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Sample records for current stem cell

  1. Limbal stem cell transplantation: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atallah MR

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Marwan Raymond Atallah, Sotiria Palioura, Victor L Perez, Guillermo Amescua Department of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA Abstract: Regeneration of the corneal surface after an epithelial insult involves division, migration, and maturation of a specialized group of stem cells located in the limbus. Several insults, both intrinsic and extrinsic, can precipitate destruction of the delicate microenvironment of these cells, resulting in limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD. In such cases, reepithelialization fails and conjunctival epithelium extends across the limbus, leading to vascularization, persistent epithelial defects, and chronic inflammation. In partial LSCD, conjunctival epitheliectomy, coupled with amniotic membrane transplantation, could be sufficient to restore a healthy surface. In more severe cases and in total LSCD, stem cell transplantation is currently the best curative option. Before any attempts are considered to perform a limbal stem cell transplantation procedure, the ocular surface must be optimized by controlling causative factors and comorbid conditions. These factors include adequate eyelid function or exposure, control of the ocular surface inflammatory status, and a well-lubricated ocular surface. In cases of unilateral LSCD, stem cells can be obtained from the contralateral eye. Newer techniques aim at expanding cells in vitro or in vivo in order to decrease the need for large limbal resection that may jeopardize the “healthy” eye. Patients with bilateral disease can be treated using allogeneic tissue in combination with systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Another emerging option for this subset of patients is the use of noncorneal cells such as mucosal grafts. Finally, the use of keratoprosthesis is reserved for patients who are not candidates for any of the aforementioned options, wherein the choice of the type of keratoprosthesis depends on

  2. Current progress with primate embryonic stem cells.

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    Byrne, James A; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat M; Wolf, Don P

    2006-05-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can proliferate indefinitely, maintain an undifferentiated pluripotent state and differentiate into any cell type. Differentiation of ESCs into various specific cell-types may be able to cure or alleviate the symptoms of various degenerative diseases. Unresolved issues regarding maintaining function, possible apoptosis and tumor formation in vivo mean a prudent approach should be taken towards advancing ESCs into human clinical trials. Rhesus macaques provide the ideal model organism for testing the feasibility, efficacy and safety of ESC based therapies and significant numbers of primate ESC lines are now available. In this review, we will summarize progress in evaluating the genetic and epigenetic integrity of primate ESCs, examine their current use in pre-clinical trials and discuss the potential of producing ESC-derived cell populations that are genetically identical (isogenic) to the host by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

  3. Stem cells in neurology - current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chary Ely Marquez Batista

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS restoration is an important clinical challenge and stem cell transplantation has been considered a promising therapeutic option for many neurological diseases. Objective : The present review aims to briefly describe stem cell biology, as well as to outline the clinical application of stem cells in the treatment of diseases of the CNS. Method : Literature review of animal and human clinical experimental trials, using the following key words: “stem cell”, “neurogenesis”, “Parkinson”, “Huntington”, “amyotrophic lateral sclerosis”, “traumatic brain injury”, “spinal cord injury”, “ischemic stroke”, and “demyelinating diseases”. Conclusion : Major recent advances in stem cell research have brought us several steps closer to their effective clinical application, which aims to develop efficient ways of regenerating the damaged CNS.

  4. Current Progress with Primate Embryonic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, James A.; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat M.; Wolf, Don P

    2006-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can proliferate indefinitely, maintain an undifferentiated pluripotent state and differentiate into any cell type. Differentiation of ESCs into various specific cell-types may be able to cure or alleviate the symptoms of various degenerative diseases. Unresolved issues regarding maintaining function, possible apoptosis and tumor formation in vivo mean a prudent approach should be taken towards advancing ESCs into human clinical trials. Rhesus macaques provide the i...

  5. Brain Cancer Stem Cells: Current Status on Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facchino, Sabrina; Abdouh, Mohamed [Developmental Biology Laboratory, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, 5415 Boul. l' Assomption, Montreal, H1T 2M4 (Canada); Bernier, Gilbert, E-mail: gbernier.hmr@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [Developmental Biology Laboratory, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, 5415 Boul. l' Assomption, Montreal, H1T 2M4 (Canada); Faculté de Médecine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, H3T 1J4 (Canada)

    2011-03-30

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive brain tumor of astrocytic/neural stem cell origin, represents one of the most incurable cancers. GBM tumors are highly heterogeneous. However, most tumors contain a subpopulation of cells that display neural stem cell characteristics in vitro and that can generate a new brain tumor upon transplantation in mice. Hence, previously identified molecular pathways regulating neural stem cell biology were found to represent the cornerstone of GBM stem cell self-renewal mechanism. GBM tumors are also notorious for their resistance to radiation therapy. Notably, GBM “cancer stem cells” were also found to be responsible for this radioresistance. Herein, we will analyze the data supporting or not the cancer stem cell model in GBM, overview the current knowledge regarding GBM stem cell self-renewal and radioresistance molecular mechanisms, and discuss the potential therapeutic application of these findings.

  6. Current Stem Cell Delivery Methods for Myocardial Repair

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    Calvin C. Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure commonly results from an irreparable damage due to cardiovascular diseases (CVDs, the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. In recent years, the rapid advancements in stem cell research have garnered much praise for paving the way to novel therapies in reversing myocardial injuries. Cell types currently investigated for cellular delivery include embryonic stem cells (ESCs, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, and adult stem cell lineages such as skeletal myoblasts, bone-marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, and cardiac stem cells (CSCs. To engraft these cells into patients’ damaged myocardium, a variety of approaches (intramyocardial, transendocardial, transcoronary, venous, intravenous, intracoronary artery and retrograde venous administrations and bioengineered tissue transplantation have been developed and explored. In this paper, we will discuss the pros and cons of these delivery modalities, the current state of their therapeutic potentials, and a multifaceted evaluation of their reported clinical feasibility, safety, and efficacy. While the issues of optimal delivery approach, the best progenitor stem cell type, the most effective dose, and timing of administration remain to be addressed, we are highly optimistic that stem cell therapy will provide a clinically viable option for myocardial regeneration.

  7. Current stem cell delivery methods for myocardial repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Calvin C; Zhou, Li; Hao, Jijun

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure commonly results from an irreparable damage due to cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. In recent years, the rapid advancements in stem cell research have garnered much praise for paving the way to novel therapies in reversing myocardial injuries. Cell types currently investigated for cellular delivery include embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and adult stem cell lineages such as skeletal myoblasts, bone-marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and cardiac stem cells (CSCs). To engraft these cells into patients' damaged myocardium, a variety of approaches (intramyocardial, transendocardial, transcoronary, venous, intravenous, intracoronary artery and retrograde venous administrations and bioengineered tissue transplantation) have been developed and explored. In this paper, we will discuss the pros and cons of these delivery modalities, the current state of their therapeutic potentials, and a multifaceted evaluation of their reported clinical feasibility, safety, and efficacy. While the issues of optimal delivery approach, the best progenitor stem cell type, the most effective dose, and timing of administration remain to be addressed, we are highly optimistic that stem cell therapy will provide a clinically viable option for myocardial regeneration.

  8. The Current Role of Stem Cells in Orthopaedic Surgery

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    Maniar HH

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Basic science and experimental research on stem cells has increased exponentially in the last decade. Our present knowledge about stem cell biology is better than ever before. This new paradigm shift in research has been reflected in the field of orthopaedic surgery. Various experimental models have suggested a potential application of stem cells for different orthopaedic conditions, and early clinical results of stem cell use have been encouraging. These cells can be easily isolated, processed and made available for clinical use. From healing of bone defects caused by trauma, tumor or infection to cartilage defects, nerve, tendon and ligament healing, stem cell use has the potential to revolutionize orthopaedic practice. The purpose of this article is to orient a general orthopaedic surgeon towards the current use and clinical applications of stem cell based therapy in orthopaedics and to provide a complete overview of the clinical advances in this field.

  9. Chick stem cells: Current progress and future prospects

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    Intarapat, Sittipon; Stern, Claudio D.

    2013-01-01

    Chick embryonic stem cells (cESCs) can be derived from cells obtained from stage X embryos (blastoderm stage); these have the ability to contribute to all somatic lineages in chimaeras, but not to the germ line. However, lines of stem cells that are able to contribute to the germ line can be established from chick primordial germ cells (cPGCs) and embryonic germ cells (cEGCs). This review provides information on avian stem cells, emphasizing different sources of cells and current methods for derivation and culture of pluripotent cells from chick embryos. We also review technologies for isolation and derivation of chicken germ cells and the production of transgenic birds. PMID:24103496

  10. Corneal stem cells and tissue engineering: Current advancesand future perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Major advances are currently being made in regenerativemedicine for cornea. Stem cell-based therapiesrepresent a novel strategy that may substituteconventional corneal transplantation, albeit there aremany challenges ahead given the singularities of eachcellular layer of the cornea. This review recapitulatesthe current data on corneal epithelial stem cells,corneal stromal stem cells and corneal endothelialcell progenitors. Corneal limbal autografts containingepithelial stem cells have been transplanted in humansfor more than 20 years with great successful rates,and researchers now focus on ex vivo cultures andother cell lineages to transplant to the ocular surface.A small population of cells in the corneal endotheliumwas recently reported to have self-renewal capacity,although they do not proliferate in vivo . Two mainobstacles have hindered endothelial cell transplantationto date culture protocols and cell delivery methods tothe posterior cornea in vivo . Human corneal stromalstem cells have been identified shortly after therecognition of precursors of endothelial cells. Stromalstem cells may have the potential to provide a directcell-based therapeutic approach when injected tocorneal scars. Furthermore, they exhibit the ability todeposit organized connective tissue in vitro and maybe useful in corneal stroma engineering in the future.Recent advances and future perspectives in the field arediscussed.

  11. Current focus of stem cell application in retinal repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria L Alonso-Alonso; Girish Kumar Srivastava

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of retinal diseases, both in society'seconomy and in the quality of people's life who suffer withthem, has made stem cell therapy an interesting topic forresearch. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotentstem cells (iPSCs) and adipose derived mesenchymal stemcells (ADMSCs) are the focus in current endeavors as asource of different retinal cells, such as photoreceptorsand retinal pigment epithelial cells. The aim is to applythem for cell replacement as an option for treating retinaldiseases which so far are untreatable in their advancedstage. ESCs, despite the great potential for differentiation,have the dangerous risk of teratoma formation as wellas ethical issues, which must be resolved before startinga clinical trial. iPSCs, like ESCs, are able to differentiatein to several types of retinal cells. However, the processto get them for personalized cell therapy has a high costin terms of time and money. Researchers are working toresolve this since iPSCs seem to be a realistic option fortreating retinal diseases. ADMSCs have the advantagethat the procedures to obtain them are easier. Despiteadvancements in stem cell application, there are stillseveral challenges that need to be overcome beforetransferring the research results to clinical application.This paper reviews recent research achievements of theapplications of these three types of stem cells as well asclinical trials currently based on them.

  12. Current view of mesenchymal stem cells biology (brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maslova O. A.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Although mesenchymal stem cells (MSC are in a focus of attention, some aspects of their biology are still unclear. This paper is a review of current research on MSC biology. The use of MSC in regenerative medicine is also briefly discussed.

  13. Current progress and prospects of induced pluripotent stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem(iPS) cells are derived from somatic cells by ectopic expression of few transcription factors.Like embryonic stem(ES) cells,iPS cells are able to self-renew indefinitely and to differentiate into all types of cells in the body.iPS cells hold great promise for regenerative medicine,because iPS cells circumvent not only immunological rejection but also ethical issues.Since the first report on the derivation of iPS cells in 2006,many laboratories all over the world started research on iPS cells and have made significant progress.This paper reviews recent progress in iPS cell research,including the methods to generate iPS cells,the molecular mechanism of reprogramming in the formation of iPS cells,and the potential applications of iPS cells in cell replacement therapy.Current problems that need to be addressed and the prospects for iPS research are also discussed.

  14. Brain Cancer Stem Cells: Current Status on Glioblastoma Multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive brain tumor of astrocytic/neural stem cell origin, represents one of the most incurable cancers. GBM tumors are highly heterogeneous. However, most tumors contain a subpopulation of cells that display neural stem cell characteristics in vitro and that can generate a new brain tumor upon transplantation in mice. Hence, previously identified molecular pathways regulating neural stem cell biology were found to represent the cornerstone of GBM stem cel...

  15. Current status of stem cell transplantation in Vietnam

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    Phuc Van Pham

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy is promising for treatment of degenerative diseases. In Vietnam, stem cell applications have been performed since the 1990s. In addition to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for malignant hematologic diseases and disorders, mesenchymal stem cells have also been clinically approved for treatment of diseases such as knee osteoarthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, autism, cerebral palsy and more in recent years. Unlike countries that only permit use of non-expanded stem cells, the Vietnamese government has permitted use of both non-expanded and expanded stem cells for both local and systemic transfusion in some diseases. After 20 years of stem cell development, the market has finally established stem cell banks and some stem cell clinical services. Although some regulations or guidelines regarding stem cell applications have yet to be published by the government, present breakthroughs in stem cell transplantation may facilitate Vietnam's recognition as a key player in stem cell application in Asia and, in the near future, the world. [Biomed Res Ther 2016; 3(4.000: 578-587

  16. Current progress and prospects of induced pluripotent stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN LingYi; Liu Lin

    2009-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are derived from somatic cells by ectopic expression of few transcription factors. Like embryonic stem (ES) cells, iPS cells are able to self-renew indefinitely and to differentiate into all types of cells in the body. iPS cells hold great promise for regenerative medicine,because iPS ceils circumvent not only immunological rejection but also ethical issues. Since the first report on the derivation of iPS cells in 2006, many laboratories all over the world started research on iPS cells and have made significant progress. This paper reviews recent progress in iPS cell research,Including the methods to generate iPS cells, the molecular mechanism of reprogramming in the formation of iPS ceils, and the potential applications of iPS cells in cell replacement therapy. Current problems that need to be addressed and the prospects for iPS research are also discussed.

  17. Stem cells in stroke repair: current success and future prospects.

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    Gopurappilly, Renjitha; Pal, Rajarshi; Mamidi, Murali Krishna; Dey, Sovan; Bhonde, Ramesh; Das, Anjan Kumar

    2011-09-01

    Stroke causes a devastating insult to the brain resulting in severe neurological deficits because of a massive loss of different neurons and glia. In the United States, stroke is the third leading cause of death. Stroke remains a significant clinical unmet condition, with only 3% of the ischemic patient population benefiting from current treatment modalities, such as the use of thrombolytic agents, which are often limited by a narrow therapeutic time window. However, regeneration of the brain after ischemic damage is still active days and even weeks after stroke occurs, which might provide a second window for treatment. Neurorestorative processes like neurogenesis, angiogenesis and synaptic plasticity lead to functional improvement after stroke. Stem cells derived from various tissues have the potential to perform all of the aforementioned processes, thus facilitating functional recovery. Indeed, transplantation of stem cells or their derivatives in animal models of cerebral ischemia can improve function by replacing the lost neurons and glial cells and by mediating remyelination, and modulation of inflammation as confirmed by various studies worldwide. While initially stem cells seemed to work by a 'cell replacement' mechanism, recent research suggests that cell therapy works mostly by providing trophic support to the injured tissue and brain, fostering both neurogenesis and angiogenesis. Moreover, ongoing human trials have encouraged hopes for this new method of restorative therapy after stroke. This review describes up-to-date progress in cell-based therapy for the treatment of stroke. Further, as we discuss here, significant hurdles remain to be addressed before these findings can be responsibly translated to novel therapies. In particular, we need a better understanding of the mechanisms of action of stem cells after transplantation, the therapeutic time window for cell transplantation, the optimal route of cell delivery to the ischemic brain, the most

  18. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for osteoarthritis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wyles CC

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cody C Wyles,1 Matthew T Houdek,2 Atta Behfar,3 Rafael J Sierra,21Mayo Medical School, 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, 3Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Osteoarthritis (OA is a painful chronic condition with a significant impact on quality of life. The societal burden imposed by OA is increasing in parallel with the aging population; however, no therapies have demonstrated efficacy in preventing the progression of this degenerative joint disease. Current mainstays of therapy include activity modification, conservative pain management strategies, weight loss, and if necessary, replacement of the affected joint. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are a multipotent endogenous population of progenitors capable of differentiation to musculoskeletal tissues. MSCs have a well-documented immunomodulatory role, managing the inflammatory response primarily through paracrine signaling. Given these properties, MSCs have been proposed as a potential regenerative cell therapy source for patients with OA. Research efforts are focused on determining the ideal source for derivation, as MSCs are native to several tissues. Furthermore, optimizing the mode of delivery remains a challenge both for appropriate localization of MSCs and for directed guidance toward stemming the local inflammatory process and initiating a regenerative response. Scaffolds and matrices with growth factor adjuvants may prove critical in this effort. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current state of MSC-based therapeutics for OA and discuss potential barriers that must be overcome for successful implementation of cell-based therapy as a routine treatment strategy in orthopedics.Keywords: mesenchymal stem cell, osteoarthritis, treatment, regenerative medicine, cell therapy

  19. Current Perspectives in Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapies for Osteoarthritis

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    Baldur Kristjánsson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a degenerative joint disease most commonly occurring in the ageing population. It is a slow progressive condition resulting in the destruction of hyaline cartilage followed by pain and reduced activity. Conventional treatments have little effects on the progression of the condition often leaving surgery as the last option. In the last 10 years tissue engineering utilising mesenchymal stem cells has been emerging as an alternative method for treating OA. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent progenitor cells found in various tissues, most commonly bone marrow and adipose tissue. MSCs are capable of differentiating into osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Autologous MSCs can be easily harvested and applied in treatment, but allogenic cells can also be employed. The early uses of MSCs focused on the implantations of cell rich matrixes during open surgeries, resulting in the formation of hyaline-like durable cartilage. More recently, the focus has completely shifted towards direct intra-articular injections where a great number of cells are suspended and injected into affected joints. In this review the history and early uses of MSCs in cartilage regeneration are reviewed and different approaches in current trends are explained and evaluated.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for osteoarthritis: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyles, Cody C; Houdek, Matthew T; Behfar, Atta; Sierra, Rafael J

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a painful chronic condition with a significant impact on quality of life. The societal burden imposed by OA is increasing in parallel with the aging population; however, no therapies have demonstrated efficacy in preventing the progression of this degenerative joint disease. Current mainstays of therapy include activity modification, conservative pain management strategies, weight loss, and if necessary, replacement of the affected joint. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a multipotent endogenous population of progenitors capable of differentiation to musculoskeletal tissues. MSCs have a well-documented immunomodulatory role, managing the inflammatory response primarily through paracrine signaling. Given these properties, MSCs have been proposed as a potential regenerative cell therapy source for patients with OA. Research efforts are focused on determining the ideal source for derivation, as MSCs are native to several tissues. Furthermore, optimizing the mode of delivery remains a challenge both for appropriate localization of MSCs and for directed guidance toward stemming the local inflammatory process and initiating a regenerative response. Scaffolds and matrices with growth factor adjuvants may prove critical in this effort. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current state of MSC-based therapeutics for OA and discuss potential barriers that must be overcome for successful implementation of cell-based therapy as a routine treatment strategy in orthopedics.

  1. Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem cells are cells with the potential to develop into many different types of cells in the body. ... the body. There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Stem ...

  2. Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency: Current Treatment Options and Emerging Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Haagdorens

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe ocular surface disease can result in limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD, a condition leading to decreased visual acuity, photophobia, and ocular pain. To restore the ocular surface in advanced stem cell deficient corneas, an autologous or allogenic limbal stem cell transplantation is performed. In recent years, the risk of secondary LSCD due to removal of large limbal grafts has been significantly reduced by the optimization of cultivated limbal epithelial transplantation (CLET. Despite the great successes of CLET, there still is room for improvement as overall success rate is 70% and visual acuity often remains suboptimal after successful transplantation. Simple limbal epithelial transplantation reports higher success rates but has not been performed in as many patients yet. This review focuses on limbal epithelial stem cells and the pathophysiology of LSCD. State-of-the-art therapeutic management of LSCD is described, and new and evolving techniques in ocular surface regeneration are being discussed, in particular, advantages and disadvantages of alternative cell scaffolds and cell sources for cell based ocular surface reconstruction.

  3. Expansion of hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation: current perspectives

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    Schuster Jessica A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are rare cells that have the unique ability to self-renew and differentiate into cells of all hematopoietic lineages. The expansion of HSCs has remained an important goal to develop advanced cell therapies for bone marrow transplantation and many blood disorders. Over the last several decades, there have been numerous attempts to expand HSCs in vitro using purified growth factors that are known to regulate HSCs. However, these attempts have been met with limited success for clinical applications. New developments in the HSC expansion field coupled with gene therapy and stem cell transplant should encourage progression in attractive treatment options for many disorders including hematologic conditions, immunodeficiencies, and genetic disorders.

  4. Stem Cells as New Agents for the Treatment of Infertility: Current and Future Perspectives and Challenges

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    Vladislav Volarevic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are undifferentiated cells that are present in the embryonic, fetal, and adult stages of life and give rise to differentiated cells that make up the building blocks of tissue and organs. Due to their unlimited source and high differentiation potential, stem cells are considered as potentially new therapeutic agents for the treatment of infertility. Stem cells could be stimulated in vitro to develop various numbers of specialized cells including male and female gametes suggesting their potential use in reproductive medicine. During past few years a considerable progress in the derivation of male germ cells from pluripotent stem cells has been made. In addition, stem cell-based strategies for ovarian regeneration and oocyte production have been proposed as future clinical therapies for treating infertility in women. In this review, we summarized current knowledge and present future perspectives and challenges regarding the use of stem cells in reproductive medicine.

  5. Current protocols in the generation of pluripotent stem cells: theoretical, methodological and clinical considerations

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    Brad B Swelstad

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Brad B Swelstad, Candace L KerrInstitute for Cell Engineering, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MA, USAAbstract: Pluripotent stem cells have been derived from various embryonic, fetal and adult sources. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs and parthenogenic ESCs (pESCs are derived from the embryo proper while embryonic germ cells (EGCs, embryonal carcinoma cells (ECCs, and germ-line stem cells (GSC are produced from germ cells. ECCs were the first pluripotent stem cell lines established from adult testicular tumors while EGCs are generated in vitro from primordial germ cells (PGCs isolated in late embryonic development. More recently, studies have also demonstrated the ability to produce GSCs from adult germ cells, known as spermatogonial stem cells. Unlike ECCs, the source of GSCs are normal, non-cancerous adult tissue. The study of these unique cell lines has provided information that has led to the ability to reprogram somatic cells into an ESC-like state. These cells, called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, have been derived from a number of human fetal and adult origins. With the promises pluripotent stem cells bring to cell-based therapies there remain several considerations that need to be carefully studied prior to their clinical use. Many of these issues involve understanding key factors regulating their generation, including those which define pluripotency. In this regard, the following article discusses critical aspects of pluripotent stem cell derivation and current issues about their therapeutic potential.Keywords: pluripotency, stem cells, derivation, human

  6. Stem cell sources for tooth regeneration: current status and future prospects

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    Keishi eOtsu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are capable of renewing themselves through cell division and have the remarkable ability to differentiate into many different types of cells. They therefore have the potential to become a central tool in regenerative medicine. During the last decade, advances in tissue engineering and stem cell-based tooth regeneration have provided realistic and attractive means of replacing lost or damaged teeth. Investigation of embryonic and adult (tissue stem cells as potential cell sources for tooth regeneration has led to many promising results. However, technical and ethical issues have hindered the availability of these cells for clinical application. The recent discovery of induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells has provided the possibility to revolutionize the field of regenerative medicine (dentistry by offering the option of autologous transplantation. In this article, we review the current progress in the field of stem cell-based tooth regeneration and discuss the possibility of using iPS cells for this purpose.

  7. Stem cell sources for tooth regeneration: current status and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsu, Keishi; Kumakami-Sakano, Mika; Fujiwara, Naoki; Kikuchi, Kazuko; Keller, Laetitia; Lesot, Hervé; Harada, Hidemitsu

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells are capable of renewing themselves through cell division and have the remarkable ability to differentiate into many different types of cells. They therefore have the potential to become a central tool in regenerative medicine. During the last decade, advances in tissue engineering and stem cell-based tooth regeneration have provided realistic and attractive means of replacing lost or damaged teeth. Investigation of embryonic and adult (tissue) stem cells as potential cell sources for tooth regeneration has led to many promising results. However, technical and ethical issues have hindered the availability of these cells for clinical application. The recent discovery of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has provided the possibility to revolutionize the field of regenerative medicine (dentistry) by offering the option of autologous transplantation. In this article, we review the current progress in the field of stem cell-based tooth regeneration and discuss the possibility of using iPS cells for this purpose.

  8. Current protocols in the generation of pluripotent stem cells: theoretical, methodological and clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swelstad, Brad B; Kerr, Candace L

    2009-12-22

    Pluripotent stem cells have been derived from various embryonic, fetal and adult sources. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and parthenogenic ESCs (pESCs) are derived from the embryo proper while embryonic germ cells (EGCs), embryonal carcinoma cells (ECCs), and germ-line stem cells (GSC) are produced from germ cells. ECCs were the first pluripotent stem cell lines established from adult testicular tumors while EGCs are generated in vitro from primordial germ cells (PGCs) isolated in late embryonic development. More recently, studies have also demonstrated the ability to produce GSCs from adult germ cells, known as spermatogonial stem cells. Unlike ECCs, the source of GSCs are normal, non-cancerous adult tissue. The study of these unique cell lines has provided information that has led to the ability to reprogram somatic cells into an ESC-like state. These cells, called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), have been derived from a number of human fetal and adult origins. With the promises pluripotent stem cells bring to cell-based therapies there remain several considerations that need to be carefully studied prior to their clinical use. Many of these issues involve understanding key factors regulating their generation, including those which define pluripotency. In this regard, the following article discusses critical aspects of pluripotent stem cell derivation and current issues about their therapeutic potential.

  9. Concise Review: Stem Cell Microenvironment on a Chip: Current Technologies for Tissue Engineering and Stem Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, DoYeun; Lim, Jaeho; Park, Joong Yull; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2015-11-01

    Stem cells have huge potential in many therapeutic areas. With conventional cell culture methods, however, it is difficult to achieve in vivo-like microenvironments in which a number of well-controlled stimuli are provided for growing highly sensitive stem cells. In contrast, microtechnology-based platforms offer advantages of high precision, controllability, scalability, and reproducibility, enabling imitation of the complex physiological context of in vivo. This capability may fill the gap between the present knowledge about stem cells and that required for clinical stem cell-based therapies. We reviewed the various types of microplatforms on which stem cell microenvironments are mimicked. We have assigned the various microplatforms to four categories based on their practical uses to assist stem cell biologists in using them for research. In particular, many examples are given of microplatforms used for the production of embryoid bodies and aggregates of stem cells in vitro. We also categorized microplatforms based on the types of factors controlling the behaviors of stem cells. Finally, we outline possible future directions for microplatform-based stem cell research, such as research leading to the production of well-defined environments for stem cells to be used in scaled-up systems or organs-on-a-chip, the regulation of induced pluripotent stem cells, and the study of the genetic states of stem cells on microplatforms. Stem cells are highly sensitive to a variety of physicochemical cues, and their fate can be easily altered by a slight change of environment; therefore, systematic analysis and discrimination of the extracellular signals and intracellular pathways controlling the fate of cells and experimental realization of sensitive and controllable niche environments are critical. This review introduces diverse microplatforms to provide in vitro stem cell niches. Microplatforms could control microenvironments around cells and have recently attracted much

  10. Concise Review: Stem Cell Microenvironment on a Chip: Current Technologies for Tissue Engineering and Stem Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, DoYeun; Lim, Jaeho; Park, Joong Yull

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells have huge potential in many therapeutic areas. With conventional cell culture methods, however, it is difficult to achieve in vivo-like microenvironments in which a number of well-controlled stimuli are provided for growing highly sensitive stem cells. In contrast, microtechnology-based platforms offer advantages of high precision, controllability, scalability, and reproducibility, enabling imitation of the complex physiological context of in vivo. This capability may fill the gap between the present knowledge about stem cells and that required for clinical stem cell-based therapies. We reviewed the various types of microplatforms on which stem cell microenvironments are mimicked. We have assigned the various microplatforms to four categories based on their practical uses to assist stem cell biologists in using them for research. In particular, many examples are given of microplatforms used for the production of embryoid bodies and aggregates of stem cells in vitro. We also categorized microplatforms based on the types of factors controlling the behaviors of stem cells. Finally, we outline possible future directions for microplatform-based stem cell research, such as research leading to the production of well-defined environments for stem cells to be used in scaled-up systems or organs-on-a-chip, the regulation of induced pluripotent stem cells, and the study of the genetic states of stem cells on microplatforms. Significance Stem cells are highly sensitive to a variety of physicochemical cues, and their fate can be easily altered by a slight change of environment; therefore, systematic analysis and discrimination of the extracellular signals and intracellular pathways controlling the fate of cells and experimental realization of sensitive and controllable niche environments are critical. This review introduces diverse microplatforms to provide in vitro stem cell niches. Microplatforms could control microenvironments around cells and have recently

  11. Optimizing stem cells for cardiac repair: Current status and new frontiers in regenerative cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Der Sarkissian, Shant; Lévesque, Thierry; Noiseux, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Cell therapy has the potential to improve healing of ischemic heart, repopulate injured myocardium and restore cardiac function. The tremendous hope and potential of stem cell therapy is well understood, yet recent trials involving cell therapy for cardiovascular diseases have yielded mixed results with inconsistent data thereby readdressing controversies and unresolved questions regarding stem cell efficacy for ischemic cardiac disease treatment. These controversies are believed to arise by the lack of uniformity of the clinical trial methodologies, uncertainty regarding the underlying reparative mechanisms of stem cells, questions concerning the most appropriate cell population to use, the proper delivery method and timing in relation to the moment of infarction, as well as the poor stem cell survival and engraftment especially in a diseased microenvironment which is collectively acknowledged as a major hindrance to any form of cell therapy. Indeed, the microenvironment of the failing heart exhibits pathological hypoxic, oxidative and inflammatory stressors impairing the survival of transplanted cells. Therefore, in order to observe any significant therapeutic benefit there is a need to increase resilience of stem cells to death in the transplant microenvironment while preserving or better yet improving their reparative functionality. Although stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes has been observed in some instance, the prevailing reparative benefits are afforded through paracrine mechanisms that promote angiogenesis, cell survival, transdifferentiate host cells and modulate immune responses. Therefore, to maximize their reparative functionality, ex vivo manipulation of stem cells through physical, genetic and pharmacological means have shown promise to enable cells to thrive in the post-ischemic transplant microenvironment. In the present work, we will overview the current status of stem cell therapy for ischemic heart disease, discuss the most recurring

  12. Diabetes treatment: A rapid review of the current and future scope of stem cell research

    OpenAIRE

    Sheik Abdulazeez, Sheriff

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major health concern of the developing and developed nations across the globe. This devastating disease accounts for the 5% deaths around the world annually. The current treatment methods do not address the underlying causes of the disease and have severe limitations. Stem cells are unique cells with the potential to differentiate into any type of specialized cells. This feature of both adult and embryonic stem cells was explored in great detail by the scientists around...

  13. Biphasic electrical currents stimulation promotes both proliferation and differentiation of fetal neural stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keun-A Chang

    Full Text Available The use of non-chemical methods to differentiate stem cells has attracted researchers from multiple disciplines, including the engineering and the biomedical fields. No doubt, growth factor based methods are still the most dominant of achieving some level of proliferation and differentiation control--however, chemical based methods are still limited by the quality, source, and amount of the utilized reagents. Well-defined non-chemical methods to differentiate stem cells allow stem cell scientists to control stem cell biology by precisely administering the pre-defined parameters, whether they are structural cues, substrate stiffness, or in the form of current flow. We have developed a culture system that allows normal stem cell growth and the option of applying continuous and defined levels of electric current to alter the cell biology of growing cells. This biphasic current stimulator chip employing ITO electrodes generates both positive and negative currents in the same culture chamber without affecting surface chemistry. We found that biphasic electrical currents (BECs significantly increased the proliferation of fetal neural stem cells (NSCs. Furthermore, BECs also promoted the differentiation of fetal NSCs into neuronal cells, as assessed using immunocytochemistry. Our results clearly show that BECs promote both the proliferation and neuronal differentiation of fetal NSCs. It may apply to the development of strategies that employ NSCs in the treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

  14. Current applications of adipose-derived stem cells and their future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Hee; Heo, Chan Yeong

    2014-01-26

    Adult stem cells have a great potential to treat various diseases. For these cell-based therapies, adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are one of the most promising stem cell types, including embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). ESCs and iPSCs have taken center stage due to their pluripotency. However, ESCs and iPSCs have limitations in ethical issues and in identification of characteristics, respectively. Unlike ESCs and iPSCs, ADSCs do not have such limitations and are not only easily obtained but also uniquely expandable. ADSCs can differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, myocytes and neurons under specific differentiation conditions, and these kinds of differentiation potential of ADSCs could be applied in regenerative medicine e.g., skin reconstruction, bone and cartilage formation, etc. In this review, the current status of ADSC isolation, differentiation and their therapeutic applications are discussed.

  15. Therapies targeting cancer stem cells: Current trends and future challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Denisa; L; Dragu; Laura; G; Necula; Coralia; Bleotu; Carmen; C; Diaconu; Mihaela; Chivu-Economescu

    2015-01-01

    Traditional therapies against cancer, chemo- and radiotherapy, have multiple limitations that lead to treatment failure and cancer recurrence. These limitations are related to systemic and local toxicity, while treatment failure and cancer relapse are due to drug resistance and self-renewal, properties of a small population of tumor cells called cancer stem cells(CSCs). These cells are involved in cancer initiation, maintenance, metastasis and recurrence. Therefore, in order to develop efficient treatments that can induce a longlasting clinical response preventing tumor relapse it is important to develop drugs that can specifically target and eliminate CSCs. Recent identification of surface markers and understanding of molecular feature associated with CSC phenotype helped with the design of effective treatments. In this review we discuss targeting surface biomarkers, signaling pathways that regulate CSCs self-renewal and differentiation, drug-efflux pumps involved in apoptosis resistance, microenvironmental signals that sustain CSCs growth, manipulation of mi RNA expression, and induction of CSCs apoptosis and differentiation, with specific aim to hamper CSCs regeneration and cancer relapse. Some of these agents are under evaluation in preclinical and clinical studies, most of them for using in combination with traditional therapies. The combined therapy using conventional anticancer drugs with CSCs-targeting agents, may offer a promising strategy for management and eradication of different types of cancers.

  16. Stem cell therapy for Alzheimer's disease and related disorders: current status and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Leslie M; Fong, Helen; Huang, Yadong

    2015-03-13

    Underlying cognitive declines in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are the result of neuron and neuronal process losses due to a wide range of factors. To date, all efforts to develop therapies that target specific AD-related pathways have failed in late-stage human trials. As a result, an emerging consensus in the field is that treatment of AD patients with currently available drug candidates might come too late, likely as a result of significant neuronal loss in the brain. In this regard, cell-replacement therapies, such as human embryonic stem cell- or induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural cells, hold potential for treating AD patients. With the advent of stem cell technologies and the ability to transform these cells into different types of central nervous system neurons and glial cells, some success in stem cell therapy has been reported in animal models of AD. However, many more steps remain before stem cell therapies will be clinically feasible for AD and related disorders in humans. In this review, we will discuss current research advances in AD pathogenesis and stem cell technologies; additionally, the potential challenges and strategies for using cell-based therapies for AD and related disorders will be discussed.

  17. Two outward potassium current types are expressed during the neural differentiation of neural stem cells**

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruiying Bai; Guowei Gao; Ying Xing; Hong Xue

    2013-01-01

    The electrophysiological properties of potassium ion channels are regarded as a basic index for determining the functional differentiation of neural stem cells. In this study, neural stem cells from the hippocampus of newborn rats were induced to differentiate with neurotrophic growth factor, and the electrophysiological properties of the voltage-gated potassium ion channels were observed. Immunofluorescence staining showed that the rapidly proliferating neural stem cells formed spheres in vitro that expressed high levels of nestin. The differentiated neurons were shown to express neuron-specific enolase. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the neural stem cells were actively dividing and the percentage of cells in the S + G2/M phase was high. However, the ratio of cells in the S + G2/M phase decreased obviously as differentiation proceeded. Whole-cellpatch-clamp re-cordings revealed apparent changes in potassium ion currents as the neurons differentiated. The potassium ion currents consisted of one transient outward potassium ion current and one delayed rectifier potassium ion current, which were blocked by 4-aminopyridine and tetraethylammonium, respectively. The experimental findings indicate that neural stem cells from newborn rat hippo-campus could be cultured and induced to differentiate into functional neurons under defined condi-tions in vitro. The differentiated neurons expressed two types of outward potassium ion currents similar to those of mature neurons in vivo.

  18. Adult stem cells in neural repair: Current options, limitations and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Mariano,Eric Domingos; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Marie, Suely Kazue Nagahashi; Lepski, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells represent a promising step for the future of regenerative medicine. As they are able to differentiate into any cell type, tissue or organ, these cells are great candidates for treatments against the worst diseases that defy doctors and researchers around the world. Stem cells can be divided into three main groups: (1) embryonic stem cells; (2) fetal stem cells; and (3) adult stem cells. In terms of their capacity for proliferation, stem cells are also classified as totipotent, plur...

  19. Adult stem cells in the use of jaw bone regeneration: current and prospective research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigdon-Giladi, Hadar; Khoury, Nizar; Evron, Ayelet

    2015-02-01

    Concomitant to the increased use of dental implants to replace lost dentition, there is a growing need to regenerate atrophic jaw bone to allow dental implant placement. Current surgical techniques for jaw bone augmentation share several limitations, such as operator sensitivity and relatively low predictability and high morbidity rates. Therefore, alternative treatment approaches have been developed in the field of tissue engineering. Bone tissue engineering integrates the use of different scaffolds, growth factors, and stem cells. This method aims to induce bone augmentation of large bone defects by mimicking biologic processes that occur during embryogenesis. This review will present available sources for adult stem cells, the rationale for using stem cells for bone regeneration, and recent studies that use mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) to induce bone augmentation.

  20. Stem Cell Transplantation for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration: Current Options and Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangfu Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve regeneration is a complicated process highlighted by Wallerian degeneration, axonal sprouting, and remyelination. Schwann cells play an integral role in multiple facets of nerve regeneration but obtaining Schwann cells for cell-based therapy is limited by the invasive nature of harvesting and donor site morbidity. Stem cell transplantation for peripheral nerve regeneration offers an alternative cell-based therapy with several regenerative benefits. Stem cells have the potential to differentiate into Schwann-like cells that recruit macrophages for removal of cellular debris. They also can secrete neurotrophic factors to promote axonal growth, and remyelination. Currently, various types of stem cell sources are being investigated for their application to peripheral nerve regeneration. This review highlights studies involving the stem cell types, the mechanisms of their action, methods of delivery to the injury site, and relevant pre-clinical or clinical data. The purpose of this article is to review the current point of view on the application of stem cell based strategy for peripheral nerve regeneration.

  1. Stem Cell Transplantation for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration: Current Options and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liangfu; Jones, Salazar; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2017-01-05

    Peripheral nerve regeneration is a complicated process highlighted by Wallerian degeneration, axonal sprouting, and remyelination. Schwann cells play an integral role in multiple facets of nerve regeneration but obtaining Schwann cells for cell-based therapy is limited by the invasive nature of harvesting and donor site morbidity. Stem cell transplantation for peripheral nerve regeneration offers an alternative cell-based therapy with several regenerative benefits. Stem cells have the potential to differentiate into Schwann-like cells that recruit macrophages for removal of cellular debris. They also can secrete neurotrophic factors to promote axonal growth, and remyelination. Currently, various types of stem cell sources are being investigated for their application to peripheral nerve regeneration. This review highlights studies involving the stem cell types, the mechanisms of their action, methods of delivery to the injury site, and relevant pre-clinical or clinical data. The purpose of this article is to review the current point of view on the application of stem cell based strategy for peripheral nerve regeneration.

  2. Stem cells for liver tissue repair:Current knowledge and perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells from extra- or intrahepatic sources have been recently characterized and their usefulness for the generation of hepatocyte-like lineages has been demonstrated.Therefore,they are being increasingly considered for future applications in liver cell therapy.In that field,liver cell transplantation is currently regarded as a possible alternative to whole organ transplantation,while stem cells possess theoretical advantages on hepatocytes as they display higher in vitro culture performances and could be used in autologous transplant procedures.However,the current research on the hepatic fate of stem cells is still facing difficulties to demonstrate the acquisition of a full mature hepatocyte phenotype,both in vitro and in vivo.Furthermore,the lack of obvious demonstration of in vivo hepatocyte-like cell functionality remains associated to low repopulation rates obtained after current transplantation procedures.The present review focuses on the current knowledge of the stern cell potential for liver therapy.We discuss the characteristics of the principal cell candidates and the methods to demonstrate their hepatic potential in vitro and in vivo.We finally address the question of the future clinical applications of stem cells for liver tissue repair and the technical aspects that remain to be investigated.

  3. Stem Cell Information: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tips Info Center Research Topics Federal Policy Glossary Stem Cell Information General Information Clinical Trials Funding Information Current ... here Home » Glossary Back to top Glossary Adult stem cell Astrocyte Blastocoel Blastocyst Bone marrow stromal cells Bone ...

  4. Types of Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stem Cell Glossary Search Toggle Nav Types of Stem Cells Stem cells are the foundation from which all ... Learn About Stem Cells > Types of Stem Cells Stem cells Stem cells are the foundation for every organ ...

  5. Current status of treating neurodegenerative disease with induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pen, A E; Jensen, U B

    2017-01-01

    Degenerative diseases of the brain have proven challenging to treat, let alone cure. One of the treatment options is the use of stem cell therapy, which has been under investigation for several years. However, treatment with stem cells comes with a number of drawbacks, for instance the source of these cells. Currently, a number of options are tested to produce stem cells, although the main issues of quantity and ethics remain for most of them. Over recent years, the potential of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has been widely investigated and these cells seem promising for production of numerous different tissues both in vitro and in vivo. One of the major advantages of iPSCs is that they can be made autologous and can provide a sufficient quantity of cells by culturing, making the use of other stem cell sources unnecessary. As the first descriptions of iPSC production with the transcription factors Sox2, Klf4, Oct4 and C-Myc, called the Yamanaka factors, a variety of methods has been developed to convert somatic cells from all germ layers to pluripotent stem cells. Improvement of these methods is necessary to increase the efficiency of reprogramming, the quality of pluripotency and the safety of these cells before use in human trials. This review focusses on the current accomplishments and remaining challenges in the production and use of iPSCs for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases of the brain such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Pluripotent stem cells - A review of the current status in neural regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Ameer Basha Paspala

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacological or neurosurgical therapies currently in practice to treat the damage in various neurodegenerative disorders are not efficient in preventing progression or cure of these progressive neurodegenerative processes. Recently, a new approach, cell therapy using stem cell, is being evaluated. However, the use of this therapy in the treatment of these neurological diseases is highly restricted, mainly owing to several technical difficulties and limitations. The strategy of isolation and characterization of neural stem cells from various sources will probably provide a major impetus and open up an interesting, novel therapeutic modality for several neurodegenerative disorders. The high regenerative potential of damaged neural tissues suggests that various embryonic/adult sources serve as a proxy for neural stem cells for cell-based therapy.

  7. Stem cells for clinical use in cardiovascular medicine: current limitations and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menasché, Philippe

    2005-10-01

    Cell transplantation is currently gaining a growing interest as a potential new means of improving the prognosis of patients with cardiac failure. The basic assumption is that left ventricular dysfunction is largely due to the loss of a critical number of cardiomyocytes and that it can be partly reversed by implantation of new contractile cells into the postinfarction scars. Primarily for practical reasons, autologous skeletal myoblasts have been the first to undergo clinical trials and now that the feasibility of the procedure is well established, efficacy data are expected from the ongoing randomized studies. Bone marrow stem cells are also generating a great deal of interest, particularly in patients with acute myocardial infarction, and are currently undergoing extensive clinical testing although recent data have raised a cautionary note about the transdifferentiation potential of these cells. While experimental studies and early-phase clinical trials tend to support the concept that cell therapy may enhance cardiac repair, several key issues still need to be addressed including (1) the optimal type of donor cells in relation to the clinical profile of the patients, (2) the mechanism by which cell engraftment improves cardiac function, (3) the optimization of cell survival, (4) the development of less invasive cell delivery techniques and (5) the potential benefits of cell transplantation in nonischemic heart failure. Current evidence suggests, however, that adult stem cells (myogenic or marrow-derived) fail to electromechanically integrate within the recipient heart, thereby mandating the search for second generation cell types able to achieve this goal which is the prerequisite for an effective enhancement of contractile function. Preliminary data suggest that cells that feature a true cardiomyogenic phenotype such as cardiac stem cells and cardiac-precommitted embryonic stem cells may fall in this category and carry the potential for ensuring a true

  8. Stem cell technology for tendon regeneration: current status, challenges, and future research directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lui PP

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pauline Po Yee Lui Headquarter, Hospital Authority, Hong Kong SAR, People's Republic of China Abstract: Tendon injuries are a common cause of physical disability. They present a clinical challenge to orthopedic surgeons because injured tendons respond poorly to current treatments without tissue regeneration and the time required for rehabilitation is long. New treatment options are required. Stem cell-based therapies offer great potential to promote tendon regeneration due to their high proliferative, synthetic, and immunomodulatory activities as well as their potential to differentiate to the target cell types and undergo genetic modification. In this review, I first recapped the challenges of tendon repair by reviewing the anatomy of tendon. Next, I discussed the advantages and limitations of using different types of stem cells compared to terminally differentiated cells for tendon tissue engineering. The safety and efficacy of application of stem cells and their modified counterparts for tendon tissue engineering were then summarized after a systematic literature search in PubMed. The challenges and future research directions to enhance, optimize, and standardize stem cell-based therapies for augmenting tendon repair were then discussed. Keywords: stem cells, tendon repair, tendon tissue engineering, tendon injuries

  9. Bone Marrow Stem Cell Derived Paracrine Factors for Regenerative Medicine: Current Perspectives and Therapeutic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom J. Burdon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past several years, there has been intense research in the field of bone marrow-derived stem cell (BMSC therapy to facilitate its translation into clinical setting. Although a lot has been accomplished, plenty of challenges lie ahead. Furthermore, there is a growing body of evidence showing that administration of BMSC-derived conditioned media (BMSC-CM can recapitulate the beneficial effects observed after stem cell therapy. BMSCs produce a wide range of cytokines and chemokines that have, until now, shown extensive therapeutic potential. These paracrine mechanisms could be as diverse as stimulating receptor-mediated survival pathways, inducing stem cell homing and differentiation or regulating the anti-inflammatory effects in wounded areas. The current review reflects the rapid shift of interest from BMSC to BMSC-CM to alleviate many logistical and technical issues regarding cell therapy and evaluates its future potential as an effective regenerative therapy.

  10. Stem Cell Therapy for Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence: The Current Status and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukui Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress urinary incontinence (SUI is a common urinary system disease that mostly affects women. Current treatments still do not solve the critical problem of urethral sphincter dysfunction. In recent years, there have been major developments in techniques to obtain, culture, and characterize autologous stem cells as well as many studies describing their applications for the treatment of SUI. In this paper, we review recent publications and clinical trials investigating the applications of several stem cell types as potential treatments for SUI and the underlying challenges of such therapy.

  11. Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhukar Thakur

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this presentation is to create awareness of stem cell applications in the ISORBE community and to foster a strategy of how the ISORBE community can disseminate information and promote the use of radiolabeled stem cells in biomedical applications. Methods: The continued excitement in Stem Cells, in many branches of basic and applied biomedical science, stems from the remarkable ability of stem cells to divide and develop into different types of cells in the body. Often called as Magic Seeds, stem cells are produced in bone marrow and circulate in blood, albeit at a relatively low concentration. These virtues together with the ability of stem cells to grow in tissue culture have paved the way for their applications to generate new and healthy tissues and to replace diseased or injured human organs. Although possibilities of stem cell applications are many, much remains yet to be understood of these remarkable magic seeds. Conclusion: This presentation shall briefly cover the origin of stem cells, the pros and cons of their growth and division, their potential application, and shall outline some examples of the contributions of radiolabeled stem cells, in this rapidly growing branch of biomedical science

  12. The application of induced pluripotent stem cells for bone regeneration: current progress and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Songsong; Liu, Chaoxu; Krettek, Christian; Jagodzinski, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Loss of healthy bone tissue and dysosteogenesis are still common and significant problems in clinics. Cell-based therapy using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been performed in patients for quite some time, but the inherent drawbacks of these cells, such as the reductions in proliferation rate and osteogenic differentiation potential that occur with aging, greatly limit their further application. Moreover, embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have brought new hope to osteoregenerative medicine because of their full pluripotent differentiation potential and excellent performance in bone regeneration. However, the ethical issues involved in destroying human embryos and the immune reactions that occur after transplantation are two major stumbling blocks impeding the clinical application of ESCs. Instead, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which are ESC-like pluripotent cells that are reprogrammed from adult somatic cells using defined transcription factors, are considered a more promising source of cells for regenerative medicine because they present no ethical or immunological issues. Here, we summarize the primary technologies for generating iPSCs and the biological properties of these cells, review the current advances in iPSC-based bone regeneration and, finally, discuss the remaining challenges associated with these cells, particularly safety issues and their potential application for osteoregenerative medicine.

  13. Augmenting peripheral nerve regeneration using stem cells: A review of current opinion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbairn, Neil G; Meppelink, Amanda M; Ng-Glazier, Joanna; Randolph, Mark A; Winograd, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Outcomes following peripheral nerve injury remain frustratingly poor. The reasons for this are multifactorial, although maintaining a growth permissive environment in the distal nerve stump following repair is arguably the most important. The optimal environment for axonal regeneration relies on the synthesis and release of many biochemical mediators that are temporally and spatially regulated with a high level of incompletely understood complexity. The Schwann cell (SC) has emerged as a key player in this process. Prolonged periods of distal nerve stump denervation, characteristic of large gaps and proximal injuries, have been associated with a reduction in SC number and ability to support regenerating axons. Cell based therapy offers a potential therapy for the improvement of outcomes following peripheral nerve reconstruction. Stem cells have the potential to increase the number of SCs and prolong their ability to support regeneration. They may also have the ability to rescue and replenish populations of chromatolytic and apoptotic neurons following axotomy. Finally, they can be used in non-physiologic ways to preserve injured tissues such as denervated muscle while neuronal ingrowth has not yet occurred. Aside from stem cell type, careful consideration must be given to differentiation status, how stem cells are supported following transplantation and how they will be delivered to the site of injury. It is the aim of this article to review current opinions on the strategies of stem cell based therapy for the augmentation of peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:25621102

  14. Epigenetic modifications of embryonic stem cells: current trends and relevance in developing regenerative medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Henry Chung; Kuldip S Sidhu

    2008-01-01

    Henry Chung, Kuldip S SidhuStem Cell Lab, Faculty of Medicine, School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Epigenetics is a growing field not only in the area of cancer research but recently in stem cells including human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research. The hallmark of profiling epigenetic changes in stem cells lies in maintaining pluripotency or multipotency and in attaining lineage specifications that are relevant for regenerative medicine. Epige...

  15. Current protocols in the generation of pluripotent stem cells: theoretical, methodological and clinical considerations

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Brad B Swelstad, Candace L KerrInstitute for Cell Engineering, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MA, USAAbstract: Pluripotent stem cells have been derived from various embryonic, fetal and adult sources. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and parthenogenic ESCs (pESCs) are derived from the embryo proper while embryonic germ cells (EGCs), embryonal carcinoma cells (ECCs), and germ-line stem cells (GSC) are produced from germ cells. ECCs were the first pluri...

  16. The role of stem cell therapy in multiple sclerosis: An overview of the current status of the clinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokhsareh Meamar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of multiple sclerosis (MS and the incompetence of a large number of promised treatments for MS urge us to plan new and more effective therapeutic approaches that aim to suppress ongoing autoimmune responses and induction of local endogenous regeneration. Emerging data propose that hematopoietic, mesenchymal, and neural stem cells have the potential to restore self-tolerance, provide in situ immunomodulation and neuroprotection, as well as promote regeneration. Thus, in this article, we will first provide an overview of the cell sources for proposed mechanisms that contribute to the beneficial effects of stem cell transplantation, the ideal route and/or timing of stem cell-based therapies for each main stem cell group, and finally, an overview of the current status of stem cell research in clinical trial stages in MS by comparable and healthy therapeutic effects of different stem cell therapies for MS patients.

