WorldWideScience

Sample records for current treatment recommendations

  1. Mixed states in bipolar disorder - changes in DSM-5 and current treatment recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzler, Felix; Stöver, Laura Apollonia; Sterzer, Philipp; Köhler, Stephan

    2017-11-01

    Mixed states in affective disorders represent a particular challenge in clinical routine, characterized by a complicated course of treatment and a worse treatment response. Clinical features of mixed states and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) criteria are presented and critical discussed. We then performed a systematic review using the terms 'bipolar', 'mixed' and 'randomized' to evaluate current treatment options. For pharmacological treatment of mixed states in total, there is still insufficient data from RCTs. However, there is some evidence for efficacy in mixed states from RCTs for atypical antipsychotics, especially olanzapine, aripiprazole and asenapine as well as mood stabilizers as valproate and carbamazepine. Mixed states are of a high clinical relevance and the DSM-5 criteria substantially reduced the diagnostic threshold. Besides advantages of a better characterization of patients with former DSM-IV-defined mixed episodes, disadvantages arise for example differential diagnoses with a substantial overlap in symptoms such as borderline personality disorders. Atypical antipsychotics, valproate and carbamazepine demonstrated efficacy in a limited sample of RCTs. The number of RCTs in the treatment of mixed states is highly limited. Furthermore, nearly all studies were funded by pharmaceutical companies which may lead to an underestimation of classical mood stabilizers such as lithium.

  2. Improving Treatment Adherence in Bipolar Disorder: A Review of Current Psychosocial Treatment Efficacy and Recommendations for Future Treatment Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudiano, Brandon A.; Weinstock, Lauren M.; Miller, Ivan W.

    2008-01-01

    Treatment adherence is a frequent problem in bipolar disorder, with research showing that more than 60% of bipolar patients are at least partially nonadherent to medications. Treatment nonadherence is consistently predictive of a number of negative outcomes in bipolar samples, and the discontinuation of mood stabilizers places these patients at…

  3. Isavuconazole for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis: current evidence, safety, efficacy, and clinical recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natesan SK

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Suganthini Krishnan Natesan,1,2 Pranatharthi H Chandrasekar1 1Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Wayne State University, 2John D Dingell VA Medical Center, Detroit, MI, USA Abstract: The majority of invasive mold infections diagnosed in immunocompromised cancer patients include invasive aspergillosis (IA and mucormycosis. Despite timely and effective therapy, mortality remains considerable. Antifungal agents currently available for the management of these serious infections include triazoles, polyenes, and echinocandins. Until recently, posaconazole has been the only triazole with a broad spectrum of anti-mold activity against both Aspergillus sp. and mucorales. Other clinically available triazoles voriconazole and itraconazole, with poor activity against mucorales, have significant drug interactions in addition to a side effect profile inherent for all triazoles. Polyenes including lipid formulations pose a problem with infusion-related side effects, electrolyte imbalance, and nephrotoxicity. Echinocandins are ineffective against mucorales and are approved as salvage therapy for refractory IA. Given that all available antifungal agents have limitations, there has been an unmet need for a broad-spectrum anti-mold agent with a favorable profile. Following phase III clinical trials that started in 2006, isavuconazole (ISZ seems to fit this profile. It is the first novel triazole agent recently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA for the treatment of both IA and mucormycosis. This review provides a brief overview of the salient features of ISZ, its favorable profile with regard to spectrum of antifungal activity, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters, drug interactions and tolerability, clinical efficacy, and side effects. Keywords: isavuconazole, aspergillosis, mucormycosis, efficacy, antifungal therapy, novel azole, tolerability, drug interactions

  4. Imaging Surveillance of Patients with Breast Cancer after Primary Treatment: Current Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung [Department of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-01

    Women who have been treated for breast cancer are at risk for second breast cancers, such as ipsilateral recurrence or contralateral metachronous breast cancer. As the number of breast cancer survivors increases, interest in patient management and surveillance after treatment has also increased. However, post-treatment surveillance programs for patients with breast cancer have not been firmly established. In this review, we focus on the imaging modalities that have been used in post-treatment surveillance for patients with breast cancer, such as mammography, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography, the effectiveness of each modality for detecting recurrence, and how they can be applied to manage patients.

  5. Imaging Surveillance of Patients with Breast Cancer after Primary Treatment: Current Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung

    2015-01-01

    Women who have been treated for breast cancer are at risk for second breast cancers, such as ipsilateral recurrence or contralateral metachronous breast cancer. As the number of breast cancer survivors increases, interest in patient management and surveillance after treatment has also increased. However, post-treatment surveillance programs for patients with breast cancer have not been firmly established. In this review, we focus on the imaging modalities that have been used in post-treatment surveillance for patients with breast cancer, such as mammography, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography, the effectiveness of each modality for detecting recurrence, and how they can be applied to manage patients

  6. Human resource aspects of antiretroviral treatment delivery models: current practices and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assefa, Yibeltal; Van Damme, Wim; Hermann, Katharina

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE OF VIEW: To illustrate and critically assess what is currently being published on the human resources for health dimension of antiretroviral therapy (ART) delivery models. The use of human resources for health can have an effect on two crucial aspects of successful ART programmes, namely the scale-up capacity and the long-term retention in care. Task shifting as the delegation of tasks from higher qualified to lower qualified cadres has become a widespread practice in ART delivery models in low-income countries in recent years. It is increasingly shown to effectively reduce the workload for scarce medical doctors without compromising the quality of care. At the same time, it becomes clear that task shifting can only be successful when accompanied by intensive training, supervision and support from existing health system structures. Although a number of recent publications have focussed on task shifting in ART delivery models, there is a lack of accessible information on the link between task shifting and patient outcomes. Current ART delivery models do not focus sufficiently on retention in care as arguably one of the most important issues for the long-term success of ART programmes. There is a need for context-specific re-designing of current ART delivery models in order to increase access to ART and improve long-term retention.

  7. Evaluation of the validity of treatment decisions based on surrogate country models before introduction of the Polish FRAX and recommendations in comparison to current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinkowski, Wojciech M; Narloch, Jerzy; Glinkowska, Bożena; Bandura, Małgorzata

    2018-03-01

    Patients diagnosed before the Polish FRAX was introduced may require re-evaluation and treatment changes if the diagnosis was established according to a surrogate country FRAX score. The aim of the study was to evaluate the validity of treatment decisions based on the surrogate country model before introduction of the Polish FRAX and to provide recommendations based on the current practice. We evaluated a group of 142 postmenopausal women (70.7 ±8.9 years) who underwent bone mineral density measurements. We used 22 country-specific FRAX models and compared these to the Polish model. The mean risk values for hip and major osteoporotic fractures within 10 years were 4.575 (from 0.82 to 8.46) and 12.47% (from 2.18 to 21.65), respectively. In the case of a major fracture, 94.4% of women would receive lifestyle advice, and 5.6% would receive treatment according to the Polish FRAX using the guidelines of the National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF). Polish treatment thresholds would implement pharmacotherapy in 32.4% of the study group. In the case of hip fractures, 45% of women according to the NOF would require pharmacotherapy but only 9.8% of women would qualify according to Polish guidelines. Nearly all surrogate FRAX calculator scores proved significantly different form Polish ( p > 0.05). More patients might have received antiresorptive medication before the Polish FRAX. This study recommends re-evaluation of patients who received medical therapy before the Polish FRAX was introduced and a review of the recommendations, considering the side effects of antiresorptive medication.

  8. Tratamento da tuberculose de infecção latente: As recomendações actuais Latent tuberculosis infection treatment: Current recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Duarte

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available O diagnóstico e tratamento da infecção latente por Mycobacterium tuberculosis reduz significativamente o risco de desenvolvimento de tuberculose activa e a transmissão da doença na comunidade. O rastreio da tuberculose infecção latente deve passar pela exclusão de doença activa (inquérito de sintomas e radiografia pulmonar e avaliação da resposta imunológica ao M. tuberculosis através dos testes actualmente ao dispor, como o teste tuberculínico e os testes IGRA (interferon-gamma release assay. A escolha do esquema de tratamento deve ter em linha de conta a eficácia, a adesão e os efeitos colaterais associados ao mesmo Este documento actualiza as recomendações sobre tratamento da tuberculose infecção latente. São apresentadas indicações sobre quem deve ser rastreado e revistos os esquemas de tratamento.Diagnosis and treatment of latent infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (LTBI, significantly reduces the risk of developing active tuberculosis and the transmission of the disease in the community. LTBI screening must pass by the exclusion of active disease (symptoms enquiry and chest radiography and assessment of immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis testing with the tests currently available - tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA. The choice of treatment must take into account the efficacy and side effects associated with the same. This document provides updated recommendations on latent tuberculosis infection treatment. Topics covered include whom to test for TB and reviewed LTBI treatment regimens.

  9. [Peripheral retinal degenerations--treatment recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joussen, A M; Kirchhof, B

    2004-10-01

    This report reviews the clinical appearance of degenerative diseases of the peripheral retina in relationship to the risk of developing a rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. We present recommendations for preventive treatment in eyes at increased risk of developing retinal detachment. Retinal degenerations are common lesions involving the peripheral retina but most of them are clinically insignificant. Lattice degeneration, degenerative retinoschisis, cystic retinal tufts, and very rarely zonular traction tufts can result in rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Therefore, these lesions have been considered for prophylactic treatment; however, adequate studies have not been performed to date. Most of the peripheral retinal degenerations may not require treatment except in rare, high-risk situations. According to current knowledge there is no higher incidence of secondary pucker or other side effects after laser coagulation. Therefore, generous laser indication is recommended if risk factors apply.

  10. Comparison of current recommended regimens of atropinization in organophosphate poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Nicholas J; Harnett, Zachary H; Hoffman, Robert S

    2014-06-01

    Atropine is the mainstay of therapy in organophosphate (OP) toxicity, though research and consensus on dosing is lacking. In 2004, as reported by Eddleston et al. (J Toxicol Clin Toxicol 42(6):865-75, 2004), they noted variation in recommended regimens. We assessed revisions of original references, additional citations, and electronic sources to determine the current variability in atropine dosing recommendations. Updated editions of references from Eddleston et al.'s work, texts of Internal and Emergency Medicine, and electronic resources were reviewed for atropine dosing recommendations. For comparison, recommendations were assessed using the same mean dose (23.4 mg) and the highest dose (75 mg) of atropine as used in the original paper. Recommendations were also compared with the dosing regimen from the World Health Organization (WHO). Thirteen of the original recommendations were updated and 15 additional references were added giving a convenience sample of 28. Sufficient information to calculate time to targeted dose was provided by 24 of these samples. Compared to 2004, current recommendations have greatly increased the speed of atropinization with 13/24 able to reach the mean and high atropine dose within 30 min compared to 1/36 in 2004. In 2004, there were 13 regimens where the maximum time to reach 75 mg was over 18 h, whereas now, there are 2. While only one recommendation called for doubling the dose for faster escalation in 2004, 15 of the 24 current works include dose doubling. In 2004, Eddleston et al. called for an evidence-based guideline for the treatment of OP poisoning that could be disseminated worldwide. Many current recommendations can adequately treat patients within 1 h. While the WHO recommendations remain slow to treat patients with OP poisoning, other authorities are close to a consensus on rapid atropinization.

  11. Current Treatments of Bruxism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaita, Marc; Högl, Birgit

    2016-02-01

    Despite numerous case reports, the evidence for treatment of bruxism is still low. Different treatment modalities (behavioral techniques, intraoral devices, medications, and contingent electrical stimulation) have been applied. A clinical evaluation is needed to differentiate between awake bruxism and sleep bruxism and rule out any medical disorder or medication that could be behind its appearance (secondary bruxism). A polysomnography is required only in a few cases of sleep bruxism, mostly when sleep comorbidities are present. Counselling with regard to sleep hygiene, sleep habit modification, and relaxation techniques has been suggested as the first step in the therapeutic intervention, and is generally considered not harmful, despite low evidence of any efficacy. Occlusal splints are successful in the prevention of dental damage and grinding sounds associated with sleep bruxism, but their effects on reducing bruxism electromyographic (EMG) events are transient. In patients with psychiatric and sleep comorbidities, the acute use of clonazepam at night has been reported to improve sleep bruxism, but in the absence of double-blind randomized trials, its use in general clinical practice cannot be recommended. Severe secondary bruxism interfering with speaking, chewing, or swallowing has been reported in patients with neurological disorders such as in cranial dystonia; in these patients, injections of botulinum toxin in the masticatory muscles may decrease bruxism for up to 1-5 months and improve pain and mandibular functions. Long-term studies in larger and better specified samples of patients with bruxism, comparing the effects of different therapeutic modalities on bruxism EMG activity, progression of dental wear, and orofacial pain are current gaps of knowledge and preclude the development of severity-based treatment guidelines.

  12. Current Trends in Radiation Protection Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomaa, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    The third generation of the ICRP recommendations was adopted in April 2007. The recommendations rely on situations (planned, emergency and existing), individual (occupational, public and patient) and radiation protection system (justification, optimization and dose limits). In the present work attention is paid to discuss the new recommendations and role of IAEA in updating its Basic Safety Standards for protection against ionizing radiation and safety of radiation sources and its impact for the national regulations

  13. Traumatic brain injury pharmacological treatment: recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Anghinah

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This article presents the recommendations on the pharmacological treatment employed in traumatic brain injury (TBI at the outpatient clinic of the Cognitive Rehabilitation after TBI Service of the Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil. A systematic assessment of the consensus reached in other countries, and of articles on TBI available in the PUBMED and LILACS medical databases, was carried out. We offer recommendations of pharmacological treatments in patients after TBI with different symptoms.

  14. Current IUBMB recommendations on enzyme nomenclature and kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athel Cornish-Bowden

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The International Union of Biochemistry (IUB, now IUBMB prepared recommendations for describing the kinetic behaviour of enzymes in 1981. Despite the more than 30 years that have passed since these have not subsequently been revised, though in various respects they do not adequately cover current needs. The IUBMB is also responsible for recommendations on the naming and classification of enzymes. In contrast to the case of kinetics, these recommendations are kept continuously up to date.

  15. Comparison of Current Recommended Regimens of Atropinization in Organophosphate Poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Connors, Nicholas J.; Harnett, Zachary H.; Hoffman, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Atropine is the mainstay of therapy in organophosphate (OP) toxicity, though research and consensus on dosing is lacking. In 2004, as reported by Eddleston et al. (J Toxicol Clin Toxicol 42(6):865-75, 2004), they noted variation in recommended regimens. We assessed revisions of original references, additional citations, and electronic sources to determine the current variability in atropine dosing recommendations. Updated editions of references from Eddleston et al.’s work, texts of Internal ...

  16. Current obesity drug treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio C. Mancini

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacological treatment of obesity is an area of sudden changes,development of new drugs and treatment propositions. This articlepresents information on physiological agents that are currentlybeing used as well as drugs that were widely used but are nomore available.

  17. Current Treatments of Bruxism

    OpenAIRE

    Guaita, Marc; H?gl, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Opinion statement Despite numerous case reports, the evidence for treatment of bruxism is still low. Different treatment modalities (behavioral techniques, intraoral devices, medications, and contingent electrical stimulation) have been applied. A clinical evaluation is needed to differentiate between awake bruxism and sleep bruxism and rule out any medical disorder or medication that could be behind its appearance (secondary bruxism). A polysomnography is required only in a few cases of slee...

  18. Current treatment of retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shields, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is a highly malignant intraocular tumor of childhood which requires prompt treatment once the diagnosis has been established. The traditionally accepted methods include enucleation, external irradiation, scleral plaque irradiation, photocoagulation, cryotherapy, chemotherapy. This article will provide an update on the modern methods of treatment which are available for retinoblastoma. It is based largely on personal experience with approximately 200 new patients with retinoblastoma who were evaluated and treated between 1974 and 1984 in the Oncology Service of Wills Eye Hospital with an overall survival of 97%. This article will be an overall review which will not go into statistical detail. (Auth.)

  19. Vitamin D in adolescents: Are current recommendations enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Taryn J; Lanham-New, Susan A; Hart, Kathryn H

    2017-10-01

    Vitamin D is essential for bone development during adolescence and low vitamin D status during this critical period of growth may impact bone mineralization, potentially reducing peak bone mass and consequently increasing the risk of osteoporosis in adulthood. Therefore, the high prevalence of vitamin D inadequacy and deficiency in adolescent populations is of great concern. However, there is currently a lack of consensus on the 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentration, the widely accepted biomarker of vitamin D status, that defines adequacy, and the vitamin D intake requirements to maintain various 25(OH)D thresholds are not well established. While the current intake recommendations of 10-15μg/day may be sufficient to prevent vitamin D deficiency (25(OH)D50nmol/l). This review will address these concerns and consider if the current dietary recommendations for vitamin D in adolescents are sufficient. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dual diagnosis in Depression: treatment recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirado Muñoz, Judit; Farré, Adriana; Mestre-Pintó, Joan; Szerman, Nestor; Torrens, Marta

    2018-01-01

    Comorbidity between substance use disorders (SUD) and major depression (MD) is the most common dual pathology in the field of addiction to substances and has prevalence rates ranging between 12% and 80%, which complicates the response to treatment and worsens the prognosis of patients. Differentiating between diagnoses of induced depressive episodes and primary depressive episodes concurrent to substance use is especially relevant for therapeutic management. This article presents the state of the art of the currently available pharmacologic treatments of comorbid depression in patients with SUD, taking into account the safety and risk of abuse of antidepressant drugs. Due to the fact that comorbidity of MD and SUD is frequent and presents greater psychopathological and medical severity, as well as worse social functioning, it is crucial to treat MD and SUD simultaneously using the integrated treatment model and not to treat both conditions separately.

  1. Treatment recommendations for DSM-5-defined mixed features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblat, Joshua D; McIntyre, Roger S

    2017-04-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) mixed features specifier provides a less restrictive definition of mixed mood states, compared to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR), including mood episodes that manifest with subthreshold symptoms of the opposite mood state. A limited number of studies have assessed the efficacy of treatments specifically for DSM-5-defined mixed features in mood disorders. As such, there is currently an inadequate amount of data to appropriately inform evidence-based treatment guidelines of DSM-5 defined mixed features. However, given the high prevalence and morbidity of mixed features, treatment recommendations based on the currently available evidence along with expert opinion may be of benefit. This article serves to provide these interim treatment recommendations while humbly acknowledging the limited amount of evidence currently available. Second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) appear to have the greatest promise in the treatment of bipolar disorder (BD) with mixed features. Conventional mood stabilizing agents (ie, lithium and divalproex) may also be of benefit; however, they have been inadequately studied. In the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) with mixed features, the comparable efficacy of antidepressants versus other treatments, such as SGAs, remains unknown. As such, antidepressants remain first-line treatment of MDD with or without mixed features; however, there are significant safety concerns associated with antidepressant monotherapy when mixed features are present, which merits increased monitoring. Lurasidone is the only SGA monotherapy that has been shown to be efficacious specifically in the treatment of MDD with mixed features. Further research is needed to accurately determine the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of treatments specifically for mood episodes with mixed features to adequately inform

  2. Measurement in Marketing: Current Scenario, Recommendations and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Zambaldi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to discuss about construct measurement in Marketing by summarizing the main considerations about the subject. First, it discusses the origins of the debates about the theme since the 1970s and describes its main consolidated models (the classical Churchill’s model, the COARSE model and the formative measurement model. Then it presents current concerns about the classical approach with relevant recommendations (particularly regarding multi-item measurement, single-item measurement, rating scales and cross-cultural aspects. At the end, it presents considerations about measurement trends in Marketing with emphasis on the Item Response Theory (IRT, Bayesian estimators and Partial Least Squares (PLS. The article updates the debate on the theme and contributes to Marketing experts and researchers who demand a current view about measurement and recommendations for research development. 

  3. Reimmunization after bone marrow transplantation: Current recommendations and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado Clarisse M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Autologous and allogeneic BMT recipients lose immune memory of exposition to infectious agents and vaccines accumulated throughout lifetime and therefore need to be revaccinated. Diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid, pertussis vaccine (children < 7 years old, Haemophilus influenza type B (Hib conjugate, 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide, inactivated influenza vaccine, inactivated polio vaccine and live-attenuated measles-mumps-rubella vaccine are the currently recommended vaccines to be included in a vaccination program after BMT. For most of them, the best time of vaccination, the number of vaccine doses and/or the duration of immunity after vaccination have not been established. Vaccination protocols vary greatly among BMT centers suggesting that the lack of sufficient data has not permitted the establishment of solid recommendations. The use of other vaccines and the perspectives for different vaccination protocols are discussed in this review.

  4. Current nutritional treatments of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Ashli

    2006-01-01

    Obesity in our country is a growing concern. There are several different options for weight loss; however, individuals must be self-motivated and amendable to change in order to achieve success with their weight loss goals. Several strategies used by professionals in the US today to treat overweight and obesity, include diet therapy, exercise, behavior modification, pharmacotherapy, and surgery. The focus of the American Dietetic Association (ADA) Weight Management Position Statement is no longer just on weight loss but now on weight management. Reaching one's ideal body weight is recommended but not often realistic. Frequently, the goal of treatment shifts to maintenance of ones current weight or attempts at moderate weight loss. Lifestyle modification or behavioral modification interventions rely on analyzing behavior to identify events that are associated with appropriate vs. inappropriate eating, exercise, or thinking habits. Certain primary strategies that have been found to be useful for helping people change their behaviors so that they can lose weight and maintain their weight loss, include self-monitoring, stimulus control, cognitive restructuring, stress management, social support, physical activity, and relapse prevention. Weight loss programs should strive to combine a nutritionally balanced dietary regimen with exercise and lifestyle modifications at the lowest possible cost. There are several different methods used for dietary modifications; low calorie diets, very low calorie diets, fasting, formula diets and meal replacement programs, and popular diets. Bariatric surgery is gaining popularity as it has been an effective way to treat obesity. Following gastric bypass surgery, the patients must be prepared to modify their eating behaviors and dietary selections to assist with weight loss and prevent potential complications. Patients should be educated on the dietary guidelines extensively prior to surgery and again post-operatively.

  5. [Current treatment of hepatic trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvio-Estaba, Leonardo; Madrazo-González, Zoilo; Ramos-Rubio, Emilio

    2008-05-01

    The therapeutic and diagnostic approach of liver trauma injuries (by extension, of abdominal trauma) has evolved remarkably in the last decades. The current non-surgical treatment in the vast majority of liver injuries is supported by the accumulated experience and optimal results in the current series. It is considered that the non-surgical treatment of liver injuries has a current rate of success of 83-100%, with an associated morbidity of 5-42%. The haemodynamic stability of the patient will determine the applicability of the non-surgical treatment. Arteriography with angioembolisation constitutes a key technical tool in the context of liver trauma. Patients with haemodynamic instability will need an urgent operation and can benefit from abdominal packing techniques, damage control and post-operative arteriography. The present review attempts to contribute to the current, global and practical management in the care of liver trauma.

  6. Fractional lasers in dermatology - Current status and recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apratim Goel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fractional laser technology is a new emerging technology to improve scars, fine lines, dyspigmentation, striae and wrinkles. The technique is easy, safe to use and has been used effectively for several clinical and cosmetic indications in Indian skin. Devices: Different fractional laser machines, with different wavelengths, both ablative and non-ablative, are now available in India. A detailed understanding of the device being used is recommended. Indications: Common indications include resurfacing for acne, chickenpox and surgical scars, periorbital and perioral wrinkles, photoageing changes, facial dyschromias. The use of fractional lasers in stretch marks, melasma and other pigmentary conditions, dermatological conditions such as granuloma annulare has been reported. But further data are needed before adopting them for routine use in such conditions. Physician qualification: Any qualified dermatologist may administer fractional laser treatment. He/ she should possess a Master′s degree or diploma in dermatology and should have had specific hands-on training in lasers, either during postgraduation or later at a facility which routinely performs laser procedures under a competent dermatologist or plastic surgeon with experience and training in using lasers. Since parameters may vary with different systems, specific training tailored towards the concerned device at either the manufacturer′s facility or at another center using the machine is recommended. Facility: Fractional lasers can be used in the dermatologist′s minor procedure room for the above indications. Preoperative counseling and Informed consent: Detailed counseling with respect to the treatment, desired effects and possible postoperative complications should be provided to the patient. The patient should be provided brochures to study and also adequate opportunity to seek information. A detailed consent form needs to be completed by the patient. Consent form should

  7. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation: Current Strategies and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald V. Naccarelli, MD

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the most common complication of atrial fibrillation (AF. Guidelines recommend anticoagulant treatment in patients with CHA2DS2VASc scores of >2. Registry data suggests that almost half of patients who should be on therapeutic anticoagulation for stroke prevention in AF (SPAF are not. Warfarin and more recently developed agents, the “novel anticoagulants” (NOACs reduce the risk of embolic strokes. In addition, the NOACs also reduce intracranial hemorrhage (ICH by over 50% compared to warfarin. Anticoagulation and bridging strategies involving cardioversion, catheter ablation, and invasive/surgical procedures are reviewed. The development of reversal agents for NOACs and the introduction of left atrial appendage occluding devices will evolve the use of newer strategies for preventing stroke in high risk AF patients.

  8. Ventilator-associated pneumonia: current status and future recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efrati, Shai; Deutsch, Israel; Antonelli, Massimo; Hockey, Peter M; Rozenblum, Ronen; Gurman, Gabriel M

    2010-04-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a common hazardous complication in ICU patients. The aim of the current review is to give an update on the current status and future recommendations for VAP prevention. This article gives an updated review of the current literature on VAP. The first part briefly reviews pathogenesis and epidemiology while the second includes an in-depth review of evidence-based practice guidelines (EBPG) and new technologies developed for prevention of VAP. VAP remains a frequent and costly complication of critical illness with a pooled relative risk of 9-27% and mortality of 25-50%. Strikingly, VAP adds an estimated cost of more than $40,000 to a typical hospital admission. An important aetiological mechanism of VAP is gross or micro-aspiration of oropharyngeal organisms around the cuff of the endotracheal tube (ETT) into the distal bronchi. Prevention of VAP is preferable. Preventative measures can be divided into two main groups: the implemen- tation of EBPGs and use of device-based technologies. EBPGs have been authored jointly by the American Thoracic Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America. The Canadian Critical Care Trials group also published VAP Guidelines in 2008. Their recommendations are detailed in this review. The current device-based technologies include drainage of subglottic secretions, silver coated ETTs aiming to influence the internal bio-layer of the ETT, better sealing of the lower airways with ultrathin cuffs and loops for optimal cuff pressure control. EBPG consensus includes: elevation of the head of the bed, use of daily "sedation vacations" and decontamination of the oropharynx. Technological solutions should aim to use the most comprehensive combination of subglottic suction of secretions, optimization of ETT cuff pressure and ultrathin cuffs. VAP is a type of hospital-acquired pneumonia that develops more than 48 h after endotracheal intubation. Its incidence is estimated to be 9-27%, with a

  9. Are the current guideline recommendations for neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation safe and effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottenberg, Eric M

    2016-08-01

    A recently published review of approaches to optimize chest compressions in the resuscitation of asphyxiated newborns discussed the current recommendations and explored potential determinants of effective neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, not all potential determinants of effective neonatal CPR were explored. Chest compression shallower than the current guideline recommendation of approximately 33% of the anterior-posterior (AP) chest diameter may be safer and more effective. From a physiological standpoint, high-velocity brief duration shallower compression may be more effective than current recommendations. The application of a 1- or 2-finger method of high-impulse CPR, which would depend on the size of the subject, may be more effective than using a 2-thumb (TT) encircling hands method of CPR. Adrenaline should not be used in the treatment of asphyxiated neonates and when necessary titrated vasopressin should be used. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Morphea: Evidence-based recommendations for treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Nicole M Fett

    2012-01-01

    Morphea is a rare fibrosing disorder of the skin. Evidence-based treatment strategies in morphea are lacking. This review summarizes the available data on morphea treatment and provides therapeutic strategies based on morphea subtypes. The Cochrane Library, Medline and Embase from inception until May of 2011 were searched using the key words "morphea" and "morphea treatment." Reference lists of the resultant articles, as well as relevant reviews, were also searched. This review focuses on ran...

  11. Morphea: Evidence-based recommendations for treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M Fett

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphea is a rare fibrosing disorder of the skin. Evidence-based treatment strategies in morphea are lacking. This review summarizes the available data on morphea treatment and provides therapeutic strategies based on morphea subtypes. The Cochrane Library, Medline and Embase from inception until May of 2011 were searched using the key words "morphea" and "morphea treatment." Reference lists of the resultant articles, as well as relevant reviews, were also searched. This review focuses on randomized controlled trials, prospective interventional trials without controls and retrospective reviews with greater than five subjects.

  12. [Current Treatment of Stable Angina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toggweiler, Stefan; Jamshidi, Peiman; Cuculi, Florim

    2015-06-17

    Current therapy for stable angina includes surgical and percutaneous revascularization, which has been improved tremendously over the last decades. Smoking cessation and regular exercise are the cornerstone for prevention of further cerebrovascular events. Medical treatment includes treatment of cardiovascular risk factors and antithrombotic management, which can be a challenge in some patients. Owing to the fact the coronary revascularization is readily accessible these days in many industrialized countries, the importance of antianginal therapy has decreased over the past years. This article presents a contemporary overview of the management of patients with stable angina in the year 2015.

  13. Improving treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders: recommendations based on preclinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homberg, Judith R; Kyzar, Evan J; Stewart, Adam Michael; Nguyen, Michael; Poudel, Manoj K; Echevarria, David J; Collier, Adam D; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Klimenko, Viktor M; Norton, William; Pittman, Julian; Nakamura, Shun; Koshiba, Mamiko; Yamanouchi, Hideo; Apryatin, Sergey A; Scattoni, Maria Luisa; Diamond, David M; Ullmann, Jeremy F P; Parker, Matthew O; Brown, Richard E; Song, Cai; Kalueff, Allan V

    2016-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) are common and severely debilitating. Their chronic nature and reliance on both genetic and environmental factors makes studying NDDs and their treatment a challenging task. Herein, the authors discuss the neurobiological mechanisms of NDDs, and present recommendations on their translational research and therapy, outlined by the International Stress and Behavior Society. Various drugs currently prescribed to treat NDDs also represent a highly diverse group. Acting on various neurotransmitter and physiological systems, these drugs often lack specificity of action, and are commonly used to treat multiple other psychiatric conditions. There has also been relatively little progress in the development of novel medications to treat NDDs. Based on clinical, preclinical and translational models of NDDs, our recommendations cover a wide range of methodological approaches and conceptual strategies. To improve pharmacotherapy and drug discovery for NDDs, we need a stronger emphasis on targeting multiple endophenotypes, a better dissection of genetic/epigenetic factors or "hidden heritability," and a careful consideration of potential developmental/trophic roles of brain neurotransmitters. The validity of animal NDD models can be improved through discovery of novel (behavioral, physiological and neuroimaging) biomarkers, applying proper environmental enrichment, widening the spectrum of model organisms, targeting developmental trajectories of NDD-related behaviors and comorbid conditions beyond traditional NDDs. While these recommendations cannot be addressed all in once, our increased understanding of NDD pathobiology may trigger innovative cross-disciplinary research expanding beyond traditional methods and concepts.

  14. Current treatments for radiation retinopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giuliari, Gian Paolo; Simpson, E. Rand (Princess Margaret Hospital, Univ. of Toronto, Dept. of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, Toronto (Canada)), e-mail: gpgiuliari@gmail.com; Sadaka, Ama (Schepens Eye Research Inst., Boston, MA (United States)); Hinkle, David M. (Massachusetts Eye Research and Surgery Institution, Cambridge, MA (United States))

    2011-01-15

    Background. To review the currently available therapeutic modalities for radiation retinopathy (RR), including newer investigational interventions directed towards specific aspects of the pathophysiology of this refractory complication. Methods. A review of the literature encompassing the pathogenesis of RR and the current therapeutic modalities available was performed. Results. RR is a chronic and progressive condition that results from exposure to any source of radiation. It might be secondary to radiation treatment of intraocular tumors such as choroidal melanomas, retinoblastomas, and choroidal metastasis, or from unavoidable exposure to excessive radiation from the treatment of extraocular tumors like cephalic, nasopharyngeal, orbital, and paranasal malignancies. After the results of the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study, most of the choroidal melanomas are being treated with plaque brachytherapy increasing by that the incidence of this radiation complication. RR has been reported to occur in as many as 60% of eyes treated with plaque radiation, with higher rates associated with larger tumors. Initially, the condition manifests as a radiation vasculopathy clinically seen as microaneurysms and telangiectasis, with posterior development of retinal hard exudates and hemorrhages, macular edema, neovascularization and tractional retinal detachment. Regrettably, the management of these eyes remains limited. Photodynamic therapy, laser photocoagulation, oral pentoxyphylline and hyperbaric oxygen have been attempted as treatment modalities with inconclusive results. Intravitreal injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor such as bevacizumab, ranibizumab and pegaptanib sodium have been recently used, also with variable results. Discussion. RR is a common vision threatening complication following radiation therapy. The available therapeutic options are limited and show unsatisfactory results. Further large investigative studies are required for developing

  15. Whither Strategic Communication? A Survey of Current Proposals and Recommendations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paul, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    ... are endorsed. Based on the recommendations put forth by the 36 selected documents and articulated in more than a dozen interviews with stakeholders and subject-matter experts, findings indicate that four core...

  16. Variation in Recommendation for Surgical Treatment for Compressive Neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, Michiel G. H.; Becker, Stephanie J. E.; Bot, Arjan G. J.; Guitton, Thierry; Ring, David; Wahegaonkar, Abhijeet L.; Garcia, Aida E.; Schefer, Alan; Castillo, Alberto Perez; Terrono, Andrew L.; Gurman, Andrew W.; Apard, T.; Watkins, Barry; Ilyas, Asif; Hearon, Bernard F.; Wills, Brian P. D.; Wintman, Bruce I.; Swigart, Carrie; Spath, Catherine; Dario, Cesar; Miranda, Oliveira; Goldfarb, Charles A.; Cassidy, Charles; Metzger, Charles; Eaton, Charles; Wilson, Chris; Walsh, Christopher J.; Wilson, Christopher J.; Jones, Christopher M.; Young, Colby; Bottke, Craig A.; Osei, Daniel A.; Kirkpatrick, D. Kay; Tate, David; Polatsch, Daniel; Nelson, David L.; Kalainov, David M.; Lamey, David M.; Hanel, Doug; Ostrowski, David M.; Miller, David R.; McKee, Desirae M.; Shin, Eon K.; Ruchelsman, David; Bonatz, Ekkehard; Hofmeister, Eric P.; Fischer, Evan S.; Kaplan, F. Thomas D.; Fernandes, C. H.; Forigua, Jamie E.; Cayon Cayon, Fidel Ernesto; Raia, Frank J.; Walter, Frank L.; Frykman, Gary K.; Pess, Gary M.; Kuzma, Gary R.; Huemer, Georg M.; Byrd, Gregory Dee; Balfour, George W.; Caro, Gladys Cecilia Zambrano; Hernandez, German Ricardo; DeSilva, Gregory; Bamberger, H. Brent; Grunwald, H. W.; MccUtchan, Hal; Solomon, Harrison; Kimball, Hervey L.; Stuart, J. E. B.; Lin, Ines C.; Choueka, Jack; Reid, James G.; Boler, James M.; Pomerance, Jay; Johnson, Jeff W.; Yao, Jeffrey; Calandruccio, Jim; Green, Jennifer B.; Wolf, Jennifer Moriatis; Frankenhoff, Jessica A.; Oakey, Jerome W.; Fischer, Jochen; Howlett, John; Jiuliano, John; Erickson, John M.; McAuliffe, John; Evans, John P.; Taras, John; Boretto, Jorge G.; Isaacs, Jonathan; Di Giovanni, Jose Fernando; Nolla, Jose; Abzug, Joshua M.; Adams, Julie; Chivers, Karel; Prommersberger, Karl-Josef; Malone, Kevin J.; Lee, Kendrick; Halperin, Lawrence S.; Weiss, Lawrence; Benson, Leon; Lane, Lewis B.; Paz, Lior; Lattanza, Lisa; Palmer, M. Jason; Catalano, Louis; Richard, Marc J.; Rizzo, Marco; Boyer, Martin; Calcagni, Maurizio; Wood, Megan M.; Baskies, Michael; Grafe, Michael W.; Behrman, Michael; Jones, Michael; Quinn, Michael; Nancollas, Michael; Kessler, Michael W.; Pirela-Cruz, Miguel A.; Patel, Milan M.; Felipe, Naquira Escobar Luis; Harness, Neil G.; Akabudike, Ngozi M.; Horangic, Nicholas J.; Semenkin, Oleg M.; Leung, Nicky L.; McCulloch, Patrick T.; Owens, Patrick W.; Martineau, Paul A.; Bettinger, Paul; Guidera, Paul; Hoepfner, Peter E.; Sitaram, Prasad; DeNoble, Peter H.; Jebson, Peter; Coogan, Philip; Dantuluri, Phani; Gaston, R. Glenn; Nyszkiewicz, Ralf; Costanzo, Ralph M.; de Bedout, Ramon; Hauck, Randy; Fricker, Renato M.; GIlbert, Richard S.; Hutchison, Richard L.; Barth, Richard W.; Papandrea, Rick; Szabo, Robert M.; Gray, Robert R. L.; Nathan, Ross; Spruijt, Sander; Shatford, Russell; Klinefelter, Ryan; Sodha, Samir; Calfee, Ryan P.; Kakar, Sanjeev; Kaplan, Saul; Duncan, Scott F.; Mitchell, Scott; Dodds, Seth; Jacoby, Sidney M.; Kennedy, Stephen A.; Marczyk, Stanley Casimir; Dailey, Stephen W.; Kronlage, Steve; Alter, Steven; Beldner, Steven; McCabe, Steven J.; Hilliard, Stuart M.; Fischer, Thomas J.; Baxamusa, Taizoon; Taleb, C.; Varecka, Thomas F.; Wyrick, Theresa; Havenhill, Timothy G.; Siff, Todd; Knoll, Victoria D.; Patel, Vipul P.; Batson, W. Arnnold; Hammert, Warren C.; van Wyk, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose It is our impression that there is substantial, unexplained variation in hand surgeon recommendations for treatment of peripheral mononeuropathy. We tested the null hypothesis that specific patient and provider factors do not influence recommendations for surgery. Methods Using a web-based

  17. A Decision Fusion Framework for Treatment Recommendation Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Jing; Liu, Haifeng; Li, Xiang; Xie, Guotong; Yu, Yiqin

    2015-01-01

    Treatment recommendation is a nontrivial task--it requires not only domain knowledge from evidence-based medicine, but also data insights from descriptive, predictive and prescriptive analysis. A single treatment recommendation system is usually trained or modeled with a limited (size or quality) source. This paper proposes a decision fusion framework, combining both knowledge-driven and data-driven decision engines for treatment recommendation. End users (e.g. using the clinician workstation or mobile apps) could have a comprehensive view of various engines' opinions, as well as the final decision after fusion. For implementation, we leverage several well-known fusion algorithms, such as decision templates and meta classifiers (of logistic and SVM, etc.). Using an outcome-driven evaluation metric, we compare the fusion engine with base engines, and our experimental results show that decision fusion is a promising way towards a more valuable treatment recommendation.

  18. The Animal Sciences Academic Quadrathlon: history, current status, and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, R G; Jobsis, C T; Onan, G; Day, B N

    2011-07-01

    The Animal Sciences Academic Quadrathlon (AQ) provides opportunities for teams of undergraduate animal and dairy science students to participate in regional American Society of Animal Science (ASAS)/American Dairy Science Association (ADSA) meetings and to collectively exhibit their knowledge and talents competitively in 4 categories: 1) solving practical, hands-on, laboratory-type problems; 2) providing written answers to essay-type questions about principles and concepts; 3) preparing and communicating orally and extemporaneously topics of current animal science interest; and 4) quickly responding to short-answer questions provided in the form of double-elimination quiz bowls. Each team is selected by winning the local AQ at their university. Overall and individual category winning teams are recognized, but team rankings are not emphasized. The ASAS/ADSA members provide leadership for organizing and conducting the AQ, and ASAS and each university provide travel expenses for students. The ultimate purpose is to stimulate academic excellence among undergraduate students and for the students to attend ASAS/ADSA regional scientific meetings to meet faculty and students and to attend scientific research presentations. The purpose of this document was to provide a history of the event and to make recommendations for its improvement. The AQ was conceived in 1967. During the next 10 yr, an ASAS committee developed procedures for a trial AQ held in 1980 at the ASAS Midwestern Section, Kansas State University-Manhattan, and in the next year the first official AQ was held at the ASAS Midwestern Section at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Starting in 1985, AQ programs were initiated at the other 3 ASAS sectional meetings, and an estimated 50,000 students representing 60 universities have participated in AQ programs since that time. If the AQ is to continue its improvement over time, it will greatly depend on sustained ASAS/ADSA faculty interest and support, as well as

  19. Current Challenges in Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugazagoitia, Jon; Guedes, Cristiano; Ponce, Santiago; Ferrer, Irene; Molina-Pinelo, Sonia; Paz-Ares, Luis

    2016-07-01

    In this review, we highlight the current concepts and discuss some of the current challenges and future prospects in cancer therapy. We frequently use the example of lung cancer. We conducted a nonsystematic PubMed search, selecting the most comprehensive and relevant research articles, clinical trials, translational papers, and review articles on precision oncology and immuno-oncology. Papers were prioritized and selected based on their originality and potential clinical applicability. Two major revolutions have changed cancer treatment paradigms in the past few years: targeting actionable alterations in oncogene-driven cancers and immuno-oncology. Important challenges are still ongoing in both fields of cancer therapy. On the one hand, druggable genomic alterations are diverse and represent only small subsets of patients in certain tumor types, which limits testing their clinical impact in biomarker-driven clinical trials. Next-generation sequencing technologies are increasingly being implemented for molecular prescreening in clinical research, but issues regarding clinical interpretation of large genomic data make their wide clinical use difficult. Further, dealing with tumor heterogeneity and acquired resistance is probably the main limitation for the success of precision oncology. On the other hand, long-term survival benefits with immune checkpoint inhibitors (anti-programmed death cell protein-1/programmed death cell ligand-1[PD-1/L1] and anti-cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 monoclonal antibodies) are restricted to a minority of patients, and no predictive markers are yet robustly validated that could help us recognize these subsets and optimize treatment delivery and selection. To achieve long-term survival benefits, drug combinations targeting several molecular alterations or cancer hallmarks might be needed. This will probably be one of the most challenging but promising precision cancer treatment strategies in the future. Targeting single molecular

  20. Current treatment options for meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apra, Caroline; Peyre, Matthieu; Kalamarides, Michel

    2018-03-01

    With an annual incidence of 5/100,000, meningioma is the most frequent primary tumor of the central nervous system. Risk factors are radiotherapy and hormone intake. Most meningiomas are grade I benign tumors, but up to 15% are atypical and 2% anaplastic according to the WHO 2016 histological criteria. Areas covered: This review details the current standard therapy based on international guidelines and recent literature, and describes new approaches developed to treat refractory cases. First-line treatments are observation and surgery, but adjuvant radiotherapy/radiosurgery is discussed for atypical and indicated for anaplastic meningiomas. The most problematic cases include skull base meningiomas that enclose vasculo-nervous structures and surgery- and radiation-refractory tumors that present with significant morbidity and mortality. The treatment of recurrent tumors is based on radiotherapy and repeated surgery. Systematic therapies are not effective in general but several clinical trials are ongoing. Expert commentary: Molecular characterization of the tumors, based on genetic mutations such as NF2, SMO, TERT, TRAF7, and on the methylation profile are developing, completing the histological classification and giving new insights into prognosis and treatment options.

  1. Do current national and international guidelines have specific recommendations for older adults with bipolar disorder?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dols, Annemiek; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Strejilevich, Sergio A

    2016-01-01

    a variety of sources have become available in recent years. It is expected that at least some of this emerging information on OABD would be incorporated into treatment guidelines available to clinicians around the world. METHODS: The International Society of Bipolar Disorders OABD task force compiled...... and compared recommendations from current national and international guidelines that specifically address geriatric or older individuals with BD (from year 2005 onwards). RESULTS: There were 34 guidelines, representing six continents and 19 countries. The majority of guidelines had no separate section on OABD....... General principles for treating OABD with medication are recommended to be similar to those for younger adults, with special caution for side effects due to somatic comorbidity and concomitant medications. Therapeutic lithium serum levels are suggested to be lower but recommendations are very general...

  2. Altered Mental Status: Current Evidence-based Recommendations for Prehospital Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Sanello

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the United States emergency medical services (EMS protocols vary widely across jurisdictions. We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of a patient with an acute change in mental status and to compare these recommendations against the current protocols used by the 33 EMS agencies in the State of California. Methods: We performed a literature review of the current evidence in the prehospital treatment of a patient with altered mental status (AMS and augmented this review with guidelines from various national and international societies to create our evidence-based recommendations. We then compared the AMS protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. The specific protocol components that we analyzed were patient assessment, point-of-care tests, supplemental oxygen, use of standardized scoring, evaluating for causes of AMS, blood glucose evaluation, toxicological treatment, and pediatric evaluation and management. Results: Protocols across 33 EMS agencies in California varied widely. All protocols call for a blood glucose check, 21 (64% suggest treating adults at <60mg/dL, and half allow for the use of dextrose 10%. All the protocols recommend naloxone for signs of opioid overdose, but only 13 (39% give specific parameters. Half the agencies (52% recommend considering other toxicological causes of AMS, often by using the mnemonic AEIOU TIPS. Eight (24% recommend a 12-lead electrocardiogram; others simply suggest cardiac monitoring. Fourteen (42% advise supplemental oxygen as needed; only seven (21% give specific parameters. In terms of considering various etiologies of AMS, 25 (76% give instructions to consider trauma, 20 (61% to consider stroke, and 18 (55% to consider seizure. Twenty-three (70% of the agencies have separate pediatric AMS protocols; others include pediatric considerations within the adult protocol. Conclusion: Protocols

  3. Online Student Services: Current Practices and Recommendations for Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Tabitha L.; Brown, Abbie

    2016-01-01

    Recommendations for planning and development of online student services based on a review of the literature on research conducted in a variety of college settings. Focus topics include the institutional website, help desks and information centers, student orientation, academic support, and library services.

  4. Fruit Juice in Infants, Children, and Adolescents: Current Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, Melvin B; Abrams, Steven A

    2017-06-01

    Historically, fruit juice was recommended by pediatricians as a source of vitamin C and as an extra source of water for healthy infants and young children as their diets expanded to include solid foods with higher renal solute load. It was also sometimes recommended for children with constipation. Fruit juice is marketed as a healthy, natural source of vitamins and, in some instances, calcium. Because juice tastes good, children readily accept it. Although juice consumption has some benefits, it also has potential detrimental effects. High sugar content in juice contributes to increased calorie consumption and the risk of dental caries. In addition, the lack of protein and fiber in juice can predispose to inappropriate weight gain (too much or too little). Pediatricians need to be knowledgeable about juice to inform parents and patients on its appropriate uses. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. Natalizumab treatment for multiple sclerosis: updated recommendations for patient selection and monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappos, Ludwig; Bates, David; Edan, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Natalizumab, a highly specific α4-integrin antagonist, is approved for treatment of patients with active relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). It is generally recommended for individuals who have not responded to a currently available first-line disease-modifying therapy or who have very......, based on additional long-term follow-up of clinical studies and post-marketing observations, including appropriate patient selection and management recommendations.......Natalizumab, a highly specific α4-integrin antagonist, is approved for treatment of patients with active relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). It is generally recommended for individuals who have not responded to a currently available first-line disease-modifying therapy or who have very...... active disease. The expected benefits of natalizumab treatment have to be weighed against risks, especially the rare but serious adverse event of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. In this Review, we revisit and update previous recommendations on natalizumab for treatment of patients with RRMS...

  6. What patient characteristics make clinicians recommend brief treatment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, B. A.; Koeter, M. W. J.; Wouters, L.; Emmelkamp, P. M. G.; Schene, A. H.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Assessing self-rated items that might have an impact on clinicians recommending brief treatment (BT) over unlimited or long-term treatment (ULT). Method: On the basis of patient self-report data we compared patients referred by clinicians to BT (n =71) with those referred to ULT (n =145).

  7. Treatment Recommendation Actions, Contingencies, and Responses: An Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stivers, Tanya; Barnes, Rebecca K

    2017-08-21

    In the era of patient participation in health care decision making, we know surprisingly little about the ways in which treatment recommendations are made, the contexts that shape their formulation, and the consequences of these formulations. In this article, we introduce a systematic collective investigation of how recommendations for medications are responded to and made in primary versus secondary care, in the US versus the UK, and in contexts where the medication was over the counter versus by prescription. This article provides an overview of the coding system that was used in this project including describing what constitutes a recommendation, the primary action types clinicians use for recommendations, and the types of responses provided by patients to recommendations.

  8. Preconception care of women with diabetes: a review of current guideline recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazza Danielle

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM continues to rise worldwide. More women from developing countries who are in the reproductive age group have diabetes resulting in more pregnancies complicated by T2DM, and placing both mother and foetus at higher risk. Management of these risks is best achieved through comprehensive preconception care and glycaemic control, both prior to, and during pregnancy. The aim of this review was to compare the quality and content of current guidelines concerned with the preconception care of women with diabetes and to develop a summary of recommendations to assist in the management of diabetic women contemplating pregnancy. Methods Relevant clinical guidelines were identified through a search of several databases (MEDLINE, SCOPUS and The Cochrane Library and relevant websites. Five guidelines were identified. Each guideline was assessed for quality using the AGREE instrument. Guideline recommendations were extracted, compared and contrasted. Results All guidelines were assessed as being of high quality and strongly recommended for use in practice. All were consistent in counselling about the risk of congenital malformation related to uncontrolled blood sugar preconceptionally, ensuring adequate contraception until glycaemic control is achieved, use of HBA1C to monitor metabolic control, when to commence insulin and switching from ACE inhibitors to other antihypertensives. Major differences were in the targets recommended for optimal metabolic control and opinion regarding the usage of metformin as an adjunct or alternative treatment before or during pregnancy. Conclusions International guidelines for the care of women with diabetes who are contemplating pregnancy are consistent in their recommendations; however some are more comprehensive than others. Having established current standards for the preconception care of diabetic women, there is now a need to focus on guideline

  9. Current NRPB recommendations on optimisation of protection of workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrixon, A.D.

    1994-01-01

    The National Radiological Protection Board is required by Ministerial Direction to provide advice on the relevance of the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection to the UK. Its advice was published in the Spring of 1993 after a period of consultation. In this article, which formed the basis of a presentation at an SRP Meeting on 29 April 1994, the Board's advice on the optimisation of protection of workers is explored and presented in the context of the developments in the understanding of the principle that have taken place in recent years. The most significant developments are the realisation that implementation of the principle is an essential function of good management and the recognition that the interests of the individual are not sufficiently taken into account by the dose limits alone but doses to individuals should be both constrained and optimised. (author)

  10. Testosterone for the aging male; current evidence and recommended practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger D Stanworth

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Roger D Stanworth, T Hugh JonesCentre of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Barnsley Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Barnsley, South Yorkshire, United Kingdom; Academic Unit of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, United KingdomAbstract: An international consensus document was recently published and provides guidance on the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of late-onset hypogonadism (LOH in men. The diagnosis of LOH requires biochemical and clinical components. Controversy in defining the clinical syndrome continues due to the high prevalence of hypogonadal symptoms in the aging male population and the non-specific nature of these symptoms. Further controversy surrounds setting a lower limit of normal testosterone, the limitations of the commonly available total testosterone result in assessing some patients and the unavailability of reliable measures of bioavailable or free testosterone for general clinical use. As with any clinical intervention testosterone treatment should be judged on a balance of risk versus benefit. The traditional benefits of testosterone on sexual function, mood, strength and quality of life remain the primary goals of treatment but possible beneficial effects on other parameters such as bone density, obesity, insulin resistance and angina are emerging and will be reviewed. Potential concerns regarding the effects of testosterone on prostate disease, aggression and polycythaemia will also be addressed. The options available for treatment have increased in recent years with the availability of a number of testosterone preparations which can reliably produce physiological serum concentrations.Keywords: review, testosterone, male, aging

  11. Spine imaging after lumbar disc replacement: pitfalls and current recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandén Bengt

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most lumbar artificial discs are still composed of stainless steel alloys, which prevents adequate postoperative diagnostic imaging of the operated region when using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Thus patients with postoperative radicular symptoms or claudication after stainless steel implants often require alternative diagnostic procedures. Methods Possible complications of lumbar total disc replacement (TDR are reviewed from the available literature and imaging recommendations given with regard to implant type. Two illustrative cases are presented in figures. Results Access-related complications, infections, implant wear, loosening or fracture, polyethylene inlay dislodgement, facet joint hypertrophy, central stenosis, and ankylosis of the operated segment can be visualised both in titanium and stainless steel implants, but require different imaging modalities due to magnetic artifacts in MRI. Conclusion Alternative radiographic procedures should be considered when evaluating patients following TDR. Postoperative complications following lumbar TDR including spinal stenosis causing radiculopathy and implant loosening can be visualised by myelography and radionucleotide techniques as an adjunct to plain film radiographs. Even in the presence of massive stainless steel TDR implants lumbar radicular stenosis and implant loosening can be visualised if myelography and radionuclide techniques are applied.

  12. Power Testing in Basketball: Current Practice and Future Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Neal; Dalbo, Vincent J; Burgos, Bill; Pyne, David B; Scanlan, Aaron T

    2018-02-01

    Numerous foundational movements performed during basketball are predicated on underlying power-related attributes, including speed, change-of-direction, and jumping. Accordingly, fitness testing batteries for basketball have incorporated an assortment of linear speed tests, change-of-direction tests, and jump tests. However, due to the wide variety of testing options it is difficult for basketball practitioners to select appropriate testing protocols for the assessment of power-related attributes. As a result, there is a need to review the relevant literature to identify game-specific, power-related attributes important in basketball and the most appropriate tests available to assess power-related attributes for basketball practitioners. Therefore, the aims of this review were to: (1) identify essential power-related attributes important in basketball; (2) discuss the suitability of common and novel power-related tests; and (3) provide recommendations for future research and best practice approaches for basketball coaching staff. In this review, we propose a series of novel tests that are more targeted and specific to basketball movements including: (1) 5-m and 10-m linear sprints, (2) Modified Agility T-Test, (3) Change-of-Direction Deficit, (4) lateral bound, (5) Sargent jump, (6) one-step jump, and (7) isometric midthigh pull test. Improved testing of power-related attributes should enable basketball practitioners to develop targeted training plans for enhancing player performance.

  13. Current treatment of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, T.; Shimaoka, K.; Mimura, T.; Ito, K.

    1987-01-01

    In this review we have described the rationale for the appropriate treatment of patients with Graves' disease. Because the etiology of this disorder remains obscure, its management remains controversial. Since antithyroid drugs and radioiodine became readily available in the early 1950s, they have been widely used for the treatment of thyrotoxicosis, and the number of cases treated surgically has markedly decreased. However, almost four decades of experience have disclosed an unexpectedly high incidence of delayed hypothyroidism after radioiodine treatment and a low remission rate after antithyroid therapy. As a result, surgery is again being advocated as the treatment of choice. The three modalities of treatment have different advantages and disadvantages, and selection of treatment is of importance. In principle, we believe that for most patients a subtotal thyroidectomy should be performed after the patient has been rendered euthyroid by antithyroid drugs. We attempt to leave a thyroid remnant of 6 to 8 gm.36 references

  14. CURRENT PRINCIPLES FOR CRANIOPHARYNGIOMA TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Konovalov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the classification and treatment options of craniopharyngiomas, benign epithelial tumors arising from the cell remains of the Rathke’s pouch. It presents a few types of surgical accesses during surgical treatment for this disease and gives examples of how to place an Ommaya reservoir. 

  15. Current recommendations: what is the clinician to do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, Joann E

    2014-04-01

    Menopausal hormone therapy (HT) has complex biologic effects but continues to have an important clinical role in the management of vasomotor and other menopausal symptoms. The rational use of menopausal HT requires balancing the potential benefits and risks of treatment. Findings from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) and other randomized clinical trials have helped to clarify the benefits and risks of HT and have provided insights to improve decision making. Several clinical characteristics have utility in identifying women for whom benefits of HT are likely to outweigh the risks. Age and time since menopause are strong predictors of health outcomes and absolute risks associated with HT, and differences by age have been particularly apparent for estrogen alone. In the WHI trial of conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) alone, younger women (50-59 years) had more favorable results for all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, and the global index, but not for stroke and venous thrombosis. Age trends were less clear for CEE + medroxyprogesterone acetate, owing to increased risks of breast cancer, stroke, and venous thrombosis in all age groups. Absolute risks of adverse events were lower in younger than in older women in both trials, however. Other predictors of lower vascular risk from HT include favorable lipid status and absence of the metabolic syndrome. Transdermal administration may be associated with lower risks of venous thrombosis and stroke, but additional research is needed. The use of risk stratification and personalized risk assessment offers promise for improved benefit-risk profile and safety of HT. One approach to decision making is presented. Key elements include: assessment of whether the patient has moderate to severe menopausal symptoms, the primary indication for initiating systemic HT (vaginal estrogen may be used to treat genitourinary symptoms in the absence of vasomotor symptoms); understanding the patient's own preference regarding therapy

  16. Current role of melatonin in pediatric neurology: clinical recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Oliviero; Alonso-Alconada, Daniel; Besag, Frank; Biran, Valerie; Braam, Wiebe; Cortese, Samuele; Moavero, Romina; Parisi, Pasquale; Smits, Marcel; Van der Heijden, Kristiaan; Curatolo, Paolo

    2015-03-01

    Melatonin, an indoleamine secreted by the pineal gland, plays a key role in regulating circadian rhythm. It has chronobiotic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and free radical scavenging properties. A conference in Rome in 2014 aimed to establish consensus on the roles of melatonin in children and on treatment guidelines. The best evidence for efficacy is in sleep onset insomnia and delayed sleep phase syndrome. It is most effective when administered 3-5 h before physiological dim light melatonin onset. There is no evidence that extended-release melatonin confers advantage over immediate release. Many children with developmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and intellectual disability have sleep disturbance and can benefit from melatonin treatment. Melatonin decreases sleep onset latency and increases total sleep time but does not decrease night awakenings. Decreased CYP 1A2 activity, genetically determined or from concomitant medication, can slow metabolism, with loss of variation in melatonin level and loss of effect. Decreasing the dose can remedy this. Animal work and limited human data suggest that melatonin does not exacerbate seizures and might decrease them. Melatonin has been used successfully in treating headache. Animal work has confirmed a neuroprotective effect of melatonin, suggesting a role in minimising neuronal damage from birth asphyxia; results from human studies are awaited. Melatonin can also be of value in the performance of sleep EEGs and as sedation for brainstem auditory evoked potential assessments. No serious adverse effects of melatonin in humans have been identified. Copyright © 2014 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Extracorporeal treatment for thallium poisoning: recommendations from the EXTRIP Workgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannoum, Marc; Nolin, Thomas D; Goldfarb, David S; Roberts, Darren M; Mactier, Robert; Mowry, James B; Dargan, Paul I; Maclaren, Robert; Hoegberg, Lotte C; Laliberté, Martin; Calello, Diane; Kielstein, Jan T; Anseeuw, Kurt; Winchester, James F; Burdmann, Emmanuel A; Bunchman, Timothy E; Li, Yi; Juurlink, David N; Lavergne, Valery; Megarbane, Bruno; Gosselin, Sophie; Liu, Kathleen D; Hoffman, Robert S

    2012-10-01

    The EXtracorporeal TReatments In Poisoning (EXTRIP) workgroup was formed to provide recommendations on the use of extracorporeal treatment (ECTR) in poisoning. To test and validate its methods, the workgroup reviewed data for thallium (Tl). After an extensive search, the co-chairs reviewed the articles, extracted the data, summarized findings, and proposed structured voting statements following a predetermined format. A two-round modified Delphi method was chosen to reach a consensus on voting statements and RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method to quantify disagreement. Blinded votes were compiled, returned, and discussed during a conference call. A second vote determined the final recommendations. Forty-five articles met inclusion criteria. Only case reports and case series were identified, yielding a very low quality of evidence for all recommendations. Data on 74 patients, including 11 who died, were abstracted. The workgroup concluded that Tl is slightly dialyzable and made the following recommendations: ECTR is recommended in severe Tl poisoning (1D). ECTR is indicated if Tl exposure is highly suspected on the basis of history or clinical features (2D) or if the serum Tl concentration is >1.0 mg/L (2D). ECTR should be initiated as soon as possible, ideally within 24-48 hours of Tl exposure (1D), and be continued until the serum Tl concentration is poisoning.

  18. Extracorporeal treatment for barbiturate poisoning: recommendations from the EXTRIP Workgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mactier, Robert; Laliberté, Martin; Mardini, Joelle; Ghannoum, Marc; Lavergne, Valery; Gosselin, Sophie; Hoffman, Robert S; Nolin, Thomas D

    2014-09-01

    The EXTRIP (Extracorporeal Treatments in Poisoning) Workgroup conducted a systematic review of barbiturate poisoning using a standardized evidence-based process to provide recommendations on the use of extracorporeal treatment (ECTR) in patients with barbiturate poisoning. The authors reviewed all articles, extracted data, summarized key findings, and proposed structured voting statements following a predetermined format. A 2-round modified Delphi method was used to reach a consensus on voting statements, and the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method was used to quantify disagreement. 617 articles met the search inclusion criteria. Data for 538 patients were abstracted and evaluated. Only case reports, case series, and nonrandomized observational studies were identified, yielding a low quality of evidence for all recommendations. Using established criteria, the workgroup deemed that long-acting barbiturates are dialyzable and short-acting barbiturates are moderately dialyzable. Four key recommendations were made. (1) The use of ECTR should be restricted to cases of severe long-acting barbiturate poisoning. (2) The indications for ECTR in this setting are the presence of prolonged coma, respiratory depression necessitating mechanical ventilation, shock, persistent toxicity, or increasing or persistently elevated serum barbiturate concentrations despite treatment with multiple-dose activated charcoal. (3) Intermittent hemodialysis is the preferred mode of ECTR, and multiple-dose activated charcoal treatment should be continued during ECTR. (4) Cessation of ECTR is indicated when clinical improvement is apparent. This report provides detailed descriptions of the rationale for all recommendations. In summary, patients with long-acting barbiturate poisoning should be treated with ECTR provided at least one of the specific criteria in the first recommendation is present. Copyright © 2014 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Matrix- and tensor-based recommender systems for the discovery of currently unknown inorganic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seko, Atsuto; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Kashima, Hisashi; Tanaka, Isao

    2018-01-01

    Chemically relevant compositions (CRCs) and atomic arrangements of inorganic compounds have been collected as inorganic crystal structure databases. Machine learning is a unique approach to search for currently unknown CRCs from vast candidates. Herein we propose matrix- and tensor-based recommender system approaches to predict currently unknown CRCs from database entries of CRCs. Firstly, the performance of the recommender system approaches to discover currently unknown CRCs is examined. A Tucker decomposition recommender system shows the best discovery rate of CRCs as the majority of the top 100 recommended ternary and quaternary compositions correspond to CRCs. Secondly, systematic density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to investigate the phase stability of the recommended compositions. The phase stability of the 27 compositions reveals that 23 currently unknown compounds are newly found to be stable. These results indicate that the recommender system has great potential to accelerate the discovery of new compounds.

  20. Breastfeeding in Iran: prevalence, duration and current recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strandvik Birgitta

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The need to promote breastfeeding is unquestionable for the health and development of infants. The aim of this study was to investigate prevalence, duration and promotion of breastfeeding status in Iran with respect to the Baby Friendly Hospital, government actions and activities by the Breastfeeding Promotion Society including comparison with European countries. Methods This retrospective study is based on data from 63,071 infants less than 24 months of age in all the 30 urban and rural provinces of Iran. The data of breastfeeding rates were collected in 2005–2006 by trained health workers in the Integrated Monitoring Evaluation System in the Family Health Office of the Ministry of Health to evaluate its subordinate offices. A translated version of a questionnaire, used to assess the current breastfeeding situation in Europe, was used. Results At a national level, 90% and 57% of infants were breastfed at one and two-years of age, respectively. Exclusive breastfeeding rates at 4 and 6 months of age at national level averaged 56.8% and 27.7%. Exclusive breastfeeding rates at 4 and 6 months of age in rural areas were 58% and 29%, and in urban areas 56% and 27%, respectively. The policy questionnaire showed that out of the 566 hospitals across the country 466 hospitals were accredited as Baby Friendly Hospitals, covering more than 80% of the births in 2006. A national board set standards and certified pre-service education at the Ministry of Health. Iran officially adopted the WHO International Code of Marketing of Breast Milk Substitutes in 1991. The legislation for working mothers met the International Labour Organization standards that cover women with formal employment. The Ministry of Health and Breastfeeding Promotion Society were responsible for producing booklets, pamphlets, breastfeeding journal, CD, workshops and websites. Monitoring of breastfeeding rates was performed every four years and funded by the Ministry of

  1. Current treatment of vesicular lithiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Rodriguez, Oscar

    2010-01-01

    Surgical treatment of vesicular lithiasis has changed in past years. The addition of the new techniques in daily medical practice not always is immediate. Reasons relative to when to operate a patient presenting with gall bladder calculi are argued and documenting how this procedure is mainly reserved for symptomatic patients where pain is considered as a symptom par excellence. Also, it is exposed how this change has been faced. (author)

  2. Adolescents’ Pain Coping Profiles: Expectations for Treatment, Functional Outcomes and Adherence to Psychological Treatment Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn Lewis Claar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To explore how adolescents’ pain coping profiles relate to their expectations regarding psychological treatment recommendations, and to examine patients’ functioning and engagement in psychological treatment three months following a multidisciplinary pain clinic evaluation.

