WorldWideScience

Sample records for current training practices

  1. Current Practices in Resident Assistant Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Virginia Albaneso

    2016-01-01

    Developing resident assistant (RA) training is a challenge for most housing and residence life staff. Grounded in the author's doctoral research on the curricular design of RA training programs, this study summarizes current practices in three types of RA training programs--preservice training, in-service training, and academic courses--and…

  2. Current Practices in Resident Assistant Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Virginia Albaneso

    2016-01-01

    Developing resident assistant (RA) training is a challenge for most housing and residence life staff. Grounded in the author's doctoral research on the curricular design of RA training programs, this study summarizes current practices in three types of RA training programs--preservice training, in-service training, and academic courses--and…

  3. Revisiting reflexology: Concept, evidence, current practice, and practitioner training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embong, Nurul Haswani; Soh, Yee Chang; Ming, Long Chiau; Wong, Tin Wui

    2015-10-01

    Reflexology is basically a study of how one part of the human body relates to another part of the body. Reflexology practitioners rely on the reflexes map of the feet and hands to all the internal organs and other human body parts. They believe that by applying the appropriate pressure and massage certain spots on the feet and hands, all other body parts could be energized and rejuvenated. This review aimed to revisit the concept of reflexology and examine its effectiveness, practices, and the training for reflexology practitioners. PubMed, SCOPUS, Google Scholar, and SpringerLink databases were utilized to search the following medical subject headings or keywords: foot massage, reflexology, foot reflexotherapy, reflexological treatment, and zone therapy. The articles published for the last 10 years were included. Previous systematic reviews failed to show concrete evidence for any specific effect of reflexology in any conditions. Due to its non-invasive, non-pharmacological complementary nature, reflexology is widely accepted and anecdotal evidence of positive effect reflexology in a variety of health conditions are available. Adequate training for practitioners is necessary to ensure the consistency of service provided.

  4. Revisiting reflexology: Concept, evidence, current practice, and practitioner training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Haswani Embong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Reflexology is basically a study of how one part of the human body relates to another part of the body. Reflexology practitioners rely on the reflexes map of the feet and hands to all the internal organs and other human body parts. They believe that by applying the appropriate pressure and massage certain spots on the feet and hands, all other body parts could be energized and rejuvenated. This review aimed to revisit the concept of reflexology and examine its effectiveness, practices, and the training for reflexology practitioners. PubMed, SCOPUS, Google Scholar, and SpringerLink databases were utilized to search the following medical subject headings or keywords: foot massage, reflexology, foot reflexotherapy, reflexological treatment, and zone therapy. The articles published for the last 10 years were included. Previous systematic reviews failed to show concrete evidence for any specific effect of reflexology in any conditions. Due to its non-invasive, non-pharmacological complementary nature, reflexology is widely accepted and anecdotal evidence of positive effect reflexology in a variety of health conditions are available. Adequate training for practitioners is necessary to ensure the consistency of service provided.

  5. A Focus Group Study of Child Nutrition Professionals' Attitudes about Food Allergies and Current Training Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yee Ming; Kwon, Junehee; Sauer, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore child nutrition professionals' (CNPs) attitudes about food allergies, current practices of food allergy training, and operational issues related to food allergy training in school foodservice operations. Methods: Three focus groups were conducted with 21 CNPs with managerial…

  6. Revisiting reflexology: Concept, evidence, current practice, and practitioner training

    OpenAIRE

    Embong, Nurul Haswani; Soh, Yee Chang; Ming, Long Chiau; Wong, Tin Wui

    2015-01-01

    Reflexology is basically a study of how one part of the human body relates to another part of the body. Reflexology practitioners rely on the reflexes map of the feet and hands to all the internal organs and other human body parts. They believe that by applying the appropriate pressure and massage certain spots on the feet and hands, all other body parts could be energized and rejuvenated. This review aimed to revisit the concept of reflexology and examine its effectiveness, practices, and th...

  7. Clinical skills training in obstetrics - a descriptive survey of current practice in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mathilde Maagaard; Johansen, Marianne; Lottrup, Pernille

    2012-01-01

    The Danish National Board of Health has recommended that labor wards establish regular obstetric emergency skills training programs. The aim of this study was to describe current practice in Denmark. A questionnaire was sent to all obstetric departments in Denmark in 2008. All responded. Simulation......-based training was conducted in 26/28 obstetrical departments. Settings for the training programs were mainly local. Training was provided for shoulder dystocia, postpartum bleeding and basic neonatal resuscitation in almost all the departments, but was not organized in a uniform way. Neither the program itself...... nor the participants' performance was evaluated in a structured or validated way. Obstetric emergency skills training is being actively conducted in the majority of the Danish labor wards. However, it still remains a challenge to ensure the uniform organization and evaluation of the current training...

  8. A description of manual wheelchair skills training: current practices in Canadian rehabilitation centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Krista L; Routhier, François; Miller, William C

    2015-01-01

    To describe current practices for manual wheelchair (MWC) skills training in Canadian rehabilitation centers. An online survey was sent to practice leaders in occupational (OT) and physical therapy (PT) at 87 Canadian rehabilitation centers. Responses were solicited from individuals who could report about wheelchair skills training at facilities with at least 10 beds designated for rehabilitation. Thirty-four questions asked about: (1) demographics, (2) components of MWC training, (3) amount of MWC skills training, (4) use of validated programs and (5) perceived barriers to using validated programs. Data were analyzed using summary statistics. About 68/87 responses were received primarily from OTs (42/68). Basic MWC skills training (e.g. wheel-locks) was consistently part of clinical practice (45/68), while advanced skills training (e.g. curb-cuts) was rare (8/68). On an average, 1-4 h of training was done (29/68). Validated training programs were used by 16/68, most of whom used them "rarely" (7/16). Common barriers to using validated programs were lack of time (43/68) and resources (39/68). Learning to use a wheelchair is important for those with ambulation impairments because the wheelchair enables mobility and social participation. Providing opportunities for advanced wheelchair skills training may enhance mobility and social participation in a safe manner. Implications for Rehabilitation There is evidence confirming the benefits of a validated wheelchair skills program, yet most clinicians do no not use them. A variety of perceived barriers may help to explain the limited use of existing programs, such as time, resources and knowledge. Effective knowledge translation efforts may help alleviate some of these barriers, and novel wheelchair training approaches may alleviate some burden on clinicians to help accommodate the increasing number of older wheelchair users.

  9. A Focus Group Study of Child Nutrition Professionals' Attitudes about Food Allergies and Current Training Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yee Ming; Kwon, Junehee; Sauer, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore child nutrition professionals' (CNPs) attitudes about food allergies, current practices of food allergy training, and operational issues related to food allergy training in school foodservice operations. Methods: Three focus groups were conducted with 21 CNPs with managerial…

  10. Evaluation of the current practices of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) awareness training in the South African mining industry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Edwards, AL

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the current practices in relation to best practice criteria and make recommendations for improvements to noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) awareness training in the South African mining industry. A survey tool based...

  11. Integration of simulation in postgraduate studies in Saudi Arabia: The current practice in anesthesia training program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer Arab

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The educational programs in the Saudi Commission for Health Specialties are developing rapidly in the fields of technical development. Such development is witnessed, particularly in the scientific areas related to what is commonly known as evidence-based medicine. This review highlights the critical need and importance of integrating simulation into anesthesia training and assessment. Furthermore, it describes the current utilization of simulation in anesthesia and critical care assessment process.

  12. Assessing Training Priorities in Developing Countries: Current Practice and Possible Alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psacharopoulos, George

    1984-01-01

    This essay deals with a series of methodological issues involved in assessing training priorities in developing countries. It is argued that the present methods of arriving at these priorities leave much to be desired, and a number of suggestions are made that might lead to more informed policy decisions on education and training. (CT)

  13. Bariatric surgery and the changing current scope of general surgery practice: implications for general surgery residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaedi, Rouzbeh; Ali, Mohamed R; Pierce, Jonathan L; Scherer, Lynette A; Galante, Joseph M

    2015-02-01

    The scope of general surgery practice has evolved tremendously in the last 20 years. However, clinical experience in general surgery residency training has undergone relatively little change. To evaluate the current scope of academic general surgery and its implications on surgical residency. The University HealthSystem Consortium and Association of American Medical Colleges established the Faculty Practice Solution Center (FPSC) to characterize physician productivity. The FPSC is a benchmarking tool for academic medical centers created from revenue data collected from more than 90,000 physicians who practice at 95 institutions across the United States. The FPSC database was queried to evaluate the annual mean procedure frequency per surgeon (PFS) in each calendar year from 2006 through 2011. The associated work relative value units (wRVUs) were also examined to measure physician effort and skill. During the 6-year period, 146 distinct Current Procedural Terminology codes were among the top 100 procedures, and 16 of these procedures ranked in the top 10 procedures in at least 1 year. The top 10 procedures accounted for more than half (range, 52.5%-57.2%) of the total 100 PFS evaluated for each year. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass was consistently among the top 10 procedures in each year (PFS, 18.2-24.6). The other most frequently performed procedures included laparoscopic cholecystectomy (PFS, 30.3-43.5), upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy (PFS, 26.5-34.3), mastectomy (PFS, 16.5-35.0), inguinal hernia repair (PFS, 15.5-22.1), and abdominal wall hernia repair (PFS, 21.6-26.1). In all years, laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass generated the highest number of wRVUs (wRVUs, 491.0-618.2), and laparoscopic cholecystectomy was regularly the next highest (wRVUs, 335.8-498.7). A significant proportion of academic general surgery is composed of bariatric surgery, yet surgical training does not sufficiently emphasize the necessary exposure to technical expertise

  14. Evaluation of the current practices of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) awareness training in the South African mining industry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Edwards, AL

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available on findings of a literature review on best practice for NIHL awareness training was developed for use in interviews, with managers responsible for NIHL awareness training at the mines. Thirty managers were interviewed in the survey at mines representative...

  15. Oral cancer--current knowledge, practices and implications for training among an Irish general medical practitioner cohort.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Riordain, Richeal

    2009-11-01

    This study investigated the current knowledge and practices of general medical practitioners (GMPs) in Ireland regarding the examination of the oral cavity and the detection of oral malignancy and the training they had received at both undergraduate and postgraduate level and since commencing in practice. A questionnaire survey of GMPs in Ireland was conducted. One hundred and fifty four (65.3%) of the practitioners reported regularly examining the oral mucosa of their patients. Almost half of these (n=68) further qualified this response by stating that they only examined the oral mucosa if the patient reported pain in this area or if the patient specifically requested an oral examination for some reason. Eighty one (34.3%) practitioners surveyed felt confident in their ability to detect oral malignancies with the remaining two thirds unsure of whether they would be able to detect oral cancer. There was a significant association between the undergraduate and postgraduate teaching on examination of the oral cavity and whether practitioners felt confident in their ability to detect oral cancer [chi(2)(1)=4.811, p<0.05]. A statistically significant association was also found between the undergraduate and postgraduate teaching on the diagnosis of oral malignant disease and whether practitioners felt confident in their ability to detect oral cancer [chi(2)(1)=6.194, p<0.05]. In conclusion the level of knowledge of Irish general medical practitioners needs to be addressed with appropriate initiatives both at undergraduate level and via CME.

  16. Identifying discharge practice training needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, L; Emmerson, K

    A training needs analysis tool was developed to identify nurses' discharge training needs and to improve discharge practice. The tool includes 49 elements of discharge practice subdivided into four areas: corporate, operational, clinical and nurse-led discharge. The tool was disseminated to 15 wards on two hospital sites with assistance from the practice development team. Analysis of discharge training is important to assess discharge training needs and to identify staff who may assist with training.

  17. Training in practical ergonomics improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogi, K

    1989-06-01

    Recent ILO experiences show that concrete ergonomics improvements can result from learning-by-doing training in real settings. Particularly important is to build on local practice focusing on good examples already available. Checklist exercise, demonstrating low-cost solutions and group work are effective training tools. Opportunities can be widely created by such enabling training.

  18. Current practice in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proclemer, Alessandro; Dagres, Nikolaos; Marinskis, Germanas

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the EP wire is to examine the clinical practice in the management of sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT), with special focus on diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Forty-five European centres, all members of the EHRA-EP Research network completed the questions of the survey...

  19. Training in Laparoscopic Gastric Cancer Surgery in the Western World: Current Educational Practices, Challenges, and Potential Opportunities at a Large University Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecso, Andras B; Bonrath, Esther M; Grantcharov, Teodor P

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore and understand how surgeons distribute tasks during a laparoscopic gastrectomy for gastric cancer in an academic teaching environment. An anonymous, cross-sectional, census survey was used to poll trainees' and staff members' opinions pertaining to laparoscopic gastrectomy. Academic and community tertiary teaching hospitals, affiliated with the University of Toronto. All surgeons, within the Department of General Surgery at the University of Toronto, who practice laparoscopic gastrectomy for gastric cancer, were invited to participate. All general surgery residents, postgraduate year 1-5, minimally invasive surgery and surgical oncology fellows at the University of Toronto were invited to participate. Overall response rate was 74.35% (n = 87/117). The results suggested that trainees do not routinely perform the major operative steps. Trainees agreed with faculty in this regard; however, there was a statistically significant difference in opinions, related to the degree of the perceived active operating of the trainees. There was also a difference in opinion, between trainees and faculty, regarding the common reasons for takeover. The present survey highlights that current level of active exposure of surgical trainees to laparoscopic gastric surgery might be insufficient. A lack of role clarity may further hinder an optimal educational experience during these cases. Adopting a stepwise approach, with task deconstruction, could optimize training. Additional training modalities may be required to ensure technical proficiency is acquired before independent practice. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Impact of Reason for Training on the Relationship between "Best Practices" and Sexual Harassment Training Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Elissa L.; Kulik, Carol T.; Bustamante, Jennifer; Golom, Frank D.

    2010-01-01

    The current study explored the use of best training practices on human resources managers' perceptions of sexual harassment training success and frequency of sexual harassment complaints. Results revealed no main effects of best training practices on sexual harassment training success. However, effects of best training practices on sexual…

  1. The Impact of Reason for Training on the Relationship between "Best Practices" and Sexual Harassment Training Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Elissa L.; Kulik, Carol T.; Bustamante, Jennifer; Golom, Frank D.

    2010-01-01

    The current study explored the use of best training practices on human resources managers' perceptions of sexual harassment training success and frequency of sexual harassment complaints. Results revealed no main effects of best training practices on sexual harassment training success. However, effects of best training practices on sexual…

  2. A snapshot of training practices in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Hernández Pozas, Ph.D

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Organizations need well trained employees in order to maintain a competitive advantage. The purpose of this paper is to describe current training practices in Peru and to provide recommendations for improving organizational performance. This paper also aims to set priorities for future research work. Human capital theory and contributions on need assessment, and training planning, implementation and evaluation served as theoretical framework. This is a cross-sectional, exploratory study that used information from surveys conducted in 24 Peru-vian companies. The findings reveal a strong interest in training, particularly with regard to the improvement of competencies, preference for face-to-face training, and the use of reaction evaluation methods. The recommendations include, among others, improving the provisions for internal support, policies, technology, behavioral evaluation, and resources.

  3. An Analysis of Entrepreneurship Aspects of Current Training Programs Conducted on Practicing Micro and Small Enterprises (MSEs): A Case Study of Roysambu

    OpenAIRE

    Joram Ng’ang’a Nyambura

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to analyze entrepreneurial aspects of current training methods administered to micro and small enterprises (MSEs) in Roysambu. More specifically, the study aimed at understanding the mode of training conducted to MSEs within Roysambu (a suburb in Nairobi) in an effort to increase its entrepreneurial aspects. Descriptive research design was employed and the population was sampled through stratified random sampling. Structured questionnaires and observation schedules were used...

  4. Current practice for pulmonary hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Toru Satoh

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the current practice of pulmonary hypertension including current epidemiology,diagnosis and treatment.Data sources The review was based on data obtained from the published articles and guidelines.Study selection Articles with high level of evidence or current best evidence in each issue were selected to be reviewed.Results Overall prevalence of pulmonary hypertension was 0.3% to 6% with left heart disease occupying the most proportion,followed by pulmonary disease,pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.In diagnosis,a flow diagram of diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension,differential diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension and how to determine the severity of pulmonary hypertension are explained including recent development of magnetic resonance imaging and gene abnormality study on bone morphogenetic protein receptor Ⅱ.In treatment,newlydeveloped pulmonary vasodilators and the way to use them are shown to treat pulmonary hypertension.Conclusion Safer and more effective treatment algorithm and basic researches and clinical trials are warranted to be explored.

  5. Training Practices of Multinational Companies in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Connie; Hyland, Paul; Soosay, Claudine

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore a range of training practices adopted by multinational companies (MNCs) operating in Asia. It investigated the level of training expenditure, the nature of training programs offered and the concerns about training in MNCs. Design/methodology/approach: Data were obtained through a survey of 529 MNCs…

  6. Training Practices of Multinational Companies in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Connie; Hyland, Paul; Soosay, Claudine

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore a range of training practices adopted by multinational companies (MNCs) operating in Asia. It investigated the level of training expenditure, the nature of training programs offered and the concerns about training in MNCs. Design/methodology/approach: Data were obtained through a survey of 529 MNCs…

  7. Employee Training: Current Trends, Future Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorovitz, Elizabeth

    1983-01-01

    Issues currently affecting employee training are the impact of high technology, worker adaptability, the communications revolution, job satisfaction, underinvestment in human capital, demographic shifts, and interest in productivity improvement. (SK)

  8. Training and Practices of Cannabis Dispensary Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Nancy A; Kieschnick, Dustin; Sottile, James E; Babson, Kimberly A; Vandrey, Ryan; Bonn-Miller, Marcel O

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The proliferation of cannabis dispensaries within the United States has emerged from patient demand for the legalization of cannabis as an alternative treatment for a number of conditions and symptoms. Unfortunately, nothing is known about the practices of dispensary staff with respect to recommendation of cannabis strains/concentrations for specific patient ailments. To address this limitation, the present study assessed the training and practices of cannabis dispensary staff. Materials and Methods: Medical and nonmedical dispensary staff (n=55) were recruited via e-mail and social media to complete an online survey assessing their demographic characteristics, dispensary features, patient characteristics, formal training, and cannabis recommendation practices. Results: Fifty-five percent of dispensary staff reported some formal training for their position, with 20% reporting medical/scientific training. A majority (94%) indicated that they provide specific cannabis advice to patients. In terms of strains, dispensary staff trended toward recommendations of Indica for anxiety, chronic pain, insomnia, nightmares, and Tourette's syndrome. They were more likely to recommend Indica and hybrid plants for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)/trauma and muscle spasms. In contrast, staff were less likely to recommend Indica for depression; hybrid strains were most often recommended for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In terms of cannabinoid concentrations, dispensary staff were most likely to recommend a 1:1 ratio of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC):cannabidiol (CBD) for patients suffering from anxiety, Crohn's disease, hepatitis C, and PTSD/trauma, while patients seeking appetite stimulation were most likely to be recommended THC. Staff recommended high CBD for arthritis and Alzheimer's disease and a high CBD or 1:1 ratio for ALS, epilepsy, and muscle spasms. Conclusions: Although many dispensary staff are making recommendations consistent with

  9. MODALITIES OF TRAINING PARAMETER ALTERNATION IN NOWADAYS STRENGTH TRAINING PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RANISAVLJEV IGOR

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Large number of variables could be alternated during the process of planning and programming in sports training. Superior training results in majority of sports are achieved by optimally manipulating training parameters in appropriate sequences and combinations. Additionally, in some sports they might be the result of appropriate periodization pattern. Today's tendency in strength training practice is training movements instead of training muscles. Exercise classification according to the dominant movement types, allows creating new modalities in training alternation. Additional variations in volume, intensity, rest brakes, repetition velocity andinter-repetition rest can be the important part of functional strength training program. Alternation and combination of different training parameters makes appropriate training stimulus for strength increase in the most of nowadays sports. Optimal alternation of basic training parameters should be the first part in the processof planning and programming. As a result, majority of athletes might not need advanced periodization patterns for optimal improvement in muscle strength and power

  10. Organizational Training and Development Practices and Identification of TNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati S. Khodke

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This journal will be a contribution for developing training and development practice in an organization, my view about training is “Training practices is investment to an organization and creating trained and practiced employees are assets” and TNA is the very first step for a training program. The first step in the TNA is to ensure that the organization has clear, focused business objectives. These should be agreed by top management so that a clear idea about methodologies of training and what the organization is trying to achieve is to be understood by everyone in it. This Journal’s findings are based on survey conducted in an organization regarding TNA and training program conducted after a proper TNA. The adoption of some formal data collection methods and techniques to analyze training needs although the types used were probably less sophisticated and involved minimal analysis. Competitors training practices and current trends in industry were not as often referred to as thought. It is assumed from this finding that the organizations paid enough attention to ensuring that their training efforts were in line with their strategic objectives. First, organizational goals and efficiency indicators were considered important organizational level data sources in studies. However, findings of the present study are probably more encouraging and the management judgment s the mostimportant source of data which could suggest an informal TNA approach. The findings of the study also suggest that training conducted in these organizations was parallel with their strategic missions and objectives.

  11. Vascular training and endovascular practice in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liapis, C.D.; Avgerinos, E.D.; Sillesen, H.;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of the status of vascular surgery (VS) training paradigms on the actual practice of endovascular therapy among the European countries. METHODS: An email-based survey concerning vascular surgery training models and endovascular practices of different clinical...... specialties was distributed to a VS educator within 14 European countries. European Vascular and Endovascular Monitor (EVEM) data also were processed to correlate endovascular practice with training models. RESULTS: Fourteen questionnaires were gathered. Vascular training in Europe appears in 3 models: 1....... Mono-specialty (independence): 7 countries, 2. Subspecialty: 5 countries, 3. An existing specialty within general surgery: 2 countries. Independent compared to non-independent certification shortens overall training length (5.9 vs 7.9 years, p=0.006), while increasing overall training devoted...

  12. Pharmacy Mentors' Views of Practical Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katajavuori, Nina; Lindblom-Ylanne, Sari; Hirvonen, Jouni

    2005-01-01

    Practical knowledge and skills are necessary components of expertise. Practical training in higher education has been shown to foster students' learning and understanding of theoretical backgrounds. The attitude and skill of mentors play a central role in enhancing the quality of students' practical learning. The aims of this study were to explore…

  13. Resistance Training: Identifying Best Practices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-18

    training: The effect of stressful, negative life events. J Strength Cond Res, 22(4), 1215-1221. *Becque, M. D., Lochmann, J. D., & Melrose, D. R...2007). Age and sex differentially affect regional changes in one repetition maximum strength. J Strength Cond Res, 21(3), 731-737. *Lexell, J...Powercise and Universal Gym circuit training. Journal of Applied Sport Science Research, 6, 152-157. *Stone, M. H., Potteiger, J. A., Pierce, K. C

  14. Practical Clinical Training in Skills Labs: Theory and Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Bugaj, T. J.; Nikendei, C.

    2016-01-01

    Today, skills laboratories or “skills labs”, i.e. specific practical skill training facilities, are a firmly established part of medical education offering the possibility of training clinical procedures in a safe and fault-forging environment prior to real life application at bedside or in the operating room. Skills lab training follows a structured teaching concept, takes place under supervision and in consideration of methodological-didactic concepts, ideally creating an atmosphere that al...

  15. Post-Graduate Training in Private Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Birgitte; Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this poster is to delineate dilemmas, pros and cons in neophyte psychologists undertaking clinical training in a context of a private psychologist practice in order to obtain their authorization as a psychologist. Introduction: In Denmark the universities training of psychologist...... is mainly theoretical. Thus, the clinical training is to be obtained after graduation. In order to obtain authorization as a psychologist the candidates must receive 160 hours of clinical supervision during fulltime occupation in at least two years. Until recently, this postgraduate training was mainly...... obtained in public positions. However, five years ago the Danish Association for Psychologist introduced a “trainee assistant arrangement” allowing neophyte candidates to work in private practice under an experienced psychologist supervision and guidance by psychologists in private practice having...

  16. Practical training for WALTER M601 engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Novák

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an overview of practical work exercises for the WALTER M601B engine. The work exercises are divided into several sections, each being with description and it is accompanied by diagrams and images. This article explains each section in brief and refers to the thesis titled Practice training for WALTER M601 engine.

  17. 38 CFR 21.4265 - Practical training approved as institutional training or on-job training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) The clinical training is; (a) An integral part of the course; (b) A prerequisite to the successful... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Practical training approved as institutional training or on-job training. 21.4265 Section 21.4265 Pensions, Bonuses,...

  18. Overview of current chelation practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Aydinok

    2011-12-01

    , should provide long-term survival and quality of life for patients with iron loading anemias. The goal of this review is to summarize current concepts in iron chelation therapies based on the considerable amount of prospective data obtained by clinical studies. 去铁胺 (DFO)是自20世纪80年以来输血引起铁过载的参考标准疗法。 虽然它是一种高效的铁螯合剂,但是去铁胺皮下给药的遵从性问题依旧是主要问题。 口服螯合剂去铁酮(DFP)在北美没有销售许可证,但是,它在1994年获得印度许可,1999年欧洲联盟(EU)批准授予去铁酮销售许可证,特别是当去铁胺不足、无法忍受或无法接受时,去铁酮可用于重型地中海贫血患者。 还可获得关于在6岁至10岁之间的儿童身上使用去铁酮的有限数据,但是没有关于在6岁以下儿童身上使用去铁酮的数据。 随后美国食品和药品管理局(FDA)和欧洲药品管理局(EMA)分别在2005年和2006年批准口服螯合剂去铁酮作为第一疗法来治疗2岁以上输血引起铁过载的患者。 铁螯合的主要目的是将身体铁维持在安全水平,但一旦铁累积起来,铁螯合的目标是把组织铁降低到安全级别,这是一个缓慢的过程。 确定螯合剂的螯合方案、剂量和频率管理的主要依据是身体铁负担、心肌铁的状态和输血铁负载速率。 适当监控螯合对测量特殊方案的反应速率和提供计量调整来加强螯合效果和避免毒效尤其重要。 由于一些因素,诸如:螯合剂的吸收和代谢,螯合方案的效果可能呈现个别变化。 耐受性和遵从性也是影响螯合反应的个别变量。 了解螯合剂的优点和局限性,准确确定铁过载患者的螯合需求以及设计毒效更小但效果更优的个性化螯合方案,可以向铁过载贫血患者提供长期的生存和生活质量。 此次调研的目的是在临床研究获得的相当数

  19. Assessment Practices and Training Needs of Early Childhood Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rashida; Luckner, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Assessment plays a critical role in the planning and delivery of quality services for young children and their families. The purpose of this study was to identify the current assessment practices and training needs of early childhood professionals. A large sample of early childhood professionals responded to a comprehensive survey. The most…

  20. Principles and practices of training for soccer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryland Morgans

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the physical demands of soccer requires the completion of a multi-component training programme. The development, planning, and implementation of such a programme are difficult due partly to the practical constraints related to the competitive schedule at the top level. The effective planning and organisation of training are therefore crucial to the effective delivery of the training stimulus for both individual players and the team. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the principles of training that can be used to prepare players for the physical demands of soccer. Information relating to periodisation is supported by an outline of the strategies used to deliver the acute training stress in a soccer environment. The importance of monitoring to support the planning process is also reviewed.

  1. Clinical neuropsychology practice and training in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Laura A; Guger, Sharon

    2016-11-01

    This invited paper provides information about professional neuropsychology issues in Canada and is part of a special issue addressing international perspectives on education, training, and practice in clinical neuropsychology. Information was gathered from literature searches and personal communication with other neuropsychologists in Canada. Canada has a rich neuropsychological history. Neuropsychologists typically have doctoral-level education including relevant coursework and supervised practical experience. Licensure requirements vary across the 10 provinces and there are regional differences in salary. While training at the graduate and internship level mirrors that of our American colleagues, completion of a two-year postdoctoral fellowship in neuropsychology is not required to obtain employment in many settings and there are few postdoctoral training programs in this country. The majority of neuropsychologists are employed in institutional settings (e.g. hospitals, universities, rehabilitation facilities), with a growing number entering private practice or other settings. There are challenges in providing neuropsychological services to the diverse Canadian population and a need for assessment measures and normative data in multiple languages. Canadian neuropsychologists face important challenges in defining ourselves as distinct from other professions and other psychologists, in maintaining funding for high-quality training and research, in establishing neuropsychology-specific training and practice standards at the provincial or national level, and ensuring the clinical care that we provide is efficient and effective in meeting the needs of our patient populations and consumers, both within and outside of the publically funded health care system.

  2. Current american practice in color measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billmeyer, F W

    1969-04-01

    Current Aimerienn practice in color measurement is reviewed from the standpoint of instrumentation practice, measurement concepts, and computational methods. Instrumentation practice is described for spectrophotometers, abridged spectrophotometers, and tristimulus colorimeters. Measurement variables discussed include photometric and wavelength scales, standards and standardization, illuminating and viewing geometry, and instrument sources simulating standard illuminants. Computation-methods practiced for obtaining color coordinates and color differences are discussed. Topics indirectly related to the measurement step, such as the basis of colorimetry, color mixing laws, and computer color matching, are specifically excluded from this paper.

  3. Training practices and ergogenic aids used by male bodybuilders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Daniel A; Johnson, Nathan A; Chow, Chin-Moi

    2013-06-01

    Bodybuilding involves performing a series of poses on stage where the competitor is judged on aesthetic muscular appearance. The purpose of this study was to describe training practices and ergogenic aids used by competitive bodybuilders and to determine whether training practices comply with current recommendations for muscular hypertrophy. A web-based survey was completed by 127 competitive male bodybuilders. The results showed that during the off-season phase of training (OFF), the majority of respondents performed 3-6 sets per exercise (95.3%), 7-12 repetition maximum (RM) per set (77.0%), and 61- to 120-seconds recovery between sets and exercises (68.6%). However, training practices changed 6 weeks before competition (PRE), where there was an increased number of respondents who reported undertaking 3-4 sets per exercise at the expense of 5-6 sets per exercise (p supplementation was used by all respondents. The findings of this study demonstrate that competitive bodybuilders comply with current resistance exercise recommendations for muscular hypertrophy; however, these changed before competition during which there is a reduction resistance training volume and intensity. This alteration, in addition to an increase in aerobic exercise volume, is purportedly used to increase muscle definition. However, these practices may increase the risk of muscle mass loss in natural compared with amateur bodybuilders who reportedly use drugs known to preserve muscle mass.

  4. Virtual reality disaster training: translation to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farra, Sharon L; Miller, Elaine T; Hodgson, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Disaster training is crucial to the mitigation of both mortality and morbidity associated with disasters. Just as clinical practice needs to be grounded in evidence, effective disaster education is dependent upon the development and use of andragogic and pedagogic evidence. Educational research findings must be transformed into useable education strategies. Virtual reality simulation is a teaching methodology that has the potential to be a powerful educational tool. The purpose of this article is to translate research findings related to the use of virtual reality simulation in disaster training into education practice. The Ace Star Model serves as a valuable framework to translate the VRS teaching methodology and improve disaster training of healthcare professionals. Using the Ace Star Model as a framework to put evidence into practice, strategies for implementing a virtual reality simulation are addressed. Practice guidelines, implementation recommendations, integration to practice and evaluation are discussed. It is imperative that health educators provide more exemplars of how research evidence can be moved through the various stages of the model to advance practice and sustain learning outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Medical physics practice and training in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amuasi, John H; Kyere, Augustine K; Schandorf, Cyril; Fletcher, John J; Boadu, Mary; Addison, Eric K; Hasford, Francis; Sosu, Edem K; Sackey, Theophilus A; Tagoe, Samuel N A; Inkoom, Stephen; Serfor-Armah, Yaw

    2016-06-01

    Medical physics has been an indispensable and strategic stakeholder in the delivery of radiological services to the healthcare system of Ghana. The practice has immensely supported radiation oncology and medical imaging facilities over the years, while the locally established training programme continues to produce human resource to feed these facilities. The training programme has grown to receive students from other African countries in addition to local students. Ghana has been recognised by the International Atomic Energy Agency as Regional Designated Centre for Academic Training of Medical Physicists in Africa. The Ghana Society for Medical Physics collaborates with the School of Nuclear and Allied Sciences of the University of Ghana to ensure that training offered to medical physicists meet international standards, making them clinically qualified. The Society has also worked together with other bodies for the passage of the Health Profession's Regulatory Bodies Act, giving legal backing to the practice of medical physics and other allied health professions in Ghana. The country has participated in a number of International Atomic Energy Agency's projects on medical physics and has benefited from its training courses, fellowships and workshops, as well as those of other agencies such as International Organization for Medical Physics. This has placed Ghana's medical physicists in good position to practice competently and improve healthcare.

  6. Disturbing Practices: Training Workers to Be Lean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, Keiko; Brown, Tony; Black, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the possibilities for expansive learning during organisational change. It considers the introduction of "lean production" as a disturbance to the existing work practices. Design/methodology/approach: The paper considers two case studies of "lean production" training with…

  7. Disturbing Practices: Training Workers to Be Lean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, Keiko; Brown, Tony; Black, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the possibilities for expansive learning during organisational change. It considers the introduction of "lean production" as a disturbance to the existing work practices. Design/methodology/approach: The paper considers two case studies of "lean production" training with…

  8. Otolaryngology Training for Family Practice Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; Rood, Stewart R.

    1980-01-01

    The faculty of the Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, has designed a rotation in the otolaryngology service, that is a basic clinical orientation to ear, nose and throat medicine, to fit the one-month block committed by the local family practice residency training program. The program is described and its…

  9. Training Pathology Residents to Practice 21st Century Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Stephen Black-Schaffer MA, MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Scientific advances, open information access, and evolving health-care economics are disrupting extant models of health-care delivery. Physicians increasingly practice as team members, accountable to payers and patients, with improved efficiency, value, and quality. This change along with a greater focus on population health affects how systems of care are structured and delivered. Pathologists are not immune to these disruptors and, in fact, may be one of the most affected medical specialties. In the coming decades, it is likely that the number of practicing pathologists will decline, requiring each pathologist to serve more and often sicker patients. The demand for increasingly sophisticated yet broader diagnostic skills will continue to grow. This will require pathologists to acquire appropriate professional training and interpersonal skills. Today’s pathology training programs are ill designed to prepare such practitioners. The time to practice for most pathology trainees is typically 5 to 6 years. Yet, trainees often lack sufficient experience to practice independently and effectively. Many studies have recognized these challenges suggesting that more effective training for this new century can be implemented. Building on the strengths of existing programs, we propose a redesign of pathology residency training that will meet (and encourage a continuing evolution of American Board of Pathology and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requirements, reduce the time to readiness for practice, and produce more effective, interactive, and adaptable pathologists. The essence of this new model is clear definition and acquisition of core knowledge and practice skills that span the anatomic and clinical pathology continuum during the first 2 years, assessed by competency-based metrics with emphasis on critical thinking and skill acquisition, followed by individualized modular training with intensively progressive responsibility

  10. The Practice of Training in Software Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Ledezma

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Software plays a critical role in the industry, the academy and everyday life, because the practices in other fields as science, engineering and business have changed over the years and the nature of real world problems also changes quickly. As a result, software engineering has perhaps become more dynamic discipline of engineering, Software engineers of the XXI century face new challenges and they roles are constantly redefined. In order to train better software engineers to carry out their functions, training Software Engineering have to be revised periodically and introduce constantly innovate. In this work, are done some suggestions, using recent innovations that may help improve the training processes in Software Engineering and better training of future professionals.

  11. Game-Based Practice versus Traditional Practice in Computer-Based Writing Strategy Training: Effects on Motivation and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proske, Antje; Roscoe, Rod D.; McNamara, Danielle S.

    2014-01-01

    Achieving sustained student engagement with practice in computer-based writing strategy training can be a challenge. One potential solution is to foster engagement by embedding practice in educational games; yet there is currently little research comparing the effectiveness of game-based practice versus more traditional forms of practice. In this…

  12. Fever management: Evidence vs current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Radhi, A Sahib Mehdi

    2012-12-08

    Fever is a very common complaint in children and is the single most common non-trauma-related reason for a visit to the emergency department. Parents are concerned about fever and it's potential complications. The biological value of fever (i.e., whether it is beneficial or harmful) is disputed and it is being vigorously treated with the belief of preventing complications such as brain injury and febrile seizures. The practice of alternating antipyretics has become widespread at home and on paediatric wards without supporting scientific evidence. There is still a significant contrast between the current concept and practice, and the scientific evidence. Why is that the case in such a common complaint like fever The article will discuss the significant contrast between the current concepts and practice of fever management on one hand, and the scientific evidence against such concepts and practice.

  13. Organizational Training and Development Practices and Identification of TNA

    OpenAIRE

    Swati S. Khodke

    2013-01-01

    This journal will be a contribution for developing training and development practice in an organization, my view about training is “Training practices is investment to an organization and creating trained and practiced employees are assets” and TNA is the very first step for a training program. The first step in the TNA is to ensure that the organization has clear, focused business objectives. These should be agreed by top management so that a clear idea about methodologies of training and wh...

  14. Practical Clinical Training in Skills Labs: Theory and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bugaj, T. J.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Today, skills laboratories or “skills labs”, i.e. specific practical skill training facilities, are a firmly established part of medical education offering the possibility of training clinical procedures in a safe and fault-forging environment prior to real life application at bedside or in the operating room. Skills lab training follows a structured teaching concept, takes place under supervision and in consideration of methodological-didactic concepts, ideally creating an atmosphere that allows the repeated, anxiety- and risk-free practice of targeted skills.In this selective literature review, the first section is devoted to (I the development and dissemination of the skills lab concept. There follows (II an outline of the underlying idea and (III an analysis of key efficacy factors. Thereafter, (IV the training method’s effectiveness and transference are illuminated, before (V the use of student tutors, in the sense of peer-assisted-learning, in skills labs is discussed separately. Finally, (VI the efficiency of the skills lab concept is analyzed, followed by an outlook on future developments and trends in the field of skills lab training.

  15. Teaching Math Online: Current Practices in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdemir, Omur

    2011-01-01

    Changing nature of student population, developments in technology, and insufficient number of traditional universities have made online courses popular around the globe. This study was designed to investigate the current practices of teaching mathematics online in Turkish Universities through a qualitative inquiry. The snowball sampling method was…

  16. Commentary: training internists for practice focused on meeting patient needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, F Daniel

    2008-10-01

    The author describes the evolution of practice within the broad specialty of internal medicine. This evolution is driven by scientific discovery, emergent patient needs, and market forces. Four ages describe the evolution: the age of the Oslerian diagnostic consultant, the age of the subspecialist, the age of the primary care internist, and the emerging age of focused general internal medicine practice. The author suggests that competence in practice-based learning and improvement linked with evaluation of practice performance throughout a career permits the professions to abandon the notion that valid learning for medical practice occurs only by completing a designated number of months of residency or fellowship training. By applying competency-based standards for specialty certification and maintaining its validity for current practice, boards can provide trainees and practitioners a tool for professional accountability for initial and continuous professional competence. The lifelong learning and evaluation process permits the timely recognition of proficiency acquired in practice. This process engages internists in ongoing guided reflection on measures of performance and provides evidence that they have incorporated new knowledge, technology, skills, and attitudes that align their practice with patient needs. As dialogue with internal medicine stakeholders and customers continues, the author describes how the training standards for certification might adapt to the evolving demands for the specialty practice and how the evaluation of continuous professional development through the maintenance of certification provides an instrument for identifying and recognizing proficiency in providing focused care within the broad discipline of internal medicine.

  17. Inclusive practices in teacher training in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasthi Jocabed Flores Barrera

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Inclusive practices include diversity as a resource that favors teaching-learning processes in the classroom, although they focus on the most vulnerable people by offering them higher-quality education. This descriptive study sought to identify the inclusive practices of teachers who train teachers in an Escuela Normal (teachers’ college in Mexico. Eight teachers and 247 students participated in the study; the Guidelines for the Evaluation of Inclusive Practices in the Classroom (observation formats and students, the Learning Strategies Questionnaire, and semi-structured interviews were used. The results suggest that, although the general perception is that participating teachers have high inclusive practices, they need greater support in the physical conditions of the classroom, methodology and teacher-student relationship. It was also identified the need for a refresher program for teachers to conceptually enrich the teaching staff and encourage the implementation of inclusive education within the Escuela Normal.

  18. Strength and conditioning in tennis: current research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Machar; Schneiker, Knut

    2008-06-01

    Virtually all professional tennis players are in continuous pursuit of enhanced performance. With the modern game becoming increasingly dynamic and tournament schedules no less demanding, the importance of physical fitness is well accepted. Indeed, most professional tennis players resource strength and conditioning specialists on a full- or part-time basis. As tennis play is characterised by intricate bio-energetics, planning specific strength and conditioning interventions represents a significant challenge for the specialist. Further, where game physiology and mechanics have been described extensively, critiques of the efficacy of different training initiatives are far less common. This review therefore considers the current scientific, tennis-specific fitness training evidence base in light of contemporary conditioning, and more particularly resistance training, practices.

  19. Practical Components in Teacher Training Programmes in Slovenia (Yugoslavia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozarnik, B. M.; Kotnik, N.

    1988-01-01

    Teacher training reform in Yugoslavia is discussed in this article. Described are changes made during the 80's, curriculum content, practical training components, conflicts among teacher educators, and problems associated with locating practice teaching sites. (IAH)

  20. Nuclear medicine training and practice in the Czech Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminek, Milan; Koranda, Pavel [University Hospital Olomouc, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2014-08-15

    Nuclear medicine in the Czech Republic is a full specialty with an exclusive practice. Since the training program was organized and structured in recent years, residents have had access to the specialty of nuclear medicine, starting with a two-year general internship (in internal medicine or radiology). At present, nuclear medicine services are provided in 45 departments. In total, 119 nuclear medicine specialists are currently registered. In order to obtain the title of Nuclear Medicine Specialist, five years of training are necessary; the first two years consist of a general internship in internal medicine or radiology. The remaining three years consist of training in the nuclear medicine specialty itself, but includes three months of practice in radiology. Twenty-one physicians are currently in nuclear medicine training and a mean of three specialists pass the final exam per year. The syllabus is very similar to that of the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS), namely concerning the minimum recommended numbers for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. In principle, the Czech law requires continuous medical education for all practicing doctors. The Czech Medical Chamber has provided a continuing medical education (CME) system. Other national CMEs are not accepted in Czech Republic. (orig.)

  1. Nuclear medicine training and practice in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamínek, Milan; Koranda, Pavel

    2014-08-01

    Nuclear medicine in the Czech Republic is a full specialty with an exclusive practice. Since the training program was organized and structured in recent years, residents have had access to the specialty of nuclear medicine, starting with a two-year general internship (in internal medicine or radiology). At present, nuclear medicine services are provided in 45 departments. In total, 119 nuclear medicine specialists are currently registered. In order to obtain the title of Nuclear Medicine Specialist, five years of training are necessary; the first two years consist of a general internship in internal medicine or radiology. The remaining three years consist of training in the nuclear medicine specialty itself, but includes three months of practice in radiology. Twenty-one physicians are currently in nuclear medicine training and a mean of three specialists pass the final exam per year. The syllabus is very similar to that of the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS), namely concerning the minimum recommended numbers for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. In principle, the Czech law requires continuous medical education for all practicing doctors. The Czech Medical Chamber has provided a continuing medical education (CME) system. Other national CMEs are not accepted in Czech Republic.

  2. Post-Graduate Training in Private Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Birgitte; Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard

    2010-01-01

    is mainly theoretical. Thus, the clinical training is to be obtained after graduation. In order to obtain authorization as a psychologist the candidates must receive 160 hours of clinical supervision during fulltime occupation in at least two years. Until recently, this postgraduate training was mainly...... an arrangement with the public health insurance system. The Trainee Assistant Candidate Arrangement: This Trainee Assistant Candidate Arrangement is a set of requirements making it possible for unauthorized psychologists to work in at private practice for maximum 12 month at least 15 working hours a week, with 2...... hours of supervision a week. The employment can be either as an employee or the unauthorized psychologist can be a private psychologist herself. Some of the requirements are recommendations, others are rules to follow. This Trainee Assistant Candidate Arrangement has never been systematically subjected...

  3. Neonatal resuscitation: advances in training and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawyer T

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Taylor Sawyer, Rachel A Umoren, Megan M Gray Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Neonatal Education and Simulation-based Training (NEST Program, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Each year in the US, some four hundred thousand newborns need help breathing when they are born. Due to the frequent need for resuscitation at birth, it is vital to have evidence-based care guidelines and to provide effective neonatal resuscitation training. Every five years, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR reviews the science of neonatal resuscitation. In the US, the American Heart Association (AHA develops treatment guidelines based on the ILCOR science review, and the Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP translates the AHA guidelines into an educational curriculum. In this report, we review recent advances in neonatal resuscitation training and practice. We begin with a review of the new 7th edition NRP training curriculum. Then, we examine key changes to the 2015 AHA neonatal resuscitation guidelines. The four components of the NRP curriculum reviewed here include eSim®, Performance Skills Stations, Integrated Skills Station, and Simulation and Debriefing. The key changes to the AHA neonatal resuscitation guidelines reviewed include initial steps of newborn care, positive-pressure ventilation, endotracheal intubation and use of laryngeal mask, chest compressions, medications, resuscitation of preterm newborns, and ethics and end-of-life care. We hope this report provides a succinct review of recent advances in neonatal resuscitation. Keywords: neonatal resuscitation, Neonatal Resuscitation Program, NRP, simulation, deliberate practice, debriefing, eSIM

  4. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teresinska, Anna [Institute of Cardiology, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warsaw (Poland); Birkenfeld, Bozena [Pomeranian Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Szczecin (Poland); Krolicki, Leszek [Warsaw Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warsaw (Poland); Dziuk, Miroslaw [Military Institute of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-10-15

    In Poland, nuclear medicine (NM) has been an independent specialty since 1988. At the end of 2013, the syllabus for postgraduate specialization in NM has been modified to be in close accordance with the syllabus approved by the European Union of Medical Specialists and is expected to be enforced before the end of 2014. The National Consultant in Nuclear Medicine is responsible for the specialization program in NM. The Medical Center of Postgraduate Training is the administrative body which accepts the specialization programs, supervises the training, organizes the examinations, and awards the specialist title. Specialization in NM for physicians lasts for five years. It consists of 36 months of training in a native nuclear medicine department, 12 months of internship in radiology, 3 months in cardiology, 3 months in endocrinology, 3 months in oncology, and 3 months in two other departments of NM. If a NM trainee is a specialist of a clinical discipline and/or is after a long residency in NM departments, the specialization in NM can be shortened to three years. During the training, there are obligatory courses to be attended which include the elements of anatomy imaging in USG, CT, and MR. Currently, there are about 170 active NM specialists working for 38.5 million inhabitants in Poland. For other professionals working in NM departments, it is possible to get the title of a medical physics specialist after completing 3.5 years of training (for those with a master's in physics, technical physics or biomedical engineering) or the title of a radiopharmacy specialist after completing 3 years of training (for those with a master's in chemistry or biology). At present, the specialization program in NM for nurses is being developed by the Medical Centre of Postgraduate Education. Continuing education and professional development are obligatory for all physicians and governed by the Polish Medical Chamber. The Polish Society of Nuclear Medicine (PTMN) organizes

  5. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teresińska, Anna; Birkenfeld, Bożena; Królicki, Leszek; Dziuk, Mirosław

    2014-10-01

    In Poland, nuclear medicine (NM) has been an independent specialty since 1988. At the end of 2013, the syllabus for postgraduate specialization in NM has been modified to be in close accordance with the syllabus approved by the European Union of Medical Specialists and is expected to be enforced before the end of 2014. The National Consultant in Nuclear Medicine is responsible for the specialization program in NM. The Medical Center of Postgraduate Training is the administrative body which accepts the specialization programs, supervises the training, organizes the examinations, and awards the specialist title. Specialization in NM for physicians lasts for five years. It consists of 36 months of training in a native nuclear medicine department, 12 months of internship in radiology, 3 months in cardiology, 3 months in endocrinology, 3 months in oncology, and 3 months in two other departments of NM. If a NM trainee is a specialist of a clinical discipline and/or is after a long residency in NM departments, the specialization in NM can be shortened to three years. During the training, there are obligatory courses to be attended which include the elements of anatomy imaging in USG, CT, and MR. Currently, there are about 170 active NM specialists working for 38.5 million inhabitants in Poland. For other professionals working in NM departments, it is possible to get the title of a medical physics specialist after completing 3.5 years of training (for those with a master's in physics, technical physics or biomedical engineering) or the title of a radiopharmacy specialist after completing 3 years of training (for those with a master's in chemistry or biology). At present, the specialization program in NM for nurses is being developed by the Medical Centre of Postgraduate Education. Continuing education and professional development are obligatory for all physicians and governed by the Polish Medical Chamber. The Polish Society of Nuclear Medicine (PTMN) organizes regular

  6. Neonatal resuscitation: advances in training and practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Taylor; Umoren, Rachel A; Gray, Megan M

    2017-01-01

    Each year in the US, some four hundred thousand newborns need help breathing when they are born. Due to the frequent need for resuscitation at birth, it is vital to have evidence-based care guidelines and to provide effective neonatal resuscitation training. Every five years, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) reviews the science of neonatal resuscitation. In the US, the American Heart Association (AHA) develops treatment guidelines based on the ILCOR science review, and the Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) translates the AHA guidelines into an educational curriculum. In this report, we review recent advances in neonatal resuscitation training and practice. We begin with a review of the new 7th edition NRP training curriculum. Then, we examine key changes to the 2015 AHA neonatal resuscitation guidelines. The four components of the NRP curriculum reviewed here include eSim®, Performance Skills Stations, Integrated Skills Station, and Simulation and Debriefing. The key changes to the AHA neonatal resuscitation guidelines reviewed include initial steps of newborn care, positive-pressure ventilation, endotracheal intubation and use of laryngeal mask, chest compressions, medications, resuscitation of preterm newborns, and ethics and end-of-life care. We hope this report provides a succinct review of recent advances in neonatal resuscitation. PMID:28096704

  7. Practical Training in Evaluation: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Michael S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides the results of a literature review on the use of practical, hands-on training experiences in evaluation course work and training programs. The review spans the years 1965-2003. I identified 18 articles that encompass four basic approaches for practical evaluation training: simulation, role-play, single course projects, and…

  8. Simulation in Training--The Current Imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-16

    be the latest in training technology --to include the Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement System, a position locating system, and changeable target...requirements docu- ment. That adds to the bureaucratic burden and inherent time delay. 12 L4 WIK 10 WEEKS 10 WEEKS ~ U TALEN /I 3* IRA *ProvidedCSIG...the "Buy American" provisions of the procurement regulations often put higher- technology European firms at a competitive disadvantage. System project

  9. Research and Practice of the Construction Mode of the Practical Training Base for Agriculture and Forestry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guiying; LIU; Junjie; WANG; Xuebin; LI; Jian; ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    In response to bottlenecks and dilemmas faced by institutions for agricultural and forestry practical training base construction, and based on Agriculture practical training base of Langfang Polytechnic Institute, this article illustrates the effective exploration and practice of the mode and ways for the construction of the practical training base,which provides some useful experience for the construction of the training base in agricultural and forestry institutions.

  10. Practice-oriented training of bachelors of philology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kravchenko Elena Vladimirovna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with practice-oriented training of philology students in the context of the new educational standard. This kind of education concentrates on the specific role of teaching practice in the process of training bachelors with the high-level professional competence. The article observes some ways of overcoming pedagogical difficulties during the students’ teaching practice at school.

  11. Current practice in transvenous lead extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina; Kennergren, Charles

    2012-01-01

    AIM: Current practice with regard to transvenous lead extraction among European implanting centres was analysed by this survey. METHODS AND RESULTS: Among all contacted centres, 164, from 30 countries, declared that they perform transvenous lead extraction and answered 58 questions...... with a compliance rate of 99.9%. Data from the survey show that there seems to be an overall increasing experience of managing various techniques of lead extraction and a widespread involvement of cardiac centres in this treatment. Results and complication rates seem comparable with those of main international...... registries. CONCLUSION: This survey gives an interesting snapshot of lead extraction in Europe today and gives some clues for future research and prospective European registries....