  17. Stem cell technology for tendon regeneration: current status, challenges, and future research directions

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Pauline Po Yee Lui Headquarter, Hospital Authority, Hong Kong SAR, People's Republic of China Abstract: Tendon injuries are a common cause of physical disability. They present a clinical challenge to orthopedic surgeons because injured tendons respond poorly to current treatments without tissue regeneration and the time required for rehabilitation is long. New treatment options are required. Stem cell-based therapies offer great potential to promote tendon regeneration due to their h...

  18. Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommerlund, Julie

    2004-01-01

    '. This paper is about tech-noscience, and about the proliferation of connections and interdependencies created by it.More specifically, the paper is about stem cells. Biotechnology in general has the power to capture the imagination. Within the field of biotechnology nothing seems more provocative...... and tantalizing than stem cells, in research, in medicine, or as products....

  19. Current and future approaches to treat graft failure after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Franco; Lucarelli, Barbarella; Merli, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    One significant obstacle to the success of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is represented by graft failure, defined as either lack of initial engraftment of donor cells (primary graft failure) or loss of donor cells after initial engraftment (secondary graft failure). Graft failure mediated by host immune cells attacking donor stem cells is named graft rejection. Factors associated with graft failure include HLA disparity in the donor/recipient pair, underlying disease, viral infections, type of conditioning regimen and stem cell source employed. In this article, the experts summarize current approaches to treat graft failure/rejection after HSCT, and they discuss new strategies of graft manipulation and immune therapy of particular interest for preventing/treating this complication. A limited array of options is available to treat graft failure. The experts believe that re-transplantation from another donor or the same donor (if there is no evidence of immunologically mediated graft failure) is the treatment of choice for patients with primary graft failure or acute graft rejection. The experts think that strategies based on innovative approaches of graft manipulation, new agents or cellular therapies could render in the future graft failure a much less relevant problem for HSCT recipients.

  20. Learn About Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Handbook Stem Cell Glossary Search Toggle Nav Stem Cell Basics Stem cells are the foundation from which ... original cell’s DNA, cytoplasm and cell membrane. About stem cells Stem cells are the foundation of development in ...

  1. Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon R. Pine

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related lethality because of high incidence and recurrence in spite of significant advances in staging and therapies. Recent data indicates that stem cells situated throughout the airways may initiate cancer formation. These putative stem cells maintain protumorigenic characteristics including high proliferative capacity, multipotent differentiation, drug resistance and long lifespan relative to other cells. Stem cell signaling and differentiation pathways are maintained within distinct cancer types, and destabilization of this machinery may participate in maintenance of cancer stem cells. Characterization of lung cancer stem cells is an area of active research and is critical for developing novel therapies. This review summarizes the current knowledge on stem cell signaling pathways and cell markers used to identify the lung cancer stem cells.

  2. Plant stem cell niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichinger, Ernst; Kornet, Noortje; Friedrich, Thomas; Laux, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Multicellular organisms possess pluripotent stem cells to form new organs, replenish the daily loss of cells, or regenerate organs after injury. Stem cells are maintained in specific environments, the stem cell niches, that provide signals to block differentiation. In plants, stem cell niches are situated in the shoot, root, and vascular meristems-self-perpetuating units of organ formation. Plants' lifelong activity-which, as in the case of trees, can extend over more than a thousand years-requires that a robust regulatory network keep the balance between pluripotent stem cells and differentiating descendants. In this review, we focus on current models in plant stem cell research elaborated during the past two decades, mainly in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We address the roles of mobile signals on transcriptional modules involved in balancing cell fates. In addition, we discuss shared features of and differences between the distinct stem cell niches of Arabidopsis.

  3. Use of Adult Stem Cells for Cartilage Tissue Engineering: Current Status and Future Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Baugé

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their low self-repair ability, cartilage defects that result from joint injury, aging, or osteoarthritis, are the most often irreversible and are a major cause of joint pain and chronic disability. So, in recent years, researchers and surgeons have been working hard to elaborate cartilage repair interventions for patients who suffer from cartilage damage. However, current methods do not perfectly restore hyaline cartilage and may lead to the apparition of fibro- or hypertrophic cartilage. In the next years, the development of new strategies using adult stem cells, in scaffolds, with supplementation of culture medium and/or culture in low oxygen tension should improve the quality of neoformed cartilage. Through these solutions, some of the latest technologies start to bring very promising results in repairing cartilage from traumatic injury or chondropathies. This review discusses the current knowledge about the use of adult stem cells in the context of cartilage tissue engineering and presents clinical trials in progress, as well as in the future, especially in the field of bioprinting stem cells.

  4. Concise review: current status of stem cells and regenerative medicine in lung biology and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Lung diseases remain a significant and devastating cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In contrast to many other major diseases, lung diseases notably chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPDs), including both asthma and emphysema, are increasing in prevalence and COPD is expected to become the third leading cause of disease mortality worldwide by 2020. New therapeutic options are desperately needed. A rapidly growing number of investigations of stem cells and cell therapies in lung biology and diseases as well as in ex vivo lung bioengineering have offered exciting new avenues for advancing knowledge of lung biology as well as providing novel potential therapeutic approaches for lung diseases. These initial observations have led to a growing exploration of endothelial progenitor cells and mesenchymal stem (stromal) cells in clinical trials of pulmonary hypertension and COPD with other clinical investigations planned. Ex vivo bioengineering of the trachea, larynx, diaphragm, and the lung itself with both biosynthetic constructs as well as decellularized tissues have been used to explore engineering both airway and vascular systems of the lung. Lung is thus a ripe organ for a variety of cell therapy and regenerative medicine approaches. Current state-of-the-art progress for each of the above areas will be presented as will discussion of current considerations for cell therapy-based clinical trials in lung diseases.

  5. Stem cell technology for bone regeneration: current status and potential applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asatrian G

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Greg Asatrian,1 Dalton Pham,1,2 Winters R Hardy,3 Aaron W James,1–3 Bruno Peault3,4 1Dental and Craniofacial Research Institute and Section of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, 3UCLA/Orthopaedic Hospital Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and the Orthopaedic Hospital Research Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 4Medical Research Council Centre for Regenerative Medicine, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK Abstract: Continued improvements in the understanding and application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC have revolutionized tissue engineering. This is particularly true within the field of skeletal regenerative medicine. However, much remains unknown regarding the native origins of MSC, the relative advantages of different MSC populations for bone regeneration, and even the biologic safety of such unpurified, grossly characterized cells. This review will first summarize the initial discovery of MSC, as well as the current and future applications of MSC in bone tissue engineering. Next, the relative advantages and disadvantages of MSC isolated from distinct tissue origins are debated, including the MSC from adipose, bone marrow, and dental pulp, among others. The perivascular origin of MSC is next discussed. Finally, we briefly comment on pluripotent stem cell populations and their possible application in bone tissue engineering. While continually expanding, the field of MSC-based bone tissue engineering and regeneration shows potential to become a clinical reality in the not-so-distant future.Keywords: mesenchymal stem cell, pericyte, bone tissue engineering, MSC, ASC, DMSC

  6. Adult stem cells in neural repair: Current options, limitations and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariano, Eric Domingos; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Marie, Suely Kazue Nagahashi; Lepski, Guilherme

    2015-03-26

    Stem cells represent a promising step for the future of regenerative medicine. As they are able to differentiate into any cell type, tissue or organ, these cells are great candidates for treatments against the worst diseases that defy doctors and researchers around the world. Stem cells can be divided into three main groups: (1) embryonic stem cells; (2) fetal stem cells; and (3) adult stem cells. In terms of their capacity for proliferation, stem cells are also classified as totipotent, pluripotent or multipotent. Adult stem cells, also known as somatic cells, are found in various regions of the adult organism, such as bone marrow, skin, eyes, viscera and brain. They can differentiate into unipotent cells of the residing tissue, generally for the purpose of repair. These cells represent an excellent choice in regenerative medicine, every patient can be a donor of adult stem cells to provide a more customized and efficient therapy against various diseases, in other words, they allow the opportunity of autologous transplantation. But in order to start clinical trials and achieve great results, we need to understand how these cells interact with the host tissue, how they can manipulate or be manipulated by the microenvironment where they will be transplanted and for how long they can maintain their multipotent state to provide a full regeneration.

  7. Two outward potassium current types are expressed during the neural differentiation of neural stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Ruiying; Gao, Guowei; Xing, Ying; Xue, Hong

    2013-01-01

    The electrophysiological properties of potassium ion channels are regarded as a basic index for determining the functional differentiation of neural stem cells. In this study, neural stem cells from the hippocampus of newborn rats were induced to differentiate with neurotrophic growth factor, and the electrophysiological properties of the voltage-gated potassium ion channels were observed. Immunofluorescence staining showed that the rapidly proliferating neural stem cells formed spheres in vi...

  8. A Compendium of Preparation and Application of Stem Cells in Parkinson's Disease: Current Status and Future Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yan; Huang, Jinsha; Liu, Ling; Xu, Xiaoyun; Han, Chao; Zhang, Guoxin; Jiang, Haiyang; Li, Jie; Lin, Zhicheng; Xiong, Nian; Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's Disease (PD) is a progressively neurodegenerative disorder, implicitly characterized by a stepwise loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and explicitly marked by bradykinesia, rigidity, resting tremor and postural instability. Currently, therapeutic approaches available are mainly palliative strategies, including L-3,4-dihydroxy-phenylalanine (L-DOPA) replacement therapy, DA receptor agonist and deep brain stimulation (DBS) procedures. As the disease proceeds, however, the pharmacotherapeutic efficacy is inevitably worn off, worse still, implicated by side effects of motor response oscillations as well as L-DOPA induced dyskinesia (LID). Therefore, the frustrating status above has propeled the shift to cell replacement therapy (CRT), a promising restorative therapy intending to secure a long-lasting relief of patients' symptoms. By far, stem cell lines of multifarious origins have been established, which can be further categorized into embryonic stem cells (ESCs), neural stem cells (NSCs), induced neural stem cells (iNSCs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In this review, we intend to present a compendium of preparation and application of multifarious stem cells, especially in relation to PD research and therapy. In addition, the current status, potential challenges and future prospects for practical CRT in PD patients will be elaborated as well.

  9. Pharmacoeconomics of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization : An Overview of Current Evidence and Gaps in the Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shaughnessy, Paul; Chao, Nelson; Shapiro, Jamie; Walters, Kent; McCarty, John; Abhyankar, Sunil; Shayani, Sepideh; Helmons, Pieter; Leather, Helen; Pazzalia, Amy; Pickard, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Adequate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) mobilization and collection is required prior to proceeding with high dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Cytokines such as G-CSF, GM-CSF, and peg-filgrastim, alone or in combination with plerixafor, and after chemotherapy have

  10. Globalization of Stem Cell Science: An Examination of Current and Past Collaborative Research Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jingyuan; Matthews, Kirstin R. W.

    2013-01-01

    Science and engineering research has becoming an increasingly international phenomenon. Traditional bibliometric studies have not captured the evolution of collaborative partnerships between countries, particularly in emerging technologies such as stem cell science, in which an immense amount of investment has been made in the past decade. Analyzing over 2,800 articles from the top journals that include stem cell research in their publications, this study demonstrates the globalization of stem cell science. From 2000 to 2010, international collaborations increased from 20.9% to 36% of all stem cell publications analyzed. The United States remains the most prolific and the most dominant country in the field in terms of publications in high impact journals. But Asian countries, particularly China are steadily gaining ground. Exhibiting the largest relative growth, the percent of Chinese-authored stem cell papers grew more than ten-fold, while the percent of Chinese-authored international papers increased over seven times from 2000 to 2010. And while the percent of total stem cell publications exhibited modest growth for European countries, the percent of international publications increased more substantially, particularly in the United Kingdom. Overall, the data indicated that traditional networks of collaboration extant in 2000 still predominate in stem cell science. Although more nations are becoming involved in international collaborations and undertaking stem cell research, many of these efforts, with the exception of those in certain Asian countries, have yet to translate into publications in high impact journals. PMID:24069210

  11. In vitro effect of direct current electrical stimulation on rat mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thottakkattumana Parameswaran, Vishnu; Barker, John Howard

    2017-01-01

    Background Electrical stimulation (ES) has been successfully used to treat bone defects clinically. Recently, both cellular and molecular approaches have demonstrated that ES can change cell behavior such as migration, proliferation and differentiation. Methods In the present study we exposed rat bone marrow- (BM-) and adipose tissue- (AT-) derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to direct current electrical stimulation (DC ES) and assessed temporal changes in osteogenic differentiation. We applied 100 mV/mm of DC ES for 1 h per day for three, seven and 14 days to cells cultivated in osteogenic differentiation medium and assessed viability and calcium deposition at the different time points. In addition, expression of osteogenic genes, Runx2, Osteopontin, and Col1A2 was assessed in BM- and AT-derived MSCs at the different time points. Results Results showed that ES changed osteogenic gene expression patterns in both BM- and AT-MSCs, and these changes differed between the two groups. In BM-MSCs, ES caused a significant increase in mRNA levels of Runx2, Osteopontin and Col1A2 at day 7, while in AT-MSCs, the increase in Runx2 and Osteopontin expression were observed after 14 days of ES. Discussion This study shows that rat bone marrow- and adipose tissue-derived stem cells react differently to electrical stimuli, an observation that could be important for application of electrical stimulation in tissue engineering.

  12. In vitro effect of direct current electrical stimulation on rat mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahba Mobini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Electrical stimulation (ES has been successfully used to treat bone defects clinically. Recently, both cellular and molecular approaches have demonstrated that ES can change cell behavior such as migration, proliferation and differentiation. Methods In the present study we exposed rat bone marrow- (BM- and adipose tissue- (AT- derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs to direct current electrical stimulation (DC ES and assessed temporal changes in osteogenic differentiation. We applied 100 mV/mm of DC ES for 1 h per day for three, seven and 14 days to cells cultivated in osteogenic differentiation medium and assessed viability and calcium deposition at the different time points. In addition, expression of osteogenic genes, Runx2, Osteopontin, and Col1A2 was assessed in BM- and AT-derived MSCs at the different time points. Results Results showed that ES changed osteogenic gene expression patterns in both BM- and AT-MSCs, and these changes differed between the two groups. In BM-MSCs, ES caused a significant increase in mRNA levels of Runx2, Osteopontin and Col1A2 at day 7, while in AT-MSCs, the increase in Runx2 and Osteopontin expression were observed after 14 days of ES. Discussion This study shows that rat bone marrow- and adipose tissue-derived stem cells react differently to electrical stimuli, an observation that could be important for application of electrical stimulation in tissue engineering.

  13. In vitro effect of direct current electrical stimulation on rat mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobini, Sahba; Leppik, Liudmila; Thottakkattumana Parameswaran, Vishnu; Barker, John Howard

    2017-01-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) has been successfully used to treat bone defects clinically. Recently, both cellular and molecular approaches have demonstrated that ES can change cell behavior such as migration, proliferation and differentiation. In the present study we exposed rat bone marrow- (BM-) and adipose tissue- (AT-) derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to direct current electrical stimulation (DC ES) and assessed temporal changes in osteogenic differentiation. We applied 100 mV/mm of DC ES for 1 h per day for three, seven and 14 days to cells cultivated in osteogenic differentiation medium and assessed viability and calcium deposition at the different time points. In addition, expression of osteogenic genes, Runx2, Osteopontin, and Col1A2 was assessed in BM- and AT-derived MSCs at the different time points. Results showed that ES changed osteogenic gene expression patterns in both BM- and AT-MSCs, and these changes differed between the two groups. In BM-MSCs, ES caused a significant increase in mRNA levels of Runx2, Osteopontin and Col1A2 at day 7, while in AT-MSCs, the increase in Runx2 and Osteopontin expression were observed after 14 days of ES. This study shows that rat bone marrow- and adipose tissue-derived stem cells react differently to electrical stimuli, an observation that could be important for application of electrical stimulation in tissue engineering.

  14. [Stem cells in adult retina--current state of research, future therapeutic prospects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machalińska, Anna; Zuba-Surma, Ewa K

    2009-01-01

    The latest research reports revealed the presence of stem/progenitor cells located in different regions of matured eye. They are able to differentiate into retinal pigment epithelium cells as well as neural structure of retina. These cells were identified in neurosensory retina, pigment epithelium and within cilliary body and iris epithelium. Moreover, it has been proved that Muller glia possess the potential of differentiation into retinal cells. These findings indicate the presence of potential mechanisms enabling retinal cell repopulation and retinal tissue regeneration. In the present work, the recent reports documenting the presence of different stem cell populations in eye have been reviewed, particularly focusing on recently identified very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSEL-SCs). The potential clinical applications of the residing stem cells and limitations of such therapeutic strategies have been also discussed.

  15. Stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redi, Carlo Alberto; Monti, Manuela; Merico, Valeria; Neri, Tui; Zanoni, Mario; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Garagna, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    The application of stem cells to regenerative medicine is one of the actual hot topics in biomedicine. This research could help the cure of a number of diseases that are affecting a large share of the population. Some good results in cell replacement have already been obtained (infarcted heart, diabetes, Parkinson disease), apart from those of more traditional applications like severe burns and blood tumors. We are now facing crucial questions in stem cell biology. One of the key questions is how a cell begins to proliferate or differentiate. Genome reprogramming, both following nuclear transfer and cytoplast action, will likely highlight some of the molecular mechanisms of cell differentiation and dedifferentiation. In turn, these clues should be useful to the production of populations of reprogrammed cells that could develop into tissues or, in the future, into proper organs. We will overview what stem cells are, what roles they play in normal developmental processes and how stem cells could have the potential to treat diseases.

  16. Adult stem cells in neural repair: Current options,limitations and perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric Domingos Mariano; Manoel Jacobsen Teixeira; Suely Kazue Nagahashi Marie; Guilherme Lepski

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells represent a promising step for the future ofregenerative medicine. As they are able to differentiateinto any cell type, tissue or organ, these cells are greatcandidates for treatments against the worst diseasesthat defy doctors and researchers around the world.Stem cells can be divided into three main groups (1)embryonic stem cells; (2) fetal stem cells; and (3) adultstem cells. In terms of their capacity for proliferation,stem cells are also classified as totipotent, pluripotentor multipotent. Adult stem cells, also known as somaticcells, are found in various regions of the adult organism,such as bone marrow, skin, eyes, viscera and brain.They can differentiate into unipotent cells of theresiding tissue, generally for the purpose of repair.These cells represent an excellent choice in regenerativemedicine, every patient can be a donor of adult stemcells to provide a more customized and efficient therapyagainst various diseases, in other words, they allow theopportunity of autologous transplantation. But in orderto start clinical trials and achieve great results, we needto understand how these cells interact with the hosttissue, how they can manipulate or be manipulated bythe microenvironment where they will be transplantedand for how long they can maintain their multipotentstate to provide a full regeneration.

  17. Current and future regenerative medicine - principles, concepts, and therapeutic use of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering in equine medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Berg, Lise Charlotte; Betts, Dean H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a bird's-eye perspective of the general principles of stem-cell therapy and tissue engineering; it relates comparative knowledge in this area to the current and future status of equine regenerative medicine.The understanding of equine stem cell biology, biofactors, and scaffolds......, and their potential therapeutic use in horses are rudimentary at present. Mesenchymal stem cell isolation has been proclaimed from several equine tissues in the past few years. Based on the criteria of the International Society for Cellular Therapy, most of these cells are more correctly referred to as multipotent...... factors, and biomaterials - are increasingly being applied in equine medicine, fuelled by better scaffolds and increased understanding of individual biofactors and cell sources.The effectiveness of stem cell-based therapies and most tissue engineering concepts has not been demonstrated sufficiently...

  18. Stem cells in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogliari, Karolyn Sassi; Marinowic, Daniel; Brum, Dario Eduardo; Loth, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical research have shown that stem cell therapy could be a promising therapeutic option for many diseases in which current medical treatments do not achieve satisfying results or cure. This article describes stem cells sources and their therapeutic applications in dermatology today.

  19. Current and future regenerative medicine - principles, concepts, and therapeutic use of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering in equine medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Berg, Lise Charlotte; Betts, Dean H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a bird's-eye perspective of the general principles of stem-cell therapy and tissue engineering; it relates comparative knowledge in this area to the current and future status of equine regenerative medicine.The understanding of equine stem cell biology, biofactors, and scaffolds...... mesenchymal stromal cells, unless there is proof that they exhibit the fundamental in vivo characteristics of pluripotency and the ability to self-renew. That said, these cells from various tissues hold great promise for therapeutic use in horses. The 3 components of tissue engineering - cells, biological...... factors, and biomaterials - are increasingly being applied in equine medicine, fuelled by better scaffolds and increased understanding of individual biofactors and cell sources.The effectiveness of stem cell-based therapies and most tissue engineering concepts has not been demonstrated sufficiently...

  20. Changing Paradigms in Cranio-Facial Regeneration: Current and New Strategies for the Activation of Endogenous Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, Luigi; Vitiello, Pietro Paolo; Tirino, Virginia; Paino, Francesca; De Rosa, Alfredo; Liccardo, Davide; Papaccio, Gianpaolo; Desiderio, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Craniofacial area represent a unique district of human body characterized by a very high complexity of tissues, innervation and vascularization, and being deputed to many fundamental function such as eating, speech, expression of emotions, delivery of sensations such as taste, sight, and earing. For this reasons, tissue loss in this area following trauma or for example oncologic resection, have a tremendous impact on patients' quality of life. In the last 20 years regenerative medicine has emerged as one of the most promising approach to solve problem related to trauma, tissue loss, organ failure etc. One of the most powerful tools to be used for tissue regeneration is represented by stem cells, which have been successfully implanted in different tissue/organs with exciting results. Nevertheless, both autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation raise many practical and ethical concerns that make this approach very difficult to apply in clinical practice. For this reason different cell free approaches have been developed aiming to the mobilization, recruitment, and activation of endogenous stem cells into the injury site avoiding exogenous cells implant but instead stimulating patients' own stem cells to repair the lesion. To this aim many strategies have been used including functionalized bioscaffold, controlled release of stem cell chemoattractants, growth factors, BMPs, Platelet-Rich-Plasma, and other new strategies such as ultrasound wave and laser are just being proposed. Here we review all the current and new strategies used for activation and mobilization of endogenous stem cells in the regeneration of craniofacial tissue.

  1. The Role of Stem Cell Therapeutics in Wound Healing: Current Understanding and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorice, Sarah; Rustad, Kristine C; Li, Alexander Y; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2016-09-01

    Chronic wounds present unique challenges for healthcare providers as they place patients at increased risk for various morbidities and mortality. Advances in wound care technology have expanded the treatment options available for wound management, but few products fully address the underlying core deficiencies responsible for the development of poorly healing wounds. In the future, addressing these derangements will undoubtedly play a key role in the treatment of these patients. Broad enthusiasm has surrounded the field of stem cell biology, which has shown great promise in repairing damaged tissues across numerous disease phenotypes. In this review, we provide a comprehensive review of the literature and evaluate the present landscape of wound therapeutics while discussing the rationales and allure behind stem cell-based products. We further propose 2 challenges that remain as new stem cell-based therapies are being developed and as this technology moves toward clinical translation. Given the relatively young age of this newer technology in wound healing, numerous challenges continue to surround its effective use including identifying the ideal population of stem cells to use and determining the optimal cell delivery method. However, significant forward progress has been made, with several clinical trials beginning to demonstrate reliable clinical benefit. The upward trajectory of stem cell technologies provides an exciting opportunity to positively impact patient outcomes through the controlled application of regenerative cell-based therapy.

  2. Neuroendocrine tumors:current therapies, notch signaling, and cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Judy S. Crabtree; Lucio Miele

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) encompass a broad spectrum of malignancies all derived from neuroendocrine cell lineage, affecting many different organs including the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, the endocrine pancreas, the thyroid, the skin and the respiratory tract. These tumors as a group are very heterogeneous, with varying characteristics attributed to each tissue of origin and tumor subtype. The pathogenesis of the different subtypes of NETs is not fully understood, but recent studies suggest the Notch signaling pathway may be dysregulated in these tumors either by under or overexpression of Notch receptors and/or ligands, or by disruption of pathway functionality through other means. Notch receptors can function as tumor suppressors in some cellular contexts and oncogenes in others which may, in part, account for the wide range of phenotypes present in NETs. Cancer stem cells are present in these tumors and may be responsible for the high rate of chemotherapy resistance, recurrence and metastasis. The heterogeneity of NETs suggests that to fully understand the role of Notch signaling and the therapeutic implications thereof, a comprehensive and systematic analysis of Notch expression and function across all NET subtypes is required. Here we outline the current knowledge base with respect to current therapies and Notch signaling in neuroendocrine tumors of the lung, skin, thyroid, GI tract and endocrine pancreas.

  3. Fish stem cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ni; Li, Zhendong; Hong, Yunhan

    2011-04-13

    Stem cells have the potential for self-renewal and differentiation. First stem cell cultures were derived 30 years ago from early developing mouse embryos. These are pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells. Efforts towards ES cell derivation have been attempted in other mammalian and non-mammalian species. Work with stem cell culture in fish started 20 years ago. Laboratory fish species, in particular zebrafish and medaka, have been the focus of research towards stem cell cultures. Medaka is the second organism that generated ES cells and the first that gave rise to a spermatogonial stem cell line capable of test-tube sperm production. Most recently, the first haploid stem cells capable of producing whole animals have also been generated from medaka. ES-like cells have been reported also in zebrafish and several marine species. Attempts for germline transmission of ES cell cultures and gene targeting have been reported in zebrafish. Recent years have witnessed the progress in markers and procedures for ES cell characterization. These include the identification of fish homologs/paralogs of mammalian pluripotency genes and parameters for optimal chimera formation. In addition, fish germ cell cultures and transplantation have attracted considerable interest for germline transmission and surrogate production. Haploid ES cell nuclear transfer has proven in medaka the feasibility of semi-cloning as a novel assisted reproductive technology. In this special issue on "Fish Stem Cells and Nuclear Transfer", we will focus our review on medaka to illustrate the current status and perspective of fish stem cells in research and application. We will also mention semi-cloning as a new development to conventional nuclear transfer.

  4. Fish Stem Cell Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Hong, Zhendong Li, Yunhan Hong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have the potential for self-renewal and differentiation. First stem cell cultures were derived 30 years ago from early developing mouse embryos. These are pluripotent embryonic stem (ES cells. Efforts towards ES cell derivation have been attempted in other mammalian and non-mammalian species. Work with stem cell culture in fish started 20 years ago. Laboratory fish species, in particular zebrafish and medaka, have been the focus of research towards stem cell cultures. Medaka is the second organism that generated ES cells and the first that gave rise to a spermatogonial stem cell line capable of test-tube sperm production. Most recently, the first haploid stem cells capable of producing whole animals have also been generated from medaka. ES-like cells have been reported also in zebrafish and several marine species. Attempts for germline transmission of ES cell cultures and gene targeting have been reported in zebrafish. Recent years have witnessed the progress in markers and procedures for ES cell characterization. These include the identification of fish homologs/paralogs of mammalian pluripotency genes and parameters for optimal chimera formation. In addition, fish germ cell cultures and transplantation have attracted considerable interest for germline transmission and surrogate production. Haploid ES cell nuclear transfer has proven in medaka the feasibility of semi-cloning as a novel assisted reproductive technology. In this special issue on “Fish Stem Cells and Nuclear Transfer”, we will focus our review on medaka to illustrate the current status and perspective of fish stem cells in research and application. We will also mention semi-cloning as a new development to conventional nuclear transfer.

  5. Potential use of mesenchymal stem cells in human meniscal repair: current insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Jaewoo; Lee, Jung Hun; Park, Kwang Seung; Jeon, Jeong Ho; Lee, Sang Hee

    2017-01-01

    The menisci of the human knee play an important role in maintaining normal functions to provide stability and nutrition to the articular cartilage, and to absorb shock. Once injured, these important structures have very limited natural healing potential. Unfortunately, the traditional arthroscopic meniscectomy performed on these damaged menisci may predispose the joint toward early development of osteoarthritis. Although a very limited number of studies are available, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been investigated as an alternative therapeutic modality to repair human knee meniscal tears. This review summarizes the results of published applications of MSCs in human patients, which showed that the patients who received MSCs (autologous adipose tissue-derived stem cells or culture-expanded bone marrow-derived stem cells) presented symptomatic improvements, along with magnetic resonance imaging evidences of the meniscal repair. PMID:28356779

  6. Mammary stem cells and the differentiation hierarchy: current status and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visvader, Jane E.; Stingl, John

    2014-01-01

    The mammary epithelium is highly responsive to local and systemic signals, which orchestrate morphogenesis of the ductal tree during puberty and pregnancy. Based on transplantation and lineage tracing studies, a hierarchy of stem and progenitor cells has been shown to exist among the mammary epithelium. Lineage tracing has highlighted the existence of bipotent mammary stem cells (MaSCs) in situ as well as long-lived unipotent cells that drive morphogenesis and homeostasis of the ductal tree. Moreover, there is accumulating evidence for a heterogeneous MaSC compartment comprising fetal MaSCs, slow-cycling cells, and both long-term and short-term repopulating cells. In parallel, diverse luminal progenitor subtypes have been identified in mouse and human mammary tissue. Elucidation of the normal cellular hierarchy is an important step toward understanding the “cells of origin” and molecular perturbations that drive breast cancer. PMID:24888586

  7. Three interrelated themes in current breast cancer research: gene addiction, phenotypic plasticity, and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiff, Robert D; Couto, Suzana; Bolon, Brad

    2011-10-25

    Recent efforts to understand breast cancer biology involve three interrelated themes that are founded on a combination of clinical and experimental observations. The central concept is gene addiction. The clinical dilemma is the escape from gene addiction, which is mediated, in part, by phenotypic plasticity as exemplified by epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition. Finally, cancer stem cells are now recognized as the basis for minimal residual disease and malignant progression over time. These themes cooperate in breast cancer, as induction of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition enhances self-renewal and expression of cancer stem cells, which are believed to facilitate tumor resistance.

  8. Information on Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home » Current Research » Focus on Research Focus on Stem Cell Research Stem cells possess the unique ability to differentiate into many ... they also retain the ability to produce more stem cells, a process termed self-renewal. There are multiple ...

  9. [Current status and future prospects of stem cell gene therapy for primary immunodeficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Toru; Onodera, Masafumi

    2013-01-01

    Patients affected by primary immunodeficiency (PID) can be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In the absence of HLA-matched donors, however, incidence of HSCT-related complications is observed. Therefore, gene therapy has been developed as a highly desirable alternative treatment for patients lacking suitable donors. Retrovirus-based gene therapy was begun in 1990 for the patients of adenosine deaminase deficiency, followed by X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome and chronic granulomatous disease. Although treated patients have had excellent immune reconstitution and resolution of ongoing infections, complications such as a lymphoproliferative syndrome and a disappearance of gene-modified cells were observed in some clinical trials. To overcome these, ongoing and upcoming clinical trials use some new strategies. The use of preconditioning chemotherapy makes space in the bone marrow for the gene-treated stem cells and allows engraftment of multi lineage stem/progenitor cells. Self-inactivating vectors in which strong enhancers of long terminal repeat are eliminated may reduce the risk of insertional activation of proto-oncogene resulting in leukemia. These modifications will surely increase the safety and efficacy of stem cell gene therapy for PID.

  10. Mesenchymal stem cell treatment for hemophilia: a review of current knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokal, E M; Lombard, C; Mazza, G

    2015-06-01

    Hemophilia remains a non-curative disease, and patients are constrained to undergo repeated injections of clotting factors. In contrast, the sustained production of endogenous factors VIII (FVIII) or IX (FIX) by the patient's own cells could represent a curative treatment. Gene therapy has thus provided new hope for these patients. However, the issues surrounding the durability of expression and immune responses against gene transfer vectors remain. Cell therapy, involving stem cells expanded in vitro, can provide de novo protein synthesis and, if implanted successfully, could induce a steady-state production of low quantities of factors, which may keep the patient above the level required to prevent spontaneous bleeding. Liver-derived stem cells are already being assessed in clinical trials for inborn errors of metabolism and, in view of their capacity to produce FVIII and FIX in cell culture, they are now also being considered for clinical application in hemophilia patients. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  11. Alignment and Elongation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells in Response to Direct-Current Electrical Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Tandon, Nina; Goh, Brian; Marsano, Anna; Chao, Pen-Hsiu Grace; Montouri-Sorrentino, Chrystina; Gimble, Jeffrey; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    In vivo, direct current electric fields are present during embryonic development and wound healing. In vitro, direct current (DC) electric fields induce directional cell migration and elongation. For the first time, we demonstrate that cultured human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASCs) respond to the presence of direct-current electric fields. Cells were stimulated for 2–4 hours with DC electric fields of 6 V/cm that were similar to those encountered in vivo post-injury. Upon stimulatio...

  12. Stem Cells of Dental Origin: Current Research Trends and Key Milestones towards Clinical Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    About, Imad

    2016-01-01

    Dental Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs), including Dental Pulp Stem Cells (DPSCs), Stem Cells from Human Exfoliated Deciduous teeth (SHED), and Stem Cells From Apical Papilla (SCAP), have been extensively studied using highly sophisticated in vitro and in vivo systems, yielding substantially improved understanding of their intriguing biological properties. Their capacity to reconstitute various dental and nondental tissues and the inherent angiogenic, neurogenic, and immunomodulatory properties of their secretome have been a subject of meticulous and costly research by various groups over the past decade. Key milestone achievements have exemplified their clinical utility in Regenerative Dentistry, as surrogate therapeutic modules for conventional biomaterial-based approaches, offering regeneration of damaged oral tissues instead of simply “filling the gaps.” Thus, the essential next step to validate these immense advances is the implementation of well-designed clinical trials paving the way for exploiting these fascinating research achievements for patient well-being: the ultimate aim of this ground breaking technology. This review paper presents a concise overview of the major biological properties of the human dental MSCs, critical for the translational pathway “from bench to clinic.”

  13. Stem Cells of Dental Origin: Current Research Trends and Key Milestones towards Clinical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athina Bakopoulou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs, including Dental Pulp Stem Cells (DPSCs, Stem Cells from Human Exfoliated Deciduous teeth (SHED, and Stem Cells From Apical Papilla (SCAP, have been extensively studied using highly sophisticated in vitro and in vivo systems, yielding substantially improved understanding of their intriguing biological properties. Their capacity to reconstitute various dental and nondental tissues and the inherent angiogenic, neurogenic, and immunomodulatory properties of their secretome have been a subject of meticulous and costly research by various groups over the past decade. Key milestone achievements have exemplified their clinical utility in Regenerative Dentistry, as surrogate therapeutic modules for conventional biomaterial-based approaches, offering regeneration of damaged oral tissues instead of simply “filling the gaps.” Thus, the essential next step to validate these immense advances is the implementation of well-designed clinical trials paving the way for exploiting these fascinating research achievements for patient well-being: the ultimate aim of this ground breaking technology. This review paper presents a concise overview of the major biological properties of the human dental MSCs, critical for the translational pathway “from bench to clinic.”

  14. Cloning, Stem Cells, and the Current National Debate: Incorporating Ethics into a Large Introductory Biology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Rachel D.

    2002-01-01

    Discussing the ethical issues involved in topics such as cloning and stem cell research in a large introductory biology course is often difficult. Teachers may be wary of presenting material biased by personal beliefs, and students often feel inhibited speaking about moral issues in a large group. Yet, to ignore what is happening "out there"…

  15. Directed migration of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in a physiological direct current electric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Zhao

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available At sites of bone fracture, naturally-occurring electric fields (EFs exist during healing and may guide cell migration. In this study, we investigated whether EFs could direct the migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs, which are known to be key players in bone formation. Human BM-MSCs were cultured in direct current EFs of 10 to 600 mV/mm. Using time-lapse microscopy, we demonstrated that an EF directed migration of BM-MSCs mainly to the anode. Directional migration occurred at a low threshold and with a physiological EF of ~25 mV/mm. Increasing the EF enhanced the MSC migratory response. The migration speed peaked at 300 mV/mm, at a rate of 42 ±1 µm/h, around double the control (no EF migration rate. MSCs showed sustained response to prolonged EF application in vitro up to at least 8 h. The electrotaxis of MSCs with either early (P3-P5 or late (P7-P10 passage was also investigated. Migration was passage-dependent with higher passage number showing reduced directed migration, within the range of passages examined. An EF of 200 mV/mm for 2 h did not affect cell senescence, phenotype, or osteogenic potential of MSCs, regardless of passage number within the range tested (P3-P10. Our findings indicate that EFs are a powerful cue in directing migration of human MSCs in vitro. An applied EF may be useful to control or enhance migration of MSCs during bone healing.

  16. Human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem; Kassem, Moustapha

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a group of clonogenic cells present among the bone marrow stroma and capable of multilineage differentiation into mesoderm-type cells such as osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Due to their ease of isolation and their differentiation potential, MSC are being...... introduced into clinical medicine in variety of applications and through different ways of administration. Here, we discuss approaches for isolation, characterization and directing differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). An update of the current clinical use of the cells is also provided....

  17. Laser biomodulation on stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Timon C.; Duan, Rui; Li, Yan; Li, Xue-Feng; Tan, Li-Ling; Liu, Songhao

    2001-08-01

    Stem cells are views from the perspectives of their function, evolution, development, and cause. Counterintuitively, most stem cells may arise late in development, to act principally in tissue renewal, thus ensuring an organisms long-term survival. Surprisingly, recent reports suggest that tissue-specific adult stem cells have the potential to contribute to replenishment of multiple adult tissues. Stem cells are currently in the news for two reasons: the successful cultivation of human embryonic stem cell lines and reports that adult stem cells can differentiate into developmentally unrelated cell types, such as nerve cells into blood cells. The spotlight on stem cells has revealed gaps in our knowledge that must be filled if we are to take advantage of their full potential for treating devastating degenerative diseases such as Parkinsons's disease and muscular dystrophy. We need to know more about the intrinsic controls that keep stem cells as stem cells or direct them along particular differentiation pathways. Such intrinsic regulators are, in turn, sensitive to the influences of the microenvironment, or niche, where stem cells normally reside. Both intrinsic and extrinsic signals regular stem cell fate and some of these signals have now been identified. Vacek et al and Wang et al have studied the effect of low intensity laser on the haemopoietic stem cells in vitro. There experiments show there is indeed the effect of low intensity laser on the haemopoietic stem cells in vitro, and the present effect is the promotion of haemopoietic stem cells proliferation. In other words, low intensity laser irradiation can act as an extrinsic signal regulating stem cell fate. In this paper, we study how low intensity laser can be used to regulate stem cell fate from the viewpoint of collective phototransduction.

  18. Three interrelated themes in current breast cancer research: gene addiction, phenotypic plasticity, and cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Recent efforts to understand breast cancer biology involve three interrelated themes that are founded on a combination of clinical and experimental observations. The central concept is gene addiction. The clinical dilemma is the escape from gene addiction, which is mediated, in part, by phenotypic plasticity as exemplified by epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition. Finally, cancer stem cells are now recognized as the basis for minimal residual disease an...

  19. Melanoma stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Alexander

    2015-02-01

    The cancer stem cell concept significantly broadens our understanding of melanoma biology. However, this concept should be regarded as an integral part of a holistic cancer model that also includes the genetic evolution of tumor cells and the variability of cell phenotypes within a dynamic tumor microenvironment. The biologic complexity and methodological difficulties in identifying cancer stem cells and their biomarkers are currently impeding the direct translation of experimental findings into clinical practice. Nevertheless, it is these methodological shortcomings that provide a new perspective on the phenotypic heterogeneity and plasticity of melanoma with important consequences for future therapies. The development of new combination treatment strategies, particularly with regard to overcoming treatment resistance, could significantly benefit from targeted elimination of cell subpopulations with cancer stem cell properties. © 2015 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation as first-line treatment in myeloma: a global perspective of current concepts and future possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catriona Elizabeth Mactier

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell transplantation forms an integral part of the treatment for multiple myeloma. This paper reviews the current role of transplantation and the progress that has been made in order to optimize the success of this therapy. Effective induction chemotherapy is important and a combination regimen incorporating the novel agent bortezomib is now favorable. Adequate induction is a crucial adjunct to stem cell transplantation and in some cases may potentially postpone the need for transplant. Different conditioning agents prior to transplantation have been explored: high-dose melphalan is most commonly used and bortezomib is a promising additional agent. There is no well-defined superior transplantation protocol but single or tandem autologous stem cell transplantations are those most commonly used, with allogeneic transplantation only used in clinical trials. The appropriate timing of transplantation in the treatment plan is a matter of debate. Consolidation and maintenance chemotherapies, particularly thalidomide and bortezomib, aim to improve and prolong disease response to transplantation and delay recurrence. Prognostic factors for the outcome of stem cell transplant in myeloma have been highlighted. Despite good responses to chemotherapy and transplantation, the problem of disease recurrence persists. Thus, there is still much room for improvement. Treatments which harness the graft-versus-myeloma effect may offer a potential cure for this disease. Trials of novel agents are underway, including targeted therapies for specific antigens such as vaccines and monoclonal antibodies.

  1. Involvement of plant stem cells or stem cell-like cells in dedifferentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangwei eJiang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dedifferentiation is the transformation of cells from a given differentiated state to a less differentiated or stem cell-like state. Stem cell-related genes play important roles in dedifferentiation, which exhibits similar histone modification and DNA methylation features to stem cell maintenance. Hence, stem cell-related factors possibly synergistically function to provide a specific niche beneficial to dedifferentiation. During callus formation in Arabidopsis petioles, cells adjacent to procambium cells (stem cell-like cells are dedifferentiated and survive more easily than other cell types. This finding indicates that stem cells or stem cell-like cells may influence the dedifferentiating niche. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of stem cell maintenance and dedifferentiation regulation. We also summarize current knowledge of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms underlying the balance between differentiation and dedifferentiation. Furthermore, we discuss the correlation of stem cells or stem cell-like cells with dedifferentiation.

  2. Current progress in use of adipose derived stem cells inperipheral nerve regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shomari DL Zack-Williams; Peter E Butler; Deepak M Kalaskar

    2015-01-01

    Unlike central nervous system neurons; those in theperipheral nervous system have the potential for fullregeneration after injury. Following injury, recovery iscontrolled by schwann cells which replicate and modulatethe subsequent immune response. The level of nerverecovery is strongly linked to the severity of the initialinjury despite the significant advancements in imagingand surgical techniques. Multiple experimental modelshave been used with varying successes to augment thenatural regenerative processes which occur following nerveinjury. Stem cell therapy in peripheral nerve injury maybe an important future intervention to improve the bestattainable clinical results. In particular adipose derivedstem cells (ADSCs) are multipotent mesenchymal stemcells similar to bone marrow derived stem cells, which arethought to have neurotrophic properties and the ability todifferentiate into multiple lineages. They are ubiquitouswithin adipose tissue; they can form many structuresresembling the mature adult peripheral nervous system.Following early in vitro work; multiple small and largeanimal in vivo models have been used in conjunction withconduits, autografts and allografts to successfully bridgethe peripheral nerve gap. Some of the ADSC relatedneuroprotective and regenerative properties have beenelucidated however much work remains before a modelcan be used successfully in human peripheral nerve injury(PNI). This review aims to provide a detailed overview ofprogress made in the use of ADSC in PNI, with discussionon the role of a tissue engineered approach for PNI repair.

  3. Xeno-free derivation and culture of human embryonic stem cells: current status,problems and challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting Lei; Sandrine Jacob; Imen Ajil-Zaraa; Jean-Bernard Dubuisson; Olivier Irion; Marisa Jaconi; Anis Feki

    2007-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) not only hold great promise for the treatment of degenerative diseases but also provide a valuable tool for developmental studies. However, the clinical applications of hESC are at present limited by xeno-contamination during the in vitro derivation and propagation of these cells. In this review, we summarize the current methodologies for the derivation and the propagation of hESC in conditions that will eventually enable the generation of clinical-grade cells for future therapeutic applications.

  4. Bone marrow derived stem cells in trauma and orthopaedics: a review of the current trend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jagwant; Onimowo, Jemina O; Khan, Wasim S

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering is a promising therapeutic option to enhance tissue regeneration and repair. The development of bone tissue engineering is directly related to changes in materials technology. While the inclusion of material requirements is standard in the design process of engineered bone substitutes, it is critical to incorporate clinical requirements in order to engineer a clinically relevant device. This review focuses on the potentials of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) in trauma and orthopaedics and presents the need for bone tissue-engineered alternatives.

  5. Characteristics of adult stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Manuel A; Bernad, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their unlimited ability to divide specifically; a stem cell is capable of making an immense number of copies of itself, maintaining the same characteristics. Moreover, these cells are able to generate several of the cell lineages which make up the body, including cells from the heart, liver, kidney, neurons, and muscles. Investigation of the mechanisms through which this differentiation occurs, the genes involved and the possibility of increasing the efficiency with which stem cells can be isolated and/or characterized are currently among the most important fields in biology and biomedicine.To date, stems cells have been identified from four different sources: Embryonic stem cells (ESC), germinal stem cells, and those derived from embryonic carcinomas (teratocarcinomas) and from somatic tissues (somatic stem cells). The latter are called adult stem cells (ASC) when they are found in postnatal tissues. We now know that there is a great diversity among ASC, with some tissues, such as the bone marrow, containing more than one type of ASC. Adult stem cells have several characteristics that make them to be the main players in current regenerative medicine and are being investigated as potential therapeutic agents for a wide variety of diseases. Specifically, HSC and MSC are being assessed in increasing numbers of clinical trials.

  6. Stem cell therapy for inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijvestein, Marjolijn

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and mesenchymal stromal (MSC) cell therapy are currently under investigation as novel therapies for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Hematopoietic stem cells are thought to repopulate the immune system and reset the immunological response to luminal

  7. Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldahmash, Abdullah; Zaher, Walid; Al-Nbaheen, May

    2012-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) represent a group of non-hematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow stroma and the stroma of other organs including subcutaneous adipose tissue, placenta, and muscles. They exhibit the characteristics of somatic stem cells of self-renewal and......Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) represent a group of non-hematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow stroma and the stroma of other organs including subcutaneous adipose tissue, placenta, and muscles. They exhibit the characteristics of somatic stem cells of self...... of clinical applications, e.g., non-healing bone fractures and defects and also non-skeletal degenerative diseases like heart failure. Currently, the numbers of clinical trials that employ MSC are increasing. However, several biological and biotechnological challenges need to be overcome to benefit from...

  8. Tracking adult stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippert, H.J.G.; Clevers, H.

    2011-01-01

    The maintenance of stem-cell-driven tissue homeostasis requires a balance between the generation and loss of cell mass. Adult stem cells have a close relationship with the surrounding tissue--known as their niche--and thus, stem-cell studies should preferably be performed in a physiological context,

  9. Embryonic Stem Cell Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Ma

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cell (ESC markers are molecules specifically expressed in ES cells. Understanding of the functions of these markers is critical for characterization and elucidation for the mechanism of ESC pluripotent maintenance and self-renewal, therefore helping to accelerate the clinical application of ES cells. Unfortunately, different cell types can share single or sometimes multiple markers; thus the main obstacle in the clinical application of ESC is to purify ES cells from other types of cells, especially tumor cells. Currently, the marker-based flow cytometry (FCM technique and magnetic cell sorting (MACS are the most effective cell isolating methods, and a detailed maker list will help to initially identify, as well as isolate ESCs using these methods. In the current review, we discuss a wide range of cell surface and generic molecular markers that are indicative of the undifferentiated ESCs. Other types of molecules, such as lectins and peptides, which bind to ESC via affinity and specificity, are also summarized. In addition, we review several markers that overlap with tumor stem cells (TSCs, which suggest that uncertainty still exists regarding the benefits of using these markers alone or in various combinations when identifying and isolating cells.

  10. Tracking adult stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snippert, Hugo J; Clevers, Hans

    2011-02-01

    The maintenance of stem-cell-driven tissue homeostasis requires a balance between the generation and loss of cell mass. Adult stem cells have a close relationship with the surrounding tissue--known as their niche--and thus, stem-cell studies should preferably be performed in a physiological context, rather than outside their natural environment. The mouse is an attractive model in which to study adult mammalian stem cells, as numerous experimental systems and genetic tools are available. In this review, we describe strategies commonly used to identify and functionally characterize adult stem cells in mice and discuss their potential, limitations and interpretations, as well as how they have informed our understanding of adult stem-cell biology. An accurate interpretation of physiologically relevant stem-cell assays is crucial to identify adult stem cells and elucidate how they self-renew and give rise to differentiated progeny.

  11. Osteoblastic differentiation and stress response of human mesenchymal stem cells exposed to alternating current electric fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaplan David L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electric fields are integral to many biological events, from maintaining cellular homeostasis to embryonic development to healing. The application of electric fields offers substantial therapeutic potential, while optimal dosing regimens and the underlying mechanisms responsible for the positive clinical impact are poorly understood. Methods The purpose of this study was to track the differentiation profile and stress response of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs undergoing osteogenic differentiation during exposure to a 20 mV/cm, 60 kHz electric field. Morphological and biochemical changes were imaged using endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF and quantitatively assessed through eccentricity calculations and extraction of the redox ratio from NADH, FAD and lipofuscin contributions. Real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR were used to track osteogenic differentiation markers, namely alkaline phosphatase (ALP and collagen type 1 (col1, and stress response markers, such as heat shock protein 27 (hsp27 and heat shock protein 70 (hsp70. Comparisons of collagen deposition between the stimulated hMSCs and controls were examined through second harmonic generation (SHG imaging. Results Quantitative differences in cell morphology, as described through an eccentricity ratio, were found on days 2 and days 5 (p Conclusions Electrical stimulation is a useful tool to improve hMSC osteogenic differentiation, while heat shock proteins may reveal underlying mechanisms, and optical non-invasive imaging may be used to monitor the induced morphological and biochemical changes.

  12. Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... transplant is a procedure that infuses healthy blood stem cells into your body to replace your damaged or ... A bone marrow transplant is also called a stem cell transplant. A bone marrow transplant may be necessary ...

  13. Induced pluripotent stem cells reveal functional differences between drugs currently investigated in patients with hutchinson-gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondel, Sophie; Jaskowiak, Anne-Laure; Egesipe, Anne-Laure; Le Corf, Amelie; Navarro, Claire; Cordette, Véronique; Martinat, Cécile; Laabi, Yacine; Djabali, Karima; de Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; Levy, Nicolas; Peschanski, Marc; Nissan, Xavier

    2014-04-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare congenital disease characterized by premature aging in children. Identification of the mutation and related molecular mechanisms has rapidly led to independent clinical trials testing different marketed drugs with a preclinically documented impact on those mechanisms. However, the extensive functional effects of those drugs remain essentially unexplored. We have undertaken a systematic comparative study of the three main treatments currently administered or proposed to progeria-affected children, namely, a farnesyltransferase inhibitor, the combination of an aminobisphosphonate and a statin (zoledronate and pravastatin), and the macrolide antibiotic rapamycin. This work was based on the assumption that mesodermal stem cells, which are derived from Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome-induced pluripotent stem cells expressing major defects associated with the disease, may be instrumental to revealing such effects. Whereas all three treatments significantly improved misshapen cell nuclei typically associated with progeria, differences were observed in terms of functional improvement in prelamin A farnesylation, progerin expression, defective cell proliferation, premature osteogenic differentiation, and ATP production. Finally, we have evaluated the effect of the different drug combinations on this cellular model. This study revealed no additional benefit compared with single-drug treatments, whereas a cytostatic effect equivalent to that of a farnesyltransferase inhibitor alone was systematically observed. Altogether, these results reveal the complexity of the modes of action of different drugs, even when they have been selected on the basis of a similar mechanistic hypothesis, and underscore the use of induced pluripotent stem cell derivatives as a critical and powerful tool for standardized, comparative pharmacological studies.