  3. Prophylaxis and treatment of HIV-1 infection in pregnancy - Swedish Recommendations 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navér, Lars; Albert, Jan; Carlander, Christina; Flamholc, Leo; Gisslén, Magnus; Karlström, Olof; Svedhem-Johansson, Veronica; Sönnerborg, Anders; Westling, Katarina; Yilmaz, Aylin; Pettersson, Karin

    2018-01-24

    Prophylaxis and treatment with antiretroviral drugs have resulted in a very low rate of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV during recent years. Registration of new antiretroviral drugs, modification of clinical praxis, updated general treatment guidelines and increasing knowledge about MTCT have necessitated regular revisions of the recommendations for 'Prophylaxis and treatment of HIV-1 infection in pregnancy'. The Swedish Reference Group for Antiviral Therapy (RAV) has updated the recommendations from 2013 at an expert meeting 19 September 2017. In the new text, current treatment guidelines for non-pregnant are considered. The most important revisions are that: (1) Caesarean section and infant prophylaxis with three drugs are recommended when maternal HIV RNA >150 copies/mL (previously >50 copies/mL). The treatment target of undetectable HIV RNA remains unchanged <50 copies/mL; (2) Obstetric management and mode of delivery at premature rupture of the membranes and rupture of the membranes at full term follow the same procedures as in HIV negative women; (3) Vaginal delivery is recommended to a well-treated woman with HIV RNA <150 copies/mL regardless of gestational age, if no obstetric contraindications are present; (4) Treatment during pregnancy should begin as soon as possible and should continue after delivery; (5) Ongoing well-functioning HIV treatment at pregnancy start should usually be retained; (6) Recommended drugs and drug combinations have been updated.

  4. Equine pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction: current understanding and recommendations from the Australian and New Zealand Equine Endocrine Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secombe, C J; Bailey, S R; de Laat, M A; Hughes, K J; Stewart, A S; Sonis, J M; Tan, Rhh

    2018-06-03

    The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the current knowledge and opinions about the epidemiology, clinical findings (including sequelae), diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of equine pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction, particularly in the Australian context. This information and the recommendations provided will assist practitioners in making informed decisions regarding the diagnosis and management of this disorder. © 2018 Australian Veterinary Association.

  5. Natalizumab treatment for multiple sclerosis: updated recommendations for patient selection and monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappos, Ludwig; Bates, David; Edan, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Natalizumab, a highly specific a4-integrin antagonist, is approved for treatment of patients with active relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). It is generally recommended for individuals who have not responded to a currently available first-line disease-modifying therapy or who have very...

  6. Prehospital Care for the Adult and Pediatric Seizure Patient: Current Evidence Based Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C. Silverman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of adult and pediatric patients with a seizure and to compare these recommendations against the current protocol used by the 33 emergency medical services (EMS agencies in California. Methods: We performed a review of the evidence in the prehospital treatment of patients with a seizure, and then compared the seizure protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. We analyzed the type and route of medication administered, number of additional rescue doses permitted, and requirements for glucose testing prior to medication. The treatment for eclampsia and seizures in pediatric patients were analyzed separately. Results: Protocols across EMS Agencies in California varied widely. We identified multiple drugs, dosages, routes of administration, re-dosing instructions, and requirement for blood glucose testing prior to medication delivery. Blood glucose testing prior to benzodiazepine administration is required by 61% (20/33 of agencies for adult patients and 76% (25/33 for pediatric patients. All agencies have protocols for giving intramuscular benzodiazepines and 76% (25/33 have protocols for intranasal benzodiazepines. Intramuscular midazolam dosages ranged from 2 to 10 mg per single adult dose, 2 to 8 mg per single pediatric dose, and 0.1 to 0.2 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Intranasal midazolam dosages ranged from 2 to 10 mg per single adult or pediatric dose, and 0.1 to 0.2 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Intravenous/intrasosseous midazolam dosages ranged from 1 to 6 mg per single adult dose, 1 to 5 mg per single pediatric dose, and 0.05 to 0.1 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Eclampsia is specifically addressed by 85% (28/33 of agencies. Forty-two percent (14/33 have a protocol for administering magnesium sulfate, with intravenous dosages ranging from 2 to 6 mg, and 58% (19/33 allow benzodiazepines to be

  7. Recommendations to avoid gross errors of dose in radiotherapeutic treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Cleber Nogueira de; Monti, Carlos Roberto; Sibata, Claudio Hissao

    2001-01-01

    Human mistakes are an important source of errors in radiotherapy and may occur at every step of the radiotherapy planning and treatment. To reduce this level of uncertainties, several specialized organizations have recommended a comprehensive quality assurance program. In Brazil, the requirement for these programs has been strongly stressed, and most radiotherapy services have pursued this goal regarding radiation units and dosimetry equipment, as well as the verification of the calculations of the patient's dose and the revision of the plan charts. As a contribution to the improvement of quality control, we present some recommendations to avoid failure of treatment due to error in the delivered dose, such as redundant check of the manual or computer calculations, weekly check of the total dose for each patient, and prevention of inadvertent access to any safety system of the equipment by any staff member that is only supposed to operate the machine. Moreover, the use of a computerized treatment record and verification system should be considered in order to eliminate errors due to incorrect selection of the treatment parameters, in a daily basis. We report four radioactive incidents with patient injuries occurred throughout the world and some gross errors of dose. (author)

  8. From the Margins to the Center: Recommendations for Current and Aspiring Educational Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Tina R.

    2009-01-01

    Tina Nolan presents a call to action for current and future leaders to assume a new role as change leaders for the museum education profession. This article puts forth a series of recommendations and strategies for repositioning museum educators from the margins of their institutions to the center. Included among these recommendations are…

  9. Nutri-RecQuest: a web-based search engine on current micronutrient recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavelaars, A.J.E.M.; Kadvan, A.; Doets, E.L.; Tepsic, J.; Novakovic, R.N.; Dhonukshe-Rutten, R.A.M.; Renkema, M.; Glibetic, M.; Bucchini, L.; Matthys, C.; Smith, R.; Veer, van 't P.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Gurinovic, M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The EURRECA (EURopean micronutrient RECommendations Aligned) Network of Excellence collated current micronutrient recommendations. A user-friendly tool, Nutri-RecQuest, was developed to allow access to the collated data and to create a database source for use in other nutritional

  10. Challenges of implementing fibromyalgia treatment guidelines in current clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Lesley M; Clauw, Daniel J

    2017-09-01

    The current diagnostic and treatment pathway for patients with fibromyalgia (FM) is lengthy, complex, and characterized by multiple physician visits with an average 2-year wait until diagnosis. It is clear that effective identification and appropriate treatment of FM remain a challenge in current clinical practice. Ideally, FM management involves a multidisciplinary approach with the preferable patient pathway originating in primary care but supported by a range of health care providers, including referral to specialist care when necessary. After the publication of individual clinical studies, high-quality reviews, and meta-analyses, recently published FM treatment guidelines have transitioned from an expert consensus to an evidence-based approach. Evidence-based guidelines provide a framework for ensuring early diagnosis and timely adoption of appropriate treatment. However, for successful outcomes, FM treatments must adopt a more holistic approach, which addresses more than just pain. Impact on the associated symptoms of fatigue and cognitive problems, sleep and mood disturbances, and lowered functional status are also important in judging the success of FM therapy. Recently published guidelines recommend the adoption of a symptom-based approach to guide pharmacologic treatment. Emerging treatment options for FM may be best differentiated on the basis of their effect on comorbid symptoms that are often associated with pain (e.g. sleep disturbance, mood, fatigue). The current review discusses the most recently published Canadian guidelines and the implications of the recent European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations, with a focus on the challenges of implementing these guidelines in current clinical practice.

  11. Evidence-based review, grade of recommendation, and suggested treatment recommendations for melasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilendu Sarma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of melasma is known to be less satisfactory, often incomplete, and relapse is frequent. Although many treatment options are available, they are either known to be unsafe on long-term use or their long-term safety profile is unknown. Patients often use various drugs, even topical steroid-based preparation without any medical supervision for long period of time, making the skin unsuitable for many of the drugs available. Thus, there has been gross disparity among the treating physician about what drugs and what regimen are best suitable for various categories of melasma patients and in different situations. With this background, numerous newer drugs, mostly combinations of some proprietary molecules or even unknown plant extracts, have flooded the market for the management of melasma. Information on efficacy or safety of these products are almost unknown. Studies on Asian people, especially Indian population, are far less commonly available. Therapeutic guideline for use on Indian patients with melasma is almost missing. Extrapolation of data from Caucasian people for use on Asian people may not be scientifically justifiable because Caucasian and Asian people are known to have inherent difference in their response as well as tolerance to the drugs used for melasma. With this background, we have extensively evaluated, following a strict, scientifically designed protocol, all the available studies on melasma management till May 2016 and prepared this document on level of evidence, grade of recommendation and suggested therapeutic guideline for melasma as per the method proposed by Oxford Centre of Evidence-Based Medicine. Various ethical, social, logical, regional, and economic issues in the context of Indian and similar populations were given due importance while preparing the suggested therapeutic recommendation.

  12. Hepatitis C in Pregnancy: Review of Current Knowledge and Updated Recommendations for Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Charlotte M; Hughes, Brenna L; Rhee, Eleanor H J; Kuller, Jeffrey A

    2017-06-01

    An estimated 1% to 2.5% of pregnant women in the United States are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), which carries approximately a 6% risk of mother-to-infant transmission. The aims of this article are to review the current evidence on HCV in pregnancy and to provide updated recommendations for management. Original research articles, review articles, and guidelines on HCV in general and specifically in pregnancy were reviewed, as were drug safety profiles from the Food and Drug Administration. Pregnancy appears to have a beneficial effect on the course of maternal chronic HCV infection. However, it is associated with an increased risk of adverse fetal outcomes, including fetal growth restriction and low birth weight, and can be transmitted to the infant in utero or during the peripartum period. No perinatal intervention has been shown to reduce the risk of vertical transmission, but some may increase this risk. To date, no treatment regimens for HCV have been approved for use in pregnancy, but the new ribavirin-free, direct-acting antiviral regimens are being used with high efficacy outside pregnancy. Hepatitis C virus infection in pregnancy generally does not adversely affect maternal well-being but is associated with adverse effects on the fetus because of pregnancy complications and vertical transmission. There are currently no approved treatment regimens for HCV in pregnancy; this should be an active area of research in obstetrics.

  13. Recommended treatment for urinary tract infection in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercaigne, L M; Zhanel, G G

    1994-02-01

    To establish and recommend a therapeutic regimen for the treatment of urinary tract infection (UTI) in pregnancy based on the published studies. An English-language literature search employing MEDLINE, Index Medicus, and bibliographic reviews of the references obtained were searched (key terms: urinary tract infection, UTI, pregnancy, bacteriuria). All identified human studies dealing with bacteriuria or UTI in pregnancy were analyzed. Limited data are available regarding the appropriate antibiotic management of UTI in pregnancy. Single-dose cure rates with amoxicillin are approximately 80 percent. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole provides cure rates of greater than 80 percent. Cephalosporins and nitrofurantoin produce variable results. We recommend separating pregnant subjects with UTI into two groups. Those with asymptomatic bacteriuria can be treated with a single dose of an antimicrobial to which the organism is susceptible. For those with symptomatic UTI, we recommend amoxicillin 500 mg tid for three days. Urine cultures should be repeated seven days following therapy to assess cure or failure. Well-designed studies need to be performed, comparing single-dose and three-day therapy for UTI in pregnancy.

  14. Current and emerging somatic treatment strategies in psychotic major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannon, Pinhas N; Lowengrub, Katherine; Gonopolski, Yehudit; Kotler, Moshe

    2006-01-01

    Psychotic major depressive disorder (MDD) is a mood disorder characterized by severe affective and neurovegetative symptoms together with the presence of delusions and/or hallucinations. It is a common disorder seen in a quarter of consecutively admitted depressed patients and is often associated with severe symptomatology, increased suicide risk, poor acute response to antidepressants and poor acute and long-term treatment outcome. It is possible that poor response in psychotic depression is caused by the fact that we have yet to identify the most efficacious treatment protocol for psychotic MDD. Multiple studies have shown that modifications in the treatment paradigm may increase treatment efficacy in psychotic MDD. It has been generally accepted that, during the acute treatment phase, antidepressant-antipsychotic drug combination therapy is more effective than either treatment alone, although this strategy has recently been challenged. The question of the optimal duration of pharmacotherapy in order to prevent relapse and improve long-term (i.e., 5-year) outcome is a focus of current investigation. This article will review currently recommended treatment strategies for the acute, continuation and maintenance phases of therapy. In particular, it will address the role of newer-generation antidepressants, the role of second-generation antipsychotics, the use of mood stabilizers and indications for electroconvulsive therapy. Other possible treatment strategies such as transcranial magnetic stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, deep-brain stimulation and glucocorticoid receptor antagonists will be discussed. Current recommendations for the prevention of relapse and improvement of long-term outcome will be reviewed.

  15. Adherence to CDC Recommendations for the Treatment of Uncomplicated Gonorrhea - STD Surveillance Network, United States, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Emily J; Workowski, Kimberly; Torrone, Elizabeth; Weinstock, Hillard; Stenger, Mark R

    2018-04-27

    Gonorrhea, the sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae, is the second most common notifiable disease in the United States after chlamydia; 468,514 cases were reported to state and local health departments in 2016, an increase of 18.5% from 2015 (1). N. gonorrhoeae has progressively developed resistance to most antimicrobials used to treat the infection (2). As a result, CDC recommends two antimicrobials (250 mg of ceftriaxone [IM] plus 1 g of azithromycin [PO]) for treating uncomplicated gonorrhea to improve treatment efficacy and, potentially, to slow the emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance. To monitor adherence to the current CDC-recommended regimen for uncomplicated gonorrhea, CDC reviewed enhanced data collected on a random sample of reported cases of gonorrhea in seven jurisdictions participating in the STD Surveillance Network (SSuN) and estimated the proportion of patients who received the CDC-recommended regimen for uncomplicated gonorrhea, by patient characteristics and diagnosing facility type. In 2016, the majority of reported patients with gonorrhea (81%) received the recommended regimen. There were no differences in the proportion of patients receiving the recommended regimen by age or race/ethnicity; however, patients diagnosed with gonorrhea in STD (91%) or family planning/reproductive health (94%) clinics were more likely to receive this regimen than were patients diagnosed in other provider settings (80%). These data document high provider adherence to CDC gonorrhea treatment recommendations in specialty STD clinics, indicating high quality of care provided in those settings. Local and state health departments should monitor adherence with recommendations in their jurisdictions and consider implementing interventions to improve provider and patient compliance with gonorrhea treatment recommendations where indicated.

  16. The Vitiligo Working Group recommendations for narrowband ultraviolet B light phototherapy treatment of vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Tasneem F; Al-Jamal, Mohammed; Hamzavi, Iltefat H; Harris, John E; Leone, Giovanni; Cabrera, Raúl; Lim, Henry W; Pandya, Amit G; Esmat, Samia M

    2017-05-01

    Treatment of vitiligo with narrowband ultraviolet B light (NBUVB) is an important component of the current standard of care. However, there are no consistent guidelines regarding the dosing and administration of NBUVB in vitiligo, reflected by varied treatment practices around the world. To create phototherapy recommendations to facilitate clinical management and identify areas requiring future research. The Vitiligo Working Group (VWG) Phototherapy Committee addressed 19 questions regarding the administration of phototherapy over 3 conference calls. Members of the Photomedicine Society and a group of phototherapy experts were surveyed regarding their phototherapy practices. Based on comparison and analysis of survey results, expert opinion, and discussion held during conference calls, expert recommendations for the administration of NBUVB phototherapy in vitiligo were created. There were several areas that required further research before final recommendations could be made. In addition, no standardized methodology was used during literature review and to assess the strength of evidence during the development of these recommendations. This set of expert recommendations by the VWG is based on the prescribing practices of phototherapy experts from around the world to create a unified, broadly applicable set of recommendations on the use of NBUVB in vitiligo. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Recommendations for the treatment of aging in standard technical specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orton, R.D.; Allen, R.P.

    1995-09-01

    As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated the standard technical specifications for nuclear power plants to determine whether the current surveillance requirements (SRs) were effective in detecting age-related degradation. Nuclear Plant Aging Research findings for selected systems and components were reviewed to identify the stressors and operative aging mechanisms and to evaluate the methods available to detect, differentiate, and trend the resulting aging degradation. Current surveillance and testing requirements for these systems and components were reviewed for their effectiveness in detecting degraded conditions and for potential contributions to premature degradation. When the current surveillance and testing requirements appeared ineffective in detecting aging degradation or potentially could contribute to premature degradation, a possible deficiency in the SRs was identified that could result in undetected degradation. Based on this evaluation, PNL developed recommendations for inspection, surveillance, trending, and condition monitoring methods to be incorporated in the SRs to better detect age- related degradation of these selected systems and components

  18. Current micronutrient recommendations in Europe: towards understanding their differences and similarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doets, Esmée L; de Wit, Liesbeth S; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A M; Cavelaars, Adriënne E J M; Raats, Monique M; Timotijevic, Lada; Brzozowska, Anna; Wijnhoven, Trudy M A; Pavlovic, Mirjana; Totland, Torunn Holm; Andersen, Lene F; Ruprich, Jiri; Pijls, Loek T J; Ashwell, Margaret; Lambert, Janet P; van 't Veer, Pieter; de Groot, Lisette C P G M

    2008-04-01

    evidence used, and assumptions made. Twenty-two countries, the World Health Organization (WHO)/the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the EC have their own reports on nutrient recommendations. Thirteen countries based their micronutrient recommendations on those from other countries or organisations. Five countries, WHO/FAO and the EC defined their own recommendations. The DACH-countries (Germany, Austria and Switzerland) as well as the Nordic countries (Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark and Iceland) cooperated in setting recommendations. Greece and Portugal use the EC and the WHO/FAO recommendations, respectively and Slovenia adopted the recommendations from the DACH-countries. Rather than by concepts, definitions, and defined population groups, variability appears to emerge from differences in criteria for adequacy, assumptions made and type of evidence used to establish micronutrient recommendations. The large variation in current micronutrient recommendations for population groups as illustrated for vitamin A and vitamin D strengthens the need for guidance on setting evidence based, up-to-date European recommendations. Differences in endpoints, type of evidence used to set recommendations, experts' opinions and assumptions are all likely to contribute to the identified variation. So far, background information was not sufficient transparent to disentangle the relative contribution of these different aspects. EURRECA has an excellent opportunity to develop tools to improve transparency on the approaches used in setting micronutrient recommendations, including the selection of criteria for adequacy, weighing of evidence, and interpretation of data.

  19. Treatment of Soft Tissue Filler Complications: Expert Consensus Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdiales-Gálvez, Fernando; Delgado, Nuria Escoda; Figueiredo, Vitor; Lajo-Plaza, José V; Mira, Mar; Moreno, Antonio; Ortíz-Martí, Francisco; Del Rio-Reyes, Rosa; Romero-Álvarez, Nazaret; Del Cueto, Sofía Ruiz; Segurado, María A; Rebenaque, Cristina Villanueva

    2018-04-01

    Dermal fillers have been increasingly used in minimally invasive facial esthetic procedures. This widespread use has led to a rise in reports of associated complications. The aim of this expert consensus report is to describe potential adverse events associated with dermal fillers and to provide guidance on their treatment and avoidance. A multidisciplinary group of experts in esthetic treatments convened to discuss the management of the complications associated with dermal fillers use. A search was performed for English, French, and Spanish language articles in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Database, and Google Scholar using the search terms "complications" OR "soft filler complications" OR "injectable complications" AND "dermal fillers" AND "Therapy". An initial document was drafted by the Coordinating Committee, and it was reviewed and modified by the experts, until a final text was agreed upon and validated. The panel addressed consensus recommendations about the classification of filler complications according to the time of onset and about the clinical management of different complications including bruising, swelling, edema, infections, lumps and bumps, skin discoloration, and biofilm formation. Special attention was paid to vascular compromise and retinal artery occlusion. Clinicians should be fully aware of the signs and symptoms related to complications and be prepared to confidently treat them. Establishing action protocols for emergencies, with agents readily available in the office, would reduce the severity of adverse outcomes associated with injection of hyaluronic acid fillers in the cosmetic setting. This document seeks to lay down a set of recommendations and to identify key issues that may be useful for clinicians who are starting to use dermal fillers. Additionally, this document provides a better understanding about the diagnoses and management of complications if they do occur. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each

  20. Current options for the treatment of pathological scarring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poetschke, Julian; Gauglitz, Gerd G

    2016-05-01

    Scarring is the consequence of surgery, trauma or different skin diseases. Apart from fresh, immature scars,that transform into mature scars over the course of would healing and that do not require further treatment,linear hypertrophic scars, widespread hypertrophic scars, keloids and atrophic scars exist. Symptoms like pruritusand pain, stigmatization as well as functional and aesthetic impairments that are very disturbing for the affected patients can bethe basis for the desire for treatment. Today, a multitude of options for the treatment and prevention of scars exists. Topical agents based on silicone or onion extract, intralesional injections of cristalline glucocorticoids (oftentimes in combinationwith cryotherapy) or 5-Fluorouracil as well as ablative and nonablative laser treatment are used. Current guidelines summarize the multitude of available treatment options and the currently available datafor the treating physicians, allowing them to make clear therapy recommendations for every single scar type. Relieving patients of their discomfort and doing their aesthetic demands justice is thus possible. Apart from scar prevention becoming more and more important, the increased use of modernlaser treatment options constitutes a key point in clinical scar treatment. At the same time the attention is turned to evaluating current therapeutic options with the help of contemporary study designs so as to graduallyimprove the level of evidence in scar treatment. © 2016 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Recommendations by NACP for accurate treatment geometry specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, P.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation among the Nordic radiotherapy centres in 1991 confirmed that inconsistent use of dose and volume concepts is jeopardizing the high standard of radiation therapy. A Nordic working group was set up by NACP to standardize the concepts and quantities used throughout the whole radiation process. Now the draft report 'Specification of Dose Delivery in Radiation Therapy' is discussed with the radiotherapy community. The recent ICRU 50 report is the first step towards a uniform terminology and procedure at all radiotherapy centres. The new NACP report will be an important and more detailed addition for level 2-3 radiotherapy clinics and it will be specially adopted to the situation at the Nordic centres as well as other well equipped centres. The aim has been to recommend the use of concepts based on recent scientific development in the field of radiation therapy which are needed for the development of daily clinical practice. The terms and concepts for treatment geometry have been chosen by separating the concepts of tissues and volumes inside a patient. The tissues can be fixed in the coordinate system of the patient by adding a margin around them. This margin accounts for the movements of the tissues of interest inside the patient. The outer boundary of this margin is then encompassing the Strict Target Volume or Organ at Risk Volume which are fixed in the patient coordinate system. The set-up uncertainties of the patient in relation to the beams are considered during treatment planning by adding set-up margins to the beams

  2. [FEDERAL CLINICAL RECOMMENDATIONS IN DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT AND PREVENTION OF HEARING LOSS DUE TO NOISE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeninskaya, E E; Bukhtiarov, I V; Bushmanov, A Iu; Dayhes, N A; Denisov, E I; Izmerov, N F; Mazitova, N N; Pankova, V B; Preobrazhenskaya, E A; Prokopenko, L V; Simonova, N I; Tavartkiladze, G A; Fedina, I N

    2016-01-01

    Noise induced hearing loss is a slowly developing hearing impairment, caused by occupational exposure to excessive noise levels, constitutes a lesion of the auditory analyzer and clinically manifested as chronic bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Currently, there is not a treatment that provide a cure of sensorineural hearing loss. Regular, individually tailored treatment should be directed to the pathogenic mechanisms and specific clinical symptoms of hearing loss, as well as the prevention of complications. We recommend using non-drug therapies that can improve blood flow in labyrinth, tissue and cellular metabolism.

  3. Current treatment of low grade astrocytoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christina Louise; Romner, Bertil

    2013-01-01

    Through a comprehensive review of the current literature, the present article investigates several aspects of low grade astrocytomas (LGA), including prognostic factors, treatment strategies and follow-up regimes. LGA are in general relatively slow-growing primary brain tumours, but they have a v...... effective in discriminating between tumour progression and radiation necrosis. The research into biomarkers is currently limited with regards to their applications in LGA diagnostics, and therefore further studies including larger patient populations are needed.......Through a comprehensive review of the current literature, the present article investigates several aspects of low grade astrocytomas (LGA), including prognostic factors, treatment strategies and follow-up regimes. LGA are in general relatively slow-growing primary brain tumours, but they have...... as the course of disease. The current literature seems to support the idea that treatment with radical tumour resection, where possible, yields better long term outcome for patients with LGA. However, adjuvant therapy is often necessary. Administering early postoperative radiotherapy to patients with partially...

  4. [Treatment with psychotropic agents in patients with dementia and delirium : Gap between guideline recommendations and treatment practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewer, Walter; Thomas, Christine

    2017-02-01

    Psychiatric symptoms in dementia and delirium are associated with a substantially reduced quality of life of patients and their families and often challenging for professionals. Pharmacoepidemiological surveys have shown that, in particular, patients living in nursing homes receive prescriptions of psychotropic agents in significant higher frequency than recommended by current guidelines. This article focuses on a critical appraisal of this gap from the point of view of German healthcare services. Narrative review with special reference to the German dementia guideline from 2016 and recently published practice guidelines for delirium in old age in German and English language. The indications for use of psychotropic agents, especially antipsychotics, are defined narrowly in the German dementia guideline. According to this guideline for several psychopathological symptoms evidence based recommendations cannot be given, currently. For delirium several practice guidelines related to different treatment settings have been published recently. Comparable to the German dementia guideline they recommend general medical interventions and nonpharmacological treatment as first line measures and the use of psychotropic agents only under certain conditions. These guidelines differ to some extent regarding the strength of recommendation for psychopharmacological treatment. The guidelines discussed here advocate well-founded a cautious prescription of psychotropic agents in patients with dementia and delirium. This contrasts to everyday practice which is characterized by significantly higher prescription rates. This gap may explained partially by a lack of evidence-based recommendations regarding certain psychopathological symptoms. Most notably, however, epidemiological data disclose an unacceptable rate of hazardous overtreatment with psychotropic agents, especially in long-term care of persons with dementia. In this situation counteractive measures by consequent implementation

  5. Current approaches in atrial fibrillation treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenk Sarı

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common sustained arrhythmia encountered in clinical practice. Its incidence increases with age. AF is classified into subtypes according to the duration and/or able to provide sinus rhytym. İnitially, patients should be evaluated for rhythm or rate control for appropriate treatment. Second stage of strategy aimed to investigate the feasibility of anticoagulation therapy. Recently, due to the progress made in treatment with rhythm control and anticoagulation therapy, either American or European guidelines have been renovated. These developments have taken place in the newly published guide. In this article, the current change in the management of AF is discussed.

  6. Current standard treatment for pediatric glioma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoda, Yukihiko; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Saito, Ryuta; Kanamori, Masayuki; Yamashita, Yoji; Tominaga, Teiji

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we selected three representative disorders among pediatric gliomas and reviewed standard treatments for these diseases. The formation of this rare disease is involved with BRAF mutation as well as cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma. Radical resection is not recommended as initial therapy due to high morbidity. Despite its good tumor control, radiotherapy is not a standard therapy due to neuroendocrine and neurocognitive dysfunction. Several papers have reported the effectiveness of platinum-based chemotherapy, which is a useful for induction therapy. Recent progress in molecular analyses has suggested that some markers might be used for staging ependymoma. While total resection is considered to be strongly correlated with patients' survival, the majority of recurrence occurs in the primary site. Despite many clinical trials, chemotherapeutic agents were not found to be effective for this disease. Since whole brain radiation cannot prevent dissemination, local radiation is recommended for adjuvant therapy. The prognosis of this disease is still dismal, and median survival time is within 1 year. Although clinical trials have been conducted to assess the efficacy of chemotherapy prior to, concomitantly with, or after radiotherapy, an effective regimen has not yet been established. Therefore, only conventional local radiotherapy is the standard regimen for this disease. A new therapeutic approach, such as convection-enhanced drug delivery, would be required for improved outcomes in patients with this disease. (author)

  7. Diaphyseal long bone nonunions - types, aetiology, economics, and treatment recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Markus; Biehl, Christoph; Budak, Matthäus; Thormann, Ulrich; Heiss, Christian; Alt, Volker

    2018-02-01

    The intention of the current article is to review the epidemiology with related socioeconomic costs, pathophysiology, and treatment options for diaphyseal long bone delayed unions and nonunions. Diaphyseal nonunions in the tibia and in the femur are estimated to occur 4.6-8% after modern intramedullary nailing of closed fractures with an even much higher risk in open fractures. There is a high socioeconomic burden for long bone nonunions mainly driven by indirect costs, such as productivity losses due to long treatment duration. The classic classification of Weber and Cech of the 1970s is based on the underlying biological aspect of the nonunion differentiating between "vital" (hypertrophic) and "avital" (hypo-/atrophic) nonunions, and can still be considered to represent the basis for basic evaluation of nonunions. The "diamond concept" units biomechanical and biological aspects and provides the pre-requisites for successful bone healing in nonunions. For humeral diaphyseal shaft nonunions, excellent results for augmentation plating were reported. In atrophic humeral shaft nonunions, compression plating with stimulation of bone healing by bone grafting or BMPs seem to be the best option. For femoral and tibial diaphyseal shaft fractures, dynamization of the nail is an atraumatic, effective, and cheap surgical possibility to achieve bony consolidation, particularly in delayed nonunions before 24 weeks after initial surgery. In established hypertrophic nonunions in the tibia and femur, biomechanical stability should be addressed by augmentation plating or exchange nailing. Hypotrophic or atrophic nonunions require additional biological stimulation of bone healing for augmentation plating.

  8. Recommendations of the Brazilian Society of Rheumatology for the diagnosis and treatment of chikungunya fever. Part 2 - Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Diniz Lopes Marques

    Full Text Available Abstract Chikungunya fever has become an important public health problem in countries where epidemics occur because half of the cases progress to chronic, persistent and debilitating arthritis. Literature data on specific therapies at the various phases of arthropathy caused by chikungunya virus (CHIKV infection are limited, lacking quality randomized trials assessing the efficacies of different therapies. There are a few studies on the treatment of musculoskeletal manifestations of chikungunya fever, but these studies have important methodological limitations. The data currently available preclude conclusions favorable or contrary to specific therapies, or an adequate comparison between the different drugs used. The objective of this study was to develop recommendations for the treatment of chikungunya fever in Brazil. A literature review was performed via evidence-based selection of articles in the databases Medline, SciELO, PubMed and Embase and conference proceedings abstracts, in addition to expert opinions to support decision-making in defining recommendations. The Delphi method was used to define the degrees of agreement in 2 face-to-face meetings and several online voting rounds. This study is part 2 of the Recommendations of the Brazilian Society of Rheumatology (Sociedade Brasileira de Reumatologia - SBR for the Diagnosis and Treatment of chikungunya fever and specifically addresses treatment.

  9. Esophageal achalasia: current diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Patti, Marco G

    2018-05-27

    Esophageal achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder of unknown origin, characterized by lack of peristalsis and by incomplete or absent relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter in response to swallowing. The goal of treatment is to eliminate the functional obstruction at the level of the gastroesophageal junction Areas covered: This comprehensive review will evaluate the current literature, illustrating the diagnostic evaluation and providing an evidence-based treatment algorithm for this disease Expert commentary: Today we have three very effective therapeutic modalities to treat patients with achalasia - pneumatic dilatation, per-oral endoscopic myotomy and laparoscopic Heller myotomy with fundoplication. Treatment should be tailored to the individual patient, in centers where a multidisciplinary approach is available. Esophageal resection should be considered as a last resort for patients who have failed prior therapeutic attempts.

  10. Current treatments for patients with Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Gerald G; Saunders, Amanda Vaughn

    2010-09-01

    There is neither proven effective prevention for Alzheimer disease nor a cure for patients with this disorder. Nevertheless, a spectrum of biopsychosocial therapeutic measures is available for slowing progression of the illness and enhancing quality of life for patients. These measures include a range of educational, psychological, social, and behavioral interventions that remain fundamental to effective care. Also available are a number of pharmacologic treatments, including prescription medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for Alzheimer disease, "off-label" uses of medications to manage target symptoms, and controversial complementary therapies. Physicians must make the earliest possible diagnosis to use these treatments most effectively. Physicians' goals should be to educate patients and their caregivers, to plan long-term care options, to maximally manage concurrent illnesses, to slow and ameliorate the most disabling symptoms, and to preserve effective functioning for as long as possible. The authors review the various current treatments for patients with Alzheimer disease.

  11. Recommendations for physical therapists on the treatment of lumbopelvic pain during pregnancy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Benten, Esther; Pool, Jan; Mens, Jan; Pool-Goudzwaard, Annelies

    2014-07-01

    Systematic review of the literature. To review and assess the peer-reviewed literature on the effectiveness of physical therapy interventions in treating lumbopelvic pain during pregnancy. Current guidelines on interventions for lumbopelvic pain during pregnancy differ in their recommendations for assessment and intervention. Recent publications may allow revising current recommendations for the treatment of this complex problem. An electronic search strategy was conducted in PubMed, PEDro, Scopus, and CINAHL of literature published from January 1992 to November 2013. Two authors independently assessed all abstracts for eligibility. Articles were independently rated for quality by 2 authors, using the Cochrane Back Review Group criteria for methodological quality. Where possible, effect sizes were calculated for the different interventions. A total of 22 articles (all randomized controlled trials) reporting on 22 independent studies were included. Overall, the methodological quality of the studies was moderate. Data for 4 types of interventions were considered: a combination of interventions (7 studies, n = 1202), exercise therapy (9 studies, n = 2149), manual therapy (5 studies, n = 360), and material support (1 study, n = 115). All included studies on exercise therapy, and most of the studies on interventions combined with patient education, reported a positive effect on pain, disability, and/or sick leave. Evidence-based recommendations can be made for the use of exercise therapy for the treatment of lumbopelvic pain during pregnancy. Therapy, level 1a-. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2014;44(7):464-473. Epub 10 May 2014. doi:10.2519/jospt.2014.5098.

  12. [Current recommendations for basic/advanced life support : Addressing unanswered questions and future prospects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, K; Schmid, B; Busch, H-J

    2016-11-01

    The revised guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation were implemented by the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) in October 2015. There were few changes concerning basic and advanced life support; however, some issues were clarified compared to the ERC recommendations from 2010. The present paper summarizes the procedures of basic and advanced life support according to the current guidelines and highlights the updates of 2015. Furthermore, the article depicts future prospects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation that may improve outcome of patients after cardiac arrest in the future.

  13. Feeding practices of low-income mothers: how do they compare to current recommendations?

    OpenAIRE

    Power, Thomas G; Hughes, Sheryl O; Goodell, L Suzanne; Johnson, Susan L; Duran, J Andrea Jaramillo; Williams, Kimberly; Beck, Ashley D; Frankel, Leslie A

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite a growing consensus on the feeding practices associated with healthy eating patterns, few observational studies of maternal feeding practices with young children have been conducted, especially in low-income populations. The aim of this study was to provide such data on a low income sample to determine the degree to which observed maternal feeding practices compare with current recommendations. Methods Eighty low-income mothers and their preschool children were videotaped a...

  14. Narcolepsy: current treatment options and future approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billiard, Michel

    2008-01-01

    The management of narcolepsy is presently at a turning point. Three main avenues are considered in this review: 1) Two tendencies characterize the conventional treatment of narcolepsy. Modafinil has replaced methylphenidate and amphetamine as the first-line treatment of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and sleep attacks, based on randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of modafinil, but on no direct comparison of modafinil versus traditional stimulants. For cataplexy, sleep paralysis, and hypnagogic hallucinations, new antidepressants tend to replace tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in spite of a lack of randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of these compounds; 2) The conventional treatment of narcolepsy is now challenged by sodium oxybate, the sodium salt of gammahydroxybutyrate, based on a series of randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials and a long-term open label study. This treatment has a fairly good efficacy and is active on all symptoms of narcolepsy. Careful titration up to an adequate level is essential both to obtain positive results and avoid adverse effects; 3) A series of new treatments are currently being tested, either in animal models or in humans, They include novel stimulant and anticataplectic drugs, endocrine therapy, and, more attractively, totally new approaches based on the present state of knowledge of the pathophysiology of narcolepsy with cataplexy, hypocretine-based therapies, and immunotherapy. PMID:18830438

  15. Narcolepsy: current treatment options and future approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Billiard

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Michel BilliardDepartment of Neurology, Gui de Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier, FranceAbstract: The management of narcolepsy is presently at a turning point. Three main avenues are considered in this review: 1 Two tendencies characterize the conventional treatment of narcolepsy. Modafinil has replaced methylphenidate and amphetamine as the first-line treatment of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS and sleep attacks, based on randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of modafinil, but on no direct comparison of modafinil versus traditional stimulants. For cataplexy, sleep paralysis, and hypnagogic hallucinations, new antidepressants tend to replace tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs in spite of a lack of randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of these compounds; 2 The conventional treatment of narcolepsy is now challenged by sodium oxybate, the sodium salt of gammahydroxybutyrate, based on a series of randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials and a long-term open label study. This treatment has a fairly good efficacy and is active on all symptoms of narcolepsy. Careful titration up to an adequate level is essential both to obtain positive results and avoid adverse effects; 3 A series of new treatments are currently being tested, either in animal models or in humans, They include novel stimulant and anticataplectic drugs, endocrine therapy, and, more attractively, totally new approaches based on the present state of knowledge of the pathophysiology of narcolepsy with cataplexy, hypocretine-based therapies, and immunotherapy.Keywords: narcolepsy, treatment, conventional drugs, modafinil, sodium oxybate, future treatments

  16. Treatment of Fibromyalgia Syndrome: Recommendations of Recent Evidence-Based Interdisciplinary Guidelines with Special Emphasis on Complementary and Alternative Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Ablin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Current evidence indicates that there is no single ideal treatment for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS. First choice treatment options remain debatable, especially concerning the importance of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM treatments. Methods. Three evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines on FMS in Canada, Germany, and Israel were compared for their first choice and CAM-recommendations. Results. All three guidelines emphasized a patient-tailored approach according to the key symptoms. Aerobic exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy, and multicomponent therapy were first choice treatments. The guidelines differed in the grade of recommendation for drug treatment. Anticonvulsants (gabapentin, pregabalin and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (duloxetine, milnacipran were strongly recommended by the Canadian and the Israeli guidelines. These drugs received only a weak recommendation by the German guideline. In consideration of CAM-treatments, acupuncture, hypnosis/guided imagery, and Tai Chi were recommended by the German and Israeli guidelines. The Canadian guidelines did not recommend any CAM therapy. Discussion. Recent evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines concur on the importance of treatment tailored to the individual patient and further emphasize the need of self-management strategies (exercise, and psychological techniques.

  17. Treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome: recommendations of recent evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines with special emphasis on complementary and alternative therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablin, Jacob; Fitzcharles, Mary-Ann; Buskila, Dan; Shir, Yoram; Sommer, Claudia; Häuser, Winfried

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Current evidence indicates that there is no single ideal treatment for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). First choice treatment options remain debatable, especially concerning the importance of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments. Methods. Three evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines on FMS in Canada, Germany, and Israel were compared for their first choice and CAM-recommendations. Results. All three guidelines emphasized a patient-tailored approach according to the key symptoms. Aerobic exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy, and multicomponent therapy were first choice treatments. The guidelines differed in the grade of recommendation for drug treatment. Anticonvulsants (gabapentin, pregabalin) and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (duloxetine, milnacipran) were strongly recommended by the Canadian and the Israeli guidelines. These drugs received only a weak recommendation by the German guideline. In consideration of CAM-treatments, acupuncture, hypnosis/guided imagery, and Tai Chi were recommended by the German and Israeli guidelines. The Canadian guidelines did not recommend any CAM therapy. Discussion. Recent evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines concur on the importance of treatment tailored to the individual patient and further emphasize the need of self-management strategies (exercise, and psychological techniques).

  18. Exercise after breast cancer treatment: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieli-Conwright CM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Christina M Dieli-Conwright, Breanna Z Orozco Division of Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy, Women's Health and Exercise Laboratory, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Over the past 2 decades, great strides have been made in the field of exercise-oncology research, particularly with breast cancer. This area of research is particularly important since there are >2.8 million breast cancer survivors who are in need of an intervention that can offset treatment-related side effects. Noticeable reductions in physical fitness (ie, cardiopulmonary fitness and muscular strength, negative changes in body composition (ie, increase in body mass, decrease in lean body mass, and increase in fat mass, increased fatigue, depression, or anxiety are some of the common side effects of cancer treatments that negatively impact overall quality of life and increase the risk for the development of comorbidities. Exercise plays a vital role in improving cardiopulmonary function, psychological events, muscular strength, and endurance in breast cancer survivors, and thus should be considered as a key factor of lifestyle intervention to reverse negative treatment-related side effects. The purpose of this review is to address current perspectives on the benefits of aerobic and resistance exercise after breast cancer treatments. This review is focused on the well-established benefits of exercise on physical and emotional well-being, bone health, lymphedema management, and the postulated benefits of exercise on risk reduction for recurrence of breast cancer. Keywords: breast cancer, exercise, physical well-being

  19. Advance Care Planning Documentation in Electronic Health Records: Current Challenges and Recommendations for Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, Daniela; Panariello, Natalie; Henrich, Natalie; Hammes, Bernard; Hanson, Laura C; Meier, Diane E; Guinn, Nancy; Corrigan, Janet; Hubber, Sean; Luetke-Stahlman, Hannah; Block, Susan

    2018-04-01

    To develop a set of clinically relevant recommendations to improve the state of advance care planning (ACP) documentation in the electronic health record (EHR). Advance care planning (ACP) is a key process that supports goal-concordant care. For preferences to be honored, clinicians must be able to reliably record, find, and use ACP documentation. However, there are no standards to guide ACP documentation in the electronic health record (EHR). We interviewed 21 key informants to understand the strengths and weaknesses of EHR documentation systems for ACP and identify best practices. We analyzed these interviews using a qualitative content analysis approach and subsequently developed a preliminary set of recommendations. These recommendations were vetted and refined in a second round of input from a national panel of content experts. Informants identified six themes regarding current inadequacies in documentation and accessibility of ACP information and opportunities for improvement. We offer a set of concise, clinically relevant recommendations, informed by expert opinion, to improve the state of ACP documentation in the EHR.

  20. Obesity prevention, screening, and treatment: practices of pediatric providers since the 2007 expert committee recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, John Conrad; Perito, Emily Rothbaum; Hametz, Patricia

    2011-05-01

    This study surveyed pediatric primary care providers at a major academic center regarding their attitudes and practices of obesity screening, prevention, and treatment. The authors compared the care providers' reported practices to the 2007 American Medical Association and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Expert Committee Recommendations to evaluate their adherence to the guidelines and differences based on level of training and specialty. Of 96 providers surveyed, less than half used the currently recommended criteria for identifying children who are overweight (24.7%) and obese (34.4%), with attendings more likely to use the correct criteria than residents (P obesity, the majority felt their counseling was not effective. There was considerable variability in reported practices of lab screening and referral patterns of overweight and obese children. More efforts are needed to standardize providers' approach to overweight and obese children.

  1. Consensus Recommendations for Treatment Strategies in Indians Using Botulinum Toxin and Hyaluronic Acid Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishan Mohan Kapoor, MCh, DNB

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions:. These recommendations give physicians treating Indians worldwide a better understanding of their unique facial characteristics and provide treatment strategies to achieve optimal aesthetic outcomes.

  2. Current and future treatment options in osteoporosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brewer, Linda

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: The incidence of osteoporosis-related fractures will increase substantially over the coming decades as the population ages globally. This has important economic and public health implications, contributing substantially to morbidity and excess mortality in this population. METHODS: When prescribing for older patients the effectiveness profile of drugs needs to be balanced against their tolerability in individual patients. RESULTS: Currently we have good anti-fracture data to support the use of many available anti-resorptive and anabolic drugs including bisphosphonates, strontium ranelate and recombinant human parathyroid hormone. We also have evidence to demonstrate the importance of calcium and vitamin D repletion in these patients. However, in recent years our understanding of normal bone physiology and the mechanisms underlying the development of osteoporosis has significantly advanced and this has led to the development of new therapies. Novel agents, particularly denosumab, but also inhibitors of cathepsin K and anabolic agents that act on Wnt signalling, will increase the therapeutic options for clinicians in the coming years. CONCLUSION: This review discusses the evidence supporting the use of currently available treatment options for osteoporosis and potential future advances in drug therapy. Particular consideration should be given when prescribing for certain older patients who have issues with compliance or tolerance and also in those with co-morbidities or levels of frailty that may restrict the choice of therapy. Understanding the evidence for the benefit and possible harm of osteoporosis treatments is critical to appropriate management of this patient population.

  3. Perspectives on Current Training Guidelines for Cardiac Imaging and Recommendations for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, James A; Kilic, Sena; Haines, Philip G

    2018-04-23

    To summarize current training guidelines for cardiac imaging and provide recommendations for future guidelines. The current structure of training in cardiac imaging is largely dictated by modality-specific guidelines. While there has been debate on how to define the advanced cardiac imager for over a decade, a uniform consensus has not emerged. We report the perspectives of three key stakeholders in this debate: a senior faculty member-former fellowship program director, a cardiology fellow, and an academic junior faculty imaging expert. The observations of these stakeholders suggest that there is no consensus on the definition of advanced cardiac imaging, leading to ambiguity in training guidelines. This may have negative impact on recruitment of fellows into cardiac imaging careers. Based on the current status of training in cardiac imaging, the authors suggest that the relevant professional groups reconvene to form a consensus in defining advanced cardiac imaging, in order to guide future revisions of training guidelines.

  4. Current status in diabetic macular edema treatments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pedro; Romero-Aroca

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a serious chronic condition,which increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases,kidney failure and nerve damage leading to amputation.Furthermore the ocular complications include diabetic macular edema,is the leading cause of blindness among adults in the industrialized countries.Today,blindness from diabetic macular edema is largely preventable with timely detection and appropriate interventional therapy.The treatment should include an optimized control of glycemia,arterial tension,lipids and renal status.The photocoagulation laser is currently restricted to focal macular edema in some countries,but due the high cost of intravitreal drugs,the use of laser treatment for focal and diffuse diabetic macular edema(DME),can be valid as gold standard in many countries.The intravitreal anti vascular endothelial growth factor drugs(ranibizumab and bevacizumab),are indicated in the treatment of all types of DME,but the correct protocol for administration should be defined for the different Retina Scientific Societies.The corticosteroids for diffuse DME,has a place in pseudophakic patients,but its complications restricted the use of these drugs for some patients.Finally the intravitreal interface plays an important role and its exploration is mandatory in all DME patients.

  5. Current treatment paradigms in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, J F

    2000-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has traditionally been treated using the pyramid approach, in which non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the first-line treatment and disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are introduced relatively late in the disease. This approach is no longer valid. Previously regarded as a benign disease, RA is now recognized as causing substantial morbidity and mortality, as do the NSAIDs used in treatment. DMARDs are more effective in controlling the pain and disability of RA than NSAIDs, and are often no more toxic. The current treatment paradigm emphasizes early, consistent use of DMARDs. A 'sawtooth' strategy of DMARD use has been proposed, in which a rising but low level of disability triggers a change in therapy. Determining the most clinically useful DMARD combinations and the optimal sequence of DMARD use requires effectiveness studies, Bayesian approaches and analyses of long-term outcomes. Such approaches will allow optimization of multiple drug therapies in RA, and should substantially improve the long-term outcome for many patients.

  6. Current status and prospects of HIV treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihlar, Tomas; Fordyce, Marshall

    2016-06-01

    Current antiviral treatments can reduce HIV-associated morbidity, prolong survival, and prevent HIV transmission. Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) containing preferably three active drugs from two or more classes is required for durable virologic suppression. Regimen selection is based on virologic efficacy, potential for adverse effects, pill burden and dosing frequency, drug-drug interaction potential, resistance test results, comorbid conditions, social status, and cost. With prolonged virologic suppression, improved clinical outcomes, and longer survival, patients will be exposed to antiretroviral agents for decades. Therefore, maximizing the safety and tolerability of cART is a high priority. Emergence of resistance and/or lack of tolerability in individual patients require availability of a range of treatment options. Development of new drugs is focused on improving safety (e.g. tenofovir alafenamide) and/or resistance profile (e.g. doravirine) within the existing drug classes, combination therapies with improved adherence (e.g. single-tablet regimens), novel mechanisms of action (e.g. attachment inhibitors, maturation inhibitors, broadly neutralizing antibodies), and treatment simplification with infrequent dosing (e.g. long-acting injectables). In parallel with cART innovations, research and development efforts focused on agents that target persistent HIV reservoirs may lead to prolonged drug-free remission and HIV cure. Copyright © 2016 Gilead Sciences, Inc. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Treatment of Childhood and Adolescent Obesity: An Integrative Review of Recent Recommendations from Five Expert Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschenbaum, Daniel S.; Gierut, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare and contrast 5 sets of expert recommendations about the treatment of childhood and adolescent obesity. Method: We reviewed 5 sets of recent expert recommendations: 2007 health care organizations' four stage model, 2007 Canadian clinical practice guidelines, 2008 Endocrine Society recommendations, 2009 seven step model, and…

  8. PREVALENCE OF MULTIPLE ADDICTIONS AND CURRENT TREATMENT BY DRUG TREATMENT CENTRES IN DURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keen, Helen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Substance-use disorders (SUD cause severe problems both globally and locally. Research suggests that multiple addictions create a more complex illness. This study investigated whether in-patients admitted for SUD at three drug treatment centres in Durban, South Africa had other, undiagnosed addictions. It utilised a three-phase concurrent mixed-methods design and initially screened for gambling and sex addiction. Results showed that, of the sample of 123 participants, 54% had either sex or gambling and 24% had both addictions which current treatment programmes neither assessed for nor treated. Recommendations include suggestions to update current assessment and treatment approaches and the need to train professional staff at drug treatment centres.

  9. Do current national and international guidelines have specific recommendations for older adults with bipolar disorder? A brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dols, Annemiek; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Strejilevich, Sergio A; Rej, Soham; Tsai, Shang-Ying; Gildengers, Ariel G; Almeida, Osvaldo P; Shulman, Kenneth I; Sajatovic, Martha

    2016-12-01

    Older adults with bipolar disorder (OABD) are a growing segment of patients with bipolar disorder (BD) for which specific guidelines are warranted. Although, OABD are frequently excluded from randomized controlled trials due to their age or somatic comorbidity, more treatment data from a variety of sources have become available in recent years. It is expected that at least some of this emerging information on OABD would be incorporated into treatment guidelines available to clinicians around the world. The International Society of Bipolar Disorders OABD task force compiled and compared recommendations from current national and international guidelines that specifically address geriatric or older individuals with BD (from year 2005 onwards). There were 34 guidelines, representing six continents and 19 countries. The majority of guidelines had no separate section on OABD. General principles for treating OABD with medication are recommended to be similar to those for younger adults, with special caution for side effects due to somatic comorbidity and concomitant medications. Therapeutic lithium serum levels are suggested to be lower but recommendations are very general and mostly not informed by specific research evidence. There is a lack of emphasis of OABD-specific issues in existing guidelines. Given the substantial clinical heterogeneity in BD across the life span, along with the rapidly expanding population of older individuals worldwide, and limited mental health workforce with geriatric expertise, it is critical that additional effort and resources be devoted to studying treatment interventions specific to OABD and that treatment guidelines reflect research findings. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. [RECOMMENDATION FOR EVALUATION AND TREATMENT OF CHRONIC URTICARIA - THE ISRAELI ASSOCIATION FOR ALLERGY AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin Agmon, Nancy; Kessel, Aharon; Maoz Segal, Ramit; Rottem, Menachem; Tal, Yuval; Confino-Cohen, Ronit; Tobi, Elias

    2017-06-01

    Chronic urticaria is a disease manifested by a pruritic rash lasting longer than 6 weeks that may severely affect quality of life and daily function. Chronic urticaria can be further divided into chronic spontaneous urticaria which appears without a trigger and chronic inducible urticaria which evolves following distinct physical triggers. These two clinical manifestations could coexist in the same patient. The pathogenesis of chronic urticaria is not fully elucidated, although it is considered an autoimmune disease in at least 50% patients that produce auto- IgG antibodies targeted against the high affinity Fc receptor and to a lesser extent against IgE itself. Auto-antibodies associated with different autoimmune diseases can be detected such as those directed at thyroid proteins. Urticaria tends to spontaneously resolve in 50% of patients within the first year while others will suffer from it for a much longer period of time. The treatment of chronic urticaria has dramatically progressed in the last decade, enabling reduction of systemic corticosteroid use which has been the cornerstone of treatment in the past. The recommended treatment for chronic urticaria is currently based on a stepwise approach that enables achieving disease control with a reasonably good quality of life. The first step of the treatment ladder consists of selective, new generation, anti-H1 histamine blockers, which do not cross the blood brain barrier, starting from the recommended dose (first line) and increasing up to four-fold (second line). The third line of treatment is the addition of immune modulators such as leukotriene receptor blockers (Singulair), anti-IgE biological therapy (Xolair), or cyclosporine. In this review we present the updates and considerations arising during evaluation and treatment of chronic urticaria. The need for specific tests, immunologist/allergologist evaluation, as well as treatment modalities taking into consideration the large body of evidence that has

  11. Current treatment of dyslipidaemia: PCSK9 inhibitors and statin intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinas, Konstantinos; Wilhelm, Matthias; Windecker, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Statins are the cornerstone of the management of dyslipidaemias and prevention of cardiovascular disease. Although statins are, overall, safe and well tolerated, adverse events can occur and constitute an important barrier to maintaining long-term adherence to statin treatment. In patients who cannot tolerate statins, alternative treatments include switch to another statin, intermittent-dosage regimens and non-statin lipid-lowering medications. Nonetheless, a high proportion of statin-intolerant patients are unable to achieve recommended low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol goals, thereby resulting in substantial residual cardiovascular risk. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a protease implicated in LDL receptor degradation and plays a central role in cholesterol metabolism. In recent studies, PCSK9 inhibition by means of monoclonal antibodies achieved LDL cholesterol reductions of 50% to 70% across various patient populations and background lipid-lowering therapies, while maintaining a favourable safety profile. The efficacy and safety of the monoclonal antibodies alirocumab and evolocumab were confirmed in statin-intolerant patients, indicating that PCSK9 inhibitors represent an attractive treatment option in this challenging clinical setting. PCSK9 inhibitors recently received regulatory approval for clinical use and may be considered in properly selected patients according to current consensus documents, including patients with statin intolerance. In this review we summarise current evidence regarding diagnostic evaluation of statin-related adverse events, particularly statin-associated muscle symptoms, and we discuss current recommendations on the management of statin-intolerant patients. In view of emerging evidence of the efficacy and safety of PCSK9 inhibitors, we further discuss the role of monoclonal PCSK9 antibodies in the management of statin-intolerant hypercholesterolaemic patients.

  12. Parastomal hernia - current knowledge and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styliński, Roman; Alzubedi, Adam; Rudzki, Sławomir

    2018-03-01

    Intestinal stoma creation is one of the most common surgical procedures. The most common long-term complication following stoma creation is parastomal hernia, which according to some authors is practically unavoidable. Statistical differences of its occurrence are mainly due to patient observation time and evaluation criteria. Consequently, primary prevention methods such as placement of prosthetic mesh and newly developed minimally invasive methods of stoma creation are used. It seems that in the light of evidence-based medicine, the best way to treat parastomal hernia is the one that the surgeon undertaking therapy is the most experienced in and is suited to the individuality of each patient, his condition and comorbidities. As a general rule, reinforcing the abdominal wall with a prosthetic mesh is the treatment of choice, with a low rate of complications and relapses over a long period of time. The current trend is to use lightweight, large pore meshes.

  13. Assessment of current NRC/IE professional training program and recommendations for improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartley, H.J.; Hagerup, J.E.; Harrison, O.J.; Heyer, F.H.K.; Kaas, I.W.; Schwartz, E.G.

    1978-05-01

    This document is the General Research Corporation (GRC) report on Task III: to assess the current NRC/IE professional training program and to provide recommendations for improvement. The major objectives of this task were to determine the overall effectiveness of the NRC/IE training program and to provide recommendations for improvements where appropriate. The research involved a review of course manuals and of student critiques, observation in the classroom and person to person interviews; it also included an evaluation of the assignment of instructors to the Career Management Branch. Findings addressed refresher training, retread training and initial training--with emphasis on the last of these. Conclusions are that: (1) The curriculum provides, in general, types and levels of training needed; (2) the mix of training methods used is correct; and (3) the training management is effective. However, the training facilities do not reflect a commitment to quality instruction nor is assignment as instructor to the Career Management Branch attractive to inspectors. Recommendations presented in the report are based upon the findings; all lie within the implementing authority of Headquarters NRC/IE

  14. Current status on preparation of dose conversion factors based on 1990 ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Michio

    1996-01-01

    The current status of arrangement of dose conversion factors for operational quantities are explained on the basis of 1995 ICRP-ICRU recommendations. The dose conversion factors of photon, neutron and electron were recommended by ICRP Publ. 74. It's contents are described. The relation between new dose conversion factors and the laws in connection with protecting radiation are explained. The dose conversion factors of 1 cm-, 3 mm- and 70 μm - dose equivalent which were introduced into the laws connected therewith in Japan are accepted the same values of ICRP Publ. 51 for photon and neutron. I mentioned the points of discussing about new dose conversion factors which are expected to be recommended. The laws have to show the dose conversion factors to be used by calculation and estimation of radiation shield, etc. The limit of energy of ICRU individual dose equivalent for photon is now until 1 MeV, but the value is insufficient and necessary to 10 MeV as same as the ambient dose equivalent in due consideration of atomic energy facilities. JAERI is preparing these dose conversion factors now. (S.Y.)

  15. Mycoplasma genitalium infections: current treatment options and resistance issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sethi S

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sunil Sethi, Kamran Zaman, Neha Jain Department of Medical Microbiology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India Abstract: Mycoplasma genitalium is one of the important causes of non-gonococcal urethritis. Rising incidence and emerging antimicrobial resistance are a major concern these days. The poor clinical outcomes with doxycycline therapy led to the use of azithromycin as the primary drug of choice. Single-dose azithromycin regimen over a period of time was changed to extended regimen following studies showing better clinical cures and less risk of resistance development. However, emerging macrolide resistance, either due to transmission of resistance or drug pressure has further worsened the management of this infection. The issues of drug resistance and treatment failures also exist in cases of M. genitalium infection. At present, the emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR M. genitalium strains is an alarming sign for its treatment and the associated public health impact due to its complications. However, newer drugs like pristinamycin, solithromycin, sitafloxacin, and others have shown a hope for the clinical cure, but need further clinical trials to optimize the therapeutic dosing schedules and formulate appropriate treatment regimens. Rampant and inappropriate use of these newer drugs will further sabotage future attempts to manage MDR strains. There is currently a need to formulate diagnostic algorithms and etiology-based treatment regimens rather than the syndromic approach, preferably using combination therapy instead of a monotherapy. Awareness about the current guidelines and recommended treatment regimens among clinicians and local practitioners is of utmost importance. Antimicrobial resistance testing and global surveillance are required to assess the efficacy of current treatment regimens and for guiding future research for the early detection and management of MDR M. genitalium infections

  16. Pressure ulcers: Current understanding and newer modalities of treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surajit Bhattacharya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the mechanism, symptoms, causes, severity, diagnosis, prevention and present recommendations for surgical as well as non-surgical management of pressure ulcers. Particular focus has been placed on the current understandings and the newer modalities for the treatment of pressure ulcers. The paper also covers the role of nutrition and pressure-release devices such as cushions and mattresses as a part of the treatment algorithm for preventing and quick healing process of these wounds. Pressure ulcers develop primarily from pressure and shear; are progressive in nature and most frequently found in bedridden, chair bound or immobile people. They often develop in people who have been hospitalised for a long time generally for a different problem and increase the overall time as well as cost of hospitalisation that have detrimental effects on patient′s quality of life. Loss of sensation compounds the problem manifold, and failure of reactive hyperaemia cycle of the pressure prone area remains the most important aetiopathology. Pressure ulcers are largely preventable in nature, and their management depends on their severity. The available literature about severity of pressure ulcers, their classification and medical care protocols have been described in this paper. The present treatment options include various approaches of cleaning the wound, debridement, optimised dressings, role of antibiotics and reconstructive surgery. The newer treatment options such as negative pressure wound therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, cell therapy have been discussed, and the advantages and disadvantages of current and newer methods have also been described.

  17. Pressure ulcers: Current understanding and newer modalities of treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Surajit; Mishra, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the mechanism, symptoms, causes, severity, diagnosis, prevention and present recommendations for surgical as well as non-surgical management of pressure ulcers. Particular focus has been placed on the current understandings and the newer modalities for the treatment of pressure ulcers. The paper also covers the role of nutrition and pressure-release devices such as cushions and mattresses as a part of the treatment algorithm for preventing and quick healing process of these wounds. Pressure ulcers develop primarily from pressure and shear; are progressive in nature and most frequently found in bedridden, chair bound or immobile people. They often develop in people who have been hospitalised for a long time generally for a different problem and increase the overall time as well as cost of hospitalisation that have detrimental effects on patient's quality of life. Loss of sensation compounds the problem manifold, and failure of reactive hyperaemia cycle of the pressure prone area remains the most important aetiopathology. Pressure ulcers are largely preventable in nature, and their management depends on their severity. The available literature about severity of pressure ulcers, their classification and medical care protocols have been described in this paper. The present treatment options include various approaches of cleaning the wound, debridement, optimised dressings, role of antibiotics and reconstructive surgery. The newer treatment options such as negative pressure wound therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, cell therapy have been discussed, and the advantages and disadvantages of current and newer methods have also been described. PMID:25991879

  18. eHealth in Saudi Arabia: Current Trends, Challenges and Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsulame, Khaled; Khalifa, Mohamed; Househ, Mowafa

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the current status of eHealth in Saudi Arabia from the perspective of health informatics professionals. We used a case study approach and analyzed participant data using thematic analysis. The study took place between July and August 2013. Data collection included interviews with nine senior health information professionals in Saudi Arabia. The findings describe participant views on current eHealth trends in Saudi Arabia and show differences among Saudi healthcare organizations in terms of eHealth adoption. Participants also describe the challenges relating to organizational and cultural issues, end user attitudes towards eHealth projects, and the lack of specialized human resources to implement eHealth systems. Two main recommendations made by the participants were to form a new national body for eHealth and to develop a unified plan for the implementation of Saudi eHealth initiatives.

  19. Methods for culturing retinal pigment epithelial cells: a review of current protocols and future recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron H Fronk

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The retinal pigment epithelium is an important part of the vertebrate eye, particularly in studying the causes and possible treatment of age-related macular degeneration. The retinal pigment epithelium is difficult to access in vivo due to its location at the back of the eye, making experimentation with age-related macular degeneration treatments problematic. An alternative to in vivo experimentation is cultivating the retinal pigment epithelium in vitro, a practice that has been going on since the 1970s, providing a wide range of retinal pigment epithelial culture protocols, each producing cells and tissue of varying degrees of similarity to natural retinal pigment epithelium. The purpose of this review is to provide researchers with a ready list of retinal pigment epithelial protocols, their effects on cultured tissue, and their specific possible applications. Protocols using human and animal retinal pigment epithelium cells, derived from tissue or cell lines, are discussed, and recommendations for future researchers included.

