralities. Statistical analysis gave an estimate of chirality dependent pinning probability of DWs at this constriction. The stochastic nature of the DW based reversal driven by magnetic field is revealed here. The asymmetry in the depinning field of the DWs to move to either side of constriction indicates the asymmetric nature of the barrier potential seen by the DWs. The results demonstrate the difficulties in achieving deterministic switching behavior of DW assisted reversal, and provide a platform to understand the main bottlenecks in the technological implementation of DWs.

  18. Tunable negligible-loss energy transfer between dipolar-coupled magnetic disks by stimulated vortex gyration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyunsung; Lee, Ki-Suk; Jeong, Dae-Eun; Choi, Youn-Seok; Yu, Young-Sang; Han, Dong-Soo; Vogel, Andreas; Bocklage, Lars; Meier, Guido; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2011-01-01

    A wide variety of coupled harmonic oscillators exist in nature. Coupling between different oscillators allows for the possibility of mutual energy transfer between them and the information-signal propagation. Low-energy input signals and their transport with negligible energy loss are the key technological factors in the design of information-signal processing devices. Here, utilizing the concept of coupled oscillators, we experimentally demonstrated a robust new mechanism for energy transfer between spatially separated dipolar-coupled magnetic disks - stimulated vortex gyration. Direct experimental evidence was obtained by a state-of-the-art experimental time-resolved soft X-ray microscopy probe. The rate of energy transfer from one disk to the other was deduced from the two normal modes' frequency splitting caused by dipolar interaction. This mechanism provides the advantages of tunable energy transfer rates, low-power input signals and negligible energy loss in the case of negligible intrinsic damping. Coupled vortex-state disks might be implemented in applications for information-signal processing.

  19. Vortex magnetic structure in framboidal magnetite reveals existence of water droplets in an ancient asteroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuki; Sato, Takeshi; Nakamura, Norihiro; Nozawa, Jun; Nakamura, Tomoki; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    The majority of water has vanished from modern meteorites, yet there remain signatures of water on ancient asteroids. How and when water disappeared from the asteroids is important, because the final fluid-concentrated chemical species played critical roles in the early evolution of organics and in the final minerals in meteorites. Here we show evidence of vestigial traces of water based on a nanometre-scale palaeomagnetic method, applying electron holography to the framboids in the Tagish Lake meteorite. The framboids are colloidal crystals composed of three-dimensionally ordered magnetite nanoparticles and therefore are only able to form against the repulsive force induced by the surface charge of the magnetite as a water droplet parches in microgravity. We demonstrate that the magnetites have a flux closure vortex structure, a unique magnetic configuration in nature that permits the formation of colloidal crystals just before exhaustion of water from a local system within a hydrous asteroid.

  20. Vortex polarity in 2-D magnetic dots by Langevin dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depondt, Ph., E-mail: depondt@insp.jussieu.f [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, UMR 7588 CNRS, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Levy, J.-C.S., E-mail: jean-claude.levy@univ-paris-diderot.f [Materiaux et Phenomenes Quantiques, Universite Denis Diderot, UMR 7162 CNRS, 75013 Paris (France); Mertens, F.G., E-mail: franz.mertens@uni-bayreuth.d [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2011-01-17

    Two-dimensional magnetic plots of finite size were simulated by integrating the Landau-Lifshitz equation for the isotropic Heisenberg model with a systematic exploration of the effect of dipole-dipole interactions of various strengths d, at a low temperature. Structures with or without vortices are observed, and in the cases in which vortices are present, out-of-plane contributions show only for relatively weak dipolar strengths: the integrated intensity of the out-of-plane component decreases roughly as 1/d with increasing dipolar strength while the vortex core width decreases as d{sup -1/2}. The coexistence of several vortices with an out-of-plane component seems limited to a narrow d-range, at least for the sample sizes studied. The size limit below which the vortices disappear decreases roughly as 1/d.

  1. First-order transition in the magnetic vortex matter in superconducting MgB2 tuned by disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, T; Marlaud, R; Marcenat, C; Cercellier, H; Konczykowski, M; van der Beek, C J; Mosser, V; Lee, H S; Lee, S I

    2010-07-23

    The field-driven transition from an ordered Bragg glass to a disordered vortex phase in single-crystalline MgB2 is tuned by an increasing density of point defects, introduced by electron irradiation. The discontinuity observed in magnetization attests to the first-order nature of the transition. The temperature and defect density dependences of the transition field point to vortex pinning mediated by fluctuations in the quasiparticle mean free path, and reveal the mechanism of the transition in the absence of complicating factors such as layeredness or thermal fluctuations.

  2. Dynamic and thermodynamic properties of porous vortex matter in Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8) in an oblique magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avraham, Nurit; Goldschmidt, Y Y; Liu, J T; Myasoedov, Y; Rappaport, M; Zeldov, E; van der Beek, C J; Konczykowski, M; Tamegai, T

    2007-08-24

    Vortex matter in Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8) with a low concentration of tilted columnar defects (CDs) was studied using magneto-optical measurements and molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that while the dynamic properties are significantly affected by tilting the magnetic field away from the CDs, the thermodynamic transitions are angle independent. The simulations indicate that vortex pancakes remain localized on the CDs even at large tilting angles. This preserves the vortex thermodynamics, while vortex pinning is considerably weakened due to kink sliding.

  3. The mechanism of vortex switching in magnetic nanodots under circular magnetic field. I. The resonance action of the field on the nanodot eigenmodes

    CERN Document Server

    Kovalev, A S

    2002-01-01

    The resonance activation of eigenmodes for a finite 2D easy-plane ferromagnet is considered to treat theoretically by the vortex switching in magnetic nanodots due to the action of external circular magnetic field. It is shown analytically that if the anisotropy is weak, i.e. the vortex has a nonzero polarity (total magnization along the z-axis), the process of the field action has a complicated nature. The circular field acts in a resonance way upon azimuthal system eigenmodes, in which magnetization depends on the azimuthal coordinate (as a direct resonance at the eigenfrequencies of these modes). The interaction of the azimuthal and symmetric modes (in which the magnetization does not depend on the azimuthal coordinate) via the applied field gives rise to complex parametric resonance at multifrequencies. The results obtained are compared with the data of previous numerical calculations.

  4. Magnetic field effects on the vestibular system: calculation of the pressure on the cupula due to ionic current-induced Lorentz force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, A.; Glover, P. M.; Li, Y.; Mian, O. S.; Day, B. L.

    2012-07-01

    Large static magnetic fields may be employed in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). At high magnetic field strengths (usually from about 3 T and above) it is possible for humans to perceive a number of effects. One such effect is mild vertigo. Recently, Roberts et al (2011 Current Biology 21 1635-40) proposed a Lorentz-force mechanism resulting from the ionic currents occurring naturally in the endolymph of the vestibular system. In the present work a more detailed calculation of the forces and resulting pressures in the vestibular system is carried out using a numerical model. Firstly, realistic 3D finite element conductivity and fluid maps of the utricle and a single semi-circular canal containing the current sources (dark cells) and sinks (hair cells) of the utricle and ampulla were constructed. Secondly, the electrical current densities in the fluid are calculated. Thirdly, the developed Lorentz force is used directly in the Navier-Stokes equation and the trans-cupular pressure is computed. Since the driving force field is relatively large in comparison with the advective acceleration, we demonstrate that it is possible to perform an approximation in the Navier-Stokes equations that reduces the problem to solving a simpler Poisson equation. This simplification allows rapid and easy calculation for many different directions of applied magnetic field. At 7 T a maximum cupula pressure difference of 1.6 mPa was calculated for the combined ampullar (0.7 µA) and utricular (3.31 µA) distributed current sources, assuming a hair-cell resting current of 100 pA per unit. These pressure values are up to an order of magnitude lower than those proposed by Roberts et al using a simplistic model and calculation, and are in good agreement with the estimated pressure values for nystagmus velocities in caloric experiments. This modeling work supports the hypothesis that the Lorentz force mechanism is a significant contributor to the perception of magnetic field induced vertigo.

  5. Magnetic field effects on the vestibular system: calculation of the pressure on the cupula due to ionic current-induced Lorentz force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, A; Glover, P M; Li, Y; Mian, O S; Day, B L

    2012-07-21

    Large static magnetic fields may be employed in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). At high magnetic field strengths (usually from about 3 T and above) it is possible for humans to perceive a number of effects. One such effect is mild vertigo. Recently, Roberts et al (2011 Current Biology 21 1635-40) proposed a Lorentz-force mechanism resulting from the ionic currents occurring naturally in the endolymph of the vestibular system. In the present work a more detailed calculation of the forces and resulting pressures in the vestibular system is carried out using a numerical model. Firstly, realistic 3D finite element conductivity and fluid maps of the utricle and a single semi-circular canal containing the current sources (dark cells) and sinks (hair cells) of the utricle and ampulla were constructed. Secondly, the electrical current densities in the fluid are calculated. Thirdly, the developed Lorentz force is used directly in the Navier-Stokes equation and the trans-cupular pressure is computed. Since the driving force field is relatively large in comparison with the advective acceleration, we demonstrate that it is possible to perform an approximation in the Navier-Stokes equations that reduces the problem to solving a simpler Poisson equation. This simplification allows rapid and easy calculation for many different directions of applied magnetic field. At 7 T a maximum cupula pressure difference of 1.6 mPa was calculated for the combined ampullar (0.7 µA) and utricular (3.31 µA) distributed current sources, assuming a hair-cell resting current of 100 pA per unit. These pressure values are up to an order of magnitude lower than those proposed by Roberts et al using a simplistic model and calculation, and are in good agreement with the estimated pressure values for nystagmus velocities in caloric experiments. This modeling work supports the hypothesis that the Lorentz force mechanism is a significant contributor to the perception of magnetic field induced vertigo.

  6. Strong vortex core pinning and Barkhausen-free magnetization response in thin Permalloy disks induced by implantation of 1 × 10{sup 4} Ga{sup +} ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fani Sani, F., E-mail: fanisani@ualberta.ca, E-mail: mark.freeman@ualberta.ca; Losby, J. E.; Diao, Z.; Parsons, L. C.; Burgess, J. A. J.; Hiebert, W. K.; Freeman, M. R., E-mail: fanisani@ualberta.ca, E-mail: mark.freeman@ualberta.ca [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada); National Institute for Nanotechnology (NINT), Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Vick, D. [National Institute for Nanotechnology (NINT), Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada)

    2014-05-07

    Artificial vortex core pinning sites are induced in thin Permalloy disks by point exposure to as few as 10 000 ions from a focused Ga{sup +} beam. These pinning sites yield a first-order change in the magnetization response of the disk. A single site can keep the vortex core pinned over an applied field range comparable to the vortex annihilation field of the unaltered disk. Several widely separated sites can work together to keep the core pinned in one place, while the Barkhausen effect is eliminated from the magnetization curve over a range approaching the saturation moment of the disk.

  7. Zero-Bias-Field Spin Torque Induced Oscillation of a Vortex Core in a Magnetic Junction Nano-Pillar with High Magnetoresistance Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukahara, Hiroshi; Imamura, Hiroshi

    2017-06-01

    Spin torque induced dynamics of a vortex core in a magnetic junction nano-pillar is studied by paying special attention to the effect of the in-plane current due to the spatial variation of magnetization. We calculated the motion of the vortex core and the current distribution simultaneously. The current has a considerable in-plane component within the magnetic junction nano-pillar with a high magnetoresistance ratio, and the stable rotational motion of the vortex core is caused by a spin transfer torque from the in-plane current without a bias field when the magnetoresistance ratio is over 180%. It is shown that the zero-bias-field oscillation of the vortex core can be maintained if the magnetoresistance ratio and strength of the in-plane current exceed a certain critical value.

  8. Current-Induced Membrane Discharge

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, MB; Soestbergen, van, M Michiel; A Mani; Bruus, H.; Biesheuvel, PM; Bazant, MZ

    2012-01-01

    Possible mechanisms for overlimiting current (OLC) through aqueous ion-exchange membranes (exceeding diffusion limitation) have been debated for half a century. Flows consistent with electro-osmotic instability have recently been observed in microfluidic experiments, but the existing theory neglects chemical effects and remains to be quantitatively tested. Here, we show that charge regulation and water self-ionization can lead to OLC by “current-induced membrane discharge” (CIMD), even in the...

  9. Vortex cores and vortex motion in superconductors with anisotropic Fermi surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvis, J. A.; Herrera, E.; Guillamón, I.; Vieira, S.; Suderow, H.

    2017-02-01

    Explaning static and dynamic properties of the vortex lattice in anisotropic superconductors requires a careful characterization of vortex cores. The vortex core contains Andreev bound states whose spatial extension depends on the anisotropy of the electronic band-structure and superconducting gap. This might have an impact on the anisotropy of the superconducting properties and on vortex dynamics. Here we briefly summarize basic concepts to understand anisotropic vortex cores and review vortex core imaging experiments. We further discuss moving vortex lattices and the influence of vortex core shape in vortex motion. We find vortex motion in highly tilted magnetic fields. We associate vortex motion to the vortex entry barrier and the screening currents at the surface. We find preferential vortex motion along the main axis of the vortex lattice. After travelling integers of the intervortex distance, we find that vortices move more slowly due to the washboard potential of the vortex lattice.

  10. Influence of a perpendicular magnetic field on the thermal depinning of a single Abrikosov vortex in a superconducting Josephson junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouzoudis, D.

    1999-02-12

    The prime interest of the present research is to measure the thermal energy needed for depinning a trapped vortex when an external magnetic field is perpendicular to the plane of the junction, and thus there are Meissner currents flowing along the edge of the film. These currents introduce an additional force and the author wishes to study thermal depinning under the influence of this force. These studies are of interest because Nb junctions are used in a wide range of electronic applications. Such junctions are useful, for instance, in superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) or in vortex-flow transistors because their performance can be enhanced by tuning the parameters of the individual junctions to optimum operation values. Furthermore gated Josephson junctions can be used as Josephson field-effect transistors (JOFETs).

  11. Honeycomb-Lattice Heisenberg-Kitaev Model in a Magnetic Field: Spin Canting, Metamagnetism, and Vortex Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Lukas; Andrade, Eric C.; Vojta, Matthias

    2016-12-01

    The Heisenberg-Kitaev model is a paradigmatic model to describe the magnetism in honeycomb-lattice Mott insulators with strong spin-orbit coupling, such as A2IrO3 (A =Na , Li ) and α -RuCl3 . Here, we study in detail the physics of the Heisenberg-Kitaev model in an external magnetic field. Using a combination of Monte Carlo simulations and spin-wave theory, we map out the classical phase diagram for different directions of the magnetic field. Broken SU(2) spin symmetry renders the magnetization process rather complex, with sequences of phases and metamagnetic transitions. In particular, we find various large-unit-cell and multi-Q phases including a vortex-crystal phase for a field in the [111 ] direction. We also discuss quantum corrections in the high-field phase.

  12. Thickness-modulated tungsten–carbon superconducting nanostructures grown by focused ion beam induced deposition for vortex pinning up to high magnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael García Serrano

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We report efficient vortex pinning in thickness-modulated tungsten–carbon-based (W–C nanostructures grown by focused ion beam induced deposition (FIBID. By using FIBID, W–C superconducting films have been created with thickness modulation properties exhibiting periodicity from 60 to 140 nm, leading to a strong pinning potential for the vortex lattice. This produces local minima in the resistivity up to high magnetic fields (2.2 T in a broad temperature range due to commensurability effects between the pinning potential and the vortex lattice. The results show that the combination of single-step FIBID fabrication of superconducting nanostructures with built-in artificial pinning landscapes and the small intrinsic random pinning potential of this material produces strong periodic pinning potentials, maximizing the opportunities for the investigation of fundamental aspects in vortex science under changing external stimuli (e.g., temperature, magnetic field, electrical current.

  13. Vortex lattice ordering in the flux flow state of Nb thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimaldi, Gaia, E-mail: gaia.grimaldi@cnr.i [CNR-SPIN, V. Ponte Don Melillo, Fisciano I-84084 (Italy); Leo, Antonio [CNR-SPIN, V. Ponte Don Melillo, Fisciano I-84084 (Italy); Nigro, Angela; Pace, Sandro [CNR-SPIN, V. Ponte Don Melillo, Fisciano I-84084 (Italy); Physics Department ' E. R. Caianiello' , University of Salerno, V. Ponte Don Melillo, Fisciano I-84084 (Italy)

    2010-10-01

    We measure current-voltage characteristics at high driving currents for different magnetic fields and temperatures in Nb thin films of rather strong pinning. In a definite range of the B-T phase diagram we find that a current induced transition occurs in the flux flow motion of the vortex lattice, namely a dynamic ordering (DO). Contrary to the case of weaker pinning materials, DO is observed only at low fields, due to the stronger intrinsic disorder that can deform plastically the moving vortex lattice even for small applied fields.

  14. Vortex cutting in superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatz, A.; Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Kwok, W. K.; Crabtree, G. W.

    2016-08-01

    Vortex cutting and reconnection is an intriguing and still-unsolved problem central to many areas of classical and quantum physics, including hydrodynamics, astrophysics, and superconductivity. Here, we describe a comprehensive investigation of the crossing of magnetic vortices in superconductors using time dependent Ginsburg-Landau modeling. Within a macroscopic volume, we simulate initial magnetization of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor followed by subsequent remagnetization with perpendicular magnetic fields, creating the crossing of the initial and newly generated vortices. The time resolved evolution of vortex lines as they approach each other, contort, locally conjoin, and detach, elucidates the fine details of the vortex-crossing scenario under practical situations with many interacting vortices in the presence of weak pinning. Our simulations also reveal left-handed helical vortex instabilities that accompany the remagnetization process and participate in the vortex crossing events.

  15. Current-induced runaway vibrations in dehydrogenated graphene nanoribbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Bjerregaard Christensen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We employ a semi-classical Langevin approach to study current-induced atomic dynamics in a partially dehydrogenated armchair graphene nanoribbon. All parameters are obtained from density functional theory. The dehydrogenated carbon dimers behave as effective impurities, whose motion decouples from the rest of carbon atoms. The electrical current can couple the dimer motion in a coherent fashion. The coupling, which is mediated by nonconservative and pseudo-magnetic current-induced forces, change the atomic dynamics, and thereby show their signature in this simple system. We study the atomic dynamics and current-induced vibrational instabilities using a simplified eigen-mode analysis. Our study illustrates how armchair nanoribbons can serve as a possible testbed for probing the current-induced forces.

  16. Current-induced membrane discharge

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, M B; Mani, A; Bruus, H; Biesheuvel, P M; Bazant, M Z

    2012-01-01

    Possible mechanisms for over-limiting current (OLC) through aqueous ion-exchange membranes (exceeding diffusion limitation) have been debated for half a century. Flows consistent with electro-osmotic instability (EOI) have recently been observed in microfluidic experiments, but the existing theory neglects chemical effects and remains to be quantitatively tested. Here, we show that charge regulation and water self-ionization can lead to OLC by "current-induced membrane discharge" (CIMD), even in the absence of fluid flow. Salt depletion leads to a large electric field which expels water co-ions, causing the membrane to discharge and lose its selectivity. Since salt co-ions and water ions contribute to OLC, CIMD interferes with electrodialysis (salt counter-ion removal) but could be exploited for current-assisted ion exchange and pH control. CIMD also suppresses the extended space charge that leads to EOI, so it should be reconsidered in both models and experiments on OLC.

  17. Current-Induced Membrane Discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mathias Bækbo; van Soestbergen, M.; Mani, A.;

    2012-01-01

    Possible mechanisms for overlimiting current (OLC) through aqueous ion-exchange membranes (exceeding diffusion limitation) have been debated for half a century. Flows consistent with electro-osmotic instability have recently been observed in microfluidic experiments, but the existing theory...... neglects chemical effects and remains to be quantitatively tested. Here, we show that charge regulation and water self-ionization can lead to OLC by "current-induced membrane discharge'' (CIMD), even in the absence of fluid flow, in ion-exchange membranes much thicker than the local Debye screening length....... Salt depletion leads to a large electric field resulting in a local pH shift within the membrane with the effect that the membrane discharges and loses its ion selectivity. Since salt co-ions, H+ ions, and OH- ions contribute to OLC, CIMD interferes with electrodialysis (salt counterion removal...

  18. Lo cal energy of magnetic vortex core reversal%磁涡旋极性翻转的局域能量∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕刚; 曹学成; 张红; 秦羽丰; 王林辉; 厉桂华; 高峰; 孙丰伟

    2016-01-01

    The polarity of magnetic vortex core can be switched by current or magnetic field through a vortex-antivortex pair creation and annihilation process, in which the significant change of the exchange energy during the switching takes an important role. To further unveil the energetic origin of magnetic vortex switching, we investigate the evolution of the maximum exchange energy density of the sample by using micromagnetic finite-element simulations based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation including the adiabatic and the nonadiabatic spin torque terms. Our micromagnetic calculations indicate that maximum exchange energy density for the considered sample must exceed a critical value of∼3.0 × 106 J/m3 in order to achieve the magnetic vortex switching. The threshold value corresponds to the maximum exchange energy density at the time of creation of new vortex-antivortex pair. Following the nucleation of antivortex, the maximum exchange energy density increases rapidly with the antivortex approaching the original vortex. The maximum exchange energy density can become large at the time of annihilation of two vortexes. To explain well the critical value of the local maximum exchange energy density, we use the rigid vortex model (in which the spin distribution is unchangeable while vortex is displaced) to develop an analytical model. For a magnetic vortex confined in a thin ferromagnetic nanodisk, the magnetization distribution is unchanged along the thickness and can be seen as a two-dimensional model when the thickness is less than or on the order of the exchange length. The components of vortex magnetization vector in a ferromagnetic dot can be expressed by using a complex function w(ζ,ζ¯). Corresponding to the trivortex state appearing in vortex core reversal process, the local exchange energy density Wex around the vortexes cores is obtained. Simultaneously, we obtain the maximum exchange energy density: Wex≈2.3×106 J/m3. In a realistic system, the shape

  19. Josephson Currents Induced by the Witten Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Flavio S.; Nussinov, Zohar; van den Brink, Jeroen

    2016-10-01

    We reveal the existence of a new type of topological Josephson effect involving type II superconductors and three-dimensional topological insulators as tunnel junctions. We predict that vortex lines induce a variant of the Witten effect that is the consequence of the axion electromagnetic response of the topological insulator: at the interface of the junction each flux quantum attains a fractional electrical charge of e /4 . As a consequence, if an external magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the junction, the Witten effect induces an ac Josephson effect in the absence of any external voltage. We derive a number of further experimental consequences and propose potential setups where these quantized, flux induced Witten effects may be observed.

  20. Novel phases in a square-lattice frustrated ferromagnet : 1/3 -magnetization plateau, helicoidal spin liquid, and vortex crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabra, Luis; Sindzingre, Philippe; Momoi, Tsutomu; Shannon, Nic

    2016-02-01

    A large part of the interest in magnets with frustrated antiferromagnetic interactions comes from the many new phases found in applied magnetic field. In this article, we explore some of the new phases which arise in a model with frustrated ferromagnetic interactions, the J1-J2-J3 Heisenberg model on a square lattice. Using a combination of classical Monte Carlo simulation and spin-wave theory, we uncover behavior reminiscent of some widely studied frustrated antiferromagnets, but with a number of new twists. We first demonstrate that, for a suitable choice of parameters, the phase diagram as a function of magnetic field and temperature is nearly identical to that of the Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a triangular lattice, including the celebrated 1 /3 -magnetization plateau. We then examine how this phase diagram changes when the model is tuned to a point where the classical ground state is highly degenerate. In this case, two new phases emerge: a classical, finite-temperature spin liquid, characterized by a "ring" in the spin structure factor S (q ) ; and a vortex crystal, a multiple-Q state with finite magnetization, which can be viewed as an ordered lattice of magnetic vortices. All of these new phases persist for a wide range of magnetic fields. We discuss the relationship between these results and published studies of frustrated antiferromagnets, together with some of the materials where these new phases might be observed in experiment.

  1. Exchange-mediated, nonlinear, out-of-plane magnetic field dependence of the ferromagnetic vortex gyrotropic mode frequency driven by core deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Jasper P.; Fangohr, Hans; Kostylev, Mikhail; Metaxas, Peter J.

    2016-12-01

    We have performed micromagnetic simulations of low-amplitude gyrotropic dynamics of magnetic vortices in the presence of spatially uniform out-of-plane magnetic fields. For disks having small lateral dimensions, we observe a frequency drop-off when approaching the disk's out-of-plane saturation field. This nonlinear frequency response is shown to be associated with a vortex core deformation driven by nonuniform demagnetizing fields that act on the shifted core. The deformation results in an increase in the average out-of-plane magnetization of the displaced vortex state (contrasting the effect of gyrofield-driven deformation at low field), which causes the exchange contribution to the vortex stiffness to switch from positive to negative. This generates an enhanced reduction of the core stiffness at high field, leading to a nonlinear field dependence of the gyrotropic mode frequency.

  2. Magnetic soft x-ray microscopy-imaging fast spin dynamics inmagnetic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Peter; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Mesler, Brooke L.; Chao, Weilun; Sakdinawat, Anne E.; Anderson, Erik H.

    2007-06-01

    Magnetic soft X-ray microscopy combines 15nm spatial resolution with 70ps time resolution and elemental sensitivity. Fresnel zone plates are used as X-ray optics and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism serves as magnetic contrast mechanism. Thus scientifically interesting and technologically relevant low dimensional nanomagnetic systems can be imaged at fundamental length and ultrafast time scales in a unique way. Studies include magnetization reversal in magnetic multilayers, nanopatterned systems, vortex dynamics in nanoelements and spin current induced phenomena.

  3. Role of spin diffusion in current-induced domain wall motion for disordered ferromagnets

    KAUST Repository

    Akosa, Collins Ashu

    2015-03-12

    Current-induced spin transfer torque and magnetization dynamics in the presence of spin diffusion in disordered magnetic textures is studied theoretically. We demonstrate using tight-binding calculations that weak, spin-conserving impurity scattering dramatically enhances the nonadiabaticity. To further explore this mechanism, a phenomenological drift-diffusion model for incoherent spin transport is investigated. We show that incoherent spin diffusion indeed produces an additional spatially dependent torque of the form ∼∇2[m×(u⋅∇)m]+ξ∇2[(u⋅∇)m], where m is the local magnetization direction, u is the direction of injected current, and ξ is a parameter characterizing the spin dynamics (precession, dephasing, and spin-flip). This torque, which scales as the inverse square of the domain wall width, only weakly enhances the longitudinal velocity of a transverse domain wall but significantly enhances the transverse velocity of vortex walls. The spatial-dependent spin transfer torque uncovered in this study is expected to have significant impact on the current-driven motion of abrupt two-dimensional textures such as vortices, skyrmions, and merons.

  4. Control of wake and vortex shedding behind a porous circular obstacle by exerting an external magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bovand, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, P.O. Box 91775-1111, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rashidi, S., E-mail: samanrashidi3983@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, P.O. Box 91775-1111, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dehghan, M. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Semnan University, P.O. 35131-19111, Semnan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Esfahani, J.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, P.O. Box 91775-1111, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Valipour, M.S. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Semnan University, P.O. 35131-19111, Semnan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-07-01

    In this article the finite volume method (FVM) is carried out to simulate the flow around and through a two-dimensional porous cylinder. An external magnetic field is used to control the wake behind the bluff body and also to suppress the vortex shedding phenomena. The Darcy–Brinkman–Forchheimer model has been used for modeling the flow in the porous medium. Effects of Stuart (N), Reynolds (Re) and Darcy (Da) numbers on the flow behavior have been investigated. The results show that the critical Stuart number for suppress vortex shedding decreases with increasing the Darcy numbers. Also, the Stuart number for disappearance the re-circulating wake increases with increased Reynolds number for both porous and solid cylinders. - Highlights: • The formation and shedding of wakes behind a porous bluff-body are investigated. • Effects of a magnetic field on controlling the wake formation is explored. • Roles of Darcy, Reynolds and Stuart numbers on the flow behavior are analyzed. • Flow patterns change with Reynolds number and Darcy numbers. • The critical Stuart number decreases with increased Darcy numbers.

  5. Chirality-mediated bistability and strong frequency downshifting of the gyrotropic resonance of a magnetic vortex due to dynamic destiffening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushruth, Manu; Fried, Jasper P.; Anane, Abdelmadjid; Xavier, Stephane; Deranlot, Cyrile; Cros, Vincent; Metaxas, Peter J.

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate an enhanced, bidirectional, in-plane magnetic field tuning of the gyrotropic resonance frequency of a magnetic vortex within a ferromagnetic disk by introducing a flat edge. When the core is in its vicinity, the flat edge locally reduces the core's directional dynamic stiffness for movement parallel to the edge. This strongly reduces the net dynamic core stiffness, leading to the gyrotropic frequency being significantly less than when the core is centered (or located near the round edge). This leads to the measurable range of gyrotropic frequencies being more than doubled and also results in a clear chirality-mediated bistability of the gyrotropic resonance frequency due to what is effectively a chirality dependence of the core's confining potential.

  6. Magnetic-field-induced crossover of vortex-line coupling in SmFeAsO0.85 single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Sook; Bartkowiak, Marek; Kim, Jun Sung; Lee, Hu-Jong

    2010-09-01

    We take the resistivity (ρ) and the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of a SmFeAsO0.85 single crystal as a function of temperature (T) for various magnetic fields up to 18 T along the c axis. The tail region of ρ(T) well fits the three-dimensional (3D) vortex-glass critical behavior. The critical exponents for the vortex-glass scaling of (dlnρ/dT)-1-T , I-V curves, and the thermal activation energies of vortices in magnetic fields show a crossover for magnetic fields around 3 T. The crossover behavior results from the change in the strength of the vortex pinning and the entanglement of vortex lines in the stacked superconducting structure of SmFeAsO0.85 material with the c -axis vortex-line coupling lying in between highly anisotropic Bi-based cuprates with decoupled two-dimensional vortices and less-anisotropic YBa2Cu3O7-δ with coupled 3D vortices.

  7. Current-Induced Effects in Nanoscale Conductors

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    We present an overview of current-induced effects in nanoscale conductors with emphasis on their description at the atomic level. In particular, we discuss steady-state current fluctuations, current-induced forces, inelastic scattering and local heating. All of these properties are calculated in terms of single-particle wavefunctions computed using a scattering approach within the static density-functional theory of many-electron systems. Examples of current-induced effects in atomic and mole...

  8. Second magnetization peak effect, vortex dynamics, and flux pinning in 112-type superconductor Ca0.8La0.2Fe(1-x)CoxAs2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Xing, Xiangzhuo; Wu, Wenjuan; Zhao, Haijun; Shi, Zhixiang

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of vortex pinning and its relaxation is of great importance for both basic physics and technological applications in the field of superconductivity. We report a great improvement of superconducting properties in the recently discovered 112-type superconductors (Ca, La)FeAs2 through Co co-doping. High critical current density Js(5 K) > 2(*)10(6) A/cm(2) is obtained and pronounced second peak effect is observed in magnetization hysteresis loops. Both the dynamic and static relaxation studies result in comparable and sizable relaxation rates S or Q, indicating a fast vortex creep. The second magnetization peak (SMP) is found to be strongly associated with a crossover from elastic to plastic vortex creep. Above the crossover, plastic vortex creep governs the vortex dynamics in a wide range of temperatures and fields. A good scaling behavior of the normalized pinning force density fp by formula fp = h(p)(1-h)(q) ((p) = 1.44, q = 1.66, h = 0.44) is revealed, which demonstrates an important contribution from core normal point-like pinning sites. To better understand the SMP phenomenon, we discuss the related physical scenario as well as the affecting factors in the SMP occurrence.

  9. Second magnetization peak effect, vortex dynamics, and flux pinning in 112-type superconductor Ca0.8La0.2Fe1-xCoxAs2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Xing, Xiangzhuo; Wu, Wenjuan; Zhao, Haijun; Shi, Zhixiang

    2016-03-01

    Investigation of vortex pinning and its relaxation is of great importance for both basic physics and technological applications in the field of superconductivity. We report a great improvement of superconducting properties in the recently discovered 112-type superconductors (Ca, La)FeAs2 through Co co-doping. High critical current density Js(5 K) > 2*106 A/cm2 is obtained and pronounced second peak effect is observed in magnetization hysteresis loops. Both the dynamic and static relaxation studies result in comparable and sizable relaxation rates S or Q, indicating a fast vortex creep. The second magnetization peak (SMP) is found to be strongly associated with a crossover from elastic to plastic vortex creep. Above the crossover, plastic vortex creep governs the vortex dynamics in a wide range of temperatures and fields. A good scaling behavior of the normalized pinning force density fp by formula fp = hp(1-h)q (p = 1.44, q = 1.66, h = 0.44) is revealed, which demonstrates an important contribution from core normal point-like pinning sites. To better understand the SMP phenomenon, we discuss the related physical scenario as well as the affecting factors in the SMP occurrence.

  10. Scanning transmission X-ray microscop e observation and quantitative study of magnetic vortex structure%利用扫描透射X射线显微镜观测磁涡旋结构∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙璐; 火炎; 周超; 梁建辉; 张祥志; 许子健; 王勇; 吴义政

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic recording has now played an important role in the development of non-volatile information storage tech-nologies, so it becomes essential to quantitatively understand the magnetization distribution in magnetic microstructures. In ferromagnetic disks, squares and triangles with submicron sizes, it is energetically favorable for the magnetization to form a closed in-plane vortex and a perpendicular vortex core at the center. This vortex magnetic structure is a new candidate for future magnetic memory device because both the vortex chirality and the core polarity can be manipulated by applying an external magnetic field or a spin-polarized current. Further development of vortex-based memory devices requires quantitative measurement of vortex domain structures, which is still lacking. In this paper, magnetization configuration in a vortex structure has been quantitatively studied by scanning trans-mission X-ray microscope (STXM) utilizing X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) effect in Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Samples have been fabricated on the 100 nm silicon-nitride membranes. The patterns are first transferred to PMMA photoresist using e-beam lithography, then a 50 nm thick Ni80Fe20 film is deposited by e-beam evaporation. Magnetic vortex configurations are characterized with the X-ray energy at Fe L3 absorption edge and Ni L3 absorption edge, respectively. The image taken at Fe edge shows greater contrast than that at Ni edge. Experimental results indicate that the magnetic vortex state remains stable in permalloy circle, square and triangle structures with diameters from 2 to 5 µm. The STXM images indicate that the magnetization in circular geometry changes continuously along the concentric circles without clear domain boundaries. In contrast, magnetization in square geometry consists of four distinct domains with clear diagonal domain boundaries. Similarly, three domains can be observed in triangle geometry. In order to quantify the in

  11. Vortex cores and vortex motion in superconductors with anisotropic Fermi surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvis, J.A. [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolás Cabrera, Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Ciencias Naturales, Facultad de ingeniería y Ciencias Básicas, Universidad Central, Bogotá (Colombia); National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Herrera, E.; Guillamón, I.; Vieira, S. [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolás Cabrera, Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada de Altos Campos Magnéticos y Bajas Temperaturas, UAM, CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Suderow, H., E-mail: hermann.suderow@uam.es [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolás Cabrera, Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada de Altos Campos Magnéticos y Bajas Temperaturas, UAM, CSIC, Madrid (Spain)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • The observation of vortex cores is reviewed, with emphasis in new experiments. • Vortex cores are follow superconducting gap and Fermi surface shapes. • The vortex core shape influences vortex dynamics. - Abstract: Explaning static and dynamic properties of the vortex lattice in anisotropic superconductors requires a careful characterization of vortex cores. The vortex core contains Andreev bound states whose spatial extension depends on the anisotropy of the electronic band-structure and superconducting gap. This might have an impact on the anisotropy of the superconducting properties and on vortex dynamics. Here we briefly summarize basic concepts to understand anisotropic vortex cores and review vortex core imaging experiments. We further discuss moving vortex lattices and the influence of vortex core shape in vortex motion. We find vortex motion in highly tilted magnetic fields. We associate vortex motion to the vortex entry barrier and the screening currents at the surface. We find preferential vortex motion along the main axis of the vortex lattice. After travelling integers of the intervortex distance, we find that vortices move more slowly due to the washboard potential of the vortex lattice.

  12. Fast Josephson vortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malishevskii, A.S.; Silin, V.P.; Uryupin, S.A

    2002-12-30

    For the magnetically coupled waveguide and long Josephson junction we gave the analytic description of two separate velocity domains where the free motion of traveling vortex (2{pi}-kink) exists. The role of the mutual influence of waveguide and long Josephson junction is discussed. It is shown the possibility of the fast vortex motion with the velocity much larger than Swihart velocity of Josephson junction and close to the speed of light in the waveguide. The excitation of motion of such fast Josephson vortex is described.

  13. Preparation and characterization of magnetic carboxylated nanodiamonds for vortex-assisted magnetic solid-phase extraction of ziram in food and water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Erkan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2016-09-01

    A simple and rapid vortex-assisted magnetic solid phase extraction (VA-MSPE) method for the separation and preconcentration of ziram (zinc dimethyldithiocarbamate), subsequent detection of the zinc in complex structure of ziram by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) has been developed. The ziram content was calculated by using stoichiometric relationship between the zinc and ziram. Magnetic carboxylated nanodiamonds (MCNDs) as solid-phase extraction adsorbent was prepared and characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). These magnetic carboxylated nanodiamonds carrying the ziram could be easily separated from the aqueous solution by applying an external magnetic field; no filtration or centrifugation was necessary. Some important factors influencing the extraction efficiency of ziram such as pH of sample solution, amount of adsorbent, type and volume of eluent, extraction and desorption time and sample volume were studied and optimized. The total extraction and detection time was lower than 10min The preconcentration factor (PF), the precision (RSD, n=7), the limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 160, 7.0%, 5.3µgL(-1) and 17.5µgL(-1), respectively. The interference of various ions has been examined and the method has been applied for the determination of ziram in various waters, foodstuffs samples and synthetic mixtures.

  14. Transverse and vortex domain wall structure in magnetic nanowires with uniaxial in-plane anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, M T; Bance, S; Dean, J; Schrefl, T; Allwood, D A

    2012-01-18

    Micromagnetic and analytical models are used to investigate how in-plane uniaxial anisotropy affects transverse and vortex domain walls in nanowires where shape anisotropy dominates. The effect of the uniaxial anisotropy can be interpreted as a modification of the effective wire dimensions. When the anisotropy axis is aligned with the wire axis (θ(a) = 0), the wall width is narrower than when no anisotropy is present. Conversely, the wall width increases when the anisotropy axis is perpendicular to the wire axis (θ(a) = π/2). The anisotropy also affects the nanowire dimensions at which transverse walls become unstable. This phase boundary shifts to larger widths or thicknesses when θ(a) = 0, but smaller widths or thicknesses when θ(a) = π/2.

  15. Electrical measurement of magnetic-field-impeded polarity switching of a ferromagnetic vortex core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushruth, Manu; Fried, Jasper P.; Anane, Abdelmadjid; Xavier, Stephane; Deranlot, Cyril; Kostylev, Mikhail; Cros, Vincent; Metaxas, Peter J.

    2016-09-01

    Vortex core polarity switching in NiFe disks has been evidenced using an all-electrical magnetoresistive rectification scheme. Simulation and experiments yield a consistent rectified signal loss when driving core gyration at high powers. With increasing power, the frequency range over which the loss occurs grows and the resonance downshifts in frequency, consistent with nonlinear core dynamics and periodic core polarity switching induced by the core reaching its critical velocity. Core-polarity-dependent rectification signals enable an independent verification of the switched core polarity. We also demonstrate the ability to impede core polarity switching by displacing the core towards the disk's edge where an increased core stiffness reduces the core velocity.

  16. Vortex rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhmetov, D.G. [Lavrentiev Institute of Hydrodynamics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-01

    This book presents a comprehensive coverage of the wide field of vortex rings. The book presents the results of systematic experimental investigations, theoretical foundation, as well as the practical applications of vortex rings, such as the extinction of fires at gushing gas and oil wells. All the basic properties of vortex rings as well as their hydrodynamic structures are presented. Special attention is paid to the formation and motion of turbulent vortex rings. (orig.)

  17. Vulcanized Vortex

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Inyong

    2008-01-01

    We investigate vortex configurations with the "vulcanization" term introduced for renormalization of $\\phi_\\star^4$ theory in canonical $\\theta$-deformed noncommutativity. In the small-$\\theta$ limit, we perform numerical calculations and find that nontopological vortex solutions exist as well as Q-ball type solutions, but topological vortex solutions are not admitted.

  18. Magnetic nanoparticles in MgB2: Vortex pinning, pair breaking and connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić, Emil; Novosel, Nikolina; Pajić, Damir; Galić, Stipe; Zadro, Krešo; Drobac, Đuro

    2016-02-01

    The results indicating magnetic flux pinning in MgB2 wires doped with three types of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) are reported. The magnetic state of MNPs, both as-prepared and inside the MgB2 core, was determined with magnetization and ac susceptibility measurements. The competition between detrimental influence of doping (reduced connectivity, pair breaking) and enhanced flux pinning leads to deterioration of electromagnetic properties of doped wires at high MNP content, whereas light doping causes an enhancement of critical current density, Jc, and/or irreversibility field, Birr, for all our MNPs. For Ni and dextrin coated NiFe2O4 MNPs the enhancement of Jc was comparable to that achieved with the best nonmagnetic dopands. Detailed analysis indicates the contribution of magnetic flux pinning including the matching effects in flux pinning on MNPs.