  12. Academic Training: Practical Statistics for Particle Physicists

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    2006-2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 October from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500, TH Auditorium, bldg 4, 3rd floor, on 13 October Practical Statistics for Particle Physicists L. LYONS, University of Oxford, GB Lecture 1: Learning to love the errror matrix Introductory remarks. Conditional probability. Statistical and systematic errors. Combining results Binomial, Poisson and 1-D Gaussian 2-D Gaussian and the error matrix. Understanding the covariance. Using the error matrix. Estimating the error matrix. Combining correlated measurements Lecture 2: Parameter determination by likelihood: Do's and don'ts Introduction to likelihood. Error estimate. Simple examples: (1) Breit Wigner (2) Lifetime binned and unbinned likelihood several parameters extended maximum likelihood. Common misapprehensions: Normalisation delta(lnL) = 1/2 rule and coverage Integrating the likelihood Unbinned L_max as goodness of fit Punzi effect Lecture 3: Chi-squared and hypothesis test...

  13. Academic Training: Practical Statistics for Particle Physicists

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    2006-2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 October from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500, TH Auditorium, bldg 4, 3rd floor, on 13 October Practical Statistics for Particle Physicists L. LYONS, University of Oxford, GB Lecture 1: Learning to love the errror matrix Introductory remarks. Conditional probability. Statistical and systematic errors. Combining results Binomial, Poisson and 1-D Gaussian 2-D Gaussian and the error matrix. Understanding the covariance. Using the error matrix. Estimating the error matrix. Combining correlated measurements Lecture 2: Parameter determination by likelihood: Do's and don'ts Introduction to likelihood. Error estimate. Simple examples: (1) Breit Wigner (2) Lifetime binned and unbinned likelihood several parameters extended maximum likelihood. Common misapprehensions: Normalisation delta(lnL) = 1/2 rule and coverage Integrating the likelihood Unbinned L_max as goodness of fit Punzi effect Lecture 3: Chi-squared and hypothesis test...

  14. Massive transfusion protocols: current best practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu YM

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Yen-Michael S Hsu,1 Thorsten Haas,2 Melissa M Cushing1 1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Anesthesia, University Children's Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland Abstract: Massive transfusion protocols (MTPs are established to provide rapid blood replacement in a setting of severe hemorrhage. Early optimal blood transfusion is essential to sustain organ perfusion and oxygenation. There are many variables to consider when establishing an MTP, and studies have prospectively evaluated different scenarios and patient populations to establish the best practices to attain improved patient outcomes. The establishment and utilization of an optimal MTP is challenging given the ever-changing patient status during resuscitation efforts. Much of the MTP literature comes from the trauma population, due to the fact that massive hemorrhage is the leading cause of preventable trauma-related death. As we come to further understand the positive and negative clinical impacts of transfusion-related factors, massive transfusion practice can be further refined. This article will first discuss specific MTPs targeting different patient populations and current relevant international guidelines. Then, we will examine a wide selection of therapeutic products to support MTPs, including newly available products and the most suitable of the traditional products. Lastly, we will discuss the best design for an MTP, including ratio-based MTPs and MTPs based on the use of point-of-care coagulation diagnostic tools. Keywords: hemorrhage, MTP, antifibrinolytics, coagulopathy, trauma, ratio, logistics, guidelines, hemostatic

  15. The epidemiology of teaching and training General Practices in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Eliot L; Gay, Simon P; McKinley, Robert K

    2016-11-01

    There is no national picture of teaching and training practices or the communities they serve. We aimed to describe the association between general practices' engagement with education and their characteristics, locality and patients' health-status and satisfaction. This data linkage study of all English practices calculated odds ratios for teaching and training status and practice, locality and patient variables. Teaching and training practices are larger than practices which do neither (mean list size (SD) 7074 (3736), 10112 (4934), and 5327 (3368) respectively, p quality and outcomes framework scores (0.507 (0.211, 0.804)) and (0.996 (0.650, 1.342)) respectively than those which did not. Educationally engaged practices are unrepresentative in serving less ethnically diverse and (for training practices) less urban environments. Investment is needed to increase the proportion of educational practices in diverse urban localities.

  16. Current practice of gastric cancer treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoon Young Choi; Ji Yeong An; Hyung-Il Kim; Jae-Ho Cheong; Woo Jin Hyung; Sung Hoon Noh

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this review was to overview the current practice of gastric cancer treatment including surgery and other adjuvant modalities.Data sources The review was based on data obtained from the published articles and main guidelines in the East and West.Study selection Articles with high level of evidence or current best evidence in each issue were selected to be reviewed.Results Although varied adjuvant modalities have been proved to be benefit for treating gastric cancer,surgery is still the most important treatment strategy against gastric cancer.Actively adapting to new technology is important but it should be balanced with an effort to establish sound scientific rationale that adheres to oncologic principles.Conclusions Future treatment of gastric cancer will be focused on tailored,personalized therapy.For achieving it,collaboration across disciplines is essential.Also the philosophy of caring for the patients with gastric cancer should be rooted in the realization of true patient benefit regardless of who is providing the care.With these philosophies,we can shift the scientific and technological advances toward triumph over gastric cancer.

  17. Rotator cuff rehabilitation: current theories and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Jeffrey D; Gowda, Ashok L; Wiater, Brett; Wiater, J Michael

    2016-01-01

    A fully functioning, painless shoulder joint is essential to maintain a healthy, normal quality of life. Disease of the rotator cuff tendons (RCTs) is a common issue that affects the population, increasing with age, and can lead to significant disability and social and health costs. RCT injuries can affect younger, healthy patients and the elderly alike, and may be the result of trauma or occur as a result of chronic degeneration. They can be acutely painful, limited to certain activities or completely asymptomatic and incidental findings. A wide variety of treatment options exists ranging from conservative local and systemic pain modalities, to surgical fixation. Regardless of management ultimately chosen, physiotherapy of the RCT, rotator cuff muscles and surrounding shoulder girdle plays an essential role in proper treatment. Length of treatment, types of therapy and timing may vary if therapy is definitive care or part of a postoperative protocol. Allowing time for adequate RCT healing must always be considered when implementing ROM and strengthening after surgery. With current rehabilitation methods, patients with all spectrums of RCT pathology can improve their function, pain and quality of life. This manuscript reviews current theories and practice involving rehabilitation for RCT injuries.

  18. Twelve best practices for team training evaluation in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Sallie J; Salas, Eduardo; King, Heidi B

    2011-08-01

    Evaluation and measurement are the building blocks of effective skill development, transfer of training, maintenance and sustainment of effective team performance, and continuous improvement. Evaluation efforts have varied in their methods, time frame, measures, and design. On the basis of the existing body of work, 12 best practice principles were extrapolated from the science of evaluation and measurement into the practice of team training evaluation. Team training evaluation refers to efforts dedicated to enumerating the impact of training (1) across multiple dimensions, (2) across multiple settings, and (3) over time. Evaluations of efforts to optimize teamwork are often afterthoughts in an industry that is grounded in evidence-based practice. The best practices regarding team training evaluation are provided as practical reminders and guidance for continuing to build a balanced and robust body of evidence regarding the impact of team training in health care. THE 12 BEST PRACTICES: The best practices are organized around three phases of training: planning, implementation, and follow-up. Rooted in the science of team training evaluation and performance measurement, they range from Best Practice 1: Before designing training, start backwards: think about traditional frameworks for evaluation in reverse to Best Practice 7: Consider organizational, team, or other factors that may help (or hinder) the effects of training and then to Best Practice 12: Report evaluation results in a meaningful way, both internally and externally. Although the 12 best practices may be perceived as intuitive, they are intended to serve as reminders that the notion of evidence-based practice applies to quality improvement initiatives such as team training and team development as equally as it does to clinical intervention and improvement efforts.

  19. Training the Knowledge Worker: A Descriptive Study of Training Practices in Irish Software Companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, Thomas; Golden, Willie

    2003-01-01

    Employees (n=200) of 39 Irish software companies indicated the following about training practices: organizational commitment to and provision for training was positively associated with employee expectations; well-designed training increased job satisfaction and helped retain organizational knowledge. One-third believed training has not helped…

  20. Module Technology: Current Practice and Issues (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlgemuth, J.

    2010-10-05

    PV modules must provide mechanical support for the cells, protect the world from the voltages inside, protect the cells, diodes and interconnects from the weather outside, couple as much light as possible into the PV cells and minimize the temperature increase of the cells. The package must continue to serve these functions for at least 25 years as that is the typical module warranty period today. Furthermore the package must do all this for as low a cost as possible since the key to large scale PV growth is a reduction in cost while retaining excellent module reliability and durability. This paper will review current module construction practices for both crystalline silicon and thin film PV with emphasis on explaining why the present designs and materials have been selected. Possible long term issues with today's designs and materials will be discussed. Several proposed solutions to these issues will be presented, highlighting the research efforts that will be necessary in order to verify that they can cost effectively solve the identified issues.

  1. Minimally invasive pediatric surgery: Increasing implementation in daily practice and resident's training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A.T. Velde (Te); N.M.A. Bax (Klaas); S.H.A.J. Tytgat; J.R. de Jong (Justin); D.V. Travassos (Vieira); W.L.M. Kramer; D.C. van der Zee (David)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In 1998, the one-year experience in minimally invasive abdominal surgery in children at a pediatric training center was assessed. Seven years later, we determined the current status of pediatric minimally invasive surgery in daily practice and surgical training. Methods: A

  2. Minimally invasive pediatric surgery : Increasing implementation in daily practice and resident's training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, E. A. te; Bax, N. M. A.; Tytgat, S. H. A. J.; de Jong, J. R.; Travassos, D. Vieira; Kramer, W. L. M.; van der Zee, D. C.

    Background: In 1998, the one-year experience in minimally invasive abdominal surgery in children at a pediatric training center was assessed. Seven years later, we determined the current status of pediatric minimally invasive surgery in daily practice and surgical training. Methods: A retrospective

  3. Research priorities in light of current trends in microsurgical training: revalidation, simulation, cross-training, and standardisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Rebecca Spenser; Madada-Nyakauru, Rudo N; Irri, Renu Anita; Myers, Simon Richard; Ghanem, Ali Mahmoud

    2014-05-01

    Plastic surgery training worldwide has seen a thorough restructuring over the past decade, with the introduction of formal training curricula and work-based assessment tools. Part of this process has been the introduction of revalidation and a greater use of simulation in training delivery. Simulation is an increasingly important tool for educators because it provides a way to reduce risks to both trainees and patients, whilst facilitating improved technical proficiency. Current microsurgery training interventions are often predicated on theories of skill acquisition and development that follow a 'practice makes perfect' model. Given the changing landscape of surgical training and advances in educational theories related to skill development, research is needed to assess the potential benefits of alternative models, particularly cross-training, a model now widely used in non-medical areas with significant benefits. Furthermore, with the proliferation of microsurgery training interventions and therefore diversity in length, cost, content and models used, appropriate standardisation will be an important factor to ensure that courses deliver consistent and effective training that achieves appropriate levels of competency. Key research requirements should be gathered and used in directing further research in these areas to achieve on-going improvement of microsurgery training.

  4. 21 CFR 226.1 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 226.1 Section...) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR TYPE A MEDICATED ARTICLES General Provisions § 226.1 Current good manufacturing practice. (a) The criteria in §§ 226.10 through 226.115,...

  5. 21 CFR 225.1 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 225.1 Section...) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS General Provisions § 225.1 Current good manufacturing practice. (a) Section 501(a)(2)(B) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  6. 21 CFR 110.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 110.5 Section...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PACKING, OR HOLDING HUMAN FOOD General Provisions § 110.5 Current good manufacturing practice. (a) The criteria...

  7. Training and Competency in Sedation Practice in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da, Ben; Buxbaum, James

    2016-07-01

    The practice of endoscopic sedation requires a thorough understanding of preprocedural assessment, sedation pharmacology, intraprocedure monitoring, adverse event management, and postprocedural care. The training process has become increasingly standardized and entails knowledge and practice-based components. The use of propofol in particular requires a higher level of structured training owing to its narrow therapeutic window. Simulation has increased opportunities for practice-based training in a controlled environment. After completion of training, the endoscopist must demonstrate competence in theoretical understanding and technical ability to administer sedation. Although individual institutions have certification processes, there is a lack of validated, standardized methods to confirm competence.

  8. Exploring Professional Development Practices for Vocational Education and Training Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kim

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the practice of professional development within the Vocational Education and Training (VET) arena. The study object was to gain the perceptions held by a selected group of VET educators in the tourism and hospitality sector of the professional teaching/training competencies required for effective practice. The study was…

  9. The Efficacy of Deliberate Practice Delivered Using Asynchronous Training Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen E. McEdwards

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Employee productivity is key to survival in business. Senior employees require access to advanced training that does not necessitate extended periods away from their work. Once performance begins to plateau, it can be difficult to reach experienced employees with cost-effective, timely, and relevant training opportunities. Organizations must find ways to enhance employee performance; however, research suggests workplace training is too expensive and is too often without lasting benefit. The purpose of this study is to further quantify deliberate practice as a potentially efficient, customizable mode of training using asynchronous e-learning. The study compared traditional seminars with online deliberate practice training. While additional research is needed in wider learning contexts and with larger sample sizes, improvements among the deliberate practice groups were significant. Using a mixed methods pretest/posttest research design, the deliberate practice training showed improved performance and increased satisfaction compared with the traditional seminar approach.

  10. General practice training and virtual communities of practice - a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnett Stephen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Good General Practice is essential for an effective health system. Good General Practice training is essential to sustain the workforce, however training for General Practice can be hampered by a number of pressures, including professional, structural and social isolation. General Practice trainees may be under more pressure than fully registered General Practitioners, and yet isolation can lead doctors to reduce hours and move away from rural practice. Virtual communities of practice (VCoPs in business have been shown to be effective in improving knowledge sharing, thus reducing professional and structural isolation. This literature review will critically examine the current evidence relevant to virtual communities of practice in General Practice training, identify evidence-based principles that might guide their construction and suggest further avenues for research. Methods Major online databases Scopus, Psychlit and Pubmed were searched for the terms “Community of Practice” (CoP AND (Online OR Virtual OR Electronic AND (health OR healthcare OR medicine OR “Allied Health”. Only peer-reviewed journal articles in English were selected. A total of 76 articles were identified, with 23 meeting the inclusion criteria. There were no studies on CoP or VCoP in General Practice training. The review was structured using a framework of six themes for establishing communities of practice, derived from a key study from the business literature. This framework has been used to analyse the literature to determine whether similar themes are present in the health literature and to identify evidence in support of virtual communities of practice for General Practice training. Results The framework developed by Probst is mirrored in the health literature, albeit with some variations. In particular the roles of facilitator or moderator and leader whilst overlapping, are different. VCoPs are usually collaborations between stakeholders

  11. Embodied Creativity Training Practice in East and West Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, ChaoYing; Hu, Weipin; Wang, Canming

    2016-01-01

    embodied creativity training programs into three groups: creative exercises beyond teaching-curriculum, embodied creative teaching program, and creativity competition project. Finally, the potential possibility of integrating the embodied creativity training into the gifted and special education......Embodied creativity training is action-based and aims to improve participants’ creative ability rather than delivery knowledge or information of creative theories. This paper introduced embodied creativity training practices in Denmark, United States, and China. This paper categorizes the related...

  12. Guide to good practices for on-the-job training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    Training programs at DOE facilities should prepare personnel to safely and efficiently operate and maintain the facilities in accordance with DOE requirements. This guide presents good practices for a systematic approach to on-the-job training (OJT) and OJT programs and should be used in conjunction with DOE Training Program Handbook: A Systematic Approach to Training, and with the DOE Handbook entitled Alternative Systematic Approaches to Training to develop performance-based OJT programs. DOE contractors may also use this guide to modify existing OJT programs that do not meet the systematic approach to training (SAT) objectives.

  13. [Development and Effects of Assertiveness Training applying Dongsasub Training for Nursing Students in Clinical Practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoungsuk

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted to develop assertiveness training applying Dongsasub training for junior nursing students, and to verify effectiveness of the training on assertiveness behavior, self-esteem, clinical practice stress, and clinical competence. The study design was a non-equivalent control group non-synchronized design. Participants were 63 nursing students in clinical training (31 students in the experimental group and 32 students in the control group). The assertiveness training applying Dongsasub training consisted of four sessions. Outcome variables included assertiveness behavior, self-esteem, clinical practice stress, and clinical competence. Data were analyzed using Chi-square, Fisher's exact test and independent samples t-test with SPSS/WIN 21.0. Scores of assertiveness behavior (t=-2.49, p=.015), self-esteem (t=-4.80, passertiveness training applying Dongsasub training can be used as a nursing intervention to lower clinical practice stress and improve the clinical competence of nursing students.

  14. The training paths and practice patterns of Canadian paediatric residency graduates, 2004-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Tahir; Lawrence, Sarah

    2016-04-01

    The Paediatric Chairs of Canada have been proactive in workforce planning, anticipating paediatric job opportunities in academic centres. To complement this, it is important to characterize the practice profiles of paediatricians exiting training, including those working outside of tertiary care centres. To describe the training paths and the practice patterns of Canadian paediatric residency graduates. A survey was completed in 2010 to 2011 by Canadian program directors regarding residents completing core paediatrics training between 2004 and 2010. Data collection included training path after completing core paediatrics training and practice type after graduation. Of 699 residents completing their core training in paediatrics, training path data were available for 685 (98%). Overall, 430 (63%) residents completed subspecialty training while 255 (37%) completed general paediatrics training only. There was a significant increase in subspecialty training, from 59% in earlier graduates (2004 to 2007) to 67% in later graduates (2008 to 2010) (P=0.037). Practice pattern data after completion of training were available for 245 general paediatricians and 205 subspecialists. Sixty-nine percent of general paediatricians were community based while 85% of subspecialists were hospital based in tertiary or quaternary centres. Of all residents currently in practice, only 36 (8%) were working in rural, remote or underserviced areas. Almost two-thirds of recent Canadian paediatric graduates pursued subspecialty training. There was a significant increase in the frequency of subspecialty training among later-year graduates. Few graduates are practicing in rural or underserviced areas. Further studies are needed to determine whether these trends continue and their impact on the future paediatric workforce in Canada.

  15. Current Trends in Psychological and Educational Approaches for Training and Teaching Students with Autism in California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trisha SUGITA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the United States, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD has seen a dramatic increase over the past twenty years. As the prevalence rate of ASD increases, an increased need for expertise in the field of education has become apparent. Psychological and educational practices for training and teaching students with ASD continue to evolve in California however, a significant gap between theory and practice remains. This article provides a historical perspective of ASD and its prevalence rates. In addition, this article examines the current shifts in teacher training and provides an overview of evidence-based strategies to support students with ASD.

  16. 21 CFR 129.1 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 129.1 Section... Current good manufacturing practice. The applicable criteria in part 110 of this chapter, as well as the... manufacturing practice to assure that bottled drinking water is safe and that it has been processed,...

  17. When students become teachers: training period, research and teaching practice in the formation of indigenous teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Humberto Alves Corrêa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The main traineeship theme in the Indigenous Teachers Training Course at the Federal University of Amazonas is one of the most important challenges in the college training of indigenous teachers. Since indigenous university students are already teachers in their villages, current investigation endeavors to answer the following questions: What kind of activities will characterize this training and which will compose the teachers' formation? How may research and teaching practice be articulated so that efforts and results may contribute towards teacher training and indigenous schools? Current research focuses on the experience of the Mura Class which is in its final year and finishing its traineeship. Traineeship has been a space-time opportunity for reflection and activities on the school and on the teaching practice to highlight teachers' training, qualify their professional insertions and, consequently, the work of the indigenous school.

  18. A Preliminary Investigation of Current Practices in American Youth Theatres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, F. Scott

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes results of a survey of youth theatres on (1) theatre goals; (2) staff training and courses offered; (3) organization and funds; and (4) teachers' knowledge of actor training, child and adolescent psychology, playwriting trends in children's theatre, and current theoretical writings. (PD)

  19. The role of general practice in postgraduate basic training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Niels Kristian; Kodal, Troels; Qvesel, Dorte

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In recent years, there has been growing interest in the role of primary care in postgraduate training. Relatively little has been published about benefits of early and sustained postgraduate basic training in general practice, especially for doctors with other ambitions than family me...... identity. The educational environment in general practice is rated highly. CONCLUSION: The inclusion of family medicine in postgraduate basic training should be considered for all doctors.......BACKGROUND: In recent years, there has been growing interest in the role of primary care in postgraduate training. Relatively little has been published about benefits of early and sustained postgraduate basic training in general practice, especially for doctors with other ambitions than family...

  20. Assessing University Nephrology Training as Preparation for Community Consultative Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muther, Richard S.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Information about the consultative practice of nephrology in a community environment was gathered and used to speculate about improvements that could be made in the training of nephrologists in academic medical centers, based on their knowledge of such training. (Author/MLW)

  1. In the Trainer's Voice: A Study of Training Transfer Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Holly M.

    2009-01-01

    Data were gathered from members of a large professional training organization regarding their practices for supporting training transfer. Transfer factor categories grounded in the literature were used to code the data using content analysis procedures. Commensurate with the transfer literature, results suggest that trainers reported strategies…

  2. Practice Management Training in the PGY1 Residency Year: Best Practices From Two Nationwide Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doligalski, Christina; Verbosky, Michael; Alexander, Earnest; Kotis, Desi; Powell, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The development of future pharmacy leaders is vital to the advancement of our profession. Postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) residency training requires residents to exercise leadership and practice management skills. Two national surveys were conducted to describe the current state of practice management experiences and elucidate best practice recommendations. The surveys, online multiple choice and free response, queried American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP)-accredited residency program practice management preceptors (survey 1) and PGY1 residents (survey 2) and were distributed via the ASHP residency program directors' listserv. Responses were reviewed and analyzed by members of the University HealthSystem Consortium Pharmacy Council Strategic Initiatives and Programming Committee. Survey 1, completed by 240 institutions, identified that a combination of concentrated and longitudinal practice management experiences were used most frequently (47%), followed by concentrated alone (33%). Universally noted activities included meeting attendance (98%), projects (94%), and committee involvement (92%). Sixty-seven percent of the programs changed the experience in the previous 3 years, with 43% planning changes in the coming year. Survey 2 was completed by 58 PGY1 residents from 42 programs. Most (80%) residents stated they had enough time with their preceptors, and 55% rated their enjoyment of the rotation as 4 or 5 on a 1 to 5 scale (5 = most enjoyed). Our findings suggest that there is not a best practice for the structure or content of the PGY1 practice management experience. These results highlight key recommendations, including the need for practice management-specific preceptor development, incorporation of longitudinal experiences, and more practice management and leadership activities.

  3. Appropriate practice of anesthesia: A plea for better training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O P Adudu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The role of the anesthesiologist is often unknown among patients. But, the situation where the anesthesiologist is uncertain of his/her function gives more cause for concern. Methods: A questionnaire survey on the appraisal of anesthetic practices was carried out over 5 months using the style of clinical practice. Results: One-third of the anesthesiologists who responded to the survey attached little importance to the work they did by not communicating the same to their patients while 45.2% did not discuss the intraoperative findings with the surgeons. Although 57 (59.4% of the respondents usually visit their patients on the ward preoperatively, only 16 (21.6% discussed the proposed anesthetic procedure with the patients. Thirty-nine (40.2% respondents claimed that they do not wear ward coats to the ward at the preoperative visit. Less than 20% consistently conducted a postoperative visit. The majority of the respondents would treat all patients as important, irrespective of social status, while 74.5% of them considered obtaining informed consent for anesthesia from patients as significantly important. Conclusion: The current practice of anesthesia has been found wanting in several aspects. Knowledgeable discussion by anesthesiologists with surgeons as well as enlightenment of patients and their relatives about their work will improve the quality of anesthesia care remarkably. Changes in the anesthesia training curriculum to reflect these deficiencies would be helpful.

  4. EUROPRACTICE Training and Best Practice Service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Ole

    1997-01-01

    .Among those should be mentioned intelligent use of internet, multimedia training and RF high speed low power training.TBPS is primarily a course broker negotiating with more than 45 course vendors to get highly qualified courses at different levels and at moderate prices in the 5 key microelectronics areas...... been organized to fill the gap, and information about the courses is distributed in different ways.Intelligent use of internet and multimedia technology promotes micro-electronics training in a very effective way.This is the most effective way to promote the large number of courses...... step the Web service has been expanded and made user-friendly with effective search mechanisms. The criteria are e.g. level, topic, place, language, and price....

  5. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Rosário; Costa, Gracinda

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear medicine in Portugal has been an autonomous speciality since 1984. In order to obtain the title of Nuclear Medicine Specialist, 5 years of training are necessary. The curriculum is very similar to the one approved under the auspices of the European Union of Medical Specialists, namely concerning the minimum recommended number of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. There is a final assessment, and during the training the resident is in an approved continuing education programme. Departments are accredited by the Medical College in order to verify their capacity to host nuclear medicine residencies.

  6. Rail temperature rise characteristics caused by linear eddy current brake of high-speed train

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoshan Lu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The rail temperature rises when the linear eddy current brake of high-speed train is working, which may lead to a change of rail physical characteristics or an effect on train operations. Therefore, a study concerning the characteristics of rail temperature rise caused by eddy current has its practical necessity. In the research, the working principle of a linear eddy current brake is introduced and its FEA model is established. According to the generation mechanism of eddy current, the theoretical formula of the internal energy which is produced by the eddy current is deduced and the thermal load on the rail is obtained. ANSYS is used to simulate the rail temperature changes under different conditions of thermal loads. The research result shows the main factors which contribute to the rising of rail temperature are the train speed, brake gap and exciting current. The rail temperature rises non-linearly with the increase of train speed. The rail temperature rise curve is more sensitive to the exciting current than the air gap. Moreover, the difference stimulated by temperature rising between rails of 60 kg/m and 75 kg/m is presented as well.

  7. Interdisciplinary Training: Preparing Counselors for Collaborative Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okech, Jane E. Atieno; Geroski, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    This article utilizes one counselor education program's experience as a framework for exploring how to prepare counselors to work in interdisciplinary teams. Based on an interdisciplinary training program that involves faculty and graduate students from counseling, social work, nursing, internal medicine and family medicine, the article explores…

  8. Fire Service Training. Rescue Practices. (Revised).

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Carolina State Dept. of Community Colleges, Raleigh.

    One of a set of fourteen instructional outlines for use in a course to train novice firemen, this guide covers the topic of rescue operations. Two types of rescue functions are recognized: the primary one consists of locating and saving trapped victims, and the secondary one of recovering bodies and making the area safe for other workers and…

  9. 21 CFR 113.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 113.5 Section 113.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... CONTAINERS General Provisions § 113.5 Current good manufacturing practice. The criteria in §§ 113.10,...

  10. 21 CFR 120.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 120.5 Section 120.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 120.5 Current good manufacturing practice. Part 110 of this chapter applies in...

  11. Varied Practice in Laparoscopy Training: Beneficial Learning Stimulation or Cognitive Overload?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward N. eSpruit

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractDetermining the optimal design for surgical skills training is an ongoing research endeavor. In education literature, varied practice is listed as a positive intervention to improve acquisition of knowledge and motor skills. In the current study we tested the effectiveness of a varied practice intervention during laparoscopy training. 24 trainees (control group without prior experience received a three week laparoscopic skills training utilizing four basic and one advanced training task. 28 trainees (experimental group received the same training with a random training task schedule, more frequent task switching and inverted viewing conditions on the four basic training tasks, but not the advanced task. Results showed inferior performance of the experimental group on the four basic laparoscopy tasks during training, at the end of training and at a two month retention session. We assume the inverted viewing conditions have led to the deterioration of learning in the experimental group because no significant differences were found between groups on the only task that had not been practiced under inverted viewing conditions; the advanced laparoscopic task. Potential moderating effects of inter-task similarity, task complexity and trainee characteristics are discussed.

  12. A survey of formal training in the care of children in family practice residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldor, R A; Luckmann, R

    1992-08-01

    Declining hospitalization rates for children and an increased emphasis on ambulatory care may be affecting the way family practice residency programs train their residents in the care of children. We surveyed all US family practice residency program directors to determine the nature of the child care training that programs currently provide to residents. Responses were received from 78% of the programs. Residencies required a mean of 5.2 months of formal pediatric training (range: 1 to 11 months). Thirty percent of programs noted a declining inpatient census on inpatient pediatric teaching services, but since 1978, the mean duration of inpatient pediatric training increased by 0.4 months to a required mean of 2.7 months of general pediatric inpatient training (range: 0 to 6 months). The mean time devoted to structured outpatient pediatric training was only 1.6 months (range: 0 to 6 months). Nine percent of responding programs required no formal pediatric outpatient training other than family health center experience. Despite declining inpatient census and increased emphasis on comprehensive ambulatory care, family practice residencies require more formal inpatient pediatric training than formal outpatient training.

  13. Confession, In-Service Training and Reflective Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejes, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on how confession operates in contemporary discourses on reflective practices. By revisiting and mobilising Foucault's genealogy of confession in relation to how reflective practices are mobilised in an in-service training programme for healthcare assistants (HCA) in elderly care, it is argued that the HCAs are shaped as their…

  14. Mindfulness Training and Practice for Effective Therapist Characteristics: A Meta-Synthesis Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    i. Volkan Gulum

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to conduct a meta-synthesis about mental health workers' and/or students' experiences on mindfulness focused training and education. While doing that the aforementioned trainings' and practices' advantageous on providing an effective mental health service were also examined. A total of 12 qualitative studies which were focused on mental health workers' mindfulness training and practice were included to meta-synthesis. Main themes obtained from the meta-synthesis were, general benefit, theoretical and conceptual changes, changes in personality-therapist identity, new skills-therapist. Empathy, compassion, increase in relationship skills, acceptance, handling better with session content and focusing were the categories those came to forefront among others. As a conclusion, mindfulness focused trainings and practices contribute to personal and professional life of the mental health workers. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(4.000: 337-353

  15. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Teresińska, Anna; Birkenfeld, Bożena; Królicki, Leszek; Dziuk, Mirosław

    2014-01-01

    In Poland, nuclear medicine (NM) has been an independent specialty since 1988. At the end of 2013, the syllabus for postgraduate specialization in NM has been modified to be in close accordance with the syllabus approved by the European Union of Medical Specialists and is expected to be enforced before the end of 2014. The National Consultant in Nuclear Medicine is responsible for the specialization program in NM. The Medical Center of Postgraduate Training is the administrative body which ac...

  16. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Teresińska, Anna; Birkenfeld, Bożena; Królicki, Leszek; Dziuk, Mirosław

    2014-01-01

    In Poland, nuclear medicine (NM) has been an independent specialty since 1988. At the end of 2013, the syllabus for postgraduate specialization in NM has been modified to be in close accordance with the syllabus approved by the European Union of Medical Specialists and is expected to be enforced before the end of 2014. The National Consultant in Nuclear Medicine is responsible for the specialization program in NM. The Medical Center of Postgraduate Training is the administrative body which ac...

  17. [Effects of Training Students through a Program Simulating Medication Administration and Patient Instructions in Pre-training for Practical Training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Chigusa; Matsunaga, Tamihide; Suzuki, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacy school students were trained in a program simulating medication administration and giving adherence instructions. Following the training, the educational effects were evaluated. Students were separated into two groups. One group of students played the role of pharmacists and instructed simulated patients on medication adherence. Another group of students played the role of patients receiving simulated drug therapy; they were instructed on medication adherence by the students playing the role of pharmacists. The educational effects were evaluated using a questionnaire. The scores for "recognition of factors that influence medication adherence" tended to increase after the simulation, and they increased significantly after practical training. The scores for "self-evaluation of technique for instructing patients on medication adherence" increased significantly after the simulation, and they increased even more after practical training. The students' understanding of the effects on patients who were being instructed also increased significantly after the simulation, and these changes were maintained after practical training. In particular, students became more aware of the influence of pharmacists' attitudes. In practical training, the simulation training was helpful for bedside practice at hospital pharmacies and over-the-counter service at community pharmacies. Thus, the use of role play and simulated patients was an effective method for training pharmacy students to instruct patients on medication adherence.

  18. Implementing portfolio in postgraduate general practice training. Benefits and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Fawaz S

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a review to explore the literature focusing on portfolio in postgraduate general practice (GP) training, and to examine the impact of implementation of portfolio on learning process, as well as proposing recommendations for its implementation in postgraduate GP training. An electronic search was carried out on several databases for studies addressing portfolio in postgraduate GP training. Six articles were included to address specifically the effectiveness of portfolio in postgraduate GP training. Five of them described successful experiences of portfolio-based learning implementation. Only one article addressed portfolio-based assessment in postgraduate GP training. The existing evidence provides various benefits of professional portfolio-based learning. It does appear to have advantages of stimulating reflective learning, promoting proactive learning, and bridging the hospital experiences of the learners to GP. Moreover, the challenges to implementation of portfolio-based learning are often based on orientation and training of stakeholders.

  19. Career Practices and Training Perspectives of Marriage and Family Therapy Program Graduates

    OpenAIRE

    Pankow, Shannon Anderson

    2000-01-01

    Using survey data gathered by both Internet and mailed questionnaires, 125 graduates of COAMFTE-accredited marriage and family therapy (MFT) programs imparted information about their perspectives on their MFT training, their current and desired career practices, and their advice to MFT trainees and graduates about maximizing career options. The results demonstrated that MFT graduates attach many different meanings to the training and career experiences they've had. Marriage ...

  20. Virtual reality training in neurosurgery: Review of current status and future applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaraj, Ali; Lemole, Michael G.; Finkle, Joshua H.; Yudkowsky, Rachel; Wallace, Adam; Luciano, Cristian; Banerjee, P. Pat; Rizzi, Silvio H.; Charbel, Fady T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Over years, surgical training is changing and years of tradition are being challenged by legal and ethical concerns for patient safety, work hour restrictions, and the cost of operating room time. Surgical simulation and skill training offer an opportunity to teach and practice advanced techniques before attempting them on patients. Simulation training can be as straightforward as using real instruments and video equipment to manipulate simulated “tissue” in a box trainer. More advanced virtual reality (VR) simulators are now available and ready for widespread use. Early systems have demonstrated their effectiveness and discriminative ability. Newer systems enable the development of comprehensive curricula and full procedural simulations. Methods: A PubMed review of the literature was performed for the MESH words “Virtual reality, “Augmented Reality”, “Simulation”, “Training”, and “Neurosurgery”. Relevant articles were retrieved and reviewed. A review of the literature was performed for the history, current status of VR simulation in neurosurgery. Results: Surgical organizations are calling for methods to ensure the maintenance of skills, advance surgical training, and credential surgeons as technically competent. The number of published literature discussing the application of VR simulation in neurosurgery training has evolved over the last decade from data visualization, including stereoscopic evaluation to more complex augmented reality models. With the revolution of computational analysis abilities, fully immersive VR models are currently available in neurosurgery training. Ventriculostomy catheters insertion, endoscopic and endovascular simulations are used in neurosurgical residency training centers across the world. Recent studies have shown the coloration of proficiency with those simulators and levels of experience in the real world. Conclusion: Fully immersive technology is starting to be applied to the practice of

  1. Telehealth: current practices and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Yadin B.

    1996-02-01

    When we review the positive impact that the integration of ostensibly independent patient-care services have on the efficient management of quality care, education, and collaborative research, it is not surprising that telehealth deployment is on the rise. The forces that drive this phenomenon include: the need to manage the entire disease episode; the desire for wider geographically-distributed quality health care; the escalation of customer expectations; globalization of healthcare and its support services; an increase in patient and provider convenience; and the acceptance of the present technological community. At the Telehealth Center at the Texas Children's Hospital, current classifications of clinical applications are listed: (1) initial urgent evaluation of patients, (2) triage decisions and pretransfer arrangements, (3) medical and surgical follow-up and medication review, (4) consultation for primary care encounters, (5) real-time subspecialty care consultation and planning, (6) management of chronic diseases and conditions, (7) extended diagnostic work-ups, (8) review of diagnostic images, and (9) preventive medicine and patient education. The delivery of such services is associated with challenges and opportunities. As we move forward from limited data processing to an integrated communication system, from centralized main frame functions to personalized and location-independent workstations, and from hospitals to clinics and homecare, an increase in the minimum features provided by the equipment and the communication systems must accompany the widening variety of clinical applications. Future expansion of telehealth systems stands to revolutionize the delivery of services to the benefits of providers' networks, our economy, and patients through integration.

  2. Overview of current and alternative slaughter practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troeger K.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional cattle slaughtering process includes some critical stages where a dissemination of Specified Risk Material (SRM: brain, spinal cord within or onto the carcass and within the slaughterhouse environment can occur. These processes are captive bolt stunning, removal of the head and first of all carcass splitting (sawing the spine lengthways. Captive bolt (CB stunning results in massive brain tissue damage with bleeding, and in some cases brain tissue also emerges from the CB hole. As the heart is still functioning, there is a risk of brain tissue particles being transferred v i a the blood flow to heart and lungs or even in the whole carcass. This contamination risk is actually assessed to be low, but a continuing leakage of Central Nervous System (CNS material from the captive bolt aperture in the further slaughter process may lead to direct and indirect contamination of carcass, meat and equipment. Therefore alternative stunning methods like electrical stunning or concussion stunning are discussed. A further critical point is the treatment of the head. When the head is removed, the spinal cord is cut with a knife. There is a danger of cross contamination due to spinal protein that may adhere to the knife and because of liquid cerebralis, which leaks from the foramen occipitale magnum. Further head cleaning with hand-held hoses following skinning also includes the danger of cross contamination from cleaning water or aerosol. Therefore measures regarding the safe handling of head and harvesting of head meat are proposed. The most critical point in terms of contamination of the meat surface with SRM is the currently common practise of sawing the spine vertically in the middle with hand-guided belt-type saws. A m i x t u r e of sawing residues and rinsing water (“sawing sludge” collects in the housing of the saw, and if it contains infectious material this leads to contamination of the subsequent carcasses. The most promising

  3. Current safety practices in nano-research laboratories in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Can; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Guoyu

    2014-06-01

    China has become a key player in the global nanotechnology field, however, no surveys have specifically examined safety practices in the Chinese nano-laboratories in depth. This study reports results of a survey of 300 professionals who work in research laboratories that handle nanomaterials in China. We recruited participants at three major nano-research laboratories (which carry out research in diverse fields such as chemistry, material science, and biology) and the nano-chemistry session of the national meeting of the Chinese Chemical Society. Results show that almost all nano-research laboratories surveyed had general safety regulations, whereas less than one third of respondents reported having nanospecific safety rules. General safety measures were in place in most surveyed nano-research laboratories, while nanospecific protective measures existed or were implemented less frequently. Several factors reported from the scientific literature including nanotoxicology knowledge gaps, technical limitations on estimating nano-exposure, and the lack of nano-occupational safety legislation may contribute to the current state of affairs. With these factors in mind and embracing the precautionary principle, we suggest strengthening or providing nanosafety training (including raising risk awareness) and establishing nanosafety guidelines in China, to better protect personnel in the nano-workplace.

  4. Postoperative delirium in elderly citizens and current practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddareddygari Velayudha Reddy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative delirium (POD represents an acute brain dysfunction in the postsurgical period. Perioperative physicians caring for the older adults are familiar with the care of dysfunction of organs such as lungs, heart, liver, or kidney in the perioperative setting, but they are less familiar with management of brain dysfunction. As early detection and prompt treatment of inciting factors are utmost important to prevent or minimize the deleterious outcomes of delirium. The purpose of this review is to prepare perioperative physicians with a set of current clinical practice recommendations to provide optimal perioperative care of older adults, with a special focus on specific perioperative interventions that have been shown to prevent POD. On literature search in EMBASE, CINAHL, and PUBMED between January 2000 and September 2015 using search words delirium, POD, acute postoperative confusion, and brain dysfunction resulted in 9710 articles. Among them, 73 articles were chosen for review, in addition, National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines, American Geriatric Society guidelines, hospital elderly life program-confusion assessment method training manual, New York geriatric nursing protocols, World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision classification of mental disorders, Food and Drug Administration requests boxed warnings on older class of antipsychotic drugs 2008 and delirium in Miller's text book of anesthesia were reviewed and relevant information presented in this article.

  5. Unannounced in situ simulations: integrating training and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Susanna T; Sevdalis, Nick; McKay, Anthony; Lambden, Simon; Gautama, Sanjay; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Vincent, Charles

    2013-06-01

    Simulation-based training for healthcare providers is well established as a viable, efficacious training tool, particularly for the training of non-technical team-working skills. These skills are known to be critical to effective teamwork, and important in the prevention of error and adverse events in hospitals. However, simulation suites are costly to develop and releasing staff to attend training is often difficult. These factors may restrict access to simulation training. We discuss our experiences of 'in situ' simulation for unannounced cardiac arrest training when the training is taken to the clinical environment. This has the benefit of decreasing required resources, increasing realism and affordability, and widening multidisciplinary team participation, thus enabling assessment and training of non-technical team-working skills in real clinical teams. While there are practical considerations of delivering training in the clinical environment, we feel there are many potential benefits compared with other forms of simulation training. We are able to tailor the training to the needs of the location, enabling staff to see a scenario that is relevant to their practice. This is particularly useful for staff who have less exposure to cardiac arrest events, such as radiology staff. We also describe the important benefit of risk assessment for a clinical environment. During our simulations we have identified a number of issues that, had they occurred during a real resuscitation attempt, may have led to patient harm or patient death. For these reasons we feel in situ simulation should be considered by every hospital as part of a patient safety initiative.

  6. Neuroimaging training among neuropsychologists: a survey of the state of current training and recommendations for trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, Andreana; Hassenstab, Jason; Bangen, Katherine J

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging has gained widespread use in neuropsychological research and practice. However, there are neither established guidelines on how neuropsychologists might become competent researchers or consumers of neuroimaging data, nor any published studies describing the state of neuroimaging training among neuropsychologists. We report the results of two online surveys, one of 13 expert neuropsychologist-neuroimagers whose responses informed the formulation of a second, larger survey to neuropsychologists-at-large that were a random selection of a third of the members of the International Neuropsychological Society and American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology. A total of 237 doctoral-level neuropsychologists, or 15.3% of potential participants, provided complete responses. Most respondents (69.2%) received training in neuroimaging, mostly at the post-doctoral level, largely through independent study, clinical conferences, instruction by clinical supervisors, and individualized mentoring, on topics such as neuroimaging modalities in neurology, neuroanatomy, and the appropriate information to glean from neuroradiology reports. Of the remaining respondents who did not receive training in neuroimaging, 64.4% indicated that such training would be very or extremely beneficial to one's career as a neuropsychologist. Both neuropsychologist-neuroimagers and neuropsychologists-at-large provided specific recommendations for training. Findings from this initial effort will guide trainees who seek to develop competence in neuroimaging, and inform future formulations of neuropsychological training.

  7. Practical Qualitative Research Strategies: Training Interviewers and Coders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodell, L Suzanne; Stage, Virginia C; Cooke, Natalie K

    2016-09-01

    The increased emphasis on incorporating qualitative methodologies into nutrition education development and evaluation underscores the importance of using rigorous protocols to enhance the trustworthiness of the findings. A 5-phase protocol for training qualitative research assistants (data collectors and coders) was developed as an approach to increase the consistency of the data produced. This training provides exposure to the core principles of qualitative research and then asks the research assistant to apply those principles through practice in a setting structured on critical reflection.

  8. Does integrated training in evidence-based medicine (EBM) in the general practice (GP) specialty training improve EBM behaviour in daily clinical practice? A cluster randomised controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kortekaas, M F; Bartelink, M E L; Zuithoff, N P A; van der Heijden, G J M G; de Wit, N J; Hoes, A W

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is an important element in the general practice (GP) specialty training. Studies show that integrating EBM training into clinical practice brings larger benefits than stand-alone modules...

  9. Best practices in bioinformatics training for life scientists.

    KAUST Repository

    Via, Allegra

    2013-06-25

    The mountains of data thrusting from the new landscape of modern high-throughput biology are irrevocably changing biomedical research and creating a near-insatiable demand for training in data management and manipulation and data mining and analysis. Among life scientists, from clinicians to environmental researchers, a common theme is the need not just to use, and gain familiarity with, bioinformatics tools and resources but also to understand their underlying fundamental theoretical and practical concepts. Providing bioinformatics training to empower life scientists to handle and analyse their data efficiently, and progress their research, is a challenge across the globe. Delivering good training goes beyond traditional lectures and resource-centric demos, using interactivity, problem-solving exercises and cooperative learning to substantially enhance training quality and learning outcomes. In this context, this article discusses various pragmatic criteria for identifying training needs and learning objectives, for selecting suitable trainees and trainers, for developing and maintaining training skills and evaluating training quality. Adherence to these criteria may help not only to guide course organizers and trainers on the path towards bioinformatics training excellence but, importantly, also to improve the training experience for life scientists.

  10. Best practices in bioinformatics training for life scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Via, Allegra; Blicher, Thomas; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Brazas, Michelle D; Brooksbank, Cath; Budd, Aidan; De Las Rivas, Javier; Dreyer, Jacqueline; Fernandes, Pedro L; van Gelder, Celia; Jacob, Joachim; Jimenez, Rafael C; Loveland, Jane; Moran, Federico; Mulder, Nicola; Nyrönen, Tommi; Rother, Kristian; Schneider, Maria Victoria; Attwood, Teresa K

    2013-09-01

    The mountains of data thrusting from the new landscape of modern high-throughput biology are irrevocably changing biomedical research and creating a near-insatiable demand for training in data management and manipulation and data mining and analysis. Among life scientists, from clinicians to environmental researchers, a common theme is the need not just to use, and gain familiarity with, bioinformatics tools and resources but also to understand their underlying fundamental theoretical and practical concepts. Providing bioinformatics training to empower life scientists to handle and analyse their data efficiently, and progress their research, is a challenge across the globe. Delivering good training goes beyond traditional lectures and resource-centric demos, using interactivity, problem-solving exercises and cooperative learning to substantially enhance training quality and learning outcomes. In this context, this article discusses various pragmatic criteria for identifying training needs and learning objectives, for selecting suitable trainees and trainers, for developing and maintaining training skills and evaluating training quality. Adherence to these criteria may help not only to guide course organizers and trainers on the path towards bioinformatics training excellence but, importantly, also to improve the training experience for life scientists.

  11. Best Practices for Improving Capacity Building Outcomes through Professional Training: Insights from NASA's Applied Remote Sensing Training (ARSET) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, B.; Mehta, A. V.; Gupta, P.; Prados, A. I.; McCullum, A. J. K.; Schmidt, C.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Applied Remote Sensing Training Program (ARSET), http://arset.gsfc.nasa.gov, has been providing applied remote sensing training since 2008. To date, the program has reached over 3500 participants, with 1600 stakeholders from 100 countries in 2015 alone. The goals of the program are to develop the technical and analytical skills necessary to utilize NASA resources for decision-support, and to help end-users navigate through the vast, freely available and open data resources. We discuss ARSET's best practices and training approach to improved data access and application of NASA satellite and model data for air quality, water resources, disasters, land, and wildfire management. ARSET follows an iterative approach where the end user community is engaged and data needs input is solicited throughout the training process. End-user data needs and feedback are also incorporated into current and future training content and communicated to NASA Applied Sciences Program principal investigators and data centers responsible for developing NASA tools, portals, data formats, and other data delivery structures. ARSET's success has relied upon 1) targeting outreach to applied science professionals both as training participants and collaborators in developing training activities 2) developing training content tailored to a specific to community's decision support activities and unique environmental challenges 3) promoting interactive forums during trainings to capture and assess end-user needs 4) training scientists within the program in science communication 5) adopting a contextualized gradual learning approach through online and hands-on instruction, and 6) conducting program evaluation, used to assess the benefit of ARSET to program participants and to plan and adapt future training content, methods, and outreach activities.

  12. Crystallization screening: the influence of history on current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luft, Joseph R; Newman, Janet; Snell, Edward H

    2014-07-01

    While crystallization historically predates crystallography, it is a critical step for the crystallographic process. The rich history of crystallization and how that history influences current practices is described. The tremendous impact of crystallization screens on the field is discussed.

  13. Teacher's current practices of teaching reading and grade four ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Teacher's current practices of teaching reading and grade four students' reading ... of teaching reading strategies and assessment in Dona Berber Primary School. ... random sampling technique and an English teacher and a school supervisor ...

  14. Training generalist doctors for rural practice in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Garry; Blattner, Katharina; Williamson, Martyn; McHugh, Patrick; Reid, James

    2017-01-01

    Targeted postgraduate training increases the likelihood young doctors will take up careers in rural generalist medicine. This article describes the postgraduate pathways that have evolved for these doctors in New Zealand. The Cairns consensus statement 2014 defined rural medical generalism as a scope of practice that encompasses primary care, hospital or secondary care, emergency care, advanced skill sets and a population-based approach to the health needs of rural communities. Even as work goes on to define this role different jurisdictions have developed their own training pathways for these important members of the rural healthcare workforce. In 2002 the University of Otago developed a distance-taught postgraduate diploma aimed at the extended practice of rural general practitioners (GPs) and rural hospital medical officers. This qualification has evolved into a 4-year vocational training program in rural hospital medicine, with the university diploma retained as the academic component. The intentionally flexible and modular nature of the rural hospital training program and university diploma allow for a range of training options. The majority of trainees are taking advantage of this by combining general practice and rural hospital training. Although structured quite differently the components of this combined pathway looks similar to the Australian rural generalist pathways. There is evidence that the program has had a positive impact on the New Zealand rural hospital medical workforce.

  15. Surveillance of child development: practices of nurses after training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altamira Pereira da Silva Reichert

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the perception of nurses regarding their practice in child care after training in child development surveillance, in the context of the Integrated Care for Childhood Prevalent Diseases. An exploratory study, using a qualitative approach, was developed between June and August 2009, by means of interviews with 11 nurses who participated in training workshops developed in João Pessoa, Paraíba, Brazil. The thematic analysis helped identify three categories: weaknesses in child development surveillance before training; post-training qualified perspective: professional motivation and empowerment; and a new behavior in child development surveillance. The training was considered to be a powerful strategy for professional qualification and for changing the attitude of primary care nurses, motivating nurses to adopt a new behavior in child development surveillance.

  16. Best practices in bioinformatics training for life scientists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Via, Allegra; Blicher, Thomas; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik

    2013-01-01

    The mountains of data thrusting from the new landscape of modern high-throughput biology are irrevocably changing biomedical research and creating a near-insatiable demand for training in data management and manipulation and data mining and analysis. Among life scientists, from clinicians...... to environmental researchers, a common theme is the need not just to use, and gain familiarity with, bioinformatics tools and resources but also to understand their underlying fundamental theoretical and practical concepts. Providing bioinformatics training to empower life scientists to handle and analyse....... In this context, this article discusses various pragmatic criteria for identifying training needs and learning objectives, for selecting suitable trainees and trainers, for developing and maintaining training skills and evaluating training quality. Adherence to these criteria may help not only to guide course...