  14. Stem cell research in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengyi SUN; Shi ZUO

    2008-01-01

    The traditional view that adult human liver tumors, mainly hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), arise from mature cell types has been challenged in recent dec-ades. The results of several studies suggest that HCC can be derived from liver stem cells. There are four levels of cells in the liver stem cell lineage: hepatocytes, hepatic stem cells/oval cells, bone marrow stem cells and hepato-pancreas stem cells. However, whether HCC is resulted from the differentiation block of stem cells and, moreover, which liver stem cell lineage is the source cell of hepatocarcinogenesis remain controversial. In this review, we focus on the current status of liver stem cell research and their roles in carcinogenesis of HCC, in order to explore new approaches for stem cell therapy of HCC.

  15. Stem Cell Transplantation for Neuroprotection in Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar V. Borlongan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell-based therapies for stroke have expanded substantially over the last decade. The diversity of embryonic and adult tissue sources provides researchers with the ability to harvest an ample supply of stem cells. However, the optimal conditions of stem cell use are still being determined. Along this line of the need for optimization studies, we discuss studies that demonstrate effective dose, timing, and route of stem cells. We recognize that stem cell derivations also provide uniquely individual difficulties and limitations in their therapeutic applications. This review will outline the current knowledge, including benefits and challenges, of the many current sources of stem cells for stroke therapy.

  16. Skin Stem Cells in Skin Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mollapour Sisakht

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Preclinical and clinical research has shown that stem cell therapy is a promising therapeutic option for many diseases. This article describes skin stem cells sources and their therapeutic applications. Evidence Acquisition Compared with conventional methods, cell therapy reduces the surgical burden for patients because it is simple and less time-consuming. Skin cell therapy has been developed for variety of diseases. By isolation of the skin stem cell from the niche, in vitro expansion and transplantation of cells offers a surprising healing capacity profile. Results Stem cells located in skin cells have shown interesting properties such as plasticity, transdifferentiation, and specificity. Mesenchymal cells of the dermis, hypodermis, and other sources are currently being investigated to promote regeneration. Conclusions Because skin stem cells are highly accessible from autologous sources and their immunological profile is unique, they are ideal for therapeutic approaches. Optimization of administrative routes requires more investigation own to the lack of a standard protocol.

  17. Emerging molecular approaches in stem cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaishankar, Amritha; Vrana, Kent

    2009-04-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their ability to self-renew and differentiate into multiple adult cell types. Although substantial progress has been made over the last decade in understanding stem cell biology, recent technological advances in molecular and systems biology may hold the key to unraveling the mystery behind stem cell self-renewal and plasticity. The most notable of these advances is the ability to generate induced pluripotent cells from somatic cells. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of molecular similarities and differences among various stem cell types. Moreover, we survey the current state of systems biology and forecast future needs and direction in the stem cell field.

  18. 乳腺癌干细胞研究现状%Current research on breast cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王欣荣

    2009-01-01

    Tumor may generate from tumor stem cell and the microenvironment,and cancer stem cells are derived from the mutation of normal stem cells according to cancer stem cells hypothesis. Breast cancer stem cells are the first identified cancer stem cells in solid tumor. Breast cancer stem cells have been isolated successfully by many kinds of strategies, and their biological behaviors are gradually studied deeply. Self-renewal and differentiation of breast cancer stem cells are regulated by microenviroment and many signaling pathways. Therapy targeting breast cancer stem cells is gradually becoming the focus of tumor targeted therapy study.%肿瘤干细胞理论认为肿瘤可能是由肿瘤干细胞和其所处微环境产生,而肿瘤干细胞由正常干细胞突变而来.乳腺癌干细胞是第一个在实体瘤中被鉴定的肿瘤干细胞,人们采用多种策略成功分离出乳腺癌干细胞,对其生物学行为的认识正逐渐深入.乳腺癌干细胞的自我更新、分化等特性受到微环境和许多信号转导通路的调控.如何靶向治疗乳腺癌干细胞,最终根治乳腺癌,正逐渐成为肿瘤靶向治疗研究的一个热点.

  19. Healing of grafted adipose tissue: current clinical applications of adipose-derived stem cells for breast and face reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, Brian J; Marra, Kacey G; Rubin, J Peter

    2014-05-01

    Since their isolation and characterization nearly a decade ago, adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have become one of the most popular adult stem cell populations for soft tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Compared with other stem cell sources, ASCs offer several advantages including abundant autologous source, minor invasive harvesting (liposuction), significant proliferative capacity in culture, and multilineage potential. In this mini review, we focus on some of the more salient published clinical and preclinical data to date regarding ASC treatment for breast and facial soft tissue reconstruction. © 2014 by the Wound Healing Society.

  20. STEM CELLS AND PROTEOMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yong-ming; GUO Tian-nan; HUANG Shi-ang

    2006-01-01

    The distinctive features of proteomics are large-scale and high throughput. The key techniques of proteomics are two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics. Stem cell can differentiate into all kinds of cells, tissues and organs. There are many proteins and cytokines involved in the process of differentiation. Applying proteomics techniques to the research of the complex process of stem cell differentiation is of great importance to study the mechanism and applications of stem cell differentiation.

  1. Regenerative medicine in Huntington's disease: current status on fetal grafts and prospects for the use of pluripotent stem cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachoud-Lévi, A-C; Perrier, A L

    2014-12-01

    Huntington's disease is currently incurable, but cell therapy is seen as a promising alternative treatment. We analyze the safety and efficacy of the intrastriatal transplantation of human fetal neuroblasts from ganglionic eminences in patients with Huntington's disease. A few rare surgical incidents were reported, but the main difficulty associated with this therapeutic approach is the occurrence of recipient alloimmunization against the graft and the lack of availability, standardization and quality control for the fetus-derived products required for cell therapy. Some patients showed sustained cognitive improvement over periods of more than six years, and motor improvements for more than four years. Grafting outcomes are variable even within individual transplantation centers. The reasons for this variability are poorly understood, highlighting the need for further research in this specific area. With the perspective of additional trials in the future, we review here the development of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cell therapy products for HD, and their advantages and disadvantages with respect to fetal cells. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. Human bone marrow-derived adult stem cells for post-myocardial infarction cardiac repair: current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, H M; Wong, P; Hsu, L F; Shim, W

    2009-10-01

    Stem cell-based cell therapy has emerged as a potentially therapeutic option for patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and heart failure. With the completion of a number of trials using bone marrow (BM)-derived adult stem cells, critical examination of the overall clinical benefits, limitations and potential side effects of this revolutionary treatment will pave the way for future clinical research. At present, clinical trials have been conducted almost exclusively using BM stem cells. The primary endpoints of these trials are mainly safety and feasibility, with secondary endpoints in the efficacy of post-myocardial infarction (MI) cardiac repair. Intervention with BM-derived cells was mainly carried out by endogenously-mobilised BM cells with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, and more frequently, by intracoronary infusion or direct intramyocardial injection of autologous BM cells. While these studies have been proven safe and feasible without notable side effects, mixed outcomes in terms of clinical benefits have been reported. The major clinical benefits observed are improved cardiac contractile function and suppressed left ventricular negative remodelling, including reduced infarct size and improved cardiac perfusion of infarct zone. Moderate and transient clinical benefits have been mostly observed in studies with intracoronary infusion or direct intramyocardial injection of BM cells. These effects are widely considered to be indirect effects of implanted cells in association with paracrine factors, cell fusion, passive ventricular remodelling, or the responses of endogenous cardiac stem cells. In contrast, evidence of cardiac regeneration characterised by differentiation of implanted stem cells into cardiomyocytes and other cardiac cell lineages, is weak or lacking. To elucidate a clear risk-benefit of this exciting therapy, future studies on the mechanisms of cardiac cell therapy will need to focus on confirming the ideal cell types in relation

  3. Stem Cell Research: Unlocking the Mystery of Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues From the Director: Stem Cell Research: Unlocking the Mystery of Disease Past Issues / ... Zerhouni, NIH Director, described the need for expanding stem cell research. Recently, he spoke about stem cell research ...

  4. Stem Cells: What They Are and What They Do

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem cells: What they are and what they do Stem cells and derived products offer great promise for new medical treatments. Learn about stem cell types, current and possible uses, ethical issues, and ...

  5. Stem cells in urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboushwareb, Tamer; Atala, Anthony

    2008-11-01

    The shortage of donors for organ transplantation has stimulated research on stem cells as a potential resource for cell-based therapy in all human tissues. Stem cells have been used for regenerative medicine applications in many organ systems, including the genitourinary system. The potential applications for stem cell therapy have, however, been restricted by the ethical issues associated with embryonic stem cell research. Instead, scientists have explored other cell sources, including progenitor and stem cells derived from adult tissues and stem cells derived from the amniotic fluid and placenta. In addition, novel techniques for generating stem cells in the laboratory are being developed. These techniques include somatic cell nuclear transfer, in which the nucleus of an adult somatic cell is placed into an oocyte, and reprogramming of adult cells to induce stem-cell-like behavior. Such techniques are now being used in tissue engineering applications, and some of the most successful experiments have been in the field of urology. Techniques to regenerate bladder tissue have reached the clinic, and exciting progress is being made in other areas, such as regeneration of the kidney and urethra. Cell therapy as a treatment for incontinence and infertility might soon become a reality. Physicians should be optimistic that regenerative medicine and tissue engineering will one day provide mainstream treatment options for urologic disorders.

  6. Stem cells sources for intervertebral disc regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gianluca; Vadalà; Fabrizio; Russo; Luca; Ambrosio; Mattia; Loppini; Vincenzo; Denaro

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc regeneration field is rapidly growing since disc disorders represent a major health problem in industrialized countries with very few possible treatments.Indeed, current available therapies are symptomatic, and surgical procedures consist in disc removal and spinal fusion, which is not immune to regardable concerns about possible comorbidities, cost-effectiveness, secondary risks and long-lasting outcomes. This review paper aims to share recent advances in stem cell therapy for the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. In literature the potential use of different adult stem cells for intervertebral disc regeneration has already been reported. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells, adipose tissue derived stem cells, synovial stem cells, muscle-derived stem cells, olfactory neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, disc stem cells, and embryonic stem cells have been studied for this purpose either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, several engineered carriers(e.g., hydrogels), characterized by full biocompatibility and prompt biodegradation, have been designed and combined with different stem cell types in order to optimize the local and controlled delivery of cellular substrates in situ. The paper overviews the literature discussing the current status of our knowledge of the different stem cells types used as a cell-based therapy for disc regeneration.

  7. Stem cell technology for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, J Simon; Sakowski, Stacey A; Hur, Junguk; Feldman, Eva L

    2011-09-01

    Over the past 20 years, stem cell technologies have become an increasingly attractive option to investigate and treat neurodegenerative diseases. In the current review, we discuss the process of extending basic stem cell research into translational therapies for patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. We begin with a discussion of the burden of these diseases on society, emphasizing the need for increased attention toward advancing stem cell therapies. We then explain the various types of stem cells utilized in neurodegenerative disease research, and outline important issues to consider in the transition of stem cell therapy from bench to bedside. Finally, we detail the current progress regarding the applications of stem cell therapies to specific neurodegenerative diseases, focusing on Parkinson disease, Huntington disease, Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and spinal muscular atrophy. With a greater understanding of the capacity of stem cell technologies, there is growing public hope that stem cell therapies will continue to progress into realistic and efficacious treatments for neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Setting FIRES to Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Roxanne Grietz

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this lesson is to present the basic scientific knowledge about stem cells, the promise of stem cell research to medicine, and the ethical considerations and arguments involved. One of the challenges of discussing stem cell research is that the field is constantly evolving and the most current information changes almost daily. Few…

  9. Setting FIRES to Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Roxanne Grietz

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this lesson is to present the basic scientific knowledge about stem cells, the promise of stem cell research to medicine, and the ethical considerations and arguments involved. One of the challenges of discussing stem cell research is that the field is constantly evolving and the most current information changes almost daily. Few…

  10. Current status and development of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in China: a report from Chinese Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Register Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Lan-ping; HUANG Xiao-jun

    2011-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) has three decades history in China. During these periods,the number of HSCT has been increasing, donor and stem cell sources were expanded, indication of diseases and patients for HSCT extended. Forty-two HSCT units offered their data 1-6 times from July 2007 to June 2010. The annual increase rates were 8.8% to 10.8%. Matched sibling donor is 41%, mismatched related/haploidentical donor is 24%,unrelated volunteer donor is 16%, and umbilical cord blood is 2%. The indications of major disease entities are acute myeloid leukemia (AML, 35%), acute lymphobastic leukemia (ALL, 25%), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, 21%), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, 8%). The different opinions on the indication of HSCT were supported by some trials,matched/haploidentical HSCT fit for middle or high risk ALL and AML in first complete remission (CR1), the international prognosis score system (IPSS) - middle-Ⅱ/high risk MDS, CML in advanced stage and so on, when patients have no matched sibling donor. In the Peking University Institute of Hematology, Peking University People's Hospital,haploidentical HSCT has received a comparable result to matched simbling donor HSCT and unrelated matched donor HSCT; we suggest haploidentical donor might be a routine alternative donor for high-risk patents who need an urgent HSCT without matched related donor in special center.

  11. Electric pulse current stimulation increases electrophysiological properties of If current reconstructed in mHCN4-transfected canine mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yuanyuan; Luo, Shouming; Yang, Pan; Song, Zhiyuan

    2016-04-01

    The 'funny' current, also known as the If current, play a crucial role in the spontaneous diastolic depolarization of sinoatrial node cells. The If current is primarily induced by the protein encoded by the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 4 (HCN4) gene. The functional If channel can be reconstructed in canine mesenchymal stem cells (cMSCs) transfected with mouse HCN4 (mHCN4). Biomimetic studies have shown that electric pulse current stimulation (EPCS) can promote cardiogenesis in cMSCs. However, whether EPCS is able to influence the properties of the If current reconstructed in mHCN4-transfected cMSCs remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of EPCS on the If current reconstructed in mHCN4-transfected cMSCs. The cMSCs were transfected with the lentiviral vector pLentis-mHCN4-GFP. Following transfection, these cells were divided into two groups: mHCN4-transfected cMSCs (group A), and mHCN4-transfected cMSCs induced by EPCS (group B). Using a whole cell patch-clamp technique, the If current was recorded, and group A cMSCs showed significant time and voltage dependencies and sensitivity to extracellular Cs+. The half-maximal activation (V1/2) value was -101.2±4.6 mV and the time constant of activation was 324±41 msec under -160 mV. In the group B cells the If current increased obviously and activation curve moved to right. The absolute value of V1/2 increased significantly to -92.4±4.8 mV (P<0.05), and the time constant of activation diminished under the same command voltage (251±44 vs. 324±41, P<0.05). In addition, the mRNA and protein expression levels of HCN4, connexin 43 (Cx43) and Cx45 were upregulated in group B compared with group A, as determined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses. Transmission electron micrographs also confirmed the increased gap junctions in group B. Collectively, these results indicated that reconstructed If channels may have a

  12. Culture of Mouse Neural Stem Cell Precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Currle, D. Spencer; Hu, Jia Sheng; Kolski-Andreaco, Aaron; Monuki, Edwin S

    2007-01-01

    Primary neural stem cell cultures are useful for studying the mechanisms underlying central nervous system development. Stem cell research will increase our understanding of the nervous system and may allow us to develop treatments for currently incurable brain diseases and injuries. In addition, stem cells should be used for stem cell research aimed at the detailed study of mechanisms of neural differentiation and transdifferentiation and the genetic and environmental signals that direct the...

  13. Dazlin' pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welling, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can be isolated from the inner cell mass (ICM) of blastocyst embryos and differentiate into all three germ layers in vitro. However, despite their similar origin, mouse embryonic stem cells represent a more naïve ICM-like pluripotent state whereas human embryo

  14. Aneuploidy in stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Martinez, Jorge; Bakker, Bjorn; Schukken, Klaske M; Simon, Judith E; Foijer, Floris

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells hold enormous promise for regenerative medicine as well as for engineering of model systems to study diseases and develop new drugs. The discovery of protocols that allow for generating induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) from somatic cells has brought this promise steps closer to real

  15. Cancer stem cell metabolism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peiris-Pagès, Maria; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pestell, Richard G; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    .... Cancer stem cells also seem to adapt their metabolism to microenvironmental changes by conveniently shifting energy production from one pathway to another, or by acquiring intermediate metabolic phenotypes...

  16. Stem cells in cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmartin, Agneta; English, Denis; Sanberg, Paul R

    2006-12-01

    This commentary documents the increased number of stem cell-related research reports recently published in the cell transplantation field in the journal Cell Transplantation. The journal covers a wide range of issues in cell-based therapy and regenerative medicine and is attracting clinical and preclinical articles from around the world. It thereby complements and extends the basic coverage of stem cell physiology reported in Stem Cells and Development. Sections in Cell Transplantation cover neuroscience, diabetes, hepatocytes, bone, muscle, cartilage, skin, vessels, and other tissues, as well as tissue engineering that employs novel methods with stem cells. Clearly, the continued use of biomedical engineering will depend heavily on stem cells, and these two journals are well positioned to provide comprehensive coverage of these developments.

  17. Many facets of stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiarui Wu

    2011-01-01

    @@ Research area on stem cells is one of frontiers in biology.The collection of five research articles in this issue aims to cover timely developments in stem cell biology, ranging from generating and identifying stem cell line to manipulating stem cells, and from basic mechanism analysis to applied medical potential.These papers reflect the various research tasks in stem cell biology.

  18. Nanotechniques Inactivate Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltsev, Anatoliy N.; Babenko, Natalya N.; Gaevskaya, Yulia A.; Bondarovich, Nikolay A.; Dubrava, Tatiana G.; Ostankov, Maksim V.; Chelombitko, Olga V.; Malyukin, Yuriy V.; Klochkov, Vladimir K.; Kavok, Nataliya S.

    2017-06-01

    One of the tasks of current oncology is identification of cancer stem cells and search of therapeutic means capable of their specific inhibition. The paper presents the data on phenotype characteristics of Ehrlich carcinoma cells as convenient and easy-to-follow model of tumor growth. The evidence of cancer stem cells as a part of Ehrlich carcinoma and significance of CD44+ and CD44- subpopulations in maintaining the growth of this type of tumor were demonstrated. A high (tenfold) tumorigenic activity of the Ehrlich carcinoma CD44+ cells if compared to CD44- cells was proven. In this pair of comparison, the CD44+ cells had a higher potential of generating in peritoneal cavity of CD44high, CD44+CD24-, CD44+CD24+ cell subpopulations, highlighting the presence of cancer stem cells in a pool of CD44+ cells.

  19. p53 in stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Valeriya; Solozobova; Christine; Blattner

    2011-01-01

    p53 is well known as a "guardian of the genome" for differentiated cells,in which it induces cell cycle arrest and cell death after DNA damage and thus contributes to the maintenance of genomic stability.In addition to this tumor suppressor function for differentiated cells,p53 also plays an important role in stem cells.In this cell type,p53 not only ensures genomic integrity after genotoxic insults but also controls their proliferation and differentiation.Additionally,p53 provides an effective barrier for the generation of pluripotent stem celllike cells from terminally differentiated cells.In this review,we summarize our current knowledge about p53 activities in embryonic,adult and induced pluripotent stem cells.

  20. Adipose stem cells for intervertebral disc regeneration: Current status and concepts for the future: Tissue Engineering Review Series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendoorn, R.J.W.; Lu, Z.F.; Kroeze, R.J.; Bank, R.A.; Wuisman, P.I.; Helder, M.N.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Degenerative disc disease and emerging biological treatment approaches Stem cell sources Integration of ASC-based regenerative medicine and surgery In vitro studies Animal models Cells in disc regeneration in vivo In vivo studies Perspective Conclusions Abstract New regenerative treatme

  1. Current perspectives in stem cell therapy for spinal cord repair in humans: a review of work from the past 10 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Domingos Mariano

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI and amyotrophic laterals sclerosis (ALS are devastating neurological conditions that affect individuals worldwide, significantly reducing quality of life, both for patients and their relatives. Objective : The present review aims to summarize the multiple restorative approaches being developed for spinal cord repair, the use of different stem cell types and the current knowledge regarding stem cell therapy. Method : Review of the literature from the past 10 years of human studies using stem cell transplantation as the main therapy, with or without adjuvant therapies. Conclusion : The current review offers an overview of the state of the art regarding spinal cord restoration, and serves as a starting point for future studies.

  2. Retinal stem cells and potential cell transplantation treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tai-Chi; Hsu, Chih-Chien; Chien, Ke-Hung; Hung, Kuo-Hsuan; Peng, Chi-Hsien; Chen, Shih-Jen

    2014-11-01

    The retina, histologically composed of ten delicate layers, is responsible for light perception and relaying electrochemical signals to the secondary neurons and visual cortex. Retinal disease is one of the leading clinical causes of severe vision loss, including age-related macular degeneration, Stargardt's disease, and retinitis pigmentosa. As a result of the discovery of various somatic stem cells, advances in exploring the identities of embryonic stem cells, and the development of induced pluripotent stem cells, cell transplantation treatment for retinal diseases is currently attracting much attention. The sources of stem cells for retinal regeneration include endogenous retinal stem cells (e.g., neuronal stem cells, Müller cells, and retinal stem cells from the ciliary marginal zone) and exogenous stem cells (e.g., bone mesenchymal stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells). The success of cell transplantation treatment depends mainly on the cell source, the timing of cell harvesting, the protocol of cell induction/transplantation, and the microenvironment of the recipient's retina. This review summarizes the different sources of stem cells for regeneration treatment in retinal diseases and surveys the more recent achievements in animal studies and clinical trials. Future directions and challenges in stem cell transplantation are also discussed.

  3. What are Stem Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadshah Farhat

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   Stem cells are undifferentiated self regenerating multi potential cells. There are three types of stem cells categories by the ability to form after cells and correlated with the body’s development process. Totipotent: these stem cells can form an entire organism such as fertilized egg. Ploripotent: ploripotent cells are those that can form any cell in the body but cannot form an entire organism such as developing embryo’s totipotent cells become ploripotent  Multipotent: Multi potent stem cells are those that can only form specific cells in the body such as blood cells based. Based on the sources of stem cells we have three types of these cells: Autologous: Sources of the patient own cells are (Autologous either the cells from patient own body or his or her cord blood. For this type of transplant the physician now usually collects the periphery rather than morrow because the procedure is easier on like a bane morrow harvest it take place outside of an operating room, and the patient does not to be under general unsetting . Allogenic: Sources of stem cells from another donore are primarily relatives (familial allogenic or completely unrelated donors. Xenogenic: In these stem cells from different species are transplanted e .g striatal porcine fetal mesan cephalic (FVM xenotransplants for Parkinson’s disease. On sites of isolation such as embryo, umbilical cord and other body tissues stem cells are named embnyonic, cord blood, and adult stem cells. The scope of results and clinical application of stem cells are such as: Neurodegenerative conditions (MS,ALS, Parkinson’s, Stroke, Ocular disorders- Glaucoma, retinitis Pigmentosa (RP, Auto Immune Conditions (Lupus, MS,R. arthritis, Diabetes, etc, Viral Conditions (Hepatitis C and AIDS, Heart Disease, Adrenal Disorders, Injury(Nerve, Brain, etc, Anti aging (hair, skin, weight control, overall well being/preventive, Emotional disorders, Organ / Tissue Cancers, Blood cancers, Blood diseases

  4. Common stemness regulators of embryonic and cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christiana; Hadjimichael; Konstantina; Chanoumidou; Natalia; Papadopoulou; Panagiota; Arampatzi; Joseph; Papamatheakis; Androniki; Kretsovali

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotency of embryonic stem cells(ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells is regulated by a well characterized gene transcription circuitry. The circuitry is assembled by ESC specific transcription factors, signal trans-ducing molecules and epigenetic regulators. Growing understanding of stem-like cells, albeit of more complex phenotypes, present in tumors(cancer stem cells), provides a common conceptual and research frame-work for basic and applied stem cell biology. In this review, we highlight current results on biomarkers, gene signatures, signaling pathways and epigenetic regulators that are common in embryonic and cancer stem cells. We discuss their role in determining the cell phenotype and finally, their potential use to design next generation biological and pharmaceutical approaches for regenerative medicine and cancer therapies.

  5. Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Stroke: Challenges and Progress

    OpenAIRE

    Bang, Oh Young; Kim, Eun Hee; Cha, Jae Min; Moon, Gyeong Joon

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and physical disability among adults. It has been 15 years since clinical trials of stem cell therapy in patients with stroke have been conducted using adult stem cells like mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells. Results of randomized controlled trials showed that adult stem cell therapy was safe but its efficacy was modest, underscoring the need for new stem cell therapy strategies. The primary limitations of current stem cell t...

  6. Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Stroke: Challenges and Progress

    OpenAIRE

    Bang, Oh Young; Kim, Eun Hee; Cha, Jae Min; Moon, Gyeong Joon

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and physical disability among adults. It has been 15 years since clinical trials of stem cell therapy in patients with stroke have been conducted using adult stem cells like mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells. Results of randomized controlled trials showed that adult stem cell therapy was safe but its efficacy was modest, underscoring the need for new stem cell therapy strategies. The primary limitations of current stem cell t...

  7. Stem Cell Transplants (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can I Help Someone Who's Being Bullied? Volunteering Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Teens > Stem Cell Transplants Print ... Does it Take to Recover? Coping What Are Stem Cells? As you probably remember from biology class, every ...

  8. Current status of stem cells and regenerative medicine research in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitossi, Fernando J; Podhajcer, Osvaldo L

    2014-12-01

    Since Takahashi and Yamanaka demonstrated for the first time that fully differentiated somatic cells can be reprogrammed to a pluripotent state with a small group of transcription factors a revolution erupted in the regenerative medicine field. New advances showing direct differentiation of mature cells increased the excitement of the field. This work describes the present situation of the field in Argentina and the efforts implemented by science authorities to strengthen and push the field forward.

  9. Dental pulp stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashri, N. Y.; Ajlan, S. A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable...... scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from...... an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors....

  10. Periosteum derived stem cells for regenerative medicine proposals: boosting current knowledge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Concetta; Ferretti; Monica; Mattioli-Belmonte

    2014-01-01

    Periosteum is a thin fibrous layer that covers most bones. It resides in a dynamic mechanically loaded environment and provides a niche for pluripotent cells and a source for molecular factors that modulate cell behaviour. Elucidating periosteum regenerative poten-tial has become a hot topic in orthopaedics. This review discusses the state of the art of osteochondral tissue engineering rested on periosteum derived progenitor cells(PDPCs) and suggests upcoming research direc-tions. Periosteal cells isolation, characterization and migration in the site of injury, as well as their differen-tiation, are analysed. Moreover, the role of cell mecha-nosensing and its contribution to matrix organization, bone microarchitecture and bone stenght is examined. In this regard the role of periostin and its upregulation under mechanical stress in order to preserve PDPC sur-vival and bone tissue integrity is contemplated. The re-view also summarized the role of the periosteum in the field of dentistry and maxillofacial reconstruction. The involvement of microRNAs in osteoblast differentiation and in endogenous tissue repair is explored as well. Fi-nally the novel concept of a guided bone regenerationbased on the use of periosteum itself as a smart mate-rial and the realization of constructs able to mimic the extracellular matrix features is talked out. Additionally, since periosteum can differentiate into insulin produc-ing cells it could be a suitable source in allogenic trans-plantations. That innovative applications would takeadvantage from investigations aimed to assess PDPCimmune privilege.

  11. Immunology of Stem Cells and Cancer Stem Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Feng Yang

    2007-01-01

    The capacity of pluri-potent stem cells to repair the tissues in which stem cells reside holds great promise in development of novel cell replacement therapeutics for treating chronic and degenerative diseases. However,numerous reports show that stem cell therapy, even in an autologous setting, triggers lymphocyte infiltration and inflammation. Therefore, an important question to be answered is how the host immune system responds to engrafted autologous stem cells or allogeneous stem cells. In this brief review, we summarize the progress in several related areas in this field, including some of our data, in four sections: (1) immunogenicity of stem cells; (2)strategies to inhibit immune rejection to allograft stem cells; (3) immune responses to cancer stem cells; and (4)mesenchymal stem cells in immune regulation. Improvement of our understanding on these and other aspects of immune system-stem cell interplay would greatly facilitate the development of stem cell-based therapeutics for regenerative purposes.

  12. Stem Cell Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... why are they important? Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types ... of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2016 [cited October 9, 2017 ] Available at < //stemcells. ...

  13. Engineering Stem Cell Organoids

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yin, Xiaolei; Mead, Benjamin E; Safaee, Helia; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M; Levy, Oren

    2016-01-01

    .... Herein, we discuss basic approaches to generate stem cell-based organoids, their advantages and limitations, and how bioengineering strategies can be used to steer the cell composition and their 3D...

  14. Skeletal (stromal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M; Kermani, Abbas Jafari; Zaher, Walid

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal (marrow stromal) stem cells (BMSCs) are a group of multipotent cells that reside in the bone marrow stroma and can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Studying signaling pathways that regulate BMSC differentiation into osteoblastic cells is a strategy....../preadipocyte factor 1 (Dlk1/Pref-1), the Wnt co-receptor Lrp5 and intracellular kinases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Stem Cells and Bone....

  15. Current Progress in Stem Cells for Clinical Application and Management Strategies%干细胞临床应用现状及管理对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王壮; 裴雪涛

    2011-01-01

    干细胞研究及以其为基础的再生医学技术已经成为生物医学发展水平的重要标志之一.对于大量组织器官缺损或功能障碍患者构成的巨大医疗市场来说,干细胞与再生医学的研究与开发将产生重要影响,其进程也日益加快.干细胞根据来源和获得方式可分为胚胎干细胞、重编程干细胞及成体干细胞等类型,不同类型干细胞特点不同,技术成熟程度处于不同发展阶段,在可能的使用过程中风险规避的策略不同,不同来源的干细胞产品针对的临床适应症和准入标准也不尽相同.在概述这三类干细胞基础研究的基础上,对应用现状和发展趋势进行述评,并提出相关的管理策略.%Stem cells research and the technology of stem cell-based regenerative medicine have become one of the important parts for the development of biomedicines. The research and development of stem cell and regenerative medicine will have important impacts on the medical market for the patients with tissue and/or organ deficits or dysfunction. Based on the origin and the way obtained, stem cells are classcified as embryonic stem cells (ESCs) ,induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and adult stem cells (ASCs). Different types of stem cells may have different characteristics, and different risk potential for clinical use. The products of stem cells may have different clinical indication, and be reviewed by different standards. The current progress in the clinical application and management strategies of stem cells were reviewed

  16. [Therapeutic use of stem cells. II. Adult stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzan, Georges

    2004-09-30

    Many degenerative diseases are not curable by means of classical medicine. The long term objective of cell therapy is to treat the patients with their own stem cells that could be either purified from the diseased organ or from "reservoirs" of stem cells such as that constituted by the bone marrow. The existence of stem cells in the organs or reservoirs is now established in vitro and in some cases, in animal models. Numbers of technical problems linked to the scarcity of these cells still delay the clinical use of purified stem cells. However, clinical protocols using heterogeneous cell populations have already started to treat a growing number of diseases. In some case, autologous cells can be used, as it is the case for bone marrow transplantation in blood diseases. Mesenchymal cells, also purified from the bone marrow are currently used in orthopaedic diseases. Because these cells reveal a broad differentiation potential, active research programs explore their possible use for treatment of other diseases. Bone marrow also contains vascular stem cells that could be active in reappearing defective vessels responsible for ischaemic diseases. Indeed, clinical trials in which bone marrow cells are injected in the cardiac muscle of patients with myocardial infarction or in the leg muscle (gastrocnemius) of patients with hind limb ischaemia have already started. Artificial skin prepared from skin biopsies is used for the reconstitution of the derma of severely burned patients. Clinical trials have also started, using allogenic cells. The patients must be treated by immunosuppressive drugs. Neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson have been successfully treated by intra-cerebral injection of foetal neurones. Pancreatic islets implanted in the liver have shown to re-establish a normal glycaemia in diabetic patients. However, all these clinical trials use differentiated cells or at least progenitors which display differentiation potential and lifetime much more

  17. Stem-cell therapy for neurologic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of research on stem cell therapy for various diseases, an important need was felt in the field of neurological diseases. While congenital lesion may not be amenable to stem cell therapy completely, there is a scope of partial improvement in the lesions and halt in further progression. Neuro degenerative lesions like Parkinson′s disease, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have shown improvement with stem cell therapy. This article reviews the available literature and summarizes the current evidence in the various neurologic diseases amenable to stem cell therapy, the plausible mechanism of action, ethical concerns with insights into the future of stem cell therapy.

  18. Stem Cells in the Umbilical Cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Mark L.; Troyer, Deryl L.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are the next frontier in medicine. Stem cells are thought to have great therapeutic and biotechnological potential. This will not only to replace damaged or dysfunctional cells, but also rescue them and/or deliver therapeutic proteins after they have been engineered to do so. Currently, ethical and scientific issues surround both embryonic and fetal stem cells and hinder their widespread implementation. In contrast, stem cells recovered postnatally from the umbilical cord, including the umbilical cord blood cells, amnion/placenta, umbilical cord vein, or umbilical cord matrix cells, are a readily available and inexpensive source of cells that are capable of forming many different cell types (i.e., they are “multipotent”). This review will focus on the umbilical cord-derived stem cells and compare those cells with adult bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. PMID:17237554

  19. Induced pluripotent stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siddhartha Bhowmik; LI Yong

    2011-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are a recent development which has brought a promise of great therapeutic values. The previous technique of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been ineffective in humans. Recent discoveries show that human fibroblasts can be reprogrammed by a transient over expression of a small number of genes; they can undergo induced pluripotency. iPS were first produced in 2006. By 2008, work was underway to remove the potential oncogenes from their structure. In 2009, protein iPS (piPS) cells were discovered. Surface markers and reporter genes play an important role in stem cell research. Clinical applications include generation of self renewing stem cells, tissue replacement and many more. Stem cell therapy has the ability to dramatically change the treatment of human diseases.

  20. Pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells: From basic research to applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masahiro; Otsu; Takashi; Nakayama; Nobuo; Inoue

    2014-01-01

    Basic research on pluripotent stem cells is designed to enhance understanding of embryogenesis, whereas applied research is designed to develop novel therapies and prevent diseases. Attainment of these goals has been enhanced by the establishment of embryonic stem cell lines, the technological development of genomic reprogramming to generate induced-pluripotent stem cells, and improvements in in vitro techniques to manipulate stem cells. This review summarizes the techniques required to generate neural cells from pluripotent stem cells. In particular, this review describes current research applications of a simple neural differentiation method, the neural stem sphere method, which we developed.

  1. Stem Cell Organoid Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiaolei; Mead, Benjamin E.; Safaee, Helia; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Levy, Oren

    2016-01-01

    Organoid systems leverage the self-organizing properties of stem cells to create diverse multi-cellular tissue proxies. Most organoid models only represent single or partial components of a tissue, and it is often difficult to control the cell type, organization, and cell-cell/cell-matrix interactions within these systems. Herein, we discuss basic approaches to generate stem cell-based organoids, their advantages and limitations, and how bioengineering strategies can be used to steer the cell composition and their 3D organization within organoids to further enhance their utility in research and therapies. PMID:26748754

  2. Pluripotent stem cells for Schwann cell engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming-San; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2015-04-01

    Tissue engineering of Schwann cells (SCs) can serve a number of purposes, such as in vitro SC-related disease modeling, treatment of peripheral nerve diseases or peripheral nerve injury, and, potentially, treatment of CNS diseases. SCs can be generated from autologous stem cells in vitro by recapitulating the various stages of in vivo neural crest formation and SC differentiation. In this review, we survey the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying these in vivo processes. We then focus on the current in vitro strategies for generating SCs from two sources of pluripotent stem cells, namely embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Different methods for SC engineering from ESCs and iPSCs are reviewed and suggestions are proposed for optimizing the existing protocols. Potential safety issues regarding the clinical application of iPSC-derived SCs are discussed as well. Lastly, we will address future aspects of SC engineering.

  3. Polymer microarray technology for stem cell engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Robert; Jia, Jia; Mei, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Stem cells hold remarkable promise for applications in tissue engineering and disease modeling. During the past decade, significant progress has been made in developing soluble factors (e.g., small molecules and growth factors) to direct stem cells into a desired phenotype. However, the current lack of suitable synthetic materials to regulate stem cell activity has limited the realization of the enormous potential of stem cells. This can be attributed to a large number of materials properties (e.g., chemical structures and physical properties of materials) that can affect stem cell fate. This makes it challenging to design biomaterials to direct stem cell behavior. To address this, polymer microarray technology has been developed to rapidly identify materials for a variety of stem cell applications. In this article, we summarize recent developments in polymer array technology and their applications in stem cell engineering. Stem cells hold remarkable promise for applications in tissue engineering and disease modeling. In the last decade, significant progress has been made in developing chemically defined media to direct stem cells into a desired phenotype. However, the current lack of the suitable synthetic materials to regulate stem cell activities has been limiting the realization of the potential of stem cells. This can be attributed to the number of variables in material properties (e.g., chemical structures and physical properties) that can affect stem cells. Polymer microarray technology has shown to be a powerful tool to rapidly identify materials for a variety of stem cell applications. Here we summarize recent developments in polymer array technology and their applications in stem cell engineering. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cardiac stem cell niches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annarosa Leri

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The critical role that stem cell niches have in cardiac homeostasis and myocardial repair following injury is the focus of this review. Cardiac niches represent specialized microdomains where the quiescent and activated state of resident stem cells is regulated. Alterations in niche function with aging and cardiac diseases result in abnormal sites of cardiomyogenesis and inadequate myocyte formation. The relevance of Notch1 signaling, gap-junction formation, HIF-1α and metabolic state in the regulation of stem cell growth and differentiation within the cardiac niches are discussed.

  5. [On plant stem cells and animal stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yun; Jiang, Chao; Huang, Lu-Qi

    2014-01-01

    A comparison of plant and animal stem cells can highlight core aspects of stem-cell biology. In both kingdoms, stem cells are defined by their clonogenic properties and are maintained by intercellular signals. The signaling molecules are different in plants and animals stem cell niches, but the roles of argonaute and polycomb group proteins suggest that there are some molecular similarities.

  6. INVASIVE CANDIDA INFECTIONS IN PATIENTS WITH HAEMATOLOGICAL MALIGNANCIES AND HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS: CURRENT EPIDEMIOLOGY AND THERAPEUTIC OPTIONS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrado Girmenia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, the global epidemiological impact of invasive candidiasis (IC in patients with hematologic malignancies (HM and in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT recipients has decreased and the incidence of invasive aspergillosis  exceeded that of Candida infections. The use of prevention strategies, first of all antifungal prophylaxis with triazoles,  contributed to the reduction of IC in these populations as demonstrated by several  epidemiological studies. However, relatively little is known about the current epidemiological patterns of IC in HM and HSCT populations, because recent epidemiological data almost exclusively derive from retrospective experiences and few prospective data are available. Several prospective, controlled studies in the prophylaxis of invasive fungal diseases have been conducted in both the HM and HSCT setting. On the contrary, most of the prospective controlled trials that demonstrated the efficacy of the antifungal drugs echinocandins and voriconazole in the treatment of candidemia and invasive candidiasis mainly involved  patients with underlying conditions other than HM or  HSCT.  For these reasons, international guidelines provided specific indications for the prophylaxis strategies in HM and HSCT patients, whereas the  recommendations on therapy of documented Candida infections are based on the results observed in the general population and should be considered with caution.

  7. Endometrial stem cells in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdi, Javad; Tan, Aaron; Shoae-Hassani, Alireza; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2014-01-01

    First described in 2004, endometrial stem cells (EnSCs) are adult stem cells isolated from the endometrial tissue. EnSCs comprise of a population of epithelial stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and side population stem cells. When secreted in the menstrual blood, they are termed menstrual stem cells or endometrial regenerative cells. Mounting evidence suggests that EnSCs can be utilized in regenerative medicine. EnSCs can be used as immuno-modulatory agents to attenuate inflammation, are implicated in angiogenesis and vascularization during tissue regeneration, and can also be reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells. Furthermore, EnSCs can be used in tissue engineering applications and there are several clinical trials currently in place to ascertain the therapeutic potential of EnSCs. This review highlights the progress made in EnSC research, describing their mesodermal, ectodermal, and endodermal potentials both in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Stem cells - biological update and cell therapy progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girlovanu, Mihai; Susman, Sergiu; Soritau, Olga; Rus-Ciuca, Dan; Melincovici, Carmen; Constantin, Anne-Marie; Mihu, Carmen Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the advances in stem cell research have suggested that the human body may have a higher plasticity than it was originally expected. Until now, four categories of stem cells were isolated and cultured in vivo: embryonic stem cells, fetal stem cells, adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Although multiple studies were published, several issues concerning the stem cells are still debated, such as: the molecular mechanisms of differentiation, the methods to prevent teratoma formation or the ethical and religious issues regarding especially the embryonic stem cell research. The direct differentiation of stem cells into specialized cells: cardiac myocytes, neural cells, pancreatic islets cells, may represent an option in treating incurable diseases such as: neurodegenerative diseases, type I diabetes, hematologic or cardiac diseases. Nevertheless, stem cell-based therapies, based on stem cell transplantation, remain mainly at the experimental stages and their major limitation is the development of teratoma and cancer after transplantation. The induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) represent a prime candidate for future cell therapy research because of their significant self-renewal and differentiation potential and the lack of ethical issues. This article presents an overview of the biological advances in the study of stem cells and the current progress made in the field of regenerative medicine.

  9. Stem cells as promising therapeutic options for neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jongman; Kim, Han-Soo; Hwang, Dong-Youn

    2013-04-01

    Due to the limitations of pharmacological and other current therapeutic strategies, stem cell therapies have emerged as promising options for treating many incurable neurologic diseases. A variety of stem cells including pluripotent stem cells (i.e., embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells) and multipotent adult stem cells (i.e., fetal brain tissue, neural stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells from various sources) have been explored as therapeutic options for treating many neurologic diseases, and it is becoming obvious that each type of stem cell has pros and cons as a source for cell therapy. Wise selection of stem cells with regard to the nature and status of neurologic dysfunctions is required to achieve optimal therapeutic efficacy. To this aim, the stem cell-mediated therapeutic efforts on four major neurological diseases, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and stroke, will be introduced, and current problems and future directions will be discussed.

  10. Application of Stem Cells in Tissue Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Stem cells have become an important source of seed cells for tissue engineering because they are relatively easy to expand in vitro and can be induced to differentiate into various cell types in vitro or in vivo. In the current stage, most stem cell researches focus on in vitro studies, including in vitro induction and phenotype characterization. Our center has made a great deal of effort in the in vivo study by using stem cells as seed cells for tissue construction. We have used bone marrow stem cells (BMS...

  11. Concise review: transplantation of cultured oral mucosal epithelial cells for treating limbal stem cell deficiency-current status and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utheim, Tor Paaske

    2015-06-01

    A number of diseases and external factors can deplete limbal stem cells, causing pain and visual loss. Ten years have passed since the first transplantation of cultured oral mucosal epithelial cells in humans, representing the first autologous cell-based therapy for severe bilateral limbal stem cell deficiency. Its steady increase in popularity since then can be attributed to the accumulating evidence of its efficacy in reverting limbal stem cell deficiency. In this review, the focus is on clinical, and to a lesser degree laboratory, features of cultured oral mucosal epithelial transplants over the past 10 years. Comparisons with other available technologies are made. Avenues for research to stimulate further improvements in clinical results and allow worldwide distribution of limbal stem cell therapy based on oral mucosal cells are discussed. These include storage and transportation of cultured oral mucosal epithelial sheets and in vivo culture of oral mucosal epithelial cells.

  12. Plant Stem Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greb, Thomas; Lohmann, Jan U

    2016-01-01

    .... While the promise of organ regeneration and the end of cancer have captured our imagination, it has gone almost unnoticed that plant stem cells represent the ultimate origin of much of the food we...

  13. Stem cell facelift: between reality and fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiyeh, Bishara S; Ibrahim, Amir E; Saad, Dibo A

    2013-03-01

    Stem cells are "big business" throughout medical technology, and their potential application in cosmetic procedures is no exception. One of the latest nonsurgical facial treatments (and new catchphrases) in plastic surgery is the "stem cell facelift." It is evident from the currently available scientific literature that the use of stem cell therapy for facial rejuvenation is limited to the theoretical induction of skin tightening and can in no way be equated to a facelift. In fact, what is advertised and promoted as a new and original technique of stem cell facelifting is mostly stem cell-enriched lipofilling. Despite encouraging data suggesting that adult stem cells hold promise for future applications, the data from clinical evidence available today do not substantiate the marketing and promotional claims being made to patients. To claim that the "stem cell facelift" is a complete facial rejuvenation procedure surgery is unethical.

  14. Stem cells and repair of lung injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randell Scott H

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fueled by the promise of regenerative medicine, currently there is unprecedented interest in stem cells. Furthermore, there have been revolutionary, but somewhat controversial, advances in our understanding of stem cell biology. Stem cells likely play key roles in the repair of diverse lung injuries. However, due to very low rates of cellular proliferation in vivo in the normal steady state, cellular and architectural complexity of the respiratory tract, and the lack of an intensive research effort, lung stem cells remain poorly understood compared to those in other major organ systems. In the present review, we concisely explore the conceptual framework of stem cell biology and recent advances pertinent to the lungs. We illustrate lung diseases in which manipulation of stem cells may be physiologically significant and highlight the challenges facing stem cell-related therapy in the lung.

  15. Pluripotent stem cells to model Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS): Current trends and future perspectives for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Cicero, Alessandra; Nissan, Xavier

    2015-11-01

    Progeria, or Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), is a rare, fatal genetic disease characterized by an appearance of accelerated aging in children. This syndrome is typically caused by mutations in codon 608 (p.G608G) of the LMNA, leading to the production of a mutated form of lamin A precursor called progerin. In HGPS, progerin accumulates in cells causing progressive molecular defects, including nuclear shape abnormalities, chromatin disorganization, damage to DNA and delays in cell proliferation. Here we report how, over the past five years, pluripotent stem cells have provided new insights into the study of HGPS and opened new original therapeutic perspectives to treat the disease.

  16. Aneuploidy in stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jorge; Garcia-Martinez; Bjorn; Bakker; Klaske; M; Schukken; Judith; E; Simon; Floris; Foijer

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells hold enormous promise for regenerative medicine as well as for engineering of model systems to study diseases and develop new drugs. The discovery of protocols that allow for generating induced pluripotent stem cells(IPSCs) from somatic cells has brought this promise steps closer to reality. However,as somatic cells might have accumulated various chromosomal abnormalities,including aneuploidies throughout their lives,the resulting IPSCs might no longer carry the perfect blueprint for the tissue to be generated,or worse,become at risk of adopting a malignant fate. In this review,we discuss the contribution of aneuploidy to healthy tissues and how aneuploidy can lead to disease. Furthermore,we review the differences between how somatic cells and stem cells respond to aneuploidy.

  17. Stem cell heterogeneity revealed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Marianne S; Jensen, Kim B

    2016-01-01

    The skin forms a protective, water-impermeable barrier consisting of heavily crosslinked epithelial cells. However, the specific role of stem cells in sustaining this barrier remains a contentious issue. A detailed analysis of the interfollicular epidermis now proposes a model for how a composite...... of cells with different properties are involved in its maintenance....

  18. Ca2+-currents in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes - effects of two different culture conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Umur Uzun

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM provide a unique opportunity to study human heart physiology and pharmacology and repair injured hearts. The suitability of hiPSC-CM critically depends on how closely they share physiological properties of human adult cardiomyocytes (CM. Here we investigated whether a 3D engineered heart tissue (EHT culture format favors maturation and addressed the L-type Ca2+-current (ICa,L as a readout. The results were compared with hiPSC-CM cultured in conventional monolayer (ML and to our previous data from human adult atrial and ventricular CM obtained when identical patch-clamp protocols were used. HiPSC-CM were 2-3 fold smaller than adult CM, independently of culture format (capacitance ML 45±1 pF (n=289, EHT 45±1 pF (n=460, atrial CM 87±3 pF (n=196, ventricular CM 126±8 pF (n=50. Only 88% of ML cells showed ICa, but all EHT. Basal ICa density was 10±1 pA/pF (n=207 for ML and 12±1 pA/pF (n=361 for EHT and was larger than in adult CM (7±1 pA/pF (p<0.05, n=196 for atrial CM and 6±1 pA/pF (p<0.05, n=47 for ventricular CM. However, ML and EHT showed robust T-type Ca2+-currents (ICa,T. While (--Bay K 8644, that activates ICa,L directly, increased ICa,L to the same extent in ML and EHT, β1- and β2-adrenoceptor effects were marginal in ML, but of same size as (--Bay K 8644 in EHT. The opposite was true for serotonin receptors. Sensitivity to β1 and β2-adrenoceptor stimulation was the same in EHT as in adult CM (-logEC50: 5.9 and 6.1 for norepinephrine (NE and epinephrine (Epi, respectively, but very low concentrations of Rp-8-Br-cAMPS were sufficient to suppress effects (-logEC50: 5.3 and 5.3 respectively for NE and Epi. Taken together, hiPSC-CM express ICa,L at the same density as human adult CM, but, in contrast, possess robust ICa,T. Increased effects of catecholamines in EHT suggest more efficient maturation.

  19. Reforming craniofacial orthodontics via stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Pritam; Prasad, N.K.K.; Sahoo, Nivedita; Kumar, Gunjan; Mohanty, Debapreeti; Sah, Sushila

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are the most interesting cells in cell biology. They have the potential to evolve as one of the most powerful technologies in the future. The future refers to an age where it will be used extensively in various fields of medical and dental sciences. Researchers have discovered a number of sources from which stem cells can be derived. Craniofacial problems are very common and occur at all ages. Stem cells can be used therapeutically in almost every field of health science. In fact, many procedures will be reformed after stem cells come into play. This article is an insight into the review of the current researches being carried out on stem cells and its use in the field of orthodontics, which is a specialized branch of dentistry. Although the future is uncertain, there is a great possibility that stem cells will be used extensively in almost all major procedures of orthodontics. PMID:25767761

  20. Haematopoietic stem cells: past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ashley P; Alexander, Warren S

    2017-01-01

    The discovery and characterisation of haematopoietic stem cells has required decades of research. The identification of adult bone marrow as a source of haematopoietic cells capable of protecting an organism from otherwise lethal irradiation led to the intense search for their identity and characteristics. Using functional assays along with evolving techniques for isolation of haematopoietic cells, haematopoietic stem cell populations were able to be enriched and their characteristics analysed. The key haematopoietic stem cell characteristics of pluripotentiality and the ability for self-renewal have emerged as characteristics of several haematopoietic stem cell populations, including those that have recently challenged the conventional concepts of the haematopoietic hierarchy. Human allogeneic stem cell therapy relies on these functional characteristics of haematopoietic stem cells that can be isolated from peripheral blood, bone marrow or cord blood, with the additional requirement that immunological barriers need to be overcome to allow sustained engraftment while minimising risk of graft-versus-host disease developing in the recipient of transplanted stem cells. Current and future research will continue to focus on the identification of haematopoietic stem cell regulators and methods for in vitro and in vivo stem cell manipulation, including genome editing, to expand the scope, potential and safety of therapy using haematopoietic stem cells. PMID:28180000

  1. Stem Cells and Neuroprotection: Understanding the Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Pearce

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of neuroprotective therapies begs the question of how such therapies could affect preexisting stem cell populations within the host, as well as those introduced through cell-replacement therapy. Multiple mechanisms may mediate stem cell responses to neuroprotectants such as host/donor age and gender, cellular lineage/differentiation status, and mitochondrial dynamics. Current therapeutic sources for stem cells are embryonic, somatic, or induced pluripotent, with very little known about the effects of gender, age, cell type, and mitochondrial dynamics. With the advent of therapies to stimulate and recruit endogenous stem cells or transplant donor cells into damage areas in the hopes of recuperative regeneration of lost neurons, it is important to discuss mechanisms that dictate the winning players in the neuroprotection game. This review will focus on our current understanding of the characteristics of renewing stem cells that may affect neuroprotection.