  19. Stepwise behavior of vortex-lattice melting transition in tilted magnetic fields in single crystals of Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8 + delta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirković, J; Savel'ev, S E; Sugahara, E; Kadowaki, K

    2001-01-29

    The vortex-lattice melting transition in Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8 + delta) single crystals was studied using in-plane resistivity measurements in magnetic fields tilted away from the c axis to the ab plane. In order to avoid the surface barrier effect which hinders the melting transition in the conventional transport measurements, we used the Corbino geometry of electric contacts. The complete H(c) - H(ab) phase diagram of the melting transition in Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8 + delta) is obtained for the first time. The c-axis melting field component H(c)(melt) exhibits the novel, stepwise dependence on the in-plane magnetic fields H(ab) which is discussed on the basis of the crossing vortex-lattice structure. The peculiar resistance behavior observed near the ab plane suggests the change of phase transition character from first to second order.

  20. Controlling of magnetic vortex chirality and p olarity by spin-p olarized current%电流调控磁涡旋的极性和旋性∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙明娟; 刘要稳

    2015-01-01

    For a nanodisk, magnetic vortex characterized by a curling magnetization is an energetically stable state. The magnetization in the center of the magnetic vortex is directed upward or downward, namely, the vortex core polarity p=+1 or p=−1 refers to up or down, respectively. The curling direction of magnetization, namely, the vortex chirality, is either counter-clockwise or clockwise. Thus, different combinations of chirality and polarity in a vortex structure demonstrate four stable magnetic states, which can be used to design a multibit memory cell. Such a multibit memory application requires the independent controlling of both the vortex chirality and vortex polarity, which has received considerable attention recently. Switching the vortex polarity has been achieved by using either a magnetic field or a current. The vortex chirality can be controlled by introducing asymmetric geometry of nanodisks. In this article, by using micromagnetic simulations, we present an effective method to simultaneously control the vortex chirality and polarity in a spin valve structure, in which the fixed spin polarizer layer is magnetized in the film plane when the free layer has a magnetic vortex configuration. The free layer is designed into a ladder shape with the right part being thicker than the left part. Our simulations indicate that a combination of desirable vortex chirality and polarity can be easily controlled by a Gaussian current pulse with proper strength and pulse duration through the spin-transfer torque effect. The insight into physical mechanism of the controllable vortex is demonstrated by a series of snapshots. If the magnetic moment of the free layer is saturated in the direction of 0<θ<πduring the current pulse, whereθis the angle between the magnetization and +x axis, the vortex with the counter-clockwise chirality will be generated after the pulse. In contrast, if the free layer magnetization is saturated along the directionπ<θ<2π, after the pulse

  1. Vortex attraction and the formation of sunspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, E. N.

    1992-01-01

    A downdraft vortex ring in a stratified atmosphere exhibits universal attraction for nearby vertical magnetic flux bundles. It is speculated that the magnetic fields emerging through the surface of the sun are individually encircled by one or more subsurface vortex rings, providing an important part of the observed clustering of magnetic fibrils to form pores and sunspots.

  2. Vortex loops entry into type-II superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Samokhvalov, A V

    1996-01-01

    The magnetic field distribution, the magnetic flux, and the free energy of an Abrikosov vortex loop near a flat surface of type--II superconductors are calculated in the London approximation. The shape of such a vortex line is a semicircle of arbitrary radius. The interaction of the vortex half--ring and an external homogeneous magnetic field applied along the surface is studied. The magnitude of the energy barrier against the vortex expansion into superconductor is found. The possibilities of formation of an equilibrium vortex line determined by the structure of the applied magnetic field by creating the expanding vortex loops near the surface of type--II superconductor are discussed.

  3. Bifurcation analysis in a vortex flow generated by an oscillatory magnetic obstacle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltrán, A.; Ramos, E.; Cuevas, S.

    2010-01-01

    A numerical simulation and a theoretical model of the two-dimensional flow produced by the harmonic oscillation of a localized magnetic field (magnetic obstacle) in a quiescent viscous, electrically conducting fluid are presented. Nonuniform Lorentz forces produced by induced currents interacting...... model based on a local analysis that predicts most of the qualitative properties calculated numerically is proposed....... of rotation twice per cycle. The transformation of the flow field present in the first part of the cycle into the pattern displayed in the second half occurs via the generation of hyperbolic and elliptic critical points. The numerical solution of the flow indicates that for low frequencies (v.e. Re-omega = 1...

  4. Magnetic vortex dynamics in the non-circular potential of a thin ellipticferromagnetic nanodisk with applied fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Wysin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous vortex motion in thin ferromagnetic nanodisks of elliptical shape is dominated by a natural gyrotropic orbital part, whose resonance frequency $\\omega_G=\\overline{k}/G$ depends on a force constant and gyrovector charge, both of which change with the disk size and shape and applied in-plane or out-of-plane fields. The system is analyzed via a dynamic Thiele equation and also using numerical simulations of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG equations for thin systems, including temperature via stochastic fields in a Langevin equation for the spin dynamics. A vortex is found to move in an elliptical potential with two principal axis force constants $k_x$ and $k_y$, whose ratio determines the eccentricity of the vortex motion, and whose geometric mean $\\overline{k}=\\sqrt{k_x k_y}$ determines the frequency. The force constants can be estimated from the energy of quasi-static vortex configurations or from an analysis of the gyrotropic orbits. $k_x$ and $k_y$ get modified either by an applied field perpendicular to the plane or by an in-plane applied field that changes the vortex equilibrium location. Notably, an out-of-plane field also changes the vortex gyrovector $G$, which directly influences $\\omega_G$. The vortex position and velocity distributions in thermal equilibrium are found to be Boltzmann distributions in appropriate coordinates, characterized by the force constants.

  5. The effects of magnetic field and temperature quenches on non-equilibrium relaxation properties of vortex lines in type-II superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assi, Hiba; Dobramysl, Ulrich; Pleimling, Michel; Täuber, Uwe

    2014-03-01

    Technological applications of type-II superconductors require a deep understanding of the dynamics of vortex matter in these complex materials. We model vortices in the London limit as interacting elastic lines, and simulate their dynamics employing a Langevin molecular dynamics (LMD) algorithm. This LMD algorithm is utilized to investigate the non-equilibrium relaxation properties of interacting lines, subject to randomly-placed point or correlated columnar pinning sites, by studying various two-time correlation functions. We consider experimentally-motivated initial conditions by applying quenches in the system temperature or the magnetic field, which is realized by suddenly adding or removing vortex lines from the system. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Award DE-FG02-09ER46613.

  6. 港珠澳大桥隔震梁桥海流涡激力特性的数值模拟%A numerical simulation study on ocean current induced vortex-excitation property for Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Base Isolation Bridge in Abyssal Zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈洋洋; 谭平; 崔杰; 黎建峰; 周福霖

    2016-01-01

    采用隔震设计的近海长周期结构,有必要明确其下部结构在可能的海流极端作用下的涡激力周期、幅值等特性参数,以供整体结构动力分析参考。文章对港珠澳大桥隔震连续梁桥深水区典型单墩及其基础的三维绕流场进行数值模拟,考察了低桩承台方案在海床面位于承台顶(设计工况)、海床面位于承台底、海床冲刷演变至淤泥层全部消失的极端情形等3种典型工况下的绕流场特性,给出墩身受到的潜在涡激力的动力参数以供设计参考。%It is significant to verify the substructural vortex-excitation properties for the base isolated offshore long-period structure.A numerical simulation study on vortex-excitation property for the substructure of Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Base Isolation Bridge in Abyssal Zone is thus presented.The typical cases for the pile cap, which are submerged,emerged low-rise,and high-rise designs,are studied in details for the project.The vor-tex-excitation properties under different cases are summarized for project design reference.

  7. Current-induced nonlinear magnetoelectric effects in strontium hexaferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavislyak, I. V.; Popov, M. A.; Srinivasan, G.

    2016-12-01

    We report on the observation of nonlinear magnetoelectric effects at room temperature due to a dc current in the ferrimagnetic M -type strontium hexaferrite platelets. Utilizing microwave measurement techniques and data on the shift in magnetic mode frequencies, it was found that a dc current along the hexagonal c axis resulted in a significant decrease in the saturation magnetization and an increase in the uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy field. These changes in the magnetic order parameters were directly proportional to the square of applied electric field and were found to be much higher than variations due to Joule heating. A phenomenological theory that takes into account the current-induced magnetobielectric (MBE) effects is proposed. Expressions for coupling coefficients for MBE effects have been obtained and have been calculated from the variations in magnetic order parameters. The electric field E (or current) tuning of the magnetic modes in Sr M reported here is orders of magnitude stronger than strain mediated E tuning of magnetic resonance in hexaferrite-ferroelectric composites. The nonlinear magnetoelectric effects in hexaferrite, therefore, open up an avenue for the realization of E -tunable broadband microwave and millimeter wave ferrite signal processing devices such as resonators and filters.

  8. Current-induced torques and interfacial spin-orbit coupling

    KAUST Repository

    Haney, Paul M.

    2013-12-19

    In bilayer systems consisting of an ultrathin ferromagnetic layer adjacent to a metal with strong spin-orbit coupling, an applied in-plane current induces torques on the magnetization. The torques that arise from spin-orbit coupling are of particular interest. Here we use first-principles methods to calculate the current-induced torque in a Pt-Co bilayer to help determine the underlying mechanism. We focus exclusively on the analog to the Rashba torque, and do not consider the spin Hall effect. The details of the torque depend strongly on the layer thicknesses and the interface structure, providing an explanation for the wide variation in results found by different groups. The torque depends on the magnetization direction in a way similar to that found for a simple Rashba model. Artificially turning off the exchange spin splitting and separately the spin-orbit coupling potential in the Pt shows that the primary source of the “fieldlike” torque is a proximate spin-orbit effect on the Co layer induced by the strong spin-orbit coupling in the Pt.

  9. Current-induced domain wall motion in ferromagnetic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Hideo

    2007-03-01

    Low magnetization (˜0.05 T) and high spin-polarization in ferromagnetism of transition metal-doped GaAs allow us to explore a number of spin-dependent phenomena not readily accessible in metal ferromagnets. Spin-polarized current induced domain wall (DW) motion in (Ga,Mn)As [1, 2] reveals rich physics resulting from the interaction between spin-polarized electrons and localized spins inside a magnetic DW. By using a 30 nm thick (Ga,Mn)As layer (xMn = 0.045) with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, we have measured by magneto-optical Kerr microscopy a wide range of velocity-current density curves in the sample temperature range of 97 -- 107 K. Two regimes are found in the current density dependence of the DW velocity. At high-current densities (> 2 x 10^5 A/cm^2), the domain wall velocity is approximately a linear function of the current density above a threshold current density. This result will be compared to the recent theories of DW motion. At low-current densities, the functional form of the velocity-current curves follow an empirical scaling law, obtained by modifying the one for magnetic-field induced creep. This shows that current-induced DW creep is present. We have also determined the intrinsic resistance of the DW in a similar configuration [3]. *M. Yamanouchi, D. Chiba, F. Matsukura, and H. Ohno, Nature 428, 539 (2004). *M. Yamanouchi, D. Chiba, F. Matsukura, T. Dietl and H. Ohno, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 096601 (2006). *D. Chiba, M. Yamanouchi, F. Matsukura, T. Dietl, and H. Ohno, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 096602 (2006).

  10. Zero-energy states bound to a magnetic {pi}-flux vortex in a two-dimensional topological insulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesaros, Andrej, E-mail: andrej.mesaros@bc.edu [Department of Physics, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States); Instituut-Lorentz for Theoretical Physics, Universiteit Leiden, P.O. Box 9506, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Slager, Robert-Jan; Zaanen, Jan; Juricic, Vladimir [Instituut-Lorentz for Theoretical Physics, Universiteit Leiden, P.O. Box 9506, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2013-02-21

    We show that the existence of a pair of zero-energy modes bound to a vortex carrying a {pi}-flux is a generic feature of the topologically non-trivial phase of the M-B model, which was introduced to describe the topological band insulator in HgTe quantum wells. We explicitly find the form of the zero-energy states of the corresponding Dirac equation, which contains a novel momentum-dependent mass term and describes a generic topological transition in a band insulator. The obtained modes are exponentially localized in the vortex-core, with the dependence of characteristic length on the parameters of the model matching the dependence extracted from a lattice version of the model. We consider in full generality the short-distance regularization of the vector potential of the vortex, and show that a particular choice yields the modes localized and simultaneously regular at the origin. Finally, we also discuss a realization of two-dimensional spin-charge separation through the vortex zero-modes.

  11. Self-consistent Bogoliubov-de Gennes theory of the vortex lattice state in a two-dimensional strongly type-II superconductor at high magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravlev, Vladimir; Duan, Wenye; Maniv, Tsofar

    2017-01-01

    A self-consistent Bogoliubov-de Gennes theory of the vortex lattice state in a 2D strong type-II superconductor at high magnetic fields reveals a novel quantum mixed state around the semiclassical Hc 2, characterized by a well-defined Landau-Bloch band structure in the quasiparticle spectrum and suppressed order-parameter amplitude, which sharply crossover into the well-known semiclassical (Helfand-Werthamer) results upon decreasing magnetic field. Application to the 2D superconducting state observed recently on the surface of the topological insulator Sb2Te3 accounts well for the experimental data, revealing a strong type-II superconductor, with unusually low carrier density and very small cyclotron mass, which can be realized only in the strong coupling superconductor limit.

  12. Vortex dynamics in ferromagnetic/superconducting bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cieplak, M.Z.; Adamus, Z. [Polish Acad Sci, Inst Phys, PL-02668 Warsaw, (Poland); Konczykowski, M. [CEA, DSM, DRECAM, Lab Solides Irradies, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS-UMR 7642, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Zhu, L.Y.; Chien, C.L. [Johns Hopkins Univ, Dept Phys and Astron, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The dependence of vortex dynamics on the geometry of magnetic domain pattern is studied in the superconducting/ferromagnetic bilayers, in which niobium is a superconductor, and Co/Pt multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy serves as a ferromagnetic layer. Magnetic domain patterns with different density of domains per surface area and different domain size, w, are obtained for Co/Pt with different thickness of Pt. The dense patterns of domains with the size comparable to the magnetic penetration depth (w {>=} {lambda}) produce large vortex pinning and smooth vortex penetration, while less dense patterns with larger domains (w {>=}{>=} {lambda}) enhance pinning less effectively and result in flux jumps during flux motion. (authors)

  13. Controlling vortex motion and vortex kinetic friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, Franco; Savel'ev, Sergey

    2006-05-01

    We summarize some recent results of vortex motion control and vortex kinetic friction. (1) We describe a device [J.E. Villegas, S. Savel'ev, F. Nori, E.M. Gonzalez, J.V. Anguita, R. Garcìa, J.L. Vicent, Science 302 (2003) 1188] that can easily control the motion of flux quanta in a Niobium superconducting film on an array of nanoscale triangular magnets. Even though the input ac current has zero average, the resulting net motion of the vortices can be directed along either one direction, the opposite direction, or producing zero net motion. We also consider layered strongly anisotropic superconductors, with no fixed spatial asymmetry, and show [S. Savel'ev, F. Nori, Nature Materials 1 (2002) 179] how, with asymmetric drives, the ac motion of Josephson and/or pancake vortices can provide a net dc vortex current. (2) In analogy with the standard macroscopic friction, we present [A. Maeda, Y. Inoue, H. Kitano, S. Savel'ev, S. Okayasu, I. Tsukada, F. Nori , Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 (2005) 077001] a comparative study of the friction force felt by vortices in superconductors and charge density waves.

  14. Spin Hall effect-driven spin torque in magnetic textures

    KAUST Repository

    Manchon, Aurelien

    2011-07-13

    Current-induced spin torque and magnetization dynamics in the presence of spin Hall effect in magnetic textures is studied theoretically. The local deviation of the charge current gives rise to a current-induced spin torque of the form (1 - ΒM) × [(u 0 + αH u 0 M) ∇] M, where u0 is the direction of the injected current, H is the Hall angle and is the non-adiabaticity parameter due to spin relaxation. Since αH and ×can have a comparable order of magnitude, we show that this torque can significantly modify the current-induced dynamics of both transverse and vortex walls. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Vortex methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chorin, A.J. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Mathematics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-06-01

    Vortex methods originated from the observation that in incompressible inviscid flow vorticity (or, more accurately, circulation) is a conserved quantity, as can be readily deduced from the absence of tangential stresses. Thus, if the vorticity is known at time t=0, one can find the flow at a later time by simply following the vorticity. In this narrow context, a vortex method is a numerical method that follows vorticity. The author restricts himself in these lectures to a special class of numerical vortex methods, those that are based on a Lagrangian transport of vorticity in hydrodynamics by smoothed particles (blobs) and those whose analysis contributes to the understanding of blob methods. Blob methods started in the 1930`s.

  16. Second magnetization peak effect, vortex dynamics, and flux pinning in 112-type superconductor Ca0.8La0.2Fe1−xCoxAs2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Xing, Xiangzhuo; Wu, Wenjuan; Zhao, Haijun; Shi, Zhixiang

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of vortex pinning and its relaxation is of great importance for both basic physics and technological applications in the field of superconductivity. We report a great improvement of superconducting properties in the recently discovered 112-type superconductors (Ca, La)FeAs2 through Co co-doping. High critical current density Js(5 K) > 2*106 A/cm2 is obtained and pronounced second peak effect is observed in magnetization hysteresis loops. Both the dynamic and static relaxation studies result in comparable and sizable relaxation rates S or Q, indicating a fast vortex creep. The second magnetization peak (SMP) is found to be strongly associated with a crossover from elastic to plastic vortex creep. Above the crossover, plastic vortex creep governs the vortex dynamics in a wide range of temperatures and fields. A good scaling behavior of the normalized pinning force density fp by formula fp = hp(1−h)q (p = 1.44, q = 1.66, h = 0.44) is revealed, which demonstrates an important contribution from core normal point-like pinning sites. To better understand the SMP phenomenon, we discuss the related physical scenario as well as the affecting factors in the SMP occurrence. PMID:26947572

  17. Solitary vortexes in magnetohydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vainshtein, S.I.

    1985-12-01

    Stationary configurations in magnetohydrodynamics are investigated for the following two particular cases: (1) there is no motion, which corresponds to a state of magnetostatic equilibrium; and (2) the magnetic field intensity becomes zero, i.e., hydrodynamic vortexes are involved. It is shown that in certain cases the line-of-force topology must be sufficiently simple in order before a stationary or equilibrium state can be achieved. It is also shown that in the two-dimensional case, the magnetic surfaces of an equilibrium configuration represent coaxial cylindrical surfaces. 12 references.

  18. Vortex state in ferromagnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betto, Davide; Coey, J. M. D.

    2014-05-01

    The evolution of the magnetic state of a soft ferromagnetic nanoparticle with its size is usually thought to be from superparamagnetic single domain to blocked single domain to a blocked multidomain structure. Néel pointed out that a vortex configuration produces practically no stray field at the cost of an increase in the exchange energy, of the order of RJS2lnR /c, where JS2 is the bond energy, R is the particle radius, and c is of the order of the exchange length. A vortex structure is energetically cheaper than single domain when the radius is greater than a certain value. The correct sequence should include a vortex configuration between the single domain and the multidomain states. The critical size is calculated for spherical particles of four important materials (nickel, magnetite, permalloy, and iron) both numerically and analytically. A vortex state is favored in materials with high magnetisation.

  19. Particle-vortex symmetric liquid

    CERN Document Server

    Mulligan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We introduce an effective theory with manifest particle-vortex symmetry for disordered thin films undergoing a magnetic field-tuned superconductor-insulator transition. The theory may enable one to access both the critical properties of the strong-disorder limit, which has recently been confirmed [Breznay et al., PNAS 113, 280 (2016)] to exhibit particle-vortex symmetric electrical response, and the metallic phase discovered earlier [Mason and Kapitulnik, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 5341 (1999)] in less disordered samples. Within the effective theory, the Cooper-pair and field-induced vortex degrees of freedom are simultaneously incorporated into an electrically-neutral Dirac fermion minimally coupled to an (emergent) Chern-Simons gauge field. A derivation of the theory follows upon mapping the superconductor-insulator transition to the integer quantum Hall plateau transition and the subsequent use of Son's particle-hole symmetric composite Fermi liquid. Remarkably, particle-vortex symmetric response does not requir...

  20. Spin Seebeck measurements of current-induced switching in YIG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartell, Jason; Jermain, Colin; Aradhya, Sriharsha; Wang, Hailong; Buhrman, Robert; Yang, Fengyuan; Ralph, Daniel; Fuchs, Gregory

    Quantifying spin torques generated at the interface between a normal metal (NM) and a ferromagnetic insulator (FI) is an important step in understanding the spin hall effect without charge transport. Measuring magnetization in NM/FI devices is challenging, however, because both magnetoresistive and magneto-optical signals are tiny in thin-film bilayers. We show that a promising alternative measurement approach is the use of picosecond thermal gradients to study spin torques in Pt/Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) bilayers. Recently, we demonstrated the application of heat to stroboscopically transduce a local magnetic moment into an electrical signal via the time resolved anomalous Nernst effect (TRANE) in ferromagnetic metals. Using a similar geometry the spin Seebeck effect of YIG combined with the inverse spin Hall effect of Pt enables measurement of local magnetization. Here we describe our study using this technique to study current-induced switching in Pt/YIG with sub-10 nm thick YIG films We acknowledge support from AFOSR.

  1. Magnetic-field-induced stripe order and a 2D vortex glass phase in La1.905 Ba 0.095 CuO 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquada, John; Wen, Jinsheng; Jie, Qing; Han, Su Jung; Li, Qiang; Huecker, Markus; Xu, Zhijun; Zhang, Liyuan; Gu, Genda; Zimmermann, M. V.; Singh, D. K.

    2011-03-01

    We have measured the resistivity parallel and perpendicular to the Cu O2 planes in La 1.905 Ba 0.095 Cu O4 (Tc = 32 K) as a function of perpendicular magnetic field. We have discovered a significant regime of field and temperature where the perpendicular resistivity is finite (and large) but the parallel resistivity is zero. This regime appears to correspond to a quasi-two-dimensional vortex glass phase, a state that theory predicts cannot exist at finite temperature. It seems to be stabilized by field-induced charge and spin stripe order, which we have detected with x-ray and neutron diffraction, respectively. Supported by Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US DOE, under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  2. Vortex dynamics in a thin superconducting film with a non-uniform magnetic field applied at its center with a small coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemberger, Thomas R.; Loh, Yen Lee

    2016-10-01

    This paper models the dynamics of vortices that are generated in the middle of a thin, large-area, superconducting film by a low-frequency magnetic field from a small coil, motivated by a desire to better understand measurements of the superconducting coherence length made with a two-coil apparatus. When the applied field exceeds a critical value, vortices and antivortices originate near the middle of the film at the radius where the Lorentz force of the screening supercurrent is largest. The Lorentz force from the screening supercurrent pushes vortices toward the center of the film and antivortices outward. In an experiment, vortices are detected as an increase in mutual inductance between the drive coil and a coaxial "pickup" coil on the opposite side of the film. The model shows that the essential features of measurements are well described when vortex pinning and the attendant hysteresis are included.

  3. Temperature dependence of carrier spin polarization determined from current-induced domain wall motion in a Co/Ni nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, K.; Koyama, T.; Hiramatsu, R.; Kobayashi, K.; Ono, T. [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Chiba, D. [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho Kawaguchi, Saitama 322-0012 (Japan); Fukami, S. [Green Innovation Research Laboratories, NEC Corporation, 34 Miyukigaoka, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8501 (Japan); Center for Spintronics Integrated Systems, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Tanigawa, H.; Suzuki, T. [RENESAS Electronics Corporation, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5298 (Japan); Ohshima, N. [NEC Energy Device Ltd., 1120 Shimokuzawa, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5298 (Japan); Ishiwata, N. [Green Innovation Research Laboratories, NEC Corporation, 34 Miyukigaoka, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8501 (Japan); Nakatani, Y. [University of Electro-communications, Chofu, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan)

    2012-05-14

    We have investigated the temperature dependence of the current-induced magnetic domain wall (DW) motion in a perpendicularly magnetized Co/Ni nanowire at various temperatures and with various applied currents. The carrier spin polarization was estimated from the measured domain wall velocity. We found that it decreased more with increasing temperature from 100 K to 530 K than the saturation magnetization did.

  4. Vortex Pinning and Slow Creep in High-Jc MgB2 Thin Films: A Magnetic and Transport Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, James R [ORNL; Sorge, K. D. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Cantoni, Claudia [ORNL; Kerchner, H R [ORNL; Christen, David K [ORNL; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the pinning of vortices in high-J{sub c} films of polycrystalline MgB{sub 2}, by studying the dependence of current density J on electric field E using both magnetic and transport methods. Precursor films of amorphous boron, deposited on sapphire substrates, were converted to 0.6 {mu}m thick MgB{sub 2} by post-annealing in the presence of Mg vapour at 890 {sup o}C for 1 h. In magnetic studies, a SQUID magnetometer was used conventionally to determine the induced current density by the Bean model. The decay of J with time t was determined unconventionally with the sample fixed in position, by monitoring the SQUID feedback voltage {proportional_to} J versus time. The logarithmic decay rate S = -d ln(J)/d ln(t) was found to be very low in the H-T phase space away from the irreversibility line. Complementary four-probe transport studies of E(J) were analysed as a power law dependence of the form E {proportional_to} J{sup {pi}} and used to obtain the corresponding creep rate S = 1/(n-1). Effective values for n approach and often significantly exceed 100. From these results, we estimate the effective energy U{sub 0} for vortex pinning, as a function of magnetizing field H.

  5. Vortex pinning and slow creep in high-J{sub c}?MgB{sub 2} thin films: a magnetic and transport study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, J R [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6061 (United States); Sorge, K D [Department of Physics, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Cantoni, C [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6061 (United States); Kerchner, H R [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6061 (United States); Christen, D K [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6061 (United States); Paranthaman, M [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6061 (United States)

    2005-07-01

    We have investigated the pinning of vortices in high-J{sub c} films of polycrystalline MgB{sub 2}, by studying the dependence of current density J on electric field E using both magnetic and transport methods. Precursor films of amorphous boron, deposited on sapphire substrates, were converted to 0.6 {mu}m thick MgB{sub 2} by post-annealing in the presence of Mg vapour at 890 deg. C for 1 h. In magnetic studies, a SQUID magnetometer was used conventionally to determine the induced current density by the Bean model. The decay of J with time t was determined unconventionally with the sample fixed in position, by monitoring the SQUID feedback voltage {proportional_to} J versus time. The logarithmic decay rate S = -d ln(J)/d ln(t) was found to be very low in the H-T phase space away from the irreversibility line. Complementary four-probe transport studies of E(J) were analysed as a power law dependence of the form E {proportional_to} J{sup {pi}} and used to obtain the corresponding creep rate S = 1/(n-1). Effective values for n approach and often significantly exceed 100. From these results, we estimate the effective energy U{sub 0} for vortex pinning, as a function of magnetizing field H.

  6. Brownian vortexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Lin, Jiayi; Darby, Ellis; Grosberg, Alexander Y.; Grier, David G.

    2009-07-01

    Mechanical equilibrium at zero temperature does not necessarily imply thermodynamic equilibrium at finite temperature for a particle confined by a static but nonconservative force field. Instead, the diffusing particle can enter into a steady state characterized by toroidal circulation in the probability flux, which we call a Brownian vortex. The circulatory bias in the particle’s thermally driven trajectory is not simply a deterministic response to the solenoidal component of the force but rather reflects interplay between advection and diffusion in which thermal fluctuations extract work from the nonconservative force field. As an example of this previously unrecognized class of stochastic heat engines, we consider a colloidal sphere diffusing in a conventional optical tweezer. We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that nonconservative optical forces bias the particle’s fluctuations into toroidal vortexes whose circulation can reverse direction with temperature or laser power.

  7. The Role of Magnetic Vortex Formation in Chains of Spherical FeNi Nanoparticles: A Micromagnetics Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barpandal, Prabeer; Scheinfein, Michael R.; Kasama, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic remanent states and magnetization reversal mechanisms in linear chains of three closely-spaced Fe1-xNix nanoparticles are studied using micromagnetic simulations, for particle sizes of between 10 and 150 nm. The role of the formation and switching of magnetic vortices in the particles...

  8. Vortex transmutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Albert; Zacarés, Mario; García-March, Miguel-Angel; Monsoriu, Juan A; de Córdoba, Pedro Fernández

    2005-09-16

    Using group theory arguments and numerical simulations, we demonstrate the possibility of changing the vorticity or topological charge of an individual vortex by means of the action of a system possessing a discrete rotational symmetry of finite order. We establish on theoretical grounds a "transmutation pass" determining the conditions for this phenomenon to occur and numerically analyze it in the context of two-dimensional optical lattices. An analogous approach is applicable to the problems of Bose-Einstein condensates in periodic potentials.

  9. Possible magnetism in vortex cores of superconducting TmNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C studied by small angle neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrahamsen, Asger Bech

    2003-11-01

    The compound TmNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C has previously been studied by Small Angle Neutron Scattering(SANS) with the applied field along the crystalline c-axis and a very rich phase diagram in terms of flux line lattices(FLL) with different symmetries have been observed. One of the FLL transitions is coincident with a magnetic phase transition between two spin density waves. In this thesis additional SANS studies of the FLL phases in TmNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C are reported and an interpretation of the phase diagram in the paramagnetic region is presented. It is suggested that the square FLL observed is stable in between two transition lines determined by two different length scales. The lower transition field is reached when the distance between the flux lines becomes comparable to the non-locality radius resulting from non-local electrodynamics, whereas the upper transition field is determined from the crossover from intermediate to high flux line density where the vortex cores start to overlap and the superconducting order parameter is suppressed in between the flux lines. A detailed examination of the intensity of the neutron diffraction spots caused by scattering on the flux line lattice in TmNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C is presented and analyzed on the basis of the form factor of an isolated flux line. This analysis can not provide a good explanation for the observed scattering and it is suggested that the scattering from the Tm ions must be considered. One can argue that the moments of the Tm ions are modulated by the flux line lattice, because the Ruderman-Kittel- Kasuya-Yosida(RKKY) interaction between the Tm ions might be different inside the vortex cores than outside in the superconducting phase. A calculation of the neutron scattering cross section of such a magnetic flux line lattice has been performed and compared to the SANS data. This offers a qualitative explanation of some of the observations, but future work is needed to perform a more quantitative comparison. (au)

  10. Phase diagrams of vortex matter with multi-scale inter-vortex interactions in layered superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingyou; Varney, Christopher N.; Fangohr, Hans; Babaev, Egor

    2017-01-01

    It was recently proposed to use the stray magnetic fields of superconducting vortex lattices to trap ultracold atoms for building quantum emulators. This calls for new methods for engineering and manipulating of the vortex states. One of the possible routes utilizes type-1.5 superconducting layered systems with multi-scale inter-vortex interactions. In order to explore the possible vortex states that can be engineered, we present two phase diagrams of phenomenological vortex matter models with multi-scale inter-vortex interactions featuring several attractive and repulsive length scales. The phase diagrams exhibit a plethora of phases, including conventional 2D lattice phases, five stripe phases, dimer, trimer, and tetramer phases, void phases, and stable low-temperature disordered phases. The transitions between these states can be controlled by the value of an applied external field.

  11. Melting of heterogeneous vortex matter: The vortex `nanoliquid'

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S S Banerjee; S Goldberg; Y Myasoedov; M Rappaport; E Zeldov; A Soibel; F de la Cruz; C J van der Beek; M Konczykowski; T Tamegai; V Vinokur

    2006-01-01

    Disorder and porosity are parameters that strongly influence the physical behavior of materials, including their mechanical, electrical, magnetic and optical properties. Vortices in superconductors can provide important insight into the effects of disorder because their size is comparable to characteristic sizes of nanofabricated structures. Here we present experimental evidence for a novel form of vortex matter that consists of inter-connected nanodroplets of vortex liquid caged in the pores of a solid vortex structure, like a liquid permeated into a nanoporous solid skeleton. Our nanoporous skeleton is formed by vortices pinned by correlated disorder created by high-energy heavy ion irradiation. By sweeping the applied magnetic field, the number of vortices in the nanodroplets is varied continuously from a few to several hundred. Upon cooling, the caged nanodroplets freeze into ordered nanocrystals through either a first-order or a continuous transition, whereas at high temperatures a uniform liquid phase is formed upon delocalization-induced melt- ing of the solid skeleton. This new vortex nanoliquid displays unique properties and symmetries that are distinct from both solid and liquid phases.

  12. CFD-DEM Simulations of Current-Induced Dune Formation and Morphological Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the fundamental mechanisms of sediment transport, particularly those during the formation and evolution of bedforms, is of critical scientific importance and has engineering relevance. Traditional approaches of sediment transport simulations heavily rely on empirical models, which are not able to capture the physics-rich, regime-dependent behaviors of the process. With the increase of available computational resources in the past decade, CFD-DEM (computational fluid dynamics-discrete element method) has emerged as a viable high-fidelity method for the study of sediment transport. However, a comprehensive, quantitative study of the generation and migration of different sediment bed patterns using CFD-DEM is still lacking. In this work, current-induced sediment transport problems in a wide range of regimes are simulated, including 'flat bed in motion', `small dune', `vortex dune' and suspended transport. Simulations are performed by using SediFoam, an open-source, massively parallel CFD-DEM solver...

  13. Odd-parity currents induced by dynamic deformations in graphene-like systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Erhu; Chen, Huawei; Zhang, Shengli

    2016-11-01

    Reduced (3  +  1)-dimensional Dirac systems with inter-pseudo-spin and inter-valley scattering are employed to investigate current responses to (chiral) gauge fields in graphene-like systems. From (chiral) current—(chiral) current correlation functions, we derive the current responses. Except for electric currents induced by external gauge fields, we find the inter-valley scattering can break the topological nature of odd-parity currents. Given the proper conditions, this property can help us realize valley-polarized electric currents. Through the dynamic deformations generating the chiral gauge fields, we find the vortex-like currents while their profiles can be tuned by superposition of some deformations. In particular, we find a more manageable approach to realize the topological electric current by choosing a linear dynamic deformation.

  14. Coupled Dzyaloshinskii walls and their current-induced dynamics by the spin Hall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez, Eduardo, E-mail: edumartinez@usal.es [Dpto. de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca, Plaza de los Caídos s/n, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain); Alejos, Óscar [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electrónica, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo de Belén, 7, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2014-07-14

    The nucleation of domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic/heavy-metal bilayers is studied by means of micromagnetic simulations. In the presence of interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, the nucleated walls naturally adopt a homochiral configuration with internal magnetization pointing antiparallely. The interaction between these walls was analyzed and described in terms of a classical dipolar force between the magnetic moments of the walls, which couples their dynamics. Additionally, the current-induced motion of two homochiral walls in the presence of longitudinal fields was also studied by means of a simple one-dimensional model and micromagnetic modeling, considering both one free-defect strip and another one with random edge roughness. It is evidenced that in the presence of pinning due to edge roughness, the in-plane longitudinal field introduces an asymmetry in the current-induced depinning, in agreement with recent experimental results.

  15. Gyrotropic elastic response of skyrmion crystals to current-induced tensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Hector; Kim, Se Kwon; Tchernyshyov, Oleg; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2017-07-01

    We theoretically study the dynamics of skyrmion crystals in electrically insulating chiral magnets subjected to current-induced spin torques by adjacent metallic layers. We develop an elasticity theory that accounts for the gyrotropic force engendered by the nontrivial topology of the spin texture, tensions at the boundaries due to the exchange of linear and spin angular momentum with the metallic reservoirs, and dissipation in the bulk of the film. A steady translation of the skyrmion crystal is triggered by the current-induced tensions and subsequently sustained by dissipative forces, generating an electromotive force on itinerant spins in the metals. This phenomenon should be revealed as a negative drag in an open two-terminal geometry, or equivalently, as a positive magnetoresistance when the terminals are connected in parallel. We propose nonlocal transport measurements with these salient features as a tool to characterize the phase diagram of insulating chiral magnets.

  16. Magnetic-field-induced nonlocal effects on the vortex interactions in twin-free YBa2Cu3O7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    White, J. S.; Heslop, R. W.; Holmes, A. T.

    2011-01-01

    measurements demonstrate how the influence of anisotropy on the VL, which in theory can be parameterized as nonlocal corrections, becomes progressively important with increasing magnetic field, and suppressed by increasing the temperature toward Tc. The data indicate that nonlocality due to different...

  17. Spin-orbit current-induced torques in (Ga,Mn)As

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vehstedt, Erin K.; Zarbo, Liviu P.; Vyborny, Karel; Kurebayashi, Hidekazu; Roy, Pierre; Wunderlich, Joerg; Ferguson, Andrew J.; Jungwirth, Tomas; Sinova, Jairo

    2013-03-01

    Electrical control of magnetic domains has the potential to overcome key challenges to the development of new non-volatile and down-scalable logic and memory devices. We study the spin-orbit torque induced by an unpolarized electric current in the dilute ferromagnetic semiconductor, (Ga,Mn)As. The current-induced torque (CIT) is modeled as the interaction between the uniform magnetization and an effective magnetic field representing the non-equilibrium carrier spin-polarization. We calculate the current-induced field (CIF) using the Kubo linear-response formalism for a broad range of material parameters. We find that the CIF is composed of a dominant term due to the inverse spin galvanic effect and a small component which is dependent on the relative orientation of the current, magnetization, and crystal axes. In conjunction with experimental studies, we investigate the magnetization dynamics using the phenomenological Landau-Lifschitz-Gilbert equation. The study of (Ga,Mn)As opens the door to a comprehensive theory of CITs in uniform magnetic semiconductors.

  18. Vortex disruption by magnetohydrodynamic feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Mak, Julian; Hughes, D W

    2016-01-01

    In an electrically conducting fluid, vortices stretch out a weak, large-scale magnetic field to form strong current sheets on their edges. Associated with these current sheets are magnetic stresses, which are subsequently released through reconnection, leading to vortex disruption, and possibly even destruction. This disruption phenomenon is investigated here in the context of two-dimensional, homogeneous, incompressible magnetohydrodynamics. We derive a simple order of magnitude estimate for the magnetic stresses --- and thus the degree of disruption --- that depends on the strength of the background magnetic field (measured by the parameter $M$, a ratio between the Alfv\\'en speed and a typical flow speed) and on the magnetic diffusivity (measured by the magnetic Reynolds number $\\mbox{Rm}$). The resulting estimate suggests that significant disruption occurs when $M^{2}\\mbox{Rm} = O(1)$. To test our prediction, we analyse direct numerical simulations of vortices generated by the breakup of unstable shear flo...

  19. Persistence of Metastable Vortex Lattice Domains in MgB2 in the Presence of Vortex Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastovski, Catherine [University of Notre Dame, IN; Schlesinger, Kimberly [University of Notre Dame, IN; Gannon, William J [Northwestern University, Evanston; Dewhurst, Charles [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL); Debeer-Schmitt, Lisa M [ORNL; Zhigadlo, Nikolai [ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Karpinski, Janusz [ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Eskildsen, Morten [University of Notre Dame, IN

    2013-01-01

    Recently, extensive vortex lattice metastability was reported in MgB2 in connection with a second-order rotational phase transition. However, the mechanism responsible for these well-ordered metastable vortex lattice phases is not well understood. Using small-angle neutron scattering, we studied the vortex lattice in MgB2 as it was driven from a metastable to the ground state through a series of small changes in the applied magnetic field. Our results show that metastable vortex lattice domains persist in the presence of substantial vortex motion and directly demonstrate that the metastability is not due to vortex pinning. Instead, we propose that it is due to the jamming of counterrotated vortex lattice domains which prevents a rotation to the ground state orientation.

  20. Persistence of metastable vortex lattice domains in MgB2 in the presence of vortex motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastovski, C; Schlesinger, K J; Gannon, W J; Dewhurst, C D; DeBeer-Schmitt, L; Zhigadlo, N D; Karpinski, J; Eskildsen, M R

    2013-09-01

    Recently, extensive vortex lattice metastability was reported in MgB2 in connection with a second-order rotational phase transition. However, the mechanism responsible for these well-ordered metastable vortex lattice phases is not well understood. Using small-angle neutron scattering, we studied the vortex lattice in MgB2 as it was driven from a metastable to the ground state through a series of small changes in the applied magnetic field. Our results show that metastable vortex lattice domains persist in the presence of substantial vortex motion and directly demonstrate that the metastability is not due to vortex pinning. Instead, we propose that it is due to the jamming of counterrotated vortex lattice domains which prevents a rotation to the ground state orientation.