  17. Current status of preventive cardiology training among United States cardiology fellowships and comparison to training guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, Quinn R; Keteyian, Steven J; McBride, Patrick E; Weaver, W Douglas; Kim, Henry E

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated preventive cardiology education in United States cardiology fellowship programs and their adherence to Core Cardiovascular Training Symposium training guidelines, which recommend 1 month of training, faculty with expertise, and clinical experience in cardiac rehabilitation, lipid disorder management, and diabetes management as a part of the prevention curricula. We sent an anonymous survey to United States cardiology program directors and their chief fellow. The survey assessed the program curricula, rotation structure, faculty expertise, obstacles, and recommended improvements. The results revealed that 24% of surveyed programs met the Core Cardiovascular Training Symposium guidelines with a dedicated 1-month rotation in preventive cardiology, 24% had no formalized training in preventive cardiology, and 30% had no faculty with expertise in preventive cardiology, which correlated with fewer rotations in prevention than those with specialized faculty (p = 0.009). Fellows rotated though the following experiences (% of programs): cardiac rehabilitation, 71%; lipid management, 37%; hypertension, 15%; diabetes, 7%; weight management/obesity, 6%; cardiac nutrition, 6%; and smoking cessation, 5%. The program directors cited "lack of time" as the greatest obstacle to providing preventive cardiology training and the chief fellows reported "lack of a developed curriculum" (p = 0.01). The most recommended improvement was for the American College of Cardiology to develop a web-based curriculum/module. In conclusion, most surveyed United States cardiology training programs currently do not adhere to basic preventive cardiovascular medicine Core Cardiovascular Training Symposium recommendations. Additional attention to developing curricular content and structure, including the creation of an American College of Cardiology on-line knowledge module might improve fellowship training in preventive cardiology.

  18. Defining The Other Solitude: Urban family practice training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruson, V; Bates, J

    1990-11-01

    The changing content of urban-based family practice needs to be redefined so that appropriate family medicine training programs can be planned to meet the primary care health needs of Canada's urban-based population. Although the core content of family practice is common to both rural and urban areas, each requires specific skills and attitudes dictated by differences in patient characteristics, disease incidence, physician expectations, and professional contexts. A challenge for the future is the development of both rural-based and urban-based streams of family medicine training that will unite rather than divide the profesiion.

  19. Exploring accountability of clinical ethics consultants: practice and training implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, Kathryn L; Daly, Barbara J

    2014-01-01

    Clinical ethics consultants represent a multidisciplinary group of scholars and practitioners with varied training backgrounds, who are integrated into a medical environment to assist in the provision of ethically supportable care. Little has been written about the degree to which such consultants are accountable for the patient care outcome of the advice given. We propose a model for examining degrees of internally motivated accountability that range from restricted to unbounded accountability, and support balanced accountability as a goal for practice. Finally, we explore implications of this model for training of clinical ethics consultants from diverse academic backgrounds, including those disciplines that do not have a formal code of ethics relating to clinical practice.

  20. Current Practices in the Delivery of Undergraduate Exercise Physiology Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Michele M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify current practices for the delivery of exercise physiology content at the undergraduate level. An anonymous 22-item survey was sent to instructors of exercise physiology to collect information concerning the structure of course offerings and instructional practices. One hundred ten instructors responded to…

  1. 21 CFR 123.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 123.5 Section 123.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... manufacturing practice. (a) Part 110 of this chapter applies in determining whether the facilities,...

  2. A summarized discussion of current good manufacturing practice regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Loyd V

    2013-01-01

    In light of recent events and discussions of compounding pharmacy, it is important to discuss and understand the purpose of good manufacturing practices. This article provides a summary of the current Good Manufacturing Practice Regulations which were established by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

  3. Sustainable practices in medicinal chemistry: current state and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Marian C; Dillon, Barry; Hamann, Lawrence G; Hughes, Gregory J; Kopach, Michael E; Peterson, Emily A; Pourashraf, Mehrnaz; Raheem, Izzat; Richardson, Paul; Richter, Daniel; Sneddon, Helen F

    2013-08-08

    The medicinal chemistry subgroup of the American Chemical Society's Green Chemistry Institute Pharmaceutical Roundtable (ACS GCI PR) offers a perspective on the current state of environmentally sustainable practices in medicinal chemistry with the aim of sharing best practices more widely and highlighting some potential future developments.

  4. Current Neonatal Resuscitation Practices among Paediatricians in Gujarat, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satvik C. Bansal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. We assessed neonatal resuscitation practices among paediatricians in Gujarat. Methods. Cross-sectional survey of 23 questions based on guidelines of Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP and Navjaat Shishu Suraksha Karyakram (NSSK was conducted using web-based tool. Questionnaire was developed and consensually validated by three neonatologists. Results. Total of 142 (21.2% of 669 paediatricians of Gujarat, India, whose e-mail addresses were available, attempted the survey and, from them, 126 were eligible. Of these, 74 (58.7% were trained in neonatal resuscitation. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with mechanical ventilation facilities was available for 54% of respondents. Eighty-eight (69.8% reported correct knowledge and practice regarding effective bag and mask ventilation (BMV and chest compressions. Knowledge and practice about continuous positive airway pressure use in delivery room were reported in 18.3% and 30.2% reported use of room air for BMV during resuscitation. Suctioning oral cavity before delivery in meconium stained liquor was reported by 27.8% and 38.1% cut the cord after a minute of birth. Paediatricians with NRP training used appropriate method of tracheal suction in cases of nonvigorous newborns than those who were not trained. Conclusions. Contemporary knowledge about neonatal resuscitative practices in paediatricians is lacking and requires improvement. Web-based tools provided low response in this survey.

  5. The efficacy of practical skills mastering by students pharmacists during compounding practical training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. O. Puchkan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Practical training give students opportunity of good mastering of practical skills. The aim of this article was to study efficacy of practical skills mastering by students pharmacists during practical training. Materials and methods. 110 5-thyear students pharmacists took part in this study. 200 tests were used as a base for practical skills assess. Statistic analysis with confidence level p<0,5 was used. Results and discussion. It was ascertained that average assess on the course was 93%±2%. Also 81 students from 110 got over 95%, 15 students got over 93% and 14 students got over 91%. Obtained results confirmed high quality of student’s training practical classes. Conclusions. Adoption of new technology in training is a necessity in process of student’s studying. Use of modern practical bases, workbooks and supervisor’s experience allow students to master practical skills. This experiment confirmed that students have average 93±2 per cent in computer tests and practical skills during practical studies.

  6. Neuroimaging training among neuropsychologists: A survey of the state of current training and recommendations for trainees

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging has gained widespread use in neuropsychological research and practice. However, there are neither established guidelines on how neuropsychologists might become competent researchers or consumers of neuroimaging data, nor any published studies describing the state of neuroimaging training among neuropsychologists. We report the results of two online surveys, one of 13 expert neuropsychologist-neuroimagers, whose responses informed the formulation of a second, larger survey to neur...

  7. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozcan, Zehra [Ege University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Izmir (Turkey); Bozkurt, M. Fani; Erbas, Belkis [Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Durak, Hatice [Dokuz Eyluel University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Izmir (Turkey)

    2017-05-15

    Nuclear medicine applications in Turkey started in the early 1950s, grew as an independent medical discipline and finally were recognized by the Ministry of Health in 1973. Later on, the professional organization of nuclear medicine physicians and other related professionals including radiopharmacists and technologists under the Turkish Society of Nuclear Medicine were established in 1975. Recently after completing more than a half century in Turkey, nuclear medicine has proved to be a strong and evolving medical field with more than 600 physicians serving for the changing needs of clinical practice throughout these years. This article describes past and present facts in this field and attempts to provide insights into the future which hopefully will be brighter than before. (orig.)

  8. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Zehra; Bozkurt, M Fani; Erbas, Belkıs; Durak, Hatice

    2017-01-31

    Nuclear medicine applications in Turkey started in the early 1950s, grew as an independent medical discipline and finally were recognized by the Ministry of Health in 1973. Later on, the professional organization of nuclear medicine physicians and other related professionals including radiopharmacists and technologists under the Turkish Society of Nuclear Medicine were established in 1975. Recently after completing more than a half century in Turkey, nuclear medicine has proved to be a strong and evolving medical field with more than 600 physicians serving for the changing needs of clinical practice throughout these years. This article describes past and present facts in this field and attempts to provide insights into the future which hopefully will be brighter than before.

  9. DUAL TRAINING IN RUSSIA: FROM THE CONCEPT TO PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Listvin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present article is to judge and justify the conditions of system elements application of dual training at implementation of programs of professional education for increase of efficiency of functioning and quality of preparation of qualified personnel by institutions of the secondary professional education (SPE. Methods. The methods used in work involve the comparative analysis of practice of application of dual training in system of professional education of Germany and regions of Russia for the purpose of identification of the existing problems and definition of optimum organizational and legal and didactic conditions. Results. The essence of system of dual training, its strong and weaknesses reveals. Necessary and indispensable conditions of application of dual training in modern regional systems of professional education are proved. Scientific novelty. According to the author, modern publications on problems and ways of development of professional education in Russia contain enough antinomy of standard and legal and organizational and administrative character. In particular, operating by the concept «dual education», an identification of the practice-focused and dual training introduction «the list 50 of the most demanded in labor market, the new and perspective professions that demand secondary professional education» as opposed to the existing list of professions and the constitutional guarantee of public and free secondary professional education. Standard and legal, and didactic conditions of application of elements of dual training in regional systems of professional education are proved theoretically. Practical significance. Implementation of the research outcomes can be useful to pedagogical staff of institutions of secondary professional education, representatives of employers and Chambers of Commerce and Industry to the organization and use of system of dual training in training of skilled workers (serving

  10. Occupational safety training and practices in selected vocational training institutions and workplaces in Kampala, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintu, Denis; Kyakula, Michael; Kikomeko, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Several industrial accidents, some of them fatal, have been reported in Uganda. Causes could include training gaps in vocational training institutions (VTIs) and workplaces. This study investigated how occupational safety training in VTIs and workplaces is implemented. The study was carried out in five selected VTIs and workplaces in Kampala. Data were collected from instructors, workshop technicians, students, workshop managers, production supervisors, machine operators and new technicians in the workplaces. A total of 35 respondents participated in the study. The results revealed that all curricula in VTIs include a component of safety but little is practiced in VTI workshops; in workplaces no specific training content was followed and there were no regular consultations between VTIs and industry on safety skills requirements, resulting in a mismatch in safety skills training. The major constraints to safety training include inadequate funds to purchase safety equipment and inadequate literature on safety.

  11. 21 CFR 114.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 114.5 Section 114.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION ACIDIFIED FOODS General Provisions § 114.5 Current good...

  12. Organizational Training across Cultures: Variations in Practices and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassi, Abderrahman; Storti, Giovanna

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a synthesis based on a review of the existing literature with respect to the variations in training practices and attitudes across national cultures. Design/methodology/approach: A content analysis technique was adopted with a comparative cross-cultural management perspective as a backdrop to…

  13. Enhancing Practical Evaluation Training through Long-Term Evaluation Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Michael S.

    2002-01-01

    Suggests an approach to providing practical evaluation training through university-supported, long-term funded evaluation projects. Such projects are managed through a university center that provides assistance to clients in student assessment and program evaluation. Discusses the benefits and challenges of these experiences for students. (SLD)

  14. Script Templates: A Practical Approach to Script Training in Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Rosalind C.; Cherney, Leora R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Script training for aphasia involves repeated practice of relevant phrases and sentences that, when mastered, can potentially be used in other communicative situations. Although an increasingly popular approach, script development can be time-consuming. We provide a detailed summary of the evidence supporting this approach. We then…

  15. 38 CFR 21.4275 - Practical training courses; measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Administration of Educational Assistance Programs Assessment and Pursuit of Courses § 21.4275 Practical training courses; measurement. (a....C. 3688(b); Pub. L. 99-576) (b) Nursing courses. (1) Courses for the objective of registered...

  16. Quality versus Quantity Debate in Swimming: Perceptions and Training Practices of Expert Swimming Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Frank J; Comyns, Thomas M; Warrington, Giles D

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The debate over low-volume, high-intensity training versus high-volume, low-intensity training, commonly known as Quality versus Quantity, respectively, is a frequent topic of discussion among swimming coaches and academics. The aim of this study was to explore expert coaches’ perceptions of quality and quantity coaching philosophies in competitive swimming and to investigate their current training practices. A purposeful sample of 11 expert swimming coaches was recruited for this study. The study was a mixed methods design and involved each coach participating in 1 semi-structured interview and completing 1 closed-ended questionnaire. The main findings of this study were that coaches felt quality training programmes would lead to short term results for youth swimmers, but were in many cases more appropriate for senior swimmers. The coaches suggested that quantity training programmes built an aerobic base for youth swimmers, promoted technical development through a focus on slower swimming and helped to enhance recovery from training or competition. However, the coaches continuously suggested that quantity training programmes must be performed with good technique and they felt this was a misunderstood element. This study was a critical step towards gaining a richer and broader understanding on the debate over Quality versus Quantity training from an expert swimming coaches’ perspective which was not currently available in the research literature. PMID:28713467

  17. Quality Versus Quantity Debate in Swimming: Perceptions and Training Practices of Expert Swimming Coaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugent Frank J.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The debate over low-volume, high-intensity training versus high-volume, low-intensity training, commonly known as Quality versus Quantity, respectively, is a frequent topic of discussion among swimming coaches and academics. The aim of this study was to explore expert coaches’ perceptions of quality and quantity coaching philosophies in competitive swimming and to investigate their current training practices. A purposeful sample of 11 expert swimming coaches was recruited for this study. The study was a mixed methods design and involved each coach participating in 1 semi-structured interview and completing 1 closed-ended questionnaire. The main findings of this study were that coaches felt quality training programmes would lead to short term results for youth swimmers, but were in many cases more appropriate for senior swimmers. The coaches suggested that quantity training programmes built an aerobic base for youth swimmers, promoted technical development through a focus on slower swimming and helped to enhance recovery from training or competition. However, the coaches continuously suggested that quantity training programmes must be performed with good technique and they felt this was a misunderstood element. This study was a critical step towards gaining a richer and broader understanding on the debate over Quality versus Quantity training from an expert swimming coaches’ perspective which was not currently available in the research literature.

  18. [Consultation skills training as an element of general practice training in Germany - a qualitative survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittritz, Christine; Schaffer, Susann; Kühlein, Thomas; Roos, Marco

    2016-11-01

    The consultation is at the heart of general practice. It is the central setting through which primary care is delivered. The competency requirements are laid down internationally by competency-based curricula for undergraduate and postgraduate education. So far, there is no competency-based vocational training to develop consultation skills in general practice in Germany. The study describes experiences with consultation skills training as an element of general practice training as reported by trainees and trainers in Germany. A qualitative and exploring approach was chosen because there is little experience with the German situation. We conducted structured focus group interviews with trainees and trainers, respectively. We recruited all participants by e-mail via the mail distributor "Junge Allgemeinmedizin Deutschland" (JADE, a trainee and junior GP organization) and the academic teachers of the Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg. Altogether, four focus group interviews with three to five participants were conducted, varying in length from 25 to 65minutes. All interviews were recorded digitally and transcribed verbatim. Then a qualitative content analysis was performed. The statements of the ten trainees and five trainers mapped a system of four main categories: (a) association with the term consultation, (b) parts of a consultation, (c) competencies required for professional practice, (d) consultation skills training as an element of vocational training. Overall, all participants regarded the consultation as the most important element in general practice. Important content of consultations is to build a relationship with the patient, gather information, conduct physical examinations and achieve informed consent on further proceedings. All participants agreed that physicians need different sets of competencies: medical expertise, communication skills, examination skills and professionalism. Finally, there was a broad consensus that a competency

  19. Strength and Conditioning and Concurrent Training Practices in Elite Rugby Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Thomas W; Smith, Andrew; Macnaughton, Lindsay S; French, Duncan N

    2016-12-01

    Jones, TW, Smith, A, Macnaughton, LS, and French, DN. Strength and Conditioning and Concurrent Training Practices in Elite Rugby Union. J Strength Cond Res 30(12): 3354-3366, 2016-There is limited published research on strength and conditioning (S&C) practices in elite rugby union (RU). Information regarding testing batteries and programme design would provide valuable information to both applied practitioners and researchers investigating the influence of training interventions or preperformance strategies. The aim of this study was to detail the current practices of S&C coaches and sport scientists working in RU. A questionnaire was developed that comprised 7 sections: personal details, physical testing, strength and power development, concurrent training, flexibility development, unique aspects of the programme, and any further relevant information regarding prescribed training programmes. Forty-three (41 men, 2 women; age: 33.1 ± 5.3 years) of 52 (83%) coaches responded to the questionnaire. The majority of practitioners worked with international level and/or professional RU athletes. All respondents believed strength training benefits RU performance and reported that their athletes regularly performed strength training. The clean and back squat were rated the most important prescribed exercises. Forty-one (95%) respondents reported prescribing plyometric exercises and 38 (88%) indicated that periodization strategies were used. Forty-two (98%) practitioners reported conducting physical testing, with body composition being the most commonly tested phenotype. Thirty-three (77%) practitioners indicated that the potential muted strength development associated with concurrent training was considered when programming and 27 (63%) believed that strength before aerobic training was more favorable for strength development than vice versa. This research represents the only published survey to date of S&C practices in northern and southern hemisphere RU.

  20. Credentialing in radiology:Current practice and future challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adam Youssef; Paul Mc Coubrie

    2016-01-01

    Radiology has changed significantly in recent years. The volume of work has increased dramatically as has its complexity. Future radiologists need an adequate training and expertise in conventional practice as well as new techniques. This comes at a time when other stakeholders outside of radiology are voicing their own concerns. The rightly justified increasing focus on patient safety has placed even more emphasis on the demonstration of competent practice by all health care professionals. Credentialing has been put forward as a way to ensure a doctor is competent in specific areas. Credentialing may be an alien concept to many radiology trainees but moves are afoot in the United Kingdom to bring it to the forefront of its postgraduate medical training. Credentialing began in 20 th century North America where it was linked to the process of privileging. It subsequently garnered a strong patient safety focus and has become a part of the international healthcare agenda. Not everyone agrees with credentialing, it has many criticisms including the risk of speciality "turf wars" and the stifling of medical excellence to name just a couple. Is credentialing in radiology here to stay or will it pass by quietly? This paper reviews the global credentialing movement and discusses how this may impact on future radiology training, using the United Kingdom as its case example.

  1. EEG Brain Activity in Dynamic Health Qigong Training: Same Effects for Mental Practice and Physical Training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henz, Diana; Schöllhorn, Wolfgang I

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, there has been significant uptake of meditation and related relaxation techniques, as a means of alleviating stress and fostering an attentive mind. Several electroencephalogram (EEG) studies have reported changes in spectral band frequencies during Qigong meditation indicating a relaxed state. Much less is reported on effects of brain activation patterns induced by Qigong techniques involving bodily movement. In this study, we tested whether (1) physical Qigong training alters EEG theta and alpha activation, and (2) mental practice induces the same effect as a physical Qigong training. Subjects performed the dynamic Health Qigong technique Wu Qin Xi (five animals) physically and by mental practice in a within-subjects design. Experimental conditions were randomized. Two 2-min (eyes-open, eyes-closed) EEG sequences under resting conditions were recorded before and immediately after each 15-min exercise. Analyses of variance were performed for spectral power density data. Increased alpha power was found in posterior regions in mental practice and physical training for eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions. Theta power was increased after mental practice in central areas in eyes-open conditions, decreased in fronto-central areas in eyes-closed conditions. Results suggest that mental, as well as physical Qigong training, increases alpha activity and therefore induces a relaxed state of mind. The observed differences in theta activity indicate different attentional processes in physical and mental Qigong training. No difference in theta activity was obtained in physical and mental Qigong training for eyes-open and eyes-closed resting state. In contrast, mental practice of Qigong entails a high degree of internalized attention that correlates with theta activity, and that is dependent on eyes-open and eyes-closed resting state.

  2. Personal trainer demographics, current practice trends and common trainee injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory R. Waryasz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing emphasis on maintaining a healthy lifestyle has led many individuals to seek advice on exercise from personal trainers. There are few studies to date that evaluate personal trainer education, practice trends, and injuries they have seen while training clients. A survey was distributed to personal trainers using Survey Monkey® (Palo Alto, CA, USA with 605 personal trainers accessing the survey. An exercise related bachelor’s degree was held by 64.2% of survey participants and a certification in personal training by 89.0%. The most common personal trainer certifications were from American College of Sports Medicine (59.2% and National Strength and Conditioning Association (28.9%. Only 2.9% of all personal trainers surveyed had no exercise-related bachelor’s degree and no personal trainer certification. The most common injuries seen by personal trainers during sessions were lumbar muscle strain (10.7%, rotator cuff tear/tendonitis (8.9%, shin splints (8.1%, ankle sprain (7.5%, and cervical muscle strain (7.4%. There is variability in the practices between different personal trainers when analyzing differences in collegiate education, personal trainer certifications, and strength and conditioning certifications. The clinical implication of the differences in practices is unknown as to the impact on injuries or exercise prescription effectiveness.

  3. Personal Trainer Demographics, Current Practice Trends and Common Trainee Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waryasz, Gregory R.; Daniels, Alan H.; Gil, Joseph A.; Suric, Vladimir; Eberson, Craig P.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing emphasis on maintaining a healthy lifestyle has led many individuals to seek advice on exercise from personal trainers. There are few studies to date that evaluate personal trainer education, practice trends, and injuries they have seen while training clients. A survey was distributed to personal trainers using Survey Monkey® (Palo Alto, CA, USA) with 605 personal trainers accessing the survey. An exercise related bachelor’s degree was held by 64.2% of survey participants and a certification in personal training by 89.0%. The most common personal trainer certifications were from American College of Sports Medicine (59.2%) and National Strength and Conditioning Association (28.9%). Only 2.9% of all personal trainers surveyed had no exercise-related bachelor’s degree and no personal trainer certification. The most common injuries seen by personal trainers during sessions were lumbar muscle strain (10.7%), rotator cuff tear/tendonitis (8.9%), shin splints (8.1%), ankle sprain (7.5%), and cervical muscle strain (7.4%). There is variability in the practices between different personal trainers when analyzing differences in collegiate education, personal trainer certifications, and strength and conditioning certifications. The clinical implication of the differences in practices is unknown as to the impact on injuries or exercise prescription effectiveness. PMID:27761219

  4. Surviving Troubled Times: Five Best Practices for Training Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villachica, Steven W.; Stepich, Donald A.; Rist, Shannon

    2011-01-01

    The business of training and performance improvement has always been cyclical, with the fortunes of human resource development (HRD) and performance improvement professionals rising and falling with the economic fortunes of the workplace. The current economic downturn and nascent recovery represent an opportunity for HRD and performance…

  5. Surviving Troubled Times: Five Best Practices for Training Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villachica, Steven W.; Stepich, Donald A.

    2010-01-01

    With the current economic downturn and signs of an emerging recovery, executives are trying to determine how to best use their organizations' funds and resources. This may mean downsizing human resource departments and eliminating positions for training personnel. The authors offer five strategies drawn from the professional literature to survive…

  6. Current Status of Nuclear Medicine Practice in the Middle East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez, Diana; Becic, Tarik; Bhonsle, Uday; Jalilian, Amir R; Nuñez-Miller, Rodolfo; Osso, Joao Alberto

    2016-07-01

    availability of (68)Ge-(68)Ga generators is increasing and studies involving prostate-specific membrane antigen or DOTA-chelated peptides or both are performed in at least seven countries. Although therapeutic radionuclide agents are mostly imported from outside the region, this does not limit the availability of therapies with (90)Y, (153)Sm, (177)Lu, (131)I, (188)Re, and (89)Sr. Nevertheless, therapies based on alpha particle emitters are still largely not available in the region and are currently only available in Israel and Turkey. Regarding human resources, according to the data provided there are 1157 NM physicians, 1953 technologists, 586 medical physicists, and 173 radiopharmacists or radiochemists in the region. Approximately half of all available human resources are accounted for by Turkey. The region has great potential for expanding the applications of NM; this becomes especially important in view of the high prevalence of non-communicable diseases. Further increasing awareness of the clinical applications of NM in healthcare and strengthening technical and human capacities including the establishment of training programs for all professionals and disciplines in the field are recognized as key components in advancing the practice of NM in the Middle East.

  7. Summary of the East Africa Training Consortium Biorisk Management Practices and Training Needs Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilder, Julie; Mancini, Giulio M.; Wakabi, Timothy; Boggs, Susan E.

    2017-03-01

    A survey was designed to query former Biorisk management (BRM) trainees in the East Africa region about their practices post-training and their perceived future training needs. A subset of those surveyed had been trained as BRM trainers. The survey was conducted to obtain a baseline of BRM practices that can serve as a benchmark for performance monitoring, to identify priorities for future BRM training and to gauge local BRM trainers' abilities to deliver effective training. The survey revealed that less than 50% of the respondents could identify evidence of a BRM system in their institute. Coaching and mentoring by BRM experts was identified as being of highest benefit to enable success as BRM practitioners. Local trainers reached 1538 trainees in the previous year and reported that trainings positively correlated with desired BRM behavior. Acknowledgements The authors wish to sincerely thank all of the former biorisk management trainees in East Africa who agreed to participate in this survey. Their candid and honest input was extremely insightful. We also thank Lora Grainger (06826) and Ben Brodsky (Manager, 06824) for careful and critical review of the report. We are grateful for the financial support of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Cooperative Biological Engagement Program.

  8. Narrative, Poststructuralism, and Social Justice: Current Practices in Narrative Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Gene; Freedman, Jill

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a review of current practice in narrative therapy with a focus on how it is attractive and useful for therapists who wish to work for social justice. The authors describe narrative therapy's roots in poststructuralist philosophy and social science. They illustrate its major theoretical constructs, including the "narrative metaphor,"…

  9. Cardioversion for atrial fibrillation in current European practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernández-Madrid, Antonio; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Lip, Gregory Y.H.

    2013-01-01

    This survey was conducted to provide an insight into the current clinical practice regarding the use of cardioversion for atrial fibrillation (AF) in Europe. Responses were received from 57 centres across Europe, 71.9% of which were university hospitals. For electrical cardioversion, general anae...

  10. Autism Spectrum Disorders: Neurobiology and Current Assessment Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Ryan A.; Robins, Diana L.; Decker, Scott L.

    2008-01-01

    This study reviews recent research related to the neurobiology of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) an provides an empirical analysis of current assessment practices. Data were collected through a survey of 117 school psychologists. The Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS), Gilliam Autism Rating Scale (GARS), and Gilliam Asperger's Disorder Scale…

  11. Current Practice and Infrastructures for Campus Centers of Community Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Marshall; Saltmarsh, John

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview of current practice and essential infrastructure of campus community engagement centers in their efforts to establish and advance community engagement as part of the college experience. The authors identified key characteristics and the prevalence of activities of community engagement centers at engaged campuses…

  12. Crystallization screening: the influence of history on current practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luft, Joseph R.; Newman, Janet; Snell, Edward H.

    2014-01-01

    While crystallization historically predates crystallography, it is a critical step for the crystallographic process. The rich history of crystallization and how that history influences current practices is described. The tremendous impact of crystallization screens on the field is discussed. PMID:25005076

  13. Paying research participants: a study of current practices in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, C L; Ritter, A; Baldwin, S; Bowen, K J; Gardiner, P; Holt, T; Jenkinson, R; Johnston, J

    2005-09-01

    To examine current research payment practices and to inform development of clearer guidelines for researchers and ethics committees. Exploratory email based questionnaire study of current research participant reimbursement practices. A diverse sample of organisations and individuals were targeted. Australia. Contacts in 84 key research organisations and select electronic listservers across Australia. A total of 100 completed questionnaires were received with representations from a variety of research areas (for example, market, alcohol and drug, medical, pharmaceutical and social research). Open-ended and fixed alternative questions about type of research agency; type of research; type of population under study; whether payment is standard; amounts and mechanisms of payment; factors taken into account when deciding on payment practices; and whether payment policies exist. Reimbursement practice is highly variable. Where it occurs (most commonly for drug dependent rather than health professional or general population samples) it is largely monetary and is for time and out-of-pocket expenses. Ethics committees were reported to be often involved in decision making around reimbursement. Research subject payment practices vary in Australia. Researchers who do provide payments to research participants generally do so without written policy and procedures. Ethics committees have an important role in developing guidelines in this area. Specific guidelines are needed considering existing local policies and procedures; payment models and their application in diverse settings; case study examples of types and levels of reimbursement; applied definitions of incentive and inducement; and the rationale for diverse payment practices in different settings.

  14. Nutritional practices of elite female surfers during training and competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, J M; Burke, L M; Lowdon, B J; Cameron-Smith, D; Collier, G R

    1998-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the dietary practices of 10 elite female surfers. Four- and five-day food diaries completed over competition and training periods demonstrated energy intakes (mean +/- SD) of 9,468 kJ (+/- 2,007) and 8,397 kJ (+/- 1,831), respectively. This level of energy intake was less than that estimated for the requirements of surfing. Female surfers' carbohydrate intakes failed to meet the recommendations, and suboptimal zinc intake was observed with 90% of subjects not meeting the Australian RDI. Comparisons between competition and training demonstrated that carbohydrate (g and g/kg body weight) and confectionary (g) intakes were significantly higher (p nutritional habits while traveling, which was compounded by a lack of knowledge of nutritional practices.

  15. Curating research data a handbook of current practice

    CERN Document Server

    Johnston, Lisa R

    2017-01-01

    Curating Research Data, Volume Two: A Handbook of Current Practice guides you across the data lifecycle through the practical strategies and techniques for curating research data in a digital repository setting. The data curation steps for receiving, appraising, selecting, ingesting, transforming, describing, contextualizing, disseminating, and preserving digital research data are each explored, and then supplemented with detailed case studies written by more than forty international practitioners from national, disciplinary, and institutional data repositories. The steps in this volume detail the sequential actions that you might take to curate a data set from receiving the data (Step 1) to eventual reuse (Step 8). Data curators, archivists, research data management specialists, subject librarians, institutional repository managers, and digital library staff will benefit from these current and practical approaches to data curation.

  16. Dysphagia training for speech-language pathologists: implications for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Rahayu Mustaffa; Ward, Elizabeth; Cornwell, Petrea

    2012-12-01

    There are competency standards available in countries with established speech-language pathology services to guide basic dysphagia training with ongoing workplace mentoring for advanced skills development. Such training processes, however, are not as well established in countries where speech-language pathology training and practice is relatively new, such as Malaysia. The current study examines the extent of dysphagia training and workplace support available to speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in Malaysia and Queensland, Australia, and explores clinicians' perceptions of the training and support provided, and of their knowledge, skills, and confidence. Using a matched cohort cross-sectional design, a purpose-built survey was administered to 30 SLPs working in Malaysian government hospitals and 30 SLPs working in Queensland Health settings in Australia. Malaysian clinicians were found to have received significantly less university training, less mentoring in the workplace, and were lacking key infrastructure needed to support professional development in dysphagia management. Over 90% of Queensland clinicians were confident and felt they had adequate skills in dysphagia management; in contrast, significantly lower levels of knowledge, skills, and confidence were observed in the Malaysian cohort. The findings identify a need for improved university training and increased opportunities for workplace mentoring, training, and support for Malaysian SLPs.

  17. Current status of General Pathology training in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casademont, J; Porcel, J M; Vargas Núñez, J A; González Macías, J

    2013-12-01

    One of the core subjects in university training of the physicians has been General Pathology. Responsibility for this has historically fallen on Internal Medicine specialists. However, we are unaware if this situation is currently maintained. A questionnaire was sent to the coordinators of the subject of the 39 Spanish medical schools to know, among other things, the current denomination of the subjects (traditionally known as «General Pathology»), number of credits, teaching activities included in the subject and number and specialty of the professors responsible for it. Some data from the medical schools that did not respond were obtained from their web pages. A total of 28 of the 39 (72%) medical schools existing in Spain answered the survey. The current denomination of the subject «General Pathology» varied greatly. The mean number of credits (one credit=20-25 h) was 11.2 (range 3 to 29). In 22 of 34 schools (65%), the subject was taught in the third year of the studies, but in 21% of the schools, it was partially and in 15% of the schools, totally, taught in the second year. More than half of the professors (54%) who taught the subject were Internal Medicine specialists, although this responsibility was shared with other specialists in a large proportion. Teaching of General Pathology shows a marked heterogeneity that does not seem to be due to teaching or pedagogic criteria among the different schools of Spain. These facts may be due to less presence in the university setting of Internal Medicine compared to other specialties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Urine drug testing: current recommendations and best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Graves T; Burton, Allen W; Schade, Cristy M; Passik, Steve

    2012-07-01

    The precise role of urine drug testing (UDT) in the practice of pain medicine is currently being defined. Confusion exists as to best practices, and even to what constitutes standard of care. A member survey by our state pain society revealed variability in practice and a lack of consensus. The authors sought to further clarify the importance of routine UDT as an important part of an overall treatment plan that includes chronic opioid prescribing. Further, we wish to clarify best practices based on consensus and data where available. A 20-item membership survey was sent to Texas Pain Society members. A group of chronic pain experts from the Texas Pain Society undertook an effort to review the best practices in the literature. The rationale for current UDT practices is clarified, with risk management strategies outlined, and recommendations for UDT outlined in detail. A detailed insight into the limitations of point-of-care (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, test cups, test strips) versus the more sensitive and specific laboratory methods is provided. Our membership survey was of a limited sample size in one geographic area in the United States and may not represent national patterns. Finally, there is limited data as to the efficacy of UDT practices in improving compliance and curtailing overall medication misuse. UDT must be done routinely as part of an overall best practice program in order to prescribe chronic opioid therapy. This program may include risk stratification; baseline and periodic UDT; behavioral monitoring; and prescription monitoring programs as the best available tools to monitor chronic opioid compliance.

  19. Pesticide safety training and practices in women working in small-scale agriculture in South Africa.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naidoo, S.; London, L.; Rother, H.A.; Burdorf, A.; Naidoo, R.N.; Kromhout, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074385224

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Unregulated use of pesticides continues in developing countries in the presence of illiteracy and limited safety training and practices. This paper describes training and safety practices when mixing and spraying pesticides, and acetylcholinesterase levels among women farmers in

  20. Mobilizing and training academic faculty for medical mission: current status and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Smith

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As more mission groups become involved with health care education, by starting medical and nursing schools, postgraduate training programs and paramedical professional training, there is a need to recruit expatriate faculty from high income countries to help start programs as there are few national health care education professionals available in the mission setting in most low- and middle-income countries. This paper outlines the current status and needs for academic faculty in health care education mission settings. A working group of medical educators met in conjunction with the Global Missions Health Conference in November 2015 and discussed the motivational factors which lead Christian academics to volunteer, both short- and long-term in mission settings. The group then looked at barriers to volunteering and made suggestions for future directions and best practices when mobilizing academics from high income countries.

  1. The Effects of Training Institution Practice Costs, Quality, and Other Characteristics on Future Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Robert L.; Petterson, Stephen M.; Bazemore, Andrew W.; Wingrove, Peter; Puffer, James C.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE Medicare beneficiary spending patterns reflect those of the 306 Hospital Referral Regions where physicians train, but whether this holds true for smaller areas or for quality is uncertain. This study assesses whether cost and quality imprinting can be detected within the 3,436 Hospital Service Areas (HSAs), 82.4 percent of which have only 1 teaching hospital, and whether sponsoring institution characteristics are associated. METHODS We conducted a secondary, multi-level, multivariable analysis of 2011 Medicare claims and American Medical Association Masterfile data for a random, nationally representative sample of family physicians and general internists who completed residency between 1992 and 2010 and had more than 40 Medicare patients (3,075 physicians providing care to 503,109 beneficiaries). Practice and training locations were matched with Dartmouth Atlas HSAs and categorized into low-, average-, and high-cost spending groups. Practice and training HSAs were assessed for differences in 4 diabetes quality measures. Institutional characteristics included training volume and percentage of graduates in rural practice and primary care. RESULTS The unadjusted, annual, per-beneficiary spending difference between physicians trained in high- and low-cost HSAs was $1,644 (95% CI, $1,253–$2,034), and the difference remained significant after controlling for patient and physician characteristics. No significant relationship was found for diabetes quality measures. General internists were significantly more likely than family physicians to train in high-cost HSAs. Institutions with more graduates in rural practice and primary care produced lower-spending physicians. CONCLUSIONS The “imprint” of training spending patterns on physicians is strong and enduring, without discernible quality effects, and, along with identified institutional features, supports measures and policy options for improved graduate medical education outcomes. PMID:28289113

  2. 17 CFR Appendix B to Part 3 - Statement of Acceptable Practices With Respect to Ethics Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Practices With Respect to Ethics Training B Appendix B to Part 3 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... Practices With Respect to Ethics Training (a) The provisions of Section 4p(b) of the Act (7 U.S.C. 6p(b... ethics training sessions within six months of registration, and all registrants to attend such training...

  3. Digitally Controllable Current Amplifier and Current Conveyors in Practical Application of Controllable Frequency Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Josef; Jerabek, Jan; Langhammer, Lukas; Sotner, Roman; Dvorak, Jan; Panek, David

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the simulations results in comparison with the measured results of the practical realization of the multifunctional second order frequency filter with a Digitally Adjustable Current Amplifier (DACA) and two Dual-Output Controllable Current Conveyors (CCCII +/-). This filter is designed for use in current mode. The filter was designed of the single input multiple outputs (SIMO) type, therefore it has only one input and three outputs with individual filtering functions. DACA element used in a newly proposed circuit is present in form of an integrated chip and the current conveyors are implemented using the Universal Current Conveyor (UCC) chip with designation UCC-N1B. Proposed frequency filter enables independent control of the pole frequency using parameters of two current conveyors and also independent control of the quality factor by change of a current gain of DACA.

  4. Asthma in children: gaps between current management and best practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haby, M M; Powell, C V E; Oberklaid, F; Waters, E B; Robertson, C F

    2002-06-01

    To determine the extent to which steps three to six of the Australian six-step asthma management plan are being implemented in the community and to identify barriers to the adoption of best practice asthma management. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted at the Royal Children's Hospital and Sunshine Hospital, Melbourne. Two hundred and thirty-one 2-5-year old children who visited the emergency department for asthma were enrolled in the study. Main outcome measures were frequency of asthma management practices and barriers, as measured by parent-completed questionnaire. Gaps: 51% of parents do not feel they have enough information about asthma triggers, more than 60% of children with persistent or frequent episodic asthma are not using regular preventive medication, 48% do not have a written action plan, 39% have not had their asthma reviewed in the last 6 months, and 38% of parents do not feel that they have enough information about their child's asthma. Areas where current practice was close to best practice: 83% of doctors had talked to parents about what causes or 'triggers' their child's asthma, less than 1% of children are using puffers without a spacer, 83% of parents who had an action plan used it for the current visit to the emergency department. Large gaps still exist between current management and best practice in this group of emergency department attenders. Improvements in asthma management could be achieved if the child's asthma doctor requested review visits for asthma, provided an action plan and followed best practice in relation to asthma medications.

  5. A Virtual Community of Practice for General Practice Training: A Preimplementation Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Barnett, Stephen; Jones, Sandra C; Bennett, Sue; Iverson, Don; Robinson, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background Professional isolation is an important factor in low rural health workforce retention. Objective The aim of this study was to gain insights to inform the development of an implementation plan for a virtual community of practice (VCoP) for general practice (GP) training in regional Australia. The study also aimed to assess the applicability of the findings of an existing framework in developing this plan. This included ascertaining the main drivers of usage, or usefulness, of the VC...

  6. Current trends in endodontic practice: emergency treatments and technological armamentarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michelle; Winkler, Johnathon; Hartwell, Gary; Stewart, Jeffrey; Caine, Rufus

    2009-01-01

    The current clinical practice of endodontics includes the utilization of a variety of new technological advances and materials. The last comprehensive survey that compared treatment modalities used in endodontic practices was conducted in 1990. The purpose of the current survey was to determine the frequency with which these new endodontic technologies and materials are being used in endodontic practices today. An e-mail questionnaire was sent to the 636 active diplomates of the American Board of Endodontics with current e-mail addresses. Two hundred thirty-two diplomates responded for a response rate of 35%. Calcium hydroxide was found to be the most frequently used intracanal medicament for all cases diagnosed with necrotic pulps. Ibuprofen was the most frequently prescribed medication for pain, and penicillin was the most frequently prescribed antibiotic when an active infection was present. Eighty-two percent of the respondents are still incorporating hand files in some fashion during the cleansing and shaping phase of treatment. Lateral condensation and continuous wave were the most common methods used for obturation. Digital radiography was reported as being used by 72.5% of the respondents, whereas 45.3% reported using the microscope greater than 75% of the patient treatment. Ultrasonics was used by 97.8% of the respondents. It appears from the results that new endodontic technology is currently being used in the endodontic offices of those who responded to the survey.

  7. Training Graduate Teaching Assistants in the Geosciences: Our Practices vs. Perceived Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasdale, R.; Ryker, K.; Bitting, K. S.

    2016-12-01

    Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) in the geosciences are responsible for teaching a large proportion of undergraduate students in many universities. Often, GTAs are primary instructors in small laboratory sections of large enrollment courses, putting them in the position of having a more personalized relationship with students, in what is often the most interactive portion of an introductory course. Anecdotally, geoscientists recognize that GTAs also have a broad range of responsibilities, but there is wide variation in the content and timing of the training they receive. Until now, no comprehensive survey has been conducted to capture and analyze this distribution in a systematic way. Data from a nationwide survey of 120 geoscientists is used here to characterize the ways GTAs are trained as well as respondents' priorities for GTA training. Respondents include faculty from PhD- and MS- granting institutions (81.4%) and MS-only granting institutions (18.5%). According to the survey, most GTAs teach laboratory sections (95.6%), and many teach lecture sections (38.9%). In many cases, GTAs support instructors during or outside of the "lecture" section (e.g. grading, 77.1%). Of GTAs who teach lecture or lab sections, most receive required training from their department or the university, commonly on a single day just before the start of the semester. GTA training typically includes logistical information (where to find materials, professionalism), but less than 40% of GTAs are required to participate in pedagogical training. In contrast, pedagogy was most often rated very important or important (74.2%) by survey respondents. The disconnect between the geoscience community's current practices in GTA training and our current values suggests that GTA training programs are needed, and that the community can benefit from reports on the success of existing programs and the dissemination of adaptable models for GTA pedagogical training.

  8. Bioinformatics Education in Pathology Training: Current Scope and Future Direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Clay

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Training anatomic and clinical pathology residents in the principles of bioinformatics is a challenging endeavor. Most residents receive little to no formal exposure to bioinformatics during medical education, and most of the pathology training is spent interpreting histopathology slides using light microscopy or focused on laboratory regulation, management, and interpretation of discrete laboratory data. At a minimum, residents should be familiar with data structure, data pipelines, data manipulation, and data regulations within clinical laboratories. Fellowship-level training should incorporate advanced principles unique to each subspecialty. Barriers to bioinformatics education include the clinical apprenticeship training model, ill-defined educational milestones, inadequate faculty expertise, and limited exposure during medical training. Online educational resources, case-based learning, and incorporation into molecular genomics education could serve as effective educational strategies. Overall, pathology bioinformatics training can be incorporated into pathology resident curricula, provided there is motivation to incorporate, institutional support, educational resources, and adequate faculty expertise.

  9. Current practice for diagnosis and management of silent atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobreanu, Dan; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Lewalter, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Although it is well known that silent atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with morbidity and mortality rates similar to those of symptomatic AF, no specific strategy for screening and management of this form of AF has been advocated. The purpose of this survey was to identify current practices...... for the diagnosis and management of silent AF. This survey is based on an electronic questionnaire sent to the European Heart Rhythm Association Research Network partners. Responses were received from 33 centres in 16 countries. The preferred screening methods for silent AF in patients with rhythm control...... episode of silent AF was documented, without recommending further investigations. The results of this survey have confirmed that there is currently no consensus regarding the screening and management of patients with silent AF and that clinical practice is not always consistent with the few existing...

  10. Current Scientific Evidence for a Polarized Cardiovascular Endurance Training Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydren, Jay R; Cohen, Bruce S

    2015-12-01

    Recent publications have provided new scientific evidence for a modern aerobic or cardiovascular endurance exercise prescription that optimizes the periodization cycle and maximizes potential endurance performance gains in highly trained individuals. The traditional threshold, high volume, and high-intensity training models have displayed limited improvement in actual race pace in (highly) trained individuals while frequently resulting in overreaching or overtraining (physical injury and psychological burnout). A review of evidence for replacing these models with the proven polarized training model seems warranted. This review provides a short history of the training models, summarizes 5 key studies, and provides example training programs for both the pre- and in-season periods. A polarized training program is characterized by an undulating nonlinear periodization model with nearly all the training time spent at a "light" (≤13) and "very hard" (≥17) pace with very limited time at "hard" (14-16) or race pace (6-20 Rating of Perceived Exertion [RPE] scale). To accomplish this, the polarization training model has specific high-intensity workouts separated by one or more long slow distance workouts, with the exercise intensity remaining below ventilatory threshold (VT) 1 and/or blood lactate of less than 2 mM (A.K.A. below race pace). Effect sizes for increasing aerobic endurance performance for the polarized training model are consistently superior to that of the threshold training model. Performing a polarized training program may be best accomplished by: going easy on long slow distance workouts, avoiding "race pace" and getting after it during interval workouts.

  11. Gender Perspective to Vedic Education: Current Practices in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Raj Timilsina

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Vedic civilization has seen changes in its history- from Satya Yug to current Kali Yug. There were equal rights and duties of both men and women at the beginning. Interpretations of Veda, brought out of the Puranas and externalities made the status unequal. Sanatan Dharma, which is still mainstream of Hinduism, has been challenged by reformist Arya Samaj. As a result, there are interpretive differences as well as practices. Such differences can be seen in contemporary Nepal for the last 130 years. Continuing the differences, classicism has been reviving in the education. This revival also commenced with the same dualism. In this qualitative approach of exploration, two different gurukuls of girls have been observed and analyzed from the field for the purpose of exploring the recent practices. The observation was based on respective scriptures as well as experts' interviews. These data have analyzed the confronting practices on gender in Veda and rooted ideas in contemporary Nepal.

  12. Guide to good practices for training and qualification of instructors. DOE handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Purpose of this guide is to provide contractor training organizations with information that can be used to verify the adquacy and/or modify existing instructor training programs, or to develop new training programs. It contains good practices for the training and qualification of technical instructors and instructional technologists at DOE reactor and non-reactor nuclear facilities. It addresses the content of initial and continuing instructor training programs, evaluation of instructor training programs, and maintenance of instructor training records.

  13. In-Training Practice Patterns of Combined Emergency Medicine/Internal Medicine Residents, 2003-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd A Templeman

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study seeks to evaluate the practice patterns of current combined emergency medicine/internal medicine (EM/IM residents during their training and compare them to the typical practice patterns of EM/IM graduates. We further seek to characterize how these current residents perceive the EM/IM physician’s niche. Methods: This is a multi-institution, cross-sectional, survey-based cohort study. Between June 2008 and July 2008, all 112 residents of the 11 EM/IM programs listed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education were contacted and asked to complete a survey concerning plans for certification, fellowship, and practice setting. Results: The adjusted response rate was 71%. All respondents anticipated certifying in both specialties, with 47% intending to pursue fellowships. Most residents (97% allotted time to both EM and IM, with a median time of 70% and 30%, respectively. Concerning academic medicine, 81% indicated intent to practice academic medicine, and 96% planned to allocate at least 10% of their future time to a university/academic setting. In evaluating satisfaction, 94% were (1 satisfied with their residency choice, (2 believed that a combined residency will advance their career, and (3 would repeat a combined residency if given the opportunity. Conclusion: Current EM/IM residents were very content with their training and the overwhelming majority of residents plan to devote time to the practice of academic medicine. Relative to the practice patterns previously observed in EM/IM graduates, the current residents are more inclined toward pursuing fellowships and practicing both specialties. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:530–536.

  14. Current Practice Patterns Regarding the Conduct of Thyroidectomy and Parathyroidectomy amongst Surgeons - A Survey Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LR Henry, LB Helou, NP Solomon, A Chang, SK Libutti, A Stojadinovic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Heterogeneity of surgical care exists among surgeons regarding the conduct of thyroidectomy and parathyroidectomy.Aim: To identify the current patterns of technical conduct of operation amongst surgeons performing thyroidectomy or parathyroidectomy.Methods: A survey was designed and beta-tested on five surgical oncologists for face validity and usability. The final version of this survey was constructed and disseminated using the professional version of the internet-based survey mechanism Survey Monkey and consisted of two eligibility questions and 22 questions regarding thyroidectomy/parathyroidectomy treatment patterns. The survey was disseminated electronically to American Association of Endocrine Surgeons (AAES and American College of Surgeons (ACS members. Survey results were collected, tabulated and analyzed. Responses among groups were compared using two sample T- tests. Significant responses were subsequently analyzed in generalized linear models to ascertain if significance remained with control of covariates.Results: Of 420 initial web survey visits, 236 (56.2% surveys were completed. The majority of respondents reported being 'fellowship trained', experienced and 'high-volume' surgeons. The most common fellowship trainings were endocrine (46%, oncology (22%, head & neck (13%, or combinations of the three fellowships (14%. Most surgeons reported that they dissect the course of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN without using neuromonitoring. Nearly a third of respondents reported routinely using the Harmonic scalpel during the conduct of the operations. Significant differences emerged regarding operative technique according to residency training type, fellowship training, surgeon volume, and practice setting, but only those associated with residency training type and annual surgeon surgical volume remained significant within generalized linear models.Conclusion: Most surgeons who responded to this survey do not routinely

  15. Synergistic effects of resistance training and protein intake: practical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; Cholewa, Jason Michael; Naimo, Marshall Alan; Zhi, X I A; Magagnin, Daiane; de Sá, Rafaele Bis Dal Ponte; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Teixeira, Tamiris da Silva; Zanchi, Nelo Eidy

    2014-10-01

    Resistance training is a potent stimulus to increase skeletal muscle mass. The muscle protein accretion process depends on a robust synergistic action between protein intake and overload. The intake of protein after resistance training increases plasma amino acids, which results in the activation of signaling molecules leading to increased muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and muscle hypertrophy. Although both essential and non-essential amino acids are necessary for hypertrophy, the intake of free L-leucine or high-leucine whole proteins has been specifically shown to increase the initiation of translation that is essential for elevated MPS. The literature supports the use of protein intake following resistance-training sessions to enhance MPS; however, less understood are the effects of different protein sources and timing protocols on MPS. The sum of the adaptions from each individual training session is essential to muscle hypertrophy, and thus highlights the importance of an optimal supplementation protocol. The aim of this review is to present recent findings reported in the literature and to discuss the practical application of these results. In that light, new speculations and questions will arise that may direct future investigations. The information and recommendations generated in this review should be of benefit to clinical dietitians as well as those engaged in sports.

  16. Kidney Failure and Liver Allocation: Current Practices and Potential Improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Varun; Lai, Jennifer C

    2015-09-01

    In February 2002, the United Network for Organ Sharing implemented a system for prioritizing candidates for liver transplantation that was based on the risk of 90-day mortality as determined by the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score. As the MELD score is driven in part by serum creatinine as a marker of kidney function, the prevalence of kidney dysfunction and failure in patients with end-stage liver disease at the time of listing and at transplantation has steadily risen. In this review, we discuss current practices in liver transplantation in patients with kidney dysfunction focusing briefly on the decision to perform simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation. We then discuss pitfalls to the current practices of liver transplantation in patients with kidney dysfunction. We conclude by discussing potential improvements to current practices including the use of the MELD-Na score, alternatives to creatinine and creatinine-based equation for estimating kidney function, and the use of intraoperative kidney replacement therapy during liver transplantation.

  17. Laser Safety: A Laser Alignment Practical Training Course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, Michael; Edstrom, Steve; /SLAC

    2011-01-26

    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has developed a Laser Alignment Practical Training Course as one of its core laser safety classes. The course is taught to small groups of up to three students and takes 1-3 hours to complete. This practical course is not a substitute for site-specific On-the-Job Training; it does, however, provide a good introduction in core laser safety practices that can be broadly applied. Alignment and diagnostic tasks are performed with low power lasers. Students learn safe alignment and diagnostic techniques and how to avoid common mistakes that might lead to an accident. The class is taught by laser supervisors, enabling them to assess the skill level of new laser personnel and determine the subsequent level of supervision needed. The course has six alignment tasks. For each task, discussion points are given for the instructor to review with the students. The optics setup includes different wavelength lasers, a beam expander, mirrors, irises, a periscope, a beam-splitting polarizer and a diffraction grating. Diagnostic tools include viewing cards, an IR viewer and a ccd camera. Laser eyewear is available to block some laser wavelengths in the setup.