  2. Laryngeal cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Greco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC is one of the most commonly diagnosed malignancies in the head and neck region with an increased incidence rate worldwide. Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a group of cells with eternal life or infinite self-renewal ability, which have high migrating, infiltrative, and metastatic abilities. Though CSCs only account for a small proportion in tumors, the high resistance to traditional therapy exempts them from therapy killing and thus they can reconstruct tumors. Our current knowledge, about CSCs in the LSCC, largely depends on head and neck studies with a lack of systematic data about the evidences of CSCs in tumorigenesis of LSCC. Certainly, the combination of therapies aimed at debulking the tumour (e.g. surgery, conventional chemotherapy, radiotherapy together with targeted therapies aimed at the elimination of the CSCs might have a positive impact on the long-term outcome of patients with laryngeal cancer (LC in the future and may cast a new light on the cancer treatment.

  3. Engineering Stem Cells for Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Perry T; Han, Edward; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2016-01-07

    Stem cells are characterized by a number of useful properties, including their ability to migrate, differentiate, and secrete a variety of therapeutic molecules such as immunomodulatory factors. As such, numerous pre-clinical and clinical studies have utilized stem cell-based therapies and demonstrated their tremendous potential for the treatment of various human diseases and disorders. Recently, efforts have focused on engineering stem cells in order to further enhance their innate abilities as well as to confer them with new functionalities, which can then be used in various biomedical applications. These engineered stem cells can take on a number of forms. For instance, engineered stem cells encompass the genetic modification of stem cells as well as the use of stem cells for gene delivery, nanoparticle loading and delivery, and even small molecule drug delivery. The present Review gives an in-depth account of the current status of engineered stem cells, including potential cell sources, the most common methods used to engineer stem cells, and the utilization of engineered stem cells in various biomedical applications, with a particular focus on tissue regeneration, the treatment of immunodeficiency diseases, and cancer.

  4. Stem cells in the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Soto, Angel R; Oakley, Derek H; Wichterle, Hynek; Stein, Joel; Doetsch, Fiona K; Henderson, Christopher E

    2014-11-01

    Given their capacity to regenerate cells lost through injury or disease, stem cells offer new vistas into possible treatments for degenerative diseases and their underlying causes. As such, stem cell biology is emerging as a driving force behind many studies in regenerative medicine. This review focuses on the current understanding of the applications of stem cells in treating ailments of the human brain, with an emphasis on neurodegenerative diseases. Two types of neural stem cells are discussed: endogenous neural stem cells residing within the adult brain and pluripotent stem cells capable of forming neural cells in culture. Endogenous neural stem cells give rise to neurons throughout life, but they are restricted to specialized regions in the brain. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms regulating these cells is key in determining their therapeutic potential as well as finding mechanisms to activate dormant stem cells outside these specialized microdomains. In parallel, patient-derived stem cells can be used to generate neural cells in culture, providing new tools for disease modeling, drug testing, and cell-based therapies. Turning these technologies into viable treatments will require the integration of basic science with clinical skills in rehabilitation.

  5. Cancer stem cell targeted therapy: progress amid controversies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Shigdar, Sarah; Gantier, Michael P.; Hou, Yingchun; Wang, Li; Li, Yong; Shamaileh, Hadi Al; Yin, Wang; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhao, Xinhan; Duan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although cancer stem cells have been well characterized in numerous malignancies, the fundamental characteristics of this group of cells, however, have been challenged by some recent observations: cancer stem cells may not necessary to be rare within tumors; cancer stem cells and non-cancer stem cells may undergo reversible phenotypic changes; and the cancer stem cells phenotype can vary substantially between patients. Here the current status and progresses of cancer stem cells theory is illustrated and via providing a panoramic view of cancer therapy, we addressed the recent controversies regarding the feasibility of cancer stem cells targeted anti-cancer therapy. PMID:26496035

  6. Human stem cells and articular cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Atsuyuki; Iwakura, Takashi; Reddi, A Hari

    2012-11-05

    The regeneration of articular cartilage damaged due to trauma and posttraumatic osteoarthritis is an unmet medical need. Current approaches to regeneration and tissue engineering of articular cartilage include the use of chondrocytes, stem cells, scaffolds and signals, including morphogens and growth factors. Stem cells, as a source of cells for articular cartilage regeneration, are a critical factor for articular cartilage regeneration. This is because articular cartilage tissue has a low cell turnover and does not heal spontaneously. Adult stem cells have been isolated from various tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose, synovial tissue, muscle and periosteum. Signals of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily play critical roles in chondrogenesis. However, adult stem cells derived from various tissues tend to differ in their chondrogenic potential. Pluripotent stem cells have unlimited proliferative capacity compared to adult stem cells. Chondrogenesis from embryonic stem (ES) cells has been studied for more than a decade. However, establishment of ES cells requires embryos and leads to ethical issues for clinical applications. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are generated by cellular reprogramming of adult cells by transcription factors. Although iPS cells have chondrogenic potential, optimization, generation and differentiation toward articular chondrocytes are currently under intense investigation.

  7. Human Stem Cells and Articular Cartilage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hari Reddi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available  The regeneration of articular cartilage damaged due to trauma and posttraumatic osteoarthritis is an unmet medical need. Current approaches to regeneration and tissue engineering of articular cartilage include the use of chondrocytes, stem cells, scaffolds and signals, including morphogens and growth factors. Stem cells, as a source of cells for articular cartilage regeneration, are a critical factor for articular cartilage regeneration. This is because articular cartilage tissue has a low cell turnover and does not heal spontaneously. Adult stem cells have been isolated from various tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose, synovial tissue, muscle and periosteum. Signals of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily play critical roles in chondrogenesis. However, adult stem cells derived from various tissues tend to differ in their chondrogenic potential. Pluripotent stem cells have unlimited proliferative capacity compared to adult stem cells. Chondrogenesis from embryonic stem (ES cells has been studied for more than a decade. However, establishment of ES cells requires embryos and leads to ethical issues for clinical applications. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells are generated by cellular reprogramming of adult cells by transcription factors. Although iPS cells have chondrogenic potential, optimization, generation and differentiation toward articular chondrocytes are currently under intense investigation.

  8. The Stem Cell Conundrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ At the beginning of this year, Kelly Reynolds,a US-national diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), became the one of the latest overseas patient to undergo stem cell treatment at the Nanshan Hospital in Shenzhen.Confined to a wheelchair and with limited use of his hands,the 39-year old received four fetal stem cell injections over a three-week period. So far,the results have been positive and Reynolds, acording to his personal blog page, is upbeat about the long-term benefits.

  9. Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Stroke: Challenges and Progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Oh Young; Kim, Eun Hee; Cha, Jae Min; Moon, Gyeong Joon

    2016-09-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and physical disability among adults. It has been 15 years since clinical trials of stem cell therapy in patients with stroke have been conducted using adult stem cells like mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells. Results of randomized controlled trials showed that adult stem cell therapy was safe but its efficacy was modest, underscoring the need for new stem cell therapy strategies. The primary limitations of current stem cell therapies include (a) the limited source of engraftable stem cells, (b) the presence of optimal time window for stem cell therapies, (c) inherited limitation of stem cells in terms of growth, trophic support, and differentiation potential, and (d) possible transplanted cell-mediated adverse effects, such as tumor formation. Here, we discuss recent advances that overcome these hurdles in adult stem cell therapy for stroke.

  10. Origins of pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelen, B A J; Chuva De Sousa Lopes, S M

    2011-08-01

    Different types of pluripotent stem cells can be identified and cultured in vitro. Here an overview is presented of the various pluripotent stem cells types. Embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells that have been cultured in vitro provided the groundwork for future pluripotent cell cultures. Conditions established for these cells such as culture on a feeder layer of mouse embryonic fibroblasts and the importance of fetal calf serum were initially also used for the culture of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells derived from the inner cell masses of blastocysts. Embryonic stem cells derived from human blastocysts were found to require different conditions and are cultured in the presence of activin and basic fibroblast growth factor. Recently pluripotent stem cells have also been derived from mouse peri-implantation epiblasts. Since these epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs) require the same conditions as the human ES cells it has been suggested that human ES cells are more similar to mouse EpiSCs than to mouse ES cells. Pluripotent cell lines have also been derived from migratory primordial germ cells and spermatogonial stem cells. The creation of pluripotent stem cells from adult cells by the introduction of reprogramming transcription factors, so-called induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells allowed the derivation of patient-specific pluripotent stem cells without the need of creation of a human blastocyst after cloning by somatic cells nuclear transfer. Recently it has become clear however that iPS cells may be quite different to ES cells in terms of epigenetics.

  11. Stem cell organization in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wendrich, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    Growth of plant tissues and organs depends on continuous production of new cells, by niches of stem cells. Stem cells typically divide to give rise to one differentiating daughter and one non-differentiating daughter. This constant process of self-renewal ensures that the niches of stem cells or mer

  12. Stem Cell Transplants (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Parents > Stem Cell Transplants Print A A A What's in this ... Recovery Coping en español Trasplantes de células madre Stem cells are cells in the body that have the ...

  13. Stem cells and transplant arteriosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingbo

    2008-05-09

    Stem cells can differentiate into a variety of cells to replace dead cells or to repair damaged tissues. Recent evidence indicates that stem cells are involved in the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis, an alloimmune initiated vascular stenosis that often results in transplant organ failure. Although the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis is not yet fully understood, recent developments in stem cell research have suggested novel mechanisms of vascular remodeling in allografts. For example, stem cells derived from the recipient may repair damaged endothelial cells of arteries in transplant organs. Further evidence suggests that stem cells or endothelial progenitor cells may be released from both bone marrow and non-bone marrow tissues. Vascular stem cells appear to replenish cells that died in donor vessels. Concomitantly, stem/progenitor cells may also accumulate in the intima, where they differentiate into smooth muscle cells. However, several issues concerning the contribution of stem cells to the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis are controversial, eg, whether bone marrow-derived stem cells can differentiate into smooth muscle cells that form neointimal lesions of the vessel wall. This review summarizes recent research on the role of stem cells in transplant arteriosclerosis, discusses the mechanisms of stem cell homing and differentiation into mature endothelial and smooth muscle cells, and highlights the controversial issues in the field.

  14. Perspectives and controversies in the field of stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Gaetano

    2006-09-01

    The fourth annual meeting of the International Society for Stem Cell Research focused on a number of pressing issues, including: (I) the need to better characterize the biology of stem cells; (II) the need to exploit and optimize the great therapeutic potential of stem cells in tissue regeneration; (III) ethical and safety considerations related to the use of human embryonic stem cells; (IV) the contribution of adult stem cells to carcinogenesis; (V) the need to investigate the biology of cancer stem cells. The purpose of this report is to summarize the current status of stem cell research, as surmised by the proceedings of this meeting.

  15. Stem cell therapy for diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K O Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy holds immense promise for the treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus. Research on the ability of human embryonic stem cells to differentiate into islet cells has defined the developmental stages and transcription factors involved in this process. However, the clinical applications of human embryonic stem cells are limited by ethical concerns, as well as the potential for teratoma formation. As a consequence, alternative forms of stem cell therapies, such as induced pluripotent stem cells, umbilical cord stem cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, have become an area of intense study. Recent advances in stem cell therapy may turn this into a realistic treatment for diabetes in the near future.

  16. Células-tronco derivadas de tecido adiposo humano: desafios atuais e perspectivas clínicas Human adipose-derived stem cells: current challenges and clinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Yarak

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available As células-tronco adultas ou somáticas detêm grande promessa para a reparação e regeneração de tecidos. Atualmente, o interesse dos cientistas é contínuo na investigação da biologia de células-tronco mesenquimais, tanto em aspectos básicos, quanto no potencial de aplicações terapêuticas. As células-tronco adultas derivadas do estroma do tecido adiposo, em comparação com as células-tronco derivadas do estroma da medula óssea, apresentam como vantagem o método fácil de obtenção da fonte tecidual. As células-tronco adultas derivadas do estroma do tecido adiposo apresentam potencial para se diferenciarem em células de tecidos mesodérmicos, como os adipócitos, as cartilagens, os ossos e o músculo esquelético e não mesodérmicos, como os hepatócitos, as células pancreáticas endócrinas, os neurônios, os hepatócitos e as células endoteliais vasculares. Entretanto, os dados disponíveis na literatura científica sobre as características das células-tronco adultas derivadas do estroma do tecido adiposo e os procedimentos para sua obtenção e manipulação no laboratório são inconsistentes. É necessário o desenvolvimento de metodologias e procedimentos eficazes de isolamento dessas células para obtenção de células em quantidade e qualidade suficientes para aplicação terapêutica. Nesta revisão, são discutidos os métodos correntes de coleta de tecido adiposo, isolamento e caracterização de células-tronco adultas derivadas do estroma do tecido adiposo, com ênfase na futura aplicação em medicina regenerativa e nos possíveis desafios nesse recente campo da ciência.Adult or somatic stem cells hold great promise for tissue regeneration. Currently, one major scientific interest is focused on the basic biology and clinical application of mesenchymal stem cells. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells share similar characteristics with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, but have some advantages including

  17. Relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma in adolescents: focus on current high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilcher GM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gregory MT Guilcher,1 Douglas A Stewart21University of Calgary, Section of Hematology/Oncology/Transplant, Alberta Children’s Hospital, Calgary, Canada; 2University of Calgary, Division of Medical Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, CanadaAbstract: Hodgkin lymphoma is one of the most common cancers of adolescence and young adulthood. Most patients are cured of their disease, with very high cure rates in early stage disease and improving rates of cure even in those who present with advanced stage disease. Upfront therapy often involves chemotherapy and radiation therapy; with improving cure rates, acute and late effects of therapy are informing newer treatment protocols to avoid toxicities. Those children and adolescents with refractory or relapsed disease have lower rates of cure and generally warrant more intensive therapy. High-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation is often administered in such cases. This intensive intervention can be curative, but carries additional risks in the short and long term. This review includes a discussion of both transplant and non-transplant therapy for relapsed disease, commonly employed conditioning regimens, acute and late toxicities of therapy, as well as quality of life data. In addition, newer approaches to therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma are reviewed, with a focus on how such novel therapies might relate to high-dose chemotherapeutic approaches.Keywords: Hodgkin lymphoma, adolescents, high-dose chemotherapy, autologous stem cell transplant

  18. Effect of aging on stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Abu Shufian Ishtiaq; Sheng, Matilda HC; Wasnik, Samiksha; Baylink, David J; Lau, Kin-Hing William

    2017-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells have the remarkable self-renewal ability and are capable of differentiating into multiple diverse cells. There is increasing evidence that the aging process can have adverse effects on stem cells. As stem cells age, their renewal ability deteriorates and their ability to differentiate into the various cell types is altered. Accordingly, it is suggested aging-induced deterioration of stem cell functions may play a key role in the pathophysiology of the various aging-associated disorders. Understanding the role of the aging process in deterioration of stem cell function is crucial, not only in understanding the pathophysiology of aging-associated disorders, but also in future development of novel effective stem cell-based therapies to treat aging-associated diseases. This review article first focuses on the basis of the various aging disease-related stem cell dysfunction. It then addresses the several concepts on the potential mechanism that causes aging-related stem cell dysfunction. It also briefly discusses the current potential therapies under development for aging-associated stem cell defects.

  19. Stem cell-derived vascular endothelial cells and their potential application in regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although a 'vascular stem cell' population has not been identified or generated, vascular endothelial and mural cells (smooth muscle cells and pericytes) can be derived from currently known pluripotent stem cell sources, including human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. We rev...

  20. Advances in studies on hepatic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The question whether hepatic stem cells exist or not has been debated for several decades. Current researches confirm that there are hepatic stem cells in the liver. Oval cells, putative bipotential hepatic stem cells, are probably located within canals of Hering, portal tracts or branches of biliary trees. Bone marrow is a potential source of oval cells, indicating that there exists a close relationship between liver and hematopoiesis in adulthood. Hepatic stem cells are able to proliferate in vitro and can be induced to differentiate into hepatocytes. This will provide a promising approach of cell transplantation, tissue engineering and gene therapy for liver diseases. In this review, the evidence of their presence, origin, identification, proliferation in vitro, differentiation by induction, application prospects of hepatic stem cells and future directions for the field are discussed.

  1. Concise Review: Asymmetric Cell Divisions in Stem Cell Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Murke

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Somatic stem cells are rare cells with unique properties residing in many organs and tissues. They are undifferentiated cells responsible for tissue regeneration and homeostasis, and contain both the capacity to self-renew in order to maintain their stem cell potential and to differentiate towards tissue-specific, specialized cells. However, the knowledge about the mechanisms controlling somatic stem cell fate decisions remains sparse. One mechanism which has been described to control daughter cell fates in selected somatic stem cell systems is the process of asymmetric cell division (ACD. ACD is a tightly regulated and evolutionary conserved process allowing a single stem or progenitor cell to produce two differently specified daughter cells. In this concise review, we will summarize and discuss current concepts about the process of ACD as well as different ACD modes. Finally, we will recapitulate the current knowledge and our recent findings about ACD in human hematopoiesis.

  2. Stem cells and healthy aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodell, Margaret A; Rando, Thomas A

    2015-12-04

    Research into stem cells and aging aims to understand how stem cells maintain tissue health, what mechanisms ultimately lead to decline in stem cell function with age, and how the regenerative capacity of somatic stem cells can be enhanced to promote healthy aging. Here, we explore the effects of aging on stem cells in different tissues. Recent research has focused on the ways that genetic mutations, epigenetic changes, and the extrinsic environmental milieu influence stem cell functionality over time. We describe each of these three factors, the ways in which they interact, and how these interactions decrease stem cell health over time. We are optimistic that a better understanding of these changes will uncover potential strategies to enhance stem cell function and increase tissue resiliency into old age.

  3. Inflammation and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigdar, Sarah; Li, Yong; Bhattacharya, Santanu; O'Connor, Michael; Pu, Chunwen; Lin, Jia; Wang, Tao; Xiang, Dongxi; Kong, Lingxue; Wei, Ming Q; Zhu, Yimin; Zhou, Shufeng; Duan, Wei

    2014-04-10

    Cancer stem cells are becoming recognised as being responsible for metastasis and treatment resistance. The complex cellular and molecular network that regulates cancer stem cells and the role that inflammation plays in cancer progression are slowly being elucidated. Cytokines, secreted by tumour associated immune cells, activate the necessary pathways required by cancer stem cells to facilitate cancer stem cells progressing through the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and migrating to distant sites. Once in situ, these cancer stem cells can secrete their own attractants, thus providing an environment whereby these cells can continue to propagate the tumour in a secondary niche.

  4. Porcine embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa Jane

    2008-01-01

    The development of porcine embryonic stem cell lines (pESC) has received renewed interest given the advances being made in the production of immunocompatible transgenic pigs. However, difficulties are evident in the production of pESCs in-vitro. This may largely be attributable to differences...

  5. Bioreactor Engineering of Stem Cell Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Nina; Marolt, Darja; Cimetta, Elisa; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells hold promise to revolutionize modern medicine by development of new therapies, disease models and drug screening systems. Standard cell culture systems have limited biological relevance because they do not recapitulate the complex 3-dimensional interactions and biophysical cues that characterize the in vivo environment. In this review, we discuss the current advances in engineering stem cell environments using novel biomaterials and bioreactor technologies. We also reflect on the challenges the field is currently facing with regard to translation of stem cell based therapies into the clinic. PMID:23531529

  6. Materials as stem cell regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, William L.; McDevitt, Todd C.; Engler, Adam J.

    2014-06-01

    The stem cell/material interface is a complex, dynamic microenvironment in which the cell and the material cooperatively dictate one another's fate: the cell by remodelling its surroundings, and the material through its inherent properties (such as adhesivity, stiffness, nanostructure or degradability). Stem cells in contact with materials are able to sense their properties, integrate cues via signal propagation and ultimately translate parallel signalling information into cell fate decisions. However, discovering the mechanisms by which stem cells respond to inherent material characteristics is challenging because of the highly complex, multicomponent signalling milieu present in the stem cell environment. In this Review, we discuss recent evidence that shows that inherent material properties may be engineered to dictate stem cell fate decisions, and overview a subset of the operative signal transduction mechanisms that have begun to emerge. Further developments in stem cell engineering and mechanotransduction are poised to have substantial implications for stem cell biology and regenerative medicine.

  7. PTEN, Stem Cells, and Cancer Stem Cells*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Reginald; Wu, Hong

    2009-01-01

    Like normal stem cells, “cancer stem cells” have the capacity for indefinite proliferation and generation of new cancerous tissues through self-renewal and differentiation. Among the major intracellular signaling pathways, WNT, SHH, and NOTCH are known to be important in regulating normal stem cell activities, and their alterations are associated with tumorigenesis. It has become clear recently that PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue) is also critical for stem cell...

  8. Application of Stem Cells in Orthopedics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Andreas; van Griensven, Martijn; Imhoff, Andreas B.; Buchmann, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell research plays an important role in orthopedic regenerative medicine today. Current literature provides us with promising results from animal research in the fields of bone, tendon, and cartilage repair. While early clinical results are already published for bone and cartilage repair, the data about tendon repair is limited to animal studies. The success of these techniques remains inconsistent in all three mentioned areas. This may be due to different application techniques varying from simple mesenchymal stem cell injection up to complex tissue engineering. However, the ideal carrier for the stem cells still remains controversial. This paper aims to provide a better understanding of current basic research and clinical data concerning stem cell research in bone, tendon, and cartilage repair. Furthermore, a focus is set on different stem cell application techniques in tendon reconstruction, cartilage repair, and filling of bone defects. PMID:22550505

  9. Stem Cell Banking for Regenerative and Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David T

    2014-02-26

    Regenerative medicine, tissue engineering and gene therapy offer the opportunity to treat and cure many of today's intractable afflictions. These approaches to personalized medicine often utilize stem cells to accomplish these goals. However, stem cells can be negatively affected by donor variables such as age and health status at the time of collection, compromising their efficacy. Stem cell banking offers the opportunity to cryogenically preserve stem cells at their most potent state for later use in these applications. Practical stem cell sources include bone marrow, umbilical cord blood and tissue, and adipose tissue. Each of these sources contains stem cells that can be obtained from most individuals, without too much difficulty and in an economical fashion. This review will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each stem cell source, factors to be considered when contemplating banking each stem cell source, the methodology required to bank each stem cell source, and finally, current and future clinical uses of each stem cell source.

  10. Stem cells and genetic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad S.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we have discussed a role of stem cells in the treatment of genetic diseases including cochlear and retinal regeneration. The most perceptive use of stem cells at the genetic diseases is cellular repair of tissues affected by a genetic mutation when stem cells without such mutation are transplanted to restore normal tissue function.

  11. Advances in stem cell research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@In 1998, biologists Thomson and Gearhart successfully derived stem cells from human embryos. One year later, several researchers discovered that adult stem cells still retain the ability to be differentiated into unrelated types of cells. Advances in stem cell research open a promising direction for applied medical science. Moreover, it may also force scientists to reconsider the fundamental theory about how cells grow up. Stem cell research was considered by Science as the top of the ten breakthroughs of science of the year[1]. This paper gives a survey of recent advances in stem cell research. 1 Overview In the 1980s, embryonic stem cell and/or embryonic germ cell line (ES cell line, EG cell line) of multifarious mammalian animals, especially those of non-human pri-mates, had been established. In 1998, Thomson and Shamblott obtained ES, EG cell lines from human blasto-cysts and gonad ridges of early human embryos, respec-tively. Their research brought up an ethical debate about whether human embryos can be used as experimental materials. It was not appeased until 1999 when research-ers discovered that stem cells from adults still retain the ability to become different kinds of tissue cells. For in-stance, brain cells can become blood cells[2], and cells from bone marrow can become cells in liver. Scientists believe, for a long time, that cells can only be developed from early pluripotent embryo cells; the differentiation potential of stem cells from mature tissues is restricted to only one of the cell types of the tissue where stem cells are obtained. Recent stem cell researches, however, sub-verted the traditional view of stem cells. These discoveries made scientists speed ahead with the work on adult stem cells, hoping to discover whether their promise will rival that of ES cells.

  12. Plant stem cells as innovation in cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moruś, Martyna; Baran, Monika; Rost-Roszkowska, Magdalena; Skotnicka-Graca, Urszula

    2014-01-01

    The stem cells thanks to their ability of unlimited division number or transformation into different cell types creating organs, are responsible for regeneration processes. Depending on the organism in which the stem cells exists, they divide to the plant or animal ones. The later group includes the stem cells existing in both embryo's and adult human's organs. It includes, among others, epidermal stem cells, located in the hair follicle relieves and also in its basal layers, and responsible for permanent regeneration of the epidermis. Temporary science looks for method suitable for stimulation of the epidermis stem cells, amongst the other by delivery of e.g., growth factors for proliferation that decrease with the age. One of the methods is the use of the plant cell culture technology, including a number of methods that should ensure growth of plant cells, issues or organs in the environment with the microorganism-free medium. It uses abilities of the different plant cells to dedifferentiation into stem cells and coming back to the pluripotent status. The extracts obtained this way from the plant stem cells are currently used for production of both common or professional care cosmetics. This work describes exactly impact of the plant stem cell extract, coming from one type of the common apple tree (Uttwiler Spätlauber) to human skin as one of the first plant sorts, which are used in cosmetology and esthetic dermatology.

  13. Stem cell research:from molecular physiology to therapeutic applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Stem cell research promises remedies to many devastating diseases that are currently incurable, ranging from diabetes and Parkinson’s disease to paralysis. Totipotent embryonic stem cells have great potential for generating a wide

  14. Biomaterial-stem cell interactions and their impact on stem cell response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oziemlak-Schaap, Aneta M.; Kuhn, Philipp T.; van Kooten, Theo G.; van Rijn, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    In this review, current research in the field of biomaterial properties for directing stem cells are discussed and placed in a critical perspective. Regenerative medicine, in which stem cells play a crucial role, has become an interdisciplinary field between cell biology and materials science. New i

  15. Biomaterial-stem cell interactions and their impact on stem cell response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oziemlak-Schaap, Aneta M.; Kuhn, Philipp T.; van Kooten, Theo G.; van Rijn, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    In this review, current research in the field of biomaterial properties for directing stem cells are discussed and placed in a critical perspective. Regenerative medicine, in which stem cells play a crucial role, has become an interdisciplinary field between cell biology and materials science. New

  16. The effect of five proteins on stem cells used for osteoblast differentiation and proliferation: a current review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatakun, P; Núñez-Toldrà, R; Díaz López, E J; Gil-Recio, C; Martínez-Sarrà, E; Hernández-Alfaro, F; Ferrés-Padró, E; Giner-Tarrida, L; Atari, M

    2014-01-01

    Bone-tissue engineering is a therapeutic target in the field of dental implant and orthopedic surgery. It is therefore essential to find a microenvironment that enhances the growth and differentiation of osteoblasts both from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and those derived from dental pulp. The aim of this review is to determine the relationship among the proteins fibronectin (FN), osteopontin (OPN), tenascin (TN), bone sialoprotein (BSP), and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP2) and their ability to coat different types of biomaterials and surfaces to enhance osteoblast differentiation. Pre-treatment of biomaterials with FN during the initial phase of osteogenic differentiation on all types of surfaces, including slotted titanium and polymers, provides an ideal microenvironment that enhances adhesion, morphology, and proliferation of pluripotent and multipotent cells. Likewise, in the second stage of differentiation, surface coating with BMP2 decreases the diameter and the pore size of the scaffold, causing better adhesion and reduced proliferation of BMP-MSCs. Coating oligomerization surfaces with OPN and BSP promotes cell adhesion, but it is clear that the polymeric coating material BSP alone is insufficient to induce priming of MSCs and functional osteoblastic differentiation in vivo. Finally, TN is involved in mineralization and can accelerate new bone formation in a multicellular environment but has no effect on the initial stage of osteogenesis.

  17. Hematopoietic cell differentiation from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells, both embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, are undifferentiated cells that can self-renew and potentially differentiate into all hematopoietic lineages, such as hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), hematopoietic progenitor cells and mature hematopoietic cells in the presence of a suitable culture system. Establishment of pluripotent stem cells provides a comprehensive model to study early hematopoietic development and has emerged as a powerful research tool to explore regenerative medicine. Nowadays, HSC transplantation and hematopoietic cell transfusion have successfully cured some patients, especially in malignant hematological diseases. Owing to a shortage of donors and a limited number of the cells, hematopoietic cell induction from pluripotent stem cells has been regarded as an alternative source of HSCs and mature hematopoietic cells for intended therapeutic purposes. Pluripotent stem cells are therefore extensively utilized to facilitate better understanding in hematopoietic development by recapitulating embryonic development in vivo, in which efficient strategies can be easily designed and deployed for the generation of hematopoietic lineages in vitro. We hereby review the current progress of hematopoietic cell induction from embryonic stem/induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:23796405

  18. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells in Aesthetic Surgery: A Mixed Methods Evaluation of the Current Clinical Trial, Intellectual Property, and Regulatory Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Zeeshaan; Halioua-Haubold, Celine-Lea; Roberts, Mackenna; Urso-Baiarda, Fulvio; Branford, Oliver A; Brindley, David A; Davies, Benjamin M; Pettitt, David

    2017-06-07

    Adipose tissue, which can be readily harvested via a number of liposuction techniques, offers an easily accessible and abundant source of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). Consequently, ASCs have become an increasingly popular reconstructive option and a novel means of aesthetic soft tissue augmentation. This paper examines recent advances in the aesthetic surgery field, extending beyond traditional review formats to incorporate a comprehensive analysis of current clinical trials, adoption status, and the commercialization pathway. Keyword searches were carried out on clinical trial databases to search for trials using ASCs for aesthetic indications. An intellectual property landscape was created using commercial software (Thomson Reuters Thomson Innovation, New York, NY). Analysis of who is claiming what in respect of ASC use in aesthetic surgery for commercial purposes was analyzed by reviewing the patent landscape in relation to these techniques. Key international regulatory guidelines were also summarized. Completed clinical trials lacked robust controls, employed small sample sizes, and lacked long-term follow-up data. Ongoing clinical trials still do not address such issues. In recent years, claims to intellectual property ownership have increased in the "aesthetic stem cell" domain, reflecting commercial interest in the area. However, significant translational barriers remain including regulatory challenges and ethical considerations. Further rigorous randomized controlled trials are required to delineate long-term clinical efficacy and safety. Providers should consider the introduction of patient reported outcome metrics to facilitate clinical adoption. Robust regulatory and ethical policies concerning stem cells and aesthetic surgery should be devised to discourage further growth of "stem cell tourism."

  19. Stem cell therapy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijuan Mao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of motor neurons. Currently, no effective therapy is available to treat ALS, except for Riluzole, which has only limited clinical benefits. Stem-cell-based therapy has been intensively and extensively studied as a potential novel treatment strategy for ALS and has been shown to be effective, at least to some extent. In this article, we will review the current state of research on the use of stem cell therapy in the treatment of ALS and discuss the most promising stem cells for the treatment of ALS.

  20. Mammary gland stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fridriksdottir, Agla J R; Petersen, Ole W; Rønnov-Jessen, Lone

    2011-01-01

    Distinct subsets of cells, including cells with stem cell-like properties, have been proposed to exist in normal human breast epithelium and breast carcinomas. The cellular origins of epithelial cells contributing to gland development, tissue homeostasis and cancer are, however, still poorly...... understood. The mouse is a widely used model of mammary gland development, both directly by studying the mouse mammary epithelial cells themselves and indirectly, by studying development, morphogenesis, differentiation and carcinogenesis of xenotransplanted human breast epithelium in vivo. While in early...... studies, human or mouse epithelium was implanted as fragments into the mouse gland, more recent technical progress has allowed the self-renewal capacity and differentiation potential of distinct cell populations or even individual cells to be interrogated. Here, we review and discuss similarities...

  1. Neurogenic differentiation of amniotic fluid stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, M; Mikula, M; Preitschopf, A; Feichtinger, M; Schipany, K; Hengstschläger, M

    2012-05-01

    In 2003, human amniotic fluid has been shown to contain stem cells expressing Oct-4, a marker for pluripotency. This finding initiated a rapidly growing and very promising new stem cell research field. Since then, amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells have been demonstrated to harbour the potential to differentiate into any of the three germ layers and to form three-dimensional aggregates, so-called embryoid bodies, known as the principal step in the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. Marker selection and minimal dilution approaches allow the establishment of monoclonal AFS cell lineages with high proliferation potential. AFS cells have a lower risk for tumour development and do not raise the ethical issues of embryonic stem cells. Compared to induced pluripotent stem cells, AFS cells do not need exogenic treatment to induce pluripotency, are chromosomal stable and do not harbour the epigenetic memory and accumulated somatic mutations of specific differentiated source cells. Compared to adult stem cells, AFS can be grown in larger quantities and show higher differentiation potential. Accordingly, in the recent past, AFS became increasingly accepted as an optimal tool for basic research and probably also for specific cell-based therapies. Here, we review the current knowledge on the neurogenic differentiation potential of AFS cells.

  2. Stem cells and small molecule screening: haploid embryonic stem cells as a new tool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bi WU; Wei LI; Liu WANG; Zhong-hua LIU; Xiao-yang ZHAO

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells can both self-renew and differentiate into various cell types under certain conditions,which makes them a good model for development and disease studies.Recently,chemical approaches have been widely applied in stem cell biology by promoting stem cell self-renewal,proliferation,differentiation and somatic cell reprogramming using specific small molecules.Conversely,stem cells and their derivatives also provide an efficient and robust platform for small molecule and drug screening.Here,we review the current research and applications of small molecules that modulate stem cell self-renewal and differentiation and improve reprogramming,as well as the applications that use stem cells as a tool for small molecule screening.Moreover,we introduce the recent advance in haploid embryonic stem cells research.Haploid embryonic stem cells maintain haploidy and stable growth over extensive passages,possess the ability to differentiate into all three germ layers in vitro and in vivo,and contribute to the germlines of chimeras when injected into blastocysts.Androgenetic haploid stem cells can also be used in place of sperm to produce fertile progeny after intracytoplasmic injection into mature oocytes.Such characteristics demonstrate that haploid stem cells are a new approach for genetic studies at both the cellular and animal levels and that they are a valuable platform for future small molecule screening.

  3. Cancer stem cells, cancer cell plasticity and radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Since the first prospective identification of cancer stem cells in solid cancers the cancer stem cell hypothesis has reemerged as a research topic of increasing interest. It postulates that solid cancers are organized hierarchically with a small number of cancer stem cells driving tumor growth, repopulation after injury and metastasis. They give rise to differentiated progeny, which lack these features. The model predicts that for any therapy to provide cure, all cancer stem cells have to be eliminated while the survival of differentiated progeny is less critical. In this review we discuss recent reports challenging the idea of a unidirectional differentiation of cancer cells. These reports provide evidence supporting the idea that non-stem cancer cells exhibit a remarkable degree of plasticity that allows them to re-acquire cancer stem cell traits, especially in the context of radiation therapy. We summarize conditions under which differentiation is reversed and discuss the current knowledge of the underlying mechanisms.

  4. Overcoming Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karobi Moitra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The principle mechanism of protection of stem cells is through the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters. These transporters serve as the guardians of the stem cell population in the body. Unfortunately these very same ABC efflux pumps afford protection to cancer stem cells in tumors, shielding them from the adverse effects of chemotherapy. A number of strategies to circumvent the function of these transporters in cancer stem cells are currently under investigation. These strategies include the development of competitive and allosteric modulators, nanoparticle mediated delivery of inhibitors, targeted transcriptional regulation of ABC transporters, miRNA mediated inhibition, and targeting of signaling pathways that modulate ABC transporters. The role of ABC transporters in cancer stem cells will be explored in this paper and strategies aimed at overcoming drug resistance caused by these particular transporters will also be discussed.

  5. Cellular quiescence in mammary stem cells and breast tumor stem cells: got testable hypotheses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmes, David C; DiRenzo, James

    2009-03-01

    Cellular quiescence is a state of reversible cell cycle arrest and has more recently been shown to be a blockade to differentiation and to correlate with resistance to cancer chemotherapeutics and other xenobiotics; features that are common to adult stem cells and possibly tumor stem cells. The biphasic kinetics of mammary regeneration, coupled to its cyclic endocrine control suggest that mammary stem cells most likely divide during a narrow window of the regenerative cycle and return to a state of quiescence. This would enable them to retain their proliferative capacity, resist differentiation signals and preserve their prolonged life span. There is accumulating evidence that mammary stem cells and other adult stem cells utilize quiescence for this purpose, however the degree to which tumor stem cells do so is largely unknown. The retained proliferative capacity of mammary stem cells likely enables them to accumulate and harbor mutations that lead to breast cancer initiation. However it is currently unclear if these causative lesions lead to defective or deranged quiescence in mammary stem cells. Evidence of such effects could potentially lead to the development of diagnostic systems that monitor mammary stem cell quiescence or activation. Such systems may be useful for the evaluation of patients who are at significant risk of breast cancer. Additionally quiescence has been postulated to contribute to therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence. This review aims to evaluate what is known about the mechanisms governing cellular quiescence and the role of tumor stem cell quiescence in breast cancer recurrence.

  6. Stem cells in dentistry--part I: stem cell sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egusa, Hiroshi; Sonoyama, Wataru; Nishimura, Masahiro; Atsuta, Ikiru; Akiyama, Kentaro

    2012-07-01

    Stem cells can self-renew and produce different cell types, thus providing new strategies to regenerate missing tissues and treat diseases. In the field of dentistry, adult mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have been identified in several oral and maxillofacial tissues, which suggests that the oral tissues are a rich source of stem cells, and oral stem and mucosal cells are expected to provide an ideal source for genetically reprogrammed cells such as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Furthermore, oral tissues are expected to be not only a source but also a therapeutic target for stem cells, as stem cell and tissue engineering therapies in dentistry continue to attract increasing clinical interest. Part I of this review outlines various types of intra- and extra-oral tissue-derived stem cells with regard to clinical availability and applications in dentistry. Additionally, appropriate sources of stem cells for regenerative dentistry are discussed with regard to differentiation capacity, accessibility and possible immunomodulatory properties.

  7. When is The Best Time of Stem Cell Transplantation for Treating Acute Myocardial Infarction——A Brief Meta-analysis of Current Clinic Trials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The best time of stem cells transplantation for treating acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is still to be followed with interest and a focus issue for clinical cardiologist. A brief meta-analysis of clinical trials about timing-window and therapeutic effects of stem cell transplantation for treating AMI will be made out in this article.

  8. Stem Cell Tracking by Nanotechnologies

    OpenAIRE

    Marzia Belicchi; Yvan Torrente; Franco Rustichelli; Fabrizio Fiori; Paola Razini; Silvia Erratico; Chiara Villa

    2010-01-01

    Advances in stem cell research have provided important understanding of the cell biology and offered great promise for developing new strategies for tissue regeneration. The beneficial effects of stem cell therapy depend also by the development of new approachs for the track of stem cells in living subjects over time after transplantation. Recent developments in the use of nanotechnologies have contributed to advance of the high-resolution in vivo imaging methods, including positron emission ...

  9. Assaying embryotoxicity in the test tube: current limitations of the embryonic stem cell test (EST) challenging its applicability domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebeling, Christian; Hayess, Katrin; Peters, Annelieke K; Steemans, Margino; Spielmann, Horst; Luch, Andreas; Seiler, Andrea E M

    2012-05-01

    Testing for embryotoxicity in vitro is an attractive alternative to animal experimentation. The embryonic stem cell test (EST) is such a method, and it has been formally validated by the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods. A number of recent studies have underscored the potential of this method. However, the EST performed well below the 78% accuracy expected from the validation study using a new set of chemicals and pharmaceutical compounds, and also of toxicity criteria, tested to enlarge the database of the validated EST as part of the Work Package III of the ReProTect Project funded within the 6th Framework Programme of the European Union. To assess the performance and applicability domain of the EST we present a detailed review of the substances and their effects in the EST being nitrofen, ochratoxin A, D-penicillamine, methylazoxymethanol, lovastatin, papaverine, warfarin, β-aminopropionitrile, dinoseb, furosemide, doxylamine, pravastatin, and metoclopramide. By delineation of the molecular mechanisms of the substances we identify six categories of reasons for misclassifications. Some of these limitations might also affect other in vitro methods assessing embryotoxicity. Substances that fall into these categories need to be included in future validation sets and in validation guidelines for embryotoxicity testing. Most importantly, we suggest conceivable improvements and additions to the EST which will resolve most of the limitations.

  10. Characterization of human neural differentiation from pluripotent stem cells using proteomics/PTMomics--current state-of-the-art and challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melo-Braga, Marcella Nunes; Meyer, Morten; Zeng, Xianmin;

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are unspecialized cells capable of self-renewal and to differentiate into the large variety of cells in the body. The possibility to differentiate these cells into neural precursors and neural cells in vitro provides the opportunity to study neural development, nerve cell biology, neur...

  11. Stem cell tracking by nanotechnologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Chiara; Erratico, Silvia; Razini, Paola; Fiori, Fabrizio; Rustichelli, Franco; Torrente, Yvan; Belicchi, Marzia

    2010-03-12

    Advances in stem cell research have provided important understanding of the cell biology and offered great promise for developing new strategies for tissue regeneration. The beneficial effects of stem cell therapy depend also by the development of new approachs for the track of stem cells in living subjects over time after transplantation. Recent developments in the use of nanotechnologies have contributed to advance of the high-resolution in vivo imaging methods, including positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and X-Ray computed microtomography (microCT). This review examines the use of nanotechnologies for stem cell tracking.

  12. Stem Cell Tracking by Nanotechnologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia Belicchi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Advances in stem cell research have provided important understanding of the cell biology and offered great promise for developing new strategies for tissue regeneration. The beneficial effects of stem cell therapy depend also by the development of new approachs for the track of stem cells in living subjects over time after transplantation. Recent developments in the use of nanotechnologies have contributed to advance of the high-resolution in vivo imaging methods, including positron emission tomography (PET, single-photon emission tomography (SPECT, magnetic resonance (MR imaging, and X-Ray computed microtomography (microCT. This review examines the use of nanotechnologies for stem cell tracking.

  13. Cancer stem cells and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, Katia; Fodde, Riccardo

    2012-06-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a subpopulation of tumour cells endowed with self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capacity but also with an innate resistance to cytotoxic agents, a feature likely to pose major clinical challenges towards the complete eradication of minimal residual disease in cancer patients. Operationally, CSCs are defined by their tumour-propagating ability when serially transplanted into immune-compromised mice and by their capacity to fully recapitulate the original heterogeneity of cell types observed in the primary lesions they are derived from. CSCs were first identified in haematopoietic malignancies and later in a broad spectrum of solid tumours including those of the breast, colon and brain. Notably, several CSC characteristics are relevant to metastasis, such as motility, invasiveness and, as mentioned above, resistance to DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Here, we have reviewed the current literature on the relation between CSCs and metastasis formation. Preliminary studies on cancer cell lines and patient-derived material suggest a rate-limiting role for stem-like cells in the processes of tumour cell dissemination and metastasis formation. However, additional studies are needed to deliver formal proof of their identity as the cell of origin of recurrences at distant organ sites. Nevertheless, several studies have already provided pre-clinical evidence of the efficacy of novel therapies directed against disseminated CSCs.

  14. Stem cell tourism and public education: the missing elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Master, Zubin; Robertson, Kelsey; Frederick, Daniel; Rachul, Christen; Caulfield, Timothy

    2014-09-04

    Stem cell tourism describes the Internet-based industry where in patients receive unproven stem cell interventions. To better inform the public, several organizations provide educational material on stem cell therapies and tourism; however, an assessment of the currently available resources reveals a lack of comprehensive information, suggesting that further efforts are needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Stem cells and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, LingLing; Hong, Tao

    2008-04-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the neurodegenerative changes or apoptosis of neurons involved in networks, which are important to specific physiological functions. With the development of old-aging society, the incidence of neurodegenerative diseases is on the increase. However, it is difficult to diagnose for most of neurodegenerative diseases. At present, there are too few effective therapies. Advances in stem cell biology have raised the hope and possibility for the therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, stem cells have been widely attempted to treat neurodegenerative diseases of animal model. Here we review the progress and prospects of various stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cell and neural stem cells and so on, for the treatments of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington' disease and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Lou Gehrig's disease.

  16. Stem cells and neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the neurodegenerative changes or apoptosis of neurons involved in networks, which are important to specific physiological functions. With the de-velopment of old-aging society, the incidence of neurodegenerative diseases is on the increase. How-ever, it is difficult to diagnose for most of neurodegenerative diseases. At present, there are too few effective therapies. Advances in stem cell biology have raised the hope and possibility for the therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, stem cells have been widely attempted to treat neurodegen-erative diseases of animal model. Here we review the progress and prospects of various stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cell and neural stem cells and so on, for the treatments of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Hunt-ington’s disease and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Lou Gehrig’s disease.

  17. Stem cells and neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU LingLing; HONG Tao

    2008-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the neurodegenerative changes or apoptosis of neurons involved in networks, which are important to specific physiological functions. With the development of old-aging society, the incidence of neurodegenerative diseases is on the increase. However, it is difficult to diagnose for most of neurodegenerative diseases. At present, there are too few effective therapies. Advances in stem cell biology have raised the hope and possibility for the therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, stem cells have been widely attempted to treat neurodegenerative diseases of animal model. Here we review the progress and prospects of various stem cells,including embryonic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cell and neural stem cells and so on, for the treatments of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Lou Gehrig's disease.

  18. Incorporating protein transduction domains (PTD) within intracellular proteins associated with the 'stemness' phenotype. Novel use of such recombinant 'fusion' proteins to overcome current limitations of applying autologous adult stem cells in regenerative medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Boon Chin; Cao, Tong

    2005-01-01

    Adult stem cells originating from post-natal tissues hold tremendous promise in regenerative medicine. Nevertheless, there are several deficiencies of adult stem cells that would limit their application in transplantation therapy, in particular their relative scarcity, restricted multi-potency and limited proliferative capacity in vitro. A possible approach to overcome these limitations would be to genetically modulate adult stem cells to strongly express genes that are closely associated with the 'stemness' phenotype. Overwhelming safety concerns would preclude the direct application of recombinant DNA technology in genetic modulation. Moreover, constitutive expression of 'stemness' genes would prevent adult stem cells from participating in tissue/organ regeneration upon transplantation. A novel alternative would be to incorporate protein transduction domains within intracellular proteins (i.e. transcription factors) that are associated with the 'stemness' phenotype. Such recombinant fusion proteins would then have the ability to translocate across the cell membrane and be internalized within the cytosol, thereby enabling them to exert a gene-modulatory effect on the cell, without any permanent genetic alteration. This would be particularly useful for maintaining the 'stemness' of adult stem cell populations during extensive ex vivo proliferation, to generate adequate cell numbers for transplantation therapy.

  19. Colon cancer stem cells: implications in carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Matthew A.; Majumdar, Adhip P. N.

    2014-01-01

    The cancer stem cell model was described for hematologic malignancies in 1997 and since then evidence has emerged to support it for many solid tumors as well, including colon cancer. This model proposes that certain cells within the tumor mass are pluripotent and capable of self-renewal and have an enhanced ability to initiate distant metastasis. The cancer stem cell model has important implications for cancer treatment, since most current therapies target actively proliferating cells and may not be effective against the cancer stem cells that are responsible for recurrence. In recent years great progress has been made in identifying markers of both normal and malignant colon stem cells. Proteins proposed as colon cancer stem cell markers include CD133, CD44, CD166, ALDH1A1, Lgr5, and several others. In this review we consider the evidence for these proteins as colon cancer stem cell markers and as prognostic indicators of colon cancer survival. Additionally, we discuss potential functions of these proteins and the implications this may have for development of therapies that target colon cancer stem cells. PMID:21196254

  20. Human epithelial hair follicle stem cells and their progeny: current state of knowledge, the widening gap in translational research and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purba, Talveen S; Haslam, Iain S; Poblet, Enrique; Jiménez, Francisco; Gandarillas, Alberto; Izeta, Ander; Paus, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Epithelial hair follicle stem cells (eHFSCs) are required to generate, maintain and renew the continuously cycling hair follicle (HF), supply cells that produce the keratinized hair shaft and aid in the reepithelialization of injured skin. Therefore, their study is biologically and clinically important, from alopecia to carcinogenesis and regenerative medicine. However, human eHFSCs remain ill defined compared to their murine counterparts, and it is unclear which murine eHFSC markers really apply to the human HF. We address this by reviewing current concepts on human eHFSC biology, their immediate progeny and their molecular markers, focusing on Keratin 15 and 19, CD200, CD34, PHLDA1, and EpCAM/Ber-EP4. After delineating how human eHFSCs may be selectively targeted experimentally, we close by defining as yet unmet key challenges in human eHFSC research. The ultimate goal is to transfer emerging concepts from murine epithelial stem cell biology to human HF physiology and pathology.

  1. Curbing stem cell tourism in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner-Roloff, Madelein; Pepper, Michael S

    2013-12-01

    Stem cells have received much attention globally due in part to the immense therapeutic potential they harbor. Unfortunately, malpractice and exploitation (financial and emotional) of vulnerable patients have also drawn attention to this field as a result of the detrimental consequences experienced by some individuals that have undergone unproven stem cell therapies. South Africa has had limited exposure to stem cells and their applications and, while any exploitation is detrimental to the field of stem cells, South Africa is particularly vulnerable in this regard. The current absence of adequate legislation and the inability to enforce existing legislation, coupled to the sea of misinformation available on the Internet could lead to an increase in illegitimate stem cell practices in South Africa. Circumstances are already precarious because of a lack of understanding of concepts involved in stem cell applications. What is more, credible and easily accessible information is not available to the public. This in turn cultivates fears born out of existing superstitions, cultural beliefs, rituals and practices. Certain cultural or religious concerns could potentially hinder the effective application of stem cell therapies in South Africa and novel ways of addressing these concerns are necessary. Understanding how scientific progress and its implementation will affect each individual and, consequently, the community, will be of cardinal importance to the success of the fields of stem cell therapy and regenerative medicine in South Africa. A failure to understand the ethical, cultural or moral ramifications when new scientific concepts are introduced could hinder the efficacy and speed of bringing discoveries to the patient. Neglecting proper procedure for establishing the field would lead to long delays in gaining public support in South Africa. Understanding the dangers of stem cell tourism - where vulnerable patients are subjected to unproven stem cell therapies that

  2. Curbing stem cell tourism in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madelein Meissner-Roloff

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have received much attention globally due in part to the immense therapeutic potential they harbor. Unfortunately, malpractice and exploitation (financial and emotional of vulnerable patients have also drawn attention to this field as a result of the detrimental consequences experienced by some individuals that have undergone unproven stem cell therapies. South Africa has had limited exposure to stem cells and their applications and, while any exploitation is detrimental to the field of stem cells, South Africa is particularly vulnerable in this regard. The current absence of adequate legislation and the inability to enforce existing legislation, coupled to the sea of misinformation available on the Internet could lead to an increase in illegitimate stem cell practices in South Africa. Circumstances are already precarious because of a lack of understanding of concepts involved in stem cell applications. What is more, credible and easily accessible information is not available to the public. This in turn cultivates fears born out of existing superstitions, cultural beliefs, rituals and practices. Certain cultural or religious concerns could potentially hinder the effective application of stem cell therapies in South Africa and novel ways of addressing these concerns are necessary. Understanding how scientific progress and its implementation will affect each individual and, consequently, the community, will be of cardinal importance to the success of the fields of stem cell therapy and regenerative medicine in South Africa. A failure to understand the ethical, cultural or moral ramifications when new scientific concepts are introduced could hinder the efficacy and speed of bringing discoveries to the patient. Neglecting proper procedure for establishing the field would lead to long delays in gaining public support in South Africa. Understanding the dangers of stem cell tourism – where vulnerable patients are subjected to unproven stem

  3. Resurrection of Neurodegenerative diseases via Stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siranjeevi Nagaraj

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs are complex disorders that degenerates central nervous system. To this end, we have achieved only palliative treatments and their success is limited. Emerging studies suggest stem cells could be an alternative to recover lost neural network. Transplanting stem cells for replacing damaged neurons is a pivotal step in cell replacement therapies. In this article, NDDs and their pathology, current methods of combating NDDs and potentiality of stem cells in treating NDDs have been reviewed briefly. In addition to this , technical issues that hamper clinical applications of stem cells in creating cellular models and grafted cells for neuron resurrection have been discussed. [Biomed Res Ther 2016; 3(7.000: 699-706

  4. Identification of Abnormal Stem Cells Using Raman Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda; Novikov, Sergey M; Beermann, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    The clinical use of stem cells in cell-based therapeutics for degenerative diseases requires development of criteria for defining normal stem cells to ensure safe transplantation. Currently, identification of abnormal from normal stem cells is based on extensive ex vivo and in vivo testing. Raman...... microscopy is a label-free method for rapid and sensitive detection of changes in cells' bio-molecular composition. Here, we report that by using Raman spectroscopy, we were able to map the distribution of different biomolecules within 2 types of stem cells: adult human bone marrow-derived stromal stem cells...... and human embryonic stem cells and to identify reproducible differences in Raman's spectral characteristics that distinguished genetically abnormal and transformed stem cells from their normal counterparts. Raman microscopy can be prospectively employed as a method for identifying abnormal stem cells in ex...

