WorldWideScience

Sample records for current sheet model

  1. A Catapult (Slingshot) Current Sheet Relaxation Model for Substorm Triggering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Ieda, A.

    2010-12-01

    Based on the results of our superposed epoch analysis of Geotail data, we have proposed a catapult (slingshot) current sheet relaxation model in which earthward flows are produced in the central plasma sheet (CPS) due to the catapult (slingshot) current sheet relaxation, together with the rapid enhancement of Poynting flux toward the CPS in the lobe around X ~ -15 Re about 4 min before the substrom onset. These earthward flows are characterized by plasma pressure decrease and large amplitude magnetic field fluctuations. When these flows reach X ~ 12Re in the magnetotail, they give significant disturbances to the inner magnetosphere to initiate some instability such as a ballooning instability or other instabilities, and the substorm starts in the inner magnetosphere. The occurrence of the magnetic reconnection is a natural consequence of the initial convective earthward flows, because the relaxation of a highly stretched catapult current sheet produces a very thin current at its tailward edge being surrounded by intense magnetic fields which were formerly the off-equatorial lobe magnetic fields. Recently, Nishimura et al. [2010] reported that the substorm onset begins when faint poleward discrete arcs collide with equatorward quiet arcs. The region of earthward convective flows correlatively moves earthward prior to the onset. Thus, this region of the earthward convective flows seems to correspond to the faint poleward discrete arcs. Interestingly, our statistical analysis shows that the earthward convective flows are not produced by the magnetic reconnection, but they are attributed to the dominance of the earthward JxB force over the tailward pressure associated with the progress of the plasma sheet thinning.

  2. Modeling the heliospheric current sheet: Solar cycle variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Pete; Linker, J. A.; Mikić, Z.

    2002-07-01

    In this report we employ an empirically driven, three-dimensional MHD model to explore the evolution of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) during the course of the solar cycle. We compare our results with a simpler ``constant-speed'' approach for mapping the HCS outward into the solar wind to demonstrate that dynamic effects can substantially deform the HCS in the inner heliosphere (ballerina skirt,'' we discuss an interval approaching the maximum of solar cycle 23 (Carrington rotations 1960 and 1961) when the shape would be better described as ``conch shell''-like. We use Ulysses magnetic field measurements to support the model results.

  3. Catapult current sheet relaxation model confirmed by THEMIS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Ieda, A.; Nose, M.; Angelopoulos, V.; McFadden, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we show the result of superposed epoch analysis on the THEMIS probe data during the period from November, 2007 to April, 2009 by setting the origin of time axis to the substorm onset determined by Nishimura with THEMIS all sky imager (THEMS/ASI) data (http://www.atmos.ucla.edu/~toshi/files/paper/Toshi_THEMIS_GBO_list_distribution.xls). We confirmed the presence of earthward flows which can be associated with north-south auroral streamers during the substorm growth phase. At around X = -12 Earth radii (Re), the northward magnetic field and its elevation angle decreased markedly approximately 4 min before substorm onset. A northward magnetic-field increase associated with pre-onset earthward flows was found at around X = -17Re. This variation indicates the occurrence of the local depolarization. Interestingly, in the region earthwards of X = -18Re, earthward flows in the central plasma sheet (CPS) reduced significantly about 3min before substorm onset. However, the earthward flows enhanced again at t = -60 sec in the region around X = -14 Re, and they moved toward the Earth. At t = 0, the dipolarization of the magnetic field started at X ~ -10 Re, and simultaneously the magnetic reconnection started at X ~ -20 Re. Synthesizing these results, we can confirm the validity of our catapult current sheet relaxation model.

  4. Hysteresis-controlled instability waves in a scale-free driven current sheet model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Uritsky

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetospheric dynamics is a complex multiscale process whose statistical features can be successfully reproduced using high-dimensional numerical transport models exhibiting the phenomenon of self-organized criticality (SOC. Along this line of research, a 2-dimensional driven current sheet (DCS model has recently been developed that incorporates an idealized current-driven instability with a resistive MHD plasma system (Klimas et al., 2004a, b. The dynamics of the DCS model is dominated by the scale-free diffusive energy transport characterized by a set of broadband power-law distribution functions similar to those governing the evolution of multiscale precipitation regions of energetic particles in the nighttime sector of aurora (Uritsky et al., 2002b. The scale-free DCS behavior is supported by localized current-driven instabilities that can communicate in an avalanche fashion over arbitrarily long distances thus producing current sheet waves (CSW. In this paper, we derive the analytical expression for CSW speed as a function of plasma parameters controlling local anomalous resistivity dynamics. The obtained relation indicates that the CSW propagation requires sufficiently high initial current densities, and predicts a deceleration of CSWs moving from inner plasma sheet regions toward its northern and southern boundaries. We also show that the shape of time-averaged current density profile in the DCS model is in agreement with steady-state spatial configuration of critical avalanching models as described by the singular diffusion theory of the SOC. Over shorter time scales, SOC dynamics is associated with rather complex spatial patterns and, in particular, can produce bifurcated current sheets often seen in multi-satellite observations.

  5. Magnetotail Current Sheet Thinning and Magnetic Reconnection Dynamics in Global Modeling of Substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.; Hesse, M.; Rastaetter, L.; Toth, G.; DeZeeuw, D. L.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetotail current sheet thinning and magnetic reconnection are key elements of magnetospheric substorms. We utilized the global MHD model BATS-R-US with Adaptive Mesh Refinement developed at the University of Michigan to investigate the formation and dynamic evolution of the magnetotail thin current sheet. The BATSRUS adaptive grid structure allows resolving magnetotail regions with increased current density up to ion kinetic scales. We investigated dynamics of magnetotail current sheet thinning in response to southwards IMF turning. Gradual slow current sheet thinning during the early growth phase become exponentially fast during the last few minutes prior to nightside reconnection onset. The later stage of current sheet thinning is accompanied by earthward flows and rapid suppression of normal magnetic field component $B-z$. Current sheet thinning set the stage for near-earth magnetic reconnection. In collisionless magnetospheric plasma, the primary mechanism controlling the dissipation in the vicinity of the reconnection site is non-gyrotropic effects with spatial scales comparable with the particle Larmor radius. One of the major challenges in global MHD modeling of the magnetotail magnetic reconnection is to reproduce fast reconnection rates typically observed in smallscale kinetic simulations. Bursts of fast reconnection cause fast magnetic field reconfiguration typical for magnetospheric substorms. To incorporate nongyritropic effects in diffusion regions we developed an algorithm to search for magnetotail reconnection sites, specifically where the magnetic field components perpendicular to the local current direction approaches zero and form an X-type configuration. Spatial scales of the diffusion region and magnitude of the reconnection electric field are calculated self-consistently using MHD plasma and field parameters in the vicinity of the reconnection site. The location of the reconnection sites and spatial scales of the diffusion region are updated

  6. Kinetic model of force-free current sheets with non-uniform temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolotkov, D. Y.; Vasko, I. Y.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2015-11-01

    The kinetic model of a one-dimensional force-free current sheet (CS) developed recently by Harrison and Neukirch [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102(13), 135003 (2009)] predicts uniform distributions of the plasma temperature and density across the CS. However, in realistic physical systems, inhomogeneities of these plasma parameters may arise quite naturally due to the boundary conditions or local plasma heating. Moreover, as the CS spatial scale becomes larger than the characteristic kinetic scales (the regime often referred to as the MHD limit), it should be possible to set arbitrary density and temperature profiles. Thus, an advanced model has to allow for inhomogeneities of the macroscopic plasma parameters across the CS, to be consistent with the MHD limit. In this paper, we generalise the kinetic model of a force-free current sheet, taking into account the inhomogeneity of the density and temperature across the CS. In the developed model, the density may either be enhanced or depleted in the CS central region. The temperature profile is prescribed by the density profile, keeping the plasma pressure uniform across the CS. All macroscopic parameters, as well as the distribution functions for the protons and electrons, are determined analytically. Applications of the developed model to current sheets observed in space plasmas are discussed.

  7. Force-free collisionless current sheet models with non-uniform temperature and density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, F.; Neukirch, T.; Allanson, O.

    2017-09-01

    We present a class of one-dimensional, strictly neutral, Vlasov-Maxwell equilibrium distribution functions for force-free current sheets, with magnetic fields defined in terms of Jacobian elliptic functions, extending the results of Abraham-Shrauner [Phys. Plasmas 20, 102117 (2013)] to allow for non-uniform density and temperature profiles. To achieve this, we use an approach previously applied to the force-free Harris sheet by Kolotkov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 112902 (2015)]. In one limit of the parameters, we recover the model of Kolotkov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 112902 (2015)], while another limit gives a linear force-free field. We discuss conditions on the parameters such that the distribution functions are always positive and give expressions for the pressure, density, temperature, and bulk-flow velocities of the equilibrium, discussing the differences from previous models. We also present some illustrative plots of the distribution function in velocity space.

  8. Reconnection in thin current sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenerani, Anna; Velli, Marco; Pucci, Fulvia; Rappazzo, A. F.

    2016-05-01

    It has been widely believed that reconnection is the underlying mechanism of many explosive processes observed both in nature and laboratory, but the question of reconnection speed and initial trigger have remained mysterious. How is fast magnetic energy release triggered in high Lundquist (S) and Reynolds (R) number plasmas?It has been shown that a tearing mode instability can grow on an ideal timescale, i.e., independent from the the Lundquist number, once the current sheet thickness becomes thin enough, or rather the inverse aspect ratio a/L reaches a scale a/L~S-1/3. As such, the latter provides a natural, critical threshold for current sheets that can be formed in nature before they disrupt in a few Alfvén time units. Here we discuss the transition to fast reconnection extended to simple viscous and kinetic models and we propose a possible scenario for the transition to explosive reconnection in high-Lundquist number plasmas, that we support with fully nonlinear numerical MHD simulations of a collapsing current sheet.

  9. Analysis of induction-type coilgun performance based on cylindrical current sheet model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, J.L.; Levi, E.; Zabar, Z.; Birenbaum, L.; Naot, Y. (Polytechnic Univ., Brooklyn, NY (United States))

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a method based on a cylindrical current sheet model for the analysis and design of induction-type coilguns. The paper starts with a derivation of closed-form formulas which relate the dimensions of the gun to the performance expressed in terms of propulsive and local maximum forces on the projectile, power factor and efficiency of the system, thermal stress of the projectile armature, distributions of the flux density around the launcher, and the system parameters in a multisection coilgun. The paper ends with a numerical example.

  10. Analysis of induction-type coilgun performance based on cylindrical current sheet model

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, J. L.; Levi, E.; Zabar, Z.; Birenbaum, L.; Naot, Y.

    1991-01-01

    A method which is based on a cylindrical current sheet model for the analysis and design of induction-type coilguns is presented. The work starts with a derivation of closed-form formulas which relate the dimensions of the gun to the performance expressed in terms of propulsive and local maximum forces on the projectile, power factor and efficiency of the system, thermal stress of the projectile armature, distributions of the flux density around the launcher, and the system parameters in a multisection coilgun. A numerical example is given.

  11. Current state and future perspectives on coupled ice-sheet – sea-level modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, B.; Stocchi, P.; Whitehouse, P.L.; van de Wal, R.S.W.