  18. Training vs practice: A tale of opposition in acute cholecystitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Purvi; P; Patel; Shaun; C; Daly; Jose; M; Velasco

    2015-01-01

    Acute cholecystitis is one of the most common surgical diagnoses encountered by general surgeons.Despite its high incidence there remains a range of treatment of approaches.Current practices in biliary surgery vary as to timing,intraoperative utilization of biliaryimaging,and management of bile duct stones despite growing evidence in the literature defining best practice.Management of patients with acute cholecystitis with early laparoscopic cholecystectomy(LC)results in better patient outcomes when compared with delayed surgical management techniques including antibiotic therapy or percutaneous cholecystostomy.Regardless of this data,many surgeons still prefer to utilize antibiotic therapy and complete an interval LC to manage acute cholecystitis.The use of intraoperative biliary imaging by cholangiogram or laparoscopic ultrasound has been demonstrated to facilitate the safe completion of cholecystectomy,minimizing the risk for inadvertent injury to surrounding structures,and lowering conversion rates,however it is rarely utilized.Choledocholithiasis used to be a diagnosis managed exclusively by surgeons but current practice favors referral to gastroenterologists for performance of preoperative endoscopic removal.Yet,there is evidence that intraoperative laparoscopic stone extraction is safe,feasible and may have added advantages.This review aims to highlight the differences between existing management of acute cholecystitis and evidence supported in the literature regarding best practice with the goal to change surgical practice to adopt these current recommendations.

  19. Clinical neuropsychology in Israel: history, training, practice and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, Eli; Hoofien, Dan

    2016-11-01

    This is an invited paper for a special issue on international perspectives on training and practice in clinical neuropsychology. We provide a review of the status of clinical neuropsychology in Israel, including the history of neuropsychological, educational, and accreditation requirements to become a clinical neuropsychologist and to practice clinical neuropsychology. The information is based primarily on the personal knowledge of the authors who have been practicing clinical neuropsychology for over three decades and hold various administrative and academic positions in this field. Second, we conducted three ad hoc surveys among clinical and rehabilitation psychologists; heads of academic programs for rehabilitation and neuropsychology; and heads of accredited service providers. Third, we present a literature review of publications by clinical neuropsychologists in Israel. Most of the clinical neuropsychologists are graduates of either rehabilitation or clinical training programs. The vast majority of neuropsychologists are affiliated with rehabilitation psychology. The training programs (2-3 years of graduate school) provide solid therapeutic and diagnostic skills to the students. Seventy-five percent of the participants in this survey are employed at least part-time by public or state-funded institutions. Israeli neuropsychologists are heavily involved in case management, including vocational counseling, and rehabilitation psychotherapy. Conclusions and future goals: Although clinical neuropsychologists in Israel are well educated and valued by all health professionals, there are still several challenges that must be addressed in order to further advance the field and the profession. These included the need for Hebrew-language standardized and normalized neuropsychological tests and the application of evidence-based interventions in neuropsychological rehabilitation.

  20. Activity Approach and Practice-oriented Primary Teacher Training, Experience of the Siberian Federal University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smolyaninova O.G.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Current issue was done under the Federal Target Education Development Program from 2011 to 2015, with the aim of networking development in vocational secondary education for teacher training based on new modules of applied bachelor programs focused on strengthening the practical orientation of future teacher training. This is considered as a basis of improvement of the federal higher educational standards, the development of new basic exemplary educational programs and finding new ways of educational outcomes assess according to the teacher professional standard. The authors believe that the successful activity in this area will improve the quality of primary school teachers training and will reduce the shortage of personnel in primary education and in secondary vocational education in Russia and Krasnoyarsk Territory in particular.

  1. DOE handbook: Guide to good practices for the selection, training, and qualification of shift supervisors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-01

    This Department of Energy (DOE) handbook is approved for use by all DOE Components and their contractors. The Handbook incorporates editorial changes to DOE-STD-1061-93, ``Guide to Good Practices for the Selection, Training, and Qualification of shift Supervisors,`` and supersedes DOE-STD-1061-93. Technical content of this Handbook has not changed from the original technical standard. Changes are primarily editorial improvements, redesignation of the standard to a Handbook, and format changes to conform with current Technical Standards Program procedures. This guide, used in conjunction with a facility-specific job analysis, provides a framework for the selection, training, qualification, and professional development of reactor facility and non-reactor nuclear facility shift supervisors. Training and qualification programs based on this guide should provide assurance that shift supervisors perform their jobs safely and competently.

  2. Does integrated training in evidence-based medicine (EBM) in the general practice (GP) specialty training improve EBM behaviour in daily clinical practice? A cluster randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortekaas, M.F.; Bartelink, M.E.L.; Zuithoff, N.P.A.; van der Heijden, G.J.M.G.; de Wit, N.J.; Hoes, A.W.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is an important element in the general practice (GP) specialty training. Studies show that integrating EBM training into clinical practice brings larger benefits than stand-alone modules. However, these studies have neither been performed in GP nor assessed E

  3. Does integrated training in evidence-based medicine (EBM) in the general practice (GP) specialty training improve EBM behaviour in daily clinical practice? : A cluster randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortekaas, M F; Bartelink, M E L|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/100449069; Zuithoff, N P A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313995494; van der Heijden, G J M G; de Wit, N J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/100525393; Hoes, A W|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/101111762

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is an important element in the general practice (GP) specialty training. Studies show that integrating EBM training into clinical practice brings larger benefits than stand-alone modules. However, these studies have neither been performed in GP nor assessed

  4. General practitioners knowledge, practice and training requirements in relation to doping in sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, C B; Moynihan, A

    2009-01-01

    This study examined General Practitioner's (GP) knowledge, practice and training requirements in relation to doping in sport in Ireland. All 2083 GPs on the Irish College of General Practitioners (ICGP) register received a postal questionnaire, yielding a 37% response rate (N=771, 63% male, average age 46.2 +/- 9SD, range 28-74 years). Results revealed that 14% (112) deemed their knowledge of doping agents to be good or very good, 12% (94) had completed specific training modules in doping or sport, and 24% (183) were connected with a specific sport as a team doctor/advisor. Over one in four (28%: 217) had been consulted for advice on doping in Sport, 33% (256) possessed the current list of prohibited substances, and 25% (190) knew of the Irish Sports Council's drug-testing procedures. The current initiatives to discourage doping in sport were felt to be ineffective, and although 92% (716) indicated that GPs had a role to play in the prevention of doping in sport, only 9% (66) felt adequately trained for such a role. There was overwhelming support for further training among GPs, although the most appropriate method of providing training is complex and requires strategic planning.

  5. Bimodal Programming: A Survey of Current Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siburt, Hannah W; Holmes, Alice E

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the current clinical practice in approaches to bimodal programming in the United States. To be specific, if clinicians are recommending bimodal stimulation, who programs the hearing aid in the bimodal condition, and what method is used for programming the hearing aid? An 11-question online survey was created and sent via email to a comprehensive list of cochlear implant programming centers in the United States. The survey was sent to 360 recipients. Respondents in this study represented a diverse group of clinical settings (response rate: 26%). Results indicate little agreement about who programs the hearing aids, when they are programmed, and how they are programmed in the bimodal condition. Analysis of small versus large implant centers indicated small centers are less likely to add a device to the contralateral ear. Although a growing number of cochlear implant recipients choose to wear a hearing aid on the contralateral ear, there is inconsistency in the current clinical approach to bimodal programming. These survey results provide evidence of large variability in the current bimodal programming practices and indicate a need for more structured clinical recommendations and programming approaches.

  6. Safety in the mountaineering practices: training in Physical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Palacio

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Physical Education Teaching with Orientation in Regional Mountain Activities at the Universidad Nacional del Comahue (PEF-CRUB-UNCo is the only one in the country that has a history with over 20 years of training physical education teachers with a particular orientation. It was through dynamic and continuous work over the years that theoretical and practical appropriate contents could be defined for this career.(Palacios, Lopez, Schneider, 2011 Coincidences with those experiences made in other countries such as Spain and Germany where the climbing activities are part of the teacher training and educational curricula have been noticed. (Saez Padilla, Gimenez, Fuentes Guerra 2005; Arribas Cubero 2008; Winter, 2000. It was determined together with other authors (Hepp, Güllich and Heidorn, 2001 that the contents related to Trekking and Climbing are the correct ones to develop a Teaching Program with these characteristics. The handling of safety conditions as an educational content is a permanent concern that challenges the activity. This paper will explain the conditions of safety that had been compiled over the years from experience, permanent research, consultation of specialized literature and actions carried out in teacher training

  7. Accounting for graduate medical education funding in family practice training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Frederick M; Phillips, Robert L; Schneeweiss, Ronald; Andrilla, C Holly A; Hart, L Gary; Fryer, George E; Casey, Susan; Rosenblatt, Roger A

    2002-10-01

    Medicare provides the majority of funding to support graduate medical education (GME). Following the flow of these funds from hospitals to training programs is an important step in accounting for GME funding. Using a national survey of 453 family practice residency programs and Medicare hospital cost reports, we assessed residency programs' knowledge of their federal GME funding and compared their responses with the actual amounts paid to the sponsoring hospitals by Medicare. A total of 328 (72%) programs responded; 168 programs (51%) reported that they did not know how much federal GME funding they received. Programs that were the only residency in the hospital (61% versus 36%) and those that were community hospital-based programs (53% versus 22%) were more likely to know their GME allocation. Programs in hospitals with other residencies received less of their designated direct medical education payment than programs that were the only residency in the sponsoring hospital (-45% versus +19%). More than half of family practice training programs do not know how much GME they receive. These findings call for improved accountability in the use of Medicare payments that are designated for medical education.

  8. Improving medical students' knowledge of genetic disease: a review of current and emerging pedagogical practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolyniak MJ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Michael J Wolyniak,1 Lynne T Bemis,2 Amy J Prunuske2 1Department of Biology, Hampden-Sydney College, Hampden-Sydney, VA, 2Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth, MN, USA Abstract: Genetics is an essential subject to be mastered by health professional students of all types. However, technological advances in genomics and recent pedagogical research have changed the way in which many medical training programs teach genetics to their students. These advances favor a more experience-based education focused primarily on developing student's critical thinking skills. In this review, we examine the current state of genetics education at both the preclinical and clinical levels and the ways in which medical and pedagogical research have guided reforms to current and emerging teaching practices in genetics. We discover exciting trends taking place in which genetics is integrated with other scientific disciplines both horizontally and vertically across medical curricula to emphasize training in scientific critical thinking skills among students via the evaluation of clinical evidence and consultation of online databases. These trends will produce future health professionals with the skills and confidence necessary to embrace the new tools of medical practice that have emerged from scientific advances in genetics, genomics, and bioinformatics. Keywords: genetics education, medical genetics, pedagogical practice, active learning, problem-based learning

  9. CONTEXTUAL TRAINING MODEL IN THE PRACTICAL COURSE OF GENERAL TECHNICAL DISCIPLINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natal’ja N. Jel’jash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is a verification of new model necessity of vocational training within the graduates of technical branches of study in high schools. Expert’s activity unlike educational activity is not structured-indetail. Knowledge from the diversified areas and based on it skills to find out appropriate, uncommon decisions of current problems and arising problems are required for effective work on present-day production with constantly improved and becoming complicated technologies. The traditional reproductive training focused on presentation of a set of information and given algorithms for completing different activities presented by the teacher does not allow forming properly creative research way of thinking, abilities to master professional innovations and readiness for regular self-education of trainees. The author notes that it is necessary to work out and introduce essentially alternate methods of preparation that would provide systematic integrity of the systematised theoretical knowledge with acquirable practical skills and its application. The author considers the contextual model of training as one of the most appropriate and reasoned. Methods. The core theory of contextual training is the statute of sensemaking influence of professional work context on educational activity of the student. Theoretically training is to be carried out in the closest field and in forms to real activity; as a peculiar kind of immersion to the future professional sphere. The proposed model of contextual training is installed on the basis of activity approach. The activity approach in contrast to traditional system preparation isn’t broken up to two stages (firstly, overlearning, then its practical application, but is posed to be indivisible: mastery to theoretical readiness and required practical skills acquisition refer a concurrent process under the performance of any tutorial activity or task at the training subject. Results. The

  10. Current assessment practice, personality measurement, and rorschach usage by psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musewicz, John; Marczyk, Geoffrey; Knauss, Linda; York, David

    2009-09-01

    In this study, we investigated current personality assessment practice and attitudes toward Rorschach (Exner, 2003) usage by 215 psychologists. We administered an Internet survey to members of the Society for Personality Assessment (SPA) and the American Psychological Association. Results were similar to those of past surveys, but the importance of using tests with strong psychometric properties was greater in this study. The majority of respondents reported using the Rorschach and supporting efforts to standardize and psychometrically validate the test. However, SPA members agreed more strongly than non-SPA members that the Rorschach is an effective test. Implications and directions for future research are discussed.

  11. Individual Performance Management: A Review of Current Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian O’ Boyle

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a review of current practice in relation to individual performance management systems and process within the traditional business environment. There is a consensus that the role of the individual is central to the overall performance of any organization and how individual performances are managed and evaluated can have significant impacts on overall organizational success. Many organizations employ the traditional performance appraisal in order to monitor and assess individual employee performances. However, new approaches, such as 360-degree feedback have also become commonplace within the business environment. An analysis of each approach including benefits and challenges associated with each process is presented within this paper.

  12. Current Practice of Thermoregulation During the Transport of Combat Wounded

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Current Practice of Thermoregulation During the Transport of Combat Wounded Michael Nesbitt , DSc, PA-C, Paul Allen, DSc, PA-C, Alec...reprints: Mike Nesbitt , PA-C, 4511 Star Grove, San Antonio, TX 78259; email: mike.nesbitt@us.army.mil. DOI: 10.1097/TA.0b013e3181e45b83 S162 The Journal...ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Nesbitt M., Allen P., Beekley A., Butler F., Eastridge B., Blackbourne L. H., 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f

  13. 76 FR 47593 - Guidance for Small Business Entities on Current Good Manufacturing Practice for Positron Emission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-05

    ... a guidance for small business entities entitled ``PET Drugs--Current Good Manufacturing Practice... entitled ``PET Drugs--Current Good Manufacturing Practice (CGMP); Small Entity Compliance Guide.'' This... Manufacturing Practice for Positron Emission Tomography Drugs; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug...

  14. Police peer support programs: current knowledge and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauwiler, Peggy; Barocas, Briana; Mills, Linda G

    2008-01-01

    This review examines the current empirical research and literature on peer assistance programs, peer support, and peer-facilitated interventions for police officers. A literature search was conducted to identify studies on police, peer support, and peer assistance programs. Studies were examined in terms of the following criteria: description of data collection methods, findings, study limitations, implications for police, workplace assistance, and peer support. Articles on peer support in the aftermath of the September 11, 2001, World Trade Center rescue and recovery efforts were also reviewed. The research studies reviewed in this article do not evaluate peer program effectiveness from the perspective of those officers receiving peer services. To better serve this invaluable population, efforts must be made to incorporate their views. Information is also needed on the effectiveness of peer assistance programs and peer-driven crisis intervention models. Finally, research is needed that specifically examines the effectiveness of programs that utilize trained peers in partnership with professional mental health practitioners.

  15. Neuroimaging in refractory epilepsy. Current practice and evolving trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramli, N. [Department of Biomedical Imaging, University Malaya Research Imaging Centre (Malaysia); Rahmat, K., E-mail: katt_xr2000@yahoo.com [Department of Biomedical Imaging, University Malaya Research Imaging Centre (Malaysia); Lim, K.S.; Tan, C.T. [Neurology Unit, Department of Medicine, University Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Neuroimaging is imperative in diagnostic work up and therapeutic assessment of refractory epilepsy. • Identification of epileptogenic zone on EEG, MRI and functional imaging improves the success of surgery. • High performance MRI greatly enhanced metabolic information and elucidate brain functions. • Optimisation of epilepsy protocols in structural and functional MRI are presented in this article. - Abstract: Identification of the epileptogenic zone is of paramount importance in refractory epilepsy as the success of surgical treatment depends on complete resection of the epileptogenic zone. Imaging plays an important role in the locating and defining anatomic epileptogenic abnormalities in patients with medically refractory epilepsy. The aim of this article is to present an overview of the current MRI sequences used in epilepsy imaging with special emphasis of lesion seen in our practices. Optimisation of epilepsy imaging protocols are addressed and current trends in functional MRI sequences including MR spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging and fusion MR with PET and SPECT are discussed.

  16. Autopsy in Islam and current practice in Arab Muslim countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Madadin; Kharoshah, Magdy A

    2014-03-01

    Autopsy, or post-mortem examination, is the dissection of a dead body. It is performed for many reasons. Attitudes toward dead bodies vary with religious beliefs and cultural and geographical backgrounds. We have carried out an extensive literature review to determine the Islamic view and current practice of Autopsy, in at least four Arab countries which published their experiences. Several research articles have studied the history of Islamic Autopsy as well as the current situation and legal debates about it. The overwhelming conclusion is that data is lacking. More must be published from Arabic Muslim countries and more research done to correct misconceptions. We also recommend more application of non-invasive Autopsy.

  17. Making the links between domestic violence and child safeguarding: an evidence-based pilot training for general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilassy, Eszter; Drinkwater, Jess; Hester, Marianne; Larkins, Cath; Stanley, Nicky; Turner, William; Feder, Gene

    2016-10-14

    We describe the development of an evidence-based training intervention on domestic violence and child safeguarding for general practice teams. We aimed - in the context of a pilot study - to improve knowledge, skills, attitudes and self-efficacy of general practice clinicians caring for families affected by domestic violence. Our evidence sources included: a systematic review of training interventions aiming to improve professional responses to children affected by domestic violence; content mapping of relevant current training in England; qualitative assessment of general practice professionals' responses to domestic violence in families; and a two-stage consensus process with a multi-professional stakeholder group. Data were collected between January and December 2013. This paper reports key research findings and their implications for practice and policy; describes how the research findings informed the training development and outlines the principal features of the training intervention. We found lack of cohesion and co-ordination in the approach to domestic violence and child safeguarding. General practice clinicians have insufficient understanding of multi-agency work, a limited competence in gauging thresholds for child protection referral to children's services and little understanding of outcomes for children. While prioritising children's safety, they are more inclined to engage directly with abusive parents than with affected children. Our research reveals uncertainty and confusion surrounding the recording of domestic violence cases in families' medical records. These findings informed the design of the RESPONDS training, which was developed in 2014 to encourage general practice clinicians to overcome barriers and engage more extensively with adults experiencing abuse, as well as responding directly to the needs of children. We conclude that general practice clinicians need more support in managing the complexity of this area of practice. We need to

  18. Practical blood flow restriction training increases muscle hypertrophy during a periodized resistance training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Ryan P; Joy, Jordan M; Loenneke, Jeremy P; de Souza, Eduardo O; Machado, Marco; Dudeck, Joshua E; Wilson, Jacob M

    2014-07-01

    Resistance training in combination with practical blood flow restriction (pBFR) is thought to stimulate muscle hypertrophy by increasing muscle activation and muscle swelling. Most previous studies used the KAATSU device; however, little long-term research has been completed using pBFR. To investigate the effects of pBFR on muscle hypertrophy. Twenty college-aged male participants with a minimum of 1 year of resistance training experience were recruited for this study. Our study consisted of a randomized, crossover protocol consisting of individuals either using pBFR for the elbow flexors during the first 4 weeks (BFR-HI) or the second 4 weeks (HI-BFR) of an 8-week resistance training programme. Direct ultrasound-determined bicep muscle thickness was assessed collectively at baseline and at the end of weeks 4 and 8. There were no differences in muscle thickness between groups at baseline (P = 0·52). There were time (Pmuscle thickness in which the combined values of both groups increased on average from week 0 (3·66 ± 0·06) to week 4 (3·95 ± 0·05) to week 8 (4·11 ± 0·07). However, both the BFR-HI and HI-BFR increased significantly from baseline to week 4 (6·9% and 8·6%, Pmuscle hypertrophy to the same degree to that of high-intensity resistance training. © 2013 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Endocrinopathies: The current and changing perspectives in anesthesia practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhminder Jit Singh Bajwa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The gateways to advancements in medical fields have always been accessed through the coalition between various specialties. It is almost impossible for any specialty to make rapid strides of its own. However, the understanding of deeper perspectives of each specialty or super specialty is essential to take initiatives for the progress of the other specialty. Endocrinology and anesthesiology are two such examples which have made rapid progress in the last three decades. Somehow the interaction and relationship among these medical streams have been only scarcely studied. Diabetes and thyroid pathophysiologies have been the most researched endocrine disorders so far in anesthesia practice but even their management strategies have undergone significant metamorphosis over the last three decades. As such, anesthesia practice has been influenced vastly by these advancements in endocrinology. However, a comprehensive understanding of the relationship between these two partially related specialties is considered to be an essential cornerstone for further progress in anesthesia and surgical sciences. The current review is an attempt to imbibe the current and the changing perspectives so as to make the understanding of the relationship between these two medical streams a little simple and clearer.

  20. Endocrinopathies: The current and changing perspectives in anesthesia practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Kaur, Gurpreet

    2015-01-01

    The gateways to advancements in medical fields have always been accessed through the coalition between various specialties. It is almost impossible for any specialty to make rapid strides of its own. However, the understanding of deeper perspectives of each specialty or super specialty is essential to take initiatives for the progress of the other specialty. Endocrinology and anesthesiology are two such examples which have made rapid progress in the last three decades. Somehow the interaction and relationship among these medical streams have been only scarcely studied. Diabetes and thyroid pathophysiologies have been the most researched endocrine disorders so far in anesthesia practice but even their management strategies have undergone significant metamorphosis over the last three decades. As such, anesthesia practice has been influenced vastly by these advancements in endocrinology. However, a comprehensive understanding of the relationship between these two partially related specialties is considered to be an essential cornerstone for further progress in anesthesia and surgical sciences. The current review is an attempt to imbibe the current and the changing perspectives so as to make the understanding of the relationship between these two medical streams a little simple and clearer. PMID:26180760

  1. Figures in clinical trial reports: current practice & scope for improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travison Thomas G

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most clinical trial publications include figures, but there is little guidance on what results should be displayed as figures and how. Purpose To evaluate the current use of figures in Trial reports, and to make constructive suggestions for future practice. Methods We surveyed all 77 reports of randomised controlled trials in five general medical journals during November 2006 to January 2007. The numbers and types of figures were determined, and then each Figure was assessed for its style, content, clarity and suitability. As a consequence, guidelines are developed for presenting figures, both in general and for each specific common type of Figure. Results Most trial reports contained one to three figures, mean 2.3 per article. The four main types were flow diagram, Kaplan Meier plot, Forest plot (for subgroup analyses and repeated measures over time: these accounted for 92% of all figures published. For each type of figure there is a considerable diversity of practice in both style and content which we illustrate with selected examples of both good and bad practice. Some pointers on what to do, and what to avoid, are derived from our critical evaluation of these articles' use of figures. Conclusion There is considerable scope for authors to improve their use of figures in clinical trial reports, as regards which figures to choose, their style of presentation and labelling, and their specific content. Particular improvements are needed for the four main types of figures commonly used.

  2. Simulation training in neurosurgery: advances in education and practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konakondla, Sanjay; Fong, Reginald; Schirmer, Clemens M

    2017-01-01

    The current simulation technology used for neurosurgical training leaves much to be desired. Significant efforts are thoroughly exhausted in hopes of developing simulations that translate to give learners the “real-life” feel. Though a respectable goal, this may not be necessary as the application for simulation in neurosurgical training may be most useful in early learners. The ultimate uniformly agreeable endpoint of improved outcome and patient safety drives these investments. We explore the development, availability, educational taskforces, cost burdens and the simulation advancements in neurosurgical training. The technologies can be directed at achieving early resident milestones placed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. We discuss various aspects of neurosurgery disciplines with specific technologic advances of simulation software. An overview of the scholarly landscape of the recent publications in the realm of medical simulation and virtual reality pertaining to neurologic surgery is provided. We analyze concurrent concept overlap between PubMed headings and provide a graphical overview of the associations between these terms. PMID:28765716

  3. A Virtual Community of Practice for General Practice Training: A Preimplementation Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sandra C; Bennett, Sue; Iverson, Don; Robinson, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background Professional isolation is an important factor in low rural health workforce retention. Objective The aim of this study was to gain insights to inform the development of an implementation plan for a virtual community of practice (VCoP) for general practice (GP) training in regional Australia. The study also aimed to assess the applicability of the findings of an existing framework in developing this plan. This included ascertaining the main drivers of usage, or usefulness, of the VCoP for users and establishing the different priorities between user groups. Methods A survey study, based on the seven-step health VCoP framework, was conducted with general practice supervisors and registrars—133 usable responses; 40% estimated response rate. Data was analyzed using the t test and the chi-square test for comparisons between groups. Factor analysis and generalized linear regression modeling were used to ascertain factors which may independently predict intention to use the VCoP. Results In establishing a VCoP, facilitation was seen as important. Regarding stakeholders, the GP training provider was an important sponsor. Factor analysis showed a single goal of usefulness. Registrars had a higher intention to use the VCoP (Psupervisors. Usefulness independently predicted intention to actively use the VCoP (Psupervisors to want allied health professional and specialist involvement (Pfeedback about site activity. Regarding technology and community, training can be online, but trust is better built face-to-face. Supervisors were significantly more likely than registrars to perceive that registrars needed help with knowledge (P=.01) and implementation of knowledge (P<.001). Conclusions Important factors for a GP training VCoP include the following: facilitation covering administration and expertise, the perceived usefulness of the community, focusing usefulness around knowledge sharing, and overcoming professional isolation with high-quality content. Knowledge needs

  4. Current Status of Abacus Training in Teacher Education Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrenner, Arthur; Becker, Carol

    1982-01-01

    Because of the applicability to blind and visually impaired students, the study surveyed 25 teacher training institutions about the kinds of abacus programs available to trainees and the effectiveness of these programs. On the basis of respondents' statements, the authors concluded the majority of programs were both incomplete and ineffective.…

  5. Transcranial direct current stimulation modulates neuronal activity and learning in pilot training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehoon eChoe

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Skill acquisition requires distributed learning both within (online and across (offline days to consolidate experiences into newly learned abilities. In particular, piloting an aircraft requires skills developed from extensive training and practice. Here, we tested the hypothesis that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS can modulate neuronal function to improve skill learning and performance during flight simulator training of aircraft landing procedures. Thirty-two right-handed participants consented to participate in four consecutive daily sessions of flight simulation training and received sham or anodal high-definition-tDCS to the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC or left motor cortex (M1 in a randomized, double-blind experiment. Continuous electroencephalography (EEG and functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS were collected during flight simulation, n-back working memory, and resting-state assessments. tDCS of the right DLPFC increased midline-frontal theta-band activity in flight and n-back working memory training, confirming tDCS-related modulation of brain processes involved in executive function. This modulation corresponded to a significantly different online and offline learning rates for working memory accuracy and decreased inter-subject behavioral variability in flight and n-back tasks in the DLPFC stimulation group. Additionally, tDCS of left M1 increased parietal alpha power during flight tasks and tDCS to the right DLPFC increased midline frontal theta-band power during n-back and flight tasks. These results demonstrate a modulation of group variance in skill acquisition through an increasing in learned skill consistency in cognitive and real-world tasks with tDCS. Further, tDCS performance improvements corresponded to changes in electrophysiological and blood-oxygenation activity of the DLPFC and motor cortices, providing a stronger link between modulated neuronal function and behavior.

  6. Research Reproducibility in Geosciences: Current Landscape, Practices and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, An

    2016-04-01

    Reproducibility of research can gauge the validity of its findings. Yet currently we lack understanding of how much of a problem research reproducibility is in geosciences. We developed an online survey on faculty and graduate students in geosciences, and received 136 responses from research institutions and universities in Americas, Asia, Europe and other parts of the world. This survey examined (1) the current state of research reproducibility in geosciences by asking researchers' experiences with unsuccessful replication work, and what obstacles that lead to their replication failures; (2) the current reproducibility practices in community by asking what efforts researchers made to try to reproduce other's work and make their own work reproducible, and what the underlying factors that contribute to irreproducibility are; (3) the perspectives on reproducibility by collecting researcher's thoughts and opinions on this issue. The survey result indicated that nearly 80% of respondents who had ever reproduced a published study had failed at least one time in reproducing. Only one third of the respondents received helpful feedbacks when they contacted the authors of a published study for data, code, or other information. The primary factors that lead to unsuccessful replication attempts are insufficient details of instructions in published literature, and inaccessibility of data, code and tools needed in the study. Our findings suggest a remarkable lack of research reproducibility in geoscience. Changing the incentive mechanism in academia, as well as developing policies and tools that facilitate open data and code sharing are the promising ways for geosciences community to alleviate this reproducibility problem.

  7. Soil Quality Impacts of Current South American Agricultural Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana B. Wingeyer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Increasing global demand for oil seeds and cereals during the past 50 years has caused an expansion in the cultivated areas and resulted in major soil management and crop production changes throughout Bolivia, Paraguay, Uruguay, Argentina and southern Brazil. Unprecedented adoption of no-tillage as well as improved soil fertility and plant genetics have increased yields, but the use of purchased inputs, monocropping i.e., continuous soybean (Glycine max (L. Merr., and marginal land cultivation have also increased. These changes have significantly altered the global food and feed supply role of these countries, but they have also resulted in various levels of soil degradation through wind and water erosion, soil compaction, soil organic matter (SOM depletion, and nutrient losses. Sustainability is dependent upon local interactions between soil, climate, landscape characteristics, and production systems. This review examines the region’s current soil and crop conditions and summarizes several research studies designed to reduce or prevent soil degradation. Although the region has both environmental and soil resources that can sustain current agricultural production levels, increasing population, greater urbanization, and more available income will continue to increase the pressure on South American croplands. A better understanding of regional soil differences and quantifying potential consequences of current production practices on various soil resources is needed to ensure that scientific, educational, and regulatory programs result in land management recommendations that support intensification of agriculture without additional soil degradation or other unintended environmental consequences.

  8. Effects of in-season plyometric training within soccer practice on explosive actions of young players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meylan, César; Malatesta, Davide

    2009-12-01

    In soccer, explosive actions such as jumping, sprinting, and changes of direction are essential to optimal performance not only in adults, but also in children's games. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine the influence of a short-term plyometric training within regular soccer practice on explosive actions of early pubertal soccer players during the in-season. Fourteen children (13.3 +/- 0.6 years) were selected as the training group (TG) and 11 children (13.1 +/- 0.6 years) were defined as the control group (CG). All children were playing in the same league and trained twice per week for 90 minutes with the same soccer drills. The TG followed an 8-week plyometric program (i.e., jumping, hurdling, bouncing, skipping, and footwork) implemented as a substitute for some soccer drills to obtain the same session duration as CG. At baseline and after training, explosive actions were assessed with the following 6 tests: 10-meter sprint, agility test, 3 vertical jump tests (squat jump [SJ], countermovement jump [CMJ], contact test [CT] and multiple 5 bounds test [MB5]). Plyometric training was associated with significant decreases in 10-m sprint time (-2.1%) and agility test time (-9.6%) and significant increases in jump height for the CMJ (+7.9%) and CT (+10.9%). No significant changes in explosive actions after the 8-week period were recorded for the CG. The current study demonstrated that a plyometric program within regular soccer practice improved explosive actions of young players compared to conventional soccer training only. Therefore, the short-term plyometric program had a beneficial impact on explosive actions, such as sprinting, change of direction, and jumping, which are important determinants of match-winning actions in soccer performance.

  9. Improving care transitions: current practice and future opportunities for pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, Anne L; Kirwin, Jennifer; Bieber, Heather L; Couchenour, Rachel L; Hall, Deanne L; Kennedy, Amy K; LaPointe, Nancy M Allen; Burkhardt, Crystal D O; Schilli, Kathleen; Seaton, Terry; Trujillo, Jennifer; Wiggins, Barbara

    2012-11-01

    During the past decade, patient safety issues during care transitions have gained greater attention at both the local and national level. Readmission rates to U.S. hospitals are high, often because of poor care transitions. Serious adverse drug events (ADEs) caused by an incomplete understanding of changes in complex drug regimens can be an important factor contributing to readmission rates. This paper describes the roles and responsibilities of pharmacists in ensuring optimal outcomes from drug therapy during care transitions. Barriers to effective care transitions, including inadequate communication, poor care coordination, and the lack of one clinician ultimately responsible for these transitions, are discussed. This paper also identifies specific patient populations at high risk of ADEs during care transitions. Several national initiatives and newer care transition models are discussed, including multi- and interdisciplinary programs with pharmacists as key members. Among their potential roles, pharmacists should participate on medical rounds where available, perform medication reconciliation and admission drug histories, apply their knowledge of drug therapy to anticipate and resolve problems during transitions, communicate changes in drug regimens between providers and care settings, assess the appropriateness and patient understanding of drug regimens, promote adherence, and assess health literacy. In addition, this paper identifies barriers and ongoing challenges limiting greater involvement of pharmacists from different practice settings during care transitions. Professional degree programs and residency training programs should increase their emphasis on pharmacists' roles, especially as part of interdisciplinary teams, in improving patient safety during care transitions in diverse practice settings. This paper also recommends that Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) standards include specific language regarding the exposure of students to

  10. Current laparoscopy training in urology: a comparison of fellowships governed by the Society of Urologic Oncology and the Endourological Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Stanley A; Ellison, Lars M; Low, Roger K

    2008-08-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is now an integral technique in the practice of urology, particularly in the management of certain urologic malignancies. Advanced laparoscopy training in urology is primarily reserved for those pursuing fellowship training and is offered both by traditional endourology fellowships and increasingly in urologic oncology fellowships. The purpose of our study was to evaluate and compare current laparoscopy training at the fellowship level. A 17-item questionnaire was developed with support from both the Endourological Society (EUS) and Society of Urologic Oncology (SUO). Surveys were sent to program directors of fellowships recognized by the EUS and SUO. Directors were surveyed on the laparoscopic case volume, degree of oncology training, and career choice of their graduates. Data were analyzed with Wilcoxon rank-sum and Student t tests. Our survey had an overall response rate of 60%. Fellows performed more than 100 laparoscopies during their training period in 57% of EUS and 25% of SUO fellowship programs. Similar trends are demonstrated when analyzing robotic procedures, with 73% of EUS fellows performing more than 50 procedures compared with 43% of SUO fellows. The majority (59%) of EUS programs provide oncologic training. Between 44% and 100% of graduates from EUS and SUO fellowships obtain academic positions. The majority of SUO directors (63%) believe that fellowship training in laparoscopy should be provided in fellowships governed solely by the SUO, while 41% of EUS directors believe this training should be governed solely by the EUS. Endourology fellowships currently provide a greater exposure to laparoscopy and robotics than SUO fellowships. The percentage of fellows seeking academic positions is similar for EUS and SUO fellowship programs and has remained stable for several years. Directors of fellowship programs that offer advanced laparoscopic training have divergent views as to which administrative body should govern its future.

  11. The emergence of thanatology and current practice in death education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Luciana Mascarenhas; Testoni, Ines

    Thanatology is a recent field that contemplates death studies and employs an interdisciplinary approach to practice. This science emerged in a historical context marked by intense social, economic, and political changes that contributed to the concept of death being excluded from social life. This literature review aims to outline the history and evolution ofthanatology in Western society, delineating the contextual circumstances that led to its origin and drawing special attention to current works on death education. In our post-modern society, the call for studies in the field of thanatology appears to be increasing. However, although there have been significant contributions and promising research is underway, there are still many questions to be answered.

  12. Typography and layout of technical reports - Survey of current practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, T. E.; Cordle, V. M.; Mccullough, R.

    1985-01-01

    As part of a review of the NASA Langley Research Center scientific and technical information program, 50 technical reports from industry, research institutions, and government agencies were systematically examined and analyzed to determine current usage and practice in regard to (1) typography, including composition method, type style, type size, and margin treatment; (2) graphic design, including layout and imposition of material on the page; and (3) physical media, including paper, ink, and binding methods. The results indicate that approximately 50 percent of the reports were typeset, 70 percent used Roman (serif) type, 80 percent used 10- or 11-point type for text, 60 percent used a ragged right-hand margin, slightly more than half used paragraph indentation, 75 percent used a single-column layout, 65 percent had one or more figures or tables placed perpendicular to (not aligned with) the text, and perfect binding was the most frequently used binding method.

  13. Preparation of intravenous cholesterol tracer using current good manufacturing practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaobo; Ma, Lina; Racette, Susan B; Swaney, William P; Ostlund, Richard E

    2015-12-01

    Studies of human reverse cholesterol transport require intravenous infusion of cholesterol tracers. Because insoluble lipids may pose risk and because it is desirable to have consistent doses of defined composition available over many months, we investigated the manufacture of cholesterol tracer under current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) conditions appropriate for phase 1 investigation. Cholesterol tracer was prepared by sterile admixture of unlabeled cholesterol or cholesterol-d7 in ethanol with 20% Intralipid(®). The resulting material was filtered through a 1.2 micron particulate filter, stored at 4°C, and tested at time 0, 1.5, 3, 6, and 9 months for sterility, pyrogenicity, autoxidation, and particle size and aggregation. The limiting factor for stability was a rise in thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances of 9.6-fold over 9 months (P postproduction. CGMP manufacturing methods can be achieved in the academic setting and need to be considered for critical components of future metabolic studies.

  14. REVIEW OF CURRENT PRACTICE IN CHARACTERIZATION AND MONITORING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A.Ebadian, Ph.D.

    2001-01-01

    Characterization and monitoring are important parts of environmental remediation of contaminated sites by the Department of Energy--Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM). The actual remediation process often cannot begin or even be planned until characterization is complete. Monitoring is essential to verify the progress of remediation and of the waste stream. However, some contaminated sites are difficult, costly, or have a high exposure risk to personnel to characterize or monitor using the baseline technology or current practice. Therefore, development of new characterization and monitoring technologies is time-critical to remediate these sites. The main task of the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Crosscutting Program (CMST-CP) is to develop and deploy innovative characterization and monitoring technologies that improve performance and reduce personnel exposure, cost, and detection limits. However, to evaluate different proposals for new technologies to decide which ones to develop or deploy, it is necessary to compare their cost and performance to the baseline technology. The goal of this project is to facilitate the direct comparison of new technologies to the baseline technology by documenting the current practices for site characterization and monitoring at DOE sites and by presenting the information in an easy-to-use, concise database. The database will assist the CMST-CP and others in evaluating or designing new technologies by identifying the baseline technologies and describing their performance and cost. The purpose of this document is to report on the completion of this project and to describe the database. Section 2.0 describes the data assessment methodology. Section 3.0 presents the database and serves as a user manual. Section 4.0 lists the references used for each baseline technology in the database. The full references can be found in the Appendix.

  15. Cancer pain management in China: current status and practice implications based on the ACHEON survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhongjun

    2017-01-01

    Cancer pain can seriously impact the quality of life (QoL) of patients, and optimal management practices are therefore of paramount importance. The ACHEON survey queried physicians and patients from 10 Asian countries/regions to assess current clinical practices in cancer pain management in Asia. This study presents the data obtained for cancer pain management in mainland China, with an emphasis on practices related to opioid drugs. In several tertiary hospitals across China, 250 patients experiencing cancer pain and 100 physicians were surveyed on questions designed to assess current cancer pain management practices and cancer pain impact on QoL. The patient survey showed that 88% of patients reported moderate-to-severe cancer pain, with a median duration of 6 months. The physician survey showed that medical school/residency training with regard to cancer pain management was inadequate in ~80% of physicians. A total of 80% of physicians and 67.2% of patients reported that pain scale was used during pain assessment; 84% of physicians expressed that physician-perceived pain severity was not completely consistent with actual pain the patient experienced. Of the 147 patients who recalled the medication received, 83.7% were administered opioid prescriptions. Of the 240 patients who received treatment, 43.8% perceived the inadequacy of controlling pain. The primary barriers from physicians perceived to optimal pain management included patients' fear of side effects (58%), patients' fear of addiction (53%), patients' reluctance to report pain (43%), physicians' reluctance to prescribe (29%), physicians' inadequacy of pain assessment (27%) and excessive regulation of opioid analgesics (47%). Knowledge of cancer pain management should be strengthened among physicians. Quantitative pain assessment and principle-based pain management should be combined to achieve pain relief. Misconceptions about opioids in patients and physicians and poor report about pain should be

  16. The Development of Perioperative Practices for Liver Transplantation: Advances and Current Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merceds Susan Mandell

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation is a young medical specialty that has grown rapidly over the past 50 years. Anesthesiologists, surgeons and hepatologists are all essential partners in the process of determining patient outcome. Each specialty has made landmark improvements in patient outcome. However, there is still variability in practice patterns in each of the 3 major specialties. This review will use a historic perspective to explore the unique forces that shaped specific transplant practices and those that gave rise to differences in perioperative practices. Anesthesiologists and surgeons have made significant improvements in the management of blood loss, and coagulation monitoring and intervention. This has improved operative survival and early patient outcome. Perioperative survival has improved despite a worldwide shortage of donor organs and a trend to transplant sicker patients. A smaller pool of donor organs is required to meet the needs of an expanding waiting list. The innovations to reduce deaths on the transplant wait list are reviewed along with their impact on overall patient outcome. The evolving organ shortage is the pinnacle point in shaping future transplant practices. Currently, institutional-specific practices may be reinforced by the informal “tutorship” that is used to train physicians and by the resources available at each site of practice. However, there is evidence that specific intraoperative practices such as the use of a low central venous pressure, selection of vasopressors and certain surgical techniques can modify patient outcome. Further investigation is needed to determine whether the good or the bad associated with each practice prevails and in what unique circumstance.

  17. SECOND LANGUAGE VOCABULARY ASSESSMENT: CURRENT PRACTICES AND NEW DIRECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Read

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper surveys some current developments in second language vocabulary assessment, with particular attention to the ways in which computer corpora can provide better quality information about the frequency of words and how they are used in specific contexts. The relative merits of different word lists are discussed, including the Academic Word List and frequency lists derived from the British National Corpus. Word frequency data is needed for measures of vocabulary size, such as the Yes/No format, which is being developed and used for a variety of purposes. The paper also reviews work on testing depth of knowledge of vocabulary, where rather less progress has been made, both in defining depth as a construct and in developing tests for practical use. Another important perspective is the use of vocabulary within particular contexts of use or registers, and recent corpus research is extending our understanding of the lexical features of academic registers. This provides a basis for assessing learners’ ability to deploy their vocabulary knowledge effectively for functional communication in specific academic contexts. It is concluded that, while current tests of vocabulary knowledge are valuable for certain purposes, they need to be complemented by more contextualised measures of vocabulary use.

  18. Current status of robotic training in the UK – a trainees perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaite E Chan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The validation of robotic surgery in a growing number of operative procedures has increased its acceptance nationwide and its usage is becoming widespread. Training needs to reflect this fast paced environment to ensure that surgeons continue to progress competently and safely. Current surgical training in the UK is validated through the Intercollegiate Surgical Curriculum Programme (ISCP with progression assessed through an Annual Review of Curriculum Progress (ARCP. There has been some resistance to this since its introduction and many trainees remain dissatisfied with this programme. Training in robotic surgery is currently focused through fellowships with little regular exposure to urology trainees at more junior levels. Robotic simulation provides a useful adjunct to training for both technical and non-technical skills. Its usage is particularly valuable to more inexperienced trainees but may be of limited benefit in those with more advanced skills. Training programmes such as the fundamental skills in robotic surgery (FSRS have been created to facilitate robotic training and it is likely that the future of robotic surgery training will include a combination of theoretical learning, training programmes and fellowship training.-------------------------------------------------------Cite this article as: Chan KE, Vasdev N. Current status of robotic training in the UK – a trainees perspective. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(1:02013.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14319/ijcto.0201.3

  19. Rural general practice training: experience of a rural general practice team and a postgraduate year two registrar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott-Jones J

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Undertaking training in rural areas is a recognised way of helping recruit staff to work in rural communities. Postgraduate year two medical doctors in New Zealand have been able to undertake a three-month placement in rural practice as part of their pre-vocational training experience since November 2010. AIM: To describe the experience of a rural general practice team providing training to a postgraduate year two medical trainee, and to describe the teaching experience and range of conditions seen by the trainee. METHODS: A pre- and post-placement interview with staff, and analysis of a logbook of cases and teaching undertaken in the practice. RESULTS: The practice team's experience of having the trainee was positive, and the trainee was exposed to a wide range of conditions over 418 clinical encounters. The trainee received 22.5 hours of formal training over the three-month placement. DISCUSSION: Rural general practice can provide a wide range of clinical experience to a postgraduate year two medical trainee. Rural practices in New Zealand should be encouraged to offer teaching placements at this training level. Exposure to rural practice at every level of training is important to encourage doctors to consider rural practice as a career.

  20. Best practice in communications training for public engagement with science, technology, engineering and mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Bultitude

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Effective training in key communications skills is critical for successful public engagement. However, what are the secrets to designing and delivering an effectual training course? This paper outlines key findings from a research study into communication training programmes for public engagement with STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The research focused on training in direct communication methods, (as separate from media training and encompassed both trainers and trainees, the latter group spanning across both scientists and explainers. The findings indicated that training courses are effective at increasing involvement in science communication events and trainees feel more confident and able to engage due to training. An interactive style was found to be a key element of training courses. Demonstrations of good practice followed by own performance with feedback were also important, preferably involving a ‘real’ audience. A list of guidelines on best practice has been developed which offers practical advice.

  1. Factors influencing the current practice of self-medication consultations in Eastern Indonesian community pharmacies: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brata, Cecilia; Fisher, Colleen; Marjadi, Brahmaputra; Schneider, Carl R; Clifford, Rhonda M

    2016-05-13

    Research has shown that the current practice of pharmacy staff when providing self-medication consultations in Indonesia is suboptimal. To improve the performance of pharmacy staff when providing self-medication consultations in community pharmacies, the factors that influence current practice need to be understood. The aim of this study is to identify the factors that influence current practice of pharmacy staff when handling self-medication consultations in Eastern Indonesian community pharmacies. Fifteen in-depth interviews were conducted with pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, pharmacy owners, and counter attendants. Thematic analysis was used to generate findings. The current practice of pharmacy staff when handling self-medication consultations is directly influenced by the professionalism of pharmacy staff and patient responses to the consultations. These factors are in turn affected by the organisational context of the pharmacy and the external pharmacy environment. The organisational context of the pharmacy includes staffing, staff affordability, and the availability of time and facilities in which to provide consultations. The external pharmacy environment includes the number of trained pharmacy staff in the research setting, the relevance of pharmacy education to the needs of pharmacy practice, the support offered by the Indonesian Pharmacists Association, a competitive business environment, and the policy environment. Complex and inter-related factors influence the current practice of pharmacy staff when providing self-medication consultations in community pharmacies in this research setting. Multiple strategies will be required to improve consultation practices.

  2. Fish quarantine: current practices in public zoos and aquaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadfield, Catherine A; Clayton, Leigh A

    2011-12-01

    The primary goal of quarantine is to reduce the risk of introducing infectious diseases into established collections. Fish quarantine is inherently complex because of the variety of species, environmental requirements, and facilities. To examine current practices, questionnaires were submitted to 60 public zoos and aquaria, predominantly in North America. Questions reviewed system type (closed, flow-through), quarantine length, diagnostics, treatments, and cleaning and disinfection. Forty-two of the 60 institutions responded. Most institutions had separate quarantine protocols for freshwater teleosts, marine teleosts, and elasmobranchs. Ninety-five percent of institutions had a minimum quarantine period of 30 days or more. Sixty-four percent of institutions used isolated areas for some or all of their fish quarantine. Twenty-five percent had designated fish quarantine staff. All institutions used regular visual examinations to assess animal health. Fifty-four percent of the institutions carried out routine hands-on diagnostics on some fish; this was more common for elasmobranchs than teleosts. All institutions carried out necropsies on mortalities. Fifteen percent of institutions performed histopathology on almost all fresh mortalities; 54% percent performed histopathology on less than 10% of mortalities. Prophylactic treatments were common in closed systems, in particular, formalin immersion for teleosts, freshwater dips and copper sulfate immersion for marine teleosts, and praziquantel immersion for marine teleosts and elasmobranchs. Institutions using dips generally did so at the start or end of quarantine. Fenbendazole- and praziquantel-medicated foods were used commonly in teleosts, but dosages varied greatly. Cleaning and disinfection of systems and equipment increased in response to known pathogens. These results can be used to compare and discuss fish quarantine practices at display facilities in order to improve quarantine success.

  3. Is dosimetry still a necessity in current dental practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, S S; Rakesh, N; Chauhan, Pallavi; Clint, Joseph Ben; Sharma, Shivani

    2015-12-01

    Today, dentists have a wide range of imaging modalities to choose from, the film based techniques, digital techniques, and the recent introduction of 3D volumetric or cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). The inherent design features of the new generation dental x-ray equipment has significantly improved over the years with no evidence of substandard x-ray units in operation. In dental facilities radiological workload is comparatively low, newer radiation equipments and accessories follow safety guidelines and employ better radiation protection measures for the patient and the operator. Dentists' knowledge and expertise in radiation protection measures is good, enabling them to carry out riskfree radiation procedures in their practice. Therefore, the present study is aimed at assessing the need for dosimeters in current dental scenario. 'Is there currently a significant risk from dental radiography to merit the use of personal dosimetery in dental practice. 'Dental health professionals (Oral radiologists) and radiographic assistants of fourteen dental colleges in Karnataka state participated in this questionnaire study. The questionnaire consisted of the following questions--the make, type, year of manufacture of radiographic machines used in their setup, number of radiographs made per day in the institution, type of receptors used, number of personnel at risk for radiation exposure, radiation protection measures used, regular monitoring by personal dosimeters, equivalent dosage readings for the past 12 months and whether the reading of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) for any personnel had exceeded the recommended exposure value in the last 3 years. Dosimetry records of the radiology staff in the last three years shows doses no more than 1.50 mSv per year. The various institutions' dose (person mSv) was in the range of 3.70 mSv-3.90 mSv. Personal monitoring for Dentists can be omitted in the dental colleges since the estimated dose of oral radiologists

  4. 75 FR 78715 - Small Entity Compliance Guide: Current Good Manufacturing Practice in Manufacturing, Packaging...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Small Entity Compliance Guide: Current Good Manufacturing Practice in Manufacturing, Packaging, Labeling, or Holding Operations for Dietary Supplements; Availability...) is announcing the availability of a guidance entitled ``Current Good Manufacturing Practice in...