  5. Breast cancer stem cells and radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Tiffany Marie

    2007-12-01

    The present studies explore the response of breast cancer stem cells (BCSC's) to radiation and the implications for clinical cancer treatment. Current cancer therapy eliminates bulky tumor mass but may fail to eradicate a critical tumor initiating cell population termed "cancer stem cells". These cells are potentially responsible for tumor formation, metastasis, and recurrence. Recently cancer stem cells have been prospectively identified in various malignancies, including breast cancer. The breast cancer stem cell has been identified by the surface markers CD44+/CD24 -(low). In vitro mammosphere cultures allow for the enrichment of the cancer stem cell population and were utilized in order to study differential characteristics of BCSC's. Initial studies found that BCSC's display increased radiation resistance as compared to other non-stem tumor cells. This resistance was accompanied by decreased H2AX phosphorylation, decreased reactive oxygen species formation, and increased phosphorylation of the checkpoint protein Chk1. These studies suggest differential DNA damage and repair within the BCSC population. Studies then examined the consequences of fractionated radiation on the BCSC population and found a two-fold increase in BCSC's following 5 x 3Gy. This observation begins to tie cancer stem cell self-renewal to the clinical stem cell phenomenon of accelerated repopulation. Accelerated repopulation is observed when treatment gaps increase between sequential fractions of radiotherapy and may be due to cancer stem cell symmetric self-renewal. The balance between asymmetric and symmetric stem cell division is vital for proper maintenance; deregulation is likely linked to cancer initiation and progression. The developmental Notch-1 pathway was found to regulate BCSC division. Over-expressing the constitutively active Notch-1-ICD in MCF7 cells produced an increase in the BCSC population. Additionally, radiation was observed to increase the expression of the Notch-1

  6. Stem cell applications in military medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopherson, Gregory T; Nesti, Leon J

    2011-10-19

    There are many similarities between health issues affecting military and civilian patient populations, with the exception of the relatively small but vital segment of active soldiers who experience high-energy blast injuries during combat. A rising incidence of major injuries from explosive devices in recent campaigns has further complicated treatment and recovery, highlighting the need for tissue regenerative options and intensifying interest in the possible role of stem cells for military medicine. In this review we outline the array of tissue-specific injuries typically seen in modern combat - as well as address a few complications unique to soldiers--and discuss the state of current stem cell research in addressing each area. Embryonic, induced-pluripotent and adult stem cell sources are defined, along with advantages and disadvantages unique to each cell type. More detailed stem cell sources are described in the context of each tissue of interest, including neural, cardiopulmonary, musculoskeletal and sensory tissues, with brief discussion of their potential role in regenerative medicine moving forward. Additional commentary is given to military stem cell applications aside from regenerative medicine, such as blood pharming, immunomodulation and drug screening, with an overview of stem cell banking and the unique opportunity provided by the military and civilian overlap of stem cell research.

  7. Calcium signaling in pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apáti, Ágota; Pászty, Katalin; Erdei, Zsuzsa; Szebényi, Kornélia; Homolya, László; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2012-04-28

    Pluripotent stem cells represent a new source of biological material allowing the exploration of signaling phenomena during normal cell development and differentiation. Still, the calcium signaling pathways and intracellular calcium responses to various ligands or stress conditions have not been sufficiently explored as yet in embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells and in their differentiated offspring. This is partly due to the special culturing conditions of these cell types, the rapid morphological and functional changes in heterogeneous cell populations during early differentiation, and methodological problems in cellular calcium measurements. In this paper, we review the currently available data in the literature on calcium signaling in pluripotent stem cells and discuss the potential shortcomings of these studies. Various assay methods are surveyed for obtaining reliable data both in undifferentiated embryonic stem cells and in specific, stem cell-derived human tissues. In this paper, we present the modulation of calcium signaling in human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and in their derivates; mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells and cardiac tissues using the fluorescent calcium indicator Fluo-4 and confocal microscopy. LPA, trypsin and angiotensin II were effective in inducing calcium signals both in HUES9 and MSCl cells. Histamine and thrombin induced calcium signal exclusively in the MSCl cells, while ATP was effective only in HUES9 cells. There was no calcium signal evoked by GABA, even at relatively high concentrations. In stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes a rapid increase in the beating rate and an increase of the calcium signal peaks could be observed after the addition of adrenaline, while verapamil led to a strong decrease in cellular calcium and stopped spontaneous contractions in a relaxed state.

  8. Stem cell ageing and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulle, Stefania; Centurione, Lucia; Mancinelli, Rosa; Sancilio, Silvia; Manzoli, Francesco Antonio; Di Pietro, Roberta

    2012-01-01

    Ageing has been defined as the process of deterioration of many body functions over the lifespan of an individual. In spite of the number of different theories about ageing, there is a general consensus in identifying ageing effects in a reduced capacity to regenerate injured tissues or organs and an increased propensity to infections and cancer. In recent years the stem cell theory of ageing has gained much attention. Adult stem cells residing in mammalian tissues are essential for tissue homeostasis and repair throughout adult life. With advancing age, the highly regulated molecular signalling necessary to ensure proper cellular, tissue, and organ homeostasis loses coordination and leads, as a consequence, to a compromised potential of regeneration and repair of damaged cells and tissues. Although a complete comprehension of the molecular mechanisms involved in stem cell ageing and apoptosis is far to be reached, recent studies are beginning to unravel the processes involved in stem cell ageing, particularly in adult skeletal muscle stem cells, namely satellite cells. Thus, the focus of this review is to analyse the relationship between stem cell ageing and apoptosis with a peculiar attention to human satellite cells as compared to haematopoietic stem cells. Undoubtedly, the knowledge of age-related changes of stem cells will help in understanding the ageing process itself and will provide novel therapeutic challenges for improved tissue regeneration.

  9. Strategies to Optimize Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy aims to replace damaged or aged cells with healthy functioning cells in congenital defects, tissue injuries, autoimmune disorders, and neurogenic degenerative diseases. Among various types of stem cells, adult stem cells (i.e., tissue-specific stem cells commit to becoming the functional cells from their tissue of origin. These cells are the most commonly used in cell-based therapy since they do not confer risk of teratomas, do not require fetal stem cell maneuvers and thus are free of ethical concerns, and they confer low immunogenicity (even if allogenous. The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of the art and advances in using stem cell therapy for tissue repair in solid organs. Here we address key factors in cell preparation, such as the source of adult stem cells, optimal cell types for implantation (universal mesenchymal stem cells vs. tissue-specific stem cells, or induced vs. non-induced stem cells, early or late passages of stem cells, stem cells with endogenous or exogenous growth factors, preconditioning of stem cells (hypoxia, growth factors, or conditioned medium, using various controlled release systems to deliver growth factors with hydrogels or microspheres to provide apposite interactions of stem cells and their niche. We also review several approaches of cell delivery that affect the outcomes of cell therapy, including the appropriate routes of cell administration (systemic, intravenous, or intraperitoneal vs. local administration, timing for cell therapy (immediate vs. a few days after injury, single injection of a large number of cells vs. multiple smaller injections, a single site for injection vs. multiple sites and use of rodents vs. larger animal models. Future directions of stem cell-based therapies are also discussed to guide potential clinical applications.

  10. Strategies to Optimize Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Tissue Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan; Zhou, Jingli; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Jin; Hu, Bo; Song, Jinlin; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2016-06-21

    Stem cell therapy aims to replace damaged or aged cells with healthy functioning cells in congenital defects, tissue injuries, autoimmune disorders, and neurogenic degenerative diseases. Among various types of stem cells, adult stem cells (i.e., tissue-specific stem cells) commit to becoming the functional cells from their tissue of origin. These cells are the most commonly used in cell-based therapy since they do not confer risk of teratomas, do not require fetal stem cell maneuvers and thus are free of ethical concerns, and they confer low immunogenicity (even if allogenous). The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of the art and advances in using stem cell therapy for tissue repair in solid organs. Here we address key factors in cell preparation, such as the source of adult stem cells, optimal cell types for implantation (universal mesenchymal stem cells vs. tissue-specific stem cells, or induced vs. non-induced stem cells), early or late passages of stem cells, stem cells with endogenous or exogenous growth factors, preconditioning of stem cells (hypoxia, growth factors, or conditioned medium), using various controlled release systems to deliver growth factors with hydrogels or microspheres to provide apposite interactions of stem cells and their niche. We also review several approaches of cell delivery that affect the outcomes of cell therapy, including the appropriate routes of cell administration (systemic, intravenous, or intraperitoneal vs. local administration), timing for cell therapy (immediate vs. a few days after injury), single injection of a large number of cells vs. multiple smaller injections, a single site for injection vs. multiple sites and use of rodents vs. larger animal models. Future directions of stem cell-based therapies are also discussed to guide potential clinical applications.

  11. [Stem cells and cardiac regeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Millan, Maria Ines; Lorenti, Alicia

    2006-01-01

    Stem cells are defined by virtue of their functional attributes: absence of tissue specific differentitated markers, capable of proliferation, able to self-maintain the population, able to produce a large number of differentiated, functional progeny, able to regenerate the tissue after injury. Cell therapy is an alternative for the treatment of several diseases, like cardiac diseases (cell cardiomyoplasty). A variety of stem cells could be used for cardiac repair: from cardiac and extracardiac sources. Each cell type has its own profile of advantages, limitations, and practicability issues in specific clinical settings. Differentiation of bone marrow stem cells to cardiomyocyte-like cells have been observed under different culture conditions. The presence of resident cardiac stem cell population capable of differentiation into cardiomyocyte or vascular lineage suggests that these cells could be used for cardiac tissue repair, and represent a great promise for clinical application. Stem cells mobilization by cytokines may also offer a strategy for cardiac regeneration. The use of stem cells (embryonic and adult) may hold the key to replacing cells lost in many devastating diseases. This potential benefit is a major focus for stem cell research.

  12. Time to Reconsider Stem Cell Induction Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Werner Denker

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in stem cell research suggest that it may be time to reconsider the current focus of stem cell induction strategies. During the previous five years, approximately, the induction of pluripotency in somatic cells, i.e., the generation of so-called ‘induced pluripotent stem cells’ (iPSCs, has become the focus of ongoing research in many stem cell laboratories, because this technology promises to overcome limitations (both technical and ethical seen in the production and use of embryonic stem cells (ESCs. A rapidly increasing number of publications suggest, however, that it is now possible to choose instead other, alternative ways of generating stem and progenitor cells bypassing pluripotency. These new strategies may offer important advantages with respect to ethics, as well as to safety considerations. The present communication discusses why these strategies may provide possibilities for an escape from the dilemma presented by pluripotent stem cells (self-organization potential, cloning by tetraploid complementation, patenting problems and tumor formation risk.

  13. Clinical grade adult stem cell banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumala, Sreedhar; Goebel, W Scott; Woods, Erik J

    2009-07-01

    There has been a great deal of scientific interest recently generated by the potential therapeutic applications of adult stem cells in human care but there are several challenges regarding quality and safety in clinical applications and a number of these challenges relate to the processing and banking of these cells ex-vivo. As the number of clinical trials and the variety of adult cells used in regenerative therapy increases, safety remains a primary concern. This has inspired many nations to formulate guidelines and standards for the quality of stem cell collection, processing, testing, banking, packaging and distribution. Clinically applicable cryopreservation and banking of adult stem cells offers unique opportunities to advance the potential uses and widespread implementation of these cells in clinical applications. Most current cryopreservation protocols include animal serum proteins and potentially toxic cryoprotectant additives (CPAs) that prevent direct use of these cells in human therapeutic applications. Long term cryopreservation of adult stem cells under good manufacturing conditions using animal product free solutions is critical to the widespread clinical implementation of ex-vivo adult stem cell therapies. Furthermore, to avoid any potential cryoprotectant related complications, reduced CPA concentrations and efficient post-thaw washing to remove CPA are also desirable. The present review focuses on the current strategies and important aspects of adult stem cell banking for clinical applications. These include current good manufacturing practices (cGMPs), animal protein free freezing solutions, cryoprotectants, freezing & thawing protocols, viability assays, packaging and distribution. The importance and benefits of banking clinical grade adult stem cells are also discussed.

  14. Bioprinting for stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasoglu, Savas; Demirci, Utkan

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there has been growing interest in applying bioprinting techniques to stem cell research. Several bioprinting methods have been developed utilizing acoustics, piezoelectricity, and lasers to deposit living cells onto receiving substrates. Using these technologies, spatially defined gradients of immobilized biomolecules can be engineered to direct stem cell differentiation into multiple subpopulations of different lineages. Stem cells can also be patterned in a high-throughput manner onto flexible implementation patches for tissue regeneration or onto substrates with the goal of accessing encapsulated stem cells of interest for genomic analysis. Here, we review recent achievements with bioprinting technologies in stem cell research, and identify future challenges and potential applications including tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, wound healing, and genomics.

  15. Stem cells for spine surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joshua Schroeder; Janina Kueper; Kaplan Leon; Meir Liebergall

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years, stem cells have become the focusof research by regenerative medicine professionals andtissue engineers. Embryonic stem cells, although capableof differentiating into cell lineages of all three germlayers, are limited in their utilization due to ethical issues.In contrast, the autologous harvest and subsequenttransplantation of adult stem cells from bone marrow,adipose tissue or blood have been experimentally utilizedin the treatment of a wide variety of diseases rangingfrom myocardial infarction to Alzheimer's disease. Thephysiologic consequences of stem cell transplantationand its impact on functional recovery have been studiedin countless animal models and select clinical trials.Unfortunately, the bench to bedside translation of thisresearch has been slow. Nonetheless, stem cell therapyhas received the attention of spinal surgeons due to itspotential benefits in the treatment of neural damage,muscle trauma, disk degeneration and its potentialcontribution to bone fusion.

  16. The myeloma stem cell concept, revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Hans Erik; Bøgsted, Martin; Schmitz, Alexander;

    2016-01-01

    The concept of the myeloma stem cell may have important therapeutic implications, yet its demonstration has been hampered by a lack of consistency in terms and definitions. Here, we summarize the current documentation and propose single-cell in vitro studies for future translational studies....... By the classical approach, a CD19(-)/CD45(low/-)/CD38(high)/CD138(+) malignant plasma cell, but not the CD19(+)/CD38(low/-) memory B cell compartment, is enriched for tumorigenic cells that initiate myeloma in xenografted immunodeficient mice, supporting that myeloma stem cells are present in the malignant PC...... anticipate that further characterization will require single cell geno- and phenotyping combined with clonogenic assays. To implement such technologies, we propose a revision of the concept of a myeloma stem cell by including operational in vitro assays to describe the cellular components of origin...

  17. Adult stem cells: hopes and hypes of regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulak, Józef; Szade, Krzysztof; Szade, Agata; Nowak, Witold; Józkowicz, Alicja

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are self-renewing cells that can differentiate into specialized cell type(s). Pluripotent stem cells, i.e. embryonic stem cells (ESC) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) differentiate into cells of all three embryonic lineages. Multipotent stem cells, like hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), can develop into multiple specialized cells in a specific tissue. Unipotent cells differentiate only into one cell type, like e.g. satellite cells of skeletal muscle. There are many examples of successful clinical applications of stem cells. Over million patients worldwide have benefited from bone marrow transplantations performed for treatment of leukemias, anemias or immunodeficiencies. Skin stem cells are used to heal severe burns, while limbal stem cells can regenerate the damaged cornea. Pluripotent stem cells, especially the patient-specific iPSC, have a tremendous therapeutic potential, but their clinical application will require overcoming numerous drawbacks. Therefore, the use of adult stem cells, which are multipotent or unipotent, can be at present a more achievable strategy. Noteworthy, some studies ascribed particular adult stem cells as pluripotent. However, despite efforts, the postulated pluripotency of such events like "spore-like cells", "very small embryonic-like stem cells" or "multipotent adult progenitor cells" have not been confirmed in stringent independent studies. Also plasticity of the bone marrow-derived cells which were suggested to differentiate e.g. into cardiomyocytes, has not been positively verified, and their therapeutic effect, if observed, results rather from the paracrine activity. Here we discuss the examples of recent studies on adult stem cells in the light of current understanding of stem cell biology.

  18. Recent advances in stem cell neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostenfeld, T; Svendsen, C N

    2003-01-01

    delivery and the expression of therapeutic proteins. In this regard, they may be eminently suitable for the correction of genetically-determined CNS disorders and in the management of certain tumors responsive to cytokines. Since large numbers of stem cells can be generated efficiently in culture, they may obviate some of the technical and ethical limitations associated with the use of fresh (primary) embryonic neural tissue in current transplantation strategies. 5. While considerable recent progress has been made in terms of developing new techniques allowing for the long-term culture of human stem cells, the successful clinical application of these cells is presently limited by our understanding of both (i) the intrinsic and extrinsic regulators of stem cell proliferation and (ii) those factors controlling cell lineage determination and differentiation. Although such cells may also provide accessible model systems for studying neural development, progress in the field has been further limited by the lack of suitable markers needed for the identification and selection of cells within proliferating heterogeneous populations of precursor cells. There is a further need to distinguish between the committed fate (defined during normal development) and the potential specification (implying flexibility of fate through manipulation of its environment) of stem cells undergoing differentiation. 6. With these challenges lying ahead, it is the opinion of the authors that stem-cell therapy is likely to remain within the experimental arena for the foreseeable future. In this regard, few (if any) of the in vivo studies employing neural stem cell grafts have shown convincingly that behavioural recovery can be achieved in the various model paradigms. Moreover, issues relating to the quality control of cultured cells and their safety following transplantation have only begun to be addressed. 7. While on the one hand cell biotechnologists have been quick to realise the potential commercial

  19. Stem Cells and Tissue Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlovic, Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells are the building blocks for all other cells in an organism. The human body has about 200 different types of cells and any of those cells can be produced by a stem cell. This fact emphasizes the significance of stem cells in transplantational medicine, regenerative therapy and bioengineering. Whether embryonic or adult, these cells can be used for the successful treatment of a wide range of diseases that were not treatable before, such as osteogenesis imperfecta in children, different forms of leukemias, acute myocardial infarction, some neural damages and diseases, etc. Bioengineering, e.g. successful manipulation of these cells with multipotential capacity of differentiation toward appropriate patterns and precise quantity, are the prerequisites for successful outcome and treatment. By combining in vivo and in vitro techniques, it is now possible to manage the wide spectrum of tissue damages and organ diseases. Although the stem-cell therapy is not a response to all the questions, it provides more...

  20. Overview of the current issues and advances in haemopoietic stem cell transplantation for β-thalassemia major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S. Anak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow transplantation (BMT is the only possible curative treatment for β-thalassemia major. The largest experience occurred in Pesaro, Italy, where the BMT was applied after a standard risk assessment. The patients were divided into 3 risk classes based on liver size by physical examination, the presence or absence of fibrosis by liver biopsy, and adherence to regular iron chelation. Outcomes were mainly affected by the risk status. After modifications to the conditioning regimens, the risk of transplantation-related complications in highrisk recipients reduced considerably. As a result, outcomes after transplantation have become more similar across risk categories. For BMT, most centers use bone marrow instead of peripheral blood in thalassemia. Some studies showed that peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT is better than BMT with regard to hematologic recovery, hospitalization period, leukemia-free survival, overall survival (OS, and transplant-related mortality (TRM. No significant differences were seen in grade II to IV acute GVHD (aGVHD; but the incidence of chronic GVHD (cGVHD was significantly higher in the PBSCT group. BMT from unrelated donors may offer similar results to those obtained using HLA-identical family donors, at least for patients who are not fully compliant with conventional treatment and do not yet show severe complications of iron overload. All studies conclude that MUD BMT might be a good alternative for patients with less risk factors. Another study concluded that, at present, due to high graft failure and GVHD rates, BMT from alternative donors should be restricted to patients who have poor life expectancies because they cannot receive adequate conventional treatment or because of alloimmunization to minor blood antigens. In another study unrelated cord blood transplantation (CBT was compared to related donor transplantation for children with β-thalassemia. The results were comparable to the

  1. Stem cell therapies: California dreamin'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Kris

    2010-01-08

    Ready or not, stem cells are a step closer to the clinic, thanks to approximately $230 million awarded by CIRM to 14 California-based research groups to develop stem cell-based therapies within 4 years. But, as Kris Novak reports, some of these projects are closer to therapeutic reality than others.

  2. Stem cell mitochondria during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min-Wen, Jason Chua; Jun-Hao, Elwin Tan; Shyh-Chang, Ng

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria are the central hubs of cellular metabolism, equipped with their own mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) blueprints to direct part of the programming of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and thus reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. In stem cells, many stem cell factors governing the intricate balance between self-renewal and differentiation have been found to directly regulate mitochondrial processes to control stem cell behaviors during tissue regeneration and aging. Moreover, numerous nutrient-sensitive signaling pathways controlling organismal longevity in an evolutionarily conserved fashion also influence stem cell-mediated tissue homeostasis during aging via regulation of stem cell mitochondria. At the genomic level, it has been demonstrated that heritable mtDNA mutations and variants affect mammalian stem cell homeostasis and influence the risk for human degenerative diseases during aging. Because such a multitude of stem cell factors and signaling pathways ultimately converge on the mitochondria as the primary mechanism to modulate cellular and organismal longevity, it would be most efficacious to develop technologies to therapeutically target and direct mitochondrial repair in stem cells, as a unified strategy to combat aging-related degenerative diseases in the future.

  3. International Society for Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and regenerative medicine community in the world. More stem cell research Take a closer look Recent Blogs View ... story independent nonprofit organization & the voice of the stem cell research community The International Society for Stem Cell ...

  4. FDA Warns About Stem Cell Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates FDA Warns About Stem Cell Claims Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... blood-forming system. back to top Regulation of Stem Cells FDA regulates stem cells in the U.S. to ...

  5. Clinical use of stem cells in orthopaedics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, G-I

    2017-02-21

    Stem cell research arose from the need to explore new therapeutic possibilities for intractable and lethal diseases. Although musculoskeletal disorders are basically nonlethal, their high prevalence and relative ease of performing clinical trials have facilitated the clinical application of stem cells in this field. However, few reliable clinical studies have been published, despite the plethora of in vitro and preclinical studies in stem cell research for regenerative medicine in the musculoskeletal system. Stem cell therapy can be applied locally for bone, cartilage and tendon regeneration. Candidate disease modalities in bone regeneration include large bone defects, nonunion of fractures, and osteonecrosis. Focal osteochondral defect and osteoarthritis are current targets for cartilage regeneration. For tendon regeneration, bone-tendon junction problems such as rotator cuff tears are hot topics in clinical research. To date, the literature supporting stem cell-based therapies comprises mostly case reports or case series. Therefore, high-quality evidence, including from randomised clinical trials, is necessary to define the role of cell-based therapies in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. It is imperative that clinicians who adopt stem cell treatment into their practices possess a good understanding of the natural course of the disease. It is also highly recommended that treating physicians do not thrust aside the concomitant use of established measures until stem cell therapy is evidently proved worthy in terms of efficacy and cost. The purpose of this review is to summarise on the current status of stem cell application in the orthopaedic field along with the author's view of future prospects.

  6. Stem cells in endodontic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sita Rama Kumar M, Madhu Varma K, Kalyan Satish R, Manikya kumar Nanduri.R, Murali Krishnam Raju S, Mohan rao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body. Serving as a sort of repair system for the body, they can theoretically divide without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. However, progress in stem cell biology and tissue engineering may present new options for replacing heavily damaged or lost teeth, or even individual tooth structures. The goal of this review is to discuss the potential impact of dental pulp stem cells on regenerative endodontics.

  7. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Soraia Carvalho; Maron-Gutierrez, Tatiana; Garcia, Cristiane Sousa Nascimento Baez; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho. Lab. de Investigacao]. E-mail: prmrocco@biof.ufrj.br

    2008-12-15

    Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions need to be answered to better understand the mechanisms that control cell division and differentiation, therefore enabling the use of cell therapy in human respiratory diseases. (author)

  8. Nano scaffolds and stem cell therapy in liver tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaser, Laila M.; Fawzy, Sherin M.

    2015-08-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have been constantly developing of late due to the major progress in cell and organ transplantation, as well as advances in materials science and engineering. Although stem cells hold great potential for the treatment of many injuries and degenerative diseases, several obstacles must be overcome before their therapeutic application can be realized. These include the development of advanced techniques to understand and control functions of micro environmental signals and novel methods to track and guide transplanted stem cells. A major complication encountered with stem cell therapies has been the failure of injected cells to engraft to target tissues. The application of nanotechnology to stem cell biology would be able to address those challenges. Combinations of stem cell therapy and nanotechnology in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have achieved significant advances. These combinations allow nanotechnology to engineer scaffolds with various features to control stem cell fate decisions. Fabrication of Nano fiber cell scaffolds onto which stem cells can adhere and spread, forming a niche-like microenvironment which can guide stem cells to proceed to heal damaged tissues. In this paper, current and emergent approach based on stem cells in the field of liver tissue engineering is presented for specific application. The combination of stem cells and tissue engineering opens new perspectives in tissue regeneration for stem cell therapy because of the potential to control stem cell behavior with the physical and chemical characteristics of the engineered scaffold environment.

  9. Gastrointestinal stem cell up-to-date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirvulet, V

    2015-01-01

    Cellular and tissue regeneration in the gastrointestinal tract depends on stem cells with properties of self-renewal, clonogenicity, and multipotency. Progress in stem cell research and the identification of potential gastric, intestinal, colonic stem cells new markers and the signaling pathways provide hope for the use of stem cells in regenerative medicine and treatments for disease. This review provides an overview of the different types of stem cells, focusing on tissue-restricted adult stem cells.

  10. Science and society: a stem cell technology model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiatpongsan, Sorapop

    2008-02-01

    Stem cell technology has been recognized as an emerging technology that could transform current supportive approach toward curing many chronic disorders and degenerative conditions. Regenerative medicine is the promising area of medical practice in the coming decade. However, stem cell technology also brings up controversial issues from the bioethical perspective such as the destruction of human embryos to derive embryonic stem cells or putting the egg donors at risk when retrieving oocytes used in somatic cell nuclear transfer technique. Recently, scientists have discovered a novel method to derive human embryonic stem cell-like cells (iPS; induced pluripotent stem cells) from human skin cells. This innovative approach would not only be a breakthrough discovery to advance the knowledge of stem cell research and the landmark for future stem cell-based therapy but will also provide viable solutions for social concerns on bioethical issues.

  11. Embryos, Clones, and Stem Cells: A Scientific Primer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenyon S. Tweedell

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is intended to give the nonspecialist an insight into the nuances of “clones”, cloning, and stem cells. It distinguishes embryonic and adult stem cells, their normal function in the organism, their origin, and how they are recovered to produce stem cell lines in culture. As background, the fundamental processes of embryo development are reviewed and defined, since the manipulation of stem cell lines into desired specialized cells employs many of the same events. Stem cells are defined and characterized and shown how they function in the intact organism during early development and later during cell regeneration in the adult. The complexity of stem cell recovery and their manipulation into specific cells and tissue is illustrated by reviewing current experimentation on both embryonic and adult stem cells in animals and limited research on human stem cell lines. The current and projected use of stem cells for human diseases and repair, along with the expanding methodology for the recovery of human embryonic stem cells, is described. An assessment on the use of human embryonic stem cells is considered from ethical, legal, religious, and political viewpoints.

  12. Bone repair and stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Noriaki; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2016-10-01

    Bones are an important component of vertebrates; they grow explosively in early life and maintain their strength throughout life. Bones also possess amazing capabilities to repair-the bone is like new without a scar after complete repair. In recent years, a substantial progress has been made in our understanding on mammalian bone stem cells. Mouse genetic models are powerful tools to understand the cell lineage, giving us better insights into stem cells that regulate bone growth, maintenance and repair. Recent findings about these stem cells raise new questions that require further investigations.

  13. Stem cell research in stroke: how far from the clinic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindvall, Olle; Kokaia, Zaal

    2011-08-01

    Stem cell-based approaches hold much promise as potential novel treatments to restore function after stroke. Studies in animal models have shown that stem cell transplantation can improve function by replacing neurons or by trophic actions, modulation of inflammation, promotion of angiogenesis, remyelination and axonal plasticity, and neuroprotection. Endogenous neural stem cells are also potential therapeutic targets because they produce new neurons after stroke. Clinical trials are ongoing but there is currently no proven stem cell-based therapy for stroke. Preclinical studies and clinical research will be needed to optimize the therapeutic benefit and minimize the risks of stem cells in stroke.

  14. Trends and Prospects of Stem Cell Research in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-wen Cao; Lu Zhang; Ye Li; Qing Yang; Wen-hua Fu; Xiao-chen Wang; Wen-long Huang

    2016-01-01

    Great progresses have been made in fundamental and clinical stem cell research in China in recent years. The official policy on stem cells, which was announced in 2015, seems as the spring of stem cell therapy in China. However, the regulation, governance, and management of clinical expectations are still challenging. This review summarized the current stem cell research and development in the field, as well as its rapidly evolving commercial, regulatory and ethical environment in China. As expected, the prospects of stem cells in China look prospective.

  15. Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated functional tooth regeneration in swine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Sonoyama

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla. Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This work integrates a stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration strategy, engineered materials for structure, and current dental crown technologies. This hybridized tissue engineering approach led to recovery of tooth strength and appearance.

  16. Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated functional tooth regeneration in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoyama, Wataru; Liu, Yi; Fang, Dianji; Yamaza, Takayoshi; Seo, Byoung-Moo; Zhang, Chunmei; Liu, He; Gronthos, Stan; Wang, Cun-Yu; Wang, Songlin; Shi, Songtao

    2006-12-20

    Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla). Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This work integrates a stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration strategy, engineered materials for structure, and current dental crown technologies. This hybridized tissue engineering approach led to recovery of tooth strength and appearance.

  17. Targeting the osteosarcoma cancer stem cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Ling

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Osteosarcoma is the most common type of solid bone cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in pediatric patients. Many patients are not cured by the current osteosarcoma therapy consisting of combination chemotherapy along with surgery and thus new treatments are urgently needed. In the last decade, cancer stem cells have been identified in many tumors such as leukemia, brain, breast, head and neck, colon, skin, pancreatic, and prostate cancers and these cells are proposed to play major roles in drug resistance, tumor recurrence, and metastasis. Recent studies have shown evidence that osteosarcoma also possesses cancer stem cells. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the osteosarcoma cancer stem cell including the methods used for its isolation, its properties, and its potential as a new target for osteosarcoma treatment.

  18. College Students' Conceptions of Stem Cells, Stem Cell Research, and Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concannon, James P.; Siegel, Marcelle A.; Halverson, Kristy; Freyermuth, Sharyn

    2010-04-01

    In this study, we examined 96 undergraduate non-science majors' conceptions of stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning. This study was performed at a large, Midwest, research extensive university. Participants in the study were asked to answer 23 questions relating to stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning in an on-line assessment before and after instruction. Two goals of the instruction were to: (1) help students construct accurate scientific ideas, and (2) enhance their reasoning about socioscientific issues. The course structure included interactive lectures, case discussions, hands-on activities, and independent projects. Overall, students' understandings of stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning increased from pre-test to post-test. For example, on the post-test, students gained knowledge concerning the age of an organism related to the type of stem cell it possesses. However, we found that some incorrect ideas that were evident on the pre-test persisted after instruction. For example, before and after instruction several students maintained the idea that stem cells can currently be used to produce organs.

  19. Stem cells and combinatorial science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yue Qin; Wong, Wan Qing; Yap, Yan Wen; Orner, Brendan P

    2007-09-01

    Stem cell-based technologies have the potential to help cure a number of cell degenerative diseases. Combinatorial and high throughput screening techniques could provide tools to control and manipulate the self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. This review chronicles historic and recent progress in the stem cell field involving both pluripotent and multipotent cells, and it highlights relevant cellular signal transduction pathways. This review further describes screens using libraries of soluble, small-molecule ligands, and arrays of molecules immobilized onto surfaces while proposing future trends in similar studies. It is hoped that by reviewing both the stem cell and the relevant high throughput screening literature, this paper can act as a resource to the combinatorial science community.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cells: cell biology and potential use in therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha; Kristiansen, Malthe; Abdallah, Basem M

    2004-01-01

    are currently available for isolation of the mesenchymal stem cells based on their physical and immunological characteristics. Because of the ease of their isolation and their extensive differentiation potential, mesenchymal stem cells are among the first stem cell types to be introduced in the clinic. Recent...... studies have demonstrated that the life span of mesenchymal stem cells in vitro can be extended by increasing the levels of telomerase expression in the cells and thus allowing culture of large number of cells needed for therapy. In addition, it has been shown that it is possible to culture the cells...... for generalized diseases, local implantation for local tissue defects, as a vehicle for genes in gene therapy protocols or to generate transplantable tissues and organs in tissue engineering protocols. The results of these initial trials are very encouraging and several clinical trials are under way to study...

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells as therapies for multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Juan; Yang, Rongbing; Biswas, Sangita; Qin, Xin; Zhang, Min; Deng, Wenbin

    2015-04-24

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, autoimmune, inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system that leads to permanent neurological deficits. Current MS treatment regimens are insufficient to treat the irreversible neurological disabilities. Tremendous progress in the experimental and clinical applications of cell-based therapies has recognized stem cells as potential candidates for regenerative therapy for many neurodegenerative disorders including MS. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs) derived precursor cells can modulate the autoimmune response in the central nervous system (CNS) and promote endogenous remyelination and repair process in animal models. This review highlights studies involving the immunomodulatory and regenerative effects of mesenchymal stem cells and iPSCs derived cells in animal models, and their translation into immunomodulatory and neuroregenerative treatment strategies for MS.

  2. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells as Therapies for Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Xiao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic, autoimmune, inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system that leads to permanent neurological deficits. Current MS treatment regimens are insufficient to treat the irreversible neurological disabilities. Tremendous progress in the experimental and clinical applications of cell-based therapies has recognized stem cells as potential candidates for regenerative therapy for many neurodegenerative disorders including MS. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs derived precursor cells can modulate the autoimmune response in the central nervous system (CNS and promote endogenous remyelination and repair process in animal models. This review highlights studies involving the immunomodulatory and regenerative effects of mesenchymal stem cells and iPSCs derived cells in animal models, and their translation into immunomodulatory and neuroregenerative treatment strategies for MS.

  3. PERSPECTIVES ON CANCER STEM CELLS IN OSTEOSARCOMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu-Roy, Upal; Basilico, Claudio; Mansukhani, Alka

    2012-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is an aggressive pediatric tumor of growing bones that, despite surgery and chemotherapy, is prone to relapse. These mesenchymal tumors are derived from progenitor cells in the osteoblast lineage that have accumulated mutations to escape cell cycle checkpoints leading to excessive proliferation and defects in their ability to differentiate appropriately into mature bone-forming osteoblasts. Like other malignant tumors, osteosarcoma is often heterogeneous, consisting of phenotypically distinct cells with features of different stages of differentiation. The cancer stem cell hypothesis posits that tumors are maintained by stem cells and it is the incomplete eradication of a refractory population of tumor-initiating stem cells that accounts for drug resistance and tumor relapse. In this review we present our current knowledge about the biology of osteosarcoma stem cells from mouse and human tumors, highlighting new insights and unresolved issues in the identification of this elusive population. We focus on factors and pathways that are implicated in maintaining such cells, and differences from paradigms of epithelial cancers. Targeting of the cancer stem cells in osteosarcoma is a promising avenue to explore to develop new therapies for this devastating childhood cancer. PMID:22659734

  4. Up-regulation of the transient A-type K+ current (IA) in the differentiation of neural stem cells of the early postnatal rat hippocampus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Hong-bo; HUANG Lian-yan; ZOU Yu-xi; ZOU Fei

    2010-01-01

    Background Neural stem cells (NSCs) not only are essential to cell replacement therapy and transplantation in clinical settings, but also provide a unique model for the research into neurogenesis and epigenesis. However, little attention has been paid to the electrophysiological characterization of NSC development. This work aimed to identify whether the morphological neuronal differentiation process in NSCs included changes in the electrophysiological properties of transient A-type K+ currents (IA).Methods NSCs were isolated from early postnatal rat hippocampus and were multiplied in basic serum-free medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor. Potassium currents were investigated and compared using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), respectively.Results Compared with NSC-derived neurons, cloned NSCs (cNSCs) had a more positive resting membrane potential, a higher input resistance, and a lower membrane capacitance. Part of cNSCs and NSC-derived neurons possessed both delayed-rectifier K+ currents (IDR) and IA, steady-state activation of IA in cNSCs (half-maximal activation at (21.34±4.37) mV) occurred at a more positive voltage than in NSC-derived neurons at 1-6 days in vitro (half-maximal activation at (12.85±4.19) mV).Conclusions Our research revealed a developmental up-regulation of the IA component during differentiation of postnatal NSCs. Together with the marked developmental up-regulation of IDR in vitro neuronal differentiation we have previously found, the voltage-gated potassium channels may participate in neuronal maturation process.

  5. Stem cells: Biology and clinical potential

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-30

    Dec 30, 2011 ... divisions to self renew or undergo terminal differentiation, or they may ... cells, hematopoietic stem cells and cancer cells conti- ..... as vascular endothelial cells, neurocytes, lung cells and ..... Patient-specific embryonic stem.

  6. Cell therapy using induced pluripotent stem cells or somatic stem cells: this is the question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somoza, Rodrigo A; Rubio, Francisco J

    2012-05-01

    A lot of effort has been developed to bypass the use of embryonic stem cells (ES) in human therapies, because of several concerns and ethical issues. Some unsolved problems of using stem cells for human therapies, excluding the human embryonic origin, are: how to regulate cell plasticity and proliferation, immunological compatibility, potential adverse side-effects when stem cells are systemically administrated, and the in vivo signals to rule out a specific cell fate after transplantation. Currently, it is known that almost all tissues of an adult organism have somatic stem cells (SSC). Whereas ES are primary involved in the genesis of new tissues and organs, SSC are involved in regeneration processes, immuno-regulatory and homeostasis mechanisms. Although the differentiating potential of ES is higher than SSC, several studies suggest that some types of SSC, such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), can be induced epigenetically to differentiate into tissue-specific cells of different lineages. This unexpected pluripotency and the variety of sources that they come from, can make MSC-like cells suitable for the treatment of diverse pathologies and injuries. New hopes for cell therapy came from somatic/mature cells and the discovery that could be reprogrammed to a pluripotent stage similar to ES, thus generating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS). For this, it is necessary to overexpress four main reprogramming factors, Sox2, Oct4, Klf4 and c-Myc. The aim of this review is to analyze the potential and requirements of cellular based tools in human therapy strategies, focusing on the advantage of using MSC over iPS.

  7. Translating Stem Cell Biology Into Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singeç, Ilyas; Simeonov, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cell research has made extraordinary progress over the last decade. The robustness of nuclear reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has created entirely novel opportunities for drug discovery and personalized regenerative medicine. Patient- and disease-specific iPSCs can be expanded indefinitely and differentiated into relevant cell types of different organ systems. As the utilization of iPSCs is becoming a key enabling technology across various scientific disciplines, there are still important challenges that need to be addressed. Here we review the current state and reflect on the issues that the stem cell and translational communities are facing in bringing iPSCs closer to clinical application.

  8. European stem cell research in legal shackles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielen, Myrthe G; de Vries, Sybe A; Geijsen, Niels

    2013-12-11

    Advances in stem cell biology have raised legal challenges to the patentability of stem cells and any derived technologies and processes. In 1999, Oliver Brüstle was granted a patent for the generation and therapeutic use of neural cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). The patent was challenged and put before the European Court of Justice, which ruled that inventions involving the prior destruction of human embryos cannot be patented. The legal maneuvering around this case demonstrates that the future of stem cell-based patents in Europe remains unsettled. Furthermore, owing to the European Court's broad definition of hESC as 'any cell that is capable of commencing development into a human being,' novel technologies that could eliminate the need for hESCs, such as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), are at risk of being included under the same ruling. Advances in the in vitro development of germ cells from pluripotent stem cells may one day provide a direct developmental path from iPSC to oocyte and sperm, and, according to the European Court's reasoning, legally equate iPSCs with human embryos. In this review, we will briefly discuss the Brüstle v Greenpeace case and the implications of the European Court of Justice's ruling. We will identify potential risks for stem cell research and future therapeutics resulting from the broad legal definition of the human embryo. Finally, we will broach the current legal landscape, as this broad definition has also created great uncertainty about the status of human iPSCs.

  9. Prostate cancer and metastasis initiating stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kathleen Kelly; Juan Juan Yin

    2008-01-01

    Androgen refractory prostate cancer metastasis is a major clinical challenge.Mechanism-based approaches to treating prostate cancer metastasis require an understanding of the developmental origin of the metastasis-initiating cell.Properties of prostate cancer metastases such as plasticity with respect to differentiated phenotype and androgen independence are consistent with the transformation of a prostate epithelial progenitor or stem cell leading to metastasis.This review focuses upon current evidence and concepts addressing the identification and properties of normal prostate stem or progenitor cells and their transformed counterparts.

  10. The promises of stem cells: stem cell therapy for movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Hideki; Choong, Chi-Jing; Yasuda, Toru

    2014-01-01

    Despite the multitude of intensive research, the exact pathophysiological mechanisms underlying movement disorders including Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy and Huntington's disease remain more or less elusive. Treatments to halt these disease progressions are currently unavailable. With the recent induced pluripotent stem cells breakthrough and accomplishment, stem cell research, as the vast majority of scientists agree, holds great promise for relieving and treating debilitating movement disorders. As stem cells are the precursors of all cells in the human body, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern how they develop and work would provide us many fundamental insights into human biology of health and disease. Moreover, stem-cell-derived neurons may be a renewable source of replacement cells for damaged neurons in movement disorders. While stem cells show potential for regenerative medicine, their use as tools for research and drug testing is thought to have more immediate impact. The use of stem-cell-based drug screening technology could be a big boost in drug discovery for these movement disorders. Particular attention should also be given to the involvement of neural stem cells in adult neurogenesis so as to encourage its development as a therapeutic option. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Stem cells in endometrium and endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulukus, Murat

    2015-08-01

    Endometriosis is a common chronic gynecological disease that is classically defined by the presence of endometrial stromal and glandular tissues outside the uterine cavity. Pelvic pain and infertility are the nonspecific but the most common symptoms of the disease; however, no currently definitive treatment has been developed since its pathogenesis has not been completely understood. Currently, none of the proposed conventional theories can explain all aspects of endometriosis. Recent evidence supports the presence of endometrial stem/progenitor cells and their possible involvement in endometrial regeneration and differentiation. The stem cell theory is a new hypothesis which may clarify the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms of endometriosis. However, this theory could not only account for an alternative pathogenic mechanism of endometriosis but could also be involved in all conventional theories. This article will review the evidence for the presence of endometrial stem/progenitor cells, their possible sources and their possible involvement in the pathogenesis of endometriosis.

  12. The Current Research of Stem Cells and its Applications%干细胞研究进展及其应用探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李敏; 黄旭东; 马强; 郭亚慧

    2012-01-01

    分析了干细胞研究现状、前景、科学意义、生物医学价值和伦理问题,阐述了近年来干细胞研究进展以及干细胞的应用情况。%The research of stem cells is a very popular area in medical reseach in recent years. With the first case of human stem cell precursor cell lines successfully isolated and cultured has been reported. The research of stern cells has developed to be the forefront of biomedical,it will soon lead to a revolution of new disease prevention and treatment,which will bring a number of legal and ethical debates. All scientists and research- ers engaged in stem cells research, pay close attention to the status quo, the prospects of scientific signifi- cance,the value of biomedical and ethical issues of stern cells. This article aims to review the progress and ap- plication of stem cells research in recent years.

  13. Development of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tong; Wang, Fen; Wu, Mengyao; Wang, Zack Z

    2015-07-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), provide a new cell source for regenerative medicine, disease modeling, drug discovery, and preclinical toxicity screening. Understanding of the onset and the sequential process of hematopoietic cells from differentiated hPSCs will enable the achievement of personalized medicine and provide an in vitro platform for studying of human hematopoietic development and disease. During embryogenesis, hemogenic endothelial cells, a specified subset of endothelial cells in embryonic endothelium, are the primary source of multipotent hematopoietic stem cells. In this review, we discuss current status in the generation of multipotent hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from hPSCs via hemogenic endothelial cells. We also review the achievements in direct reprogramming from non-hematopoietic cells to hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Further characterization of hematopoietic differentiation in hPSCs will improve our understanding of blood development and expedite the development of hPSC-derived blood products for therapeutic purpose.

  14. Current challenges in dedifferentiated fat cells research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mickey; George, Richard L; Evancho-Chapman, M Michelle; Zhang, Ge

    2016-07-02

    Dedifferentiated fat cells show great promises as a novel cell source for stem cell research. It has many advantages when used for cell-based therapeutics including abundance, pluripotency, and safety. However, there are many obstacles researchers need to overcome to make the next big move in DFAT cells research. In this review, we summarize the current main challenges in DFAT cells research including cell culture purity, phenotypic properties, and dedifferentiation mechanisms. The common methods to produce DFAT cells as well as the cell purity issue during DFAT cell production have been introduced. Current approaches to improve DFAT cell purity have been discussed. The phenotypic profile of DFAT cells have been listed and compared with other stem cells. Further studies on elucidating the underlying dedifferentiation mechanisms will dramatically advance DFAT cell research.

  15. Stem cells in the face: tooth regeneration and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jeremy J; Robey, Pamela G; Prockop, Darwin J

    2012-09-07

    The face distinguishes one person from another. Postnatal orofacial tissues harbor rare cells that exhibit stem cell properties. Despite unmet clinical needs for reconstruction of tissues lost in congenital anomalies, infections, trauma, or tumor resection, how orofacial stem/progenitor cells contribute to tissue development, pathogenesis, and regeneration is largely obscure. This perspective article critically analyzes the current status of our understanding of orofacial stem/progenitor cells, identifies gaps in our knowledge, and highlights pathways for the development of regenerative therapies.

  16. Hematopoietic Development from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    A decade of research on human embryonic stem cells (ESC) has paved the way for the discovery of alternative approaches to generating pluripotent stem cells.Combinatorial overexpression of a limited number of proteins linked to pluripotency in ESC was recently found to reprogram differentiated somatic cells back to a pluripotent state, enabling the derivation of isogenic (patient-specific) pluripotent stem cell lines. Current research is focusing on improving reprogramming protocols (e.g. circ...

  17. Therapeutics from Adult Stem Cells and the Hype Curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Greg

    2016-05-12

    The Gartner curve for regenerative and stem cell therapeutics is currently climbing out of the "trough of disillusionment" and into the "slope of enlightenment". Understanding that the early years of stem cell therapy relied on the model of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), and then moved into a period of the overhype of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), instead of using the model of 40 years of success, i.e. adult stem cells used in bone marrow transplants, the field of stem cell therapy has languished for years, trying to move beyond the early and poorly understood success of bone marrow transplants. Recent studies in the lab and clinic show that adult stem cells of various types, and the molecules that they release, avoid the issues associated with ESCs and iPSCs and lead to better therapeutic outcomes and into the slope of enlightenment.

  18. [Progress in stem cells and regenerative medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Libin; Zhu, He; Hao, Jie; Zhou, Qi

    2015-06-01

    Stem cells have the ability to differentiate into all types of cells in the body and therefore have great application potential in regenerative medicine, in vitro disease modelling and drug screening. In recent years, stem cell technology has made great progress, and induced pluripotent stem cell technology revolutionizes the whole stem cell field. At the same time, stem cell research in our country has also achieved great progress and becomes an indispensable power in the worldwide stem cell research field. This review mainly focuses on the research progress in stem cells and regenerative medicine in our country since the advent of induced pluripotent stem cell technology, including induced pluripotent stem cells, transdifferentiation, haploid stem cells, and new gene editing tools.

  19. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Tooth Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Peng; Ling Ye; Xue-dong Zhou

    2009-01-01

    Tooth loss compromises human oral health. Although several prosthetic methods, such as artificial denture and dental implants, are clinical therapies to tooth loss problems, they are thought to have safety and usage time issues. Recently, tooth tissue engineering has attracted more and more attention. Stem cell based tissue engineering is thought to be a promising way to replace the missing tooth. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells which can differentiate into a variety of cell types. The potential MSCs for tooth regeneration mainly include stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs), adult dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from the apical part of the papilla (SCAPs), stem cells from the dental follicle (DFSCs), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). This review outlines the recent progress in the mesenchymal stem cells used in tooth regeneration.

  20. Stemness in Cancer: Stem Cells, Cancer Stem Cells, and Their Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro M. Aponte

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stemness combines the ability of a cell to perpetuate its lineage, to give rise to differentiated cells, and to interact with its environment to maintain a balance between quiescence, proliferation, and regeneration. While adult Stem Cells display these properties when participating in tissue homeostasis, Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs behave as their malignant equivalents. CSCs display stemness in various circumstances, including the sustaining of cancer progression, and the interaction with their environment in search for key survival factors. As a result, CSCs can recurrently persist after therapy. In order to understand how the concept of stemness applies to cancer, this review will explore properties shared between normal and malignant Stem Cells. First, we provide an overview of properties of normal adult Stem Cells. We thereafter elaborate on how these features operate in CSCs. We then review the organization of microenvironment components, which enables CSCs hosting. We subsequently discuss Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells (MSCs, which, although their stemness properties are limited, represent essential components of the Stem Cell niche and tumor microenvironment. We next provide insights of the therapeutic strategies targeting Stem Cell properties in tumors and the use of state-of-the-art techniques in future research. Increasing our knowledge of the CSCs microenvironment is key to identifying new therapeutic solutions.

  1. The Investigation of Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome (SADS – the current approach to family screening and the future role of genomics & stem cell technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal eVyas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available SADS is defined as sudden death under the age of 40 years old in the absence of structural heart disease. Family screening studies are able to identify a cause in up to 50% of cases-most commonly long QT syndrome, Brugada and early repolarisation syndrome, and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia using standard clinical screening investigations including pharmacological challenge testing. These diagnoses may be supported by genetic testing which can aid cascade screening and may help guide management. In the current era it is possible to undertake molecular autopsy provided suitable samples of DNA can be obtained from the proband. With the evolution of rapid sequencing techniques it is possible to sequence the whole exome for candidate genes. This major advance offers the opportunity to identify novel causes of lethal arrhythmia but also poses the challenge of managing the volume of data generated and evaluating variants of unknown significance. The emergence of induced pluripotent stem cell technology could enable evaluation of the electrophysiological relevance of specific ion channel mutations in the proband or their relatives and will potentially enable screening of idiopathic ventricular fibrillation survivors combining genetic and electrophysiological studies in derived myocytes. This also could facilitate the assessment of personalised preventative pharmacological therapies. This review will evaluate the current screening strategies in SADS families, the role of molecular autopsy and genetic testing and the potential applications of molecular and cellular diagnostic strategies on the horizon.

  2. Wnt signaling and stem cell control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roel Nusse

    2008-01-01

    Wnt signaling has been implicated in the control over various types of stem cells and may act as a niche factor to maintain stem cells in a self-renewing state.As currently understood,Wnt proteins bind to receptors of the Frizzled and LRP families on the cell surface.Through several cytoplasmic relay components,the signal is transduced to B-catenin,which then enters the nucleus and forms a complex with TCF to activate transcription of Wnt target genes.Wnts can also signal through tyrosine kinase receptors,in particular the ROR and RYK receptors,leading to alternative modes of Wnt signaling.During the growth of tissues,these ligands and receptors are dynamically expressed,often transcriptionally controlled by Wnt signals themselves,to ensure the right balance between proliferation and differentiation.Isolated Wnt proteins are active on a variety of stem cells,including neural,mammary and embryonic stem cells.In general,Wnt proteins act to maintain the undifferentiated state of stem cells,while other growth factors instruct the cells to proliferate.These other factors include FGF and EGF,signaling through tyrosine kinase pathways.