  20. Improving treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders: recommendations based on preclinical studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homberg, J.R.; Kyzar, E.J.; Stewart, A.M.; Nguyen, M; Poudel, M.K.; Echevarria, D.J.; Collier, A.D.; Gaikwad, S.; Klimenko, V.M.; Norton, W.; Pittman, J.; Nakamura, S.; Koshiba, M.; Yamanouchi, H.; Apryatin, S.A.; Scattoni, M.L.; Diamond, D.M.; Ullmann, J.F.; Parker, M.O.; Brown, R.E.; Song, C.; Kalueff, A.V.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) are common and severely debilitating. Their chronic nature and reliance on both genetic and environmental factors makes studying NDDs and their treatment a challenging task. AREAS COVERED: Herein, the authors discuss the neurobiological mechanisms of

  1. Prevention of Backover Fatalities in Highway Work Zones: A Synthesis of Current Practices and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Fan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to synthesize current practices and procedures on the prevention of backing fatalities in highway work zones. First, general work zone safety hazards are reviewed, particularly blind areas are identified. Second, engineering controls currently in use are examined and explained to help understand what steps can be taken to prevent future backing fatalities. Third, administrative controls (including signalers, drivers, and workers-on-foot training are also discussed. Fourth, existing technology controls are reviewed for use in aiding equipment operators in identifying when pedestrian personnel are in dangerous areas around their equipment (i.e., back-up camera, radar. Fifth, recommendations are made based on the comprehensive review of the backover fatality prevention techniques in construction work zones and the conducted testing results of several commercially available systems. Recommendations on engineering and technology controls are discussed, with detailed information such as improving internal traffic control plans, and integrating technology with traffic control plans. Information and drawings are provided to illustrate how to design work zones, and the internal traffic flow diagrams are created using the integrated technology available, and site specific characteristics. The drawings represent examples of using different types of technology, in different scenarios using the proper legend, as well as using the proper general and technology notes to help explain the traffic control plan, ensuring that full comprehension is made. Recommendations on administrative controls are also given such as how to conduct safety meetings, electing safety officers, how to set regulations and guidelines for workers, and how to handle training. Training should be used as a backover fatality prevention method for pedestrian workers, flaggers, spotters, and equipment operators. Finally, a summary and discussion of future research

  2. Feedback from physical activity monitors is not compatible with current recommendations: A recalibration study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Dylan; Batterham, Alan M; Peacock, Oliver J; Western, Max J; Booso, Rahuman

    2016-10-01

    Wearable devices to self-monitor physical activity have become popular with individuals and healthcare practitioners as a route to the prevention of chronic disease. It is not currently possible to reconcile feedback from these devices with activity recommendations because the guidelines refer to the amount of activity required on top of normal lifestyle activities (e.g., 150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous intensity activity per week over-and-above normal moderate-to-vigorous lifestyle activities). The aim of this study was to recalibrate the feedback from self-monitoring. We pooled data from four studies conducted between 2006 and 2014 in patients and volunteers from the community that included both sophisticated measures of physical activity and 10-year risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes (n=305). We determined the amount of moderate-to-vigorous intensity activity that corresponded to FAO/WHO/UNU guidance for a required PAL of 1.75 (Total Energy Expenditure/Basal Metabolic Rate). Our results show that, at the UK median PAL, total moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity will be around 735 minutes per week (~11% of waking time). We estimate that a 4% increase in moderate-to-vigorous intensity activity will achieve standardised guidance from FAO/WHO/UNU and will require ~1000 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous intensity activity per week. This study demonstrates that feedback from sophisticated wearable devices is incompatible with current physical activity recommendations. Without adjustment, people will erroneously form the view that they are exceeding recommendations by several fold. A more appropriate target from self-monitoring that accounts for normal moderate-to-vigorous lifestyle activities is ~1000 minutes per week, which represents ~15% of waking time. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Recommendations of diagnosis and treatment of pleural effusion. Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villena Garrido, Victoria; Cases Viedma, Enrique; Fernández Villar, Alberto; de Pablo Gafas, Alicia; Pérez Rodríguez, Esteban; Porcel Pérez, José Manuel; Rodríguez Panadero, Francisco; Ruiz Martínez, Carlos; Salvatierra Velázquez, Angel; Valdés Cuadrado, Luis

    2014-06-01

    Although during the last few years there have been several important changes in the diagnostic or therapeutic methods, pleural effusion is still one of the diseases that the respiratory specialist have to evaluate frequently. The aim of this paper is to update the knowledge about pleural effusions, rather than to review the causes of pleural diseases exhaustively. These recommendations have a longer extension for the subjects with a direct clinical usefulness, but a slight update of other pleural diseases has been also included. Among the main scientific advantages are included the thoracic ultrasonography, the intrapleural fibrinolytics, the pleurodesis agents, or the new pleural drainages techniques. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. In touch with psoriasis: topical treatments and current guidelines.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, G

    2012-02-01

    This article describes topical therapies and treatment guidelines for psoriasis and is based on a presentation given by the authors at a satellite symposium held during the 19th Congress of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, 6-10 October, 2010, in Gothenburg, Sweden. The highly variable nature of psoriasis and its individual presentation in patients can make it difficult to choose the most appropriate treatment. There are many treatment options, from topical treatment with emollients for very mild psoriasis, to systemic therapy with fumaric acid esters, methotrexate or biologics for severe disease. For the treatment of mild-to-moderate psoriasis, topical therapy is generally the most appropriate and a variety of options, both historical and recent, are available. Newer therapies offer greater convenience and fewer side-effects. Of the more recently available therapies, vitamin D analogues and topical corticosteroids are the two with the greatest proven efficacy in randomized clinical trials. A recent Cochrane review showed the highest efficacy overall with the fixed combination vitamin D analogue (calcipotriol) and corticosteroid (betamethasone dipropionate). Indeed, clinical trials have shown that two-compound calcipotriol\\/betamethasone dipropionate ointment has higher efficacy than calcipotriol or betamethasone dipropionate alone. With regard to safety, two-compound calcipotriol\\/betamethasone dipropionate was shown to be suitable for intermittent long-term treatment of mild-to-moderate psoriasis. The findings of the Cochrane review are reflected in the current treatment guidelines from the USA and Germany regarding the treatment of mild-to-moderate psoriasis. In both these guidelines, which will be discussed in this article, the recommended treatments for this patient group are vitamin D analogues and corticosteroids, particularly when used in combination.

  5. In touch with psoriasis: topical treatments and current guidelines.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, G

    2011-06-01

    This article describes topical therapies and treatment guidelines for psoriasis and is based on a presentation given by the authors at a satellite symposium held during the 19th Congress of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, 6-10 October, 2010, in Gothenburg, Sweden. The highly variable nature of psoriasis and its individual presentation in patients can make it difficult to choose the most appropriate treatment. There are many treatment options, from topical treatment with emollients for very mild psoriasis, to systemic therapy with fumaric acid esters, methotrexate or biologics for severe disease. For the treatment of mild-to-moderate psoriasis, topical therapy is generally the most appropriate and a variety of options, both historical and recent, are available. Newer therapies offer greater convenience and fewer side-effects. Of the more recently available therapies, vitamin D analogues and topical corticosteroids are the two with the greatest proven efficacy in randomized clinical trials. A recent Cochrane review showed the highest efficacy overall with the fixed combination vitamin D analogue (calcipotriol) and corticosteroid (betamethasone dipropionate). Indeed, clinical trials have shown that two-compound calcipotriol\\/betamethasone dipropionate ointment has higher efficacy than calcipotriol or betamethasone dipropionate alone. With regard to safety, two-compound calcipotriol\\/betamethasone dipropionate was shown to be suitable for intermittent long-term treatment of mild-to-moderate psoriasis. The findings of the Cochrane review are reflected in the current treatment guidelines from the USA and Germany regarding the treatment of mild-to-moderate psoriasis. In both these guidelines, which will be discussed in this article, the recommended treatments for this patient group are vitamin D analogues and corticosteroids, particularly when used in combination.

  6. Femoral head injuries: Which treatment strategy can be recommended?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henle, Philipp; Kloen, Peter; Siebenrock, Klaus A.

    2007-01-01

    Despite different operative and non-operative treatment regimens, the outcome after femoral head fractures has changed little over the past decades. The initial trauma itself as well as secondary changes such as posttraumatic osteoarthritis, avascular necrosis or heterotopic ossification is often

  7. New and current preventive treatment options in actinic keratosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenberger, P; Arenbergerova, M

    2017-09-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is a characteristic skin lesion on skin areas of subjects with mainly phototype I and phototype II, or with specific genetic factors and who are exposed to prolonged ultraviolet radiation. AK may be considered a precursor of in situ squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), a type of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). However, it is still not possible to predict which AK lesions will develop into SCC. Early treatment of AK is therefore recommended. Despite the increasing number of patients with AK developing into SCC, to date, there is still no clear suggestion of therapeutic strategy for AK. Current treatment consists of a multitude of topical lesion-directed or field-directed therapies or a combination of both. Recently, orally administered nicotinamide has shown to significantly reduce rates of new NMSC and AK in high-risk patients. This study aims to provide an update on the most relevant information about AK and to provide an insight into current and new treatment options. © 2017 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  8. Recommendations for severe hypertriglyceridemia treatment, are there new strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippatos, Theodosios D; Elisaf, Moses S

    2014-01-01

    This review considers drug combinations and newer treatment strategies for patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia is associated with an atherogenic metabolic profile and in most studies with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia also have increased incidence of pancreatitis. All types of severe hypertriglyceridemia are associated with a reduction in lipoprotein lipase activity. Patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia and abdominal pain or pancreatitis should be hospitalized and treated with hypolipidemic drugs and, if needed, with insulin/dextrose infusion or therapeutic apheresis. Fibrates are the first-line treatment in patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia. Omega-3 fatty acids and niacin are very useful drugs for patients with hypertriglyceridemia. Statins in high doses exhibit a significant hypotriglyceridemic activity. Drugs that interfere with chylomicron production such as orlistat are also useful for hypertriglyceridemic patients. In most patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia drug combinations are needed to maintain an acceptable triglyceride concentration. Gene therapy is under development for patients with known genetic abnormalities of triglyceride metabolism. Clinicians should be vigilant for the recognition and prompt treatment of patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia aimed to avoid the serious complication of pancreatitis and to reduce their cardiovascular risk.

  9. Contrast media for fluoroscopic examinations of the GI and GU tracts: current challenges and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federle, Michael P; Jaffe, Tracy A; Davis, Peter L; Al-Hawary, Mahmoud M; Levine, Marc S

    2017-01-01

    One of the significant challenges facing radiologists who perform and interpret studies of the gastrointestinal and genitourinary systems have been periodic interruptions in the availability of barium and iodinated contrast media specially formulated for gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) studies. These interruptions are due to the US Food and Drug Administration's recent requirement for more stringent documentation of the safety and efficacy of contrast media and the consolidation among contrast manufacturers. Therefore, radiologists may be required to recommend an alternative means of evaluation, such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance, or endoscopy, or they may need to substitute a different formulation of a contrast agent not specifically developed for GI or GU use, for example the utilization of an agent designed and marketed for vascular use. This article reviews the current status of fluoroscopic contrast media, and provides suggestions and recommendations for the optimal and alternative use of contrast media formulations.

  10. Panel: Current Status of Knowledge and Recommendations for Further Related Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldarola, L.; Costa, J.; Fauske, Hans K.; Jakeman, D.; Mizuta, H.; Wright, R.W.; Stadie, K.B.

    1976-01-01

    This Panel consists of two parts, in the first part the participants attempt to summarise their views on the current status and knowledge of SFI and its importance for the LMFBR safety case and in the second part they try to agree on recommendations for future actions. The first question tackled was: what progress has been made since the Ispra meeting which was a little over two years ago - in answering the question: 'what role does SFI play in LMFBR safety'? The second question approached was: 'Is it possible to identify SFI areas which are not yet covered by the present research and development programme? Finally 4 recommendations were proposed: 1. to have another meeting of the same nature as this one and the previous ones in two years' time; 2. to create a group dealing with the fundamental science with a view to further the safety of the LMFBR. This group would meet more regularly and would not require, and that is the important thing, approval from-CSNI every time it meets; 3. to discontinue the group on calculational models; 4. to publish at least one to two newsletters between this SFI meeting and the next SFI meeting in two years

  11. Recommended treatment strategies for patients with excessive daytime sleepiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Russell P

    2015-10-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is a common and bothersome phenomenon. It can be associated with insufficient sleep syndrome, narcolepsy, idiopathic hypersomnia, obstructive sleep apnea, shift work disorder, Kleine-Levin syndrome, or Parkinson's disease. Once the underlying cause of the excessive sleepiness is determined, clinicians must select the most appropriate behavioral and pharmacologic interventions to reduce daytime sleepiness, alleviate other symptoms, improve functioning, and ensure the safety of patients and those around them. Patient history, adverse effects, and efficacy in specific conditions should be considered in pharmacologic treatment options for patients with EDS. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  12. Newborn screening for proximal urea cycle disorders: Current evidence supporting recommendations for newborn screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, J Lawrence; Brody, Linnea L; Pino, Gisele; Rinaldo, Piero

    2018-04-20

    Current newborn screening (NBS) for urea cycle disorders (UCD) is incomplete as only distal UCDs are included in most NBS programs by measuring elevated amino acid concentrations. NBS for the proximal UCDs involves the detection in NBS spots of low citrulline values, a finding which is often overlooked because it is considered to be inadequate. We retrospectively analyzed NBS blood spots from known UCD patients comparing the utility of the Region 4 Stork (R4S) interpretive tools to conventional cutoff based interpretation. This study shows the utility of R4S tools in detecting all UCDs, and provides evidence to support the nomination to add proximal UCDs to the recommended uniform screening panel. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Business intelligence and data warehouse programs in higher education institutions: current status and recommendations for improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Marinova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to explore the current situation and the main challenges in existing Business Intelligence (BI and Data Warehouse (DW curricula. On the base of this research, certain recommendations for their improvement are made. At the same time, the paper gives concrete guidelines for the development of a clear and comprehensive graduate profile with knowledge, skills and social competence in the field of BI and DW. This is particularly beneficial for universities and other higher education institutions, that seek to offer courses with high quality content and tendencies, adequate to the latest education, in the concerned area. The paper is written within the Erasmus plus KA2 project “Developing the innovative methodology of teaching Business Informatics” (DIMBI, 2015-1-PL01-KA203-0016636.

  14. Current recommendations for the study of carotid stenosis by doppler ultrasound and other imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Matamoros, Angelica

    2012-01-01

    Ischemic cerebrovascular disease has been one of the most frequent causes of death from chronic disease, as well as cause of long-term disabilities, in both the United States, and in Latin American countries during recent years. It is therefore, important to know about it. An updated review of international recommendations to the Costa Rican health system is performed for carotid imaging study in patients at risk of accidents and ischemic cerebrovascular disease; with special emphasis on carotid Doppler ultrasonography, due to its wide availability in the medical field Costa Rican. Furthermore, certain relevant concepts of other imaging techniques currently available are listed to determine the appropriate choice of each method according to the individual patient's condition, such as conventional angiography and tomographic angiography [es

  15. The Schizophrenia Patient Outcomes Research Team (PORT): updated treatment recommendations 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreyenbuhl, Julie; Buchanan, Robert W; Dickerson, Faith B; Dixon, Lisa B

    2010-01-01

    The Schizophrenia Patient Outcomes Research Team (PORT) project has played a significant role in the development and dissemination of evidence-based practices for schizophrenia. In contrast to other clinical guidelines, the Schizophrenia PORT Treatment Recommendations, initially published in 1998 and first revised in 2003, are based primarily on empirical data. Over the last 5 years, research on psychopharmacologic and psychosocial treatments for schizophrenia has continued to evolve, warranting an update of the PORT recommendations. In consultation with expert advisors, 2 Evidence Review Groups (ERGs) identified 41 treatment areas for review and conducted electronic literature searches to identify all clinical studies published since the last PORT literature review. The ERGs also reviewed studies preceding 2002 in areas not covered by previous PORT reviews, including smoking cessation, substance abuse, and weight loss. The ERGs reviewed over 600 studies and synthesized the research evidence, producing recommendations for those treatments for which the evidence was sufficiently strong to merit recommendation status. For those treatments lacking empirical support, the ERGs produced parallel summary statements. An Expert Panel consisting of 39 schizophrenia researchers, clinicians, and consumers attended a conference in November 2008 in which consensus was reached on the state of the evidence for each of the treatment areas reviewed. The methods and outcomes of the update process are presented here and resulted in recommendations for 16 psychopharmacologic and 8 psychosocial treatments for schizophrenia. Another 13 psychopharmacologic and 4 psychosocial treatments had insufficient evidence to support a recommendation, representing significant unmet needs in important treatment domains.

  16. Feeding practices of low-income mothers: how do they compare to current recommendations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Thomas G; Hughes, Sheryl O; Goodell, L Suzanne; Johnson, Susan L; Duran, J Andrea Jaramillo; Williams, Kimberly; Beck, Ashley D; Frankel, Leslie A

    2015-03-07

    Despite a growing consensus on the feeding practices associated with healthy eating patterns, few observational studies of maternal feeding practices with young children have been conducted, especially in low-income populations. The aim of this study was to provide such data on a low income sample to determine the degree to which observed maternal feeding practices compare with current recommendations. Eighty low-income mothers and their preschool children were videotaped at dinner in their homes. Mothers were chosen from a larger study to create a 2 X 2 X 2 design: maternal ethnicity (African American vs. Latina) by child gender by child weight status (healthy weight vs. overweight/obese). Observers coded videotapes for a range of maternal feeding strategies and other behaviors. Many mothers spent considerable time encouraging eating--often in spite of the child's insistence that he or she was finished. Mothers talked little about food characteristics, rarely referred to feelings of hunger and fullness, and made more attempts to enforce table manners than to teach eating skills. Latina mothers showed higher levels of teaching eating skills and encouraging their children to eat; African American mothers showed higher levels of enforcing table manners and getting children to clear their plates. Mothers of boys used more unelaborated commands and less questions/suggestions than mothers of girls. Finally, compared to mothers of overweight/obese children, mothers of healthy weight children showed higher levels of encouraging eating and lower levels of discouraging eating. Most of the mothers in this study did not engage in feeding practices that are consistent with current recommendations. They did this, despite the fact that they knew they were being observed. These results should be used to inform future research about the motivations behind mothers' feeding practices and the development of interventions by helping identify areas in greatest need of change.

  17. Fever and Pain Management in Childhood: Healthcare Providers’ and Parents’ Adherence to Current Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genny Raffaeli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the adherence of healthcare providers and parents to the current recommendations concerning fever and pain management, randomized samples of 500 healthcare providers caring for children and 500 families were asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire. The 378 health care providers (HCPs responding to the survey (75.6% included 144 primary care pediatricians (38.1%, 98 hospital pediatricians (25.9%, 62 pediatric residents (16.4%, and 71 pediatric nurses (19.6%; the 464 responding parents (92.8% included 175 whose youngest (or only child was ≤5 years old (37.7%, 175 whose youngest (or only child was aged 6–10 years (37.7%, and 114 whose youngest (or only child was aged 11–14 years (24.6%. There were gaps in the knowledge of both healthcare providers and parents. Global adherence to the guidelines was lower among the pediatric nurses than the other healthcare providers (odds ratio 0.875; 95% confidence interval 0.795–0.964. Among the parents, those of children aged 6–10 and 11–14 years old, those who were older, and those without a degree answered the questions correctly significantly less frequently than the others. These findings suggest that there is an urgent need to improve the dissemination of the current recommendations concerning fever and pain management among healthcare providers and parents in order to avoid mistaken and sometimes risky attitudes, common therapeutic errors, and the unnecessary overloading of emergency department resources. Pediatric nurses and parents with older children, those who are older, and those with a lower educational level should be the priority targets of educational programmes.

  18. Pain in Fabry Disease: Practical Recommendations for Diagnosis and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politei, Juan M; Bouhassira, Didier; Germain, Dominique P; Goizet, Cyril; Guerrero-Sola, Antonio; Hilz, Max J; Hutton, Elspeth J; Karaa, Amel; Liguori, Rocco; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Zeltzer, Lonnie K; Burlina, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    Patients with Fabry disease (FD) characteristically develop peripheral neuropathy at an early age, with pain being a crucial symptom of underlying pathology. However, the diagnosis of pain is challenging due to the heterogeneous and nonspecific symptoms. Practical guidance on the diagnosis and management of pain in FD is needed. In 2014, experts met to discuss recent advances on this topic and update clinical guidance. Emerging disease-specific tools, including FabryScan, Fabry-specific Pediatric Health and Pain Questionnaire, and Würzburg Fabry Pain Questionnaire, and more general tools like the Total Symptom Score can aid diagnosis, characterization, and monitoring of pain in patients with FD. These tools can be complemented by more objective and quantifiable sensory testing. In male and female patients of any age, pain related to FD can be an early indication to start disease-specific enzyme replacement therapy before potentially irreversible organ damage to the kidneys, heart, or brain occurs. To improve treatment outcomes, pain should be diagnosed early in unrecognized or newly identified FD patients. Treatment should include: (a) enzyme replacement therapy controlling the progression of underlying pathology; (b) adjunctive, symptomatic pain management with analgesics for chronic neuropathic and acute nociceptive, and inflammatory or mixed pain; and (c) lifestyle modifications. © 2016 The Authors. CNS Neuroscience & Therapeutics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Utility of the Canadian Treatment Optimization Recommendations (TOR) in MS care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grand'Maison, François; Bhan, Virender; Freedman, Mark S; Myles, Mary L; Patry, David G; Selchen, Daniel H; Moriarty, Patrick; Traboulsee, Anthony L

    2013-07-01

    Criteria for Treatment Optimization Recommendations (TOR) for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) identify suboptimal response to disease-modifying treatment (DMT). The Canadian TOR (CanTOR) were used to indicate recommendations for treatment switches or treatment maintenance based on relapse, disease progression and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) criteria in patients. We assessed concordance between the TOR and clinicians' decisions regarding treatment response and identified prevalence of patients with MS receiving DMT meeting medium/high levels of concern according to TOR. Prospective baseline and end-of-study assessments of patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) or clinically isolated syndrome were conducted in this open-label, 12-month, Phase IV, observational Canadian study. Data were reported for 184 patients (female 72%, mean age 39 years) of which 96% had RRMS. The TOR criteria identified 19 (10.3%) patients with suboptimal response to treatment. Twelve patients had ≥1 high level of concern. Two patients had ≥2 medium levels of concern. Concordance between TOR and clinician decision in maintaining treatment was 95.3%. Where treatment change was recommended by the TOR, concordance was 29.4%. Clinicians identified the TOR as the principal reason for changing treatment in 50.0% of cases where the TOR identified suboptimal response. The TOR were considered useful by 70.6% of clinicians when treatment optimization was recommended and by 55.3% when maintaining treatment was recommended. The TOR criteria can identify suboptimal response in this patient cohort. Concordance between TOR and clinician decision was high when maintaining treatment was recommended. Usefulness of the TOR was most apparent when treatment optimization was recommended.

  20. Supra-recommendation Treatment of Super-refractory Status Epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Devashish Dhiren; Dash, Gopal Krishna

    2016-06-01

    A 28-year old female was admitted with recurrent seizures following 2 days of febrile illness, after which she developed status epilepticus. Midazolam and later thiopentone infusions were started after failure of regular intravenous antiepileptics. Burst suppression was achieved at doses of 3 mg/kg/hr for midazolam and 6 mg/kg/hr of thiopentone. Adjunctive medications included methylprednisolone, intravenous immunoglobulin and acyclovir. Imaging and biochemical parameters were normal. She required 3 cycles of midazolam and 2 cycles of thiopentone for complete cessation of seizures. She recovered with mild attentional and recent memory deficits on follow up. Treatment of super-refractory status epilepticus requires individualized regimens and may need doses beyond conventional limits. To the best of our knowledge, there is no such reported case from India.

  1. Subclinical hyperthyroidism and cardiovascular risk: recommendations for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeiro, Christopher; Davila, Maria I; Bhat, Mallika; Frishman, William H; Weiss, Irene A

    2013-01-01

    Subclinical hyperthyroidism (SHy), the mildest form of hyperthyroidism, is diagnosed in patients having a persistently low or undetectable serum concentration of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) with normal free T4 and T3 concentrations. Although overt hyperthyroidism is associated with an increased risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes, the cardiovascular risk of SHy is controversial. Multiple studies have demonstrated an increased risk of atrial fibrillation, especially in older individuals with TSH levels effects of SHy on all-cause and cardiovascular mortality are not clear, but recent meta-analyses suggest a modest increase in mortality, with the risk increasing with age and associated with the lowest TSH levels. The long-term consequences of SHy in young- and middle-aged adults, and in those with TSH levels are mildly low, are uncertain. For these reasons, guidelines for treatment are based on patient age, the degree of TSH suppression, symptoms consistent with hyperthyroidism, and overall cardiovascular and osteoporotic fracture risks.

  2. Current limitations and recommendations to improve testing for the environmental assessment of endocrine active substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coady, Katherine K.; Biever, Ronald C.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Gross, Melanie; Guiney, Patrick D.; Holbech, Henrik; Karouna-Renier, Natalie K.; Katsiadaki, Ioanna; Krueger, Hank; Levine, Steven L.; Maack, Gerd; Williams, Mike; Wolf, Jeffrey C.; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, existing regulatory frameworks and test systems for assessing potential endocrine active chemicals are described, and associated challenges are discussed, along with proposed approaches to address these challenges. Regulatory frameworks vary somewhat across geographies, but all basically evaluate whether a chemical possesses endocrine activity and whether this activity can result in adverse outcomes either to humans or to the environment. Current test systems include in silico, in vitro, and in vivo techniques focused on detecting potential endocrine activity, and in vivo tests that collect apical data to detect possible adverse effects. These test systems are currently designed to robustly assess endocrine activity and/or adverse effects in the estrogen, androgen, and thyroid hormone signaling pathways; however, there are some limitations of current test systems for evaluating endocrine hazard and risk. These limitations include a lack of certainty regarding: 1) adequately sensitive species and life stages; 2) mechanistic endpoints that are diagnostic for endocrine pathways of concern; and 3) the linkage between mechanistic responses and apical, adverse outcomes. Furthermore, some existing test methods are resource intensive with regard to time, cost, and use of animals. However, based on recent experiences, there are opportunities to improve approaches to and guidance for existing test methods and to reduce uncertainty. For example, in vitro high-throughput screening could be used to prioritize chemicals for testing and provide insights as to the most appropriate assays for characterizing hazard and risk. Other recommendations include adding endpoints for elucidating connections between mechanistic effects and adverse outcomes, identifying potentially sensitive taxa for which test methods currently do not exist, and addressing key endocrine pathways of possible concern in addition to those associated with estrogen, androgen, and thyroid

  3. Common rugby league injuries. Recommendations for treatment and preventative measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, N

    1994-12-01

    Rugby league is the main professional team sport played in Eastern Australia. It is also very popular at a junior and amateur level. However, injuries are common because of the amount of body contact that occurs and the amount of running that is required to participate in the game. Injuries to the lower limbs account for over 50% of all injuries. The most common specific injuries are ankle lateral ligament tears, knee medial collateral and anterior cruciate ligament tears, groin musculotendinous tears, hamstring and calf muscle tears, and quadriceps muscle contusions. Head injuries are common and consist of varying degrees of concussion as well as lacerations and facial fractures. Serious head injury is rare. Some of the more common upper limb injuries are to the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints. Accurate diagnosis of these common injuries using appropriate history, examination and investigations is critical in organising a treatment and rehabilitation plan that will return the player to competition as soon as possible. An understanding of the mechanism of injury is also important in order to develop preventative strategies.

  4. Extracorporeal Treatment for Lithium Poisoning: Systematic Review and Recommendations from the EXTRIP Workgroup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Brian S.; Goldfarb, David S.; Dargan, Paul I.; Friesen, Marjorie; Gosselin, Sophie; Hoffman, Robert S.; Lavergne, Valéry; Nolin, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    The Extracorporeal Treatments in Poisoning Workgroup was created to provide evidence-based recommendations on the use of extracorporeal treatments in poisoning. Here, the EXTRIP workgroup presents its recommendations for lithium poisoning. After a systematic literature search, clinical and toxicokinetic data were extracted and summarized following a predetermined format. The entire workgroup voted through a two-round modified Delphi method to reach a consensus on voting statements. A RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method was used to quantify disagreement, and anonymous votes were compiled and discussed in person. A second vote was conducted to determine the final workgroup recommendations. In total, 166 articles met inclusion criteria, which were mostly case reports, yielding a very low quality of evidence for all recommendations. A total of 418 patients were reviewed, 228 of which allowed extraction of patient-level data. The workgroup concluded that lithium is dialyzable (Level of evidence=A) and made the following recommendations: Extracorporeal treatment is recommended in severe lithium poisoning (1D). Extracorporeal treatment is recommended if kidney function is impaired and the [Li+] is >4.0 mEq/L, or in the presence of a decreased level of consciousness, seizures, or life-threatening dysrhythmias irrespective of the [Li+] (1D). Extracorporeal treatment is suggested if the [Li+] is >5.0 mEq/L, significant confusion is present, or the expected time to reduce the [Li+] to 36 hours (2D). Extracorporeal treatment should be continued until clinical improvement is apparent or [Li+] is treatments should be continued for a minimum of 6 hours if the [Li+] is not readily measurable (1D). Hemodialysis is the preferred extracorporeal treatment (1D), but continuous RRT is an acceptable alternative (1D). The workgroup supported the use of extracorporeal treatment in severe lithium poisoning. Clinical decisions on when to use extracorporeal treatment should take into account the

  5. Dental Student Academic Integrity in U.S. Dental Schools: Current Status and Recommendations for Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Bruce S; Knight, G William; Graham, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Cheating incidents in 2006-07 led U.S. dental schools to heighten their efforts to enhance the environment of academic integrity in their institutions. The aims of this study were to document the measures being used by U.S. dental schools to discourage student cheating, determine the current incidence of reported cheating, and make recommendations for enhancing a culture of integrity in dental education. In late 2014-early 2015, an online survey was distributed to academic deans of all 61 accredited U.S. dental schools that had four classes of dental students enrolled; 50 (82%) responded. Among measures used, 98% of respondents reported having policy statements regarding student academic integrity, 92% had an Honor Code, 96% provided student orientation to integrity policies, and most used proctoring of final exams (91%) and tests (93%). Regarding disciplinary processes, 27% reported their faculty members only rarely reported suspected cheating (though required in 76% of the schools), and 40% disseminated anonymous results of disciplinary hearings. A smaller number of schools (n=36) responded to the question about student cheating than to other questions; those results suggested that reported cheating had increased almost threefold since 1998. The authors recommend that schools add cheating case scenarios to professional ethics curricula; disseminate outcomes of cheating enforcement actions; have students sign a statement attesting to compliance with academic integrity policies at every testing activity; add curricular content on correct writing techniques to avoid plagiarism; require faculty to distribute retired test items; acquire examination-authoring software programs to enable faculty to generate new multiple-choice items and different versions of the same multiple-choice tests; avoid take-home exams when assessing independent student knowledge; and utilize student assessment methods directly relevant to clinical practice.

  6. Surgeons agree more on treatment recommendations than on classification of proximal humeral fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorson, Stig; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Frich, Lars Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Orthopaedic surgeons disagree considerably when classifying fractures of the proximal humerus. However, the clinical implications of low observer agreement remain unclear. The purpose of the study was to compare the agreement on Neer classification with the agreement on treatment recommendations....

  7. Gastric Cancer: Current Status of Diagnosis and Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Tsunehiro; Saikawa, Yoshiro; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of death from malignant disease worldwide and most frequently discovered in advanced stages. Because curative surgery is regarded as the only option for cure, early detection of resectable gastric cancer is extremely important for good patient outcomes. Therefore, noninvasive diagnostic modalities such as evolutionary endoscopy and positron emission tomography are utilized as screening tools for gastric cancer. To date, early gastric cancer is being treated using minimally invasive methods such as endoscopic treatment and laparoscopic surgery, while in advanced cancer it is necessary to consider multimodality treatment including chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery. Because of the results of large clinical trials, surgery with extended lymphadenectomy could not be recommended as a standard therapy for advanced gastric cancer. Recent clinical trials had shown survival benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy after curative resection compared with surgery alone. In addition, recent advances of molecular targeted agents would play an important role as one of the modalities for advanced gastric cancer. In this review, we summarize the current status of diagnostic technology and treatment for gastric cancer

  8. The current treatment of erectile dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabela Sarbu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Erectile dysfunction (ED is the inability to achieve and maintain an erection sufficient for satisfactory sexual intercourse. It is the most frequent sexual dysfunction in elderly men and its prevalence increases with age. Ever since ED was recognized as a real health problem, several treatment options became available and some of them proved to be very efficient. PDE5 inhibitors are the mainstay treatment of ED. However, other treatment options such as intracorporal injections, surgery, vacuum devices and prosthesis are also available for patients who are unresponsive to PDE5 inhibitors. Since none of the treatment options available so far has proven ideal, research in the field of sexual medicine continues. The aim of this paper is to review the most advances in the treatment of ED.

  9. Hepatitis B vaccination of premature infants: a reassessment of current recommendations for delayed immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losonsky, G A; Wasserman, S S; Stephens, I; Mahoney, F; Armstrong, P; Gumpper, K; Dulkerian, S; West, D J; Gewolb, I H

    1999-02-01

    Current American Academy of Pediatrics and United States Public Health Service Immunization Practices Advisory Committee recommendations for hepatitis B immunization in premature infants weighing birth born to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBSAg)-negative mothers are to delay the initiation of vaccination until such infants reach 2 kg or until 2 months of age. This proposal to delay vaccination at birth in these low-risk infants was based on limited studies not conducted in the United States. We sought to reassess current recommendations to delay administration of hepatitis B vaccine in low-risk premature infants by determining the immunogenicity of early hepatitis B vaccination in a US population and identifying variables associated with poor immunogenicity. A total of 148 infants birth and stratified to three birth weight groups: 1500 g. Recombinant hepatitis B vaccine was administered within the first week of life, at 1 to 2 months of age, and at 6 to 7 months of age. Serum obtained at birth and after the second and third doses of vaccine was tested for antibody to HBSAg. Variables associated with poor response were sought prospectively by collecting demographic and clinical data. A total of 118 subjects (83%) completed the study. Postsecond dose sera were available for 117 infants and postthird dose sera were available for 112 infants. The seroprotection rate (attaining >/=10 mIU/mL HBS antibody) after two doses was low (25%) regardless of birth weight; infants weighing birth had the poorest response (11%). The seroprotection response rate after three doses of vaccine increased with birth weight; infants weighing birth (groups 1 and 2) had lower rates of response (52% and 68%, respectively) than did infants weighing >1500 g at birth (group 3; 84% response rate). The seroprotection response rate of group 3 infants after three doses of vaccine, although low, could not be differentiated from the response rates reported for full-term infants using 95% confidence

  10. Recommendations for standardized diagnostics, treatment and following care in tumor diseases. Geriatric patient with tumor disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagmueller, E.; Neises, M.; Queisser, W.; Richter, H.; Schneider, G.

    2001-01-01

    The recommendations for the treatment of geriatric patients with tumor disease, presented in the paper, cover: surgery; chemotherapy; radiotherapy and immunotherapy. Radiotherapy is recommended for skin tumors, pain treatment in the bone metastases (40 - 50 Gy), system diseases (with reduction of the usual size of the irradiated area), small size tumors etc. It is considered as an appropriate method (excluding wide fields) for geriatric outpatients

  11. European audit of current practice in diagnosis and treatment of childhood growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Anders; Bernasconi, Sergio; Clayton, Peter E

    2002-01-01

    The present survey among members of the ESPE on current practice in diagnosis and treatment of growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD) is of great clinical relevance and importance in the light of the recently published guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of GHD by the Growth Hormone Research...... Society. We have found much conformity but also numerous discrepancies between the recommendations of the Growth Hormone Research Society and the current practice in Europe....

  12. European evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of paediatric antiphospholipid syndrome: the SHARE initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, Noortje; de Graeff, Nienke; Avcin, Tadej; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Dolezalova, Pavla; Feldman, Brian; Kenet, Gili; Koné-Paut, Isabelle; Lahdenne, Pekka; Marks, Stephen D; McCann, Liza; Pilkington, Clarissa A; Ravelli, Angelo; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Uziel, Yosef; Vastert, Sebastiaan J; Wulffraat, Nico M; Ozen, Seza; Brogan, Paul; Kamphuis, Sylvia; Beresford, Michael W

    2017-10-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is rare in children, and evidence-based guidelines are sparse. Consequently, management is mostly based on observational studies and physician's experience, and treatment regimens differ widely. The Single Hub and Access point for paediatric Rheumatology in Europe (SHARE) initiative was launched to develop diagnostic and management regimens for children and young adults with rheumatic diseases. Here, we developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of paediatric APS. Evidence-based recommendations were developed using the European League Against Rheumatism standard operating procedure. Following a detailed systematic review of the literature, a committee of paediatric rheumatologists and representation of paediatric haematology with expertise in paediatric APS developed recommendations. The literature review yielded 1473 articles, of which 15 were valid and relevant. In total, four recommendations for diagnosis and eight for treatment of paediatric APS (including paediatric Catastrophic Antiphospholipid Syndrome) were accepted. Additionally, two recommendations for children born to mothers with APS were accepted. It was agreed that new classification criteria for paediatric APS are necessary, and APS in association with childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus should be identified by performing antiphospholipid antibody screening. Treatment recommendations included prevention of thrombotic events, and treatment recommendations for venous and/or arterial thrombotic events. Notably, due to the paucity of studies on paediatric APS, level of evidence and strength of the recommendations is relatively low. The SHARE initiative provides international, evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment for paediatric APS, facilitating improvement and uniformity of care. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use

  13. Breast cancer. Current approach in the treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez Menendez, Miguel M; Chaparro Cuellar, Sixta Rossana

    2009-01-01

    Of 115 women who had surgery for a malignant breast tumor proven by biopsy at the Department of General Surgery, Hospital 'Jose Ramon Lopez Tabrane' of Matanzas during the period January 2007 to May 2008 a study was conducted observational, analytical (study cohort) and using certain variables, with the aim of analyzing the behavior of this disease in our environment. Data were collected from medical records of patients admitted a breast lump in that period and files Statistics and Provincial Hospital Pathology 'Jose Ramon Lopez Tabrane'. The percentage method was applied to the description found in our sample, expressing the results in tabular form, with the objective facilitate their interpretation. The most affected age range between 65 and 74, but followed very near the range between 55 and 64. The most frequent clinical stage II, followed by the III. The left breast has proven to be most affected in outer quadrant exceeded. Veronesi conservative technique was the most used in our study. We recommend promoting breast self-examination and use of media We recommend promoting breast self-examination and use of media such as mammography as a method of early diagnosis of breast cancer and the creation of a file to the technical assessment conservative based on the survival and the immediate and mediate complications of this technique, and the best instruction in family practice clinical diagnosis of breast diseases and specialized inter consultation. (Author)

  14. Poisoining with Tricyclic Antidepressants and Current Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muge Gulen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Poisoning with tricyclic antidepressants is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality compared to all the antidepressants. Main toxic effects are on the cardiovascular system and central nervous system and manifests itself as anticholinergic symptoms. There is no antidote known to be used in the treatment. But sodium bicarbonate treatment is effective in preventing ventricular arrhythmias and hypotension, and resolving metabolic acidosis. There are some treatments that has been used for relief of symptoms and some of them still are in research stage. The drugs that are used can be customized according to the patients symptoms. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(4.000: 608-621

  15. Current treatment approach of bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez Cabrera, Erasmo Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The document deals with the cancer situation in Cuba; the factors that produce and causes destruction of bone metastases. It also describes osteoblastic and osteolytic lesions; and details the different treatments for bone metastases

  16. Mobile Clinical Decision Support System for Acid-base Balance Diagnosis and Treatment Recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandzuka, Mensur; Begic, Edin; Boskovic, Dusanka; Begic, Zijo; Masic, Izet

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents mobile application implementing a decision support system for acid-base disorder diagnosis and treatment recommendation. The application was developed using the official integrated development environment for the Android platform (to maximize availability and minimize investments in specialized hardware) called Android Studio. The application identifies disorder, based on the blood gas analysis, evaluates whether the disorder has been compensated, and based on additional input related to electrolyte imbalance, provides recommendations for treatment. The application is a tool in the hands of the user, which provides assistance during acid-base disorders treatment. The application will assist the physician in clinical practice and is focused on the treatment in intensive care.

  17. The omni-relevance of surgery: how medical specialization shapes orthopedic surgeons' treatment recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, Pamela L; Clark, Shannon J; Raymond, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    This article examines treatment recommendations in orthopedic surgery consultations and shows how surgery is treated as "omni-relevant" within this activity, providing a context within which the broad range of treatment recommendations proposed by surgeons is offered. Using conversation analysis to analyse audiotaped encounters between orthopedic surgeons and patients, we highlight how surgeons treat surgery as having a special, privileged status relative to other treatment options by (1) invoking surgery (whether or not it is actually being recommended) and (2) presenting surgery as the "last best resort" (in relation to which other treatment options are calibrated, described and considered). This privileged status surfaces in the design and delivery of recommendations as a clear asymmetry: Recommendations for surgery are proposed early, in relatively simple and unmitigated form. In contrast, recommendations not for surgery tend to be delayed and involve significantly more interactional work in their delivery. Possible implications of these findings, including how surgeons' structuring of recommendations may shape patient expectations (whether for surgery or some alternative), and potentially influence the distribution of orthopedic surgery procedures arising from these consultations, are considered.

  18. [Contemporary criteria of the diagnosis and current recommendations for nutritional therapy in anorexia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrypnik, Damian; Bogdański, Paweł; Musialik, Katarzyna; Skrypnik, Katarzyna

    2014-05-01

    The basic criterion for the diagnosis of anorexia (AN - anorexia nervosa) by ICD-10 (International Classification of Diseases, version 10) is the body weight less than 15% of the expected normal body weight. According to DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, version IV) the basic feature of AN is a refusal to maintain body weight equal or greater than the minimal normal weight. The prevalence of anorexia nervosa is 0.3-0.5% or even 1.3-3.7% if include pre-anorexic states (eg. the phenomenon of pro-ana). The main feature of anorexia is a reduction of caloric intake. According to the recommendations of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) for nutritional treatment of patients with AN the main goals in therapy of AN are: restoration of body weight, normalization of eating patterns, achievement a normal feeling of hunger and satiety and correction of the consequences of improper nutrition. APA suggests that achievable weight gain is about 0.9-1.4 kg per week in the case of hospitalized patients and approximately 0.23-0.45 kg per week in the case of outpatients. During the nutritional treatment of AN numerous side effects including anxiety, phobia, occurrence of obsessive thoughts and compulsive behavior, suicidal thoughts and intentions may occur. According to National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) the most important goal of AN therapy is weight gain in the range of 0.5-1 kg per week in hospitalized patients and 0.5 kg per week for outpatients. A person suffering from anorexia in the initial period of nutritional treatment spends twice more energy to maintain elevated body temperature, which significantly increases during the night rest. This phenomenon is called nocturnal hyperthermia and has a negative effect on the healing process. "Refeeding syndrome" is an adverse effect of nutritional treatment in anorexia. It is caused by too rapid nutrition in a patient suffering from chronic starvation. It can endanger the patient

  19. Treatment of severe psoriasis in children: recommendations of an Italian expert group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortina, Anna Belloni; Bardazzi, Federico; Berti, Samantha; Carnevale, Claudia; Di Lernia, Vito; El Hachem, Maya; Neri, Iria; Gelmetti, Carlo Mario; Lora, Viviana; Mazzatenta, Carlo; Milioto, Mirella; Moretta, Gaia; Patrizi, Annalisa; Peris, Ketty; Villani, Alberto

    2017-10-01

    This article provides comprehensive recommendations for the systemic treatment of severe pediatric psoriasis based on evidence obtained from a systematic review of the literature and the consensus opinion of expert dermatologists and pediatricians. For each systemic treatment, the grade of recommendation (A, B, C) based on the treatment's approval by the European Medicines Agency for childhood psoriasis and the experts' opinions is discussed. The grade of recommendation for narrow-band-ultraviolet B phototherapy, cyclosporine, and retinoids is C, while that for methotrexate is C/B. The use of adalimumab, etanercept, and ustekinumab has a grade A recommendation. No conventional systemic treatments are approved for pediatric psoriasis. Adalimumab is approved by the European Medicines Agency as a first-line treatment for severe chronic plaque psoriasis in children (≥ 4 years old) and adolescents. Etanercept and ustekinumab are approved as second-line therapy in children ≥ 6 and ≥ 12 years, respectively. A treatment algorithm as well as practical tools (i.e., tabular summaries of differential diagnoses, treatment mechanism of actions, dosing regimens, control parameters) are provided to assist in therapeutic reasoning and decision-making for individual patients. These treatment recommendations are endorsed by major Italian Pediatric and Dermatology Societies. What is Known: • Guidelines for the treatment of severe pediatric psoriasis are lacking and most traditional systemic treatments are not approved for use in young patients. Although there has been decades of experience with some of the traditional agents such as phototherapy, acitretin, and cyclosporine in children, there are no RCTs on their pediatric use while RCTs investigating new biologic agents have been performed. What is New: • In this manuscript, an Italian multidisciplinary team of experts focused on treatment recommendations for severe forms of psoriasis in children based on an up

  20. Human-carnivore conflict in China: a review of current approaches with recommendations for improved management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Melissa; Xie, Yan; Kang, Aili; Rao, Madhu; Goodrich, John; Liu, Tong; Berger, Joshua

    2012-06-01

    Human-wildlife conflict (HWC) is a conservation concern that increasingly threatens the continued existence of some of the world's most endangered species. With an increase in human population, urban sprawl and subsequent encroachment on wild land, human and wildlife interaction has become inevitable. In the majority of cases, this interaction results in a negative outcome for humans, wildlife or both. In China, these key elements, along with a decrease in wild prey species, have resulted in the expansion of HWC encounters, and the need for alleviating this conflict has become a conservation priority. Loss of human life, livestock and/or crops is most often the catalysts that fuel HWC. Techniques to alleviate conflict around the world have included preventative measures and mitigation techniques, such as financial compensation and other incentive programs. Both types of measures have had variable success. We review the current status of human-carnivore conflict management in China, and, drawing lessons from around the globe, we make recommendations for improving conservation management in China. For example, an increase in law enforcement in nature reserves is vital to reducing human disturbance in prime carnivore habitat, thereby reducing conflict encounters. Also, modifications to current wildlife compensation programs, so that they are linked with preventative measures, will ensure that moral hazards are avoided. Furthermore, investigating the potential for a community self-financed insurance scheme to fund compensation and increasing efforts to restore wild prey populations will improve the outcome for wildlife conservation. Ultimately, HWC management in China will greatly benefit from an integrative approach. © 2012 ISZS, Blackwell Publishing and IOZ/CAS.

  1. Construct validity-Current issues and recommendations for future hand hygiene research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neo, Jun Rong Jeffrey

    2017-05-01

    Health care-associated infection is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Hand hygiene is widely regarded as an effective prevention strategy. Often, hand hygiene research is designed and conducted by health care practitioners who may lack formal training in research methods, particularly in the area of social science. In a research context, a construct is a concept that can be measured or observed in some way. A construct can be directly or indirectly measured. For example, height can be directly measured by centimeters, whereas depression can be indirectly measured by a scale of 20 items. Every construct needs to be operationalized by measure(s) to make it a variable. Hence, construct validity refers to the degree of fit between the construct of interest and its operational measure. However, issues with construct validity often weaken the translation from construct to measure(s). This article will (1) describe the common threats to construct validity pertaining to hand hygiene research, (2) identify practical limitations in current research design, and (3) provide recommendations to improve construct validity in future hand hygiene research. By understanding how construct validity may affect hand hygiene research design, there is great potential to improve the validity of future hand hygiene research findings. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Current Perspectives on Physical Activity and Exercise Recommendations for Children and Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Sudha M.; Pescatello, Linda S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that childhood obesity is increasing in children who are developing typically as well as in children with developmental disabilities such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Impairments specific to autism as well as general environmental factors could lead to an imbalance between the intake and expenditure of energy, leading to obesity. In this article, we describe the mechanisms by which autism-specific impairments contribute to obesity. The evidence on exercise interventions to improve physical fitness, address obesity, and reduce autism-specific impairments in children and adolescents with ASDs is discussed. Limited evidence is currently available for exercise interventions in individuals with ASDs. Therefore, literature on other pediatric developmental disabilities and children who are developing typically was reviewed to provide recommendations for clinicians to assess physical activity levels, to promote physical fitness, and to reduce obesity in children and adolescents with ASDs. There is a clear need for further systematic research to develop sensitive assessment tools and holistic multisystem and multifactorial obesity interventions that accommodate the social communication, motor, and behavioral impairments of individuals with ASDs. PMID:24525861

  3. MRI technique for the preoperative evaluation of deep infiltrating endometriosis: current status and protocol recommendation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, C.; Oehmke, F.; Tinneberg, H.-R.; Krombach, G.A.

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is a common cause of chronic pelvic pain and infertility. It is defined as the occurrence of endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity and can manifest as a peritoneal, ovarian or infiltrating form, the latter being referred to as deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE). Surgery is essential in the treatment of DIE and depending on the severity of the disease, surgery can be difficult and extensive. Beside clinical examination and ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proven its value to provide useful information for planning surgery in patients with suspected DIE. To optimise the quality of MRI examinations, radiologists have to be familiar with the capabilities and also the limitations of this technique with respect to the assessment of DIE. MRI yields morphological information by using mainly T1- and T2-weighted sequences, but can also provide functional information by means of intravenous gadolinium, diffusion-weighted imaging or cine-MRI. In this article, these techniques and also adequate measures of patient preparation, which are indispensable for successful MRI imaging for the preoperative evaluation of DIE, are reviewed and a comprehensive protocol recommendation is provided.

  4. Female pattern hair loss: Current treatment concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Q Dinh

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Quan Q Dinh, Rodney SinclairDepartment of Dermatology, St Vincent’s Hospital, Fitzroy, Victoria, AustraliaAbstract: Fewer than 45% of women go through life with a full head of hair. Female pattern hair loss is the commonest cause of hair loss in women and prevalence increases with advancing age. Affected women may experience psychological distress and impaired social functioning. In most cases the diagnosis can be made clinically and the condition treated medically. While many women using oral antiandrogens and topical minoxidil will regrow some hair, early diagnosis and initiation of treatment is desirable as these treatments are more effective at arresting progression of hair loss than stimulating regrowth. Adjunctive nonpharmacological treatment modalities such as counseling, cosmetic camouflage and hair transplantation are important measures for some patients. The histology of female pattern hair loss is identical to that of male androgenetic alopecia. While the clinical pattern of the hair loss differs between men, the response to oral antiandrogens suggests that female pattern hair loss is an androgen dependant condition, at least in the majority of cases. Female pattern hair loss is a chronic progressive condition. All treatments need to be continued to maintain the effect. An initial therapeutic response often takes 12 or even 24 months. Given this delay, monitoring for treatment effect through clinical photography or standardized clinical severity scales is helpful.Keywords: female pattern hair loss, androgenetic alopecia

  5. Extracorporeal Treatment for Lithium Poisoning: Systematic Review and Recommendations from the EXTRIP Workgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Brian S; Goldfarb, David S; Dargan, Paul I; Friesen, Marjorie; Gosselin, Sophie; Hoffman, Robert S; Lavergne, Valéry; Nolin, Thomas D; Ghannoum, Marc

    2015-05-07

    The Extracorporeal Treatments in Poisoning Workgroup was created to provide evidence-based recommendations on the use of extracorporeal treatments in poisoning. Here, the EXTRIP workgroup presents its recommendations for lithium poisoning. After a systematic literature search, clinical and toxicokinetic data were extracted and summarized following a predetermined format. The entire workgroup voted through a two-round modified Delphi method to reach a consensus on voting statements. A RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method was used to quantify disagreement, and anonymous votes were compiled and discussed in person. A second vote was conducted to determine the final workgroup recommendations. In total, 166 articles met inclusion criteria, which were mostly case reports, yielding a very low quality of evidence for all recommendations. A total of 418 patients were reviewed, 228 of which allowed extraction of patient-level data. The workgroup concluded that lithium is dialyzable (Level of evidence=A) and made the following recommendations: Extracorporeal treatment is recommended in severe lithium poisoning (1D). Extracorporeal treatment is recommended if kidney function is impaired and the [Li(+)] is >4.0 mEq/L, or in the presence of a decreased level of consciousness, seizures, or life-threatening dysrhythmias irrespective of the [Li(+)] (1D). Extracorporeal treatment is suggested if the [Li(+)] is >5.0 mEq/L, significant confusion is present, or the expected time to reduce the [Li(+)] to 36 hours (2D). Extracorporeal treatment should be continued until clinical improvement is apparent or [Li(+)] is lithium poisoning. Clinical decisions on when to use extracorporeal treatment should take into account the [Li(+)], kidney function, pattern of lithium toxicity, patient's clinical status, and availability of extracorporeal treatments. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  6. Current Treatment of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamroziak, Krzysztof; Puła, Bartosz; Walewski, Jan

    2017-01-01

    A number of new treatment options have recently emerged for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients, including the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor ibrutinib, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) delta isoform inhibitor idelalisib combined with rituximab, the Bcl-2 antagonist venetoclax, and the new anti-CD20 antibodies obinutuzumab and ofatumumab. Most of these agents are already included into treatment algorithms defined by international practice guidelines, but more clinical investigations are needed to answer still remaining questions. Ibrutinib was proven as a primary choice for patients with the TP53 gene deletion/mutation, who otherwise have no active treatment available. Idelalisib with rituximab is also an active therapy, but due to increased risk of serious infections, its use in first-line treatment is limited to patients for whom ibrutinib is not an option. A new indication for ibrutinib was recently approved for older patients with comorbidities, as an alternative to the already existing indication for chlorambucil with obinutuzumab. The use of kinase inhibitors is already well established in recurrent/refractory disease. Immunochemotherapy with fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, rituximab (FCR) remains a major first-line option for many CLL patients without the TP53 gene deletion/mutation, and who have no significant comorbidities or history of infections, and is particularly effective in patients with favorable features including mutated IGHV status. There are a number of issues regarding novel therapies for CLL that need further investigation such as optimum duration of treatment with kinase inhibitors, appropriate sequencing of novel agents, mechanisms of resistance to inhibitors and response to class switching after treatment failure, along with the potential role of combinations of targeted agents.

  7. Current and future treatment options for acne.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Kleinpenning, M.M.; Jong, E.M.G.J. de; Gerritsen, M.J.P.; Dooren-Greebe, R.J. van; Alkemade, J.A.C.

    2006-01-01

    Acne is a frequent skin disease with abnormalities in the process of keratinization, sebaceous gland functioning and inflammation. In this review, our understanding of the pathogenesis of acne has been updated. An overview of efficacy and side effects of available anti-acne treatments is presented.

  8. Current Directions in ADHD and Its Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norvilitis, Jill M., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is a matter of ongoing research and debate, with considerable data supporting both psychopharmacological and behavioral approaches. Researchers continue to search for new interventions to be used in conjunction with or in place of the more traditional approaches. These interventions run the…

  9. Current perspectives on the treatment of ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Chaves Cruz

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Three short-term interventions have been corroborated for the treatment of ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: psychotherapeutic (behavioural, psychopharmacological, and the combining of both interventions. This article reviews clinical questions, limitations and efficacy of these interventions. Behavioural interventions in the form of Parental Behavioural Training and the Management of Behavioural Contingencies in the Classroom seem to be particularly efficacious.

  10. Cancer Control in Central and Eastern Europe: Current Situation and Recommendations for Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrdoljak, Eduard; Bodoky, Gyorgy; Jassem, Jacek; Popescu, Razvan A; Mardiak, Jozef; Pirker, Robert; Čufer, Tanja; Bešlija, Semir; Eniu, Alexandru; Todorović, Vladimir; Kubáčková, Kateřina; Kurteva, Galia; Tomašević, Zorica; Sallaku, Agim; Smichkoska, Snezhana; Bajić, Žarko; Šikić, Branimir I

    2016-10-01

    : The incidence of many cancers is higher in Western European (WE) countries, but mortality is frequently higher in Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries. A panel of oncology leaders from CEE countries participating in the South Eastern European Research Oncology Group (SEEROG) was formed in 2015, aiming to analyze the current status and trends of oncology care in CEE and to propose recommendations leading to improved care and outcomes. The SEEROG panel, meeting during the 11th Central European Oncology Congress, proposed the following: (a) national cancer control plans (NCCPs) required in all CEE countries, defining priorities in cancer care, including finance allocation considering limited health care budgets; (b) national cancer registries, describing in detail epidemiological trends; (c) efforts to strengthen comprehensive cancer centers; (d) that multidisciplinary care should be mandated by the NCCPs; (e) that smaller hospitals should be connected to multidisciplinary tumor boards via the Internet, providing access to specialized expertise; (f) nationwide primary prevention programs targeting smoking, obesity, and alcohol consumption and centrally evaluated secondary prevention programs for cervical, colorectal, and breast cancers; (g) prioritize education for all involved in cancer care, including oncology nurses, general practitioners, and palliative care providers; (h) establish outpatient care in day hospitals to reduce costs associated with the current inpatient model of care in CEE countries and to improve patients' quality of life; (i) long-term pharmacoeconomic evaluations of new therapies in CEE countries; (j) increase national oncology budgets in view of the higher mortality rates in CEE compared with WE countries; and (k) CEE countries urgently need help from the European Union to increase and monitor overall investment in cancer care. Significant differences in cancer incidence and mortality have been observed between European countries

  11. Do guidelines recommending pharmacogenetic testing of psychiatric patients affect treatment costs and the use of healthcare services?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbild, Louise; Bech, Mickael; Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte

    2011-01-01

    To identify the effects of local recommendations of pharmacogenetic testing in psychiatry with respect to treatment costs.......To identify the effects of local recommendations of pharmacogenetic testing in psychiatry with respect to treatment costs....

  12. Current micronutrient recommendations in Europe: towards understanding their differences and similarities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doets, E.L.; Wit, de L.S.; Dhonukshe-Rutten, R.A.M.; Cavelaars, A.J.E.M.; Raats, M.M.; Timotijevic, L.; Brzozowska, A.; Wijnhoven, T.M.A.; Pavlovic, M.; Holm Totland, T.; Andersen, L.F.; Ruprich, J.; Pijls, L.T.J.; Ashwell, M.; Lambert, J.P.; Veer, van 't P.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Nowadays most countries in Europe have established their own nutrient recommendations to assess the adequacy of dietary intakes and to plan desirable dietary intakes. As yet there is no standard approach for deriving nutrient recommendations, they may vary from country to country. This

  13. American Society of Radiation Oncology Recommendations for Documenting Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, Timothy; Das, Rupak; Low, Daniel; Yin Fangfang; Balter, James; Palta, Jatinder; Eifel, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for approximately a decade, a lack of adequate guidelines for documenting these treatments persists. Proper IMRT treatment documentation is necessary for accurate reconstruction of prior treatments when a patient presents with a marginal recurrence. This is especially crucial when the follow-up care is managed at a second treatment facility not involved in the initial IMRT treatment. To address this issue, an American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) workgroup within the American ASTRO Radiation Physics Committee was formed at the request of the ASTRO Research Council to develop a set of recommendations for documenting IMRT treatments. This document provides a set of comprehensive recommendations for documenting IMRT treatments, as well as image-guidance procedures, with example forms provided.

  14. Opiate addiction - current trends and treatment options

    OpenAIRE

    Achal Bhatt; Aminder Gill

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are widely used drugs for treatment of pain and related disorders. Opiate addiction is a major public health concern in the United States causing significant increase in healthcare expenditure. They produce euphoria and sense of well-being which makes them addictive to some people. Used in higher doses they can lead to cardiac or respiratory compromise. They also impair cognition leading to impaired decision making. Opioids exert their effects by acting on three different types of re...

  15. Sedentary behaviour and physical activity in South Asian women: time to review current recommendations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waidyatilaka, Indu; Lanerolle, Pulani; Wickremasinghe, Rajitha; Atukorala, Sunethra; Somasundaram, Noel; de Silva, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Our aims were to describe activity and sedentary behaviours in urban Asian women, with dysglycaemia (diagnosed at recruitment), and without dysglycaemia and examine the relative contribution of these parameters to their glycaemic status. 2800 urban women (30-45 years) were selected by random cluster sampling and screened for dysglycaemia for a final sample of 272 newly diagnosed, drug naive dysglycaemic and 345 normoglycaemic women. Physical activity and sedentary behaviours were assessed by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). Demographic data, diet and anthropometry were recorded. Logistic regression analysis assessed contribution of all parameters to dysglycaemia and exposure attributable fractions were calculated. The mean energy expenditure on walking (2648.5±1023.7 MET-min/week) and on moderate and vigorous physical activity (4342.3±1768.1 MET-min/week) for normoglycemic women and dysglycaemic women (walking;1046.4±728.4 MET-min/week, moderate and vigorous physical activity; 1086.7±1184.4 MET-min/week) was above the recommended amount of physical activity per week. 94.3% of women spent >1000 MET-minutes/week on activity. Mean sitting and TV time for normoglycaemic and dysglycaemic women were 154.3±62.8, 38.4±31.9, 312.6±116.7 and 140.2±56.5 minutes per day respectively. Physical activity and sedentary behaviour contributed to dysglycaemia after adjustment for family history, diet, systolic blood pressure and Body Mass Index. Exposure attributable fractions for dysglycaemia were; lower physical activity: 78%, higher waist circumference: 94%, and TV viewing time: 85%. Urban South Asian women are at risk of dysglycaemia at lower levels of sedentary behaviour and greater physical activity than western populations, indicating the need for re-visiting current physical activity guidelines for South Asians.

  16. Sedentary behaviour and physical activity in South Asian women: time to review current recommendations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indu Waidyatilaka

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Our aims were to describe activity and sedentary behaviours in urban Asian women, with dysglycaemia (diagnosed at recruitment, and without dysglycaemia and examine the relative contribution of these parameters to their glycaemic status. METHODS: 2800 urban women (30-45 years were selected by random cluster sampling and screened for dysglycaemia for a final sample of 272 newly diagnosed, drug naive dysglycaemic and 345 normoglycaemic women. Physical activity and sedentary behaviours were assessed by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ. Demographic data, diet and anthropometry were recorded. Logistic regression analysis assessed contribution of all parameters to dysglycaemia and exposure attributable fractions were calculated. RESULTS: The mean energy expenditure on walking (2648.5±1023.7 MET-min/week and on moderate and vigorous physical activity (4342.3±1768.1 MET-min/week for normoglycemic women and dysglycaemic women (walking;1046.4±728.4 MET-min/week, moderate and vigorous physical activity; 1086.7±1184.4 MET-min/week was above the recommended amount of physical activity per week. 94.3% of women spent >1000 MET-minutes/week on activity. Mean sitting and TV time for normoglycaemic and dysglycaemic women were 154.3±62.8, 38.4±31.9, 312.6±116.7 and 140.2±56.5 minutes per day respectively. Physical activity and sedentary behaviour contributed to dysglycaemia after adjustment for family history, diet, systolic blood pressure and Body Mass Index. Exposure attributable fractions for dysglycaemia were; lower physical activity: 78%, higher waist circumference: 94%, and TV viewing time: 85%. CONCLUSIONS: Urban South Asian women are at risk of dysglycaemia at lower levels of sedentary behaviour and greater physical activity than western populations, indicating the need for re-visiting current physical activity guidelines for South Asians.

  17. The use of lithium for the treatment of bipolar disorder: Recommendations from clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhi, Gin S; Gessler, Danielle; Outhred, Tim

    2017-08-01

    Lithium is an effective mood stabilizer that is used principally for the management of bipolar disorder (BD). Its administration is complex and often requires sophisticated management and assiduous monitoring. When considering the use of lithium therapy for bipolar disorder, clinicians are advised to refer to recommendations outlined in clinical practice guidelines (CPGs); but because of varying emphases placed by different international CPGs, recommendations addressing the practical use of lithium lack consistency. In order to inform clinicians of optimal lithium therapy for bipolar disorder, we compared and synthesized recommendations for the treatment of bipolar disorder made by recognized CPGs internationally. We conducted a search of the literature and extracted guidance across multiple clinical issues, including clinical indications, disorder subtypes, additional uses, special populations, practical aspects, and side effects. Collectively, CPGs consider lithium most robustly as a first-line intervention for maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder and strongly for the treatment of mania, with relatively modest support for the management of acute bipolar depression. Additionally, there is consensus across the CPGs that lithium tangibly reduces the risk of suicide. Generally, CPGs provide guidance on the many facets of initiating and maintaining patients on lithium therapy, but individually the CPGs varied in terms of depth and practical guidance they provide across these areas. However, consensus was established across many key areas of practice such as the ideal lithium plasma concentration for maintenance and monitoring (0.6-0.8mmol/L), along with the need for regular monitoring of renal and endocrine function. However, with more complex aspects (e.g., atypical presentations) and in special populations (e.g., youth; pregnancy and post-partum; older adults), guidance varied considerably and clear consensus recommendations were more difficult to achieve. In

  18. Introducing New Biosimilars Into Current Treatment Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Isaacs

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Three biosimilar products are now licensed for the treatment of rheumatic diseases in Europe. The European Medicines Agency (EMA requires that similarity between a biosimilar and its reference product is demonstrated using a rigorous, stepwise process that includes extensive physicochemical and biological analytical testing, non-clinical pharmacology, clinical evaluations, and pharmacovigilance plans. Each step is highly sensitive to any differences between products and progressively reduces any uncertainty over similarity; all steps must be satisfied to demonstrate biosimilarity. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA requires a similar stringent biosimilar development process. The etanercept biosimilar SB4 (Benepali®, recently approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, axial spondyloarthritis (ankylosing spondylitis, non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis, and plaque psoriasis, is herein used to demonstrate the detailed analytical characterisation and clinical testing that are required by the EMA before biosimilars are approved for use. A comprehensive characterisation study involving >55 physiochemical and >25 biological assays demonstrated that SB4 has highly similar structural, physicochemical, and biological quality attributes to reference etanercept. A Phase I study demonstrated pharmacokinetic equivalence between SB4 and reference etanercept in healthy male subjects. Furthermore, a Phase III, randomised, controlled trial performed in patients with moderate-to-severe rheumatoid arthritis despite treatment with methotrexate (MTX showed that SB4 was equivalent to etanercept in terms of efficacy, safety, and immunogenicity. In conclusion, the biosimilar development process performed according to EMA or FDA guidelines is highly rigorous and comprehensive. Biosimilars such as SB4 are now available in clinical practice and are likely to improve access, reduce costs, and ultimately, improve health outcomes.