  1. Ultrafast vortex core dynamics investigated by finite-element micromagnetic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gliga, Sebastian

    2010-07-01

    The investigations carried out in this thesis concern the ultrafast dynamics of a fundamental micromagnetic configuration: the vortex. Over the past decade, a detailed understanding of the dynamic and static properties of such magnetic nanostructures has been achieved as a result of close interplay between experiments, theory and numeric simulations. Here, micromagnetic simulations were performed based on the finite-element method. The vortex structure arises in laterally-confined ferromagnets, in particular in thin-film elements, and is characterized by an in-plane curling of the magnetic moments around a very stable and narrow core. In the present study, a novel process in micromagnetism was found: the ultrafast reversal of the vortex core. The possibility of easily switching the core orientation by means of short in-plane field pulses is surprising in view of the very high stability of the core. Moreover, the simulations presented here showed that this reversal process unfolds on a time scale of only a few tens of picoseconds, which leads to the prediction of the fastest and most complex micromagnetic reversal process known to date. Indeed, the vortex core is not merely switched: it is destroyed and recreated in the immediate vicinity with an opposite direction. This is mediated by a rapid sequence of vortex-antivortex pair creation and annihilation subprocesses and results in a sudden burst-like emission of spin waves. Equally fascinating is the ultrafast dynamics of an isolated magnetic antivortex, the topological counterpart of the vortex. The simulations performed here showed that the static complementarity between vortices and antivortices is equally reflected in their ultrafast dynamics, which leads to the reversal of the antivortex core. A promising means for the control of the magnetization on the nanoscale consists in exploiting the spin-transfer torque effect. The study of the current-induced dynamics of vortices showed that the core reversal can be

  2. Total Eddy Currents Induced in Screens of a Symmetrical Three-Phase Single-Pole Gas-Insulated Transmission Line (GIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zygmunt Piatek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper we discuss the question of eddy currents induced in screens of a symmetrical three-phase singlepole gas-insulated transmission line (GIL. First, we determine the eddy currents induced in the tubular screen by the magnetic field of self-current of the phase conductor. Then the magnetic field in the external parallel phase conductor is presented by means of a vector magnetic potential as Fourrier series. In the non-conducting external and internal area of the screen we use Laplace equation for the magnetic field strength taking into account the reverse reaction of eddy currents induced in the screen. In the conducting screen we apply Helmholtz equation for eddy currents density. Using classical boundary conditions we determine the density of the currents. The solutions obtained are used to determine the total eddy currents induced in all the screens of the GIL under consideration.

  3. Fractional vortex Hilbert's Hotel

    CERN Document Server

    Gbur, Greg

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate how the unusual mathematics of transfinite numbers, in particular a nearly perfect realization of Hilbert's famous hotel paradox, manifests in the propagation of light through fractional vortex plates. It is shown how a fractional vortex plate can be used, in principle, to create any number of "open rooms," i.e. topological charges, simultaneously. Fractional vortex plates are therefore demonstrated to create a singularity of topological charge, in which the vortex state is completely undefined and in fact arbitrary.

  4. Particle-vortex symmetric liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We introduce an effective theory with manifest particle-vortex symmetry for disordered thin films undergoing a magnetic field-tuned superconductor-insulator transition. The theory may enable one to access both the critical properties of the strong-disorder limit, which has recently been confirmed by Breznay et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 113, 280 (2016), 10.1073/pnas.1522435113] to exhibit particle-vortex symmetric electrical response, and the nearby metallic phase discovered earlier by Mason and Kapitulnik [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 5341 (1999), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.82.5341] in less disordered samples. Within the effective theory, the Cooper-pair and field-induced vortex degrees of freedom are simultaneously incorporated into an electrically neutral Dirac fermion minimally coupled to a (emergent) Chern-Simons gauge field. A derivation of the theory follows upon mapping the superconductor-insulator transition to the integer quantum Hall plateau transition and the subsequent use of Son's particle-hole symmetric composite Fermi liquid. Remarkably, particle-vortex symmetric response does not require the introduction of disorder; rather, it results when the Dirac fermions exhibit vanishing Hall effect. The theory predicts approximately equal (diagonal) thermopower and Nernst signal with a deviation parameterized by the measured electrical Hall response at the symmetric point.

  5. Sadovskii vortex in strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freilich, Daniel; Llewellyn Smith, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    A Sadovskii vortex is a patch of fluid with uniform vorticity surrounded by a vortex sheet. Using a boundary element type method, we investigate the steady states of this flow in an incompressible, inviscid straining flow. Outside the vortex, the fluid is irrotational. In the limiting case where the entire circulation is due to the vortex patch, this is a patch vortex (Moore & Saffman, Aircraft wake turbulence and its detection 1971). In the other limiting case, where all the circulation is due to the vortex sheet, this is a hollow vortex (Llewellyn Smith and Crowdy, J. Fluid Mech. 691, 2012). This flow has two governing nondimensional parameters, relating the strengths of the straining field, vortex sheet, and patch vorticity. We study the relationship between these two parameters, and examine the shape of the resulting vortices. We also work towards a bifurcation diagram of the steady states of the Sadovskii vortex in an attempt to understand the connection between vortex sheet and vortex patch desingularizations of the point vortex. Support from NSF-CMMI-0970113.

  6. Current-induced dynamics in carbon atomic contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jing Tao; Gunst, Tue; Brandbyge, Mads

    2011-01-01

    voltage, which can be used to explore current-induced vibrational instabilities due the NC/BP forces. Furthermore, using tight-binding and the Brenner potential we illustrate how Langevin-type molecular-dynamics calculations including the Joule heating effect for the carbon-chain systems can be performed...... of molecular-scale contacts. Systems based on molecules bridging electrically gated graphene electrodes may offer an interesting test-bed for these effects. Results: We employ a semi-classical Langevin approach in combination with DFT calculations to study the current-induced vibrational dynamics of an atomic...... carbon chain connecting electrically gated graphene electrodes. This illustrates how the device stability can be predicted solely from the modes obtained from the Langevin equation, including the current-induced forces. We point out that the gate offers control of the current, independent of the bias...

  7. Streamwise Vortex Interaction with a Horseshoe Vortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Piotr Doerffer; Pawel Flaszynski; Franco Magagnato

    2003-01-01

    Flow control in turbomachinery is very difficult because of the complexity of its fully 3-D flow structure. The authors propose to introduce streamwise vortices into the control of internal flows. A simple configuration of vortices was investigated in order to better understand the flow control methods by means of streamwise vortices.The research presented here concerns streamwise vortex interaction with a horseshoe vortex. The effects of such an interaction are significantly dependent on the relative location of the streamwise vortex in respect to the leading edge of the profile. The streamwise vortex is induced by an air jet. The horseshoe vortex is generated by the leading edge of a symmetric profile. Such a configuration gives possibility to investigate the interaction of these two vortices alone. The presented analysis is based on numerical simulations by means of N-S compressible solver with a two-equation turbulence model.

  8. Current-induced dynamics in carbon atomic contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Tao Lü

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The effect of electric current on the motion of atoms still poses many questions, and several mechanisms are at play. Recently there has been focus on the importance of the current-induced nonconservative forces (NC and Berry-phase derived forces (BP with respect to the stability of molecular-scale contacts. Systems based on molecules bridging electrically gated graphene electrodes may offer an interesting test-bed for these effects.Results: We employ a semi-classical Langevin approach in combination with DFT calculations to study the current-induced vibrational dynamics of an atomic carbon chain connecting electrically gated graphene electrodes. This illustrates how the device stability can be predicted solely from the modes obtained from the Langevin equation, including the current-induced forces. We point out that the gate offers control of the current, independent of the bias voltage, which can be used to explore current-induced vibrational instabilities due the NC/BP forces. Furthermore, using tight-binding and the Brenner potential we illustrate how Langevin-type molecular-dynamics calculations including the Joule heating effect for the carbon-chain systems can be performed. Molecular dynamics including current-induced forces enables an energy redistribution mechanism among the modes, mediated by anharmonic interactions, which is found to be vital in the description of the electrical heating.Conclusion: We have developed a semiclassical Langevin equation approach that can be used to explore current-induced dynamics and instabilities. We find instabilities at experimentally relevant bias and gate voltages for the carbon-chain system.

  9. Electric and magnetic p olarization singularities of fo cused Gaussian vortex b eams in the fo cal region%聚焦高斯涡旋光束焦区电场和磁场的偏振奇点*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗亚梅; 高曾辉; 唐碧华; 吕百达

    2014-01-01

    Taking the Gaussian vortex beam as an example, the variation of electric and magnetic polarization singularities of focused Gaussian vortex beams is studied. It is shown that in the focal region there exist two-and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) electric and magnetic polarization singularities of focused Gaussian vortex beams, which do not coincide in general. By suitably varying the distance from the focal plane and the truncation parameter, the motion, creation, and annihilation of circular polarization singularities will take place. The critical valuse of the parameters at which a pair of circular polarization singularities of 2D and 3D electric and magnetic fields will annihilate, are not the same. In the 2D electric field the V-point may appear at the focal plane.%以高斯涡旋光束为例,研究了聚焦场中电场和磁场的偏振奇点变化规律。结果表明,高斯涡旋光束经透镜聚焦后,在焦区存在二维和三维电场和磁场的偏振奇点,其位置一般不重合。适当改变与焦面的距离以及光阑截断参数等出现圆偏振奇点的移动、产生和湮没。不同二维和三维电场和磁场圆偏振奇点湮没所对应的各参数临界值不同。在二维电场中,几何焦面上会有V 点的产生。

  10. Vortex mechanism in hydrocyclones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐继润; 刘正宁; 邢军; 李新跃; 黄慧; 徐海燕; 罗茜

    2001-01-01

    On the basis of analyzing the vortex characteristics, a new mechanism of the vortex formation in hydrocyclones is developed. The main concept of the mechanism is that the vortex flow in a hydrocyclone is resulted from the overlapping of container rotation and hole leakage. The model is then used to explain the compound distribution of free vortex and forced vortex, predict the similarity of tangential velocity at different input pressures, and make count of the principle of small hydrocyclone with lower cut-size than large one. Meanwhile a new possible approach to a large hydro-cyclone with lower cut-size by minimizing or eliminating the air core is discussed briefly.

  11. Formation of Periodic Vortex Streets Driven by the Lorents Force

    OpenAIRE

    池端, 義人; 本地, 弘之; 杉原, 裕司

    1996-01-01

    Quasi-2D periodic vortex streets, driven by the Lorentz force due to the interaction of a localized magnetic field with an electrolytic current, have been investigated experimentally using a shallow water tank with a movable bottom floor. The vortex street formation has also been investigated numerically and some simulated flow patterns are presented.

  12. Current-induced runaway vibrations in dehydrogenated graphene nanoribbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rasmus Bjerregaard; Lu, Jing Tao; Hedegard, Per

    2016-01-01

    We employ a semi-classical Langevin approach to study current-induced atomic dynamics in a partially dehydrogenated armchair graphene nanoribbon. All parameters are obtained from density functional theory. The dehydrogenated carbon dimers behave as effective impurities, whose motion decouples from...

  13. Current-induced runaway vibrations in dehydrogenated graphene nanoribbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rasmus Bjerregaard; Lu, Jing Tao; Hedegard, Per

    2016-01-01

    We employ a semi-classical Langevin approach to study current-induced atomic dynamics in a partially dehydrogenated armchair graphene nanoribbon. All parameters are obtained from density functional theory. The dehydrogenated carbon dimers behave as effective impurities, whose motion decouples from...

  14. Depicting Vortex Stretching and Vortex Relaxing Mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    符松; 李启兵; 王明皓

    2003-01-01

    Different from many existing studies on the paranetrization of vortices, we investigate the effectiveness of two new parameters for identifying the vortex stretching and vortex relaxing mechanisms. These parameters are invariants and identify three-dimensional flow structures only, i.e. they diminish in two-dimensional flows. This is also unlike the existing vortex identification approaches which deliver information in two-dimensional flows. The present proposals have been successfully applied to identify the stretching and relaxing vortices in compressible mixing layers and natural convection flows.

  15. Preparation and characterization of magnetic allylamine modified graphene oxide-poly(vinyl acetate-co-divinylbenzene) nanocomposite for vortex assisted magnetic solid phase extraction of some metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mansoor; Yilmaz, Erkan; Sevinc, Basak; Sahmetlioglu, Ertugrul; Shah, Jasmin; Jan, Muhammad Rasul; Soylak, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic allylamine modified graphene oxide-poly(vinyl acetate-co-divinylbenzene) (MGO-DVB-VA) was synthesized and used for magnetic solid phase extraction of Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) prior to their determination by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. The adsorbent surface functional group was characterized by using FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy. XRD pattern was used to determine the layers of GO. Surface morphology and elemental composition of the adsorbent were evaluated by using SEM and EDX analysis. Various parameters, effecting adsorption efficiency like initial solution pH, adsorbent dose, type and volume of eluent, volume of sample and diverse ions effects were optimized. The preconcentration factor (PF) is 40 for all the metals and the limits of detection for Pb, Cd, Cu, Ni and Co are in the range of 0.37-2.39 µg L(-1) and relative standard deviation below 3.1%. The method was validated by using the method for certified reference materials (Tobacco Leaves (INCT-OBTL-5), Tomato Leaves (1573a), Certified Water (SPS-ww2) and Certified Water (TMDA 64-2)). The method was successfully applied for natural water and food samples.

  16. Interpreting current-induced spin polarization in topological insulator surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengke; Appelbaum, Ian

    2016-06-01

    Several recent experiments on three-dimensional topological insulators claim to observe a large charge current-induced nonequilibrium ensemble spin polarization of electrons in the helical surface state. We present a comprehensive criticism of such claims, using both theory and experiment: First, we clarify the interpretation of quantities extracted from these measurements by deriving standard expressions from a Boltzmann transport equation approach in the relaxation-time approximation at zero and finite temperature to emphasize our assertion that, despite high in-plane spin projection, obtainable current-induced ensemble spin polarization is minuscule. Second, we use a simple experiment to demonstrate that magnetic field-dependent open-circuit voltage hysteresis (identical to those attributed to current-induced spin polarization in topological insulator surface states) can be generated in analogous devices where current is driven through thin films of a topologically trivial metal. This result ipso facto discredits the naive interpretation of previous experiments with TIs, which were used to claim observation of helicity, i.e., spin-momentum locking in the topologically protected surface state.

  17. Strongly enhanced vortex pinning from 4 to 77 K in magnetic fields up to 31 T in 15 mol.% Zr-added (Gd, Y-Ba-Cu-O superconducting tapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Xu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Applications of REBCO coated conductors are now being developed for a very wide range of temperatures and magnetic fields and it is not yet clear whether vortex pinning strategies aimed for high temperature, low field operation are equally valid at lower temperatures and higher fields. A detailed characterization of the superconducting properties of a 15 mol. % Zr-added REBCO thin film made by metal organic chemical vapor deposition, from 4.2 to 77 K under magnetic fields up to 31 T is presented in this article. Even at a such high level of Zr addition, Tc depression has been avoided (Tc = 91 K, while at the same time an exceptionally high irreversibility field Hirr ≈ 14.8 T at 77 K and a remarkably high vortex pinning force density Fp ≈ 1.7 TN/m3 at 4.2 K have been achieved. We ascribe the excellent pinning performance at high temperatures to the high density (equivalent vortex matching field ∼7 T of self-assembled BZO nanorods, while the low temperature pinning force is enhanced by large additional pinning which we ascribe to strain-induced point defects induced in the REBCO matrix by the BZO nanorods. Our results suggest even more room for further performance enhancement of commercial REBCO coated conductors and point the way to REBCO coil applications at liquid nitrogen temperatures since the critical current density Jc(H//c characteristic at 77 K are now almost identical to those of fully optimized Nb-Ti at 4 K.

  18. CFD-DEM simulations of current-induced dune formation and morphological evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rui; Xiao, Heng

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the fundamental mechanisms of sediment transport, particularly those during the formation and evolution of bedforms, is of critical scientific importance and has engineering relevance. Traditional approaches of sediment transport simulations heavily rely on empirical models, which are not able to capture the physics-rich, regime-dependent behaviors of the process. With the increase of available computational resources in the past decade, CFD-DEM (computational fluid dynamics-discrete element method) has emerged as a viable high-fidelity method for the study of sediment transport. However, a comprehensive, quantitative study of the generation and migration of different sediment bed patterns using CFD-DEM is still lacking. In this work, current-induced sediment transport problems in a wide range of regimes are simulated, including 'flat bed in motion', 'small dune', 'vortex dune' and suspended transport. Simulations are performed by using SediFoam, an open-source, massively parallel CFD-DEM solver developed by the authors. This is a general-purpose solver for particle-laden flows tailed for particle transport problems. Validation tests are performed to demonstrate the capability of CFD-DEM in the full range of sediment transport regimes. Comparison of simulation results with experimental and numerical benchmark data demonstrates the merits of CFD-DEM approach. In addition, the improvements of the present simulations over existing studies using CFD-DEM are presented. The present solver gives more accurate prediction of sediment transport rate by properly accounting for the influence of particle volume fraction on the fluid flow. In summary, this work demonstrates that CFD-DEM is a promising particle-resolving approach for probing the physics of current-induced sediment transport.

  19. Convectively driven vortex flows in the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Bonet, J A; Almeida, J Sanchez; Cabello, I; Domingo, V

    2008-01-01

    We have discovered small whirlpools in the Sun, with a size similar to the terrestrial hurricanes (<~0.5 Mm). The theory of solar convection predicts them, but they had remained elusive so far. The vortex flows are created at the downdrafts where the plasma returns to the solar interior after cooling down, and we detect them because some magnetic bright points (BPs) follow a logarithmic spiral in their way to be engulfed by a downdraft. Our disk center observations show 0.009 vortexes per Mm^2, with a lifetime of the order of 5 min, and with no preferred sense of rotation. They are not evenly spread out over the surface, but they seem to trace the supergranulation and the mesogranulation. These observed properties are strongly biased by our type of measurement, unable to detect vortexes except when they are engulfing magnetic BPs.

  20. Chiral specific electron vortex beam spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, J; Babiker, M

    2013-01-01

    Electron vortex beams carry well-defined orbital angular momentum (OAM) about the propagation axis. Such beams are thus characterised by chirality features which make them potentially useful as probes of magnetic and other chiral materials. An analysis of the inelastic processes in which electron vortex beams interact with atoms and which involve OAM exchange is outlined, leading to the multipolar selection rules governing this chiral specific electron vortex beam spectroscopy. Our results show clearly that the selection rules are dependent on the dynamical state and location of the atoms involved. In the most favorable scenario, this form of electron spectroscopy can induce magnetic sublevel transitions which are commonly probed using circularly polarized photon beams.

  1. Bitter decoration and magneto-optical observations of vortex chains in high temperature superconductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Tamegai; H Aoki; M Matsui; M Tokunaga

    2006-01-01

    In tilted magnetic fields, vortices in anisotropic superconductors form one-dimensional arrangements, called vortex chains. We have visualized vortex chains by Bitter decoration and magneto-optical technique. The fundamental energy scale for the attractive interaction between pancake and Josephson vortices is evaluated by observing vortex chains under various conditions. We also explore how the vortex chains evolve when the large in-plane field is applied or when the anisotropy parameter of the system is changed.

  2. One-step green synthesis of β-cyclodextrin/iron oxide-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite with high supramolecular recognition capability: Application for vortex-assisted magnetic solid phase extraction of organochlorine pesticides residue from honey samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahpishanian, Shokouh; Sereshti, Hassan

    2017-02-17

    In this research, β-cyclodextrin/iron oxide reduced graphene oxide hybrid nanostructure (β-CD/MRGO) with high water dispersability, excellent magnetic responsivity and molecular selectivity was prepared via a facile one step green strategy. The obtained nanomaterial was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), which confirmed the modification of GO with β-CD and magnetic nanoparticles. The formation mechanism of β-CD/MRGO was also discussed. The prepared magnetic nanocomposite was then applied as adsorbent in the vortex-assisted magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) of 16 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) from honey samples prior to gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD) analysis. Optimum extraction conditions have been assessed with respect to vortex time, sample pH, adsorbent amount, and salt concentration as well as desorption conditions (type and volume of desorption solvent and desorption time). A good level of linearity (2-10,000ngkg(-1)) with satisfactory determination coefficients (R(2)>0.9966) and suitable precision (%RSDs less than 7.8) was obtained for OCPs under the optimal conditions. The limits of detection and quantification of the method were obtained in the sub-parts per trillion (ppt) to parts per trillion range (LOD: 0.52-3.21ngkg(-1); LOQ: 1.73-10.72ngkg(-1)) based on 3 and 10 signal to noise ratios, respectively. The MSPE method was successfully applied to analysis of OCPs in honey samples with recoveries in the range of 78.8% to 116.2% and RSDs (n=3) below 8.1%. The results demonstrated that β-CD/MRGO could exhibit good supramolecular recognition, enrichment capability and high extraction recoveries toward OCPs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Vortices and vortex lattices in quantum ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A. M.; Marchant, N. G.; O’Dell, D. H. J.; Parker, N. G.

    2017-03-01

    The experimental realization of quantum-degenerate Bose gases made of atoms with sizeable magnetic dipole moments has created a new type of fluid, known as a quantum ferrofluid, which combines the extraordinary properties of superfluidity and ferrofluidity. A hallmark of superfluids is that they are constrained to rotate through vortices with quantized circulation. In quantum ferrofluids the long-range dipolar interactions add new ingredients by inducing magnetostriction and instabilities, and also affect the structural properties of vortices and vortex lattices. Here we give a review of the theory of vortices in dipolar Bose–Einstein condensates, exploring the interplay of magnetism with vorticity and contrasting this with the established behaviour in non-dipolar condensates. We cover single vortex solutions, including structure, energy and stability, vortex pairs, including interactions and dynamics, and also vortex lattices. Our discussion is founded on the mean-field theory provided by the dipolar Gross–Pitaevskii equation, ranging from analytic treatments based on the Thomas–Fermi (hydrodynamic) and variational approaches to full numerical simulations. Routes for generating vortices in dipolar condensates are discussed, with particular attention paid to rotating condensates, where surface instabilities drive the nucleation of vortices, and lead to the emergence of rich and varied vortex lattice structures. We also present an outlook, including potential extensions to degenerate Fermi gases, quantum Hall physics, toroidal systems and the Berezinskii–Kosterlitz–Thouless transition.

  4. Vortex patterns in a superconducting-ferromagnetic rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romaguera, Antonio R. de C, E-mail: antonio.romaguera@df.ufrpe.b [Departamento de Fi' sica, Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, 52171-900 Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil); Doria, Mauro M. [Departamento de Fi' sica dos Solidos, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Peeters, Francois M. [Departement Fysica, Universiteit Antwerpen, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2010-10-01

    A superconducting rod with a magnetic moment on top develops vortices obtained here through 3D calculations of the Ginzburg-Landau theory. The inhomogeneity of the applied field brings new properties to the vortex patterns that vary according to the rod thickness. We find that for thin rods (disks) the vortex patterns are similar to those obtained in presence of a homogeneous magnetic field instead because they consist of giant vortex states. For thick rods novel patterns are obtained as vortices are curve lines in space that exit through the lateral surface.

  5. Study of vortex dynamics with local magnetic relaxation measurements in the superconducting compound Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8}; Etude de la dynamique des vortex par des mesures locales de relaxation magnetique dans le compose supraconducteur Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, St

    2000-07-01

    This experimental study of the magnetic field-temperature phase diagram and of the vortex dynamics in high- T{sub c} superconductors focuses on Bismuth-based cuprates: Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8}. In type-II superconductors, mixed state characterized by the presence of vortices (quanta of magnetic flux) is divided by a transition line determined by two features of magnetization loops. For T > 40 K, magnetization loops vs applied field show a step evidence of a first order transition. From 20 to 40 K, a second peak replacing the step correspond to an abrupt increase of irreversibility interpreted as a bulk current. We want to understand the nature of the second peak (thermodynamic or nonequilibrium property) and separate phenomena contributing to irreversibility (flux pinning, geometrical or surface effects). Magnetic measurement techniques are nondestructive and have a resolution of few microns. Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} single crystals are optimized by localizing defectives regions with a magneto-optic technique for flux imaging and elimination of these regions with a wire saw. Local magnetization loops and relaxation measurements performed with a microscopic Hall probe array allow to distinguish irreversibility sources. The shape of induction profiles indicates which current dominate between surface current and bulk pinning induced current. Two crossover with time and a direct observation of two phases coexistence in induction profiles enlighten phenomena in play. The measured electric field-current density characteristics lead to barrier energy U(j) controlling thermally activated flux motion. Three relations (U(j) (surface, bulk low and high field) explain second peak. (author)

  6. Cryptanalysis of Vortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aumasson, Jean-Philippe; Dunkelman, Orr; Mendel, Florian;

    2009-01-01

    Vortex is a hash function that was first presented at ISC'2008, then submitted to the NIST SHA-3 competition after some modifications. This paper describes several attacks on both versions of Vortex, including collisions, second preimages, preimages, and distinguishers. Our attacks exploit flaws ...

  7. Aerodynamically shaped vortex generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Velte, Clara Marika; Øye, Stig;

    2016-01-01

    An aerodynamically shaped vortex generator has been proposed, manufactured and tested in a wind tunnel. The effect on the overall performance when applied on a thick airfoil is an increased lift to drag ratio compared with standard vortex generators. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  8. Wave modes of collective vortex gyration in dipolar-coupled-dot-array magnonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dong-Soo; Vogel, Andreas; Jung, Hyunsung; Lee, Ki-Suk; Weigand, Markus; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Fischer, Peter; Meier, Guido; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2013-07-01

    Lattice vibration modes are collective excitations in periodic arrays of atoms or molecules. These modes determine novel transport properties in solid crystals. Analogously, in periodical arrangements of magnetic vortex-state disks, collective vortex motions have been predicted. Here, we experimentally observe wave modes of collective vortex gyration in one-dimensional (1D) periodic arrays of magnetic disks using time-resolved scanning transmission x-ray microscopy. The observed modes are interpreted based on micromagnetic simulation and numerical calculation of coupled Thiele equations. Dispersion of the modes is found to be strongly affected by both vortex polarization and chirality ordering, as revealed by the explicit analytical form of 1D infinite arrays. A thorough understanding thereof is fundamental both for lattice vibrations and vortex dynamics, which we demonstrate for 1D magnonic crystals. Such magnetic disk arrays with vortex-state ordering, referred to as magnetic metastructure, offer potential implementation into information processing devices.

  9. Paramagnetic excited vortex states in superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Rodolpho Ribeiro; Doria, Mauro M.; Romaguera, Antonio R. de C.

    2016-06-01

    We consider excited vortex states, which are vortex states left inside a superconductor once the external applied magnetic field is switched off and whose energy is lower than of the normal state. We show that this state is paramagnetic and develop here a general method to obtain its Gibbs free energy through conformal mapping. The solution for any number of vortices in any cross-section geometry can be read off from the Schwarz-Christoffel mapping. The method is based on the first-order equations used by Abrikosov to discover vortices.

  10. Current-induced forces and hot spots in biased nanojunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Jing-Tao; Christensen, Rasmus B; Wang, Jian-Sheng; Hedegård, Per; Brandbyge, Mads

    2015-03-06

    We investigate theoretically the interplay of current-induced forces (CIFs), Joule heating, and heat transport inside a current-carrying nanoconductor. We find that the CIFs, due to the electron-phonon coherence, can control the spatial heat dissipation in the conductor. This yields a significant asymmetric concentration of excess heating (hot spot) even for a symmetric conductor. When coupled to the electrode phonons, CIFs drive different phonon heat flux into the two electrodes. First-principles calculations on realistic biased nanojunctions illustrate the importance of the effect.

  11. Current-Induced Forces and Hot Spots in Biased Nanojunctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jing Tao; Christensen, Rasmus Bjerregaard; Wang, Jian-Sheng;

    2015-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the interplay of current-induced forces (CIFs), Joule heating, and heat transport inside a current-carrying nanoconductor. We find that the CIFs, due to the electron-phonon coherence, can control the spatial heat dissipation in the conductor. This yields a significant...... asymmetric concentration of excess heating (hot spot) even for a symmetric conductor. When coupled to the electrode phonons, CIFs drive different phonon heat flux into the two electrodes. First-principles calculations on realistic biased nanojunctions illustrate the importance of the effect....

  12. Vortex properties of mesoscopic superconducting samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral, Leonardo R.E. [Laboratorio de Supercondutividade e Materiais Avancados, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife 50670-901 (Brazil); Barba-Ortega, J. [Grupo de Fi' sica de Nuevos Materiales, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Souza Silva, C.C. de [Laboratorio de Supercondutividade e Materiais Avancados, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife 50670-901 (Brazil); Albino Aguiar, J., E-mail: albino@df.ufpe.b [Laboratorio de Supercondutividade e Materiais Avancados, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife 50670-901 (Brazil)

    2010-10-01

    In this work we investigated theoretically the vortex properties of mesoscopic samples of different geometries, submitted to an external magnetic field. We use both London and Ginzburg-Landau theories and also solve the non-linear Time Dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations to obtain vortex configurations, equilibrium states and the spatial distribution of the superconducting electron density in a mesoscopic superconducting triangle and long prisms with square cross-section. For a mesoscopic triangle with the magnetic field applied perpendicularly to sample plane the vortex configurations were obtained by using Langevin dynamics simulations. In most of the configurations the vortices sit close to the corners, presenting twofold or three-fold symmetry. A study of different meta-stable configurations with same number of vortices is also presented. Next, by taking into account de Gennes boundary conditions via the extrapolation length, b, we study the properties of a mesoscopic superconducting square surrounded by different metallic materials and in the presence of an external magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the square surface. It is determined the b-limit for the occurrence of a single vortex in a mesoscopic square of area d{sup 2}, for 4{xi}(0){<=}d{<=}10{xi}(0).

  13. An optical vortex coronagraph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, David M.

    2005-08-01

    An optical vortex may be characterized as a dark core of destructive interference in a beam of spatially coherent light. This dark core may be used as a filter to attenuate a coherent beam of light so an incoherent background signal may be detected. Applications of such a filter include: eye and sensor protection, forward-scattered light measurement, and the detection of extra-solar planets. Optical vortices may be created by passing a beam of light through a vortex diffractive optical element, which is a plate of glass etched with a spiral pattern, such that the thickness of the glass increases in the azimuthal direction. An optical vortex coronagraph may be constructed by placing a vortex diffractive optical element near the image plane of a telescope. An optical vortex coronagraph opens a dark window in the glare of a distant star so nearby terrestrial sized planets and exo-zodiacal dust may be detected. An optical vortex coronagraph may hold several advantages over other techniques presently being developed for high contrast imaging, such as lower aberration sensitivity and multi-wavelength operation. In this manuscript, I will discuss the aberration sensitivity of an optical vortex coronagraph and the key advantages it may hold over other coronagraph architectures. I will also provide numerical simulations demonstrating high contrast imaging in the presence of low-order static aberrations.

  14. Effect of Rashba Spin-Orbit Interaction on the Stability of Spin-Vortex-Induced Loop Current in Hole-Doped Cuprate Superconductors: A Scenario for the Appearance of Magnetic Field Enhanced Charge Order and Fermi Surface Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisaki, Tsubasa; Wakaura, Hikaru; Koizumi, Hiroyasu

    2017-10-01

    Rashba type spin-orbit interaction is included in the model Hamiltonian for the spin-vortex-induced loop current (SVILC) mechanism of superconductivity for hole doped cuprate superconductors and its effects are investigated. We assume that a Rashba interaction appears around the small polarons formed by the doped holes in the bulk; its internal electric field is assumed to be in the direction perpendicular to the CuO2 plane and stabilizes the spin polarization lying in the CuO2 plane. We examine 4 × 4, 4 × 6, and 4 × 8 spin-vortex-quartet (SVQ) and perform Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the superconducting transition temperature Tc, where each SVQ is a n × m two dimensional region (in the units of the lattice constant) containing four holes, four spin-vortices, and four SVILCs. We find that the 4 × 6 SVQ is the most stable one among them with the highest Tc; in this case, the hole concentration per Cu atom is x = 0.167, which is close to the optimal doping value x = 0.170, suggesting that the optimal doping may be related to the stabilization of the superconducting state by the Rashba interaction. We also find that the 4 × 8 SVQ becomes more stable than the 4 × 6 SVQ in a current flowing situation; this indicates that the conversion from the 4 × 6 SVQs to 4 × 8 SVQs may occur upon the emergence of a macroscopic current by the application of a magnetic field. This conversion may explain the enhancement of the charge order around x = 0.125 and the Fermi surface reconstruction upon an application of a magnetic field.

  15. Current-induced enhancement of DNA bubble creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lei; Fu, Hua-Hua

    2016-05-01

    Current-induced heating of short double-stranded DNA chains is studied within a two-probe transport setup by using the Langevin approach. The electrons are modeled by a tight-binding Hamiltonian. The DNA atomic motion is described by the Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois atomic potential, coupled with electrons through the Holstein interaction. The solvent environment is accounted for as a classical heat bath. Voltage biases of 0.1˜ 0.5 {{V}} can effectively break the base pairs and lead to the melting transition, which can be detected from the resulting significant reduction of the conductance. When the bias increases, the opening of base pairs near the leads with higher chemical potential is suppressed and bubble (localized separation of the double strand) formation becomes asymmetric. Our results suggest that the voltage bias can excite the base pairs, hence increases the chemical activity of DNA.

  16. Nonconservative current-induced forces: A physical interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tchavdar N. Todorov

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We give a physical interpretation of the recently demonstrated nonconservative nature of interatomic forces in current-carrying nanostructures. We start from the analytical expression for the curl of these forces, and evaluate it for a point defect in a current-carrying system. We obtain a general definition of the capacity of electrical current flow to exert a nonconservative force, and thus do net work around closed paths, by a formal noninvasive test procedure. Second, we show that the gain in atomic kinetic energy over time, generated by nonconservative current-induced forces, is equivalent to the uncompensated stimulated emission of directional phonons. This connection with electron–phonon interactions quantifies explicitly the intuitive notion that nonconservative forces work by angular momentum transfer.

  17. Nonconservative current-induced forces: A physical interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Tchavdar N; Dundas, Daniel; Paxton, Anthony T; Horsfield, Andrew P

    2011-01-01

    We give a physical interpretation of the recently demonstrated nonconservative nature of interatomic forces in current-carrying nanostructures. We start from the analytical expression for the curl of these forces, and evaluate it for a point defect in a current-carrying system. We obtain a general definition of the capacity of electrical current flow to exert a nonconservative force, and thus do net work around closed paths, by a formal noninvasive test procedure. Second, we show that the gain in atomic kinetic energy over time, generated by nonconservative current-induced forces, is equivalent to the uncompensated stimulated emission of directional phonons. This connection with electron-phonon interactions quantifies explicitly the intuitive notion that nonconservative forces work by angular momentum transfer.

  18. Vortex flow hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, A. M., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to quantify the hysteresis associated with various vortex flow transition points and to determine the effect of planform geometry. The transition points observed consisted of the appearance (or disappearance) of trailing edge vortex burst and the transition to (or from) flat plate or totally separated flows. Flow visualization with smoke injected into the vortices was used to identify the transitions on a series of semi-span models tested in a low speed tunnel. The planforms tested included simple deltas (55 deg to 80 deg sweep), cranked wings with varying tip panel sweep and dihedral, and a straked wing. High speed movies at 1000 frames per second were made of the vortex flow visualization in order to better understand the dynamics of vortex flow, burst and transition.

  19. Modeling gasodynamic vortex cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdyan, A. E.; Fauve, S.

    2017-08-01

    We aim at studying gasodynamic vortex cooling in an analytically solvable, thermodynamically consistent model that can explain limitations on the cooling efficiency. To this end, we study an angular plus radial flow between two (coaxial) rotating permeable cylinders. Full account is taken of compressibility, viscosity, and heat conductivity. For a weak inward radial flow the model qualitatively describes the vortex cooling effect, in terms of both temperature and the decrease of the stagnation enthalpy, seen in short uniflow vortex (Ranque) tubes. The cooling does not result from external work and its efficiency is defined as the ratio of the lowest temperature reached adiabatically (for the given pressure gradient) to the lowest temperature actually reached. We show that for the vortex cooling the efficiency is strictly smaller than 1, but in another configuration with an outward radial flow, we find that the efficiency can be larger than 1. This is related to both the geometry and the finite heat conductivity.

  20. Nanostructuring superconducting vortex matter with focused ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillamón, I. [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolás Cabrera, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada de Bajas Temperaturas y Altos Campos Magnéticos, UAM, CSIC, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Suderow, H., E-mail: hermann.suderow@uam.es [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolás Cabrera, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada de Bajas Temperaturas y Altos Campos Magnéticos, UAM, CSIC, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Kulkarni, P.; Vieira, S. [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolás Cabrera, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada de Bajas Temperaturas y Altos Campos Magnéticos, UAM, CSIC, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Córdoba, R.; Sesé, J. [Laboratorio de Microscopías Avanzadas (LMA) – Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza 50009 (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); and others

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Nanostructuring vortex matter with focused ion beams. • Nanofabrication produces high vortex density gradients. • Patterning gives nanocrystalline vortex lattice. - Abstract: Focused ion beams provide new opportunities to create small nanofabricated structures. Materials where this technique is successfully applied are different from those that are widely used in e-beam or photolithography processes. Arrays of holes have been fabricated in several layered superconductors, such as the transition metal dichalcogenides. A focused ion beam system can be also used to deposit superconducting material. A Ga beam is used to decompose a precusor W(CO){sub 6} molecule, giving an amorphous mixture of W–C–Ga–O which is superconducting below liquid helium temperatures. The amorphous nature of the deposit gives isotropic superconducting features, and vortex pinning is determined by the surface topography (or film thickness). Here we present vortex lattice images in an amorphous thin film with a nanofabricated array of dots. We find vortex confinement within the dots and inhomogeneous vortex distributions with large magnetic field gradients (around a Tesla in 10–20 nm). We discuss scaling behavior of the vortex lattice after nanofabrication.

  1. On the electron vortex beam wavefunction within a crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendis, B.G., E-mail: b.g.mendis@durham.ac.uk

    2015-10-15

    Electron vortex beams are distorted by scattering within a crystal, so that the wavefunction can effectively be decomposed into many vortex components. Using a Bloch wave approach equations are derived for vortex beam decomposition at any given depth and with respect to any frame of reference. In the kinematic limit (small specimen thickness) scattering largely takes place at the neighbouring atom columns with a local phase change of π/2 rad. When viewed along the beam propagation direction only one vortex component is present at the specimen entrance surface (i.e. the ‘free space’ vortex in vacuum), but at larger depths the probe is in a mixed state due to Bragg scattering. Simulations show that there is no direct correlation between vortex components and the pendellösung, i.e. at a given depth probes with relatively constant can be in a more mixed state compared to those with more rapidly varying . This suggests that minimising oscillations in the pendellösung by probe channelling is not the only criterion for generating a strong electron energy loss magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD) signal. - Highlights: • Equations are derived for vortex decomposition due to scattering within a crystal. • There is no direct correlation between vortex decomposition and pendellösung. • Results are also discussed in the context of EMCD measurements.

  2. Vector Lattice Vortex Solitons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian-Dong; YE Fang-Wei; DONG Liang-Wei; LI Yong-Ping

    2005-01-01

    @@ Two-dimensional vector vortex solitons in harmonic optical lattices are investigated. The stability properties of such solitons are closely connected to the lattice depth Vo. For small Vo, vector vortex solitons with the total zero-angular momentum are more stable than those with the total nonzero-angular momentum, while for large Vo, this case is inversed. If Vo is large enough, both the types of such solitons are stable.

  3. Buoyant Norbury's vortex rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyth, Mark; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Salman, Hayder

    2014-11-01

    Norbury's vortices are a one-parameter family of axisymmetric vortex rings that are exact solutions to the Euler equations. Due to their relative simplicity, they are extensively used to model the behavior of real vortex rings found in experiments and in Nature. In this work, we extend the original formulation of the problem to include buoyancy effects for the case where the fluid that lies within the vortex has a different density to that of the ambient. In this modified formulation, buoyancy effects enter the problem through the baroclinic term of the vorticity equation. This permits an efficient numerical solution of the governing equation of motion in terms of a vortex contour method that tracks the evolution of the boundary of the vortex. Finally, we compare our numerical results with the theoretical analysis of the short-time evolution of a buoyant vortex. Funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through grant DPI2011-28356-C03-02 and by the London Mathematical Society.

  4. Evolution of a Vortex in a Strain Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, N. C.; Danielson, J. R.; Dubin, D. H. E.; Surko, C. M.

    2016-12-01

    Experiments and vortex-in-cell simulations are used to study an initially axisymmetric, spatially distributed vortex subject to an externally imposed strain flow. The experiments use a magnetized pure electron plasma to model an inviscid two-dimensional fluid. The results are compared to a theory assuming an elliptical region of constant vorticity. For relatively flat vorticity profiles, the dynamics and stability threshold are in close quantitative agreement with the theory. Physics beyond the constant-vorticity model, such as vortex stripping, is investigated by studying the behavior of nonflat vorticity profiles.

  5. Vortex Dynamics in Anisotropic Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, David Gordon

    Measurements of the ac screening response and resistance of superconducting Bi_2Sr _2CaCu_2O _8 (BSCCO) crystals have been used to probe the dynamics of the magnetic flux lines within the mixed state as a function of frequency, temperature, and applied dc field. For the particular range of temperature and magnetic field in which measurements were made, the systematic behavior of the observed dissipation peak in the screening response is consistent with electromagnetic skin size effects rather than a phase transition. According to microscopic theories of the interaction between the flux lines and a driving ac field, such a skin size effect is expected for the case when the vortex motion is diffusive in nature. However, diffusive motion is inconsistent with simple activation models that use a single value for the pinning energy (derived from direct measurement of the dc resistance). This contradiction suggests a distribution of pinning energies within the sample. Interlayer vortex decoupling has been directly observed as a function of temperature and applied magnetic field using electronic transport perpendicular to the layers in synthetic amorphous MoGe/Ge multilayer samples. Perpendicular transport has been shown to be a far more sensitive measure of the phase coupling between layers than in-plane properties. Below the decoupling temperature T_{D} the resistivity anisotropy collapses and striking nonlinearities appear in the perpendicular current-voltage behavior, which are not observed in parallel transport. A crossover in behavior is also observed at a field H _{x}, in accordance with theory. The data suggest the presence of a phase transition into a state with finite in-plane resistivity. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.).