  3. Large animal models for stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, John; Roberts, R Michael; Mirochnitchenko, Oleg

    2013-03-28

    The field of regenerative medicine is approaching translation to clinical practice, and significant safety concerns and knowledge gaps have become clear as clinical practitioners are considering the potential risks and benefits of cell-based therapy. It is necessary to understand the full spectrum of stem cell actions and preclinical evidence for safety and therapeutic efficacy. The role of animal models for gaining this information has increased substantially. There is an urgent need for novel animal models to expand the range of current studies, most of which have been conducted in rodents. Extant models are providing important information but have limitations for a variety of disease categories and can have different size and physiology relative to humans. These differences can preclude the ability to reproduce the results of animal-based preclinical studies in human trials. Larger animal species, such as rabbits, dogs, pigs, sheep, goats, and non-human primates, are better predictors of responses in humans than are rodents, but in each case it will be necessary to choose the best model for a specific application. There is a wide spectrum of potential stem cell-based products that can be used for regenerative medicine, including embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, somatic stem cells, and differentiated cellular progeny. The state of knowledge and availability of these cells from large animals vary among species. In most cases, significant effort is required for establishing and characterizing cell lines, comparing behavior to human analogs, and testing potential applications. Stem cell-based therapies present significant safety challenges, which cannot be addressed by traditional procedures and require the development of new protocols and test systems, for which the rigorous use of larger animal species more closely resembling human behavior will be required. In this article, we discuss the current status and challenges of and several major directions

  4. Stem cell therapy: facts and fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spits, C

    2012-01-01

    This opinion paper is a brief overview of the current state of the translation of stem cell therapy from the bench to the clinic. The hype generated by the great medical potential of stem cells has lead to hundreds of clinics worldwide claiming to have the cure for every imaginable condition. This fraudulent practice is far from the reality of scientists and bona fide companies. Much effort is put into addressing all the hurdles we have been encountering for the safe use of stem cells in therapy. By now, a significant number of clinical trials are booking very exciting progress, opening a realistic path to the use of these amazing cells in regenerative medicine.

  5. Induced pluripotent stem cells for cardiac repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwi-Dantsis, Limor; Gepstein, Lior

    2012-10-01

    Myocardial stem cell therapies are emerging as novel therapeutic paradigms for myocardial repair, but are hampered by the lack of sources for autologous human cardiomyocytes. An exciting development in the field of cardiovascular regenerative medicine is the ability to reprogram adult somatic cells into pluripotent stem cell lines (induced pluripotent stem cells, iPSCs) and to coax their differentiation into functional cardiomyocytes. This technology holds great promise for the emerging disciplines of personalized and regenerative medicine, because of the ability to derive patient-specific iPSCs that could potentially elude the immune system. The current review describes the latest techniques of generating iPSCs as well as the methods used to direct their differentiation towards the cardiac lineage. We then detail the unique potential as well as the possible hurdles on the road to clinical utilizing of the iPSCs derived cardiomyocytes in the emerging field of cardiovascular regenerative medicine.

  6. Stem cell research: from molecular physiology to therapeutic applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengyu Jiang

    2009-01-01

    @@ Stem cell research promises remedies to many devastating diseases that are currently incurable, ranging from diabetes and Parkinson's disease to paralysis. Totipotent embryonic stem cells have great potential for generating a wide range of different human cells that can be used to restore malfunctioning or damaged cells and tissues in patients. Recent studies have shown that pluripotent stem cells derived from adult bone marrow, the umbilical cord and the placenta could also be induced to differentiate into a variety of different tissues. In this issue, we have invited several scientists in China to summarize their pioneering works in the stem cell research field.

  7. Human embryonic stem cells handbook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Alberto Redi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available After the Nobel prize in physiology or medicine was awarded jointly to Sir John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent it became imperative to write down the review for a book entirely devoted to human embryonic stem cells (hES, those cells that are a urgent need for researchers, those cells that rekindle the ethical debates and finally, last but not least, those cells whose study paved the way to obtain induced pluripotent stem cells by the OSKC’s Yamanaka method (the OSKC acronim refers, for those not familiar with the topic, to the four stemness genes used to transfect somatic fibroblasts: Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc....

  8. Bone regeneration and stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvidson, K; Abdallah, B M; Applegate, L A

    2011-01-01

    cells, use of platelet rich plasma for tissue repair, osteogenesis and its molecular markers. A variety of cells in addition to stem cells, as well as advances in materials science to meet specific requirements for bone and soft tissue regeneration by addition of bioactive molecules, are discussed....

  9. Cord Blood-Derived Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells: Current Challenges in Engraftment, Infection, and Ex Vivo Expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiro Kita

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Umbilical cord blood has served as an alternative to bone marrow for hematopoietic transplantation since the late 1980s. Numerous clinical studies have proven the efficacy of umbilical cord blood. Moreover, the possible immaturity of cells in umbilical cord blood gives more options to recipients with HLA mismatch and allows for the use of umbilical cord blood from unrelated donors. However, morbidity and mortality rates associated with hematopoietic malignancies still remain relatively high, even after cord blood transplantation. Infections and relapse are the major causes of death after cord blood transplantation in patients with hematopoietic diseases. Recently, new strategies have been introduced to improve these major problems. Establishing better protocols for simple isolation of primitive cells and ex vivo expansion will also be very important. In this short review, we discuss several recent promising findings related to the technical improvement of cord blood transplantation.

  10. Stem Cell Therapy for Diabetes: Are We Close Enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin S. Kadam

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few decades, understanding of the mechanism of cellular development has increased tremendously. The knowledge of the potential of stem/precursor cells in tissue engineering and cell therapy has gained the popularity. In case of diabetes, the availability of the source of stem cells and the efficacy of their isolation techniques for maximum yield of viable cells to expand is an important issue which needs attention. Attempts to make beta cells from mouse embryonic stem cells (ES and adult stem cells have been frustrating in part because too much has been expected too soon. The problem with ES cells are that it is not known whether these cells are truly similar to normal beta cells or not and ethical issues surrounding them. ES cells is a major concern. Current claims about differentiation / transdifferentiation of adult stem cells to insulin producing cells has been demonstrated by many groups. These adult stem cells are of enormous interest because of their general accessibility and lack of ethical issues. Also, adult stem cells are non immunocompatible unless isolated from the same patient whereas ethical and scientific issues surrounding embryonic and fetal stem cells hinder their widespread implementation. Therefore, much attention is now focused on alternative sources of adult/postnatal stem cells.

  11. Methods in Molecular Biology: Germline Stem Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The protocols in Germline Stem Cells are intended to present selected genetic, molecular, and cellular techniques used in germline stem cell research. The book is divided into two parts. Part I covers germline stem cell identification and regulation in model organisms. Part II covers current techniques used in in vitro culture and applications of germline stem cells.

  12. Ethical clinical translation of stem cell interventions for neurologic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, David J; Bredenoord, Annelien L; Smith, Timothy R; Ammirati, Mario; Brennum, Jannick; Mendez, Ivar; Ammar, Ahmed S; Balak, Naci; Bolles, Gene; Esene, Ignatius Ngene; Mathiesen, Tiit; Broekman, Marike L

    2017-01-17

    The application of stem cell transplants in clinical practice has increased in frequency in recent years. Many of the stem cell transplants in neurologic diseases, including stroke, Parkinson disease, spinal cord injury, and demyelinating diseases, are unproven-they have not been tested in prospective, controlled clinical trials and have not become accepted therapies. Stem cell transplant procedures currently being carried out have therapeutic aims, but are frequently experimental and unregulated, and could potentially put patients at risk. In some cases, patients undergoing such operations are not included in a clinical trial, and do not provide genuinely informed consent. For these reasons and others, some current stem cell interventions for neurologic diseases are ethically dubious and could jeopardize progress in the field. We provide discussion points for the evaluation of new stem cell interventions for neurologic disease, based primarily on the new Guidelines for Stem Cell Research and Clinical Translation released by the International Society for Stem Cell Research in May 2016. Important considerations in the ethical translation of stem cells to clinical practice include regulatory oversight, conflicts of interest, data sharing, the nature of investigation (e.g., within vs outside of a clinical trial), informed consent, risk-benefit ratios, the therapeutic misconception, and patient vulnerability. To help guide the translation of stem cells from the laboratory into the neurosurgical clinic in an ethically sound manner, we present an ethical discussion of these major issues at stake in the field of stem cell clinical research for neurologic disease. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  13. Stem Cell Therapies in Retinal Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aakriti Garg

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy has long been considered a promising mode of treatment for retinal conditions. While human embryonic stem cells (ESCs have provided the precedent for regenerative medicine, the development of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs revolutionized this field. iPSCs allow for the development of many types of retinal cells, including those of the retinal pigment epithelium, photoreceptors, and ganglion cells, and can model polygenic diseases such as age-related macular degeneration. Cellular programming and reprogramming technology is especially useful in retinal diseases, as it allows for the study of living cells that have genetic variants that are specific to patients’ diseases. Since iPSCs are a self-renewing resource, scientists can experiment with an unlimited number of pluripotent cells to perfect the process of targeted differentiation, transplantation, and more, for personalized medicine. Challenges in the use of stem cells are present from the scientific, ethical, and political realms. These include transplant complications leading to anatomically incorrect placement, concern for tumorigenesis, and incomplete targeting of differentiation leading to contamination by different types of cells. Despite these limitations, human ESCs and iPSCs specific to individual patients can revolutionize the study of retinal disease and may be effective therapies for conditions currently considered incurable.

  14. Road for understanding cancer stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Erzik, Can

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing evidence suggesting that stem cells are susceptive to carcinogenesis and, consequently, can be the origin of many cancers. Recently, the neoplastic potential of stem cells has been supported by many groups showing the existence of subpopulations with stem cell characteristics...... in tumor biopsies such as brain and breast. Evidence supporting the cancer stem cell hypothesis has gained impact due to progress in stem cell biology and development of new models to validate the self-renewal potential of stem cells. Recent evidence on the possible identification of cancer stem cells may...... offer an opportunity to use these cells as future therapeutic targets. Therefore, model systems in this field have become very important and useful. This review will focus on the state of knowledge on cancer stem cell research, including cell line models for cancer stem cells. The latter will, as models...

  15. Adipose derived stem cells and nerve regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alessandro Faroni; Richard JP Smith; Adam J Reid

    2014-01-01

    Injuries to peripheral nerves are common and cause life-changing problems for patients along-side high social and health care costs for society. Current clinical treatment of peripheral nerve injuries predominantly relies on sacriifcing a section of nerve from elsewhere in the body to pro-vide a graft at the injury site. Much work has been done to develop a bioengineered nerve graft, precluding sacriifce of a functional nerve. Stem cells are prime candidates as accelerators of re-generation in these nerve grafts. This review examines the potential of adipose-derived stem cells to improve nerve repair assisted by bioengineered nerve grafts.

  16. Stem cell treatment for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Guo, Kequan; Ikehara, Susumu

    2014-10-23

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive and neurodegenerative disorder that induces dementia in older people. It was first reported in 1907 by Alois Alzheimer, who characterized the disease as causing memory loss and cognitive impairment. Pathologic characteristics of AD are β-amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles and neurodegeneration. Current therapies only target the relief of symptoms using various drugs, and do not cure the disease. Recently, stem cell therapy has been shown to be a potential approach to various diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, and in this review, we focus on stem cell therapies for AD.

  17. Are reviewers obstructing stem cell research?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Binetruy

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Bernard BinetruyINSERM U626, Faculté de Médecine La Timone, Marseille, FranceA current controversy in stem cell research was published on the BBC website recently. Some stem cell researchers have said that "they believe a small group of scientists is effectively vetoing high quality science from publication in journals". They strongly suspected some reviewers to be deliberately sending back negative comments or asking for unnecessary experiments. Nature editor, Dr Philip Campbell, has said that "this idea is utterly false".

  18. Cancer stem cells in solid tumors: elusive or illusive?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehrach Hans R

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the past years in vivo transplantation experiments and in vitro colony-forming assays indicated that tumors arise only from rare cells. These cells were shown to bear self-renewal capacities and the ability to recapitulate all cell types within an individual tumor. Due to their phenotypic resemblance to normal stem cells, the term "cancer stem cells" is used. However, some pieces of the puzzle are missing: (a a stringent definition of cancer stem cells in solid tumors (b specific markers that only target cells that meet the criteria for a cancer stem cell in a certain type of tumor. These missing parts started an ongoing debate about which is the best method to identify and characterize cancer stem cells, or even if their mere existence is just an artifact caused by the experimental procedures. Recent findings query the cancer stem cell hypothesis for solid tumors itself since it was shown in xenograft transplantation experiments that under appropriate conditions tumor-initiating cells are not rare. In this review we critically discuss the challenges and prospects of the currently used major methods to identify cancer stem cells. Further on, we reflect the present discussion about the existence of cancer stem cells in solid tumors as well as the amount and characteristics of tumor-initiating cells and finally provide new perspectives like the correlation of cancer stem cells and induced pluripotent cells.

  19. Stem cell regulation: Implications when differentiated cells regulate symmetric stem cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høyem, Marte Rørvik; Måløy, Frode; Jakobsen, Per; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2015-09-07

    We use a mathematical model to show that if symmetric stem cell division is regulated by differentiated cells, then changes in the population dynamics of the differentiated cells can lead to changes in the population dynamics of the stem cells. More precisely, the relative fitness of the stem cells can be affected by modifying the death rate of the differentiated cells. This result is interesting because stem cells are less sensitive than differentiated cells to environmental factors, such as medical therapy. Our result implies that stem cells can be manipulated indirectly by medical treatments that target the differentiated cells. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Biobridge concept in stem cell therapy for ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liska, Michael G; Crowley, Marci G; Nguyen, Hung; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2017-04-01

    Stroke causes a significant social and economic burden to the society. Despite advancement in awareness and prevention of stroke, there are still limited treatment options for stroke patients. One of the emerging experimental therapies for stroke is stem cell transplantation. The conventional belief of stem cell mechanisms is that the protective effects are produced by either cell replacement or releasing trophic factors. While the exact mechanisms of action of stem cells are not completely understood, recent evidence demonstrates another possible mechanism of stem cells. This new approach emphasizes on the formation of a biobridge between the damage area and the endogenous neurogenic niches of the brain. The transplanted cells can form a pathway which promotes the proliferation and migration of the endogenous stem cells. This paper discusses the use of stem cell transplantation for stroke with an emphasis on the new biobridge concept. Also discussed are the current challenges faced before this approach can advance to the clinical setting.

  1. Large Scale Production of Stem Cells and Their Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweigerdt, Robert

    Stem cells have been envisioned to become an unlimited cell source for regenerative medicine. Notably, the interest in stem cells lies beyond direct therapeutic applications. They might also provide a previously unavailable source of valuable human cell types for screening platforms, which might facilitate the development of more efficient and safer drugs. The heterogeneity of stem cell types as well as the numerous areas of application suggests that differential processes are mandatory for their in vitro culture. Many of the envisioned applications would require the production of a high number of stem cells and their derivatives in scalable, well-defined and potentially clinical compliant manner under current good manufacturing practice (cGMP). In this review we provide an overview on recent strategies to develop bioprocesses for the expansion, differentiation and enrichment of stem cells and their progenies, presenting examples for adult and embryonic stem cells alike.

  2. Stem cell-based therapies for spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandoe Tewarie, Rishi S; Hurtado, Andres; Bartels, Ronald H; Grotenhuis, Andre; Oudega, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in loss of nervous tissue and consequently loss of motor and sensory function. There is no treatment available that restores the injury-induced loss of function to a degree that an independent life can be guaranteed. Transplantation of stem cells or progenitors may support spinal cord repair. Stem cells are characterized by self-renewal and their ability to become any cell in an organism. Promising results have been obtained in experimental models of SCI. Stem cells can be directed to differentiate into neurons or glia in vitro, which can be used for replacement of neural cells lost after SCI. Neuroprotective and axon regeneration-promoting effects have also been credited to transplanted stem cells. There are still issues related to stem cell transplantation that need to be resolved, including ethical concerns. This paper reviews the current status of stem cell application for spinal cord repair.

  3. The endometrium as a source of mesenchymal stem cells for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Levent; Hufnagel, Demetra; Taylor, Hugh S

    2015-06-01

    Stem cell therapies have opened new frontiers in medicine with the possibility of regenerating lost or damaged cells. Embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells have been used to derive mature cell types for tissue regeneration and repair. However, the endometrium has emerged as an attractive, novel source of adult stem cells that are easily accessed and demonstrate remarkable differentiation capacity. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of endometrial stem cells and their therapeutic potential in regenerative medicine.

  4. Pluripotent hybrid stem cells from transgenic Huntington's disease monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laowtammathron, Chuti; Chan, Anthony W S

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a devastating disease that currently has no cure. Transgenic HD monkeys have developed key neuropathological and cognitive behavioral impairments similar to HD patients. Thus, pluripotent stem cells derived from transgenic HD monkeys could be a useful comparative model for clarifying HD pathogenesis and developing novel therapeutic approaches, which could be validated in HD monkeys. In order to create personal pluripotent stem cells from HD monkeys, here we present a tetraploid technique for deriving pluripotent hybrid HD monkey stem cells.

  5. Isolation and Culture of Postnatal Stem Cells from Deciduous Teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Olávez, Daniela; Facultad de Odontología Universidad de Los Andes; Salmen, Siham; Instituto de Inmunología Clínica, Universidad de Los Andes.; Padrón, Karla; Facultad de Odontología. Univerisdad de Los Andes.; Lobo, Carmine; Facultad de Odontología. Univerisdad de Los Andes.; Díaz, Nancy; Facultad de Odontología, Universidad de Los Andes.; Berrueta, Lisbeth; Doctora en Inmunología por Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas (IVIC). Instituto de Inmunología Clínica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Los Andes, Venezuela.; Solorzanio, Eduvigis; Facultad de Odontología, Universidad de Los Andes.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Currently, degenerative diseases represent a public health problem; therefore, the development and implementation of strategies to fully or partially recover of damaged tissues has a special interest in the biomedical field. Therapeutic strategies based on mesenchymal stem cells transplantation from dental pulp have been proposed as an alternative. Purpose: To develop a mesenchymal stem cells culture isolated from dental pulp of deciduous teeth. Methods: The mesenchymal stem cells...

  6. Isolation and Culture of Postnatal Stem Cells from Deciduous Teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Olávez, Daniela; Facultad de Odontología Universidad de Los Andes; Salmen, Siham; Instituto de Inmunología Clínica, Universidad de Los Andes.; Padrón, Karla; Facultad de Odontología. Univerisdad de Los Andes.; Lobo, Carmine; Facultad de Odontología. Univerisdad de Los Andes.; Díaz, Nancy; Facultad de Odontología, Universidad de Los Andes.; Berrueta, Lisbeth; Doctora en Inmunología por Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas (IVIC). Instituto de Inmunología Clínica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Los Andes, Venezuela.; Solorzanio, Eduvigis; Facultad de Odontología, Universidad de Los Andes.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Currently, degenerative diseases represent a public health problem; therefore, the development and implementation of strategies to fully or partially recover of damaged tissues has a special interest in the biomedical field. Therapeutic strategies based on mesenchymal stem cells transplantation from dental pulp have been proposed as an alternative. Purpose: To develop a mesenchymal stem cells culture isolated from dental pulp of deciduous teeth. Methods: The mesenchymal stem cells...

  7. Dental Stem Cell in Tooth Development and Advances of Adult Dental Stem Cell in Regenerative Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jiali; Xu, Xin; Lin, Jiong; Fan, Li; Zheng, Yuting; Kuang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies are considered as a promising treatment for many clinical usage such as tooth regeneration, bone repairation, spinal cord injury, and so on. However, the ideal stem cell for stem cell-based therapy still remains to be elucidated. In the past decades, several types of stem cells have been isolated from teeth, including dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), dental follicle progenitor stem cells (DFPCs) and stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP), which may be a good source for stem cell-based therapy in certain disease, especially when they origin from neural crest is considered. In this review, the specific characteristics and advantages of the adult dental stem cell population will be summarized and the molecular mechanisms of the differentiation of dental stem cell during tooth development will be also discussed.

  8. Stem cell therapy for retinal diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jose Mauricio Garcia,; Luisa Mendon?a; Rodrigo Brant; Murilo Abud; Caio Regatieri; Bruno Diniz

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss about current knowledgeabout stem cell (SC) therapy in the treatment of retinaldegeneration. Both human embryonic stem cell andinduced pluripotent stem cell has been growth inculture for a long time, and started to be explored inthe treatment of blinding conditions. The Food andDrug Administration, recently, has granted clinical trialsusing SC retinal therapy to treat complex disorders, asStargardt's dystrophy, and patients with geographicatrophy, providing good outcomes. This study'sintent is to overview the critical regeneration of thesubretinal anatomy through retinal pigment epitheliumtransplantation, with the goal of reestablish importantpathways from the retina to the occipital cortex of thebrain, as well as the differentiation from pluripotentquiescent SC to adult retina, and its relationshipwith a primary retinal injury, different techniques oftransplantation, management of immune rejection andtumorigenicity, its potential application in improvingpatients' vision, and, finally, approaching future directionsand challenges for the treatment of several conditions.

  9. Engineering the niche for stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shawna; Barker, Nicholas

    2013-12-01

    Much has been made about the potential for stem cells in regenerative medicine but the reality is that the development of actual therapies has been slow. Adult stem cells rely heavily on the assortment of biochemical and biophysical elements that constitute the local microenvironment in which they exist. One goal of biomedicine is to create an artificial yet biofunctional niche to support multipotency, differentiation and proliferation. Such tools would facilitate more conclusive experimentation by biologists, pharmaceutical scientists and tissue engineers. While many bioengineering techniques and platforms are already in use, technological innovations now allow this to be done at a higher resolution and specificity. Ultimately, the multidisciplinary integration of engineering and biology will allow the niche to be generated at a scale that can be clinically exploited. Using the systems that constitute the intestinal, hematopoietic and epidermal tissues, this article summarizes the various approaches and tools currently employed to recreate stem cell niches and also explores recent advances in the field.

  10. Development and application of stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUI Guo-zhen; SHAN Li-dong

    2005-01-01

    @@ Stem cells are defined by two important characteristics: the ability to proliferate by a process of self-renewal and the potential to form at least one specialized cell type. Transient population of pluripotent or multipotent stem cells first appear during the development at the first days post coitum. The cells of the inner cell mass (ICM) of the blastocyst, of which embryonic stem cells (ES) are the in vitro counterpart, can give rise to any differentiated cell type in the three primary germ layers of the embryo (endoderm, mesoderm and ectoderm).1-3 These cells gradually mature into committed, organ- and tissue-specific stem cells or adult stem cells, such as neural stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, etc. Over the past years, studies have focused on two aspects: molecular level and application, and some new methods and technology have been used.

  11. Influence of the intensity and loading time of direct current electric field on the directional migration of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Gao, Yuxuan; Shi, Haigang; Liu, Na; Zhang, Wei; Li, Hongbo

    2016-09-01

    Exogenic electric fields can effectively accelerate bone healing and remodeling through the enhanced migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) toward the injured area. This study aimed to determine the following: (1) the direction of rat BMSC (rBMSC) migration upon exposure to a direct current electric field (DCEF), (2) the optimal DCEF intensity and duration, and (3) the possible regulatory role of SDF-1/CXCR4 axis in rBMSC migration as induced by DCEF. Results showed that rBMSCs migrated to the positive electrode of the DCEF, and that the DCEF of 200 mV/mm for 4 h was found to be optimal in enhancing rBMSC migration. This DCEF strength and duration also upregulated the expression of osteoblastic genes, including ALP and OCN, and upregulated the expression of ALP and Runx2 proteins. Moreover, when CXCR4 was inhibited, rBMSC migration due to DCEF was partially blocked. These findings indicated that DCEF can effectively induce rBMSC migration. A DCEF of 200 mV/mm for 4 h was recommended because of its ability to promote rBMSC migration, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation. The SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling pathway may play an important role in regulating the DCEF-induced migration of rBMSCs.

  12. Elements of a neural stem cell niche derived from embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierret, Chris; Spears, Kathleen; Morrison, Jason A; Maruniak, Joel A; Katz, Martin L; Kirk, Mark D

    2007-12-01

    Recent studies show that adult neural tissues can harbor stem cells within unique niches. In the mammalian central nervous system, neural stem cell (NSC) niches have been identified in the dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone (SVZ). Stem cells in the well-characterized SVZ exist in a microenvironment established by surrounding cells and tissue components, including transit-amplifying cells, neuroblasts, ependymal cells, blood vessels, and a basal lamina. Within this microenvironment, stem cell properties, including proliferation and differentiation, are maintained. Current NSC culture techniques often include the addition of molecular components found within the in vivo niche, such as mitogenic growth factors. Some protocols use bio-scaffolds to mimic the physical growth environment of living tissue. We describe a novel NSC culture system, derived from embryonic stem (ES) cells, that displays elements of an NSC niche in the absence of exogenously applied mitogens or complex physical scaffolding. Mouse ES cells were neuralized with retinoic acid and plated on an entactin-collagen-laminin-coated glass surface at high density (250,000 cells/cm(2)). Six to eight days after plating, complex multicellular structures consisting of heterogeneous cell types developed spontaneously. NSC and progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation continued within these structures. The identity of cellular and molecular components within the cultures was documented using RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and neurosphere-forming assays. We show that ES cells can be induced to form structures that exhibit key properties of a developing NSC niche. We believe this system can serve as a useful model for studies of neurogenesis and stem cell maintenance in the NSC niche as well as for applications in stem cell transplantation.

  13. Generating cartilage repair from pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Aixin; Hardingham, Timothy E; Kimber, Susan J

    2014-08-01

    The treatment of degeneration and injury of articular cartilage has been very challenging for scientists and surgeons. As an avascular and hypocellular tissue, cartilage has a very limited capacity for self-repair. Chondrocytes are the only cell type in cartilage, in which they are surrounded by the extracellular matrix that they secrete and assemble. Autologous chondrocyte implantation for cartilage defects has achieved good results, but the limited resources and complexity of the procedure have hindered wider application. Stem cells form an alternative to chondrocytes as a source of chondrogenic cells due to their ability to proliferate extensively while retaining the potential for differentiation. Adult stem cells such as mesenchymal stem cells have been differentiated into chondrocytes, but the limitations in their proliferative ability and the heterogeneous cell population hinder their adoption as a prime alternative source for generating chondrocytes. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are attractive as candidates for cell replacement therapy because of their unlimited self-renewal and ability for differentiation into mesodermal derivatives as well as other lineages. In this review, we focus on current protocols for chondrogenic differentiation of ESCs, in particular the chemically defined culture system developed in our lab that could potentially be adapted for clinical application.

  14. [Therapeutic use of stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzan, Georges

    2004-09-15

    Stem cells display important capacities of self renewing, proliferation and differentiation. Because those present in the embryo have the more remarkable properties, their potential use in the therapy of until now incurable degenerative diseases have been envisioned. Embryonic stem (ES) cells are located in the inner mass of the balstocyst at early stages of the development. Even in long-term cultures they still retain their undifferentiated features. Under specific culture conditions, ES cells can be committed into a variety of differentiation pathways, giving rise to large amounts of cells corresponding to different tissues (neurones, cardiomyocytes, skeletal muscle, etc.). However, producing these tissues from already established ES cell lines would lead to immune rejection when transplanted to patients. To prevent this pitfall and using the expertise accumulated by animal cloning by nucleus transfer, it has been proposed to adapt this technique to human ES cells. The therapeutic cloning consists in transferring the nucleus of somatic stem cells isolated from the patient into an enucleated oocyte, to allow blastocyst development from which ES cells will be derived. From these stem cells, compatible tissues will be then produced. The problem is that it is in theoretically possible to reimplant the cloned blastocyst into a surrogate mother for obtaining a baby genetically identical to the donor. This is called reproductive cloning. This worrying risk raises important ethic and legal questions.

  15. Flexibility of neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eumorphia eRemboutsika

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic cortical neural stem cells are self-renewing progenitors that can differentiate into neurons and glia. We generated neurospheres from the developing cerebral cortex using a mouse genetic model that allows for lineage selection and found that the self-renewing neural stem cells are restricted to Sox2 expressing cells. Under normal conditions, embryonic cortical neurospheres are heterogeneous with regard to Sox2 expression and contain astrocytes, neural stem cells and neural progenitor cells sufficiently plastic to give rise to neural crest cells when transplanted into the hindbrain of E1.5 chick and E8 mouse embryos. However, when neurospheres are maintained under lineage selection, such that all cells express Sox2, neural stem cells maintain their Pax6+ cortical radial glia identity and exhibit a more restricted fate in vitro and after transplantation. These data demonstrate that Sox2 preserves the cortical identity and regulates the plasticity of self-renewing Pax6+ radial glia cells.

  16. Suspension culture of pluripotent stem cells: effect of shear on stem cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Kevin C; Rodrigues, Beatriz; zur Nieden, Nicole I

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant promise, the routine usage of suspension cell culture to manufacture stem cell-derived differentiated cells has progressed slowly. Suspension culture is an innovative way of either expanding or differentiating cells and sometimes both are combined into a single bioprocess. Its advantages over static 2D culturing include a homogeneous and controllable culture environment and producing a large quantity of cells in a fraction of time. This feature makes suspension cell culture ideal for use in stem cell research and eventually ideal in the large-scale production of differentiated cells for regenerative medicine. Because of their tremendous differentiation capacities and unlimited growth properties, pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) in particular are considered potential sources for future cell-replacement therapies. Currently, expansion of PSCs is accomplished in 2D, which only permits a limited amount of cell growth per culture flask before cells need to be passaged. However, before stem cells can be applied clinically, several aspects of their expansion, such as directed growth, but also differentiation, need to be better controlled. This review will summarize recent advantages in suspension culture of PSCs, while at the same time highlighting current challenges.

  17. Cancer stem cells in osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Hannah K; Tellez-Gabriel, Marta; Heymann, Dominique

    2017-02-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumour in children and adolescents and advanced osteosarcoma patients with evidence of metastasis share a poor prognosis. Osteosarcoma frequently gains resistance to standard therapies highlighting the need for improved treatment regimens and identification of novel therapeutic targets. Cancer stem cells (CSC) represent a sub-type of tumour cells attributed to critical steps in cancer including tumour propagation, therapy resistance, recurrence and in some cases metastasis. Recent published work demonstrates evidence of cancer stem cell phenotypes in osteosarcoma with links to drug resistance and tumorigenesis. In this review we will discuss the commonly used isolation techniques for cancer stem cells in osteosarcoma as well as the identified biochemical and molecular markers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Epigenetics in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Tan Boon; Lim, Jhin Jieh; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Compelling evidence have demonstrated that bulk tumors can arise from a unique subset of cells commonly termed "cancer stem cells" that has been proposed to be a strong driving force of tumorigenesis and a key mechanism of therapeutic resistance. Recent advances in epigenomics have illuminated key mechanisms by which epigenetic regulation contribute to cancer progression. In this review, we present a discussion of how deregulation of various epigenetic pathways can contribute to cancer initiation and tumorigenesis, particularly with respect to maintenance and survival of cancer stem cells. This information, together with several promising clinical and preclinical trials of epigenetic modulating drugs, offer new possibilities for targeting cancer stem cells as well as improving cancer therapy overall.

  19. Stem cell sources for cardiac regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roccio, M; Goumans, M J; Sluijter, J P G; Doevendans, P A

    2008-03-01

    Cell-based cardiac repair has the ambitious aim to replace the malfunctioning cardiac muscle developed after myocardial infarction, with new contractile cardiomyocytes and vessels. Different stem cell populations have been intensively studied in the last decade as a potential source of new cardiomyocytes to ameliorate the injured myocardium, compensate for the loss of ventricular mass and contractility and eventually restore cardiac function. An array of cell types has been explored in this respect, including skeletal muscle, bone marrow derived stem cells, embryonic stem cells (ESC) and more recently cardiac progenitor cells. The best-studied cell types are mouse and human ESC cells, which have undisputedly been demonstrated to differentiate into cardiomyocyte and vascular lineages and have been of great help to understand the differentiation process of pluripotent cells. However, due to their immunogenicity, risk of tumor development and the ethical challenge arising from their embryonic origin, they do not provide a suitable cell source for a regenerative therapy approach. A better option, overcoming ethical and allogenicity problems, seems to be provided by bone marrow derived cells and by the recently identified cardiac precursors. This report will overview current knowledge on these different cell types and their application in cardiac regeneration and address issues like implementation of delivery methods, including tissue engineering approaches that need to be developed alongside.

  20. Progress with nonhuman primate embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Don P; Kuo, Hung-Chih; Pau, K-Y Francis; Lester, Linda

    2004-12-01

    Embryonic stem cells hold potential in the fields of regenerative medicine, developmental biology, tissue regeneration, disease pathogenicity, and drug discovery. Embryonic stem (ES) cell lines are now available in primates, including man, rhesus, and cynomologous monkeys. Monkey ES cells serve as invaluable clinically relevant models for studies that can't be conducted in humans because of practical or ethical limitations, or in rodents because of differences in physiology and anatomy. Here, we review the current status of nonhuman primate research with ES cells, beginning with a description of their isolation, characterization, and availability. Substantial limitations still plague the use of primate ES cells, such as their required growth on feeder layers, poor cloning efficiency, and restricted availability. The ability to produce homogenous populations of both undifferentiated as well as differentiated phenotypes is an important challenge, and genetic approaches to achieving these objectives are discussed. Finally, safety, efficiency, and feasibility issues relating to the transplantation of ES-derived cells are considered.

  1. Stem cells' exodus: a journey to immortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi; Lewallen, Michelle; Xie, Ting

    2013-01-28

    Stem cell niches provide a regulatory microenvironment that retains stem cells and promotes self-renewal. Recently in Developmental Cell, Rinkevich et al. (2013) showed that cell islands (CIs) of Botryllus schlosseri, a colonial chordate, provide niches for maintaining cycling stem cells that migrate from degenerated CIs to newly formed buds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Stem Cells in Skeletal Tissue Engineering: Technologies and Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhans, Mark T.; Yu, Shuting; Tuan, Rocky S.

    2017-01-01

    This review surveys the use of pluripotent and multipotent stem cells in skeletal tissue engineering. Specific emphasis is focused on evaluating the function and activities of these cells in the context of development in vivo, and how technologies and methods of stem cell-based tissue engineering for stem cells must draw inspiration from developmental biology. Information on the embryonic origin and in vivo differentiation of skeletal tissues is first reviewed, to shed light on the persistence and activities of adult stem cells that remain in skeletal tissues after embryogenesis. Next, the development and differentiation of pluripotent stem cells is discussed, and some of their advantages and disadvantages in the context of tissue engineering is presented. The final section highlights current use of multipotent adult mesenchymal stem cells, reviewing their origin, differentiation capacity, and potential applications to tissue engineering. PMID:26423296

  3. The spermatogonial stem cell niche

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.G. de Rooij

    2009-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs; A(s) spermatogonia) and their direct descendants (A(pr) and A(al) spermatogonia) are preferentially located in those areas of the seminiferous tubules that border on the interstitial tissue. Fewer of these cells are present in tubule areas directly bordering on anoth

  4. Introduction to stem cells and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolios, George; Moodley, Yuben

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells are a population of undifferentiated cells characterized by the ability to extensively proliferate (self-renewal), usually arise from a single cell (clonal), and differentiate into different types of cells and tissue (potent). There are several sources of stem cells with varying potencies. Pluripotent cells are embryonic stem cells derived from the inner cell mass of the embryo and induced pluripotent cells are formed following reprogramming of somatic cells. Pluripotent cells can differentiate into tissue from all 3 germ layers (endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm). Multipotent stem cells may differentiate into tissue derived from a single germ layer such as mesenchymal stem cells which form adipose tissue, bone, and cartilage. Tissue-resident stem cells are oligopotent since they can form terminally differentiated cells of a specific tissue. Stem cells can be used in cellular therapy to replace damaged cells or to regenerate organs. In addition, stem cells have expanded our understanding of development as well as the pathogenesis of disease. Disease-specific cell lines can also be propagated and used in drug development. Despite the significant advances in stem cell biology, issues such as ethical controversies with embryonic stem cells, tumor formation, and rejection limit their utility. However, many of these limitations are being bypassed and this could lead to major advances in the management of disease. This review is an introduction to the world of stem cells and discusses their definition, origin, and classification, as well as applications of these cells in regenerative medicine.

  5. Isolating stem cells from soft musculoskeletal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Pan, Haiying; Huard, Johnny

    2010-07-05

    Adult stem cells have long been discussed in regards to their application in regenerative medicine. Adult stem cells have generated a great deal of excitement for treating injured and diseased tissues due to their impressive capabilities to undergo multi-lineage cell differentiation and their self-renewal ability. Most importantly, these qualities have made them advantageous for use in autologous cell transplantation therapies. The current protocol will introduce the readers to the modified preplate technique where soft tissues of the musculoskeletal system, e.g. tendon and muscle, are 1(st) enzymatically dissociated and then placed in collagen coated flasks with medium. The supernatant, which is composed of medium and the remaining floating cells, is serially transferred daily to new flasks. The stem cells are the slowest to adhere to the flasks which is usually takes 5-7 days (serial transfers or preplates). By using this technique, adult stem cells present in these tissues can be easily harvested through fairly non-invasive procedures.

  6. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Cardiovascular Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Egashira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells are generated by reprogramming human somatic cells through the forced expression of several embryonic stem (ES cell-specific transcription factors. The potential of iPS cells is having a significant impact on regenerative medicine, with the promise of infinite self-renewal, differentiation into multiple cell types, and no problems concerning ethics or immunological rejection. Human iPS cells are currently generated by transgene introduction principally through viral vectors, which integrate into host genomes, although the associated risk of tumorigenesis is driving research into nonintegration methods. Techniques for pluripotent stem cell differentiation and purification to yield cardiomyocytes are also advancing constantly. Although there remain some unsolved problems, cardiomyocyte transplantation may be a reality in the future. After those problems will be solved, applications of human iPS cells in human cardiovascular regenerative medicine will be envisaged for the future. Furthermore, iPS cell technology has generated new human disease models using disease-specific cells. This paper summarizes the progress of iPS cell technology in cardiovascular research.

  7. Electrical Guidance of Human Stem Cells in the Rat Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Feng Feng

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Limited migration of neural stem cells in adult brain is a roadblock for the use of stem cell therapies to treat brain diseases and injuries. Here, we report a strategy that mobilizes and guides migration of stem cells in the brain in vivo. We developed a safe stimulation paradigm to deliver directional currents in the brain. Tracking cells expressing GFP demonstrated electrical mobilization and guidance of migration of human neural stem cells, even against co-existing intrinsic cues in the rostral migration stream. Transplanted cells were observed at 3 weeks and 4 months after stimulation in areas guided by the stimulation currents, and with indications of differentiation. Electrical stimulation thus may provide a potential approach to facilitate brain stem cell therapies.

  8. Stem Cell Banking for Regenerative and Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T. Harris

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative medicine, tissue engineering and gene therapy offer the opportunity to treat and cure many of today’s intractable afflictions. These approaches to personalized medicine often utilize stem cells to accomplish these goals. However, stem cells can be negatively affected by donor variables such as age and health status at the time of collection, compromising their efficacy. Stem cell banking offers the opportunity to cryogenically preserve stem cells at their most potent state for later use in these applications. Practical stem cell sources include bone marrow, umbilical cord blood and tissue, and adipose tissue. Each of these sources contains stem cells that can be obtained from most individuals, without too much difficulty and in an economical fashion. This review will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each stem cell source, factors to be considered when contemplating banking each stem cell source, the methodology required to bank each stem cell source, and finally, current and future clinical uses of each stem cell source.

  9. Development of New Technologies for Stem Cell Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xibo Ma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1960s, the stem cells have been extensively studied including embryonic stem cells, neural stem cells, bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells. In the recent years, several stem cells have been initially used in the treatment of diseases, such as in bone marrow transplant. At the same time, isolation and culture experimental technologies for stem cell research have been widely developed in recent years. In addition, molecular imaging technologies including optical molecular imaging, positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, and computed tomography have been developed rapidly in recent the 10 years and have also been used in the research on disease mechanism and evaluation of treatment of disease related with stem cells. This paper will focus on recent typical isolation, culture, and observation techniques of stem cells followed by a concise introduction. Finally, the current challenges and the future applications of the new technologies in stem cells are given according to the understanding of the authors, and the paper is then concluded.

  10. Chemical approaches to studying stem cell biology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenlin Li; Kai Jiang; Wanguo Wei; Yan Shi; Sheng Ding

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells,including both pluripotent stem cells and multipotent somatic stem cells,hold great potential for interrogating the mechanisms of tissue development,homeostasis and pathology,and for treating numerous devastating diseases.Establishment of in vitro platforms to faithfully maintain and precisely manipulate stem cell fates is essential to understand the basic mechanisms of stem cell biology,and to translate stem cells into regenerative medicine.Chemical approaches have recently provided a number of small molecules that can be used to control cell selfrenewal,lineage differentiation,reprogramming and regeneration.These chemical modulators have been proven to be versatile tools for probing stem cell biology and manipulating cell fates toward desired outcomes.Ultimately,this strategy is promising to be a new frontier for drug development aimed at endogenous stem cell modulation.

  11. Molecular imaging of stem cell transplantation for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Moore, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Cell replacement therapy with stem cells holds tremendous therapeutic potential for treating neurodegenerative diseases. Over the last decade, molecular imaging techniques have proven to be of great value in tracking transplanted cells and assessing the therapeutic efficacy. This current review summarizes the role and capabilities of different molecular imaging modalities including optical imaging, nuclear imaging and magnetic resonance imaging in the field of stem cell therapy for neurodegenerative disorders. We discuss current challenges and perspectives of these techniques and encompass updated information such as theranostic imaging and optogenetics in stem cell-based treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Fetal stem cell transplantation: Past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Tetsuya; Eto, Koji

    2014-09-26

    Since 1928, human fetal tissues and stem cells have been used worldwide to treat various conditions. Although the transplantation of the fetal midbrain substantia nigra and dopaminergic neurons in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease is particularly noteworthy, the history of other types of grafts, such as those of the fetal liver, thymus, and pancreas, should be addressed as there are many lessons to be learnt for future stem cell transplantation. This report describes previous practices and complications that led to current clinical trials of isolated fetal stem cells and embryonic stem (ES) cells. Moreover, strategies for transplantation are considered, with a particular focus on donor cells, cell processing, and the therapeutic cell niche, in addition to ethical issues associated with fetal origin. With the advent of autologous induced pluripotent stem cells and ES cells, clinical dependence on fetal transplantation is expected to gradually decline due to lasting ethical controversies, despite landmark achievements.

  13. Fetal stem cell transplantation: Past, present, and future

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tetsuya; Ishii; Koji; Eto

    2014-01-01

    Since 1928, human fetal tissues and stem cells have been used worldwide to treat various conditions. Although the transplantation of the fetal midbrain substantia nigra and dopaminergic neurons in patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease is particularly noteworthy, the history of other types of grafts, such as those of the fetal liver, thymus, and pancreas, should be addressed as there are many lessons to be learnt for future stem cell transplantation. This report describes previous practices and complications that led to current clinical trials of isolated fetal stem cells and embryonic stem(ES) cells. Moreover, strategies for transplantation are considered, with a particular focus on donor cells, cell processing, and the therapeutic cell niche, in addition to ethical issues associated with fetal origin. With the advent of autologous induced pluripotent stem cells and ES cells, clinical dependence on fetal transplantation is expected to gradually decline due to lasting ethical controversies, despite landmark achievements.

  14. Cancer Stem Cells and Pediatric Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory K. Friedman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a subpopulation of cells, termed tumor-initiating cells or tumor stem cells (TSC, has been identified in many different types of solid tumors. These TSC, which are typically more resistant to chemotherapy and radiation compared to other tumor cells, have properties similar to normal stem cells including multipotency and the ability to self-renew, proliferate, and maintain the neoplastic clone. Much of the research on TSC has focused on adult cancers. With considerable differences in tumor biology between adult and pediatric cancers, there may be significant differences in the presence, function and behavior of TSC in pediatric malignancies. We discuss what is currently known about pediatric solid TSC with specific focus on TSC markers, tumor microenvironment, signaling pathways, therapeutic resistance and potential future therapies to target pediatric TSC.

  15. Stem cell therapy - Hope and scope in pediatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Devendra

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A stem cell is an undifferentiated cell in the body with undetermined function capable of forming various tissues under definite signals received from the body. Stem cell research in animals using embryonal stem cells has been an ongoing program in the west with fruitful results. However, only limited information is available with the use of stem cells in human beings. Of the various sources of stem cells, umbilical cord blood stem cell research has shown potential for future treatment in Alzheimer′s, Parkinson′s, heart attack, stroke and spinal cord injuries. Human trials have been done in diseases like spinal cord injury and chronic liver cirrhosis. Cord blood stem cells have already been effectively used in the treatment of sickle cell, leukemia, non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma and some other cancers, life threatening anemias and auto-immune diseases. Current challenges with the use of stem cells in clinical practice include the provisions to direct the differentiation of embryonic stem cells into specialized cell populations, and also devise ways to guard their development or proliferation once placed in vivo. Only further research and its clinical application will solve the many unanswered queries.

  16. Innovative diagnostics and treatment nanorobotics and stem cells

    CERN Document Server

    Jadczyk, Tomasz; Mishra, Sachin; Jędrzejek, Marek; Bołoz, Marta; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Wojakowski, Wojciech; Stárek, Zdeněk; Martel, Sylvain; Gulyás, Balázs

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on nanorobotic agents and stem cells for biomedical applications.It is intended for researchers and clinicians interested in innovative diagnostic and therapeutic strategies based on nanorobots and stem cells.It presents current advances in the field of molecular machines, which could be applied to generate novel therapeutic-diagnostic systems.

  17. New Advanced Technologies in Stem Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Stem Cells and Development , vol. 21, no. 8, pp. 1299–1308, 2012. [25] B. Zheng, B...Matsumoto, H. Eto et al., “Functional implications of CD34 expression in human adipose-derived stem/progenitor cells,” Stem Cells and Development , vol...and progenitor cells within adipose tissue,” Stem Cells and Development , vol. 17, no. 6, pp. 1053–1063, 2008. [43] H. Li, L. Zimmerlin, K. G. Marra,

  18. Characterization and comparison of osteoblasts derived from mouse embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Ming-San; Kannan, Vishnu; de Vries, Anneriek E; Czepiel, Marcin; Wesseling, Evelyn M; Balasubramaniyan, Veerakumar; Kuijer, Roelof; Vissink, Arjan; Copray, Sjef C V M; Raghoebar, Gerry M

    2016-01-01

    New developments in stem cell biology offer alternatives for the reconstruction of critical-sized bone defects. One of these developments is the use of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. These stem cells are similar to embryonic stem (ES) cells, but can be generated from adult somatic cells and t

  19. European stem cell research in legal shackles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, M.G.; de Vries, S.A.; Geijsen, N.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in stem cell biology have raised legal challenges to the patentability of stem cells and any derived technologies and processes. In 1999, Oliver Brustle was granted a patent for the generation and therapeutic use of neural cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). The patent wa

  20. Towards Personalized Regenerative Cell Therapy: Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Bolund, Lars; Luo, Yonglun

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells with the capacity of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation, and can be isolated from several adult tissues. However, isolating MSCs from adult tissues for cell therapy is hampered by the invasive procedure, the rarity of the cells and their attenuated proliferation capacity when cultivated and expanded in vitro. Human MSCs derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC-MSCs) have now evolved as a promising alternative cell source for MSCs and regenerative medicine. Several groups, including ours, have reported successful derivation of functional iPSC-MSCs and applied these cells in MSC-based therapeutic testing. Still, the current experience and understanding of iPSC-MSCs with respect to production methods, safety and efficacy are primitive. In this review, we highlight the methodological progress in iPSC-MSC research, describing the importance of choosing the right sources of iPSCs, iPSC reprogramming methods, iPSC culture systems, embryoid body intermediates, pathway inhibitors, basal medium, serum, growth factors and culture surface coating. We also highlight some progress in the application of iPSC-MSCs in direct cell therapy, tissue engineering and gene therapy.

  1. Renal stem cells: fact or science fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCampbell, Kristen K; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2012-06-01

    The kidney is widely regarded as an organ without regenerative abilities. However, in recent years this dogma has been challenged on the basis of observations of kidney recovery following acute injury, and the identification of renal populations that demonstrate stem cell characteristics in various species. It is currently speculated that the human kidney can regenerate in some contexts, but the mechanisms of renal regeneration remain poorly understood. Numerous controversies surround the potency, behaviour and origins of the cell types that are proposed to perform kidney regeneration. The present review explores the current understanding of renal stem cells and kidney regeneration events, and examines the future challenges in using these insights to create new clinical treatments for kidney disease.

  2. Human fetal mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, Keelin; Chan, Jerry

    2006-09-01

    Stem cells have been isolated at all stages of development from the early developing embryo to the post-reproductive adult organism. However, the fetal environment is unique as it is the only time in ontogeny that there is migration of stem cells in large numbers into different organ compartments. While fetal neural and haemopoietic stem cells (HSC) have been well characterised, only recently have mesenchymal stem cells from the human fetus been isolated and evaluated. Our group have characterised in human fetal blood, liver and bone marrow a population of non-haemopoietic, non-endothelial cells with an immunophenotype similar to adult bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). These cells, human fetal mesenchymal stem cells (hfMSC), are true multipotent stem cells with greater self-renewal and differentiation capacity than their adult counterparts. They circulate in first trimester fetal blood and have been found to traffic into the maternal circulation, engrafting in bone marrow, where they remain microchimeric for decades after pregnancy. Though fetal microchimerism has been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease, the biological role of hfMSC microchimerism is unknown. Potential downstream applications of hfMSC include their use as a target cell for non-invasive pre-natal diagnosis from maternal blood, and for fetal cellular and gene therapy. Using hfMSC in fetal therapy offers the theoretical advantages of avoidance of immune rejection, increased engraftment, and treatment before disease pathology sets in. Aside from allogeneic hfMSC in utero transplantation, the use of autologous hfMSC has been brought a step forward with the development of early blood sampling techniques, efficient viral transduction and clonal expansion. Work is ongoing to determine hfMSC fate post-transplantation in murine models of genetic disease. In this review we will examine what is known about hfMSC biology, as well as discussing areas for future research. The

  3. Systems Biology and Stem Cell Pluripotency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mashayekhi, Kaveh; Hall, Vanessa; Freude, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in stem cell biology have accelerated research in the area of regenerative medicine. Over the past years, it has become possible to derive patient-specific stem cells which can be used to generate different cell populations for potential cell therapy. Systems biological...... modeling of stem cell pluripotency and differentiation have largely been based on prior knowledge of signaling pathways, gene regulatory networks, and epigenetic factors. However, there is a great need to extend the complexity of the modeling and to integrate different types of data, which would further...... improve systems biology and its uses in the field. In this chapter, we first give a general background on stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. Stem cell potency is introduced together with the hierarchy of stem cells ranging from pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem...

  4. Stem cell biology and cell transplantation therapy in the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osakada, Fumitaka; Hirami, Yasuhiko; Takahashi, Masayo

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells, which are derived from the inner cell mass of mammalian blastocyst stage embryos, have the ability to differentiate into any cell type in the body and to grow indefinitely while maintaining pluripotency. During development, cells undergo progressive and irreversible differentiation into specialized adult cell types. Remarkably, in spite of this restriction in potential, adult somatic cells can be reprogrammed and returned to the naive state of pluripotency found in the early embryo simply by forcing expression of a defined set of transcription factors. These induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are molecularly and functionally equivalent to ES cells and provide powerful in vitro models for development, disease, and drug screening, as well as material for cell replacement therapy. Since functional impairment results from cell loss in most central nervous system (CNS) diseases, recovery of lost cells is an important treatment strategy. Although adult neurogenesis occurs in restricted regions, the CNS has poor potential for regeneration to compensate for cell loss. Thus, cell transplantation into damaged or diseased CNS tissues is a promising approach to treating various neurodegenerative disorders. Transplantation of photoreceptors or retinal pigment epithelium cells derived from human ES cells can restore some visual function. Patient-specific iPS cells may lead to customized cell therapy. However, regeneration of retinal function will require a detailed understanding of eye development, visual system circuitry, and retinal degeneration pathology. Here, we review the current progress in retinal regeneration, focusing on the therapeutic potential of pluripotent stem cells.