  5. Current training on the basics of robotic surgery in the Netherlands: time for a multidisciplinary approach?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, W.; Angst, I. de; Schreuder, H.; Schout, B.M.A.; Draaisma, W.; Verweij, L.; Hendrikx, A.; Poel, H. van der

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The following research questions were answered: (1) What are the training pathways followed by the current robot professionals? (2) Are there any differences between the surgical specialties in robot training and robot use? (3) What is their opinion about multidisciplinary basic skills

  6. Current training on the basics of robotic surgery in the Netherlands: Time for a multidisciplinary approach?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Brinkman (Willem); I. de Angst (Isabel); H.W.R. Schreuder (Henk); B. Schout (Barbara); W.A. Draaisma (Werner); L.M. Verweij (Lisanne); A.J.M. Hendrikx (A. J M); H.G. van der Poel (Henk G.)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: The following research questions were answered: (1) What are the training pathways followed by the current robot professionals? (2) Are there any differences between the surgical specialties in robot training and robot use? (3) What is their opinion about multidisciplinary

  7. Current training on the basics of robotic surgery in the Netherlands: time for a multidisciplinary approach?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, W.; Angst, I. de; Schreuder, H.; Schout, B.M.A.; Draaisma, W.; Verweij, L.; Hendrikx, A.; Poel, H. van der

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The following research questions were answered: (1) What are the training pathways followed by the current robot professionals? (2) Are there any differences between the surgical specialties in robot training and robot use? (3) What is their opinion about multidisciplinary basic skills

  8. Current training on the basics of robotic surgery in the Netherlands: Time for a multidisciplinary approach?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, Willem; de Angst, Isabel; Schreuder, Henk; Schout, Barbara; Draaisma, Werner; Verweij, Lisanne; Hendrikx, Ad; van der Poel, Henk

    Introduction The following research questions were answered: (1) What are the training pathways followed by the current robot professionals? (2) Are there any differences between the surgical specialties in robot training and robot use? (3) What is their opinion about multidisciplinary basic skills

  9. Current training on the basics of robotic surgery in the Netherlands: Time for a multidisciplinary approach?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Brinkman (Willem); I. de Angst (Isabel); H.W.R. Schreuder (Henk); B. Schout (Barbara); W.A. Draaisma (Werner); L.M. Verweij (Lisanne); A.J.M. Hendrikx (A. J M); H.G. van der Poel (Henk G.)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: The following research questions were answered: (1) What are the training pathways followed by the current robot professionals? (2) Are there any differences between the surgical specialties in robot training and robot use? (3) What is their opinion about multidisciplinary

  10. Current training on the basics of robotic surgery in the Netherlands: Time for a multidisciplinary approach?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, Willem; de Angst, Isabel; Schreuder, Henk|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304815977; Schout, Barbara; Draaisma, Werner; Verweij, Lisanne; Hendrikx, Ad; van der Poel, Henk

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The following research questions were answered: (1) What are the training pathways followed by the current robot professionals? (2) Are there any differences between the surgical specialties in robot training and robot use? (3) What is their opinion about multidisciplinary basic skills

  11. Current Practices in Global/International Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences: Home/Host Country or Site/Institution Considerations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Naser Z Alsharif; Adnan Dakkuri; Jeanine P Abrons; Dennis Williams; David N Ombengi; HaiAn Zheng; Sara Al-Dahir; Toyin Tofade; Suzanna Gim; Mary Beth O'Connell; Anna Ratka; Emily Dornblaser

    2016-01-01

      International outreach by schools and colleges of pharmacy is increasing. In this paper, we provide current practice guidelines to establish and maintain successful global/international advanced pharmacy practice experiences (G/I APPEs...

  12. Extension of general practice training from three to four years: experiences of a vocational training programme in Southern Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dowling, Stephanie

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the experiences of trainees taking part in an extended (four-year) general practice training programme introduced in the South Eastern region of the Republic of Ireland to replace the previous traditional (three-year) programme. In a qualitative design, eight homogeneous focus groups were held to determine the value of the additional year of training. The first cohort of trainees was interviewed towards the start and at the end of their fourth year. Trainees finishing the following year were also interviewed, as were graduates from the final three-year programme. GP trainers and the four members of the programme directing team comprised two further independent focus groups. Trainees reported that the integration of hospital posts and general practice attachments over the four years was particularly beneficial. The exposure to a variety of different general practices and the opportunity to take part in specialty clinics were considered extremely useful. The fourth year of training was felt to be less pressurised than previous years. Professional and personal development was enhanced; improved readiness to practise and confidence were noted. Perceived disadvantages of extended training included a lack of acknowledgment for doctors in their fourth year and excessive emphasis placed on research during the final year of training. The addition of an extra year of vocational training improves professional and personal development and changes the learning experience for doctors. Doctors felt more confident and ready to enter independent practice at the end of the fourth year of training.

  13. A Study of Best Practices in Training Transfer and Proposed Model of Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Lisa A.; Hutchins, Holly M.

    2008-01-01

    Data were gathered from a sample of training professionals of an American Society of Training and Development (ASTD) chapter in the southern United States regarding best practices for supporting training transfer. Content analysis techniques, based on a rigorous methodology proposed by Insch, Moore, & Murphy (1997), were used to analyze the…

  14. Industrial Provision of Practice Skills of Students Training Gastronomy Education (Case of Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarioglan, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of this study is to determine to what extent practice skills of students, training in gastronomy education, meet the expectations of food and beverage industry. In the study, 197 students training internship in 27 different firms of total 1540 students training in gastronomy education at higher education level in Turkey were reached by…

  15. Effect of Dairy Beef Quality Assurance Training on Dairy Worker Knowledge and Welfare-Related Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Ashley E.; Ahola, Jason K.; Chahine, Mireille; Roman-Muniz, I. Noa

    2016-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether on-farm dairy beef quality assurance (BQA) training affected dairy worker knowledge of BQA and welfare-related practices. Dairy personnel who participated in the BQA training were administered an exam before and after the training to gauge the amount of knowledge gained. The average exam score was 21.0…

  16. Parameters of training, academic involvement, and practice setting predictive of retention in combined medical-psychiatric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Edward; Summergrad, Paul; Price, Lori

    2014-08-01

    The authors contrasted physicians trained in both psychiatry and another specialty who continue to practice both specialties vs. those who practice only psychiatry, in terms of their training, academic profile, and practice setting. The authors analyzed survey responses from 132 doubly boarded physicians who vary in whether or not they continue to practice both specialties. Group results were compared using chi square, Fisher exact, and t tests. Of graduates of double-board programs, 79.2% continue in dual practice. Other factors associated with continued combined practice were training in neurology-psychiatry, greater academic involvement, high motivation, practice in a non-public hospital setting, and demonstrated leadership capacity. Double-board training programs have been successful in producing a group of clinicians committed to long-term combined medical-psychiatric practice, but this effect is stronger in psychiatry-neurology than in other types of combined practice. Future research should investigate other practice parameters that foster or impede integrated medical-psychiatric care.

  17. Embodied Creativity Training Practice in East and West Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, ChaoYing; Hu, Weipin; Wang, Canming

    2016-01-01

    embodied creativity training programs into three groups: creative exercises beyond teaching-curriculum, embodied creative teaching program, and creativity competition project. Finally, the potential possibility of integrating the embodied creativity training into the gifted and special education...

  18. Gender relations and health research: a review of current practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bottorff Joan L

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The importance of gender in understanding health practices and illness experiences is increasingly recognized, and key to this work is a better understanding of the application of gender relations. The influence of masculinities and femininities, and the interplay within and between them manifests within relations and interactions among couples, family members and peers to influence health behaviours and outcomes. Methods To explore how conceptualizations of gender relations have been integrated in health research a scoping review of the existing literature was conducted. The key terms gender relations, gender interactions, relations gender, partner communication, femininities and masculinities were used to search online databases. Results Through analysis of this literature we identified two main ways gender relations were integrated in health research: a as emergent findings; and b as a basis for research design. In the latter, gender relations are included in conceptual frameworks, guide data collection and are used to direct data analysis. Conclusions Current uses of gender relations are typically positioned within intimate heterosexual couples whereby single narratives (i.e., either men or women are used to explore the influence and/or impact of intimate partner gender relations on health and illness issues. Recommendations for advancing gender relations and health research are discussed. This research has the potential to reduce gender inequities in health.

  19. Current Continuing Professional Education Practice among Malaysian Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Chan Chong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nurses need to participate in CPE to update their knowledge and increase their competencies. This research was carried out to explore their current practice and the future general needs for CPE. This cross-sectional descriptive study involved registered nurses from government hospitals and health clinics from Peninsular Malaysia. Multistage cluster sampling was used to recruit 1000 nurses from four states of Malaysia. Self-explanatory questionnaires were used to collect the data, which were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Seven hundred and ninety-two nurses participated in this survey. Only 80% (562 of the nurses had engaged in CPE activities during the past 12 months. All attendance for the various activities was below 50%. Workshops were the most popular CPE activity (345, 43.6% and tertiary education was the most unpopular activity (10, 1.3%. The respondents did perceive the importance of future CPE activities for career development. Mandatory continuing professional education (MCPE is a key measure to ensure that nurses upgrade their knowledge and skills; however, it is recommended that policy makers and nurse leaders in the continuing professional development unit of health service facilities plan CPE activities to meet registered nurses’ (RNs needs and not simply organizational requirements.

  20. Current UK practices in the management of subacromial impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Colin; Tait, Gavin R

    2015-01-01

    Background Controversy presently exists surrounding the management of patients with subacromial impingement. This study aims to highlight current UK practices in the management of these patients. Methods BESS members were invited to complete a questionnaire and responses were received from 157 consultant shoulder surgeons. Results Physiotherapy is an integral part of management for 93% of surgeons with a minimum period of 12 weeks being most popular prior to consideration of arthroscopic subacromial decompression. Subacromial steroid injection is used by 95% and 86% repeat this if the patient has failed to respond to a previous injection by the general practioner. From initial presentation, 77% felt there should be at least 3 months of conservative management before proceeding to surgery. Good but transient response to subacromial injection was considered the best predictor of good surgical outcome by 77%. The coracoacromial ligament is fully released by 78%, although there was greater variation in how aggressive surgeons were with acromioplasty. Most (59%) do not include the nontender acromioclavicular joint to any extent in routine acromioplasty. Hospital physiotherapy protocols are used by 63% for postoperative rehabilitation. Conclusions Variation exists in the management regimes offered to patients with subacromial impingement, but most employ a minimum period of 12 weeks of conservative management incorporating physiotherapy and at least 2 subacromial steriod injections. PMID:27582972

  1. Computational structures technology at Grumman: Current practice/future needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifko, Allan B.; Eidinoff, Harvey

    1992-05-01

    The current practice for the design analysis of new airframe structural systems is to construct a master finite element model of the vehicle in order to develop internal load distributions. The inputs to this model include the geometry which is taken directly from CADAM and CATIA structural layout and aerodynamic loads and mass distribution computer models. This master model is sufficiently detailed to define major load paths and for the computation of dynamic mode shapes and structural frequencies, but not detailed enough to define local stress gradients and notch stresses. This master model is then used to perform structural optimization studies that will provide minimum weights for major structural members. The post-processed output from the master model, load, stress, and strain analysis is then used by structural analysts to perform detailed stress analysis of local regions in order to design local structure with all its required details. This local analysis consists of hand stress analysis and life prediction analysis with the assistance of manuals, design charts, computer stress and structural life analysis and sometimes finite element or boundary element analysis. The resulting design is verified by fatigue tests.

  2. Current Continuing Professional Education Practice among Malaysian Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Mei Chan; Francis, Karen; Cooper, Simon; Abdullah, Khatijah Lim

    2014-01-01

    Nurses need to participate in CPE to update their knowledge and increase their competencies. This research was carried out to explore their current practice and the future general needs for CPE. This cross-sectional descriptive study involved registered nurses from government hospitals and health clinics from Peninsular Malaysia. Multistage cluster sampling was used to recruit 1000 nurses from four states of Malaysia. Self-explanatory questionnaires were used to collect the data, which were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Seven hundred and ninety-two nurses participated in this survey. Only 80% (562) of the nurses had engaged in CPE activities during the past 12 months. All attendance for the various activities was below 50%. Workshops were the most popular CPE activity (345, 43.6%) and tertiary education was the most unpopular activity (10, 1.3%). The respondents did perceive the importance of future CPE activities for career development. Mandatory continuing professional education (MCPE) is a key measure to ensure that nurses upgrade their knowledge and skills; however, it is recommended that policy makers and nurse leaders in the continuing professional development unit of health service facilities plan CPE activities to meet registered nurses' (RNs) needs and not simply organizational requirements.

  3. Cytokine release assays: current practices and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finco, D; Grimaldi, C; Fort, M; Walker, M; Kiessling, A; Wolf, B; Salcedo, T; Faggioni, R; Schneider, A; Ibraghimov, A; Scesney, S; Serna, D; Prell, R; Stebbings, R; Narayanan, P K

    2014-04-01

    As a result of the CD28 superagonist biotherapeutic monoclonal antibody (TGN 1412) "cytokine storm" incident, cytokine release assays (CRA) have become hazard identification and prospective risk assessment tools for screening novel biotherapeutics directed against targets having a potential risk for eliciting adverse pro-inflammatory clinical infusion reactions. Different laboratories may have different strategies, assay formats, and approaches to the reporting, interpretation, and use of data for either decision making or risk assessment. Additionally, many independent contract research organizations (CROs), academic and government laboratories are involved in some aspect of CRA work. As a result, while some pharmaceutical companies are providing CRA data as part of the regulatory submissions when necessary, technical and regulatory practices are still evolving to provide data predictive of cytokine release in humans and that are relevant to safety. This manuscript provides an overview of different approaches employed by the pharmaceutical industry and CROs, for the use and application of CRA based upon a survey and post survey follow up conducted by ILSI-Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) Immunotoxicology Committee CRA Working Group. Also discussed is ongoing research in the academic sector, the regulatory environment, current limitations of the assays, and future directions and recommendations for cytokine release assays.

  4. NanoSIMS for Biological Applications: Current Practices and Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Jamie R.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Cliff, John B.; Anderton, Christopher R.

    2017-09-27

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has become an increasingly utilized tool in biologically-relevant studies. Of these, high lateral resolution methodologies using the NanoSIMS 50/50L have been especially powerful within many biological fields over the past decade. Here, we provide a review of this technology, sample preparation and analysis considerations, examples of recent biological studies, data analysis, and current outlooks. Specifically, we offer an overview of SIMS and development of the NanoSIMS. We describe the major experimental factors that should be considered prior to NanoSIMS analysis and then provide information on best practices for data analysis and image generation, which includes an in-depth discussion of appropriate colormaps. Additionally, we provide an open-source method for data representation that allows simultaneous visualization of secondary electron and ion information within a single image. Finally, we present a perspective on the future of this technology and where we think it will have the greatest impact in near future.

  5. Targeted temperature management: Current evidence and practices in critical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Saigal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeted temperature management (TTM in today′s modern era, especially in intensive care units represents a promising multifaceted therapy for a variety of conditions. Though hypothermia is being used since Hippocratic era, the renewed interest of late has been since early 21 st century. There have been multiple advancements in this field and varieties of cooling devices are available at present. TTM requires careful titration of its depth, duration and rewarming as it is associated with side-effects. The purpose of this review is to find out the best evidence-based clinical practice criteria of therapeutic hypothermia in critical care settings. TTM is an unique therapeutic modality for salvaging neurological tissue viability in critically ill patients viz. Post-cardiac arrest, traumatic brain injury (TBI, meningitis, acute liver failure and stroke. TTM is standard of care in post-cardiac arrest situations; there has been a lot of controversy of late regarding temperature ranges to be used for the same. In patients with TBI, it reduces intracranial pressure, but has not shown any favorable neurologic outcome. Hypothermia is generally accepted treatment for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in newborns. The current available technology to induce and maintain hypothermia allows for precise temperature control. Future studies should focus on optimizing hypothermic treatment to full benefit of our patients and its application in other clinical scenarios.

  6. Current practice of therapeutic drug monitoring of biopharmaceuticals in spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Frédéric; Placensia, Chamaida; Goupille, Philippe; Paintaud, Gilles; Balsa, Alejandro; Mulleman, Denis

    2017-04-04

    Treatment of spondyloarthritis (SpA) has greatly improved in the biopharmaceutical era. These compounds, primarily tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors, are effective, but some patients may show poor response, sometimes due to the presence of anti-drug antibodies (ADAs). In some instances, clinicians may increase or taper the dose, depending on the clinical response. Besides the current clinical practice, a tailored strategy based on drug monitoring is emerging as a way to improve the use of these drugs. However, the relevance of this therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of biopharmaceuticals for SpA is still unknown. In this literature review, we examined the most relevant articles dealing with the concentration-response relation, ADA detection, and pharmacokinetics in SpA treated with biopharmaceuticals. ADAs were associated with low or undetectable concentration of monoclonal antibodies. The relation between drug concentration and clinical response in SpA is debated, some studies showing an association and others not. Therefore, TDM of biopharmaceuticals for SpA requires a better understanding of the association among the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and immunogenicity of these drugs.

  7. Life cycle assessment part 2: current impact assessment practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, D W; Potting, J; Finnveden, G; Lindeijer, E; Jolliet, O; Rydberg, T; Rebitzer, G

    2004-07-01

    Providing our society with goods and services contributes to a wide range of environmental impacts. Waste generation, emissions and the consumption of resources occur at many stages in a product's life cycle-from raw material extraction, energy acquisition, production and manufacturing, use, reuse, recycling, through to ultimate disposal. These all contribute to impacts such as climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion, photooxidant formation (smog), eutrophication, acidification, toxicological stress on human health and ecosystems, the depletion of resources and noise-among others. The need exists to address these product-related contributions more holistically and in an integrated manner, providing complimentary insights to those of regulatory/process-oriented methodologies. A previous article (Part 1, Rebitzer et al., 2004) outlined how to define and model a product's life cycle in current practice, as well as the methods and tools that are available for compiling the associated waste, emissions and resource consumption data into a life cycle inventory. This article highlights how practitioners and researchers from many domains have come together to provide indicators for the different impacts attributable to products in the life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) phase of life cycle assessment (LCA).

  8. The current state of personal training: managers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Deana I; Dail, Teresa K; Katula, Jeffrey A; Mustian, Karen M

    2010-11-01

    Fitness managers play an integral role in the day-to-day operation of the facilities in which they work. One of the most critical responsibilities is that of hiring, training, and supervising personal trainers. Research studies have identified a number of qualities and competencies that an effective exercise leader is required to have, but there is little scholarly work addressing managers' attitudes surrounding the performance of personal trainers. Using focus group methodology, managers of personal trainers were recruited to provide viewpoints related to desirable qualities of personal trainers and opinions regarding certification and academic preparation. Responses of the participants were transcribed, coded, and analyzed for themes. Two global themes, Selection Rationale and Negative Characteristics, emerged. Selection Rationale consisted of qualities that influence a manager's decision to hire a particular trainer (e.g., physique, education, social skills). Negative characteristics referred to qualities considered unethical or unprofessional (e.g., sexual comments, misuse of power) and the consequences of those behaviors (e.g., loss of clients, potential for litigation). The results suggest that undergraduate exercise science programs devote additional time toward the development of the affective qualities of future fitness trainers. Managers also recommended licensure for employees.

  9. Mapping the Context and Practice of Training, Development and HRD in European Call Centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavan, Thomas N.; Wilson, John P.; Cross, Christine; Carbery, Ronan

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Utilising data from 18 in-depth case studies, this study seeks to explore training, development and human resource development (HRD) practices in European call centres. It aims to argue that the complexity and diversity of training, development and HRD practices is best understood by studying the multilayered contexts within which call…

  10. Gestalt Practice and Arts-Based Training for Leadership, Innovation and Change Management Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liotas, Naoum

    2014-01-01

    Gestalt practice and arts-based training has been examined and evaluated using evidence from the literature and personal experience. Gestalt practice allows the training and learning process to take into account the intrapersonal as well as the interpersonal aspects of the group and the individuals involved: the resulting knowledge and…

  11. How Does Education and Training Impact on Management Practices? CRLRA Discussion Paper Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Sue

    A study examined the impact of agricultural education and training on farm business practice and the influence of training on changes to farming practice in Australia. Data were from an additional set of questions on the Australian Bureau of Statistics' 1993-94 Agricultural Financial Survey and an interview survey of 65 Tasmanian farmers. Findings…

  12. Pesticide safety training and practices in women working in small-scale agriculture in South Africa.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naidoo, S.; London, L.; Rother, H.A.; Burdorf, A.; Naidoo, R.N.; Kromhout, H.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Unregulated use of pesticides continues in developing countries in the presence of illiteracy and limited safety training and practices. This paper describes training and safety practices when mixing and spraying pesticides, and acetylcholinesterase levels among women farmers in KwaZulu-N

  13. Structural Decoupling between the VET and the Employment Systems: Challenges Manifested in Assessment of Practical Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umarik, Meril; Loogma, Krista; Hinno, Krista

    2010-01-01

    This article aims to analyse how structural decoupling, which is an especially relevant problem for school-based vocational education and training (VET) systems, reveals itself in the assessment of practical training. Niklas Luhmann's social system theory has been applied to the analysis of assessment practices as a communication act between the…

  14. Gestalt Practice and Arts-Based Training for Leadership, Innovation and Change Management Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liotas, Naoum

    2014-01-01

    Gestalt practice and arts-based training has been examined and evaluated using evidence from the literature and personal experience. Gestalt practice allows the training and learning process to take into account the intrapersonal as well as the interpersonal aspects of the group and the individuals involved: the resulting knowledge and…

  15. Structural Decoupling between the VET and the Employment Systems: Challenges Manifested in Assessment of Practical Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umarik, Meril; Loogma, Krista; Hinno, Krista

    2010-01-01

    This article aims to analyse how structural decoupling, which is an especially relevant problem for school-based vocational education and training (VET) systems, reveals itself in the assessment of practical training. Niklas Luhmann's social system theory has been applied to the analysis of assessment practices as a communication act between the…

  16. Barriers Encountered in the Transfer of Educational Training to Workplace Practice in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almannie, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces a critical issue in the practicality of training programs, not only in Saudi Arabia, but also in other developing countries where billions of dollars are spent on training human resources without evaluation of these programs on workplace practice and organization development. This study investigates barriers encountered in…

  17. Mapping the Context and Practice of Training, Development and HRD in European Call Centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavan, Thomas N.; Wilson, John P.; Cross, Christine; Carbery, Ronan

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Utilising data from 18 in-depth case studies, this study seeks to explore training, development and human resource development (HRD) practices in European call centres. It aims to argue that the complexity and diversity of training, development and HRD practices is best understood by studying the multilayered contexts within which call…

  18. Elite Sports Training as Model for Future Internet Practices?

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    This paper reflects on the experience of using ethnographic and experimental research at a high-performance athletic training center as model for drawing conclusion about the future everyday use of ICT and Internet technologies. The research project has consisted of field studies of training session and everyday life at an elite training center where athletes live and train as well as experimental design processes where new internet and media technologies has been explored within elite sports...

  19. An empirical identification and categorisation of training best practices for ERP implementation projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Jose Manuel

    2014-11-01

    Although training is one of the most cited critical success factors in Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems implementations, few empirical studies have attempted to examine the characteristics of management of the training process within ERP implementation projects. Based on the data gathered from a sample of 158 respondents across four stakeholder groups involved in ERP implementation projects, and using a mixed method design, we have assembled a derived set of training best practices. Results suggest that the categorised list of ERP training best practices can be used to better understand training activities in ERP implementation projects. Furthermore, the results reveal that the company size and location have an impact on the relevance of training best practices. This empirical study also highlights the need to investigate the role of informal workplace trainers in ERP training activities.

  20. 21 CFR 212.2 - What is current good manufacturing practice for PET drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is current good manufacturing practice for... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY DRUGS (Eff. 12-12-2011) General Provisions § 212.2 What is current good manufacturing practice...

  1. 21 CFR 210.1 - Status of current good manufacturing practice regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Status of current good manufacturing practice... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PROCESSING, PACKING, OR HOLDING OF DRUGS; GENERAL § 210.1 Status of current good manufacturing practice...

  2. Simulation in resuscitation teaching and training, an evidence based practice review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahu Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the management of a patient in cardiac arrest, it is sometimes the least experienced provider giving chest compressions, intubating the patient, and running the code during the most crucial moment in that patient′s life. Traditional methods of educating residents and medical students using lectures and bedside teaching are no longer sufficient. Today′s generation of trainees grew up in a multimedia environment, learning on the electronic method of learning (online, internet instead of reading books. It is unreasonable to expect the educational model developed 50 years ago to be able to adequately train the medical students and residents of today. One area that is difficult to teach is the diagnosis and management of the critically ill patient, specifically who require resuscitation for cardiac emergencies and cardiac arrest. Patient simulation has emerged as an educational tool that allows the learner to practice patient care, away from the bedside, in a controlled and safe environment, giving the learner the opportunity to practice the educational principles of deliberate practice and self-refection. We performed a qualitative literature review of the uses of simulators in resuscitation training with a focus on their current and potential applications in cardiac arrest and emergencies.

  3. Final report on implementation of energy conservation practices training in selected public housing developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    This report on the implementation of energy conservation practices training in selected public housing developments represents an initiative of the Research and Education Division, Office of Minority Economic Impact, US Department of Energy. The Office of Minority Economic Impact (MI) was created by Congress in 1979, within the US Department of Energy, to afford the Secretary advice on the effect policies, regulations and other actions of DOE respecting minority participation in energy programs. The Director of MI is responsible for the conduct of ongoing research into the effects, including socio-economic and environmental, of national energy programs, policies, and regulations of the Department of minorities. Public housing in the United States is dominated by minorities, public housing is a large consumer of residential energy. Consequently, this project is a logical merging of these two factors and an attempt to somehow influence energy savings through improving public housing residents` energy-consumption practices. This final report attempts to capture the results of this current demonstration, and incorporate the historical basis for today`s results by renewing the efforts that preceded the implementation of energy conservation practices training in selected public housing developments.

  4. Final report on implementation of energy conservation practices training in selected public housing developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    This report on the implementation of energy conservation practices training in selected public housing developments represents an initiative of the Research and Education Division, Office of Minority Economic Impact, US Department of Energy. The Office of Minority Economic Impact (MI) was created by Congress in 1979, within the US Department of Energy, to afford the Secretary advice on the effect policies, regulations and other actions of DOE respecting minority participation in energy programs. The Director of MI is responsible for the conduct of ongoing research into the effects, including socio-economic and environmental, of national energy programs, policies, and regulations of the Department of minorities. Public housing in the United States is dominated by minorities, public housing is a large consumer of residential energy. Consequently, this project is a logical merging of these two factors and an attempt to somehow influence energy savings through improving public housing residents' energy-consumption practices. This final report attempts to capture the results of this current demonstration, and incorporate the historical basis for today's results by renewing the efforts that preceded the implementation of energy conservation practices training in selected public housing developments.

  5. Does academic training background make a difference among practicing marriage and family therapists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, D S; Doherty, W J

    1998-07-01

    Using a national sample of practicing marriage and family therapists (MFTs) and their clients, this study investigated whether academic training background is associated with differences in practice patterns and client outcomes. Clinical members of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy with academic training in psychology, social work, counseling, and marriage and family therapy were compared on a wide range of clinical practice variables, and their clients were surveyed about their satisfaction and outcomes. Results showed highly similar practice patterns and client outcomes across all four disciplinary groups. Although the findings showed little evidence for the uniqueness of academic marriage and family therapy training among experienced MFTs, they also refute the notion that therapists trained in MFT degree programs practice in unusual or inferior ways compared to MFTs trained originally in other mental health disciplines.

  6. A revisit on the current practice of dispute resolution and ADR in the Malaysian construction industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Suhaimi Mohd Danuri

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The current dispute resolution procedures available in the Malaysian construction industry are mainly litigation and arbitration. In addition, the alternative dispute resolutions (ADR, namely mediation and adjudication, have also been introduced as the other methods for resolving disputes. The objective of this study is to examine the current practice of dispute resolution and ADR available in the Malaysian construction industry. The aim of this paper is two-fold: to report the current practice of dispute resolution and ADR, and identify the attributes of successful implementation of both mechanisms based on the perceptions of the Malaysian construction industry players. From the jurisprudence point of view, this study looks into the law as it is, in relation to the current practice of dispute resolution and ADR, by showing how those findings can be used to explain why improvement is needed to promote a successful and well received dispute resolution and ADR, and what lessons can be learnt, towards the formulation of a more viable methods for the Malaysian construction industry. NVivo software has been used to manage and organise the complete interview transcripts and facilitate the data analysis process for this study. Literature review reveals a continuous development of dispute resolution and ADR in the Malaysian construction industry, while, globally the industry has not only embraced ADR but also spearheaded the development of innovative forms of dispute avoidance mechanism. The findings of interviews show that locally, apart from litigation, the common types of ADR are arbitration, mediation and ad hoc mechanism. The findings also lead to the discovery of the following attributes: faster, less procedural, cost effective and enforceable; regulation and government's support; professionalism and ethic; training; and facility, that may promote a successful implementation of dispute resolution and ADR in Malaysia.

  7. Eddy current system for inspection of train hollow axles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chady, Tomasz; Psuj, Grzegorz; Sikora, Ryszard; Kowalczyk, Jacek; Spychalski, Ireneusz [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin (Poland)

    2014-02-18

    The structural integrity of wheelsets used in rolling stock is of great importance to the safety. In this paper, electromagnetic system with an eddy current transducer suitable for the inspection of hollow axles have been presented. The transducer was developed to detect surface braking defects having depth not smaller than 0.5 mm. Ultrasound technique can be utilized to inspect the whole axle, but it is not sufficiently sensitive to shallow defects located close to the surface. Therefore, the electromagnetic technique is proposed to detect surface breaking cracks that cannot be detected by ultrasonic technique.

  8. Does self-control improve with practice? Evidence from a six-week training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Eleanor; Sheeran, Paschal; Baird, Harriet; Macdonald, Ian; Webb, Thomas L; Harris, Peter R

    2016-08-01

    Can self-control be improved through practice? Several studies have found that repeated practice of tasks involving self-control improves performance on other tasks relevant to self-control. However, in many of these studies, improvements after training could be attributable to methodological factors (e.g., passive control conditions). Moreover, the extent to which the effects of training transfer to real-life settings is not yet clear. In the present research, participants (N = 174) completed a 6-week training program of either cognitive or behavioral self-control tasks. We then tested the effects of practice on a range of measures of self-control, including lab-based and real-world tasks. Training was compared with both active and no-contact control conditions. Despite high levels of adherence to the training tasks, there was no effect of training on any measure of self-control. Trained participants did not, for example, show reduced ego depletion effects, become better at overcoming their habits, or report exerting more self-control in everyday life. Moderation analyses found no evidence that training was effective only among particular groups of participants. Bayesian analyses suggested that the data were more consistent with a null effect of training on self-control than with previous estimates of the effect of practice. The implication is that training self-control through repeated practice does not result in generalized improvements in self-control. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Training minimal invasive approaches in hepatopancreatobilliary fellowship: the current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhas, Gokulakkrishna; Mittal, Vijay K

    2011-01-01

    Background There has been an increasing role of advanced minimally invasive procedures in hepatopancreatobilliary (HPB) surgery. However, there are no set minimum laparoscopic case requirements. Methods A 14-question electronic survey was sent to 82 worldwide HPB fellowship programme directors. Results Forty-nine per cent (n = 40) of the programme directors responded. The programmes were predominantly university based (83%). Programmes had either one (55%) or two fellows (40%) each year. Programmes (35–48%) had average annual volumes of 51–100 hepatic, 51–100 pancreatic and 25–50 biliary cases. For many programmes, <10% of hepatic (48%), pancreatic (40%) and biliary (70%) cases were done laparoscopically. The average annual fellow case volumes for hepatic, pancreatic and biliary surgeries were 25–50 (62%), 25–50 (47%) and <25 (50%), respectively. The average annual number of hepatic, pancreatic and biliary cases done laparoscopically by a fellow was 9, 9 and 4, which constitutes 36%, 36% and 16%, respectively, of the International Hepato-Pancreato-Billiary Association (IHPBA) requirement. Conclusion We surmise that the low average number of surgeries performed by minimally-invasive techniques by HPB fellows is not sufficient in today's practice. Should there be an increase in the minimal number of hepatic, pancreatic and complex biliary cases to 50, 50, and 25, with at least 50% of these performed laparoscopically? PMID:21309929

  10. Cardiovascular pharmacogenomics; state of current knowledge and implementation in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabi, Payman; Dubé, Marie-Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Pharmacogenomics (PGx) is the science that examines how an individual's genetic make-up affects the safety and efficacy of therapeutic drugs. PGx of response to cardiovascular (CV) medications is of the most successfully translated branches of PGx into the clinical workout. However, the clinical implementation of PGx of CV drugs is yet far beyond the growth of our understanding of the role of genetics in drug therapy. A considerable amount of efforts have been devoted by the regulatory agents like the food and drug administration (FDA) as well as the expert-based networks such as the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) to overcome the existing barriers. This has been done, at least in part, for some of the most widely prescribed CV drugs, including clopidogrel, warfarin and simvastatin for which the PGx knowledge have been satisfactorily robust to provoke the CPIC to issue the guidelines for these drugs and the FDA to update the drugs' labeling, both strongly recommended the use of genotype-guided dosing for these medications, provided that the genetic data are available. For other drugs, however, studies have produced contradictory results and further large and well-designed clinical trials are required to expand and confirm the clinical utility of their PGx data. This review paper presents the current state of knowledge in the field of PGx of CV medications and describes the facilities assisting to the translation of PGx data into the clinical practice. Afterward, the existing body of PGx literature of the most-commonly used CV medications is comprehensively discussed.

  11. Shifting currents: Progress, setbacks, and shifts in policy and practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,; Dunning, Charles; Robertson, Dale

    2016-01-01

    clean water future. More than a decade has passed since our first statewide WOW conversation and the report that captured recommendations from its participants: Waters of Wisconsin: The Future of Our Aquatic Ecosystems and Resources. Drawing from a diverse and growing set of stakeholders from across the state, the Wisconsin Academy initiated a new conversation in 2012 (known as WOW II) to assess progress in regard to our 2003 recommendations. We also sought to review the status of waters in Wisconsin today. The result of this renewed conversation is Shifting Currents: Progress, Setbacks, and Shifts in Policy and Practice. The new report assesses progress in brief, and explores in greater depth the continuing and emerging challenges to water quality, supply, and aquatic ecosystems in Wisconsin.In this report, we first review the context and frameworks for public decision-making about water and then examine some of the root causes—or “drivers”—and ecological stressors that underlie many of the symptoms we see in the form of pollution or ecosystem degradation in Wisconsin. This is followed by a summary of current water issues, many of which had been identified in the 2003 report and remain relevant today. We examine progress since 2003 but also setbacks, and discuss issues that we are likely to continue to face in the coming decades, including controlling agricultural runoff, mitigating climate change and grappling with its effects on the state’s waters, protecting groundwater from bacterial contamination and other pollutants, and preventing groundwater depletion. We also attempt to anticipate issues on the horizon. We offer a deeper look at some particular challenges, such as phosphorus pollution and groundwater contamination. We then consider the current decision-making framework and how it is shaping our capacity to respond to water challenges in Wisconsin. Finally, we offer recommendations and identify opportunities to safeguard Wisconsin’s waters in the

  12. An exploration into the applicability of school principals' training on the principals' leadership practices in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Kakon Montua Ajua, Shantal

    2012-01-01

    Quality leadership preparation has been shown to have positive influences on leadership practices of graduates. With five formal categories of leadership training programmes in the decentralized Finnish educational system, little is known about the leadership practices of graduates. This study explored the applicability of training on principals’ self-assessed leadership practices in Central Finland. Eight semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with principals from schools i...

  13. FAN EMPIRICAL STUDY OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ASSIGNMENT PRACTICES IN TRAINING PROGRAMS AND TRAINING MOTIVATION

    OpenAIRE

    AZMAN Ismail; MUHAMMAD ZULFADHLIZAM Ghazali; YUSOF Ismail; MOHD HASBULLAH Mohamad Faudzi; MOHD MURSYID Arshad

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the relationship between training assignment and training motivation using self-report questionnaires collected from cadet officers in a military training academy, Malaysia. The outcomes of testing hypothesis using a stepwise regression analysis showed two important findings: firstly, mandatory assignment is significantly correlated with training motivation. Secondly, voluntary assignment is also significantly correlated with training motivation. This ...

  14. REVIEW OF SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS IN JORDAN: CURRENT PRACTICES, CHALLENGES, AND PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza MAHMUD SULEIMAN AL SHOURA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper will try to provide an overview on Jordan’s special education programs for children with disabilities. Specifically, this paper will describe the emergence and development of special education services and the providers of these services within the context of Jordanian society. The key issues relevant to special teacher education, early childhood intervention, inclusive education and challenges faced by children with disabilities are also presented. The findings indicate that there are many challenges, including funding and support, inadequate instructional resources and techniques, shortage of pertinent knowledge and training, limited cooperation, and sparse data on children and youth with disabilities. This paper uses secondary data gathered from relevant reports, studies, and the understanding and experience of the author. Implications to improve the current special education practices for these students are discussed in this paper.

  15. A new practice in fruit trees: Centrifugal training system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin ATAY

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The choice of the training system is a rather important decision for yield, fruit quality and profitability. There were dramatic changes in concepts for apple training in the last years. Centrifugal training system which was one of the innovations was developed in the beginning of the 2000’s in France. SolAxe training system forms the main part of this training system. The most innovative aspect of the Centrifugal training system is the artificial extinction technique. This technique is carried out more specifically in the center of the tree and on the underside of branches to remove potentially poor quality fruits. Artificial extinction improves light distribution within the tree canopy especially in colored-fruit varieties for which the light climate is particularly important. It also offers an alternative training method to reduce biennial bearing. In addition to canopy porosity created by artificial extinction, this training system can help reducing disease and harmful insects. In this study it is aimed to explain general rules of centrifugal training system.

  16. Analysis of eddy current induced in track on medium-low speed maglev train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanchun; Jia, Zhen; He, Guang; Li, Jie

    2017-06-01

    Electromagnetic levitation (EMS) maglev train relies on the attraction between the electromagnets and rails which are mounted on the train to achieve suspension. During the movement, the magnetic field generated by the electromagnet will induce the eddy current in the orbit and the eddy current will weaken the suspended magnetic field. Which leads to the attenuation of the levitation force, the increases of suspension current and the degradation the suspension performance. In this paper, the influence of eddy current on the air gap magnetic field is solved by theoretical analysis, and the correction coefficient of air gap magnetic field is fitted according to the finite element data. The levitation force and current are calculated by the modified formula, and the velocity curves of the levitation force and current are obtained. The results show that the eddy current effect increases the load power by 61.9% in the case of heavy loads.

  17. [Effects of practical training to increase motivation for learning and related factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Takumi; Akiyama, Shinji; Sagara, Hidenori; Tanaka, Akihiro; Miyauchi, Yoshirou; Araki, Hiroaki; Shibata, Kazuhiko; Izushi, Fumio; Namba, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Under the six-year pharmaceutical education system that was initiated in April 2006, students who had completed the course in March 2012 became the first graduates. The six-year system encourages students to develop a well-rounded personality, a deep sense of ethics, knowledge required for health care professionals, abilities to identify and solve problems, and practical skills required in clinical settings, as well as basic knowledge and skills. Under the new education system based on the "pharmaceutical education model core curriculums" and "practical training model core curriculums", general pharmaceutical education is implemented in each college, and five-month practical training is conducted in clinical settings. Clinical tasks experienced by students for the first time are expected to significantly influence their motivation to learn and future prospects. In the present survey research, students who had completed practical training evaluated the training program, and correspondence and logistic regression analyses of the results were conducted to examine the future effects and influences of the training on the students. The results suggest that the students viewed the practical training program positively. In addition, clinical experience during the training sessions not only influenced their decisions on future careers, but also significantly increased their motivation to learn. Furthermore, their motivation for learning was increased most by the enthusiasm of pharmacists who advised them in clinical settings, rather than the training program itself. To improve pharmaceutical clinical learning, it is important to develop teaching and working environments for pharmacists in charge of advising students in clinical training.

  18. Current Practices and Opportunities in a Resident Clinic Regarding the Care of Older Adults with Multimorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenborn, Nancy L; Boyd, Cynthia M; McNabney, Matthew; Ray, Anushree; Cayea, Danelle

    2015-08-01

    Multimorbidity (≥2 chronic conditions) affects more than half of all older adults. The American Geriatrics Society developed and published guiding principles for the care of older adults with multimorbidity in 2012. Improved clinician training in caring for older adults with multimorbidity is needed, but it is not clear what opportunities arise within clinical encounters to apply the guiding principles or how clinicians at all stages of training currently practice in this area. This project aimed to characterize current practice and opportunities for improvement in an internal medicine residency clinic regarding the care of older adults with multimorbidity. Qualitative content analysis of audio-recorded clinic visits. Thirty clinic visits between 21 internal medicine residents and 30 of their primary care patients aged 65 and older with two or more chronic conditions were audio-recorded. Patients' mean age was 73.6, and they had on average 3.7 chronic conditions and took 12.6 medications. Transcripts of the audio-recorded visit discussions were analyzed using standard techniques of qualitative content analysis to describe the content and frequency of discussions in the clinic visits related to the five guiding principles: patient preferences, interpreting the evidence, prognosis, clinical feasibility, and optimizing therapies. All visits except one included discussions that were thematically related to at least one guiding principle, suggesting regular opportunities to apply the guiding principles in primary care encounters with internal medicine residents. Discussions related to some guiding principles occurred much more frequently than others. Patients presented a number of opportunities to incorporate the guiding principles that the residents missed, suggesting target areas for future educational interventions. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Learning & Using British Sign Language: Current Skills & Training of Hearing Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, James G.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Two aspects of a study of the problems hearing people have in acquiring British Sign Language (BSL) are described: (1) the measurement of current skills in BSL of professionals in the field, and (2) current training programs in BSL in the United Kingdom and results of some controlled teaching situations. (Author/PJM)

  20. The role of practical training in educating future cadre in hotel industry and tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekulić Dejan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourism stimulates the work of a large number of small and medium companies, who provide increase of the number of employees. By following the trends, high education institutions try to provide expert cadre who will be future transmitters of trends in the field. In order to preserve and enhance the quality of education in this area it is necessary to take care of the quality of the program of practical training as the bridge between formal education and work in tourism. In that context, the aim of the research was to explore the role and importance of practical training in the education of students in hotel industry and tourism. The research included 134 respondents, divided in two groups depending upon whether they had any experience in practical training in hotels and tourist agencies. The result shows that there are no significant differences in the perception of the importance of practical training and the factors which influence the selection of the company in which students perform practical training. On the other hand, the results show that there are significant differences, related to the role of hotels and tourist agencies in their practical education and competencies they should master at the end of the training, between those students who had practical training and those who have not had it yet.

  1. Praktikum Medizinische Recherche: Erfahrungen mit einer curricular integrierten Schulungsveranstaltung / Medical Information Retrieval Training: a practical training integrated into the curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner, Christiane

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available n June 2004 a course problem oriented learning (POL has been introduced at the medical faculty of the University Leipzig. The course on the topic „Infectology and Immunology“ takes place once a year and lasts for four weeks. It consists of a series of lectures and tutorials, in which small groups of students work on clinical case examples. Also part of the course are some practical training sessions. One of them is a 90 minutes practical training on searching for medical literature, which is organized by the medical library. In 2006 the practical training took place for the third time. The article tells about the development within the three years and the experiences that have been made.

  2. Craft Training in Russia: Theory and Practice of Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romantsev, Gennadij M.; Efanov, Andrei V.; Moiseev, Andrei V.; Bychkova, Ekaterina Yu.; Karpova, Natalia P.; Tidemann, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the research topic is substantiated by the social commitment to the establishment of a system of craft training focused on training personnel for craft enterprises. The purpose of the article is to provide theoretical and methodological substantiation of the necessity to provide organizational and pedagogical foundations for the…

  3. Traditional Birth Attendant Training and Local Birthing Practices in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, Sheela; Turrell, Gavin; Johnson, Helen; Fraser, Jenny; Patterson, Carla

    2011-01-01

    Training birth attendants (TBAs) to provide essential maternal and infant health care services during delivery and ongoing community care in developing countries. Despite inadequate evidence of relevance and effectiveness of TBA training programmes, there has been a policy shift since the 1990s in that many donor agencies funding TBA training…

  4. Training Practices and Organisational Learning Capability: Relationship and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerez Gomez, Pilar; Cespedes Lorente, Jose J.; Valle Cabrera, Ramon

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides an in-depth study of the relationship between the company's training strategy and its learning capability. On a sample of 111 Spanish companies from the chemical industry, tests a set of hypotheses which link four different training strategies with the learning capability dimensions. The results obtained from the regression…

  5. The Impact of Baccalaureate Medical Humanities on Subsequent Medical Training and Practice: A Physician-Educator's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Lauren

    2017-06-17

    This reflective essay is an attempt to organize trends in feedback I have observed during ten years of coursework, conversations, and correspondence with former students associated with the Medical Humanities Program at Baylor University. Over the years, recurrent themes arise when speaking with alumni about whether and how their medical humanities experience intersects with their current training. I have identified five particular domains in which baccalaureate medical humanities training affects students' subsequent healthcare professions training and practice: context and complementarity, clinical relevance, reflective practice, professional preparedness and vocational calling. I created an instrument of open-ended questions for each of these categories and posted it to social media with an invitation for alumni to respond. This informal survey was conceived as an exploratory exercise with the intent to help generate a foundation for more formal qualitative research in these five domains. In this essay, I offer my own reflections together with those of former students on the impact of baccalaureate-level medical humanities training in order to illustrate the benefits in each domain for subsequent healthcare training and practice. The need for qualitative research that explores the impact of baccalaureate medical humanities merits collaboration between multiple centers of investigation across many disciplines, and across the divide between premedical and medical educators.

  6. Current Perspectives on Pronunciation. Practices Anchored in Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Joan, Ed.

    A collection of essays on pronunciation instruction theory and practice includes: "Teaching Pronunciation as Communication" (Marianne Celce-Murcia); "Learner Variables and Prepronunciation Considerations in Teaching Pronunciation" (Rita Wong); "Pronunciation and Listening Comprehension" (Judy B. Gilbert); "Pronunciation Tutorials for Nonnative…

  7. Evidence-based risk recommendations for best practices in the training of qualified exercise professionals working with clinical populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, Darren E R; Bredin, Shannon S D; Charlesworth, Sarah A; Foulds, Heather J A; McKenzie, Don C; Shephard, Roy J

    2011-07-01

    This systematic review examines critically "best practices" in the training of qualified exercise professionals. Particular attention is given to the core competencies and educational requirements needed for working with clinical populations. Relevant information was obtained by a systematic search of 6 electronic databases, cross-referencing, and through the authors' knowledge of the area. The level and grade of the available evidence was established. A total of 52 articles relating to best practices and (or) core competencies in clinical exercise physiology met our eligibility criteria. Overall, current literature supports the need for qualified exercise professionals to possess advanced certification and education in the exercise sciences, particularly when dealing with "at-risk" populations. Current literature also substantiates the safety and effectiveness of exercise physiologist supervised stress testing and training in clinical populations.

  8. High-speed pulse train amplification in semiconductor optical amplifiers with optimized bias current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Mingjun; Ghafouri-Shiraz, H; Hou, Lianping; Kelly, Anthony E

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we have experimentally investigated the optimized bias current of semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) to achieve high-speed input pulse train amplification with high gain and low distortion. Variations of the amplified output pulse duration with the amplifier bias currents have been analyzed and, compared to the input pulse duration, the amplified output pulse duration is broadened. As the SOA bias current decreases from the high level (larger than the saturated bias current) to the low level, the broadened pulse duration of the amplified output pulse initially decreases slowly and then rapidly. Based on the analysis, an optimized bias current of SOA for high-speed pulse train amplification is introduced. The relation between the SOA optimized bias current and the parameters of the input pulse train (pulse duration, power, and repetition rate) are experimentally studied. It is found that the larger the input pulse duration, the lower the input pulse power or a higher repetition rate can lead to a larger SOA optimized bias current, which corresponds to a larger optimized SOA gain. The effects of assist light injection and different amplifier temperatures on the SOA optimized bias current are studied and it is found that assist light injection can effectively increase the SOA optimized bias current while SOA has a lower optimized bias current at the temperature 20°C than that at other temperatures.

  9. Evaluating the Training, Responsibilities, and Practices of P&T Committee Members and Nonmember Contributors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Ryan; Kelly, Brett J; Moody, Mary

    2017-08-01

    use any criteria for author selection. When authoring documents, primary literature was routinely consulted by 89.5% of the respondents. Most of the respondents (84.1%) used an organization-specific document template, while 5.8% of the respondents indicated that they prepared documents with no defined process. The most highly ranked factor that could have a perceived beneficial effect on P&T committee functions were guidelines on the authoring and reviewing of P&T committee documents. The survey of P&T committee members and nonmember contributors used in this study identified current training, responsibilities, and practices that can inform recommendations for standards in these domains. Findings suggest opportunities for improvement in achieving best practice recommendations to ensure evidence-based decision making by P&T committees. No outside funding supported this study. At the time of this study, Kelly was employed by Global Account Management Group (GAMG), which provides consulting services to the hospital and health services industry. As an employee of GAMG, Kelly has served on various advisory boards. All fees for consulting work were paid to GAMG and were primarily related to training or the federal market (e.g., Department of Defense or the Department of Veterans Affairs) and have no association with this study. Rodriguez and Moody report no conflicts of interest. All authors contributed to study concept and design. Rodriguez took the lead in data collection, assisted by the other authors. Data interpretation was performed by Rodriguez, along with Kelly and Moody. The manuscript was written and revised primarily by Rodriguez, along with the other authors.

  10. Forensic Occupational Therapy in Canada: The Current State of Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Adora L Y; Wong, Chantal Isabelle; Maraj, Sara A; Fry, Danielle; Jecker, Justine; Jung, Bonny

    2016-09-01

    Although occupational therapists have been practicing in forensic settings for many years, there is a paucity of literature regarding the nature of this practice in Canada. The purpose of this study was to describe the practices of Canadian occupational therapists in forensic mental health. An online survey was designed based on the Canadian Practice Process Framework. Following purposive and snowball sampling, responses were analysed with descriptive statistics and content analysis. Twenty-seven clinicians responded (56% response rate). Respondents indicated commonalities in workplaces, client caseloads and practice challenges. The outstanding need in Canada to demonstrate client outcomes through the use of evaluation instruments reflects those practice gaps identified internationally. Education, advocacy and research are critical areas for the development of Canadian forensic occupational therapy. Although findings heavily reflect one provincial context and may not be generalizable to nonhospital settings, a number of priority areas were identified. Future efforts should clarify the role of forensic occupational therapy to stakeholders, and validate their contributions through research that evaluates intervention efficacy and meaningful outcomes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. A Survey of Current and Future Perceived Multi-National Corporation Manufacturing Training Needs in Tianjin, (T.E.D.A.) China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Will

    2001-01-01

    Describes a study that surveyed current and perceived future employer-provided training practices among multinational corporations manufacturing companies in the Tianjin Economic Development Area (T.E.D.A.) of China. Highlights include labor market; human resources management in China; workforce productivity; and return on investment. (Author/LRW)

  12. Surgical residency training in the mission setting: current status and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Smith

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgery has traditionally been an important aspect of services offered by mission hospitals, but only in the last 20 years has surgical residency training been incorporated into the mission hospital setting. A working group of surgical educators met in conjunction with the Global Missions Health Conference in November 2015 and discussed the current status of surgical training in the mission setting. This paper outlines the current status and makes recommendations for mission groups who are contemplating starting a residency training program. Potential difficulties and the importance of regional recognition of the program are discussed. The work group felt that it was important to include a strong spiritual emphasis as part of the training. Future directions and the concern about employment opportunities are explored.