    2017-01-01

    The interaction between ice-sheet growth and retreat and sea-level change has been an established fieldof research for many years. However, recent advances in numerical modelling have shed new light on theprecise interaction of marine ice sheets with the change in near-field sea level, and the

  12. Thin and superthin ion current sheets. Quasi-adiabatic and nonadiabatic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Zelenyi

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin anisotropic current sheets (CSs are phenomena of the general occurrence in the magnetospheric tail. We develop an analytical theory of the self-consistent thin CSs. General solitions of the Grad-Shafranov equation are obtained in a quasi-adiabatic approximation which neglects the jumps of the sheet adiabatic invariant Iz This is possible if the anisotropy of the initial distribution function is not too strong. The resulting structure of the thin CSs is interpreted as a sum of negative dia- and positive paramagnetic currents flowing near the neutral plane. In the immediate vicinity of the magnetic field reversal region the paramagnetic current arising from the meandering motion of the ions on Speiser orbits dominates. The maximum CS thick-ness is achieved in the case of weak plasma anisotropy and is of the order of the thermal ion gyroradius outside the sheet. A unified picture of thin CS scalings includes both the quasi-adiabatic regimes of weak and strong anisotropies and the nonadiabatic limit of super-strong anisotropy of the source ion distribution. The later limit corresponds to the case of almost field-aligned initial distribution, when the ratio of the drift velocity outside the CS to the thermal ion velocity exceeds the ratio of the magnetic field outside the CS to its value in-side the CS (vD/vT> B0/Bn. In this regime the jumps of Iz, become essential, and the current sheet thickness is approaching to some small but finite value, which depends upon the parameter Bn /B0. Convective electric field increases the effective anisotropy of the source distribution and might produce the essential CS thinning which could have important implications for the sub-storm dynamics.

  13. A Theoretical Model of Pinching Current Sheet in Low-beta Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Takeshige, Satoshi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is an important physical process in various explosive phenomena in the universe. In the previous studies, it was found that fast re- connection takes place when the thickness of a current sheet becomes on the order of a microscopic length such as the ion larmor radius or the ion inertial length. In this study, we investigated the pinching process of a current sheet by the Lorentz force in a low-{\\beta} plasma using one-dimensional magnetohydrodynam- ics (MHD) simulations. It is known that there is an exact self-similar solution for this problem that neglects gas pressure. We compared the non-linear MHD dynamics with the analytic self-similar solution. From the MHD simulations, we found that with the gas pressure included the implosion process deviates from the analytic self-similar solution as t {\\rightarrow} t 0, where t 0 is the explosion time when the thickness of a current sheet of the analytic solution becomes 0. We also found a pair of MHD fast-mode shocks are generated and propaga...

  14. Simulating the Thinning Magnetotail Current Sheet During a Substorm Growth Phase with the Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, C. L.; Crabtree, C. E.; Chen, M.; Guild, T. B.

    2015-12-01

    Modeling the progression of the magnetotail configuration during a substorm growth phase is challenging because the current sheet becomes very thin, and is difficult to resolve while keeping the problem computationally tractable. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) models have dealt with this problem in various ways, and many claim to be driven by physical rather than numerical considerations. The Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium (RCM-E) is not an MHD model, and has advantages and disadvantages compared to MHD. The notable advantages are the characterization of the full energy distribution of the plasma (including the associated gradient/curvature drift), as well as its generally more comprehensive treatment of the electrodynamics of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. The disadvantages include the bounce-averaging of plasma drift, which limits the domain to closed field lines, and the assumption of slow flow relative to the Alfvén speed. The RCM-E has been used in the past to model a substorm growth phase, but its assumptions do not allow it to properly treat the onset mechanism or the formation of x-lines. It can simulate the approach to onset, but is limited by its ability to resolve the thinning current sheet. In this presentation, we present advances in the technique used to calculate the self-consistent magnetic field, which allows us to resolve thinner current sheets than were previously possible. We combine this with a generalized ballooning mode analysis of specific flux tubes in order to assess the stability of the magnetotail to substorm onset.

  15. Radiating Current Sheets in the Solar Chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Michael L

    2014-01-01

    An MHD model of a Hydrogen plasma with flow, an energy equation, NLTE ionization and radiative cooling, and an Ohm's law with anisotropic electrical conduction and thermoelectric effects is used to self-consistently generate atmospheric layers over a $50$ km height range. A subset of these solutions contain current sheets, and have properties similar to those of the lower and middle chromosphere. The magnetic field profiles are found to be close to Harris sheet profiles, with maximum field strengths $\\sim 25-150$ G. The radiative flux $F_R$ emitted by individual sheets is $\\sim 4.9 \\times 10^5 - 4.5 \\times 10^6$ ergs-cm$^{-2}$-s$^{-1}$, to be compared with the observed chromospheric emission rate of $\\sim 10^7$ ergs-cm$^{-2}$-s$^{-1}$. Essentially all emission is from regions with thicknesses $\\sim 0.5 - 13$ km containing the neutral sheet. About half of $F_R$ comes from sub-regions with thicknesses 10 times smaller. A resolution $\\lesssim 5-130$ m is needed to resolve the properties of the sheets. The sheets...

  16. Ohm's law for a current sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, L. R.; Speiser, T. W.

    1985-01-01

    The paper derives an Ohm's law for single-particle motion in a current sheet, where the magnetic field reverses in direction across the sheet. The result is considerably different from the resistive Ohm's law often used in MHD studies of the geomagnetic tail. Single-particle analysis is extended to obtain a self-consistency relation for a current sheet which agrees with previous results. The results are applicable to the concept of reconnection in that the electric field parallel to the current is obtained for a one-dimensional current sheet with constant normal magnetic field. Dissipated energy goes directly into accelerating particles within the current sheet.

  17. Finite-elements numerical model of the current-sheet movement and shaping in coaxial discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casanova, Federico [CNEA-CONICET and Universidad Nacional del Centro, 7000 Tandil (Argentina); Moreno, Cesar [INFIP-PLADEMA, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Clausse, Alejandro [CNEA-CONICET and Universidad Nacional del Centro, 7000 Tandil (Argentina)

    2005-08-01

    The movement and shaping of the current sheath in coaxial plasma guns is numerically modelled by means of a dynamic finite-elements representation. Numerical instabilities are avoided by a reshaping algorithm applied during the tracking of the current sheath acceleration. Improving upon older versions of the algorithm, the present model includes a delay model to treat the dielectric breakdown. Comparison against experimental measurements showed very good performances in representing the arrival times of the shock front at different filling pressures.

  18. Plasma Relaxation Dynamics Moderated by Current Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, Robert; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Yoshida, Zensho

    2014-10-01

    Ideal magnetohydrodynamics (IMHD) is strongly constrained by an infinite number of microscopic constraints expressing mass, entropy and magnetic flux conservation in each infinitesimal fluid element, the latter preventing magnetic reconnection. By contrast, in the Taylor-relaxed equilibrium model all these constraints are relaxed save for global magnetic flux and helicity. A Lagrangian is presented that leads to a new variational formulation of magnetized fluid dynamics, relaxed MHD (RxMHD), all static solutions of which are Taylor equilibrium states. By postulating that some long-lived macroscopic current sheets can act as barriers to relaxation, separating the plasma into multiple relaxation regions, a further generalization, multi-relaxed MHD (MRxMHD), is developed. These concepts are illustrated using a simple two-region slab model similar to that proposed by Hahm and Kulsrud--the formation of an initial shielding current sheet after perturbation by boundary rippling is calculated using MRxMHD and the final island state, after the current sheet has relaxed through a reconnection sequence, is calculated using RxMHD. Australian Research Council Grant DP110102881.

  19. Bifurcation of Jovian magnetotail current sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. L. Israelevich

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiple crossings of the magnetotail current sheet by a single spacecraft give the possibility to distinguish between two types of electric current density distribution: single-peaked (Harris type current layer and double-peaked (bifurcated current sheet. Magnetic field measurements in the Jovian magnetic tail by Voyager-2 reveal bifurcation of the tail current sheet. The electric current density possesses a minimum at the point of the Bx-component reversal and two maxima at the distance where the magnetic field strength reaches 50% of its value in the tail lobe.

  20. Local structure of the magnetotail current sheet: 2001 Cluster observations

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    A. Runov

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Thirty rapid crossings of the magnetotail current sheet by the Cluster spacecraft during July-October 2001 at a geocentric distance of 19 RE are examined in detail to address the structure of the current sheet. We use four-point magnetic field measurements to estimate electric current density; the current sheet spatial scale is estimated by integration of the translation velocity calculated from the magnetic field temporal and spatial derivatives. The local normal-related coordinate system for each case is defined by the combining Minimum Variance Analysis (MVA and the curlometer technique. Numerical parameters characterizing the plasma sheet conditions for these crossings are provided to facilitate future comparisons with theoretical models. Three types of current sheet distributions are distinguished: center-peaked (type I, bifurcated (type II and asymmetric (type III sheets. Comparison to plasma parameter distributions show that practically all cases display non-Harris-type behavior, i.e. interior current peaks are embedded into a thicker plasma sheet. The asymmetric sheets with an off-equatorial current density peak most likely have a transient nature. The ion contribution to the electric current rarely agrees with the current computed using the curlometer technique, indicating that either the electron contribution to the current is strong and variable, or the current density is spatially or temporally structured.

  1. Origin of the warped heliospheric current sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, J.M.; Hoeksema, J.T.; Scherrer, P.H.

    1980-08-01

    The warped heliospheric current sheet for early 1976 is calculated from the observed photospheric magnetic field by a potential field method. Comparisons with measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field polarity for early 1976 obtained at several locations in the heliosphere by Helios 1, Helios 2, Pioneer 11, and at the earth show a rather detailed agreement between the computed current sheet and the observations. It appears that the large-scale structure of the warped heliospheric current sheet is determined by the structure of the photospheric magnetic field and that ballerina skirt effects may add small-scale ripples.

  2. Origin of the warped heliospheric current sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, J. M.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Scherrer, P. H.

    1980-08-01

    The warped heliospheric current sheet for early 1976 is calculated from the observed photospheric magnetic field by a potential field method. Comparisons with measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field polarity for early 1976 obtained at several locations in the heliosphere by Helios 1, Helios 2, Pioneer 11, and at the earth show a rather detailed agreement between the computed current sheet and the observations. It appears that the large-scale structure of the warped heliospheric current sheet is determined by the structure of the photospheric magnetic field and that 'ballerina skirt' effects may add small scale ripples.

  3. Physics of the magnetotail current sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J. (Beam Physics Branch, Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States))

    1993-07-01

    The Earth's magnetotail plays an important role in the solar-wind--magnetosphere coupling. At the midplane of the magnetotail is a current sheet where the dominant magnetic field component reverses sign. The charged particle motion in and near the current sheet is collisionless and nonintegrable, exhibiting chaotic scattering. The current understanding of the dynamical properties of the charged particle motion is discussed. In particular, the relationships between particle dynamics and global attributes of the system are elucidated. Geometrical properties of the phase space determine important physical observables on both micro- and macroscales.