  5. Potential of embryonic and adult stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyz, Jaroslaw; Wiese, Cornelia; Rolletschek, Alexandra; Blyszczuk, Przemyslaw; Cross, Michael; Wobus, Anna M

    2003-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of stem cell research indicate their enormous potential as a source of tissue for regenerative therapies. The success of such applications will depend on the precise properties and potentials of stem cells isolated either from embryonic, fetal or adult tissues. Embryonic stem cells established from the inner cell mass of early mouse embryos are characterized by nearly unlimited proliferation, and the capacity to differentiate into derivatives of essentially all lineages. The recent isolation and culture of human embryonic stem cell lines presents new opportunities for reconstructive medicine. However, important problems remain; first, the derivation of human embryonic stem cells from in vitro fertilized blastocysts creates ethical problems, and second, the current techniques for the directed differentiation into somatic cell populations yield impure products with tumorigenic potential. Recent studies have also suggested an unexpectedly wide developmental potential of adult tissue-specific stem cells. Here too, many questions remain concerning the nature and status of adult stem cells both in vivo and in vitro and their proliferation and differentiation/transdifferentiation capacity. This review focuses on those issues of embryonic and adult stem cell biology most relevant to their in vitro propagation and differentiation. Questions and problems related to the use of human embryonic and adult stem cells in tissue regeneration and transplantation are discussed.

  6. Development of patient-specific hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell grafts from pluripotent stem cells, in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klump, H; Teichweyde, N; Meyer, C; Horn, P A

    2013-06-01

    Pluripotent stem cells hold great promise for future applications in many areas of regenerative medicine. Their defining property of differentiation towards any of the three germ layers and all derivatives thereof, including somatic stem cells, explains the special interest of the biomedical community in this cell type. In this review, we focus on the current state of directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells towards hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HSCs are especially interesting because they are the longest known and, thus, most intensively investigated somatic stem cells. They were the first stem cells successfully used for regenerative purposes in clinical human medicine, namely in bone marrow transplantation, and also the first stem cells to be genetically altered for the first successful gene therapy trial in humans. However, because of the technical difficulties associated with this rare type of cell, such as the current incapability of prospective isolation, in vitro expansion and gene repair by homologous recombination, there is great interest in using pluripotent stem cells, such as Embryonic Stem (ES-) cells, as a source for generating and genetically altering HSCs, ex vivo. This has been hampered by ethical concerns associated with the use of human ES-cells. However, since Shinya Yamanaka´s successful attempts to reprogram somatic cells of mice and men to an ES-cell like state, so-called induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, this field of research has experienced a huge boost. In this brief review, we will reflect on the status quo of directed hematopoietic differentiation of human and mouse pluripotent stem cells.

  7. nduced pluripotent stem cells and cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu İskender

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells are derived from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst-stage embryo. They hold a huge promise for cell therapy with their self-renewing ability and pluripotency, which is known as the potential to differentiate into all cell types originating from three embryonic germ layers. However, their unique pluripotent feature could not be utilised for therapeutic purposes due to the ethical and legal problems during derivation. Recently, it was shown that the cells from adult tissues could be reverted into embryonic state, thereby restoring their pluripotent feature. This has strenghtened the possiblity of directed differentition of the reprogrammed somatic cells into the desired cell types in vitro and their use in regenerative medicine. Although these cells were termed as induced pluripotent cells, the mechanism of pluripotency has yet to be understood. Still, induced pluripotent stem cell technology is considered to be significant by proposing novel approaches in disease modelling, drug screening and cell therapy. Besides their self-renewing ability and their potential to differentiate into all cell types in a human body, they arouse a great interest in scientific world by being far from the ethical concerns regarding their embryonic counterparts and their unique feature of being patient-specific in prospective cell therapies. In this review, induced pluripotent stem cell technology and its role in cell-based therapies from past to present will be discussed. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (4: 550-561

  8. Can Stem Cell 'Patch' Help Heart Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164475.html Can Stem Cell 'Patch' Help Heart Failure? Small improvement seen over ... Scientists report another step in the use of stem cells to help treat people with debilitating heart failure. ...

  9. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel Unsubscribe ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  10. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel Unsubscribe ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  11. Blood-Forming Stem Cell Transplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Ask about Your Treatment Research Blood-Forming Stem Cell Transplants On This Page What are bone marrow ... Considering becoming a bone marrow or a blood stem cell donor? View this video on YouTube. Follow a ...

  12. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel Unsubscribe ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  13. Stem cells: A tale of two kingdoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benfey, P N

    1999-03-11

    Homologous genes have recently been shown to regulate stem cell maintenance in animals and plants. This discovery should facilitate elucidation of the poorly understood factors that control stem cell maintenance and differentiation.

  14. What's It Like to Donate Stem Cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Types Stem Cell Transplant for Cancer What’s It Like to Donate Stem Cells? People usually volunteer ... their baby’s cord blood should make arrangements for it early in the pregnancy, at least before the ...

  15. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel Unsubscribe ... considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  16. Stem cells: a plant biology perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, B.J.G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07493662X

    2005-01-01

    A recent meeting at the Juan March Foundation in Madrid, Spain brought together plant biologists to discuss the characteristics of plant stem cells that are unique and those that are shared by stem cells from the animal kingdom

  17. Ethics and Governance of Stem Cell Banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Donald; Rathjen, Peter; Rathjen, Joy; Nicol, Dianne

    2017-01-01

    This chapter examines the ethical principles and governance frameworks for stem cell banks. Good governance of stem cell banks should balance facilitation of the clinical use of stem cells with the proper respect and protection of stem cell sample providers and stem cell recipients and ensure compliance with national regulatory requirements to foster public trust in the use of stem cell technology. Stem cell banks must develop with regard to the science, the needs of scientists, and the requirements of the public, which will benefit from this science. Given the international reach of this promising research and its clinical application, it is necessary for stem cell bank governance frameworks to be harmonized across jurisdictions.

  18. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel Unsubscribe ... considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  19. Stem cells: a plant biology perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, B.J.G.

    2005-01-01

    A recent meeting at the Juan March Foundation in Madrid, Spain brought together plant biologists to discuss the characteristics of plant stem cells that are unique and those that are shared by stem cells from the animal kingdom

  20. Cord blood stem cell banking and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhot, P S; Nair, V; Swarup, D; Sirohi, D; Ganguli, P

    2003-12-01

    Stem cells have the ability to divide for indefinite periods in culture and to give rise to specialized cells. Cord blood as a source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) has several advantages as it is easily available, involves non-invasive collection procedure and is better tolerated across the HLA barrier. Since the first cord blood transplant in 1988, over 2500 cord blood HSC transplants have been done world wide. Since then, the advantages of cord blood as a source of hematopietic stem cells for transplantation have become clear. Firstly, the proliferative capacity of HSC in cord blood is superior to that of cells in bone marrow or blood from adults. A 100 ml unit of cord blood contains 1/10th the number of nucleated cells and progenitor cells (CD34+ cells) present in 1000 ml of bone marrow, but because they proliferate rapidly, the stem cell in a single unit of cord blood can reconstitute the entire haematopoietic system. Secondly, the use of cord blood reduces the risk of graft vs host disease. Cord Blood Stem Cell banks have been established in Europe and United States to supply HSC for related and unrelated donors. Currently, more than 65,000 units are available and more than 2500 patients have received transplants of cord blood. Results in children have clearly shown that the number of nucleated cells in the infused cord blood influences the speed of recovery of neutrophils and platelets after myeloablative chemotherapy. The optimal dose is about 2 x 10(7) nucleated cells/kg of body weight. The present study was carried out for collection, separation, enumeration and cryopreservation of cord blood HSC and establishing a Cord Blood HSC Bank. 172 samples of cord blood HSC were collected after delivery of infant prior to expulsion of placenta. The average cord blood volume collected was 101.20 ml. Mononuclear cell count ranged from 7.36 to 25.6 x 10(7)/ml. Viability count of mononuclear cells was 98.1%. After 1 year of cryopreservation, the viability count on

  1. Progress and prospects in stem cell therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-ling XU; Fei YI; Hui-ze PAN; Shun-lei DUAN; Zhi-chao DING; Guo-hong YUAN; Jing QU

    2013-01-01

    In the past few years,progress being made in stem cell studies has incontestably led to the hope of developing cell replacement based therapy for diseases deficient in effective treatment by conventional ways.The induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are of great interest of cell therapy research because of their unrestricted self-renewal and differentiation potentials.Proof of principle studies have successfully demonstrated that iPSCs technology would substantially benefit clinical studies in various areas,including neurological disorders,hematologic diseases,cardiac diseases,liver diseases and etc.On top of this,latest advances of gene editing technologies have vigorously endorsed the possibility of obtaining disease-free autologous cells from patient specific iPSCs.Here in this review,we summarize current progress of stem cell therapy research with special enthusiasm in iPSCs studies.In addition,we compare current gene editing technologies and discuss their potential implications in clinic application in the future.

  2. Human pluripotent stem cells in contemporary medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Rodin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs are capable of indefinite proliferation and can be differentiated into any cell type of the human body. Therefore, they are a promising source of cells for treatment of numerous degenerative diseases and injuries. Pluripotent stem cells are also associated with a number of ethical, safety and technological issues. In this review, we describe various types of hPSCs, safety issues that concern all or some types of hPSCs and methods of clinical-grade hPSC line development. Also, we discuss current and past clinical trials involving hPSCs, their outcomes and future perspectives of hPSC-based therapy. 

  3. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gathier, WA; Türktas, Z; Duckers, HJ

    2015-01-01

    Until recently bone marrow was perceived to be the only significant reservoir of stem cells in the body. However, it is now recognized that there are other and perhaps even more abundant sources, which include adipose tissue. Subcutaneous fat is readily available in most patients, and can easily be

  4. [Genetic regulation of plant shoot stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al'bert, E V; Ezhova, T A

    2013-02-01

    This article describes the main features of plant stem cells and summarizes the results of studies of the genetic control of stem cell maintenance in the apical meristem of the shoot. It is demonstrated that the WUS-CLV gene system plays a key role in the maintenance of shoot apical stem cells and the formation of adventitious buds and somatic embryos. Unconventional concepts of plant stem cells are considered.

  5. Nine Things to Know About Stem Cell Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Toggle Nav Nine Things To Know About Stem Cell Treatments Home > Stem Cells and Medicine > Nine Things ... Know About Stem Cell Treatments Many clinics offering stem cell treatments make claims that are not supported by ...

  6. Medaka fish stem cells and their applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Stem cells are present in developing embryos and adult tissues of multicellular organisms. Owing to their unique features, stem cells provide excellent opportunities for experimental analyses of basic developmental processes such as pluripotency control and cell fate decision and for regenerative medicine by stem cell-based therapy. Stem cell cultures have been best studied in 3 vertebrate organisms. These are the mouse, human and a small laboratory fish called medaka. Specifically, medaka has given rise to the first embryonic stem (ES) cells besides the mouse, the first adult testis-derived male stem cells spermatogonia capable of test-tube sperm production, and most recently, even haploid ES cells capable of producing Holly, a semi-cloned fertile female medaka from a mosaic oocyte created by microinjecting a haploid ES cell nucleus directly into a normal oocyte. These breakthroughs make medaka a favoring vertebrate model for stem cell research, the topic of this review.

  7. Current approaches and future prospects of stem cells for glaucoma%干细胞移植治疗青光眼的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗静; 张慧明; 魏为; 周亮; 张康

    2014-01-01

    Irreversible retina neuron cell damage and dysfunction is the main pathology of blindness eye diseases such as glaucoma and age related retinopathy. However, no treatment showed efficiency to replace the damaged cells and restore the visual function. In 2012, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) were successfully differentiated into retina pigment epithelial cells and were evaluated in a clinical trial for human age related macular disease. It’s a milestone of stem cell regenerative medicine, which also brought hope for glaucoma treatment. Our review focused on the progress of stem cell transplantation strategy on retina ganglion cell replacement research. Recent studies found that ESCs have advantage in differentiation and function on rescuing central nervous system disease, which indicates that ESCs are excellent resource for treatment of neuron diseases including glaucoma. Furthermore, induced progenitor cells also provided new resource for studies of mechanism of eye diseases, drug delivery system and cell replacement treatment. In addition, Müller cells and bone marrow stem cells provided more stem cell resource for the future cell regenerative medicine.%不可逆性的视网膜神经细胞死亡和功能丧失是青光眼、老年黄斑变性等致盲性眼病的共同原因,目前没有有效的治疗方法修复已有的病变,恢复受损的视功能。2012年Schwartz等用人胚胎干细胞来源的视网膜色素上皮细胞移植进入临床实验用于治疗年龄相关性黄斑变性,这标志着干细胞替代治疗进入一个新的里程碑,也给青光眼的治疗带来了希望。本文综述了干细胞移植治疗青光眼的研究进展。近年的研究发现,胚胎干细胞在治疗中枢神经系统疾病中具有特别的优势,是细胞移植治疗视神经疾病包括青光眼的极具前景的来源。随着干细胞研究的不断深入,诱导多能干细胞的问世,为研究眼科难治性疾病的发病机制、开

  8. College Students' Conceptions of Stem Cells, Stem Cell Research, and Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concannon, James P.; Siegel, Marcelle A.; Halverson, Kristy; Freyermuth, Sharyn

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examined 96 undergraduate non-science majors' conceptions of stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning. This study was performed at a large, Midwest, research extensive university. Participants in the study were asked to answer 23 questions relating to stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning in an on-line assessment before…

  9. College Students' Conceptions of Stem Cells, Stem Cell Research, and Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concannon, James P.; Siegel, Marcelle A.; Halverson, Kristy; Freyermuth, Sharyn

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examined 96 undergraduate non-science majors' conceptions of stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning. This study was performed at a large, Midwest, research extensive university. Participants in the study were asked to answer 23 questions relating to stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning in an on-line assessment before…

  10. Stem cell sources for clinical islet transplantation in type 1 diabetes: embryonic and adult stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miszta-Lane, Helena; Mirbolooki, Mohammadreza; James Shapiro, A M; Lakey, Jonathan R T

    2006-01-01

    Lifelong immunosuppressive therapy and inadequate sources of transplantable islets have led the islet transplantation benefits to less than 0.5% of type 1 diabetics. Whereas the potential risk of infection by animal endogenous viruses limits the uses of islet xeno-transplantation, deriving islets from stem cells seems to be able to overcome the current problems of islet shortages and immune compatibility. Both embryonic (derived from the inner cell mass of blastocysts) and adult stem cells (derived from adult tissues) have shown controversial results in secreting insulin in vitro and normalizing hyperglycemia in vivo. ESCs research is thought to have much greater developmental potential than adult stem cells; however it is still in the basic research phase. Existing ESC lines are not believed to be identical or ideal for generating islets or beta-cells and additional ESC lines have to be established. Research with ESCs derived from humans is controversial because it requires the destruction of a human embryo and/or therapeutic cloning, which some believe is a slippery slope to reproductive cloning. On the other hand, adult stem cells are already in some degree specialized, recipients may receive their own stem cells. They are flexible but they have shown mixed degree of availability. Adult stem cells are not pluripotent. They may not exist for all organs. They are difficult to purify and they cannot be maintained well outside the body. In order to draw the future avenues in this field, existent discrepancies between the results need to be clarified. In this study, we will review the different aspects and challenges of using embryonic or adult stem cells in clinical islet transplantation for the treatment of type 1 diabetes.

  11. Ethical clinical translation of stem cell interventions for neurologic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cote, David J; Bredenoord, Annelien L; Smith, Timothy R

    2017-01-01

    The application of stem cell transplants in clinical practice has increased in frequency in recent years. Many of the stem cell transplants in neurologic diseases, including stroke, Parkinson disease, spinal cord injury, and demyelinating diseases, are unproven-they have not been tested...... in prospective, controlled clinical trials and have not become accepted therapies. Stem cell transplant procedures currently being carried out have therapeutic aims, but are frequently experimental and unregulated, and could potentially put patients at risk. In some cases, patients undergoing such operations...... are not included in a clinical trial, and do not provide genuinely informed consent. For these reasons and others, some current stem cell interventions for neurologic diseases are ethically dubious and could jeopardize progress in the field. We provide discussion points for the evaluation of new stem cell...

  12. Stemness & Niche sans Frontiers – The Cancer Stem Cell myth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The niche or the environment in which the cells reside and/or develop plays a major role in influencing the behaviour and characteristics of those cells. In case of normal stem cells, the niche acts as a physical anchoring site and the adhesion molecules therein help with their interaction [1]. The niche secretes extrinsic factors that control the self-renewal and lineage differentiation of the stem cells, thereby guiding them towards a pre-determined path of differentiation. For eg. stem cells in the corneal limbus give rise to corneal epithelial cells, stem cells in liver give rise to hepatocytes etc. which happen within the same organ or tissue. The bone marrow stem cells however have been found to come out of the marrow into the circulation, reach sites far away from their origin and have been reported to home to the site of injury and help in tissue repair either by direct differentiation to the cells native to the site of injury or by paracrine effect or other mechanisms [2]. In both these examples, the stem cells of relevance tend to differentiate into a mature cell of the surrounding niche/organ. However when it comes to cancer stem cells, the niche needs to be perceived in a different light. The cancer stem cells possess the ability to mobilize to distant sites and instead of differentiating to the cell type native to the distant metastasized site, these cancer stem cells either stay in a latent state or establish the tumour there, which makes us hypothesize that they might possess the capacity to modify the environment or the niche at that distant metastasized site. For instance, tumour cells in breast cancer have been found to disseminate to the bone marrow at a very early stage of cancer and these disseminated tumor cells (DTC have been found to possess a cancer stem cell phenotype [3]. These DTCs have been reported to persist for long and have been suggested to play a role in cancer recurrence [4]. Also these DTCs acquire a highly

  13. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are most commonly used in the treatment of cancers like leukemia and lymphoma to restore stem cells that have been destroyed by high doses of ... EuroStemCell 312,828 views 15:53 Understanding Your Cancer Prognosis ... views 6:48 Stem cell donation from brother saves child from cancer - Duration: ...

  14. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 53 PBSC (Peripheral blood stem cell) Harvest - Duration: 2:55. bmdpsg 4,554 views 2:55 Introduction To Stem Cells – Manipal Hospital - Duration: ... in Germany. #priceless - Duration: 1:04. Jacque Brohawn 2,548 views 1:04 Stem Cell Basics - How ...

  15. Cancer Stem Cells in Osteosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Heymann, D; Brown, H K; Tellez-Gabriel, M.

    2017-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumour in children and adolescents and advanced osteosarcoma patients with evidence of metastasis share a poor prognosis. Osteosarcoma frequently gains resistance to standard therapies highlighting the need for improved treatment regimens and identification of novel therapeutic targets. Cancer stem cells (CSC) represent a sub-type of tumour cells attributed to critical steps in cancer including tumour propagation, therapy resistance, recurrence and...

  16. Viscoelastic and dynamic properties of embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Christine

    ofthe cells themselves. In this thesis, the viscoelastic properties of mouse embryonic stem cells primedeither toward the epiblast (Epi) or the primitive endoderm (PrE) lineage were investigated.Optical tweezers were used to measure the fluctuations of endogenous lipid granules and therebydraw......Stem cells are often referred to as the ‘holy grail’ of regenerative medicine, because they possessthe ability to develop into any cell type. The use of stem cells within medicine is currently limited bythe effectivity of differentiation and cell reprogramming protocols, making it therefore...... imperative tounderstand stem cells’ differentiation mechanisms better. Studies have shown that mechanical cuescan have an influence on stem cell fate decision. However, in order to understand the reaction of stemcells to mechanical input, one should first investigate and understand the mechanical properties...

  17. Some applications of nanotechnologies in stem cells research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belicchi, M. [Fondazione IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico di Milano, Via Francesco Sforza, Milano 20122 (Italy); Cancedda, R. [Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro and Dipartimento di Oncologia Biologia e Genetica - Universita di Genova, Largo R. Benzi 10, Genova 16132 (Italy); Cedola, A. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie - CNR, Via Cinto Romano 42, Roma 00156 (Italy); Fiori, F. [Dipartimento S.A.I.F.E.T. Sezione di Scienze Fisiche - Universita' Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, Ancona 60131 (Italy); INBB - Istituto Nazionale Biostrutture e Biosistemi (Italy); CNISM - Matec (Ancona) (Italy); Gavina, M. [Fondazione IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico di Milano, Via Francesco Sforza, Milano 20122 (Italy); Giuliani, A. [Dipartimento S.A.I.F.E.T. Sezione di Scienze Fisiche - Universita' Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, Ancona 60131 (Italy); CNISM - Matec (Ancona) (Italy); Komlev, V.S. [Dipartimento S.A.I.F.E.T. Sezione di Scienze Fisiche - Universita' Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, Ancona 60131 (Italy); Institute for Physical Chemistry of Ceramics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ozernaya 48, 119361 Moscow (Russian Federation); Lagomarsino, S. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie - CNR, Via Cinto Romano 42, Roma 00156 (Italy); Mastrogiacomo, M. [Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro and Dipartimento di Oncologia Biologia e Genetica - Universita di Genova, Largo R. Benzi 10, Genova 16132 (Italy); Renghini, C. [Dipartimento S.A.I.F.E.T. Sezione di Scienze Fisiche - Universita' Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, Ancona 60131 (Italy); INBB - Istituto Nazionale Biostrutture e Biosistemi (Italy); CNISM - Matec (Ancona) (Italy); Rustichelli, F., E-mail: f.rustichelli@univpm.i [Dipartimento S.A.I.F.E.T. Sezione di Scienze Fisiche - Universita' Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, Ancona 60131 (Italy); INBB - Istituto Nazionale Biostrutture e Biosistemi (Italy); CNISM - Matec (Ancona) (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    Stem cell based tissue engineering therapies involve the administration of ex vivo manipulated stem cell populations with the purpose of repairing and regenerating damaged or diseased tissue. Currently available methods of monitoring transplanted cells are quite limited. To monitor the outcomes of stem cell therapy longitudinally requires the development of non-destructive strategies that are capable of identifying the location, magnitude, and duration of cellular survival and fate. The recent development of imaging techniques offers great potential to address these critical issues by non-invasively tracking the fate of the transplanted cells. This review offers a focused presentation of some examples of the use of imaging techniques connected to the nanotechnological world in research areas related to stem cells. In particular investigations will be considered concerning tissue-engineered bone, treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration, treatment by human stem cells of muscular dystrophy of Duchenne in small animal models and the repair of spinal cord injuries.

  18. Viscoelastic and dynamic properties of embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Christine

    Stem cells are often referred to as the ‘holy grail’ of regenerative medicine, because they possessthe ability to develop into any cell type. The use of stem cells within medicine is currently limited bythe effectivity of differentiation and cell reprogramming protocols, making it therefore...... imperative tounderstand stem cells’ differentiation mechanisms better. Studies have shown that mechanical cuescan have an influence on stem cell fate decision. However, in order to understand the reaction of stemcells to mechanical input, one should first investigate and understand the mechanical properties...... ofthe cells themselves. In this thesis, the viscoelastic properties of mouse embryonic stem cells primedeither toward the epiblast (Epi) or the primitive endoderm (PrE) lineage were investigated.Optical tweezers were used to measure the fluctuations of endogenous lipid granules and therebydraw...

  19. Pluripotent Stem Cells for Schwann Cell Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Ming-San; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering of Schwann cells (SCs) can serve a number of purposes, such as in vitro SC-related disease modeling, treatment of peripheral nerve diseases or peripheral nerve injury, and, potentially, treatment of CNS diseases. SCs can be generated from autologous stem cells in vitro by recapitu

  20. Stem cell therapy for neonatal brain injury: perspectives and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titomanlio, Luigi; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Dalous, Jeremie; Mani, Shyamala; El Ghouzzi, Vincent; Heijnen, Cobi; Baud, Olivier; Gressens, Pierre

    2011-11-01

    Cerebral palsy is a major health problem caused by brain damage during pregnancy, delivery, or the immediate postnatal period. Perinatal stroke, intraventricular hemorrhage, and asphyxia are the most common causes of neonatal brain damage. Periventricular white matter damage (periventricular leukomalacia) is the predominant form in premature infants and the most common antecedent of cerebral palsy. Stem cell treatment has proven effective in restoring injured organs and tissues in animal models. The potential of stem cells for self-renewal and differentiation translates into substantial neuroprotection and neuroregeneration in the animal brain, with minimal risks of rejection and side effects. Stem cell treatments described to date have used neural stem cells, embryonic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, umbilical cord stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. Most of these treatments are still experimental. In this review, we focus on the efficacy of stem cell therapy in animal models of cerebral palsy, and discuss potential implications for current and future clinical trials. Copyright © 2011 American Neurological Association.

  1. Methods for Stem Cell Production and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudio, Pier Paolo (Inventor); Valluri, Jagan V. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods for rapidly expanding a stem cell population with or without culture supplements in simulated microgravity conditions. The present invention relates to methods for rapidly increasing the life span of stem cell populations without culture supplements in simulated microgravity conditions. The present invention also relates to methods for increasing the sensitivity of cancer stem cells to chemotherapeutic agents by culturing the cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions and in the presence of omega-3 fatty acids. The methods of the present invention can also be used to proliferate cancer cells by culturing them in the presence of omega-3 fatty acids. The present invention also relates to methods for testing the sensitivity of cancer cells and cancer stem cells to chemotherapeutic agents by culturing the cancer cells and cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions. The methods of the present invention can also be used to produce tissue for use in transplantation by culturing stem cells or cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions. The methods of the present invention can also be used to produce cellular factors and growth factors by culturing stem cells or cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions. The methods of the present invention can also be used to produce cellular factors and growth factors to promote differentiation of cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions.

  2. Notch signaling in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jialiang; Sullenger, Bruce A; Rich, Jeremy N

    2012-01-01

    Subpopulations of cancer cells with stem cell-like characteristics, termed cancer stem cells, have been identified in a wide range of human cancers. Cancer stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew as well as recapitulate the original heterogeneity of cancer cells in culture and in serial xenotransplants. Not only are cancer stem cells highly tumorigenic, but these cells are implicated in tumor resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, thus highlighting their significance as therapeutic targets. Considerable similarities have been found between cancer stem cells and normal stem cells on their dependence on certain signaling pathways. More specifically, the core stem cell signaling pathways, such as the Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog pathways, also critically regulate the self-renewal and survival of cancer stem cells. While the oncogenic functions of Notch pathway have been well documented, its role in cancer stem cells is just emerging. In this chapter, we will discuss recent advances in cancer stem cell research and highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting Notch in cancer stem cells.

  3. Nuclear Mechanics and Stem Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xinjian; Gavara, Nuria; Song, Guanbin

    2015-12-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation potential. Stem cell differentiation is a prerequisite for the application of stem cells in regenerative medicine and clinical therapy. In addition to chemical stimulation, mechanical cues play a significant role in regulating stem cell differentiation. The integrity of mechanical sensors is necessary for the ability of cells to respond to mechanical signals. The nucleus, the largest and stiffest cellular organelle, interacts with the cytoskeleton as a key mediator of cell mechanics. Nuclear mechanics are involved in the complicated interactions of lamins, chromatin and nucleoskeleton-related proteins. Thus, stem cell differentiation is intimately associated with nuclear mechanics due to its indispensable role in mechanotransduction and mechanical response. This paper reviews several main contributions of nuclear mechanics, highlights the hallmarks of the nuclear mechanics of stem cells, and provides insight into the relationship between nuclear mechanics and stem cell differentiation, which may guide clinical applications in the future.

  4. Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells for skeletal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Siyeon; Im, Gun-Il

    2014-10-01

    Tissue engineering for skeletal tissues including bone and cartilage have been focused on the use of adult stem cells. Although there are several pioneering researches on skeletal tissue regeneration from embryonic stem cells (ESCs), ethical issues and the possibility of immune rejection clouded further attention to the application of ESCs for nonlethal orthopedic conditions. However, the recent discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) led to reconsider the use of these pluripotential cells for skeletal regeneration. The purpose of this review was to summarize the current knowledge of osteogenic and chondrogenic induction from ESCs and iPSCs and to provide a perspective on the application of iPSCs for skeletal regeneration.

  5. Stem Cell Technology in Cardiac Regeneration: A Pluripotent Stem Cell Promise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Duelen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in cardiovascular biology and medical therapy, heart disorders are the leading cause of death worldwide. Cell-based regenerative therapies become a promising treatment for patients affected by heart failure, but also underline the need for reproducible results in preclinical and clinical studies for safety and efficacy. Enthusiasm has been tempered by poor engraftment, survival and differentiation of the injected adult stem cells. The crucial challenge is identification and selection of the most suitable stem cell type for cardiac regenerative medicine. Human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs have emerged as attractive cell source to obtain cardiomyocytes (CMs, with potential applications, including drug discovery and toxicity screening, disease modelling and innovative cell therapies. Lessons from embryology offered important insights into the development of stem cell-derived CMs. However, the generation of a CM population, uniform in cardiac subtype, adult maturation and functional properties, is highly recommended. Moreover, hurdles regarding tumorigenesis, graft cell death, immune rejection and arrhythmogenesis need to be overcome in clinical practice. Here we highlight the recent progression in PSC technologies for the regeneration of injured heart. We review novel strategies that might overcome current obstacles in heart regenerative medicine, aiming at improving cell survival and functional integration after cell transplantation.

  6. Femtosecond laser pulses for chemical-free embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mthunzi, P

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their self renewal and pluripotency properties, stem cells can efficiently advance current therapies in tissue regeneration and/or engineering. Under appropriate culture conditions in vitro, pluripotent stem cells can be primed...

  7. Stem Cell-based Tissue Engineering Approaches for Musculoskeletal Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Patrick T.; Handorf, Andrew M.; Jeon, Won Bae; Li, Wan-Ju

    2014-01-01

    The field of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering is an ever evolving field that holds promise in treating numerous musculoskeletal diseases and injuries. An important impetus in the development of the field was the discovery and implementation of stem cells. The utilization of mesenchymal stem cells, and later embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, opens new arenas for tissue engineering and presents the potential of developing stem cell-based therapies for disease treatment. Multipotent and pluripotent stem cells can produce various lineage tissues, and allow for derivation of a tissue that may be comprised of multiple cell types. As the field grows, the combination of biomaterial scaffolds and bioreactors provides methods to create an environment for stem cells that better represent their microenvironment for new tissue formation. As technologies for the fabrication of biomaterial scaffolds advance, the ability of scaffolds to modulate stem cell behavior advances as well. The composition of scaffolds could be of natural or synthetic materials and could be tailored to enhance cell self-renewal and/or direct cell fates. In addition to biomaterial scaffolds, studies of tissue development and cellular microenvironments have determined other factors, such as growth factors and oxygen tension, that are crucial to the regulation of stem cell activity. The overarching goal of stem cell-based tissue engineering research is to precisely control differentiation of stem cells in culture. In this article, we review current developments in tissue engineering, focusing on several stem cell sources, induction factors including growth factors, oxygen tension, biomaterials, and mechanical stimulation, and the internal and external regulatory mechanisms that govern proliferation and differentiation. PMID:23432679

  8. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Quaade, Marlene Louise; Sheikh, Søren Paludan

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence has shown that adipose tissue is the richest and most accessible source of mesenchymal stem cells. Many different therapies for chronic wounds exist with varying success rates. The capacity of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) to promote angiogenesis, secrete growth factors......, regulate the inflammatory process, and differentiate into multiple cell types makes them a potential ideal therapy for chronic wounds. The aim of this article was to review all preclinical trials using ASCs in problem wound models. A systematic search was performed and 12 studies were found where different...... chronic wound models across different animals were treated with ASCs. Different ASC sources and delivery methods were used in the described studies. Studies demonstrated improved wound healing with utilization of ASC, and this treatment modality has so far shown great potential. However, more preclinical...

  9. Runx Family Genes in Tissue Stem Cell Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chelsia Qiuxia; Mok, Michelle Meng Huang; Yokomizo, Tomomasa; Tergaonkar, Vinay; Osato, Motomi

    2017-01-01

    The Runx family genes play important roles in development and cancer, largely via their regulation of tissue stem cell behavior. Their involvement in two organs, blood and skin, is well documented. This review summarizes currently known Runx functions in the stem cells of these tissues. The fundamental core mechanism(s) mediated by Runx proteins has been sought; however, it appears that there does not exist one single common machinery that governs both tissue stem cells. Instead, Runx family genes employ multiple spatiotemporal mechanisms in regulating individual tissue stem cell populations. Such specific Runx requirements have been unveiled by a series of cell type-, developmental stage- or age-specific gene targeting studies in mice. Observations from these experiments revealed that the regulation of stem cells by Runx family genes turned out to be far more complex than previously thought. For instance, although it has been reported that Runx1 is required for the endothelial-to-hematopoietic cell transition (EHT) but not thereafter, recent studies clearly demonstrated that Runx1 is also needed during the period subsequent to EHT, namely at perinatal stage. In addition, Runx1 ablation in the embryonic skin mesenchyme eventually leads to complete loss of hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) in the adult epithelium, suggesting that Runx1 facilitates the specification of skin epithelial stem cells in a cell extrinsic manner. Further in-depth investigation into how Runx family genes are involved in stem cell regulation is warranted.

  10. Adult stem cell transplantation in stroke: its limitations and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Jae-Kyu; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Chu, Kon

    2008-09-01

    A growing number of studies have demonstrated stem cell-based therapy provides a feasible, realistic approach to the restoration of lost brain function after stroke. Moreover, adult stem cells may provide more appropriate clinical strategies. Leading candidate sources include bone marrow, peripheral blood, adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and olfactory mucosa, which act as central repositories for multipotent stem cells that can repopulate neural tissues. The medical society is currently enthusiastic concerning the clinical applications of autologous adult stem cells in stroke, based on promising results obtained during experimental studies and initial clinical trials. However, before embracing clinical applications, several essential precautions must be properly addressed. For example, the regenerative potentials of adult stem cells decline with age, and stem cells isolated from aged patients may retain dysfunctional characteristics. Are the natures and amounts of available autologous cells appropriate for therapeutic application in stroke? Do transplanted cells remain functional in the diseased brain, and if so what are the optimal injection routes, cell doses, and timings? Thus, we believe that success in future clinical trials will depend on careful investigation at the experimental level, to allow us to understand not only the practicalities of stem cell use, but also the underlying biological principles involved. Here, we review the advantages and disadvantages of the different adult stem cell sources and discuss the challenges that must be negotiated to achieve transplantation success.

  11. Combination Cell Therapy with Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Neural Stem Cells for Brain Stroke in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseini, Seyed Mojtaba; Farahmandnia, Mohammad; Razi, Zahra; Delavari, Somayeh; Shakibajahromi, Benafsheh; Sarvestani, Fatemeh Sabet; Kazemi, Sepehr; Semsar, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Brain stroke is the second most important events that lead to disability and morbidity these days. Although, stroke is important, there is no treatment for curing this problem. Nowadays, cell therapy has opened a new window for treating central nervous system disease. In some previous studies the Mesenchymal stem cells and neural stem cells. In this study, we have designed an experiment to assess the combination cell therapy (Mesenchymal and Neural stem cells) effects on brain stro...

  12. Stem cell procedures in arthroscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrna, Felix; Herbst, Elmar; Hoberman, Alexander; Imhoff, Andreas B; Schmitt, Andreas

    2016-07-13

    The stem cell as the building block necessary for tissue reparation and homeostasis plays a major role in regenerative medicine. Their unique property of being pluripotent, able to control immune process and even secrete a whole army of anabolic mediators, draws interest. While new arthroscopic procedures and techniques involving stem cells have been established over the last decade with improved outcomes, failures and dissatisfaction still occur. Therefore, there is increasing interest in ways to improve the healing response. MSCs are particularly promising for this task given their regenerative potential. While methods of isolating those cells are no longer poses a challenge, the best way of application is not clear. Several experiments in the realm of basic science and animal models have recently been published, addressing this issue, yet the application in clinical practice has lagged. This review provides an overview addressing the current standing of MSCs in the field of arthroscopic surgery.

  13. Recent advances in hematopoietic stem cell biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Hess, David A; Nolta, Jan A

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Exciting advances have been made in the field of hematopoietic stem cell biology during the past year. This review summarizes recent progress in the identification, culture, and in vivo tracking of hematopoietic stem cells. RECENT FINDINGS: The roles of Wnt and Notch proteins...... in regulating stem cell renewal in the microenvironment, and how these molecules can be exploited in ex vivo stem cell culture, are reviewed. The importance of identification of stem cells using functional as well as phenotypic markers is discussed. The novel field of nanotechnology is then discussed...... in the context of stem cell tracking in vivo. This review concludes with a section on the unexpected potential of bone marrow-derived stem cells to contribute to the repair of damaged tissues. The contribution of cell fusion to explain the latter phenomenon is discussed. SUMMARY: Because of exciting discoveries...

  14. The intestinal stem cell.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, N.; van de Wetering, M.L.; Clevers, H.

    2008-01-01

    The epithelium of the adult mammalian intestine is in a constant dialog with its underlying mesenchyme to direct progenitor proliferation, lineage commitment, terminal differentiation, and, ultimately, cell death. The epithelium is shaped into spatially distinct compartments that are dedicated to

  15. Modelling Neurodegenerative Diseases Using Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa J.

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are being modelled in-vitro using human patient-specific, induced pluripotent stem cells and transgenic embryonic stem cells to determine more about disease mechanisms, as well as to discover new treatments for patients. Current research in modelling Alzheimer’s disease......, frontotemporal dementia and Parkinson’s disease using pluripotent stem cells is described, along with the advent of gene-editing, which has been the complimentary tool for the field. Current methods used to model these diseases are predominantly dependent on 2D cell culture methods. Outcomes reveal that only...... that includes studying more complex 3D cell cultures, as well as accelerating aging of the neurons, may help to yield stronger phenotypes in the cultured cells. Thus, the use and application of pluripotent stem cells for modelling disease have already shown to be a powerful approach for discovering more about...

  16. Multiple myeloma cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Minjie; Kong, Yuanyuan; Yang, Guang; Gao, Lu; Shi, Jumei

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains incurable despite much progress that has been made in the treatment of the disease. MM cancer stem cell (MMSC), a rare subpopulation of MM cells with the capacity for self-renewal and drug resistance, is considered to lead to disease relapse. Several markers such as side population (SP) and ALDH1+ have been used to identify MMSCs. However, ideally and more precisely, the identification of the MMSCs should rely on MMSCs phenotype. Unfortunately the MMSC phenotype has not been properly defined yet. Drug resistance is the most important property of MMSCs and contributes to disease relapse, but the mechanisms of drug resistance have not been fully understood. The major signaling pathways involved in the regulation of self-renewal and differentiation of MMSCs include Hedgehog (Hh), Wingless (Wnt), Notch and PI3K/Akt/mTOR. However, the precise role of these signaling pathways needs to be clarified. It has been reported that the microRNA profile of MMSCs is remarkably different than that of non-MMSCs. Therefore, the search for targeting MMSCs has also been focused on microRNAs. Complex and mutual interactions between the MMSC and the surrounding bone marrow (BM) microenvironment sustain self-renewal and survival of MMSC. However, the required molecules for the interaction of the MMSC and the surrounding BM microenvironment need to be further identified. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge of MMSCs regarding their phenotype, mechanisms of drug resistance, signaling pathways that regulate MMSCs self-renewal and differentiation, abnormal microRNAs expression, and their interactions with the BM microenvironment. PMID:27007154

  17. Stem cells: progressions and applications in clinical medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hosseini Bereshneh

    2016-05-01

    of them in transferring gene into different cells. Today, this method have had considerable progress in the treatment of many disease. In this review study, some aspect of stem cells like types and characteristic, origin, derivation techniques, storage conditions and differentiation to target tissues, current clinical usage and their therapeutic capabilities will be discussed.

  18. Challenges for heart disease stem cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoover-Plow J

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Jane Hoover-Plow, Yanqing GongDepartments of Cardiovascular Medicine and Molecular Cardiology, Joseph J Jacobs Center for Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs are the leading cause of death worldwide. The use of stem cells to improve recovery of the injured heart after myocardial infarction (MI is an important emerging therapeutic strategy. However, recent reviews of clinical trials of stem cell therapy for MI and ischemic heart disease recovery report that less than half of the trials found only small improvements in cardiac function. In clinical trials, bone marrow, peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood cells were used as the source of stem cells delivered by intracoronary infusion. Some trials administered only a stem cell mobilizing agent that recruits endogenous sources of stem cells. Important challenges to improve the effectiveness of stem cell therapy for CVD include: (1 improved identification, recruitment, and expansion of autologous stem cells; (2 identification of mobilizing and homing agents that increase recruitment; and (3 development of strategies to improve stem cell survival and engraftment of both endogenous and exogenous sources of stem cells. This review is an overview of stem cell therapy for CVD and discusses the challenges these three areas present for maximum optimization of the efficacy of stem cell therapy for heart disease, and new strategies in progress.Keywords: mobilization, expansion, homing, survival, engraftment

  19. Microfluidics for gametes, embryos, and embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G D; Swain, J E; Bormann, C L

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidics is a young but established field that holds significant potential for scientific discovery. The utility of microfluidics can improve our knowledge of basic biology as well as expand our understanding in specialized areas such as assisted reproduction and stem cell developmental biology. This review describes the technology of microfluidics and discusses applications within assisted reproduction technology and embryonic stem cell growth and directed differentiation. Development of an integrated microfluidic platform for assisted reproduction, which can manipulate gametes, embryos, embryonic stem cells, their culture environment, and incorporate biomarker analysis, could have a dramatic impact on the basic understanding of embryo/embryonic stem cell development, as well as provide significant improvements in current technologies used to treat infertility, preserve fertility, and derive therapeutic cells from stem cells.

  20. Regulation of stem cells in the zebra fish hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H-T; Zon, L I

    2008-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been used extensively as a model for stem cell biology. Stem cells share the ability to self-renew and differentiate into multiple cell types, making them ideal candidates for tissue regeneration or replacement therapies. Current applications of stem cell technology are limited by our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that control their proliferation and differentiation, and various model organisms have been used to fill these gaps. This chapter focuses on the contributions of the zebra fish model to our understanding of stem cell regulation within the hematopoietic system. Studies in zebra fish have been valuable for identifying new genetic and signaling factors that affect HSC formation and development with important implications for humans, and new advances in the zebra fish toolbox will allow other aspects of HSC behavior to be investigated as well, including migration, homing, and engraftment.

  1. Differentiation of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells to cardiomyocytes: a methods overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mummery, Christine L; Zhang, Jianhua; Ng, Elizabeth S; Elliott, David A; Elefanty, Andrew G; Kamp, Timothy J

    2012-07-20

    Since human embryonic stem cells were first differentiated to beating cardiomyocytes a decade ago, interest in their potential applications has increased exponentially. This has been further enhanced over recent years by the discovery of methods to induce pluripotency in somatic cells, including those derived from patients with hereditary cardiac diseases. Human pluripotent stem cells have been among the most challenging cell types to grow stably in culture, but advances in reagent development now mean that most laboratories can expand both embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells robustly using commercially available products. However, differentiation protocols have lagged behind and in many cases only produce the cell types required with low efficiency. Cardiomyocyte differentiation techniques were also initially inefficient and not readily transferable across cell lines, but there are now a number of more robust protocols available. Here, we review the basic biology underlying the differentiation of pluripotent cells to cardiac lineages and describe current state-of-the-art protocols, as well as ongoing refinements. This should provide a useful entry for laboratories new to this area to start their research. Ultimately, efficient and reliable differentiation methodologies are essential to generate desired cardiac lineages to realize the full promise of human pluripotent stem cells for biomedical research, drug development, and clinical applications.

  2. Biological impact of human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Miguel; Menéndez, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Research on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent (iPS) stem cells is currently a field of great potential in biomedicine. These cells represent a highly valuable tool for developmental biology studies, disease models, and drug screening and toxicity. The ultimate goal of hESCs and iPS cell research is the treatment of diseases or disorders for which there is currently no treatment or existing therapies are only partially effective. Despite the disproportionate short-term hopes generated, which are putting too much pressure on scientists, the international scientific community is making rapid progress in understanding hESCs and iPS cells. Nonetheless, great efforts have to be made to provide an answer to still quite basic questions concerning their biology. Moreover, translation to clinical applications in cell replacement therapy requires prior solution to ethical barriers. The recent development of iPS cells has provided a strong alternative to overcome ethical issues concerning hESCs. However, an in-depth characterization of their genetic and epigenetic features, as well as their differentiation potential still remains to be undertaken. This chapter will describe, precisely, what the critical issues are, where scientific and ethical barriers stand, and how we are to overcome them. Only then, we shall finally discover whether hESCs and iPS cells will allow building reproducible disease models, and whether they really are a safe tool, with great potential for regenerative medicine.

  3. Mesenchymal stem cell exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ruenn Chai; Yeo, Ronne Wee Yeh; Lim, Sai Kiang

    2015-04-01

    MSCs are an extensively used cell type in clinical trials today. The initial rationale for their clinical testing was based on their differentiation potential. However, the lack of correlation between functional improvement and cell engraftment or differentiation at the site of injury has led to the proposal that MSCs exert their effects not through their differentiation potential but through their secreted product, more specifically, exosomes, a type of extracellular vesicle. We propose here that MSC exosomes function as an extension of MSC's biological role as tissue stromal support cells. Like their cell source, MSC exosomes help maintain tissue homeostasis for optimal tissue function. They target housekeeping biological processes that operate ubiquitously in all tissues and are critical in maintaining tissue homeostasis, enabling cells to recover critical cellular functions and begin repair and regeneration. This hypothesis provides a rationale for the therapeutic efficacy of MSCs and their secreted exosomes in a wide spectrum of diseases. Here, we give a brief introduction of the biogenesis of MSC exosomes, review their physiological functions and highlight some of their biochemical potential to illustrate how MSC exosomes could restore tissue homeostasis leading to tissue recovery and repair.

  4. Targeting Cancer Stem Cells with Natural Killer Cell Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Jesus I; Grossenbacher, Steven K; Murphy, William J; Canter, Robert J

    2017-03-01

    Standard cytoreductive cancer therapy, such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy, are frequently resisted by a small portion of cancer cells with 'stem-cell' like properties including quiescence and repopulation. Immunotherapy represents a breakthrough modality for improving oncologic outcomes in cancer patients. Since the success of immunotherapy is not contingent on target cell proliferation, it may also be uniquely suited to address the problem of resistance and repopulation exerted by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Areas covered: Natural killer (NK) cells have long been known for their ability to reject allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells, and there are increasing data demonstrating that NK cells can selectively identify and lyse CSCs. The authors review the current knowledge of CSCs and NK cells and highlight recent studies that support the concept that NK cells are capable of targeting CSC in solid tumors, especially in the context of combination therapy simultaneously targeting non-CSCs and CSCs. Expert opinion: Unlike cytotoxic cancer treatments, NK cells can target and eliminate quiescent/non-proliferating cells such as CSCs, and these enigmatic cells are an important source of relapse and metastasis. NK targeting of CSCs represents a novel and potentially high impact method to capitalize on the intrinsic therapeutic potential of NK cells.

  5. Chromatin remodeling and stem cell theory of relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Jan; Quesenberry, Peter J

    2004-10-01

    The field of stem cell biology is currently being redefined. Stem cell (hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic) differentiation has been considered hierarchical in nature, but recent data suggest that there is no progenitor/stem cell hierarchy, but rather a reversible continuum. The stem cell (hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic) phenotype, the total differentiation capacity (hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic), gene expression as well as other stem cell functional characteristics (homing, receptor and adhesion molecule expression) vary throughout a cell-cycle transit widely. This seems to be dependent on shifting chromatin and gene expression with cell-cycle transit. The published data on DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and also RNAi, the major regulators of gene expression, conjoins very well and provides an explanation for the major issues of stem cell biology. Those features of stem cells mentioned above can be rather difficult to apprehend when a classical hierarchy biology view is applied, but they become clear and easier to understand once they are correlated with the underlining epigenetic changes. We are entering a new era of stem cell biology the era of "chromatinomics." We are one step closer to the practical use of cellular therapy for degenerative diseases.

  6. Bovine mammary stem cells: new perspective for dairy science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martignani, E; Cravero, D; Miretti, S; Accornero, P; Baratta, M

    2014-01-01

    Mammary stem cells provide opportunities for the cyclic remodelling of the bovine mammary gland. Therefore, understanding the character and regulation of mammary stem cells is important for increasing animal health and productivity. The exciting possibility that stem cell expansion can influence milk production is currently being investigated by several researchers. In fact, appropriate regulation of mammary stem cells could hopefully benefit milk yield, persistency of lactation, dry period management and tissue repair. Accordingly, we and others have attempted to characterize and regulate the function of bovine mammary stem cells. However, research on mammary stem cells requires tissue biopsies, which represents a limitation for the management of animal welfare. Interestingly, different studies recently reported the identification of putative mammary stem cells in human breast milk. The possible identification of primitive cell types within cow's milk may provide a non-invasive source of relevant mammary cells for a wide range of applications. In this review, we have summarized the main achievements in this field for dairy cow science and described the interesting perspectives open to manipulate milk persistency during lactation and to cope with oxidative stress during the transition period by regulating mammary stem cells.

  7. Multidimensional nanomaterials for the control of stem cell fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chueng, Sy-Tsong Dean; Yang, Letao; Zhang, Yixiao; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2016-09-01

    Current stem cell therapy suffers low efficiency in giving rise to differentiated cell lineages, which can replace the original damaged cells. Nanomaterials, on the other hand, provide unique physical size, surface chemistry, conductivity, and topographical microenvironment to regulate stem cell differentiation through multidimensional approaches to facilitate gene delivery, cell-cell, and cell-ECM interactions. In this review, nanomaterials are demonstrated to work both alone and synergistically to guide selective stem cell differentiation. From three different nanotechnology families, three approaches are shown: (1) soluble microenvironmental factors; (2) insoluble physical microenvironment; and (3) nano-topographical features. As regenerative medicine is heavily invested in effective stem cell therapy, this review is inspired to generate discussions in the potential clinical applications of multi-dimensional nanomaterials.

  8. Klotho, stem cells, and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Ao; Neyra, Javier A; Zhan, Ming; Hu, Ming Chang

    2015-01-01

    Aging is an inevitable and progressive biological process involving dysfunction and eventually destruction of every tissue and organ. This process is driven by a tightly regulated and complex interplay between genetic and acquired factors. Klotho is an antiaging gene encoding a single-pass transmembrane protein, klotho, which serves as an aging suppressor through a wide variety of mechanisms, such as antioxidation, antisenescence, antiautophagy, and modulation of many signaling pathways, including insulin-like growth factor and Wnt. Klotho deficiency activates Wnt expression and activity contributing to senescence and depletion of stem cells, which consequently triggers tissue atrophy and fibrosis. In contrast, the klotho protein was shown to suppress Wnt-signaling transduction, and inhibit cell senescence and preserve stem cells. A better understanding of the potential effects of klotho on stem cells could offer novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of klotho deficiency-related aging and disease. The klotho protein may be a promising therapeutic agent for aging and aging-related disorders.

  9. Combination cell therapy with mesenchymal stem cells and neural stem cells for brain stroke in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Mojtaba; Farahmandnia, Mohammad; Razi, Zahra; Delavari, Somayeh; Shakibajahromi, Benafsheh; Sarvestani, Fatemeh Sabet; Kazemi, Sepehr; Semsar, Maryam

    2015-05-01

    Brain stroke is the second most important events that lead to disability and morbidity these days. Although, stroke is important, there is no treatment for curing this problem. Nowadays, cell therapy has opened a new window for treating central nervous system disease. In some previous studies the Mesenchymal stem cells and neural stem cells. In this study, we have designed an experiment to assess the combination cell therapy (Mesenchymal and Neural stem cells) effects on brain stroke. The Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from adult rat bone marrow and the neural stem cells were isolated from ganglion eminence of rat embryo 14 days. The Mesenchymal stem cells were injected 1 day after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and the neural stem cells transplanted 7 day after MCAO. After 28 days, the neurological outcomes and brain lesion volumes were evaluated. Also, the activity of Caspase 3 was assessed in different groups. The group which received combination cell therapy had better neurological examination and less brain lesion. Also the combination cell therapy group had the least Caspase 3 activity among the groups. The combination cell therapy is more effective than Mesenchymal stem cell therapy and neural stem cell therapy separately in treating the brain stroke in rats.