  13. Current Practice and Theoretical Foundations of the After Action Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Oxford England: Penguin Books. Atkinson , R.C., & Shiffrin , R.M. (1968). Human memory : A proposed system and its control processes. In K.W. Spence...Learning Knowledge Garvin (2000); Bilodeau (1966); Atkinson & Shiffrin (1968) Task Training Knowledge, Feedback, Performance Appraisals Holding...long-term memory . There are two main components of the learning process as it pertains to the long term memory storage (LTS). Encoding is the process

  14. Nutrition training in medical and other health professional schools in West Africa: the need to improve current approaches and enhance training effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Sodjinou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health professionals play a key role in the delivery of nutrition interventions. Improving the quality of nutrition training in health professional schools is vital for building the necessary human resource capacity to implement effective interventions for reducing malnutrition in West Africa. This study was undertaken to assess the current status of nutrition training in medical, nursing and midwifery schools in West Africa. Design: Data were collected from 127 training programs organized by 52 medical, nursing, and midwifery schools. Using a semi-structured questionnaire, we collected information on the content and distribution of nutrition instruction throughout the curriculum, the number of hours devoted to nutrition, the years of the curriculum in which nutrition was taught, and the prevailing teaching methods. Simple descriptive and bivariate analyses were performed. Results: Nutrition instruction occurred mostly during the first 2 years for the nursing (84%, midwifery (87%, and nursing assistant (77% programs and clinical years in medical schools (64%. The total amount of time devoted to nutrition was on average 57, 56, 48, and 28 hours in the medical, nursing, midwifery, and nursing assistant programs, respectively. Nutrition instruction was mostly provided within the framework of a dedicated nutrition course in nursing (78%, midwifery (87%, and nursing assistant programs (100%, whereas it was mainly embedded in other courses in medical schools (46%. Training content was heavily weighted to basic nutrition in the nursing (69%, midwifery (77%, and nursing assistant (100% programs, while it was oriented toward clinical practice in the medical programs (64%. For all the programs, there was little focus (<6 hours contact time on public health nutrition. The teaching methods on nutrition training were mostly didactic in all the surveyed schools; however, we found an integrated model in some medical schools (12%. None of the

  15. Exodus of clergy: A practical theological grounded theory exploration of Hatfield Training Centre trained pastors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun Joynt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a shortage of clergy, at least in the Roman Catholic Church. Protestant churches in general are experiencing more of a distribution or placement challenge than a shortage. The two greatest hindrances to addressing the Protestant clergy distribution challenge are a lack of adequate compensation for clergy and the undesirable geographical location of a number of churches, as perceived by clergy. Influences such as secularisation, duality of vocation, time management, change in type of ministry, family issues, congregational and denominational conflict, burnout, sexual misconduct, divorce or marital problems, and suicide, affect clergy. Studies on the shortage of clergy have been conducted mostly in the USA and Europe and not in South Africa. This article focuses on the research gap by means of a practical theological grounded theory exploration of the exodus of clergy. Grounded theory methodology is used to identify the reasons why clergy trained at a Bible college of a Protestant charismatic mega church leave full-time pastoral ministry. Findings correspond to previous studies with two reasons appearing more frequently than others: responding to a call and leadership related issues. Firstly, respondents differed in their replies with respect to reconciling their exit from full-time pastoral ministry with their call. The replies included not being called, a dual call, or called but left anyway. Secondly, respondents indicated that leadership influence was mostly negative with regard to affirming their call.

  16. The Science of Selection: Using Best Practices From Industry to Improve Success in Surgery Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Aimee K; Grantcharov, Teodor; Dunkin, Brian J

    2017-07-24

    The selection of high-quality applicants is critical to the future of surgery. However, it is unclear if current practices meet industry criteria of a successful selection system, as measured by administrative efficiency and performance and attrition of those selected. We performed a modified systematic review process to gain an understanding of current selection processes, remediation practices, and attrition rates in surgery residency training programs in the United States. We also conducted semistructured interviews with local residency program directors and coordinators to obtain a specific snapshot of the amount of time and resources dedicated to these activities in various sized programs. The associated financial costs of these activities are also presented. The administrative costs for current residency selection processes are substantial, ranging from $45,000 to $148,000 for each program per year. Approximately 30% of residents require at least 1 remediation intervention, costing programs $3400 to $5300 per episode, and typically involve concerns around nontechnical skills. Attrition rates range from 20% to 40%. This review suggests that additional methodologies may allow surgery residency programs to identify best-fit candidates more efficiently and effectively, while also decreasing remediation and attrition rates. Possible solutions include incorporation of structured interviews, personality inventories, and situational judgment tests. Resources dedicated to current interview practices, remediation efforts, and attrition management can be redirected to support these methodologies. By applying the science of selection and assessment to the recruitment process, programs may be able to make more data-driven decisions to identify candidates who will be successful at their institution. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Procedural skills practice and training needs of doctors, nurses, midwives and paramedics in rural Victoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell D

    2015-03-01

    . Online surveys were distributed between November 2011 and April 2012 with three follow-up attempts. The Monash University Human Research Ethics Committee approved the study. Results: Valid responses were received from 58 doctors, 94 nurses, 46 midwives, and 30 paramedics, whom we estimate to represent not more than 20% of current clinicians within these professions. This response rate reflected some of the difficulties experienced in the conduct of the research. Results were tabulated for each professional group across the range of skills. There was significant correlation between the frequency of certain skills and confidence with maintenance of these skills. This did not necessarily correlate with perceptions of respondents as to how often they need to practice each skill to maintain mastery. The more complex the skill, the more likely the respondents were to report a need for frequent rehearsal of the skill. There was variation between the professional groups as to how to retain mastery; for some skills, professional groups reported skill maintenance through clinical observation and clinical practice; for other skills, simulation was seen to be more appropriate. Conclusion: This project provided insight into the clinical application of procedural skills for clinicians comprising a relatively large professional population within a defined geographical region in rural Victoria, as well as attitudes to skills maintenance and competency. Although not the focus of the study, an unexpected outcome was the design of questionnaires on procedural skills. We believe that the questionnaires may have value in other rural settings. We acknowledge the limitations of the study in the text. The project provides some information on which to base planning for procedural skills education, including simulation-based training, and directions for further research. Keywords: procedural skills, simulation, rural health education, skills maintenance

  18. Antagonism of non-depolarising neuromuscular block: current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopman, A F; Eikermann, M

    2009-03-01

    There is now mounting evidence that even small degrees of postoperative residual neuromuscular block increases the incidence of adverse respiratory events in the Post Anaesthesia Care Unit and may increase longer-term morbidity as well. In the absence of quantitative neuromuscular monitoring, residual block is easily missed. A very strong case can be made for the routine administration of a non-depolarising antagonist unless it can be objectively demonstrated that complete recovery has occurred spontaneously. However, the use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors is associated with the potential for cardiovascular and respiratory side-effects, so there are cogent reasons for using low doses when the level of neuromuscular block is not intense. As little as 0.015-0.025 mg.kg(-1) of neostigmine is required at a train-of-four count of four with minimal fade, whereas 0.04-0.05 mg.kg(-1) is needed at a train-of-four count of two or three. If only a single twitch or none at all can be evoked, neostigmine should not be expected to promptly reverse neuromuscular block, and antagonism is best delayed till a train-of-four-count of two is achieved.

  19. The Army’s Institutional Values: Current Doctrine and the Army’s Values Training Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    called Generation X, and the generation after that is being referred to as the Millennials . The current demographic makeup of the Army includes members...Fraternization, Code of Conduct Training, Character Development, Law of War, Military Ethics, Suicide Prevention, Army Family Advocacy, Alcohol and Drug...explains that by introducing height and weight 112 standards, raising PT standards, emphasizing training and education, and deglamorizing alcohol

  20. Human resource aspects of antiretroviral treatment delivery models: current practices and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assefa, Yibeltal; Van Damme, Wim; Hermann, Katharina

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE OF VIEW: To illustrate and critically assess what is currently being published on the human resources for health dimension of antiretroviral therapy (ART) delivery models. The use of human resources for health can have an effect on two crucial aspects of successful ART programmes, namely the scale-up capacity and the long-term retention in care. Task shifting as the delegation of tasks from higher qualified to lower qualified cadres has become a widespread practice in ART delivery models in low-income countries in recent years. It is increasingly shown to effectively reduce the workload for scarce medical doctors without compromising the quality of care. At the same time, it becomes clear that task shifting can only be successful when accompanied by intensive training, supervision and support from existing health system structures. Although a number of recent publications have focussed on task shifting in ART delivery models, there is a lack of accessible information on the link between task shifting and patient outcomes. Current ART delivery models do not focus sufficiently on retention in care as arguably one of the most important issues for the long-term success of ART programmes. There is a need for context-specific re-designing of current ART delivery models in order to increase access to ART and improve long-term retention.

  1. [Description of current hypnosis practice in French university hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabridon, G; Nekrouf, N; Bioy, A

    2017-10-01

    Hypnosis is very fashionable as an entertainment through TV shows searching for new sensational experiences. What about its practice in the medical world? The aim of this article is to answer to this question. Therefore, we contacted every French University Hospital of each region to find out if hypnosis was practiced for the care of pain (hypnoanalgesia), for chirurgical procedures (hypnosedation) and in adult psychiatry care units (hypnotherapy). For this last practice, we also questioned the type of indications. All 30 of the French University Hospitals had replied by November 2015. Hypnoanalgesia is practiced by all and two-thirds offer hypnosedation. Hypnotherapy is practiced by 40 % of the University Hospitals, 91,7 % for anxiety disorders, 66,7 % for psychotraumatic care and 25 % for mood disorders. Therefore, hypnosis seems to have found its place in the care of pain and as an anesthetic to replace standard procedures. However, the use of hypnotherapy in psychiatry is less frequent, indications for its use being variable and not very consensual. Copyright © 2016 L’Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Debriefing after failed paediatric resuscitation: a survey of current UK practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, S; Gilchrist, J; Maconochie, I

    2008-06-01

    Debriefing is a form of psychological "first aid" with origins in the military. It moved into the spotlight in 1983, when Mitchell described the technique of critical incident stress debriefing. To date little work has been carried out relating to the effectiveness of debriefing hospital staff after critical incidents. The aim of this study was to survey current UK practice in order to develop some "best practice" guidelines. This study was a descriptive evaluation based on a structured questionnaire survey of 180 lead paediatric and emergency medicine consultants and nurses, selected from 50 UK trusts. Questions collected data about trust policy and events and also about individuals' personal experience of debrief. Free text comments were analyzed using the framework method described for qualitative data. Overall, the response rate was 80%. 62% said a debrief would occur most of the time. 85% reported that the main aim was to resolve both medical and psychological and emotional issues. Nearly all involve both doctors and nurses (88%); in over half (62%) other healthcare workers would be invited, eg, paramedics, students. Sessions are usually led by someone who was involved in the resuscitation attempt (76%). This was a doctor in 80%, but only 18% of responders said that a specifically trained person had led the session. Individuals' psychological issues would be discussed further on a one-to-one basis and the person directed to appropriate agencies. Any strategic working problems highlighted would be discussed with a senior member of staff and resolved via clinical governance pathways. Little is currently known about the benefits of debriefing hospital staff after critical incidents such as failed resuscitation. Debriefing is, however, widely practised and the results of this study have been used to formulate some best practice guidelines while awaiting evidence from further studies.

  3. Laser training courses: new purpose-built room for practical exercises

    CERN Multimedia

    Safety Training, HSE Unit

    2015-01-01

    CERN’s Safety Training Centre, on the Prévessin site, now features a new facility for the “Laser - Expert” and “Laser - User” training courses: a dedicated room for practical exercises, near the theoretical training room. From now on, participants will be able to move from theory to practice in just a few steps!   The new room, equipped with real lasers ranging from levels 1 to 4, allows the participants to put their training into practice in real-life situations, solidifying the principles and lessons learned during the theory part – and all in complete safety, since the room was of course designed to allow the control of dangers posed by lasers. The participants and instructors are also provided with the required personal protective equipment (goggles, etc.) during the sessions. Efforts are being made to make the Centre's infrastructure more useful to improve the quality of training on offer. For example, the la...

  4. Training the eye care team: Principles and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Garg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the crucial factors to make high quality eye care services available, accessible and affordable to all is the availability of appropriately trained human resources. Providing health through a health care team is a better and cost effective alternative. The concept of the team approach is based on the principles of working together; task shifting; and ensuring continuity of care. Composition of a team varies based on the community needs, population characteristics and disease burden. But for it to be effective, a team must possess four attributes - availability, competency, productivity, and responsiveness. Therefore, training of all team members and training the team to work together as a unit are crucial components in the success of this concept. Some of the critical attributes include: Training across the health spectrum through quality and responsive curricula administered by motivated teachers; accreditation of programs or institutions by national or international bodies; certification and recertification of team members; and training in working together as a team through inter- and intra- disciplinary workshops both during training and as a part of the job activity.

  5. Training the eye care team: principles and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Prashant; Reddy, Snigdha; Nelluri, Chaitanya

    2014-01-01

    One of the crucial factors to make high quality eye care services available, accessible and affordable to all is the availability of appropriately trained human resources. Providing health through a health care team is a better and cost effective alternative. The concept of the team approach is based on the principles of working together; task shifting; and ensuring continuity of care. Composition of a team varies based on the community needs, population characteristics and disease burden. But for it to be effective, a team must possess four attributes - availability, competency, productivity, and responsiveness. Therefore, training of all team members and training the team to work together as a unit are crucial components in the success of this concept. Some of the critical attributes include: Training across the health spectrum through quality and responsive curricula administered by motivated teachers; accreditation of programs or institutions by national or international bodies; certification and recertification of team members; and training in working together as a team through inter- and intra- disciplinary workshops both during training and as a part of the job activity.

  6. Practice makes perfect: Training the interpretation of emotional ambiguity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Jessica L; Hedley, Sophie; Mountier, Emily; Tiszai, Boglarka; Grimshaw, Gina M

    2016-01-01

    The interpretation of emotionally ambiguous words, sentences, or scenarios can be altered through training procedures that are collectively called cognitive bias modification for interpretation (CBM-I). In three experiments, we systematically manipulated the nature of the training in order to discriminate between emotional priming and ambiguity resolution accounts of training effects. In Experiment 1 participants completed word fragments that were consistently related to either a negative or benign interpretation of an ambiguous sentence. In a subsequent semantic priming task they demonstrated an interpretation bias, in that they were faster to identify relatedness of targets that were associated with the training-congruent meaning of an emotionally ambiguous homograph. We then manipulated the training sentences to show that interpretation bias was eliminated when participants simply completed valenced word fragments following unrelated sentences (Experiment 2), or completed fragments that were related to emotional but unambiguous sentences (Experiment 3). Only when participants were required to actively resolve emotionally ambiguous sentences during training did changes in interpretation emerge at test. Findings suggest that CBM-I achieves its effects by altering a production rule that aids the selection of meaning from emotionally ambiguous alternatives, in line with an ambiguity resolution account.

  7. Communication skills in the training of psychiatrists: A systematic review of current approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditton-Phare, Philippa; Loughland, Carmel; Duvivier, Robbert; Kelly, Brian

    2017-07-01

    A range of communication skills training programmes have been developed targeting trainees in various medical specialties, predominantly in oncology but to a lesser extent in psychiatry. Effective communication is fundamental to the assessment and treatment of psychiatric conditions, but there has been less attention to this in clinical practice for psychiatrists in training. This review examines the outcomes of communication skills training interventions in psychiatric specialty training. The published English-language literature was examined using multiple online databases, grey literature and hand searches. The review was conducted and reported using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses guidelines. Studies examining the efficacy of communication skills training were included. Randomised controlled trials, pseudo-randomised studies and quasi-experimental studies, as well as observational analytical studies and qualitative studies that met criteria, were selected and critically appraised. No limits were applied for date of publication up until 16 July 2016. Total search results yielded 2574 records. Of these, 12 studies were identified and reviewed. Two were randomised controlled trials and the remaining 10 were one-group pretest/posttest designs or posttest-only designs, including self-report evaluations of communication skills training and objective evaluations of trainee skills. There were no studies with outcomes related to behaviour change or patient outcomes. Two randomised controlled trials reported an improvement in clinician empathy and psychotherapeutic interviewing skills due to specific training protocols focused on those areas. Non-randomised studies showed varying levels of skills gains and self-reported trainee satisfaction ratings with programmes, with the intervention being some form of communication skills training. The heterogeneity of communication skills training is a barrier to evaluating the efficacy of

  8. CONTINUOUS TRAINING OF ARCHITECTS AND A PRACTICAL COURSE IN ARCHITECTURAL COMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogoleva Natal'ya Arkad'evna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The problem of training of architects in architectural composition is relevant at each stages of the training process. Continuous training in architectural composition is to assure better mastering of fundamentals of composition. Specialized training courses is to be incorporated into each stage of the training process, namely, into each specialized discipline that shapes up the compositional thinking in the field of architecture and town planning patterns. The fundamental course is entitled "Three-dimensional spatial composition"; it is based on the theory of architecture and urban development, as well as practical classes in architectural analysis and modeling. The author proposes new methods of teaching three-dimensional composition through a cycle of exercises and term papers. The systemic approach contemplates a good knowledge of the theory to serve as the basis for workshops and practical classes, as well as a new idea of continuous training.

  9. Current status of traditional mental health practice in Ilorin Emirate Council area, Kwara State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makanjuola, A B; Adelekan, M L; Morakinyo, O

    2000-01-01

    Twenty-seven traditional mental health practitioners (TMHPs) and 16 patients' relatives (PR) were studied with a view to gaining an understanding of the current status of traditional mental health practice in five local government areas in Ilorin Emirate Council Area, Kwara State, Nigeria. Data was collected using Practitioners' Questionnaire (PQ), Patients' Relatives' Questionnaire (PRQ), Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) and observation of TMHPs in their clinics. Factors which affect utilization of traditional mental health services were also reviewed. We found that TMHPs still enjoy considerable patronage from the populace, are more in numerical strength, and are more widely and evenly dispersed in the community than orthodox mental health practitioners (OMHPs). About 74% of TMHPs expressed interest in attending seminars aimed at improving their skills. Most of the patients' relatives expressed the belief that only traditional healers can understand the supernatural aetiological basis of mental disorders, and can therefore offer more effective care than OMHPs. Some of the negative practices observed were (i) infliction of corporal punishment and physical restraints on patients by some TMHPs resulting in wounds, which often become septic (ii) low level of hygiene at the clinics and (iii) lack of adequate follow-up care. In conclusion, since TMHPs still play a major role in the treatment of the mentally ill in this environment, OMHPs should assist them in improving on some of the negative practices identified. Thus, there is an urgent need to organize a training programme for TMHPs to expose them to the general rules of hygiene in medical care, basic principles of orthodox mental health practice, including human treatment of the mentally ill.

  10. Applying Current Theory and Research in Career Exploration to Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blustein, David L.

    1992-01-01

    Provides selected review of two lines of recent research on career exploration (identifying antecedents of exploratory activity and application of information processes biases to career exploration), with specific focus on applications for counseling practice. Describes relevant counseling interventions and concludes with summary of six goals to…

  11. Equity crowdfunding in China : Current practice and important legal issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Jing

    2017-01-01

    By studying two leading Chinese equity crowdfunding portals, namely, Renrentou and Zhongou8, this paper provides the very first empirical evidence on the practice and regulation of equity crowdfunding in China. In the case of Renrentou, I examine a hand-collected sample consisting of the investment

  12. Behavioral Marital Therapy: Current Trends in Research, Assessment and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Neil S.

    1980-01-01

    Behavioral Marital Therapy (BMT) is clinically useful because it includes elaborating procedures, modifying the spouse's self-defeating cognitions, and moving toward early intervention and prevention. Each article in this issue of American Journal of Family Therapy focuses on innovations in BMT, either in research or practice. (Author/NRB)

  13. Equity crowdfunding in China : Current practice and important legal issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Jing

    2017-01-01

    By studying two leading Chinese equity crowdfunding portals, namely, Renrentou and Zhongou8, this paper provides the very first empirical evidence on the practice and regulation of equity crowdfunding in China. In the case of Renrentou, I examine a hand-collected sample consisting of the investment

  14. Current Practice of Extensive Reading in Asia: Teachers' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Anna C.-S.; Renandya, Willy A.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated teachers' perceptions of the practice of extensive reading (ER) in the Asian context. One hundred and nineteen L2 teachers in Asia responded to an online questionnaire that probed into their reasons for implementing ER, the difficulties they encountered, and their perception about the effectiveness of different ways of…

  15. Family Counseling in Malaysia: Current Issues and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Norhayati Mohd.

    2014-01-01

    The study is carried out to explore the issues and practices in family counselling among the family counsellors at few counseling centres in Malaysia. Qualitative approach of single case embedded units was used for the study. Data collection was done using in-depth interview, observation and document analysis with 12 family counsellors. The data…

  16. The role of practical training in educating future cadre in hotel industry and tourism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sekulić Dejan; Milovanović Vesna; Milićević Snežana

    2015-01-01

    .... In order to preserve and enhance the quality of education in this area it is necessary to take care of the quality of the program of practical training as the bridge between formal education and work in tourism...

  17. Clinical Training and Practice Patterns of Medical Family Therapists: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubatsky, Max; Harris, Steven M; Mendenhall, Tai J

    2017-04-01

    Medical family therapy (MedFT) has gained momentum as a framework in healthcare for individuals and families. However, little is known about what background training and clinical experiences Medical Family Therapists (MedFTs) have in everyday practice. This study investigated the clinical training of MedFTs and their practices in a variety of care settings. A survey was completed by 80 participants who use a MedFT framework in practice, with descriptive data on curriculum, clinical training, and treatment characteristics. Results reflect that many MedFTs lack formal coursework in key content areas of their graduate training and work primarily with psychological and relational concerns. Future research is needed to explore how MedFTs practice around specific mental health and chronic health conditions. © 2016 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  18. An overview of practice facilitation programs in Canada: current perspectives and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddy, Clare; Laferriere, Dianne; Baskerville, Bruce; Dahrouge, Simone; Knox, Lyndee; Hogg, William

    2013-02-01

    Practice facilitation has proven to be effective in improving the quality of primary care. A practice facilitator is a health professional, usually external to the practice, who regularly visits the practice to provide support in change management that targets improvements in the delivery of care. Our environmental scan shows that several initiatives across Canada utilize practice facilitation as a quality improvement method; however, many are conducted in isolation as there is a lack of coordinated effort, knowledge translation and dissemination in this field across the country. We recommend that investments be made in capacity building, knowledge exchange and facilitator training, and that partnership building be considered a priority in this field.

  19. Current marketing practices in the nursing home sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Judith G; Banaszak-Holl, Jane; Hearld, Larry R

    2006-01-01

    Marketing is widely recognized as an essential business function across all industries, including healthcare. While many long-term care facilities adopted basic healthcare marketing practices and hired marketing staff by the early 1990s, a paucity of research on nursing home marketing exists in the literature. This study examines the extent to which nursing homes have developed more formulated marketing and related communication and promotional strategies as market competition has increased in this sector during the past two decades. In addition, we explored managers' perceptions of their control over marketing decision making, the impact of competition on the use of marketing practices, and areas for enhanced competitive positioning. Administrators from 230 nursing homes in 18 Southeastern Michigan counties were surveyed regarding (1) the adoption level of approximately 40 literature-based, best-practice marketing strategies; (2) the types of staff involved with the marketing function; and (3) their perception of their level of control over marketing functions and of local competition. Results from 101 (44 percent) survey participants revealed that although respondents viewed their markets as highly competitive, their marketing practices remained focused on traditional and relatively constrained practices. In relation to the importance of customer relationship management, the majority of the administrators reported intensive efforts being focused on residents and their families, referrers, and staff, with minimal efforts being extended to insurers and other types of payers. A significant positive relation was found between the intensity of marketing initiatives and the size of the facility (number of beds), whereas significant negative correlations were revealed in relation to occupancy and the perceived level of control over the function.

  20. Formation of the research competence of future breeder-geneticists during the practical training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталія Павлівна Антіпова

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article were analyzed content, structure and special features of the practical training of the future breeder-geneticists. There was specified that for bachelor breeder-geneticists of the 6.090101 “Agronomy” training direction are provided the following practices: botany, tractors and cars, soil science, agricultural machines, fruit growing, vegetable growing, agriculture, agrochemistry, plant growing, entomology, phytopathology, technology of retreatment and preservation of plant growing production, selection and seed growing of agricultural crops; work practice on agronomy.In the article was grounded the structural-logic scheme of organization of practices of the future breeder-geneticists for forming their professional research competences. There were analyzed functions and methods of scientific-cognitive activity, forms, means and methods of the practical education. According to the types of practices there were elucidated and grounded the structure of practical training of the future breeder-geneticists – natural-technical and special-professional – educational and work practices.The natural-technical, special-professional and production-technological practices form in bachelor agronomists breeder-geneticists professional scientific-research competences: theoretical-analytical ones – geosphere, bio-geo-physical-chemical, meteorological-climatological, informative, fundamental and applied ecological, fundamental-scientific agrosphere; professional competences of professionally oriented and special practical training – agricultural, branch, techno-service, technological, selective, special-genetic-engineering ones; managerial ones

  1. Education and training for learning disability practice: key messages from contemporary literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crickmore, Debbie; Wray, Jane

    2009-12-01

    Over the last quarter of a century, much attention has justifiably been given to the closure of long-stay hospitals and the subsequent community-based experiences of people with learning disabilities. This has inevitably led to debate regarding how best they might continue to be supported, and by whom. Having identified a range of accredited provision currently available to prepare or develop staff working with adults with learning disabilities in the United Kingdom, this article reviews a range of contemporary literature relating to education in learning disability health and social care that is typically produced and viewed in isolation. Four themes are identified: training social carers, user involvement, (inter)professional practice and work-based learning. Key messages emerge from these themes to form recommendations for the future education of learning disability practitioners across the workforce.

  2. Foreign-trained dentists in advanced education in prosthodontics programs in the United States: demographics, perspectives on current training, and future goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sowygh, Zeyad H; Sukotjo, Cortino

    2011-02-01

    This study investigated the perspectives of foreign-trained dentists (FTDs) in comparison with US-trained Dentists (USTDs) in Advanced Education in Prosthodontics (AEP) programs on their current clinical training and future goals. This study was conducted by analyzing data from previously published literature. When appropriate, Chi-square statistical analysis was conducted to determine the influence of where the AEP residents earned their DMD/DDS degree (FTDs/USTDs) on all variables. Only results that yielded significant differences were discussed. A majority of both FTDs and USTDs were male. Most USTDs were married, while most FTDs were single. Most FTDs were not US citizens and most originated from Asia, followed by the Middle East, South America, and Europe. Significantly more FTDs had higher ranks in their dental schools, had more advanced degrees, and spent more time practicing before entering the AEP programs. In selecting AEP programs, FTDs placed significantly higher values on a program's reputation and research opportunities. During their AEP training, FTDs paid significantly higher tuition and received lower stipends, but obtained more financial support from families. On the other hand, USTDs received significantly more financial aid and earned income from part-time work, but had significantly higher total educational debts. USTDs showed a significantly higher interest in becoming a student member of the American College of Prosthodontists and participated actively in prosthodontics organizations. USTDs were more interested in becoming maxillofacial prosthodontists, while FTDs were more interested in pursuing academic careers. FTDs differed from USTDs in several ways. Because of their interests in academics and research, FTDs may potentially have a positive impact on the development of the prosthodontics discipline. This information may be beneficial for AEP program directors in accommodating the needs of FTDs, and for FTDs in better preparing for their

  3. Creating Opportunities: Good Practice in Small Business Training for Australian Rural Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Lyn; Daws, Leonie; Wood, Leanne

    2002-01-01

    To overcome barriers to participation in small business training faced by rural Australian women, training needs and delivery issues were identified and a good practice matrix was developed with the following components: marketing, content, delivery, support, impact, and innovation. Underlying principles included unique needs, diversity, use of…

  4. Animating Research with Counseling Values: A Training Model to Address the Research-to-Practice Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kristi A.; Dewell, John A.; Holmes, Courtney M.

    2014-01-01

    The persistent research-to-practice gap poses a problem for counselor education. The gap may be caused by conflicts between the humanistic values that guide much of counseling and the values that guide research training. In this article, the authors address historical concerns regarding research training for students and the conducting of research…

  5. FERPA Training Practices: Results of the AACRAO January 2016 60 Second Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO), 2016

    2016-01-01

    The January 2016 American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO) "60 Second Survey" focused on institutional Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) training practices and measuring the level of interest in an AACRAO-developed online FERPA training module. The survey received 878 usable responses.…

  6. Practical Recommendations to Improve the Quality of Training and Methodical Support of Professional Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebennikov, Valery V.; Grudtsina, Ludmila Yu.; Marchuk, Nikolay N.; Sangadgiev, Badma V.; Kudyashev, Nail K.

    2016-01-01

    The research urgency is caused by the transition to the knowledge society and new demands for training and methodical provision of professional pedagogical education. The purpose of this paper is to develop practical recommendations to improve the quality of training and methodical support of professional pedagogical education. The leading…

  7. Using Flexible Data-Driven Frameworks to Enhance School Psychology Training and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Stephanie L.; Hendricker, Elise

    2016-01-01

    While a great number of scientific advances have been made in school psychology, the research to practice gap continues to exist, which has significant implications for training future school psychologists. Training in flexible, data-driven models may help school psychology trainees develop important competencies that will benefit them throughout…

  8. Evaluating the Impact of Training: A Collection of Federal Agency Evaluation Practices. Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinger, Ruth; Roberts, Cynthia

    The purpose of this publication on agency training evaluation practices is to share approaches used by federal agencies to assess needs and measure training effectiveness. Emphasis is placed on the process of evaluation. Names of the agencies and highlights of the examples used by each follow: (1) Plant Protection and Quarantine (Department of…

  9. Exploring Current Sensory Enhancement Practices Within Videofluoroscopic Swallow Study (VFSS) Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkington, Leisa; Nund, Rebecca L; Ward, Elizabeth C; Farrell, Anna

    2017-04-01

    Whilst some research evidence supports the potential benefits of sensory enhancement strategies (SES) in dysphagia management, there is limited understanding of how SES are used in clinical services and the influencing drivers involved in selection during instrumental assessment. SES include modification of temperature, flavour, texture, chemesthetic qualities and bolus size of food/fluid. This study aimed to explore the use of SES within Australian Videofluoroscopic Swallow Study (VFSS) clinics providing adult services, via a qualitative methodology. Maximum variation sampling was used to select a cross section of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) with a range of experience working within 16 VFSS clinics across metropolitan and regional settings to participate in semi-structured, focus group or individual teleconference interviews. Content analysis of interview transcripts was conducted, with four themes emerging as influencing drivers of SES use, including: Patient factors influence SES use; Clinician factors influence SES use; Trials of SES require planning and organisation, and; Organisational barriers impact on SES use. These four themes were all connected through a single integrative theme: Extensive variations of SES procedures exist across clinical settings. Findings indicate that achieving alignment of clinical purpose and implementation of practices amongst VFSS clinicians will be complex given current diversity in SES use. Organisational issues and clinician training need to be addressed, and more research is needed to provide a stronger evidence base to inform clinical practice in this emerging area of dysphagia management.

  10. Self-efficacy perception in high school students with mild intellectual disability in practical training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milanović-Dobrota Biljana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is to determine how students with mild intellectual disability perceive self-efficacy in practical training, with regard to the intellectual level, gender, work field and professional level for which they are being trained. The sample consists of 120 students with mild intellectual disability, of both genders, undergoing vocational training in five work fields for the second and third level professions. Adapted Self-Efficacy to Regulate Training Scale (Bandura, 2006 was used to assess the influence of negative internal and external factors on the students' efficacy at performing tasks in practical training. It was determined that there is a statistically significant difference among the examinees of the same disability category, but different level of intellectual functioning. Girls with lower and higher levels of intellectual functioning were found to perceive self-efficacy in practical training with lower level of confidence than boys with the same levels of intellectual functioning. The examinees undergoing the third level vocational training are more confident in their abilities to coordinate knowledge and skills in training regardless of different distracting factors. There we no statistically significant differences determined with regard to the work field. Assessing self-efficacy in training can direct the development of self-efficacy, help individuals gain a sense of control over their career development, and for professionals involved in finding jobs for persons with intellectual disability provide a predictive success/failure role at work.

  11. Employee Internet management: current business practices and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Carl J; Young, Kimberly S

    2002-08-01

    This paper empirically examines emergent business practices that attempt to reduce and control employee Internet misuse and abuse. Over a 6-month period, 52 web-administered surveys were collected. Respondents ranged from human resource managers to company presidents. Data were stored in a database management system and analyzed utilizing statistical measures. Monitoring efforts and policy development issues are examined against critical incidents of employee Internet abuse. The analysis also includes a rank ordering of the types of Internet applications that were perceived as most problematic or abused. Types of applications abused include electronic mail, adult web sites, online gaming, chat rooms, stock trading, and so on. Moreover, company size and years online are examined. Overall, this research will assist organizations in implementing effective corporate initiatives to improve employee Internet management practices.

  12. Current Credit Risk Management Practices in Chinese Banking Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Hao

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bank loans can be characterized as the engine of the Chinese economy as the economy is almost financed by bank loans. As a result, Credit risk management in Chinese banks is not only the issue to those banks, but it is also essential to the stability of the whole economy. Inadequate credit risk management practices can create an unforeseeable disaster to China in the future, especially with a significant increase in credit expansion. In the last decade, the government has tried ha...

  13. Current practice in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proclemer, Alessandro; Dobreanu, Dan; Pison, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: The purpose of this EP wire is to examine clinical practice in the field of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) management, with special focus on in-hospital diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. METHODS AND RESULTS: Fifty-three European centres, all members of the EHRA-EP Research network...... management strategy, including coronary angiography/PCI and implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy, while therapeutic hypothermia appears to be underused....

  14. Self-Assessment in Librarianship: Current Practices and Future Possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ania Dymarz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The authors of this qualitative study set out to investigate self-assessment practices within the library profession. The researchers conducted semi-structured interviews with a purposeful sample of nine librarians coming from a range of library settings and possessing a diversity of library experience. Interviews were then transcribed and coded in NVIVO to identify emergent themes. This paper details some of the results of that study, highlighting motivations, limitations, and strategies with regard to self-assessment. The findings present a summary of a range of approaches to the practice of assessment as reported by the interviewees. One area of possible growth for our profession, as highlighted by the findings, is in the development of peer networks as a support for the individual practice of self-assessment. While the results of this small case study cannot be generalized, the authors hope these preliminary findings can open up the conversation around self-assessment both for individual librarians and for those librarians and managers working to shape their workplace culture.

  15. New Ways for EUROPRACTICE Training and Best Practice Service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Ole

    1997-01-01

    .Among those should be mentioned intelligent use of internet, multimedia training and RF high speed low power training.TBPS is primarily a course broker negotiating with more than 45 course vendors to get highly qualified courses at different levels and at moderate prices in the 5 key microelectronics areas...... been organized to fill the gap, and information about the courses is distributed in different ways.Intelligent use of internet and multimedia technology promotes micro-electronics training in a very effective way.This is the most effective way to promote the large number of courses...... step the Web service has been expanded and made user-friendly with effective search mechanisms. The criteria are e.g. level, topic, place, language, and price....

  16. Cross-Cultural “Allies” in Immigrant Community Practice: Roles of foreign-trained former Montagnard health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Xin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This pilot case study describes foreign-trained former Montagnard refugee physicians’ practice experiences in Vietnam and their current community health worker and “ally” roles within the Montagnard refugee community. It highlights key features that facilitate cross-culturally responsive health care. We interviewed five Vietnam-trained former Montagnard refugee physicians using an open-ended interview format during March, 2012. We used content analysis procedures to identify key themes characterizing Montagnard physicians’ former and current practice experiences and emphasizing the roles they currently play in their new homeland. Montagnard physicians were fighting infectious diseases in homeland Vietnamese communities. Since coming to the U.S., Montagnard physicians have reoriented their competencies to fit within a community health workers model, and have shifted practice to fighting chronic disease in this refugee community. Tasks now include describing and contextualizing unique characteristics of the Montagnard languages and cultures to outside constituents. They become cross-cultural allies to the U.S. health care and facilitate individuals’ medical adherence with mainstream physicians’ orders. They ensure accuracy of interpretation of Montagnard patients’ medical complaints during a medical visit. Our findings reveal the potential roles that can be ascribed to a cross-cultural ally and can be built into practice to fulfill the Montagnard community’s unmet health needs: oral historian, mediator, facilitator/negotiator, quality assurer, psychosocial confidant, and health advocate. Normal 0 false false false EN-US ZH-CN X-NONE

  17. [Current problems in training of minimally invasive surgery: vision of residents in pediatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, C; Cano, I; Peláez, D; Fuentes, S; Tardáguila, A R

    2013-01-01

    Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) is getting more and more important in our specialty. However, the formation of the residents on MIS is, in many cases, irregular. The purpose of this study is to assess the state of training in MIS among the residents of Pediatric Surgery and their potential weaknesses. An electronic survey was distributed among 71 residents of Pediatric Surgery from 17 national hospitals. The response rate was 70.2%.100% of the residents are interested in a broadening of training activities in MIS. The main areas of interest are gastrointestinal (92%) and thoracic (47%) surgery. Only 57% have access to training facilities and less than half of them attend to courses and conferences. 80% believe that they are not given adequate attention from specialized associations. 52% think they should do rotations at referral centers, 86% that courses and seminars should be enhanced, and 44% that the responsibility of the resident in surgery should be increased. The main defects encountered in their training are scarce volume of patients, lack of financial support and overcoming the learning curve of surgeons in their services. Despite the advance of the MIS, resident's training in this discipline still has shortcomings, as expressed in their views. Knowledge of the current state of training should be the starting point for designing a training strategy that ensures adequate skills.

  18. Current status of advanced gastrointestinal endoscopy training fellowships in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Heller

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stephen J Heller, Jeffrey L TokarDepartment of Medicine, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Rapid growth in the field of advanced gastrointestinal endoscopy has led to an increase in specialized therapeutic endoscopy fellowships. The cornerstones of these programs are training in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP and endoscopic ultrasound. These procedures are more complex and challenging to master than routine colonoscopy and upper endoscopy, and in the case of ERCP, higher risk. The concentration of the educational experience in the hands of relatively fewer trainees with specialized interest in advanced endoscopy has resulted in providing a focused cohort of graduating fellows with higher case volumes in training, which likely enhances diagnostic and therapeutic success and safer performance of these procedures. Endoscopic simulators, although not currently in widespread use, have the potential to improve advanced procedural training without jeopardizing patient safety.Keywords: gastrointestinal endoscopy, training, procedures, safety 

  19. Interactive teaching methods in teaching "practical (industrial training an accountant"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Zaicev

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Practical teaching activities needed to develop the methodological level, focused on their actual implementation in the classroom when studying a particular academic discipline. Given that interactive teaching methods are quite new for many teachers category, consideration of their nature and possibilities of practical application the subject of this article.

  20. Training reduces catabolic and inflammatory response to a single practice in female volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliakim, Alon; Portal, Shawn; Zadik, Zvi; Meckel, Yoav; Nemet, Dan

    2013-11-01

    We examined the effect of training on hormonal and inflammatory response to a single volleyball practice in elite adolescent players. Thirteen female, national team level, Israeli volleyball players (age 16.0 ± 1.4 years, Tanner stage 4-5) participated in the study. Blood samples were collected before and immediately after a typical 60 minutes of volleyball practice, before and after 7 weeks of training during the initial phase of the season. Training involved tactic and technical drills (20% of time), power and speed drills (25% of time), interval sessions (25% of time), endurance-type training (15% of time), and resistance training (15% of time). To achieve greater training responses, the study was performed during the early phase (first 7 weeks) of the volleyball season. Hormonal measurements included the anabolic hormones growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF-binding protein-3, the catabolic hormone cortisol, the proinflammatory marker interleukin-6 (IL-6), and the anti-inflammatory marker IL-1 receptor antagonist. Training led to a significant improvement of vertical jump, anaerobic properties (peak and mean power by the Wingate Anaerobic Test), and predicted VO2max (by the 20-m shuttle run). Volleyball practice, both before and after the training intervention, was associated with a significant increase of serum lactate, GH, and IL-6. Training resulted in a significantly reduced cortisol response ([INCREMENT]cortisol: 4.2 ± 13.7 vs. -4.4 ± 12.3 ng · ml, before and after training, respectively; p volleyball practice. The results suggest that along with the improvement of power and anaerobic and aerobic characteristics, training reduces the catabolic and inflammatory response to exercise.

  1. Geropsychology Mentoring: A Survey of Current Practices and Perceived Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiske, Amy; Zimmerman, Jennifer A.; Scogin, Forrest

    2011-01-01

    The need for clinical geropsychologists currently exceeds their availability, and this imbalance is expected to worsen along with the impending growth in the older adult population. Effective geropsychology mentoring may be helpful in meeting this challenge. However, little is known about mentoring within clinical geropsychology. The present paper…

  2. Integrative Assessment: Reframing Assessment Practice for Current and Future Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Geoffrey T.

    2012-01-01

    The requirement to provide timely formative tasks that are designed to facilitate student learning and autonomy has provoked a wider examination of the role of assessment in higher education and encouraged further investigation of the alignment of learning, teaching and assessment in curriculum design frameworks. Many current authors have proposed…

  3. An Examination of Current Assessment Practices in Northeastern School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaus, Joseph; Rinaldi, Claudia; Bigaj, Stephen; Chafouleas, Sandra M.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the central role of assessment in special education, there is a paucity of current research on instruments and methods used in schools. Special education directors (N = 164) in five northeastern states responded to an electronic survey related to the use of assessment instruments and methods in their districts. Data are presented regarding…

  4. NUCLEAR CARDIOLOGY, CURRENT APPLICATIONS IN CLINICAL-PRACTICE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NIEMEYER, MG; VANDERWALL, EE; KUIJPER, AFM; CLEOPHAS, AT; PAUWELS, EKJ

    1995-01-01

    The clinical applications of nuclear cardiology have rapidly expanded since the introduction of suitable imaging cameras and readily applicable isotopes. The currently available methods can provide useful data on estimates of ventricular function and detection of myocardial ischemia for adequate pat

  5. Current HRD trends in the Netherlands: Conceptualisation and practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwakman, C.H.E.; Streumer, Jan; van der Heijden, Beatrice; Wognum, Ida; van Zolingen, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    In this contribution, we first report on a literature study aimed at describing current HRD developments. The resulting literature report was presented to a group of experts in the field of HRD. The participants were asked to sketch their vision as to the relevance of the HRD developments for their

  6. Current HRD trends in the Netherlands : conceptualizing and practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwakman, C.H.E.; Streumer, J.N.; Heijden, B.I.J.M. van der; Wognum, A.A.M.; Zolingen, S.J. van

    2002-01-01

    In this contribution, we first report on a literature study aimed at describing current HRD developments. The resulting literature report was presented to a group of experts in the field of HRD. The participants were asked to sketch their vision as to the relevance of the HRD developments for their

  7. Transcranial direct current stimulation enhances verbal working memory training performance over time and near transfer outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Lauren L; Wolk, David; Chein, Jason; Olson, Ingrid R

    2014-11-01

    Studies attempting to increase working memory (WM) capacity show promise in enhancing related cognitive functions but have also raised criticism in the broader scientific community given the inconsistent findings produced by these studies. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been shown to enhance WM performance in a single session [Fregni, F., Boggio, P., Nitsche, M., Bermpohl, F., Anatal, A., Feredoes, E., et al. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation of prefrontal cortex enhances working memory. Experimental Brain Research, 166, 23-30, 2005]; however, the extent to which tDCS might enhance learning on a WM training regime and the extent to which learning gains might transfer outside the training task remains largely unknown. To this end, participants engaged in an adaptive WM training task [previously utilized in Richmond, L., Morrison, A., Chein, J., & Olson, I. Working memory training and transfer in older adults. Psychology & Aging, 26, 813-822, 2011; Chein, J., & Morrison, A. Expanding the mind's workspace: Training and transfer effects with a complex working memory span task. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 17, 193-199, 2010] for 10 sessions over 2 weeks, concurrent with either active or sham stimulation of dorsolateral pFC. Before and after training, a battery of tests tapping domains known to relate to WM abilities was administered. Results show that tDCS enhanced learning on the verbal portion of the training task by 3.65 items. Furthermore, tDCS was shown to enhance near transfer to other untrained WM tasks in comparison with a no-contact control group. These results lend support to the idea that tDCS might bolster training and transfer gains in populations with compromised WM abilities.

  8. Current problems of foreign practice-related educational psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.D. Andreeva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article regards the questions of scientific-methodological provision of psychologist’s activity in an educational settlement which are urgent for the activity of practical educational psychologist in Russia as well. The presented information concerns the psychologist’s particular strands of work which can be both developing (development of ABM and psycho-correcting (reasons and forms of school phobias, bullying displays, lying. The ethical problems of psychologist’s work with families namely in case of the parent-child conflicts is also reviewed in the article.

  9. SOFTWARE TRAINING AIDS DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION IN PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION PRACTICE OF TECHNOLOGICAL EDUCATION TEACHER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoliy G. Gritchenko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The article outlines the theoretical and practical aspects of software training aids development and implementation in professional preparation practice of technological education teacher. The myriad opportunities of new information technologies are described; the characteristic features of modern software training tool (STT are revealed; the main algorithmic structure circuits of training programs construction (linear, cyclic, with hyperlinks, to the labels, which enable the development of STT variety and functionality are given; the methodology of STT creating is described based on the analysis of the technology teacher preparation in HEE content, MITE didactic functions and selection criteria of educational software for this area of specialist’s preparation.

  10. From Theory to Practice: Faculty Training in Business Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatright, John R.

    1991-01-01

    Claims that training business faculty in ethics is a critical component of including ethics in the business curriculum. Includes suggestions concerning what business faculty should know about ethical theory, how to include theory, and curricular and teaching issues. Describes research projects, publications, and workshops. (DK)

  11. Training and Health. Leonardo da Vinci Series: Good Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Directorate-General for Education and Culture.

    This document profiles programs in the fields of health and medicine that are offered through the European Commission's Leonardo da Vinci program. The following programs are profiled: (1) CYTOTRAIN (a transnational vocational training program in cervical cancer screening); (2) Apollo (a program of open and distance learning for paramedical…

  12. Enabling SMEs to Deliver Synchronous Online Training--Practical Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taran, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: While synchronous and asynchronous distance education options have fulfilled the promise to reduce travel costs and decrease the number of human resources necessary for training delivery, many corporations are faced with the need to produce learning even at a faster pace in order to gain and sustain competitive advantage. This means a…

  13. From Theory to Practice: Faculty Training in Business Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatright, John R.

    1991-01-01

    Claims that training business faculty in ethics is a critical component of including ethics in the business curriculum. Includes suggestions concerning what business faculty should know about ethical theory, how to include theory, and curricular and teaching issues. Describes research projects, publications, and workshops. (DK)

  14. [Feedback in relation to training of practical clinical skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C.S.; Ringsted, Charlotte Vibeke

    2008-01-01

    Feedback has been identified as an essential component of motor learning. However, feedback principles derived from motor learning theories cannot uncritically be applied to clinical skills training because this knowledge is based primarily on the study of very simple motor skills. Research...

  15. Encouraging SME Participation in Training: Identifying Practical Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Karen; Loader, Kim

    2003-01-01

    A case study of training for small- to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) at a university found that the following factors influenced SME participation: preliminary consultation with SMEs on design and delivery, free half-day workshops in repeated cycles, individual pacing of learning, and business focus. (Contains 14 references.) (JOW)

  16. Acquisition of communication skills in postgraduate training for general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, A.W.M.; Dusman, H.; Tan, L.; Jansen, J.J.M.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: The evidence suggests that a longitudinal training of communication skills embedded in a rich clinical context is most effective. In this study we evaluated the acquisition of communication skills under such conditions. METHODS: In a longitudinal design the communication skills of a randoml

  17. Disability Awareness and University Staff Training in Ireland (Practice Brief)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padden, Lisa; Ellis, Carol

    2015-01-01

    It is vital that all university staff have awareness of the difficulties that may be experienced by students with disabilities. Staff must be given the knowledge and resources to support these students effectively. University College Dublin (UCD) Access & Lifelong Learning has developed a communication and training strategy to improve…

  18. Best practices in bioinformatics training for life scientists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Via, A.; Blicher, T.; Bongcam-Rudloff, E.; Brazas, M.D.; Brooksbank, C.; Budd, A.; Rivas, J. De Las; Dreyer, J.; Fernandes, P.L.; Gelder, C.W. van; Jacob, J.; Jimenez, R.C.; Loveland, J.; Moran, F.; Mulder, N.; Nyronen, T.; Rother, K.; Schneider, M.V.; Attwood, T.K.

    2013-01-01

    The mountains of data thrusting from the new landscape of modern high-throughput biology are irrevocably changing biomedical research and creating a near-insatiable demand for training in data management and manipulation and data mining and analysis. Among life scientists, from clinicians to environ

  19. Place of Diversity in the Current Ethiopian Education and Training Policy: Analysis of Cardinal Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sime, Tariku; Latchanna, Gara

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate to what extent the diversity dimensions are addressed in the current Education and Training Policy. To that end, document analysis was employed. The major diversity dimensions were analyzed based on their cardinal features. The study demonstrated that there is an ambitious need to address issues of…

  20. Voice rest after vocal fold surgery: current practice and evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, A C; Carswell, A J; Tierney, P A

    2013-08-01

    Voice rest is commonly recommended after vocal fold surgery, but there is a lack of evidence base and no standard protocol. The aim of this study was to establish common practice regarding voice rest following vocal fold surgery. An online survey was circulated via e-mail invitation to members of the ENT UK Expert Panel between October and November 2011. The survey revealed that 86.5 per cent of respondents agreed that 'complete voice rest' means no sound production at all, but there was variability in how 'relative voice rest' was defined. There was no dominant type of voice rest routinely recommended after surgery for laryngeal papillomatosis or intermediate pathologies. There was considerable variability in the duration of voice rest recommended, with no statistically significant, most popular response (except for malignant lesions). Surgeons with less than 10 years of experience were more likely to recommend fewer days of voice rest. There is a lack of consistency in advice given to patients after vocal fold surgery, in terms of both type and length of voice rest. This may arise from an absence of robust evidence on which to base practice.

  1. Premedication for neonatal intubation: Current practice in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafat Mosalli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite strong evidence of the benefits of rapid sequence intubation in neonates, it is still infrequently utilized in neonatal intensive care units (NICU, contributing to avoidable pain and secondary procedure-related physiological disturbances. Objectives: The primary objective of this cross-sectional survey was to assess the practice of premedication and regimens commonly used before elective endotracheal intubation in NICUs in Saudi Arabia. The secondary aim was to explore neonatal physicians′ attitudes regarding this intervention in institutions across Saudi Arabia. Methods: A web-based, structured questionnaire was distributed by the Department of Pediatrics, Umm Al Qura University, Mecca, to neonatal physicians and consultants of 10 NICUs across the country by E-mail. Responses were tabulated and descriptive statistics were conducted on the variables extracted. Results: 85% responded to the survey. Although 70% believed it was essential to routinely use premedication for all elective intubations, only 41% implemented this strategy. 60% cited fear of potential side effects for avoiding premedication and 40% indicated that the procedure could be executed more rapidly without drug therapy. Treatment regimens varied widely among respondents. Conclusion: Rates of premedication use prior to non-emergent neonatal intubation are suboptimal. Flawed information and lack of unified unit policies hampered effective implementation. Evidence-based guidelines may influence country-wide adoption of this practice.

  2. Post-arthroscopy septic arthritis: Current data and practical recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, T; Boisrenoult, P; Jenny, J Y

    2015-12-01

    Septic arthritis develops after less than 1% of all arthroscopy procedures. The clinical symptoms may resemble those seen after uncomplicated arthroscopy, raising diagnostic challenges. The diagnosis rests on emergent joint aspiration with microscopic smear examination and prolonged culturing on specific media. Urgent therapeutic measures must be taken, including abundant arthroscopic lavage, synovectomy, and the concomitant administration of two effective antibiotics for at least 6 weeks. Preservation of implants or transplants is increasingly accepted, and repeated joint lavage is a component of the treatment strategy. After knee arthroscopy, infection is the most common complication; most cases occur after cruciate ligament reconstruction, and staphylococci are the predominant causative organisms. Emergent synovectomy with transplant preservation and appropriate antibiotic therapy ensures eradication of the infection in 85% of cases, with no adverse effect on final functional outcomes. After shoulder arthroscopy, infection is 10 times less common than neurological complications and occurs mainly after rotator cuff repair procedures; the diagnosis may be difficult and delayed if Propionibacterium acnes is the causative organism. The update presented here is based on both a literature review and a practice survey. The findings have been used to develop practical recommendations aimed at improving the management of post-arthroscopy infections, which are exceedingly rare but can induce devastating functional impairments.