  6. Inducing vortex formation in multilayered circular dots using remanent curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Ok; Ryeol Lee, Dong; Choi, Yongseong; Metlushko, Vitali; Park, Jihwey; Kim, Jae-Young; Bong Lee, Ki

    2012-11-01

    We report field manipulation of magnetic vortex states in Co(30 nm)/Cu(3 nm)/Ni80Fe20 (20 nm)-multilayer dot arrays via remanent curve. The element-resolved resonant x-ray magnetic measurements, combined with micromagnetic simulations, show vortex formation in the Co layer but not in the NiFe layer along the major hysteresis loop. Although the two magnetic layers are not directly coupled due to the presence of the Cu interlayer, the NiFe layer is strongly influenced by the dipolar field from uncompensated magnetic poles in the Co layer. Using remanent curves, we demonstrate that the single vortex state can be induced simultaneously in both layers.

  7. Vortex structures in exponentially shaped Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Semerdjieva, E. G.; Boyadjiev, T. L.

    2005-04-01

    We report the numerical calculations of the static vortex structure and critical curves in exponentially shaped long Josephson junctions for in-line and overlap geometries. Stability of the static solutions is investigated by checking the sign of the smallest eigenvalue of the associated Sturm-Liouville problem. The change in the junction width leads to the renormalization of the magnetic flux in comparison with the case of a linear one-dimensional model. We study the influence of the model's parameters, and particularly, the shape parameter on the stability of the states of the magnetic flux. We compare the vortex structure and critical curves for the in-line and overlap geometries. Our numerically constructed critical curve of the Josephson junction matches well with the experimental one.

  8. Vortices and vortex lattices in quantum ferrofluids

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, A M; O'Dell, D H J; Parker, N G

    2016-01-01

    The achievement of quantum-degenerate Bose gases composed of atoms with sizeable magnetic dipole moments has realized quantum ferrofluids, a form of fluid which combines the extraordinary properties of superfluidity and ferrofluidity. A hallmark of superfluids is that they are constrained to circulate through vortices with quantized circulation. These excitations underpin a variety of rich phenomena, including vortex lattices, quantum turbulence, the Berenzinksii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition and Kibble-Zurek defect formation. Here we provide a comprehensive review of the theory of vortices and vortex lattices in quantum ferrofluids created from dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates, exploring the interplay of magnetism with vorticity and contrasting this with the established behaviour in non-dipolar condensates. Our discussion is based on the mean-field theory provided by the dipolar Gross-Pitaevskii equation, from analytic treatments based on the Thomas-Fermi and variational approaches to full numerical simula...

  9. Enhanced Nonadiabaticity in Vortex Cores due to the Emergent Hall Effect

    KAUST Repository

    Bisig, André

    2017-01-04

    We present a combined theoretical and experimental study, investigating the origin of the enhanced nonadiabaticity of magnetic vortex cores. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy is used to image the vortex core gyration dynamically to measure the nonadiabaticity with high precision, including a high confidence upper bound. We show theoretically, that the large nonadiabaticity parameter observed experimentally can be explained by the presence of local spin currents arising from a texture induced emergent Hall effect. This study demonstrates that the magnetic damping α and nonadiabaticity parameter β are very sensitive to the topology of the magnetic textures, resulting in an enhanced ratio (β/α>1) in magnetic vortex cores or Skyrmions.

  10. Enhanced Nonadiabaticity in Vortex Cores due to the Emergent Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisig, André; Akosa, Collins Ashu; Moon, Jung-Hwan; Rhensius, Jan; Moutafis, Christoforos; von Bieren, Arndt; Heidler, Jakoba; Kiliani, Gillian; Kammerer, Matthias; Curcic, Michael; Weigand, Markus; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Van Waeyenberge, Bartel; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Manchon, Aurelien; Kläui, Mathias

    2016-12-01

    We present a combined theoretical and experimental study, investigating the origin of the enhanced nonadiabaticity of magnetic vortex cores. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy is used to image the vortex core gyration dynamically to measure the nonadiabaticity with high precision, including a high confidence upper bound. We show theoretically, that the large nonadiabaticity parameter observed experimentally can be explained by the presence of local spin currents arising from a texture induced emergent Hall effect. This study demonstrates that the magnetic damping α and nonadiabaticity parameter β are very sensitive to the topology of the magnetic textures, resulting in an enhanced ratio (β /α >1 ) in magnetic vortex cores or Skyrmions.

  11. Direct observation of imprinted antiferromagnetic vortex state in CoO/Fe/Ag(001) disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, J.; Carlton, D.; Park, J. S.; Meng, Y.; Arenholz, E.; Doran, A.; Young, A.T.; Scholl, A.; Hwang, C.; Zhao, H. W.; Bokor, J.; Qiu, Z. Q.

    2010-12-21

    In magnetic thin films, a magnetic vortex is a state in which the magnetization vector curls around the center of a confined structure. A vortex state in a thin film disk, for example, is a topological object characterized by the vortex polarity and the winding number. In ferromagnetic (FM) disks, these parameters govern many fundamental properties of the vortex such as its gyroscopic rotation, polarity reversal, core motion, and vortex pair excitation. However, in antiferromagnetic (AFM) disks, though there has been indirect evidence of the vortex state through observations of the induced FM-ordered spins in the AFM disk, they have never been observed directly in experiment. By fabricating single crystalline NiO/Fe/Ag(001) and CoO/Fe/Ag(001) disks and using X-ray Magnetic Linear Dichroism (XMLD), we show direct observation of the vortex state in an AFM disk of AFM/FM bilayer system. We observe that there are two types of AFM vortices, one of which has no analog in FM structures. Finally, we show that a frozen AFM vortex can bias a FM vortex at low temperature.

  12. Fast nanoscale addressability of nitrogen-vacancy spins via coupling to a dynamic ferromagnetic vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, M. S.; Badea, R.; Berezovsky, J.

    2016-01-01

    The core of a ferromagnetic vortex domain creates a strong, localized magnetic field, which can be manipulated on nanosecond timescales, providing a platform for addressing and controlling individual nitrogen-vacancy centre spins in diamond at room temperature, with nanometre-scale resolution. Here, we show that the ferromagnetic vortex can be driven into proximity with a nitrogen-vacancy defect using small applied magnetic fields, inducing significant nitrogen-vacancy spin splitting. We also find that the magnetic field gradient produced by the vortex is sufficient to address spins separated by nanometre-length scales. By applying a microwave-frequency magnetic field, we drive both the vortex and the nitrogen-vacancy spins, resulting in enhanced coherent rotation of the spin state. Finally, we demonstrate that by driving the vortex on fast timescales, sequential addressing and coherent manipulation of spins is possible on ∼100 ns timescales. PMID:27296550

  13. Current-induced domain wall motion in nanoscale ferromagnetic elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinowski, G [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, CNRS, Universite Paris-sud 11, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Boulle, O [SPINTEC, CEA/CNRS/UJF/GINP, INAC, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Klaeui, M, E-mail: Klaeui@uni-mainz.de [SwissFEL, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Laboratory of Nanomagnetism and Spin Dynamics, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-09-28

    We review the details of domain wall (DW) propagation due to spin-polarized currents that could potentially be used in magnetic data storage devices based on domains and DWs. We discuss briefly the basics of the underlying spin torque effect and show how the two torques arising from the interaction between the spin-polarized charge carriers and the magnetization lead to complex dynamics of a spin texture such as a DW. By direct imaging we show how confined DWs in nanowires can be displaced using currents in in-plane soft-magnetic materials, and that when using short pulses, fast velocities can be attained. For high-anisotropy out-of-plane magnetized wires with narrow DWs we present approaches to deducing the torque terms and show that in these materials potentially more efficient domain wall motion could be achieved.

  14. Current-Induced Transistor Sensorics with Electrogenic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromherz, Peter

    2016-04-25

    The concepts of transistor recording of electroactive cells are considered, when the response is determined by a current-induced voltage in the electrolyte due to cellular activity. The relationship to traditional transistor recording, with an interface-induced response due to interactions with the open gate oxide, is addressed. For the geometry of a cell-substrate junction, the theory of a planar core-coat conductor is described with a one-compartment approximation. The fast electrical relaxation of the junction and the slow change of ion concentrations are pointed out. On that basis, various recording situations are considered and documented by experiments. For voltage-gated ion channels under voltage clamp, the effects of a changing extracellular ion concentration and the enhancement/depletion of ion conductances in the adherent membrane are addressed. Inhomogeneous ion conductances are crucial for transistor recording of neuronal action potentials. For a propagating action potential, the effects of an axon-substrate junction and the surrounding volume conductor are distinguished. Finally, a receptor-transistor-sensor is described, where the inhomogeneity of a ligand-activated ion conductance is achieved by diffusion of the agonist and inactivation of the conductance. Problems with regard to a development of reliable biosensors are mentioned.

  15. Monopole-Antimonopole and Vortex Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Teh, R; Teh, Rosy; Wong, Khai-Ming

    2004-01-01

    The SU(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs theory supports the existence of monopoles, antimonopoles, and vortex rings. In this paper, we would like to present new exact static antimonopole-monopole-antimonopole (A-M-A) configurations. The net magnetic charge of these configurations is always negative one, whilst the net magnetic charge at the origin is always positive one for all positive integer values of the solution parameter $m$. However, when $m$ increases beyond one, vortex rings appear coexisting with these A-M-A configurations. The number of vortex rings increases proportionally with the value of $m$. They are magnetically neutral and are located in space where the Higgs field vanishes. We also show that a single point singularity in the Higgs field need not corresponds to a structureless 1-monopole at the origin but to a zero size monopole-antimonopole-monopole (MAM) structure. These exact solutions are a different kind of BPS solutions as they satisfy the first order Bogomol'nyi equation but possess infinite energ...

  16. Reconnection of superfluid vortex bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamri, Sultan Z; Youd, Anthony J; Barenghi, Carlo F

    2008-11-21

    Using the vortex filament model and the Gross-Pitaevskii nonlinear Schroedinger equation, we show that bundles of quantized vortex lines in He II are structurally robust and can reconnect with each other maintaining their identity. We discuss vortex stretching in superfluid turbulence and show that, during the bundle reconnection process, kelvin waves of large amplitude are generated, in agreement with the finding that helicity is produced by nearly singular vortex interactions in classical Euler flows.

  17. Vortex Characterization for Engineering Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jankun-Kelly, M; Thompson, D S; Jiang, M; Shannahan, B; Machiraju, R

    2008-01-30

    Realistic engineering simulation data often have features that are not optimally resolved due to practical limitations on mesh resolution. To be useful to application engineers, vortex characterization techniques must be sufficiently robust to handle realistic data with complex vortex topologies. In this paper, we present enhancements to the vortex topology identification component of an existing vortex characterization algorithm. The modified techniques are demonstrated by application to three realistic data sets that illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of our approach.

  18. Jet vortex methods

    CERN Document Server

    Holm, Darryl D

    2015-01-01

    Vortex blob methods are typically characterized by a regularization length scale, below which the the dynamics are trivial for isolated blobs. In this article we will find that the dynamics need not be trivial if one is willing to consider distributional derivatives of Dirac delta functionals as valid vorticity distributions. More specifically, a new singular vortex theory is presented for regularised Euler fluid equations of ideal incompressible flow in the plane. We determine the conditions under which such regularised Euler fluid equations may admit vorticity singularities which are stronger than delta functions, e.g., derivatives of delta functions. We also characterise the Hamiltonian dynamics of the higher-order singular vortices. Applications to the design of numerical meth- ods similar to vortex blob methods are also discussed. Such findings shed light onto the rich dynamics which occur below the regularization length scale and enlighten our perspective on the multiscale aspects of regularized fluid m...

  19. Vortex tube optimization theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewins, Jeffery [Cambridge Univ., Magdalene Coll., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bejan, Adrian [Duke Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Durham, NC (United States)

    1999-11-01

    The Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube splits a single high pressure stream of gas into cold and warm streams. Simple models for the vortex tube combined with regenerative precooling are given from which an optimisation can be undertaken. Two such optimisations are needed: the first shows that at any given cut or fraction of the cold stream, the best refrigerative load, allowing for the temperature lift, is nearly half the maximum loading that would result in no lift. The second optimisation shows that the optimum cut is an equal division of the vortex streams between hot and cold. Bounds are obtainable within this theory for the performance of the system for a given gas and pressure ratio. (Author)

  20. Vortex formation and instability in the left ventricle

    CERN Document Server

    Le, Trung; Coffey, Dane; Keefe, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We study the formation of the mitral vortex ring during early diastolic filling in a patient-specific left ventricle (LV) using direct numerical simulation. The geometry of the left ventricle is reconstructed from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data of a healthy human subject. The left ventricular kinematics is modeled via a cell-based activation methodology, which is inspired by cardiac electro-physiology and yields physiologic LV wall motion. In the fluid dynamics videos, we describe in detail the three-dimensional structure of the mitral vortex ring, which is formed during early diastolic filling. The ring starts to deform as it propagates toward the apex of the heart and becomes inclined. The trailing secondary vortex tubes are formed as the result of interaction between the vortex ring and the LV wall. These vortex tubes wrap around the circumference and begin to interact with and destabilize the mitral vortex ring. At the end of diastole, the vortex ring impinges on the LV wall and the large-scale int...

  1. Electron Drift Speed And Current-Induced Drive Torques On A Domain Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Luc

    2009-03-01

    It has become fashionable to describe [1] current-induced torques on a DW in terms of an electron drift speed u = - P*j*muB/e*M where muB is the Bohr magneton and M the saturation magnetization. While appropriate for adiabatic torques, this quantity u is misleading and not the best choice in the case of non-adiabatic torques. For example, it leads [2] to beta not equal to alpha, where beta represents the intensity of the non-adiabatic torque, and alpha is the damping parameter. By writing equations of motion for conduction- electron spins in a moving frame where the electron gas is at rest, we find [3] a direct relation between damping and non- adiabatic torques. The correct electron drift speed turns out to be the speed of the frame, and is v = P*j/(n*q) where n and q are the carrier density and charge. It is related to the ordinary Hall constant R0 by v P*R0*j. After substituting v for u in the expression of the non-adiabatic torque, we find that beta = alpha holds now. Because v is larger than u in Permalloy, it can explain better the large current-induced DW speeds found [4] experimentally. In materials where R0> 0 and the carriers are dominantly hole-like, v and u have opposite signs, leading to different predictions for the sense of DW motion. We discuss examples of such materials. 1. G. Tatara and H. Kohno, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 086601 (2004). 2. H. Kohno et al., J. Phys. Soc. Japan, 75, 113706 (2006). 3. L. Berger, Phys. Rev. B 75, 174401 (2007). 4. M. Hayashi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 037204 (2007).

  2. Spin current-induced by a sound wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyapilin, Igor I

    2013-04-01

    The interaction of conduction electrons with a longitudinal sound wave propagating in a crystal in a constant magnetic field is investigated. It is shown that the transverse spin current arises when the longitudinal sound wave propagation through the system. The average power absorbed by the spin subsystem of the conduction electrons and the spin-Hall conductivity have a resonant character.

  3. Vortex motion in YBCO thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, V.; Verdyan, A.; Lapsker, I.; Azoulay, J.

    1999-09-01

    Hall resistivity measurements as function of temperature in the vicinity of Tc were carried out on a thin films YBCO superconductors. A sign reversal of Hall voltage with external magnetic field applied along c axis have been observed upon crossing Tc. Hall voltage in the mixed state was found to be insensitive to the external magnetic field inversion. These effects are discussed and explained in terms of vortex motion under the influence of Magnus force balanced by large damping force. It is argued that in this model the flux-line velocity has component opposite to the superfluid current direction thus yielding a negative Hall voltage.

  4. Self-current induced spin-orbit torque in FeMn/Pt multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanjun; Yang, Yumeng; Yao, Kui; Xu, Baoxi; Wu, Yihong

    2016-05-01

    Extensive efforts have been devoted to the study of spin-orbit torque in ferromagnetic metal/heavy metal bilayers and exploitation of it for magnetization switching using an in-plane current. As the spin-orbit torque is inversely proportional to the thickness of the ferromagnetic layer, sizable effect has only been realized in bilayers with an ultrathin ferromagnetic layer. Here we demonstrate that, by stacking ultrathin Pt and FeMn alternately, both ferromagnetic properties and current induced spin-orbit torque can be achieved in FeMn/Pt multilayers without any constraint on its total thickness. The critical behavior of these multilayers follows closely three-dimensional Heisenberg model with a finite Curie temperature distribution. The spin torque effective field is about 4 times larger than that of NiFe/Pt bilayer with a same equivalent NiFe thickness. The self-current generated spin torque is able to switch the magnetization reversibly without the need for an external field or a thick heavy metal layer. The removal of both thickness constraint and necessity of using an adjacent heavy metal layer opens new possibilities for exploiting spin-orbit torque for practical applications.

  5. Dynamics of Vortex Cavitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, P.C.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the mechanisms with which tip vortex cavitation is responsible for broadband pressure fluctuations on ship propellers. Hypotheses for these are described in detail by Bosschers (2009). Validation is provided by three main cavitation-tunnel experiments, one on a model propeller

  6. Passive Wake Vortex Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, J M

    2001-10-18

    The collapse of the Soviet Union and ending of the Cold War brought about many significant changes in military submarine operations. The enemies that the US Navy faces today and in the future will not likely be superpowers armed with nuclear submarines, but rather smaller, rogue nations employing cheaper diesel/electric submarines with advanced air-independent propulsion systems. Unlike Cold War submarine operations, which occurred in deep-water environments, future submarine conflicts are anticipated to occur in shallow, littoral regions that are complex and noisy. Consequently, non-acoustic signatures will become increasingly important and the submarine stealth technology designed for deep-water operations may not be effective in these environments. One such non-acoustic signature is the surface detection of a submarine's trailing vortex wake. If a submarine runs in a slightly buoyant condition, its diving planes must be inclined at a negative angle of attack to generate sufficient downforce, which keeps the submarine from rising to the surface. As a result, the diving planes produce a pair of counter-rotating trailing vortices that propagate to the water surface. In previous deep-water operations, this was not an issue since the submarines could dive deep enough so that the vortex pair became incoherent before it reached the water surface. However, in shallow, littoral environments, submarines do not have the option of diving deep and, hence, the vortex pair can rise to the surface and leave a distinct signature that might be detectable by synthetic aperture radar. Such detection would jeopardize not only the mission of the submarine, but also the lives of military personnel on board. There has been another attempt to solve this problem and reduce the intensity of trailing vortices in the wakes of military submarines. The research of Quackenbush et al. over the past few years has been directed towards an idea called ''vortex leveraging

  7. Experimental stabilisation of 2D vortex patterns using time-dependent forcing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lauret, M.; Kamp, L. P. J.; van Heijst, G. J. F.; M.R. de Baar,; Nijmeijer, H.

    2013-01-01

    Experimental results of the effect of time-periodic and “chirped” (electro-magnetic) forcing on vortex patterns in shallow-water-layer flows are presented. Analogously to vibrational control, the use of a time-periodic forcing results in stabilisation of otherwise unstable vortex patterns. Chirped f

  8. Monopole-antimonopole and vortex rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Rosy; Wong, Khai-Ming

    2005-08-01

    The SU(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs theory supports the existence of monopoles, antimonopoles, and vortex rings. In this paper, we would like to present new exact static antimonopole-monopole-antimonopole (A-M-A) configurations. The net magnetic charge of these configurations is always -1, while the net magnetic charge at the origin is always +1 for all positive integer values of the solution's parameter m. However, when m increases beyond 1, vortex rings appear coexisting with these AMA configurations. The number of vortex rings increases proportionally with the value of m. They are located in space where the Higgs field vanishes along rings. We also show that a single-point singularity in the Higgs field does not necessarily correspond to a structureless 1-monopole at the origin but to a zero-size monopole-antimonopole-monopole (MAM) structure when the solution's parameter m is odd. This monopole is the Wu-Yang-type monopole and it possesses the Dirac string potential in the Abelian gauge. These exact solutions are a different kind of Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) solutions as they satisfy the first-order Bogomol'nyi equation but possess infinite energy due to a point singularity at the origin of the coordinate axes. They are all axially symmetrical about the z-axis.

  9. Vortex dynamics and irreversibility line in optimally doped SmFeAsO0.8F0.2 from ac susceptibility and magnetization measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prando, G.; Carretta, P.; de Renzi, R.; Sanna, S.; Palenzona, A.; Putti, M.; Tropeano, M.

    2011-05-01

    Ac susceptibility and static magnetization measurements were performed in the optimally doped SmFeAsO0.8F0.2 superconductor. The field-temperature phase diagram of the superconducting state was drawn, and, in particular, the features of the flux lines were derived. The dependence of the intragrain depinning energy on the magnetic field intensity was derived in the thermally activated flux-creep framework, enlightening a typical 1/H dependence in the high-field regime. The intragrain critical current density was extrapolated in the zero-temperature and zero-magnetic-field limit, showing a remarkably high value Jc0(0)~2×107 A/cm2, which demonstrates that this material is rather interesting for potential future technological applications.

  10. Anomalous vortex dynamics in κ-[bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene]2Cu[N(CN)2]Br: Evidence for field-induced magnetic order and unconventional superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahaise, U. G.; Chen, Qun; de Long, L. E.; Brock, C. P.; Wang, H. H.; Carlson, K. D.; Schlueter, J. A.; Williams, J. M.

    1995-02-01

    Anisotropic superconducting flux-line behavior of single-crystal κ-[bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiaful- valene]2Cu[N(CN)2]Br has been studied with dc magnetization and vibrating-reed (VR) techniques. A peak at T*(H) in the temperature dependence of the VR inverse quality factor 1/Q exhibits a shoulder for magnetic fields 0<μ0H<=0.5 T parallel to the conducting ac plane. The shoulder becomes unresolved near a kink in T*(H) at μ0H~=0.7 T. Discontinuities in 1/Q and the VR frequency shift occur for 0.1<=μ0H<=1.3 T applied perpendicular to the ac plane and temperatures T<=20 K, well into the normal state. These anomalies are preliminary evidence for a field-induced magnetic phase transition and unconventional superconductivity.

  11. The shock-vortex interaction patterns affected by vortex flow regime and vortex models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Keun-Shik; Barik, Hrushikesh; Chang, Se-Myong

    2009-08-01

    We have used a third-order essentially non-oscillatory method to obtain numerical shadowgraphs for investigation of shock-vortex interaction patterns. To search different interaction patterns, we have tested two vortex models (the composite vortex model and the Taylor vortex model) and as many as 47 parametric data sets. By shock-vortex interaction, the impinging shock is deformed to a S-shape with leading and lagging parts of the shock. The vortex flow is locally accelerated by the leading shock and locally decelerated by the lagging shock, having a severely elongated vortex core with two vertices. When the leading shock escapes the vortex, implosion effect creates a high pressure in the vertex area where the flow had been most expanded. This compressed region spreads in time with two frontal waves, an induced expansion wave and an induced compression wave. They are subsonic waves when the shock-vortex interaction is weak but become supersonic waves for strong interactions. Under a intermediate interaction, however, an induced shock wave is first developed where flow speed is supersonic but is dissipated where the incoming flow is subsonic. We have identified three different interaction patterns that depend on the vortex flow regime characterized by the shock-vortex interaction.

  12. Solitary vortex couples in viscoelastic Couette flow

    CERN Document Server

    Groisman, A; Groisman, Alexander; Steinberg, Victor

    1996-01-01

    We report experimental observation of a localized structure, which is of a new type for dissipative systems. It appears as a solitary vortex couple ("diwhirl") in Couette flow with highly elastic polymer solutions. A unique property of the diwhirls is that they are stationary, in contrast to the usual localized wave structures in both Hamiltonian and dissipative systems which are stabilized by wave dispersion. It is also a new object in fluid dynamics - a couple of vortices that build a single entity somewhat similar to a magnetic dipole. The diwhirls arise as a result of a purely elastic instability through a hysteretic transition at negligible Reynolds numbers. It is suggested that the vortex flow is driven by the same forces that cause the Weissenberg effect. The diwhirls have a striking asymmetry between the inflow and outflow, which is also an essential feature of the suggested elastic instability mechanism.

  13. What is the vortex ``transport entropy"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, Andrei; Reizer, Michael; Mitin, Vladimir

    2008-03-01

    Below the superconducting transition the large thermomagnetic effects in the type II superconductors are determined by magnetic vortices. These topological excitations are completely different from particle-hole exctitations in the Fermi liquid and, therefore, the thermomagnetic effects do not require particle-hole asymmetry. Thermomagnetic effects in the vortex state are widely described in terms of the ``transport entropy.'' Despite of intensive theoretical and experimental investigations, this mysterious quantity is still in conflict with either the Onsager principle or the third law of thermodynamics [1]. We resolve this forty years enigma taking into account the magnetization current in the presence of the temperature gradient. Then contributions of superconducting currents of vortices are canceled in the Nernst effect, and, therefore, in agreement with the Onsager relation, both the Nernst and Ettingshausen phenomena originate solely from vortex cores. Finally, the transport entropy turns out to be by a factor of 4 ln (λ/ ξ) smaller than that used in literature [1] (λ is the magnetic field penetration depth, ξ is the coherence length. For high-temperature cuprates this factor is ˜20. [1] R.P. Huebener, Magnetic flux structures in superconductors, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, (1979).

  14. Simulations of vortex generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumoutsakos, P.

    1995-01-01

    We are interested in the study, via direct numerical simulations, of active vortex generators. Vortex generators may be used to modify the inner part of the boundary layer or to control separation thus enhancing the performance and maneuverability of aerodynamic configurations. We consider generators that consist of a surface cavity elongated in the stream direction and partially covered with a moving lid that at rest lies flush with the boundary. Streamwise vorticity is generated and ejected due to the oscillatory motion of the lid. The present simulations complement relevant experimental investigations of active vortex generators at NASA Ames and Stanford University (Saddoughi, 1994, and Jacobson and Reynolds, 1993). Jacobson and Reynolds (1993) used a piezoelectric device in water, allowing for small amplitude high frequency oscillations. They placed the lid asymmetrically on the cavity and observed a strong outward velocity at the small gap of the cavity. Saddoughi used a larger mechanically driven device in air to investigate this flow and he observed a jet emerging from the wide gap of the configuration, contrary to the findings of Jacobson and Reynolds. Our task is to simulate the flows generated by these devices and to conduct a parametric study that would help us elucidate the physical mechanisms present in the flow. Conventional computational schemes encounter difficulties when simulating flows around complex configurations undergoing arbitrary motions. Here we present a formulation that achieves this task on a purely Lagrangian frame by extending the formulation presented by Koumoutsakos, Leonard and Pepin (1994). The viscous effects are taken into account by modifying the strength of the particles, whereas fast multipole schemes employing hundreds of thousands of particles allow for high resolution simulations. The results of the present simulations would help us assess some of the effects of three-dimensionality in experiments and investigate the role

  15. Multiply Phased Traveling BPS Vortex

    CERN Document Server

    Kimm, Kyoungtae; Cho, Y M

    2016-01-01

    We present the multiply phased current carrying vortex solutions in the U(1) gauge theory coupled to an $(N+1)$-component SU(N+1) scalar multiplet in the Bogomolny limit. Our vortex solutions correspond to the static vortex dressed with traveling waves along the axis of symmetry. What is notable in our vortex solutions is that the frequencies of traveling waves in each component of the scalar field can have different values. The energy of the static vortex is proportional to the topological charge of $CP^N$ model in the BPS limit, and the multiple phase of the vortex supplies additional energy contribution which is proportional to the Noether charge associated to the remaining symmetry.

  16. Origin of current-induced forces in an atomic gold wire: A first-principles study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandbyge, Mads; Stokbro, Kurt; Taylor, Jeremy Philip;

    2003-01-01

    We address the microscopic origin of the current-induced forces by analyzing results of first principles density functional calculations of atomic gold wires connected to two gold electrodes with different electrochemical potentials. We find that current induced forces are closely related...

  17. Quantitative determination of vortex core dimensions in head‑to‑head domain walls using off‑axis electron holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junginger, F; Klaui, M; Backes, D

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present a complete three-dimensional characterization of vortex core spin structures, which is important for future magnetic data storage based on vortex cores in disks and in wires. Using electron holography to examine vortices in patterned Permalloy devices we have quantitativ......In this paper, we present a complete three-dimensional characterization of vortex core spin structures, which is important for future magnetic data storage based on vortex cores in disks and in wires. Using electron holography to examine vortices in patterned Permalloy devices we have...

  18. Mapping the chemical potential dependence of current-induced spin polarization in a topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joon Sue; Richardella, Anthony; Hickey, Danielle Reifsnyder; Mkhoyan, K. Andre; Samarth, Nitin

    2015-10-01

    We report electrical measurements of the current-induced spin polarization of the surface current in topological insulator devices where contributions from bulk and surface conduction can be disentangled by electrical gating. The devices use a ferromagnetic tunnel junction (permalloy/Al 2O3 ) as a spin detector on a back-gated (Bi,Sb ) 2Te3 channel. We observe hysteretic voltage signals as the magnetization of the detector ferromagnet is switched parallel or antiparallel to the spin polarization of the surface current. The amplitude of the detected voltage change is linearly proportional to the applied dc bias current in the (Bi,Sb ) 2Te3 channel. As the chemical potential is tuned from the bulk bands into the surface state band, we observe an enhancement of the spin-dependent voltages up to 300% within the range of the electrostatic gating. Using a simple model, we extract the spin polarization near charge neutrality (i.e., the Dirac point).

  19. Microscopic vortex velocity in the inner crust and outer core of neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gügercinoğlu, Erbil; Alpar, M. Ali

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of the vortex motion in the superfluids of the inner crust and the outer core of neutron stars is a key ingredient in modelling a number of pulsar phenomena, including glitches and magnetic field evolution. After recalculating the microscopic vortex velocity in the inner crust, we evaluate the velocity for the vortices in the outer core for the first time. The vortex motion between pinning sites is found to be substantially faster in the inner crust than in the outer core, v_0^crust ˜ 107{ cm s^{-1}} ≫ v_0^core ˜ 1{ cm s^{-1}}. One immediate result is that vortex creep is always in the nonlinear regime in the outer core in contrast to the inner crust, where both nonlinear and linear regimes of vortex creep are possible. Other implications for pulsar glitches and magnetic field evolution are also presented.

  20. Microscopic Vortex Velocity in the Inner Crust and Outer Core of Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Gügercinoğlu, Erbil

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of the vortex motion in the superfluids of the inner crust and the outer core of neutron stars is a key ingredient in modeling a number of pulsar phenomena, including glitches and magnetic field evolution. After recalculating the microscopic vortex velocity in the inner crust, we evaluate the velocity for the vortices in the outer core for the first time. The vortex motion between pinning sites is found to be substantially faster in the inner crust than in the outer core, $v_0^{\\rm crust} \\sim 10^{7}\\mbox{\\cms} \\gg v_0^{\\rm core} \\sim 1\\mbox{\\cms}$. One immediate result is that vortex creep is always in the nonlinear regime in the outer core in contrast to the inner crust, where both nonlinear and linear regimes of vortex creep are possible. Other implications for pulsar glitches and magnetic field evolution are also presented.

  1. A generalization of vortex lines

    CERN Document Server

    Fecko, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Helmholtz theorem states that, in ideal fluid, vortex lines move with the fluid. Another Helmholtz theorem adds that strength of a vortex tube is constant along the tube. The lines may be regarded as integral surfaces of an 1-dimensional integrable distribution (given by the vorticity 2-form). In general setting of theory of integral invariants, due to Poincare and Cartan, one can find $d$-dimensional integrable distribution whose integral surfaces show both properties of vortex lines: they move with (abstract) fluid and, for appropriate generalization of vortex tube, strength of the latter is constant along the tube.

  2. Aircraft Wake Vortex Deformation in Turbulent Atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Hennemann, Ingo; Holzaepfel, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Large-scale distortion of aircraft wake vortices appears to play a crucial role for aircraft safety during approach and landing. Vortex distortion is investigated based on large eddy simulations of wake vortex evolution in a turbulent atmosphere. A vortex identification method is developed that can be adapted to the vortex scales of interest. Based on the identified vortex center tracks, a statistics of vortex curvature radii is established. This statistics constitutes the basis for understan...

  3. Bose glass scaling for superconducting vortex arrays revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, David R. [Lyman Laboratory of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Vinokur, V. M. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2000-03-01

    Lidmar and Wallin have recently pointed out that Bose glass scaling theory predicts a linear cusp in the phase boundary of vortex matter with correlated disorder as a function temperature of temperature and perpendicular magnetic field. Here, we collect a number of consequences of this observation for physical quantities near the Bose glass transition. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  4. Thickness dependence of vortex critical velocity in wide Nb films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimaldi, Gaia [CNR-INFM Regional Laboratory SuperMat, Via S. Allende, Baronissi, SA, I-84081 (Italy)], E-mail: grimaldi@sa.infn.it; Leo, Antonio; Nigro, Angela; Pace, Sandro; Cirillo, Carla; Attanasio, Carmine [CNR-INFM Regional Laboratory SuperMat, Via S. Allende, Baronissi, SA, I-84081 (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.R. Caianiello' , Universita di Salerno, Via S. Allende, Baronissi, SA, I-84081 (Italy)

    2008-04-01

    Pulsed I-V measurements performed on wide Nb films of different thickness show the electronic instability, at high driving currents, predicted by Larkin and Ovchinnikov (LO). We find that the associated vortex critical velocity v* decreases with the film thickness, and its temperature and magnetic field dependences exhibit some discrepancies with respect to the LO theoretical results.

  5. High velocity vortex channeling in vicinal YBCO thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puica, I; Lang, W; Durrell, J H

    2012-09-01

    We report on electrical transport measurements at high current densities on optimally doped YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin films grown on vicinal SrTiO3 substrates. Data were collected by using a pulsed-current technique in a four-probe arrangement, allowing to extend the current-voltage characteristics to high supercritical current densities (up to 24 MA cm(-2)) and high electric fields (more than 20 V/cm), in the superconducting state at temperatures between 30 and 80 K. The electric measurements were performed on tracks perpendicular to the vicinal step direction, such that the current crossed between ab planes, under magnetic field rotated in the plane defined by the crystallographic c axis and the current density. At magnetic field orientation parallel to the cuprate layers, evidence for the sliding motion along the ab planes (vortex channeling) was found. The signature of vortex channeling appeared to get enhanced with increasing electric field, due to the peculiar depinning features in the kinked vortex range. They give rise to a current-voltage characteristics steeper than in the more off-plane rectilinear vortex orientations, in the electric field range below approximately 1 V/cm. Roughly above this value, the high vortex channeling velocities (up to 8.6 km/s) could be ascribed to the flux flow, although the signature of ohmic transport appeared to be altered by unavoidable macroscopic self-heating and hot-electron-like effects.

  6. Vortex-Surface Interactions: Vortex Dynamics and Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-16

    a) Main vortex structures developing on a typical submarine hull; (b) Schematic illustrating a horseshoe vortex at a wing-body junction of a " Rood ...secondary vortices. Firstly, looking at Figure 7, showing only the secondary vortices being visualized by our technique , we see that a tongue of secondary

  7. Evolution of optical vortex distributions in stochastic vortex fields

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available dipole,? Opt. Commun. 236, 433?440 (2004). [23] Dana, I. and Freund, I., ?Vortex-lattice wave fields,? Opt. Commun. . [24] Jenkins, R., Banerji, J., and Davies, A., ?The generation of optical vortices and shape preserving vortex arrays in hollow...

  8. Magneto-Vortex Dynamo Model in Solar convection zone

    CERN Document Server

    Ershkov, Sergey V

    2011-01-01

    Here is presented a new magneto-vortex dynamo model for modeling & predicting of a processes in Solar plasma convection zone. Solar convection zone is located above the level r > 0,6-0,7 R, where R is a Solar radius. A key feature of such a model is that equation of Solar plasma motion as well as equation of magnetic fields evolution - are reduced to Helmholtz's vortex equation, which is up-graded in according with alpha-effect (Coriolis force forms an additional vorticity field or magnetic field due to Sun's differential rotation). Such an additional vorticity or magnetic field are proved to be concentrated at the proper belt in Solar convection zone under the influence of Coriolis force (at the middle latitudes of the Sun in respect to equator). Besides, such an an additional vorticity & magnetic fields are to be the basic sources of well-known phenomena "Maunder's butterfly" diagram.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic Vortex Behavior in Free-Surface Channel Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubricht, J.; Rhoads, J.; Spence, E.; Ji, H.

    2011-10-01

    Flowing liquid plasma-facing systems have been proposed for fusion devices due to their structural consistency and capability to withstand enormous heat fluxes. In support of these designs, the effects of magnetic field on the thermal mixing of conductive fluids need to be studied and understood. The Princeton Liquid Metal Experiment (LMX) consists of a free-surface, externally driven channel flow subjected to a strong vertical magnetic field. LMX uses an infrared camera and non-intrusive heat signatures to visually study the vortex street of a vertical cylinder while an array of potential probes has been installed to map the velocity profile for varying magnetic field strengths. Our studies show a decrease in surface activity with increasing field strength as well as distinct changes in vortex behavior. Velocity distributions across the channel are compared with infrared observations and the relationship between Strouhal number and magnetic field strength is examined.

  10. New Vortex States in Mesoscopic Aluminum Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terai, Y.; Yakabe, T.; Terakura, C.; Terashima, T.; Yasuzuka, S.; Takamasu, T.; Uji, S.

    2003-03-01

    We report resistance measurements in mesoscopic Al ring and disks whose sizes are much smaller than the superconducting coherence length of Al bulk. In the magnetic filed, the ring sample shows periodic oscillations in the resistance known as Little-Park oscillations in superconducting rings. In the disks, non-periodic resistance peaks are observed, which are due to transitions between the quantized states with different orbital quantum numbers. When the sample size is sufficiently small, the circular and square disks show a remarkable difference in the field intervals of the non-periodic resistance peaks. The results suggest that a new vortex state is induced by the effect of the sample topology.

  11. Vortex Flow Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    j . 1978. 93. Grabowski , W.J.; "Solutions of the Navier-Stokes Equations for Vortex Breakdown," NASA CR...including foreign nations. This technical report has been reviewed and is approved for publication. LAWRENCE W. ROGERS Q LOWELL C. KEEL, Major, USAF Project...or’ a w U - a LU LU U- LU C - J ’di 2 2 C LU I- 4 S Ua * - w x 2 40 20 I- 2 LU W S ~ 00 * U. 4 I- 𔃾 LU a 4 U 4 2 C C LU 4 a 4a 2 I- 4 a 3 9

  12. Robustness of a coherence vortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Cleberson R; Jesus-Silva, Alcenisio J; Fonseca, Eduardo J S

    2016-09-20

    We study, experimentally and theoretically, the behavior of a coherence vortex after its transmission through obstacles. Notably, we find that such a vortex survives and preserves its effective topological charge. Despite suffering changes on the modulus of the coherence function, these changes disappear during propagation.

  13. Vortex duality in higher dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, Aron Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    A dynamic vortex line traces out a world sheet in spacetime. This thesis shows that the information of all its dynamic behaviour is completely contained in the world sheet. Furthermore a mathematical framework for order–disorder phase transitions in terms of the proliferation of such vortex world sh

  14. Fast vortex oscillations in a ferrimagnetic disk near the angular momentum compensation point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se Kwon; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2017-07-01

    We theoretically study the oscillatory dynamics of a vortex core in a ferrimagnetic disk near its angular momentum compensation point, where the spin density vanishes but the magnetization is finite. Due to the finite magnetostatic energy, a ferrimagnetic disk of suitable geometry can support a vortex as a ground state similar to a ferromagnetic disk. In the vicinity of the angular momentum compensation point, the dynamics of the vortex resemble those of an antiferromagnetic vortex, which is described by equations of motion analogous to Newton's second law for the motion of particles. Owing to the antiferromagnetic nature of the dynamics, the vortex oscillation frequency can be an order of magnitude larger than the frequency of a ferromagnetic vortex, amounting to tens of GHz in common transition-metal based alloys. We show that the frequency can be controlled either by applying an external field or by changing the temperature. In particular, the latter property allows us to detect the angular momentum compensation temperature, at which the lowest eigenfrequency attains its maximum, by performing ferromagnetic resonance measurements on the vortex disk. Our work proposes a ferrimagnetic vortex disk as a tunable source of fast magnetic oscillations and a useful platform to study the properties of ferrimagnets.

  15. Exploiting bistable pinning of a ferromagnetic vortex for nitrogen-vacancy spin control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, R.; Wolf, M. S.; Berezovsky, J.

    2016-09-01

    The strong, localized magnetic field produced by the core of a ferromagnetic vortex provides a platform for addressing and controlling individual nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center spins in diamond. Translation of a vortex state in a thin ferromagnetic disk or wire can be understood as motion through an effective pinning potential, arising from the defects in the material. Coupling an NV spin to a vortex state in a proximal ferromagnet imprints the pinning landscape onto the spin transitions. Quantitative characterization of the pinning potential is necessary to control the spin-vortex system. First, we map the effective pinning potential by raster scanning the vortex core through a permalloy disk and measuring the hysteretic vortex displacement vs. magnetic field using differential magneto-optical microscopy. Second, we demonstrate that the interaction between the vortex and a nearby NV spin can be characterized using the pinning map and the path taken by the vortex core through the landscape. Finally, we identify locations of bistability in the pinning landscape, and use them to manipulate the nitrogen vacancy spin in a controlled bimodal fashion by switching the spin on and off resonance with a driving field on a ˜ 10 ns timescale at room temperature.