  4. Fluctuation dynamics in reconnecting current sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Stechow, Adrian; Grulke, Olaf; Ji, Hantao; Yamada, Masaaki; Klinger, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    During magnetic reconnection, a highly localized current sheet forms at the boundary between opposed magnetic fields. Its steep perpendicular gradients and fast parallel drifts can give rise to a range of instabilities which can contribute to the overall reconnection dynamics. In two complementary laboratory reconnection experiments, MRX (PPPL, Princeton) and VINETA.II (IPP, Greifswald, Germany), magnetic fluctuations are observed within the current sheet. Despite the large differences in geometries (toroidal vs. linear), plasma parameters (high vs. low beta) and magnetic configuration (low vs. high magnetic guide field), similar broadband fluctuation characteristics are observed in both experiments. These are identified as Whistler-like fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range that propagate along the current sheet in the electron drift direction. They are intrinsic to the localized current sheet and largely independent of the slower reconnection dynamics. This contribution characterizes these magnetic fluctuations within the wide parameter range accessible by both experiments. Specifically, the fluctuation spectra and wave dispersion are characterized with respect to the magnetic topology and plasma parameters of the reconnecting current sheet.

  5. Criticality and turbulence in a resistive magnetohydrodynamic current sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimas, Alexander J; Uritsky, Vadim M

    2017-02-01

    Scaling properties of a two-dimensional (2d) plasma physical current-sheet simulation model involving a full set of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations with current-dependent resistivity are investigated. The current sheet supports a spatial magnetic field reversal that is forced through loading of magnetic flux containing plasma at boundaries of the simulation domain. A balance is reached between loading and annihilation of the magnetic flux through reconnection at the current sheet; the transport of magnetic flux from boundaries to current sheet is realized in the form of spatiotemporal avalanches exhibiting power-law statistics of lifetimes and sizes. We identify this dynamics as self-organized criticality (SOC) by verifying an extended set of scaling laws related to both global and local properties of the current sheet (critical susceptibility, finite-size scaling of probability distributions, geometric exponents). The critical exponents obtained from this analysis suggest that the model operates in a slowly driven SOC state similar to the mean-field state of the directed stochastic sandpile model. We also investigate multiscale correlations in the velocity field and find them numerically indistinguishable from certain intermittent turbulence (IT) theories. The results provide clues on physical conditions for SOC behavior in a broad class of plasma systems with propagating instabilities, and suggest that SOC and IT may coexist in driven current sheets which occur ubiquitously in astrophysical and space plasmas.

  6. Criticality and turbulence in a resistive magnetohydrodynamic current sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimas, Alexander J.; Uritsky, Vadim M.

    2017-02-01

    Scaling properties of a two-dimensional (2d) plasma physical current-sheet simulation model involving a full set of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations with current-dependent resistivity are investigated. The current sheet supports a spatial magnetic field reversal that is forced through loading of magnetic flux containing plasma at boundaries of the simulation domain. A balance is reached between loading and annihilation of the magnetic flux through reconnection at the current sheet; the transport of magnetic flux from boundaries to current sheet is realized in the form of spatiotemporal avalanches exhibiting power-law statistics of lifetimes and sizes. We identify this dynamics as self-organized criticality (SOC) by verifying an extended set of scaling laws related to both global and local properties of the current sheet (critical susceptibility, finite-size scaling of probability distributions, geometric exponents). The critical exponents obtained from this analysis suggest that the model operates in a slowly driven SOC state similar to the mean-field state of the directed stochastic sandpile model. We also investigate multiscale correlations in the velocity field and find them numerically indistinguishable from certain intermittent turbulence (IT) theories. The results provide clues on physical conditions for SOC behavior in a broad class of plasma systems with propagating instabilities, and suggest that SOC and IT may coexist in driven current sheets which occur ubiquitously in astrophysical and space plasmas.

  7. Self-similar current sheet collapse triggered by "ideal" tearing

    CERN Document Server

    Tenerani, Anna; Rappazzo, Antonio Franco; Pucci, Fulvia

    2015-01-01

    We study the onset and evolution of fast reconnection via the "ideal: tearing mode instability within a collapsing current sheet at high Lundquist numbers ($S\\gg10^4$). As the collapse proceeds, fast reconnection is triggered well before a Sweet-Parker type configuration can form: after the linear phase of the initial instability, X-points collapse and reform nonlinearly, a hierarchy of "ideal" tearing modes repeating faster and faster on current sheets at ever smaller scales. We present a simple model describing the self-similar evolution which explains both the timescale of the disruption of the initial sheet and the consequent turbulent spectra.

  8. Solar wind and substorm excitation of the wavy current sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, C.; Lester, M.; Fear, R. C.; Lucek, E.; Dandouras, I.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Singer, H.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2009-06-01

    Following a solar wind pressure pulse on 3 August 2001, GOES 8, GOES 10, Cluster and Polar observed dipolarizations of the magnetic field, accompanied by an eastward expansion of the aurora observed by IMAGE, indicating the occurrence of two substorms. Prior to the first substorm, the motion of the plasma sheet with respect to Cluster was in the ZGSM direction. Observations following the substorms show the occurrence of current sheet waves moving predominantly in the -YGSM direction. Following the second substorm, the current sheet waves caused multiple current sheet crossings of the Cluster spacecraft, previously studied by Zhang et al. (2002). We further this study to show that the velocity of the current sheet waves was similar to the expansion velocity of the substorm aurora and the expansion of the dipolarization regions in the magnetotail. Furthermore, we compare these results with the current sheet wave models of Golovchanskaya and Maltsev (2005) and Erkaev et al. (2008). We find that the Erkaev et al. (2008) model gives the best fit to the observations.

  9. Solar wind and substorm excitation of the wavy current sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Forsyth

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Following a solar wind pressure pulse on 3 August 2001, GOES 8, GOES 10, Cluster and Polar observed dipolarizations of the magnetic field, accompanied by an eastward expansion of the aurora observed by IMAGE, indicating the occurrence of two substorms. Prior to the first substorm, the motion of the plasma sheet with respect to Cluster was in the ZGSM direction. Observations following the substorms show the occurrence of current sheet waves moving predominantly in the −YGSM direction. Following the second substorm, the current sheet waves caused multiple current sheet crossings of the Cluster spacecraft, previously studied by Zhang et al. (2002. We further this study to show that the velocity of the current sheet waves was similar to the expansion velocity of the substorm aurora and the expansion of the dipolarization regions in the magnetotail. Furthermore, we compare these results with the current sheet wave models of Golovchanskaya and Maltsev (2005 and Erkaev et al. (2008. We find that the Erkaev et al. (2008 model gives the best fit to the observations.

  10. Modelling the Antarctic Ice Sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Holm, A.

    2015-01-01

    The Antarctic ice sheet is a major player in the Earth’s climate system and is by far the largest depository of fresh water on the planet. Ice stored in the Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) contains enough water to raise sea level by about 58 m, and ice loss from Antarctica contributed significantly...... Science) Antarctic Ice Sheet (DAIS) model (Shaffer 2014) is forced by reconstructed time series of Antarctic temperature, global sea level and ocean subsurface temperature over the last two glacial cycles. In this talk a modelling work of the Antarctic ice sheet over most of the Cenozoic era using...

  11. Analytical ice-sheet models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    2005-01-01

    To model present-day or palaeo-ice sheets in a realistic way requires numerical methods with high spatial resolution and a comprehensive description of the relevant physical processes. Nevertheless, some basic elements of the interaction between ice sheets and climate can be investigated by simple m

  12. Electron surfing acceleration in a current sheet of flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A model of electron acceleration in a current sheet of flares is studied by the analytical approximation solution and the test particle simulation. The electron can be trapped in a potential of propagating electrostatic wave. The trapped electron moving with the phase velocity vp of wave may be effectively accelerated by evc p× Bz force along the outflow direction in the current sheet, if a criterion condition K > 0 for electron surfing acceleration is satisfied. The electron will be accelerated continuously until the electron detrap from the wave potential at the turning point S.

  13. Drift modes of a quasi-two-dimensional current sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Malova, Kh. V.; Popov, V. Yu.; Zelenyi, L. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation)

    2012-03-15

    Stability of a plasma configuration consisting of a thin one-dimensional current sheet embedded into a two-dimensional background current sheet is studied. Drift modes developing in plasma as unstable waves along the current direction are considered. Dispersion relations for kink and sausage perturbation modes are obtained depending on the ratio of parameters of thin and background current sheets. It is shown that the existence of the background sheet results in a decrease in the instability growth rates and a significant increase in the perturbation wavelengths. The role of drift modes in the excitation of oscillations observed in the current sheet of the Earth's magnetotail is discussed.

  14. Thin current sheets in the deep geomagnetic tail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pulkkinen, T.I. (Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki (Finland)); Baker, D.N.; Owen, C.J. (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)); Gosling, J.T. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Murphy, N. (Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States))

    1993-11-19

    The ISEE-3 magnetic field and plasma electron data from Jan-March 1983 have been searched to study thin current sheets in the deep tail region. 33 events were selected where the spacecraft crossed through the current sheet from lobe to lobe within 15 minutes. The average thickness of the observed current sheets was 2.45R[sub E], and in 24 cases the current sheet was thinner than 3.0R[sub E]; 6 very thin current sheets (thickness [lambda] < 0.5R[sub E]) were found. The electron data show that the very thin current sheets are associated with considerable temperature anisotropy. On average, the electron gradient current was [approximately]17% of the total current, whereas the current arising from the electron temperature anisotropy varied between 8-45% of the total current determined from the lobe field magnitude. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Solar Energetic Particle Transport Near a Heliospheric Current Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battarbee, Markus; Dalla, Silvia; Marsh, Mike S.

    2017-02-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs), a major component of space weather, propagate through the interplanetary medium strongly guided by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). In this work, we analyze the implications that a flat Heliospheric Current Sheet (HCS) has on proton propagation from SEP release sites to the Earth. We simulate proton propagation by integrating fully 3D trajectories near an analytically defined flat current sheet, collecting comprehensive statistics into histograms, fluence maps, and virtual observer time profiles within an energy range of 1-800 MeV. We show that protons experience significant current sheet drift to distant longitudes, causing time profiles to exhibit multiple components, which are a potential source of confusing interpretations of observations. We find that variation of the current sheet thickness within a realistic parameter range has little effect on particle propagation. We show that the IMF configuration strongly affects the deceleration of protons. We show that in our model, the presence of a flat equatorial HCS in the inner heliosphere limits the crossing of protons into the opposite hemisphere.

  16. Current sheets with inhomogeneous plasma temperature: Effects of polarization electric field and 2D solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catapano, F., E-mail: menacata3@gmail.com; Zimbardo, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, Rende, Cosenza (Italy); Artemyev, A. V., E-mail: ante0226@gmail.com; Vasko, I. Y. [Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    We develop current sheet models which allow to regulate the level of plasma temperature and density inhomogeneities across the sheet. These models generalize the classical Harris model via including two current-carrying plasma populations with different temperature and the background plasma not contributing to the current density. The parameters of these plasma populations allow regulating contributions of plasma density and temperature to the pressure balance. A brief comparison with spacecraft observations demonstrates the model applicability for describing the Earth magnetotail current sheet. We also develop a two dimensional (2D) generalization of the proposed model. The interesting effect found for 2D models is the nonmonotonous profile (along the current sheet) of the magnetic field component perpendicular to the current sheet. Possible applications of the model are discussed.

  17. 3-D Magnetospheric Field and Plasma Containing Thin Current Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharia, S.; Cheng, C. Z.; Maezawa, K.; Wing, S.