  3. A critique of current practice: ten foundational guidelines for autoethnographers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolich, Martin

    2010-12-01

    Any research is potentially compromised when researchers address ethical issues retrospectively rather than by anticipating these issues. In this regard, creative analytical practices (CAP) autoethnography has endemic problems. In Part 1 of this article, I detail a case study of an autoethnography in which journal reviewers insisted that an author gain retrospective informed consent from the 23 persons documented in an autoethnography. Yet the journal reviewers' insistence failed to go one step further-acknowledging that a conflict of interest develops when gaining consent retrospectively. In Part 2, I contrast three leading autoethnographers' justifications for not gaining informed consent with the Position Statement on Qualitative Research developed by successive Congresses of Qualitative Inquiry. In Part 3, I identify resources available for autoethnographers, including ethical issues present when researchers use autoethnography to heal themselves, violating the internal confidentiality of relational others. In Part 4, I question if autoethnography is research and, like journalism, exempt from formal ethics review. Throughout the article, 10 foundational ethical considerations for autoethnographers are developed, taking autoethnographers beyond procedural ethics and providing tools for their ethics in practice.

  4. [Cervical cancer screening in Switzerland - current practice and future challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untiet, Sarah; Schmidt, Nicole; Low, Nicola; Petignat, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    At the beginning of the 20th Century, cervical cancer was the leading cause of death from cancer in women. A marked decline in cervical cancer has been observed since the 1960s, in parallel with the introduction of the Papanicolau (Pap) test as a cytological screening method. Today, Pap smear screening is still the most widely used tool for cervical cancer prevention. Testing for human papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical specimens or a combination of Pap and HPV testing are also now available. In this article we compare current guidelines for cervical cancer screening in Switzerland with those in other European countries. In view of the opportunities offered by HPV testing and, since 2008, HPV vaccination, current guidelines for cervical cancer screening should be updated. Both the choice of screening tests and general organization of cervical cancer screening should be reviewed.

  5. Practical Application of Eddy Currents Generated by Wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirba, I; Kleperis, J, E-mail: imants.dirba@gmail.com [Institute of Solid State Physics of University of Latvia, 8 Kengaraga Street, Riga, LV-1063 (Latvia)

    2011-06-23

    When a conductive material is subjected to time-varying magnetic fluxes, eddy (Foucault) currents are generated in it and magnetic field of opposite polarity as the applied one arises. Due to the internal resistance of the conductive material, the eddy currents will be dissipated into heat (Joule heating). Conventional domestic water heaters utilize gas burners or electric resistance heating elements to heat the water in the tank and substantial part of the energy to use for it is wasted. In this paper the origin of electromagnetic induction heat generated by wind turbine in special heat exchange camera connected to water boiler is discussed and material evaluation performed using mathematical modelling (comparing the 2D finite element model with analytical and numerical calculation results).

  6. Practical Application of Eddy Currents Generated by Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirba, I.; Kleperis, J.

    2011-06-01

    When a conductive material is subjected to time-varying magnetic fluxes, eddy (Foucault) currents are generated in it and magnetic field of opposite polarity as the applied one arises. Due to the internal resistance of the conductive material, the eddy currents will be dissipated into heat (Joule heating). Conventional domestic water heaters utilize gas burners or electric resistance heating elements to heat the water in the tank and substantial part of the energy to use for it is wasted. In this paper the origin of electromagnetic induction heat generated by wind turbine in special heat exchange camera connected to water boiler is discussed and material evaluation performed using mathematical modelling (comparing the 2D finite element model with analytical and numerical calculation results).

  7. Anaesthetic specialist registrars in Ireland: current teaching practices and perceptions of their role as undergraduate teachers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, K

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Teaching is an important responsibility of non-consultant hospital doctors. In Ireland, specialist registrars (SpRs) in anaesthesia are contractually obliged to teach medical students, other doctors and nurses. Both medical students and fellow non-consultant hospital doctors attribute between 30 and 40% of their knowledge gain to non-consultant hospital doctors. METHODS: We carried out a confidential telephone survey of anaesthetic SpRs in Ireland regarding their current teaching practices and the perceptions of their role as undergraduate teachers. All the SpRs currently working in clinical practice in Ireland were eligible. RESULTS: Fifty-five of the 79 (70%) SpRs responded to the questionnaire. Only 7 (12.7%) of the respondents said they had been well trained as a teacher. The majority of the respondents stated that they would attend a learning-to-teach course\\/workshop if one was available, and felt that such a course would improve their ability as a teacher. Only 8 (14.5%) agreed that adequate emphasis is placed on commitment to teaching in the assessment of SpRs, both by individual departments and by the College of Anaesthetists. Anaesthetic SpRs in Ireland spend a considerable amount of time each day teaching undergraduate medical students, the majority (68.9%) stated that they had inadequate time to prepare for teaching. CONCLUSION: The majority of the respondents stated that they enjoy teaching, feel that they play an important role in undergraduate teaching but have inadequate time to prepare for teaching. An adequate emphasis is not placed on their commitment to teaching.

  8. Cervical spine trauma radiographs: Swimmers and supine obliques; an exploration of current practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fell, Michael, E-mail: michael.fell@mkgeneral.nhs.u [Milton Keynes General Hospital, Radiology Standing Way, Eaglestone, Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire MK6 5LD (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    The study objectives were: to investigate current cervical spine radiographic imaging practices in conscious adult patients with suspected neck injury; reasons behind variation and consideration of dose estimates were explored. Comparison with a previous survey has been made. Questionnaires were sent to superintendent radiographers responsible for accident and emergency X-ray departments in English trusts with over 8500 emergency admissions per year, with a response rate of 97% (n = 181/186). Departmental cervical spine imaging protocols were reported by 82% of respondents. None use fewer than the three standard projections; if the cervicothoracic junction (C7/T1), is not adequately demonstrated 87% use swimmers projections, 9% supine obliques, 3% CT alone. Following projectional radiography, 97% perform CT. A significant (p = 0.018) increase was found since 1999 in CT use once the swimmers projection fails; fewer now use obliques at this point, continuing with CT instead. No significant difference (p = 0.644) was found in choice of first supplementary radiographs; despite British Trauma Society's recommendation to undertake supine obliques, swimmers remain the most widespread technique. An 85% response rate (n = 103/121) completed a second questionnaire, exploring reasons behind the various practices. Several reported a perceived difficulty in interpreting oblique radiographs, some a concern over high dose of the swimmers. Numerous issues affect the acquisition of cervical spine radiographs. Patient radiation dose should be a major consideration in selection of technique. A potential need for training in interpretation of obliques is highlighted. Specific guidelines for optimum projections should be researched, and protocols issued to ensure best practice.

  9. Supervision in neuropsychological assessment: a survey of training, practices, and perspectives of supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Laura A Schwent; Pedersen, Heather A; Roper, Brad L; Rey-Casserly, Celiane

    2014-01-01

    Within the psychology supervision literature, most theoretical models and practices pertain to general clinical or counseling psychology. Supervision specific to clinical neuropsychology has garnered little attention. This survey study explores supervision training, practices, and perspectives of neuropsychology supervisors. Practicing neuropsychologists were invited to participate in an online survey via listservs and email lists. Of 451 respondents, 382 provided supervision to students, interns, and/or fellows in settings such as VA medical centers (37%), university medical centers (35%), and private practice (15%). Most supervisors (84%) reported supervision was discussed in graduate school "minimally" or "not at all." Although 67% completed informal didactics or received continuing education in supervision, only 27% reported receiving training specific to neuropsychology supervision. Notably, only 39% were satisfied with their training in providing supervision and 77% indicated they would likely participate in training in providing supervision, if available at professional conferences. Results indicate that clinical neuropsychology as a specialty has paid scant attention to developing supervision models and explicit training in supervision skills. We recommend that the specialty develop models of supervision for neuropsychological practice, supervision standards and competencies, training methods in provision of supervision, and benchmark measures for supervision competencies.

  10. Training principles for fascial connective tissues: scientific foundation and suggested practical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleip, Robert; Müller, Divo Gitta

    2013-01-01

    Conventional sports training emphasizes adequate training of muscle fibres, of cardiovascular conditioning and/or neuromuscular coordination. Most sports-associated overload injuries however occur within elements of the body wide fascial net, which are then loaded beyond their prepared capacity. This tensional network of fibrous tissues includes dense sheets such as muscle envelopes, aponeuroses, as well as specific local adaptations, such as ligaments or tendons. Fibroblasts continually but slowly adapt the morphology of these tissues to repeatedly applied challenging loading stimulations. Principles of a fascia oriented training approach are introduced. These include utilization of elastic recoil, preparatory counter movement, slow and dynamic stretching, as well as rehydration practices and proprioceptive refinement. Such training should be practiced once or twice a week in order to yield in a more resilient fascial body suit within a time frame of 6-24 months. Some practical examples of fascia oriented exercises are presented.

  11. The Literacy Practices of Vocational Training in Carpentry and Automotive Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Jean; Mackay, James

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies indicate that vocational students' literacy practices are more demanding than is generally recognised. Employing a view of literacy acquisition as socialisation, we investigated the literacy practices of trades training in Carpentry and Automotive Technology, by interviewing tutors and examined course books and student writing. A…

  12. [Characterization of the training and practice of human talent working in environmental health in Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudelo-Calderón, Carlos A; García-Ubaque, Juan C; Robledo-Martínez, Rocío; García-Ubaque, Cesar A; Vaca, Martha L

    2015-07-01

    Objectives To characterize the peculiarities in the training, exercise, and performance of human talent working in environmental health in Colombia. Method Documentary and database reviews. Surveys and semi-structured interviews. Results Approximately 70 % of professionals in the area of environmental health work in health management, food engineering, environmental engineering, sanitary engineering, veterinary medicine, and pharmaceutical chemistry. 63 % of technologists belong to the field of sanitation technology. Only 20 % of surveyed educational institutions apply the competence approach to training to their students and the identification of occupational characteristics in the labor market is only used at the undergraduate level as a criterion of academic analysis and design. Only 20 % of educational institutions identify educational trends in Colombian and or international environmental health as a contribution to their programs. In prospective practices, the following topics to be strengthened were identified: risk factor identfication, measurement, and control; design and implementation of mechanisms for controlling environmental risks; forms of interdisciplinary work between the natural, social and health sciences; preventative and environmental protection measures and the concept of environment (natural, social, and cultural). Conclusion The human talent currently working in environmental health in the country is concentrated in primary care activities (inspection, monitoring and control) and a large spread exists in mission processes and competences, both professionally and technologically. A lack of coordination between the environmental sector and the education sector can be observed. A great diversity exists among the profiles offered by the different educational programs related to environmental health.

  13. An Investigation of Current Endodontic Practice in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptan, R. F.; Haznedaroglu, F.; Kayahan, M. B.; Basturk, F. B.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to gather information about the quality and quantity of root canal treatments carried out by general dental practitioners in Turkey. Methods. Questionnaires were given to 1400 dentists who attended the 16th National Congress organized by the Turkish Dental Association. The participants were asked to answer 34 multiple-choice questions. The questions were subdivided into 3 main topics; general information; general approach to endodontic treatment; and cleaning, shaping, and obturation of root canals. The statistical analysis was carried out by an χ 2-test to compare the means at a significance level of P Endodontic procedures in general practice in Turkey have differences from widely acknowledged quality guidelines. Despite the introduction of new instruments and techniques, most of the general practitioners chose conventional methods. PMID:23251103

  14. Information-based Teaching Practice of Practical Training Course%实训课程信息化教学实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李光兰

    2015-01-01

    "electronics assembly and commissioning" is a practical training course integrated"teaching and practice" .It is a new subject of current vocational education research training courses that changes face to face teaching into the network course .In network course website ,it applies the technolo-gy of virtual simulation to exercise the operational ability and actually realize informatization ,digitiza-tion ,and virtualization of practical training course ,which meets the requirement for randomness ,re-peatability ,and mobile learning of students . It is possible for students to study knowledge and skills without going into classrooms .It is recommended to be promoted .%《电子产品组装与调试》是一门"教学做"一体化实训课程.将面授实训课建设成网络课程 ,是目前职业教育研究的新课题.在课程网站中应用虚拟仿真实训技术 ,锻炼学生动手能力,真正实现实训课程的信息化、数字化、实践训练虚拟化 ,解决了学生随机性、重复性、移动式学习的需求,使学习者不进入课堂也能学习知识与技能 ,值得推广.

  15. 77 FR 16158 - Current Good Manufacturing Practice in Manufacturing, Processing, Packing, or Holding of Drugs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... Manufacturing Practice in Manufacturing, Processing, Packing, or Holding of Drugs; Revision of Certain Labeling... Administration (FDA) is amending the packaging and labeling control provisions of the current good manufacturing..., 21 CFR part 211 is amended as follows: PART 211--CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED...

  16. DETERMINANTS OF CURRENT ACCOUNT DEFICIT AND ECONOMY POLICIES PRACTICES FOR CURRENT ACCOUNT DEFICIT IN TURKISH ECONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veysel Karagol

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In last years with the impact of rapid globalization and financiallisation current account deficit became a major problem for Turkish economy. Hence, many studies have been conducted foreseeing for policy recommendations and precautions against the current deficit. In this study, by considering determinants of current account deficit and implemented policies, it is intended to provide policy recommendations for closing the deficit. As part of this goal, the determinants of current account deficit and impacts of the determinantsa re discussed. Also, by mentioning monetary and fiscal policies during the period 2003-2015 overall assessment of the policies and a set of policiy recommendations for the next periods were presented. The most important result achieved by the study is applying discussed structural reforms in able to have quick progress in dealing with the current account deficit would have a great effect.

  17. Impact of Training on Improving Proper Handwashing Practices among Elementary School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theruna Huthamaputiran

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hand washing is among the most effective ways to prevent diseases. In Indonesia, only a quarter of the entire population practice proper handwashing techniques. Of these, children are the most vulnerable group for contracting diseases. Nevertheless, they also are crucial agent for behavior transformation as they are keen and open to new ideas. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine if training would have an improvement on a proper hand washing practices among elementary school students. Methods:An observational descriptive study design using random sampling was conducted from September to November 2013 in Jatinangor Subdistrict, West Java, Indonesia using primary data of one hundred elementary school students from four elementary schools. Questionnaires were given after informed consent. A demonstration on hand washing techniques and education on proper hand washing practices was then given. Two weeks later, the same questionnaire was given to measure the influence of the training. The collected data were presented using frequency tabulation. Results: Before the training on proper hand washing practices was conducted, only 86.9% students were practicing it properly. After the training was given, 90.7% of the students were doing it properly. For the hand washing technique, only 66.8% of students knew the correct steps before the intervention was given and 78.7% students did them correctly after the intervention. Conclusions:The training shows an overall improvement on the students’ hand washing practices.   DOI: 10.15850/amj.v4n2.1073

  18. Integration of research and teaching practices and the training of reflective professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Therrien

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study approaches critical reflexivity as a mediating element of the integration between research and teaching practices in the training of the education professional. Based on the parameter of research as an educational principle associated to the presupposition that involvement in research activities encourages the development of rationalities that support reflective practices, which lead the most significant and independent learning processes, this essay aims at, on the one hand, identifying “macro” theoretic schemes that may support the analysis of different knowledge types and therefore, the rationalities that affect theory-practice dynamics in education initiatives and on the other hand, finding “micro” theoretical-practical schemes for reflective training related to the practice in learning contexts. The study analyzes proposals made by reference authors, as well as educational practices that support enunciated presuppositions.

  19. Effectiveness of Working Memory Training among Subjects Currently on Sick Leave Due to Complex Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasvik, Julie K.; Woodhouse, Astrid; Stiles, Tore C.; Jacobsen, Henrik B.; Landmark, Tormod; Glette, Mari; Borchgrevink, Petter C.; Landrø, Nils I.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The current study examined if adaptive working memory training (Cogmed QM) has the potential to improve inhibitory control, working memory capacity, and perceptions of memory functioning in a group of patients currently on sick leave due to symptoms of pain, insomnia, fatigue, depression and anxiety. Participants who were referred to a vocational rehabilitation center volunteered to take part in the study. Methods: Participants were randomly assigned to either a training condition (N = 25) or a control condition (N = 29). Participants in the training condition received working memory training in addition to the clinical intervention offered as part of the rehabilitation program, while participants in the control condition received treatment as usual i.e., the rehabilitation program only. Inhibitory control was measured by The Stop Signal Task, working memory was assessed by the Spatial Working Memory Test, while perceptions of memory functioning were assessed by The Everyday Memory Questionnaire-Revised. Results: Participants in the training group showed a significant improvement on the post-tests of inhibitory control when compared with the comparison group (p = 0.025). The groups did not differ on the post-tests of working memory. Both groups reported less memory problems at post-testing, but there was no sizeable difference between the two groups. Conclusions: Results indicate that working memory training does not improve general working memory capacity per se. Nor does it seem to give any added effects in terms of targeting and improving self-perceived memory functioning. Results do, however, provide evidence to suggest that inhibitory control is accessible and susceptible to modification by adaptive working memory training. PMID:28111555

  20. Application of current knowledge and trends in sports training of top level volleyball teams in the Czech Republic

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    Michal Lehnert

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To achieve the best results in top volleyball it is necessary to analyze the current state and to react adequately to development trends, which characterize modern volleyball. OBJECTIVES: The goal of the study was to acquire information regarding how do top volleyball coaches of senior and junior volleyball teams in the Czech Republic put current knowledge and trends in volleyball sport training and coaching in practice. METHODS: We created a survey consisting of 31 questions, which were divided into 5 areas: respecting of the current requirements of game performance in training, training efficiency, conditioning, coaching and psycho-social aspects. The survey was sent to 49 coaches, 24 of them replied (response rate 49 %. RESULTS: The research shows that coaches do not apply all important knowledge and trends for players' preparation (76 % of correct answers in total. Groups of coaches were further divided to subgroups according to gender of the trained teams, age categories, coaches work load and 1st and 2nd class coaches. The comparison of the answers in the subgroup of coaches with respect to segregated areas has only pointed at a difference between male and female teams in the area of psycho-social training aspects (Z = 1.756; p = 0.079; d = 0.717. The comparison of coaches' groups answers to individual questions show that: a coaches of male teams base their training sessions on real game situations and choose the content of the exercises with the ball more thoroughly (Z = 1.85; p = 0.07; d = 0.75 and require defensive game combinations at the net more often (Z = 1.81; p = 0.07; d = 0.74; b junior teams are behind (Z = 1.90; p = 0.06; d = 0.77 senior teams in the number of training hours with the ball a week and in making conditions for successful realization of offensive game combinations with fast set (Z = 2.10; p = 0.04; d = 0.86; c 1st class coaches within the scope of condition training pay more attention to core training

  1. Labelling of electronic cigarettes: regulations and current practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonocore, Federico; Marques Gomes, Ana C N; Nabhani-Gebara, Shereen; Barton, Stephen J; Calabrese, Gianpiero

    2017-01-01

    Background Over the past decade e-cigarettes have established themselves in the global market. E-cigarettes triggered much interest in relation to their content and efficacy as smoking cessation tools, but less attention has been paid to users and environmental safety warnings and guidance. Several regulations have been introduced to promote their safe handling and disposal. From May 2016, liquids and cartridges will be regulated by European Community Directives (ECDs) 2001/83/EC and 93/42/EEC, or 2014/40/EU if marketed as tobacco-related products. Currently, manufacturers and distributors must abide by the Chemical (Hazard Information and Packaging for Supply) Regulations 2009 (CHIP) or Classification, Labelling and Packaging Regulations (CLP), the latter replacing CHIP in June 2015. Objective In this work, the compliance of marketed e-liquids and e-cigarettes with current European Union and UK legislations is assessed. Results E-liquids and e-cigarettes (21 and 9 brands, respectively) were evaluated. Evidence of non-compliance was found in relation to the CHIP/CLP toxic (13%) and environmental (37%) pictograms, tactile warning (23%), nominal amount of solution (30%), supplier contact telephone number and address (40%). None of the evaluated e-cigarettes displayed information on the correct disposal/recycling of batteries in line with the ECD 2006/66/EC. Conclusions More stringent enforcement of regulations is needed to ensure not only the user's safety and awareness, but also the safeguarding of the environment. PMID:26790924

  2. Laparoscopic simulation training in gynaecology: Current provision and staff attitudes - a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Christy; Fox, Robert; Hinshaw, Kim; Draycott, Timothy J; James, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore current provision of laparoscopic simulation training, and to determine attitudes of trainers and trainees to the role of simulators in surgical training across the UK. An anonymous cross-sectional survey with cluster sampling was developed and circulated. All Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) Training Programme Directors (TPD), College Tutors (RCT) and Trainee representatives (TR) across the UK were invited to participate. One hundred and ninety-six obstetricians and gynaecologists participated. Sixty-three percent of hospitals had at least one box trainer, and 14.6% had least one virtual-reality simulator. Only 9.3% and 3.6% stated that trainees used a structured curriculum on box and virtual-reality simulators, respectively. Respondents working in a Large/Teaching hospital (p = 0.008) were more likely to agree that simulators enhance surgical training. Eighty-nine percent agreed that simulators improve the quality of training, and should be mandatory or desirable for junior trainees. Consultants (p = 0.003) and respondents over 40 years (p = 0.011) were more likely to hold that a simulation test should be undertaken before live operation. Our data demonstrated, therefore, that availability of laparoscopic simulators is inconsistent, with limited use of mandatory structured curricula. In contrast, both trainers and trainees recognise a need for greater use of laparoscopic simulation for surgical training.

  3. Training in clinical forensic medicine in the UK--perceptions of current regulatory standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Margaret M; Norfolk, Guy A

    2011-08-01

    As clinical forensic medicine (CFM) is not currently recognised as a speciality in the UK there are no nationally agreed mandatory standards for training forensic physicians in either general forensic (GFM) or sexual offence medicine (SOM). The General Medical Council (GMC), the medical regulator in the UK, has issued clear standards for training in all specialities recommending that "trainees must be supported to acquire the necessary skills and experience through induction, effective educational supervision, an appropriate workload and time to learn". In order to evaluate the current situation in the field of clinical forensic medicine, doctors who have recently (within the last two years) started working in the field "trainees" (n = 38), and trainers (n = 61) with responsibility for clinical and educational supervision of new trainees, were surveyed by questionnaire to gather their perceptions of how the relevant GMC standards are being met in initial on-the-job training. Telephone interviews were performed with eleven doctors working as clinical or medical directors to determine their views. It is clear that currently the quality of training in CFM is sub-standard and inconsistent and that the published standards, as to the minimum requirement for training that must be met by post-graduate medical and training providers at all levels, are not being met. The Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine (FFLM) needs to set explicit minimum standards which will comply with the regulator and work to pilot credentialing for forensic physicians. A number of recommendations are made for urgent FFLM development.

  4. The Influence of Controller Parameters on the Quality of the Train Converter Current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Brenna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a stability analysis of train converters in order to evaluate how the controller parameters affect the absorbed current. The new dynamic model presented in this paper is capable of considering the time-variant nature of the system for the correct tuning of the feedback proportional-integral PI controller, applying a current controlled modulation technique never used in high-power traction converters. The reduction of the harmonic content of the current absorbed by a converter employed at the input stage onboard high-speed trains is really important, considering the interaction with the signaling system set up for traffic control. A computer model of the converter, considering both the power and the control structure, has also been implemented in order to deliver a validated tool for the developed theoretical analysis.

  5. Procedural skills practice and training needs of doctors, nurses, midwives and paramedics in rural Victoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, David; Shepherd, Irwyn; McGrail, Matthew; Kassell, Lisa; Connolly, Marnie; Williams, Brett; Nestel, Debra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Procedural skills are a significant component of clinical practice. Doctors, nurses, midwives and paramedics are trained to use a variety of procedural skills. Rural clinicians in particular are often required to maintain competence in some procedural skills that are used infrequently, and which may require regular and repeated rehearsal. This paper reports on a research project conducted in Gippsland, Victoria, to ascertain the frequency of use, and relevance to clinical practice, of a range of skills in the fields of medicine, nursing, midwifery, and paramedic practice. The project also gathered data on the attitudes of clinicians regarding how frequently and by what means they thought they needed to practice these skills with a particular focus on the use of simulation as an educational method. Methods The research was conducted following identification of a specific set of procedural skills for each professional group. Skills were identified by an expert steering committee. We developed online questionnaires that consisted of two parts: 1) demographic and professional characteristics, and 2) experience of procedural skills and perceived training needs. We sought to invite all practicing clinicians (doctors, nurses, midwives, paramedics) working in Gippsland. Online surveys were distributed between November 2011 and April 2012 with three follow-up attempts. The Monash University Human Research Ethics Committee approved the study. Results Valid responses were received from 58 doctors, 94 nurses, 46 midwives, and 30 paramedics, whom we estimate to represent not more than 20% of current clinicians within these professions. This response rate reflected some of the difficulties experienced in the conduct of the research. Results were tabulated for each professional group across the range of skills. There was significant correlation between the frequency of certain skills and confidence with maintenance of these skills. This did not necessarily correlate

  6. Telephone techniques and etiquette: a medical practice staff training tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura Sachs

    2007-01-01

    The telephone is usually the first contact a prospective or new patient has with a medical practice. It is also the method that existing patients and others commonly use to ask questions or convey information. At the same time, a telephone that rings off the hook can be one of the biggest drains on staff time and a source of tremendous frustration. This article suggests practical techniques for managing the medical practice telephone. It provides seven never-fail strategies for saving time on the phone while remaining courteous and attentive to callers. It offers tips to help readers avoid getting caught in an endless game of telephone tag. The article highlights strategies that work particularly well when placing calls and when dealing with a busy signal or voicemail system problem in the practice. It also describes the fine points for taking accurate and complete telephone messages without turning off callers or misleading them. This article further explores practical strategies for using and not abusing the hold button and offers additional tips for telephone equipment and accessories readers may find helpful. Finally, this article suggests guidelines for using an answering machine or voicemail system and provides a 25-question quiz to help readers assess their own telephone technique.

  7. Current Developments and Best Practice in Open and Distance Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Rocha Trinidade

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Through the many documents regularly emitted by those dedicated to this activity, it is comparatively easy to describe factual developments in the field of open and distance education in different places in the world. However, it is much more difficult to produce judgements of value about their quality. Quality is a subjective rather than an absolute concept and may be examined from different analytical perspectives: consumers' satisfaction level, intrinsic value of scientific and technical content of learning materials, soundness of learning strategies, efficiency of organisation and procedures, adequate use of advanced technologies, reliability of student support mechanisms, etc.These parameters should be put into the context of specific objectives, nature of target populations and availability of different kinds of resources. In a specific geographic, social, economic and cultural situation a given set of solutions might be judged as adequate and deserving the qualification of "good practice," while in a different context it could be considered of rather poor quality.The selection of examples in this article is the sole responsibility of the authors: neither should the chosen cases be considered as clearly better than any other one, nor missing cases be interpreted as lack of appreciation or a negative judgement.Finally, the authors are aware of the risks of interpreting trends and trying to extrapolate them into the near future: readers should use their own judgement in accepting (or forcefully rejecting these projections.

  8. Overview of robotic colorectal surgery: Current and future practical developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sudipta; Evans, Charles

    2016-02-27

    Minimal access surgery has revolutionised colorectal surgery by offering reduced morbidity and mortality over open surgery, while maintaining oncological and functional outcomes with the disadvantage of additional practical challenges. Robotic surgery aids the surgeon in overcoming these challenges. Uptake of robotic assistance has been relatively slow, mainly because of the high initial and ongoing costs of equipment but also because of limited evidence of improved patient outcomes. Advances in robotic colorectal surgery will aim to widen the scope of minimal access surgery to allow larger and more complex surgery through smaller access and natural orifices and also to make the technology more economical, allowing wider dispersal and uptake of robotic technology. Advances in robotic endoscopy will yield self-advancing endoscopes and a widening role for capsule endoscopy including the development of motile and steerable capsules able to deliver localised drug therapy and insufflation as well as being recharged from an extracorporeal power source to allow great longevity. Ultimately robotic technology may advance to the point where many conventional surgical interventions are no longer required. With respect to nanotechnology, surgery may eventually become obsolete.

  9. Current practices and improved recommendations for treating hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, L; Sherwood, W G

    1987-06-01

    A study of treatment practices of pediatric centers managing hereditary fructose intolerance and a review of recent literature on this subject were undertaken in an attempt to establish the degree of dietary liberalization allowable with age and the acceptability of foods containing trace amounts of fructose. The information was needed to plan optimal therapy and thus avoid the consequences of the disorder, namely intestinal dysfunction, metabolic imbalance, and hepatic and renal damage. Fifty responses to 113 letters to centers in Canada and the United States, as well as data from The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, identified only 29 affected children and provided information on their care, including food lists and literature references. Major principles of treatment were similar, but the approach to allowing and quantifying dietary fructose differed. In response to the apparent need for standardization of treatment, the authors formulated improved recommendations for the control of dietary fructose (less than 1.5 gm/day). Only a few foods of vegetable origin are allowed, including a limited selection of vegetables and cereal products from grain endosperm. Repeated dietary counseling is advocated with regard to allowed foods, sweeteners, and medications to ensure long-term dietary compliance.

  10. An Investigation of Current Endodontic Practice in Turkey

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    R. F. Kaptan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of this study was to gather information about the quality and quantity of root canal treatments carried out by general dental practitioners in Turkey. Methods. Questionnaires were given to 1400 dentists who attended the 16th National Congress organized by the Turkish Dental Association. The participants were asked to answer 34 multiple-choice questions. The questions were subdivided into 3 main topics; general information; general approach to endodontic treatment; and cleaning, shaping, and obturation of root canals. The statistical analysis was carried out by an -test to compare the means at a significance level of . Results. The response rate for this study was 43%. There was a wide variation in the number of root canal treatments completed per month. Nearly 92% of practitioners stated that they never used rubber dam. The most commonly used working length determination technique was radiographic evaluation (. Sodium hypochlorite was the irrigant of choice with varying concentrations and AH Plus was the sealer of choice (. Resin composite was the most frequently used material for final restorations. Conclusions. Endodontic procedures in general practice in Turkey have differences from widely acknowledged quality guidelines. Despite the introduction of new instruments and techniques, most of the general practitioners chose conventional methods.

  11. Corrective shoes for children: a survey of current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staheli, L T; Giffin, L

    1980-01-01

    A survey of shoe-prescribing practices for children was taken among pediatricians, orthopaedists, pediatric orthopaedists, and podiatrists. Opinions differed significantly regarding the usefulness of shoe modifications for common pediatric lower limb and foot problems. Parents' attitudes toward children's shoes were also surveyed. Pediatricians and pediatric orthopaedists tended to prescribe corrective shoes less often than did orthopaedists and podiatrists. High topped shoes are not necessary to promote normal foot development, in the opinion of 85% of those surveyed; however, high topped shoes were often recommended for infants because they slip off less easily. Preferences for Thomas heels, scaphoid pads, reverse lasts, straight lasts, wedges, torque heels, and shoe lifts for problems including flexible flat feet, metatarsus adductus, intoeing, bow legs, knock knees, and leg length inequalities were delineated among the four groups treating children's feet. The authors conclude that whereas studies show that shoe modifications are of questionable value in the problems discussed, corrective shoes are often prescribed when regular shoes would be more appropriate and economical.

  12. Somatic cell nuclear transfer cloning: practical applications and current legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, H; Lucas-Hahn, A

    2012-08-01

    Somatic cloning is emerging as a new biotechnology by which the opportunities arising from the advances in molecular genetics and genome analysis can be implemented in animal breeding. Significant improvements have been made in SCNT protocols in the past years which now allow to embarking on practical applications. The main areas of application of SCNT are: Reproductive cloning, therapeutic cloning and basic research. A great application potential of SCNT based cloning is the production of genetically modified (transgenic) animals. Somatic cell nuclear transfer based transgenic animal production has significant advances over the previously employed microinjection of foreign DNA into pronuclei of zygotes. This cell based transgenesis is compatible with gene targeting and allows both, the addition of a specific gene and the deletion of an endogenous gene. Efficient transgenic animal production provides numerous opportunities for agriculture and biomedicine. Regulatory agencies around the world have agreed that food derived from cloned animals and their offspring is safe and there is no scientific basis for questioning this. Commercial application of somatic cloning within the EU is via the Novel Food regulation EC No. 258/97. Somatic cloning raises novel questions regarding the ethical and moral status of animals and their welfare which has prompted a controversial discussion in Europe which has not yet been resolved.

  13. Global health training and international clinical rotations during residency: current status, needs, and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drain, Paul K; Holmes, King K; Skeff, Kelley M; Hall, Thomas L; Gardner, Pierce

    2009-03-01

    Increasing international travel and migration have contributed to globalization of diseases. Physicians today must understand the global burden and epidemiology of diseases, the disparities and inequities in global health systems, and the importance of cross-cultural sensitivity. To meet these needs, resident physicians across all specialties have expressed growing interest in global health training and international clinical rotations. More residents are acquiring international experience, despite inadequate guidance and support from most accreditation organizations and residency programs. Surveys of global health training, including international clinical rotations, highlight the benefits of global health training as well as the need for a more coordinated approach. In particular, international rotations broaden a resident's medical knowledge, reinforce physical examination skills, and encourage practicing medicine among underserved and multicultural populations. As residents recognize these personal and professional benefits, a strong majority of them seek to gain international clinical experience. In conclusion, with feasible and appropriate administrative steps, all residents can receive global health training and be afforded the accreditation and programmatic support to participate in safe international rotations. The next steps should address accreditation for international rotations and allowance for training away from continuity clinics by residency accreditation bodies, and stipend and travel support for six or more weeks of call-free elective time from residency programs.

  14. From Current Algae Products to Future Biorefinery Practices: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppink, Michel H M; Olivieri, Giuseppe; Reith, Hans; van den Berg, Corjan; Barbosa, Maria J; Wijffels, Rene H

    2017-03-07

    Microalgae are considered to be one of the most promising next generation bio-based/food feedstocks with a unique lipid composition, high protein content, and an almost unlimited amount of other bio-active molecules. High-value components such as the soluble proteins, (poly) unsaturated fatty acids, pigments, and carbohydrates can be used as an important ingredient for several markets, such as the food/feed/chemical/cosmetics and health industries. Although cultivation costs have decreased significantly in the last few decades, large microalgae production processes become economically viable if all complex compounds are optimally valorized in their functional state. To isolate these functional compounds from the biomass, cost-effective, mild, and energy-efficient biorefinery techniques need to be developed and applied. In this review we describe current microalgae biorefinery strategies and the derived products, followed by new technological developments and an outlook toward future products and the biorefinery philosophy.

  15. The Training in Educational Assessment practices of Special Education Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier J. Maquilón Sánchez

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Admitting the importance of evaluation in the culture of quality, and especially in the field of education, 233 teachers have taken part in this research. They work to help children with especial educational needs, in Murcia (Spain.We asked them about their level of real execution of practical assessment of learning, teaching and programs, and the level of importance that they give to this evaluation. In this study we analyzed the differences found in variables as gender, type of the school (specific/ordinary, speciality (therapeutic pedagogy/audition and language, administrative situation (official/supply teacher and years of experience. In general, they gave more importance to evaluation than their real practice shows, and it concerned more the evaluation of learning and less that of teaching. The comparison between variables is allowed to make an x-ray about commitment to practical systematized assessment.

  16. Provision of genetic services in Europe: current practices and issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godard, Béatrice; Kääriäinen, Helena; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Tranebjaerg, Lisbeth; Coviello, Domenico; Aymé, Ségolène

    2003-12-01

    This paper examines the professional and scientific views on the social, ethical and legal issues that impact on the provision of genetic services in Europe. Many aspects have been considered, such as the definition and the aims of genetic services, their organization, the quality assessment, public education, as well as the partnership with patients support groups and the multicultural aspects. The methods was primarily the analysis of professional guidelines, legal frameworks and other documents related to the organization of genetic services, mainly from Europe, but also from USA and international organizations. Then, the method was to examine the background data emerging from an updated report produced by the Concerted Action on Genetic Services in Europe, as well as the issues debated by 43 experts from 17 European countries invited to an international workshop organized by the European Society of Human Genetics Public and Professional Policy Committee in Helsinki, Finland, 8 and 9 September 2000. Some conclusions were identified from the ESHG workshop to arrive at outlines for optimal genetic services. Participants were concerned about equal accessibility and effectiveness of clinical genetic services, quality assessment of services, professional education, multidisciplinarity and division of tasks as well as networking. Within European countries, adherence to the organizational principles of prioritization, regionalization and integration into related health services would maximize equal accessibility and effectiveness of genetic actions. There is a need for harmonization of the rules involved in financial coverage of DNA tests in order to make these available to all Europeans. Clear guidelines for the best practice will ensure that the provision of genetic services develops in a way that is beneficial to its customers, be they health professionals or the public, especially since the coordination of clinical, laboratory and research perspectives within a

  17. Medication therapy management services in North Carolina community pharmacies: current practice patterns and projected demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Richard A; Roth, Mary T; Brouwer, Emily S; Herndon, Susan; Christensen, Dale B

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the types of cognitive services offered and the number of patients being served in community pharmacies, determine the number of pharmacies that plan to offer medication therapy management (MTM) services under the Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit, and assess whether current and expected practices will meet the potential needs of enrollees. Cross-sectional study. North Carolina in January 2005. 1,593 community pharmacy managers. Survey using a Web-based tool. Provision of cognitive services and number of patients for whom services are provided. A total of 262 (16%) pharmacy managers provided usable responses. Approximately 42% of respondents (n = 110) indicated that they provide some type of cognitive service. Comprehensive MTM services, or services consistent with the professionwide consensus definition, were provided by 31% of respondents (n = 81). Independent pharmacies were more likely to offer some type of service compared with chain pharmacies (58% versus 31%, respectively; P Pharmacy managers with a doctor of pharmacy degree were less likely than pharmacy managers with a bachelor's degree to offer services in their pharmacies (P = .02), and pharmacies with pharmacists on staff who had received certificate training were more likely to offer cognitive services (P = .03). Of all respondents, 28% (n = 73) indicated that they planned to offer MTM services under the Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit. Comparing these results with those of a 1999 survey of North Carolina pharmacists that used some of the same items, the percentage of community pharmacies that provide cognitive services has increased in the intervening years but remains low. Among the services being offered in 2005, most were focused on patient education and training, coordinating and integrating care, and medication regimen reviews. Implementation of MTM services under the Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit should hasten the development and offering of these

  18. Investigation of the current requirements engineering practices among software developers at the Universiti Utara Malaysia Information Technology (UUMIT) centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Azham; Mkpojiogu, Emmanuel O. C.; Abdullah, Inam

    2016-08-01

    Requirements Engineering (RE) is a systemic and integrated process of eliciting, elaborating, negotiating, validating and managing of the requirements of a system in a software development project. UUM has been supported by various systems developed and maintained by the UUM Information Technology (UUMIT) Centre. The aim of this study was to assess the current requirements engineering practices at UUMIT. The main problem that prompted this research is the lack of studies that support software development activities at the UUMIT. The study is geared at helping UUMIT produce quality but time and cost saving software products by implementing cutting edge and state of the art requirements engineering practices. Also, the study contributes to UUM by identifying the activities needed for software development so that the management will be able to allocate budget to provide adequate and precise training for the software developers. Three variables were investigated: Requirement Description, Requirements Development (comprising: Requirements Elicitation, Requirements Analysis and Negotiation, Requirements Validation), and Requirement Management. The results from the study showed that the current practice of requirement engineering in UUMIT is encouraging, but still need further development and improvement because a few RE practices were seldom practiced.

  19. How to improve mental health competency in general practice training?--a SWOT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Marwijk, Harm

    2004-06-01

    It is quite evident there is room for improvement in the primary care management of common mental health problems. Patients respond positively when GPs adopt a more proactive role in this respect. The Dutch general practice curriculum is currently being renewed. The topics discussed here include the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) of present primary mental healthcare teaching. What works well and what needs improving? Integrated teaching packages are needed to help general practice trainees manage various presentations of psychological distress. Such packages comprise training videotapes, in which models such as problem-solving treatment (PST) are demonstrated, as well as roleplaying material for new skills, self-report questionnaires for patients, and small-group video feedback of consultations. While GP trainees can effectively master such skills, it is important to query the level of proficiency required by registrars. Are these skills of use only to connoisseur GPs, or to all? More room for specialisation and differentiation among trainees may be the way forward. We have just developed a new curriculum for the obligatory three-month psychiatry housemanship. It is competency oriented, self-directed and assignment driven. This new curriculum will be evaluated in due course.

  20. Oh Language Sense Training in College English Teaching Practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The author supposes that there is a big gap between vocabulary and text in the course of second languageacquisition.Ignorance of individual sentence training to acquire language sense in the CET coursemight be one of the reasons to account for the failure of many students to be speakers of English afterthey graduate.Students should be encouraged to read and recite some model sentences and articles so asto gain a certain language sense as hardware and supporting materials in linguitic communication.Thus confidence is obtained and the gap between vocabulary and text can be easily jumped over.

  1. Current practices by forensic anthropologists in adult skeletal age estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, Heather M; Passalacqua, Nicholas V

    2012-03-01

    When determining an age estimate from adult skeletal remains, forensic anthropologists face a series of methodological choices. These decisions, such as which skeletal region to evaluate, which methods to apply, what statistical information to use, and how to combine information from multiple methods, ultimately impacts the final reported age estimate. In this study, a questionnaire was administered to 145 forensic anthropologists, documenting current trends in adult age at death estimation procedures used throughout the field. Results indicate that the Suchey-Brooks pubic symphysis method (1990) remains the most highly favored aging technique, with cranial sutures and dental wear being the least preferred, regardless of experience. The majority of respondents stated that they vary their skeletal age estimate process case-by-case and ultimately present to officials both a narrow and broad possible age range. Overall, respondents displayed a very high degree of variation in how they generate their age estimates, and indicated that experience and expertise play a large role in skeletal age estimates.

  2. Critical analysis of biomarkers in the current periodontal practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khiste, Sujeet V; Ranganath, V; Nichani, Ashish S; Rajani, V

    2011-04-01

    Periodontal disease is a chronic microbial infection that triggers inflammation-mediated loss of the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone that supports the teeth. Because of the increasing prevalence and associated comorbidities, there is a need for the development of new diagnostic tests that can detect the presence of active disease, predict future disease progression, and evaluate the response to periodontal therapy, thereby improving the clinical management of periodontal patients. The diagnosis of active phases of periodontal disease and the identification of patients at risk for active disease represent challenges for clinical investigators and practitioners. Advances in diagnostic research are moving toward methods whereby the periodontal risk can be identified and quantified by objective measures using biomarkers. Patients with periodontitis may have elevated circulating levels of specific inflammatory markers that can be correlated to the severity of the disease. Advances in the use of oral fluids as possible biological samples for objective measures of the current disease state, treatment monitoring, and prognostic indicators have boosted saliva- and other oral-based fluids to the forefront of technology. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) is an inflammatory exudate that can be collected at the gingival margin or within the gingival crevice. This article highlights recent advances in the use of biomarker-based disease diagnostics that focus on the identification of active periodontal disease from plaque biofilms, GCF, and saliva.

  3. Peripheral interventions and antiplatelet therapy: Role in current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pahul; Harper, Yenal; Oliphant, Carrie S; Morsy, Mohamed; Skelton, Michelle; Askari, Raza; Khouzam, Rami N

    2017-07-26

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common disorder associated with a high risk of cardiovascular mortality and continues to be under-recognized. The major risk factors for PAD are similar to those for coronary and cerebrovascular disease. Management includes exercise program, pharmacologic therapy and revascularization including endovascular and surgical approach. The optimal revascularization strategy, endovascular or surgical intervention, is often debated due to the paucity of head to head randomized controlled studies. Despite significant advances in endovascular interventions resulting in increased utilization over surgical bypass, significant challenges still remain. Platelet activation and aggregation after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of atherosclerotic arteries are important risk factors for re-occlusion/restenosis and life-threatening thrombosis following endovascular procedures. Antiplatelet agents are commonly prescribed to reduce the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke and death from cardiovascular causes in patients with PAD. Despite an abundance of data demonstrating efficacy of antiplatelet therapy in coronary artery disease and cerebrovascular disease, there is a paucity of clinical information, clinical guidelines and randomized controlled studies in the PAD population. Hence, data on antiplatelet therapy in coronary interventions is frequently extrapolated to peripheral interventions. The aim of this review article is to elucidate the current data on revascularization and the role and duration of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy in re-vascularized lower limb PAD patients.

  4. An Approach to Ethical Practice in Management and Trainer Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Rita

    1992-01-01

    Concern with ethics has given rise to two educational approaches, one derived from philosophical principles of social ethics, the other based on case studies of practical issues. A combination of these is necessary to ensure situational applicability and to avoid moral relativism and expediency. (SK)

  5. An Approach to Ethical Practice in Management and Trainer Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Rita

    1992-01-01

    Concern with ethics has given rise to two educational approaches, one derived from philosophical principles of social ethics, the other based on case studies of practical issues. A combination of these is necessary to ensure situational applicability and to avoid moral relativism and expediency. (SK)

  6. Effect of Training on Knowledge and Practice of Universal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adedamla

    Nigeria remains a public health problem of. 2 enormous .... Sample size. The sample size was determined using the formula ... educational institutions, religion and culture. A ... exposure management of injuries. .... control group had adequate supply of resources for .... in Malaysia where mean practice score was 79.5%,.

  7. Training Advanced Writing Skills: The Case for Deliberate Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Ronald T.; Whiteford, Alison P.

    2009-01-01

    The development of advanced writing skills has been neglected in schools of the United States, with even some college graduates lacking the level of ability required in the workplace (National Commission on Writing, 2003, 2004). The core problem, we argue, is an insufficient degree of appropriate task practice distributed throughout the secondary…

  8. The reflective dancer: ICT support for practical training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijen, Ä.

    2008-01-01

    The research reported in this dissertation was started with the premise that web-based ICT applications could be useful for supporting teaching and learning in practical dance education. The central research question of this thesis was, How can web-based ICT applications be used to facilitate teachi

  9. Telehealth and eHealth in nurse practitioner training: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutledge CM

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Carolyn M Rutledge,1 Karen Kott,2 Patty A Schweickert,3 Rebecca Poston,1 Christianne Fowler,1 Tina S Haney1 1College of Health Sciences, School of Nursing, 2College of Health Sciences, School of Physical Therapy, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, 3Department of Neuroradiology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA Abstract: Telehealth is becoming a vital process for providing access to cost-effective quality care to patients at a distance. As such, it is important for nurse practitioners, often the primary providers for rural and disadvantaged populations, to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to utilize telehealth technologies in practice. In reviewing the literature, very little information was found on programs that addressed nurse practitioner training in telehealth. This article provides an overview of both the topics and the techniques that have been utilized for training nurse practitioners and nurse practitioner students in the delivery of care utilizing telehealth. Specifically, this article focuses on topics including 1 defining telehealth, 2 telehealth etiquette, 3 interprofessional collaboration, 4 regulations, 5 reimbursement, 6 security/Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA, 7 ethical practice in telehealth, and 8 satisfaction of patients and providers. A multimodal approach based on a review of the literature is presented for providing the training: 1 didactics, 2 simulations including standardized patient encounters, 3 practice immersions, and 4 telehealth projects. Studies found that training using the multimodal approach allowed the students to develop comfort, knowledge, and skills needed to embrace the utilization of telehealth in health care. Keywords: telehealth, nurse practitioner education, telemedicine, simulation, health care

  10. Improving Patient Outcomes: Effectively Training Healthcare Staff in Psychological Practice Skills: A Mixed Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzonis, Katherine; Mann, Eryn; Wyrzykowska, Aleksandra; Kanellakis, Pavlo

    2015-08-01

    Training is an important part of modern European healthcare services and is often cited as a way to improve care quality. To date, various training methods have been used to impart skills relevant to psychological practice in a variety of mental health professionals. However, patient outcomes are rarely used in evaluating the effectiveness of the different training methods used, making it difficult to assess true utility. In the present review, we consider methods of training that can effectively impact trainee and patient outcomes. To do so, PubMed, PsycNET, Scopus, CENTRAL and ERIC were searched for studies on training of healthcare staff in psychological practice approaches. In total, 24 studies were identified (16 quantitative and 8 qualitative). For the most part, group, individual, and web-based training was used. A variety of health professionals were trained in skills including 'communication', 'diagnosis', and 'referral' to name but a few. In the majority of studies staff skill level improved. These findings hold implications for the design, implementation, and evaluation of training for mental healthcare staff.

  11. Does integrated training in evidence-based medicine (EBM) in the general practice (GP) specialty training improve EBM behaviour in daily clinical practice? A cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortekaas, M F; Bartelink, M E L; Zuithoff, N P A; van der Heijden, G J M G; de Wit, N J; Hoes, A W

    2016-09-13

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is an important element in the general practice (GP) specialty training. Studies show that integrating EBM training into clinical practice brings larger benefits than stand-alone modules. However, these studies have neither been performed in GP nor assessed EBM behaviour of former trainees in daily clinical practice. GP specialty training in the Netherlands. All 82 third year GP trainees who started their final third year in 2011 were approached for inclusion, of whom 79 (96%) participated: 39 in the intervention group and 40 in the control group. Integrated EBM training, in which EBM is embedded closely within the clinical context by joint assignments for the trainee and supervisor in daily practice, and teaching sessions based on dilemmas from actual patient consultations. Stand-alone EBM training at the institute only. Our primary outcome was EBM behaviour, assessed by measuring guideline adherence (incorporating rational, motivated deviation) and information-seeking behaviour. Our secondary outcomes were EBM attitude and EBM knowledge. Data were acquired using logbooks and questionnaires, respectively. Analyses were performed using mixed models. Logbook data were available from 76 (96%) of the participating trainees at baseline (7614 consultations), 60 (76%) at the end of the third year (T1, 4973 consultations) and 53 (67%) 1 year after graduation (T2, 3307 consultations). We found no significant differences in outcomes between the 2 groups, with relative risks for guideline adherence varying between 0.96 and 0.99 (95% CI 0.86 to 1.11) at T1, and 0.99 and 1.10 (95% CI 0.92 to 1.25) at T2, and for information-seeking behaviour between 0.97 and 1.16 (95% CI 0.70 to 1.91) and 0.90 and 1.10 (95% CI 0.70 to 1.32), respectively. Integrated EBM training compared with stand-alone EBM training does not improve EBM behaviour, attitude or knowledge of (future) GPs. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where

  12. Enhancing Self-Awareness: A Practical Strategy to Train Culturally Responsive Social Work Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini J. Negi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A primary goal of social justice educators is to engage students in a process of self-discovery, with the goal of helping them recognize their own biases, develop empathy, and become better prepared for culturally responsive practice. While social work educators are mandated with the important task of training future social workers in culturally responsive practice with diverse populations, practical strategies on how to do so are scant. This article introduces a teaching exercise, the Ethnic Roots Assignment, which has been shown qualitatively to aid students in developing self-awareness, a key component of culturally competent social work practice. Practical suggestions for classroom utilization, common challenges, and past student responses to participating in the exercise are provided. The dissemination of such a teaching exercise can increase the field’s resources for addressing the important goal of cultural competence training.

  13. Current Practices in Assessing Professionalism in United States and Canadian Allopathic Medical Students and Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittur, Nandini

    2017-01-01

    Professionalism is a critically important competency that must be evaluated in medical trainees but is a complex construct that is hard to assess. A systematic review was undertaken to give insight into the current best practices for assessment of professionalism in medical trainees and to identify new research priorities in the field. A search was conducted on PubMed for behavioral assessments of medical students and residents among the United States and Canadian allopathic schools in the last 15 years. An initial search yielded 594 results, 28 of which met our inclusion criteria. Our analysis indicated that there are robust generic definitions of the major attributes of medical professionalism. The most commonly used assessment tools are survey instruments that use Likert scales tied to attributes of professionalism. While significant progress has been made in this field in recent years, several opportunities for system-wide improvement were identified that require further research. These include a paucity of information about assessment reliability, the need for rater training, a need to better define competency in professionalism according to learner level (preclinical, clerkship, resident etc.) and ways to remediate lapses in professionalism. Student acceptance of assessment of professionalism may be increased if assessment tools are shifted to better incorporate feedback. Tackling the impact of the hidden curriculum in which students may observe lapses in professionalism by faculty and other health care providers is another priority for further study. PMID:28652951

  14. Current practices for maintaining occupational exposures ALARA at low-level waste disposal sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadlock, D.E.; Herrington, W.N.; Hooker, C.D.; Murphy, D.W.; Gilchrist, R.L.