  19. Current Treatment Options for Auricular Hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPhail, Catriona

    2016-07-01

    Ear disease, such as otitis externa, resulting in aggressive head shaking or ear scratching, is the most common cause of the development of aural hematomas in dogs and cats. An underlying immunologic cause has also been proposed to explain cartilage and blood vessel fragility. Numerous options exist for management of aural hematomas, from medical management alone with corticosteroids, to simple hematoma centesis, to surgical intervention. Because this condition is usually secondary to another disease process, regardless of mode of treatment, likelihood of recurrence is low if the underlying condition is managed properly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Superficial femoral artery: current treatment options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tepe, Gunnar; Schmehl, Joerg; Heller, Stephan; Wiesinger, Benjamin; Claussen, Claus D.; Duda, Stephan H.

    2006-01-01

    Treatment of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) has been among the least effective of all endovascular procedures in terms of long-term patency. The relatively small vessel lumen, in conjunction with a high plaque burden, slow flow, and a high frequency of primary occlusions, contributes to a considerable rate of acute technical failures. Because of these technical limitations a much effort has been made during the past years. This manuscript should summarize the hopes and limitations of different approaches such as brachytherapy, cutting balloons, stents and stent grafts, drug-eluting stents, and drug-coated balloons. (orig.)

  1. Hematopoietic cell transplantation in Fanconi anemia: current evidence, challenges and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebens, Christen L; MacMillan, Margaret L; Wagner, John E

    2017-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation for Fanconi Anemia (FA) has improved dramatically over the past 40 years. With an enhanced understanding of the intrinsic DNA-repair defect and pathophysiology of hematopoietic failure and leukemogenesis, sequential changes to conditioning and graft engineering have significantly improved the expectation of survival after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) with incidence of graft failure decreased from 35% to 40% to <10%. Today, five-year overall survival exceeds 90% in younger FA patients with bone marrow failure but remains about 50% in those with hematologic malignancy. Areas covered: We review the evolution of alloHCT contributing to decreased rates of transplant related complications; highlight current challenges including poorer outcomes in cases of clonal hematologic disorders, alloHCT impact on endocrine function and intrinsic FA risk of epithelial malignancies; and describe investigational therapies for prevention and treatment of the hematologic manifestations of FA. Expert commentary: Current methods allow for excellent survival following alloHCT for FA associated BMF irrespective of donor hematopoietic cell source. Alternative curative approaches, such as gene therapy, are being explored to eliminate the risks of GVHD and minimize therapy-related adverse effects.

  2. Treatment recommendations in patients diagnosed with high-risk cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veness, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    Non-melanoma cutaneous cancers occur at an epidemic rate in Australia. With an ageing population, more Australians will develop these cancers and at an increasing rate. In the majority of cases local treatment is highly curative. However, a subset of the population will be diagnosed with a high-risk cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. These can be defined as patients at risk of having subclinical metastases to regional lymph nodes based on unfavourable primary lesion features (including inadequately excised and recurrent lesions), patients with metastatic squamous cell carcinoma to regional lymph nodes, and squamous cell carcinoma in immunosuppressed patients. The mortality and morbidity associated with high-risk cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma is usually as a consequence of uncontrolled metastatic nodal disease and, to a lesser extent, distant metastases. Radiotherapy has an essential role in treating these patients and in many cases the addition of adjuvant radiotherapy may be life saving. It is therefore important that all clinicians treating skin cancers have an understanding and awareness of the optimal approach to these patients. The aim of this article is to present treatment recommendations based on an overview of the current published literature. Copyright (2005) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  3. Cough in Children: Current Approaches to the Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.O. Rechkina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cough is one of the most common symptoms in the practice of doctors of various specialties, including pediatricians. Cough treatment should be started with the identification of its cause and correct diagnosis. Most often, cough in children is due to the increased viscosity of bronchial secretions, i.e. violation of sputum transport in the bronchial tree, and insufficient activity of ciliated epithelium. The main objective of the treatment of productive cough is dilution of sputum, bronchial secretion and excretion, thus necessitating the administration of mucolytics. Currently, one of the most famous mucolytics is acetylcysteine, cysteine amino acid product, such as ACC®. However, today the question of ACC® (acetylcysteine application in infants and young children is still debatable. This article presents a study whose objective was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and tolerability of ACC® (20 mg/ml solution in the treatment of bronchopulmonary diseases in children aged 2 to 6 years. Materials and methods. The study involved 60 children with acute tracheitis, simple bronchitis, acute obstructive bronchitis, recurrent bronchitis in the acute phase, community-acquired pneumonia, asthma exacerbation, cystic fibrosis. Patients of the main groups (n = 40 received ACC® (20 mg/ml solution at the age-specific dosage 3 times a day in combined treatment. Therapy of patients in the control group (n = 20 was conducted without ACC®. Results. During follow-up, patients who received ACC® had significant positive changes in the nature of cough, sputum viscosity and its amount as opposed to a comparison group of patients. Complete disappearance of cough was achieved on day 5–8 from the beginning of treatment, while in the control group patients, this time was longer. The evaluation of the effectiveness of the study drug showed that very good efficacy was achieved in 75 % of patients and good — in 20 %, and among patients who

  4. Substantial variability in postoperative treatment, and convalescence recommendations following vaginal repair. A nationwide questionnaire study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Marianne; Møller, Charlotte; Kehlet, H

    2001-01-01

    -employed gynecologists, and gynecologists in private practice, to patients undergoing vaginal repair. METHOD: In 1999 all Danish gynecologists (n=433) received a tested questionnaire about postoperative treatment and convalescence recommendations following vaginal repair. Non-responders received one reminder. OUTCOME...... MEASURES: Pre and postoperative treatment, and expected hospital stay. Furthermore, lifting restrictions, sick leave, and convalescence before resumption of defined activities. RESULTS: The overall response rate was 82%. The expected postoperative hospital stay was median 3 days (range, 1-7) following...... anterior repair, and 2 days (range, 1-7) following posterior repair. The recommended sick leave was median 6 weeks (range, 2-12) for patients with work with heavy lifts. There were substantial differences in recommendations. Recommended lifting restrictions were median 3 kg (range, 0-20) for median 4 weeks...

  5. Recommendations on Chronic Constipation (Including Constipation Associated with Irritable Bowel Syndrome Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Paré

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available While chronic constipation (CC has a high prevalence in primary care, there are no existing treatment recommendations to guide health care professionals. To address this, a consensus group of 10 gastroenterologists was formed to develop treatment recommendations. Although constipation may occur as a result of organic disease, the present paper addresses only the management of primary CC or constipation associated with irritable bowel syndrome. The final consensus group was assembled and the recommendations were created following the exact process outlined by the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology for the following areas: epidemiology, quality of life and threshold for treatment; definitions and diagnostic criteria; lifestyle changes; bulking agents and stool softeners; osmotic agents; prokinetics; stimulant laxatives; suppositories; enemas; other drugs; biofeedback and behavioural approaches; surgery; and probiotics. A treatment algorithm was developed by the group for CC and constipation associated with irritable bowel syndrome. Where possible, an evidence-based approach and expert opinions were used to develop the statements in areas with insufficient evidence. The nature of the underlying pathophysiology for constipation is often unclear, and it can be tricky for physicians to decide on an appropriate treatment strategy for the individual patient. The myriad of treatment options available to Canadian physicians can be confusing; thus, the main aim of the recommendations and treatment algorithm is to optimize the approach in clinical care based on available evidence.

  6. Current diagnosis and treatment of Castleman's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González García, A; Moreno Cobo, M Á; Patier de la Peña, J L

    2016-04-01

    Castleman's disease is not just a single disease but rather an uncommon, heterogeneous group of nonclonal lymphoproliferative disorders, which have a broad spectrum of clinical expression. Three histological types have been reported, along with several clinical forms according to clinical presentation, histological substrate and associated diseases. Interleukin-6, its receptor polymorphisms, the human immunodeficiency virus and the human herpes virus 8 are involved in the etiopathogenesis of Castleman's disease. The study of this disease has shed light on a syndrome whose incidence is unknown. Despite recent significant advances in our understanding of this disease and the increasing therapeutic experience with rituximab, tocilizumab and siltuximab, there are still difficult questions concerning its aetiology, prognosis and optimal treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  7. Current and potential treatment options for hyperphosphatemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carfagna, Fabio; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Pontoriero, Giuseppe; Locatelli, Francesco

    2018-05-21

    Hyperphosphatemia is common in late stages of chronic kidney disease and is often associated with elevated parathormone levels, abnormal bone mineralization, extra-osseous calcification, and increased risk of cardiovascular events and death. Several classes of oral phosphate binders are available to help control plasma phosphorus levels. Although effective at lowering serum phosphorus, they all have safety, tolerability, and compliance issues that need to be considered when selecting which one to use. Areas covered: This paper reviews the most established treatment options for hyperphosphatemia, in patients with chronic kidney disease, focusing on the new inhibitors of active phosphate absorption. Expert opinion: The prevention and the treatment of hyperphosphatemia is today far to be satisfactory. Nonetheless, an extending range of phosphate binders are now available. Aluminum has potentially serious toxic risks. Calcium-based binders are very effective but can lead to hypercalcemia and/or positive calcium balance and progression of cardiovascular calcification. No long-term data are available for the new calcium acetate/magnesium combination product. Lanthanum is an effective phosphate binder, and long-term effects of tissue deposition seem clinically irrelevant. Sevelamer, appear to have profiles that would lead to pleiotropic effects and reduced progression of vascular calcification, and the main adverse events seen with these agents are gastrointestinal. Iron has a powerful capability of binding phosphate, thus numerous preparations are available, both with and without significant systemic absorption of the iron component. The inhibitors of active intestinal phosphate transport, with their very selective mechanism of action and low pill burden seem the most interesting approach; however, do not seem at present to be effective alone, in reducing serum phosphorus levels.

  8. Current Diagnosis and Treatment of Halitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Mustafa Kılıçkaya

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Halitosis or oral malodor is not a diagnosis, but is symptom. Halitosis, that we frequently encounter in ear, nose and throat practice can be the harbinger of some serious underlying disease. Therefore, diagnosis and to find the cause of the halitosis are important. Also halitosis treatment is necessary due to the social and psychological effects. Breath contains hundreds of volatile organic compounds that are by-products of our metabolism. Certain diseases such as nasopharynx cancer, larynx cancer ve lung cancer alter the mix of gases. Thus, the analysis of exhaled air has gained importance. New technologies lead to the development of new devices. And with these called electronic noses the analysis of exhaled air has becomes an important non-invasive diagnostic method. In the literature, halitosis and bad breath which is used as synonymus with oral malodor is the emission of unpleasant odor from mouth and nasal passage. It occurs in 25% of the population, approximately and it has a significant social and economic impact. Halitosis is classified as true halitosis (physiologic halitosis and pathologic halitosis, pseudohalitosis and halitophobia. The most common cause is intra-oral diseases. Among all these factors, the most important etiologic factor are the coating tongue. Other ear, nose and throat diseases such as rhinitis and sinusitis are seen among the most common extraoral causes. Treponema denticola, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tanneralla forsythia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens, Actinobacilli and Solobacterium moorei are the bacteria which are commonly isolated from patients with halitosis and they are volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs producing ones as well. The treatment of halitosis should be carried out according to the etiology. In the physiologic halitosis tooth brushing, use of dental floss, tongue cleaning and chlorhexidine, cetylpyridinium chloride and zinc containing antimicrobial mouthwashes

  9. Substantial variability in postoperative treatment, and convalescence recommendations following vaginal repair. A nationwide questionnaire study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Marianne; Møller, Charlotte; Kehlet, H

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative care and convalescence recommendations following vaginal surgery are generally not evidence based. The aim of this study was to describe pre and postoperative treatment, and advice and restrictions for the convalescence period, given by Danish hospital-employed gynecolog......BACKGROUND: Postoperative care and convalescence recommendations following vaginal surgery are generally not evidence based. The aim of this study was to describe pre and postoperative treatment, and advice and restrictions for the convalescence period, given by Danish hospital......-employed gynecologists, and gynecologists in private practice, to patients undergoing vaginal repair. METHOD: In 1999 all Danish gynecologists (n=433) received a tested questionnaire about postoperative treatment and convalescence recommendations following vaginal repair. Non-responders received one reminder. OUTCOME...... anterior repair, and 2 days (range, 1-7) following posterior repair. The recommended sick leave was median 6 weeks (range, 2-12) for patients with work with heavy lifts. There were substantial differences in recommendations. Recommended lifting restrictions were median 3 kg (range, 0-20) for median 4 weeks...

  10. Current surgical treatment for chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimoto, Takayuki; Uchida, Eiji; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Yamahatsu, Kazuya; Matsushita, Akira; Katsuno, Akira; Cho, Kazumitsu; Kawamoto, Masao

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a painful, yet benign inflammatory process of the pancreas. Surgical management should be individualized because the pain is multifactorial and its mechanisms vary from patient to patient. Two main pathogenetic theories for the mechanisms of pain in CP have been proposed: the neurogenic theory and the theory of increased intraductal/intraparenchymal pressures. The latter theory is strongly supported by the good results of drainage procedures in the surgical management of CP. Other possible contributing factors include pancreatic ischemia; a centrally sensitized pain state; and the development of complications, such as pseudocysts and stenosis of the duodenum or common bile duct. Common indications for surgery include intractable pain, suspicion of neoplasm, and complications that cannot be resolved with radiological or endoscopic treatments. Operative procedures have been historically classified into 4 categories: decompression procedures for diseased and obstructed pancreatic ducts; resection procedures for the proximal, distal, or total pancreas; denervation procedures of the pancreas; and hybrid procedures. Pancreaticoduodenectomy and pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy, once the standard operations for patients with CP, have been replaced by hybrid procedures, such as duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection, the Frey procedure, and their variants. These procedures are safe and effective in providing long-term pain relief and in treating CP-related complications. Hybrid procedures should be the operations of choice for patients with CP.

  11. Ulcerative colitis: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and current treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffel, L H; Das, K M

    1996-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the colon that affects the rectum and a variable length of contiguous colon. The disease is characterized by rectal bleeding and diarrhea during periods of exacerbation; these symptoms usually abate with treatment. The pathogenic mechanism of ulcerative colitis is believed to be an aberrant immune response in which antibodies are formed against colonic epithelial protein(s). The disease usually presents during the second and third decades of life, with a smaller peak after the age of 60 years. There is a genetic component to ulcerative colitis, with a higher incidence among family members and, particularly, first-degree relatives. Diagnosis depends on several factors, most notably symptoms, demonstration of uniformly inflamed mucosa beginning in the rectum, and exclusion of other causes of colitis, such as infection. There is no medical cure for ulcerative colitis, but medical therapy is effective and can improve or eliminate symptoms in more than 80% of patients. Surgery offers a cure but carries the high price of total colectomy. New surgical methods, such as ileoanal anastomosis, allow for maintenance of bowel continuity and better patient satisfaction.

  12. Cardiorespiratory fitness and adiposity in breast cancer survivors: is meeting current physical activity recommendations really enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Lozano, Alejandro; Ramos, Javier; Alvarez-Bustos, Alejandro; Cantos, Blanca; Alejo, Lidia B; Pagola, Itziar; Soria, Ana; Maximiano, Constanza; Fiuza-Luces, Carmen; Soares-Miranda, Luisa; Lucia, Alejandro; Ruiz-Casado, Ana

    2018-02-05

    Breast cancer (BC) survivors are becoming increasingly predisposed to cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality. Low cardiorespiratory fitness and physical activity (PA) levels, as well as high values of adiposity indices, contribute to CVD risk. We evaluated adiposity, cardiorespiratory profile, and PA levels in two independent cohorts of BC survivors. Data were collected from two groups (99% women) from different areas of Madrid (Spain): group 1, n = 110, age 51.4 ± 9.7 years, median time from diagnosis 365 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 354-401), and group 2, n = 93, age 54.7 ± 8.9 years, 1714 days (95% CI, 1502-1938). We estimated peak oxygen uptake (VO 2peak ) and measured body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), waist-to-hip index, and accelerometry-determined PA. Both groups had values of BMI in the overweight range (25.3 ± 4.3 and 27.1 ± 5.1 kg/m 2 , p = 0.003). Estimated VO 2peak levels were lower in group 2 than in group 1 (28.1 ± 9.1 and 23.7 ± 8.8 ml/kg/min, p < 0.001), although levels in both groups were low. Yet, the majority of participants in both groups (81 and 88%, p = 0.234) met international PA recommendations (235 ± 196 and 351 ± 173 min/week of moderate-vigorous PA, p < 0.001). Both groups had very low levels of vigorous PA. These results were essentially independent of type of treatment (anthracycline/radiotherapy). We found a poor cardiorespiratory profile in two independent BC cohorts that differed in median time from diagnosis (as well in socioeconomic status), supporting the notion that implementation of PA (possibly focusing on vigorous PA) and dietary intervention is urgently needed in this patient population.

  13. Revisiting safe sleep recommendations for African-American infants: why current counseling is insufficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaydos, Laura M; Blake, Sarah C; Gazmararian, Julie A; Woodruff, Whitney; Thompson, Winifred W; Dalmida, Safiya George

    2015-03-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children be placed in the supine position on firm bedding and not bed share with parents or other children. Health professionals increasingly understand that many African-American parents do not follow these recommendations, but little research exists on provider reactions to this non-compliance. This study was intended to better understand how low-income, African-American mothers understand and act upon safe sleep recommendations for newborns and how providers counsel these mothers. We conducted focus groups with 60 African-American, low-income, first-time mothers and telephone interviews with 20 providers serving these populations to explore provider counseling and patient decision making. The large majority of mothers reported understanding, but not following, the safe-sleeping recommendations. Key reasons for non-compliance included perceived safety, convenience, quality of infant sleep and conflicting information from family members. Mothers often take measures intended to mitigate risk associated with noncompliance, instead increasing SIDS risk. Providers recognize that many mothers are non-compliant and attribute non-compliance largely to cultural and familial influence. However, few provider attempts are made to mitigate SIDS risks from non-compliant behaviors. We suggest that counseling strategies should be adapted to: (1) provide greater detailed rationale for SIDS prevention recommendations; and (2) incorporate or acknowledge familial and cultural preferences. Ignoring the reasons for sleep decisions by African-American parents may perpetuate ongoing racial/ethnic disparities in SIDS.

  14. Increasing consumer demand for tobacco treatments: Ten design recommendations for clinicians and healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Susan Swartz; Jaén, Carlos Roberto

    2010-03-01

    Health professionals play an important role in addressing patient tobacco use in clinical settings. While there is clear evidence that identifying tobacco use and assisting smokers in quitting affects outcomes, challenges to improve routine, clinician-delivered tobacco intervention persist. The Consumer Demand Initiative has identified simple design principles to increase consumers' use of proven tobacco treatments. Applying these design strategies to activities across the healthcare system, we articulate ten recommendations that can be implemented in the context of most clinical systems where most clinicians work. The recommendations are: (1) reframe the definition of success, (2) portray proven treatments as the best care, (3) redesign the 5A's of tobacco intervention, (4) be ready to deliver the right treatment at the right time, (5) move tobacco from the social history to the problem list, (6) use words as therapy and language that makes sense, (7) fit tobacco treatment into clinical team workflows, (8) embed tobacco treatment into health information technology, (9) make every encounter an opportunity to intervene, and (10) end social disparities for tobacco users. Clinical systems need to change to improve tobacco treatment implementation. The consumer- and clinician-centered recommendations provide a roadmap that focuses on increasing clinician performance through greater understanding of the clinician's role in helping tobacco users, highlighting the value of evidence-based tobacco treatments, employing shared decision-making skills, and integrating routine tobacco treatment into clinical system routines. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Practical recommendations for radium-223 treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Yong; Carrio, Ignasi; De Vincentis, Giuseppe; Fanti, Stefano; Ilhan, Harun; Mommsen, Caroline; Nitzsche, Egbert; Sundram, Francis; Vogel, Wouter; Oyen, Wim; Lewington, Val

    2017-01-01

    Radium Ra 223 dichloride (radium-223, Xofigo registered) is the first targeted alpha therapy for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer and symptomatic bone metastases. Radium-223 provides a new treatment option for this setting, but also necessitates a new treatment management approach. We provide straightforward and practical recommendations for European nuclear medicine centres to optimize radium-223 service provision. An independent research consultancy agency observed radium-223 procedures and conducted interviews with all key staff members involved in radium-223 treatment delivery in 11 nuclear medicine centres across six countries (Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland and the UK) experienced in administering radium-223. The findings were collated and discussed at a meeting of experts from these centres, during which key consensus recommendations were defined. The recommendations cover centre organization and preparation; patient referral; radium-223 ordering, preparation and disposal; radium-223 treatment delivery/administration; and patient experience. Guidance includes structured coordination and communication within centres and multidisciplinary teams, focusing on sharing best practice to provide high-quality, patient-centred care throughout the treatment pathway. These expert recommendations are intended to complement existing management guidelines. Sharing best practice and experience will help nuclear medicine centres to optimize radium-223 service provision and improve patient care. (orig.)

  16. Practical recommendations for radium-223 treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Yong [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET/CT, London (United Kingdom); Carrio, Ignasi [Hospital Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); De Vincentis, Giuseppe [Policlinico Umberto I University Hospital Rome, Rome (Italy); Fanti, Stefano [University Hospital Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Ilhan, Harun [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Munich (Germany); Mommsen, Caroline [Praxis fuer diagnostische und therapeutische Nuklearmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Nitzsche, Egbert [Canton Hospital Aarau, Aarau (Switzerland); Sundram, Francis [University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Vogel, Wouter [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Oyen, Wim [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET/CT, London (United Kingdom); The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Lewington, Val [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-09-15

    Radium Ra 223 dichloride (radium-223, Xofigo registered) is the first targeted alpha therapy for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer and symptomatic bone metastases. Radium-223 provides a new treatment option for this setting, but also necessitates a new treatment management approach. We provide straightforward and practical recommendations for European nuclear medicine centres to optimize radium-223 service provision. An independent research consultancy agency observed radium-223 procedures and conducted interviews with all key staff members involved in radium-223 treatment delivery in 11 nuclear medicine centres across six countries (Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland and the UK) experienced in administering radium-223. The findings were collated and discussed at a meeting of experts from these centres, during which key consensus recommendations were defined. The recommendations cover centre organization and preparation; patient referral; radium-223 ordering, preparation and disposal; radium-223 treatment delivery/administration; and patient experience. Guidance includes structured coordination and communication within centres and multidisciplinary teams, focusing on sharing best practice to provide high-quality, patient-centred care throughout the treatment pathway. These expert recommendations are intended to complement existing management guidelines. Sharing best practice and experience will help nuclear medicine centres to optimize radium-223 service provision and improve patient care. (orig.)

  17. CAEP 2015 Academic Symposium: Current State and Recommendations to Achieve Adequate and Sustainable Funding for Emergency Medicine Academic Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Eddy S; Artz, Jennifer D; Wilkie, Ryan D; Stiell, Ian G; Topping, Claude; Belanger, François P; Afilalo, Marc; Renouf, Tia; Crocco, Anthony; Wyatt, Kelly; Christenson, Jim

    2016-05-01

    To describe the current state of academic emergency medicine (EM) funding in Canada and develop recommendations to grow and establish sustainable funding. A panel of eight leaders from different EM academic units was assembled. Using mixed methods (including a literature review, sharing of professional experiences, a survey of current EM academic heads, and data previously collected from an environmental scan), 10 recommendations were drafted and presented at an academic symposium. Attendee feedback was incorporated, and the second set of draft recommendations was further distributed to the Canadian Association Emergency Physicians (CAEP) Academic Section for additional comments before being finalized. Recommendations were developed around the funding challenges identified and solutions developed by academic EM university-based units across Canada. A strategic plan was seen as integral to achieving strong funding of an EM unit, especially when it aligned with departmental and institutional priorities. A business plan, although occasionally overlooked, was deemed an important component for planning and sustaining the academic mission. A number of recommendations surrounding philanthropy consisted of creating partnerships with existing foundations and engaging multiple stakeholders and communities. Synergy between academic and clinical EM departments was also viewed as an opportunity to ensure integration of common missions. Education and networking for current and future leaders were also viewed as invaluable to ensure that opportunities are optimized through strong leadership development and shared experiences to further the EM academic missions across the country. These recommendations were designed to improve the financial circumstances for many Canadian EM units. There is a considerable wealth of resources that can contribute to financial stability for an academic unit, and an annual networking meeting and continuing education on these issues will facilitate

  18. General practitioners do not systematically adhere to regional recommendations on treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Thea; Bjerrum, Lars; Nielsen, Anni Brit Sternhagen

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Uncomplicated urinary tract infection (uUTI) is a common reason for seeing a GP. In Denmark, it is debated if sulfamethizole or pivmecillinam should be recommended for empirical treatment of uUTIs. We evaluated sulfamethizole and pivmecillinam use in the five Danish regions from 2007...... to 2011 and explored if the choice of antibiotic in primary care was in accordance with the regional recommendations for uUTI. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Regional drug use data on pivmecillinam and sulfamethizole from 2007 to 2011 were retrieved from the Registry of Medicinal Product Statistics. Regional...... recommendations from the same period were identified. We calculated differences in consumption based on defined daily doses per 1,000 inhabitants per day (DID) of pivmecillinam and sulfamethizole between the five regions, and intraregional developments. RESULTS: Four regions had recommendations on uUTI in 2011...

  19. Consensus Recommendations for Radiation Therapy Contouring and Treatment of Vulvar Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaffney, David K., E-mail: david.gaffney@hci.utah.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); King, Bronwyn [Department of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Epworth Radiation Oncology, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Viswanathan, Akila N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Barkati, Maroie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Beriwal, Sushil [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Eifel, Patricia [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Erickson, Beth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Proedtert and Medical College Clinical Cancer Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Fyles, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Goulart, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Harkenrider, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University, Maywood, Illinois (United States); Jhingran, Anuja; Klopp, Ann [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Koh, Wui-Jin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Lim, Karen [Liverpool Cancer Therapy Centre, Radiation Oncology Unit, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Petersen, Ivy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [Radiation Oncology Department, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); and others

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a radiation therapy (RT) contouring atlas and recommendations for women with postoperative and locally advanced vulvar carcinoma. Methods and Materials: An international committee of 35 expert gynecologic radiation oncologists completed a survey of the treatment of vulvar carcinoma. An initial set of recommendations for contouring was discussed and generated by consensus. Two cases, 1 locally advanced and 1 postoperative, were contoured by 14 physicians. Contours were compared and analyzed using an expectation-maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), and a 95% confidence interval contour was developed. The level of agreement among contours was assessed using a kappa statistic. STAPLE contours underwent full committee editing to generate the final atlas consensus contours. Results: Analysis of the 14 contours showed substantial agreement, with kappa statistics of 0.69 and 0.64 for cases 1 and 2, respectively. There was high specificity for both cases (≥99%) and only moderate sensitivity of 71.3% and 64.9% for cases 1 and 2, respectively. Expert review and discussion generated consensus recommendations for contouring target volumes and treatment for postoperative and locally advanced vulvar cancer. Conclusions: These consensus recommendations for contouring and treatment of vulvar cancer identified areas of complexity and controversy. Given the lack of clinical research evidence in vulvar cancer radiation therapy, the committee advocates a conservative and consistent approach using standardized recommendations.

  20. Consensus Recommendations for Radiation Therapy Contouring and Treatment of Vulvar Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffney, David K.; King, Bronwyn; Viswanathan, Akila N.; Barkati, Maroie; Beriwal, Sushil; Eifel, Patricia; Erickson, Beth; Fyles, Anthony; Goulart, Jennifer; Harkenrider, Matthew; Jhingran, Anuja; Klopp, Ann; Koh, Wui-Jin; Lim, Karen; Petersen, Ivy; Portelance, Lorraine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a radiation therapy (RT) contouring atlas and recommendations for women with postoperative and locally advanced vulvar carcinoma. Methods and Materials: An international committee of 35 expert gynecologic radiation oncologists completed a survey of the treatment of vulvar carcinoma. An initial set of recommendations for contouring was discussed and generated by consensus. Two cases, 1 locally advanced and 1 postoperative, were contoured by 14 physicians. Contours were compared and analyzed using an expectation-maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), and a 95% confidence interval contour was developed. The level of agreement among contours was assessed using a kappa statistic. STAPLE contours underwent full committee editing to generate the final atlas consensus contours. Results: Analysis of the 14 contours showed substantial agreement, with kappa statistics of 0.69 and 0.64 for cases 1 and 2, respectively. There was high specificity for both cases (≥99%) and only moderate sensitivity of 71.3% and 64.9% for cases 1 and 2, respectively. Expert review and discussion generated consensus recommendations for contouring target volumes and treatment for postoperative and locally advanced vulvar cancer. Conclusions: These consensus recommendations for contouring and treatment of vulvar cancer identified areas of complexity and controversy. Given the lack of clinical research evidence in vulvar cancer radiation therapy, the committee advocates a conservative and consistent approach using standardized recommendations.

  1. [Current dietary exposure to mercury during pregnancy and childhood, and public health recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llop, Sabrina; Ibarlucea, Jesús; Sunyer, Jordi; Ballester, Ferran

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to high levels of mercury during vulnerable periods (such as pregnancy and childhood) may have serious consequences for cognitive development, as observed after acute poisoning episodes in Japan and Irak. The main source of mercury exposure in the general population is consumption of certain types of fish. There is growing concern about the possible neurotoxic effects of mercury, especially in younger children in populations where fish intake is moderate to high. The scientific evidence to date is inconclusive. In Spain, the Childhood and Environment (Infancia y Medio Ambiente [INMA]) project has provided information on levels of prenatal exposure to mercury among 1800 newborns from Valencia, Sabadell, Asturias and Guipúzcoa. In general, levels were high, being above the World Health Organization's recommended dose in 24% of children and above the recommended levels of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 64%. However, the results did not indicate a significant association between prenatal mercury exposure and delayed cognitive development during the second year of life. Various agencies have developed recommendations on fish consumption for pregnant women and children, due to the presence of mercury. These recommendations should be strengthened, since there is general consensus among all regional and national public administrations that fish is an essential source of nutrients for development in the early stages of life. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Have Recommended Book Lists Changed to Reflect Current Expectations for Informational Text in K-3 Classrooms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreher, Mariam Jean; Kletzien, Sharon B.

    2016-01-01

    Despite both longstanding and recent calls for more informational text in K-3 classrooms, research indicates that narrative text remains in the majority for read alouds, classroom libraries, and instruction, thus limiting children's opportunity to experience the demands of expository text. Because national associations' recommended book lists are…

  3. Extracorporeal treatment for theophylline poisoning: systematic review and recommendations from the EXTRIP workgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannoum, Marc; Wiegand, Timothy J; Liu, Kathleen D; Calello, Diane P; Godin, Melanie; Lavergne, Valery; Gosselin, Sophie; Nolin, Thomas D; Hoffman, Robert S

    2015-05-01

    The Extracorporeal Treatments in Poisoning workgroup was created to provide evidence-based recommendations on the use of extracorporeal treatments (ECTRs) in poisoning. Here, the workgroup presents its systematic review and recommendations for theophylline. After a systematic review of the literature, a subgroup reviewed articles, extracted data, summarized findings, and proposed structured voting statements following a pre-determined format. A two-round modified Delphi method was chosen to reach a consensus on voting statements and the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method was used to quantify disagreement. Anonymous votes were compiled, returned, and discussed. A second vote determined the final recommendations. 141 articles were included: 6 in vitro studies, 4 animal studies, 101 case reports/case series, 7 descriptive cohorts, 4 observational studies, and 19 pharmacokinetic studies, yielding a low-to-very-low quality of evidence for all recommendations. Data on 143 patients were reviewed, including 10 deaths. The workgroup concluded that theophylline is dialyzable (level of evidence = A) and made the following recommendations: ECTR is recommended in severe theophylline poisoning (1C). Specific recommendations for ECTR include a theophylline concentration [theophylline] > 100 mg/L (555 μmol/L) in acute exposure (1C), the presence of seizures (1D), life-threatening dysrhythmias (1D) or shock (1D), a rising [theophylline] despite optimal therapy (1D), and clinical deterioration despite optimal care (1D). In chronic poisoning, ECTR is suggested if [theophylline] > 60 mg/L (333 μmol/L) (2D) or if the [theophylline] > 50 mg/L (278 μmol/L) and the patient is either less than 6 months of age or older than 60 years of age (2D). ECTR is also suggested if gastrointestinal decontamination cannot be administered (2D). ECTR should be continued until clinical improvement is apparent or the [theophylline] is poisoning is amenable to ECTRs. The workgroup recommended

  4. [Treatment of hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease: what is the recommended antithyroid drug during pregnancy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, P

    2013-05-01

    Clinical hyperthyroidism during the first trimester of pregnancy due to Graves' disease can be associated with maternal, obstetrical and fetal complications, indicating an active treatment to restore normal thyroid function. Antithyroid drugs are the first line treatment in pregnant women with hyperthyroidism. Due to the increased congenital malformations reported in neonates after first-trimester carbimazole/methimazole treatment and propylthiouracil associated hepatotoxicity, the recommended treatment for pregnant women with hyperthyroid Graves' disease is propylthiouracil during the first trimester of pregnancy and following the first trimester, consideration should be given switching to carbimazole/methimazole during the second part of gestation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Alzheimer’s Disease: Background, Current and Future Treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Evelyn Chou

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a currently incurable neurodegenerative disorder, and its treatment has posed a big challenge. Proposed causes of Alzheimer’s disease include the cholinergic, amyloid and tau hypothesis. Current therapeutic treatments have been aimed at dealing with neurotransmitter imbalance. These include cholinesterase inhibitors and N-methyl D-aspartate receptor antagonists. However, current therapeutics have been unable to halt its progression. The future of Alzheimer’s disease tre...

  6. DeepSurv: personalized treatment recommender system using a Cox proportional hazards deep neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzman, Jared L; Shaham, Uri; Cloninger, Alexander; Bates, Jonathan; Jiang, Tingting; Kluger, Yuval

    2018-02-26

    Medical practitioners use survival models to explore and understand the relationships between patients' covariates (e.g. clinical and genetic features) and the effectiveness of various treatment options. Standard survival models like the linear Cox proportional hazards model require extensive feature engineering or prior medical knowledge to model treatment interaction at an individual level. While nonlinear survival methods, such as neural networks and survival forests, can inherently model these high-level interaction terms, they have yet to be shown as effective treatment recommender systems. We introduce DeepSurv, a Cox proportional hazards deep neural network and state-of-the-art survival method for modeling interactions between a patient's covariates and treatment effectiveness in order to provide personalized treatment recommendations. We perform a number of experiments training DeepSurv on simulated and real survival data. We demonstrate that DeepSurv performs as well as or better than other state-of-the-art survival models and validate that DeepSurv successfully models increasingly complex relationships between a patient's covariates and their risk of failure. We then show how DeepSurv models the relationship between a patient's features and effectiveness of different treatment options to show how DeepSurv can be used to provide individual treatment recommendations. Finally, we train DeepSurv on real clinical studies to demonstrate how it's personalized treatment recommendations would increase the survival time of a set of patients. The predictive and modeling capabilities of DeepSurv will enable medical researchers to use deep neural networks as a tool in their exploration, understanding, and prediction of the effects of a patient's characteristics on their risk of failure.

  7. Should recommendations about starting inhaled corticosteroid treatment for mild asthma be based on symptom frequency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reddel, Helen K.; Busse, William W.; Pedersen, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Background Low-dose inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are highly effective for reducing asthma exacerbations and mortality. Conventionally, ICS treatment is recommended for patients with symptoms on more than 2 days per week, but this criterion has scant evidence. We aimed to assess the validity of t...

  8. Curve identification for high friction surface treatment (HFST) installation recommendation : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The objectives of this study are to develop and deploy a means for cost-effectively extracting curve information using the widely available GPS and GIS data to support high friction surface treatment (HFST) installation recommendations (i.e., start a...

  9. Laboratory recommendations for scoring deep molecular responses following treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cross, N. C. P.; White, H. E.; Colomer, D.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) with tyrosine kinase inhibitors has advanced to a stage where many patients achieve very low or undetectable levels of disease. Remarkably, some of these patients remain in sustained remission when treatment is withdrawn, suggesting that they may be at ...... of sensitivity. Here we present detailed laboratory recommendations, developed as part of the European Treatment and Outcome Study for CML (EUTOS), to enable testing laboratories to score MR in a reproducible manner for CML patients expressing the most common BCR-ABL1 variants....

  10. SIOP PODC adapted treatment recommendations for standard-risk medulloblastoma in low and middle income settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, Jeannette; Hendricks, Marc; Ssenyonga, Peter; Mugamba, John; Molyneux, Elizabeth; Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Fieggen, Graham; Luna-Fineman, Sandra; Howard, Scott; Mitra, Dipayan; Bouffet, Eric; Davidson, Alan; Bailey, Simon

    2015-04-01

    Effective treatment of children with medulloblastoma requires a functioning multi-disciplinary team with adequate neurosurgical, neuroradiological, pathological, radiotherapy and chemotherapy facilities and personnel. In addition the treating centre should have the capacity to effectively screen and manage any tumour and treatment-associated complications. These requirements have made it difficult for many low and middle-income countries (LMIC) centres to offer curative treatment. This article provides management recommendations for children with standard-risk medulloblastoma (localised tumours in children over the age of 3-5 years) according to the level of facilities available. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Current algorithm for the surgical treatment of facial pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munawar Naureen

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Facial pain may be divided into several distinct categories, each requiring a specific treatment approach. In some cases, however, such categorization is difficult and treatment is ineffective. We reviewed our extensive clinical experience and designed an algorithmic approach to the treatment of medically intractable facial pain that can be treated through surgical intervention. Methods Our treatment algorithm is based on taking into account underlying pathological processes, the anatomical distribution of pain, pain characteristics, the patient's age and medical condition, associated medical problems, the history of previous surgical interventions, and, in some cases, the results of psychological evaluation. The treatment modalities involved in this algorithm include diagnostic blocks, peripheral denervation procedures, craniotomy for microvascular decompression of cranial nerves, percutaneous rhizotomies using radiofrequency ablation, glycerol injection, balloon compression, peripheral nerve stimulation procedures, stereotactic radiosurgery, percutaneous trigeminal tractotomy, and motor cortex stimulation. We recommend that some patients not receive surgery at all, but rather be referred for other medical or psychological treatment. Results Our algorithmic approach was used in more than 100 consecutive patients with medically intractable facial pain. Clinical evaluations and diagnostic workups were followed in each case by the systematic choice of the appropriate intervention. The algorithm has proved easy to follow, and the recommendations include the identification of the optimal surgery for each patient with other options reserved for failures or recurrences. Our overall success rate in eliminating facial pain presently reaches 96%, which is higher than that observed in most clinical series reported to date Conclusion This treatment algorithm for the intractable facial pain appears to be effective for patients with a wide variety

  12. Evidence for current recommendations concerning the management of foot health for people with chronic long-term conditions: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Edwards

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research focusing on management of foot health has become more evident over the past decade, especially related to chronic conditions such as diabetes. The level of methodological rigour across this body of work however is varied and outputs do not appear to have been developed or translated into clinical practice. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the latest guidelines, standards of care and current recommendations relative to people with chronic conditions to ascertain the level of supporting evidence concerning the management of foot health. Methods A systematic search of electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Cinahl, Web of Science, SCOPUS and The Cochrane Library for literature on recommendations for foot health management for people with chronic conditions was performed between 2000 and 2016 using predefined criteria. Data from the included publications was synthesised via template analysis, employing a thematic organisation and structure. The methodological quality of all included publications was appraised using the Appraisal for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II instrument. A more in-depth analysis was carried out that specifically considered the levels of evidence that underpinned the strength of their recommendations concerning management of foot health. Results The data collected revealed 166 publications in which the majority (102 were guidelines, standards of care or recommendations related to the treatment and management of diabetes. We noted a trend towards a systematic year on year increase in guidelines standards of care or recommendations related to the treatment and management of long term conditions other than diabetes over the past decade. The most common recommendation is for preventive care or assessments (e.g. vascular tests, followed by clinical interventions such as foot orthoses, foot ulcer care and foot health education. Methodological quality was spread across the range of AGREE II

  13. Current developments in bovine mastitis treatment and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wager, L A; Linquist, W E; Hayes, G L; Britten, A M; Whitehead, R G; Webster, D E; Barnes, F D

    1978-01-01

    Mastitis in its complexity has managed to forestall all efforts of eradication in spite of years of research, antibiotics and practical control measures. This minisymposium will touch on seven topics current to treatment and control of this economically important disease.

  14. GESIDA/PETHEMA recommendations on the diagnosis and treatment of lymphomas in patients infected by the human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, Pilar; Navarro, José Tomás; Berenguer, Juan; Gómez Codina, José; Kwon, Mi; Serrano, David; Díez-Martín, José Luis; Villà, Salvador; Rubio, Rafael; Menárguez, Javier; Ribera Santasusana, José-María

    2018-01-18

    The incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Hodgkin's lymphoma is higher in patients with HIV infection than in the general population. Following the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), the prognostic significance of HIV-related variables has decreased, and lymphoma-related factors have become more pronounced. Currently, treatments for lymphomas in HIV-infected patients do not differ from those used in the general population. However, differentiating characteristics of seropositive patients, such as the need for cART and specific prophylaxis and treatment of certain opportunistic infections, should be considered. This document updates recommendations on the diagnosis and treatment of lymphomas in HIV infected patients published by GESIDA/PETHEMA in 2008. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Dietary fibre in Europe: current state of knowledge on definitions, sources, recommendations, intakes and relationships to health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Alison M; Champ, Martine M-J; Cloran, Susan J; Fleith, Mathilde; van Lieshout, Lilou; Mejborn, Heddie; Burley, Victoria J

    2017-12-01

    Research into the analysis, physical properties and health effects of dietary fibre has continued steadily over the last 40-50 years. From the knowledge gained, countries have developed guidelines for their populations on the optimal amount of fibre to be consumed each day. Food composition tables from many countries now contain values for the dietary fibre content of foods, and, from these, combined with dietary surveys, population intakes have been determined. The present review assessed the uniformity of the analytical methods used, health claims permitted, recommendations and intakes, particularly from national surveys across Europe and around the world. It also assessed current knowledge on health effects of dietary fibre and related the impact of different fibre types on health. The overall intent was to be able to provide more detailed guidance on the types of fibre which should be consumed for good health, rather than simply a total intake figure, the current situation. Analysis of data indicated a fair degree of uniformity in the definition of dietary fibre, the method used for analysis, the recommended amount to be consumed and a growing literature on effects on digestive health and disease risk. However, national dietary survey data showed that intakes do not reach recommendations and very few countries provide guidance on the types of fibre that are preferable to achieve recommended intakes. Research gaps were identified and ideas suggested to provide information for more detailed advice to the public about specific food sources that should be consumed to achieve health benefits.

  16. Current and emerging treatment options for myopic choroidal neovascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Matri L

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Leila El Matri, Ahmed Chebil, Fedra Kort Department B of Ophthalmology, Hedi Rais Institute of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine of Tunis, University of El Manar, Tunis, Tunisia Abstract: Choroidal neovascularization (CNV is the main cause of visual impairment in highly myopic patients younger than 50 years of age. There are different treatments for myopic CNV (mCNV, with 5- to 10-year outcomes currently. Chorioretinal atrophy is still the most important determinant factor for visual outcome. The purpose of this study is to provide an overview of the current treatments for mCNV, including laser, surgical management, verteporfin photodynamic therapy, and mainly anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy. Emerging treatment options are also discussed. Keywords: myopia, choroidal neovascularization, current treatment, emerging treatment

  17. Literature-based recommendations for treatment planning and execution in high-dose radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senan, Suresh; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Giraud, Philippe; Mirimanoff, Rene; Budach, Volker

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: To review the literature on techniques used in high-dose radiotherapy of lung cancer in order to develop recommendations for clinical practice and for use in research protocols. Patients and methods: A literature search was performed for articles and abstracts that were considered both clinically relevant and practical to use. The relevant information was arbitrarily categorized under the following headings: patient positioning, CT scanning, incorporating tumour mobility, definition of target volumes, radiotherapy planning, treatment delivery, and scoring of response and toxicity. Results: Recommendations were made for each of the above steps from the published literature. Although most of the recommended techniques have yet to be evaluated in multicenter clinical trials, their use in high-dose radiotherapy to the thorax appears to be rational on the basis of current evidence. Conclusions: Recommendations for the clinical implementation of high-dose conformal radiotherapy for lung tumours were identified in the literature. Procedures that are still considered to be investigational were also highlighted

  18. Energy sector assistance in developing countries: Current trends and policy recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tharakan, Pradeep J.; Castro, Julio de; Kroeger, Timm

    2007-01-01

    An estimated 2.5 billion people remain without access to modern energy supplies. This shortfall is expected to grow as the population in developing countries continues to grow rapidly and the existing infrastructure ages. The United Nations' goal of lowering poverty by half by 2015 will not be attained unless the poor in developing countries gain greater access to basic infrastructure and services, including energy services. The key objective of this paper is to analyze trends in overseas development assistance (ODA) to the energy sector in developing countries during the period 1990-2003, relative to realized private sector investments. This analysis then forms the basis for policy recommendations for consideration by decision makers within countries that are major contributors to ODA

  19. Current maternal age recommendations for prenatal diagnosis: a reappraisal using the expected utility theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicherman, N; Bombard, A T; Rappoport, P

    1995-01-01

    The expected utility theory suggests eliminating an age-specific criterion for recommending prenatal diagnosis to patients. We isolate the factors which patients and physicians need to consider intelligently in prenatal diagnosis, and show that the sole use of a threshold age as a screening device is inadequate. Such a threshold fails to consider adequately patients' attitudes regarding many of the possible outcomes of prenatal diagnosis; in particular, the birth of a chromosomally abnormal child and procedural-related miscarriages. It also precludes testing younger women and encourages testing in patients who do not necessarily require or desire it. All pregnant women should be informed about their prenatal diagnosis options, screening techniques, and diagnostic procedures, including their respective limitations, risks, and benefits.

  20. Italian consensus on Eular 2003 recommendations for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Patrignani

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The recommendations for the management of osteoarthritis (OA of the knee firstly proposed by the EULAR in 2000, have been updated in 2003. One of the most important objectives of the expert charged to provide these recommendations was their dissemination. Thus, the information generated may be used by each individual country to produce their own set of management guidelines and algorithms for treatment in primary care. The Italian Society of Rheumatology (SIR and the Italian League against Rheumatism (LIMAR have organised a Consensus on the EULAR recommendations 2003 with the aim to analyse their acceptability and the applicability according to our own experience and local situations in the Italy. The results of this Consensus have demonstrated that a large majority of the EULAR recommendations are endorsed by the Italian experts. Furthermore, the final document of the Italian Consensus clearly indicated the need that the specialists involved in the management of knee OA strongly encourage the dissemination of the EULAR 2003 recommendations also in Italy.

  1. Brazilian society of hepatology recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flair J Carrilho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Hepatocellular carcinoma is a malignancy of global importance and is associated with a high rate of mortality. Recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of this disease make it imperative to update the recommendations on the management of the disease. In order to draw evidence-based recommendations concering the diagnosis and management of hepatocellular carcinoma, the Brazilian Society of Hepatology has sponsored a single-topic meeting in João Pessoa (PB. All the invited pannelists were asked to make a systematic review of the literature and to present topics related to the risk factors for its development, methods of screening, radiological diagnosis, staging systems, curative and palliative treatments and hepatocellular carcinoma in noncirrhotic liver. After the meeting, all panelists gathered together for the discussion of the topics and the elaboration of those recommendations. The text was subsequently submitted for suggestions and approval of all members of the Brazilian Society of Hepatology through its homepage. The present paper is the final version of the reviewed manuscript containing the recommendations of the Brazilian Society of Hepatology.

  2. [Concordance between hospital prescriptions and recommendations in the treatment of mania].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laforgue, Edouard-Jules; Bulteau, Samuel; Cholet, Jennyfer; Victorri-Vigneau, Caroline; Guitteny, Marie; Mauduit, Nicolas; Vanelle, Jean-Marie; Sauvaget, Anne

    2017-06-01

    There are differences between recommendations and practice in the pharmacological treatment of acute mania. The objective was to assess conformity of the anti-manic prescription between national recommendations (Haute Autorité de santé [French health authority, HAS] and "résumé des caractéristiques du produit" [product characteristics, RCP]) and clinical practice. We observed the drug prescriptions of in-patients for a manic episode. The main outcome measure was the concordance rate with the recommendations of the drugs prescriptions at the 48th hour. The secondary outcome repeated the same process with the hospital discharge statement of switches, associations, the presence of symptomatic and antidepressant treatments. Sixty-six episodes were included, 40 patients (60%) had a prescription complies with RCP recommendations H48 and 46 patients (70%) to HAS. These rates fall at hospital discharge. Off-label prescriptions, drug combinations and choices of not listed molecules are the most common reasons for non-conformity. Copyright © 2016 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Varying effects of recommended treatments for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Marius Mark; Lewinter, Christian; Køber, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the treatment effects of recommended drugs and devices on key clinical outcomes for patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFREF). Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) listed in the 2012 HF guideline from the European Society of Cardiology...... as well as the 2013 HF guideline from the American College of Cardiology Foundation and American Heart Association were evaluated for use in the meta-analysis. RCTs written in English evaluating recommended drugs and devices for the treatment of patients with HFREF were included. Meta-analyses, based...... on the outcomes of all-cause mortality and hospitalization because of HF, were performed with relative risk ratio as the effect size. In the identified 47 RCTs, patients were on average 63 years old and 22% were female. Drugs targeting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, beta-blockers, cardiac...

  4. Different recommendations for empiric first-choice antibiotic treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infections in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQuiston Haslund, Josephine; Rosborg Dinesen, Marianne; Nielsen, Anni Brit Sternhagen

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Uncomplicated urinary tract infection (uUTI) is a common reason for antibiotic treatment in primary health care. Due to the increasing prevalence of antibiotic-resistant uropathogens it is crucial to use the most appropriate antibiotics for first-choice empiric treatment of uUTI....... Particularly, it is important to avoid antibiotics associated with a high rate of antimicrobial resistance. This study compares national recommendations from six European countries, investigating recommendations for first-choice antibiotic therapy of uUTI. SETTING: General practice in six European countries...... at least one antibiotic associated with a low (UTI could not be explained by differences in local bacterial aetiology or by different patterns of antimicrobial resistance. Despite resistance rates exceeding 10...

  5. Current approaches to treatments for schizophrenia spectrum disorders, part I: an overview and medical treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien WT

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Wai Tong Chien, Annie LK Yip School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong Abstract: During the last three decades, an increasing understanding of the etiology, psychopathology, and clinical manifestations of schizophrenia spectrum disorders, in addition to the introduction of second-generation antipsychotics, has optimized the potential for recovery from the illness. Continued development of various models of psychosocial intervention promotes the goal of schizophrenia treatment from one of symptom control and social adaptation to an optimal restoration of functioning and/or recovery. However, it is still questionable whether these new treatment approaches can address the patients' needs for treatment and services and contribute to better patient outcomes. This article provides an overview of different treatment approaches currently used in schizophrenia spectrum disorders to address complex health problems and a wide range of abnormalities and impairments resulting from the illness. There are different treatment strategies and targets for patients at different stages of the illness, ranging from prophylactic antipsychotics and cognitive–behavioral therapy in the premorbid stage to various psychosocial interventions in addition to antipsychotics for relapse prevention and rehabilitation in the later stages of the illness. The use of antipsychotics alone as the main treatment modality may be limited not only in being unable to tackle the frequently occurring negative symptoms and cognitive impairments but also in producing a wide variety of adverse effects to the body or organ functioning. Because of varied pharmacokinetics and treatment responsiveness across agents, the medication regimen should be determined on an individual basis to ensure an optimal effect in its long-term use. This review also highlights that the recent practice guidelines and standards have

  6. RECOMMENDATIONS ON DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Margiyeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Given very high prevalence of urinary tract infection (UTI in the setting of renal pathology in children, timely disease identification, adequate antibacterial treatment and, if necessary, anti relapse therapy are of extreme importance. It is known that recurrent UTI is a risk factor of renal damage progression and development of renal failure. The given clinical recommendations on UTI diagnosis and management are based on the evidence-based approach. This helps to optimize work of pediatricians and pediatric nephrologists.

  7. Update: cholera--Western Hemisphere, and recommendations for treatment of cholera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-16

    Epidemic cholera appeared in Peru in January 1991 and subsequently spread to Ecuador, Colombia, Chile, Brazil, Mexico, and Guatemala. Cholera can be a severe, life-threatening illness but is highly preventable and easily treated; however, few health-care practitioners in the United States have experience identifying and treating cholera. This report provides an update on cholera in the Western Hemisphere and provides recommendations on the clinical diagnosis and treatment of cholera in the United States.

  8. [The suitability of the current recommendations for introducing gluten to the diet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marugán de Miguelsanz, J M; Ochoa Sangrador, C

    2013-08-01

    The habits of introducing gluten and the implementation of the ESPGHAN-2008 recommendations are evaluated. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in 2011 using a questionnaire containing various epidemiological variables and supplementary feeding that was completed by the parents of children between 12-18 months who were seen by the pediatrician. Central tendency measures were calculated for the quantitative variables, and non-parametric tests used for comparison of means (Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis). The Chi-squared or exact tests were used for analyzing the qualitative variables, analysis of frequencies and comparisons. Multivariate adjustment techniques were used for the significant variables. A total of 46 primary care pediatricians, who collected 1,015 questionnaires, collaborated. The mean age of the introduction of gluten was 6.99 months (standard deviation 1.46, median 7). Only 45.1% (95% confidence interval [CI 95%]: 41.8-48.3) introduced it between 4-6 months, 0.2% before 4 months, and 54.7% after 7 months. Only 13.9% (CI 95% 11.6-16.1) introduced gluten between 4-6 months with breastfeeding. Multivariate analysis showed that the variables linked to lower compliance with the introduction between 4-6 months are mothers of 35 years of age or older (adjusted Odds ratio (aOR 1.44; CI95%: 1.11-1.88), celiac family (aOR 2.04; CI 95%: 1.11-3.72) and breastfeeding (aOR 1.55; CI 95%: 1.06-2.26), and for the introduction between 4-6 months coinciding with breastfeeding, breastfeeding and mothers who had studied at university (aOR 1.72; CI 95%: 1.17-2.53). The ESPGHAN recommendation on the introduction of gluten among pediatricians in our sector has not yet been sufficiently implemented. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. International recommendations on the diagnosis and treatment of patients with acquired hemophilia A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huth-Kühne, Angela; Baudo, Francesco; Collins, Peter; Ingerslev, Jørgen; Kessler, Craig M.; Lévesque, Hervé; Castellano, Maria Eva Mingot; Shima, Midori; St-Louis, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare bleeding disorder characterized by autoantibodies directed against circulating coagulation factor (F) VIII. Typically, patients with no prior history of a bleeding disorder present with spontaneous bleeding and an isolated prolonged aPTT. AHA may, however, present without any bleeding symptoms, therefore an isolated prolonged aPTT should always be investigated further irrespective of the clinical findings. Control of acute bleeding is the first priority, and we recommend first-line therapy with bypassing agents such as recombinant activated FVII or activated prothrombin complex concentrate. Once the diagnosis has been achieved, immediate autoantibody eradication to reduce subsequent bleeding risk should be performed. We recommend initial treatment with corticosteroids or combination therapy with corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide and suggest second-line therapy with rituximab if first-line therapy fails or is contraindicated. In contrast to congenital hemophilia, no comparative studies exist to support treatment recommendations for patients with AHA, therefore treatment guidance must rely on the expertise and clinical experience of specialists in the field. The aim of this document is to provide a set of international practice guidelines based on our collective clinical experience in treating patients with AHA and contribute to improved care for this patient group. PMID:19336751

  10. Patient Reactions to Surgeon Recommendations About Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy for Treatment of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Steven J; Janz, Nancy K; Abrahamse, Paul; Wallner, Lauren P; Hawley, Sarah T; An, Lawrence C; Ward, Kevin C; Hamilton, Ann S; Morrow, Monica; Jagsi, Reshma

    2017-07-01

    Guidelines assert that contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) should be discouraged in patients without an elevated risk for a second primary breast cancer. However, little is known about the impact of surgeons discouraging CPM on patient care satisfaction or decisions to seek treatment from another clinician. To examine the association between patient report of first-surgeon recommendation against CPM and the extent of discussion about it with 3 outcomes: patient satisfaction with surgery decisions, receipt of a second opinion, and receipt of surgery by a second surgeon. This population-based survey study was conducted in Georgia and California. We identified 3880 women with stages 0 to II breast cancer treated in 2013-2014 through the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registries of Georgia and Los Angeles County. Surveys were sent approximately 2 months after surgery (71% response rate, n = 2578). In this analysis conducted from February to May 2016, we included patients with unilateral breast cancer who considered CPM (n = 1140). Patients were selected between July 2013 and September 2014. We examined report of surgeon recommendations, level of discussion about CPM, satisfaction with surgical decision making, receipt of second surgical opinion, and surgery from a second surgeon. The mean (SD) age of patients included in this study was 56 (10.6) years. About one-quarter of patients (26.7%; n = 304) reported that their first surgeon recommended against CPM and 30.1% (n = 343) reported no substantial discussion about CPM. Dissatisfaction with surgery decision was uncommon (7.6%; n = 130), controlling for clinical and demographic characteristics. One-fifth of patients (20.6%; n = 304) had a second opinion about surgical options and 9.8% (n = 158) had surgery performed by a second surgeon. Dissatisfaction was very low (3.9%; n = 42) among patients who reported that their surgeon did not recommend against CPM but

  11. Are current coaching recommendations for cricket batting technique supported by biomechanical research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Melissa J; Spratford, Wayne

    2012-09-01

    Coaching manuals are an invaluable tool for coaches, used in player skill and technique development, especially at grass-roots level. Commonly developed by former players and coaches, this information is generally based on anecdotal evidence and in general lacks the scientific rigour of a peer-reviewed journal. Thus there is a need to establish the level of agreement and support between the coaching and biomechanical literature. In doing so, evidence-based coaching practices can be optimally developed. Moreover, this will ensure the technique and skill development practices implemented at grass-roots level are supported by successful performance in the later stages of player development. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the latest batting biomechanics research, providing a comprehensive and up-to-date insight into the kinematic and kinetic aspects of batting in cricket. Furthermore, this review compared and contrasted this research with a selection of coaching literature, establishing a strong level of support and agreement between the coaching and biomechanical literature in recommendations for cricket batting technique. Although the ambiguity in a number of coaching concepts still exists, coaches and players can be confident in the successful implementation of both sources of information in a player's technical development.

  12. Forest Planning Heuristics—Current Recommendations and Research Opportunities for s-Metaheuristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pete Bettinger

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive forest management requires planning and implementation of activities designed to maintain or improve forest conditions, and in support of these endeavors knowledge of silviculture, economics, operations research, and other allied fields are necessary. With regard to forest planning, traditional (exact mathematical techniques along with heuristics have been demonstrated as useful in developing alternative courses of action for forest managers to consider. In this discussion paper, we present six areas of future work with regard to investigations into the development of heuristics, along with several recommendations that are based on our experiences. These areas include process improvements, reversion strategies, destruction and reconstruction strategies, intelligent or dynamic parameterization approaches, intelligent termination or transitioning approaches, and seeding strategies. We chose the six areas based on our experiences in developing forest planning heuristics. These areas reflect our opinion of where future research might concentrate. All of these areas of work have the potential to enhance the capabilities and effectiveness of heuristic approaches when applied to adaptive forest management problems.

  13. [Whooping cough in Spain. Current epidemiology, prevention and control strategies. Recommendations by the Pertussis Working Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campins, Magda; Moreno-Pérez, David; Gil-de Miguel, Angel; González-Romo, Fernando; Moraga-Llop, Fernando A; Arístegui-Fernández, Javier; Goncé-Mellgren, Anna; Bayas, José M; Salleras-Sanmartí, Lluís

    2013-04-01

    A large increase of pertussis incidence has been observed in recent years in countries with high vaccination coverage. Outbreaks of pertussis are increasingly being reported. The age presentation has a bipolar distribution: infants younger 6months that have not initiated or completed a vaccination schedule, and adolescents and adults, due to the lost of natural or vaccine immunity over time. These epidemiological changes justify the need to adopt new vaccination strategies in order to protect young infants and to reduce pertussis incidence in all age groups. Adolescents and adults immunization must be a priority. In the first group, strategy is easy to implement, and with a very low additional cost (to replace dT vaccine by dTap one). Adult vaccination may be more difficult to implement; dT vaccine decennial booster should be replaced by dTap. The immunization of household contacts of newborn infants (cocooning) is the strategy that has a most important impact on infant pertussis. Recently, pregnant women vaccination (after 20weeks of gestation) has been recommended in some countries as the most effective way to protect the newborn. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. Current Limitations and Recommendations to Improve Testing for the Environmental Assessment of Endocrine Active Substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coady, Katherine K; Biever, Ronald C; Denslow, Nancy D

    2017-01-01

    In this paper existing regulatory frameworks and test systems for assessing potential endocrine-active chemicals are described, and associated challenges discussed, along with proposed approaches to address these challenges. Regulatory frameworks vary somewhat across geographies, but all basically...... evaluate whether a chemical possesses endocrine activity and whether this activity can result in adverse outcomes either to humans or the environment. Current test systems include in silico, in vitro and in vivo techniques focused on detecting potential endocrine activity, and in vivo tests that collect...... methods currently do not exist, and addressing key endocrine pathways of possible concern in addition to those associated with estrogen, androgen and thyroid signaling. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  15. Antiretroviral Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of HIV Infection in Adults: 2016 Recommendations of the International Antiviral Society-USA Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günthard, Huldrych F; Saag, Michael S; Benson, Constance A; del Rio, Carlos; Eron, Joseph J; Gallant, Joel E; Hoy, Jennifer F; Mugavero, Michael J; Sax, Paul E; Thompson, Melanie A; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Landovitz, Raphael J; Smith, Davey M; Jacobsen, Donna M; Volberding, Paul A

    2016-07-12

    monitoring during treatment is recommended to assess response, adverse effects, and adherence. Approaches are recommended to improve linkage to and retention in care are provided. Daily tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine is recommended for use as preexposure prophylaxis to prevent HIV infection in persons at high risk. When indicated, postexposure prophylaxis should be started as soon as possible after exposure. Antiretroviral agents remain the cornerstone of HIV treatment and prevention. All HIV-infected individuals with detectable plasma virus should receive treatment with recommended initial regimens consisting of an InSTI plus 2 NRTIs. Preexposure prophylaxis should be considered as part of an HIV prevention strategy for at-risk individuals. When used effectively, currently available ARVs can sustain HIV suppression and can prevent new HIV infection. With these treatment regimens, survival rates among HIV-infected adults who are retained in care can approach those of uninfected adults.

  16. Vegetable and Fruit Intakes of On-Reserve First Nations Schoolchildren Compared to Canadian Averages and Current Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian D. Martin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated, in on-reserve First Nations (FN youth in Ontario, Canada, the following: (a the intakes of vegetable and fruit, “other” foods and relevant nutrients as compared to current recommendations and national averages, (b current prevalence rates of overweight and obesity and (c the relationship between latitude and dietary intakes. Twenty-four-hour diet recalls were collected via the Waterloo Web-Based Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (WEB-Q (n = 443. Heights and weights of participants were self reported using measured values and Body Mass Index was categorized using the International Obesity Task Force cutoffs. Food group and nutrient intakes were compared to current standards, Southern Ontario Food Behaviour data and the Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 2.2, using descriptive statistics. Mean vegetable and fruit, fibre and folate intakes were less than current recommendations. Girls aged 14–18 years had mean intakes of vitamin A below current recommendations for this sub-group; for all sub-groups, mean intakes of vegetables and fruit were below Canadian averages. All sub-groups also had intakes of all nutrients and food groups investigated that were less than those observed in non-FN youth from Southern Ontario, with the exception of “other” foods in boys 12–18 years. Prevalence rates of overweight and obesity were 31.8% and 19.6%, respectively, exceeding rates in the general population. Dietary intakes did not vary consistently by latitude (n = 248, as revealed by ANOVA. This study provided a unique investigation of the dietary intakes of on-reserve FN youth in Ontario and revealed poor intakes of vegetables and fruit and related nutrients and high intakes of “other” foods. Prevalence rates of overweight and obesity exceed those of the general population.

  17. Vegetable and Fruit Intakes of On-Reserve First Nations Schoolchildren Compared to Canadian Averages and Current Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Allison; Hanning, Rhona M.; Gates, Michelle; Skinner, Kelly; Martin, Ian D.; Tsuji, Leonard J. S.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated, in on-reserve First Nations (FN) youth in Ontario, Canada, the following: (a) the intakes of vegetable and fruit, “other” foods and relevant nutrients as compared to current recommendations and national averages, (b) current prevalence rates of overweight and obesity and (c) the relationship between latitude and dietary intakes. Twenty-four-hour diet recalls were collected via the Waterloo Web-Based Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (WEB-Q) (n = 443). Heights and weights of participants were self reported using measured values and Body Mass Index was categorized using the International Obesity Task Force cutoffs. Food group and nutrient intakes were compared to current standards, Southern Ontario Food Behaviour data and the Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 2.2, using descriptive statistics. Mean vegetable and fruit, fibre and folate intakes were less than current recommendations. Girls aged 14–18 years had mean intakes of vitamin A below current recommendations for this sub-group; for all sub-groups, mean intakes of vegetables and fruit were below Canadian averages. All sub-groups also had intakes of all nutrients and food groups investigated that were less than those observed in non-FN youth from Southern Ontario, with the exception of “other” foods in boys 12–18 years. Prevalence rates of overweight and obesity were 31.8% and 19.6%, respectively, exceeding rates in the general population. Dietary intakes did not vary consistently by latitude (n = 248), as revealed by ANOVA. This study provided a unique investigation of the dietary intakes of on-reserve FN youth in Ontario and revealed poor intakes of vegetables and fruit and related nutrients and high intakes of “other” foods. Prevalence rates of overweight and obesity exceed those of the general population. PMID:22690200

  18. A review of current treatment strategies for gestational diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi W Kelley

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 90% of diabetes cases in pregnant women are considered gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. It is well known that uncontrolled glucose results in poor pregnancy outcomes in both the mother and fetus. Worldwide there are many guidelines with recommendations for appropriate management strategies for GDM once lifestyle modifications have been instituted and failed to achieve control. The efficacy and particularly the safety of other treatment modalities for GDM has been the source of much debate in recent years. Studies that have demonstrated the safety and efficacy of both glyburide and metformin in the management of patients with GDM will be reviewed. There is a lack of evidence with other oral and injectable non-insulin agents to control blood glucose in GDM. The role of insulin will be discussed, with emphasis on insulin analogs. Ideal patient characteristics for each treatment modality will be reviewed. In addition, recommendations for postpartum screening of patients will be described as well as recommendations for use of agents to manage subsequent type 2 diabetes in patients who are breastfeeding.