    2002-05-01

    In this study we present fully-3D self-consistent solutions of the magnetosphere by using observation-based plasma pressure distributions and computational boundary conditions based on the T96 magnetospheric field model. The pressure profiles we use are either taken directly from observations (GEOTAIL pressure data in the plasma sheet and DMSP ionospheric pressure) or empirical (Spence-Kivelson formula for pressure on the midnight equatorial line). The 3-D solutions involve solving 2 coupled elliptic equations in a flux coordinate systems, with the magnetic field expressed by two Euler potentials and using appropriate boundary conditions for both the closed- and open-field regions derived from the empirical field model. We look into how the self-consistent magnetic field and current structures change under different external conditions, and we discuss the appearance of thin cross-tail current sheets during disturbed magnetospheric times.

  18. Current-sheet formation in incompressible electron magnetohydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruban, V P

    2002-04-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of axisymmetric, as well as helical, frozen-in vortex structures is investigated by the Hamiltonian method in the framework of ideal incompressible electron magnetohydrodynamics. For description of current-sheet formation from a smooth initial magnetic field, local and nonlocal nonlinear approximations are introduced and partially analyzed that are generalizations of the previously known exactly solvable local model neglecting electron inertia.

  19. Magnetic configurations of the tilted current sheets in magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Shen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the geometrical structures of tilted current sheet and tail flapping waves have been analysed based on multiple spacecraft measurements and some features of the tilted current sheets have been made clear for the first time. The geometrical features of the tilted current sheet revealed in this investigation are as follows: (1 The magnetic field lines (MFLs in the tilted current sheet are generally plane curves and the osculating planes in which the MFLs lie are about vertical to the equatorial plane, while the normal of the tilted current sheet leans severely to the dawn or dusk side. (2 The tilted current sheet may become very thin, the half thickness of its neutral sheet is generally much less than the minimum radius of the curvature of the MFLs. (3 In the neutral sheet, the field-aligned current density becomes very large and has a maximum value at the center of the current sheet. (4 In some cases, the current density is a bifurcated one, and the two humps of the current density often superpose two peaks in the gradient of magnetic strength, indicating that the magnetic gradient drift current is possibly responsible for the formation of the two humps of the current density in some tilted current sheets. Tilted current sheets often appear along with tail current sheet flapping waves. It is found that, in the tail flapping current sheets, the minimum curvature radius of the MFLs in the current sheet is rather large with values around 1 RE, while the neutral sheet may be very thin, with its half thickness being several tenths of RE. During the flapping waves, the current sheet is tilted substantially, and the maximum tilt angle is generally larger than 45°. The phase velocities of these flapping waves are several tens km/s, while their periods and wavelengths are several tens of minutes, and several earth radii, respectively. These tail flapping events generally last several hours and occur

  20. Bashful Ballerina: Southward shifted Heliospheric Current Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mursula, K.; Hiltula, T.

    It is known since long (Rosenberg and Coleman, 1969) that one of the two sectors of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) observed at the Earth's orbit dominates at high heliographic latitudes during solar minimum times, reflecting the poloidal structure of the global solar magnetic field at these times. Here we find that while this latitudinal variation of the dominant IMF sector around the solar equator is valid for both solar hemispheres during the last four solar minima covered by direct observations, it is systematically more strongly developed in the northern heliographic hemisphere. This implies that the average heliospheric current sheet is shifted or coned southward during solar minimum times, suggesting that the temporary southward shift of the heliosheet found earlier by Ulysses observations in 1995 is a persistent pattern. This also implies that the open solar magnetic field is north-south asymmetric at these times, suggesting that the solar dynamo has an asymmetric component. Accordingly, the Sun with the heliosheet is like a bashful ballerina who is repeatedly trying to push her excessively high flaring skirt downward. However, the effective shift at 1 AU is only a few degrees, allowing the Rosenberg-Coleman rule to be valid, on an average, in both hemispheres during solar minima.

  1. Morphology and Density Structure of Post-CME Current Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrsnak, B.; Poletto, G.; Vujic, E.; Vourlidas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Eruption of a coronal mass ejection (CME) is believed to drag and open the coronal magnetic field, presumably leading to the formation of a large-scale current sheet and field relaxation by magnetic reconnection. This paper analyzes the physical characteristics of ray-like coronal features formed in the aftermath of CMEs, to confirm whether interpreting such phenomena in terms of a reconnecting current sheet is consistent with observations. Methods: The study focuses on UVCS/SOHO and LASCO/SOHO measurements of the ray width, density excess, and coronal velocity field as a function of the radial distance. The morphology of the rays implies that they are produced by Petschek-like reconnection in the large-scale current sheet formed in the wake of CME. The hypothesis is supported by the flow pattern, often showing outflows along the ray, and sometimes also inflows into the ray. The inferred inflow velocities range from 3 to 30 km/s, and are consistent with the narrow opening-angle of rays, which add up to a few degrees. The density of rays is an order of magnitude higher than in the ambient corona. The model results are consistent with the observations, revealing that the main cause of the density excess in rays is a transport of the dense plasma from lower to higher heights by the reconnection outflow.

  2. The Dynamical Generation of Current Sheets in Astrophysical Plasma Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Howes, Gregory G

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence profoundly affects particle transport and plasma heating in many astrophysical plasma environments, from galaxy clusters to the solar corona and solar wind to Earth's magnetosphere. Both fluid and kinetic simulations of plasma turbulence ubiquitously generate coherent structures, in the form of current sheets, at small scales, and the locations of these current sheets appear to be associated with enhanced rates of dissipation of the turbulent energy. Therefore, illuminating the origin and nature of these current sheets is critical to identifying the dominant physical mechanisms of dissipation, a primary aim at the forefront of plasma turbulence research. Here we present evidence from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations that strong nonlinear interactions between counterpropagating Alfven waves, or strong Alfven wave collisions, are a natural mechanism for the generation of current sheets in plasma turbulence. Furthermore, we conceptually explain this current sheet development in terms of the nonlinear...

  3. Heliospheric current sheet and its interaction with solar cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malova, Helmi; Popov, Victor; Grigorenko, Elena; Dunko, Andrey; Petrukovich, Anatoly

    2016-04-01

    We investigated effects resulting from the interaction of solar cosmic rays (SCR) with the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) in the solar wind. Self-consistent kinetic model of the HCS is developed, where ions demonstrate quasi-adiabatic dynamics. HCS is considered as the equilibrium embedded current structure, where the two main kinds of plasma with different temperatures give the main contribution to the current (low-energy background plasma and SCR). It is shown that HCS is a relatively thin multiscale configuration of the current sheet, embedded in a thicker plasma layer. The taking into account of SCR particles in HCS could lead to a change of its structure and to enhancement of its properties such as the embedding and multi-scaling. Parametric family of solutions is considered where the current balance in HCS is provided at different temperatures of SCR and different concentrations of high-energy plasma. Concentrations of SCR are determined which may contribute to the thickening of the HCS that can be observed in satellite studies. The possibility to apply this modeling for the explanation of experimental observations is considered.

  4. Magnetic Reconnection Onset via Disruption of a Forming Current Sheet by the Tearing Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzdensky, D A; Loureiro, N F

    2016-03-11

    The recent realization that Sweet-Parker current sheets are violently unstable to the secondary tearing (plasmoid) instability implies that such current sheets cannot occur in real systems. This suggests that, in order to understand the onset of magnetic reconnection, one needs to consider the growth of the tearing instability in a current layer as it is being formed. Such an analysis is performed here in the context of nonlinear resistive magnetohydrodynamics for a generic time-dependent equilibrium representing a gradually forming current sheet. It is shown that two onset regimes, single-island and multi-island, are possible, depending on the rate of current sheet formation. A simple model is used to compute the criterion for transition between these two regimes, as well as the reconnection onset time and the current sheet parameters at that moment. For typical solar corona parameters, this model yields results consistent with observations.

  5. Spatial Offsets in Flare-CME Current Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, John C.; Giordano, Silvio; Ciaravella, Angela

    2017-07-01

    Magnetic reconnection plays an integral part in nearly all models of solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The reconnection heats and accelerates the plasma, produces energetic electrons and ions, and changes the magnetic topology to form magnetic flux ropes and to allow CMEs to escape. Structures that appear between flare loops and CME cores in optical, UV, EUV, and X-ray observations have been identified as current sheets and have been interpreted in terms of the nature of the reconnection process and the energetics of the events. Many of these studies have used UV spectral observations of high temperature emission features in the [Fe xviii] and Si xii lines. In this paper, we discuss several surprising cases in which the [Fe xviii] and Si xii emission peaks are spatially offset from each other. We discuss interpretations based on asymmetric reconnection, on a thin reconnection region within a broader streamer-like structure, and on projection effects. Some events seem to be easily interpreted as the projection of a sheet that is extended along the line of sight that is viewed an angle, but a physical interpretation in terms of asymmetric reconnection is also plausible. Other events favor an interpretation as a thin current sheet embedded in a streamer-like structure.

  6. Formation of the current sheet in a coronal streamer

    CERN Document Server

    Abbo, Lucia; Lionello, Roberto; Mikić, Zoran; Riley, Pete

    2011-01-01

    The present work is on the study of a coronal streamer observed in March 2008 at high spectral and spatial resolution by the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) onboard SOHO. On the basis of a spectroscopic analysis of the O VI doublet, the solar wind plasma parameters are inferred in the extended corona. The analysis accounts for the coronal magnetic topology, extrapolated through a 3D magneto-hydrodynamic model. The results of the analysis show indications on the formation of the current sheet, one of the source regions of the slow coronal wind.

  7. The origin of the warped heliospheric current sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, J. M.; Scherrer, P. H.; Hoeksema, J. T.

    1980-03-01

    The warped heliospheric current sheet in early 1976 was calculated from the observed photospheric magnetic field using a potential field method. Comparisons with measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field polarity in early 1976 obtained at several locations in the heliosphere at Helios 1, Helios 2, Pioneer 11 and Earth show a rather detailed agreement between the computed current sheet and the observations. It appears that the large scale structure of the warped heliospheric current sheet is determined by the structure of the photospheric magnetic field, and that "ballerina skirt" effects may add small scale ripples.

  8. ISSM: Ice Sheet System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larour, Eric; Schiermeier, John E.; Seroussi, Helene; Morlinghem, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    In order to have the capability to use satellite data from its own missions to inform future sea-level rise projections, JPL needed a full-fledged ice-sheet/iceshelf flow model, capable of modeling the mass balance of Antarctica and Greenland into the near future. ISSM was developed with such a goal in mind, as a massively parallelized, multi-purpose finite-element framework dedicated to ice-sheet modeling. ISSM features unstructured meshes (Tria in 2D, and Penta in 3D) along with corresponding finite elements for both types of meshes. Each finite element can carry out diagnostic, prognostic, transient, thermal 3D, surface, and bed slope simulations. Anisotropic meshing enables adaptation of meshes to a certain metric, and the 2D Shelfy-Stream, 3D Blatter/Pattyn, and 3D Full-Stokes formulations capture the bulk of the ice-flow physics. These elements can be coupled together, based on the Arlequin method, so that on a large scale model such as Antarctica, each type of finite element is used in the most efficient manner. For each finite element referenced above, ISSM implements an adjoint. This adjoint can be used to carry out model inversions of unknown model parameters, typically ice rheology and basal drag at the ice/bedrock interface, using a metric such as the observed InSAR surface velocity. This data assimilation capability is crucial to allow spinning up of ice flow models using available satellite data. ISSM relies on the PETSc library for its vectors, matrices, and solvers. This allows ISSM to run efficiently on any parallel platform, whether shared or distrib- ISSM: Ice Sheet System Model NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California uted. It can run on the largest clusters, and is fully scalable. This allows ISSM to tackle models the size of continents. ISSM is embedded into MATLAB and Python, both open scientific platforms. This improves its outreach within the science community. It is entirely written in C/C++, which gives it flexibility in its

  9. Simulation of the dynamics in the magnetotail current sheet

    CERN Document Server

    Ojeda, Arian; Calzadilla, Alexander; Savio, Siomel; Alazo, Katy

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics in the magnetosphere current sheet was simulated following transformations to the rectangular NxM array of cells (cellular automaton) originally proposed by Koselov and Koselova (2002). The magnetosphere part of the modeling system was organized as a rectangular arrangement of cells with a stored energy, a local redistribution of the energy will exist when a value threshold is exceeded in one of the cells. We assume that the threshold value in each cell depends on external control parameter which influences the long boundaries of the rectangular array (40x80). The model dynamics controlled by the z-component of the interplanetary magnetic field (Bz) as well as analogies between the model transient processes and the observed substorm auroral activations are discussed. The Bz correspond to temporary windows of the solar wind for a group of magnetic clouds and plasmoids. The model simulates organized patterns in the energy distribution. The function of distribution of probability (or PDF) of the siz...