    1983-12-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to provide technical assistance in establishing operational guidelines, with respect to radiation control programs and methods of minimizing occupational radiation exposure, at Low-Level Waste (LLW) disposal sites. The PNL, through site visits, evaluated operations at LLW disposal sites to determine the adequacy of current practices in maintaining occupational exposures as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA). The data sought included the specifics of: ALARA programs, training programs, external exposure control, internal exposure control, respiratory protection, surveillance, radioactive waste management, facilities and equipment, and external dose analysis. The results of the study indicated the following: The Radiation Protection and ALARA programs at the three commercial LLW disposal sites were observed to be adequate in scope and content compared to similar programs at other types of nuclear facilities. However, it should be noted that there were many areas that could be improved upon to help ensure the health and safety of occupationally exposed individuals.

  15. 21 CFR 210.2 - Applicability of current good manufacturing practice regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applicability of current good manufacturing... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PROCESSING, PACKING, OR HOLDING OF DRUGS; GENERAL § 210.2 Applicability of current good...

  16. Advanced education in prosthodontics: residents' perspectives on their current training and future goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sowygh, Zeyad H; Sukotjo, Cortino

    2010-02-01

    The purposes of this study were to identify current prosthodontic residents' demographics and to document prosthodontic residents' perspectives on their clinical training and future goals. A 52-item survey was created and distributed to prosthodontic residents in the United States on February 8, 2007. The data collected were analyzed; the means and standard deviations were calculated and ranked. Statistical analysis was conducted using Chi-square and Mann-Whitney analysis (p = 0.05). A 43% response rate was achieved, representing approximately 48% of the total population of prosthodontic residents in the United States. The majority of residents ranked clinical education as the most important factor in selecting their programs, were satisfied with their training, and planned to pursue the certification of the American Board of Prosthodontics. When asked how often they planned to work, 4 days a week was the most common answer. This is the first report identifying current prosthodontic residents' demographics and their perspectives on their clinical training and future goals. Several trends were identified, indicating a bright future for the specialty. By knowing the students' perceptions regarding their training and future goals, the American College of Prosthodontists and/or program directors will be able to use this information to improve residency programs and the specialty.

  17. Is the current level of training in the use of equipment for prehospital radio communication sufficient?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jimmy Højberg

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Physicians working in prehospital care are expected to handle radio communication both within their own sector as well as with other divisions of the National Emergency Services. To date, no study has been conducted on the level of training received by physicians in the use of the equ......BACKGROUND: Physicians working in prehospital care are expected to handle radio communication both within their own sector as well as with other divisions of the National Emergency Services. To date, no study has been conducted on the level of training received by physicians in the use...... of the equipment provided or on the level of competency acquired by physicians. METHODS: In order to investigate the self-assessed skill level acquired in the use of the TETRA (TErrestrial Trunked RAdio) authority radio for communication in a prehospital setting, a cross-sectional study was conducted...... setting 38% of physicians reported having received no training in the use of the equipment, while 80% of physicians reported having received one1 hour of training or less. Among the majority of physicians their current level of training was sufficient for their everyday needs for prehospital communication...

  18. How Is Working Memory Training Likely to Influence Academic Performance? Current Evidence and Methodological Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman Nutley, Sissela; Söderqvist, Stina

    2017-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is one of our core cognitive functions, allowing us to keep information in mind for shorter periods of time and then work with this information. It is the gateway that information has to pass in order to be processed consciously. A well-functioning WM is therefore crucial for a number of everyday activities including learning and academic performance (Gathercole et al., 2003; Bull et al., 2008), which is the focus of this review. Specifically, we will review the research investigating whether improving WM capacity using Cogmed WM training can lead to improvements on academic performance. Emphasis is given to reviewing the theoretical principles upon which such investigations rely, in particular the complex relation between WM and mathematical and reading abilities during development and how these are likely to be influenced by training. We suggest two possible routes in which training can influence academic performance, one through an effect on learning capacity which would thus be evident with time and education, and one through an immediate effect on performance on reading and mathematical tasks. Based on the theoretical complexity described we highlight some methodological issues that are important to take into consideration when designing and interpreting research on WM training and academic performance, but that are nonetheless often overlooked in the current research literature. Finally, we will provide some suggestions for future research for advancing the understanding of WM training and its potential role in supporting academic attainment.

  19. How Is Working Memory Training Likely to Influence Academic Performance? Current Evidence and Methodological Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman Nutley, Sissela; Söderqvist, Stina

    2017-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is one of our core cognitive functions, allowing us to keep information in mind for shorter periods of time and then work with this information. It is the gateway that information has to pass in order to be processed consciously. A well-functioning WM is therefore crucial for a number of everyday activities including learning and academic performance (Gathercole et al., 2003; Bull et al., 2008), which is the focus of this review. Specifically, we will review the research investigating whether improving WM capacity using Cogmed WM training can lead to improvements on academic performance. Emphasis is given to reviewing the theoretical principles upon which such investigations rely, in particular the complex relation between WM and mathematical and reading abilities during development and how these are likely to be influenced by training. We suggest two possible routes in which training can influence academic performance, one through an effect on learning capacity which would thus be evident with time and education, and one through an immediate effect on performance on reading and mathematical tasks. Based on the theoretical complexity described we highlight some methodological issues that are important to take into consideration when designing and interpreting research on WM training and academic performance, but that are nonetheless often overlooked in the current research literature. Finally, we will provide some suggestions for future research for advancing the understanding of WM training and its potential role in supporting academic attainment.

  20. AAPM/SNMMI Joint Task Force: report on the current state of nuclear medicine physics training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, Beth A; Allison, Jerry D; Clements, Jessica B; Coffey, Charles W; Fahey, Frederic H; Gress, Dustin A; Kinahan, Paul E; Nickoloff, Edward L; Mawlawi, Osama R; MacDougall, Robert D; Pizzutiello, Robert J

    2015-09-08

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) recognized the need for a review of the current state of nuclear  medicine physics training and the need to explore pathways for improving nuclear medicine physics training opportunities. For these reasons, the two organizations formed a joint AAPM/SNMMI Ad Hoc Task Force on Nuclear Medicine Physics  Training. The mission of this task force was to assemble a representative group of stakeholders to:• Estimate the demand for board-certified nuclear medicine physicists in the next 5-10 years,• Identify the critical issues related to supplying an adequate number of physicists who have received the appropriate level of training in nuclear medicine physics, and• Identify approaches that may be considered to facilitate the training of nuclear medicine physicists.As a result, a task force was appointed and chaired by an active member of both organizations that included representation from the AAPM, SNMMI, the American Board of Radiology (ABR), the American Board of Science in Nuclear Medicine (ABSNM), and the Commission for the Accreditation of Medical Physics Educational Programs (CAMPEP). The Task Force first met at the AAPM Annual Meeting in Charlotte in July 2012 and has met regularly face-to-face, online, and by conference calls. This manuscript reports the findings of the Task Force, as well as recommendations to achieve the stated mission.

  1. Procedural confidence in hospital based practitioners: implications for the training and practice of doctors at all grades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsagkaraki Petroula A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical doctors routinely undertake a number of practical procedures and these should be performed competently. The UK Postgraduate Medical Education and Training Board (PMETB curriculum lists the procedures trainees should be competent in. We aimed to describe medical practitioner's confidence in their procedural skills, and to define which practical procedures are important in current medical practice. Methods A cross sectional observational study was performed measuring procedural confidence in 181 hospital practitioners at all grades from 2 centres in East Anglia, England. Results Both trainees and consultants provide significant service provision. SpR level doctors perform the widest range and the highest median number of procedures per year. Most consultants perform few if any procedures, however some perform a narrow range at high volume. Cumulative confidence for the procedures tested peaks in the SpR grade. Five key procedures (central line insertion, lumbar puncture, pleural aspiration, ascitic aspiration, and intercostal drain insertion are the most commonly performed, are seen as important generic skills, and correspond to the total number of procedures for which confidence can be maintained. Key determinants of confidence are gender, number of procedures performed in the previous year and total number of procedures performed. Conclusion The highest volume of service requirement is for six procedures. The procedural confidence is dependent upon gender, number of procedures performed in the previous year and total number of procedures performed. This has implications for those designing the training curriculum and with regards the move to shorten the duration of training.

  2. Evaluation of freshmen coordination abilities on practical training in gymnastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereschenko I.A.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Measured coordination abilities (baseline to the static and dynamic equilibrium of the body, the space-time orientation on the support and in unsupported position, proprioception sense, vestibular stability, vestibular sensitivity, coordination limbs symmetrical and asymmetrical. Coordination abilities were also measured under difficult conditions. The study involved 238 students aged 17 - 18 years. Registered a positive trend of improving performance motor tests, development of educational material. Students who specialize in difficult to coordinate sports had significantly better performance. Found that the content of the material work programs of sports and educational disciplines helps improve sensorimotor coordination tasks students. It is noted that the content of the training material is the basis for efficient formation of motor skills and motor skills development of gymnastic exercises. Recommended ways to increase sports and technical and professional skills of students.

  3. Exercise training after burn injury: a survey of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego, Alejandro M; Serghiou, Michael; Padmanabha, Anand; Porro, Laura J; Herndon, David N; Suman, Oscar E

    2013-01-01

    Exercise programs capable of contributing positively to the long-term rehabilitation of burn patients should be included in outpatient rehabilitation programs. However, the extent and intensity of the resistance and cardiopulmonary exercise prescribed are unclear. This study was conducted to investigate the existence, design, content, and prescription of outpatient cardiopulmonary and resistance exercise programs within outpatient burn rehabilitation. A survey was designed to gather information on existing exercise programs for burn survivors and to assess the extent to which these programs are included in overall outpatient rehabilitation programs. Three hundred and twenty-seven surveys were distributed in the licensed physical and occupational therapists part of the American Burn Association Physical Therapy/Occupational Therapy Special Interest Group. One hundred and three surveys were completed. Eighty-two percent of respondents indicated that their institutions offered outpatient therapy after discharge. The frequency of therapists' contact with patients during this period varied greatly. Interestingly, 81% of therapists stated that no hospital-based cardiopulmonary endurance exercise programs were available. Patients' physical function was infrequently determined through the use of cardiopulmonary parameters (oxygen consumption and heart rate) or muscle strength. Instead, more subjective parameters such as range of motion (75%), manual muscle testing (61%), and quality of life (61%) were used. Prescription and follow-up assessment of cardiopulmonary endurance training are inconsistent among institutions, underscoring the need for greater awareness of the importance of exercise in any burn rehabilitation program. Identification of cardiopulmonary and progressive resistance parameters for establishing and tracking exercise training is also needed to maximize exercise-induced benefits.

  4. Current Practices in Global/International Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences: Home/Host Country or Site/Institution Considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Alsharif, Naser Z.; Dakkuri, Adnan; Abrons, Jeanine P.; Williams, Dennis; Ombengi, David N.; Zheng, HaiAn; Al-Dahir, Sara; Tofade, Toyin; Gim, Suzanna; O’Connell, Mary Beth; Ratka, Anna; Dornblaser, Emily

    2016-01-01

    International outreach by schools and colleges of pharmacy is increasing. In this paper, we provide current practice guidelines to establish and maintain successful global/international advanced pharmacy practice experiences (G/I APPEs) with specific recommendations for home/host country and host site/institution. The paper is based on a literature review (2000-2014) in databases and Internet searches with specific keywords or terms. Educational documents such as syllabi and memoranda of unde...

  5. Current Practices in Global/International Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences: Home/Host Country or Site/Institution Considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Alsharif, Naser Z.; Dakkuri, Adnan; Abrons, Jeanine P.; Williams, Dennis; Ombengi, David N.; Zheng, HaiAn; Al-Dahir, Sara; Tofade, Toyin; Gim, Suzanna; O’Connell, Mary Beth; Ratka, Anna; Dornblaser, Emily

    2016-01-01

    International outreach by schools and colleges of pharmacy is increasing. In this paper, we provide current practice guidelines to establish and maintain successful global/international advanced pharmacy practice experiences (G/I APPEs) with specific recommendations for home/host country and host site/institution. The paper is based on a literature review (2000-2014) in databases and Internet searches with specific keywords or terms. Educational documents such as syllabi and memoranda of unde...

  6. Current state of musculoskeletal ultrasound training and implementation in Europe: results of a survey of experts and scientific societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naredo, Esperanza; D'Agostino, Maria A; Conaghan, Philip G

    2010-01-01

    To document the current state of musculoskeletal US (MSUS) training and extent of implementation among rheumatologists in the member countries of EULAR.......To document the current state of musculoskeletal US (MSUS) training and extent of implementation among rheumatologists in the member countries of EULAR....

  7. Prospects for Research Training Activities in the Context of the Problems of the Modern Practice of Primary School.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guruzhapov V. A.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the current problems of research training activities in terms of the requirements of the Federal state educational standard of primary education. The initial methodological basis for the formulation of the problems is the theory of developmental education by Davydov and his followers. The article raises the question of the possibility of using the ideas of Dewey and Maslow to develop research training activities. There is the analysis of such subjects as formulating and performing learning tasks as a way of mastering theoretical knowledge in «from abstract to particular» microcycle; the content of theoretical generalizations formed before training activities (naive scientific concepts; forms of assimilation into the collective training activities; forms of cooperation in teaching and project activities; the content and form of requirements for training activities. Possible practical use of the study results are described. This area provides a lot of topics for Master’s thesis in the “Cultural-Historical Psychology and Activity Approach in Education” research Master’s program

  8. Emerging Approaches to Counseling Intervention: Theory, Research, Practice, and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Nancy L.; Duan, Changming; Nilsson, Johanna E.

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the major contribution that presents three emerging approaches to counseling: narrative therapy, dialectical behavior therapy, and acceptance and commitment therapy. The three theoretical systems were chosen because they are current, for the most part not addressed in the mainstream counseling psychology…

  9. Rehabilitation Policy and Practice in Romania: Implications for Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rak, Eniko C.

    2007-01-01

    This article provides a comprehensive account of the Romanian rehabilitation service delivery system. After a short presentation of disability issues during communism, the article shifts focus to a detailed review of current advancements in disability policy and legislation, prevalence, diagnosis, service delivery system and procedures, and…

  10. Journalism, controversy and convincing practices: the words and the training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José Castilhos Karam

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Journalism is raised by Greco-RomanRhetoric and Dialectics and comes through thepresent days without ever giving up on its centralpillar: words. Words are to be found everywhere:in writt en texts, static or dynamic images; in infographicsand great, typical journalistic tales. Theyare to be found in chronics, comics, informal talkand social networks. To become a journalist meansto not give up on words that are central when oneacknowledges the importance of the surroundings,of detection methods and narrative models. Wordsare at the core of controversy and convincing practices.They are at the core of becoming a journalist.

  11. Networking and training in palliative care - Challenging values and changing practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mhoira EF Leng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available What make a good doctor is a question posed by the public and profession and is key when designing training programmes. The goal of training is to change practice not simply acquire knowledge yet too often curriculums and assessment focuses on knowledge and skills. Professional practice is underpinned by beliefs and values and therefore training may need to challenge deeply held values in order to result in a change in practice. Palliative care offers an opportunity to challenge values at a deeply personal level as it brings experiences of pain and suffering alongside clinical knowledge and skills. Palliative care is holistic and so real scenarios where physical, psychological, social and spiritual issues are evident can be presented in an interactive, learner centered environment. Training in ethics alongside clinical skills will assist the development of judgment which should also be assessed. Communication skills enable the clinician to hear and understand the needs and wishes of those facing life limiting illness. Training should include aspects of modeling and mentorship to demonstrate and integrate the learning with the realities of clinical practice and include those who lead and influence policy and advocacy.

  12. Current Understandings of the Research-Practice Gap From the Viewpoint of Complementary Medicine Academics: A Mixed-Method Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Matthew J; Tucker, Basil

    Research plays an important role in advancing health and healthcare. However, much research evidence is not reflected in contemporary complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practice. Understanding and addressing the reasons for this research-practice gap may have positive implications for quality of care. To shed light on the gap between research and CAM practice. Descriptive cross-sectional, mixed-method study. A total of 126 senior CAM academics across Australasia, Europe, UK, and North America. Participants completed a 30-item online survey and a semi-structured interview; both of which explored the research-practice gap in CAM. A total of 43 (34%) academics completed the survey, with 29 (67%) respondents undergoing an interview. There was general agreement among respondents that CAM research should be informed by practice, and practice informed by research; however, most agreed that this did not reflect the current situation. Translational issues were perceived to be the primary reason for the research-practice gap in CAM. Suggested strategies for closing the gap focussed mostly around improving CAM student/practitioner education and training, and researcher-practitioner engagement and collaboration. Study findings point toward the presence of a research-practice gap in CAM, with several factors likely to be instrumental in sustaining this gap. Attention now needs to focus on understanding the views of CAM clinicians on this issue. Insights gained from this research will help inform the development of a multi-modal strategy that will effectively target the barriers to change in order to bring CAM research and practice closer together. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Future of School Social Work Practice: Current Trends and Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Franklin

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the information on school social work practice in the United States and summarizes recent trends and their implications for the future of school social work. The number of school social workers and current infrastructure available for the development of school social work practice is reviewed. Five sociocultural trends are summarized that are affecting public schools as well as important school-based practice trends such as standardized testing, and high stakes accountability measures. The emerging practice trend of evidence-based practices is discussed in light of its standards and implications for school-based practice. Finally, essential knowledge for strengthening practice competencies to meet the future challenges of school-based practice is highlight.

  14. Impact of critical care-trained flight paramedics on casualty survival during helicopter evacuation in the current war in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabry, Robert L; Apodaca, Amy; Penrod, Jason; Orman, Jean A; Gerhardt, Robert T; Dorlac, Warren C

    2012-08-01

    The US Army pioneered medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) by helicopter, yet its system remains essentially unchanged since the Vietnam era. Care is provided by a single combat medic credentialed at the Emergency Medical Technician - Basic level. Treatment protocols, documentation, medical direction, and quality improvement processes are not standardized and vary significantly across US Army helicopter evacuation units. This is in contrast to helicopter emergency medical services that operate within the United States. Current civilian helicopter evacuation platforms are routinely staffed by critical care-trained flight paramedics (CCFP) or comparably trained flight nurses who operate under trained EMS physician medical direction using formalized protocols, standardized patient care documentation, and rigorous quality improvement processes. This study compares mortality of patients with injury from trauma between the US Army's standard helicopter evacuation system staffed with medics at the Emergency Medical Technician - Basic level (standard MEDEVAC) and one staffed with experienced CCFP using adopted civilian helicopter emergency medical services practices. This is a retrospective study of a natural experiment. Using data from the Joint Theater Trauma Registry, 48-hour mortality for severely injured patients (injury severity score ≥ 16) was compared between patients transported by standard MEDEVAC units and CCFP air ambulance units. The 48-hour mortality for the CCFP-treated patients was 8% compared to 15% for the standard MEDEVAC patients. After adjustment for covariates, the CCFP system was associated with a 66% lower estimated risk of 48-hour mortality compared to the standard MEDEVAC system. These findings demonstrate that using an air ambulance system based on modern civilian helicopter EMS practice was associated with a lower estimated risk of 48-hour mortality among severely injured patients in a combat setting.

  15. Adult-trained perioperative nurses' practice of family-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Grainne; Corlett, Jo; Dowling, Maura

    The aim of this study was to explore adult-trained perioperative nurses' practice of family-centered care (FCC). A qualitative research design with a hermeneutic phenomenological approach was used. In-depth interviews were conducted with six adult-trained perioperative nurses. Data analysis was guided by Colaizzi's seven-step framework, resulting in a composite description of perioperative nurses' practice of FCC. While participants supported the principle of family involvement in care, they found its implementation in practice difficult and stressful. They reported that families often appeared inadequately prepared for the surgical experience, and subsequent poor experiences for families caused feelings of upset and inadequacy for nurses. While some of these findings are similar to those in previous studies of paediatric nurses' practice of FCC, this is the first known study to examine adult-trained perioperative nurses' practice of FCC. Participants articulated an awareness of what constitutes effective FCC and showed the motivation to accomplish the task of improving family-centered practice in their practice area.

  16. A framework and two sketches concerning psychoanalytical training and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelbaum, Belinda

    2003-02-01

    The author discusses the mode of knowledge production in psychoanalysis based on a reflection on the psychoanalytical education and its relationship to clinical practice. She points out that there is a risk in a form of clinical activity found in our education, which, under the fascination of the analyst's power of operating in the metaphorical domain of words, loses sight of the material dimension of the clinical action. In other words, this form of clinical activity loses sight of the meeting with another human being, of the repertoire of theories and experiences that informs this action and the patient's and the analyst's concrete life situation. The author highlights the role of writing as a privileged way of dealing with the material and immaterial facts that constitute the clinical action and reflects on some of the forces that structure nowadays the reception of knowledge production inside the psychoanalytical field. She uses the notion of 'minor literature', by Franz Kafka, to express the possibility that a live circuit of writings exchanged among psychoanalysts can offer to an interchange of experiences and ideas that is the live expression of the history of the psychoanalytical groups. A clinical session is presented in order to promote considerations about the psychoanalytical education, theory and practice.

  17. Current issues in dental practice management. Part 1. The importance of shared values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, Philip R H

    2003-04-01

    There can be few who would argue with the notion that the nature of dental practice in the United Kingdom has changed dramatically over the last couple of decades. A variety of factors, including new clinical techniques, growing consumerism, a much greater awareness of health-related and well-being issues in the public at large, as well as a marked deregulation within the dental profession, the development of vocational training and recently mandatory lifelong learning, the growing number of females working in the profession, and an increasing reluctance of young dentists to finance dental practices have all combined to create an environment which has enabled and encouraged a move away from traditional forms of dental care delivery. Instead, there has been considerable growth in independently-funded practice and a commensurate growth in the number of practices operating under a corporate body umbrella of one form or another. Currently there are 27 corporate bodies registered with the General Dental Council (GDC) with the likelihood of more in the future given the proposed GDC review. This will no doubt take into consideration European law, under which the restriction within the Dentist's Act on the number of corporate bodies is likely to be untenable. Although they still have only a small share of the dental market--with 4% of all dentists in the UK in 1999--they have expanded rapidly from a small base. The data available at the time the paper was written indicate that the global total of fees earned from dentistry in the UK in the financial year 2001/2002 was almost 3 billion Pounds, of which 1.9 billion Pounds (64%) came from NHS fees and 1.1 billion Pounds (36%) from private fees. Of this 1.9 billion Pounds received in NHS fees in 2001/2002, 0.55 billion Pounds were paid by patients who were not exempt from charges, bringing the total amount actually paid out of patients' pockets for dental treatment to 1.65 billion Pounds. Compare these figures with 1996

  18. Physical activity levels during youth sport practice: does coach training or experience have an influence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlechter, Chelsey R; Rosenkranz, Richard R; Milliken, George A; Dzewaltowski, David A

    2017-01-01

    This study examined moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) levels in youth during flag football practice and compared youth MVPA in practices led by trained or untrained, and by experienced or inexperienced, coaches. Boys (n = 111, mean age = 7.9 ± 1.2 years) from 14 recreation-level flag football teams wore an accelerometer during two practices. Each team's volunteer head coach reported prior training and coaching experience. Mixed-model team-adjusted means showed the proportion of practice time spent in sedentary (13 ± 1%), MVPA (34 ± 2%) and vigorous (12 ± 1%) activity. Practice contributed ~20 min of MVPA towards public health guidelines. There was no significant difference in percentage time spent in MVPA between teams with trained (mean = 33.3%, 95% CI = 29.4%, 37.2%) and untrained coaches (mean = 35.9%, 95% CI = 25.5%, 42.4%) or between experienced (mean = 34.1%, 95% CI = 30.2%, 38.0%) and inexperienced coaches (mean = 33.8, 95% CI = 27.9%, 39.7%). Although sport provides a setting for youth to accrue MVPA, two-thirds of practice was spent sedentarily or in light activity. Participation in a coach training programme was not associated with higher MVPA. Further research is needed to inform volunteer coach training programmes that provide coaches with skills necessary to increase the percentage of practice time spent in MVPA.

  19. Teaching, Practice, Feedback: 15 years of COMPASS science communication training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeley, L.; Smith, B.; McLeod, K.; English, C. A.; Baron, N.

    2014-12-01

    COMPASS is focused on helping scientists build the skills and relationships they need to effectively participate in public discourse. Founded in 2001 with an emphasis on ocean science, and since expanding to a broader set of environmental sciences, we have advised, coached, and/or trained thousands of researchers of all career stages. Over the years, our primary work has notably shifted from needing to persuade scientists why communication matters to supporting them as they pursue the question of what their communication goals are and how best to achieve them. Since our earliest forays into media promotion, we have evolved with the state of the science communication field. In recent years, we have adapted our approach to one that facilitates dialogue and encourages engagement, helps scientists identify the most relevant people and times to engage, tests our own assumptions, and incorporates relevant social science as possible. In this case study, we will discuss more than a decade of experience in helping scientists find or initiate and engage in meaningful conversations with journalists and policymakers.

  20. [Training -- competency-based education -- learning theory and practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, Georg

    2013-11-01

    A lifelong learning process is necessarily the basis for the specialization and expertise in the field of anesthesiology. Thus competency as a physician is a complex, multidimensional construction of knowledge, skills and attitudes to be able to solve and persist the complex daily work challenges in a flexible and responsible way. Experts therefore showflexible and intuitive capabilities in pursuing their profession. Accordingly modern competency based learning objectives are very helpful. The DGAI Commission for “Further Education” already thought ahead in defining a competencybased curriculum for the specialization in the field of anesthesiology and could be integrated into the frameworks of the German Medical Association. In addition to the curricular framework elements of assessment are necessary. A single oral exam is consequently not representative for different levels of competencies. However, there is beside the responsibility of the learners for their learning processalso a high obligation of the clinical teachers to attend the learning process and to ensure a positive learning atmosphere with scope for feedback. Some competencies potentially could be better learned in a “sheltered” room based on simulation outside the OR, for example to train rare incidents or emergency procedures. In general there should be ongoing effort to enhance the process of expertise development, also in context of patient safety and quality management.

  1. Beyond Feedforward Models Trained by Backpropagation: a Practical Training Tool for a More Efficient Universal Approximator

    CERN Document Server

    Ilin, Roman; Werbos, Paul J

    2007-01-01

    Cellular Simultaneous Recurrent Neural Network (SRN) has been shown to be a function approximator more powerful than the MLP. This means that the complexity of MLP would be prohibitively large for some problems while SRN could realize the desired mapping with acceptable computational constraints. The speed of training of complex recurrent networks is crucial to their successful application. Present work improves the previous results by training the network with extended Kalman filter (EKF). We implemented a generic Cellular SRN and applied it for solving two challenging problems: 2D maze navigation and a subset of the connectedness problem. The speed of convergence has been improved by several orders of magnitude in comparison with the earlier results in the case of maze navigation, and superior generalization has been demonstrated in the case of connectedness. The implications of this improvements are discussed.

  2. Study on Students' Impression Data in Practical Training Using Text Mining Method-Analysis of Considerable Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramachi, Hitomi; Sugita, Ikuto; Ino, Yoko; Hayashi, Yuta; Yoshida, Aki; Otsubo, Manami; Ueno, Anri; Katsuno, Hayato; Noguchi, Yoshihiro; Iguchi, Kazuhiro; Tachi, Tomoya

    2017-09-01

     We analyzed impression data and the scale of communication skills of students using text mining method to clarify which area a student was conscious of in communication in practical training. The results revealed that students tended to be conscious of the difference between practical hospital training and practical pharmacy training. In practical hospital training, specific expressions denoting relationships were "patient-visit", "counseling-conduct", "patient-counseling", and "patient-talk". In practical pharmacy training, specific expressions denoting relationships were "patient counseling-conduct", "story-listen", "patient-many", and "patient-visit". In practical hospital training, the word "patient" was connected to many words suggesting that students were conscious of a patient-centered communication. In practical pharmacy training, words such as "patient counseling", "patient", and "explanation" were placed in center and connected with many other words and there was an independent relationship between "communication" and "accept". In conclusion, it was suggested that students attempted active patient-centered communication in practical hospital training, while they were conscious of listening closely in patient counseling in practical pharmacy training.

  3. Protocol for audit of current Filipino practice in rehabilitation of stroke inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez-Suarez CB

    2015-03-01

    with various hospitals in the Philippines. Data collectors will be identified and trained in the audit process. A pilot audit will be conducted to test the feasibility of the audit protocol, and refinements to the protocol will be undertaken as necessary. The comprehensive audit process will take place for a period of 3 months. Data will be encoded using MS Excel®. Data will be reported as means and percentages as appropriate. Subgroup analysis will be undertaken to look into differences and variability of stroke patient descriptors and rehabilitation activities.Conclusion: This audit study is an ambitious project, but given the “need” to conduct the audit to identify “gaps” in current practice, and the value it can bring to serve as a platform for implementation of evidence-based stroke management in the Philippines to achieve best patient and health outcomes, the audit team is more than ready to take up the challenge. Keywords: audit, Filipino practice, stroke, rehabilitation, protocol

  4. Echocardiography practice, training and accreditation in the intensive care: document for the World Interactive Network Focused on Critical Ultrasound (WINFOCUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catena Emanuele

    2008-10-01

    elements delivered through blended-learning and practical elements acquired in parallel through proctored practice. These all linked with existing national/international echocardiography courses. When completed, it is anticipated that the practitioner will have performed the prerequisite number of studies, and achieved the competency to undertake accreditation (leading to Level 2 competence via a recognized National or European examination and provide the appropriate required evidence of competency (logbook. Thus, even where appropriate fellowships are not available, with support from the relevant echocardiography bodies, training and subsequently accreditation in ICU echocardiography becomes achievable within the existing framework of current critical care and cardiological practice, and is adaptable to each countrie's needs.

  5. European audit of current practice in diagnosis and treatment of childhood growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Anders; Bernasconi, Sergio; Clayton, Peter E

    2002-01-01

    The present survey among members of the ESPE on current practice in diagnosis and treatment of growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD) is of great clinical relevance and importance in the light of the recently published guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of GHD by the Growth Hormone Research...... Society. We have found much conformity but also numerous discrepancies between the recommendations of the Growth Hormone Research Society and the current practice in Europe....

  6. Feeding practices of low-income mothers: how do they compare to current recommendations?

    OpenAIRE

    Power, Thomas G.; Hughes, Sheryl O; Goodell, L. Suzanne; Johnson, Susan L.; Duran, J Andrea Jaramillo; Williams, Kimberly; Beck, Ashley D; Frankel, Leslie A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite a growing consensus on the feeding practices associated with healthy eating patterns, few observational studies of maternal feeding practices with young children have been conducted, especially in low-income populations. The aim of this study was to provide such data on a low income sample to determine the degree to which observed maternal feeding practices compare with current recommendations. Methods Eighty low-income mothers and their preschool children were videotaped a...

  7. The Future of School Social Work Practice: Current Trends and Opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the information on school social work practice in the United States and summarizes recent trends and their implications for the future of school social work. The number of school social workers and current infrastructure available for the development of school social work practice is reviewed. Five sociocultural trends are summarized that are affecting public schools as well as important school-based practice trends such as standardized testing, and high stakes accounta...

  8. The Practice of School Psychology in Quebec English Schools: Current Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Cindy A.

    2016-01-01

    In Quebec, school psychology is alive and well. This article outlines current challenges and opportunities related to the practice of psychology in Quebec English schools. Changes to the practice of psychology in Quebec over the last decade have had an impact on the delivery of psychological services in schools. Modifications of the admission…

  9. Critical appraisal of the current practice in murine TNBS-induced colitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.T. Velde; M.I. Verstege; D.W. Hommes

    2006-01-01

    There is no standard practice in the induction of colitis by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid. In this review the current practice in 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid colitis is studied using 20 recently published articles. We compare the different protocols, discuss the mechanism of disease a

  10. Analyzing Matrices of Meta-Analytic Correlations: Current Practices and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Zitong; Kong, Wenmo; Cortina, Jose M.; Hou, Shuofei

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have become increasingly interested in conducting analyses on meta-analytic correlation matrices. Methodologists have provided guidance and recommended practices for the application of this technique. The purpose of this article is to review current practices regarding analyzing meta-analytic correlation matrices, to identify the gaps…

  11. Current State of Environmental Education in Mexico: A Study on Practices, Audiences, Settings, and Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos-Iga, Jose; Shaw, William

    2011-01-01

    Environmental education in Mexico takes many forms and plays a wide variety of roles. Through an online survey, we addressed the need to present a wider picture on the current state of environmental education practices in Mexico: Who is engaging in environmental education practices, how important is it for their organization, who are they…

  12. Globalization of Gerontology Education: Current Practices and Perceptions for Graduate Gerontology Education in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwangi, Samuel M.; Yamashita, Takashi; Ewen, Heidi H.; Manning, Lydia K.; Kunkel, Suzanne R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to document current practices and understandings about globalization of gerontology education in the United States. Better understanding of aging requires international perspectives in global communities. However, little is known about how globalization of gerontology education is practiced in U.S. graduate-level…

  13. The legal and ethical framework governing Body Donation in Europe - 1st update on current practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riederer, B.M.; Bolt, S.H.; Brenner, E.; Bueno-López, J.L.; Circulescu, A.R.M.; Davies, D.C.; Caro, R. de; Gerrits, P.O.; McHanwell, S.; Pais, D.; Paulsen, F.; Plaisant, O.; Sendemir, E.; Stabile, I.; Moxham, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we have reported on the legal and ethical aspects and current practice of body donation in several European countries, reflecting cultural and religious variations as well as different legal and constitutional frameworks. We have also established good practice in body donation. Here we s

  14. The legal and ethical framework governing Body Donation in Europe - 1st update on current practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riederer, B.M.; Bolt, S.H.; Brenner, E.; Bueno-López, J.L.; Circulescu, A.R.M.; Davies, D.C.; Caro, R. de; Gerrits, P.O.; McHanwell, S.; Pais, D.; Paulsen, F.; Plaisant, O.; Sendemir, E.; Stabile, I.; Moxham, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we have reported on the legal and ethical aspects and current practice of body donation in several European countries, reflecting cultural and religious variations as well as different legal and constitutional frameworks. We have also established good practice in body donation. Here we

  15. Analyzing Matrices of Meta-Analytic Correlations: Current Practices and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Zitong; Kong, Wenmo; Cortina, Jose M.; Hou, Shuofei

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have become increasingly interested in conducting analyses on meta-analytic correlation matrices. Methodologists have provided guidance and recommended practices for the application of this technique. The purpose of this article is to review current practices regarding analyzing meta-analytic correlation matrices, to identify the gaps…

  16. Globalization of Gerontology Education: Current Practices and Perceptions for Graduate Gerontology Education in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwangi, Samuel M.; Yamashita, Takashi; Ewen, Heidi H.; Manning, Lydia K.; Kunkel, Suzanne R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to document current practices and understandings about globalization of gerontology education in the United States. Better understanding of aging requires international perspectives in global communities. However, little is known about how globalization of gerontology education is practiced in U.S. graduate-level…

  17. Current State of Environmental Education in Mexico: A Study on Practices, Audiences, Settings, and Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos-Iga, Jose; Shaw, William

    2011-01-01

    Environmental education in Mexico takes many forms and plays a wide variety of roles. Through an online survey, we addressed the need to present a wider picture on the current state of environmental education practices in Mexico: Who is engaging in environmental education practices, how important is it for their organization, who are they…

  18. Policies and Practices for Recruiting, Training, and Evaluating High-Quality Substitute Teachers: a Delphi Study

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Effective substitute teachers are needed in classrooms across the United States; however, little attention is given to the policies and practices that school districts use to recruit, train, and evaluate them. The challenge of finding quality substitute teachers, despite the absence of definitive policies and practices to guide them, continues to be a problem nationwide. The purpose of this study was to identify, using a three-round Delphi technique (Linstone & Turoff, 1975), policies and...

  19. Current Practice in Measuring the Quality of Conceptual Models:Challenges and Research%Current Practice in Measuring the Quality of Conceptual Models:Challenges and Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lei; WU Yu-feng; LI Xiao-jun

    2012-01-01

    How to measure the quality of conceptual models is an important issue in the IS field and related research. This paper conducts a review of research in measuring conceptual model quality and identifies the major theoretical and practical issues that need to be addressed in future studies. We review current classification frameworks for conceptual model quality and practice of measuring conceptual model quality. Based on the review, challenges for studies of measuring the quality of conceptual models are proposed and these challenges are also research points which should be strengthened in future studies.

  20. Effects of exercise training on chronic inflammation in obesity : current evidence and potential mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Tongjian; Arsenis, Nicole C; Disanzo, Beth L; Lamonte, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    Chronic, systemic inflammation is an independent risk factor for several major clinical diseases. In obesity, circulating levels of inflammatory markers are elevated, possibly due to increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines from several tissues/cells, including macrophages within adipose tissue, vascular endothelial cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Recent evidence supports that adipose tissue hypoxia may be an important mechanism through which enlarged adipose tissue elicits local tissue inflammation and further contributes to systemic inflammation. Current evidence supports that exercise training, such as aerobic and resistance exercise, reduces chronic inflammation, especially in obese individuals with high levels of inflammatory biomarkers undergoing a longer-term intervention. Several studies have reported that this effect is independent of the exercise-induced weight loss. There are several mechanisms through which exercise training reduces chronic inflammation, including its effect on muscle tissue to generate muscle-derived, anti-inflammatory 'myokine', its effect on adipose tissue to improve hypoxia and reduce local adipose tissue inflammation, its effect on endothelial cells to reduce leukocyte adhesion and cytokine production systemically, and its effect on the immune system to lower the number of pro-inflammatory cells and reduce pro-inflammatory cytokine production per cell. Of these potential mechanisms, the effect of exercise training on adipose tissue oxygenation is worth further investigation, as it is very likely that exercise training stimulates adipose tissue angiogenesis and increases blood flow, thereby reducing hypoxia and the associated chronic inflammation in adipose tissue of obese individuals.

  1. Contradictions in the Practices of Training for and Assessment of Competency: A Case Study from the Maritime Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emad, Gholamreza; Roth, Wolff Michael

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to highlight the contradictions in the current maritime education and training system (MET), which is based on competency-based education, training and assessment, and to theorize the failure to make the training useful. Design/methodology/approach: A case study of education and training in the international…

  2. Private practice and the economic rate of return for residency training as a prosthodontist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Kent D; Pfeifer, David L

    2005-08-01

    The authors used survey data to estimate the economic rate of return from undertaking an investment in residency training to become a practicing prosthodontist. The authors estimated earnings of practicing prosthodontists using results from a survey of 2500 U.S. prosthodontists. Survey data were used to assess the total costs of prosthodontic residency and earnings of practicing general practitioners. The authors applied statistical methods to estimate the internal rate of return (IRR) for prosthodontic residency training. The estimated IRR ranged from 8.23 percent for private practitioners with no financial assistance during residency training to 12.18 percent for full-time private practitioners with stipends and loans. Total costs of residency ranged from 271,835 dollars to 441,321 dollars, depending on the amount of forgone earnings, time in practice and how soon practice began after the residency. All of the estimates of IRR in this study were positive, indicating that prosthodontic residency is a financially attractive investment. The positive IRR for prosthodontic residency indicates that the demand for advanced education in prosthodontics will continue, and that the amount of time spent in practice increases the rate of return.

  3. Semantic Feature Training in Combination with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS for Progressive Anomia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyi Hung

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We examined the effectiveness of a 2-week regimen of a semantic feature training in combination with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS for progressive naming impairment associated with primary progressive aphasia (N = 4 or early onset Alzheimer’s Disease (N = 1. Patients received a 2-week regimen (10 sessions of anodal tDCS delivered over the left temporoparietal cortex while completing a language therapy that consisted of repeated naming and semantic feature generation. Therapy targets consisted of familiar people, household items, clothes, foods, places, hygiene implements, and activities. Untrained items from each semantic category provided item level controls. We analyzed naming accuracies at multiple timepoints (i.e., pre-, post-, 6-month follow-up via a mixed effects logistic regression and individual differences in treatment responsiveness using a series of non-parametric McNemar tests. Patients showed advantages for naming trained over untrained items. These gains were evident immediately post tDCS. Trained items also showed a shallower rate of decline over 6-months relative to untrained items that showed continued progressive decline. Patients tolerated stimulation well, and sustained improvements in naming accuracy suggest that the current intervention approach is viable. Future implementation of a sham control condition will be crucial toward ascertaining whether neurostimulation and behavioral treatment act synergistically or alternatively whether treatment gains are exclusively attributable to either tDCS or the behavioral intervention.

  4. A Mismatch Between Athlete Practice and Current Sports Nutrition Guidelines Among Elite Female and Male Middle- and Long-Distance Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikura, Ida A; Stellingwerff, Trent; Mero, Antti A; Uusitalo, Arja Leena Tuulia; Burke, Louise M

    2017-08-01

    Contemporary nutrition guidelines promote a variety of periodized and time-sensitive recommendations, but current information regarding the knowledge and practice of these strategies among world-class athletes is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate this theme by implementing a questionnaire on dietary periodization practices in national/international level female (n = 27) and male (n = 21) middle- and long-distance runners/race-walkers. The questionnaire aimed to gain information on between and within-day dietary choices, as well as timing of pre- and posttraining meals and practices of training with low or high carbohydrate (CHO) availability. Data are shown as percentage (%) of all athletes, with differences in responses between subgroups (sex or event) shown as Chi-square x(2) when p key sessions. Twenty-six percent of athletes (11% of middle vs 42% of long-distance athletes [x(2) (1, n = 46) = 4.308, p = .038, phi = 0.3])) reported to undertake training in the fasted state, while 11% said they periodically restrict CHO intake, with 30% ingesting CHO during training sessions. Our findings show that elite endurance athletes appear to execute pre- and post-key session nutrition recovery recommendations. However, very few athletes deliberately undertake some contemporary dietary periodization approaches, such as training in the fasted state or periodically restricting CHO intake. This study suggests mismatches between athlete practice and current and developing sports nutrition guidelines.

  5. Putting integrated reservoir characterization into practice - in house training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, F.M. Jr.; Best, D.A.; Clarke, R.T. [Mobile Exploration and Producing Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The need for even more efficient reservoir characterization and management has forced a change in the way Mobil Oil provides technical support to its production operations. We`ve learned that to be successful, a good understanding of the reservoir is essential. This includes an understanding of the technical and business significance of reservoir heterogeneities at different stages of field development. A multi-disciplinary understanding of the business of integrated reservoir characterization is essential and to facilitate this understanding, Mobil has developed a highly successful {open_quotes}Reservoir Characterization Field Seminar{close_quotes}. Through specific team based case studies that incorporate outcrop examples and data the program provides participants the opportunity to explore historic and alternative approaches to reservoir description, characterization and management. We explore appropriate levels and timing of data gathering, technology applications, risk assessment and management practices at different stages of field development. The case studies presented throughout the course are a unique element of the program which combine real life and hypothetical problem sets that explore how different technical disciplines interact, the approaches to a problem solving they use, the assumptions and uncertainties contained in their contributions and the impact those conclusions may have on other disciplines involved in the overall reservoir management process. The team building aspect of the course was an added bonus.

  6. Engineering-Oriented Practical Training Methodology for Undergraduate and a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyong Zuo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the education method which is different from traditional Chinese education methods for its accentuation of practical training is proposed. Compared with traditional engineering education methods, engineering-oriented practical training methodology is student-centered, contains various educational activities, requires interdisciplinary skills, values teamwork and have more objective evaluation methods. Based on the educational case of anti-skid control of railway train, a semi-physical simulation platform is introduced with details in design philosophy, system structure, operator interface and training process. The intention of creating the platform is to provide the students who use it with more hands-on experience since one of the key factors in transfer of learning is the diversion of practice. Based on the knowledge transfer theory, we encourage our students to do their work more independently and freely and the corresponding scores of their performance prove that the students who are better-rounded tend to perform well in the training courses we offered while those only with straight a scores may not outperform their classmates. Thus, the results indicate that this mode is effective in education and instructive to the reform of technological college education.

  7. Leadership in athletic training: implications for practice and education in allied health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutz, Matthew R

    2010-01-01

    Leadership behaviors are an important aspect of athletic training and are needed within all allied health care disciples. A two-phase, exploratory, non-experimental research study using a Delphi technique and a randomly selected sample of athletic trainers (n = 161) was conducted to determine leadership competencies perceived to be important for athletic training practice and education. The Delphi technique (phase one) resulted in the Leadership Development in Athletic Training instrument (LDAT). In the national survey (phase two), respondents used the LDAT to rate the importance of leadership competencies for athletic training practice and for athletic training education. Coefficient alphas ranged from α = 0.83 to 0.97 and provided satisfactory estimates of internal consistency. Concurrent, construct, and convergent validity were established. Forty-nine leadership competencies were rated important for practice and 48 for education (M = 1.5, p ≤ 0.001). Exploratory factor analysis revealed that leadership competencies were organized by four constructs (with six emphases): 1) personality characteristics, 2) diagnosing context and people skills, 3) communication and initiative, and 4) strategic thinking. Repeated measures ANOVA with Sidak post-hoc adjustments indicated each leadership construct significantly increased in importance as the level of the ATEP progressed.

  8. Feline transfusion practice in South Africa : current status and practical solutions : continuing education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Dippenaar

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Blood transfusion therapy is often under-utilised in feline practice in South Africa. However, it is a technique that can be safely and effectively introduced in practice. Cats have naturally occurring allo-antibodies against the blood type that they lack, which makes blood typing, or alternatively cross-matching, essential before transfusions. Feline blood donors must be carefully selected, be disease free and should be sedated before blood collection. The preferred anticoagulant for feline blood collection is citrate-phosphatedextrose-adenine. Blood can either be administered intravenously or into the medullary cavity, with the transfusion rate depending on the cat's hydration status and cardiac function. Transfusion reactions can be immediate or delayed and they are classified as immunological or non-immunological. Indications, methods and techniques to do feline blood transfusions in a safe and economical way are highlighted.

  9. Application of radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma in current clinical practice guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rim, Chai Hong; Seong, Jin Sil [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    In oncologic practice, treatment guidelines provide appropriate treatment strategies based on evidence. Currently, many guidelines are used, including those of the European Association for the Study of the Liver and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EASL-EORTC), National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), Asia-Pacific Primary Liver Cancer Expert (APPLE), and Korean Liver Cancer Study Group and National Cancer Centre (KLCSG-NCC). Although radiotherapy is commonly used in clinical practice, some guidelines do not accept it as a standard treatment modality. In this review, we will investigate the clinical practice guidelines currently used, and discuss the application of radiotherapy.

  10. Accommodating Learning Styles: Relevance and Good Practice in Vocational Education and Training--Supporting Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter; Dalton, Jennifer; Henry, John

    2005-01-01

    This document was produced by the author(s) based on their research for the Australian report, "Accommodating Learning Styles: Relevance and Good Practice in Vocational Education and Training," and contains three parts. Part 1, Research Methodology and Findings (Peter Smith and Jennifer Dalton), contains: (1) Research Questions; (2)…

  11. Utilizing Simulation-Based Training of Video Clip Instruction for the Store Service Operations Practice Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Che-Hung; Yen, Yu-Ren; Wu, Pai-Lu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a store service operations practice course based on simulation-based training of video clip instruction. The action research of problem-solving strategies employed for teaching are by simulated store operations. The counter operations course unit used as an example, this study developed 4 weeks of subunits for…

  12. Disseminating educational innovations in health care practice : Training versus social networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jippes, Erik; Achterkamp, Marjolein C.; Brand, Paul L. P.; Kiewiet, Derk Jan; Pols, Jan; van Engelen, Jo M. L.

    2010-01-01

    Improvements and innovation in health service organization and delivery have become more and more important due to the gap between knowledge and practice, rising costs, medical errors, and the organization of health care systems. Since training and education is widely used to convey and distribute i

  13. Exploring the Theory-Practice Gap: Applications to Health Information Management/Technology Education and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Zakevia Denise

    2013-01-01

    Although research on the theory-practice gap is available across multiple disciplines, similar studies focusing on the profession of health information management/technology (HIM/T) are not yet available. The projected number of qualified HIM/T needed with advanced skills and training suggests that skillful use of electronic health records (EHR)…

  14. The Practical Aspects of Online Counseling: Ethics, Training, Technology, and Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallen, Michael J.; Vogel, David L.; Rochlen, Aaron B.

    2005-01-01

    This article addresses the practical aspects of online counseling, including ethics, training, supervision, technology, and competency issues. The authors discuss online counseling's strengths and limitations and present guidelines for what types of clients and counseling psychologists may be appropriate for online counseling. To illustrate the…

  15. Vocational Education and Training Manager Discursive Practices at the Frontline: Alternative Possibilities in a Victorian Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Annette

    2011-01-01

    This article looks at how the neoliberal reform process is affecting the professional identity of frontline managers in the Australian vocational education and training sector. The article examines how frontline managers are required to negotiate their working practices between their understandings and experiences as educators and the new…

  16. [The preparatory education of electronic patient record for nursing students before practical nursing training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamatsu, Yuki; Kanayama, Masako; Yoshioka, Makoto; Anan, Ayumi; Takeyama, Yumiko; Kubo, Yoko; Shibata, Hiroko; Kawamoto, Rieko

    2006-12-01

    Preparatory education has been provided for both nursing students and teachers to understand the electronic patient record (EPR) since 2004 when EPR was introduced to the hospitals where students are allocated to undertake their work experience. First, the training and management board contacted our medical information department for an appointment and sent us a working group. They taught the nursing training staff how to use EPR and how to assign students to the proper patient record in the EPR system. Second, as preparatory education for the students, they explained the procedure for the use of EPR and the protection of personal information. Students practiced with training in the EPR system, focusing on the functions which are used frequently in practical tasks. As a result of this preparatory education, students understood the protection of personal information very well, although their understanding of the operation and management of the equipment was relatively poor and adversely affected their practice. We need to review our education contents more often. We also need to examine the present state of understanding of EPR and the problems of teaching in practical nursing training.

  17. Examining Inclusion of Evidence-Based Practice on Social Work Training Program Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wike, Traci L.; Bledsoe, Sarah E.; Bellamy, Jennifer L.; Grady, Melissa D.

    2013-01-01

    Websites represent a visible medium for social work programs to communicate information about social work research, academics, and professional training priorities, including evidence-based practice (EBP). However, few studies have examined the content of social work program websites. This exploratory study aimed to answer the question: Are EBP…

  18. Using Performance Analysis for Training in an Organization Implementing ISO-9000 Manufacturing Practices: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunneman, Dale E.; Sleezer, Catherine M.

    2000-01-01

    This case study examines the application of the Performance Analysis for Training (PAT) Model in an organization that was implementing ISO-9000 (International Standards Organization) processes for manufacturing practices. Discusses the interaction of organization characteristics, decision maker characteristics, and analyst characteristics to…

  19. Cybermentoring: Evolving High-End Video Conferencing Practices to Support Preservice Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Todd E.; Maring, Gerald H.; Doty, John H.; Fickle, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    This article is a descriptive study of an evolving cybermentoring videoconferencing practice and tool developed to support preservice teacher training. Cybermentoring projects are synchronous distance learning collaborations using high-end video conferencing to foster interactive learning and tutoring among preservice teachers and K-12 students,…

  20. Recruitment and Training Policies and Practices: The Case of Turkey as an EU Candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanova, Cem; Nadiri, Halil

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To provide information on differences between recruitment methods and training practices used in SMEs and large organizations in Turkey, as a representative of a developing country. Design/methodology/approach: A survey as designed by the Cranfield Network on International Human Resource Management (CRANET-G) was used for this study. The…