  19. Solitary pulmonary nodule and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. Part 2: accuracy, cost-effectiveness, and current recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosmann, Marcos Pretto; Borba, Marcelle Alves; Macedo, Francisco Pires Negromonte de; Liguori, Adriano de Araujo Lima; Villarim Neto, Arthur [Liga Norte-Riograndense Contra o Cancer, Natal, RN (Brazil); Lima, Kenio Costa de, E-mail: mosmann@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Saude Coletiva

    2016-03-15

    A solitary pulmonary nodule is a common, often incidental, radiographic finding. The investigation and differential diagnosis of solitary pulmonary nodules remain complex, because there are overlaps between the characteristics of benign and malignant processes. There are currently many strategies for evaluating solitary pulmonary nodules. The main objective is to identify benign lesions, in order to avoid exposing patients to the risks of invasive methods, and to detect cases of lung cancer accurately, in order to avoid delaying potentially curative treatment. The focus of this study was to review the evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodules, to discuss the current role of {sup 18}F fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography, addressing its accuracy and cost-effectiveness, and to detail the current recommendations for the examination in this scenario. (author)

  20. The current situation of treatment systems for alcoholism in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jee Wook; Lee, Boung Chul; Kang, Tae-Cheon; Choi, Ihn-Geun

    2013-02-01

    Alcoholism is becoming one of the most serious issues in Korea. The purpose of this review article was to understand the present status of the treatment system for alcoholism in Korea compared to the United States and to suggest its developmental direction in Korea. Current modalities of alcoholism treatment in Korea including withdrawal treatment, pharmacotherapy, and psychosocial treatment are available according to Korean evidence-based treatment guidelines. Benzodiazepines and supportive care including vitamin and nutritional support are mainly used to treat alcohol withdrawal in Korea. Naltrexone and acamprosate are the drugs of first choice to treat chronic alcoholism. Psychosocial treatment methods such as individual psychotherapy, group psychotherapy, family therapy, cognitive behavior therapy, cue exposure therapy, 12-step facilitation therapy, self-help group therapy, and community-based treatment have been carried out to treat chronic alcoholism in Korea. However, current alcohol treatment system in Korea is not integrative compared to that in the United States. To establish the treatment system, it is important to set up an independent governmental administration on alcohol abuse, to secure experts on alcoholism, and to conduct outpatient alcoholism treatment programs and facilities in an open system including some form of continuing care.

  1. Treatment for primary hypothyroidism: current approaches and future possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakera, Ali J; Pearce, Simon HS; Vaidya, Bijay

    2012-01-01

    Primary hypothyroidism is the most common endocrine disease. Although the diagnosis and treatment of hypothyroidism is often considered simple, there are large numbers of people with this condition who are suboptimally treated. Even in those people with hypothyroidism who are biochemically euthyroid on levothyroxine replacement there is a significant proportion who report poorer quality of life. This review explores the historical and current treatment options for hypothyroidism, reasons for and potential solutions to suboptimal treatment, and future possibilities in the treatment of hypothyroidism. PMID:22291465

  2. Sportsman hernia; the review of current diagnosis and treatment modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paksoy, Melih; Sekmen, Ümit

    2016-01-01

    Groin pain is an important clinical entity that may affect a sportsman's active sports life. Sportsman's hernia is a chronic low abdominal and groin pain syndrome. Open and laparoscopic surgical treatment may be chosen in case of conservative treatment failure. Studies on sportsman's hernia, which is a challenging situation in both diagnosis and treatment, are ongoing in many centers. We reviewed the treatment results of 37 patients diagnosed and treated as sportsman's hernia at our hospital between 2011-2014, in light of current literature.

  3. A critical appraisal of guidelines for electronic communication between patients and clinicians: the need to modernize current recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joy L; Matthias, Marianne S; Menachemi, Nir; Frankel, Richard M; Weiner, Michael

    2018-04-01

    Patient-provider electronic communication has proliferated in recent years, yet there is a dearth of published research either leading to, or including, recommendations that improve clinical care and prevent unintended negative consequences. We critically appraise published guidelines and suggest an agenda for future work in this area. To understand how existing guidelines align with current practice, evidence, and technology. We performed a narrative review of provider-targeted guidelines for electronic communication between patients and providers, searching Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, and PubMed databases using relevant terms. We limited the search to articles published in English, and manually searched the citations of relevant articles. For each article, we identified and evaluated the suggested practices. Across 11 identified guidelines, the primary focus was on technical and administrative concerns, rather than on relational communication. Some of the security practices recommended by the guidelines are no longer needed because of shifts in technology. It is unclear the extent to which the recommendations that are still relevant are being followed. Moreover, there is no guideline-cited evidence of the effectiveness of the practices that have been proposed. Our analysis revealed major weaknesses in current guidelines for electronic communication between patients and providers: the guidelines appear to be based on minimal evidence and offer little guidance on how best to use electronic tools to communicate effectively. Further work is needed to systematically evaluate and identify effective practices, create a framework to evaluate quality of communication, and assess the relationship between electronic communication and quality of care.

  4. Current Status of and Recommendations for Nutrition Education in Gastroenterology Fellowship Training in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jing; Raman, Maitreyi; Gramlich, Leah

    2018-04-01

    Knowledge and skill in the area of nutrition are a key competency for the gastroenterologist. However, standards for nutrition education for gastroenterology fellows in Canada do not exist, and gastroenterologists in training and in practice do not feel confident in their knowledge or skill as it relates to nutrition. This study was undertaken to identify the current status of nutrition education in gastroenterology (GI) fellowship training programs in Canada and to provide insight into the development of nutrition educational goals, processes, and evaluation. Using mixed methods, we did a survey of current and recent graduates and program directors of GI fellowship programs in Canada. We undertook a focus group with program directors and fellows to corroborate findings of the survey and to identify strategies to advance nutrition education, knowledge, and skill of trainees. In total, 89.3% of the respondents perceived that the nutrition education was important for GI training, and 82.1% of the respondents perceived nutrition care would be part of their practice. However, only 50% of respondents had a formal rotation in their program, and it was mandatory only 36% of the time. Of the respondents, 95% felt that nutrition education should be standardized within GI fellowship training. Significant gaps in nutrition education exist with GI fellowship programs in Canada. The creation of standards for nutrition education would be valued by training programs, and such a nutrition curriculum for GI fellowship training in Canada is proposed. © 2017 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  5. Extracorporeal treatment for carbamazepine poisoning: Systematic review and recommendations from the EXTRIP workgroup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannoum, Marc; Yates, Christopher; Galvao, Tais F.; Sowinski, Kevin M.; Vo, Thi Hai Vân; Coogan, Andrew; Gosselin, Sophie; Lavergne, Valery; Nolin, Thomas D.; Hoffman, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Context. The Extracorporeal Treatments in Poisoning (EXTRIP) workgroup was created to provide evidence and consensus-based recommendations on the use of extracorporeal treatments (ECTRs) in poisoning. Objectives. To perform a systematic review and provide clinical recommendations for ECTR in carbamazepine poisoning. Methods. After a systematic literature search, the subgroup extracted the data and summarized the findings following a pre-determined format. The entire workgroup voted via a two-round modified Delphi method to reach a consensus on voting statements, using a RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method to quantify disagreement. Anonymous votes were compiled, returned, and discussed in person. A second vote determined the final recommendations. Results. Seventy-four articles met inclusion criteria. Articles included case reports, case series, descriptive cohorts, pharmacokinetic studies, and in-vitro studies; two poor-quality observational studies were identified, yielding a very low quality of evidence for all recommendations. Data on 173 patients, including 6 fatalities, were reviewed. The workgroup concluded that carbamazepine is moderately dialyzable and made the following recommendations: ECTR is suggested in severe carbamazepine poisoning (2D). ECTR is recommended if multiple seizures occur and are refractory to treatment (1D), or if life-threatening dysrhythmias occur (1D). ECTR is suggested if prolonged coma or respiratory depression requiring mechanical ventilation are present (2D) or if significant toxicity persists, particularly when carbamazepine concentrations rise or remain elevated, despite using multiple-dose activated charcoal (MDAC) and supportive measures (2D). ECTR should be continued until clinical improvement is apparent (1D) or the serum carbamazepine concentration is below 10 mg/L (42 the μ in μmol/L looks weird.) (2D). Intermittent hemodialysis is the preferred ECTR (1D), but both intermittent hemoperfusion (1D) or continuous

  6. Investigation of barriers to clinical practice guideline-recommended pharmacotherapy in the treatment of COPD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Price L

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The adoption of clinical practice guideline recommendations for COPD is suboptimal. Determining the barriers to the implementation of these practice guidelines may help improve patient care.Objective: To determine whether barriers to the use of pharmacotherapy according to practice guidelines are related primarily to patient or prescriber factors.Methods: Retrospective cohort study. Members of a health maintenance organization identified as having spirometry-defined COPD ranging from stage II to IV. Electronic medical records were reviewed for documentation of the following: 1 patient affordability issues, 2 history of an adverse drug reaction, 3 history of inefficacy to therapy, and 4 prescription history.Results: A total of 111 medical records were reviewed. There were 51% of patients who had not filled medications that had been prescribed in accordance with guidelines and 43% did not have the guideline recommended medications prescribed in the previous year. Only 4% and 2% of patients had documented inefficacy and affordability issues, respectively. There were no reported cases of adverse drug reactions. Conclusions: This study provides insight to the acceptance of COPD treatment recommendations by patients and providers. Further research is needed to design interventions to reduce barriers and optimize COPD treatment.

  7. MANAGEMENT OF DIABETES DURING AIR TRAVEL: A SYSTEMATIC LITERATURE REVIEW OF CURRENT RECOMMENDATIONS AND THEIR SUPPORTING EVIDENCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavela, James; Suresh, Rahul; Blue, Rebecca S; Mathers, Charles H; Belalcazar, L Maria

    2018-02-01

    Individuals with diabetes are increasingly seeking pretravel advice, but updated professional recommendations remain scant. We performed a systematic review on diabetes management during air travel to summarize current recommendations, assess supporting evidence, and identify areas of future research. A systematic review of the English literature on diabetes management during air travel was undertaken utilizing PubMed and MEDLINE. Publications regarding general travel advice; adjustment of insulin and noninsulin therapies; and the use of insulin pumps, glucometers and subcutaneous glucose sensors at altitude were included. Gathered information was used to create an updated summary of glucose-lowering medication adjustment during air travel. Sixty-one publications were identified, most providing expert opinion and few offering primary data (47 expert opinion, 2 observational studies, 2 case reports, 10 device studies). General travel advice was uniform, with increasing attention to preflight security. Indications for oral antihyperglycemic therapy adjustments varied. There were few recommendations on contemporary agents and on nonhypoglycemic adverse events. There was little consensus on insulin adjustment protocols, many antedating current insulin formulations. Most publications advocated adjusting insulin pump time settings after arrival; however, there was disagreement on timing and rate adjustments. Glucometers and subcutaneous glucose sensors were reported to be less accurate at altitude, but not to an extent that would preclude their clinical use. Recommendations for diabetes management during air travel vary significantly and are mostly based on expert opinion. Data from systematic investigation on glucose-lowering medication adjustment protocols may support the development of a future consensus statement. CSII = continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (device) DPP-4 = dipeptidyl peptidase 4 EGA = error grid analysis GDH = glucose dehydrogenase GOX = glucose

  8. Current approaches and future directions in the treatment of leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worobec SM

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Sophie M WorobecDepartment of Dermatology, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USAAbstract: This review surveys current treatments and future treatment trends in leprosy from a clinical perspective. The World Health Organization provides a multidrug treatment regimen that targets the Mycobacterium leprae bacillus which causes leprosy. Several investigational drugs are available for the treatment of drug-resistant M. leprae. Future directions in leprosy treatment will focus on: the molecular signaling mechanism M. leprae uses to avoid triggering an immune response; prospective studies of the side effects experienced during multiple-drug therapy; recognition of relapse rates post-completion of designated treatments; combating multidrug resistance; vaccine development; development of new diagnostic tests; and the implications of the recent discovery of a genetically distinct leprosy-causing bacillus, Mycobacterium lepromatosis.Keywords: epidemiology, leprosy, Hansen’s disease, multidrug resistance, multidrug therapy

  9. Optimization of recommendations for abdomen computerized tomography based on reconstruction filters, voltage and tube current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, Vinicius da Costa

    2015-01-01

    The use of computed tomography has increased significantly over the past decades. In Brazil the use increased more than twofold from 2008 to 2014, in the meantime the abdomen procedures have tripled. The high frequency of this procedure combined by the increasing collective radiation dose in medical exposures, has resulted development tools to maximize the benefit in CT images. This work aimed to establish protocols optimized in abdominal CT through acquisitions parameters and reconstructions techniques based on filters kernels. A sample of patients undergoing abdominal CT in a diagnostic center of Rio de Janeiro was assessed. Had been collected patients information and acquisitions parameters. The phantoms CT image acquisitions were performed by using different voltage values by adjusting the tube current (mAs) to obtain the same value from CTDI vol patients with normal BMI. Afterwards, the CTDIvol values were reduced by 30%, 50% and 60%. All images were reconstructed with low-contrast filters (A) and standard filters (B). The CTDIvol values for patients with normal BMI were 7% higher than in patients with underweight BMI and 30%, 50% and 60% lower than the overweight, obese I and III patients, respectively. The evaluations of image quality showed that variation of the current (mA) and the reconstruction filters did not affect the Hounsfield values. When the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was normalized to CTDIvol, the protocols acquired with 60% reduction of CTDIvol with 140 kV and 80 kV showed CNR 6% lower than the routine. Modifications of the acquisition parameters did not affect spatial resolution, but the post-processing with B filters reduced the spatial frequency by 16%. With reduced the dose of 30%, lesions in the spleen had the CNR higher than 10% routine protocols with 140 kV acquired and post-processed to filter A. The image post-processing with a filter A with a 80kV voltage provided CNR values equal to the routine for the liver lesions with a 30

  10. IIW recommendations for the HFMI treatment for improving the fatigue strength of welded joints

    CERN Document Server

    Marquis, Gary B

    2016-01-01

    This book of recommendations presents an overview of High Frequency Mechanical Impact (HFMI) techniques existing today in the market and their proper procedures, quality assurance measures and documentation. Due to differences in HFMI tools and the wide variety of potential applications, certain details of proper treatments and quantitative quality control measures are presented generally. An example of procedure specification as a quality assurance measure is given in the Appendix. Moreover, the book presents procedures for the fatigue life assessment of HFMI-improved welded joints based on nominal stress, structural hot spot stress and effective notch stress. It also considers the extra benefit that has been experimentally observed for HFMI-treated high-strength steels. The recommendations offer proposals on the effect of loading conditions like high mean stress fatigue cycles, variable amplitude loading and large amplitude/low cycle fatigue cycles. Special considerations for low stress concentration welded...

  11. Accumulating Data to Optimally Predict Obesity Treatment (ADOPT): Recommendations from the Biological Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Michael; Agurs-Collins, Tanya; Bray, Molly S; Hall, Kevin D; Hopkins, Mark; Laughlin, Maren; MacLean, Paul S; Maruvada, Padma; Savage, Cary R; Small, Dana M; Stoeckel, Luke

    2018-04-01

    The responses to behavioral, pharmacological, or surgical obesity treatments are highly individualized. The Accumulating Data to Optimally Predict obesity Treatment (ADOPT) project provides a framework for how obesity researchers, working collectively, can generate the evidence base needed to guide the development of tailored, and potentially more effective, strategies for obesity treatment. The objective of the ADOPT biological domain subgroup is to create a list of high-priority biological measures for weight-loss studies that will advance the understanding of individual variability in response to adult obesity treatments. This list includes measures of body composition, energy homeostasis (energy intake and output), brain structure and function, and biomarkers, as well as biobanking procedures, which could feasibly be included in most, if not all, studies of obesity treatment. The recommended high-priority measures are selected to balance needs for sensitivity, specificity, and/or comprehensiveness with feasibility to achieve a commonality of usage and increase the breadth and impact of obesity research. The accumulation of data on key biological factors, along with behavioral, psychosocial, and environmental factors, can generate a more precise description of the interplay and synergy among them and their impact on treatment responses, which can ultimately inform the design and delivery of effective, tailored obesity treatments. © 2018 The Obesity Society.

  12. Adherence to Follow-up Recommendations Among Individuals in the Philadelphia Glaucoma Detection and Treatment Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hark, Lisa A; Leiby, Benjamin E; Waisbourd, Michael; Myers, Jonathan S; Fudemberg, Scott J; Mantravadi, Anand V; Dai, Yang; Gilligan, John P; Resende, Arthur F; Katz, L Jay

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate rates of adherence to free follow-up eye exam appointments among participants in the Philadelphia Glaucoma Detection and Treatment Project. Ophthalmologists and testing equipment were brought directly to participants at risk for glaucoma at 43 community sites in Philadelphia. Those diagnosed with glaucoma-related pathology were recommended to return for follow-up to be reexamined on site. Rates of adherence and clinical and demographic risk factors for adherence were evaluated. Five hundred thirty-one participants were diagnosed with glaucoma-related conditions and recommended to attend community-based follow-up exams. Follow-up adherence rate was 61.2% (n=325/531). Significant factors associated with greater eye exam appointment adherence, based on our univariable analysis, included final diagnosis of glaucoma (risk ratio [RR]=1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.13-1.57), male sex (RR=1.19; 95% CI, 1.04-1.36), white race (RR=1.26; 95% CI, 1.08-1.48), age (RR=1.17; 95% CI, 1.00-1.37) recommendation for glaucoma medication (RR=1.52; 95% CI, 1.35-1.71), recommendation for laser peripheral iridotomy (RR=1.18; 95% CI, 1.02-1.35), diagnosis of age-related macular degeneration (RR=1.42; 95% CI, 1.13-1.77) and an increased intraocular pressure (>22 mm Hg in the worse eye) (RR=1.23; 95% CI, 1.06-1.42). On the basis of our multivariable model, diagnosis, sex, and recommended glaucoma medications were significantly associated with follow-up adherence. This study demonstrates that individuals living in underserved urban communities would take advantage of free eye exams in community sites and return for follow-up eye exams in these same settings. Future studies could investigate interventions to improve eye exam appointment adherence in community-based settings to detect glaucoma-eye conditions.

  13. Humpback Dolphins of Western Australia: A Review of Current Knowledge and Recommendations for Future Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanf, Daniella M; Hunt, Tim; Parra, Guido J

    2016-01-01

    Among the many cetacean species that occupy Australian coastal waters, Australian humpback dolphins, Sousa sahulensis, are one of the most vulnerable to extirpation due to human activities. This review summarises the existing knowledge, presently occurring and planned research projects, and current conservation measures for humpback dolphins in Western Australia (WA). Rapid and wide-scale coastal development along the northern WA coastline has occurred despite a lack of baseline data for inshore dolphins and, therefore, without a precautionary approach to their conservation. The distribution, abundance, habitat use, and population structure of humpback dolphins remain poorly understood. Less than 1% of their inferred distribution has so far been studied to understand local population demography. The sparse data available suggest that WA humpback dolphins occur as localised populations in low numbers within a range of inshore habitats, including both clear and turbid coastal waters. Marine protected areas cover a third of their inferred distribution in WA, but the efficacy of these reserves in protecting local cetacean populations is unknown. There is a pressing need for coordination and collaboration among scientists, government agencies, industry bodies, Traditional Owners, and local community groups to fill in the gaps of information on humpback dolphins in WA. The recently developed strategies and sampling guidelines developed by state and federal governments should serve as a best practise standard for collection of data aimed at assessing the conservation status of humpback dolphins in WA and Australia. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Current treatment approaches in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Elbey

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ankylosing spondylitis (AS is a chronic, inflammatory, rheumatic disease that mainly affects sacroiliac joints and spine. AS predominantly occurs more often in males and typically begins in the second or third decade. The mainstay of therapy in AS are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, which reduce inflammation and pain. Disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD did not have enough evidence to prove their effect in AS treatment. The use of DMARD may not sufficient to improve the treatment and symptoms. Currently, TNF-blockers such as, Golimumab Etanersept Adalimumab İnfliksimab have promising results in the treatment of AS. TNF-blockers improve the clinical signs and symptoms, and improve the patients’ physical function and quality of life. This manuscript is focused that Current pharmacological treatments in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

  15. Extracorporeal treatment for valproic acid poisoning: systematic review and recommendations from the EXTRIP workgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannoum, Marc; Laliberté, Martin; Nolin, Thomas D; MacTier, Robert; Lavergne, Valery; Hoffman, Robert S; Gosselin, Sophie

    2015-06-01

    The EXtracorporeal TReatments In Poisoning (EXTRIP) workgroup presents its systematic review and clinical recommendations on the use of extracorporeal treatment (ECTR) in valproic acid (VPA) poisoning. The lead authors reviewed all of the articles from a systematic literature search, extracted the data, summarized the key findings, and proposed structured voting statements following a predetermined format. A two-round modified Delphi method was chosen to reach a consensus on voting statements and the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method was used to quantify disagreement. Anonymous votes were compiled, returned, and discussed in person. A second vote was conducted to determine the final workgroup recommendations. The latest literature search conducted in November 2014 retrieved a total of 79 articles for final qualitative analysis, including one observational study, one uncontrolled cohort study with aggregate analysis, 70 case reports and case series, and 7 pharmacokinetic studies, yielding a very low quality of evidence for all recommendations. Clinical data were reported for 82 overdose patients while pharmaco/toxicokinetic grading was performed in 55 patients. The workgroup concluded that VPA is moderately dialyzable (level of evidence = B) and made the following recommendations: ECTR is recommended in severe VPA poisoning (1D); recommendations for ECTR include a VPA concentration > 1300 mg/L (9000 μmol/L)(1D), the presence of cerebral edema (1D) or shock (1D); suggestions for ECTR include a VPA concentration > 900 mg/L (6250 μmol/L)(2D), coma or respiratory depression requiring mechanical ventilation (2D), acute hyperammonemia (2D), or pH ≤ 7.10 (2D). Cessation of ECTR is indicated when clinical improvement is apparent (1D) or the serum VPA concentration is between 50 and 100 mg/L (350-700 μmol/L)(2D). Intermittent hemodialysis is the preferred ECTR in VPA poisoning (1D). If hemodialysis is not available, then intermittent hemoperfusion (1D) or continuous

  16. Effect of Prostate Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Ultrasound Fusion-guided Biopsy on Radiation Treatment Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Aaron; Valle, Luca F.; Shankavaram, Uma; Krauze, Andra; Kaushal, Aradhana; Schott, Erica; Cooley-Zgela, Theresa [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Wood, Bradford [Center for Interventional Oncology, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Pinto, Peter [Urologic Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Choyke, Peter; Turkbey, Baris [Molecular Imaging Program, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Citrin, Deborah E., E-mail: citrind@mail.nih.gov [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: Targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/ultrasound fusion prostate biopsy (MRI-Bx) has recently been compared with the standard of care extended sextant ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (SOC-Bx), with the former associated with an increased rate of detection of clinically significant prostate cancer. The present study sought to determine the influence of MRI-Bx on radiation therapy and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) recommendations. Methods and Materials: All patients who had received radiation treatment and had undergone SOC-Bx and MRI-Bx at our institution were included. Using the clinical T stage, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen, and Gleason score, patients were categorized into National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk groups and radiation treatment or ADT recommendations assigned. Intensification of the recommended treatment after multiparametric MRI, SOC-Bx, and MRI-Bx was evaluated. Results: From January 2008 to January 2016, 73 patients received radiation therapy at our institution after undergoing a simultaneous SOC-Bx and MRI-Bx (n=47 with previous SOC-Bx). Repeat SOC-Bx and MRI-Bx resulted in frequent upgrading compared with previous SOC-Bx (Gleason score 7, 6.7% vs 44.6%; P<.001; Gleason score 8-10, 2.1% vs 38%; P<.001). MRI-Bx increased the proportion of patients classified as very high risk from 24.7% to 41.1% (P=.027). Compared with SOC-Bx alone, including the MRI-Bx findings resulted in a greater percentage of pathologically positive cores (mean 37% vs 44%). Incorporation of multiparametric MRI and MRI-Bx results increased the recommended use and duration of ADT (duration increased in 28 of 73 patients and ADT was added for 8 of 73 patients). Conclusions: In patients referred for radiation treatment, MRI-Bx resulted in an increase in the percentage of positive cores, Gleason score, and risk grouping. The benefit of treatment intensification in accordance with the MRI-Bx findings is unknown.

  17. Rehabilitation for post-stroke cognitive impairment: an overview of recommendations arising from systematic reviews of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, David C; Bowen, Audrey; Chung, Charlie S; Cockburn, Janet; Knapp, Peter; Pollock, Alex

    2015-02-01

    Although cognitive impairments are common following stroke, there is considerable uncertainty about the types of interventions that can reduce activity restrictions and improve quality of life. Indeed, a recent project to identify priorities for research into life after stroke determined that the top priority for patients, carers and health professionals was how to improve cognitive impairments. To provide an overview of the evidence for the effectiveness of cognitive rehabilitation for patients with stroke and to determine the main gaps in the current evidence base. Evidence was synthesised for the six Cochrane reviews relating to rehabilitation for post-stroke cognitive impairment and any subsequently published randomized controlled trials to February 2012. Data arising from 44 trials involving over 1500 patients was identified. Though there was support for the effectiveness of cognitive rehabilitation for some cognitive impairments, significant gaps were found in the current evidence base. All of the Cochrane reviews identified major limitations within the evidence they identified. There is currently insufficient research evidence, or evidence of insufficient quality, to support clear recommendations for clinical practice. Recommendations are made as to the research required to strengthen the evidence base, and so facilitate the delivery of effective interventions to individuals with cognitive impairment after stroke. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Current Treatment Options in Challenging Oral Diseases: Burning Mouth Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Bilgen Erdoğan; Murat Yılmaz

    2012-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is a chronic condition characterized by burning pain without any signs of an oral mucosal pathology, that usually affects postmenopausal women. Burning sensation is often accompanied by dysgeusia and xerostomia. The pathogenesis of the disease is unknown and an effective treatment option for most of the patients has not been defined yet. The aim of this review is to present current pharmacological and physicological treatments of burning mouth syndrome.

  19. Current Treatment Options in Challenging Oral Diseases: Burning Mouth Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilgen Erdoğan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome is a chronic condition characterized by burning pain without any signs of an oral mucosal pathology, that usually affects postmenopausal women. Burning sensation is often accompanied by dysgeusia and xerostomia. The pathogenesis of the disease is unknown and an effective treatment option for most of the patients has not been defined yet. The aim of this review is to present current pharmacological and physicological treatments of burning mouth syndrome.

  20. Current practice and recommendations in UK epilepsy monitoring units. Report of a national survey and workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamandi, Khalid; Beniczky, Sandor; Diehl, Beate; Kandler, Rosalind H; Pressler, Ronit M; Sen, Arjune; Solomon, Juliet; Walker, Matthew C; Bagary, Manny

    2017-08-01

    Inpatient video-EEG monitoring (VEM) is an important investigation in patients with seizures or blackouts, and in the pre-surgical workup of patients with epilepsy. There has been an expansion in the number of Epilepsy Monitoring Units (EMU) in the UK offering VEM with a necessary increase in attention on quality and safety. Previous surveys have shown variation across centres on issues including consent and patient monitoring. In an effort to bring together healthcare professionals in the UK managing patients on EMU, we conducted an online survey of current VEM practice and held a one-day workshop convened under the auspices of the British Chapter of the ILAE. The survey and workshop aimed to cover all aspects of VEM, including pre-admission, consent procedures, patient safety, drug reduction and reinstatement, seizure management, staffing levels, ictal testing and good data recording practice. This paper reports on the findings of the survey, the workshop presentations and workshop discussions. 32 centres took part in the survey and there were representatives from 22 centres at the workshop. There was variation in protocols, procedures and consent processes between units, and levels of observation of monitored patients. Nevertheless, the workshop discussion found broad areas of agreement on points. A survey and workshop of UK epilepsy monitoring units found that some variability in practice is inevitable due to different local arrangements and patient groups under investigation. However, there were areas of clear consensus particularly in relation to consent and patient safety that can be applied to most units and form a basis for setting minimum standards. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Review of Current Experience on Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) and A Recommended Code Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duane Spencer; Kevin McCoy

    2010-02-02

    The purpose of the ASME/DOE Gen IV Task 7 Part I is to review the current experience on various high temperature reactor intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) concepts. There are several different IHX concepts that could be envisioned for HTR/VHTR applications in a range of temperature from 850C to 950C. The concepts that will be primarily discussed herein are: (1) Tubular Helical Coil Heat Exchanger (THCHE); (2) Plate-Stamped Heat Exchanger (PSHE); (3) Plate-Fin Heat Exchanger (PFHE); and (4) Plate-Machined Heat Exchanger (PMHE). The primary coolant of the NGNP is potentially subject to radioactive contamination by the core as well as contamination from the secondary loop fluid. To isolate the radioactivity to minimize radiation doses to personnel, and protect the primary circuit from contamination, intermediate heat exchangers (IHXs) have been proposed as a means for separating the primary circuit of the NGNP (Next Generation Nuclear Plant) or other process heat application from the remainder of the plant. This task will first review the different concepts of IHX that could be envisioned for HTR/VHTR applications in a range of temperature from 850 to 950 C. This will cover shell-and-tube and compact designs (including the platefin concept). The review will then discuss the maturity of the concepts in terms of design, fabricability and component testing (or feedback from experience when applicable). Particular attention will be paid to the feasibility of developing the IHX concepts for the NGNP with operation expected in 2018-2021. This report will also discuss material candidates for IHX applications and will discuss specific issues that will have to be addressed in the context of the HTR design (thermal aging, corrosion, creep, creep-fatigue, etc). Particular attention will be paid to specific issues associated with operation at the upper end of the creep regime.

  2. Review of Current Experience on Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) and A Recommended Code Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, Duane; McCoy, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the ASME/DOE Gen IV Task 7 Part I is to review the current experience on various high temperature reactor intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) concepts. There are several different IHX concepts that could be envisioned for HTR/VHTR applications in a range of temperature from 850C to 950C. The concepts that will be primarily discussed herein are: (1) Tubular Helical Coil Heat Exchanger (THCHE); (2) Plate-Stamped Heat Exchanger (PSHE); (3) Plate-Fin Heat Exchanger (PFHE); and (4) Plate-Machined Heat Exchanger (PMHE). The primary coolant of the NGNP is potentially subject to radioactive contamination by the core as well as contamination from the secondary loop fluid. To isolate the radioactivity to minimize radiation doses to personnel, and protect the primary circuit from contamination, intermediate heat exchangers (IHXs) have been proposed as a means for separating the primary circuit of the NGNP (Next Generation Nuclear Plant) or other process heat application from the remainder of the plant. This task will first review the different concepts of IHX that could be envisioned for HTR/VHTR applications in a range of temperature from 850 to 950 C. This will cover shell-and-tube and compact designs (including the platefin concept). The review will then discuss the maturity of the concepts in terms of design, fabricability and component testing (or feedback from experience when applicable). Particular attention will be paid to the feasibility of developing the IHX concepts for the NGNP with operation expected in 2018-2021. This report will also discuss material candidates for IHX applications and will discuss specific issues that will have to be addressed in the context of the HTR design (thermal aging, corrosion, creep, creep-fatigue, etc). Particular attention will be paid to specific issues associated with operation at the upper end of the creep regime.

  3. Reirradiation of recurrent node-positive non-small cell lung cancer after previous stereotactic radiotherapy for stage I disease. A multi-institutional treatment recommendation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieder, Carsten; Ruysscher, Dirk de; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Guckenberger, Matthias; Mehta, Minesh P.; Cheung, Patrick; Sahgal, Arjun

    2017-01-01

    Practice guidelines have been developed for early-stage and locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, many common clinical scenarios still require individualized decision making. This is true for locoregional relapse after initial stereotactic radiotherapy (stereotactic body radiation therapy or stereotactic ablative radiotherapy; SBRT or SABR), an increasingly utilized curative treatment option for stage I NSCLC. A consortium of expert radiation oncologists was established with the aim of providing treatment recommendations. In this scenario, a case was distributed to six radiation oncologists who provided their institutions' treatment recommendations. In this case, a patient developed local and mediastinal relapse after SABR (45 Gy, 3 fractions), comparable to the tumor burden in de novo stage IIIA NSCLC. Treatment recommendations were tabulated and a consensus conclusion was developed. Three institutions recommended evaluation for surgery. If the patient was not a surgical candidate, and/or refused surgery, definitive chemoradiation was recommended, including retreating the primary to full dose. European participants were more in favor of a non-surgical approach. None of the participants were reluctant to prescribe reirradiation, but two institutions prescribed doses lower than 60 Gy. Platinum-based doublets together with intensity-modulated radiotherapy were preferred. The institutional recommendations reflect the questions and uncertainties discussed in current stage III guidelines. All institutions agreed that previous SABR is not a contraindication for salvage chemoradiation. In the absence of high-quality prospective trials for recurrent NSCLC, all treatment options recommended in current guidelines for stage III disease can be considered in clinical scenarios such as this. (orig.) [de

  4. Labeling programs and efficiency standards to control the energy consumption of household appliances: current situation, main results and recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menanteau, Ph.

    2000-09-01

    To control the rise in electricity consumption for specific uses, the industrialized countries started by introducing special programs aimed at improving energy efficiency. Among the different instruments available, labeling programs and minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) have proved to be very effective. The first part of this document presents the current situation, the main results and recommendations concerning the labeling programs and efficiency standards to control the energy consumption of household appliances. This analyze is done for each country in details providing the name of the program or measure, the date of implementation, the objective and the main characteristics of the program, the impacts and evaluation. (A.L.B.)

  5. Modeling of novel diagnostic strategies for active tuberculosis - a systematic review: current practices and recommendations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Zwerling

    Full Text Available The field of diagnostics for active tuberculosis (TB is rapidly developing. TB diagnostic modeling can help to inform policy makers and support complicated decisions on diagnostic strategy, with important budgetary implications. Demand for TB diagnostic modeling is likely to increase, and an evaluation of current practice is important. We aimed to systematically review all studies employing mathematical modeling to evaluate cost-effectiveness or epidemiological impact of novel diagnostic strategies for active TB.Pubmed, personal libraries and reference lists were searched to identify eligible papers. We extracted data on a wide variety of model structure, parameter choices, sensitivity analyses and study conclusions, which were discussed during a meeting of content experts.From 5619 records a total of 36 papers were included in the analysis. Sixteen papers included population impact/transmission modeling, 5 were health systems models, and 24 included estimates of cost-effectiveness. Transmission and health systems models included specific structure to explore the importance of the diagnostic pathway (n = 4, key determinants of diagnostic delay (n = 5, operational context (n = 5, and the pre-diagnostic infectious period (n = 1. The majority of models implemented sensitivity analysis, although only 18 studies described multi-way sensitivity analysis of more than 2 parameters simultaneously. Among the models used to make cost-effectiveness estimates, most frequent diagnostic assays studied included Xpert MTB/RIF (n = 7, and alternative nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs (n = 4. Most (n = 16 of the cost-effectiveness models compared new assays to an existing baseline and generated an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER.Although models have addressed a small number of important issues, many decisions regarding implementation of TB diagnostics are being made without the full benefits of insight from mathematical

  6. Breast cancer treatment: historical review and current approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulakowski, A.

    1994-01-01

    The evolution and development of opinions on the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer since Galen to present time is presented. The concept of breast cancer as a local disease has been replaced by the understanding of its systemic character. On this background described are the methods of surgical treatment beginning from early - supraradical, to present -conservative approaches. The ''milestones'' in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer of the last 40 years are presented. Current methods of breast cancer management include correct diagnosis (clinical examination, mammography, ultrasound, fine needle aspiration biopsy), TNM staging, adequate loco-regional therapy, systemic therapy, rehabilitation, reconstruction and careful follow-up. (author)

  7. Current strategies for the treatment of aneurysmal bone cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Tsagozis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aneurysmal bone cysts are benign bone tumors that usually present in childhood and early adulthood. They usually manifest as expansile osteolytic lesions with a varying potential to be locally aggressive. Since their first description in 1942, a variety of treatment methods has been proposed. Traditionally, these tumors were treated with open surgery. Either intralesional surgical procedures or en bloc excisions have been described. Furthermore, a variety of chemical or physical adjuvants has been utilized in order to reduce the risk for local recurrence after excision. Currently, there is a shift to more minimally invasive procedures in order to avoid the complications of open surgical excision. Good results have been reported during percutaneous surgery, or the use of embolization. Recently, sclerotherapy has emerged as a promising treatment, showing effective consolidation of the lesions and functional results that appear to be superior to the ones of open surgery. Lastly, non-invasive treatment, such as pharmaceutical intervention with denosumab or bisphosphonates has been reported to be effective in the management of the disease. Radiotherapy has also been shown to confer good local control, either alone or in conjunction to other treatment modalities, but is associated with serious adverse effects. Here, we review the current literature on the methods of treatment of aneurysmal bone cysts. The indication for each type of treatment along reported outcome of the intervention, as well as potential complications are systematically presented. Our review aims to increase awareness of the different treatment modalities and facilitate decision-making regarding each individual patient.

  8. Current status of radiation treatment of water and wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikaev, A.K.

    1997-01-01

    This is a brief review of the current status of radiation treatment of surface water, groundwater, wastewaters, and sewage sludges. Sources of ionizing radiation, and combination radiation methods for purification are described in some detail. Special attention is paid to pilot and industrial facilities. (author)

  9. Transcranial direct current stimulation as a treatment for auditory hallucinations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne eKoops

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Auditory hallucinations (AH are a symptom of several psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia. In a significant minority of patients, AH are resistant to antipsychotic medication. Alternative treatment options for this medication-resistant group are scarce and most of them focus on coping with the hallucinations. Finding an alternative treatment that can diminish AH is of great importance.Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is a safe and non-invasive technique that is able to directly influence cortical excitability through the application of very low electric currents. A 1-2 mA direct current is applied between two surface electrodes, one serving as the anode and the other as the cathode. Cortical excitability is increased in the vicinity of the anode and reduced near the cathode. The technique, which has only a few transient side effects and is cheap and portable, is increasingly explored as a treatment for neurological and psychiatric symptoms. It has shown efficacy on symptoms of depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy and stroke. However, the application of tDCS as a treatment for AH is relatively new. This article provides an overview of the current knowledge in this field and provides guidelines for future research.

  10. PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY: CURRENT LOOK AT THE ISSUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. S. Lashkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the current data on the metabolism of vitamin D and its role in the development of bone tissue in children and the further condition thereof. Natural vitamin D sources, as well as the current routine practice of preventing deficiency of this organic substance are unable to fully satisfy a child's demand for this vitamin, which is why recommendations on vitamin D intake ought to be revised. The article details schedules for prescription of vitamin D for preventing and treating the body deficiency thereof based on results of the studies completed in the recent years. The role of the main marker enabling assessing vitamin D concentration in the body — 25(OHD — the reference values whereof are yet to be commonly established has been analyzed. The article lists recommendations on rickets prevention and treatment in children. The article presents data on the possible mechanisms of development of toxic effects in the setting of vitamin D intake.

  11. [Recommendations for the diagnosis, staging and treatment of pre-malignant lesions and pancreatic adenocarcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Richard, Marta; Ginès, Angels; Ayuso, Juan Ramón; Sabater, Luis; Fabregat, Joan; Mendez, Ramiro; Fernández-Esparrach, Glòria; Molero, Xavier; Vaquero, Eva C; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Ferrández, Antonio; Maurel, Joan

    2016-11-18

    Clinical management of adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is complex, and requires a multidisciplinary approach. The same applies for the premalignant lesions that are increasingly being diagnosed. The current document is an update on the diagnosis and management of premalignant lesions and adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. A conference to establish the basis of the literature review and manuscript redaction was organized by the Grupo Español Multidisciplinar en Cáncer Digestivo. Experts in the field from different specialties (Gastroenterology, Surgery, Radiology, Pathology, Medical Oncology and Radiation Oncology) met to prepare the present document. The current literature was reviewed and discussed, with subsequent deliberation on the evidence. Final recommendations were established in view of all the above. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Recommendations for the role of extracorporeal treatments in the management of acute methanol poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, Darren M; Yates, Christopher; Megarbane, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    in Poisoning workgroup aimed to develop evidence-based consensus recommendations for extracorporeal treatment in methanol poisoning. DESIGN AND METHODS: Utilizing predetermined methods, we conducted a systematic review of the literature. Two hundred seventy-two relevant publications were identified...... to methanol: coma, seizures, new vision deficits, metabolic acidosis with blood pH ≤7.15, persistent metabolic acidosis despite adequate supportive measures and antidotes, serum anion gap higher than 24 mmol/L; or, serum methanol concentration 1) greater than 700 mg/L (21.8 mmol/L) in the context...... of fomepizole therapy, 2) greater than 600 mg/L or 18.7 mmol/L in the context of ethanol treatment, 3) greater than 500 mg/L or 15.6 mmol/L in the absence of an alcohol dehydrogenase blocker; in the absence of a methanol concentration, the osmolal/osmolar gap may be informative; or, in the context of impaired...

  13. Causes and Recommendations for Unanticipated Ink Retention Following Tattoo Removal Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cynthia L.; Desai, Alpesh; Desai, Tejas

    2013-01-01

    While placement of ink into the skin is a long-standing tradition, patients are now seeking tattoo removal on a more frequent basis. Once considered acceptable removal options, tattoo ink removal via physical destruction included dermabrasion, chemical destruction, salabrasion, thermal destruction, and cryotherapy. Now these options are used extremely infrequently. These modalities provided unpredictable results and often required prolonged healing times and left patients with skin discoloration, pain, scarring, and ink retention. Even the widely adopted use of lasers, now considered the gold standard method, offers some level of unpredictability surrounding the natural progression of ink resolution. Multiple factors need to be taken into consideration when successfully removing tattoo pigment including the modalities used, number and frequency of treatments, proper device technique, and physiological barriers to tattoo removal. This paper serves to elucidate the common causes of ink retention following tattoo removal treatment with recommendations on how best to address this relatively common occurrence. PMID:23882312

  14. Recommendations for pacemaker implantation for the treatment of atrial tachyarrhythmias and resynchronisation therapy for heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hemel, N.M.; Dijkman, B.; de Voogt, W.G.; Beukema, W.P.; Bosker, H.A.; de Cock, C.C.; Jordaens, L.J.L.M.; van Gelder, I.C.; van Gelder, L.M.; van Mechelen, R.; Ruiter, J.H.; Sedney, M.I.; Slegers, L.C.

    2004-01-01

    Today, new pacing algorithms and stimulation methods for the prevention and interruption of atrial tachyarrhythmias can be applied on patients who need bradycardia pacing for conventional reasons. In addition, biventricular pacing as additive treatment for patients with severe congestive heart failure due to ventricular systolic dysfunction and prolonged intraventricular conduction has shown to improve symptoms and reduce hospital admissions. These new pacing technologies and the optimising of the pacing programmes are complex, expensive and time-consuming. Based on many clinical studies the indications for these devices are beginning to emerge. To support the cardiologist's decision-making and to prevent waste of effort and resources, the 'ad hoc committee' has provided preliminary recommendations for implantable devices to treat atrial tachyarrhythmias and to extend the treatment of congestive heart failure respectively. PMID:25696255

  15. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy in Children: A Review of Clinical Characteristics and Recommendations for Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Karimi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculopathy (CIDP is an acquired and autoimmune neuropathy, characterized by a chronic, rapidly progressive, symmetric weakness. In children, abnormal gait is as a first symptom of muscle weakness. Evidence Acquisition: The diagnosis of CIDP is on the basis of clinical characteristics, electrodiagnostic that shows the severity of the disease, lumbar puncture and spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Results: The first-line treatments in childhood CIDP are intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG, corticosteroids, and plasmapheresis. Response to first-line therapies is usually satisfactory; nevertheless, recommendations regarding the choice of second-line therapy can only be prepared on the basis of the existing practice described in some of the case reports. Conclusions: This review demonstrated the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of childhood CIDP.

  16. Brief report: Adherence to fluid recommendations in children receiving treatment for retentive encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl, Elizabeth S; Felt, Barbara T; Patton, Susana R

    2009-01-01

    Limited data are available regarding whether children being treated for retentive encopresis are adherent to recommendations to increase their daily fluid intake. The purpose of this study was to examine fluid adherence in children who received treatment for retentive encopresis. A retrospective chart review was performed using diet diary data for 26 children (ages 3-12) who completed a group behavioral intervention for retentive encopresis. Mean daily intake of clear fluid increased significantly during treatment and children relied primarily on water and juice to make this dietary change. However, adherence rates to clear fluid goals were <50%. Children's increased clear fluid intake did not equate to high fluid adherence. Children's high juice consumption is concerning as it could place them at risk for other negative health consequences. Future research should examine whether enhanced fluid education and use of behavior change strategies yield higher fluid adherence.

  17. Current pharmacotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egolf, A; Coffey, B J

    2014-02-01

    Tourette syndrome is a childhood onset neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics. Although many youth experience attenuation or even remission of tics in adolescence and young adulthood, some individuals experience persistent tics which can be debilitating or disabling. The majority of patients also have one or more psychiatric comorbid disorders, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and/or obsessive-compulsive disorder. Treatment is multimodal, including both pharmacotherapy and cognitive behavioral treatment, and requires disentanglement of tics and the comorbid symptoms. Although the only two formally approved medications in the United States are haloperidol and pimozide, these treatments are generally not used as first-line interventions due to their significant potential for adverse effects. The α-adrenoceptor agonists guanfacine and clonidine have an established evidence base for both efficacy and tolerability, and are usually recommended as initial pharmacotherapy. Atypical neuroleptics, such as aripiprazole or risperidone, are typically used if the α-adrenoceptor agonists are ineffective or intolerable. However, many other pharmacological agents reviewed in this manuscript have been studied as treatment alternatives. Copyright 2014 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  18. [Current treatment and epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, A; Bouchand, F; Le Monnier, A

    2015-09-01

    During the past 10years, Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) have become a major public health challenge. Their epidemiology has changed with a rise in the number of cases and an increase in severe episodes. Recurrence and failure of conventional treatments have become more common. Furthermore, a spread of CDI has been observed in the general population-involving subjects without the usual risk factors (unexposed to antibiotic treatment, young people, pregnant women, etc.). All these change are partially due to the emergence of the hypervirulent and hyperepidemic clone NAP1/B1/027. New therapeutic strategies (antimicrobial treatment, immunoglobulins, toxin chelation, fecal microbiota transplantation) are now available and conventional treatments (metronidazole and vancomycin) have been reevaluated with new recommendations. Recent studies show a better efficacy of vancomycin compared to metronidazole for severe episodes. Fidaxomicin is a novel antibiotic drug with interesting features, including an efficacy not inferior to vancomycin and a lower risk of recurrence. Finally, for multi-recurrent forms, fecal microbiota transplantation seems to be the best option. We present the available data in this review. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. [Current treatment concepts for olecranon and prepatellar bursitis in Austria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbach, S F; Michel, M; Wyen, H; Buschmann, C T; Kdolsky, R; Kanz, K-G

    2013-04-01

    The limited evidence available on the diagnosis and treatment of olecranon and prepatellar bursitis indicates nationally varying treatment approaches. Therefore the aim of this study was to survey the current treatment concepts of olecranon and prepatellar bursitis in Austria. An online questionnaire comprising of demographic data, questions regarding diagnostics and differentiation between septic bursitis (SB) and non-septic bursitis (NSB) as well as two case reports for therapy appraisal were sent to members of the Austrian Society of Orthopaedics and Orthopaedic Surgery (ÖGO) and the Austrian Society of Traumatology (ÖGU). The overall response rates were 46 % (ÖGU)/12 % (ÖGO). Differentiation between SB and NSB was predominantly based on medical history/clinical presentation (ÖGU: 100 %/ÖGO: 84 %) and blood sampling (ÖGU: 82 %/ÖGO: 77 %). 64/36 % of surveyed members of ÖGO/OGU performed a bursal aspiration. 95/55 % of Austrian ÖGU opinion leaders favoured a surgical treatment approach in cases of SB/NSB. Conversely, ÖGO members rather favoured a conservative treatment approach (28/27 %). Significant differences were found between ÖGO and ÖGU, with the latter favouring a surgical treatment approach in cases of SB and NSB. However, the international literature argues for a conservative treatment approach. Further high quality research is needed to establish an evidence-based treatment approach. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Compliance with dental treatment recommendations by rural paediatric patients after a live-video teledentistry consultation: A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Sean W; Kopycka-Kedzierawski, Dorota T

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this research was to assess the compliance rate with recommended dental treatment by rural paediatric dental patients after a live-video teledentistry consultation. A retrospective dental chart review was completed for 251 rural paediatric patients from the Finger Lakes region of New York State who had an initial teledentistry appointment with a paediatric dentist located remotely at the Eastman Institute for Oral Health in Rochester, NY. The recommended treatment modalities were tabulated and comprehensive dental treatment completion rates were obtained. The recommended treatment modality options of: treatment in the paediatric dental clinic; treatment using nitrous oxide anxiolysis; treatment with oral sedation; treatment in the operating room with general anaesthesia; or teleconsultation were identified for the 251 patients. Compliance rates for completed dental treatment based on initial teleconsultation recommendations were: 100% for treatment in the paediatric dental clinic; 56% for nitrous oxide patients; 87% for oral sedation; 93% for operating room; and 90% for teleconsultations. The differences in the compliance rates for all treatment modalities were not statistically significant (Fisher's exact test, p > 0.05). Compliance rates for completed comprehensive dental treatment for this rural population of paediatric dental patients were quite high, ranging from 56% to 100%, and tended to be higher when treatment was completed in fewer visits. Live-video teledentistry consultations conducted among rural paediatric patients and a paediatric dentist in the specialty clinic were feasible options for increasing dental treatment compliance rates when treating complex paediatric dental cases. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Recommendations for the treatment of ulcerative colitis with infliximab: A gastroenterology expert group consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinisch, Walter; van Assche, Gert; Befrits, Ragnar; Connell, William; D'Haens, Geert; Ghosh, Subrata; Michetti, Pierre; Ochsenkühn, Thomas; Panaccione, Remo; Schreiber, Stefan; Silverberg, Mark S.; Sorrentino, Dario; van der Woude, C. Janneke; Vermeire, Séverine; Panes, Julian

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims: Infliximab is currently the only biologic approved for treatment of adults with moderate to severe, active ulcerative colitis (UC) unresponsive to conventional therapies. It rapidly controls symptoms, induces and sustains steroid-free remission, stimulates mucosal healing, and

  2. BNF Recommendations for the treatment of Wernicke's encephalopathy : Lost in translation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudman, Erik; Wijnia, Jan W.

    2014-01-01

    We agree with Thomson and Marshall (2013) that the current prescribing of thiamine replacement therapy for Wernicke's Encephalopathy (WE) is ambiguous. In response to their article, we also advocate that any consensus on accurate thiamine treatment for WE should receive sufficient international

  3. Current and Emerging Directions in the Treatment of Eating Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany A. Brown

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Eating disorders are a significant source of psychiatric morbidity in young women and demonstrate high comorbidity with mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders. Thus, clinicians may encounter eating disorders in the context of treating other conditions. This review summarizes the efficacy of current and emerging treatments for anorexia nervosa (AN, bulimia nervosa (BN, and binge eating disorder (BED. Treatment trials were identified using electronic and manual searches and by reviewing abstracts from conference proceedings. Family based therapy has demonstrated superiority for adolescents with AN but no treatment has established superiority for adults. For BN, both 60 mg fluoxetine and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT have well-established efficacy. For BED, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, CBT, and interpersonal psychotherapy have demonstrated efficacy. Emerging directions for AN include investigation of the antipsychotic olanzapine and several novel psychosocial treatments. Future directions for BN and BED include increasing CBT disseminability, targeting affect regulation, and individualized stepped-care approaches.

  4. Recommendations from the Spanish Oncology Genitourinary Group for the treatment of metastatic renal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellmunt, Joaquim; Calvo, Emiliano; Castellano, Daniel; Climent, Miguel Angel; Esteban, Emilio; García del Muro, Xavier; González-Larriba, José Luis; Maroto, Pablo; Trigo, José Manuel

    2009-03-01

    For almost the last two decades, interleukin-2 and interferon-alpha have been the only systemic treatment options available for metastatic renal cell carcinoma. However, in recent years, five new targeted therapies namely sunitinib, sorafenib, temsirolimus, everolimus and bevacizumab have demonstrated clinical activity in these patients. With the availability of new targeted agents that are active in this disease, there is a need to continuously update the treatment algorithm of the disease. Due to the important advances obtained, the Spanish Oncology Genitourinary Group (SOGUG) has considered it would be useful to review the current status of the disease, including the genetic and molecular biology factors involved, the current predicting models for development of metastases as well as the role of surgery, radiotherapy and systemic therapies in the early- or late management of the disease. Based on this previous work, a treatment algorithm was developed.

  5. Current trends in endodontic practice: emergency treatments and technological armamentarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michelle; Winkler, Johnathon; Hartwell, Gary; Stewart, Jeffrey; Caine, Rufus

    2009-01-01

    The current clinical practice of endodontics includes the utilization of a variety of new technological advances and materials. The last comprehensive survey that compared treatment modalities used in endodontic practices was conducted in 1990. The purpose of the current survey was to determine the frequency with which these new endodontic technologies and materials are being used in endodontic practices today. An e-mail questionnaire was sent to the 636 active diplomates of the American Board of Endodontics with current e-mail addresses. Two hundred thirty-two diplomates responded for a response rate of 35%. Calcium hydroxide was found to be the most frequently used intracanal medicament for all cases diagnosed with necrotic pulps. Ibuprofen was the most frequently prescribed medication for pain, and penicillin was the most frequently prescribed antibiotic when an active infection was present. Eighty-two percent of the respondents are still incorporating hand files in some fashion during the cleansing and shaping phase of treatment. Lateral condensation and continuous wave were the most common methods used for obturation. Digital radiography was reported as being used by 72.5% of the respondents, whereas 45.3% reported using the microscope greater than 75% of the patient treatment. Ultrasonics was used by 97.8% of the respondents. It appears from the results that new endodontic technology is currently being used in the endodontic offices of those who responded to the survey.

  6. Extracorporeal Treatment in Phenytoin Poisoning: Systematic Review and Recommendations from the EXTRIP (Extracorporeal Treatments in Poisoning) Workgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anseeuw, Kurt; Mowry, James B; Burdmann, Emmanuel A; Ghannoum, Marc; Hoffman, Robert S; Gosselin, Sophie; Lavergne, Valery; Nolin, Thomas D

    2016-02-01

    The Extracorporeal Treatments in Poisoning (EXTRIP) Workgroup conducted a systematic literature review using a standardized process to develop evidence-based recommendations on the use of extracorporeal treatment (ECTR) in patients with phenytoin poisoning. The authors reviewed all articles, extracted data, summarized findings, and proposed structured voting statements following a predetermined format. A 2-round modified Delphi method was used to reach a consensus on voting statements, and the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method was used to quantify disagreement. 51 articles met the inclusion criteria. Only case reports, case series, and pharmacokinetic studies were identified, yielding a very low quality of evidence. Clinical data from 31 patients and toxicokinetic grading from 46 patients were abstracted. The workgroup concluded that phenytoin is moderately dialyzable (level of evidence = C) despite its high protein binding and made the following recommendations. ECTR would be reasonable in select cases of severe phenytoin poisoning (neutral recommendation, 3D). ECTR is suggested if prolonged coma is present or expected (graded 2D) and it would be reasonable if prolonged incapacitating ataxia is present or expected (graded 3D). If ECTR is used, it should be discontinued when clinical improvement is apparent (graded 1D). The preferred ECTR modality in phenytoin poisoning is intermittent hemodialysis (graded 1D), but hemoperfusion is an acceptable alternative if hemodialysis is not available (graded 1D). In summary, phenytoin appears to be amenable to extracorporeal removal. However, because of the low incidence of irreversible tissue injury or death related to phenytoin poisoning and the relatively limited effect of ECTR on phenytoin removal, the workgroup proposed the use of ECTR only in very select patients with severe phenytoin poisoning. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Current and Under Development Treatment Modalities of Psoriasis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaghdadi, Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic and complex autoimmune inflammatory skin disease that affects over 125 million people worldwide. It can exhibit at any age, in spite of the fact that children are less normally influenced than adults. It is characterized by distinct erythematous plaques shielded with conspicuous silvery scales that shows up in different areas of the skin. Knowledge of pathophysiology, especially the pathogenesis of psoriasis, has significantly progressed in the recent decade. Advancement in molecular knowledge leads to better understanding of the disease, thus influencing the development of efficient treatment modalities. However, even with the availability of various options of treatment most of the efficient treatment modalities are costly. Expenses of health care bring about major financial weight to the patients as well as to health care systems. Thus, it was important to review the available current treatment options and those which are under development, in terms of efficacy, safety and cost to assist in selecting the most appropriate treatment for psoriasis patients. Literatures were searched by using key words psoriasis, topical treatment, systemic treatment, biologics and phototherapies, on Embase, Medline, Jstor, Cochrane and Merck Index databases. Life-style choices such as smoking, alcohol consumption, obesity and stress are recognised as risk factors and triggers associated with psoriasis. Psoriasis poses psycho-social and economic burden on affected patients that sometimes leads to depression, reduced social interaction and suicidal tendencies in patients. Depending on the type, severity and extent of the disease, comorbidities, patient preference, efficacy and safety profile, numerous treatment modalities and therapeutic agents are available such as topical, systemic, biologic and phototherapeutic treatments. However, it was found that among all the current available treatments for psoriasis, biologic agents and phototherapeutic modalities are

  8. Oligometastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: current treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard PJ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Patrick J Richard, Ramesh Rengan Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: The oligometastatic disease theory was initially described in 1995 by Hellman and Weichselbaum. Since then, much work has been performed to investigate its existence in many solid tumors. This has led to subclassifications of stage IV cancer, which could redefine our treatment approaches and the therapeutic outcomes for this historically “incurable” entity. With a high incidence of stage IV disease, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC remains a difficult cancer to treat and cure. Recent work has proven the existence of an oligometastatic state in NSCLC in terms of properly selecting patients who may benefit from aggressive therapy and experience long-term overall survival. This review discusses the current treatment approaches used in oligometastatic NSCLC and provides the evidence and rationale for each approach. The prognostic factors of many trials are discussed, which can be used to properly select patients for aggressive treatment regimens. Future advances in both molecular profiling of NSCLC to find targetable mutations and investigating patient selection may increase the number of patients diagnosed with oligometastatic NSCLC. As this disease entity increases, it is of utmost importance for oncologists treating NSCLC to be aware of the current treatment strategies that exist and the potential advantages/disadvantages of each. Keywords: oligometastatic, non-small-cell lung cancer, oligoprogressive, treatment

  9. Current treatment for anorexia nervosa: efficacy, safety, and adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay P Bodell

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Lindsay P Bodell, Pamela K KeelDepartment of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USAAbstract: Anorexia nervosa (AN is a serious psychiatric illness associated with significant medical and psychiatric morbidity, psychosocial impairment, increased risk of death, and chronicity. Given the severity of the disorder, the establishment of safe and effective treatments is necessary. Several treatments have been tried in AN, but few favorable results have emerged. This paper reviews randomized controlled trials in AN, and provides a synthesis of existing data regarding the efficacy, safety, and adherence associated with pharmacologic and psychological interventions. Randomized controlled trials for the treatment of AN published in peer-reviewed journals were identified by electronic and manual searches. Overall, pharmacotherapy has limited benefits in the treatment of AN, with some promising preliminary findings associated with olanzapine, an antipsychotic agent. No single psychological intervention has demonstrated clear superiority in treating adults with AN. In adolescents with AN, the evidence base is strongest for the use of family therapy over alternative individual psychotherapies. Results highlight challenges in both treating individuals with AN and in studying the effects of those treatments, and further emphasize the importance of continued efforts to develop novel interventions. Treatment trials currently underway and areas for future research are discussed.Keywords: anorexia nervosa, treatment, pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, randomized controlled trials

  10. Treatment Recommendations for Locally Advanced, Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: The Influence of Physician and Patient Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Irwin H.; Hayman, James A.; Landrum, Mary Beth; Tepper, Joel; Tao, May Lin; Goodman, Karyn A.; Keating, Nancy L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of patient age, comorbidity, and physician factors on treatment recommendations for locally advanced, unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We surveyed radiation oncologists regarding their recommendations for treatment (chemoradiation, radiation alone, chemotherapy alone, or no therapy) for hypothetical patients with Stage IIIB NSCLC who varied by age (55 vs. 80 years) and comorbid illness (none, moderate, or severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]). Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess the impact of physician and practice characteristics on radiation oncologists' treatment recommendations for three scenarios with the least agreement. Results: Of 214 radiation oncologists, nearly all (99%) recommended chemoradiation for a healthy 55 year old. However, there was substantial variability in recommendations for a 55 year old with severe COPD, an 80-year-old with moderate COPD, and an 80-year-old with severe COPD. Physicians seeing a lower volume of lung cancer patients were statistically less likely to recommend radiotherapy for younger or older patients with severe COPD (both p < 0.05), but the impact was modest. Conclusions: Nearly all radiation oncologists report following the evidence-based recommendation of chemoradiation for young, otherwise healthy patients with locally advanced, unresectable NSCLC, but there is substantial variability in treatment recommendations for older or sicker patients, probably related to the lack of clinical trial data for such patients. The physician and practice characteristics we examined only weakly affected treatment recommendations. Additional clinical trial data are necessary to guide recommendations for treatment of elderly patients and patients with poor pulmonary function to optimize their management.

  11. Inter-rater Agreement of Clinicians' Treatment Recommendations Based on Modified Barium Swallow Study Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovarp, Laurie; Danielson, Jennifer; Liss, Julie

    2018-06-07

    The modified barium swallow study (MBSS) is a commonly used radiographic procedure for diagnosis and treatment of swallowing disorders. Despite attempts by dysphagia specialists to standardize the MBSS, most institutions have not adopted such standardized procedures. High variability of assessment patterns arguably contribute to variability of treatment recommendations made from diagnostic information derived from the MBSS report. An online survey was distributed to speech-language pathologists (SLPs) participating in American Speech Language Hearing Association (ASHA) listservs. Sixty-three SLPs who treat swallowing disorders participated. Participating SLPs reviewed two MBSS reports and chose physiologic treatment targets (e.g., tongue base retraction) based on each report. One report primarily contained symptomatology (e.g., aspiration, pharyngeal residue) with minimal information on impaired physiology (e.g., laryngeal incompetence, reduced hyolaryngeal elevation/excursion). In contrast, the second report contained a clear description of impaired physiology to explain the dysphagia symptoms. Fleiss kappa coefficients were used to analyze inter-rater agreement across the high and low physiology report types. Results revealed significantly higher inter-rater agreement across clinicians when reviewing reports with clear explanation(s) of physiologic impairment relative to reports that primarily focused on symptomatology. Clinicians also reported significantly greater satisfaction and treatment confidence following review of reports with clear description(s) of impaired physiology.