  10. Reconnection current sheet structure in a turbulent medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. T. Vishniac

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In the presence of turbulence, magnetic field lines lose their dynamical identity and particles entrained on field lines diffuse through space at a rate determined by the amplitude of the turbulence. In previous work (Lazarian and Vishniac, 1999; Kowal et al., 2009; Eyink et al., 2011 we showed that this leads to reconnection speeds which are independent of resistivity. In particular, in Kowal et al. (2009 we showed that numerical simulations were consistent with the predictions of this model. Here we examine the structure of the current sheet in simulations of turbulent reconnection. Laminar flows consistent with the Sweet-Parker reconnection model produce very thin and well ordered currents sheets. On the other hand, the simulations of Kowal et al. (2009 show a strongly disordered state even for relatively low levels of turbulence. Comparing data cubes with and without reconnection, we find that large scale field reversals are the cumulative effect of many individual eddies, each of which has magnetic properties which are not very different from turbulent eddies in a homogeneous background. This implies that the properties of stationary and homogeneous MHD turbulence are a reasonable guide to understanding turbulence during large scale magnetic reconnection events. In addition, dissipation and high energy particle acceleration during reconnection events take place over a macroscopic volume, rather than being confined to a narrow zone whose properties depend on microscopic transport coefficients.

  11. Folded Sheet Versus Transparent Sheet Models for Human Symmetry Judgments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Ninio

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available As a contribution to the mysteries of human symmetry perception, reaction time data were collected on the detection of symmetry or repetition violations, in the context of short term visual memory studies. The histograms for reaction time distributions are rather narrow in the case of symmetry judgments. Their analysis was performed in terms of a simple kinetic model of a mental process in two steps, a slow one for the construction of the representation of the images to be compared, and a fast one, in the 50 ms range, for the decision. There was no need for an additional ‘mental rotation’ step. Symmetry seems to facilitate the construction step. I also present here original stimuli showing a color equalization effect across a symmetry axis, and its counterpart in periodic patterns. According to a “folded sheet model”, when a shape is perceived, the brain automatically constructs a mirror-image representation of the shape. Based in part on the reaction time analysis, I present here an alternative “transparent sheet” model in which the brain constructs a single representation, which can be accessed from two sides, thus generating simultaneously a pattern and its mirror-symmetric partner. Filtering processes, implied by current models of symmetry perception could intervene at an early stage, by nucleating the propagation of similar perceptual groupings in the two symmetric images.

  12. Pulsar Wind Nebulae as Cosmic Pevatrons: A Current Sheet's Tale

    CERN Document Server

    Arons, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    I outline, from a theoretical and somewhat personal perspective, significant features of Pulsar Wind Nebulae as Cosmic Accelerators. I discuss recent studies of Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe). I pay special attention to the recently discovered gamma ray flares in the Crab Nebula's emission, focusing on the possibility, raised by the observations, that the accelerating electric field exceeds the magnetic field, suggesting that reconnection in the persistent current layer (a current sheet) plays a significant role in the behavior of this well studied Pevatron. I address the present status of the termination shock model for the particle accelerator that converts the wind flow energy to the observed non thermal particle spectra, concluding that it has a number of major difficulties related to the transverse magnetic geometry of the shock wave. I discuss recent work on the inferred pair outflow rates, which are in excess of those predicted by existing theories of pair creation, and use those results to point out that ...

  13. Thickness of Heliospheric Current and Plasma Sheets: Dependence on Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X.; Smith, E. J.; Winterhalter, D.; McComas, D. J.; Skoug, R. M.; Goldstein, B. E.; Smith, C. W.

    2005-05-01

    Heliospheric current sheets (HCS) are well defined structures that separate the interplanetary magnetic fields with inverse polarities. Surrounded by heliospheric plasma sheets (HPS), the current sheets stretch throughout the heliosphere. Interesting questions that still remain unanswered include how the thickness of these structures will change along the distance? And what determines the thickness of these structures? To answer these fundamental questions, we have carried out a study of the HCS and HPS using recent Ulysses data near 5 AU. When the results were compared with earlier studies at 1 AU using ISEE-3 data, they were surprising and unexplained. Although the plasma sheet grew thicker, the embedded current sheet grew thinner! Using data under the same (or very similar) circumstances, we have extended the analysis in two ways. First, the same current-plasma sheets studied at 5 AU have been identified at 1 AU using ACE data. Second, data obtained while Ulysses was en-route to Jupiter near 3 AU have been analyzed. This three-point investigation reveals the thickness variation along the distance and enables the examination of the controller of this variation.

  14. Numerical analysis of the current sheet near a magnetic null line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brushlinskii, K.V.; Zaborov, A.M.; Syrovatskii, S.I.

    1980-03-01

    A mathematical model is constructed for the two-dimensional MHD plasma flow near a magnetic null line in a perturbing electric field. A numerical study is also carried out. This type of flow is the key element of the reconnection of magnetic lines of force and is being studied in connection with the mechanism for solar flares, the magnetospheres of planes, and certain questions in thermonuclear fusion. The results show that during this flow a nearly steady-state current sheet forms with a characteristic two-dimensional configuration. The sheet has four outgrowths corresponding to slow MHD shock waves. The geometric shape of the sheet and the maximum current in it are determined primarily by the plasma conductivity. The dependence of the sheet properties on the gas pressure is very weak. The thermal conditions in the flow, which are related to the heat conduction and radiation, strongly affect the plasma density distribution on the current sheet.

  15. Relation between current sheets and vortex sheets in stationary incompressible MHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Nickeler

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetohydrodynamic configurations with strong localized current concentrations and vortices play an important role in the dissipation of energy in space and astrophysical plasma. Within this work we investigate the relation between current sheets and vortex sheets in incompressible, stationary equilibria. For this approach it is helpful that the similar mathematical structure of magnetohydrostatics and stationary incompressible hydrodynamics allows us to transform static equilibria into stationary ones. The main control function for such a transformation is the profile of the Alfvén-Mach number MA, which is always constant along magnetic field lines, but can change from one field line to another. In the case of a global constant MA, vortices and electric current concentrations are parallel. More interesting is the nonlinear case, where MA varies perpendicular to the field lines. This is a typical situation at boundary layers like the magnetopause, heliopause, the solar wind flowing around helmet streamers and at the boundary of solar coronal holes. The corresponding current and vortex sheets show in some cases also an alignment, but not in every case. For special density distributions in 2-D, it is possible to have current but no vortex sheets. In 2-D, vortex sheets of field aligned-flows can also exist without strong current sheets, taking the limit of small Alfvén Mach numbers into account. The current sheet can vanish if the Alfvén Mach number is (almost constant and the density gradient is large across some boundary layer. It should be emphasized that the used theory is not only valid for small Alfvén Mach numbers MA << 1, but also for MA ≲ 1. Connection to other theoretical approaches and observations and physical effects in space plasmas are presented. Differences in the various aspects of theoretical investigations of current sheets and vortex

  16. Ice Sheet System Model as Educational Entertainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, G.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the importance of polar ice sheets and their role in the evolution of Sea Level Rise (SLR), as well as Climate Change, is of paramount importance for policy makers as well as the public and schools at large. For example, polar ice sheets and glaciers currently account for 1/3 of the SLR signal, a ratio that will increase in the near to long-term future, which has tremendous societal ramifications. Consequently, it is important to increase awareness about our changing planet. In our increasingly digital society, mobile and web applications are burgeoning venues for such outreach. The Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM) is a software that was developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory/CalTech/NASA, in collaboration with University of California Irvine (UCI), with the goal of better understanding the evolution of polar ice sheets. It is a state-of-the-art framework, which relies on higher-end cluster-computing to address some of the aforementioned challenges. In addition, it is a flexible framework that can be deployed on any hardware; in particular, on mobile platforms such as Android or iOS smart phones. Here, we look at how the ISSM development team managed to port their model to these platforms, what the implications are for improving how scientists disseminate their results, and how a broader audience may familiarize themselves with running complex climate models in simplified scenarios which are highly educational and entertaining in content. We also look at the future plans toward a web portal fully integrated with mobile technologies to deliver the best content to the public, and to provide educational plans/lessons that can be used in grades K-12 as well as collegiate under-graduate and graduate programs.

  17. Analogies between Jovian magnetodisk and heliospheric current sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kislov, Roman; Khabarova, Olga; Malova, Helmi

    Recently due to the development of spatial missions the famous model by E. Parker [1] faced with some problems, such as the effect of magnetic flux excess and the existence of latitude component of magnetic field [2]. Thus the incomplete knowledge about large scale current system of heliospheric current sheet (HCS) motivated us to construct and investigate the self-consistent axisymmetric stationary MHD model of HCS and to compare it with earlier presented model of Jupiterian magnetodisk [3]. Both HCS and magnetodisk have inner plasma sources (i.e. the Sun in case of HCS and satellite Io in case of Jupiter); also they depend on the centrifugal force at small distances and on corotation processes. They both have strong radial component of current density, thin elongated structure etc. Thus in the frame of the MHD model we have calculated for HCS the parallel currents (analogous to Jovian Birkeland currents) and we obtained the latitude component of the magnetic field. The results of the model allowed us to explain the magnetic flux excess by the existence of the self-consistent HCS magnetic field. The decrease of radial magnetic field from the distance from the Sun as the power -5/3 obtained by numerical calculations is in good agreement with experimental data. Generally this model can be applied for the quiet period of the low solar activity when the perturbation of HCS structure named “ballerina skirt” does not play any role. References: 1. Parker E. N., Astrophys. J., V. 128, 664, pp. 664-676, 1958. 2. Khabarova O. V., Астрономический журнал, V. 90, №11, pp. 919-935, 2013. 3. Kislov R.A. et al., Bull. MSU, Physics and Astron., 2013

  18. Experimental study of the dynamics of a thin current sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekelman, W.; DeHaas, T.; Van Compernolle, B.; Daughton, W.; Pribyl, P.; Vincena, S.; Hong, D.