  16. A stress field in the vortex lattice in the type-II superconductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruszewski, Bogdan

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic flux can penetrate a type-II superconductor in the form of Abrikosov vortices (also called flux lines, flux tubes, or fluxons, each carrying a quantum of magnetic flux. These tiny vortices of supercurrent tend to arrange themselves in a triangular and/or quadratic flux-line lattice, which is more or less perturbed by material inhomogeneities that pin the flux lines. Pinning is caused by imperfections of the crystal lattice, such as dislocations, point defects, grain boundaries, etc. Hence, a honeycomb-like pattern of the vortex array presents some mechanical properties. If the Lorentz force of interactions between the vortices is much bigger than the pinning force, the vortex lattice behaves elastically. So we assume that the pinning force is negligible in the sequel and we deal with soft vortices. The vortex motion in the vortex lattice and/or creep of the vortices in the vortex fluid is accompanied by energy dissipation. Hence, except for the elastic properties, the vortex field is also of a viscous character. The main aim of the paper is a formulation of a thermoviscoelastic stress - strain constitutive law consisted of coexistence of the ordered and disordered states of the vortex field. Its form describes an auxetic-like thermomechanical (anomalous property of the vortex field.

  17. Vortex equations governing the fractional quantum Hall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, Luciano, E-mail: lmedina@nyu.edu [Department of Mathematics, Polytechnic School of Engineering, New York University, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    An existence theory is established for a coupled non-linear elliptic system, known as “vortex equations,” describing the fractional quantum Hall effect in 2-dimensional double-layered electron systems. Via variational methods, we prove the existence and uniqueness of multiple vortices over a doubly periodic domain and the full plane. In the doubly periodic situation, explicit sufficient and necessary conditions are obtained that relate the size of the domain and the vortex numbers. For the full plane case, existence is established for all finite-energy solutions and exponential decay estimates are proved. Quantization phenomena of the magnetic flux are found in both cases.

  18. The Potential-Vortex Theory of the Electromagnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Tomilin, A K

    2010-01-01

    Maxwell-Lorenz theory describes only vortex electromagnetic processes. Potential component of the magnetic field is usually excluded by the introduction of mathematical terms: Coulomb and Lorenz gauges. Proposed approach to the construction of the four-dimensional electrodynamics based on the total (four-dimensional) field theory takes into account both vortex and potential components of its characteristics. It is shown that potential components of the electromagnetic field have physical content. System of modified (generalized) Maxwell equations is written. With their help contradictions usually appearing while describing the distribution of electromagnetic waves, are eliminated. Works of other authors obtained similar results are presented and analyzed.

  19. Spin wave vortex from the scattering on Bloch point solitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho-Santos, V.L., E-mail: vagson.carvalho@usach.cl [Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia Baiano - Campus Senhor do Bonfim, Km 04 Estrada da Igara, 48970-000 Senhor do Bonfim, Bahia (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile and CEDENNA, Avda. Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile); Elías, R.G., E-mail: gabriel.elias@usach.cl [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile and CEDENNA, Avda. Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile); Nunez, A.S., E-mail: alnunez@dfi.uchile.cl [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 487-3, Santiago (Chile)

    2015-12-15

    The interaction of a spin wave with a stationary Bloch point is studied. The topological non-trivial structure of the Bloch point manifests in the propagation of spin waves endowing them with a gauge potential that resembles the one associated with the interaction of a magnetic monopole and an electron. By pursuing this analogy, we are led to the conclusion that the scattering of spin waves and Bloch points is accompanied by the creation of a magnon vortex. Interference between such a vortex and a plane wave leads to dislocations in the interference pattern that can be measurable by means of magnon holography.

  20. Large-scale-vortex dynamos in planar rotating convection

    CERN Document Server

    Guervilly, Céline; Jones, Chris A

    2016-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated how large-scale vortices may arise spontaneously in rotating planar convection. Here we examine the dynamo properties of such flows in rotating Boussinesq convection. For moderate values of the magnetic Reynolds number ($100 \\lesssim Rm \\lesssim 550$, with $Rm$ based on the box depth and the convective velocity), a large-scale (i.e. system-size) magnetic field is generated. The amplitude of the magnetic energy oscillates in time, out of phase with the oscillating amplitude of the large-scale vortex. The dynamo mechanism relies on those components of the flow that have length scales lying between that of the large-scale vortex and the typical convective cell size; smaller-scale flows are not required. The large-scale vortex plays a crucial role in the magnetic induction despite being essentially two-dimensional. For larger magnetic Reynolds numbers, the dynamo is small scale, with a magnetic energy spectrum that peaks at the scale of the convective cells. In this case, ...

  1. Lift enhancement by trapped vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of lift enhancement by trapped vortex are provided. Efforts are continuously being made to find simple ways to convert wings of aircraft from an efficient cruise configuration to one that develops the high lift needed during landing and takeoff. The high-lift configurations studied here consist of conventional airfoils with a trapped vortex over the upper surface. The vortex is trapped by one or two vertical fences that serve as barriers to the oncoming stream and as reflection planes for the vortex and the sink that form a separation bubble on top of the airfoil. Since the full three-dimensional unsteady flow problem over the wing of an aircraft is so complicated that it is hard to get an understanding of the principles that govern the vortex trapping process, the analysis is restricted here to the flow field illustrated in the first slide. It is assumed that the flow field between the two end plates approximates a streamwise strip of the flow over a wing. The flow between the endplates and about the airfoil consists of a spanwise vortex located between the suction orifices in the endplates. The spanwise fence or spoiler located near the nose of the airfoil serves to form a separated flow region and a shear layer. The vorticity in the shear layer is concentrated into the vortex by withdrawal of fluid at the suction orifices. As the strength of the vortex increases with time, it eventually dominates the flow in the separated region so that a shear or vertical layer is no longer shed from the tip of the fence. At that point, the vortex strength is fixed and its location is such that all of the velocity contributions at its center sum to zero thereby making it an equilibrium point for the vortex. The results of a theoretical analysis of such an idealized flow field are described.

  2. Hall Effect in the Vortex Lattice of d-Wave Superconductors with Anisotropic Fermi Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Wataru; Ueki, Hikaru; Kita, Takafumi

    2017-02-01

    On the basis of the augmented quasiclassical theory of superconductivity with the Lorentz force, we study the magnetic field dependence of the charge distribution due to the Lorentz force in a d-wave vortex lattice with anisotropic Fermi surfaces. Owing to the competition between the energy-gap and Fermi surface anisotropies, the charge profile in the vortex lattice changes dramatically with increasing magnetic field because of the overlaps of each nearest vortex-core charge. In addition, the accumulated charge in the core region may reverse its sign as a function of magnetic field. This strong field dependence of the vortex-core charge cannot be observed in the model with an isotropic Fermi surface.

  3. A new method to detect the vortex glass phase and its evidence in YBCO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesso, M G; Polichetti, M; Pace, S

    2008-09-24

    The evidence of the vortex glass phase has been obtained by analysing the nonlinear magnetic response of type-II superconductors. The method introduced here is based on a combined frequency dependence analysis of the real and imaginary part of the 1st and 3rd harmonics of the AC magnetic susceptibility. The analysis has been performed by taking into account both the components and the Cole-Cole plots (i.e. the imaginary part as a function of the real part). Numerical simulations have been used to identify the fingerprints of the magnetic behaviour in the vortex glass phase. These characteristics allowed the vortex glass phase to be distinguished from the other disordered phases, even those showing similar electrical properties. Finally, this method has been successfully applied to detecting the vortex glass phase in an YBCO bulk melt-textured sample.

  4. Superfluid Vortex Cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaeva, I. A.; Lindemann, U.; Jiang, N.; de Waele, A. T. A. M.; Thummes, G.

    2004-06-01

    A superfluid vortex cooler (SVC) is a combination of a fountain pump and a vortex cooler. The working fluid in the SVC is 4He at a temperature below the lambda line. The cooler has no moving parts, is gravity independent, and hardly requires any additional infrastructure. At saturated vapour pressure the SVC is capable of reaching a temperature as low as 0.75 K. At pressures close to the melting pressure the temperature can be brought down to 0.65 K. As the SVC operates only below the lambda line, it has to be precooled e.g. by a liquid-helium bath or a cryocooler. As a first step of our research we have carried out a number of experiments, using a liquid-helium bath as a precooler for the SVC. In this arrangement we have reached temperatures below 1 K with 3.5 mW heating power supplied to the fountain part of the SVC at 1.4 K. The next step was combining the SVC with a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR), developed at the University of Giessen. It is a two-stage G-M type refrigerator with 3He as a working fluid that reached a lowest temperature of 1.27 K. In this contribution we report on the results of the SVC tests in liquid helium and the progress in the integration of the SVC with the PTR.

  5. Flux-Vortex Pinning and Neutron Star Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpar, M. Ali

    2017-09-01

    G. Srinivasan et al. (1990) proposed a simple and elegant explanation for the reduction of the neutron star magnetic dipole moment during binary evolution leading to low mass X-ray binaries and eventually to millisecond pulsars: Quantized vortex lines in the neutron star core superfluid will pin against the quantized flux lines of the proton superconductor. As the neutron star spins down in the wind accretion phase of binary evolution, outward motion of vortex lines will reduce the dipole magnetic moment in proportion to the rotation rate. The presence of a toroidal array of flux lines makes this mechanism inevitable and independent of the angle between the rotation and magnetic axes. The incompressibility of the flux-line array (Abrikosov lattice) determines the epoch when the mechanism will be effective throughout the neutron star. Flux vortex pinning will not be effective during the initial young radio pulsar phase. It will, however, be effective and reduce the dipole moment in proportion with the rotation rate during the epoch of spindown by wind accretion as proposed by Srinivasan et al. The mechanism operates also in the presence of vortex creep.

  6. Investigation of Vortex Structures in Gas-Discharge Nonneutral Electron Plasma: II. Vortex Formation, Evolution and Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kervalishvili, N A

    2015-01-01

    The results of experimental investigations of inhomogeneities of gas-discharge nonneutral electron plasma obtained by using the nonperturbing experimental methods [N.A. Kervalishvili, arXiv:1502.02516 [physics.plasm-ph] (2015)] have been presented. Inhomogeneities are the dense solitary vortex structures stretched along the magnetic field, the lifetime of which is much greater than the time of electron-neutral collisions. The processes of formation, evolution and dynamics of vortex structures were studied. The periodic sequence of these processes is described for different geometries of discharge device.

  7. Enhanced Amplification and Fan-Out Operation in an All-Magnetic Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Saswati; Saha, Susmita; Mondal, Sucheta; Kumar, Dheeraj; Barman, Anjan

    2016-09-14

    Development of all-magnetic transistor with favorable properties is an important step towards a new paradigm of all-magnetic computation. Recently, we showed such possibility in a Magnetic Vortex Transistor (MVT). Here, we demonstrate enhanced amplification in MVT achieved by introducing geometrical asymmetry in a three vortex sequence. The resulting asymmetry in core to core distance in the three vortex sequence led to enhanced amplification of the MVT output. A cascade of antivortices travelling in different trajectories including a nearly elliptical trajectory through the dynamic stray field is found to be responsible for this amplification. This asymmetric vortex transistor is further used for a successful fan-out operation, which gives large and nearly equal gains in two output branches. This large amplification in magnetic vortex gyration in magnetic vortex transistor is proposed to be maintained for a network of vortex transistor. The above observations promote the magnetic vortex transistors to be used in complex circuits and logic operations.

  8. Regimes of flow past a vortex generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika; Okulov, V.L.; Naumov, I.V.

    2012-01-01

    A complete parametric investigation of the development of multi-vortex regimes in a wake past simple vortex generator has been carried out. It is established that the vortex structure in the wake is much more complicated than a simple monopole tip vortex. The vortices were studied by stereoscopic...

  9. Vortex jump behavior in coupled nanomagnetic heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S.; Phatak, C., E-mail: cd@anl.gov [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Petford-Long, A. K. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, 2220 Campus Drive, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Heinonen, O. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3112 (United States)

    2014-11-24

    The spin configuration and magnetic behavior in patterned nanostructures can be controlled by manipulating the interplay between the competing energy terms. This in turn requires fundamental knowledge of the magnetic interactions at the local nanometer scale. Here, we report on the spin structure and magnetization behavior of patterned discs containing exchange coupled ferromagnetic layers with additional exchange bias to an antiferromagnetic layer. The magnetization reversal was explored by direct local visualization of the domain behavior using in-situ Lorentz transmission electron microscopy, from which quantitative magnetic induction maps were reconstructed. The roles of the main competing energy terms were elucidated and the reversal mechanism was identified as a coupled phenomenon of incoherent rotation in the exchange-biased layer and localized vortex nucleation and discontinuous propagation in the free layer, including an anomalous jump in the trajectory. The observations were supported by micromagnetic simulations and modeled phase shift simulations. The work presented here provides fundamental insights into opportunities for macroscopic control of the energy landscape of magnetic heterostructures for functional applications.

  10. Some discussions on Arctic vortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Hai; Sun Lantao; Wu Huiding; Li Xiang

    2006-01-01

    The Arctic vortex is a persistent large-scale cyclonic circulation in the middle and upper troposphere and the stratosphere. Its activity and variation control the semi-permanent active centers of Pan-Arctic and the short-time cyclone activity in the subarctic areas. Its strength variation, which directly relates to the atmosphere, ocean, sea ice and ecosystem of the Arctic, can affect the lower atmospheric circulation, the weather of subarctic area and even the weather of middle latitude areas. The 2003 Chinese Second Arctic Research Expedition experienced the transition of the stratosphereic circulation from a warm anticyclone to a cold cyclone during the ending period of Arctic summertime, a typical establishing process of the polar vortex circulation. The impact of the polar vortex variation on the low-level circulation has been investigated by some scientists through studying the coupling mechanisms of the stratosphere and troposphere. The impact of the Stratospheric Sudden Warming (SFW) events on the polar vortex variation was drawing people's great attention in the fifties of the last century. The Arctic Oscillation (AO) , relating to the variation of the Arctic vortex, has been used to study the impact of the Arctic vortex on climate change. The recent Arctic vortex studies are simply reviewed and some discussions on the Arctic vertex are given in the paper. Some different views and questions are also discussed.

  11. Motion of a helical vortex

    CERN Document Server

    Fuentes, Oscar Velasco

    2015-01-01

    We study the motion of a single helical vortex in an unbounded, inviscid, incompressible fluid. The vortex is an infinite tube whose centerline is a helix and whose cross section is a circle of small radius (compared to the radius of curvature) where the vorticity is uniform and parallel to the centerline. Ever since Joukowsky (1912) deduced that this vortex translates and rotates steadily without change of form, numerous attempts have been made to compute these self-induced velocities. Here we use Hardin's (1982) solution for the velocity field to find new expressions for the vortex's linear and angular velocities. Our results, verified by numerically computing the Helmholtz integral and the Rosenhead-Moore approximation to the Biot-Savart law, are more accurate than previous results over the whole range of values of the vortex pitch and cross-section. We then use the new formulas to study the advection of passive particles near the vortex; we find that the vortex's motion and capacity to transport fluid dep...

  12. Ballistic rectification of vortex domain wall chirality at nanowire corners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omari, K.; Bradley, R. C.; Broomhall, T. J.; Hodges, M. P. P.; Hayward, T. J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Rosamond, M. C.; Linfield, E. H. [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Im, M.-Y. [Center for X-Ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Daegu 711-873 (Korea, Republic of); Fischer, P. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 94056 (United States)

    2015-11-30

    The interactions of vortex domain walls with corners in planar magnetic nanowires are probed using magnetic soft X-ray transmission microscopy. We show that when the domain walls are propagated into sharp corners using applied magnetic fields above a critical value, their chiralities are rectified to either clockwise or anticlockwise circulation depending on whether the corners turn left or right. Single-shot focused magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements are then used to demonstrate how, when combined with modes of domain propagation that conserve vortex chirality, this allows us to dramatically reduce the stochasticity of domain pinning at artificial defect sites. Our results provide a tool for controlling domain wall chirality and pinning behavior both in further experimental studies and in future domain wall-based memory, logic and sensor technologies.

  13. Faraday Rotation for Electron Beams Composed of Vortex Modes

    CERN Document Server

    Greenshields, Colin; Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Propagating vortex states, which carry orbital angular momentum (OAM), are well known in optics and have recently been demonstrated for electrons. While many analogies exist between photonic and electron vortex states, electron vortices in addition possess an orbital magnetic moment. We show here that propagation of electrons in a superposition of OAM states through a longitudinal magnetic field produces an analogue to optical Faraday rotation. In the optical domain, Faraday rotation is observed for polarisation, but not for superpositions of OAM states. The rotation we predict arises from the additional phase accumulated by the electron as it propagates in the presence of an external magnetic field. We propose an experiment in which this rotation can be measured directly in a transmission electron microscope, and discuss its relation to the well known classical image rotation associated with the Lorentz force.

  14. Vortex lines in a ferromagnetic spin-triplet superconductor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Li; Yang Jie; Xie Qun-Ying; Tian Miao; Duan Yi-Shi

    2012-01-01

    Based on Duan's topological current theory,we show that in a ferromagnetic spin-triplet superconductor there is a topological defect of string structures which can be interpreted as vortex lines.Such defects are different from the Abrikosov vortices in one-component condensate systems.We investigate the inner topological structure of the vortex lines.The topological charge density,velocity,and topological current of the vortex lines can all be expressed in terms of δ function,which indicates that the vortices can only arise from the zero points of an order parameter field.The topological charges of vortex lines are quantized in terms of the Hopf indices and Brouwer degrees of φ-mapping.The divergence of the self-induced magnetic field can be rigorously determined by the corresponding order parameter fields and its expression also takes the form of a δ-like function.Finally,based on the implicit function theorem and the Taylor expansion,we conduct detailed studies on the bifurcation of vortex topological current and find different directions of the bifurcation.

  15. Direct observation of multiferroic vortex domains in YMnO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinghua; Tan, Guotai; Gu, Lin; Yao, Yuan; Jin, Changqing; Wang, Yanguo; Duan, Xiaofeng; Yu, Richeng

    2013-01-01

    Topological vortices with swirling ferroelectric, magnetic and structural anti-phase relationship in hexagonal RMnO3 (R = Ho to Lu, Y, and Sc) have attracted much attention because of their intriguing behaviors. Herein, we report the structure of multiferroic vortex domains in YMnO3 at atomic scale using state-of-the-art aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Two types of displacements were identified among six domain walls (DWs); six translation-ferroelectric domains denoted by α+, γ-, β+, α-, γ+ and β-, respectively, were recognized, demonstrating the interlocking nature of the anti-vortex domain. We found that the anti-vortex core is about four unit cells wide. In addition, we reconstructed the vortex model with three swirling pairs of DWs along the [001] direction. These results are very critical for the understanding of topological behaviors and unusual properties of the multiferroic vortex.

  16. Bathtub vortex induced by instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizushima, Jiro; Abe, Kazuki; Yokoyama, Naoto

    2014-10-01

    The driving mechanism and the swirl direction of the bathtub vortex are investigated by the linear stability analysis of the no-vortex flow as well as numerical simulations. We find that only systems having plane symmetries with respect to vertical planes deserve research for the swirl direction. The bathtub vortex appearing in a vessel with a rectangular cross section having a drain hole at the center of the bottom is proved to be induced by instability when the flow rate exceeds a threshold. The Coriolis force is capable of determining the swirl direction to be cyclonic.

  17. Crystalline Scaling Geometries from Vortex Lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Bao, Ning

    2013-01-01

    We study magnetic geometries with Lifshitz and/or hyperscaling violation exponents (both with a hard wall cutoff in the IR and a smooth black brane horizon) which have a complex scalar field which couples to the magnetic field. The complex scalar is unstable to the production of a vortex lattice in the IR. The lattice is a normalizable mode which is relevant (i.e. grows into the IR.) When one considers linearized backreaction of the lattice on the metric and gauge field, the metric forms a crystalline structure. We analyze the scaling of the free energy, thermodynamic entropy, and entanglement in the lattice phase and find that in the smeared limit, the leading order correction to thermodynamic properties due to the lattice has the scaling behavior of a theory with a hyperscaling violation exponent between 0 and 1, indicating a flow to an effectively lower-dimensional theory in the deep IR.

  18. Dynamic signatures of driven vortex motion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crabtree, G. W.; Kwok, W. K.; Lopez, D.; Olsson, R. J.; Paulius, L. M.; Petrean, A. M.; Safar, H.

    1999-09-16

    We probe the dynamic nature of driven vortex motion in superconductors with a new type of transport experiment. An inhomogeneous Lorentz driving force is applied to the sample, inducing vortex velocity gradients that distinguish the hydrodynamic motion of the vortex liquid from the elastic and-plastic motion of the vortex solid. We observe elastic depinning of the vortex lattice at the critical current, and shear induced plastic slip of the lattice at high Lorentz force gradients.

  19. Vortex electronis and squids

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the nature of vortices in high-Tc superconductors is a crucial subject for research on superconductive electronics, especially for superconducting interference devices (SQUIDs), it is also a fundamental problem in condensed-matter physics. Recent technological progress in methods for both direct and indirect observation of vortices, e.g. scanning SQUID, terahertz imaging, and microwave excitation, has led to new insights into vortex physics, the dynamic behavior of vortices in junctions and related questions of noise. This book presents the current status of research activity and provides new information on the applications of SQUIDs, including magnetocardiography, immunoassays, and laser-SQUID microscopes, all of which are close to being commercially available.

  20. Entangled vector vortex beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Carvacho, Gonzalo; Graffitti, Francesco; Vitelli, Chiara; Piccirillo, Bruno; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    Light beams having a vectorial field structure, or polarization, that varies over the transverse profile and a central optical singularity are called vector vortex (VV) beams and may exhibit specific properties such as focusing into "light needles" or rotation invariance. VV beams have already found applications in areas ranging from microscopy to metrology, optical trapping, nano-optics, and quantum communication. Individual photons in such beams exhibit a form of single-particle quantum entanglement between different degrees of freedom. On the other hand, the quantum states of two photons can be also entangled with each other. Here, we combine these two concepts and demonstrate the generation of quantum entanglement between two photons that are both in VV states: a form of entanglement between two complex vectorial fields. This result may lead to quantum-enhanced applications of VV beams as well as to quantum information protocols fully exploiting the vectorial features of light.

  1. Vortex loops and Majoranas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chesi, Stefano [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); CEMS, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Jaffe, Arthur [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zürich, Zürich (Switzerland); Loss, Daniel [CEMS, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Pedrocchi, Fabio L. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel (Switzerland)

    2013-11-15

    We investigate the role that vortex loops play in characterizing eigenstates of interacting Majoranas. We give some general results and then focus on ladder Hamiltonian examples as a test of further ideas. Two methods yield exact results: (i) A mapping of certain spin Hamiltonians to quartic interactions of Majoranas shows that the spectra of these two examples coincide. (ii) In cases with reflection-symmetric Hamiltonians, we use reflection positivity for Majoranas to characterize vortices in the ground states. Two additional methods suggest wider applicability of these results: (iii) Numerical evidence suggests similar behavior for certain systems without reflection symmetry. (iv) A perturbative analysis also suggests similar behavior without the assumption of reflection symmetry.

  2. Low Temperature Limit of the Vortex Core Radius and the Kramer-Pesch Effect in NbSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. I.; Kiefl, R. F.; Brewer, J. H.; Chakhalian, J.; Dunsiger, S.; Morris, G. D.; Sonier, J. E.; Macfarlane, W. A.

    2000-08-01

    Muon spin rotation ( μSR) has been used to measure the magnetic field distribution in the vortex state of the type-II superconductor NbSe2 ( Tc = 7.0 K) below T = 2 K. The distribution is consistent with a highly ordered hexagonal vortex lattice with a well resolved high-field cutoff associated with the finite size of the vortex cores. The temperature dependence of the core radius is much weaker than the temperature dependence predicted from the Bogoliubov-de Gennes theory. Furthermore, the vortex radius measured by μSR near the low temperature quantum limit is about an order of magnitude larger than predicted.

  3. Vortex migration in protoplanetary discs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papaloizou John C. B.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Vortices embedded in protoplanetary discs can act as obstacles to the unperturbed disc flow. The resulting velocity perturbations propagate away from the vortex in the form of density waves that transport angular momentum. Any asymmetry between the inner and the outer density wave means that the region around the vortex has to change its angular momentum. We find that this leads to orbital migration of the vortex. Asymmetric waves always arise except in the case of a disc with constant pressure, for isothermal as well as non-isothermal discs. Depending on the size and strength of the vortex, the resulting migration time scales can be as short as a few thousand orbits.

  4. New omega vortex identification method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, ChaoQun; Wang, YiQian; Yang, Yong; Duan, ZhiWei

    2016-08-01

    A new vortex identification criterion called Ω-method is proposed based on the ideas that vorticity overtakes deformation in vortex. The comparison with other vortex identification methods like Q-criterion and λ 2-method is conducted and the advantages of the new method can be summarized as follows: (1) the method is able to capture vortex well and very easy to perform; (2) the physical meaning of Ω is clear while the interpretations of iso-surface values of Q and λ 2 chosen to visualize vortices are obscure; (3) being different from Q and λ 2 iso-surface visualization which requires wildly various thresholds to capture the vortex structure properly, Ω is pretty universal and does not need much adjustment in different cases and the iso-surfaces of Ω=0.52 can always capture the vortices properly in all the cases at different time steps, which we investigated; (4) both strong and weak vortices can be captured well simultaneously while improper Q and λ 2 threshold may lead to strong vortex capture while weak vortices are lost or weak vortices are captured but strong vortices are smeared; (5) Ω=0.52 is a quantity to approximately define the vortex boundary. Note that, to calculate Ω, the length and velocity must be used in the non-dimensional form. From our direct numerical simulation, it is found that the vorticity direction is very different from the vortex rotation direction in general 3-D vortical flow, the Helmholtz velocity decomposition is reviewed and vorticity is proposed to be further decomposed to vortical vorticity and non-vortical vorticity.

  5. Formation number for vortex dipoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadri, Vahid; Krueger, Paul S.

    2016-11-01

    This investigation considers the axisymmetric formation of two opposite sign concentric vortex rings from jet ejection between concentric cylinders. This arrangement is similar to planar flow in that the vortex rings will travel together when the gap between the cylinders is small, similar to a vortex dipole, but it has the advantage that the vortex motion is less constrained than the planar case (vortex stretching and vortex line curvature is allowed). The flow was simulated numerically at a jet Reynolds number of 1,000 (based on ΔR and the jet velocity), jet pulse length-to-gap ratio (L / ΔR) in the range 10-20, and gap-to-outer radius ratio (ΔR /Ro) in the range 0.01-0.1. Small gap ratios were chosen for comparison with 2D results. In contrast with 2D results, the closely paired vortices in this study exhibited pinch-off from the generating flow and finite formation numbers. The more complex flow evolution afforded by the axisymmetric model and its influence on the pinch-off process will be discussed. This material is based on work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1133876 and SMU. This supports are gratefully acknowledged.

  6. Vortex migration in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Paardekooper, S -J; Papaloizou, J C B

    2010-01-01

    We consider the radial migration of vortices in two-dimensional isothermal gaseous disks. We find that a vortex core, orbiting at the local gas velocity, induces velocity perturbations that propagate away from the vortex as density waves. The resulting spiral wave pattern is reminiscent of an embedded planet. There are two main causes for asymmetries in these wakes: geometrical effects tend to favor the outer wave, while a radial vortensity gradient leads to an asymmetric vortex core, which favors the wave at the side that has the lowest density. In the case of asymmetric waves, which we always find except for a disk of constant pressure, there is a net exchange of angular momentum between the vortex and the surrounding disk, which leads to orbital migration of the vortex. Numerical hydrodynamical simulations show that this migration can be very rapid, on a time scale of a few thousand orbits, for vortices with a size comparable to the scale height of the disk. We discuss the possible effects of vortex migrat...

  7. Effects of chiral helimagnets on vortex states in a superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Saoto; Kato, Masaru; Togawa, Yoshihiko

    2016-12-01

    We have investigated vortex states in chiral helimagnet/superconductor bilayer systems under an applied external magnetic field {H}{appl}, using the Ginzburg-Landau equations. Effect of the chiral helimagnet on the superconductor is taken as a magnetic field {H}{CHM}, which is perpendicular to the superconductor and oscillates spatially. For {H}{appl}=0 and weak {H}{CHM}, there appear pairs of up- and down-vortices. Increasing {H}{appl}, down-vortices gradually disappear, and the number of up-vortices increases in the large magnetic field region. Then, up-vortices form parallel, triangular, or square structures.

  8. Optical Vortex Solitons in Parametric Wave Mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, T J; Buryak, A V; Sammut, R A; Alexander, Tristram J.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Buryak, Alexander V.; Sammut, Rowland A.

    2000-01-01

    We analyze two-component spatial optical vortex solitons supported by degenerate three- or four-wave mixing in a nonlinear bulk medium. We study two distinct cases of such solitons, namely, parametric vortex solitons due to phase-matched second-harmonic generation in a optical medium with competing quadratic and cubic nonlinear response, and vortex solitons in the presence of third-harmonic generation in a cubic medium. We find, analytically and numerically, the structure of two-component vortex solitons, and also investigate modulational instability of their plane-wave background. In particular, we predict and analyze in detail novel types of vortex solitons, a `halo-vortex', consisting of a two-component vortex core surrounded by a bright ring of its harmonic field, and a `ring-vortex' soliton which is a vortex in a harmonic field that guides a bright localized ring-like mode of a fundamental frequency field.

  9. Evolution of an electron plasma vortex in a strain flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, J. R.

    2016-10-01

    Coherent vortex structures are ubiquitous in fluids and plasmas and are examples of self-organized structures in nonlinear dynamical systems. The fate of these structures in strain and shear flows is an important issue in many physical systems, including geophysical fluids and shear suppression of turbulence in plasmas. In two-dimensions, an inviscid, incompressible, ideal fluid can be modeled with the Euler equations, which is perhaps the simplest system that supports vortices. The Drift-Poisson equations for pure electron plasmas in a strong, uniform magnetic field are isomorphic to the Euler equations, and so electron plasmas are an excellent test bed for the study of 2D vortex dynamics. This talk will describe results from a new experiment using pure electron plasmas in a specially designed Penning-Malmberg (PM) trap to study the evolution of an initially axisymmetric 2D vortex subject to externally imposed strains. Complementary vortex-in-cell simulations are conducted to validate the 2D nature of the experimental results and to extend the parameter range of these studies. Data for vortex destruction using both instantaneously applied and time dependent strains with flat (constant vorticity) and extended radial profiles will be presented. The role of vortex self-organization will be discussed. A simple 2D model works well for flat vorticity profiles. However, extended profiles exhibit more complicated behavior, such as filamentation and stripping; and these effects and their consequences will be discussed. Work done in collaboration with N. C. Hurst, D. H. E. Dubin, and C. M. Surko.

  10. New vortex-matter size effect observed in Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8 + delta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y M; Fuhrer, M S; Zettl, A; Ooi, S; Tamegai, T

    2001-04-16

    The vortex-matter 3D to 2D phase transition is studied in micron-sized Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8 + delta) single crystals using local Hall magnetization measurements. At a given temperature, the second magnetization peak, the signature of a possible 3D--2D vortex phase transition, disappears for samples smaller than a critical length. We suggest that this critical length should be equated with the 2D vortex lattice ab-plane correlation length R(2D)(c). The magnitude and temperature dependence of R(2D)(c) agree well with Larkin-Ovchinnikov collective pinning theory.

  11. Electronic thermal conductivity in a superconducting vortex state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, H. [Department of Physics, Okayama University, Tsushima, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan)], E-mail: adachi@itp.phys.ethz.ch; Miranovic, P. [Department of Physics, University of Montenegro, Podgorica 81000 (Montenegro); Ichioka, M.; Machida, K. [Department of Physics, Okayama University, Tsushima, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan)

    2007-10-01

    The longitudinal component of the electronic thermal conductivity {kappa}{sub xx} in a superconducting vortex state is calculated as a function of magnetic field B. Calculations are performed by taking account of the spatial dependence of normal Green's function g, which was neglected in the previous studies using the Brandt-Pesch-Tewordt method. We discuss the possibility of using {kappa}{sub xx}(B) as a probe of the pair potential symmetry.

  12. Electronic thermal conductivity in a superconducting vortex state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, H.; Miranovic, P.; Ichioka, M.; Machida, K.

    2007-10-01

    The longitudinal component of the electronic thermal conductivity κxx in a superconducting vortex state is calculated as a function of magnetic field B. Calculations are performed by taking account of the spatial dependence of normal Green's function g, which was neglected in the previous studies using the Brandt-Pesch-Tewordt method. We discuss the possibility of using κxx(B) as a probe of the pair potential symmetry.

  13. Quasi-particle vortex scattering in UPt{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suderow, H.; Huxley, A. [CEA Centre des Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, Grenoble (France). DRFMC; Aubin, H.; Behnia, K. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides (CNRS), Universite Paris-Sud, 91405, Orsay (France)

    1997-09-08

    We present a study of thermal conductivity in the superconducting phase of the heavy fermion superconductor UPt{sub 3}. The angular dependence of the thermal conductivity shows a cosine-square law when the magnetic field rotates in the basal plane. For a field rotating out of the basal plane, however, our results present features which can not be explained through our current conventional picture for vortex scattering of heat-carrying quasi-particles. (orig.).

  14. Study of transient current induced by heavy-ion microbeams in Si and GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirao, Toshio; Nashiyama, Isamu; Kamiya, Tomihiro; Suda, Tamotu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Heavy-ion microbeams were applied to the study of mechanism of single event upset (SEU). Transient current induced in p{sup +}n junction diodes by strike of heavy ion microbeam were measured by using a high-speed digitizing sampling system. (author)

  15. Understanding the catalyst-free transformation of amorphous carbon into graphene by current-induced annealing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barreiro, A.; Börrnert, F.; Avdoshenko, S.M.; Rellinghaus, B.; Cunibert, G.; Rümmeli, M.H.; Vandersypen, L.M.K.

    2013-01-01

    We shed light on the catalyst-free growth of graphene from amorphous carbon (a–C) by current induced annealing by witnessing the mechanism both with in-situ transmission electron microscopy and with molecular dynamics simulations. Both in experiment and in simulation, we observe that small a–C clust

  16. Activation energy of fractional vortices and spectroscopy of a vortex molecule in long Josephson junction; Aktivierungsenergie fraktionaler Flusswirbel und Spektroskopie an Vortex-Molekuelen in langen Josephsonkontakten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckenmaier, Kai

    2010-06-09

    This thesis is divided into two parts, the measurement of the activation energy of a fractional vortex and the spectroscopy of a vortex-molecule. Fractional vortices can be studied in long 0-{kappa} Josephson junctions, where a jump of the Josephson phase is created artificially with a pair of tiny current injectors. To compensate for this phase discontinuity, a {rho} vortex is formed. Here, {rho} describes the vortex's so called topological charge. The {rho} vortices are pinned at the discontinuity and they carry the fraction ({rho}/2).{phi}{sub 0} of magnetic flux, with the magnetic flux quantum {phi}{sub 0} 2.07.10{sup -15}. Two stable vortex configurations are possible, a direct Vortex and a complementary one. {rho} depends on the injector current. When the bias current of the junction exceeds a characteristic threshold, which dependents on {rho}, the Lorentz force is bigger than the pinning force of the vortex and a fluxon is pulled away. In this case a complementary ({rho}-2{pi}) vortex is left behind. This switching of the {rho} vortex and the resulting emission of a fluxon can be described as a Kramers like escape of a particle out of a tilted washboard potential. The washboard potential is tilted to the point where the barrier is small enough, so that the particle can escape via thermal or quantum fluctuations. In the case of thermal fluctuations the barrier height is called activation energy. The activation energy can be determined by measuring the junction's switching current statistics. In this thesis, the activation energy, necessary for the vortex escape, was measured as a function of {rho} and a homogenous external magnetic field perpendicular to the junction. The main focus was the investigation of 0-{pi} junctions. The temperature dependence of the activation energy was investigated, too. It turns out, that the transition-state-theory is convenient to describe the switching probability of the standard Nb-AlO{sub x}-Nb junctions at 4.2 K

  17. Spontaneous vortex nanodomain arrays at ferroelectric heterointerfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Christopher T; Winchester, Benjamin; Zhang, Yi; Kim, Sung-Joo; Melville, Alexander; Adamo, Carolina; Folkman, Chad M; Baek, Seung-Hyub; Eom, Chang-Beom; Schlom, Darrell G; Chen, Long-Qing; Pan, Xiaoqing

    2011-02-09

    The polarization of the ferroelectric BiFeO(3) sub-jected to different electrical boundary conditions by heterointerfaces is imaged with atomic resolution using a spherical aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. Unusual triangular-shaped nanodomains are seen, and their role in providing polarization closure is understood through phase-field simulations. Heterointerfaces are key to the performance of ferroelectric devices, and this first observation of spontaneous vortex nanodomain arrays at ferroelectric heterointerfaces reveals properties unlike the surrounding film including mixed Ising-Néel domain walls, which will affect switching behavior, and a drastic increase of in-plane polarization. The importance of magnetization closure has long been appreciated in multidomain ferromagnetic systems; imaging this analogous effect with atomic resolution at ferroelectric heterointerfaces provides the ability to see device-relevant interface issues. Extension of this technique to visualize domain dynamics is envisioned.

  18. Ferromagnetic vortex core switching at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebecki, Kristof M.; Nowak, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    An approach for the investigation of vortex core switching is presented. Thermal effects up to the Curie point are included in a micromagnetic framework based on the recently developed Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch equation. In this approach it is easier to avoid numerical discretization artifacts, commonly present when a Bloch point is mediating the switching process. Switching in thin circular permalloy disks caused by the application of a slowly increasing magnetic field oriented orthogonally to the disk is considered. An energy barrier which can be overcome by thermal fluctuations is taken into account, leading to a strong influence of the temperature on the switching field. In particular, the switching field goes to zero at a significantly smaller temperature than the Curie temperature. The deduced nucleation volume is smaller than the typical grain size in permalloy.

  19. Spin-dependent transport and current-induced spin transfer torque in a disordered zigzag silicene nanoribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Benliang; Zhou, Benhu; Liu, Guang; Guo, Dan; Zhou, Guanghui

    2016-11-01

    We study theoretically the spin-dependent transport and the current-induced spin transfer torque (STT) for a zigzag silicene nanoribbon (ZSiNR) with Anderson-type disorders between two ferromagnetic electrodes. By using the nonequilibrium Green's function method, it is predicted that the transport property and STT through the junction depend sensitively on the disorder, especially around the Dirac point. As a result, the conductance decreases and increases for two electrode in parallel and antiparallel configurations, respectively. Due to the disorder, the magnetoresistance (MR) decreases accordingly even within the energy regime for the perfect plateau without disorders. In addition, the conductance versus the relative angle of the magnetization shows a cosine-like behavior. The STT per unit of the bias voltage versus the angle of the magnetization exhibits a sine-like behavior, and versus the Fermi energy is antisymmetrical to the Dirac point and exhibits sharp peaks. Furthermore, the peaks of the STT are suppressed much as the disorder strength increases, especially around the Dirac point. The results obtained here may provide a valuable suggestion to experimentally design spin valve devices based on ZSiNR.

  20. Spin-dependent transport and current-induced spin transfer torque in a disordered zigzag silicene nanoribbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Benliang [Department of Physics and Key Laboratory for Low-Dimensional Quantum Structures and Manipulation (Ministry of Education), Synergetic Innovation Center for Quantum Effects and Applications of Hunan, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Zhou, Benhu [Department of Physics, Shaoyang University, Shaoyang 422001 (China); Liu, Guang; Guo, Dan [Department of Physics and Key Laboratory for Low-Dimensional Quantum Structures and Manipulation (Ministry of Education), Synergetic Innovation Center for Quantum Effects and Applications of Hunan, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Zhou, Guanghui, E-mail: ghzhou@hunnu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Key Laboratory for Low-Dimensional Quantum Structures and Manipulation (Ministry of Education), Synergetic Innovation Center for Quantum Effects and Applications of Hunan, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China)

    2016-11-01

    We study theoretically the spin-dependent transport and the current-induced spin transfer torque (STT) for a zigzag silicene nanoribbon (ZSiNR) with Anderson-type disorders between two ferromagnetic electrodes. By using the nonequilibrium Green's function method, it is predicted that the transport property and STT through the junction depend sensitively on the disorder, especially around the Dirac point. As a result, the conductance decreases and increases for two electrode in parallel and antiparallel configurations, respectively. Due to the disorder, the magnetoresistance (MR) decreases accordingly even within the energy regime for the perfect plateau without disorders. In addition, the conductance versus the relative angle of the magnetization shows a cosine-like behavior. The STT per unit of the bias voltage versus the angle of the magnetization exhibits a sine-like behavior, and versus the Fermi energy is antisymmetrical to the Dirac point and exhibits sharp peaks. Furthermore, the peaks of the STT are suppressed much as the disorder strength increases, especially around the Dirac point. The results obtained here may provide a valuable suggestion to experimentally design spin valve devices based on ZSiNR.

  1. Vortex Laser at Exceptional Point

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xing-Yuan; Li, Ying; Li, Bo; Ma, Ren-Min

    2016-01-01

    The optical vortices carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) are commonly generated by modulating the available conventional light beam. This article shows that a micro-laser operates at the exceptional point (EP) of the non-Hermitian quantum system can directly emit vortex laser with well-defined OAM at will. Two gratings (the refractive index modulation and along azimuthal direction and the grating protruding from the micro-ring cavity) modulate the eigenmode of a micro-ring cavity to be a vortex laser mode. The phase-matching condition ensures that we can tune the OAM of the vortex beam to be arbitrary orders by changing the grating protruding from the micro-ring cavity while the system is kept at EP. The results are obtained by analytical analysis and confirmed by 3D full wave simulations.