  12. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis: current and emerging treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihler F

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Friedrich Ihler, Martin CanisDepartment of Otorhinolaryngology, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen, GermanyAbstract: Ragweed (Ambrosia spp. is an annually flowering plant whose pollen bears high allergenic potential. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis has long been seen as a major immunologic condition in Northern America with high exposure and sensitization rates in the general population. The invasive occurrence of ragweed (A. artemisiifolia poses an increasing challenge to public health in Europe and Asia as well. Possible explanations for its worldwide spread are climate change and urbanization, as well as pollen transport over long distances by globalized traffic and winds. Due to the increasing disease burden worldwide, and to the lack of a current and comprehensive overview, this study aims to review the current and emerging treatment options for ragweed-induced rhinoconjunctivitis. Sound clinical evidence is present for the symptomatic treatment of ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis with oral third-generation H1-antihistamines and leukotriene antagonists. The topical application of glucocorticoids has also been efficient in randomized controlled clinical trials. Combined approaches employing multiple agents are common. The mainstay of causal treatment to date, especially in Northern America, is subcutaneous immunotherapy with the focus on the major allergen, Amb a 1. Beyond this, growing evidence from several geographical regions documents the benefit of sublingual immunotherapy. Future treatment options promise more specific symptomatic treatment and fewer side effects during causal therapy. Novel antihistamines for symptomatic treatment are aimed at the histamine H3-receptor. New adjuvants with toll-like receptor 4 activity or the application of the monoclonal anti-immunoglobulin E antibody, omalizumab, are supposed to enhance conventional immunotherapy. An approach targeting toll-like receptor 9 by

  13. Inmate Prerelease Assessment (IPASS) Aftercare Placement Recommendation as a Predictor of Rural Inmate's 12-Step Attendance and Treatment Entry Postrelease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oser, Carrie B.; Biebel, Elizabeth P.; Havens, Jennifer R.; Staton-Tindall, Michele; Knudsen, Hannah K.; Mooney, Jenny L.; Leukefeld, Carl G.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to use the Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies' (CJ-DATS) Inmate Prerelease Assessment (IPASS), which recommends either intensive or nonintensive treatment after release, to predict rural offenders' 12-step attendance and treatment entry within six months of release from prison. IPASS scores indicated that…

  14. Hepatitis C in sub-Saharan Africa: the current status and recommendations for achieving elimination by 2030.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonderup, Mark W; Afihene, Mary; Ally, Reidwaan; Apica, Betty; Awuku, Yaw; Cunha, Lina; Dusheiko, Geoffrey; Gogela, Neliswa; Lohouès-Kouacou, Marie-Jeanne; Lam, Phillip; Lesi, Olufunmilayo; Mbaye, Papa Saliou; Musabeyezu, Emmanuel; Musau, Betty; Ojo, Olesegun; Rwegasha, John; Scholz, Barbara; Shewaye, Abate B; Tzeuton, Christian; Kassianides, Chris; Spearman, C Wendy

    2017-12-01

    In 2016, WHO adopted a strategy for the elimination of viral hepatitis by 2030. Africa, and more specifically, sub-Saharan Africa, carries a substantial portion of the global burden of viral hepatitis, especially chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus infections. The task that lies ahead for sub-Saharan Africa to achieve elimination is substantial, but not insurmountable. Major developments in the management of hepatitis C have put elimination within reach, but several difficulties will need to be navigated on the path to elimination. Many of the challenges faced are unique to sub-Saharan Africa and the development of strategies is complicated by a scarcity of good data from countries and regions within sub-Saharan Africa. However, this hindrance should not act as a barrier to delay interventions in screening, detection, and linkage to care. Moreover, by sharing experiences from across sub-Saharan Africa, countries can create supranational synergies to develop their programmes and work together in a more cohesive manner to tackle the burden of hepatitis C in sub-Saharan Africa. In this Series paper, several issues related to hepatitis C in sub-Saharan Africa are addressed, including prevalence, risk factors, and fibrosis assessment, and recommendations are given by experts from across the region. Simplified diagnostic algorithms and treatment regimens for both HIV co-infected and hepatitis C mono-infected patients are suggested. The recommendations are consensus based and provided to guide the development of programmes in sub-Saharan Africa. Political will and appropriate funding will be required to provide impetus to implement these recommendations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Angina pectoris: current therapy and future treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Raj; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2014-02-01

    Angina pectoris is the consequence of an inequality between the demand and supply of blood to the heart. Angina manifests itself as chest pain or discomfort and is a common complaint of patients in the hospital and in the clinic. There are, in fact, roughly half a million new cases of angina per year. Chest pain, while having many etiologies, is generally considered to be most lethal when related to a cardiac cause. In this review, the authors outline the current medical and surgical therapies that are used in the management of angina. Highlights of the various clinical trials that have assisted in the investigation of these therapies are summarized also. Then, the authors provide a focused review of the novel therapy options for angina that are currently being explored. From new medical treatments to revised surgical techniques to the discovery of stem cell therapy, many innovative options are being investigated for the treatment of angina.

  16. Current and future medical treatments for patients with acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffezzoni, Filippo; Formenti, Anna Maria; Mazziotti, Gherardo; Frara, Stefano; Giustina, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Acromegaly is a relatively rare condition of growth hormone (GH) excess associated with significant morbidity and, when left untreated, high mortality. Therapy for acromegaly is targeted at decreasing GH and insulin-like growth hormone 1 levels, ameliorating patients' symptoms and decreasing any local compressive effects of the pituitary adenoma. The therapeutic options for acromegaly include surgery, medical therapies (such as dopamine agonists, somatostatin receptor ligands and the GH receptor antagonist pegvisomant) and radiotherapy. However, despite all these treatments option, approximately 50% of patients are not adequately controlled. In this paper, the authors discuss: 1) efficacy and safety of current medical therapy 2) the efficacy and safety of the new multireceptor-targeted somatostatin ligand pasireotide 3) medical treatments currently under clinical investigation (oral octreotide, ITF2984, ATL1103), and 4) preliminary data on the use of new injectable and transdermal/transmucosal formulations of octreotide. This expert opinion supports the need for new therapeutic agents and modalities for patients with acromegaly.

  17. Current status of quality assurance of treatment planning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mijnheer, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    A review is given of the current status of quality assurance of treatment planning systems. At this moment only one comprehensive report is available. In order to review national activities a questionnaire has been distributed amongst national societies of medical physicists. From the 23 responding countries, 8 indicated that only limited efforts are underway, 8 answered that a working group is evaluating their specific national requirements while in 5 countries a document is drafted. The highlights of these reports have been summarized. (author)

  18. Treatment of Comorbid Alcohol Dependence and Anxiety Disorder: Review of the Scientific Evidence and Recommendations for Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno, Carmen; Dorado, Marisa Luisa; Roncero, Carlos; Szerman, Nestor; Vega, Pablo; Balanzá-Martínez, Vicent; Alvarez, F. Javier

    2017-01-01

    Patients with alcohol-use disorders (AUDs) have a high prevalence of anxiety disorders (AnxDs). “Co-occurring disorders” refers to the coexistence of an AUD and/or drug related disorders with another non-addictive psychiatric disorder. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of psychopharmacological treatments and psychotherapy in patients with AUD and AnxD and to propose recommendations for the treatment of patients with comorbid AnxDs and AUDs. Randomized clinical trials, meta-analyses, and clinical guidelines were retrieved from PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases. Paroxetine was found to be effective in social anxiety patients with alcohol dependence. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), especially sertraline, showed effective results in posttraumatic stress disorder and in comorbid AnxD–AUD. However, SSRIs should be used with caution when patients are actively drinking because they may increase alcohol consumption. Buspirone, gabapentin, and pregabalin were found to be effective in comorbid AnxD–AUD. The treatment of dual AnxDs should start as early as possible. Since AUDs and AnxDs can reinforce each other, treatments targeting both pathologies can be effective. Women suffer from higher levels of stress and AnxDs than men, and they are also more vulnerable to maintaining alcohol consumption levels. Further research is needed in this comorbid patient population, including the study of different types of patients and gender perspectives. PMID:29018367

  19. Treatment of Comorbid Alcohol Dependence and Anxiety Disorder: Review of the Scientific Evidence and Recommendations for Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Gimeno

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with alcohol-use disorders (AUDs have a high prevalence of anxiety disorders (AnxDs. “Co-occurring disorders” refers to the coexistence of an AUD and/or drug related disorders with another non-addictive psychiatric disorder. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of psychopharmacological treatments and psychotherapy in patients with AUD and AnxD and to propose recommendations for the treatment of patients with comorbid AnxDs and AUDs. Randomized clinical trials, meta-analyses, and clinical guidelines were retrieved from PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases. Paroxetine was found to be effective in social anxiety patients with alcohol dependence. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs, especially sertraline, showed effective results in posttraumatic stress disorder and in comorbid AnxD–AUD. However, SSRIs should be used with caution when patients are actively drinking because they may increase alcohol consumption. Buspirone, gabapentin, and pregabalin were found to be effective in comorbid AnxD–AUD. The treatment of dual AnxDs should start as early as possible. Since AUDs and AnxDs can reinforce each other, treatments targeting both pathologies can be effective. Women suffer from higher levels of stress and AnxDs than men, and they are also more vulnerable to maintaining alcohol consumption levels. Further research is needed in this comorbid patient population, including the study of different types of patients and gender perspectives.

  20. Current and emerging treatment options for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spratt DE

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Daniel E Spratt, Nancy LeeDepartment of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USAAbstract: In this article, we focus on the current and emerging treatments in nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC. A detailed evolution of the current standard of care, and new techniques and treatment options will be reviewed. Intergroup 0099 established the role for chemoradiotherapy (chemo-RT in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Multiple randomized Phase III trials have shown the benefit of chemo-RT; however, none of these studies utilized modern radiotherapy (RT techniques of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT. IMRT has the ability to deliver high doses of radiation to the target structures while sparing adjacent bystander healthy tissues, and has now become the preferred RT treatment modality. Chemotherapy also has had a shifting paradigm of induction and/or adjuvant chemotherapy combined with RT alone, to the investigation with concurrent chemo-RT. New treatment options including targeted monoclonal antibodies and small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors are being studied in NPC. These new biologic therapies have promising in vitro activity for NPC, and emerging clinical studies are beginning to define their role. RT continues to expand its capabilities, and since IMRT and particle therapy, specifically intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT, has reports of impressive dosimetric efficacy in-silica. Adaptive RT is attempting to reduce toxicity while maintaining treatment efficacy, and the clinical results are still in their youth. Lastly, Epstein–Barr virus (EBV DNA has recently been studied for prediction of tumor response and its use as a biomarker is increasingly promising to aid in early detection as well as supplementing the current staging system. RT with or without chemotherapy remains the standard of care for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Advances in RT technique, timing of chemotherapy, biologically

  1. Current status in the treatment options for esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, Seng-Kee; Chiu, Chien-Hua; Tai, Wei-Chen; Lee, Jyong-Hong; Lu, Hung-I; Changchien, Chi-Sin; Tseng, Ping-Huei; Wu, Keng-Liang

    2013-09-07

    Recent advances in the treatment of achalasia include the use of high-resolution manometry to predict the outcome of patients and the introduction of peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). The first multicenter randomized, controlled, 2-year follow-up study conducted by the European Achalasia Trial group indicated that laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) was not superior to pneumatic dilations (PD). Publications on the long-term success of laparoscopic surgery continue to emerge. In addition, laparoscopic single-site surgery is applicable to advanced laparoscopic operations such as LHM and anterior fundoplication. The optimal treatment option is an ongoing matter of debate. In this review, we provide an update of the current progress in the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Unless new conclusive data prove otherwise, LHM is considered the most durable treatment for achalasia at the expense of increased reflux-associated complications. However, PD is the first choice for non-surgical treatment and is more cost-effective. Repeated PD according to an "on-demand" strategy based on symptom recurrence can achieve long-term remission. Decision making should be based on clinical evidence that identifies a subcategory of patients who would benefit from specific treatment options. POEM has shown promise but its long-term efficacy and safety need to be assessed further.

  2. Current Diagnosis, Treatment and Etiology of Status Epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çetin Kürşad Akpınar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Status Epilepticus (SE is a medical emergency that causes significant morbidity and mortality and requires prompt diagnosis and treatment. Although SE can be divided into two subgroups as convulsive and nonconvulsive, treatment principles are generally similar. Treatment should be prompt and underlying cause should be corrected. Although intravenous lorazepam is the first-line treatment due to a lower risk of relapse, diazepam becomes the first choice since loeazepan is not available in our country. Even though intravenous benzodiazepine stops seizures, intravenous antiepileptic drug (phenytoin, etc. should be administered at a loading dose. Patients with refractory status epilepticus should be supported with respect to vital, respiratory, metabolic and hemodynamic aspects and followed up in an intensive care unit to monitor cerebral electrical activity. The most common cause in the etiology is the cessation of antiepileptic drugs. The aim of SE treatment is to stop seizures and prevent complications and recurrence. In this paper, current diagnosis, treatment and etiology of SE are reviewed.

  3. [Our current approach in the treatment of sigmoid colon volvulus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taviloğlu, Korhan; Aydin, Erol; Ertekin, Cemalettin; Güloğlu, Recep; Kurtoğlu, Mehmet

    2002-04-01

    Our aim was to emphasize the role of endoscopic detorsion in the treatment of sigmoid colon volvulus, which we currently apply in the majority of our cases. The data of 37 patients were analyzed in a retrospective manner, during a 86-month period, between May 1994 and July 2001. The patients were classified into three groups. The first group consisted of 9 patients with resection and anastomosis, the second group consisted of 20 patients with Hartmann's procedure, and the third group consisted of 8 patients with endoscopic detorsion. Complications were encountered in 7 patients (19%), and 3 patients (8%) died following treatment. We favor colonic resection following endoscopic treatment. Resection should be preferred, if endoscopic detorsion is not successful or in the presence of a complication.

  4. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation for Treatment of Muscle Impairment: Critical Review and Recommendations for Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Pamela; Anthony, Joseph; Rennie, Sandy; Shay, Barbara L.; Hoens, Alison M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: In response to requests from physiotherapists for guidance on optimal stimulation of muscle using neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), a review, synthesis, and extraction of key data from the literature was undertaken by six Canadian physical therapy (PT) educators, clinicians, and researchers in the field of electrophysical agents. The objective was to identify commonly treated conditions for which there was a substantial body of literature from which to draw conclusions regarding the effectiveness of NMES. Included studies had to apply NMES with visible and tetanic muscle contractions. Method: Four electronic databases (CINAHL, Embase, PUBMED, and SCOPUS) were searched for relevant literature published between database inceptions until May 2015. Additional articles were identified from bibliographies of the systematic reviews and from personal collections. Results: The extracted data were synthesized using a consensus process among the authors to provide recommendations for optimal stimulation parameters and application techniques to address muscle impairments associated with the following conditions: stroke (upper or lower extremity; both acute and chronic), anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, patellofemoral pain syndrome, knee osteoarthritis, and total knee arthroplasty as well as critical illness and advanced disease states. Summaries of key details from each study incorporated into the review were also developed. The final sections of the article outline the recommended terminology for describing practice using electrical currents and provide tips for safe and effective clinical practice using NMES. Conclusion: This article provides physiotherapists with a resource to enable evidence-informed, effective use of NMES for PT practice. PMID:29162949

  5. Current status of brachytherapy in cancer treatment – short overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Skowronek

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer incidence and mortality depend on a number of factors, including age, socio-economic status and geographical location, and its prevalence is growing around the world. Most of cancer treatments include external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy. Brachytherapy, a type of radiotherapy with energy from radionuclides inserted directly into the tumor, is increasingly used in cancer treatment. For cervical and skin cancers, it has become a standard therapy for more than 100 years as well as an important part of the treatment guidelines for other malignancies, including head and neck, skin, breast, and prostate cancers. Compared to external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy has the potential to deliver an ablative radiation dose over a short period of time directly to the altered tissue area with the advantage of a rapid fall-off in dose, and consequently, sparing of adjacent organs. As a result, the patient is able to complete the treatment earlier, and the risks of occurrence of another cancer are lower than in conventional radiotherapy treatment. Brachytherapy has increased its use as a radical or palliative treatment, and become more advanced with the spread of pulsed-dose-rate and high-dose-rate afterloading machines; the use of new 3D/4D planning systems has additionally improved the quality of the treatment. The aim of the present study was to present short summaries of current studies on brachytherapy for the most frequently diagnosed tumors. Data presented in this manuscript should help especially young physicians or physicists to explore and introduce brachytherapy in cancer treatments.

  6. Conclusions and recommendations from the symposium, Beyond Cholesterol: Prevention and Treatment of Coronary Heart Disease with n-3 Fatty Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckelbaum, Richard J; Leaf, Alexander; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Jacobson, Terry A; Harris, William S; Akabas, Sharon R

    2008-06-01

    After the symposium "Beyond Cholesterol: Prevention and Treatment of Coronary Heart Disease with n-3 Fatty Acids," faculty who presented at the conference submitted manuscripts relating to their conference topics, and these are presented in this supplement. The content of these manuscripts was reviewed, and 2 conference calls were convened. The objective was to summarize existing evidence, gaps in evidence, and future research needed to strengthen recommendations for specific intakes of n-3 fatty acids for different conditions relating to cardiovascular disease. The following 2 questions were the main items discussed. What are the roles of n-3 fatty acids in primary versus secondary prevention of coronary heart disease? What are the roles of n-3 fatty acids in hypertriglyceridemia, in the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, and in sudden cardiac death, cardiac arrhythmias, and vulnerable plaque? Each area was summarized by using 2 general categories: 1) current knowledge for which general consensus exists, and 2) recommendations for research and policy. Additional references for these conclusions can be found in the articles included in the supplement.

  7. Current and emerging therapies for the treatment of myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Mantegazza

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Renato Mantegazza, Silvia Bonanno, Giorgia Camera, Carlo AntozziDepartment of Neuromuscular Diseases and Neuroimmunology, Fondazione Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milan, ItalyAbstract: Myasthenia gravis (MG is an autoimmmune disease in which autoantibodies to different antigens of the neuromuscular junction cause the typical weakness and fatigability. Treatment includes anticholinesterase drugs, immunosuppression, immunomodulation, and thymectomy. The autoimmune response is maintained under control by corticosteroids frequently associated with immunosuppressive drugs, with improvement in the majority of patients. In case of acute exacerbations with bulbar symptoms or repeated relapses, modulation of autoantibody activity by plasmapheresis or intravenous immunoglobulins provides rapid improvement. Recently, techniques removing only circulating immunoglobulins have been developed for the chronic management of treatment-resistant patients. The rationale for thymectomy relies on the central role of the thymus. Despite the lack of controlled studies, thymectomy is recommended as an option to improve the clinical outcome or promote complete remission. New videothoracoscopic techniques have been developed to offer the maximal surgical approach with the minimal invasiveness and hence patient tolerability. The use of biological drugs such as anti-CD20 antibodies is still limited but promising. Studies performed in the animal model of MG demonstrated that several more selective or antigen-specific approaches, ranging from mucosal tolerization to inhibition of complement activity or cellular therapy, might be feasible. Investigation of the transfer of these therapeutic approaches to the human disease will be the challenge for the future.Keywords: myasthenia gravis, therapy, immunosuppression, thymectomy, plasmapheresis

  8. Current and emerging therapies for the treatment of myasthenia gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantegazza, Renato; Bonanno, Silvia; Camera, Giorgia; Antozzi, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmmune disease in which autoantibodies to different antigens of the neuromuscular junction cause the typical weakness and fatigability. Treatment includes anticholinesterase drugs, immunosuppression, immunomodulation, and thymectomy. The autoimmune response is maintained under control by corticosteroids frequently associated with immunosuppressive drugs, with improvement in the majority of patients. In case of acute exacerbations with bulbar symptoms or repeated relapses, modulation of autoantibody activity by plasmapheresis or intravenous immunoglobulins provides rapid improvement. Recently, techniques removing only circulating immunoglobulins have been developed for the chronic management of treatment-resistant patients. The rationale for thymectomy relies on the central role of the thymus. Despite the lack of controlled studies, thymectomy is recommended as an option to improve the clinical outcome or promote complete remission. New videothoracoscopic techniques have been developed to offer the maximal surgical approach with the minimal invasiveness and hence patient tolerability. The use of biological drugs such as anti-CD20 antibodies is still limited but promising. Studies performed in the animal model of MG demonstrated that several more selective or antigen-specific approaches, ranging from mucosal tolerization to inhibition of complement activity or cellular therapy, might be feasible. Investigation of the transfer of these therapeutic approaches to the human disease will be the challenge for the future. PMID:21552317

  9. Spinal cord stimulation: Current applications for treatment of chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannemreddy, Prasad; Slavin, Konstantin V

    2011-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is thought to relieve chronic intractable pain by stimulating nerve fibers in the spinal cord. The resulting impulses in the fibers may inhibit the conduction of pain signals to the brain, according to the pain gate theory proposed by Melzack and Wall in 1965 and the sensation of pain is thus blocked. Although SCS may reduce pain, it will not eliminate it. After a period of concern about safety and efficacy, SCS is now regaining popularity among pain specialists for the treatment of chronic pain. The sympatholytic effect of SCS is one of its most interesting therapeutic properties. This effect is considered responsible for the effectiveness of SCS in peripheral ischemia, and at least some cases of complex regional pain syndrome. The sympatholytic effect has also been considered part of the management of other chronic pain states such as failed back surgery syndrome, phantom pain, diabetic neuropathy, and postherpetic neuralgia. In general, SCS is part of an overall treatment strategy and is used only after the more conservative treatments have failed. The concept of SCS has evolved rapidly following the technological advances that have produced leads with multiple contact electrodes and battery systems. The current prevalence of patients with chronic pain requiring treatment other than conventional medical management has significantly increased and so has been the need for SCS. With the cost benefit analysis showing significant support for SCS, it may be appropriate to offer this as an effective alternative treatment for these patients.

  10. Current and emerging treatment options for Peyronie's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokce A

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ahmet Gokce, Julie C Wang, Mary K Powers, Wayne JG HellstromDepartment of Urology, Tulane University – School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USAAbstract: Peyronie's disease (PD is a condition of the penis, characterized by the presence of localized fibrotic plaque in the tunica albuginea. PD is not an uncommon disorder, with recent epidemiologic studies documenting a prevalence of 3–9% of adult men affected. The actual prevalence of PD may be even higher. It is often associated with penile pain, anatomical deformities in the erect penis, and difficulty with intromission. As the definitive pathophysiology of PD has not been completely elucidated, further basic research is required to make progress in the understanding of this enigmatic condition. Similarly, research on effective therapies is limited. Currently, nonsurgical treatments are used for those men who are in the acute stage of PD, whereas surgical options are reserved for men with established PD who cannot successfully penetrate. Intralesional treatments are growing in clinical popularity as a minimally invasive approach in the initial treatment of PD. A surgical approach should be considered when men with PD do not respond to conservative, medical, or minimally invasive therapies for approximately 1 year and cannot have satisfactory sexual intercourse. As scientific breakthroughs in the understanding of the mechanisms of this disease process evolve, novel treatments for the many men suffering with PD are anticipated.Keywords: oral therapy, intralesional treatment, topical therapy, extracorporeal shockwave therapy, traction devices, plication, incision and grafting, penile prosthesis.

  11. Current Treatment of Toxoplasma Retinochoroiditis: An Evidence-Based Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith Harrell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To perform an evidence-based review of treatments for Toxoplasma retinochoroiditis (TRC. Methods. A systematic literature search was performed using the PubMed database and the key phrase “ocular toxoplasmosis treatment” and the filter for “controlled clinical trial” and “randomized clinical trial” as well as OVID medline (1946 to May week 2 2014 using the keyword ‘‘ocular toxoplasmosis’’. The included studies were used to evaluate the various treatment modalities of TRC. Results. The electronic search yielded a total of 974 publications of which 44 reported on the treatment of ocular toxoplasmosis. There were 9 randomized controlled studies and an additional 3 comparative studies on the treatment of acute TRC with systemic or intravitreous antibiotics or on reducing the recurrences of TRC. Endpoints of studies included visual acuity improvement, inflammatory response, lesion size changes, recurrences of lesions, and adverse effects of medications. Conclusions. There was conflicting evidence as to the effectiveness of systemic antibiotics for TRC. There is no evidence to support that one antibiotic regimen is superior to another so choice needs to be informed by the safety profile. Intravitreous clindamycin with dexamethasone seems to be as effective as systemic treatments. There is currently level I evidence that intermittent trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prevents recurrence of the disease.

  12. Treatment of Liver Tumors with Lipiodol TACE: Technical Recommendations from Experts Opinion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baere, Thierry de, E-mail: thierry.debaere@gustaveroussy.fr [Gustave Roussy, Department of Interventional Radiology (France); Arai, Yasuaki, E-mail: arai-y3111@mvh.biglobe.ne.jp [National Cancer Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Lencioni, Riccardo, E-mail: riccardo.lencioni@med.unipi.it [Pisa University School of Medicine, Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Intervention (R.L.) (Italy); Geschwind, Jean-Francois, E-mail: jfg@jhmi.edu [The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States); Rilling, William, E-mail: wrilling@mcw.edu [Medical College of Wisconsin, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology Rm2803 (United States); Salem, Riad, E-mail: r-salem@northwestern.edu [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology (United States); Matsui, Osamu, E-mail: matsuio@med.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Advanced Medical Imaging (Japan); Soulen, Michael C., E-mail: michael.soulen@uphs.upenn.edu [University of Pennsylvania, Division of Interventional Radiology (MCS) (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Transarterial chemoembolization with Lipiodol (Lipiodol TACE), also called conventional TACE, was developed in the early 1980s and widely adopted worldwide after randomized control trials and meta-analysis demonstrated superiority of Lipiodol TACE to best supportive care. Presently, there is no level one evidence that other TACE techniques are superior to Lipiodol TACE for intermediate stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which includes patients with preserved liver function and nonsurgical large or multinodular HCC without distant metastases. In addition, TACE is part of the treatment for progressive or symptomatic liver metastases from gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. When injected into the hepatic artery, Lipiodol has the unique property of selective uptake and retention in hyperarterialyzed liver tumors. Lipiodol/drug emulsion followed by particle embolization has been demonstrated to improve the pharmacokinetic of the drug and tumor response. Radio opacity of Lipiodol helps to monitor treatment delivery, with retention of Lipiodol serving as an imaging biomarker for tumor response. For 30 years, Lipiodol TACE has been inconsistently referenced in many publications with various levels of details for the method of preparation and administration, with reported progressive outcomes following improvements in the technique and the devices used to deliver the treatment and better patient selection. Consequently, there is no consensus on the standard method of TACE regarding the use of anticancer agents, embolic material, technical details, and the treatment schedule. In order to develop an internationally validated technical recommendation to standardize the Lipiodol TACE procedure, a worldwide panel of experts participated in a consensus meeting held on May 10, 2014.

  13. Danish recommendations on treatment of ankylosing spondylitis and spondyloarthritis based on multinational project initiative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne Juhl; Madsen, Ole Rintek; Erlendsson, J.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The multinational initiative "3e Initiative in Rheumatology - Multi-national Recommendations for the Management of Ankylosing Spondylitis 2006-7" served the primary purpose of providing specific recommendations for the management of ankylosing spondylitis and spondyloarthritis...

  14. Genetic Variation in Choline-Metabolizing Enzymes Alters Choline Metabolism in Young Women Consuming Choline Intakes Meeting Current Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel B. Ganz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in choline metabolizing genes are associated with disease risk and greater susceptibility to organ dysfunction under conditions of dietary choline restriction. However, the underlying metabolic signatures of these variants are not well characterized and it is unknown whether genotypic differences persist at recommended choline intakes. Thus, we sought to determine if common genetic risk factors alter choline dynamics in pregnant, lactating, and non-pregnant women consuming choline intakes meeting and exceeding current recommendations. Women (n = 75 consumed 480 or 930 mg choline/day (22% as a metabolic tracer, choline-d9 for 10–12 weeks in a controlled feeding study. Genotyping was performed for eight variant SNPs and genetic differences in metabolic flux and partitioning of plasma choline metabolites were evaluated using stable isotope methodology. CHKA rs10791957, CHDH rs9001, CHDH rs12676, PEMT rs4646343, PEMT rs7946, FMO3 rs2266782, SLC44A1 rs7873937, and SLC44A1 rs3199966 altered the use of choline as a methyl donor; CHDH rs9001 and BHMT rs3733890 altered the partitioning of dietary choline between betaine and phosphatidylcholine synthesis via the cytidine diphosphate (CDP-choline pathway; and CHKA rs10791957, CHDH rs12676, PEMT rs4646343, PEMT rs7946 and SLC44A1 rs7873937 altered the distribution of dietary choline between the CDP-choline and phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT denovo pathway. Such metabolic differences may contribute to disease pathogenesis and prognosis over the long-term.

  15. A diet quality index for American preschoolers based on current dietary intake recommendations and an indicator of energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, Sibylle; Hartman, Terryl; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Herring, Amy H

    2006-10-01

    Based on current dietary intake recommendations and a recommendation to limit sedentary activity in preschoolers, an overall diet quality index for preschoolers (RC-DQI) incorporating a component for energy balance to measure adequacy of nutrition for growth, development, and disease prevention was developed. The newly developed index was used in nationally representative samples of 2- to 5-year-olds in the US Department of Agriculture Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals 1994-96 and 1998 (n=5,437). Index components included added sugar, total fat, polyunsaturated fatty acids, total and whole grains, fruits, vegetables, excess fruit juice, dairy, iron, and an interaction term of total daily energy intake and sedentary behavior (television time). Points were allocated to reflect deficient or excessive intakes. Means and standard errors were used to describe food intakes and RC-DQI scores. Ability to differentiate diets was ascertained using mean intakes of food groups/nutrients followed by a nonparametric test of trends across ordered groups. Correlation coefficients measured dependence among RC-DQI components, nutrients, and overall energy intakes. Component scores of the highest and lowest quartile of RC-DQI were compared. Mean RC-DQI score was 64 points (range=28 to 93). Increasing RC-DQI scores were associated with improved diet quality. Children in the lowest RC-DQI quartile scored lower in all components. The RC-DQI successfully differentiated diets by level of diet quality. Increasing scores were associated with decreasing consumption of added sugar and juices, and increasing intakes of fiber, essential fatty acids, fruits, and vegetables. The RC-DQI can be used to determine diet quality in groups of preschool-age children.

  16. Transcranial direct-current stimulation as treatment in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwind, Markus; Seeck, Margitta

    2016-12-01

    Neuromodulation (NM) is a complementary therapy for patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. Vagal nerve stimulation and deep brain stimulation of the anterior thalamus are established techniques and have shown their efficacy in lowering seizure frequency, but they are invasive and rarely render patients seizure-free. Non-invasive NM techniques are therefore increasingly investigated in a clinical context. Areas covered: Current knowledge about transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) and other non-invasive NM in patients with epilepsy, based on the available animal and clinical studies from PubMed search. Expert commentary: tDCS modulates neuronal membrane potentials, and consequently alters cortical excitability. Cathodal stimulation leads to cortical inhibition, which is of particular importance in epilepsy treatment. The antiepileptic efficacy is promising but still lacks systematic studies. The beneficial effect, seen in ~20%, outlasts the duration of stimulation, indicating neuronal plasticity and is therefore of great interest to obtain long-term effects.

  17. Treatment of giant cell tumor of bone: Current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Ajay; Agarwal, Manish

    2007-04-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone though one of the commonest bone tumors encountered by an orthopedic surgeon continues to intrigue treating surgeons. Usually benign, they are locally aggressive and may occasionally undergo malignant transformation. The surgeon needs to strike a balance during treatment between reducing the incidence of local recurrence while preserving maximal function.Differing opinions pertaining to the use of adjuvants for extension of curettage, the relative role of bone graft or cement to pack the defect and the management of recurrent lesions are some of the issues that offer topics for eternal debate.Current literature suggests that intralesional curettage strikes the best balance between controlling disease and preserving optimum function in the majority of the cases though there may be occasions where the extent of the disease mandates resection to ensure adequate disease clearance.An accompanying treatment algorithm helps outline the management strategy in GCT.

  18. Treatment of giant cell tumor of bone: Current concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puri Ajay

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor (GCT of bone though one of the commonest bone tumors encountered by an orthopedic surgeon continues to intrigue treating surgeons. Usually benign, they are locally aggressive and may occasionally undergo malignant transformation. The surgeon needs to strike a balance during treatment between reducing the incidence of local recurrence while preserving maximal function. Differing opinions pertaining to the use of adjuvants for extension of curettage, the relative role of bone graft or cement to pack the defect and the management of recurrent lesions are some of the issues that offer topics for eternal debate. Current literature suggests that intralesional curettage strikes the best balance between controlling disease and preserving optimum function in the majority of the cases though there may be occasions where the extent of the disease mandates resection to ensure adequate disease clearance. An accompanying treatment algorithm helps outline the management strategy in GCT.

  19. Updated CDC Recommendations for Using Artemether-Lumefantrine for the Treatment of Uncomplicated Malaria in Pregnant Women in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Sarah-Blythe; Salinger, Allison; Arguin, Paul M; Desai, Meghna; Tan, Kathrine R

    2018-04-13

    Malaria infection during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk for maternal and fetal complications. In the United States, treatment options for uncomplicated, chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax malaria in pregnant women are limited to mefloquine or quinine plus clindamycin (1). However, limited availability of quinine and increasing resistance to mefloquine restrict these options. Strong evidence now demonstrates that artemether-lumefantrine (AL) (Coartem) is effective and safe in the treatment of malaria in pregnancy. The World Health Organization (WHO) has endorsed artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs), such as AL, for treatment of uncomplicated malaria during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy and is currently considering whether to add ACTs, including AL, as an option for malaria treatment during the first trimester (2,3). This policy note reviews the evidence and updates CDC recommendations to include AL as a treatment option for uncomplicated malaria during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy and during the first trimester of pregnancy when other treatment options are unavailable. These updated recommendations reflect current evidence and are consistent with WHO treatment guidelines.

  20. Tourette Syndrome and comorbid ADHD: current pharmacological treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Renata; Gulisano, Mariangela; Calì, Paola V; Curatolo, Paolo

    2013-09-01

    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is the most common co-morbid condition encountered in people with tics and Tourette Syndrome (TS). The co-occurrence of TS and ADHD is associated with a higher psychopathological, social and academic impairment and the management may represent a challenge for the clinicians. To review recent advances in management of patients with tic, Tourette Syndrome and comorbid Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. We searched peer reviewed and original medical publications (PUBMED 1990-2012) and included randomized, double-blind, controlled trials related to pharmacological treatment for tic and TS used in children and adolescents with comorbid ADHD. "Tourette Syndrome" or "Tic" and "ADHD", were cross referenced with the words "pharmacological treatment", "α-agonist", "psychostimulants", "selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor", "antipsychotics". Three classes of drugs are currently used in the treatment of TS and comorbid ADHD: α-agonists (clonidine and guanfacine), stimulants (amphetamine enantiomers, methylphenidate enantiomers or slow release preparation), and selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (atomoxetine). It has been recently suggested that in a few selected cases partial dopamine agonists (aripiprazole) could be useful. Level A of evidence supported the use of noradrenergic agents (clonidine). Reuptake inhibitors (atomoxetine) and stimulants (methylphenidate) could be, also used for the treatment of TS and comorbid ADHD. Taking into account the risk-benefit profile, clonidine could be used as the first line treatment. However only few studies meet rigorous quality criteria in terms of study design and methodology; most trials have low statistical power due to small sample size or short duration. Treatment should be "symptom targeted" and personalized for each patient. Copyright © 2013 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Azelaic acid in dermatological treatmentcurrent state of knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radomir Reszke

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Azelaic acid (AZA is a naturally occurring substance produced by Malassezia furfur which exerts various effects on the skin. Azelaic acid has antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, keratolytic, comedolytic, sebostatic and tyrosinase-inhibiting properties. Topical application of AZA as 20% cream or 15% gel is a well-established therapeutic method in various common dermatoses, mainly acne vulgaris, rosacea and disorders associated with hyperpigmentation. Azelaic acid is used as a component of chemical peels as well. The paper summarizes the most relevant issues concerning AZA application in dermatological treatment based on current knowledge.

  2. Current Status of Interventional Radiology Treatment of Infrapopliteal Arterial Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rand, T., E-mail: thomas.rand@wienkav.at [General Hospital Hietzing, Department of Radiology (Austria); Uberoi, R. [John Radcliffe Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-15

    Treatment of infrapopliteal arteries has developed to a standard technique during the past two decades. With the introduction of innovative devices, a variety of techniques has been created and is still under investigation. Treatment options range from plain balloon angioplasty (POBA), all sorts of stent applications, such as bare metal, balloon expanding, self-expanding, coated and drug-eluting stents, and bio-absorbable stents, to latest developments, such as drug-eluting balloons. Regarding the scientific background, several prospective, randomized studies with relevant numbers of patients have been (or will be) published that are Level I evidence. In contrast to older studies, which primarily were based mostly on numeric parameters, such as diameters or residual stenoses, more recent study concepts focus increasingly on clinical features, such as amputation rate improvement or changes of clinical stages and quality of life standards. Although it is still not decided, which of the individual techniques might be the best one, we can definitely conclude that whatever treatment of infrapopliteal arteries will be used it is of substantial benefit for the patient. Therefore, the goal of this review is to give an overview about the current developments and techniques for the treatment of infrapopliteal arteries, to present clinical and technical results, to weigh individual techniques, and to discuss the recent developments.

  3. Current pharmacological agents for the treatment of premature ejaculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Dede

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to review and assess the update studies regarding medical treatment for premature ejaculation (PE. It is the most common sexual problem affecting men. It can affect men at all ages and has a serious impact on the quality of life for men and their partners. A wide variety of therapeutic modalities have been tried for treatment of premature ejaculation. Psychological therapies may be helpful for patients with complaint PE. Several topical therapies have been used including lidocaine cream, lidocaine-prilocaine cream. There has been recent interest in the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI for the treatment of PE, due to the fact that one of their common side effects is delayed ejaculation. Currently used SSRIs have several non-sexual side effects and long half lives, therefore there has been interest in developing a short acting, and efficacious SSRI that can be used on-demand for PE. Dapoxetine has been recently evaluated for the treatment of PE by several groups, and results so far appear promising.

  4. Effectiveness of multiple sclerosis treatment with current immunomodulatory drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milo, Ron

    2015-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the CNS of a putative autoimmune origin characterized by neurologic dysfunction disseminated in space and time due to demyelination and axonal loss that results in progressive disability. Recent advances in understanding the immune pathogenesis of the disease resulted in the introduction of numerous effective immunomodulatoty drugs having diverse mechanisms of action, modes of administration and risk-benefit profiles. This results in more complex albeit more promising treatment selection and choices. The epidemiology, clinical features, pathogenesis and diagnosis of the disease are discussed. The mode of action and main characteristics of current immunomodulatory drugs for MS and their place in the therapeutic algorithm of the disease based on evidence from clinical trials are described. Speculation on new paradigms, treatment goals and outcome measures aimed at improving the landscape of MS treatment is presented. Multiple disease, drug and patient-related factors should be taken into consideration when selecting the appropriate drug and treatment strategy to the appropriate patient, thus paving the road for personalized medicine in MS.

  5. Current Status of Interventional Radiology Treatment of Infrapopliteal Arterial Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rand, T.; Uberoi, R.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of infrapopliteal arteries has developed to a standard technique during the past two decades. With the introduction of innovative devices, a variety of techniques has been created and is still under investigation. Treatment options range from plain balloon angioplasty (POBA), all sorts of stent applications, such as bare metal, balloon expanding, self-expanding, coated and drug-eluting stents, and bio-absorbable stents, to latest developments, such as drug-eluting balloons. Regarding the scientific background, several prospective, randomized studies with relevant numbers of patients have been (or will be) published that are Level I evidence. In contrast to older studies, which primarily were based mostly on numeric parameters, such as diameters or residual stenoses, more recent study concepts focus increasingly on clinical features, such as amputation rate improvement or changes of clinical stages and quality of life standards. Although it is still not decided, which of the individual techniques might be the best one, we can definitely conclude that whatever treatment of infrapopliteal arteries will be used it is of substantial benefit for the patient. Therefore, the goal of this review is to give an overview about the current developments and techniques for the treatment of infrapopliteal arteries, to present clinical and technical results, to weigh individual techniques, and to discuss the recent developments.

  6. Prevention and treatment of skin lesions associated with non-invasive mechanical ventilation. Recommendations of experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raurell-Torredà, M; Romero-Collado, A; Rodríguez-Palma, M; Farrés-Tarafa, M; Martí, J D; Hurtado-Pardos, B; Peñarrubia-San Florencio, L; Saez-Paredes, P; Esquinas, A M

    In the last two decades, non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) has been consolidated as an initial strategy for the management of respiratory failure in critical adult and paediatric patients. To identify risk factors and preventive strategies to reduce the incidence of skin lesions associated with clinical devices (LESADIC) related to NIV, as well as the most effective treatment for injuries that cannot be avoided. Review in the MEDLINE, CINAHL and Cochrane databases of studies published in the last 10years to reach consensus through an expert panel. Knowledge about how to measure correct mask size and protection of the skin with foam or hydrocolloids dressings are factors related to the incidence of LESADIC, as it conditions the degree of pressure-friction and shear that the interface exerts on the skin. The interface that causes fewer LESADIC and is better tolerated is the face mask. When there are injuries, the first thing is to remove the interface that causes pressure on damaged skin, recommending a Helmet ® hood as an alternative, treating the infection, managing the exudate and stimulating perilesional skin. The mask of choice is the facial, always using foam or hydrocolloid dressings on the nasal bridge. Evaluate the condition of the skin under the interface and harness every 4hours (recommended) and 11hours (maximum). Evaluate the rotation strategy of the interface at 24hours if the NIV is still needed on an ongoing basis. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Enfermería Intensiva y Unidades Coronarias (SEEIUC). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Cholera Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diagnosis and Detection Laboratory Testing for Cholera Treatment Rehydration Therapy Antibiotic Treatment Zinc Treatment Prevention & Control Five ... page for current cholera treatment recommendations. Cholera Treatments Rehydration therapy , meaning prompt restoration of lost fluids and ...

  8. Clostridium difficile infection: current, forgotten and emerging treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drekonja, Dimitri M

    2014-09-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has increased in incidence and severity, and is now among the most common nosocomial infections. Several agents are available for the initial treatment of CDI, some of which are rarely used, and none of which is clearly superior for initial clinical cure. Fidaxomicin appears to offer a benefit in terms of preventing recurrent disease, although the cost-benefit ratio is debated. Recurrent CDI is a major challenge, occurring after 15-30% of initial episodes. The treatment of recurrent CDI is difficult, with sparse evidence available to support any particular agent. Fecal microbiota therapy, also known as 'stool transplantation', appears to be highly effective, although availability is currently limited, and the regulatory environment is in flux. Synthetic stool products and an orally available fecal microbiota therapy product are both under investigation, which may address the problem of availability. As with most infectious diseases, an effective vaccine would be a welcome addition to our armamentarium, but none is currently available.

  9. Retinopathy of prematurity - from recognition of risk factors to treatment recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerholm, Reija; Vesti, Eija

    Retinopathy of prematurity is a proliferative retinal disorder diagnosed exclusively in prematurely born infants. In retinopathy of prematurity, growth of the retinal vasculature is disturbed, leading to hypoxia-induced pathological changes typical of retinopathy of prematurity, in the worst case resulting in retinal detachment. The most typical risk factors predisposing to the disease include hyperoxemia, low levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I), and low birth weight in relation to weeks of pregnancy. Laser therapy of peripheral retina is the currently established form of treatment. Screening is applied in order to recognize the pathological changes in retinopathy of prematurity early enough.

  10. Intravenous high-dose immunotherapy: practical recommendations for use in the treatment of neurological disimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Suponeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current publication summarizes main indications and benefits of intravenous high-dose immunotherapy (IHI in the treatment of various autoimmune diseases of the peripheral nervous system. Available products of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG on the Russian market are reviewed. Tactics for choosing optimal medication for IHI based on its effectiveness and safety are analyzed. Dosage calculation and way of administration of IVIG are described, beeing of a high practical value in neurologist’s daily work.

  11. Current and emerging treatment options for hairy cell leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Rubio M

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Montserrat López-Rubio,1 Jose Antonio Garcia-Marco2 1Department of Hematology, Hospital Universitario Príncipe de Asturias, Alcalá de Henares, 2Department of Hematology, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, Majadahonda, Madrid, Spain Abstract: Hairy cell leukemia (HCL is a lymphoproliferative B-cell disorder characterized by pancytopenia, splenomegaly, and characteristic cytoplasmic hairy projections. Precise diagnosis is essential in order to differentiate classic forms from HCL variants, such as the HCL-variant and VH4-34 molecular variant, which are more resistant to available treatments. The current standard of care is treatment with purine analogs (PAs, such as cladribine or pentostatin, which provide a high rate of long-lasting clinical remissions. Nevertheless, ~30%–40% of the patients relapse, and moreover, some of these are difficult-to-treat refractory cases. The use of the monoclonal antibody rituximab in combination with PA appears to produce even higher responses, and it is often employed to minimize or eliminate residual disease. Currently, research in the field of HCL is focused on identifying novel therapeutic targets and potential agents that are safe and can universally cure the disease. The discovery of the BRAF mutation and progress in understanding the biology of the disease has enabled the scientific community to explore new therapeutic targets. Ongoing clinical trials are assessing various treatment strategies such as the combination of PA and anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies, recombinant immunotoxins targeting CD22, BRAF inhibitors, and B-cell receptor signal inhibitors. Keywords: hairy cell leukemia, purine analogs, rituximab, immunotoxins, vemurafenib, ibrutinib

  12. Current neurotrauma treatment practice in secondary medical service centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suehiro, Eiichi; Yoshino, Hiroko; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Yoneda, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2011-01-01

    Despite neurotrauma treatment practices comprising a significant amount of neurosurgical work for secondary medical service centers, little attention has been placed on neurotrauma cases and evaluation of current neurotrauma treatment practices is limited. Therefore we investigated current neurotrauma practices in our hospital located in a Japanese suburban city. We analyzed 439 patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) admitted to our hospital between April 2004 and October 2010. Patients were divided into three groups based on the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score on admission: mild TBI (GCS 14-15) in 252 patients (57.4%), moderate TBI (GCS 9-13) in 116 patients (26.4%), and severe TBI (GCS 3-8) in 71 patients (16.2%). Age, gender, alcohol consumption, cause of injury, cranial CT findings, neurosurgical procedure, length of hospital stay, and clinical outcome were analyzed. The average age of the patients was 59.2 years old. Male patients comprised 65%. Alcohol consumption was reported in 81 cases (18.5%), most of them with moderate TBI. Fall (208 cases, 47.4%) was the most frequent cause of injury, followed by traffic accident (115 cases, 26.2%) and high fall (73 cases, 16.6%). Acute subdural hematoma (174 cases, 39.6%) was most frequently seen in cranial CT findings on admission, which significantly increased with severity. A neurosurgical procedure was performed for 70 cases (15.9%), of which 15 (6.0%) were mild TBI and 18 (15.5%) were moderate TBI. The average hospital stay was 20.8 days, which significantly increased with severity. The overall rate of favorable outcome was 82.7%, and mortality was 8.2%; outcome deteriorated with severity. Some mild and moderate TBI cases had deteriorated and required surgery or resulted in death. These findings suggest that cautious treatment is necessary even in mild to moderate TBI cases which are often encountered in secondary medical service centers. (author)

  13. Treatment Recommendations for Single-Unit Crowns: Findings from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, Michael S.; Louis, David R.; Litaker, Mark S.; Minyé, Helena M.; Mungia, Rahma; Gordan, Valeria V.; Marshall, Don G.; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Objectives were to: (1) quantify practitioner variation in likelihood to recommend a crown; and (2) test whether certain dentist, practice, and clinical factors are significantly associated with this likelihood. Methods Dentists in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network completed a questionnaire about indications for single-unit crowns. In four clinical scenarios, practitioners ranked their likelihood of recommending a single-unit crown. These responses were used to calculate a dentist-specific “Crown Factor” (CF; range 0–12). A higher score implies a higher likelihood to recommend a crown. Certain characteristics were tested for statistically significant associations with the CF. Results 1,777 of 2,132 eligible dentists responded (83%). Practitioners were most likely to recommend crowns for teeth that were fractured, cracked, endodontically-treated, or had a broken restoration. Practitioners overwhelmingly recommended crowns for posterior teeth treated endodontically (94%). Practice owners, Southwest practitioners, and practitioners with a balanced work load were more likely to recommend crowns, as were practitioners who use optical scanners for digital impressions. Conclusions There is substantial variation in the likelihood of recommending a crown. While consensus exists in some areas (posterior endodontic treatment), variation dominates in others (size of an existing restoration). Recommendations varied by type of practice, network region, practice busyness, patient insurance status, and use of optical scanners. Practical Implications Recommendations for crowns may be influenced by factors unrelated to tooth and patient variables. A concern for tooth fracture -- whether from endodontic treatment, fractured teeth, or large restorations -- prompted many clinicians to recommend crowns. PMID:27492046

  14. Current knowledge and treatment strategies for grade II gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Yoshitaka

    2013-01-01

    World Health Organization grade II gliomas (GIIGs) include diffuse astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, and oligoastrocytoma. GIIG is a malignant brain tumor for which the treatment outcome can still be improved. Review of previous clinical trials found the following: GIIG increased in size by 3-5 mm per year when observed or treated with surgery alone; after pathological diagnosis, the survival rate was increased by early aggressive tumor removal at an earlier stage compared to observation alone; although the prognosis after total tumor removal was significantly better than that after partial tumor removal, half of the patients relapsed within 5 years; comparing postoperative early radiotherapy (RT) and non-early RT after relapse, early RT prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) but did not affect overall survival (OS); local RT of 45 to 64.8 Gy did not impact PFS or OS; in patients with residual tumors, RT combined with chemotherapy (procarbazine plus lomustine plus vincristine) prolonged PFS compared with RT alone but did not affect OS; and poor prognostic factors included astrocytoma, non-total tumor removal, age ≥40 years, largest tumor diameter ≥4-6 cm, tumor crossing the midline, and neurological deficit. To improve treatment outcomes, surgery with functional brain mapping or intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging or chemoradiotherapy with temozolomide is important. In this review, current knowledge regarding GIIG is described and treatment strategies are explored. (author)

  15. Current status of atypical antipsychotics for the treatment of fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico-Villademoros, F; Calandre, E P; Slim, M

    2014-06-01

    The treatment of fibromyalgia requires pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies. The pharmacological treatment of fibromyalgia is limited to a few drugs that have been demonstrated to be moderately effective in some but not all dimensions of the disease. Therefore, the search for new drugs to treat this condition is warranted. Atypical antipsychotics offered an attractive alternative because they had been shown to be active against several key symptoms of fibromyalgia. The results of open-label studies, however, appear to indicate that atypical antipsychotics are poorly tolerated in patients with fibromyalgia, and only quetiapine XR has been studied in randomized controlled trials. Quetiapine XR has demonstrated effectiveness in treating comorbid major depression, anxiety and sleep disturbance. However, in two randomized controlled trials, quetiapine XR was not differentiated from placebo and failed to demonstrate noninferiority to amitriptyline in terms of improving overall symptomatology. The effect of quetiapine XR on pain and its usefulness as part of a combination pharmacological regimen should be further evaluated. Overall, the use of quetiapine (initiated at a low dose and slowly titrated) in fibromyalgia should be limited to patients with comorbid major depression or patients who are currently receiving other treatments and have unresolved and disabling depressive and/or anxiety symptoms. Copyright 2014 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  16. Current and emerging treatment options in the management of lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Natasha; D’Cruz, David

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease with variable clinical manifestations. While the clearest guidelines for the treatment of SLE exist in the context of lupus nephritis, patients with other lupus manifestations such as neuropsychiatric, hematologic, musculoskeletal, and severe cutaneous lupus frequently require immunosuppression and/or biologic therapy. Conventional immunosuppressive agents such as mycophenolate mofetil, azathioprine, and cyclophosphamide are widely used in the management of SLE with current more rationalized treatment regimens optimizing the use of these agents while minimizing potential toxicity. The advent of biologic therapies has advanced the treatment of SLE particularly in patients with refractory disease. The CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and the anti-BLyS agent belimumab are now widely in use in clinical practice. Several other biologic agents are in ongoing clinical trials. While immunosuppressive and biologic agents are the foundation of inflammatory disease control in SLE, the importance of managing comorbidities such as cardiovascular risk factors, bone health, and minimizing susceptibility to infection should not be neglected. PMID:27529058

  17. Tailoring pharmacotherapy to specific eating behaviours in obesity: Can recommendations for personalised therapy be made from the current data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Carl A; Christiansen, Paul; Halford, Jason C G

    2017-08-01

    Pharmacotherapy provides an adjunct to behaviour modification in the management of obesity. There are a number of new drug therapies purportedly targeting appetite; liraglutide, and bupropion/naltrexone, which are European Medicines Agency and US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved, and lorcaserin and phentermine/topiramate, which have FDA approval only. Each of the six drugs, used singly or in combination, has distinct pharmacological, and presumably distinct behavioural, mechanisms of action, thus the potential to provide defined therapeutic options to personalise the management of obesity. Yet, with regard to pharmacotherapy for obesity, we are far from true personalised medicine. We review the limited mechanistic data with four mono and combination pharmacotherapies, to assess the potential for tailoring their use to target specific obesogenic behaviours. Potential treatment options are considered, but in the absence of adequate research in respect to effects of these drugs on eating behaviour, neural activity and psychological substrates that underlie poorly controlled eating, we are far from definitive therapeutic recommendations. Specific mechanistic studies and broader behavioural phenotyping, possibly in conjunction with pharmacogenetic research, are required to characterise responders for distinct pharmacotherapeutic options.

  18. Recommendations on the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of late-onset hypogonadism in men - a suggested update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunenfeld, Bruno; Mskhalaya, George; Kalinchenko, Svetlana; Tishova, Yulia

    2013-12-01

    Recommendations on the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) in men were first published by ISSAM in 2002 In 2005, and, in 2008, updated recommendations were published in the International Journal of Andrology, the Journal of Andrology, the Aging Male and European Urology. Towards discussions at the next ISSAM/ESSAM meeting in Moscow, 29 November 2013, we suggest the following update.

  19. When Patients Write the Guidelines: Patient Panel Recommendations for the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraenkel, Liana; Miller, Amy S; Clayton, Kelly; Crow-Hercher, Rachelle; Hazel, Shantana; Johnson, Britt; Rott, Leslie; White, Whitney; Wiedmeyer, Carole; Montori, Victor M; Singh, Jasvinder A; Nowell, W Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    How best to involve patients in the development of clinical practice guideline (CPG) recommendations is not known. We sought to determine the feasibility and value of developing CPG recommendations based on a voting panel composed entirely of patients, with the ultimate goal of comparing the patients' recommendations to ones developed by a physician-dominated voting panel on the same clinical questions. Ten patients with rheumatoid arthritis completed 8 hours of training on evidence-based medicine and guideline development. They constituted a voting panel and, with 2 American College of Rheumatology staff with expertise in CPG development and a physician facilitator, subsequently met at a face-to-face meeting to develop recommendations. They applied the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology to formulate recommendations on 18 questions for which there was evidence warranting moderate or high confidence. The patient panel developed recommendations for 16 of the 18 questions; for the other 2, the panel thought there were insufficient data to support a recommendation. For 13 of the 16 questions, the patient panel recommended the same course of action as did the physician-dominated panel. Differences were due to how the 2 panels valued the balance between benefits and harms. Patient and physician-dominated panels developed the same recommendations for most questions for which there was evidence warranting moderate to high confidence. Additional experiences are necessary to advance the evidence necessary to determine what panel composition is optimal to produce the best guidelines. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  20. Lost in translation? How adults living with Cystic Fibrosis understand treatment recommendations from their healthcare providers, and the impact on adherence to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhale, S; Baron, J; Armstrong, M; Tasca, G; Gaudet, E; Aaron, S D; Cameron, W; Balfour, L

    2016-08-01

    This study builds on the limited research documenting Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients' understanding of treatment recommendations and how this may impact adherence to therapy. We surveyed adults with CF and their healthcare professional (HCP) to capture treatment recommendations provided by the HCP, and patients' knowledge, and frequency of performance, of these recommendations. We classified CF participants' understanding of treatment recommendations (correct/incorrect) as compared to the actual recommendations made by the HCP. We computed CF participants' adherence in relation to HCP treatment recommendations and to their own understanding of treatment recommendations (adherent/non-adherent). Complete HCP and patient data were available for 42 participants. The recommended treatment frequency was correctly understood by 0%-87.8% of CF participants. Adherence to HCP treatment recommendations ranged from 0 to 68.3% (mean 45.4%±21.5), and rates were low (<33%) for acapella, percussion/postural drainage, tobramycin nebulization and insulin. Participants' adherence was greater when calculated in relation to participants' understanding of treatment recommendations (62.4%±25.1) than when calculated in relation to actual HCP treatment recommendations (45.4%±21.5%) (p=0.009). Adults with CF misunderstand treatment recommendations; this likely affects treatment adherence. Interventions to ensure HCPs use effective communication strategies are needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Essential role of radiation therapy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Novel study concepts and established treatment recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobiasch, Sophie; Goerig, Nicole L.; Fietkau, Rainer; Combs, Stephanie E.

    2018-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human tumors and the incidence has increased over the last 6 years. In the majority of cases the disease is already in an advanced stage at the time of diagnosis where surgery, the only curative treatment, is no longer an option and explains the still abysmal overall survival. The role of radiation therapy as treatment option for patients with pancreatic cancer is controversially discussed although radiation oncology has emerged as a central pillar in the combined oncological treatment. The present manuscript gives an overview of advanced radiotherapeutic strategies in the context of chemotherapy and surgery according to the current American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) guidelines in comparison with the German guidelines and to elucidate the role of radiation therapy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Advanced modern radiotherapeutic techniques in combination with individualized high-precision radiation concepts are new therapeutic approaches for pancreatic cancer in a multimodal setting with tolerable side effects. Several clinical studies together with experimental approaches are in process, to deliver further evidence and ultimately allow true personalized medicine. (orig.) [de

  2. Treatment of asthma: Identification of the practice behavior and the deviation from the guideline recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharyya Parthasarathi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite an exponential development of the understanding of the disease with availability of good therapy and feasibility of good control along with availability of globally accepted guidelines, there remains a significant gap between the guidelines and prevailing practice behavior for treating asthma all over the globe. This perhaps stands as the single most deterrent factor for good asthma care worldwide. The objective of the study is to analyze the asthma prescriptions to find out the available status of the practice behaviour and the deviations from the guideline in asthma practice. Materials and Methods: The asthma prescriptions of the referred patients presenting to the OPD services of the IPCR, Kolkata were photocopied and collected. They were further analyzed based on the available information upon a format being prepared on four major areas as qualifications, clinical recording habit, practice of evaluating patients, and treatment habit that stands apparent from the prescribed medications. The doctors were divided into three categories as a MBBS, b MD/DNB (medicine and respiratory medicine, and c DM (non respiratory sub-specialities and statistical analysis has been performed comparing the three groups as per the performance in the four pre-decided areas. Results: All the groups fall short of any guideline or text of asthma care in all the areas involved. Conclusion: The practice behaviour of our doctors for asthma care appears deficient in several areas and seems far from guideline recommendations. This needs further evaluation and adoption of appropriate interventions.

  3. Should snacks be recommended in obesity treatment? A 1-year randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertéus Forslund, H; Klingström, S; Hagberg, H; Löndahl, M; Torgerson, J S; Lindroos, A K

    2008-11-01

    To study the effect to recommend no snacks vs three snacks per day on 1-year weight loss. The hypothesis was that it is easier to control energy intake and lose weight if snacks in between meals are omitted. In total 140 patients (36 men, 104 women), aged 18-60 years and body mass index>30 kg/m(2) were randomized and 93 patients (27 men, 66 women) completed the study. A 1-year randomized intervention trial was conducted with two treatment arms with different eating frequencies; 3 meals/day (3M) or 3 meals and 3 snacks/day (3+3M). The patients received regular and individualized counseling by dieticians. Information on eating patterns, dietary intake, weight and metabolic variables was collected at baseline and after 1 year. Over 1 year the 3M group reported a decrease in the number of snacks whereas the 3+3M group reported an increase (-1.1 vs +0.4 snacks/day, respectively, Ptreatment (3M vs 3+3M=-4.1+/-6.1 vs -5.9+/-9.4 kg; P=0.31). Changes in metabolic variables did not differ between the groups, except for high-density lipoprotein that increased in the 3M group but not in 3+3M group (Psnacks or not between meals does not influence 1-year weight loss.

  4. Practical recommendations for outpatients after differentiated thyroid carcinoma treatment with iodine-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlier, T.; Kraeber-Bodere, F.; Ansquer, C.; Couturier, O.; Lisbona, A.; Kraeber-Bodere, F.; Couturier, O.

    2004-01-01

    Few studies on radiation protection recommendation for patients leaving hospitalization area after thyroid carcinoma treatment with iodine-131 are based on experimental determination of effective half life. The aim of this work was to calculate times of adhesion to restrictions for patients using one dose rate measurement at 30 cm the last day, just before leaving hospital. Dose rate measurements were achieved every day at two localizations (abdomen mid trunk and neck) during hospitalization. Data were fitted by a monoexponential or a biexponential model in order to derive the effective half life. We considered 7 exposure states between patient and neighboring. We showed, according to our realistic scatter state, a dose rate variation inversely proportional to the distance from patient. Effective half life is equal to 16 ± 6 h whatever the measurement localization. Thus the times of adhesion to restrictions is never greater than 2 days after 3 days of hospitalization. A simple table is given to allow the computation of restrictions times according to the dose rate measurement before the patient is discharged. This protocol is applied in our institution and gives whole satisfaction as far as the ALARA principle and the patient information are concerned. (author)

  5. Pancreatic Cancer Diagnostics and TreatmentCurrent State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk Krška

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC represents permanent and ever rising issue worldwide. Five-year survival does not exceed 3 to 6%, i.e. the worst result among solid tumours. The article evaluates the current state of PDAC diagnostics and treatment specifying also development and trends. Percentage of non-resectable tumours due to locally advanced or metastatic condition varies 60–80%, mostly over 80%. Survival with non-resectable PDAC is 4 to 8 months (median 3.5. In contrast R0 resection shows the survival 18–27 months. Laboratory and imaging screening methods are not indicated on large scale. Risk factors are smoking, alcohol abuse, chronic pancreatitis, diabetes mellitus. Genetic background in most PDAC has not been detected yet. Some genes connected with high risk of PDAC (e.g. BRCA2, PALB2 have been identified as significant and highly penetrative, but link between PDAC and these genes can be seen only in 10–20%. This article surveys perspective oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes, microRNA. Albeit CT is still favoured over other imaging methods, involvement of NMR rises. Surgery prefers the “vessel first” approach, which proves to be justified especially in R0 resection. According to EBM immunotherapy same as radiotherapy are not significant in PDAC treatment. Chemotherapy shows limited importance in conversion treatment of locally advanced or borderline tumours or in case of metastatic spread. Unified procedures cannot be defined due to inhomogenous arrays. Surgical resection is the only chance for curative treatment of PDAC and depends mainly on timely indication for surgery and quality of multidisciplinary team in a high-volume centre.

  6. Current approaches to the diagnosis, treatment, and reporting of trichomoniasis and candidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, B H; Adler, M W

    1979-02-01

    The current approach to the management of trichomoniasis and candidosis in sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics in England and Wales is described. Microscopy alone was used in the diagnosis of trichomoniasis in 44% of clinics and of candidosis in 35% of clinics. Oral metronidazole was used for the treatment of trichomoniasis in women in 92% of clinics. Vaginal pessaries containing nystatin or clotrimazole were routinely used to treat candidosis in 95% of clinics. Male sexual contacts of female patients with candidosis and trichomoniasis were invited to attend for examination in 88% of clinics. Physicians in 81% of clinics prescribed treatment on epidemiological grounds for male contacts of female patients with trichomoniasis. A more uniform approach to the diagnostic categories used for the quarterly returns for cases treated epidemiologically is recommended.

  7. Current concepts in the diagnosis and treatment of shoulder impingement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijayendra Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS is a very common cause of shoulder pain in the young adults. It can cause debilitating pain, dysfunction, and affects the activities of daily living. It represents a spectrum of pathology ranging from bursitis to rotator cuff tendinopathy which can ultimately lead to degenerative tear of the rotator cuff. Various theories and concepts have been described and it is still a matter of debate. However, most published studies suggest that both extrinsic and intrinsic factors have a role in the development of SIS. The management is controversial as both nonoperative and operative treatments have shown to provide good results. This article aims to provide a comprehensive current concepts review of the pathogenesis, etiologies, clinical diagnosis, appropriate use of investigations, and discussion on the management of SIS.

  8. Recommendations for diagnosis and treatment planning, and treatment during the pregnancy, postpartum and breastfeeding period in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Ostanek

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is an interdisciplinary condition with a clinical picture in which thrombotic complications and obstetric failures play the most significant role. It has been demonstrated on the basis of multicentre clinical observations that the most common pregnancy-related complications in the course of APS include: recurrent miscarriage in the first trimester of pregnancy, pregnancy loss in the second and third trimester of pregnancy, early preeclampsia and preterm delivery. Any APS female patient planning a pregnancy should be advised about the risk of complications which may occur in the course of pregnancy. The treatment of pregnant APS patients should be conducted by a multidisciplinary team including specialists in rheumatology, obstetrics, and in justified cases also in haematology. The most important element of the pregnant APS patient management is secondary thromboprophylaxis with low dose aspirin and heparins. The introduction of hydroxychloroquine is recommended in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The visits should take place every 4 weeks and starting from week 26–28 of pregnancy every 1–2 weeks. The patients should be strictly monitored for signs of preeclampsia and/or thrombosis.