    2016-05-01

    Many plasmas in natural settings or in laboratory experiments carry currents. In magnetized plasmas the currents can be narrow field-aligned filaments as small as the electron inertial length ≤ft(\\tfrac{c}{{ω }pe}\\right) in the transverse dimension or fill the entire plasma column. Currents can take the form of sheets, again with the transverse dimension the narrow one. Are laminar sheets of electric current in a magnetized plasma stable? This became an important issue in the 1960s when current-carrying plasmas became key in the quest for thermonuclear fusion. The subject is still under study today. The conditions necessary for the onset for tearing are known, the key issue is that of the final state. Is there a final state? One possibility is a collection of stable tubes of current. On the other hand, is the interaction between the current filaments which are the byproduct endless, or does it go on to become chaotic? The subject of three-dimensional current systems is intriguing, rich in a variety of phenomena on multiple scale sizes and frequencies, and relevant to fusion studies, solar physics, space plasmas and astrophysical phenomena. In this study a long (δz = 11 m) and narrow (δx = 1 cm, δy = 20 cm) current sheet is generated in a background magnetoplasma capable of supporting Alfvén waves. The current is observed to rapidly tear into a series of magnetic islands when viewed in a cross-sectional plane, but they are in essence three-dimensional flux ropes. At the onset of the current, magnetic field line reconnection is observed between the flux ropes. The sheet on the whole is kink-unstable, and after kinking exhibits large-scale, low-frequency (f ≪ f ci ) rotation about the background field with an amplitude that grows with distance from the source of the current. Three-dimensional data of the magnetic and electric fields is acquired throughout the duration of the experiment and the parallel resistivity is derived from it. The parallel

  19. Low frequency eigenmodes of thin anisotropic current sheets and Cluster observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Zelenyi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The eigenmodes of low frequency perturbations of thin anisotropic current sheets with a finite value of the normal magnetic field, are investigated in this paper. It is shown that two possible polarizations of symmetric and asymmetric modes (sausage and kink exist where the growth rate of instabilities is positive. In addition, we demonstrate that a tearing instability might have a positive growth rate in thin anisotropic current sheets. The class of relatively fast wavy flapping oscillations observed by Cluster is described. The main direction of wave motion coincides with the direction of the current and the typical velocity of this motion is comparable with the plasma drift velocity in the current sheet. The comparison of these characteristics with theoretical predictions of the model of anisotropic thin current sheets, demonstrates that, in principle, the theory adequately describes the observations.

  20. Monitoring dc stray current corrosion at sheet pile structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peelen, W.H.A.; Neeft, E.A.C.; Leegwater, G.; Kanten-Roos, W. van; Courage, W.M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Steel is discarded by railway owners as a material for underground structures near railway lines, due to uncertainty over increased corrosion by DC stray currents stemming from the traction power system. This paper presents a large scale field test in which stray currents interference of a sheet pil

  1. The Elementary Marine Ice Sheet Model (EMISM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattyn, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Ice sheet models become more and more components of global climate system modelling instead of stand-alone features to study cryospheric processes. Full coupling of ice sheet models to atmospheric and ocean models requires a standard for ice sheet models, and more precisely for marine ice sheet models, where complex feedbacks between ice and ocean, such as marine ice sheet instability, and the atmosphere, such as the elevation-mass balance feedback, operate at different time scales. Recent model intercomparisons (e.g., SeaRISE, MISMIP) have shown that basic requirements for marine ice sheet models are still lacking and that the complexity of many ice sheet models is focused on processes that are either not well captured numerically (spatial resolution issue) or are of secondary importance compared to the essential features of marine ice sheet dynamics. Here, we propose a new and fast computing ice sheet model, devoid of most complexity, but capturing the essential feedbacks when coupled to ocean or atmospheric models. Its computational efficiency guarantees to easily tests its advantages as well as limits through ensemble modelling. EMISM (Elementary Marine Ice Sheet Model) is a vertically integrated ice sheet model based on the Shallow-Ice Approximation extended a Weertman sliding law. Although vertically integrated, thermomechanical coupling is ensured through a simplified representation of ice sheet thermodynamics based on an analytical solution of the vertical temperature profile, enhanced with strain heating. The marine boundary is represented by a parameterized flux condition similar to Pollard & Deconto (2012), based on Schoof (2007). A simplified ice shelf is added to account for buttressing of ice shelves in this parameterization. The ice sheet model is solved on a finite difference grid and special care is taken to its numerical efficiency and stability. While such model has a series of (known) deficiencies with respect to short time effects, its overall

  2. Dynamic of Current Sheets and Their Associated Particle Energization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Guo, Fan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Makwan, Kirit [Univ. Chicago; Li, Xiaocan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhandrin, Vladimir [Univ. Washington; Daughton, William Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-08-19

    Magnetic reconnection in current sheets has relevance to Earth's magnetosphere, solar flares, high-energy astrophysics (pulsar wind nebula (e.g. Crab Nebula), gamma-ray bursts, black hole jets), and laboratory plasma/fusion. Data are shown for several cases with varying values of configuration energy Ec and β. Several conclusions were drawn: Depending on the “configuration energy”, the formation, shape, and lifetime of current sheets can vary. Plasma condition (configuration, β, driving, etc.) strongly affect the efficiency of particle acceleration. For low β and general “configuration energy”, particle heating is expected. For low β, large and long-lived current sheets, it is possible to produce highly non-thermal particles via collisionless plasmoid reconnection.

  3. Current-sheet formation in incompressible electron magnetohydrodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruban, Victor P.

    2002-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of axisymmetric, as well as helical, frozen-in vortex structures is investigated by the Hamiltonian method in the framework of ideal incompressible electron magnetohydrodynamics. For description of current-sheet formation from a smooth initial magnetic field, local and nonl......The nonlinear dynamics of axisymmetric, as well as helical, frozen-in vortex structures is investigated by the Hamiltonian method in the framework of ideal incompressible electron magnetohydrodynamics. For description of current-sheet formation from a smooth initial magnetic field, local...

  4. Electron currents supporting the near-Earth magnetotail during current sheet thinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Angelopoulos, V.; Liu, J.; Runov, A.

    2017-01-01

    Formation of intense, thin current sheets (i.e., current sheet thinning) is a critical process for magnetospheric substorms, but the kinetic physics of this process remains poorly understood. Using a triangular configuration of the three Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) spacecraft at the end of 2015 we investigate field-aligned and transverse currents in the magnetotail current sheet around 12 Earth radii downtail. Combining the curlometer technique with direct measurements of ion and electron velocities, we demonstrate that intense, thin current sheets supported by strong electron currents form in this region. Electron field-aligned currents maximize near the neutral plane Bx˜0, attaining magnitudes of ˜20 nA/m2. Carried by hot (>1 keV) electrons, they generate strong magnetic shear, which contributes up to 20% of the vertical (along the normal direction to the equatorial plane) pressure balance. Electron transverse currents, on the other hand, are carried by the curvature drift of anisotropic, colder (<1 keV) electrons and gradually increase during the current sheet thinning. In the events under consideration the thinning process was abruptly terminated by earthward reconnection fronts which have been previously associated with tail reconnection further downtail. It is likely that the thin current sheet properties described herein are similar to conditions further downtail and are linked to the loss of stability and onset of reconnection there. Our findings are likely applicable to thin current sheets in other geophysical and astrophysical settings.

  5. Observations of the Formation, Development, and Structure of a Current Sheet in an Eruptive Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Seaton, Daniel B; Darnel, Jonathan M

    2016-01-01

    We present AIA observations of a structure we interpret as a current sheet associated with an X4.9 flare and coronal mass ejection that occurred on 2014~February~25 in NOAA Active Region 11990. We characterize the properties of the current sheet, finding that the sheet remains on the order of a few thousand km thick for much of the duration of the event and that its temperature generally ranged between $8-10\\,\\mathrm{MK}$. We also note the presence of other phenomena believed to be associated with magnetic reconnection in current sheets, including supra-arcade downflows and shrinking loops. We estimate that the rate of reconnection during the event was $M_{A} \\approx 0.004-0.007$, a value consistent with model predictions. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of this event for reconnection-based eruption models.

  6. Observations of the Formation, Development, and Structure of a Current Sheet in an Eruptive Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaton, Daniel B.; Bartz, Allison E.; Darnel, Jonathan M.

    2017-02-01

    We present Atmospheric Imaging Assembly observations of a structure we interpret as a current sheet associated with an X4.9 flare and coronal mass ejection that occurred on 2014 February 25 in NOAA Active Region 11990. We characterize the properties of the current sheet, finding that the sheet remains on the order of a few thousand kilometers thick for much of the duration of the event and that its temperature generally ranged between 8 and 10 MK. We also note the presence of other phenomena believed to be associated with magnetic reconnection in current sheets, including supra-arcade downflows and shrinking loops. We estimate that the rate of reconnection during the event was MA ≈ 0.004–0.007, a value consistent with model predictions. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of this event for reconnection-based eruption models.

  7. Structure and evolution of the current sheet by multi-spacecraft observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, X.Y. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Inst. of Geophysics; Russell, C.T. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Inst. of Geophysics and Planetary Physics; Gosling, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    On April 22, 1979, from 0840 to 1018 UT, ISEE 1, ISEE 2 and IMP 8 were all in or near the magnetotail current sheet at 17 Re, 16 Re and 35 Re respectively while ISEE 3 monitored the solar wind 206 Re upstream of the Earth. A global perspective of the four spacecraft observations and of the ground magnetic records is presented in this paper. The hyperbolic tangent current sheet model of Harris has been used to calculate the current sheet thickness and to analyze the plasma distribution in the vertical direction. It is found that during this event the current sheet thickness varied from 2.5 Re to 1.5 Re for northward IMF but thinned abruptly to 0.5 Re when the IMF turned southward.

  8. Nonlinear Dynamics of Non-uniform Current-Vortex Sheets in Magnetohydrodynamic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, C.; Nishihara, K.; Sano, T.

    2016-10-01

    A theoretical model is proposed to describe fully nonlinear dynamics of interfaces in two-dimensional MHD flows based on an idea of non-uniform current-vortex sheet. Application of vortex sheet model to MHD flows has a crucial difficulty because of non-conservative nature of magnetic tension. However, it is shown that when a magnetic field is initially parallel to an interface, the concept of vortex sheet can be extended to MHD flows (current-vortex sheet). Two-dimensional MHD flows are then described only by a one-dimensional Lagrange parameter on the sheet. It is also shown that bulk magnetic field and velocity can be calculated from their values on the sheet. The model is tested by MHD Richtmyer-Meshkov instability with sinusoidal vortex sheet strength. Two-dimensional ideal MHD simulations show that the nonlinear dynamics of a shocked interface with density stratification agrees fairly well with that for its corresponding potential flow. Numerical solutions of the model reproduce properly the results of the ideal MHD simulations, such as the roll-up of spike, exponential growth of magnetic field, and its saturation and oscillation. Nonlinear evolution of the interface is found to be determined by the Alfvén and Atwood numbers. Some of their dependence on the sheet dynamics and magnetic field amplification are discussed. It is shown by the model that the magnetic field amplification occurs locally associated with the nonlinear dynamics of the current-vortex sheet. We expect that our model can be applicable to a wide variety of MHD shear flows.

  9. Nonlinear Dynamics of Non-uniform Current-Vortex Sheets in Magnetohydrodynamic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, C.; Nishihara, K.; Sano, T.