  2. Dynamics of vortex matter in YBCO sub-micron bridges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papari, G., E-mail: papari@fisica.unina.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Carillo, F. [NEST, CNR-NANO and Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Stornaiuolo, D.; Massarotti, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); CNR-SPIN UOS Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte SantAngelo, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Longobardi, L. [American Physical Society, 1 Research Road, Ridge, NY 11961 (United States); Beltram, F. [NEST, CNR-NANO and Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Tafuri, F. [CNR-SPIN UOS Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte SantAngelo, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale e dell' informazione, Seconda Universit‘a di Napoli, via Roma 29, 81031 Aversa (CE) (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Superconducting properties of YBCO nanowires in the width range ξvortex lattice melting temperature. • Magnetoresistence oscillations: entrance of vortex rows and modulation of screening currents. - Abstract: We have developed a fabrication process that allows us to realize pure YBCO nanowires displaying robust superconductivity at widths w as low as 160 nm. We can modify the process in order to maintain a Au protective layer. This allows us to scale our nanowires even further to widths as low as 50 nm. We have studied how the presence of vortices and the occurrence of phase slips affect the transport properties of nanowires in the width range ξmagnetic penetration depth. Magnetoresistance curves present features which are related to the effect of screening currents. Vortex entry barrier is found to scale with the width. Our findings confirm that for widths ξvortex flow.

  3. Phase transition in vortex system in Bi2212:Pb monocrystal

    CERN Document Server

    Uspenskaya, L S; Rakhmanov, A L

    2002-01-01

    Penetration of the magnetic flux into the (Bi sub 0 sub . sub 8 sub 4 Pb sub 0 sub . sub 1 sub 6) sub 2 sub . sub 2 Sr sub 2 CaCu sub 2 O sub 8 high-temperature superconductor monocrystal is studied thorough the magnetooptical method in the crossed magnetic fields. It is shown that the magnetic flux penetration in the low-temperature areas is anisotropic: it moves primarily along the magnetic field, applied in the sample plane, and this anisotropy grows with the temperature growth. At the temperature of T sub m = 54 +- 2 K there takes place sharp change in the character of the magnetic field penetration into the superconductor, whereby the direction of the flux motion discontinues to be dependent on the direction and value of the magnetic field applied in the sample plane. This effect is interpreted within the frames of representations on the phase transition in the vortex system connected with a sharp decrease in the correlations of the vortex position in the different CuO-planes

  4. A Experimental Study of Viscous Vortex Rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziedzic, Mauricio

    Motivated by the role played by vortex rings in the process of turbulent mixing, the work is focused on the problem of stability and viscous decay of a single vortex ring. A new classification is proposed for vortex rings which is based on extensive hot-wire measurements of velocity in the ring core and wake and flow visualization. Vortex rings can be classified as laminar, wavy, turbulence-producing, and turbulent. Prediction of vortex ring type is shown to be possible based on the vortex ring Reynolds number. Linear growth rates of ring diameter with time are observed for all types of vortex rings, with different growth rates occurring for laminar and turbulent vortex rings. Data on the viscous decay of vortex rings are used to provide experimental confirmation of the accuracy of Saffman's equation for the velocity of propagation of a vortex ring. Experimental data indicate that instability of the vortex ring strongly depends on the mode of generation and can be delayed by properly adjusting the generation parameters. A systematic review of the literature on vortex-ring interactions is presented in the form of an appendix, which helps identify areas in which further research may be fruitful.

  5. Fractional vortex dipole phase filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Joseph, Joby; Senthilkumaran, Paramasivam

    2014-10-01

    In spatial filtering experiments, the use of vortex phase filters plays an important role in realizing isotropic edge enhancement. In this paper, we report the use of a vortex dipole phase filter in spatial filtering. A dipole made of fractional vortices is used, and its filtering characteristics are studied. It is observed that the filter performance can be tuned by varying the distance of separation between the vortices of the dipole to achieve better contrast and output noise suppression, and when this distance tends to infinity, the filter performs like a 1-D Hilbert mask. Experimental and simulation results are presented.

  6. Vortex ice in nanostructured superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichhardt, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reichhardt, Cynthia J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Libal, Andras J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate using numerical simulations of nanostructured superconductors that it is possible to realize vortex ice states that are analogous to square and kagome ice. The system can be brought into a state that obeys either global or local ice rules by applying an external current according to an annealing protocol. We explore the breakdown of the ice rules due to disorder in the nanostructure array and show that in square ice, topological defects appear along grain boundaries, while in kagome ice, individual defects appear. We argue that the vortex system offers significant advantages over other artificial ice systems.

  7. Generation of nonlinear vortex precursors

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yue-Yue; Liu, Chengpu

    2016-01-01

    We numerically study the propagation of a few-cycle pulse carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) through a dense atomic system. Nonlinear precursors consisting of high-order vortex har- monics are generated in the transmitted field due to ultrafast Bloch oscillation. The nonlinear precursors survive to propagation effects and are well separated with the main pulse, which provide a straightforward way of measuring precursors. By the virtue of carrying high-order OAM, the obtained vortex precursors as information carriers have potential applications in optical informa- tion and communication fields where controllable loss, large information-carrying capacity and high speed communication are required.

  8. Superconductor-ferromagnet bilayer under external drive: The role of vortex-antivortex matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frota, D. A.; Chaves, A.; Ferreira, W. P.; Farias, G. A.; Milošević, M. V.

    2016-03-01

    Using advanced Ginzburg-Landau simulations, we study the superconducting state of a thin superconducting film under a ferromagnetic layer, separated by an insulating oxide, in applied external magnetic field and electric current. The taken uniaxial ferromagnet is organized into a series of parallel domains with alternating polarization of out-of-plane magnetization, sufficiently strong to induce vortex-antivortex pairs in the underlying superconductor in absence of other magnetic field. We show the organization of such vortex-antivortex matter into rich configurations, some of which are not matching the periodicity of the ferromagnetic film. The variety of possible configurations is enhanced by applied homogeneous magnetic field, where additional vortices in the superconductor may lower the energy of the system by either annihilating the present antivortices under negative ferromagnetic domains or by lowering their own energy after positioning under positive ferromagnetic domains. As a consequence, both the vortex-antivortex reordering in increasing external field and the evolution of the energy of the system are highly nontrivial. Finally, we reveal the very interesting effects of applied dc electric current on the vortex-antivortex configurations, since resulting Lorentzian force has opposite direction for vortices and antivortices, while direction of the applied current with respect to ferromagnetic domains is of crucial importance for the interaction of the applied and the Meissner current, as well as the consequent vortex-antivortex dynamics—both of which are reflected in the anisotropic critical current of the system.

  9. Axial dipolar dynamo action in the Taylor-Green vortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstulovic, Giorgio; Thorner, Gentien; Vest, Julien-Piera; Fauve, Stephan; Brachet, Marc

    2011-12-01

    We present a numerical study of the magnetic field generated by the Taylor-Green vortex. We show that periodic boundary conditions can be used to mimic realistic boundary conditions by prescribing the symmetries of the velocity and magnetic fields. This gives insight into some problems of central interest for dynamos: the possible effect of velocity fluctuations on the dynamo threshold, and the role of boundary conditions on the threshold and on the geometry of the magnetic field generated by dynamo action. In particular, we show that an axial dipolar dynamo similar to the one observed in a recent experiment can be obtained with an appropriate choice of the symmetries of the magnetic field. The nonlinear saturation is studied and a simple model explaining the magnetic Prandtl number dependence of the super- and subcritical nature of the dynamo transition is given.

  10. The enhancement of vortex pinning in ferromagnet/superconductor bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cieplak, Marta Z.; Adamus, Z.; Abal' oshev, A.; Abal' osheva, I.; Berkowski, M. [Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikw 32/46, 02668 Warsaw (Poland); Cheng, X.M.; Sang, Hai; Chien, C.L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md 21218 (United States)

    2005-03-01

    The magnetic-domain induced vortex pinning is studied in the ferromagnet/superconductor bilayers (FSB's), in which the F layers are Co/Pt multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, and the S layers are either niobium or high temperature superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (YBCO). The magnetization measurements reveal the enhancement of the flux pinning in both types of FSB's during the reversal of the magnetization of the F layer, but the details of the behavior depend on the type of the S layer. In the case of niobium FSB the maximum of pinning appears when the F layer is in the final stage of the magnetic reversal process, while the FSB with YBCO shows the maximum when the F layer is saturated. The possible origins of these differences are discussed. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Memory-bit selection and recording by rotating fields in vortex-core cross-point architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Y. -S.; Jung, H.; Lee, K. -S.; Fischer, P.; Kim, S. -K.

    2010-10-21

    In one of our earlier studies [Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 022509 (2008)], we proposed a concept of robust information storage, recording and readout, which can be implementaed in nonvolatile magnetic random-access memories and is based on the energetically degenerated twofold ground states of vortex-core magnetizations. In the present study, we experimentally demonstrate reliable memory-bit selection and information recording in vortex-core cross-point architecture, specifically using a two-by-two vortex-state disk array. In order to efficiently switch a vortex core positioned at the intersection of crossed electrodes, two orthogonal addressing electrodes are selected, and then two Gaussian pulse currents of optimal pulse width and time delay are applied. Such tailored pulse-type rotating magnetic fields which occurs only at the selected intersection is prerequisite for a reliable memory-bit selection and low-power-consumption recording of information in the existing cross-point architecture.

  12. Lift Enhancement and Oscillatory Suppression of Vortex-induced Vibration in Shear Flow by Loentz Force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张辉; 范宝春; 李鸿志

    2012-01-01

    The flow of the weak electrolyte solution can be controlled by Lorentz force achieved with the suitable magnetic and electric fields, and it has the advantages of vortex street suppression, drag reduction, lift enhancement and oscillatory suppression for the flow over a bluff body. The electro-magnetic control of vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of a circular cyl- inder in the shear flow was investigated numerically in the exponential-polar coordinates attached on the moving cylinder for Re = 150. With the effect of background vorticity, the vortex street of VIV cylinder was composed of two parallel rows with an opposite sign of the vortices which inclines toward the lower side and the strength of upper vortex is larger than that of lower vortex. The lift force vibrated periodically with the effect of vortex shedding and the mean value was negative due to the background vorticity. The Lorentz force for controlling the VIV cylinder was classified into the field Lorentz force and the wall Lorentz force. The field Lorentz force suppresses the lift oscillation, and in turn, suppresses the VIV, whereas the wall Loreutz force increases the lift.

  13. Observation of vortex coalescence, vortex chains and crossing vortices in the anisotropic spin-triplet superconductor Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasselbach, K. [CRTBT-CNRS, BP 166X, 38042 Grenoble (France)], E-mail: klaus.hasselbach@grenoble.cnrs.fr; Dolocan, V.O. [CRTBT-CNRS, BP 166X, 38042 Grenoble (France)], E-mail: dolocan@cpfs.mpg.de; Lejay, P. [CRTBT-CNRS, BP 166X, 38042 Grenoble (France); Mailly, Dominique [LPN-CNRS, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France)

    2007-09-01

    Scanning {mu}SQUID force microscopy is used to study magnetic flux structures in single crystals of the layered spin-triplet superconductor Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4}. Images of the magnetic flux configuration above the a{sup {yields}}b{sup {yields}}-face of the cleaved crystal are acquired, mostly after field-cooling the sample. For low applied magnetic fields, individual vortices are observed, each carrying a single quantum of flux. Above 1 G, coalescence of vortices is discovered. The coalescing vortices may indicate the presence of domains of a chiral order parameter. When the applied field is tilted from the c{sup {yields}}-axis, we observe a gradual transition from vortex domains to vortex chains. The in-plane component of the applied magnetic field transforms the vortex domains to vortex chains by aligning them along the field direction.This behavior and the inter-chain distance varies in qualitative agreement with the Ginzburg-Landau theory of anisotropic 3D superconductors. The effective mass anisotropy of Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4}, {gamma} = 20, is the highest observed in three-dimensional superconductors. When the applied field is closely in-plane, the vortex form flux channels confined between the crystal-layers. Residual Abrikosov vortices are pinned preferentially on these channels. Thus the in-plane vortices are decorated by crossing Abrikosov vortices: two vortex orientations are apparent simultaneously, one along the layers and the other perpendicular to the layers.

  14. Nonlinear Dynamics of Non-uniform Current-Vortex Sheets in Magnetohydrodynamic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, C.; Nishihara, K.; Sano, T.

    2016-10-01

    A theoretical model is proposed to describe fully nonlinear dynamics of interfaces in two-dimensional MHD flows based on an idea of non-uniform current-vortex sheet. Application of vortex sheet model to MHD flows has a crucial difficulty because of non-conservative nature of magnetic tension. However, it is shown that when a magnetic field is initially parallel to an interface, the concept of vortex sheet can be extended to MHD flows (current-vortex sheet). Two-dimensional MHD flows are then described only by a one-dimensional Lagrange parameter on the sheet. It is also shown that bulk magnetic field and velocity can be calculated from their values on the sheet. The model is tested by MHD Richtmyer-Meshkov instability with sinusoidal vortex sheet strength. Two-dimensional ideal MHD simulations show that the nonlinear dynamics of a shocked interface with density stratification agrees fairly well with that for its corresponding potential flow. Numerical solutions of the model reproduce properly the results of the ideal MHD simulations, such as the roll-up of spike, exponential growth of magnetic field, and its saturation and oscillation. Nonlinear evolution of the interface is found to be determined by the Alfvén and Atwood numbers. Some of their dependence on the sheet dynamics and magnetic field amplification are discussed. It is shown by the model that the magnetic field amplification occurs locally associated with the nonlinear dynamics of the current-vortex sheet. We expect that our model can be applicable to a wide variety of MHD shear flows.

  15. Nonlinear Dynamics of Non-uniform Current-Vortex Sheets in Magnetohydrodynamic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, C.; Nishihara, K.; Sano, T.

    2017-04-01

    A theoretical model is proposed to describe fully nonlinear dynamics of interfaces in two-dimensional MHD flows based on an idea of non-uniform current-vortex sheet. Application of vortex sheet model to MHD flows has a crucial difficulty because of non-conservative nature of magnetic tension. However, it is shown that when a magnetic field is initially parallel to an interface, the concept of vortex sheet can be extended to MHD flows (current-vortex sheet). Two-dimensional MHD flows are then described only by a one-dimensional Lagrange parameter on the sheet. It is also shown that bulk magnetic field and velocity can be calculated from their values on the sheet. The model is tested by MHD Richtmyer-Meshkov instability with sinusoidal vortex sheet strength. Two-dimensional ideal MHD simulations show that the nonlinear dynamics of a shocked interface with density stratification agrees fairly well with that for its corresponding potential flow. Numerical solutions of the model reproduce properly the results of the ideal MHD simulations, such as the roll-up of spike, exponential growth of magnetic field, and its saturation and oscillation. Nonlinear evolution of the interface is found to be determined by the Alfvén and Atwood numbers. Some of their dependence on the sheet dynamics and magnetic field amplification are discussed. It is shown by the model that the magnetic field amplification occurs locally associated with the nonlinear dynamics of the current-vortex sheet. We expect that our model can be applicable to a wide variety of MHD shear flows.

  16. Backreaction of excitations on a vortex

    CERN Document Server

    Arodz, H; Arodz, Henryk; Hadasz, Leszek

    1997-01-01

    Excitations of a vortex are usually considered in a linear approximation neglecting their backreaction on the vortex. In the present paper we investigate backreaction of Proca type excitations on a straightlinear vortex in the Abelian Higgs model. We propose exact Ansatz for fields of the excited vortex. From initial set of six nonlinear field equations we obtain (in a limit of weak excitations) two linear wave equations for the backreaction corrections. Their approximate solutions are found in the cases of plane wave and wave packet type excitations. We find that the excited vortex radiates vector field and that the Higgs field has a very broad oscillating component.

  17. Quantitative theory of thermal fluctuations and disorder in the vortex matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dingping Li; Rosenstein Baruch; P Lin

    2006-01-01

    A metastable supercooled homogeneous vortex liquid state exists down to zero fluctuation temperature in systems of mutually repelling objects. The zero-temperature liquid state therefore serves as a (pseudo) `fixed point' controlling the properties of vortex liquid below and even around the melting point. Based on this picture, a quantitative theory of vortex melting and glass transition in Type II superconductors in the framework of Ginzburg-Landau approach is presented. The melting line location is determined and magnetization and specific heat jumps are calculated. The point-like disorder shifts the line downwards and joins the order{disorder transition line. On the other hand, the disorder induces irreversible effects via replica symmetry breaking. The irreversibility line can be calculated within the Gaussian variational method. Therefore, the generic phase diagram contains four phases divided by the irreversibility line and melting line: liquid, solid, vortex glass and Bragg glass. We compare various experimental results with the theoretical formula.

  18. Long-Lived Vortex Structures in Collisional Pure and Gas-Discharge Nonneutral Electron Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kervalishvili, N A

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of experimental investigations of equilibrium, interaction and dynamics of vortex structures in pure electron and gas-discharge electron nonneutral plasmas during the time much more than the electron-neutral collision time has been carried out. The problem of long confinement of the column of pure electron plasma in Penning-Malmberg trap is considered. The mechanism of stability of long-lived vortex structure in gas-discharge nonneutral electron plasma is investigated. The collapse of electron sheath in gas-discharge nonneutral electron plasma in Penning cell at high pressures of neutral gas is described. The interaction between the stable vortex structure and the annular electron sheath, and the action of vortex structures on the transport of electrons along and across the magnetic field are discussed.

  19. Vortex fluctuations in underdoped Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta) crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, Sylvain; Konczykowski, Marcin; Gaifullin, Marat B; Matsuda, Yuji; Gierłowski, Piotr; Li, Ming; Kes, Peter H; Van Der Beek, Cornelis J

    2003-04-04

    Vortex thermal fluctuations in heavily underdoped Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta) (T(c)=69.4 K) are studied using Josephson plasma resonance. From the zero-field data, we obtain the c-axis penetration depth lambda(L,c)(0)=230+/-10 micrometer and the anisotropy ratio gamma(T). The low plasma frequency allows us to study phase correlations over the whole vortex solid state and to extract a wandering length r(w) of vortex pancakes. The temperature dependence of r(w) as well as its increase with dc magnetic field is explained by the renormalization of the vortex line tension by the fluctuations, suggesting that this softening is responsible for the dissociation of the vortices at the first order transition.

  20. A toroidal vortex field as an origin of the narrow mass spectrum of neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontorovich, V. M.

    2016-03-01

    The evolution and collapse of a gaseous, self-gravitating sphere in the presence of an internal massive toroidal vortex analogous to the vortex created by the toroidal magnetic field of the Sun is considered. When thermal pressure is taken into account, for sufficiently high masses, the instability is preserved even for a polytropic index γ neutrons differs appreciably. In the ultrarelativistic limit, an interval of stablemasses arises in a neutron gas, between a minimum mass that depends on the circulation velocity in the vortex and the critical mass for the formation of a black hole. This suggests toroidal vortex fields as a possible physical origin for the observed narrow spectrum of neutron-star masses.

  1. Anatomy of a Bathtub Vortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Bohr, Tomas; Stenum, Bjarne

    2003-01-01

    We present experiments and theory for the "bathtub vortex," which forms when a fluid drains out of a rotating cylindrical container through a small drain hole. The fast down-flow is found to be confined to a narrow and rapidly rotating "drainpipe" from the free surface down to the drain hole. Sur...

  2. Merger of Long Vortex Filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Khandekar, Akshay

    2012-01-01

    This fluid dynamics video demonstrates the merger of long vortex filaments is shown experimentally. Two counter-rotating vortices are generated using in a tank with very high aspect ratio. PIV demonstrates the merger of the vortices within a single orbit.

  3. Thermal inhomogeneities in vortex tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemesh, N. I.; Senchuk, L. A.

    An experimental study of the effect of the temperature of the inlet gas on the temperature difference between the hot and cold streams discharged from a Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube is described. The experimental results are presented in graphical form. It is that the temperature difference increases with the temperature of the entering gas.

  4. Instability of vortex pair leapfrogging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tophøj, Laust; Aref, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    pairs fly off to infinity, and a "walkabout" mode, where the vortices depart from leapfrogging but still remain within a finite distance of one another. We show numerically that this transition is more gradual, a result that we relate to earlier investigations of chaotic scattering of vortex pairs [L...

  5. 150 Years of vortex dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aref, Hassan

    2010-01-01

    An IUTAM symposium with the title of this paper was held on October 12-16, 2008, in Lyngby and Copenhagen, Denmark, to mark the sesquicentennial of publication of Helmholtz's seminal paper on vortex dynamics. This volume contains the proceedings of the Symposium. The present paper provides...

  6. Current-induced changes of migration energy barriers in graphene and carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Obodo, Tobechukwu Joshua

    2016-04-29

    An electron current can move atoms in a nanoscale device with important consequences for the device operation and breakdown. We perform first principles calculations aimed at evaluating the possibility of changing the energy barriers for atom migration in carbon-based systems. In particular, we consider the migration of adatoms and defects in graphene and carbon nanotubes. Although the current-induced forces are large for both the systems, in graphene the force component along the migration path is small and therefore the barrier height is little affected by the current flow. In contrast, the same barrier is significantly reduced in carbon nanotubes as the current increases. Our work also provides a real-system numerical demonstration that current-induced forces within density functional theory are non-conservative. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  7. Chaos in body-vortex interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Johan Rønby; Aref, Hassan

    2010-01-01

    The model of body–vortex interactions, where the fluid flow is planar, ideal and unbounded, and the vortex is a point vortex, is studied. The body may have a constant circulation around it. The governing equations for the general case of a freely moving body of arbitrary shape and mass density...... of a circle is integrable. As the body is made slightly elliptic, a chaotic region grows from an unstable relative equilibrium of the circle-vortex case. The case of a cylindrical body of any shape moving in fluid otherwise at rest is also integrable. A second transition to chaos arises from the limit between...... and an arbitrary number of point vortices are presented. The case of a body and a single vortex is then investigated numerically in detail. In this paper, the body is a homogeneous, elliptical cylinder. For large body–vortex separations, the system behaves much like a vortex pair regardless of body shape. The case...

  8. Current-induced forces in mesoscopic systems: A scattering-matrix approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Bode

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanoelectromechanical systems are characterized by an intimate connection between electronic and mechanical degrees of freedom. Due to the nanoscopic scale, current flowing through the system noticeably impacts upons the vibrational dynamics of the device, complementing the effect of the vibrational modes on the electronic dynamics. We employ the scattering-matrix approach to quantum transport in order to develop a unified theory of nanoelectromechanical systems out of equilibrium. For a slow mechanical mode the current can be obtained from the Landauer–Büttiker formula in the strictly adiabatic limit. The leading correction to the adiabatic limit reduces to Brouwer’s formula for the current of a quantum pump in the absence of a bias voltage. The principal results of the present paper are the scattering-matrix expressions for the current-induced forces acting on the mechanical degrees of freedom. These forces control the Langevin dynamics of the mechanical modes. Specifically, we derive expressions for the (typically nonconservative mean force, for the (possibly negative damping force, an effective “Lorentz” force that exists even for time-reversal-invariant systems, and the fluctuating Langevin force originating from Nyquist and shot noise of the current flow. We apply our general formalism to several simple models that illustrate the peculiar nature of the current-induced forces. Specifically, we find that in out-of-equilibrium situations the current-induced forces can destabilize the mechanical vibrations and cause limit-cycle dynamics.

  9. Magnetization dynamics induced by Rashba effect in a Permalloy nanodisk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huanan; Hua, Zhong; Li, Dongfei

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic vortex dynamics mediated by spin-polarized ac current of different amplitudes and frequencies are investigated by micromagnetic simulations in a system lacking structure inversion symmetry. Micromagnetic calculations reveal that the critical current density required to induce vortex core reversal may be decreased to below 1010 A m-2 due to strong transverse magnetic field by Rashba effect. We also find the spin torque of ac current plays a trivial role in magnetic vortex dynamics in a broken inversion symmetry system when the current density is on the order of 1010 A m-2 and the current with frequency close to the vortex eigenfrequency is the most efficient for reversal.

  10. Characterization of vortex pinning through the Campbell length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willa, Roland; Geshkenbein, Vadim B.; Blatter, Gianni

    Vortex pinning is decisive in establishing dissipation-free current flow in a type-II superconductor; knowledge and optimization of the pinning landscape (pinscape) is of major importance for applications. The ac magnetic response, characterized by the Campbell penetration depth λC, provides valuable information on the pinscape, besides the critical current density jc. While microscopic derivations of jc are available both in the weak and strong pinning limits, this is not the case for the Campbell length, whose understanding has remained on a phenomenological level so far. Based on the microscopic theory of strong pinning, we have established a proper link between the Campbell length and the pinscape parameters. This new quantitative formalism captures all experimentally observed signatures, among which are the dependence of λC on the vortex state preparation and the hysteresis in λC upon thermal cycling the field-cooled state.

  11. MHD waves generated by high-frequency photospheric vortex motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Fedun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we discuss simulations of MHD wave generation and propagation through a three-dimensional open magnetic flux tube in the lower solar atmosphere. By using self-similar analytical solutions for modelling the magnetic field in Cartesian coordinate system, we have constructed a 3-D magnetohydrostatic configuration which is used as the initial condition for non-linear MHD wave simulations. For a driver we have implemented a high-frequency vortex-type motion at the footpoint region of the open magnetic flux tube. It is found that the implemented swirly source is able to excite different types of wave modes, i.e. sausage, kink and torsional Alfvén modes. Analysing these waves by magneto-seismology tools could provide insight into the magnetic structure of the lower solar atmosphere.

  12. Vortex shaking study of REBCO tape with consideration of anisotropic characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fei; Qu, Timing; Zhang, Zhenyu; Sheng, Jie; Yuan, Weijia; Iwasa, Yukikazu; Zhang, Min

    2017-09-01

    The second generation high temperature superconductor, specifically REBCO, has become a new research focus in the development of a new generation of high-field (>25 T) magnets. One of the main challenges in the application of the magnets is the current screening problem. Previous research shows that for magnetized superconducting stacks and bulks the application of an AC field in plane with the circulating current will lead to demagnetization due to vortex shaking, which provides a possible solution to remove the shielding current. This paper provides an in-depth study, both experimentally and numerically, to unveil the vortex shaking mechanism of REBCO stacks. A new experiment was carried out to measure the demagnetization rate of REBCO stacks exposed to an in-plane AC magnetic field. Meanwhile, 2D finite element models, based on the E-J power law, are developed for simulating the vortex shaking effect of the AC magnetic field. Qualitative agreement was obtained between the experimental and the simulation results. Our results show that the applied in-plane magnetic field leads to a sudden decay of trapped magnetic field in the first half shaking cycle, which is caused by the magnetic field dependence of critical current. Furthermore, the decline of demagnetization rate with the increase of tape number is mainly due to the cross-magnetic field being screened by the top and bottom stacks during the shaking process, which leads to lower demagnetization rate of inner layers. We also demonstrate that the frequency of the applied AC magnetic field has little impact on the demagnetization process. Our modeling tool and findings perfect the vortex shaking theory and provide helpful guidance for eliminating screening current in the new generation REBCO magnets.

  13. Vortex core properties in iron pnictides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakharchuk I.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of unconventional superconductivity in recently discovered Fe-based superconductors has been intensively discussed. A plausible candidate is the superconducting (SC pairing mediated by antiferromagnetic (AFM interactions. There are two different approaches predicting the s± pairing state, in which the SC gap shows an s-wave symmetry that changes sign between different Fermi-surface (FS sheets. The first one is based on the itinerant spin fluctuations promoted by FS nesting, and the second is based on the local AFM exchange couplings. We apply quasiclassical Eilenberger approach to the vortex state to calculate the cutoff parameter, ξh, at different levels of impurity scattering rates and to compare results with experimental data for iron pnictides. The s±-wave pairing symmetry is considered as a presumable state for these materials. Magnetic field dependence of ξh/ξc2 is found to be nonuniversal for s± pairing: depending on the chosen parameter set it can reside both below and above analytical Ginzburg-Landau curve. It is also found that normalized ξ2/ξc2(B/Bc2 dependence is increasing with pair-breaking (interband impurity scattering, and the intraband scattering results in decreasing of the ξ2/ξc2 value. Here, ξ2 is the vortex core size and ξc2 is the Ginzburg-Landau coherence length determined from the upper critical field. The ξ2/ξc2(B/Bc2 curve has a minimum at low temperatures and small scattering evolving into monotonously decreasing function at strong scattering and high temperatures.

  14. Two vortex-blob regularization models for vortex sheet motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Sung-Ik

    2014-04-01

    Evolving vortex sheets generally form singularities in finite time. The vortex blob model is an approach to regularize the vortex sheet motion and evolve past singularity formation. In this paper, we thoroughly compare two such regularizations: the Krasny-type model and the Beale-Majda model. It is found from a linear stability analysis that both models have exponentially decaying growth rates for high wavenumbers, but the Beale-Majda model has a faster decaying rate than the Krasny model. The Beale-Majda model thus gives a stronger regularization to the solution. We apply the blob models to the two example problems: a periodic vortex sheet and an elliptically loaded wing. The numerical results show that the solutions of the two models are similar in large and small scales, but are fairly different in intermediate scales. The sheet of the Beale-Majda model has more spiral turns than the Krasny-type model for the same value of the regularization parameter δ. We give numerical evidences that the solutions of the two models agree for an increasing amount of spiral turns and tend to converge to the same limit as δ is decreased. The inner spiral turns of the blob models behave differently with the outer turns and satisfy a self-similar form. We also examine irregular motions of the sheet at late times and find that the irregular motions shrink as δ is decreased. This fact suggests a convergence of the blob solution to the weak solution of infinite regular spiral turns.

  15. A new theoretical model for transmembrane potential and ion currents induced in a spherical cell under low frequency electromagnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Gao, Yang; Chen, Ruijuan; Wang, Huiquan; Dong, Lei; Dou, Junrong

    2016-10-01

    Time-varying electromagnetic fields (EMF) can induce some physiological effects in neuronal tissues, which have been explored in many applications such as transcranial magnetic stimulation. Although transmembrane potentials and induced currents have already been the subjects of many theoretical studies, most previous works about this topic are mainly completed by utilizing Maxwell's equations, often by solving a Laplace equation. In previous studies, cells were often considered to be three-compartment models with different electroconductivities in different regions (three compartments are often intracellular regions, membrane, and extracellular regions). However, models like that did not take dynamic ion channels into consideration. Therefore, one cannot obtain concrete ionic current changes such as potassium current change or sodium current change by these models. The aim of the present work is to present a new and more detailed model for calculating transmembrane potentials and ionic currents induced by time-varying EMF. Equations used in the present paper originate from Nernst-Plank equations, which are ionic current-related equations. The main work is to calculate ionic current changes induced by EMF exposure, and then transmembrane potential changes are calculated with Hodgkin-Huxley model. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:481-492, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. BPS Lorentz-violating vortex solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casana, Rodolfo; Ferreira Junior, Manoel M. [Universidade Federal do Maranhao (UFMA), Sao Luis, MA (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Hora, E. da [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica

    2011-07-01

    In this work, we deal with the construction of static Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) rotationally symmetric configurations on the dimensional CPT-even Lorentz-breaking photonic sector of the Standard Model Extension (SME). The main objective of this presentation is to show the possibility of obtaining such BPS solutions, even in the presence of a Lorentz-violating background. A secondary objective is to analyze the effects of this background on such topologically non-trivial BPS configurations. In order to obtain these results, we deal with some specific components of Lorentz-violating field, handling with the static Euler-Lagrange equation of motion to gauge field, from which we fix temporal gauge (absence of electric field) as a proper gauge choice. Also, considering this equation, we consistently determine an interesting configuration (discarding non-interesting ones) to the Lorentz-breaking sector. Using this configuration and the standard rotationally symmetric vortex Ansatz (which describes the behaviors of Higgs and gauge fields via two profile functions, g(r) and a(r), respectively), we construct a rotationally symmetric expression to the energy density of the system. To obtain BPS solutions, we rewrite this expression in order to have static vortex solutions satisfying a set of first order differential equations (BPS ones). The existence of such solutions is strongly constrained by a relation between some parameters of the model, including the Lorentz-breaking one. Naturally, we show that the total energy of these BPS solutions is proportional to their magnetic flux, which is quantized according to their winding number. Using suitable boundary conditions (near the origin and asymptotically), we numerically integrate the BPS equations (by means of the shooting method). By this way, we obtain solutions for some physical quantities (Higgs field, magnetic field and energy density) for several values of the Lorentz-violating parameters. From these

  17. Recent progress in vortex studies by tunneling spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohen, A. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, UMR7588 au CNRS, Universite Paris 6 and Paris 7, 140 rue de Lourmel, 75015 Paris (France)]. E-mail: Amir.Kohen@insp.jussieu.fr; Cren, T. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, UMR7588 au CNRS, Universite Paris 6 and Paris 7, 140 rue de Lourmel, 75015 Paris (France); Noat, Y. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, UMR7588 au CNRS, Universite Paris 6 and Paris 7, 140 rue de Lourmel, 75015 Paris (France); Proslier, T. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, UMR7588 au CNRS, Universite Paris 6 and Paris 7, 140 rue de Lourmel, 75015 Paris (France); Giubileo, F. [Physics Department and INFM-SUPERMAT Laboratory, University of Salerno, via S. Allende, 84081 Baronissi (SA) (Italy); Bobba, F. [Physics Department and INFM-SUPERMAT Laboratory, University of Salerno, via S. Allende, 84081 Baronissi (SA) (Italy); Cucolo, A.M. [Physics Department and INFM-SUPERMAT Laboratory, University of Salerno, via S. Allende, 84081 Baronissi (SA) (Italy); Zhigadlo, N. [Solid State Physics Laboratory, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Kazakov, S.M. [Solid State Physics Laboratory, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Karpinski, J. [Solid State Physics Laboratory, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Sacks, W. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, UMR7588 au CNRS, Universite Paris 6 and Paris 7, 140 rue de Lourmel, 75015 Paris (France); Roditchev, D. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, UMR7588 au CNRS, Universite Paris 6 and Paris 7, 140 rue de Lourmel, 75015 Paris (France)

    2006-05-15

    Among the methods used to study the vortex state in superconductors, scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), is unique in its ability to measure in real space the variations in the local quasiparticle density of states. Thus, as opposed to magnetic imaging, STS gives direct access to the coherence length rather than to the penetration length. Here we discuss two novel methods which enhance the capabilities of STS as a tool for the study of the vortex state. In the first one, called Lazy Fisherman [A. Kohen et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 86 (2005) 212503], the scanning tunneling microscope's tip is kept fixed at a selected location while the vortices are being moved by varying the applied magnetic field. By continuously acquiring the local tunneling conductance spectra, dI/dV(V), we detect the changes in the local density of states under the tip due to the vortex motion. With no need for scanning, the method permits one to extend the study of vortices to samples in which scanning is difficult or even impossible due to surface non-uniformity and allows one to detect faster vortex dynamics. To illustrate the approach we study single crystal samples of MgB{sub 2}. In the second STS method, we replace the commonly used normal metal STM tip by a superconducting (SC) tip which we produce either by mechanically breaking a Nb wire under vacuum in the STM chamber [A. Kohen et al., Physica C 49 (2005) 18] or by gluing a piece of a crystal of MgB{sub 2} [F. Giubileo et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 (2001) 177008]. The use of a SC tip enhances the energy resolution of STS in comparison to that obtained with a normal metal tip. The method is illustrated by using Nb and MgB{sub 2} tips to perform a simultaneous topographic and spectroscopic imaging on 2H-NbSe{sub 2}.

  18. Model of strong stationary vortex turbulence in space plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Aburjania

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the macroscopic consequences of nonlinear solitary vortex structures in magnetized space plasmas by developing theoretical model of plasma turbulence. Strongly localized vortex patterns contain trapped particles and, propagating in a medium, excite substantial density fluctuations and thus, intensify the energy, heat and mass transport processes, i.e., such vortices can form strong vortex turbulence. Turbulence is represented as an ensemble of strongly localized (and therefore weakly interacting vortices. Vortices with various amplitudes are randomly distributed in space (due to collisions. For their description, a statistical approach is applied. It is supposed that a stationary turbulent state is formed by balancing competing effects: spontaneous development of vortices due to nonlinear twisting of the perturbations' fronts, cascading of perturbations into short scales (direct spectral cascade and collisional or collisionless damping of the perturbations in the short-wave domain. In the inertial range, direct spectral cascade occurs through merging structures via collisions. It is shown that in the magneto-active plasmas, strong turbulence is generally anisotropic Turbulent modes mainly develop in the direction perpendicular to the local magnetic field. It is found that it is the compressibility of the local medium which primarily determines the character of the turbulent spectra: the strong vortex turbulence forms a power spectrum in wave number space. For example, a new spectrum of turbulent fluctuations in k−8/3 is derived which agrees with available experimental data. Within the framework of the developed model particle diffusion processes are also investigated. It is found that the interaction of structures with each other and particles causes anomalous diffusion in the medium. The effective coefficient of diffusion has a square root dependence on the stationary level of noise.

  19. Metastable states in magnetic nanorings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castaño, F. J.; Ross, C. A.; Frandsen, Cathrine;

    2003-01-01

    Magnetization states and hysteresis behavior of small ferromagnetic rings, of diameters 180-520 nm, have been investigated using magnetic force microscopy. In addition to the expected bi-domain ("onion") and flux-closed ("vortex") magnetization states, a metastable state has been found...

  20. Vortex tube reconnection at Re = 104

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rees, Wim M.; Hussain, Fazle; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2012-07-01

    We present simulations of the long-time dynamics of two anti-parallel vortex tubes with and without initial axial flow, at Reynolds number Re = Γ/ν = 104. Simulations were performed in a periodic domain with a remeshed vortex method using 785 × 106 particles. We quantify the vortex dynamics of the primary vortex reconnection that leads to the formation of elliptical rings with axial flow and report for the first time a subsequent collision of these rings. In the absence of initial axial flow, a -5/3 slope of the energy spectrum is observed during the first reconnection of the tubes. The resulting elliptical vortex rings experience a coiling of their vortex lines imparting an axial flow inside their cores. These rings eventually collide, exhibiting a -7/3 slope of the energy spectrum. Studies of vortex reconnection with an initial axial flow exhibit also the -7/3 slope during the initial collision as well as in the subsequent collision of the ensuing elliptical vortex rings. We quantify the detailed vortex dynamics of these collisions and examine the role of axial flow in the breakup of vortex structures.

  1. Influence of mesoscale topography on vortex intensity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The effect of mesoscale topography on multi-vortex self-organization is investigated numerically in this paper using a barotropic primitive equation model with topographic term. In the initial field there are one DeMaria major vortex with the maximum wind radius rm of 80 km at the center of the computational domain, and four meso-β vortices in the vicinity of rm to the east of the major vortex center.When there is no topography present, the initial vortices self-organize into a quasi-final state flow pattern, I.e. A quasi-axisymmetric vortex whose intensity is close to that of the initial major vortex. However, when a mesoscale topography is incorporated, the spatial scale of the quasi-final state vortex reduces, and the relative vorticity at the center of the vortex and the local maximum wind speed remarkably increase. The possible mechanism for the enhancement of the quasi-final state vortex might be that the negative relative vorticity lump,generated above the mesoscale topography because of the constraint of absolute vorticity conservation, squeezes the center of positive vorticity towards the mountain slope area, and thus reduces the spatial range of the major vortex. Meanwhile, because the total kinetic energy is basically conservative, the squeezing directly leads to the concentration of the energy in a smaller area, I.e. The strengthening of the vortex.

  2. Measurements of current-induced spin polarizations in topological insulators Bi2Te2Se and Bi2Se3 thin flakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jifa; Miotkowski, Ireneusz; Hong, Seokmin; Datta, Supriyo; Chen, Yong

    Topological insulators (TIs) possess nontrivial spin-momentum-locked topological surface states (TSS). Real TI can also host trivial surface 2DEG with strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling derived from the bulk states. Both TSS and Rashba 2DEG can generate current induced spin polarization, although the dominant helicities of their spin-momentum locking (SML) are expected to be opposite. Here, we report spin potentiometric measurements in exfoliated bulk-insulating Bi2Te2Se and bulk-metallic Bi2Se3 thin flakes. In both materials, the voltage measured by a FM electrode shows a hysteretic step-like change when the FM magnetization is switched by an in-plane magnetic field. The trend of the voltage change can be reversed by reversing the direction of the dc current, and the amplitude of the spin signal increases linearly with increasing bias current. Such a spin signal is consistent with a current induced spin polarization arising from a helical SML. However, the observed trend of the voltage change is opposite between Bi2Te2Se and Bi2Se3, suggesting opposite signs of dominant spin helicity that we attribute to TSS and Rashba 2DEG respectively.

  3. Effect of heavy metal layer thickness on spin-orbit torque and current-induced switching in Hf|CoFeB|MgO structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyol, Mustafa; Jiang, Wanjun; Yu, Guoqiang; Fan, Yabin; Gunes, Mustafa; Ekicibil, Ahmet; Khalili Amiri, Pedram; Wang, Kang L.