  10. Strategies for future histocompatible stem cell therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nehlin, Jan; Barington, Torben

    2009-01-01

    Stem cell therapy based on the safe and unlimited self-renewal of human pluripotent stem cells is envisioned for future use in tissue or organ replacement after injury or disease. A gradual decline of regenerative capacity has been documented among the adult stem cell population in some body organs...... during the aging process. Recent progress in human somatic cell nuclear transfer and inducible pluripotent stem cell technologies has shown that patient-derived nuclei or somatic cells can be reprogrammed in vitro to become pluripotent stem cells, from which the three germ layer lineages can be generated......, genetically identical to the recipient. Once differentiation protocols and culture conditions can be defined and optimized, patient-histocompatible pluripotent stem cells could be directed towards virtually every cell type in the human body. Harnessing this capability to enrich for given cells within...

  11. Stem Cell-Based Cell Therapy for Glomerulonephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiling Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glomerulonephritis (GN, characterized by immune-mediated inflammatory changes in the glomerular, is a common cause of end stage renal disease. Therapeutic options for glomerulonephritis applicable to all cases mainly include symptomatic treatment and strategies to delay progression. In the attempt to yield innovative interventions fostering the limited capability of regeneration of renal tissue after injury and the uncontrolled pathological process by current treatments, stem cell-based therapy has emerged as novel therapy for its ability to inhibit inflammation and promote regeneration. Many basic and clinical studies have been performed that support the ability of various stem cell populations to ameliorate glomerular injury and improve renal function. However, there is a long way before putting stem cell-based therapy into clinical practice. In the present article, we aim to review works performed with respect to the use of stem cell of different origins in GN, and to discuss the potential mechanism of therapeutic effect and the challenges for clinical application of stem cells.

  12. [Stem cells and tissue engineering techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sica, Gigliola

    2013-01-01

    The therapeutic use of stem cells and tissue engineering techniques are emerging in urology. Here, stem cell types, their differentiating potential and fundamental characteristics are illustrated. The cancer stem cell hypothesis is reported with reference to the role played by stem cells in the origin, development and progression of neoplastic lesions. In addition, recent reports of results obtained with stem cells alone or seeded in scaffolds to overcome problems of damaged urinary tract tissue are summarized. Among others, the application of these biotechnologies in urinary bladder, and urethra are delineated. Nevertheless, apart from the ethical concerns raised from the use of embryonic stem cells, a lot of questions need to be solved concerning the biology of stem cells before their widespread use in clinical trials. Further investigation is also required in tissue engineering utilizing animal models.

  13. Stem cells news update: a personal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sc

    2013-12-01

    This article is a follow-up to a previous Commentary published in 2011. It updates some of the events mentioned in that Commentary and continues with more interesting and exciting news on stem cell research and the emerging field of Regenerative Medicine. Some of the news includes: 1) the 2012 Nobel Prize for Medicine awarded to John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka; 2) the cloning of human embryonic stem cells; 3) the continued search for truly pluripotent adult stem cells via in vitro and in vivo protocols; 4) the breakthrough in organ replacements; 5) the global stem cell race; 6) the global stem cell cryo-preservation business; 7) the worldwide stem cell donor registries, and 8) the issue of government regulation on stem cell therapy.

  14. Spermatogonial stem cells: Current biotechnologicaladvances in reproduction and regenerative medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are the germ stemcells of the seminiferous epithelium in the testis.Through the process of spermatogenesis, they producesperm while concomitantly keeping their cellular poolconstant through self-renewal. SSC biology offersimportant applications for animal reproduction andovercoming human disease through regenerativetherapies. To this end, several techniques involvingSSCs have been developed and will be covered inthis article. SSCs convey genetic information to thenext generation, a property that can be exploited forgene targeting. Additionally, SSCs can be induced tobecome embryonic stem cell-like pluripotent cells invitro . Updates on SSC transplantation techniques withrelated applications, such as fertility restoration andpreservation of endangered species, are also covered onthis article. SSC suspensions can be transplanted to thetestis of an animal and this has given the basis for SSCfunctional assays. This procedure has proven technicallydemanding in large animals and men. In parallel, testistissue xenografting, another transplantation technique,was developed and resulted in sperm production intestis explants grafted into ectopical locations in foreignspecies. Since SSC culture holds a pivotal role in SSCbiotechnologies, current advances are overviewed.Finally, spermatogenesis in vitro , already demonstratedin mice, offers great promises to cope with reproductiveissues in the farm animal industry and human clinicalapplications.

  15. Molecular mechanisms controlling the cell cycle in embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelalim, Essam M

    2013-12-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are originated from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst stage embryo. They can proliferate indefinitely, maintain an undifferentiated state (self-renewal), and differentiate into any cell type (pluripotency). ES cells have an unusual cell cycle structure, consists mainly of S phase cells, a short G1 phase and absence of G1/S checkpoint. Cell division and cell cycle progression are controlled by mechanisms ensuring the accurate transmission of genetic information from generation to generation. Therefore, control of cell cycle is a complicated process, involving several signaling pathways. Although great progress has been made on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of ES cell cycle, many regulatory mechanisms remain unknown. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms regulating the cell cycle of ES cells and describes the relationship existing between cell cycle progression and the self-renewal.

  16. Stem Cells, Science, and Public Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbut, J. Benjamin; Robert, Jason Scott

    2012-01-01

    These are interesting days in the scientific, social, and political debates about human embryonic stem cell research. Pluripotent stem cells--cells that can, in principle, give rise to the body's full range of cell types--were previously derivable only from human embryos that were destroyed in the process. Now, a variety of somatic cell types can…

  17. Stem Cells, Science, and Public Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbut, J. Benjamin; Robert, Jason Scott

    2012-01-01

    These are interesting days in the scientific, social, and political debates about human embryonic stem cell research. Pluripotent stem cells--cells that can, in principle, give rise to the body's full range of cell types--were previously derivable only from human embryos that were destroyed in the process. Now, a variety of somatic cell types can…

  18. Adult stem cell responses to nanostimuli

    OpenAIRE

    Tsimbouri, Penelope

    2015-01-01

    Adult or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been found in different tissues in the body, residing in stem cell microenvironments called “stem cell niches”. They play different roles but their main activity is to maintain tissue homeostasis and repair throughout the lifetime of an organism. Their ability to differentiate into different cell types makes them an ideal tool to study tissue development and to use them in cell-based therapies. This differentiation process is subject to both interna...

  19. RhoGTPases in stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    RhoGTPases are small molecules that control a wide variety of signal transduction pathways. Their profound function in regulating the actin cytoskeleton is well recognized. Stem cells are unique in their ability to self-renew and produce progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells. RhoGT-Pases influence stem cell morphology and cell migration as well as stem cell self-renewal, proliferation, transplantation, homing and differentiation. In this review, the multiple roles of the RhoGTPases in stem cells are discussed.

  20. Generalized Potential of Adult Neural Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Diana L.; Johansson, Clas B.; Wilbertz, Johannes; Veress, Biborka; Nilsson, Erik; Karlström, Helena; Lendahl, Urban; Frisén, Jonas

    2000-06-01

    The differentiation potential of stem cells in tissues of the adult has been thought to be limited to cell lineages present in the organ from which they were derived, but there is evidence that some stem cells may have a broader differentiation repertoire. We show here that neural stem cells from the adult mouse brain can contribute to the formation of chimeric chick and mouse embryos and give rise to cells of all germ layers. This demonstrates that an adult neural stem cell has a very broad developmental capacity and may potentially be used to generate a variety of cell types for transplantation in different diseases.

  1. Embryonic stem cells: testing the germ-cell theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochedlinger, Konrad

    2011-10-25

    The exact cellular origin of embryonic stem cells remains elusive. Now a new study provides compelling evidence that embryonic stem cells, established under conventional culture conditions, originate from a transient germ-cell state.

  2. Therapeutic potential of adult stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Keith, W. Nicol

    2006-01-01

    is the necessity to be able to identify, select, expand and manipulate cells outside the body. Recent advances in adult stem cell technologies and basic biology have accelerated therapeutic opportunities aimed at eventual clinical applications. Adult stem cells with the ability to differentiate down multiple...... lineages are an attractive alternative to human embryonic stem cells (hES) in regenerative medicine. In many countries, present legislation surrounding hES cells makes their use problematic, and indeed the origin of hES cells may represent a controversial issue for many communities. However, adult stem...... cells are not subject to these issues. This review will therefore focus on adult stem cells. Based on their extensive differentiation potential and, in some cases, the relative ease of their isolation, adult stem cells are appropriate for clinical development. Recently, several observations suggest...

  3. Skeletal Muscle Cell Induction from Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusaku Kodaka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells (ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have the potential to differentiate into various types of cells including skeletal muscle cells. The approach of converting ESCs/iPSCs into skeletal muscle cells offers hope for patients afflicted with the skeletal muscle diseases such as the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. Patient-derived iPSCs are an especially ideal cell source to obtain an unlimited number of myogenic cells that escape immune rejection after engraftment. Currently, there are several approaches to induce differentiation of ESCs and iPSCs to skeletal muscle. A key to the generation of skeletal muscle cells from ESCs/iPSCs is the mimicking of embryonic mesodermal induction followed by myogenic induction. Thus, current approaches of skeletal muscle cell induction of ESCs/iPSCs utilize techniques including overexpression of myogenic transcription factors such as MyoD or Pax3, using small molecules to induce mesodermal cells followed by myogenic progenitor cells, and utilizing epigenetic myogenic memory existing in muscle cell-derived iPSCs. This review summarizes the current methods used in myogenic differentiation and highlights areas of recent improvement.

  4. Targeting cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He AR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aiwu Ruth He,1 Daniel C Smith,1 Lopa Mishra2 1Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: The poor outcome of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is attributed to recurrence of the disease after curative treatment and the resistance of HCC cells to conventional chemotherapy, which may be explained partly by the function of liver cancer stem cells (CSCs. Liver CSCs have emerged as an important therapeutic target against HCC. Numerous surface markers for liver CSCs have been identified, and include CD133, CD90, CD44, CD13, and epithelial cell adhesion molecules. These surface markers serve not only as tools for identifying and isolating liver CSCs but also as therapeutic targets for eradicating these cells. In studies of animal models and large-scale genomic analyses of human HCC samples, many signaling pathways observed in normal stem cells have been found to be altered in liver CSCs, which accounts for the stemness and aggressive behavior of these cells. Antibodies and small molecule inhibitors targeting the signaling pathways have been evaluated at different levels of preclinical and clinical development. Another strategy is to promote the differentiation of liver CSCs to less aggressive HCC that is sensitive to conventional chemotherapy. Disruption of the tumor niche essential for liver CSC homeostasis has become a novel strategy in cancer treatment. To overcome the challenges in developing treatment for liver CSCs, more research into the genetic makeup of patient tumors that respond to treatment may lead to more effective therapy. Standardization of HCC CSC tumor markers would be helpful for measuring the CSC response to these agents. Herein, we review the current strategies for developing treatment to eradicate liver CSCs and to improve the outcome for patients with

  5. Clinical Trials of Adult Stem Cell Therapy in Patients with Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Oh Young

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is considered a potential regenerative strategy for patients with neurologic deficits. Studies involving animal models of ischemic stroke have shown that stem cells transplanted into the brain can lead to functional improvement. With current advances in the understanding regarding the effects of introducing stem cells and their mechanisms of action, several clinical trials of stem cell therapy have been conducted in patients with stroke since 2005, including studies using mesenchymal stem cells, bone marrow mononuclear cells, and neural stem/progenitor cells. In addition, several clinical trials of the use of adult stem cells to treat ischemic stroke are ongoing. This review presents the status of our understanding of adult stem cells and results from clinical trials, and introduces ongoing clinical studies of adult stem cell therapy in the field of stroke.

  6. Embryonic stem cells: prospects for developmental biology and cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wobus, Anna M; Boheler, Kenneth R

    2005-04-01

    Stem cells represent natural units of embryonic development and tissue regeneration. Embryonic stem (ES) cells, in particular, possess a nearly unlimited self-renewal capacity and developmental potential to differentiate into virtually any cell type of an organism. Mouse ES cells, which are established as permanent cell lines from early embryos, can be regarded as a versatile biological system that has led to major advances in cell and developmental biology. Human ES cell lines, which have recently been derived, may additionally serve as an unlimited source of cells for regenerative medicine. Before therapeutic applications can be realized, important problems must be resolved. Ethical issues surround the derivation of human ES cells from in vitro fertilized blastocysts. Current techniques for directed differentiation into somatic cell populations remain inefficient and yield heterogeneous cell populations. Transplanted ES cell progeny may not function normally in organs, might retain tumorigenic potential, and could be rejected immunologically. The number of human ES cell lines available for research may also be insufficient to adequately determine their therapeutic potential. Recent molecular and cellular advances with mouse ES cells, however, portend the successful use of these cells in therapeutics. This review therefore focuses both on mouse and human ES cells with respect to in vitro propagation and differentiation as well as their use in basic cell and developmental biology and toxicology and presents prospects for human ES cells in tissue regeneration and transplantation.

  7. Stem/progenitor cells: a potential source of retina-specific cells for retinal repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yong-Yan; Feng, Dong-Fu; Pan, Dong-Chao

    2009-11-01

    Retinal injury generally results in permanent visual disturbance or even blindness. Any effort to restore vision in such condition would require replacement of the highly specialized retinal cells. Stem/progenitor cells have been proposed as a potential source of new retina-specific cells to replace those lost due to retina injury. Evidence to date suggests that continued development of stem cell therapies may ultimately lead to viable treatment options for retina injury. A wide range of stem/progenitor cells from various sources is currently being investigated for the treatment of retinal injury. This article reviews the recent achievements about stem/progenitor cell source for retinal repair.

  8. O transplante de células-tronco hematopoéticas na infância: situação atual e perspectivas Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in childhood: current status and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Seber

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available O transplante de células-tronco hematopoéticas (TCTH é uma opção terapêutica para um grande número de crianças com doenças malignas e não malignas. O objetivo deste artigo é apresentar a situação atual dos TCTH em pediatria para o tratamento de doenças hematológicas malignas, incluindo dados de nosso país e perspectivas futuras.Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a treatment option for a large number of children with malignant and non-malignant diseases. The objective of this article is to present the current status of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in the treatment of malignant hematological diseases in pediatrics, including results in Brazil, and future perspectives.

  9. Role of stem cells in spondyloarthritis: Pathogenesis, treatment and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Rebecca S Y

    2015-10-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is a family of interrelated inflammatory arthritis that includes ankylosing spondylitis (AS), psoriatic arthritis, reactive arthritis, arthritis related to inflammatory bowel disease and undifferentiated SpA. The classification, epidemiology, pathogenesis and treatment of SpA have been extensively reviewed in the published literature. Reviews on the use of stem cells in various autoimmune diseases in general are also common. However, a review on the role of stem cells in SpA is currently lacking. This review focuses on the involvement of stem cells in the pathogenesis of SpA and the application of different types of stem cells in the treatment of SpA. It also addresses some of the complications which may arise as a result of the use of stem cells in the treatment of SpA.

  10. Skin Tissue Engineering: Application of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimoch, Jakub; Biedermann, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Perception of the adipose tissue has changed dramatically over the last few decades. Identification of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) ultimately transformed paradigm of this tissue from a passive energy depot into a promising stem cell source with properties of self-renewal and multipotential differentiation. As compared to bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs), ASCs are more easily accessible and their isolation yields higher amount of stem cells. Therefore, the ASCs are of high interest for stem cell-based therapies and skin tissue engineering. Currently, freshly isolated stromal vascular fraction (SVF), which may be used directly without any expansion, was also assessed to be highly effective in treating skin radiation injuries, burns, or nonhealing wounds such as diabetic ulcers. In this paper, we review the characteristics of SVF and ASCs and the efficacy of their treatment for skin injuries and disorders.

  11. Molecular Imaging in Stem Cell Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahuan Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is a serious disease of the center nervous system (CNS. It is a devastating injury with sudden loss of motor, sensory, and autonomic function distal to the level of trauma and produces great personal and societal costs. Currently, there are no remarkable effective therapies for the treatment of SCI. Compared to traditional treatment methods, stem cell transplantation therapy holds potential for repair and functional plasticity after SCI. However, the mechanism of stem cell therapy for SCI remains largely unknown and obscure partly due to the lack of efficient stem cell trafficking methods. Molecular imaging technology including positron emission tomography (PET, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, optical imaging (i.e., bioluminescence imaging (BLI gives the hope to complete the knowledge concerning basic stem cell biology survival, migration, differentiation, and integration in real time when transplanted into damaged spinal cord. In this paper, we mainly review the molecular imaging technology in stem cell therapy for SCI.

  12. Stem Cell Based Gene Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Heon Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Current prostate cancer treatment, especially hormone refractory cancer, may create profound iatrogenic outcomes because of the adverse effects of cytotoxic agents. Suicide gene therapy has been investigated for the substitute modality for current chemotherapy because it enables the treatment targeting the cancer cells. However the classic suicide gene therapy has several profound side effects, including immune-compromised due to viral vector. Recently, stem cells have been regarded as a new upgraded cellular vehicle or vector because of its homing effects. Suicide gene therapy using genetically engineered mesenchymal stem cells or neural stem cells has the advantage of being safe, because prodrug administration not only eliminates tumor cells but consequently kills the more resistant therapeutic stem cells as well. The attractiveness of prodrug cancer gene therapy by stem cells targeted to tumors lies in activating the prodrug directly within the tumor mass, thus avoiding systemic toxicity. Therapeutic achievements using stem cells in prostate cancer include the cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine prodrug system, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir, carboxyl esterase/CPT11, and interferon-beta. The aim of this study is to review the stem cell therapy in prostate cancer including its proven mechanisms and also limitations.

  13. More Than Tiny Sacks: Stem Cell Exosomes as Cell-Free Modality for Cardiac Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, Raj; Khan, Mohsin

    2016-01-22

    Stem cell therapy provides immense hope for regenerating the pathological heart, yet has been marred by issues surrounding the effectiveness, unclear mechanisms, and survival of the donated cell population in the ischemic myocardial milieu. Poor survival and engraftment coupled to inadequate cardiac commitment of the adoptively transferred stem cells compromises the improvement in cardiac function. Various alternative approaches to enhance the efficacy of stem cell therapies and to overcome issues with cell therapy have been used with varied success. Cell-free components, such as exosomes enriched in proteins, messenger RNAs, and miRs characteristic of parental stem cells, represent a potential approach for treating cardiovascular diseases. Recently, exosomes from different kinds of stem cells have been effectively used to promote cardiac function in the pathological heart. The aim of this review is to summarize current research efforts on stem cell exosomes, including their potential benefits and limitations to develop a potentially viable therapy for cardiovascular problems.

  14. Current progress and application prospects of induced pluripotent stem cells%iPS细胞研究的新进展及应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦彤; 苗向阳

    2010-01-01

    通过导入特定的转录因子可将分化的体细胞重编程为诱导性多能干细胞(Induced pluripotent stem cells, iPS cells), 这项技术避免了干细胞研究领域的免疫排斥和伦理道德问题, 是生命科学领域的一次巨大革命.与胚胎干细胞(Embryonic stem cells, ES cells)一样, iPS 细胞能够自我更新并维持未分化状态, 在体内可分化为3 个胚层来源的所有细胞, 进而参与形成机体所有组织和器官.在体外, iPS 细胞可定向诱导分化出多种成熟细胞.因此, iPS 细胞在理论研究和临床应用等方面都极具应用价值.文章对iPS细胞诱导的最新研究进展、iPS细胞诱导的不同方法, 如何提高iPS细胞的制备效率和安全性, iPS细胞在基础研究以及临床研究等方面的应用进行了全面综述, 并探讨了iPS细胞研究领域面临的问题以及该技术在转基因动物研究中的发展前景.

  15. Similarity on neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cells in transgenic brain tumor mouse models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanqun Qiao; Qingquan Li; Gang Peng; Jun Ma; Hongwei Fan; Yingbin Li

    2013-01-01

    Although it is believed that glioma is derived from brain tumor stem cells, the source and molecular signal pathways of these cells are stil unclear. In this study, we used stable doxycycline-inducible transgenic mouse brain tumor models (c-myc+/SV40Tag+/Tet-on+) to explore the malignant trans-formation potential of neural stem cells by observing the differences of neural stem cel s and brain tumor stem cells in the tumor models. Results showed that chromosome instability occurred in brain tumor stem cells. The numbers of cytolysosomes and autophagosomes in brain tumor stem cells and induced neural stem cel s were lower and the proliferative activity was obviously stronger than that in normal neural stem cells. Normal neural stem cells could differentiate into glial fibril ary acidic protein-positive and microtubule associated protein-2-positive cells, which were also negative for nestin. However, glial fibril ary acidic protein/nestin, microtubule associated protein-2/nestin, and glial fibril ary acidic protein/microtubule associated protein-2 double-positive cells were found in induced neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cel s. Results indicate that induced neural stem cells are similar to brain tumor stem cells, and are possibly the source of brain tumor stem cells.

  16. Stem Cells in Functional Bladder Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolar, Jakub; Salemi, Souzan; Horst, Maya; Sulser, Tullio; Eberli, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Conditions impairing bladder function in children and adults, such as myelomeningocele, posterior urethral valves, bladder exstrophy or spinal cord injury, often need urinary diversion or augmentation cystoplasty as when untreated they may cause severe bladder dysfunction and kidney failure. Currently, the gold standard therapy of end-stage bladder disease refractory to conservative management is enterocystoplasty, a surgical enlargement of the bladder with intestinal tissue. Despite providing functional improvement, enterocystoplasty is associated with significant long-term complications, such as recurrent urinary tract infections, metabolic abnormalities, stone formation, and malignancies. Therefore, there is a strong clinical need for alternative therapies for these reconstructive procedures, of which stem cell-based tissue engineering (TE) is considered to be the most promising future strategy. This review is focused on the recent progress in bladder stem cell research and therapy and the challenges that remain for the development of a functional bladder wall.

  17. Stem Cell Therapy: A Prospective Treatment for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Han; Oh, Il-Hoan; Lim, Hyun Kook

    2016-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) without cure remains as a serious health issue in the modern society. The major neuropathological alterations in AD are characterized by chronic neuroinflammation and neuronal loss due to neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) of abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau, plaques of β-amyloid (Aβ) and various metabolic dysfunctions. Due to the multifaceted nature of AD pathology and our limited understanding on its etiology, AD is difficult to be treated with currently available pharmaceuticals. This unmet need, however, could be met with stem cell technology that can be engineered to replace neuronal loss in AD patients. Although stem cell therapy for AD is only in its development stages, it has vast potential uses ranging from replacement therapy to disease modelling and drug development. Current progress with stem cells in animal model studies offers promising results for the new prospective treatment for AD. This review will discuss the characteristics of AD, current progress in stem cell therapy and remaining challenges and promises in its development.

  18. Stepwise development of hematopoietic stem cells from embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Matsumoto

    Full Text Available The cellular ontogeny of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs remains poorly understood because their isolation from and their identification in early developing small embryos are difficult. We attempted to dissect early developmental stages of HSCs using an in vitro mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC differentiation system combined with inducible HOXB4 expression. Here we report the identification of pre-HSCs and an embryonic type of HSCs (embryonic HSCs as intermediate cells between ESCs and HSCs. Both pre-HSCs and embryonic HSCs were isolated by their c-Kit(+CD41(+CD45(- phenotype. Pre-HSCs did not engraft in irradiated adult mice. After co-culture with OP9 stromal cells and conditional expression of HOXB4, pre-HSCs gave rise to embryonic HSCs capable of engraftment and long-term reconstitution in irradiated adult mice. Blast colony assays revealed that most hemangioblast activity was detected apart from the pre-HSC population, implying the early divergence of pre-HSCs from hemangioblasts. Gene expression profiling suggests that a particular set of transcripts closely associated with adult HSCs is involved in the transition of pre-HSC to embryonic HSCs. We propose an HSC developmental model in which pre-HSCs and embryonic HSCs sequentially give rise to adult types of HSCs in a stepwise manner.

  19. Stem cell therapy to treat heart ischaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali Qayyum, Abbas; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Kastrup, Jens

    2014-01-01

    (CABG), morbidity and mortality is still high in patients with CAD. Along with PCI and CABG or in patients without options for revascularization, stem cell regenerative therapy in controlled trials is a possibility. Stem cells are believed to exert their actions by angiogenesis and regeneration...... of cardiomyocytes. Recently published clinical trials and meta-analysis of stem cell studies have shown encouraging results with increased left ventricle ejection fraction and reduced symptoms in patients with CAD and heart failure. There is some evidence of mesenchymal stem cell being more effective compared...... to other cell types and cell therapy may be more effective in patients with known diabetes mellitus. However, further investigations are warranted....

  20. Stem cell differentiation and human liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Li Zhou; Claire N Medine; Liang Zhu; David C Hay

    2012-01-01

    Human stem cells are scalable cell populations capable of cellular differentiation.This makes them a very attractive in vitro cellular resource and in theory provides unlimited amounts of primary cells.Such an approach has the potential to improve our understanding of human biology and treating disease.In the future it may be possible to deploy novel stem cell-based approaches to treat human liver diseases.In recent years,efficient hepatic differentiation from human stem cells has been achieved by several research groups including our own.In this review we provide an overview of the field and discuss the future potential and limitations of stem cell technology.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, Nora [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Vereb, Zoltan; Rajnavoelgyi, Eva [Department of Immunology, Medical and Health Science Centre, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Nemet, Katalin; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balazs [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Apati, Agota, E-mail: apati@kkk.org.hu [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  2. Therapeutic Potential of Stem Cells Strategy for Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Youn Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite development of medicine, cardiovascular diseases (CVDs are still the leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Over the past 10 years, various stem cells have been utilized in therapeutic strategies for the treatment of CVDs. CVDs are characterized by a broad range of pathological reactions including inflammation, necrosis, hyperplasia, and hypertrophy. However, the causes of CVDs are still unclear. While there is a limit to the currently available target-dependent treatments, the therapeutic potential of stem cells is very attractive for the treatment of CVDs because of their paracrine effects, anti-inflammatory activity, and immunomodulatory capacity. Various studies have recently reported increased therapeutic potential of transplantation of microRNA- (miRNA- overexpressing stem cells or small-molecule-treated cells. In addition to treatment with drugs or overexpressed miRNA in stem cells, stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles also have therapeutic potential because they can deliver the stem cell-specific RNA and protein into the host cell, thereby improving cell viability. Here, we reported the state of stem cell-based therapy for the treatment of CVDs and the potential for cell-free based therapy.

  3. Stem and progenitor cells: advancing bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevlin, R; Walmsley, G G; Marecic, O; Hu, Michael S; Wan, D C; Longaker, M T

    2016-04-01

    Unlike many other postnatal tissues, bone can regenerate and repair itself; nevertheless, this capacity can be overcome. Traditionally, surgical reconstructive strategies have implemented autologous, allogeneic, and prosthetic materials. Autologous bone--the best option--is limited in supply and also mandates an additional surgical procedure. In regenerative tissue engineering, there are myriad issues to consider in the creation of a functional, implantable replacement tissue. Importantly, there must exist an easily accessible, abundant cell source with the capacity to express the phenotype of the desired tissue, and a biocompatible scaffold to deliver the cells to the damaged region. A literature review was performed using PubMed; peer-reviewed publications were screened for relevance in order to identify key advances in stem and progenitor cell contribution to the field of bone tissue engineering. In this review, we briefly introduce various adult stem cells implemented in bone tissue engineering such as mesenchymal stem cells (including bone marrow- and adipose-derived stem cells), endothelial progenitor cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. We then discuss numerous advances associated with their application and subsequently focus on technological advances in the field, before addressing key regenerative strategies currently used in clinical practice. Stem and progenitor cell implementation in bone tissue engineering strategies have the ability to make a major impact on regenerative medicine and reduce patient morbidity. As the field of regenerative medicine endeavors to harness the body's own cells for treatment, scientific innovation has led to great advances in stem cell-based therapies in the past decade.

  4. Transplantation? Peripheral Stem Cell/Bone Marrow/Cord Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itır Sirinoglu Demiriz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of peripheral stem cell (PSC and cord blood (CB as an alternative to bone marrow (BM recently has caused important changes on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT practice. According to the CIBMTR data, there has been a significant decrease in the use of bone marrow and increase in the use of PSC and CB as the stem cell source for HSCT performed during 1997–2006 period for patients under the age of 20. On the other hand, the stem cell source in 70% of the HSCT procedures performed for patients over the age of 20 was PSC and the second most preferred stem cell source was bone marrow. CB usage is very limited for the adult population. Primary disease, stage, age, time and urgency of transplantation, HLA match between the patient and the donor, stem cell quantity, and the experience of the transplantation center are some of the associated factors for the selection of the appropriate stem cell source. Unfortunately, there is no prospective randomized study aimed to facilitate the selection of the correct source between CB, PSC, and BM. In this paper, we would like to emphasize the data on stem cell selection in light of the current knowledge for patient populations according to their age and primary disease.

  5. Skin appendage-derived stem cells: cell biology and potential for wound repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jiangfan; Yao, Bin; Han, Yutong; Huang, Sha; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells residing in the epidermis and skin appendages are imperative for skin homeostasis and regeneration. These stem cells also participate in the repair of the epidermis after injuries, inducing restoration of tissue integrity and function of damaged tissue. Unlike epidermis-derived stem cells, comprehensive knowledge about skin appendage-derived stem cells remains limited. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of skin appendage-derived stem cells, including their fundamental characteristics, their preferentially expressed biomarkers, and their potential contribution involved in wound repair. Finally, we will also discuss current strategies, future applications, and limitations of these stem cells, attempting to provide some perspectives on optimizing the available therapy in cutaneous repair and regeneration.

  6. A novel and effective strategy for the isolation of adipose-derived stem cells: minimally manipulated adipose-derived stem cells for more rapid and safe stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposio, Edoardo; Caruana, Giorgia; Bonomini, Sabrina; Libondi, Guido

    2014-06-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells are an ideal mesenchymal stem cell population for regenerative medical application. The isolation procedure is performed by mechanical isolation under a laminar air flow bench without using serum or animal-derived reagents; cells were characterized by flow cytometric analysis. Cell availability is improved compared with enzymatic digestion procedures. The adipose-derived stem cell mechanical isolating procedure presented here is easier, safer, cheaper, and faster than traditional currently performed enzymatic procedures.

  7. Intravenous transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells preconditioned with early phase stroke serum: current evidence and study protocol for a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suk Jae; Moon, Gyeong Joon; Chang, Won Hyuk; Kim, Yun-Hee; Bang, Oh Young

    2013-10-01

    Recovery after a major stroke is usually limited, but cell therapy for patients with fixed neurologic deficits is emerging. Several recent clinical trials have investigated mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy for patients with ischemic stroke. We previously reported the results of a controlled trial on the application of autologous MSCs in patients with ischemic stroke with a long-term follow-up of up to 5 years (the 'STem cell Application Researches and Trials In NeuroloGy' (STARTING) study). The results from this pilot trial are challenging, but also raise important issues. In addition, there have been recent efforts to improve the safety and efficacy of MSC therapy for stroke. The clinical and preclinical background and the STARTING-2 study protocol are provided. The trial is a prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded-endpoint (PROBE) clinical trial. Both acute and chronic stroke patients will be selected based on clinical and radiological features and followed for 3 months after MSC treatment. The subjects will be randomized into one of two groups: (A) a MSC group (n = 40) or (B) a control group (n = 20). Autologous MSCs will be intravenously administered after ex vivo culture expansion with autologous ischemic serum obtained as early as possible, to enhance the therapeutic efficacy (ischemic preconditioning). Objective outcome measurements will be performed using multimodal MRI and detailed functional assessments by blinded observers. This trial is the first to evaluate the efficacy of MSCs in patients with ischemic stroke. The results may provide better evidence for the effectiveness of MSC therapy in patients with ischemic stroke. This trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01716481.

  8. Basic Science and Clinical Application of Stem Cells in Veterinary Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribitsch, I.; Burk, J.; Delling, U.; Geißler, C.; Gittel, C.; Jülke, H.; Brehm, W.

    Stem cells play an important role in veterinary medicine in different ways. Currently several stem cell therapies for animal patients are being developed and some, like the treatment of equine tendinopathies with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), have already successfully entered the market. Moreover, animal models are widely used to study the properties and potential of stem cells for possible future applications in human medicine. Therefore, in the young and emerging field of stem cell research, human and veterinary medicine are intrinsically tied to one another. Many of the pioneering innovations in the field of stem cell research are achieved by cooperating teams of human and veterinary medical scientists.

  9. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and Periodontal Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Mi; Duan, Xuejing; Yang, Pishan

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease which leads to destruction of both the soft and hard tissues of the periodontium. Tissue engineering is a therapeutic approach in regenerative medicine that aims to induce new functional tissue regeneration via the synergistic combination of cells, biomaterials, and/or growth factors. Advances in our understanding of the biology of stem cells, including embryonic stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells, have provided opportunities for periodontal ...

  10. Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    stem cells ( BMDC ), which then acts in a paracrine fashion on the cancer cells to enhance their invasion [7]. Interestingly the group of Karnoub showed...AD_________________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-08-1-0523 TITLE: Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in...DATES COVERED 1 Aug 2008 – 31 Jul 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Tumorigenesis 5b. GRANT

  11. Imported Stem Cells Strike against Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péron, Sophie; Berninger, Benedikt

    2015-11-05

    Cells with neural stem cell (NSC)-like properties can be isolated from the cortex of adult brains following injury, but their origins and function are unclear. Now in Cell Stem Cell, Faiz et al. (2015) show that subventricular-zone-derived NSCs home to injured cortical area following stroke, where they generate reactive astrocytes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Characteristics and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantz, Tobias; Martin, Ulrich

    The induction of pluripotency in somatic cells is widely considered as a major breakthrough in regenerative medicine, because this approach provides the basis for individualized stem cell-based therapies. Moreover, with respect to cell transplantation and tissue engineering, expertise from bioengineering to transplantation medicine is now meeting basic research of stem cell biology.

  13. Autonomous behavior of hematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamminga, LM; Akkerman, [No Value; Weersing, E; Ausema, A; Dontje, B; Van Zant, G; de Haan, G

    2000-01-01

    Objective. Mechanisms that affect the function of primitive hematopoietic stem cells with long-term proliferative potential remain largely unknown. Here we assessed whether properties of stem cells are cell-extrinsically or cell-autonomously regulated. Materials and Methods. We developed a model in

  14. Autonomous behavior of hematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamminga, LM; Akkerman, [No Value; Weersing, E; Ausema, A; Dontje, B; Van Zant, G; de Haan, G

    2000-01-01

    Objective. Mechanisms that affect the function of primitive hematopoietic stem cells with long-term proliferative potential remain largely unknown. Here we assessed whether properties of stem cells are cell-extrinsically or cell-autonomously regulated. Materials and Methods. We developed a model in

  15. Expanding intestinal stem cells in culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heo, Inha; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Culturing intestinal stem cells into 3D organoids results in heterogeneous cell populations, reflecting the in vivo cell type diversity. In a recent paper published in Nature, Wang et al. established a culture condition for a highly homogeneous population of intestinal stem cells.

  16. The potency of human testicular stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chikhovskaya, J.V.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, we evaluate the stem cell state of cells present in primary human testicular cell cultures as well as their origin and relation to germ or somatic lineages within testicular tissue. We conclude that human testis-derived embryonic stem cell-like (htES-like) colonies arising in primary

  17. Expanding intestinal stem cells in culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heo, Inha; Clevers, Hans

    Culturing intestinal stem cells into 3D organoids results in heterogeneous cell populations, reflecting the in vivo cell type diversity. In a recent paper published in Nature, Wang et al. established a culture condition for a highly homogeneous population of intestinal stem cells.

  18. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraia Carvalho Abreu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions need to be answered to better understand the mechanisms that control cell division and differentiation, therefore enabling the use of cell therapy in human respiratory diseases.As células-tronco têm uma infinidade de implicações clínicas no pulmão. Este artigo é uma revisão crítica que inclui estudos clínicos e experimentais advindos do banco de dados do MEDLINE e SciElo nos últimos 10 anos, onde foram destacados os efeitos da terapia celular na síndrome do desconforto respiratório agudo ou doenças mais crônicas, como fibrose pulmonar e enfisema. Apesar de muitos estudos demonstrarem os efeitos benéficos das células-tronco no desenvolvimento, reparo e remodelamento pulmonar; algumas questões ainda precisam ser respondidas para um melhor entendimento dos mecanismos que controlam a divisão celular e diferenciação, permitindo o uso da terapia celular nas doenças respiratórias.

  19. Stem Cells and Herbal Acupuncture Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Rok Kwon

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy implies the birth of regenerative medicine. Regenerative medicine signify treatment through regeneration of cells which was impossible by existing medicine. Stem cell is classified into embryonic stem cell and adult stem cell and they have distinctive benefits and limitations. Researches on stem cell are already under active progression and is expected to be commercially available in the near future. One may not relate the stem cell treatment with Oriental medicine, but can be interpreted as the fundamental treatment action of Oriental medicine is being investigated in more concrete manner. When it comes to difficult to cure diseases, there is no boundary between eastern and western medicine, and one must be ready to face and overcome changes lying ahead.

  20. Regulation of apoptosis pathways in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulda, Simone

    2013-09-10

    Cancer stem cell are considered to represent a population within the bulk tumor that share many similarities to normal stem cells as far as their capacities to self-renew, differentiate, proliferate and to reconstitute the entire tumor upon serial transplantation are concerned. Since cancer stem cells have been shown to be critical for maintaining tumor growth and have been implicated in treatment resistance and tumor progression, they constitute relevant targets for therapeutic intervention. Indeed, it has been postulated that eradication of cancer stem cells will be pivotal in order to achieve long-term relapse-free survival. However, one of the hallmarks of cancer stem cells is their high resistance to undergo cell death including apoptosis in response to environmental cues or cytotoxic stimuli. Since activation of apoptosis programs in tumor cells underlies the antitumor activity of most currently used cancer therapeutics, it will be critical to develop strategies to overcome the intrinsic resistance to apoptosis of cancer stem cells. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the ability of cancer stem cells to evade apoptosis will likely open new avenues to target this critical pool of cells within the tumor in order to develop more efficient treatment options for patients suffering from cancer.

  1. Advances in Lung Stem Cells and Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijing YIN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are emerging as a hot topic for cancer research. Lung CSCs share many characteristics with normal lung stem cells (SCs, including self-renewal and multi-potency for differentiation. Many molecular markers expressed in various types of CSCs were also found in lung CSCs, such as CD133, CD44, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2. Similarly, proliferation and expansion of lung CSCs are regulated not only by signal transduction pathways functioning in normal lung SCs, such as Notch, Hedgehog and Wnt pathways, but also by those acting in tumor cells, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K pathways. As CSC plays an critical role in tumor recurrence, metastasis and drug-resistance, understanding the difference between lung CSCs and normal lung SCs, identifying and targeting CSC markers or related signaling pathways may increase the efficacy of therapy on lung cancer and improved survival of lung cancer patients.

  2. Generation of male differentiated germ cells from various types of stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jingmei; Yang, Shi; Yang, Hao; Liu, Yang; Liu, Yun; Hai, Yanan; Chen, Zheng; Guo, Ying; Gong, Yuehua; Gao, Wei-Qiang; Li, Zheng; He, Zuping

    2014-06-01

    Infertility is a major and largely incurable disease caused by disruption and loss of germ cells. It affects 10-15% of couples, and male factor accounts for half of the cases. To obtain human male germ cells 'especially functional spermatids' is essential for treating male infertility. Currently, much progress has been made on generating male germ cells, including spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and spermatids, from various types of stem cells. These germ cells can also be used in investigation of the pathology of male infertility. In this review, we focused on advances on obtaining male differentiated germ cells from different kinds of stem cells, with an emphasis on the embryonic stem (ES) cells, the induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, and spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). We illustrated the generation of male differentiated germ cells from ES cells, iPS cells and SSCs, and we summarized the phenotype for these stem cells, spermatocytes and spermatids. Moreover, we address the differentiation potentials of ES cells, iPS cells and SSCs. We also highlight the advantages, disadvantages and concerns on derivation of the differentiated male germ cells from several types of stem cells. The ability of generating mature and functional male gametes from stem cells could enable us to understand the precise etiology of male infertility and offer an invaluable source of autologous male gametes for treating male infertility of azoospermia patients. © 2014 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  3. What can pluripotent stem cells teach us about neurodegenerative diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichterle, Hynek; Przedborski, Serge

    2010-07-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases represent a growing public health challenge. Current medications treat symptoms, but none halt or retard neurodegeneration. The recent advent of pluripotent cell biology has opened new avenues for neurodegenerative disease research. The greatest potential for induced pluripotent cells derived from affected individuals is likely to be their utility for modeling and understanding the mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative processes, and for searching for new treatments, including cell replacement therapies. However, much work remains to be done before pluripotent cells can be used for preclinical and clinical applications. Here we discuss the challenges of generating specific neural cell subtypes from pluripotent stem cells, the use of pluripotent stem cells to model both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous mechanisms of neurodegeneration, whether adult-onset neurodegeneration can be emulated in short-term cultures and the hurdles of cell replacement therapy. Progress in these four areas will substantially accelerate effective application of pluripotent stem cells.

  4. Therapeutic potential of amniotic fluid stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulrazzak, Hassan; De Coppi, Paolo; Guillot, Pascale V

    2013-03-01

    Human amniotic fluid cells have been used traditionally as a diagnostic tool for genetic anomalies. More recently it has been recognized that amniotic fluid contains populations of stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells (AFMSC) were first to be described. These cells are able to differentiate towards mesodermal lineages. More recently cells with broader potential, defined as amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSC), were also isolated. They have intermediate characteristics between embryonic and adult stem cells and are able to differentiate into lineages representative of all three germ layers but unlike ES cells they do not form tumours in vivo. Furthermore, AFSC have been reverted to functional pluripotency in a transgene-free approach using an epigenetics modifier. These characteristics, together with absence of ethical issues concerning their employment, have made stem cells from amniotic fluid a promising candidate for cell therapy and tissue engineering.

  5. Mammary stem cells have myoepithelial cell properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Michael D.; Petit, Valérie; Russell, I. Alasdair; Giraddi, Rajshekhar; Shehata, Mona; Menon, Suraj; Schulte, Reiner; Kalajzic, Ivo; Rath, Nicola; Olson, Michael F.; Metzger, Daniel; Faraldo, Marisa M.; Deugnier, Marie-Ange; Glukhova, Marina A.; Stingl, John

    2014-01-01

    Contractile myoepithelial cells dominate the basal layer of the mammary epithelium and are considered to be differentiated cells. However, we observe that up to 54% of single basal cells can form colonies when seeded into adherent culture in the presence of agents that disrupt acin-myosin interactions, and on average, 65% of the single-cell-derived basal colonies can repopulate a mammary gland when transplanted in vivo. This indicates that a high proportion of basal myoepithelial cells can give rise to a mammary repopulating unit (MRU). We demonstrate that myoepithelial cells, flow-sorted using 2 independent myoepithelial-specific reporter strategies, have MRU capacity. Using an inducible lineage tracing approach we follow the progeny of α-smooth muscle actin-expressing myoepithelial cells and show that they function as long-lived lineage-restricted stem cells in the virgin state and during pregnancy. PMID:25173976

  6. Mammary stem cells have myoepithelial cell properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Michael D; Petit, Valérie; Alasdair Russell, I; Giraddi, Rajshekhar R; Shehata, Mona; Menon, Suraj; Schulte, Reiner; Kalajzic, Ivo; Rath, Nicola; Olson, Michael F; Metzger, Daniel; Faraldo, Marisa M; Deugnier, Marie-Ange; Glukhova, Marina A; Stingl, John

    2014-10-01

    Contractile myoepithelial cells dominate the basal layer of the mammary epithelium and are considered to be differentiated cells. However, we observe that up to 54% of single basal cells can form colonies when seeded into adherent culture in the presence of agents that disrupt actin-myosin interactions, and on average, 65% of the single-cell-derived basal colonies can repopulate a mammary gland when transplanted in vivo. This indicates that a high proportion of basal myoepithelial cells can give rise to a mammary repopulating unit (MRU). We demonstrate that myoepithelial cells, flow-sorted using two independent myoepithelial-specific reporter strategies, have MRU capacity. Using an inducible lineage-tracing approach we follow the progeny of myoepithelial cells that express α-smooth muscle actin and show that they function as long-lived lineage-restricted stem cells in the virgin state and during pregnancy.

  7. Pancreatic cancer stem cells: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagwandin, Vikash J; Shay, Jerry W

    2009-04-01

    The terms cancer-initiating or cancer stem cells have been the subject of great interest in recent years. In this review we will use pancreatic cancer as an overall theme to draw parallels with historical findings to compare to recent reports of stem-like characteristics in pancreatic cancer. We will cover such topics as label-retaining cells (side-population), ABC transporter pumps, telomerase, quiescence, cell surface stem cell markers, and epithelial-mesenchymal transitions. Finally we will integrate the available findings into a pancreatic stem cell model that also includes metastatic disease.

  8. Radiation response of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow and human pluripotent stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Mohammad S; Stemig, Melissa E.; Takahashi, Yutaka; Hui, Susanta K.

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from human pluripotent stem cells are comparable with bone marrow-derived MSCs in their function and immunophenotype. The purpose of this exploratory study was comparative evaluation of the radiation responses of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow- (BMMSCs) and from human embryonic stem cells (hESMSCs). BMMSCs and hESMSCs were irradiated at 0 Gy (control) to 16 Gy using a linear accelerator commonly used for cancer treatment. Cells were harv...

  9. Stem cells and chronic wound healing: state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leavitt T

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tripp Leavitt, Michael S Hu, Clement D Marshall, Leandra A Barnes, Michael T Longaker, H Peter Lorenz Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: Currently available treatments for chronic wounds are inadequate. A clearly effective therapy does not exist, and treatment is often supportive. This is largely because the cellular and molecular processes underlying failure of wound repair are still poorly understood. With an increase in comorbidities, such as diabetes and vascular disease, as well as an aging population, the incidence of these intractable wounds is expected to rise. As such, chronic wounds, which are already costly, are rapidly growing as a tremendous burden to the health-care system. Stem cells have garnered much interest as a therapy for chronic wounds due to their inherent ability to differentiate into multiple lineages and promote regeneration. Herein, we discuss the types of stem cells used for chronic wound therapy, as well as the proposed means by which they do so. In particular, we highlight mesenchymal stem cells (including adipose-derived stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. We include the results of recent in vitro and in vivo studies in both animal models and human clinical trials. Finally, we discuss the current studies to improve stem cell therapies and the limitations of stem cell-based therapeutics. Stem cells promise improved therapies for healing chronic wounds, but further studies that are well-designed with standardized protocols are necessary for fruition. Keywords: stem cells, chronic wounds, cell therapy, wound healing

  10. Stem cells for brain repair in neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicha, L; Smith, T; Guzman, R

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic insults are a significant cause of pediatric encephalopathy, developmental delays, and spastic cerebral palsy. Although the developing brain's plasticity allows for remarkable self-repair, severe disruption of normal myelination and cortical development upon neonatal brain injury are likely to generate life-persisting sensory-motor and cognitive deficits in the growing child. Currently, no treatments are available that can address the long-term consequences. Thus, regenerative medicine appears as a promising avenue to help restore normal developmental processes in affected infants. Stem cell therapy has proven effective in promoting functional recovery in animal models of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic injury and therefore represents a hopeful therapy for this unmet medical condition. Neural stem cells derived from pluripotent stem cells or fetal tissues as well as umbilical cord blood and mesenchymal stem cells have all shown initial success in improving functional outcomes. However, much still remains to be understood about how those stem cells can safely be administered to infants and what their repair mechanisms in the brain are. In this review, we discuss updated research into pathophysiological mechanisms of neonatal brain injury, the types of stem cell therapies currently being tested in this context, and the potential mechanisms through which exogenous stem cells might interact with and influence the developing brain.

  11. [Stem cells and growth factors in wound healing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuła, Michał; Langa, Paulina; Kosikowska, Paulina; Trzonkowski, Piotr

    2015-01-02

    Wound healing is a complex process which depends on the presence of various types of cells, growth factors, cytokines and the elements of extracellular matrix. A wound is a portal of entry for numerous pathogens, therefore during the evolution wound healing process has formed very early, being critical for the survival of every individual. Stem cells, which give rise to their early descendants progenitor cells and subsequently differentiated cells, play a specific role in the process of wound healing. Among the most important cells which take part in wound healing the following cells need to be distinguished: epidermal stem cells, dermal precursor of fibroblasts, adipose-derived stem cells as well as bone marrow cells. The activity of these cells is strictly regulated by various growth factors, inter alia epidermal growth factor (EGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor (TGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Any disorders in functioning of stem cells and biological activity of growth factors may lead to the defects in wound healing, for instance delayed wound healing or creation of hypertrophic scars. Therefore, knowledge concerning the mechanisms of wound healing is extremely essential from clinical point of view. In this review the current state of the knowledge of the role of stem cells and growth factors in the process of wound healing has been presented. Moreover, some clinical aspects of wound healing as well as the possibility of the therapy based on stem cells and growth factors have included.

  12. Stem cells and growth factors in wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Pikuła

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a complex process which depends on the presence of various types of cells, growth factors, cytokines and the elements of extracellular matrix. A wound is a portal of entry for numerous pathogens, therefore during the evolution wound healing process has formed very early, being critical for the survival of every individual. Stem cells, which give rise to their early descendants progenitor cells and subsequently differentiated cells, play a specific role in the process of wound healing. Among the most important cells which take part in wound healing the following cells need to be distinguished: epidermal stem cells, dermal precursor of fibroblasts, adipose-derived stem cells as well as bone marrow cells. The activity of these cells is strictly regulated by various growth factors, inter alia epidermal growth factor (EGF, fibroblast growth factor (FGF, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF, transforming growth factor (TGF, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Any disorders in functioning of stem cells and biological activity of growth factors may lead to the defects in wound healing, for instance delayed wound healing or creation of hypertrophic scars. Therefore, knowledge concerning the mechanisms of wound healing is extremely essential from clinical point of view. In this review the current state of the knowledge of the role of stem cells and growth factors in the process of wound healing has been presented. Moreover, some clinical aspects of wound healing as well as the possibility of the therapy based on stem cells and growth factors have included.

  13. Reprogramming stem cells is a microenvironmental task

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    Bissell, Mina J; Inman, Jamie

    2008-10-14

    That tumor cells for all practical purposes are unstable and plastic could be expected. However, the astonishing ability of the nuclei from cells of normal adult tissues to be reprogrammed - given the right embryonic context - found its final truth even for mammals in the experiments that allowed engineering Dolly (1). The landmark experiments showed that nuclei originating from cells of frozen mammary tissues were capable of being reprogrammed by the embryonic cytoplasm and its microenvironment to produce a normal sheep. The rest is history. However, whether microenvironments other than those of the embryos can also reprogram adult cells of different tissue origins still containing their cytoplasm is of obvious interest. In this issue of PNAS, the laboratory of Gilbert Smith (2) reports on how the mammary gland microenvironment can reprogram both embryonic and adult stem neuronal cells. The work is a follow-up to their previous report on testis stem cells that were reprogrammed by the mammary microenvironment (3). They demonstrated that cells isolated from the seminiferous tubules of the mature testis, mixed with normal mammary epithelial cells, contributed a sizable number of epithelial progeny to normal mammary outgrowths in transplanted mammary fat pads. However, in those experiments they were unable to distinguish which subpopulation of the testis cells contributed progeny to the mammary epithelial tree. The current work adds new, compelling, and provocative information to our understanding of stem cell plasticity. Booth et al. (2) use neuronal stem cells (NSCs) isolated from WAP-cre/R26R mice combined with unlabeled mammary epithelial cells that subsequently are implanted in cleared mammary fat pads. In this new microenvironment, the NSCs that are incorporated into the branching mammary tree make chimeric glands (Fig. 1) that remarkably can also express the milk protein {beta}-casein, progesterone receptor, and estrogen receptor {alpha}. Remarkably, the

  14. Current status and prospect of in vitro induction of induced pluripotent stem cells%诱导性多能干细胞体外诱导的现状和展望

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Informatio