    2017-04-01

    A theoretical model is proposed to describe fully nonlinear dynamics of interfaces in two-dimensional MHD flows based on an idea of non-uniform current-vortex sheet. Application of vortex sheet model to MHD flows has a crucial difficulty because of non-conservative nature of magnetic tension. However, it is shown that when a magnetic field is initially parallel to an interface, the concept of vortex sheet can be extended to MHD flows (current-vortex sheet). Two-dimensional MHD flows are then described only by a one-dimensional Lagrange parameter on the sheet. It is also shown that bulk magnetic field and velocity can be calculated from their values on the sheet. The model is tested by MHD Richtmyer-Meshkov instability with sinusoidal vortex sheet strength. Two-dimensional ideal MHD simulations show that the nonlinear dynamics of a shocked interface with density stratification agrees fairly well with that for its corresponding potential flow. Numerical solutions of the model reproduce properly the results of the ideal MHD simulations, such as the roll-up of spike, exponential growth of magnetic field, and its saturation and oscillation. Nonlinear evolution of the interface is found to be determined by the Alfvén and Atwood numbers. Some of their dependence on the sheet dynamics and magnetic field amplification are discussed. It is shown by the model that the magnetic field amplification occurs locally associated with the nonlinear dynamics of the current-vortex sheet. We expect that our model can be applicable to a wide variety of MHD shear flows.

  10. Current-sheet formation in 3D ideal incompressible magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer; Marliani

    2000-05-22

    The evolution of current density and vorticity in the ideal, inviscid incompressible magnetohydrodynamic equations in three dimensions is studied numerically. Highly effective resolutions are obtained by adaptive structured mesh refinement techniques. We report on results for three different initial conditions showing similar behavior: in the early stage of the evolution a fast increase in vorticity and current density is observed. Thereafter, the evolution towards nearly two-dimensional current sheets results in a depletion of nonlinearity.

  11. Thin current sheets in collisionless plasma: Equilibrium structure, plasma instabilities, and particle acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelenyi, L. M.; Malova, H. V.; Artemyev, A. V.; Popov, V. Yu.; Petrukovich, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation)

    2011-02-15

    The review is devoted to plasma structures with an extremely small transverse size, namely, thin current sheets that have been discovered and investigated by spacecraft observations in the Earth's magnetotail in the last few decades. The formation of current sheets is attributed to complicated dynamic processes occurring in a collisionless space plasma during geomagnetic perturbations and near the magnetic reconnection regions. The models that describe thin current structures in the Earth's magnetotail are reviewed. They are based on the assumption of the quasi-adiabatic ion dynamics in a relatively weak magnetic field of the magnetotail neutral sheet, where the ions can become unmagnetized. It is shown that the ion distribution can be represented as a function of the integrals of particle motion-the total energy and quasi-adiabatic invariant. Various modifications of the initial equilibrium are considered that are obtained with allowance for the currents of magnetized electrons, the contribution of oxygen ions, the asymmetry of plasma sources, and the effects related to the non-Maxwellian particle distributions. The theoretical results are compared with the observational data from the Cluster spacecraft mission. Various plasma instabilities developing in thin current sheets are investigated. The evolution of the tearing mode is analyzed, and the parameter range in which the mode can grow are determined. The paradox of complete stabilization of the tearing mode in current sheets with a nonzero normal magnetic field component is thereby resolved based on the quasi-adiabatic model. It is shown that, over a wide range of current sheet parameters and the propagation directions of large-scale unstable waves, various modified drift instabilities-kink and sausage modes-can develop in the system. Based on the concept of a turbulent electromagnetic field excited as a result of the development and saturation of unstable waves, a mechanism for charged particle

  12. Current Sheets in the Heliosheath: Voyager 1, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    2011-01-01

    We identified all of the current sheets for which we have relatively complete and accurate magnetic field (B) data from Voyager 1 (V1) from days of year (DOYs) 1 to 331, 2009, which were obtained deep in the heliosheath between 108.5 and 111.8 AU. Three types of current sheets were found: (1) 15 proton boundary layers (PBLs), (2) 10 and 3 magnetic holes and magnetic humps, respectively, and (3) 3 sector boundaries. The magnetic field strength changes across PBL, and the profile B(t) is linearly related to the hyperbolic tangent function, but the direction of B does not change. For each of the three sector boundaries, B rotated in a plane normal to the minimum variance direction, and the component of B along the minimum variance direction was zero within the uncertainties, indicating that the sector boundaries were tangential discontinuities. The structure of the sector boundaries was not as simple as that for PBLs. The average thickness of magnetic holes and humps (approx.30 RL) was twice that of the PBLs (approx.15 RL). The average thickness of the current sheets associated with sector boundaries was close to the thickness of the PBLs. Our observations are consistent with the hypothesis that magnetic holes and humps are solitons, which are initiated by the mirror mode instability, and evolve by nonlinear kinetic plasma processes to pressure balanced structures maintained by magnetization currents and proton drift currents in the gradients of B.

  13. Mercury's Magnetospheric Cusps and Cross-Tail Current Sheet: Structure and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Gang Kai

    Mercury has proven to be a unique natural laboratory for space plasma processes. Mercury's magnetosphere is formed by the interaction between its intrinsic planetary magnetic field and the supersonic solar wind. The structure of Mercury's magnetosphere is very similar to Earth's; yet the results from the MESSENGER mission to Mercury have shown that the spatial and temporal scales of magnetospheric processes are very different at Mercury. In this thesis, we analyze in situ observations from the MESSENGER spacecraft to characterize and understand the dynamic physical plasma processes occurring in Mercury's magnetosphere. We identified and analyzed 345 plasma filaments in Mercury's northern magnetospheric cusp to determine their physical properties. Cusp plasma filaments are magnetic structures that are identified on the basis of their characteristic 2-3 seconds long decrease in magnetic field intensity. Our analysis indicates that these cusp filaments are cylindrical flux tubes filled with plasma, which causes a diamagnetic decrease in the magnetic field inside the flux tube. MESSENGER observations of flux transfer events (FTEs) and cusp filament suggests that cusp filaments properties are the low-altitude extension of FTEs formed at Mercury's dayside magnetopause. We examined 319 central plasma sheet crossings observed by MESSENGER. Using a Harris model, we determined the physical properties of Mercury's cross-tail current sheet. Analysis of BZ in the current sheet indicated that MESSENGER usually crossed the current sheet sunward of the Near Mercury Neutral Line. Magnetohydrodynamics-based analysis using the MESSENGER magnetic field and plasma measurements suggests that heavy planetary ions and/or ion temperature anisotropy may be important in maintaining radial stress balance within Mercury's central plasma sheet. We report the observation of significant dawn-dusk variation in Mercury's cross-tail current sheet with thicker, lower plasma beta dawn side current

  14. Current-voltage characteristics of borophene and borophane sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadi Vishkayi, Sahar; Bagheri Tagani, Meysam

    2017-08-16

    Motivated by recent experimental and theoretical research on a monolayer of boron atoms, borophene, the current-voltage characteristics of three different borophene sheets, 2Pmmn, 8Pmmn, and 8Pmmm, are calculated using density functional theory combined with the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. Borophene sheets with two and eight atoms in a unit cell are considered. Their band structure, electron density, and structural anisotropy are analyzed in detail. The results show that the 8Pmmn and 8Pmmm structures that have eight atoms in the unit cell have less anisotropy than 2Pmmn. In addition, although 8Pmmn shows a Dirac cone in the band structure, its current is lower than that of the other two. We also consider a fully hydrogenated borophene, borophane, and find that the hydrogenation process reduces the structural anisotropy and the current significantly. Our findings reveal that the current-voltage characteristics of the borophene sheets can be used to detect the type and the growth direction of the sample because it is strongly dependent on the direction of the electron transport, anisotropy, and details of the unit cell of the borophene.

  15. Metastability of collisionless current sheets. Hannes Alfven Lecture on behalf of Albert Galeev

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenyi, L.; Galeev, A.

    2009-04-01

    Complicated magnetic configurations containing numerous magnetic field reversals are widespread in nature. Each of such reversals is supported by corresponding current sheet (CS) which could often have very small thickness comparable to ion skin depth. Since the beginning of Space Age "in situ" investigations of current sheets in the Earth's magnetosphere (magnetopause and magnetotail) acquired one of the highest priorities in national space programs and became one of the cornerstones of various international activities, like ISTP, IACG, and ILWS, which appeared to be very effective. Intense theoretical efforts were undertaken by theorists all over the world to develop both equilibrium models of current sheets and analyze its stability and further nonlinear evolution. Lack of collisions and smallness of many characteristic scales in comparison with ion Larmor radius made an application of straightforward MHD approach dramatically questionable. Professor Alfven was one of the first who suggested in 1968 simple but very physical self-consistent particle model of CS. One of the most intriguing features of current sheets in collisionless plasma is their ability to accumulate tremendous amounts of magnetic energy (1015 J for magnetospheric substorms , 1024 J for solar flare associated sheets) and then suddenly sometimes almost explosively release them. We will demonstrate in this talk that such METASTABILITY is a principal intrinsic feature of current sheets in hot plasma. Very intense theoretical debates of 80-ies and late 90-ies resulted in some consensus that current sheets with the small component of magnetic field normal to their plane become overstable for spontaneous reconnection (i.e. versus the development of ion tearing mode). Analysis of INTERBALL and especially 4- point CLUSTER data have shown that real current sheets observed in the Earth's magnetotail very rarely resemble simplistic HARRIS current sheets which have been used for an early stability

  16. Generation of sheet currents by high frequency fast MHD waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Núñez, Manuel, E-mail: mnjmhd@am.uva.es

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of fast magnetosonic waves of high frequency propagating into an axisymmetric equilibrium plasma is studied. By using the methods of weakly nonlinear geometrical optics, it is shown that the perturbation travels in the equatorial plane while satisfying a transport equation which enables us to predict the time and location of formation of shock waves. For plasmas of large magnetic Prandtl number, this would result into the creation of sheet currents which may give rise to magnetic reconnection and destruction of the original equilibrium. - Highlights: • Regular solutions of quasilinear hyperbolic systems may evolve into shocks. • The shock location is found for high frequency fast MHD waves. • The result is applied to static axisymmetric equilibria. • The previous process may lead to the formation of sheet currents and destruction of the equilibrium.

  17. Heliospheric current sheet inclinations at Venus and Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ma

    Full Text Available We investigate the inclinations of heliospheric current sheet at two sites in interplanetary space, which are generated from the same solar source. From the data of solar wind magnetic fields observed at Venus (0.72 AU and Earth (1 AU during December 1978-May 1982 including the solar maximum of 1981, 54 pairs of candidate sector boundary crossings are picked out, of which 16 pairs are identified as sector boundaries. Of the remainder, 12 pairs are transient structures both at Venus and Earth, and 14 pairs are sector boundaries at one site and have transient structures at the other site. It implies that transient structures were often ejected from the coronal streamer belt around the solar maximum. For the 16 pairs of selected sector boundaries, we determine their normals by using minimum variance analysis. It is found that most of the normal azimuthal angles are distributed between the radial direction and the direction perpendicular to the spiral direction both at Venus and Earth. The normal elevations tend to be smaller than ~ 45° with respect to the solar equatorial plane, indicating high inclinations of the heliospheric current sheet, in particular at Earth. The larger scatter in the azimuth and elevation of normals at Venus than at Earth suggests stronger effects of the small-scale structures on the current sheet at 0.72 AU than at 1 AU. When the longitude difference between Venus and Earth is small (<40° longitudinally, similar or the same inclinations are generally observed, especially for the sector boundaries without small-scale structures. This implies that the heliospheric current sheet inclination tends to be maintained during propagation of the solar wind from 0.72 AU to 1 AU. Detailed case studies reveal that the dynamic nature of helmet streamers causes variations of the sector boundary structure.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (interplanetary magnetic fields; sources of solar wind

  18. Nonlinear Evolution of Magnetic Islands in the Magnetopause Current Sheet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XianminWANG; ZuyinPU

    1996-01-01

    Nonlinear evolution of magnetic islands produced by time-dependent magnetic reconnection in the magnetopause current sheet is studied.It is shown that the magnetic islands are unstable against the interference from external disturbances.Their structure can be destroyed by medium and small-scale solar wind turbulences,leading to stochastic magnetic reconnection and the formation of irregular small0scale structures in magnetospheric boundary regions.