    2016-07-01

    We study the heavy metal layer thickness dependence of the current-induced spin-orbit torque (SOT) in perpendicularly magnetized Hf|CoFeB|MgO multilayer structures. The damping-like (DL) current-induced SOT is determined by vector anomalous Hall effect measurements. A non-monotonic behavior in the DL-SOT is found as a function of the thickness of the heavy-metal layer. The sign of the DL-SOT changes with increasing the thickness of the Hf layer in the trilayer structure. As a result, in the current-driven magnetization switching, the preferred direction of switching for a given current direction changes when the Hf thickness is increased above ˜7 nm. Although there might be a couple of reasons for this unexpected behavior in DL-SOT, such as the roughness in the interfaces and/or impurity based electric potential in the heavy metal, one can deduce a roughness dependence sign reversal in DL-SOT in our trilayer structure.

  4. Vortex distribution in amorphous Mo{sub 80}Ge{sub 20} plates with artificial pinning center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Hitoshi [Department of Physics and Electronics, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Huy, Ho Thanh [Department of Physics and Electronics, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Sciences, Vietnam National University HCMC, 227 Nguyen Van Cu, District 5, HoChiMinh City (Viet Nam); Miyoshi, Hiroki; Okamoto, Takuto; Dang, Vu The [Department of Physics and Electronics, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Kato, Masaru [Institute for Nanofabrication Research, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Department of Mathematical Science, Osaka Prefecture University1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Ishida, Takekazu, E-mail: ishida@center.osakafu-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics and Electronics, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Institute for Nanofabrication Research, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • We reveal that the vortex distribution in small amorphous Mo{sub 80}Ge{sub 20} superconducting starshaped plate by using a scanning SQUID microscope. • We find that vortex configuration evolves systematically when the applied magnetic field is changed at the several different fields. • We fabricate an artificial dip by Ar ion milling in a mesoscopic plate, and find this works as a pinning center by comparing the vortex behavior in a sample without pins. - Abstract: Vortices in superconductor give rise to a rich variety of phenomena because they interact with shielding currents, temperature gradients, sample defects, boundaries, and other neighboring vortices. It would be very important to understand particular features of vortex states in a downsized system. Our study focuses on vortex states in small star-shaped Mo{sub 80}Ge{sub 20} plates with and without an artificial pin at the plate center. Vortex states are greatly influenced by the sample geometry, the temperature and the magnetic field, and they can be occasionally exotic compared to the bulk case. We use the amorphous Mo{sub 80}Ge{sub 20} films due to the nature of weak pinning in studying vortex configurations. We applied scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscopy because it enables us to see vortex states directly and it is the most sensitive instrument for mapping tiny local current flows or magnetic moments without damaging the sample. We interpreted that vortex configurations had essentially the nature of mirror reflection symmetry in both cases with an artificial pin and without an artificial pin and pinned cases while the influence of disorder was seen in our observation on the specimen without an artificial pin.

  5. Front propagation in vortex-dominated flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Garrett; Winokur, Justin; Solomon, Tom

    2008-11-01

    We present experiments that explore how the propagation of a reaction front is affected by a two-dimensional flow dominated by vortices. The reaction is the excitable Belousov-Zhabotinsky chemical reaction. The flow is driven by the interaction between an electrical current passing through the fluid and a spatially-varying magnetic field produced by an array of magnets below the fluid. For some of the experiments, the forcing is strong enough to produce a weakly turbulent flow. Measurements are made both of the enhanced diffusion coefficient D^* describing transport in the flow and of the propagation speed v of a reaction front in the same flow. Scaling of v versus D^* is compared with that for the standard Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovsky-Piskunov prediction v ˜√D (with D as the molecular diffusion coefficient) for the reaction-diffusion limit with no fluid advection. We also study the effects of superdiffusive transport and Lévy flights on front propagation in a time-dependent vortex array with wavy jet regions.

  6. Vortex ring formation in the left ventricle of the heart: analysis by 4D flow MRI and Lagrangian coherent structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töger, Johannes; Kanski, Mikael; Carlsson, Marcus; Kovács, Sándor J; Söderlind, Gustaf; Arheden, Håkan; Heiberg, Einar

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that vortex ring formation during left ventricular (LV) rapid filling is an optimized mechanism for blood transport, and that the volume of the vortex ring is an important measure. However, due to lack of quantitative methods, the volume of the vortex ring has not previously been studied. Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) is a new flow analysis method, which enables in vivo quantification of vortex ring volume. Therefore, we aimed to investigate if vortex ring volume in the human LV can be reliably quantified using LCS and magnetic resonance velocity mapping (4D PC-MR). Flow velocities were measured using 4D PC-MR in 9 healthy volunteers and 4 patients with dilated ischemic cardiomyopathy. LV LCS were computed from flow velocities and manually delineated in all subjects. Vortex volume in the healthy volunteers was 51 ± 6% of the LV volume, and 21 ± 5% in the patients. Interobserver variability was -1 ± 13% and interstudy variability was -2 ± 12%. Compared to idealized flow experiments, the vortex rings showed additional complexity and asymmetry, related to endocardial trabeculation and papillary muscles. In conclusion, LCS and 4D PC-MR enables measurement of vortex ring volume during rapid filling of the LV.

  7. Periodic oscillations of Josephson-vortex flow resistance in Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+y).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, S; Mochiku, T; Hirata, K

    2002-12-09

    To study the Josephson-vortex system, we have measured the vortex-flow resistance as a function of magnetic field parallel to the ab plane in Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+y) single crystals. Novel periodic oscillations of the vortex-flow resistance have been observed in a wide range of temperatures and magnetic fields. The period of the oscillations corresponds to the field needed to add "one" vortex quantum per "two" intrinsic Josephson junctions. The flow velocity is related to a matching effect between the lattice spacing of Josephson vortices along the layers and the width of the sample. These results suggest that Josephson vortices form a triangular lattice in the ground state where the oscillations occur.

  8. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    by B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet operation was very satisfactory till the technical stop at the end of the year 2010. The field was ramped down on 5th December 2010, following the successful regeneration test of the turbine filters at full field on 3rd December 2010. This will limit in the future the quantity of magnet cycles, as it is no longer necessary to ramp down the magnet for this type of intervention. This is made possible by the use of the spare liquid Helium volume to cool the magnet while turbines 1 and 2 are stopped, leaving only the third turbine in operation. This obviously requires full availability of the operators to supervise the operation, as it is not automated. The cryogenics was stopped on 6th December 2010 and the magnet was left without cooling until 18th January 2011, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The maintenance of the vacuum pumping was done immediately after the magnet stop, when the magnet was still at very low temperature. Only the vacuum pumping of the ma...

  9. Polarization-selective vortex-core switching by tailored orthogonal Gaussian-pulse currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Young-Sang; Lee, Ki-Suk; Jung, Hyunsung; Choi, Youn-Seok; Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Han, Dong-Soo; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2011-05-01

    We experimentally demonstrate low-power-consumption vortex-core switching in magnetic nanodisks using tailored rotating magnetic fields produced with orthogonal and unipolar Gaussian-pulse currents. The optimal width of the orthogonal pulses and their time delay are found, from analytical and micromagnetic numerical calculations, to be determined only by the angular eigenfrequency ωD for a given vortex-state disk of polarization p, such that σ=1/ωD and Δt=π/2p/ωD. The estimated optimal pulse parameters are in good agreement with the experimental results. Finally, this work lays a foundation for energy-efficient information recording in vortex-core cross-point architecture.

  10. Plastic vortex-creep in $YBa_{2}Cu_{3}O_{7-x}$ crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Abulafia, Y; Wolfus, Y; Prozorov, R; Burlachkov, L; Yeshurun, Y; Zeldov, D M E; Wühl, H; Geshkenbein, B V; Vinokur, V M

    1996-01-01

    Local magnetic relaxation measurements in YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{7-x}$ crystals show evidence for plastic vortex-creep associated with the motion of dislocations in the vortex lattice. This creep mechanism governs the vortex dynamics in a wide range of temperatures and fields below the melting line and above the field corresponding to the peak in the ''fishtail'' magnetization. In this range the activation energy $U_{pl}$, which decreases with field, drops below the elastic (collective) creep activation energy, $U_{el}$, which increases with field. A crossover in flux dynamics from elastic to plastic creep is shown to be the origin of the fishtail in YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{7-x}$.

  11. Observation of the Gouy and Larmor rotations in electron vortex beams

    CERN Document Server

    Guzzinati, Giulio; Bliokh, Konstantin; Nori, Franco; Verbeeck, Jo

    2012-01-01

    The Gouy phase anomaly has attracted considerable interest in optics and describes an extra phase shift of a beam going through a focal point compared to a plane wave. Here we directly observe the Gouy phase with electron vortex waves making use of a transmission electron microscope. The image rotation of a superposition of free electron vortex states when focused in a magnetic lens exposes the effect of the Gouy phase in the observed image intensity, dependent on the OAM possessed by the superposition. These observations confirm our previously proposed theoretical predictions on how electron vortex beams behave in a constant magnetic field. Both theory and observations expand the common phenomenon of Larmor rotation in an electron microscope with an OAM dependent Gouy effect.

  12. Element Specific Observation of Ferromagnetic Interlayer Exchange Coupled Dual Vortex Core Nano Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulecio, Javier; Arena, Dario; Warnicke, Peter; Im, Mi-Young; Pollard, Shawn; Fischer, Peter; Zhu, Yimei

    2013-03-01

    We report on the magnetic evolution of magnetic vortices in nanoscale and multilayer disk structures. The tri-layer structure consists of Co and Permalloy (Py) layers, coupled across a thin (1nm) Cu spacer that provides strong coupling between the Co and Py layers. Element-resolved full-field XMCD microscopy is combined with ultra-high resolution Lorentz transmission electron microscopy, permitting measurement of both layer-resolved domain patterns and the vortex structure averaged across the tri-layer. We examine the evolution of the vortex structure while the nanostructure is cycled through the M-H hysteresis loop. In particular we will discuss the effects of strong interlayer exchanged coupling on a dual vortex core system, including analysis of the layer-resolved coercivity, and the evolution, deformation, annihilation, and nucleation of the vortices.

  13. Vortex scattering by step topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, A. K.; Johnson, E. R.; McDonald, N. R.

    The scattering at a rectilinear step change in depth of a shallow-water vortex pair consisting of two patches of equal but opposite-signed vorticity is studied. Using the constants of motion, an explicit relationship is derived relating the angle of incidence to the refracted angle after crossing. A pair colliding with a step from deep water crosses the escarpment and subsequently propagates in shallow water refracted towards the normal to the escarpment. A pair colliding with a step from shallow water either crosses and propagates in deep water refracted away from the normal or, does not cross the step and is instead totally internally reflected by the escarpment. For large depth changes, numerical computations show that the coherence of the vortex pair is lost on encountering the escarpment.

  14. Perturbations of vortex ring pairs

    CERN Document Server

    Gubser, Steven S; Parikh, Sarthak

    2015-01-01

    We study pairs of co-axial vortex rings starting from the action for a classical bosonic string in a three-form background. We complete earlier work on the phase diagram of classical orbits by explicitly considering the case where the circulations of the two vortex rings are equal and opposite. We then go on to study perturbations, focusing on cases where the relevant four-dimensional transfer matrix splits into two-dimensional blocks. When the circulations of the rings have the same sign, instabilities are mostly limited to wavelengths smaller than a dynamically generated length scale at which single-ring instabilities occur. When the circulations have the opposite sign, larger wavelength instabilities can occur.

  15. Collisions of Vortex Filament Pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banica, Valeria; Faou, Erwan; Miot, Evelyne

    2014-12-01

    We consider the problem of collisions of vortex filaments for a model introduced by Klein et al. (J Fluid Mech 288:201-248, 1995) and Zakharov (Sov Phys Usp 31(7):672-674, 1988, Lect. Notes Phys 536:369-385, 1999) to describe the interaction of almost parallel vortex filaments in three-dimensional fluids. Since the results of Crow (AIAA J 8:2172-2179, 1970) examples of collisions are searched as perturbations of antiparallel translating pairs of filaments, with initial perturbations related to the unstable mode of the linearized problem; most results are numerical calculations. In this article, we first consider a related model for the evolution of pairs of filaments, and we display another type of initial perturbation leading to collision in finite time. Moreover, we give numerical evidence that it also leads to collision through the initial model. We finally study the self-similar solutions of the model.

  16. Divergence of optical vortex beams

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, Salla Gangi; Prabhakar, Shashi; Anwar, Ali; Banerji, J; Singh, R P

    2015-01-01

    We show, both theoretically and experimentally, that the propagation of optical vortices in free space can be analysed by using the width ($w(z)$) of the host Gaussian beam and the inner and outer radii of the vortex beam at the source plane ($z=0$) as defined in \\textit{Optics Letters \\textbf{39,} 4364-4367 (2014)}. We also studied the divergence of vortex beams, considered as the rate of change of inner or outer radius with the propagation distance, and found that it varies with the order in the same way as that of the inner and outer radii at zero propagation distance. These results may be useful in designing optical fibers for orbital angular momentum modes that play a crucial role in quantum communication.

  17. Supercooling of the disordered vortex lattice in Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Der Beek CJ; Colson; Indenbom; Konczykowski

    2000-05-01

    Time-resolved local induction measurements near the vortex lattice order-disorder transition in optimally doped Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta) crystals show that the high-field, disordered phase can be quenched to fields as low as half the transition field. Over an important range of fields, the electrodynamical behavior of the vortex system is governed by the coexistence of ordered and disordered vortex phases in the sample. We interpret the results as supercooling of the high-field phase and the possible first-order nature of the order-disorder transition at the "second magnetization peak."

  18. Dust vortex flows in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, P.K

    2002-12-30

    Coherent nonlinear structures in the form of dust vortex flows have been observed in unmagnetized laboratory dusty plasmas. Our objective here is show that the dynamics of such dust vortices is governed by a modified Navier-Stokes equation (MNSE) and that the stationary solutions of the MNSE can be represented as monopolar as well as a row of identical Stuart and a row of counter-rotating vortices.

  19. Experimental characteristics of vortex heaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piralishvili, Sh. A.; Novikov, N. N.

    The performance of a Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube is investigated experimentally for the case where the tube operates as a heater, with the mass of the heated gas remaining constant. The results obtained indicate that energy separation zones with sufficiently high (50 percent) relative heating effects can be achieved for a gas flow ratio of unity. A nomogram is presented for calculating the relative and absolute heating effects as a function of the tube geometry.

  20. Prediction and Control of Vortex Dominated and Vortex-wake Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Osama

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the activities and accomplishments under this research grant, including a list of publications and dissertations, produced in the field of prediction and control of vortex dominated and vortex wake flows.

  1. Birth and evolution of an optical vortex

    CERN Document Server

    Vallone, Giuseppe; D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Sciarrino, Fabio; Villoresi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    When a phase singularity is suddenly imprinted on the axis of an ordinary Gaussian beam, an optical vortex appears and starts to grow radially, by effect of diffraction. This radial growth and the subsequent evolution of the optical vortex under focusing or imaging can be well described in general within the recently introduced theory of circular beams, which generalize the hypergeometric-Gaussian beams and which obey novel kinds of ABCD rules. Here, we investigate experimentally these vortex propagation phenomena and test the validity of circular-beam theory. Moreover, we analyze the difference in radial structure between the newly generated optical vortex and the vortex obtained in the image plane, where perfect imaging would lead to complete closure of the vortex core.

  2. Topology of Vortex-Wing Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Chris; Rockwell, Donald

    2016-11-01

    Aircraft flying together in an echelon or V formation experience aerodynamic advantages. Impingement of the tip vortex from the leader (upstream) wing on the follower wing can yield an increase of lift to drag ratio. This enhancement is known to depend on the location of vortex impingement on the follower wing. Particle image velocimetry is employed to determine streamline topology in successive crossflow planes, which characterize the streamwise evolution of the vortex structure along the chord of the follower wing and into its wake. Different modes of vortex-follower wing interaction are created by varying both the spanwise and vertical locations of the leader wing. These modes are defined by differences in the number and locations of critical points of the flow topology, and involve bifurcation, attenuation, and mutual induction. The bifurcation and attenuation modes decrease the strength of the tip vortex from the follower wing. In contrast, the mutual induction mode increases the strength of the follower tip vortex. AFOSR.

  3. Vortex rings impinging on permeable boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujal-Colilles, Anna; Dalziel, Stuart B.; Bateman, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Experiments with vortex rings impinging permeable and solid boundaries are presented in order to investigate the influence of permeability. Utilizing Particle Image Velocimetry, we compared the behaviour of a vortex ring impinging four different reticulated foams (with permeability k ˜ 26 - 85 × 10-8 m2) and a solid boundary. Results show how permeability affects the stretching phenomena of the vortex ring and the formation and evolution of the secondary vortex ring with opposite sign. Moreover, permeability also affects the macroscopic no-slip boundary condition found on the solid boundary, turning it into an apparent slip boundary condition for the most permeable boundary. The apparent slip-boundary condition and the flux exchange between the ambient fluid and the foam are jointly responsible for both the modified formation of the secondary vortex and changes on the vortex ring diameter increase.

  4. Vortex dynamics in nonrelativistic Abelian Higgs model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Kozhevnikov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of the gauge vortex with arbitrary form of a contour is considered in the framework of the nonrelativistic Abelian Higgs model, including the possibility of the gauge field interaction with the fermion asymmetric background. The equations for the time derivatives of the curvature and the torsion of the vortex contour generalizing the Betchov–Da Rios equations in hydrodynamics, are obtained. They are applied to study the conservation of helicity of the gauge field forming the vortex, twist, and writhe numbers of the vortex contour. It is shown that the conservation of helicity is broken when both terms in the equation of the vortex motion are present, the first due to the exchange of excitations of the phase and modulus of the scalar field and the second one due to the coupling of the gauge field forming the vortex, with the fermion asymmetric background.

  5. An axisymmetric steady state vortex ring model

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ruo-Qian

    2016-01-01

    Based on the solution of Atanasiu et al. (2004), a theoretical model for axisymmetric vortex flows is derived in the present study by solving the vorticity transport equation for an inviscid, incompressible fluid in cylindrical coordinates. The model can describe a variety of axisymmetric flows with particular boundary conditions at a moderately high Reynolds number. This paper shows one example: a high Reynolds number laminar vortex ring. The model can represent a family of vortex rings by specifying the modulus function using a Rayleigh distribution function. The characteristics of this vortex ring family are illustrated by numerical methods. For verification, the model results compare well with the recent direct numerical simulations (DNS) in terms of the vorticity distribution and streamline patterns, cross-sectional areas of the vortex core and bubble, and radial vorticity distribution through the vortex center. Most importantly, the asymmetry and elliptical outline of the vorticity profile are well capt...

  6. Excitation of plasma waves by nonlinear currents induced by a high-frequency electromagnetic pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishkov, V. E.; Uryupin, S. A., E-mail: uryupin@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    Excitation of plasma waves by nonlinear currents induced by a high-frequency electromagnetic pulse is analyzed within the kinetic approach. It is shown that the most efficient source of plasma waves is the nonlinear current arising due to the gradient of the energy density of the high-frequency field. Generation of plasma waves by the drag current is usually less efficient but not negligibly small at relatively high frequencies of electron–ion collisions. The influence of electron collisions on the excitation of plasma waves by pulses of different duration is described quantitatively.

  7. Current-induced energy barrier suppression for electromigration from first principles

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Ruoxing

    2011-08-01

    We present an efficient method for evaluating current-induced forces in nanoscale junctions, which naturally integrates into the nonequilibrium Green\\'s function formalism implemented within density functional theory. This allows us to perform dynamic atomic relaxation in the presence of an electric current while evaluating the current-voltage characteristics. The central idea consists of expressing the system energy density matrix in terms of Green\\'s functions. To validate our implementation, we perform a series of benchmark calculations, both at zero and at finite bias. First we evaluate the current-induced forces acting over an Al nanowire and compare them with previously published results for fixed geometries. Then we perform structural relaxation of the same wires under bias and determine the critical voltage at which they break. We find that although a perfectly straight wire does not break at any of the voltages considered, a zigzag wire is more fragile and snaps at 1.4 V, with the Al atoms moving against the electron flow. The critical current density for the rupture is estimated to be 9.6 × 1010 A/cm2, in good agreement with the experimentally measured value of 5 × 1010 A/cm2. Finally, we demonstrate the capability of our scheme to tackle the electromigration problem by studying the current-induced motion of a single Si atom covalently attached to the sidewall of a (4,4) armchair single-walled carbon nanotube. Our calculations indicate that if Si is attached along the current path, then current-induced forces can induce migration. In contrast, if the bonding site is away from the current path, then the adatom remains stable regardless of the voltage. An analysis based on decomposing the total force into a wind and an electrostatic component, as well as on a detailed evaluation of the bond currents, shows that this remarkable electromigration phenomenon is due solely to the position-dependent wind force. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  8. Exploring surface waves vortex interaction in deep water: a classical analog of the Quantum Mechanics Aharonov-Bohm effect

    CERN Document Server

    Vivanco, F

    2002-01-01

    We present a simple experiment to study the interaction of surface waves with a vertical vortex in the deep water regime. Similarly to what occurs in the Quantum Mechanics Aharonov-Bohm problem for electron interacting with a magnetic potential, the effect of the vortex circulation is to introduce dislocations in the wavefront. These defects are explained taken into account the effects of advection on the propagating wavefront, due to the fluid motion. (Author)

  9. Vortex softening: origin of the second peak effect in Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, V F; Nieva, G; de la Cruz, F

    2001-07-30

    Magnetic hysteresis and transverse ac permeability measurements in Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta) allow a comparative analysis of the critical current with the elastic response of vortex structures, in equilibrium with their pinning potential, in the field and temperature region where the second peak is detected. This study provides strong evidence that the second peak has its origin in changes of the elastic equilibrium properties of the vortex structures.

  10. Astronomical demonstration of an optical vortex coronagraph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartzlander, Grover A; Ford, Erin L; Abdul-Malik, Rukiah S; Close, Laird M; Peters, Mary A; Palacios, David M; Wilson, Daniel W

    2008-07-07

    Using an optical vortex coronagraph and simple adaptive optics techniques, we have made the first convincing demonstration of an optical vortex coronagraph that is coupled to a star gazing telescope. We suppressed by 97% the primary star of a resolvable binary system, Cor Caroli. The stars had an angular separation of 1.9lambda/D at our imaging camera. The secondary star suffered no suppression from the vortex lens.

  11. Effect of Born and unitary impurity scattering on the Kramer–Pesch shrinkage of a vortex core in an s-wave superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Nobuhiko, E-mail: n-hayashi@21c.osakafu-u.ac.jp [NanoSquare Research Center (N2RC), Osaka Prefecture University, 1-2 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai 599-8570 (Japan); CREST(JST), 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Higashi, Yoichi [NanoSquare Research Center (N2RC), Osaka Prefecture University, 1-2 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai 599-8570 (Japan); Department of Mathematical Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan); CREST(JST), 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Nakai, Noriyuki; Suematsu, Hisataka [NanoSquare Research Center (N2RC), Osaka Prefecture University, 1-2 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai 599-8570 (Japan); CREST(JST), 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► We study non-magnetic impurity effect on a vortex in moderately clean regime. ► Impurity effect on s-wave vortex core in unitary limit is weaker than in Born one. ► Kramer–Pesch vortex core shrinkage is stronger in unitary limit than in Born one. -- Abstract: We theoretically investigate a non-magnetic impurity effect on the temperature dependence of the vortex core shrinkage (Kramer–Pesch effect) in a single-band s-wave superconductor. The Born limit and the unitary limit scattering are compared within the framework of the quasiclassical theory of superconductivity. We find that the impurity effect inside a vortex core in the unitary limit is weaker than in the Born one when a system is in the moderately clean regime, which results in a stronger core shrinkage in the unitary limit than in the Born one.

  12. The quasi-vortex-lattice method for wings with edge vortex separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pao, J. L.; Lan, E.

    1980-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of wings with leading-edge vortex separation were predicted using a method based on a flow model with free vortex elements which are allowed to merge into a concentrated core. The calculated pressure distribution is more accurate than that predicted by methods with discrete vortex filaments alone. In addition, the computer time is reduced approximately by half.

  13. Magnetic Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils

    2015-01-01

    of the fluid flow at the top of the core. However, what is measured at or near the surface of the Earth is the superposition of the core field and fields caused by magnetized rocks in the Earth’s crust, by electric currents flowing in the ionosphere, magnetosphere, and oceans, and by currents induced......he Earth has a large and complicated magnetic field, the major part of which is produced by a self-sustaining dynamo operating in the fluid outer core. Magnetic field observations provide one of the few tools for remote sensing the Earth’s deep interior, especially regarding the dynamics...... in the Earth by time-varying external fields. These sources have their specific characteristics in terms of spatial and temporal variations, and their proper separation, based on magnetic measurements, is a major challenge. Such a separation is a prerequisite for remote sensing by means of magnetic field...

  14. Recent Advances in Study of Oceanic Vortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Gang; LI Li; LIU Qinyu

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the recent advances in the study of oceanic vortex are outlined. Firstly, the previous studies on oceanic vortex are reviewed. Secondly, some prominent features of oceanic vortex in the Gulf Stream, the Kuroshio, the South China Sea and the Japan Sea regions are depicted based upon the observations and numerical modeling results. Generally, the lifetime of these oceanic vortices ranges from several weeks to several months, and their horizontal scales vary from tens of kilometers to hundreds of kilometers. Their vertical scales are on the order of thousands of meters. Finally, some theoretical studies, mainly on the splitting of a cyclonic vortex and the merging of anticyclonic vortices, are introduced.

  15. Neutron diffraction from the vortex lattice in the heavy-fermion superconductor UPt3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleiman, R.N.; Broholm, C.; Aeppli, G.

    1992-01-01

    We have used neutron diffraction to observe the vortex lattice of UPt3. This is the first such measurement in a heavy-fermion system, a superconductor below 1 K, or in a system with such a long magnetic penetration depth (6000 +/- 75 angstrom). It also provides the first value for the pair...

  16. Vortex dynamics in superconducting MgB2 and prospects for applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugoslavsky, Y; Perkins, G K; Qi, X; Cohen, L F; Caplin, A D

    2001-03-29

    The recently discovered superconductor magnesium diboride, MgB2, has a transition temperature, Tc, approaching 40 K, placing it intermediate between the families of low- and high-temperature superconductors. In practical applications, superconductors are permeated by quantized vortices of magnetic flux. When a supercurrent flows, there is dissipation of energy unless these vortices are 'pinned' in some way, and so inhibited from moving under the influence of the Lorentz force. Such vortex motion ultimately determines the critical current density, Jc, which the superconductor can support. Vortex behaviour has proved to be more complicated in high-temperature superconductors than in low-temperature superconductors and, although this has stimulated extensive theoretical and experimental research, it has also impeded applications. Here we describe the vortex behaviour in MgB2, as reflected in Jc and in the vortex creep rate, S, the latter being a measure of how fast the 'persistent' supercurrents decay. Our results show that naturally occurring grain boundaries are highly transparent to supercurrents, a desirable property which contrasts with the behaviour of the high-temperature superconductors. On the other hand, we observe a steep, practically deleterious decline in Jc with increasing magnetic field, which is likely to reflect the high degree of crystalline perfection in our samples, and hence a low vortex pinning energy.

  17. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet was energised at the beginning of March 2012 at a low current to check all the MSS safety chains. Then the magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T on 6 March 2012. Unfortunately two days later an unintentional switch OFF of the power converter caused a slow dump. This was due to a misunderstanding of the CCC (CERN Control Centre) concerning the procedure to apply for the CMS converter control according to the beam-mode status at that time. Following this event, the third one since 2009, a discussion was initiated to define possible improvement, not only on software and procedures in the CCC, but also to evaluate the possibility to upgrade the CMS hardware to prevent such discharge from occurring because of incorrect procedure implementations. The magnet operation itself was smooth, and no power cuts took place. As a result, the number of magnetic cycles was reduced to the minimum, with only two full magnetic cycles from 0 T to 3.8 T. Nevertheless the magnet suffered four stops of the cryogeni...

  18. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    Operation of the magnet has gone quite smoothly during the first half of this year. The magnet has been at 4.5K for the full period since January. There was an unplanned short stop due to the CERN-wide power outage on May 28th, which caused a slow dump of the magnet. Since this occurred just before a planned technical stop of the LHC, during which access in the experimental cavern was authorized, it was decided to leave the magnet OFF until 2nd June, when magnet was ramped up again to 3.8T. The magnet system experienced a fault also resulting in a slow dump on April 14th. This was triggered by a thermostat on a filter choke in the 20kA DC power converter. The threshold of this thermostat is 65°C. However, no variation in the water-cooling flow rate or temperature was observed. Vibration may have been the root cause of the fault. All the thermostats have been checked, together with the cables, connectors and the read out card. The tightening of the inductance fixations has also been checked. More tem...

  19. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      Following the unexpected magnet stops last August due to sequences of unfortunate events on the services and cryogenics [see CMS internal report], a few more events and initiatives again disrupted the magnet operation. All the magnet parameters stayed at their nominal values during this period without any fault or alarm on the magnet control and safety systems. The magnet was stopped for the September technical stop to allow interventions in the experimental cavern on the detector services. On 1 October, to prepare the transfer of the liquid nitrogen tank on its new location, several control cables had to be removed. One cable was cut mistakenly, causing a digital input card to switch off, resulting in a cold-box (CB) stop. This tank is used for the pre-cooling of the magnet from room temperature down to 80 K, and for this reason it is controlled through the cryogenics control system. Since the connection of the CB was only allowed for a field below 2 T to avoid the risk of triggering a fast d...

  20. Time-Correlated Vortex Tunneling in Layered Superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H. Miller

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The nucleation and dynamics of Josephson and Abrikosov vortices determine the critical currents of layered high-Tc superconducting (HTS thin films, grain boundaries, and coated conductors, so understanding their mechanisms is of crucial importance. Here, we treat pair creation of Josephson and Abrikosov vortices in layered superconductors as a secondary Josephson effect. Each full vortex is viewed as a composite fluid of micro-vortices, such as pancake vortices, which tunnel coherently via a tunneling matrix element. We introduce a two-terminal magnetic (Weber blockade effect that blocks tunneling when the applied current is below a threshold value. We simulate vortex tunneling as a dynamic, time-correlated process when the current is above threshold. The model shows nearly precise agreement with voltage-current (V-I characteristics of HTS cuprate grain boundary junctions, which become more concave rounded as temperature decreases, and also explains the piecewise linear V-I behavior observed in iron-pnictide bicrystal junctions and other HTS devices. When applied to either Abrikosov or Josephson pair creation, the model explains a plateau seen in plots of critical current vs. thickness of HTS-coated conductors. The observed correlation between theory and experiment strongly supports the proposed quantum picture of vortex nucleation and dynamics in layered superconductors.

  1. Vortex Dynamics in a Spin-Orbit-Coupled Bose-Einstein Condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetter, Alexander L.

    2015-07-01

    Vortices in a one-component dilute atomic ultracold Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) usually arise as a response to externally driven rotation. Apart from a few special situations, these vortices are singly quantized with unit circulation (Fetter, Rev Mod Phys 81, 647-691, 2009). Recently, the NIST group has constructed a two-component BEC with a spin-orbit-coupled Hamiltonian involving Pauli matrices (Spielman, Phys Rev A 79, 063613, 2009; Y.-J. Lin et al., Nature 462, 628-632, 2009; Y.-J. Lin et al., Nature 471, 83-87, 2011), and I here study the dynamics of a two-component vortex in such a spin-orbit-coupled condensate. These spin-orbit-coupled BECs use an applied magnetic field to split the hyperfine levels. Hence, they rely on a focused laser beam to trap the atoms. In addition, two Raman laser beams create an effective (or synthetic) gauge potential. The resulting spin-orbit Hamiltonian is discussed in some detail. The various laser beams are fixed in the laboratory, so that it is not feasible to nucleate a vortex by an applied rotation that would need to rotate all the laser beams and the magnetic field. In a one-component BEC, a vortex can also be created by a thermal quench, starting from the normal state and suddenly cooling deep into the condensed state (Freilich et al., Science 329, 1182-1185, 2010). I propose that a similar method would work for a vortex in a spin-orbit-coupled BEC. Such a vortex has two components, and each has its own circulation quantum number (typically ). If both components have the same circulation, I find that the composite vortex should execute uniform precession, like that observed in a single-component BEC (Freilich et al., Science 329, 1182-1185, 2010). In contrast, if one component has unit circulation and the other has zero circulation, then some fraction of the dynamical vortex trajectories should eventually leave the condensate, providing clear experimental evidence for this unusual vortex structure. In the context of

  2. Rotating hot-wire investigation of the vortex responsible for blade-vortex interaction noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Richard Remo

    1988-01-01

    This distribution of the circumferential velocity of the vortex responsible for blade-vortex interaction noise was measured using a rotating hot-wire rake synchronously meshed with a model helicopter rotor at the blade passage frequency. Simultaneous far-field acoustic data and blade differential pressure measurements were obtained. Results show that the shape of the measured far-field acoustic blade-vortex interaction signature depends on the blade-vortex interaction geometry. The experimental results are compared with the Widnall-Wolf model for blade-vortex interaction noise.

  3. Vortex diffusion and vortex-line hysteresis in radial quantum turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saluto, L., E-mail: lidia.saluto@unipa.it [DEIM, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Jou, D., E-mail: david.jou@uab.es [Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Mongiovi, M.S., E-mail: m.stella.mongiovi@unipa.it [DEIM, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2014-05-01

    We study the influence of vortex diffusion on the evolution of inhomogeneous quantized vortex tangles. A simple hydrodynamical model to describe inhomogeneous counterflow superfluid turbulence is used. As an illustration, we obtain solutions for these effects in radial counterflow of helium II between two concentric cylinders at different temperatures. The vortex diffusion from the inner hotter cylinder to the outer colder cylinder increases the vortex length density everywhere as compared with the non-diffusive situation. The possibility of hysteresis in the vortex line density under cyclical variations of the heat flow is explored.

  4. Vortex Solutions in the Chern-Simons Stueckelberg Model

    CERN Document Server

    McKeon, D G C

    1998-01-01

    Vortex solutions to the classical field equations in a massive, renormalizable U(1) gauge model are considered in (2+1) dimensions. A vector field whose kinetic term consists of a Chern-Simons term plus a Stuekelberg mass term is coupled to a scalar field. If the classical scalar field is set equal to zero, then there are classical configurations of the vector field in which the magnetic flux is non-vanishing and finite. In contrast to the Nielsen-Olesen vortex, the magnetic field vanishes exponentially at large distances and diverges logarithmicly at short distances. This divergence, although not so severe as to cause the flux to diverge, results in the Hamiltonian becoming infinite. If the classical scalar field is no longer equal to zero, then the magnetic flux is not only finite, but quantized and the asymptotic behaviour of the field is altered so that the Hamiltonian no longer suffers from a divergence due to the field configuration at the origin. Furthermore, the asymptotic behaviour at infinity is dep...

  5. Vortex structure in a long Josephson junction with two inhomogeneities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreeva, O.Yu. [Tumen Thermal Networks OAO ' TRGK' , Tobolsk 626150 (Russian Federation); Boyadjiev, T.L. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Shukrinov, Yu.M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)], E-mail: shukrinv@theor.jinr.ru

    2007-09-01

    We study the vortex structure in the long Josephson junctions with one and two rectangular inhomogeneities in the barrier layer. In case of one inhomogeneity we demonstrate the existence of the asymmetric fluxon states. The disappearance of the mixed fluxon-antifluxon states is shown when the position of the inhomogeneity shifted to the end of the junction. In case of two inhomogeneities the change of the amplitude of Josephson current through the inhomogeneity in the end of the junction makes strong effect on the stability of the fluxon states and smoothes the maximums on the dependence 'critical current-magnetic field'.

  6. Vortex structure in a long Josephson junction with two inhomogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, O. Yu.; Boyadjiev, T. L.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2007-09-01

    We study the vortex structure in the long Josephson junctions with one and two rectangular inhomogeneities in the barrier layer. In case of one inhomogeneity we demonstrate the existence of the asymmetric fluxon states. The disappearance of the mixed fluxon-antifluxon states is shown when the position of the inhomogeneity shifted to the end of the junction. In case of two inhomogeneities the change of the amplitude of Josephson current through the inhomogeneity in the end of the junction makes strong effect on the stability of the fluxon states and smoothes the maximums on the dependence “critical current-magnetic field”.

  7. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet and its sub-systems were stopped at the beginning of the winter shutdown on 8th December 2011. The magnet was left without cooling during the cryogenics maintenance until 17th January 2012, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The vacuum pumping was maintained during this period. During this shutdown, the yearly maintenance was performed on the cryogenics, the vacuum pumps, the magnet control and safety systems, and the power converter and discharge lines. Several preventive actions led to the replacement of the electrovalve command coils, and the 20A DC power supplies of the magnet control system. The filters were cleaned on the demineralised water circuits. The oil of the diffusion pumps was changed. On the cryogenics, warm nitrogen at 343 K was circulated in the cold box to regenerate the filters and the heat exchangers. The coalescing filters have been replaced at the inlet of both the turbines and the lubricant trapping unit. The active cha...

  8. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet was successfully operated at the end of the year 2009 despite some technical problems on the cryogenics. The magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T at the end of November until December 16th when the shutdown started. The magnet operation met a few unexpected stops. The field was reduced to 3.5 T for about 5 hours on December 3rd due to a faulty pressure sensor on the helium compressor. The following day the CERN CCC stopped unintentionally the power converters of the LHC and the experiments, triggering a ramp down that was stopped at 2.7 T. The magnet was back at 3.8 T about 6 hours after CCC sent the CERN-wide command. Three days later, a slow dump was triggered due to a stop of the pump feeding the power converter water-cooling circuit, during an intervention on the water-cooling plant done after several disturbances on the electrical distribution network. The magnet was back at 3.8 T in the evening the same day. On December 10th a break occurred in one turbine of the cold box producing the liquid ...

  9. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

      The magnet was operated without any problem until the end of the LHC run in February 2013, apart from a CERN-wide power glitch on 10 January 2013 that affected the CMS refrigerator, causing a ramp down to 2 T in order to reconnect the coldbox. Another CERN-wide power glitch on 15 January 2013 didn’t affect the magnet subsystems, the cryoplant or the power converter. At the end of the magnet run, the reconnection of the coldbox at 2.5 T was tested. The process will be updated, in particular the parameters of some PID valve controllers. The helium flow of the current leads was reduced but only for a few seconds. The exercise will be repeated with the revised parameters to validate the automatic reconnection process of the coldbox. During LS1, the water-cooling services will be reduced and many interventions are planned on the electrical services. Therefore, the magnet cryogenics and subsystems will be stopped for several months, and the magnet cannot be kept cold. In order to avoid unc...

  10. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The CMS magnet has been running steadily and smoothly since the summer, with no detected flaw. The magnet instrumentation is entirely operational and all the parameters are at their nominal values. Three power cuts on the electrical network affected the magnet run in the past five months, with no impact on the data-taking as the accelerator was also affected at the same time. On 22nd June, a thunderstorm caused a power glitch on the service electrical network. The primary water cooling at Point 5 was stopped. Despite a quick restart of the water cooling, the inlet temperature of the demineralised water on the busbar cooling circuit increased by 5 °C, up to 23.3 °C. It was kept below the threshold of 27 °C by switching off other cooling circuits to avoid the trigger of a slow dump of the magnet. The cold box of the cryogenics also stopped. Part of the spare liquid helium volume was used to maintain the cooling of the magnet at 4.5 K. The operators of the cryogenics quickly restarted ...

  11. Pinch-off of axisymmetric vortex pairs in the limit of vanishing vortex line curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadri, V.; Krueger, P. S.

    2016-07-01

    Pinch-off of axisymmetric vortex pairs generated by flow between concentric cylinders with radial separation ΔR was studied numerically and compared with planar vortex dipole behavior. The axisymmetric case approaches planar vortex dipole behavior in the limit of vanishing ΔR. The flow was simulated at a jet Reynolds number of 1000 (based on ΔR and the jet velocity), jet pulse length-to-gap ratio ( /L Δ R ) in the range 10-20, and gap-to-outer radius ratio ( /Δ R R o ) in the range 0.01-0.1. Contrary to investigations of strictly planar flows, vortex pinch-off was observed for all gap sizes investigated. This difference was attributed to the less constrained geometry considered, suggesting that even very small amounts of vortex line curvature and/or vortex stretching may disrupt the absence of pinch-off observed in strictly planar vortex dipoles.