  9. Ivabradine: Current and Future Treatment of Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorup, Lene; Simonsen, Ulf; Grimm, Daniela; Hedegaard, Elise R

    2017-08-01

    In heart failure (HF), the heart cannot pump blood efficiently and is therefore unable to meet the body's demands of oxygen, and/or there is increased end-diastolic pressure. Current treatments for HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) include angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotension receptor type 1 (AT 1 ) antagonists, β-adrenoceptor antagonists, aldosterone receptor antagonists, diuretics, digoxin and a combination drug with AT 1 receptor antagonist and neprilysin inhibitor. In HF, the risk of readmission for hospital and mortality is markedly higher with a heart rate (HR) above 70 bpm. Here, we review the evidence regarding the use of ivabradine for lowering HR in HF. Ivabradine is a blocker of an I funny current (I(f)) channel and causes rate-dependent inhibition of the pacemaker activity in the sinoatrial node. In clinical trials of HFrEF, treatment with ivabradine seems to improve clinical outcome, for example improved ejection fraction (EF) and less readmission for hospital, but the effect appears most pronounced in patients with HRs above 70 bpm, while the effect on cardiovascular death appears less consistent. The adverse effects of ivabradine include bradycardia, atrial fibrillation and visual disturbances, but ivabradine avoids the negative inotrope effects observed with β-adrenoceptor antagonists. In conclusion, in patients with stable HFrEF with EF<35% and HR above 70 bpm, ivabradine improves the outcome and might be a first choice of therapy, if beta-adrenoceptor antagonists are not tolerated. Further studies must show whether that can be extended to HF patients with preserved EF. © 2017 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  10. Seizing Control: From Current Treatments to Optogenetic Interventions in Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Anh D; Alexander, Allyson; Soltesz, Ivan

    2015-12-23

    The unpredictability and severity of seizures contribute to the debilitating nature of epilepsy. These factors also render the condition particularly challenging to treat, as an ideal treatment would need to detect and halt the pathological bursts of hyperactivity without disrupting normal brain activity. Optogenetic techniques offer promising tools to study and perhaps eventually treat this episodic disorder by controlling specific brain circuits in epileptic animals with great temporal precision. Here, we briefly review the current treatment options for patients with epilepsy. We then describe the many ways optogenetics has allowed us to untangle the microcircuits involved in seizure activity, and how it has, in some cases, changed our perception of previous theories of seizure generation. Control of seizures with light is no longer a dream, and has been achieved in numerous different animal models of epilepsy. Beyond its application as a seizure suppressor, we highlight another facet of optogenetics in epilepsy, namely the ability to create "on-demand" seizures, as a tool to systematically probe the dynamics of networks during seizure initiation and propagation. Finally, we look into the future to discuss the possibilities and challenges of translating optogenetic techniques to clinical use. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Current Research Therapeutic Strategies for Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaume Folch

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD currently presents one of the biggest healthcare issues in the developed countries. There is no effective treatment capable of slowing down disease progression. In recent years the main focus of research on novel pharmacotherapies was based on the amyloidogenic hypothesis of AD, which posits that the beta amyloid (Aβ peptide is chiefly responsible for cognitive impairment and neuronal death. The goal of such treatments is (a to reduce Aβ production through the inhibition of β and γ secretase enzymes and (b to promote dissolution of existing cerebral Aβ plaques. However, this approach has proven to be only modestly effective. Recent studies suggest an alternative strategy centred on the inhibition of the downstream Aβ signalling, particularly at the synapse. Aβ oligomers may cause aberrant N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR activation postsynaptically by forming complexes with the cell-surface prion protein (PrPC. PrPC is enriched at the neuronal postsynaptic density, where it interacts with Fyn tyrosine kinase. Fyn activation occurs when Aβ is bound to PrPC-Fyn complex. Fyn causes tyrosine phosphorylation of the NR2B subunit of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5. Fyn kinase blockers masitinib and saracatinib have proven to be efficacious in treating AD symptoms in experimental mouse models of the disease.

  12. Medical treatment of radiation injuries-Current US status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarrett, D.G. [OSA - CBD and CDP, 3050 Defense Pentagon, Room 3C257, Washington, DC 20301-3050 (United States)], E-mail: david.jarrett@us.army.mil; Sedlak, R.G.; Dickerson, W.E. [Uniformed Services University, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States); Reeves, G.I. [Northrop Grumman IT, 8211 Terminal Road, Lorton, VA 22079-1421 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    A nuclear incident or major release of radioactive materials likely would result in vast numbers of patients, many of whom would require novel therapy. Fortunately, the numbers of radiation victims in the United States (USA) have been limited to date. If a mass-casualty situation occurs, there will be a need to perform rapid, accurate dose estimates and to provide appropriate medications and other treatment to ameliorate radiation injury. The medical management of radiation injury is complex. Radiation injury may include acute radiation sickness (ARS) from external and/or internal radiation exposure, internal organ damage from incorporated radioactive isotopes, and cutaneous injury. Human and animal data have shown that optimal medical care may nearly double the survivable dose of ionizing radiation. Current treatment strategies for radiation injuries are discussed with concentration on the medical management of the hematopoietic syndrome. In addition, priority areas for continuing and future research into both acute deterministic injuries and also long-term stochastic sequelae of radiation exposure have been identified. There are several near-term novel therapies that appear to offer excellent prognosis for radiation casualties, and these are also described.

  13. Osteoarthritis: detection, pathophysiology, and current/future treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovani, Sujata; Grogan, Shawn P

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disease of the joint, and age is the major risk factor for its development. Clinical manifestation of OA includes joint pain, stiffness, and loss of mobility. Currently, no pharmacological treatments are available to treat this specific joint disease; only symptom-modifying drugs are available. Improvement in imaging technology, identification of biomarkers, and increased understanding of the molecular basis of OA will aid in detecting the early stages of disease. Yet the development of interventional strategies remains elusive and will be critical for effective prevention of OA-associated joint destruction. The potential of cell-based therapies may be applicable in improving joint function in mild to more advanced cases of OA. Ongoing studies to understand the basis of this disease will eventually lead to prevention and treatment strategies and will also be a key in reducing the social and economic burden of this disease. Nurses are advised to provide an integrative approach of disease assessment and management in OA patients' care with a focus on education and implementation. Knowledge and understanding of OA and how this affects the individual patient form the basis for such an integrative approach to all-round patient care and disease management.

  14. Evidence-based recommendations for treatment with methotrexate in rheumatic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Rintek; Faurschou, Mikkel; Loft, Anne Gitte

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop 3E (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) recommendations (RCs) on the use of methotrexate in rheumatic disorders and to assess the agreement among Danish rheumatologists.......The aim of this study was to develop 3E (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) recommendations (RCs) on the use of methotrexate in rheumatic disorders and to assess the agreement among Danish rheumatologists....

  15. Current and emerging treatment strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Jean K

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in childhood. It is caused by mutations of the DMD gene, leading to progressive muscle weakness, loss of independent ambulation by early teens, and premature death due to cardiorespiratory complications. The diagnosis can usually be made after careful review of the history and examination of affected boys presenting with developmental delay, proximal weakness, and elevated serum creatine kinase, plus confirmation by muscle biopsy or genetic testing. Precise characterization of the DMD mutation is important for genetic counseling and individualized treatment. Current standard of care includes the use of corticosteroids to prolong ambulation and to delay the onset of secondary complications. Early use of cardioprotective agents, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, and other supportive strategies has improved the life expectancy and health-related quality of life for many young adults with DMD. New emerging treatment includes viral-mediated microdystrophin gene replacement, exon skipping to restore the reading frame, and nonsense suppression therapy to allow translation and production of a modified dystrophin protein. Other potential therapeutic targets involve upregulation of compensatory proteins, reduction of the inflammatory cascade, and enhancement of muscle regeneration. So far, data from DMD clinical trials have shown limited success in delaying disease progression; unforeseen obstacles included immune response against the generated mini-dystrophin, inconsistent evidence of dystrophin production in muscle biopsies, and failure to demonstrate a significant improvement in the primary outcome measure, as defined by the 6-minute walk test in some studies. The long-term safety and efficacy of emerging treatments will depend on the selection of appropriate clinical end points and sensitive biomarkers to detect meaningful changes in disease progression. Correction of the underlying

  16. [Latest trends and recommendations on epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabuev, A; Oelke, M

    2011-05-01

    bleeding, duration of catheterisation, or maintenance of sexual function. Current guidelines have integrated the latest knowledge and developments on BPH and are likely to improve assessment and treatment. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart New York.

  17. Infant feeding and allergy prevention: a review of current knowledge and recommendations. A EuroPrevall state of the art paper.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Grimshaw, K E C

    2009-10-01

    The relationship between infant feeding patterns and the later development of food allergies has been the focus of much debate and research over the last decade. National recommendations have been made by many countries on how to feed infants to reduce the risk of food allergy but due to the lack of firm evidence the recommendations differ widely. This review has been developed as part of EuroPrevall, a European multicentre research project funded by the European Union, to document the differing feeding recommendations made across Europe, to investigate the current evidence base for any allergy prevention feeding recommendations and to identify areas where further research is needed. This review will also provide information which, when combined with the infant feeding data collected as part of EuroPrevall, will give an indication of compliance to national feeding guidelines which can be utilised to assess the effectiveness of current dissemination and implementation strategies.

  18. Population pharmacokinetics of rifampicin, pyrazinamide and isoniazid in children with tuberculosis: in silico evaluation of currently recommended doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvada, Simbarashe P; Denti, Paolo; Donald, Peter R; Schaaf, H Simon; Thee, Stephanie; Seddon, James A; Seifart, Heiner I; Smith, Peter J; McIlleron, Helen M; Simonsson, Ulrika S H

    2014-05-01

    To describe the population pharmacokinetics of rifampicin, pyrazinamide and isoniazid in children and evaluate the adequacy of steady-state exposures. We used previously published data for 76 South African children with tuberculosis to describe the population pharmacokinetics of rifampicin, pyrazinamide and isoniazid. Monte Carlo simulations were used to predict steady-state exposures in children following doses in fixed-dose combination tablets in accordance with the revised guidelines. Reference exposures were derived from an ethnically similar adult population with tuberculosis taking currently recommended doses. The final models included allometric scaling of clearance and volume of distribution using body weight. Maturation was included for clearance of isoniazid and clearance and absorption transit time of rifampicin. For a 2-year-old child weighing 12.5 kg, the estimated typical oral clearances of rifampicin and pyrazinamide were 8.15 and 1.08 L/h, respectively. Isoniazid typical oral clearance (adjusted for bioavailability) was predicted to be 4.44, 11.6 and 14.6 L/h for slow, intermediate and fast acetylators, respectively. Higher oral clearance values in intermediate and fast acetylators also resulted from 23% lower bioavailability compared with slow acetylators. Simulations based on our models suggest that with the new WHO dosing guidelines and utilizing available paediatric fixed-dose combinations, children will receive adequate rifampicin exposures when compared with adults, but with a larger degree of variability. However, pyrazinamide and isoniazid exposures in many children will be lower than in adults. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings in children administered the revised dosages and to optimize pragmatic approaches to dosing.

  19. Application of the GRAPPA psoriatic arthritis treatment recommendations in clinical practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mumtaz, Aizad

    2012-02-01

    Psoriatic disease presents with a complex array of clinical features, including peripheral synovitis and skin psoriasis, but there is also variable involvement of the nail, dactylitis, enthesitis, and spinal disease. Composite assessment of disease activity and response taking into account the impact of the disease as a whole on an individual\\'s health and quality of life is of vital importance. Following an extensive literature review, discussions, and consensus, the Group for Research in Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) published guidelines to help clinicians make treatment decisions. The utility of these guidelines in routine clinical practice is further enhanced by incorporating them into a Composite Psoriatic Disease Activity Index (CPDAI). The potential application of the CPDAI in typical psoriatic disease patients is presented and discussed. Validation and possible modification of a composite disease activity and responder index is currently being undertaken by GRAPPA.

  20. Congenital hypothyroidism - Polish recommendations for therapy, treatment monitoring, and screening tests in special categories of neonates with increased risk of hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharska, Anna Małgorzata; Beń-Skowronek, Iwona; Walczak, Mieczysław; Ołtarzewski, Mariusz; Szalecki, Mieczysław; Jackowska, Teresa; Lewiński, Andrzej; Bossowski, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Proper treatment of congenital hypothyroidism warrants normal intellectual and physical development. This paper introduces the principles of treatment of congenital hypothyroidism, the recommended levothyroxine dosage, and the aims of therapy with its justification. The principles of treatment, specialist care of the patient, and methods used to evaluate therapeutic effects are described. Based on these data, recommendations concerning treatment and its monitoring in patients with congenital hypothyroidism are formulated. The paper also highlights the importance of educating the patients and/or their caretakers as one of the basic components of an effective therapy. The interpretation of screening tests in preterm neonates is provided as well. In the current screening program in preterm children TSH was determined between days three and five of life and then after three weeks. During this time TSH values are frequently low because of the immaturity of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Due to the increased risk of primary and secondary hypothyroidism in preterm and low birth weight babies the determination of TSH and fT4 between days three and five of life is recommended, irrespective of the screening test. (Endokrynol Pol 2016; 67 (5): 536-547).

  1. Survey of caregivers in Kenya to assess perceptions of zinc as a treatment for diarrhea in young children and adherence to recommended treatment behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan Simpson

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In 2004, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF and the World Health Organization (WHO revised their recommendations for management of acute diarrhea in children to include zinc treatment as well as oral rehydration solution (ORS. Little is known about how caregivers in low–resource settings perceive and use zinc treatment.

  2. Essential role of radiation therapy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Novel study concepts and established treatment recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobiasch, Sophie [Technical University of Munich (TUM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Goerig, Nicole L.; Fietkau, Rainer [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Combs, Stephanie E. [Technical University of Munich (TUM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institute of Innovative Radiotherapy (iRT), Department of Radiation Sciences (DRS), Neuherberg (Germany)

    2018-03-15

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human tumors and the incidence has increased over the last 6 years. In the majority of cases the disease is already in an advanced stage at the time of diagnosis where surgery, the only curative treatment, is no longer an option and explains the still abysmal overall survival. The role of radiation therapy as treatment option for patients with pancreatic cancer is controversially discussed although radiation oncology has emerged as a central pillar in the combined oncological treatment. The present manuscript gives an overview of advanced radiotherapeutic strategies in the context of chemotherapy and surgery according to the current American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) guidelines in comparison with the German guidelines and to elucidate the role of radiation therapy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Advanced modern radiotherapeutic techniques in combination with individualized high-precision radiation concepts are new therapeutic approaches for pancreatic cancer in a multimodal setting with tolerable side effects. Several clinical studies together with experimental approaches are in process, to deliver further evidence and ultimately allow true personalized medicine. (orig.) [German] Das Pankreaskarzinom gehoert zu den aggressivsten menschlichen Tumoren und verzeichnete in den letzten 6 Jahren eine steigende Inzidenz. Die Diagnose wird meist erst im fortgeschrittenen Stadium gestellt; dies schliesst haeufig eine primaer kurative Intervention mithilfe der chirurgischen Resektion aus und bedingt die hohe Mortalitaet. Obwohl die Strahlentherapie im multimodalen Therapieansatz des Pankreaskarzinoms eine zentrale Saeule darstellt, wird die Rolle der Strahlentherapie in der Literatur kontrovers diskutiert. Der vorliegende Beitrag bietet eine Uebersicht moderner Bestrahlungsstrategien im interdisziplinaeren Konzept gemaess der Leitlinien der American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) im Vergleich zu den

  3. Current calibration, treatment, and treatment planning techniques among institutions participating in the Children's Oncology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urie, Marcia; FitzGerald, T.J.; Followill, David; Laurie, Fran; Marcus, Robert; Michalski, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To report current technology implementation, radiation therapy physics and treatment planning practices, and results of treatment planning exercises among 261 institutions belonging to the Children's Oncology Group (COG). Methods and Materials: The Radiation Therapy Committee of the newly formed COG mandated that each institution demonstrate basic physics and treatment planning abilities by satisfactorily completing a questionnaire and four treatment planning exercises designed by the Quality Assurance Review Center. The planning cases are (1) a maxillary sinus target volume (for two-dimensional planning), (2) a Hodgkin's disease mantle field (for irregular-field and off-axis dose calculations), (3) a central axis blocked case, and (4) a craniospinal irradiation case. The questionnaire and treatment plans were submitted (as of 1/30/02) by 243 institutions and completed satisfactorily by 233. Data from this questionnaire and analyses of the treatment plans with monitor unit calculations are presented. Results: Of the 243 clinics responding, 54% use multileaf collimators routinely, 94% use asymmetric jaws routinely, and 13% use dynamic wedges. Nearly all institutions calibrate their linear accelerators following American Association of Physicists in Medicine protocols, currently 16% with TG-51 and 81% with TG-21 protocol. Treatment planning systems are relied on very heavily for all calculations, including monitor units. Techniques and results of each of the treatment planning exercises are presented. Conclusions: Together, these data provide a unique compilation of current (2001) radiation therapy practices in institutions treating pediatric patients. Overall, the COG facilities have the equipment and the personnel to perform high-quality radiation therapy. With ongoing quality assurance review, radiation therapy compliance with COG protocols should be high

  4. Rheumatoid arthritis treatment with TNF inhibitors and alternative procedures in case of its failure – results of the Polish survey in the context of EULAR recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Tłustochowicz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : According to the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR, rheumatoid arthritis (RA treatment aims to achieve remission or low disease activity (LDA within 6 months. In Poland, despite the existence of the National Health Fund Drug Program (NHF-DP, data on the effects of treatment with biological agents in patients with RA are not publicly available. Also we cannot compare registers from other countries with the Polish results because the rules of the therapeutic program in Poland impose restrictions that do not exist in other countries. For this reason, the data will not be comparable, but the results of the currently used regimen for biological treatment in Poland should be analyzed and compared with the recommendations of the European EULAR as a contribution to further discussion. Objectives: To determine the tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α inhibitor treatment patterns in RA patients in Poland, to evaluate the frequency and causes of treatment failure as well as post-failure recommendations, and to compare Polish clinical practice enforced by the therapeutic program with the EULAR recommendations. Material and methods: The data on 895 RA patients were retrospectively collected from routine medical records. A questionnaire was completed only once for each patient. Results : After 3 months of treatment with a TNF-α inhibitor, the therapeutic target was achieved in 72% of patients: 4% in remission, 8% LDA, and 60% with moderate disease activity (MDA; after 9 months, 46% had reached the target: 16% in remission, 30% with LDA. An average of 49% of patients presented with MDA or high disease activity (HDA, thus requiring treatment modification. Treatment failure was confirmed in 14% of patients and a modified therapy administered: rituximab (72% or adalimumab (20%. The most common cause of failure was inefficacy of treatment (70%. Conclusions : In the Polish therapeutic program, despite the persistence of MDA or HDA, the

  5. Osteoporosis – a current view of pharmacological prevention and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das S

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Subhajit Das, Julie C Crockett Musculoskeletal Research Programme, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK Abstract: Postmenopausal osteoporosis is the most common bone disease, associated with low bone mineral density (BMD and pathological fractures which lead to significant morbidity. It is defined clinically by a BMD of 2.5 standard deviations or more below the young female adult mean (T-score = −2.5. Osteoporosis was a huge global problem both socially and economically – in the UK alone, in 2011 £6 million per day was spent on treatment and social care of the 230,000 osteoporotic fracture patients – and therefore viable preventative and therapeutic approaches are key to managing this problem within the aging population of today. One of the main issues surrounding the potential of osteoporosis management is diagnosing patients at risk before they develop a fracture. We discuss the current and future possibilities for identifying susceptible patients, from fracture risk assessment to shape modeling and in relation to the high heritability of osteoporosis now that a plethora of genes have been associated with low BMD and osteoporotic fracture. This review highlights the current therapeutics in clinical use (including bisphosphonates, anti-RANKL [receptor activator of NF-κB ligand], intermittent low dose parathyroid hormone, and strontium ranelate and some of those in development (anti-sclerostin antibodies and cathepsin K inhibitors. By highlighting the intimate relationship between the activities of bone forming (osteoblasts and bone-resorbing (osteoclasts cells, we include an overview and comparison of the molecular mechanisms exploited in each therapy. Keywords: BMD, fracture, bisphosphonate, strontium, denosumab, teriparatide, raloxifene

  6. Pivotal response treatment for autism spectrum disorder: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei J

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Jiedi Lei, Pamela Ventola Yale Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA Abstract: Pivotal response treatment (PRT is an evidence-based behavioral intervention based on applied behavior analysis principles aimed to improve social communication skills in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. PRT adopts a more naturalistic approach and focuses on using a number of strategies to help increase children’s motivation during intervention. Since its conceptualization, PRT has received much empirical support for eliciting therapeutic gains in greater use of functional social communication skills in individuals with ASD. Building upon the empirical evidence supporting PRT, recent advancements have increasingly turned to using interdisciplinary research integrating neuroimaging techniques and behavioral measures to help identify objective biomarkers of treatment, which have two primary purposes. First, neuroimaging results can help characterize how PRT may elicit change, and facilitate partitioning of the heterogeneous profiles of neural mechanisms underlying similar profile of behavioral changes observed over PRT. Second, neuroimaging provides an objective means to both map and track how biomarkers may serve as reliable and sensitive predictors of responder profiles to PRT, assisting clinicians to identify who will most likely benefit from PRT. Together, a better understanding of both mechanisms of change and predictors of responder profile will help PRT to serve as a more precise and targeted intervention for individuals with ASD, thus moving towards the goal of precision medicine and improving quality of care. This review focuses on the recent emerging neuroimaging evidences supporting PRT, offering current perspectives on the importance of interdisciplinary research to help clinicians better understand how PRT works and predict who will respond to PRT. Keywords: PRT, ASD, biomarkers, neuroimaging

  7. Interpreting the clinical importance of treatment outcomes in chronic pain clinical trials: IMMPACT recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dworkin, R.H.; Turk, D.C.; Wyrwich, K.W.

    2008-01-01

    of 40 participants from universities, governmental agencies, a patient self-help organization, and the pharmaceutical industry considered methodologic issues and research results relevant to determining the clinical importance of changes in the specific outcome measures previously recommended by IMMPACT...

  8. More than 5000 patients with metastatic melanoma in Europe per year do not have access to recommended first-line innovative treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandolf Sekulovic, L.; Peris, Ketty; Hauschild, A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite the efficacy of innovative treatments for metastatic melanoma, their high costs has led to disparities in cancer care among different European countries. We analysed the availability of these innovative therapies in Europe and estimated the number of patients without access...... to first-line recommended treatment per current guidelines of professional entities such as the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), the European Association of Dermato-Oncology (EADO), and European Dermatology Forum (EDF...... treated with innovative medicines and a number of reimbursed medicines. Conclusions Great discrepancy exists in metastatic melanoma treatment across Europe. It is crucial to increase the awareness of national and European policymakers, oncological societies, melanoma patients' associations and pharma...

  9. Neonatal posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus from prematurity: pathophysiology and current treatment concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Shenandoah

    2013-01-01

    Object Preterm infants are at risk for perinatal complications, including germinal matrix–intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) and subsequent posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus (PHH). This review summarizes the current understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, management, and outcomes of IVH and PHH in preterm infants. Methods The MEDLINE database was systematically searched using terms related to IVH, PHH, and relevant neurosurgical procedures to identify publications in the English medical literature. To complement information from the systematic search, pertinent articles were selected from the references of articles identifed in the initial search. Results This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding the epidemiology and pathophysiology of IVH and PHH, primarily using evidence-based studies. Advances in obstetrics and neonatology over the past few decades have contributed to a marked improvement in the survival of preterm infants, and neurological morbidity is also starting to decrease. The incidence of IVH is declining, and the incidence of PHH will likely follow. Currently, approximately 15% of preterm infants who suffer severe IVH will require permanent CSF diversion. The clinical presentation and surgical management of symptomatic PHH with temporary ventricular reservoirs (ventricular access devices) and ventriculosubgaleal shunts and permanent ventriculoperitoneal shunts are discussed. Preterm infants who develop PHH that requires surgical treatment remain at high risk for other related neurological problems, including cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and cognitive and behavioral delay. This review highlights numerous opportunities for further study to improve the care of these children. Conclusions A better grasp of the pathophysiology of IVH is beginning to impact the incidence of IVH and PHH. Neonatologists conduct rigorous Class I and II studies to advance the outcomes of preterm infants. The need for well-designed multicenter trials is

  10. Early identification and intervention matters: A comprehensive review of current evidence and recommendations for the monitoring of bone health in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodowicz, Thomas; Hadji, Peyman; Niepel, Daniela; Diel, Ingo

    2017-12-01

    Bone metastases are common in patients with advanced solid tumors, and many individuals experience debilitating skeletal-related events (SREs; e.g. pathologic fracture, hypercalcemia, radiotherapy or surgery to bone, and spinal cord compression). These events substantially affect disease outcomes, including survival and quality of life, and healthcare systems. Plain radiography is the most widely used imaging modality for the detection of bone metastases; skeletal scintigraphy, computed tomography, positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging offer greater sensitivity but their use in routine practice is restricted by high costs and limited availability. Biomarkers of bone turnover may also have a role in the early detection of bone metastases and can provide valuable prognostic information on disease progression. SREs can be delayed or prevented using agents such as the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) inhibitor, denosumab, and bisphosphonates. Painful bone metastases can be treated with radiofrequency ablation, radiotherapy, or radionuclides such as radium-223 dichloride, which has been shown to delay the onset of SREs in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer. Close monitoring of bone health in patients with advanced cancer may lead to early identification of individuals with bone metastases who could benefit from early intervention to prevent SREs. This review examines current guideline recommendations for assessing and monitoring bone health in patients with advanced cancer, use of biomarkers and treatment of patients with bone metastases. The emerging evidence for the potential survival benefit conferred by early intervention with denosumab and bisphosphonates is also discussed, together with best practice recommendations. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Current options and new developments in the treatment of haemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Trisha; Recht, Michael

    2011-02-12

    Haemophilia A and B are X-linked bleeding disorders due to the inherited deficiency of factor VIII or factor IX, respectively. Of the approximately 1 per 5000-10000 male births affected by haemophilia, 80% are deficient in factor VIII and 20% are deficient in factor IX. Haemophilia is characterized by spontaneous and provoked joint, muscle, gastrointestinal and CNS bleeding leading to major morbidity and even mortality if left untreated or under-treated. The evolution of haemophilia management has been marked by tragedy and triumph over recent decades. Clotting factors and replacement strategies continue to evolve for patients without inhibitors. For patients with an inhibitor, factor replacement for acute bleeding episodes and immune tolerance, immune modulation and extracorporeal methods for inhibitor reduction are the cornerstone of care. In addition, adjuvant therapies such as desmopressin, antifibrinolytics and topical agents also contribute to improved outcomes for patients with and without inhibitors. The future direction of haemophilia care is promising with new longer-acting clotting factors and genetic therapies, including gene transfer and premature termination codon suppressors. With these current and future treatment modalities, the morbidity and mortality rates in patients with haemophilia certainly will continue to improve.

  12. Current Pharmacological Advances in the Treatment of Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andry Papastylianou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest is defined as the sudden cessation of spontaneous ventilation and circulation. Within 15 seconds of cardiac arrest, the patient loses consciousness, electroencephalogram becomes flat after 30 seconds, pupils dilate fully after 60 seconds, and cerebral damage takes place within 90–300 seconds. It is essential to act immediately as irreversible damage can occur in a short time. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is an attempt to restore spontaneous circulation through a broad range of interventions which are early defibrillation, high-quality and uninterrupted chest compressions, advanced airway interventions, and pharmacological interventions. Drugs should be considered only after initial shocks have been delivered (when indicated and chest compressions and ventilation have been started. During cardiopulmonary resuscitation, no specific drug therapy has been shown to improve survival to hospital discharge after cardiac arrest, and only few drugs have a proven benefit for short-term survival. This paper reviews current pharmacological treatment of cardiac arrest. There are three groups of drugs relevant to the management of cardiac arrest: vasopressors, antiarrhythmics, and other drugs such as sodium bicarbonate, calcium, magnesium, atropine, fibrinolytic drugs, and corticosteroids.

  13. Mutation based treatment recommendations from next generation sequencing data: a comparison of web tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jaymin M; Knopf, Joshua; Reiner, Eric; Bossuyt, Veerle; Epstein, Lianne; DiGiovanna, Michael; Chung, Gina; Silber, Andrea; Sanft, Tara; Hofstatter, Erin; Mougalian, Sarah; Abu-Khalaf, Maysa; Platt, James; Shi, Weiwei; Gershkovich, Peter; Hatzis, Christos; Pusztai, Lajos

    2016-04-19

    Interpretation of complex cancer genome data, generated by tumor target profiling platforms, is key for the success of personalized cancer therapy. How to draw therapeutic conclusions from tumor profiling results is not standardized and may vary among commercial and academically-affiliated recommendation tools. We performed targeted sequencing of 315 genes from 75 metastatic breast cancer biopsies using the FoundationOne assay. Results were run through 4 different web tools including the Drug-Gene Interaction Database (DGidb), My Cancer Genome (MCG), Personalized Cancer Therapy (PCT), and cBioPortal, for drug and clinical trial recommendations. These recommendations were compared amongst each other and to those provided by FoundationOne. The identification of a gene as targetable varied across the different recommendation sources. Only 33% of cases had 4 or more sources recommend the same drug for at least one of the usually several altered genes found in tumor biopsies. These results indicate further development and standardization of broadly applicable software tools that assist in our therapeutic interpretation of genomic data is needed. Existing algorithms for data acquisition, integration and interpretation will likely need to incorporate artificial intelligence tools to improve both content and real-time status.

  14. Infant feeding and allergy prevention: a review of current knowledge and recommendations. A EuroPrevall state of the art paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimshaw, K.E.C.; Allen, K.; Edwards, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    of firm evidence the recommendations differ widely. This review has been developed as part of EuroPrevall, a European multicentre research project funded by the European Union, to document the differing feeding recommendations made across Europe, to investigate the current evidence base for any allergy......The relationship between infant feeding patterns and the later development of food allergies has been the focus of much debate and research over the last decade. National recommendations have been made by many countries on how to feed infants to reduce the risk of food allergy but due to the lack...... prevention feeding recommendations and to identify areas where further research is needed. This review will also provide information which, when combined with the infant feeding data collected as part of EuroPrevall, will give an indication of compliance to national feeding guidelines which can be utilised...

  15. Current recommendations for surveillance and surgery of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms may overlook some patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Andrew H; Toste, Paul A; Farrell, James J; Clerkin, Barbara M; Williams, Jennifer; Muthusamy, V Raman; Watson, Rabindra R; Tomlinson, James S; Hines, O Joe; Reber, Howard A; Donahue, Timothy R

    2015-02-01

    The 2012 Sendai Criteria recommend that patients with 3 cm or larger branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (BD-IPMN) without any additional "worrisome features" or "high-risk stigmata" may undergo close observation. Furthermore, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is not recommended for BD-IPMN 3 cm were removed based on size alone. Our results suggest that "larger" size on noninvasive imaging can indicate high-grade/invasive cysts, and EUS-FNA may help identify "smaller" cysts with high-grade/invasive pathology.

  16. Tratamiento actual del tabaquismo Current treatment for smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justino Regalado-Pineda

    2007-01-01

    receptors blocker, rimonabant. As for non-pharmaceutical treatments, medical advice is a useful tool whose success can range from 2 to 4%, but only 35% of medical professionals provide it (RM 1.74, IC95% 1.48-2.05. Group psychological therapy helps to modify the perception of cigarettes and its noxious effects. The success of this modality is between 20% and 35% per year (RM 2.17, IC95% 1.42-3.45. Some of the disadvantages are the time invested and the cost of the treatment, which can be considerable. Finally, self-help materials can increase success (RM 1.24, IC95% 1.07-1.45. In summary, multiple modalities currently exist that have been proven effective in the treatment for quitting smoking; however, the treatment should be individualized according to each particular case.

  17. Canadian Headache Society systematic review and recommendations on the treatment of migraine pain in emergency settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Serena L; Aubé, Michel; Becker, Werner J; Davenport, W Jeptha; Dilli, Esma; Dodick, David; Giammarco, Rose; Gladstone, Jonathan; Leroux, Elizabeth; Pim, Heather; Dickinson, Garth; Christie, Suzanne N

    2015-03-01

    There is a considerable amount of practice variation in managing migraines in emergency settings, and evidence-based therapies are often not used first line. A peer-reviewed search of databases (MEDLINE, Embase, CENTRAL) was carried out to identify randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials of interventions for acute pain relief in adults presenting with migraine to emergency settings. Where possible, data were pooled into meta-analyses. Two independent reviewers screened 831 titles and abstracts for eligibility. Three independent reviewers subsequently evaluated 120 full text articles for inclusion, of which 44 were included. Individual studies were then assigned a US Preventive Services Task Force quality rating. The GRADE scheme was used to assign a level of evidence and recommendation strength for each intervention. We strongly recommend the use of prochlorperazine based on a high level of evidence, lysine acetylsalicylic acid, metoclopramide and sumatriptan, based on a moderate level of evidence, and ketorolac, based on a low level of evidence. We weakly recommend the use of chlorpromazine based on a moderate level of evidence, and ergotamine, dihydroergotamine, lidocaine intranasal and meperidine, based on a low level of evidence. We found evidence to recommend strongly against the use of dexamethasone, based on a moderate level of evidence, and granisetron, haloperidol and trimethobenzamide based on a low level of evidence. Based on moderate-quality evidence, we recommend weakly against the use of acetaminophen and magnesium sulfate. Based on low-quality evidence, we recommend weakly against the use of diclofenac, droperidol, lidocaine intravenous, lysine clonixinate, morphine, propofol, sodium valproate and tramadol. © International Headache Society 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  18. Current practices in treatment of female genital fistula: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruminjo Joseph

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal outcomes in most countries of the developed world are good. However, in many developing/resource-poor countries, maternal outcomes are bleaker: Every year, more than 500,000 women die in childbirth, mostly in resource-poor countries. Those who survive often suffer from severe and long-term morbidities. One of the most devastating injuries is obstetric fistula, occurring most often in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Fistula treatment and care are available in many countries across Africa and Asia, but there is a lack of reliable data around clinical factors associated with the success of fistula repair surgery. Most published research has been retrospective. While these studies have provided useful information about the care and treatment of fistula, they are limited by the design. This study was designed to identify practices in care that could lead to the design of prospective and randomized controlled trials. Methods Self-administered questionnaires were completed by 40 surgeons known to provide fistula treatment services in Africa and Asia at private and government hospitals. The questionnaire was divided into three parts to address the following issues: prophylactic use of antibiotics before, during, and after fistula surgery; urethral catheter management; and management practices for patients with urinary incontinence following fistula repair. Results The results provide a glimpse into current practices in fistula treatment and care across a wide swath of geographic, economic, and organizational considerations. There is consensus in treatment in some areas (routine use of prophylactic antibiotics, limited bed rest until the catheter is removed, nonsurgical treatment for postsurgical incontinence, while there are wide variations in practice in other areas (duration of catheter use, surgical treatments for postsurgical incontinence. These findings are based on a small sample and do not allow for recommending

  19. Current practices in treatment of female genital fistula: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrowsmith, Steven D; Ruminjo, Joseph; Landry, Evelyn G

    2010-11-10

    Maternal outcomes in most countries of the developed world are good. However, in many developing/resource-poor countries, maternal outcomes are bleaker: Every year, more than 500,000 women die in childbirth, mostly in resource-poor countries. Those who survive often suffer from severe and long-term morbidities. One of the most devastating injuries is obstetric fistula, occurring most often in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Fistula treatment and care are available in many countries across Africa and Asia, but there is a lack of reliable data around clinical factors associated with the success of fistula repair surgery. Most published research has been retrospective. While these studies have provided useful information about the care and treatment of fistula, they are limited by the design. This study was designed to identify practices in care that could lead to the design of prospective and randomized controlled trials. Self-administered questionnaires were completed by 40 surgeons known to provide fistula treatment services in Africa and Asia at private and government hospitals. The questionnaire was divided into three parts to address the following issues: prophylactic use of antibiotics before, during, and after fistula surgery; urethral catheter management; and management practices for patients with urinary incontinence following fistula repair. The results provide a glimpse into current practices in fistula treatment and care across a wide swath of geographic, economic, and organizational considerations. There is consensus in treatment in some areas (routine use of prophylactic antibiotics, limited bed rest until the catheter is removed, nonsurgical treatment for postsurgical incontinence), while there are wide variations in practice in other areas (duration of catheter use, surgical treatments for postsurgical incontinence). These findings are based on a small sample and do not allow for recommending changes in clinical care, but they point to issues for

  20. A Narrative Review of the Confluence of Breast Cancer and Low-wage Employment and Its Impact on Receipt of Guideline-recommended Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderpool, Robin C; Swanberg, Jennifer E; Chambers, Mara D

    2013-09-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer among women in the United States, costing the healthcare system, employers, and society billions of dollars each year. Despite improvements in screening and treatment, significant breast cancer treatment and survivorship disparities exist among various groups of women. One variable that has not been explored extensively as a possible contributor to breast cancer treatment disparities is employment. This is concerning, given the changing economic and employment trends in the United States favoring low-wage employment. Currently, one-quarter to one-third of all US workers are considered to be working poor, and women are disproportionally represented in this group. Characteristics of low-wage work-limited paid time off, minimal health benefits, schedule inflexibility, and economic insecurity-may become even more significant in the event of a breast cancer diagnosis. To date, there has been limited research into how job conditions inherent to low-wage work may influence working poor survivors' receipt of guideline-recommended breast cancer treatment. Therefore, the purpose of this narrative review was to critically examine the current literature to further our understanding of how employment context may impact treatment decisions and adherence-and therefore receipt of guideline-recommended care-among newly diagnosed, working poor breast cancer survivors. After undertaking a comprehensive review, we failed to identify any published literature that explicitly addressed low-wage employment and receipt of guideline-recommended breast cancer treatment. Four articles reported circumstances where women delayed, missed, or quit treatments due to work interference, or alternatively, developed strategies that allowed them to continue to work and obtain their breast cancer treatment concurrent with medical and economic challenges. An additional five articles, while focused on other cancer and employment outcomes, described the need for

  1. Pharmacological Treatments of Alzheimer’s Disease: Current Medication,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Mowla

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alzheimer’s disease (AD that is identified by progressive cognitive deficit and behavioral disturbances (BD are the most common form of dementia. As the population is aging, patients with AD are becoming a serious burden for societies. In this study, current medication for cognitive deficit and behavioral disturbances are reviewed. Also the new treatment strategies for cognitive dysfunction and behavioral disturbances are surveyed. Methods: The method employed in this researh was a systematic bibliographic review, in which only the double-blind placebo-controlled studies or the clinically detailed enough open-labeled studies using validated scales were retained. Results: The efficacy of cholinesterase inhibitors (Tacrine, Rivastigmine, Donapezil and Galantamine has been demonstrated in several double blind placebo controlled clinical trials. They have shown a mild efficacy in mild to moderate AD. Memantine, a NMDA antagonist is the only drug that has demonstrated mild efficacy in moderate to severe AD in controlled clinical trial. Clinical trials surveying the efficacy of active and passive immunization against B amyloid protoin has halted due to serious adverse events. Studies of inducing neurogenesis in brain of AD patients are preliminary. Antipsychotics have shown efficacy for controlling BD of AD patients but they are associated with adverse events. Except for carbamazepine, there is not enough evidence for other anticanvulsants to be effective for behavioral disturbances of AD patients. A controlled clinical trial and some open studies have shown the efficacy of citalopram for BD. Further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of other medications like trazadon, buspiron and beta blockers for BD. Conclusion: Cholinesterase inhibitors have demonstrated disappointing results. Memantine is only mildly effective for cognitive deficit. To date, no amyloid-modifying therapy has yet been successful in phase 3 clinical trials

  2. Current and emerging treatments for the management of myasthenia gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathasivam, Sivakumar

    2011-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune neuromuscular disorder. There are several treatment options, including symptomatic treatment (acetylcholinesterase inhibitors), short-term immunosuppression (corticosteroids), long-term immunosuppression (azathioprine, cyclosporine, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil, rituximab, tacrolimus), rapid acting short-term immunomodulation (intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange), and long-term immunomodulation (thymectomy). This review explores in detail these different treatment options. Potential future treatments are also discussed. PMID:21845054

  3. Human Milk Fortifiers Do Not Meet the Current Recommendation for Nutrients in Very Low Birth Weight Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Winston; Tice, Hilary

    2017-06-01

    Use of multinutrient fortifiers is standard of care for small preterm infants fed exclusively human milk. However, adequacy of human milk fortifiers (HMFs) to meet the recommended intake for macronutrients and micronutrients is now known. Nutrient content of human milk fortified according to manufacturer's recommendations was compared at isocaloric levels for 1 human milk-based (HMF-A), 2 bovine milk protein-based (HMF-B, HMF-C), and 2 preterm infant formulas (PTF-B, PTF-C). In addition, 4 multivitamin supplements were compared. At 130 kcal/kg, intake of macronutrients was similar to the recommendation, although deficient and excess intake of micronutrient occurred with all fortifiers. Four to 9 micronutrients were absent in HMF or PTF (biotin, choline, inositol, carnitine, taurine, molybdenum, iodine, selenium, or chromium). For the remainder, HMF resulted in deficient intake for 1-13 micronutrients, occurring most frequently with HMF-A. Excess micronutrients (3-15 at <50% and 1-3 at 109%-437%) occurred with all HMF and most frequently with HMF-B and HMF-C. At 150 kcal/kg, deficient intake improved but generally remained below recommendation, while excess intake became exaggerated. PTF and multivitamin formulations do not fully compensate for the deficiencies and can result in extremely high micronutrient intake. At the recommended energy intake for very low birth weight infants, many micronutrients are absent or are present in grossly inadequate amounts, and several micronutrients are in excess. Reformulation of HMF is urgently needed since PTF or multivitamin supplement only partially corrects some deficiencies while providing some nutrients in excess. ( JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. XXXX;xx:xx-xx).

  4. Special report: workshop on 4D-treatment planning in actively scanned particle therapy--recommendations, technical challenges, and future research directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, Antje; Bert, Christoph; Heath, Emily; Nill, Simeon; Kraus, Kim; Richter, Daniel; Hug, Eugen; Pedroni, Eros; Safai, Sairos; Albertini, Francesca; Zenklusen, Silvan; Boye, Dirk; Söhn, Matthias; Soukup, Martin; Sobotta, Benjamin; Lomax, Antony

    2010-09-01

    This article reports on a 4D-treatment planning workshop (4DTPW), held on 7-8 December 2009 at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in Villigen, Switzerland. The participants were all members of institutions actively involved in particle therapy delivery and research. The purpose of the 4DTPW was to discuss current approaches, challenges, and future research directions in 4D-treatment planning in the context of actively scanned particle radiotherapy. Key aspects were addressed in plenary sessions, in which leaders of the field summarized the state-of-the-art. Each plenary session was followed by an extensive discussion. As a result, this article presents a summary of recommendations for the treatment of mobile targets (intrafractional changes) with actively scanned particles and a list of requirements to elaborate and apply these guidelines clinically.

  5. Municipal wastewater treatment in Mexico: current status and opportunities for employing ecological treatment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurita, Florentina; Roy, Eric D; White, John R

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the current status of municipal wastewater (MWW) treatment in Mexico, as well as to assess opportunities for using ecological treatment systems, such as constructed wetlands. In 2008, Mexico had 2101 MWW treatment plants that treated only 84 m3/s of wastewater (208 m3/s ofMWW were collected in sewer systems). Unfortunately, most treatment plants operate below capacity owing to a lack of maintenance and paucity of properly trained personnel. The main types of treatment systems applied in Mexico are activated sludge and waste stabilization ponds, which treat 44.3% and 18% of the MWW collected, respectively. As in many other developing nations around the world, there is a great need in Mexico for low-cost, low-maintenance wastewater treatment systems that are both economically and environmentally sustainable. In 2005, 24.3 million Mexicans lived in villages of less than 2500 inhabitants and 14.1 million lived in towns with 2500-15,000 inhabitants. An opportunity exists to extend the use of ecological treatment systems to these low population density areas and considerably increase the percentage of MWW that is treated in Mexico. Small-scale and medium-size constructed wetlands have been built successfully in some states, primarily during the past five years. Several barriers need to be overcome to increase the adoption and utilization of ecological wastewater technology in Mexico, including: a lack of knowledge about this technology, scarce technical information in Spanish, and the government's concentration on constructing MWW treatment plants solely in urban areas.

  6. Definition, diagnosis and treatment strategies for opioid-induced bowel dysfunction-Recommendations of the Nordic Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, Asbjørn M; Munkholm, Pia; Simrén, Magnus; Breivik, Harald; Kongsgaard, Ulf E; Hatlebakk, Jan G; Agreus, Lars; Friedrichsen, Maria; Christrup, Lona L

    2016-04-01

    Opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OIBD) is an increasing problem due to the common use of opioids for pain worldwide. It manifests with different symptoms, such as dry mouth, gastro-oesophageal reflux, vomiting, bloating, abdominal pain, anorexia, hard stools, constipation and incomplete evacuation. Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is one of its many symptoms and probably the most prevalent. The current review describes the pathophysiology, clinical implications and treatment of OIBD. The Nordic Working Group was formed to provide input for Scandinavian specialists in multiple, relevant areas. Seven main topics with associated statements were defined. The working plan provided a structured format for systematic reviews and included instructions on how to evaluate the level of evidence according to the GRADE guidelines. The quality of evidence supporting the different statements was rated as high, moderate or low. At a second meeting, the group discussed and voted on each section with recommendations (weak and strong) for the statements. The literature review supported the fact that opioid receptors are expressed throughout the gastrointestinal tract. When blocked by exogenous opioids, there are changes in motility, secretion and absorption of fluids, and sphincter function that are reflected in clinical symptoms. The group supported a recent consensus statement for OIC, which takes into account the change in bowel habits for at least one week rather than focusing on the frequency of bowel movements. Many patients with pain receive opioid therapy and concomitant constipation is associated with increased morbidity and utilization of healthcare resources. Opioid treatment for acute postoperative pain will prolong the postoperative ileus and should also be considered in this context. There are no available tools to assess OIBD, but many rating scales have been developed to assess constipation, and a few specifically address OIC. A clinical treatment strategy for OIBD

  7. Knowledge translation: an overview and recommendations in relation to the Fourth Canadian Consensus Conference on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The growing population of persons with dementia in Canada and the provision of quality care for this population is an issue that no healthcare authority will escape. Physicians often view dementia as a difficult and time-consuming condition to diagnose and manage. Current evidence must be effectively transformed into usable recommendations for physicians; however, we know that use of evidence-based practice recommendations is a challenge in all realms of medical care, and failure to utilize these leads to less than optimal care for patients. Despite this expanding need for readily available resources, knowledge translation (KT) is often seen as a daunting, if not confusing, undertaking for researchers. Here we offer a brief introduction to the processes around KT, including terms and definitions, and outline some common KT frameworks including the knowledge to action cycle, the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services framework and the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research. We also outline practical steps for planning and executing a KT strategy particularly around the implementation of recommendations for practice, and offer recommendations for KT planning in relation to the Fourth Canadian Consensus Conference on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Dementia. PMID:24565407

  8. Does intravenous induction dosing among patients undergoing gastrointestinal surgical procedures follow current recommendations: a study of contemporary practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Shamsuddin; Liu, Jia; Heng, Joseph; Dai, Feng; Schonberger, Robert B; Burg, Matthew M

    2016-09-01

    It is recommended to correct intravenous induction doses by up to 50% for patients older than 65 years. The objectives were to determine (a) the degree to which anesthesia providers correct induction doses for age and (b) additionally adjust for American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status (ASA-PS) class (severity of illness) and (c) whether postinduction hypotension is more common among patients aged >65. Retrospective chart review. Academic medical center. A total of 1869 adult patients receiving general anesthesia for GI surgical procedures from February 2013 to January 2014. Patients were divided into 3 age groups (age 80, which was still in less than the recommendations. An inverse relationship was observed between propofol dosing and ASA-PS class, but no consistent relationship was noted for fentanyl and midazolam. There were a significantly larger drop in mean arterial pressure and a greater likelihood of hypotension following induction in patients aged 65-79 years and >80 years as compared with those aged <65 years. This study shows that the administered dose of anesthetic induction agents is significantly higher than that recommended for patients older than 65 years. This failure to age-adjust dose may contribute to hypotensive episodes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Maintaining Professional Relationships in an Interdisciplinary Setting: Strategies for Navigating Nonbehavioral Treatment Recommendations for Individuals with Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodhead, Matthew T

    2015-05-01

    Due to an increase in research and clinical application of behavior analysis with individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), one setting a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) may work within is an interdisciplinary setting, where multiple disciplines collaborate to improve the outcomes of individuals with ASD. In some cases, nonbehavioral colleagues could recommend nonbehavioral treatments, setting the occasion for the BCBA to offer an alternative treatment to or question the nonbehavioral treatment. However, excessive questioning or critiques of nonbehavioral treatments by the BCBA may unintentionally erode professional relationships between the BCBA and their nonbehavioral colleagues. Because an erosion of professional relationships may occur when a BCBA questions a nonbehavioral treatment, a decision-making model for determining whether or not the proposed nonbehavioral treatment is worth addressing may be useful. The purpose of this paper is to outline such a decision-making model in order to assist the BCBA in assessing nonbehavioral treatments while maintaining an ethical balance between professional relationships and the well-being and safety of the individual with ASD. Such a model could assist the BCBA in becoming familiar with the proposed treatment, understanding the perspective of the nonbehavioral colleague and assessing the negative impacts the treatment could have on the individual with ASD. With this information, the BCBA will be in a better position to decide whether or not addressing the nonbehavioral treatment is worth the possibility of eroding a professional relationship.

  10. Bariatric surgery and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: current and potential future treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira eSasaki

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH are increasingly common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. The diagnosis of NASH is challenging as most affected patients are symptom-free and the role of routine screening is not clearly established. Most patients with severe obesity who undergo bariatric surgery have NAFLD, which is associated insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, hypertension, and obesity-related dyslipidemia. The effective treatment for NAFLD is weight reduction through lifestyle modifications, antiobesity medication, or bariatric surgery. Among these treatments, bariatric surgery is the most reliable method for achieving substantial, sustained weight loss. This procedure is safe when performed by a skilled surgeon, and the benefits include reduced weight, improved quality of life, decreased obesity-related comorbidities, and increased life expectancy. Further research is urgently needed to determine the best use of bariatric surgery with NAFLD patients at high risk of developing liver cirrhosis and its role in modulating complications of NAFLD, such as T2DM and cardiovascular disease. The current evidence suggests that bariatric surgery for patients with severe obesity decreases the grade of steatosis, hepatic inflammation, and fibrosis. However, further long-term studies are required to confirm the true effects before recommending bariatric surgery as a potential treatment for nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

  11. Management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms: Current treatment options, challenges and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre R Pachman

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Deirdre R Pachman1, Jason M Jones1, Charles L Loprinzi21Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Hot flashes are one of the most common and distressing symptoms associated with menopause, occurring in more than 75% of postmenopausal women. They are especially problematic in breast cancer patients since some breast cancer therapies can induce hot flashes. For mild hot flashes, it is proposed that behavioral modifications are the first step in management. Hormonal therapies, including estrogens and progestogens, are the most well known effective agents in relieving hot flashes; however, the safety of these agents is controversial. There is an increasing amount of literature on nonhormonal agents for the treatment of hot flashes. The most promising data regard newer antidepressant agents such as venlafaxine, which reduces hot flashes by about 60%. Gabapentin is another nonhormonal agent that is effective in reducing hot flashes. While many complimentary therapies, including phytoestrogens, black cohosh, and dehydroepiandrosterone, have been explored for the treatment of hot flashes; none can be recommended at this time. Furthermore, there is a lack of strong evidence to support exercise, yoga, or relaxation for the treatment of hot flashes. Paced respirations and hypnosis appear to be promising enough to warrant further investigation. Another promising nonpharmacological therapy, currently under investigation, involves a stellate ganglion block.Keywords: vasomotor symptoms, hot flashes, menopause, therapy

  12. Recommendations of the Brazilian Society of Rheumatology for diagnosis and treatment of Chikungunya fever. Part 1 - Diagnosis and special situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Diniz Lopes Marques

    Full Text Available Abstract Chikungunya fever has become a relevant public health problem in countries where epidemics occur. Until 2013, only imported cases occurred in the Americas, but in October of that year, the first cases were reported in Saint Marin island in the Caribbean. The first autochthonous cases were confirmed in Brazil in September 2014; until epidemiological week 37 of 2016, 236,287 probable cases of infection with Chikungunya virus had been registered, 116,523 of which had serological confirmation. Environmental changes caused by humans, disorderly urban growth and an ever-increasing number of international travelers were described as the factors responsible for the emergence of large-scale epidemics. Clinically characterized by fever and joint pain in the acute stage, approximately half of patients progress to the chronic stage (beyond 3 months, which is accompanied by persistent and disabling pain. The aim of the present study was to formulate recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of Chikungunya fever in Brazil. A literature review was performed in the MEDLINE, SciELO and PubMed databases to ground the decisions for recommendations. The degree of concordance among experts was established through the Delphi method, involving 2 in-person meetings and several online voting rounds. In total, 25 recommendations were formulated and divided into 3 thematic groups: (1 clinical, laboratory and imaging diagnosis; (2 special situations; and (3 treatment. The first 2 themes are presented in part 1, and treatment is presented in part 2.

  13. Current treatment of HIV/hepatitis B virus coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iser, David M; Sasadeusz, Joseph J

    2008-05-01

    Coinfection with HIV and hepatitis B virus (HBV) has become a significant global health problem. Liver disease is now one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in individuals with HIV, particularly those with viral hepatitis. There are a number of agents available with dual activity against HIV and HBV, and effective treatment depends on understanding the potential advantages and pitfalls in using these agents. There are a number of unresolved issues in the management of HIV/HBV coinfection. These include the role of liver biopsy, the significance of normal aminotransferase levels, serum HBV DNA threshold for treatment, treatment end-points, and the treatment of HBV when HIV does not yet require treatment. Treatment of HBV should be considered in individuals with HIV/HBV coinfection with evidence of significant fibrosis (>/=F2), or with elevated serum HBV DNA levels (>2000 IU/mL). Sustained suppression of serum HBV DNA to below the level of detection by the most sensitive available assay should be the goal of therapy, and, at present, treatment of HBV in HIV/HBV coinfection is lifelong. If antiretroviral therapy is required, then two agents with anti-HBV activity should be incorporated into the regimen. If antiretroviral therapy is not required, then the options are pegylated interferon, adefovir or the early introduction of antiretroviral therapy. Close monitoring is necessary to detect treatment failure or hepatic flares, such as immune reconstitution disease. Further studies of newer anti-HBV agents in individuals HIV/HBV coinfection may advance treatment of this important condition.

  14. Current concepts in the assessment and treatment of hepatic encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cash, W J

    2012-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is defined as a metabolically induced, potentially reversible, functional disturbance of the brain that may occur in acute or chronic liver disease. Standardized nomenclature has been proposed but a standardized approach to the treatment, particularly of persistent, episodic and recurrent encephalopathy associated with liver cirrhosis has not been proposed. This review focuses on the pathogenesis and treatment of HE in patients with cirrhosis. The pathogenesis and treatment of hepatic encephalopathy in fulminant hepatic failure is quite different and is reviewed elsewhere.

  15. [Treatment of posterior noninfectious uveitis : Current situation and future developments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleyer, U; Pohlmann, D; Stübiger, N

    2016-05-01

    Treatment of autoimmune diseases has undergone significant changes and developments in recent years. New classes of active substances, in particular biologics and small molecules have resulted in previously unknown success in the treatment of many diseases. In particular patients suffering from autoimmune rheumatic or dermatological diseases have benefited. For autoimmune uveitis there are numerous reports indicating excellent therapeutic and preventive effects; however, statutory approval for therapy in adults is still pending. This article outlines recent advances and future therapeutic options for the treatment of posterior segment noninfectious uveitis.

  16. Current advances in the treatment of medial and lateral epicondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarpada, Sandip P; Morris, Matthew T; Lian, Jayson; Rashidi, Sina

    2018-03-01

    Despite advances elucidating the causes of lateral and medial epicondylitis, the standard of care remains conservative management with NSAIDs, physical therapy, bracing, and rest. Scar tissue formation provoked by conservative management creates a tendon lacking the biomechanical properties and mechanical strength of normal tendon. The following review analyzes novel therapies to regenerate tendon and regain function in patients with epicondylitis. These treatments include PRP injection, BMAC, collagen-producing cell injection, and stem cell treatments. While these treatments are in early stages of investigation, they may warrant further consideration based on prospects of pain alleviation, function enhancement, and improved healing.

  17. Current status of radioiodine (131I) treatment of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, D.V.; Hurley, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    Radioiodine appears to be increasingly selected as the primary form of therapy for most hyperthyroid adults. Some controversy exists concerning the use of I-131 in children and adolescents as well as in some patients with toxic nodular goiter. The technical aspects of radioiodine administration reviewed in this chapter include the biologic basis of I-131 use, dose strategies, measurement and evaluation of radioiodine parameters, and I-125 treatment of hyperthyroidism. The management of patients before and after I-131 treatment is discussed as well as posttreatment hypothyroidism and complications of radioiodine treatment

  18. [The Spanish AIDS Study Group and Spanish National AIDS Plan (GESIDA/Secretaría del Plan Nacional sobre el Sida) recommendations for the treatment of tuberculosis in HIV-infected individuals (Updated January 2013)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Antonio; Pulido, Federico; Caylá, Joan; Iribarren, José A; Miró, José M; Moreno, Santiago; Pérez-Camacho, Inés

    2013-12-01

    This consensus document was prepared by an expert panel of the Grupo de Estudio de Sida (GESIDA [Spanish AIDS Study Group]) and the Plan Nacional sobre el Sida (PNS [Spanish National AIDS Plan]). The document updates current guidelines on the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) in HIV-infected individuals contained in the guidelines on the treatment of opportunistic infections published by GESIDA and PNS in 2008. The document aims to facilitate the management and treatment of HIV-infected patients with TB in Spain, and includes specific sections and recommendations on the treatment of drug-sensitive TB, multidrug-resistant TB, and extensively drug-resistant TB, in this population. The consensus guidelines also make recommendations on the treatment of HIV-infected patients with TB in special situations, such as chronic liver disease, pregnancy, kidney failure, and transplantation. Recommendations are made on the timing and initial regimens of antiretroviral therapy in patients with TB, and on immune reconstitution syndrome in HIV-infected patients with TB who are receiving antiretroviral therapy. The document does not cover the diagnosis of TB, diagnosis/treatment of latent TB, or treatment of TB in children. The quality of the evidence was evaluated and the recommendations graded using the approach of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation Working Group. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. Current insights in sepsis: from pathogenesis to new treatment targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, W. Joost

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis continues to be a leading cause of ICU death. This review summarizes current knowledge on sepsis pathogenesis and new therapeutical strategies. Although systemic inflammatory response syndrome predominates in early sepsis, the compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome causes

  20. Current options for the treatment of facial angiofibromas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salido-Vallejo, R; Garnacho-Saucedo, G; Moreno-Giménez, J C

    2014-01-01

    Facial angiofibromas are hamartomatous growths that are closely associated with tuberous sclerosis complex and, in fact, they constitute one of the main diagnostic criteria for that disease. These lesions composed of blood vessels and fibrous tissue appear on the face at an early age. Since they have important physical and psychological repercussions for patients, several treatment options have been used to remove them or improve their appearance. However, the lack of treatment guidelines prevents us from developing a common protocol for patients with this condition. The present article aims to review the treatments for facial angiofibromas used to date and to propose a new evidence-based treatment protocol. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  1. Tuberculosis: current trends in diagnosis and treatment | Njoku ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among communicable diseases, tuberculosis (TB) is the second leading ... There may be need to modify the treatment modalities especially with the ... liver disease, renal failure or even in coexistence with HIV/AIDS or the drug resistant state.

  2. Current treatment options for the management of patent ductus arteriosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeuchi K

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Koh Takeuchi,1 Atsushi Hirota,2 Sachito Minegishi,1 Jotaro Kobayashi,1 Keiji Tsuchiya3 1Division of Cardiovascular Surgery, 2Department of Neonatology, 3Department of Pediatrics, Japanese Red Cross Medical Center, Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Pharmacological and/or surgical closure of a hemodynamically significant patent ductus arteriosus (PDA in the very premature infant has been the standard of care over the past few decades. However, the rationale for closure of PDA has recently been challenged. In this article, three ways of approaching the closure of PDA including pharmacological treatment, catheter intervention, and surgical intervention, are reviewed in detail. In addition, the different treatment strategies applied in clinical care are evaluated with a focus on the discussion of the available evidence of PDA treatment in the literature. Keywords: patent ductus arteriosus, premature infant, treatment option

  3. Currently used systems of dental posts for endodontic treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Machado, Joana; Almeida, Paulo; Fernandes, Sampaio; Marques, Arcelina; Vaz, Mário

    2017-01-01

    An advanced stage of a tooth decay promotes an extremely damaged tooth that needs endodontic treatment to be restored. When satisfactory coronal tooth structure remains, an artificial crown can be placed without a post. On the other hand, the treatment of seriously damaged teeth often require an endodontic post. The main reason for using post is to enable rebuilding of the tooth structure prior to crown restoration. Dentists believe that endodontic posts provide a stable ...

  4. Neurofeedback for Tinnitus Treatment – Review and Current Concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Güntensperger, Dominik; Thüring, Christian; Meyer, Martin; Neff, Patrick; Kleinjung, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    An effective treatment to completely alleviate chronic tinnitus symptoms has not yet been discovered. However, recent developments suggest that neurofeedback (NFB), a method already popular in the treatment of other psychological and neurological disorders, may provide a suitable alternative. NFB is a non-invasive method generally based on electrophysiological recordings and visualizing of certain aspects of brain activity as positive or negative feedback that enables patients to voluntarily ...

  5. Current approaches to the treatment of Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Jankovic

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Joseph Jankovic, L Giselle AguilarParkinson’s Disease Center and Movement Disorders Clinic, Department of Neurology, Baylor College of MedicineAbstract: Enormous progress has been made in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD. As a result of advances in experimental therapeutics, many promising therapies for PD are emerging. Levodopa remains the most potent drug for controlling PD symptoms, yet is associated with significant complications such as the “wearing off” effect, levodopa-induced dyskinesias and other motor complications. Catechol-o-methyl-transferase inhibitors, dopamine agonists and nondopaminergic therapy are alternative modalities in the management of PD and may be used concomitantly with levodopa or one another. The neurosurgical treatment, focusing on deep brain stimulation, is reviewed briefly. Although this review has attempted to highlight the most recent advances in the treatment of PD, it is important to note that new treatments are not necessarily better than the established conventional therapy and that the treatment options must be individualized and tailored to the needs of each individual patient.Keywords: Parkinson’s disease, levodopa, medical treatment, pallidotomy, deep brain stimulation

  6. Current options for the treatment of optic neuritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pula JH

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available John H Pula,1 Christopher J MacDonald21Division of Neuro-ophthalmology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria; 2University of Illinois College of Medicine at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL, USAAbstract: Optic neuritis can be defined as typical (associated with multiple sclerosis, improving independent of steroid treatment, or atypical (not associated with multiple sclerosis, steroid-dependent improvement. Causes of atypical optic neuritis include connective tissue diseases (eg, lupus, vasculitis, sarcoidosis, or neuromyelitis optica. In this manuscript, updated treatment options for both typical and atypical optic neuritis are reviewed. Conventional treatments, such as corticosteroids, therapeutic plasma exchange, and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy are all discussed with commentary regarding evidence-based outcomes. Less commonly used treatments and novel purported therapies for optic neuritis are also reviewed. Special scenarios in the treatment of optic neuritis – pediatric optic neuritis, acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis, and optic neuritis occurring during pregnancy – are specifically examined.Keywords: optic neuritis, optic neuropathy, treatment, neuroophthalmology

  7. Treatment of Cannabis Use Disorder: Current Science and Future Outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Brian J.; McRae-Clark, Aimee L.

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis is the most commonly used illicit substance in the United States. Rates of cannabis use and cannabis use disorder have increased in the past decade, paralleling changes in the legal and political climate favoring legalization. Almost 20 million people aged 12 years or older report past-month cannabis use, and 8 million report daily or near-daily use. Concurrently, the perception that cannabis use poses a significant risk of negative consequences has decreased. Contrary to this perception, heavy cannabis use is associated with cognitive impairment, increased risk for psychotic disorders and other mental health problems, lower education attainment, and unemployment. Clinical trials of various treatments for cannabis use disorder have likewise increased, focusing primarily on psychotherapy treatments, specifically, motivational enhancement therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, and contingency management. Their findings suggest that a combination of these three modalities produces the best abstinence outcomes, although abstinence rates remain modest and decline after treatment. More recently, pharmacotherapy trials have been conducted as adjunctive interventions to psychosocial treatment. N-acetylcysteine and gabapentin are two of the most promising medications, although no pharmacologic treatment has emerged as clearly efficacious. In this review, we provide a detailed summary of clinical trials that evaluated psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for treating cannabis use disorder and discuss emerging areas of clinical research and cannabis-specific barriers to treatment. PMID:27027272

  8. Recommendations on the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of hypogonadism in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunenfeld, Bruno; Mskhalaya, George; Zitzmann, Michael; Arver, Stefan; Kalinchenko, Svetlana; Tishova, Yuliya; Morgentaler, Abraham

    2015-03-01

    Hypogonadism or Testosterone Deficiency (TD) in adult men as defined by low levels of serum testosterone accompanied by characteristic symptoms and/or signs as detailed further on can be found in long-recognized clinical entities such as Klinefelter syndrome, Kallmann syndrome, pituitary or testicular disorders, as well as in men with idiopathic, metabolic or iatrogenic conditions that result in testosterone deficiency. These recommendations do not encompass the full range of pathologies leading to hypogonadism (testosterone deficiency), but instead focus on the clinical spectrum of hypogonadism related to metabolic and idiopathic disorders that contribute to the majority of cases that occur in adult men.