  12. Simulations of Active Vortex Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, N. N.; Koumoutsakos, P.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We are interested in the study, via numerical simulations, of active vortex generators. Vortex generators may be used to modify the inner part of the boundary layer or to control separation thus enhancing the performance and maneuverability of aerodynamic configurations. We consider generators that consist of a surface cavity elongated in the streamwise direction and partially covered with a moving lid that at rest lies flush with the boundary. Streamwise voracity is generated and ejected due to the oscillatory motion of the lid. The present simulations c Implement relevant experimental investigations of active vortex generators that have been conducted at NASA Ames Research Center and Stanford University. Jacobson and Reynolds used a piezoelectric device in water, allowing for small amplitude high frequency oscillations. They placed the lid asymmetrically on the cavity and observed a strong outward velocity at the small gap of the cavity. Saddoughi used a larger mechanically driven device in air to investigate this flow and observed a jet emerging from the wide gap of the configuration, contrary to the findings of Jacobson and Reynolds. More recently, Lachowiez and Wlezien are investigating the flow generated by an electro-mechanically driven lid to be used for assertion control in aerodynamic applications. We are simulating the flows generated by these devices and we are conducting a parametric study that would help us elucidate the physical mechanisms present in the flow. Conventional computational schemes encounter difficulties when simulating flows around complex configurations undergoing arbitrary motions. Here we present a formulation that achieves this task on a purely Lagrangian frame by extending the formulation presented by Koumoutsakos, Leonard and Pepin. The viscous effects are taken into account by modifying the strength of the particles, whereas fast multipole schemes employing hundreds of thousands ol'particle's allow for high resolution simulations

  13. Vortex metrology using Fourier analysis techniques: vortex networks correlation fringes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel-Toro, Luciano; Sierra-Sosa, Daniel; Tebaldi, Myrian; Bolognini, Néstor

    2012-10-20

    In this work, we introduce an alternative method of analysis in vortex metrology based on the application of the Fourier optics techniques. The first part of the procedure is conducted as is usual in vortex metrology for uniform in-plane displacement determination. On the basis of two recorded intensity speckled distributions, corresponding to two states of a diffuser coherently illuminated, we numerically generate an analytical signal from each recorded intensity pattern by using a version of the Riesz integral transform. Then, from each analytical signal, a two-dimensional pseudophase map is generated in which the vortices are located and characterized in terms of their topological charges and their core's structural properties. The second part of the procedure allows obtaining Young's interference fringes when Fourier transforming the light passing through a diffracting mask with multiple apertures at the locations of the homologous vortices. In fact, we use the Fourier transform as a mathematical operation to compute the far-field diffraction intensity pattern corresponding to the multiaperture set. Each aperture from the set is associated with a rectangular hole that coincides both in shape and size with a pixel from recorded images. We show that the fringe analysis can be conducted as in speckle photography in an extended range of displacement measurements. Effects related with speckled decorrelation are also considered. Our experimental results agree with those of speckle photography in the range in which both techniques are applicable.

  14. Delaying vortex breakdown by waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, M. F.; Jiang, L. B.; Wu, J. Z.; Ma, H. Y.; Pan, J. Y.

    1989-03-01

    The effect of spiral waves on delaying vortex breakdown in a tube is studied experimentally and theoretically. When a harmonic oscillation was imposed on one of guiding vanes in the tube, the breakdown was observed to be postponed appreciately. According to the generalized Lagrangian mean theory, proper forcing spiral waves may produce an additional streaming momentum, of which the effect is favorable and similar to an axial suction at downstream end. The delayed breakdown position is further predicted by using nonlinear wave theory. Qualitative agreement between theory and experiment is obtained, and experimental comparison of the effects due to forcing spiral wave and axial suction is made.

  15. Anatomy of a bathtub vortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, A; Bohr, T; Stenum, B; Rasmussen, J Juul; Lautrup, B

    2003-09-05

    We present experiments and theory for the "bathtub vortex," which forms when a fluid drains out of a rotating cylindrical container through a small drain hole. The fast down-flow is found to be confined to a narrow and rapidly rotating "drainpipe" from the free surface down to the drain hole. Surrounding this drainpipe is a region with slow upward flow generated by the Ekman layer at the bottom of the container. This flow structure leads us to a theoretical model similar to one obtained earlier by Lundgren [J. Fluid Mech. 155, 381 (1985)

  16. Formation of Ion Phase-Space Vortexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans; Trulsen, J.; Armstrong, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    The formation of ion phase space vortexes in the ion two stream region behind electrostatic ion acoustic shocks are observed in a laboratory experiment. A detailed analysis demonstrates that the evolution of such vortexes is associated with ion-ion beam instabilities and a nonlinear equation for ...

  17. Tight Focusing of Partially Coherent Vortex Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tight focusing of partially polarized vortex beams has been studied. Compact form of the coherence matrix has been derived for polarized vortex beams. Effects of topological charge and polarization distribution of the incident beam on intensity distribution, degree of polarization, and coherence have been investigated.

  18. The linear stability of swirling vortex rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargan-Shingles, C.; Rudman, M.; Ryan, K.

    2016-11-01

    The stability of vortex rings with an azimuthal component of velocity is investigated numerically for various combinations of ring wavenumber and swirl magnitude. The vortex rings are equilibrated from an initially Gaussian distribution of azimuthal vorticity and azimuthal velocity, at a circulation-based Reynolds number of 10 000, to a state in which the vortex core is qualitatively identical to that of the piston generated vortex rings. The instability modes of these rings can be characterised as Kelvin instability modes, analogous to instability modes observed for Gaussian and Batchelor vortex pairs. The shape of an amplified mode typically depends only on the azimuthal wavenumber at the centre of the vortex core and the magnitude of the corresponding velocity component. The wavenumber of a particular sinuous instability varies with radius from the vortex ring centre for rings of finite aspect ratio. Thicker rings spread the amplification over a wider range of wavenumbers for a particular resonant mode pair, while the growth rate and the azimuthal wavenumber corresponding to the peak growth both vary as a function of the wavenumber variation. Normalisation of the wavenumber and the growth rate by a measure of the wavenumber variation allows a coherent description of stability modes to be proposed, across the parameter space. These results provide a framework for predicting the development of resonant Kelvin instabilities on vortex rings with an induced component of swirling velocity.

  19. Ring vortex solitons in nonlocal nonlinear media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Briedis, D.; Petersen, D.E.; Edmundson, D.;

    2005-01-01

    or higher charge fundamental vortices as well as higher order (multiple ring) vortex solitons. Our results pave the way for experimental observation of stable vortex rings in other nonlocal nonlinear systems including Bose-Einstein condensates with pronounced long-range interparticle interaction....

  20. An investigation of the vortex method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pryor, Jr., Duaine Wright [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The vortex method is a numerical scheme for solving the vorticity transport equation. Chorin introduced modern vortex methods. The vortex method is a Lagrangian, grid free method which has less intrinsic diffusion than many grid schemes. It is adaptive in the sense that elements are needed only where the vorticity is non-zero. Our description of vortex methods begins with the point vortex method of Rosenhead for two dimensional inviscid flow, and builds upon it to eventually cover the case of three dimensional slightly viscous flow with boundaries. This section gives an introduction to the fundamentals of the vortex method. This is done in order to give a basic impression of the previous work and its line of development, as well as develop some notation and concepts which will be used later. The purpose here is not to give a full review of vortex methods or the contributions made by all the researchers in the field. Please refer to the excellent review papers in Sethian and Gustafson, chapters 1 Sethian, 2 Hald, 3 Sethian, 8 Chorin provide a solid introduction to vortex methods, including convergence theory, application in two dimensions and connection to statistical mechanics and polymers. Much of the information in this review is taken from those chapters, Chorin and Marsden and Batchelor, the chapters are also useful for their extensive bibliographies.

  1. Investigation of Wake-Vortex Aircraft Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sonya T.

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is addressing airport capacity enhancements during instrument meteorological conditions though the Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) program. The major goal of the TAP program is to develop the technology that will allow air traffic levels during instrument meteorological condition to approach those achieved during visual operations. The Reduced Spacing Operations (RSO) subelement of TAP at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) will develop the Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS). The purpose of the AVOSS is to integrate current and predicted weather conditions, wake vortex transport and decay knowledge, wake vortex sensor data, and operational definitions of acceptable strengths for vortex encounters to produce dynamic wake vortex separation criteria. The proposed research is in support of the wake vortex hazard definition component of the LaRC AVOSS development research. The research program described in the next section provided an analysis of the static test data and uses this data to evaluate the accuracy vortex/wake-encounter models. The accuracy of these models has not before been evaluated using experimental data. The research results also presented the first analysis of the forces and moments imparted on an airplane during a wake vortex encounter using actual flight test data.

  2. On a few Aspects of Vortex Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prantik Sinha

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Intricacies of vortex motion have been drawing the attention of scientists for many years. A number of works both experimental and numerical have been conducted to understand the various features of vortex motion and its effects on drag, etc. In the present experimental work we have made an attempt to visualize the patterns of both Forced and Free vortex motion. Here colored die has been used to understand the profiles and an arrow shaped strip marks the difference between irrotational and rotational flow. In the Forced vortex motion it has been observed that the parabolic profile remains invariant with the flow rate (speed of paddle, height of the lowest point of the profile decreases with the increase in flow rate (paddle speed. In the Free Vortex motion observations, the hyperbolic profile doesn’t change with the change in flow rate. In this case, suction is created towards the centre where as in the case of Force vortex no such suction arises. With the reduction in the size of the orifice diameter, the profile becomes less steep for Free vortex. In this case the velocity profile in the core region is straight, as the radius increases the profile becomes rectangular hyperbola where as in the case of Forced vortex the velocity profile maintains its linear nature for the entire range of radii.

  3. The bathtub vortex in a rotating container

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Bohr, Tomas; Stenum, B.

    2006-01-01

    We study the time-independent free-surface flow which forms when a fluid drains out of a container, a so-called bathtub vortex. We focus on the bathtub vortex in a rotating container and describe the free-surface shape and the complex flow structure using photographs of the free surface, flow...

  4. EXPERIMENTAL AND NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF FREE SURFACE VORTEX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hai-feng; CHEN Hong-xun; MA Zheng; ZHOU Yi

    2008-01-01

    An experimental model was set up to investigate the formation and evolution of the free surface vortex. A Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was used to measure the free surface vortex flow field at different development stages. Flow visualization was used to locate the vortex position and find its structure. Empirical formulas about the critical submergence and the whole field structure were obtained. It is found that the tangential velocity distribution is similar to that of the Rankine vortex and the radial velocity changes little in the vortex functional scope. Vortex starts from the free surface and gradually intensifies to air entrainment vortex. The vortex core moves during the formation and evolution of the free surface vortex. Based on the experimental model, the vortex position and structure were predicted by numerical simulation combined with a vortex model and compared with that of the experiments, which shows satisfactory agreement.

  5. MAGNETS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  6. DC-current induced magneto-oscillations in very high-mobility 2D electron gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C. L.; Zhang, Chi; Du, R. R.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2007-03-01

    We report on a systematic experimental study of DC-current induced magneto-oscillations [1] using Hall bar samples of very high-mobility (8-20 x 10^6 cm^2/Vs) GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs heterostructures. Previously we show that remarkable nonlinear resistance and 1/B oscillations can arise when a high bias current (Ix) is passed through a Hall bar (width w), and the effect can be explained by a Zener tunneling model in the presence of a tilting Hall field [1]. Data of resistance Rxx≡Vx/Ix, differential resistance rxx≡Vx/Ix, and rxx'≡rxx/Ix in higher mobility samples, which show higher order oscillations, have confirmed the validity of this model. Our temperature dependent date show that this effect can persist to kBT>φc, where φc is the cyclotron energy. [1] Yang et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 076801 (2002).

  7. Simulation of Wave-Plus-Current Induced Scour Beneath Submarine Pipelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eltard-Larsen, Bjarke; Fuhrman, David R.; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    of combined wave-plus-current scour processes beneath pipelines. The results of 77 simulated wave-plus-current scour cases will be presented and analysed. The cases considered will consist of waves characterized by 10 different Keulegan-Carpenter numbers, KC=UmTw/D and up to eight different values of m......-plus-current environments. The present study, which is published in Larsen et al. (2016) focuses on the numerical simulation of wave-plus-current induced scour beneath submarine pipelines, based on a model solving Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations, fully coupled with turbulence closure, bed and suspended...... load sediment transport descriptions, and a seabed morphological model. The model was utilized in simulating breaker bar development by Jacobsen et al. (2014) and has been used in simulating wave induced scour beneath pipelines by Fuhrman et al. (2014) . The model is utilized for the numerical study...

  8. Experiments on Interaction Between Current-Induced Vibration and Scour of Submarine Pipelines on Sandy Bottom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Zhonghan; LIU Yubiao; LI Qingping; HUANG Qinghua; ZHU Farong

    2000-01-01

    In order to understand the dynamic behavior of submarine pipelines exposed to current and the mechanism of the interaction between current-induced vibration and scour of pipelines on a sandy bottom, an experimental investigation is conducted with a small scale model. A test model which can be testedin the flume is set up by taking into account the typical working conditions of the pipelines and by applying the similarity theory. The interactions between the shape of the scour hole and the behavior of the pipeline as well as the flow patterns of the current are detailed, and the interaction mechanism outlined.The effect of vibration of the pipeline on the development of dynamic scour at different stages is found out. The proposed experimental method and test results provide an effective means for design of marine pipelines against scouring.

  9. Bifurcation and instability problems in vortex wakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aref, H [Center for Fluid Dynamics and Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, DK-2800 (Denmark); Broens, M [Center for Fluid Dynamics and Department of Mathematics, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, DK-2800 (Denmark); Stremler, M A [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2007-04-15

    A number of instability and bifurcation problems related to the dynamics of vortex wake flows are addressed using various analytical tools and approaches. We discuss the bifurcations of the streamline pattern behind a bluff body as a vortex wake is produced, a theory of the universal Strouhal-Reynolds number relation for vortex wakes, the bifurcation diagram for 'exotic' wake patterns behind an oscillating cylinder first determined experimentally by Williamson and Roshko, and the bifurcations in topology of the streamlines pattern in point vortex streets. The Hamiltonian dynamics of point vortices in a periodic strip is considered. The classical results of von Karman concerning the structure of the vortex street follow from the two-vortices-in-a-strip problem, while the stability results follow largely from a four-vortices-in-a-strip analysis. The three-vortices-in-a-strip problem is argued to be relevant to the wake behind an oscillating body.

  10. Bifurcation and instability problems in vortex wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aref, Hassan; Brøns, Morten; Stremler, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    A number of instability and bifurcation problems related to the dynamics of vortex wake flows are addressed using various analytical tools and approaches. We discuss the bifurcations of the streamline pattern behind a bluff body as a vortex wake is produced, a theory of the universal Strouhal......-Reynolds number relation for vortex wakes, the bifurcation diagram for "exotic" wake patterns behind an oscillating cylinder first determined experimentally by Williamson & Roshko, and the bifurcations in topology of the streamlines pattern in point vortex streets. The Hamiltonian dynamics of point vortices...... in a periodic strip is considered. The classical results of von Kármán concerning the structure of the vortex street follow from the two-vortices-in-a-strip problem, while the stability results follow largely from a four-vortices-in-a-strip analysis. The three-vortices-in-a-strip problem is argued...

  11. Nonlinear vortex structures with perpendicular shear flow, hot ions, and nonthermal distribution of electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gul-e-Ali,; Mirza, Arshad M. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Group, Physics Department, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Masood, W. [COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Park Road, Chak Shahzad, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics, Shahdara Valley Road, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2016-02-15

    Coupling of drift vortex and the ion acoustic modes in the linear and nonlinear regimes are investigated with sheared ion flow perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field in a plasma comprising of hot ions and nonthermal population of electrons. In this regard, generation of nonlinear vortex structures in the presence of kappa, Cairns, and q-nonextensive electron distributions are investigated in detail, and comparison with the Maxwellian distribution is also made. The appositeness of the present investigation in the matter of auroral F-region is also pointed out.

  12. Imaging of vortex chains in Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolocan, V.O.; Veauvy, C.; Liu, Y.; Servant, F.; Lejay, P.; Mailly, D.; Hasselbach, K

    2004-05-01

    Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} is an unconventional superconductor with a superconducting transition temperature of {approx}1.5 K. The formation of vortex chains in Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} is observed, they have been directly imaged by {mu}SQUID force microscopy at low temperature. Ginzburg-Landau theory for anisotropic superconductors is in qualitative agreement with the observed dependencies of the vortex chains on the variation of the tilting angle or the amplitude of the external magnetic field.

  13. Vortex dynamics in the presence of excess energy for the Landau-Lifschitz-Gilbert equation

    CERN Document Server

    Kurzke, Matthias; Moser, Roger; Spirn, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We study the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for the dynamics of a magnetic vortex system. We present a PDE-based method for proving vortex dynamics that does not rely on strong well-preparedness of the initial data and allows for instantaneous changes in the strength of the gyrovector force due to bubbling events. The main tools are estimates of the Hodge decomposition of the supercurrent and an analysis of the defect measure of weak convergence of the stress energy tensor. Ginzburg-Landau equations with mixed dynamics in the presence of excess energy are also discussed.

  14. Theory of specific heat of vortex liquid of high T c superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Chen; Chi, Cheng; Wang, Jiangfan

    2016-10-01

    Superconducting thermal fluctuation (STF) plays an important role in both thermodynamic and transport properties in the vortex liquid phase of high T c superconductors. It was widely observed in the vicinity of the critical transition temperature. In the framework of Ginzburg-Landau-Lawrence-Doniach theory in magnetic field, a self-consistent analysis of STF including all Landau levels is given. Besides that, we calculate the contribution of STF to specific heat in vortex liquid phase for high T c cuprate superconductors, and the fitting results are in good agreement with experimental data. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11274018).

  15. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet ran smoothly in the last few months until a fast dump occurred on 9th May 2011. Fortunately, this occurred in the afternoon of the first day of the technical stop. The fast dump was due to a valve position controller that caused the sudden closure of a valve. This valve is used to regulate the helium flow on one of the two current leads, which electrically connects the coil at 4.5 K to the busbars at room temperature. With no helium flow on the lead, the voltage drop and the temperatures across the leads increase up to the defined thresholds, triggering a fast dump through the Magnet Safety System (MSS). The automatic reaction triggered by the MSS worked properly. The helium release was limited as the pressure rise was just at the limit of the safety valve opening pressure. The average temperature of the magnet reached 72 K. It took four days to recover the temperature and refill the helium volumes. The faulty valve controller was replaced by a spare one before the magnet ramp-up resumed....

  16. Introduction to Vortex Lattice Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Pinzón

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Panel methods have been widely used in industry and are well established since the 1970s for aerodynamic analysis and computation. The Vortex Lattice Panel Method presented in this study comes across a sophisticated method that provides a quick solution time, allows rapid changes in geometry and suits well for aerodynamic analysis. The aerospace industry is highly competitive in design efficiency, and perhaps one of the most important factors on airplane design and engineering today is multidisciplinary optimization.  Any cost reduction method in the design cycle of a product becomes vital in the success of its outcome. The subsequent sections of this article will further explain in depth the theory behind the vortex lattice method, and the reason behind its selection as the method for aerodynamic analysis during preliminary design work and computation within the aerospace industry. This article is analytic in nature, and its main objective is to present a mathematical summary of this widely used computational method in aerodynamics.

  17. The VORTEX coronagraphic test bench

    CERN Document Server

    Jolivet, Aissa; Huby, Elsa; Absil, Olivier; Delacroix, Christian; Mawet, Dimitri; Surdej, Jean; Habraken, Serge

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present the infrared coronagraphic test bench of the University of Li\\`ege named VODCA (Vortex Optical Demonstrator for Coronagraphic Applications). The goal of the bench is to assess the performances of the Annular Groove Phase Masks (AGPMs) at near- to mid-infrared wavelengths. The AGPM is a subwavelength grating vortex coronagraph of charge two (SGVC2) made out of diamond. The bench is designed to be completely achromatic and will be composed of a super continuum laser source emitting in the near to mid-infrared, several parabolas, diaphragms and an infrared camera. This way, we will be able to test the different AGPMs in the M, L, K and H bands. Eventually, the bench will also allow the computation of the incident wavefront aberrations on the coronagraph. A reflective Lyot stop will send most of the stellar light to a second camera to perform low-order wavefront sensing. This second system coupled with a deformable mirror will allow the correction of the wavefront aberrations. We also ai...

  18. Vortex dynamics in $R^4$

    CERN Document Server

    Shashikanth, Banavara N

    2011-01-01

    The vortex dynamics of Euler's equations for a constant density fluid flow in $R^4$ is studied. Most of the paper focuses on singular Dirac delta distributions of the vorticity two-form $\\omega$ in $R^4$. These distributions are supported on two-dimensional surfaces termed {\\it membranes} and are the analogs of vortex filaments in $R^3$ and point vortices in $R^2$. The self-induced velocity field of a membrane is shown to be unbounded and is regularized using a local induction approximation (LIA). The regularized self-induced velocity field is then shown to be proportional to the mean curvature vector field of the membrane but rotated by 90 degrees in the plane of normals. Next, the Hamiltonian membrane model is presented. The symplectic structure for this model is derived from a general formula for vorticity distributions due to Marsden and Weinstein (1983). Finally, the dynamics of the four-form $\\omega \\wedge \\omega$ is examined. It is shown that Ertel's vorticity theorem in $R^3$, for the constant density...

  19. Vortex spin-torque oscillator using Co2FexMn1 -xSi Heusler alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Seki, Takeshi; Takanashi, Koki

    2016-09-01

    We show spin-transfer-torque-driven vortex oscillations in current-perpendicular-to-plane giant magnetoresistance junctions using epitaxially grown Co2FexMn1 -xSi (CFMS) Heusler alloy thin films. The soft magnetic property and high spin polarization of CFMS enable us to realize vortex oscillation emitting large microwave power with a low threshold current. The output power is maximized for a certain Fe-Mn composition ratio associated with a reduction of the threshold current for the oscillation, which is in agreement with a general model for spin-torque oscillation. Through comparison with an analytical theory that describes the translational motion of a vortex core, we show that the vortex core motion excited in the present device is inhomogeneous along the thickness direction. In spite of the inhomogeneity, the gyration radius at the CFMS/spacer interface region was estimated to be ˜75 % of the actual ferromagnetic layer radius, which indicates that the CFMS-based all-metallic junction is useful for achieving large-amplitude vortex core motion. This comprehensive investigation would also be useful for designing high-performance all-metallic nano-oscillators based on magnetic vortex dynamics.

  20. Vortex bursting and tracer transport of a counter-rotating vortex pair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misaka, T.; Holzäpfel, F.; Hennemann, I.; Gerz, T.; Manhart, M.; Schwertfirm, F.

    2012-02-01

    Large-eddy simulations of a coherent counter-rotating vortex pair in different environments are performed. The environmental background is characterized by varying turbulence intensities and stable temperature stratifications. Turbulent exchange processes between the vortices, the vortex oval, and the environment, as well as the material redistribution processes along the vortex tubes are investigated employing passive tracers that are superimposed to the initial vortex flow field. It is revealed that the vortex bursting phenomenon, known from photos of aircraft contrails or smoke visualization, is caused by collisions of secondary vortical structures traveling along the vortex tube which expel material from the vortex but do not result in a sudden decay of circulation or an abrupt change of vortex core structure. In neutrally stratified and weakly turbulent conditions, vortex reconnection triggers traveling helical vorticity structures which is followed by their collision. A long-lived vortex ring links once again establishing stable double rings. Key phenomena observed in the simulations are supported by photographs of contrails. The vertical and lateral extents of the detrained passive tracer strongly depend on environmental conditions where the sensitivity of detrainment rates on initial tracer distributions appears to be low.

  1. Rotor Wake Vortex Definition Using 3C-PIV Measurements: Corrected for Vortex Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, Casey L.; Brooks, Thomas F.; vanderWall, Berend; Richard, Hughues Richard; Raffel, Markus; Beaumier, Philippe; Delrieux, Yves; Lim, Joon W.; Yu, Yung H.; Tung, Chee

    2003-01-01

    Three-component (3-C) particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements, within the wake across a rotor disk plane, are used to determine wake vortex definitions important for BVI (Blade Vortex Interaction) and broadband noise prediction. This study is part of the HART II test program conducted using a 40 percent scale BO-105 helicopter main rotor in the German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW). In this paper, measurements are presented of the wake vortex field over the advancing side of the rotor operating at a typical descent landing condition. The orientations of the vortex (tube) axes are found to have non-zero tilt angles with respect to the chosen PIV measurement cut planes, often on the order of 45 degrees. Methods for determining the orientation of the vortex axis and reorienting the measured PIV velocity maps (by rotation/projection) are presented. One method utilizes the vortex core axial velocity component, the other utilizes the swirl velocity components. Key vortex parameters such as vortex core size, strength, and core velocity distribution characteristics are determined from the reoriented PIV velocity maps. The results are compared with those determined from velocity maps that are not corrected for orientation. Knowledge of magnitudes and directions of the vortex axial and swirl velocity components as a function of streamwise location provide a basis for insight into the vortex evolution.

  2. The method to control the submarine horseshoe vortex by breaking the vortex core

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhi-hua; XIONG Ying; TU Cheng-xu

    2014-01-01

    The quality of the inflow across the propeller is closely related with the hydrodynamic performance and the noise characteristics of the propeller. For a submarine, with a horseshoe vortex generated at the junction of the main body and the appendages, the submarine wake is dominated by a kind of highly non-uniform flow field, which has an adverse effect on the performance of the submarine propeller. In order to control the horseshoe vortex and improve the quality of the submarine wake, the flow field around a submarine model is simulated by the detached eddies simulation (DES) method, and the vortex configuration is displayed using the second invariant of the velocity derivative tensor. The state and the transition process of the horseshoe vortex are analyzed, then a modified method to break the vortex core by a vortex baffle is proposed. The flow numerical simulation is carried out to study the effect of this method. Numerical simulations show that, with the breakdown of the vortex core, many unstable vortices are shed and the energy of the horseshoe vortex is dissipated quickly, and the uniformity of the submarine wake is improved. The submarine wake test in a wind tunnel has verified the effect of the method to control the horseshoe vortex. The vortex baffle can improve the wake uniformity in cases of high Reynolds numbers as well, and it does not have adverse effects on the maneuverability and the speed ability of the submarine.

  3. DC current induced metal-insulator transition in epitaxial Sm0.6Nd0.4NiO3/LaAlO3 thin film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoliang Huang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The metal-insulator transition (MIT in strong correlated electron materials can be induced by external perturbation in forms of thermal, electrical, optical, or magnetic fields. We report on the DC current induced MIT in epitaxial Sm0.6Nd0.4NiO3 (SNNO thin film deposited by pulsed laser deposition on (001-LaAlO3 substrate. It was found that the MIT in SNNO film not only can be triggered by thermal, but also can be induced by DC current. The TMI of SNNO film decreases from 282 K to 200 K with the DC current density increasing from 0.003 × 109 A•m−2 to 4.9 × 109 A•m−2. Based on the resistivity curves measured at different temperatures, the MIT phase diagram has been successfully constructed.

  4. GINZBURG-LANDAU THEORY AND VORTEX LATTICE OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU SHI-PING

    2001-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the vortex lattice of high-temperature superconductors has been studied by solving the generalized Ginzburg-Landau equations derived microscopically. Our numerical simulation indicates that the structure of the vortex lattice is oblique at the temperature far away from the transition temperature Tc, where the mixed s-dx2-ya state is expected to have the lowest energy. Whereas, very close to Tc, the dx2-ya wave is slightly lower energetically, and a triangular vortex lattice recovers. The coexistence and the coupling between the s and d waves would account for the unusual dynamic behaviours such as the upward curvature of the upper critical field curve Hc2(T), as observed in dc magnetization measurements on single-crystal YBa2Cu307 samples.

  5. An evolving MHD vortex street model for quasi-periodic solar wind fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siregar, Edouard; Roberts, D. A.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation are used to provide a dynamical basis for the 'vortex street' model of the quasi-periodic meridional flow observed by Voyager 2 in the outer heliosphere. Various observations suggest the existence near the current sheet at solar minimum, of a vorticity distribution of two opposite shear layers with an antisymmetric staggered velocity pattern due to structured high-speed wind surrounding low-speed equatorial flow. It is shown that this flow pattern leads to the formation of a highly stable vortex street through the nonlinear interaction of the two shear layers. Spatial profiles of various simulated parameters (velocity, density, meridional flow angle and the location of magnetic sector boundaries) and their relative locations in the quasi-steady vortex street are generally in good agreement with the observations.

  6. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

    The magnet is fully stopped and at room temperature. The maintenance works and consolidation activities on the magnet sub-systems are progressing. To consolidate the cryogenic installation, two redundant helium compressors will be installed as ‘hot spares’, to avoid the risk of a magnet downtime in case of a major failure of a compressor unit during operation. The screw compressors, their motors, the mechanical couplings and the concrete blocks are already available and stored at P5. The metallic structure used to access the existing compressors in SH5 will be modified to allow the installation of the two redundant ones. The plan is to finish the installation and commissioning of the hot spare compressors before the summer 2014. In the meantime, a bypass on the high-pressure helium piping will be installed for the connection of a helium drier unit later during the Long Shutdown 1, keeping this installation out of the schedule critical path. A proposal is now being prepared for the con...

  7. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    MAGNET During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bough...

  8. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet worked very well at 3.8 T as expected, despite a technical issue that manifested twice in the cryogenics since June. All the other magnet sub-systems worked without flaw. The issue in the cryogenics was with the cold box: it could be observed that the cold box was getting progressively blocked, due to some residual humidity and air accumulating in the first thermal exchanger and in the adsorber at 65 K. This was later confirmed by the analysis during the regeneration phases. An increase in the temperature difference between the helium inlet and outlet across the heat exchanger and a pressure drop increase on the filter of the adsorber were observed. The consequence was a reduction of the helium flow, first compensated by the automatic opening of the regulation valves. But once they were fully opened, the flow and refrigeration power reduced as a consequence. In such a situation, the liquid helium level in the helium Dewar decreased, eventually causing a ramp down of the magnet current and a field...

  9. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé.

    The magnet operation restarted end of June this year. Quick routine checks of the magnet sub-systems were performed at low current before starting the ramps up to higher field. It appeared clearly that the end of the field ramp down to zero was too long to be compatible with the detector commissioning and operations plans. It was decided to perform an upgrade to keep the ramp down from 3.8T to zero within 4 hours. On July 10th, when a field of 1.5T was reached, small movements were observed in the forward region support table and it was decided to fix this problem before going to higher field. At the end of July the ramps could be resumed. On July 28th, the field was at 3.8T and the summer CRAFT exercise could start. This run in August went smoothly until a general CERN wide power cut took place on August 3rd, due to an insulation fault on the high voltage network outside point 5. It affected the magnet powering electrical circuit, as it caused the opening of the main circuit breakers, resulting in a fast du...

  10. Application of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with vortex-assisted hydrophobic magnetic nanoparticles based solid-phase extraction for determination of aflatoxin M1 in milk samples by sensitive micelle enhanced spectrofluorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoli-Diva, Mitra; Taherimaslak, Zohreh; Allahyari, Mehdi; Pourghazi, Kamyar; Manafi, Mohammad Hanif

    2015-03-01

    An efficient, simple and fast low-density solvent based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (LDS-DLLME) followed by vortex-assisted dispersive solid phase extraction (VA-D-SPE) has been developed as a new approach for extraction and preconcentration of aflatoxin M1 in milk samples prior to its micelle enhanced spectrofluorimetic determination. In this LDS-DLLME coupled VA-D-SPE method, milk samples were first treated with methanol/water (80:20, v/v) after removing the fat layer. This solvent was directly used as the dispersing solvent in DLLME along with using 1-heptanol (as a low-density solvent with respect to water) as the extracting solvent. In VA-D-SPE approach, hydrophobic oleic acid modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles were used to retrieve the analyte from the DLLME step. It is considerably that the target of VA-D-SPE was 1-heptanol rather than the aflatoxin M1 directly. The main parameters affecting the efficiency of LDS-DLLME and VA-D-SPE procedures and signal enhancement of aflatoxin M1 were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the method was linear in the range from 0.02 to 200 µg L(-1) with the correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.9989 and detection limit of 13 ng L(-1). The intra-day precision was 2.9 and 4.3% and the inter-day precision was 2.1 and 3.3% for concentration of 2 and 50 µg L(-1) respectively. The developed method was applied for extraction and preconcentration of AFM1 in three commercially available milk samples and the results were compared with the official AOAC method.

  11. Microscale vortex laser with controlled topological charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing-Yuan; Chen, Hua-Zhou; Li, Ying; Li, Bo; Ma, Ren-Min

    2016-12-01

    A microscale vortex laser is a new type of coherent light source with small footprint that can directly generate vector vortex beams. However, a microscale laser with controlled topological charge, which is crucial for virtually any of its application, is still unrevealed. Here we present a microscale vortex laser with controlled topological charge. The vortex laser eigenmode was synthesized in a metamaterial engineered non-Hermitian micro-ring cavity system at exceptional point. We also show that the vortex laser cavity can operate at exceptional point stably to lase under optical pumping. The microscale vortex laser with controlled topological charge can serve as a unique and general building block for next-generation photonic integrated circuits and coherent vortex beam sources. The method we used here can be employed to generate lasing eigenmode with other complex functionalities. Project supported by the “Youth 1000 Talent Plan” Fund, Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. 201421) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11574012 and 61521004).

  12. Nonlinear ion acoustic waves scattered by vortexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yuji; Yoshida, Zensho

    2016-09-01

    The Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) hierarchy is the archetype of infinite-dimensional integrable systems, which describes nonlinear ion acoustic waves in two-dimensional space. This remarkably ordered system resides on a singular submanifold (leaf) embedded in a larger phase space of more general ion acoustic waves (low-frequency electrostatic perturbations). The KP hierarchy is characterized not only by small amplitudes but also by irrotational (zero-vorticity) velocity fields. In fact, the KP equation is derived by eliminating vorticity at every order of the reductive perturbation. Here, we modify the scaling of the velocity field so as to introduce a vortex term. The newly derived system of equations consists of a generalized three-dimensional KP equation and a two-dimensional vortex equation. The former describes 'scattering' of vortex-free waves by ambient vortexes that are determined by the latter. We say that the vortexes are 'ambient' because they do not receive reciprocal reactions from the waves (i.e., the vortex equation is independent of the wave fields). This model describes a minimal departure from the integrable KP system. By the Painlevé test, we delineate how the vorticity term violates integrability, bringing about an essential three-dimensionality to the solutions. By numerical simulation, we show how the solitons are scattered by vortexes and become chaotic.

  13. A VORTEX MODEL OF A HELICOPTER ROTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin BUTOESCU

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A vortex model of a helicopter rotor is presented. Each blade of the rotor has three degrees of freedom: flapping, lagging and feathering. The motions after each degree of freedom are also known for all blades. The blade is modelled as a thin vortex surface. The wakes are free fluid surfaces. A system of five equations are obtained: the first one is the integral equation of the lifting surface (rotor, the next three describe the wakes motion, and the last one relates the vortex strength on the wakes and the variation of vorticity on the rotor. A numerical solution of this system is presented. To avoid the singularities that can occur due to the complexity of vortex system, a desingularized model of the vortex core was adopted. A Mathcad worksheet containing the method has been written.The original contribution of the work. The calculation method of the motion of the wakes free vortex system, the development of the vortex cores in time and a new method to approximate the aerodynamic influence of remoted wake regions.

  14. Rayleigh instability of confined vortex droplets in critical superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanchuk, I.; Vinokur, V. M.; Rydh, A.; Xie, R.; Milošević, M. V.; Welp, U.; Zach, M.; Xiao, Z. L.; Crabtree, G. W.; Bending, S. J.; Peeters, F. M.; Kwok, W. K.

    2015-01-01

    Depending on the Ginzburg-Landau parameter κ, superconductors can either be fully diamagnetic if (type I superconductors) or allow magnetic flux to penetrate through Abrikosov vortices if (type II superconductors; refs , ). At the Bogomolny critical point, , a state that is infinitely degenerate with respect to vortex spatial configurations arises. Despite in-depth investigations of conventional type I and type II superconductors, a thorough understanding of the magnetic behaviour in the near-Bogomolny critical regime at κ ~ κc remains lacking. Here we report that in confined systems the critical regime expands over a finite interval of κ forming a critical superconducting state. We show that in this state, in a sample with dimensions comparable to the vortex core size, vortices merge into a multi-quanta droplet, which undergoes Rayleigh instability on increasing κ and decays by emitting single vortices. Superconducting vortices realize Nielsen-Olesen singular solutions of the Abelian Higgs model, which is pervasive in phenomena ranging from quantum electrodynamics to cosmology. Our study of the transient dynamics of Abrikosov-Nielsen-Olesen vortices in systems with boundaries promises access to non-trivial effects in quantum field theory by means of bench-top laboratory experiments.

  15. Model for vortex turbulence with discontinuities in the solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. P. Verkhoglyadova

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A model of vortex with embedded discontinuities in plasma flow is developed in the framework of ideal MHD in a low b plasma. Vortex structures are considered as a result of 2-D evolution of nonlinear shear Alfvén waves in the heliosphere. Physical properties of the solutions and vector fields are analyzed and the observational aspects of the model are discussed. The ratio of normal components to the discontinuity Br /Vr can be close to -2. The alignment between velocity and magnetic field vectors takes place. Spacecraft crossing such vortices will typically observe a pair of discontinuities, but with dissimilar properties. Occurrence rate for different discontinuity types is estimated and agrees with observations in high-speed solar wind stream. Discontinuity crossing provides a backward rotation of magnetic field vector and can be observed as part of a backward arc. The Ulysses magnetometer data obtained in the fast solar wind are compared with the results of theoretical modelling.

  16. Observation of vortex coalescence in the anisotropic spin-triplet superconductor Sr2RuO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolocan, V O; Veauvy, C; Servant, F; Lejay, P; Hasselbach, K; Liu, Y; Mailly, D

    2005-08-26

    We present direct imaging of magnetic flux structures over the ab face of the anisotropic, spin-triplet superconductor Sr2RuO4 using a scanning microSQUID force microscope. Individual vortices with a single flux quantum were observed at low magnetic fields applied along the out-of-pane direction. At intermediate fields, the direct imaging revealed coalescing of vortices and the formation of flux domains. Our observations imply the existence of a mechanism in this material for bringing vortices together overcoming the conventional repulsive vortex-vortex interaction.

  17. Complete mapping of the spin-wave spectrum in a vortex-state nanodisk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taurel, B.; Valet, T.; Naletov, V. V.; Vukadinovic, N.; de Loubens, G.; Klein, O.

    2016-05-01

    We report a study on the complete spin-wave spectrum inside a vortex-state nanodisk. Transformation of this spectrum is continuously monitored as the nanodisk becomes gradually magnetized by a perpendicular magnetic field and encounters a second-order phase transition to the uniformly magnetized state. This reveals the bijective relationship that exists between the eigenmodes in the vortex state and the ones in the saturated state. It is found that the gyrotropic mode can be continuously viewed as a uniform phase precession, which uniquely softens (its frequency vanishes) at the saturation field to transform above into the Kittel mode. By contrast, the other spin-wave modes remain finite as a function of the applied field, while their character is altered by level anticrossing.

  18. Large amplitude spin torque vortex oscillations at zero external field using a perpendicular spin polarizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dussaux, A.; Rache Salles, B.; Jenkins, A. S.; Bortolotti, P.; Grollier, J.; Cros, V.; Fert, A. [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales and Université Paris Sud 11, 1 Ave. A. Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); Grimaldi, E., E-mail: eva.grimaldi@thalesgroup.com [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales and Université Paris Sud 11, 1 Ave. A. Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); CNES, 1 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Khvalkovskiy, A. V. [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales and Université Paris Sud 11, 1 Ave. A. Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of RAS, Vavilova Str. 38, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kubota, H.; Fukushima, A.; Yakushiji, K.; Yuasa, S. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan)

    2014-07-14

    We investigate the microwave response of a spin transfer vortex based oscillator in a magnetic tunnel junction with an in-plane reference layer combined with a spin valve with an out-of-plane magnetization spin polarizing layer. The main advantage of this perpendicular spin polarizer is to induce a large spin transfer force even at zero magnetic field, thus leading to a record emitted power (up to 0.6 μW) associated to a very narrow spectral linewidth of a few hundreds of kHz. The characteristics of this hybrid vortex based spin transfer nano-oscillator obtained at zero field and room temperature are of great importance for applications based on rf spintronic devices as integrated and tunable microwave source and/or microwave detector.

  19. Vortex reconnections and rebounds in trapped atomic Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galantucci, Luca; Serafini, Simone; Iseni, Elena; Bienaime', Tom; Bisset, Russell; Dalfovo, Franco; Lamporesi, Giacomo; Ferrari, Gabriele; Barenghi, Carlo F.

    2016-11-01

    Reconnections and interactions of filamentary coherent structures play a fundamental role in the dynamics of classical and quantum fluids, plasmas and nematic liquid crystals. In quantum fluids vorticity is concentrated into discrete (quantised) vortex lines (unlike ordinary fluids where vorticity is a continuous field), turning vortex reconnections into isolated events, conceptually easier to study. In order to investigate the impact of non-homogeneous density fields on the dynamics of quantum reconnections, we perform a numerical study of two-vortex interactions in magnetically trapped elongated Bose-Einstein condensates in the T=0 limit. We observe different vortex interactions regimes depending on the vortex orientations and their relative velocity: unperturbed orbiting, bounce dynamics, single and double reconnection events. The key ingredients driving the dynamics are the anti-parallel preferred alignment of the vortices and the impact of density gradients arising from the inhomogeneity of the trapping potential. The results are confirmed by ongoing experiments in Trento performed employing an innovative non-destrutive real-time imaging technique capable of determining the axial dynamics and the orientation of the vortices.

  20. Efficient creation of electron vortex beams for high resolution STEM imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béché, A; Juchtmans, R; Verbeeck, J

    2016-05-10

    The recent discovery of electron vortex beams carrying quantised angular momentum in the TEM has led to an active field of research, exploring a variety of potential applications including the possibility of mapping magnetic states at the atomic scale. A prerequisite for this is the availability of atomic sized electron vortex beams at high beam current and mode purity. In this paper we present recent progress showing that by making use of the Aharonov-Bohm effect near the tip of a long single domain ferromagnetic Nickel needle, a very efficient aperture for the production of electron vortex beams can be realised. The aperture transmits more than 99% of all electrons and provides a vortex mode purity of up to 92%. Placing this aperture in the condenser plane of a state of the art Cs corrected microscope allows us to demonstrate atomic resolution HAADF STEM images with spatial resolution better than 1 Angström, in agreement with theoretical expectations and only slightly inferior to the performance of a non-vortex probe on the same instrument.