  9. Recommendations on the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of hypogonadism in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunenfeld, Bruno; Zitzmann, Michael; Arver, Stefan; Kalinchenko, Svetlana; Tishova, Yuliya; Morgentaler, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Hypogonadism or Testosterone Deficiency (TD) in adult men as defined by low levels of serum testosterone accompanied by characteristic symptoms and/or signs as detailed further on can be found in long-recognized clinical entities such as Klinefelter syndrome, Kallmann syndrome, pituitary or testicular disorders, as well as in men with idiopathic, metabolic or iatrogenic conditions that result in testosterone deficiency. These recommendations do not encompass the full range of pathologies leading to hypogonadism (testosterone deficiency), but instead focus on the clinical spectrum of hypogonadism related to metabolic and idiopathic disorders that contribute to the majority of cases that occur in adult men. PMID:25657080

  10. Indicator Amino Acid-Derived Estimate of Dietary Protein Requirement for Male Bodybuilders on a Nontraining Day Is Several-Fold Greater than the Current Recommended Dietary Allowance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandegan, Arash; Courtney-Martin, Glenda; Rafii, Mahroukh; Pencharz, Paul B; Lemon, Peter Wr

    2017-05-01

    Background: Despite a number of studies indicating increased dietary protein needs in bodybuilders with the use of the nitrogen balance technique, the Institute of Medicine (2005) has concluded, based in part on methodologic concerns, that "no additional dietary protein is suggested for healthy adults undertaking resistance or endurance exercise." Objective: The aim of the study was to assess the dietary protein requirement of healthy young male bodybuilders ( with ≥3 y training experience) on a nontraining day by measuring the oxidation of ingested l-[1- 13 C]phenylalanine to 13 CO 2 in response to graded intakes of protein [indicator amino acid oxidation (IAAO) technique]. Methods: Eight men (means ± SDs: age, 22.5 ± 1.7 y; weight, 83.9 ± 11.6 kg; 13.0% ± 6.3% body fat) were studied at rest on a nontraining day, on several occasions (4-8 times) each with protein intakes ranging from 0.1 to 3.5 g · kg -1 · d -1 , for a total of 42 experiments. The diets provided energy at 1.5 times each individual's measured resting energy expenditure and were isoenergetic across all treatments. Protein was fed as an amino acid mixture based on the protein pattern in egg, except for phenylalanine and tyrosine, which were maintained at constant amounts across all protein intakes. For 2 d before the study, all participants consumed 1.5 g protein · kg -1 · d -1 On the study day, the protein requirement was determined by identifying the breakpoint in the F 13 CO 2 with graded amounts of dietary protein [mixed-effects change-point regression analysis of F 13 CO 2 (labeled tracer oxidation in breath)]. Results: The Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) of protein and the upper 95% CI RDA for these young male bodybuilders were 1.7 and 2.2 g · kg -1 · d -1 , respectively. Conclusion: These IAAO data suggest that the protein EAR and recommended intake for male bodybuilders at rest on a nontraining day exceed the current recommendations of the Institute of Medicine by ∼2.6-fold

  11. Evidence-based guideline recommendations on treatment strategies for localized Ewing's sarcoma of bone following neo-adjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werier, Joel; Yao, Xiaomei; Caudrelier, Jean-Michel; di Primio, Gina; Ghert, Michelle; Gupta, Abha A; Kandel, Rita; Verma, Shailendra

    2016-06-01

    (1) To provide recommendations regarding the choice of surgery, radiation therapy (RT), or the combination of surgery plus RT in patients with localized Ewing's sarcoma of bone following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. (2) To determine the appropriate surgical planning imaging (pre-chemotherapy magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] or post-chemotherapy MRI) to identify optimal resection margins in patients with localized Ewing's sarcoma who undergo surgery following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library (1999 to February 2015), main guideline websites, and relevant annual meeting abstracts (2012 to January 2015) were searched. Internal and external reviews were conducted. 1. Recommendation (1) - In patients with localized Ewing's sarcoma of bone following neoadjuvant chemotherapy: (a) Surgery alone or RT alone are two reasonable treatment options; the combination of surgery plus RT is not recommended as an initial treatment option. (b) The local treatment for an individual patient should be decided by a multidisciplinary tumour board together with the patient after consideration of the following: (1) patient characteristics (e.g., age, tumour location, tumour size, response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and existing comorbidities), (2) the potential benefit weighed against the potential complications from surgery and/or toxicities associated with RT, and (3) patient preferences. 2. Recommendation (2) - In patients with localized Ewing's sarcoma who will undergo surgery: (a) Both pre-chemotherapy and post-chemotherapy MRI scans should be taken into consideration for surgical planning. In certain anatomic locations with good chemotherapy response, the post-chemotherapy MRI may be the appropriate imaging modality to plan surgical resection margins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Current options for palliative treatment in patients with pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridwelski, K; Meyer, F

    2001-01-01

    Palliative treatment is often the only remaining option in the management of pancreatic carcinoma, but its efficacy is poor due to low tumor sensitivity and inadequate treatment protocols. There are several options of palliative treatment with antitumor or supportive intention. Classical end points of palliative treatment are survival, tumor response, and quality of life. A decade ago, palliative chemotherapy consisted mainly of 5-fluorouracil as the standard agent in combination with either other agents and/or radiotherapy. Only the new antineoplastic drug gemcitabine, which was introduced simultaneously with the definition of novel end points of chemotherapy such as clinical benefit, allowed to achieve some progress. However, while gemcitabine monotherapy appeared to be superior to 5-fluorouracil and improved important parameters of quality of life, it could not provide a significant improvement of survival. A novel concept, therefore, is to improve this beneficial cytostatic response in pancreatic carcinoma using a gemcitabine-based protocol by combining it with antineoplastic drugs such as taxanes or platin analogs. This strategy may have the potential to improve the outcome in palliative chemotherapy of pancreatic carcinoma patients with advanced tumor growth or metastases. Best supportive care in pancreatic cancer consists of the treatment of symptoms, such as pain, jaundice, duodenal obstruction, weight loss, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, and tumor-associated depression. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  13. Review of Current Student-Monitoring Techniques used in eLearning-Focused recommender Systems and Learning analytics. The Experience API & LIME model Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Corbi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Recommender systems require input information in order to properly operate and deliver content or behaviour suggestions to end users. eLearning scenarios are no exception. Users are current students and recommendations can be built upon paths (both formal and informal, relationships, behaviours, friends, followers, actions, grades, tutor interaction, etc. A recommender system must somehow retrieve, categorize and work with all these details. There are several ways to do so: from raw and inelegant database access to more curated web APIs or even via HTML scrapping. New server-centric user-action logging and monitoring standard technologies have been presented in past years by several groups, organizations and standard bodies. The Experience API (xAPI, detailed in this article, is one of these. In the first part of this paper we analyse current learner-monitoring techniques as an initialization phase for eLearning recommender systems. We next review standardization efforts in this area; finally, we focus on xAPI and the potential interaction with the LIME model, which will be also summarized below.

  14. [Current standards in the treatment of gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Ulrich; Lordick, Florian

    2015-08-01

    Endoscopic resection is established in the treatment of early gastric cancer. More advanced gastric cancer requires gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy. Perioperative chemotherapy improves overall survival in locally advanced gastric cancer representing a standard of care. Locally advanced adenocarcinomas of the esophago-gastric junction can alternatively be treated with concurrent radiochemotherapy. In metastatic disease, systemic chemotherapy improves survival, quality of life and symptom control. Trastuzumab plus chemotherapy should be used together with first-line chemotherapy in HER2 positive gastric cancer patients. Second- and third-line therapy is now well established. The anti-VEGFR2 antibody Ramucirumab improves survival in second line treatment both as a monotherapy and in combination with paclitaxel and represents a novel treatment option. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Palmoplantar Psoriasis and Palmoplantar Pustulosis: Current Treatment and Future Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposo, Inês; Torres, Tiago

    2016-08-01

    Palmoplantar psoriasis and palmoplantar pustulosis are chronic skin diseases with a large impact on patient quality of life. They are frequently refractory to treatment, being generally described as a therapeutic challenge. This article aims to review the definitions of palmoplantar psoriasis and palmoplantar pustulosis, highlighting the similarities and differences in terms of epidemiology, clinical presentation, genetics, histopathology, and pathogenesis, as well as treatment options for both entities. Classical management of mild to moderate palmoplantar pustulosis and palmoplantar psoriasis relies on use of potent topical corticosteroids, phototherapy, and/or acitretin. Nevertheless, these drugs have proven to be insufficient in long-term control of extensive disease. Biologic therapy-namely, anti-interleukin-17 agents and phosphodiesterase type 4 inhibitors-has recently shown promising results in the treatment of palmoplantar psoriasis. Knowledge of the pathophysiologic pathways of both entities is of utmost importance and may, in the future, allow development of molecularly targeted therapeutics.

  16. Evolution and currents in the treatment of nasopharyngeal angiofibroma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda Jimenez, Luis Diego

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, its management and treatment was specified through a literature review on recent results of retrospective clinical history studies. The clinical characteristics of the population with this tumor are described as a function of the location, size and extent of the tumor. Diagnostic imaging techniques such as computerized axial tomography, nuclear magnetic resonance and angiography were used for the diagnosis of tumor extension and invasion. The most frequent differential diagnoses were determined. The three most frequent staging systems for juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas are shown in tables for better interpretation. The response to the different types and schemes of applied treatment was specified in the revised literature, according to the clinical evolution and the stage of the disease. The characteristics of postoperative evolution and recurrences are described in patients operated on for nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. The new treatment modalities are specified and the advantages of these are compared [es

  17. Current opinions on the radioiodine treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Woo; Lee, Jae Tae

    2003-01-01

    Radioactive iodine therapy using I-131 for hyperthyroidism has been used for more than 50 years, and generally considered safe and devoid of major side effects. Appropriate patient selection criteria and clinical judgement concerning patient preparation should be employed for its optimal use. It has not been possible to resolve the trade-off between efficient definite cure of hyperthyroidism and the high incidence of post-therapy hypothyroidism. The dose of the I-131 needed to maintain euthyroid state remains an area of uncertainty and debate. Early side effects are uncommon and readily manageable. Other than the need for long-term monitoring and, in most cases, lifelong thyroid hormone treatment for late adverse consequences of this treatment remains only conjectural. We have reviewed general principles and recent advances in radioiodine treatment for Graves' hyperthyroidism, specially regarding to several controversies

  18. Current state of prostate cancer treatment in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Belinda F; Aiken, William D; Mayhew, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the commonest cancer in Jamaica as well as the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. One report suggested that Jamaica has the highest incidence rate of prostate cancer in the world, with an age-standardised rate of 304/100,000 per year. The Caribbean region is reported to have the highest mortality rate of prostate cancer worldwide. Prostate cancer accounts for a large portion of the clinical practice for health-care practitioners in Jamaica. The Jamaica Urological Society is a professional body comprising 19 urologists in Jamaica who provide most of the care for men with prostate cancer in collaboration with medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, and a palliative care physician. The health-care system is structured in two tiers in Jamaica: public and private. The urologist-to-patient ratio is high, and this limits adequate urological care. Screening for prostate cancer is not a national policy in Jamaica. However, the Jamaica Urological Society and the Jamaica Cancer Society work synergistically to promote screening as well as to provide patient education for prostate cancer. Adequate treatment for localised prostate cancer is available in Jamaica in the forms of active surveillance, nerve-sparing radical retropubic prostatectomy, external beam radiation, and brachytherapy. However, there is a geographic maldistribution of centres that provide prostate cancer treatment, which leads to treatment delays. Also, there is difficulty in affording some treatment options in the private health-care sectors. Androgen deprivation therapy is available for treatment of locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer and is subsidised through a programme called the National Health Fund. Second-line hormonal agents and chemotherapeutic agents are available but are costly to most of the population. The infrastructure for treatment of prostate cancer in Jamaica is good, but it requires additional technological advances as well as additional specialist

  19. 2014 Update of the Canadian Rheumatology Association/spondyloarthritis research consortium of Canada treatment recommendations for the management of spondyloarthritis. Part I: principles of the management of spondyloarthritis in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohekar, Sherry; Chan, Jon; Tse, Shirley M L; Haroon, Nigil; Chandran, Vinod; Bessette, Louis; Mosher, Dianne; Flanagan, Cathy; Keen, Kevin J; Adams, Karen; Mallinson, Michael; Thorne, Carter; Rahman, Proton; Gladman, Dafna D; Inman, Robert D

    2015-04-01

    The Canadian Rheumatology Association (CRA) and the Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada (SPARCC) have collaborated to update the recommendations for the management of spondyloarthritis (SpA). A working group was assembled and consisted of the SPARCC executive committee, rheumatologist leaders from SPARCC collaborating sites, Canadian rheumatologists from across the country with an interest in SpA (both academic and community), a rheumatology trainee with an interest in SpA, an epidemiologist/health services researcher, a member of the CRA executive, a member of the CRA therapeutics committee, and a patient representative from the Canadian Spondylitis Association. An extensive review was conducted of literature published from 2007 to 2014 involving the management of SpA. The working group created draft recommendations using multiple rounds of Web-based surveys and an in-person conference. A survey was sent to the membership of the CRA to obtain an extended review that was used to finalize the recommendations. Guidelines for the management of SpA were created. Part I focuses on the principles of management of SpA in Canada and includes 6 general management principles, 5 ethical considerations, target groups for treatment recommendations, 2 wait time recommendations, and recommendations for disease monitoring. Also included are 6 modifications for application to juvenile SpA. These recommendations were developed based on current literature and applied to a Canadian healthcare context. It is hoped that the implementation of these recommendations will promote best practices in the treatment of SpA.

  20. Recommendations for physical therapists on the treatment of lumbopelvic pain during pregnancy: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Benten, E.; Pool, J.J.; Mens, J; Pool-Goudzwaard, A.L.

    2014-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Systematic review of the literature. OBJECTIVES: To review and assess the peer-reviewed literature on the effectiveness of physical therapy interventions in treating lumbopelvic pain during pregnancy. BACKGROUND: Current guidelines on interventions for lumbopelvic pain during pregnancy

  1. Current concepts in the treatment of hereditary ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Braga Neto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Hereditary ataxias (HA represents an extensive group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous neurodegenerative diseases, characterized by progressive ataxia combined with extra-cerebellar and multi-systemic involvements, including peripheral neuropathy, pyramidal signs, movement disorders, seizures, and cognitive dysfunction. There is no effective treatment for HA, and management remains supportive and symptomatic. In this review, we will focus on the symptomatic treatment of the main autosomal recessive ataxias, autosomal dominant ataxias, X-linked cerebellar ataxias and mitochondrial ataxias. We describe management for different clinical symptoms, mechanism-based approaches, rehabilitation therapy, disease modifying therapy, future clinical trials and perspectives, genetic counseling and preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

  2. A Proposal for a Study on Treatment Selection and Lifestyle Recommendations in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Holmskov, Uffe; Sørensen, Signe Bek

    2017-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases (CIDs), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (inflammatory bowel diseases, IBD), rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, spondyloarthritides, hidradenitis suppurativa, and immune-mediated uveitis, are treated with biologics targeting the pro......-inflammatory molecule tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF) (i.e., TNF inhibitors). Approximately one-third of the patients do not respond to the treatment. Genetics and lifestyle may affect the treatment results. The aims of this multidisciplinary collaboration are to identify (1) molecular signatures of prognostic value...... to help tailor treatment decisions to an individual likely to initiate TNF inhibitor therapy, followed by (2) lifestyle factors that support achievement of optimised treatment outcome. This report describes the establishment of a cohort that aims to obtain this information. Clinical data including...

  3. Recommendations for the paracetamol treatment nomogram and side effects of N-acetylcysteine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppen, A.; van Riel, A.; de Vries, I.; Meulenbelt, J.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of paracetamol intoxication consists of administration of N-acetylcysteine, preferably shortly after paracetamol ingestion. In most countries, the decision to treat patients with N-acetylcysteine depends on the paracetamol plasma concentration. In the literature, different arguments are

  4. SIOP PODC adapted treatment recommendations for standard-risk medulloblastoma in low and middle income settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parkes, Jeannette; Hendricks, Marc; Ssenyonga, Peter; Mugamba, John; Molyneux, Elizabeth; Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Fieggen, Graham; Luna-Fineman, Sandra; Howard, Scott; Mitra, Dipayan; Bouffet, Eric; Davidson, Alan; Bailey, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Effective treatment of children with medulloblastoma requires a functioning multi-disciplinary team with adequate neurosurgical, neuroradiological, pathological, radiotherapy and chemotherapy facilities and personnel. In addition the treating centre should have the capacity to effectively screen and

  5. Yoga for the Treatment of Insomnia among Cancer Patients: Evidence, Mechanisms of Action, and Clinical Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Mustian, Karen M.; Janelsins, Michelle; Peppone, Luke J.; Kamen, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Up to 90% of cancer patients report symptoms of insomnia during and after treatment. Symptoms of insomnia include excessive daytime sleepiness, difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, and waking up too early. Insomnia symptoms are among the most prevalent, distressing and persistent cancer- and cancer treatment-related toxicities reported by patients, and can be severe enough to increase cancer morbidity and mortality. Despite the ubiquity of insomnia symptoms, they are under-sc...

  6. Nutrition (Micronutrients) in Child Growth and Development: A Systematic Review on Current Evidence, Recommendations and Opportunities for Further Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakoob, Mohammad Yawar; Lo, Clifford W

    2017-10-01

    An important aspect of malnutrition is deficiency of different micronutrients during pregnancy or early childhood. We systematically reviewed the role of nutrition in child growth (weight or height gain) and development. A comprehensive literature search was done on PubMed/Cochrane Library browsing through 38,795 abstracts until December 31, 2016 to select systematic reviews/meta-analyses and individual randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of micronutrient supplementation. Micronutrients studied included iron, iodine, folate, zinc, calcium, magnesium, selenium, vitamin D, vitamin A, vitamin B complex, and multiple micronutrients. We summarize evidence with details and results of RCTs, highlight strengths/weaknesses, and critically interpret findings. Effects of breastfeeding-promotion, food-supplementation (complementary and school feeding), conditional-cash-transfers, and integrated nutrition/psychosocial interventions are discussed. Based on this evidence we make policy and programmatic recommendations for supplementation to mothers and children at high-risk of deficiency.

  7. Do Current Recommendations for Upper Instrumented Vertebra Predict Shoulder Imbalance? An Attempted Validation of Level Selection for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerke, Benjamin T; Cheung, Zoe B; Shifflett, Grant D; Iyer, Sravisht; Derman, Peter B; Cunningham, Matthew E

    2015-10-01

    Shoulder balance for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients is associated with patient satisfaction and self-image. However, few validated systems exist for selecting the upper instrumented vertebra (UIV) post-surgical shoulder balance. The purpose is to examine the existing UIV selection criteria and correlate with post-surgical shoulder balance in AIS patients. Patients who underwent spinal fusion at age 10-18 years for AIS over a 6-year period were reviewed. All patients with a minimum of 1-year radiographic follow-up were included. Imbalance was determined to be radiographic shoulder height |RSH| ≥ 15 mm at latest follow-up. Three UIV selection methods were considered: Lenke, Ilharreborde, and Trobisch. A recommended UIV was determined using each method from pre-surgical radiographs. The recommended UIV for each method was compared to the actual UIV instrumented for all three methods; concordance between these levels was defined as "Correct" UIV selection, and discordance was defined as "Incorrect" selection. One hundred seventy-one patients were included with 2.3 ± 1.1 year follow-up. For all methods, "Correct" UIV selection resulted in more shoulder imbalance than "Incorrect" UIV selection. Overall shoulder imbalance incidence was improved from 31.0% (53/171) to 15.2% (26/171). New shoulder imbalance incidence for patients with previously level shoulders was 8.8%. We could not identify a set of UIV selection criteria that accurately predicted post-surgical shoulder balance. Further validated measures are needed in this area. The complexity of proximal thoracic curve correction is underscored in a case example, where shoulder imbalance occurred despite "Correct" UIV selection by all methods.

  8. Reirradiation of recurrent node-positive non-small cell lung cancer after previous stereotactic radiotherapy for stage I disease. A multi-institutional treatment recommendation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieder, Carsten [Nordland Hospital, Department of Oncology and Palliative Medicine, Bodoe (Norway); University of Tromsoe, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tromsoe (Norway); Ruysscher, Dirk de [MAASTRO Clinic, Department of Radiation Oncology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Gaspar, Laurie E. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aurora, CO (United States); Guckenberger, Matthias [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland); Mehta, Minesh P. [Miami Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Miami, FL (United States); Cheung, Patrick; Sahgal, Arjun [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and University of Toronto, Department of Radiation Oncology, Toronto (Canada)

    2017-07-15

    Practice guidelines have been developed for early-stage and locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, many common clinical scenarios still require individualized decision making. This is true for locoregional relapse after initial stereotactic radiotherapy (stereotactic body radiation therapy or stereotactic ablative radiotherapy; SBRT or SABR), an increasingly utilized curative treatment option for stage I NSCLC. A consortium of expert radiation oncologists was established with the aim of providing treatment recommendations. In this scenario, a case was distributed to six radiation oncologists who provided their institutions' treatment recommendations. In this case, a patient developed local and mediastinal relapse after SABR (45 Gy, 3 fractions), comparable to the tumor burden in de novo stage IIIA NSCLC. Treatment recommendations were tabulated and a consensus conclusion was developed. Three institutions recommended evaluation for surgery. If the patient was not a surgical candidate, and/or refused surgery, definitive chemoradiation was recommended, including retreating the primary to full dose. European participants were more in favor of a non-surgical approach. None of the participants were reluctant to prescribe reirradiation, but two institutions prescribed doses lower than 60 Gy. Platinum-based doublets together with intensity-modulated radiotherapy were preferred. The institutional recommendations reflect the questions and uncertainties discussed in current stage III guidelines. All institutions agreed that previous SABR is not a contraindication for salvage chemoradiation. In the absence of high-quality prospective trials for recurrent NSCLC, all treatment options recommended in current guidelines for stage III disease can be considered in clinical scenarios such as this. (orig.) [German] Fuer fruehe und lokal fortgeschrittene Stadien des nicht-kleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinoms (NSCLC) wurden Behandlungsleitlinien publiziert

  9. Evalutating Inward Rectifier Current Inhibiton for Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ji, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is one of the most common forms of cardiac arrhythmia and affects a large percentage of the human population, especially in the elderly. Currently, more than 6 million Europeans suffer from AF, and due to ageing this number will at least double in the next 50 years.

  10. Human pharmacology of current and new treatments for schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liem-Moolenaar, Marieke

    2012-01-01

    The studies in this thesis together show different ways of studying human pharmacology, give an impression of the current drug development in schizophrenia, and provide examples how human pharmacology can be applied in an early stage of drug development in healthy volunteers. The investigated

  11. Current multiple myeloma treatment strategies with novel agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludwig, Heinz; Beksac, Meral; Bladé, Joan

    2010-01-01

    in the relapsed/refractory setting, they are also undergoing investigation in the initial treatment of MM. A number of phase III trials have demonstrated the efficacy of novel agent combinations in the transplant and nontransplant settings, and based on these results standard induction regimens are being...

  12. Current trends in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Rasm Al Sibae

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Mohamad Rasm Al Sibae, Brendan M McGuireDepartment of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USAAbstract: Hepatic encephalopathy (HE is a common reversible neuropsychiatric syndrome associated with chronic and acute liver dysfunction and significant morbidity and mortality. Although a clear pathogenesis is yet to be determined, elevated ammonia in the serum and central nervous system are the mainstay for pathogenesis and treatment. Management includes early diagnosis and prompt treatment of precipitating factors (infection, gastrointestinal bleeding, electrolyte disturbances, hepatocellular carcinoma, dehydration, hypotension, and use of benzodiazepines, psychoactive drugs, and/or alcohol. Clinical trials have established the efficacy of lactulose and lactitol enemas in the treatment of acute hepatic encephalopathy. Extensive clinical experience has demonstrated the efficacy of oral lactulose and lactitol with the goal of two to three soft bowel movements a day for the treatment of chronic HE. However, lactulose and lactitol have significant gastrointestinal side effects. For patients unable to tolerate lactulose or lactitol or who still have persistent chronic HE with lactulose or lactitol, neomycin, metronidazole and rifaximin are second-line agents. More recent data supports the benefits of rifaximin used solely and as an additional agent with fewer side effects than neomycin or metronidazole. Newer therapies being investigated in humans with clinical promise include nitazoxanide, the molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS, L-ornithine phenylacetate, sodium benzoate, and/or sodium phenylacetate and Kremezin® (AST-120.Keywords: hepatic encephalopathy, liver dysfunction, lactulose, lactitol

  13. Transcranial direct current stimulation as a treatment for auditory hallucinations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koops, Sanne; van den Brink, Hilde; Sommer, Iris E C

    2015-01-01

    Auditory hallucinations (AH) are a symptom of several psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia. In a significant minority of patients, AH are resistant to antipsychotic medication. Alternative treatment options for this medication resistant group are scarce and most of them focus on coping with

  14. [The costs of new drugs compared to current standard treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujeyl, Mariam; Schlegel, Claudia; Gundert-Remy, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Until AMNOG came into effect Germany had free pricing of new drugs. Our exemplary work investigates the costs of new drugs that were licensed in the two years prior to AMNOG, and compares them to the costs of standard treatment that has been used in pivotal trials. Also, the important components of pharmaceutical prices will be illustrated. We retrospectively analysed the European Public Assessment Reports of proprietary medicinal products that the European Medicinal Agency initially approved in 2009 and 2010 and that were tested against an active control in at least one pivotal trial. If the standard treatment was a generic, the average pharmacy retail price of new drugs was 7.4 times (median 7.1) higher than that of standard treatment. If the standard treatment was an originator drug the average price was 1.4 times (median 1.2) higher than that of the new drug. There was no clear correlation of an increase in costs for new drugs and their "grade of innovation" as rated according to the criteria of Fricke. Our study shows that prices of new drugs must be linked to the evidence of comparative benefit; since German drug pricing is complex, cost saving effects obtained thereby will depend on a range of other rules and decisions. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  15. Treatment for spasmodic dysphonia: limitations of current approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, Christy L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Although botulinum toxin injection is the gold standard for treatment of spasmodic dysphonia, surgical approaches aimed at providing long-term symptom control have been advancing over recent years. Recent findings When surgical approaches provide greater long-term benefits to symptom control, they also increase the initial period of side effects of breathiness and swallowing difficulties. However, recent analyses of quality-of-life questionnaires in patients undergoing regular injections of botulinum toxin demonstrate that a large proportion of patients have limited relief for relatively short periods due to early breathiness and loss-of-benefit before reinjection. Summary Most medical and surgical approaches to the treatment of spasmodic dysphonia have been aimed at denervation of the laryngeal muscles to block symptom expression in the voice, and have both adverse effects as well as treatment benefits. Research is needed to identify the central neuropathophysiology responsible for the laryngeal muscle spasms in order target treatment towards the central neurological abnormality responsible for producing symptoms. PMID:19337127

  16. Current Trends in Treatment Outcomes of Orbital Cellulitis in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    from optic nerve compression.[1‑5] Deaths can also occur as ... thrombosis, meningitis, and brain abscess.[1‑3] Bacteria and fungi ... The age, sex, duration of symptoms, predisposing factors, clinical findings, laboratory/radiological investigations, treatment provided, complications, and follow‑up were recorded. Results were.

  17. Current problems of prevention diagnosis and treatment of radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gus'kova, A.K.

    1986-01-01

    Causes of increasing interest to the problems of prevention, diagnosis and treatment of radiation sickness are presented. On the basis of recent publications some new aspects as quantitative criteria in radiobiology, organization problems of medical aid at radiation incidents estimation of efficiency of preventive medicine and radiation sickness therapy, theoretical development of radiotherapy of different organs et al., are characterized

  18. Neurofeedback for Tinnitus Treatment - Review and Current Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güntensperger, Dominik; Thüring, Christian; Meyer, Martin; Neff, Patrick; Kleinjung, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    An effective treatment to completely alleviate chronic tinnitus symptoms has not yet been discovered. However, recent developments suggest that neurofeedback (NFB), a method already popular in the treatment of other psychological and neurological disorders, may provide a suitable alternative. NFB is a non-invasive method generally based on electrophysiological recordings and visualizing of certain aspects of brain activity as positive or negative feedback that enables patients to voluntarily control their brain activity and thus triggers them to unlearn typical neural activity patterns related to tinnitus. The purpose of this review is to summarize and discuss previous findings of neurofeedback treatment studies in the field of chronic tinnitus. In doing so, also an overview about the underlying theories of tinnitus emergence is presented and results of resting-state EEG and MEG studies summarized and critically discussed. To date, neurofeedback as well as electrophysiological tinnitus studies lack general guidelines that are crucial to produce more comparable and consistent results. Even though neurofeedback has already shown promising results for chronic tinnitus treatment, further research is needed in order to develop more sophisticated protocols that are able to tackle the individual needs of tinnitus patients more specifically.

  19. Neurofeedback for Tinnitus Treatment – Review and Current Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Güntensperger

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An effective treatment to completely alleviate chronic tinnitus symptoms has not yet been discovered. However, recent developments suggest that neurofeedback (NFB, a method already popular in the treatment of other psychological and neurological disorders, may provide a suitable alternative. NFB is a non-invasive method generally based on electrophysiological recordings and visualizing of certain aspects of brain activity as positive or negative feedback that enables patients to voluntarily control their brain activity and thus triggers them to unlearn typical neural activity patterns related to tinnitus. The purpose of this review is to summarize and discuss previous findings of neurofeedback treatment studies in the field of chronic tinnitus. In doing so, also an overview about the underlying theories of tinnitus emergence is presented and results of resting-state EEG and MEG studies summarized and critically discussed. To date, neurofeedback as well as electrophysiological tinnitus studies lack general guidelines that are crucial to produce more comparable and consistent results. Even though neurofeedback has already shown promising results for chronic tinnitus treatment, further research is needed in order to develop more sophisticated protocols that are able to tackle the individual needs of tinnitus patients more specifically.

  20. Neurofeedback for Tinnitus Treatment – Review and Current Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güntensperger, Dominik; Thüring, Christian; Meyer, Martin; Neff, Patrick; Kleinjung, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    An effective treatment to completely alleviate chronic tinnitus symptoms has not yet been discovered. However, recent developments suggest that neurofeedback (NFB), a method already popular in the treatment of other psychological and neurological disorders, may provide a suitable alternative. NFB is a non-invasive method generally based on electrophysiological recordings and visualizing of certain aspects of brain activity as positive or negative feedback that enables patients to voluntarily control their brain activity and thus triggers them to unlearn typical neural activity patterns related to tinnitus. The purpose of this review is to summarize and discuss previous findings of neurofeedback treatment studies in the field of chronic tinnitus. In doing so, also an overview about the underlying theories of tinnitus emergence is presented and results of resting-state EEG and MEG studies summarized and critically discussed. To date, neurofeedback as well as electrophysiological tinnitus studies lack general guidelines that are crucial to produce more comparable and consistent results. Even though neurofeedback has already shown promising results for chronic tinnitus treatment, further research is needed in order to develop more sophisticated protocols that are able to tackle the individual needs of tinnitus patients more specifically. PMID:29249959

  1. A review of current investigations and treatment modalities of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infertility of the couple is a major health problem in Africa, affecting between 37- 66% of women of childbearing age in some regions of the continent. Because of the high cost of evaluation, a good history and thorough physical examination will narrow the investigations necessary for treatment. This paper briefly reviews the ...

  2. Recommendation to use iso-osmotic contrast medium in interventional treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Bing; Cheng Yongde

    2012-01-01

    With the rapid development of imaging diagnostic and interventional therapeutic techniques, the contrast medium (CM) has been used more and more common in clinical practice, and meanwhile more and more attention has been paid to the CM-related adverse events. Contrast induced nephropathy (CN) is the most common CM-related adverse event, and CM-related neurotoxicity has already attracted the physicians' attention. The osmotic pressure of the iso-osmotic contrast medium (IOCM) is quite the same as that of the plasma, and therefore its safety is higher than that of low-osmotic contrast medium (LOCM), the patient's tolerance to IOCM is better than that to LOCM. For this reason, the use of IOCM should be strongly recommended in interventional procedures, which is of great significance to the reduction of the occurrence of CM-related adverse events. (authors)

  3. Current diagnostics and treatment of the cubital tunnel syndrome in Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harder, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the vote of the Austrian Society for Surgery of the Hand (ÖGH an investigation to collect data on the current state of the treatment of cubital tunnel syndrome was initiated. Over one year a total of 875 patients with cubital tunnel syndrome were operated in Austria, this means an incidence of this nerve entrapment of 0.011%. Most of the operations were done by trauma surgeons (287; 33%. For diagnosis most of the centers rely on clinical symptoms, electroneurophysiology, and elbow X-ray. 40% of the institutions regard conservative therapy as useless and not indicated. If conservative treatment modalities are applied, physiotherapy (97%, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication (77%, and glucocorticoid injections (30% are primarily used. In case of simple nerve entrapment most of the surgeons (72% prefer simple nerve decompression. If there is additional pathology subcutaneous cubital nerve transposition is recommended (62%. Endoscopic techniques are only use by 3% of the surgeons. In the postoperative care, physiotherapy is favored in 51%, whereas 24% do not judge any postoperative care as beneficial.The three most often encountered complications were incomplete remission, scar contracture and hypertrophy, and postoperative bleeding.

  4. Treatment of Thrombotic Antiphospholipid Syndrome: The Rationale of Current Management-An Insight into Future Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chighizola, Cecilia Beatrice; Ubiali, Tania; Meroni, Pier Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Vascular thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity represent the clinical manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), which is serologically characterized by the persistent positivity of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Antiplatelet and anticoagulant agents currently provide the mainstay of APS treatment. However, the debate is still open: controversies involve the intensity and the duration of anticoagulation and the treatment of stroke and refractory cases. Unfortunately, the literature cannot provide definite answers to these controversial issues as it is flawed by many limitations, mainly due to the recruitment of patients not fulfilling laboratory and clinical criteria for APS. The recommended therapeutic management of different aPL-related clinical manifestations is hereby presented, with a critical appraisal of the evidence supporting such approaches. Cutting edge therapeutic strategies are also discussed, presenting the pioneer reports about the efficacy of novel pharmacological agents in APS. Thanks to a better understanding of aPL pathogenic mechanisms, new therapeutic targets will soon be explored. Much work is still to be done to unravel the most controversial issues about APS management: future studies are warranted to define the optimal management according to aPL risk profile and to assess the impact of a strict control of cardiovascular risk factors on disease control.

  5. Treatment of Thrombotic Antiphospholipid Syndrome: The Rationale of Current Management—An Insight into Future Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubiali, Tania; Meroni, Pier Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Vascular thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity represent the clinical manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), which is serologically characterized by the persistent positivity of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Antiplatelet and anticoagulant agents currently provide the mainstay of APS treatment. However, the debate is still open: controversies involve the intensity and the duration of anticoagulation and the treatment of stroke and refractory cases. Unfortunately, the literature cannot provide definite answers to these controversial issues as it is flawed by many limitations, mainly due to the recruitment of patients not fulfilling laboratory and clinical criteria for APS. The recommended therapeutic management of different aPL-related clinical manifestations is hereby presented, with a critical appraisal of the evidence supporting such approaches. Cutting edge therapeutic strategies are also discussed, presenting the pioneer reports about the efficacy of novel pharmacological agents in APS. Thanks to a better understanding of aPL pathogenic mechanisms, new therapeutic targets will soon be explored. Much work is still to be done to unravel the most controversial issues about APS management: future studies are warranted to define the optimal management according to aPL risk profile and to assess the impact of a strict control of cardiovascular risk factors on disease control. PMID:26075289

  6. A hybrid fuzzy-ontology based intelligent system to determine level of severity and treatment recommendation for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torshizi, Abolfazl Doostparast; Zarandi, Mohammad Hossein Fazel; Torshizi, Ghazaleh Doostparast; Eghbali, Kamyar

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with application of fuzzy intelligent systems in diagnosing severity level and recommending appropriate therapies for patients having Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia. Such an intelligent system can have remarkable impacts on correct diagnosis of the disease and reducing risk of mortality. This system captures various factors from the patients using two modules. The first module determines severity level of the Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia and the second module, which is a decision making unit, obtains output of the first module accompanied by some external knowledge and makes an appropriate treatment decision based on its ontology model and a fuzzy type-1 system. In order to validate efficiency and accuracy of the developed system, a case study is conducted by 44 participants. Then the results are compared with the recommendations of a panel of experts on the experimental data. Then precision and accuracy of the results were investigated based on a statistical analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Treatment for primary hypothyroidism: current approaches and future possibilities

    OpenAIRE

    Chakera, Ali J; Pearce, Simon HS; Vaidya, Bijay

    2011-01-01

    Ali J Chakera1, Simon HS Pearce2, Bijay Vaidya11Department of Endocrinology, Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital and Peninsula Medical School, Exeter, 2Endocrine Unit, Royal Victoria Infirmary and Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UKAbstract: Primary hypothyroidism is the most common endocrine disease. Although the diagnosis and treatment of hypothyroidism is often considered simple, there are large numbers of people with this condition who are suboptimally treated. Even in those people ...

  8. Treatment of giant cell tumor of bone: Current concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Puri Ajay; Agarwal Manish

    2007-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone though one of the commonest bone tumors encountered by an orthopedic surgeon continues to intrigue treating surgeons. Usually benign, they are locally aggressive and may occasionally undergo malignant transformation. The surgeon needs to strike a balance during treatment between reducing the incidence of local recurrence while preserving maximal function. Differing opinions pertaining to the use of adjuvants for extension of curettage, the relative role of bone ...

  9. HYPOPARATHYROIDISM: ETIOLOGY, CLINICAL MANIFESTATION, CURRENT DIAGNOSTICS AND TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. G. Mokrysheva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Parathyroid hormone (PTH is the main regulator of calcium and phosphorus metabolism. PTH deficiency or tissue resistance to its effects results in hypoparathyroidism characterized by low serum calcium and elevated serum phosphate levels. The most common is post-operative hypoparathyroidism caused by an inadvertent damage or removal of the parathyroid glands, deterioration of blood supply to the neck region, most often during thyroid surgery. The second common form of the disease is the autoimmune one related with immune destruction of parathyroid cells. Less frequent causes of hypoparathyroidism include a variety of genetic syndromes, mitochondrial genome defects, and hypomagnesemia. The main signs and symptoms of hypoparathyroidism are related to hypocalcaemia and hyperphosphatemia land result in increased neuromuscular irritability and general autonomic reactivity, with finger and toe tingling, muscle cramps, tonic seizures, laryngo- and bronchospasm, and neurosis. These symptoms are closely associated with serum calcium levels; their severity depends on the degree of hypocalcaemia. Laboratory parameters confirming the diagnosis of hypoparathyroidism are hypocalcaemia, hyperphosphatemia, and reduced serum PTH. Treatment of hypoparathyroidism involves management of hypocalcaemic crisis and maintenance therapy. Acute hypocalcaemia, a  potentially life-threatening condition, is treated as an emergency with intravenous calcium combined with oral calcium and active vitamin D. Standard chronic treatment for hypoparathyroidism is based on oral calcium and active metabolites of vitamin  D / vitamin  D analogs and is aimed at the balance between optimal low-normal serum calcium concentrations and normocalciuria. Worsening hypercalciuria is often underestimated by specialists, although it can cause severe renal problems, such as nephrocalcinosis and neprolithiasis. Hypoparathyroidism is one of the few endocrine deficiencies for which replacement

  10. Current concepts of etiology and treatment of chondromalacia patellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, G; Dowd, G

    1984-10-01

    Chondromalacia patellae is a distinct clinical entity characterized by retropatellar pain that is associated with recognizable changes in the articular cartilage of the posterior surface of the patella. Several factors may be involved in the etiology, such as severe patella alta, trauma, and, in rare cases, abnormal patellar tracking. Clinical symptoms and signs are reliable in only 50% of cases, but measurable quadriceps wasting, palpable patellofemoral crepitus, and effusion are strongly suggestive. Diagnosis must be confirmed by arthroscopy or direct examination of the posterior surface of the patella. Radiologic measurements of patellofemoral relations are of limited value in diagnosis. The initial pathologic finding is usually surface cartilage breakdown. Radioisotope studies show cartilage cell replication which suggests a healing capacity in early cases following treatment that alters the load through the affected cartilage. There is no evidence of progression to patellofemoral osteoarthritis, which is probably a different entity. The treatment should be conservative where possible with isometric quadriceps exercises and simple anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin. Operative treatment is indicated for patients with persistent pain and macroscopic involvement of more than half a centimeter of the articular cartilage surface. The simplest effective procedure that avoids quadriceps dysfunction and fibrosis is a distal patellar tendon medial realignment with lateral release and medial reefing of the quadriceps expansion. Patellectomy is indicated in more extensive involvement of the patella of 2 or more centimeters in diameter, but this must be performed only when the patient has excellent quadriceps function before surgery and is motivated to exercise after surgery.

  11. Current and emerging treatments for the management of osteogenesis imperfecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Elena; Mottes, Monica; Fraschini, Paolo; Brunelli, PierCarlo; Forlino, Antonella; Venturi, Giacomo; Doro, Francesco; Perlini, Silvia; Cavarzere, Paolo; Antoniazzi, Franco

    2010-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is the most common bone genetic disorder and it is characterized by bone brittleness and various degrees of growth disorder. Clinical severity varies widely; nowadays eight types are distinguished and two new forms have been recently described although not yet classified. The approach to such a variable and heterogeneous disease should be global and therefore multidisciplinary. For simplicity, the objectives of treatment can be reduced to three typical situations: the lethal perinatal form (type II), in which the problem is survival at birth; the severe and moderate forms (types III–IX), in which the objective is ‘autonomy’; and the mild form (type I), in which the aim is to reach ‘normal life’. Three types of treatment are available: non-surgical management (physical therapy, rehabilitation, bracing and splinting), surgical management (intramedullary rod positioning, spinal and basilar impression surgery) and medical-pharmacological management (drugs to increase the strength of bone and decrease the number of fractures as bisphosphonates or growth hormone, depending on the type of OI). Suggestions and guidelines for a therapeutic approach are indicated and updated with the most recent findings in OI diagnosis and treatment. PMID:20856683

  12. Current approach to the treatment of chronic myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasic, Ivan; Lipton, Jeffrey H

    2017-04-01

    Of all the cancers, chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) has witnessed the most rapid evolution of the therapeutic milieu in recent decades. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) as a therapeutic option has profoundly changed patient experience and outcome. The availability of multiple new highly effective therapies has increasingly underscored the importance of a good understanding of the underlying pathophysiological basis in CML, as well as patient-specific factors in choosing the right treatment for every individual. The treatment of CML has migrated in many jurisdictions from the office of a highly specialized malignant hematologist to the general hematologist or even a general practitioner. The goal of this review is to offer an overview of the modern approach to the treatment of CML, with an emphasis on chronic phase (CP) CML, including both TKI-based therapies such as imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, bosutinib and ponatinib, and non-TKI medications, such as omacetaxine. We discuss evidence behind each drug, most common and material adverse reactions and outline how this information can be used in selecting the right drug for the right patient. We also discuss evidence as it relates to other therapies, including stem cell transplant (SCT), and patients in accelerated (AP) and blastic phase (BP). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Using mobile technology to promote safe sex and sexual health in adolescents: current practices and future recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelius JB

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Judith B Cornelius,1 Josephine A Appiah2 1School of Nursing, 2Health Services Research Doctoral Program, College of Health and Human Services, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC, USA Abstract: Youth and young adults (19–24 years of age shoulder the burden of sexually transmitted infections accounting for nearly half of all new infections annually. Mobile technology is one way that we have reached this population with safer sex information but challenges exist with the delivery process. The literature between 2010 and 2015 was reviewed for data on safe sex and sexual health information delivered using mobile cell phone devices. A search for relevant databases revealed that 17 articles met our inclusion criteria. Findings suggest that mobile cell phone interventions are an effective mode for delivering safe sex and sexual health information to youth; those at the highest risk may not be able to access cell phones based on availability and cost of the text messages or data plans. Keywords: mobile, safe sex, sexual health, practices, recommendations

  14. Recommendations for the long-term treatment of psoriasis with infliximab: A dermatology expert group consensus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reich, K.; Griffiths, C.; Barker, J.

    2008-01-01

    Background/Aims: Infliximab has been approved for the treatment of chronic plaque psoriasis for only a few years. As physicians gain confidence in initiating and maintaining this therapy, guidance on the management of patients beyond several months or years is needed. To date, there is little or ...

  15. Description of recommended non-thermal mixed waste treatment technologies: Version 1.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    This document contains description of the technologies selected for inclusions in the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) Study. The purpose of these descriptions is to provide a more complete description of the INTS technologies. It supplements the summary descriptions of candidate nonthermal technologies that were considered for the INTS

  16. Treatment recommendations from the Eighth International Workshop on Waldenström's Macroglobulinemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leblond, Véronique; Kastritis, Efstathios; Advani, Ranjana; Ansell, Stephen M; Buske, Christian; Castillo, Jorge J; García-Sanz, Ramón; Gertz, Morie; Kimby, Eva; Kyriakou, Charalampia; Merlini, Giampaolo; Minnema, Monique C; Morel, Pierre; Morra, Enrica; Rummel, Mathias; Wechalekar, Ashutosh; Patterson, Christopher J; Treon, Steven P; Dimopoulos, Meletios A

    2016-01-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is a distinct B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder for which clearly defined criteria for the diagnosis, initiation of therapy, and treatment strategy have been proposed as part of the consensus panels of the International Workshop on Waldenström's Macroglobulinemia

  17. Description of recommended non-thermal mixed waste treatment technologies: Version 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This document contains description of the technologies selected for inclusions in the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) Study. The purpose of these descriptions is to provide a more complete description of the INTS technologies. It supplements the summary descriptions of candidate nonthermal technologies that were considered for the INTS.

  18. Assessment and Treatment of Selective Mutism: Recommendations and a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Susan M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents results of stimulus fading procedure used to treat a six-year-old girl with elective mutism. Presents assessment protocol that features procedures that can be used to render a diagnosis and assist in treatment planning. Results suggest stimulus fading of new persons into the school setting was effective in producing speech. (JBJ)

  19. Recommended patient-reported core set of symptoms to measure in adult cancer treatment trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reeve, B.B.; Mitchell, S.A.; Dueck, A.C.; Basch, E.; Cella, D.; Miller Reilly, C.; Minasian, L.M.; Denicoff, A.M.; O'Mara, A.M.; Fisch, M.J.; Chauhan, C.; Aaronson, N.K.; Coens, C.; Watkins Bruner, D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The National Cancer Institute’s Symptom Management and Health-Related Quality of Life Steering Committee held a clinical trials planning meeting (September 2011) to identify a core symptom set to be assessed across oncology trials for the purposes of better understanding treatment

  20. Recommendations for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the pneumonia acquired in the community in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The pneumonia acquired in the community in adults, is the acute infection of the pulmonary parenchyma that is developed away from the hospital environment, it is manifested in the first 48 hours from the entrance to the hospital or after seven days of having left. The supplement includes clinical square, epidemiology, etiology classification, diagnostic, treatment and prevention among others

  1. Pulmonary tuberculosis treatment regimen recommended by the Brazilian National Ministry of Health: predictors of treatment noncompliance in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campani, Simone Teresinha Aloise; Moreira, José da Silva; Tietbohel, Carlos Nunes

    2011-01-01

    To determine the predictors of noncompliance with the pulmonary tuberculosis treatment regimen recommended by the Brazilian National Ministry of Health, in previously treatment-naïve patients with active tuberculosis treated in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil. This was a case-control study involving six referral primary health care clinics for tuberculosis in Porto Alegre. We reviewed the medical charts of all previously treatment-naïve patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis who were noncompliant with the treatment between 2004 and 2006. Those were paired with other patients having similar characteristics and having been cured. We conducted univariate and multivariate analyses. Of the 2,098 patients included, 218 (10.4%) became noncompliant with the treatment. In the multivariate analysis, the factors most strongly associated with treatment noncompliance were being an alcoholic (with or without concomitant use of illicit drugs), being HIV-infected, not residing with family members, and having a low level of education. In the univariate analysis, treatment noncompliance was also significantly associated with being younger and with being non-White. Gender was not significantly associated with treatment noncompliance; nor was the occurrence of adverse effects of the drugs included in the regimen. In the population studied, being an alcoholic, being HIV-infected, and not residing with family members were the major predictors of noncompliance with treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis among previously treatment-naïve patients.

  2. Treatment Patterns Associated with ACR-Recommended Medications in the Management of Fibromyalgia in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yifei; Qian, Chunlin; Yang, Mei

    2016-03-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) affects up to 6% of U.S. adults, resulting in a significant burden on the health care system and poor quality of life for patients. Duloxetine, pregabalin, and milnacipran are approved for management of FM; however, consensus is lacking regarding optimal therapy. Patients with FM taking approved medications often do not experience meaningful symptom relief, and many experience intolerable adverse events. To assess treatment patterns associated with available and commonly used medications for the management of FM using U.S. health insurance claims. This retrospective analysis used the MarketScan claims database to identify adults with a first diagnosis of FM (ICD-9-CM code 729.1) between 2009 and 2011 with continuous health plan enrollment for 12 months pre- and post-index. Medications of interest were pregabalin, gabapentin, duloxetine, milnacipran, cyclobenzaprine, and tramadol. These are 6 of the 8 medications recommended by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) for treating FM; the other 2 (amitriptyline and venlafaxine) were only included in some initial assessments. The Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) was used to assess overall comorbidity burden. Endpoints included proportion of patients treated within 1 year after first diagnosis; initial treatment pattern; adherence over the first-year follow-up period for the medications of interest; and discontinuation, switching, and combination therapy patterns among pain medications of interest at different time points. Proportion of days covered (PDC; defined as number of days in the period when the patient had drug supply divided by the number of days in the period) was used to define adherence, which was categorized as low (PDC time to discontinuation (defined as the first drug supply gap ≥ 90 days) was estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Overall, 240,144 patients met the inclusion criteria. Patients were predominantly women (68%), had preferred provider organization insurance coverage

  3. Current and emerging treatments for the management of osteogenesis imperfecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Monti

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Elena Monti1, Monica Mottes1, Paolo Fraschini2, PierCarlo Brunelli3, Antonella Forlino4, Giacomo Venturi1, Francesco Doro1, Silvia Perlini1, Paolo Cavarzere1, Franco Antoniazzi11Department of Life Sciences and Reproduction, Pediatric Clinic University of Verona, Verona, Italy; 2Istituto Di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, ‘E. Medea’, Associazione La Nostra Famiglia, Bosisio Parini (LC, Italy; 3Divisione di Ortopedia Pediatrica, Spedali Civili, Brescia, Italy; 4Department of Biochemistry “A. Castellani”, University of Pavia, ItalyAbstract: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI is the most common bone genetic disorder and it is characterized by bone brittleness and various degrees of growth disorder. Clinical severity varies widely; nowadays eight types are distinguished and two new forms have been recently described although not yet classified. The approach to such a variable and heterogeneous disease should be global and therefore multidisciplinary. For simplicity, the objectives of treatment can be reduced to three typical situations: the lethal perinatal form (type II, in which the problem is survival at birth; the severe and moderate forms (types III–IX, in which the objective is ‘autonomy’; and the mild form (type I, in which the aim is to reach ‘normal life’. Three types of treatment are available: non-surgical management (physical therapy, rehabilitation, bracing and splinting, surgical management (intramedullary rod positioning, spinal and basilar impression surgery and medical-pharmacological management (drugs to increase the strength of bone and decrease the number of fractures as bisphosphonates or growth hormone, depending on the type of OI. Suggestions and guidelines for a therapeutic approach are indicated and updated with the most recent findings in OI diagnosis and treatment.Keywords: osteogenesis imperfecta, bone genetic disorder, bone brittleness, “brittle bone disease”, connective tissue malfunction, short

  4. Management of patients with resistant hypertension: current treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar N

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Nilay Kumar,1 David A Calhoun,2 Tanja Dudenbostel21Department of Medicine, 2Division of Cardiovascular Disease, Hypertension and Vascular Biology Program, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USAAbstract: Resistant hypertension (RHTN is an increasingly common clinical problem that is often heterogeneous in etiology, risk factors, and comorbidities. It is defined as uncontrolled blood pressure on optimal doses of three antihypertensive agents, ideally one being a diuretic. The definition also includes controlled hypertension with use of four or more antihypertensive agents. Recent observational studies have advanced the characterization of patients with RHTN. Patients with RHTN have higher rates of cardiovascular events and mortality compared with patients with more easily controlled hypertension. Secondary causes of hypertension, including obstructive sleep apnea, primary aldosteronism, renovascular disease, are common in patients with RHTN and often coexist in the same patient. In addition, RHTN is often complicated by metabolic abnormalities. Patients with RHTN require a thorough evaluation to confirm the diagnosis and optimize treatment, which typically includes a combination of lifestyle adjustments, and pharmacologic and interventional treatment. Combination therapy including a diuretic, a long-acting calcium channel blocker, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, a beta blocker, and a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist where warranted is the classic regimen for patients with treatment-resistant hypertension. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists like spironolactone or eplerenone have been shown to be efficacious in patients with RHTN, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and primary aldosteronism. Novel interventional therapies, including baroreflex activation and renal denervation, have shown that both of these methods may be used to lower blood pressure safely, thereby providing exciting and promising new

  5. When is facial paralysis Bell palsy? Current diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Anwar

    2005-05-01

    Bell palsy is largely a diagnosis of exclusion, but certain features in the history and physical examination help distinguish it from facial paralysis due to other conditions: eg, abrupt onset with complete, unilateral facial weakness at 24 to 72 hours, and, on the affected side, numbness or pain around the ear, a reduction in taste, and hypersensitivity to sounds. Corticosteroids and antivirals given within 10 days of onset have been shown to help. But Bell palsy resolves spontaneously without treatment in most patients within 6 months.

  6. Current and Emerging Treatment Options in Diabetes Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Christoffer; Müller, Timo D; Finan, Brian

    2016-01-01

    in elevated plasma glucose. In the last three decades, a set of new medicines built upon a deeper understanding of physiology and diabetic pathology have emerged to enhance the clinical management of the disease and related disorders. Recent insights into insulin-dependent and insulin-independent molecular...... events have accelerated the generation of a series of novel medicinal agents, which hold the promise for further advances in the management of diabetes. In this chapter, we provide a historical context for what has been accomplished to provide perspective for future research and novel emerging treatment...

  7. Framework of outcome measures recommended for use in the evaluation of childhood obesity treatment interventions: the CoOR framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, M; Ashton, L; Nixon, J; Jebb, S; Wright, J; Roberts, K; Brown, J

    2014-12-01

    Consensus is lacking in determining appropriate outcome measures for assessment of childhood obesity treatments. Inconsistency in the use and reporting of such measures impedes comparisons between treatments and limits consideration of effectiveness. This study aimed to produce a framework of recommended outcome measures: the Childhood obesity treatment evaluation Outcomes Review (CoOR) framework. A systematic review including two searches was conducted to identify (1) existing trial outcome measures and (2) manuscripts describing development/evaluation of outcome measures. Outcomes included anthropometry, diet, eating behaviours, physical activity, sedentary time/behaviour, fitness, physiology, environment, psychological well-being and health-related quality of life. Eligible measures were appraised by the internal team using a system developed from international guidelines, followed by appraisal from national external expert collaborators. A total of 25,486 papers were identified through both searches. Eligible search 1 trial papers cited 417 additional papers linked to outcome measures, of which 56 were eligible. A further 297 outcome development/evaluation papers met eligibility criteria from search 2. Combined, these described 191 outcome measures. After internal and external appraisal, 52 measures across 10 outcomes were recommended for inclusion in the CoOR framework. Application of the CoOR framework will ensure greater consistency in choosing robust outcome measures that are appropriate to population characteristics. © 2014 The Authors. Pediatric Obesity © 2014 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  8. Current status of gastroesophageal reflux disease : diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Tang-Wei; Chen, Shou-Chien; Chen, Kow-Tong

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the recent advances in diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Previous studies were searched using the terms "gastroesophageal reflux disease" and "diagnosis" or "treatment" in Medline and Pubmed. Articles that were not published in the English language, manuscripts without an abstract, reviews, meta-analysis, and opinion articles were excluded from the review. After a preliminary screening, all of the articles were reviewed and synthesized to provide an overview of the contemporary approaches to GERD. GERD has a variety of symptomatic manifestations, which can be grouped into typical, atypical and extra-esophageal symptoms. Those with the highest specificity for GERD are acid regurgitation and heartburn. In the absence of other alarming symptoms, these symptoms allow one to make a presumptive diagnosis of GERD and initiate empiric therapy. GERD-associated complications include erosive esophagitis, peptic stricture, Barrett's esophagus, esophageal adenocarcinoma and pulmonary disease. Management of GERD may involve lifestyle modifications, medical and surgical therapy. Medical therapy involves acid suppression, which can be achieved with antacids, histamine-receptor antagonists or proton-pump inhibitors. Whereas most patients can be effectively managed with medical therapy, others may go on to require anti-reflux surgery after undergoing a proper pre-operative evaluation. The management of this disease requires a complex approach. Maintenance therapy of GERD after using anti-secretory drugs should be continuously monitored. © Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica.

  9. Gastroparesis: a review of current and emerging treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enweluzo C

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Chijioke Enweluzo, Fahad AzizHospital Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC, USAAbstract: Gastroparesis is a motility disorder of the stomach causing delay in food emptying from the stomach without any evidence of mechanical obstruction. The majority of cases are idiopathic. Patients need to be diagnosed properly by formal testing, and the evaluation of the severity of the gastroparesis may assist in guiding therapy. Initially, dietary modifications are encouraged, which include frequent and small semisolid-based meals. Promotility medications, like erythromycin, and antiemetics, like prochlorperazine, are offered for symptom relief. In patients who are refractory to pharmacologic treatment, more invasive options, such as intrapyloric botulinum toxin injections, placement of a jejunostomy tube, or implantation of a gastric stimulator, can be considered. Hemin therapy and gastric electric stimulation are emerging treatment options that are still at different stages of research. Regenerative medicine and stem cell-based therapies also hold promise for gastroparesis in the near future.Keywords: Gastroparesis, gastric emptying, gastric electrical stimulation, hemin

  10. Dosimetric Study of Current Treatment Options for Radiotherapy in Retinoblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldebawy, Eman [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Children' s Cancer Hospital, Cairo (Egypt); Parker, William, E-mail: william.parker@mcgill.ca [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Abdel Rahman, Wamied [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Freeman, Carolyn R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the best treatment technique for patients with retinoblastoma requiring radiotherapy to the whole eye. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans for 3 patients with retinoblastoma were developed using 10 radiotherapy techniques including electron beams, photon beam wedge pair (WP), photon beam three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), fixed gantry intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), photon volumetric arc therapy (VMAT), fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy (HT). Dose-volume analyses were carried out for each technique. Results: All techniques provided similar target coverage; conformity was highest for VMAT, nine-field (9F) IMRT, and HT (conformity index [CI] = 1.3) and lowest for the WP and two electron techniques (CI = 1.8). The electron techniques had the highest planning target volume dose gradient (131% of maximum dose received [D{sub max}]), and the CRT techniques had the lowest (103% D{sub max}) gradient. The volume receiving at least 20 Gy (V{sub 20Gy}) for the ipsilateral bony orbit was lowest for the VMAT and HT techniques (56%) and highest for the CRT techniques (90%). Generally, the electron beam techniques were superior in terms of brain sparing and delivered approximately one-third of the integral dose of the photon techniques. Conclusions: Inverse planned image-guided radiotherapy delivered using HT or VMAT gives better conformity index, improved orbital bone and brain sparing, and a lower integral dose than other techniques.

  11. Drugs currently under investigation for the treatment of invasive candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Matthew W; Walsh, Thomas J

    2017-07-01

    The widespread implementation of immunosuppressants, immunomodulators, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and solid organ transplantation in clinical practice has led to an expanding population of patients who are at risk for invasive candidiasis, which is the most common form of fungal disease among hospitalized patients in the developed world. The emergence of drug-resistant Candida spp. has added to the morbidity associated with invasive candidiasis and novel therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Areas covered: In this paper, we explore investigational agents for the treatment of invasive candidiasis, with particular attention paid to compounds that have recently entered phase I or phase II clinical trials. Expert opinion: The antifungal drug development pipeline has been severely limited due to regulatory hurdles and a systemic lack of investment in novel compounds. However, several promising drug development strategies have recently emerged, including chemical screens involving Pathogen Box compounds, combination antifungal therapy, and repurposing of existing agents that were initially developed to treat other conditions, all of which have the potential to redefine the treatment of invasive candidiasis.

  12. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure treatment: current realities and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthon-Jones, M; Lawrence, S; Sullivan, C E; Grunstein, R

    1996-11-01

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a highly effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. The apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) is reduced 10-fold, but the patient dropout rate is up to 30%, and usage is typically 20/hour were recruited, with written informed consent. Subjects slept for a diagnostic night, followed by a treatment night, in the laboratory, using the AutoSet system with full polysomnographic monitoring of respiratory and sleep variables. Arousals were scored using ASDA criteria. Hypopneas were scored when there was a 50% reduction in ventilation for > 10 seconds, associated with a 4% drop in oxygen saturation. For comparison, the ASDA arousal index in 16 normal subjects (without nasal CPAP) is provided. Results are given as mean +/- standard error of the mean. AHI was reduced from 55 +/- 3 to 1.5 +/- 0.35 events/hour (p < 0.0001). The arousal index was reduced from 65 +/- 3 to 18 +/- 2 events/hour (p < 0.0001), identical to the value in the 16 healthy normal subjects. There was a 158% +/- 21% increase in slow-wave sleep (p = 0.01) and a 186% +/- 27% increase in rapid eye movement sleep (p = 0.013). The AutoSet self-adjusting nasal CPAP system adequately treats obstructive sleep apnea syndrome on the first night under laboratory conditions.

  13. Conflicts of interests in the area of healthcare products and technology. Current state of affairs and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarez, Jean-Paul; Funck-Brentano, Christian; Molimard, Mathieu

    2012-01-01

    The handling of conflicts of interest in the area of healthcare products and technology has become a major issue for all of those involved in healthcare. Round Table N°4 at the Giens Workshops 2011 has put forward concrete proposals to clarify and optimise the handling of conflicts of interest. Conflicts of interest cannot be defined by the individuals consulted or applying for funds since each institution, whether public or private, that puts out a call for projects or that requests advice, analyses or expert testimony in the healthcare field has different degrees of what it defines as a conflict of interest, depending on the context of the proposal or specific request that it puts out. In contrast, each individual has ties of personal interest that can and must be openly disclosed. The ties are much more diverse than what is commonly found in the conflict of interest statements of large institutions operating in the healthcare field and are not limited to financial and operational ties between companies and individuals. In addition, the statements are difficult to manage because of their sheer number. The Round Table recommends that each individual should openly disclose all of his or her ties of personal interest in a Single Statement of Ties of personal Interest (SSTI). The SSTI would be updated regularly and accessible on line. Each institution could then determine whether or not the reported ties represent a conflict in the context of the mission proposed. Each institution could publish in advance the conditions that would give rise to a conflict and, in this way, an individual could refrain from applying for the mission. Other practical approaches to handling conflicts of interest were put forward. © 2012 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  14. [Detailed methodological recommendations for the treatment of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea with faecal transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Gergely György; Várvölgyi, Csaba; Balogh, Zoltán; Orosi, Piroska; Paragh, György

    2013-01-06

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile associated enteral disease shows dramatic increase worldwide, with appallingly high treatment costs, mortality figures, recurrence rates and treatment refractoriness. It is not surprising, that there is significant interest in the development and introduction of alternative therapeutic strategies. Among these only stool transplantation (or faecal bacteriotherapy) is gaining international acceptance due to its excellent cure rate (≈92%), low recurrence rate (≈6%), safety and cost-effectiveness. Unfortunately faecal transplantation is not available for most patients, although based on promising international results, its introduction into the routine clinical practice is well justified and widely expected. The authors would like to facilitate this process, by presenting a detailed faecal transplantation protocol prepared in their Institution based on the available literature and clinical rationality. Officially accepted national methodological guidelines will need to be issued in the future, founded on the expert opinion of relevant professional societies and upcoming advances in this field.

  15. Diagnosis and treatments of Prader-Willi syndrome: a review of current consensuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed international consensuses of experts and clinical recommendations on diagnosis and treatment of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS: PWS consensus diagnostic criteria (1993; US PWS Association (PWSA-USA consensus statements on evaluating of breathing abnormalities (2007, osteoporosis (2008, growth hormone treatment in PWS (2000 and 2009; Endocrine society clinical practice guideline on Prevention and treatment of pediatric obesity (2008; the Second Expert Meeting of the Comprehensive Care of Patients with PWS Consensus published as Recommendations for the diagnosis and management of PWS (2008. Historical analysis and comparison of recommendations are presented in this review article. Absence of Russian clinical practice guidelines on PWS patients management makes necessary the detailed study of listed documents.

  16. Expert Consensus Group report on the use of apomorphine in the treatment of Parkinson's disease - Clinical practice recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trenkwalder, Claudia; Chaudhuri, K Ray; García Ruiz, Pedro J

    2015-01-01

    practice. This document outlines best-practice recommendations for selecting appropriate candidates for apomorphine intermittent injection (the pen-injection formulation) or apomorphine continuous infusion (the pump formulation), for initiating patients onto therapy and for managing their ongoing treatment...... and predictable 'off' periods, those who require reliable and fast relief when anticipating an 'off', those with levodopa absorption or gastric emptying problems resulting in delayed or failed 'on', or for rapid relief of early morning dystonia or akinesia. Apomorphine infusion(1) is suited for patients whose...