  19. Multiscale friction modeling for sheet metal forming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, J.; Cid Alfaro, M.V.; de Rooij, Matthias B.; Meinders, Vincent T.; Felder, Eric; Montmitonnet, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The most often used friction model for sheet metal forming simulations is the relative simple Coulomb friction model. This paper presents a more advanced friction model for large scale forming simulations based on the surface change on the micro-scale. The surface texture of a material changes when

  20. High-latitude Conic Current Sheets in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabarova, Olga V.; Malova, Helmi V.; Kislov, Roman A.; Zelenyi, Lev M.; Obridko, Vladimir N.; Kharshiladze, Alexander F.; Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Sokół, Justyna M.; Grzedzielski, Stan; Fujiki, Ken'ichi

    2017-02-01

    We provide observational evidence for the existence of large-scale cylindrical (or conic-like) current sheets (CCSs) at high heliolatitudes. Long-lived CCSs were detected by Ulysses during its passages over the South Solar Pole in 1994 and 2007. The characteristic scale of these tornado-like structures is several times less than a typical width of coronal holes within which the CCSs are observed. CCS crossings are characterized by a dramatic decrease in the solar wind speed and plasma beta typical for predicted profiles of CCSs. Ulysses crossed the same CCS at different heliolatitudes at 2-3 au several times in 1994, as the CCS was declined from the rotation axis and corotated with the Sun. In 2007, a CCS was detected directly over the South Pole, and its structure was strongly highlighted by the interaction with comet McNaught. Restorations of solar coronal magnetic field lines reveal the occurrence of conic-like magnetic separators over the solar poles in both 1994 and 2007. Such separators exist only during solar minima. Interplanetary scintillation data analysis confirms the presence of long-lived low-speed regions surrounded by the typical polar high-speed solar wind in solar minima. Energetic particle flux enhancements up to several MeV/nuc are observed at edges of the CCSs. We built simple MHD models of a CCS to illustrate its key features. The CCSs may be formed as a result of nonaxiality of the solar rotation axis and magnetic axis, as predicted by the Fisk-Parker hybrid heliospheric magnetic field model in the modification of Burger and coworkers.

  1. An ice sheet model validation framework for the Greenland ice sheet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Price, Stephen F.; Hoffman, Matthew J.; Bonin, Jennifer A.; Howat, Ian M.; Neumann, Thomas; Saba, Jack; Tezaur, Irina; Guerber, Jeffrey; Chambers, Don P.; Evans, Katherine J.; Kennedy, Joseph H.; Lenaerts, Jan; Lipscomb, William H.; Perego, Mauro; Salinger, Andrew G.; Tuminaro, Raymond S.; Van Den Broeke, Michiel R.; Nowicki, Sophie M J

    2017-01-01

    We propose a new ice sheet model validation framework - the Cryospheric Model Comparison Tool (CmCt) - that takes advantage of ice sheet altimetry and gravimetry observations collected over the past several decades and is applied here to modeling of the Greenland ice sheet. We use realistic

  2. Kink-like mode of a double gradient instability in a compressible plasma current sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korovinskiy, D.B.; Ivanova, V.V.; Erkaev, N.V.; Semenov, V.S.; Ivanov, I.B.; Biernat, H.K.; Zellinger, M.

    2011-01-01

    A linear MHD instability of the electric current sheet, characterized by a small normal magnetic field component, varying along the sheet, is investigated. The tangential magnetic field component is modeled by a hyperbolic function, describing Harris-like variations of the field across the sheet. For this problem, which is formulated in a 3D domain, the conventional compressible ideal MHD equations are applied. By assuming Fourier harmonics along the electric current, the linearized 3D equations are reduced to 2D ones. A finite difference numerical scheme is applied to examine the time evolution of small initial perturbations of the plasma parameters. This work is an extended numerical study of the so called “double gradient instability”, – a possible candidate for the explanation of flapping oscillations in the magnetotail current sheet, which has been analyzed previously in the framework of a simplified analytical approach for an incompressible plasma. The dispersion curve is obtained for the kink-like mode of the instability. It is shown that this curve demonstrates a quantitative agreement with the previous analytical result. The development of the instability is investigated also for various enhanced values of the normal magnetic field component. It is found that the characteristic values of the growth rate of the instability shows a linear dependence on the square root of the parameter, which scales uniformly the normal component of the magnetic field in the current sheet. PMID:22053125

  3. Mutual Inductance Problem for a System Consisting of a Current Sheet and a Thin Metal Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, J. P.; Wincheski, B.; Nath, S.; Namkung, M.

    1993-01-01

    Rapid inspection of aircraft structures for flaws is of vital importance to the commercial and defense aircraft industry. In particular, inspecting thin aluminum structures for flaws is the focus of a large scale R&D effort in the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) community. Traditional eddy current methods used today are effective, but require long inspection times. New electromagnetic techniques which monitor the normal component of the magnetic field above a sample due to a sheet of current as the excitation, seem to be promising. This paper is an attempt to understand and analyze the magnetic field distribution due to a current sheet above an aluminum test sample. A simple theoretical model, coupled with a two dimensional finite element model (FEM) and experimental data will be presented in the next few sections. A current sheet above a conducting sample generates eddy currents in the material, while a sensor above the current sheet or in between the two plates monitors the normal component of the magnetic field. A rivet or a surface flaw near a rivet in an aircraft aluminum skin will disturb the magnetic field, which is imaged by the sensor. Initial results showed a strong dependence of the flaw induced normal magnetic field strength on the thickness and conductivity of the current-sheet that could not be accounted for by skin depth attenuation alone. It was believed that the eddy current imaging method explained the dependence of the thickness and conductivity of the flaw induced normal magnetic field. Further investigation, suggested the complexity associated with the mutual inductance of the system needed to be studied. The next section gives an analytical model to better understand the phenomenon.

  4. Glacial Cycles and ice-sheet modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    1982-01-01

    An attempt is made to simulate the Pleistocene glacial cycles with a numerical model of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets. This model treats the vertically-integrated ice flow along a meridian, including computation of bedrock adjustment and temperature distribution in the ice. Basal melt water is

  5. A model of the Antarctic Ice Sheet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    1982-01-01

    Numerical modelling of ice sheets and glaciers has become a useful tool in glaciological research. A model described here deals with the vertical mean ice velocity, is time dependent, computes bedrock adjustment and uses an empirical diagnostic relationship to derive the distribution of ice thicknes

  6. Effect of Inductive Coil Geometry and Current Sheet Trajectory of a Conical Theta Pinch Pulsed Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Bonds, Kevin W.; Emsellem, Gregory D.

    2011-01-01

    Results are presented demonstrating the e ect of inductive coil geometry and current sheet trajectory on the exhaust velocity of propellant in conical theta pinch pulsed induc- tive plasma accelerators. The electromagnetic coupling between the inductive coil of the accelerator and a plasma current sheet is simulated, substituting a conical copper frustum for the plasma. The variation of system inductance as a function of plasma position is obtained by displacing the simulated current sheet from the coil while measuring the total inductance of the coil. Four coils of differing geometries were employed, and the total inductance of each coil was measured as a function of the axial displacement of two sep- arate copper frusta both having the same cone angle and length as the coil but with one compressed to a smaller size relative to the coil. The measured relationship between total coil inductance and current sheet position closes a dynamical circuit model that is used to calculate the resulting current sheet velocity for various coil and current sheet con gura- tions. The results of this model, which neglects the pinching contribution to thrust, radial propellant con nement, and plume divergence, indicate that in a conical theta pinch ge- ometry current sheet pinching is detrimental to thruster performance, reducing the kinetic energy of the exhausting propellant by up to 50% (at the upper bound for the parameter range of the study). The decrease in exhaust velocity was larger for coils and simulated current sheets of smaller half cone angles. An upper bound for the pinching contribution to thrust is estimated for typical operating parameters. Measurements of coil inductance for three di erent current sheet pinching conditions are used to estimate the magnetic pressure as a function of current sheet radial compression. The gas-dynamic contribution to axial acceleration is also estimated and shown to not compensate for the decrease in axial electromagnetic acceleration

  7. Current sheet flapping in the near-Earth magnetotail: peculiarities of propagation and parallel currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yushkov, Egor V.; Artemyev, Anton V.; Petrukovich, Anatoly A.; Nakamura, Rumi

    2016-09-01

    We consider series of tilted current sheet crossings, corresponding to flapping waves in the near-Earth magnetotail. We analyse Cluster observations from 2005 to 2009, when spacecraft visited the magnetotail neutral plane near X ∈ [ - 17, - 8], Y ∈ [ - 16, - 2] RE (in the GSM system). Large separation of spacecraft allows us to estimate both local and global properties of flapping current sheets. We find significant variation in flapping wave direction of propagation between the middle tail and flanks. Th series of tilted current sheets represent the system of periodic, almost parallel currents with typical thickness of current filaments about L = 0.4 RE. The earthward gradients of Bz magnetic field are reduced within this current system in comparison with the gradients in the quiet near-Earth magnetotail. The wavelength (i.e. a distance between two crossings of current sheets with the same orientations) of the flapping waves is larger than 2πL for most of observations. The velocity of flapping wave propagation is about ion bulk velocity and is significantly lower than the velocity of ion drift relative to electrons. We discuss possible drivers of flapping and estimate the amplitude of the total parallel current generated by flapping waves.

  8. A technique for generating consistent ice sheet initial conditions for coupled ice-sheet/climate models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Fyke

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A new technique for generating ice sheet preindustrial 1850 initial conditions for coupled ice-sheet/climate models is developed and demonstrated over the Greenland Ice Sheet using the Community Earth System Model (CESM. Paleoclimate end-member simulations and ice core data are used to derive continuous surface mass balance fields which are used to force a long transient ice sheet model simulation. The procedure accounts for the evolution of climate through the last glacial period and converges to a simulated preindustrial 1850 ice sheet that is geometrically and thermodynamically consistent with the 1850 preindustrial simulated CESM state, yet contains a transient memory of past climate that compares well to observations and independent model studies. This allows future coupled ice-sheet/climate projections of climate change that include ice sheets to integrate the effect of past climate conditions on the state of the Greenland Ice Sheet, while maintaining system-wide continuity between past and future climate simulations.

  9. Physics and Dynamics of Current Sheets in Pulsed Plasma Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    pulsed plasma thruster. A simple experiment would involve measuring the impulse bit of a coaxial gas-fed pulsed plasma thruster operated in both positive...Princeton, NJ, 2002. [2] J. Marshal. Performance of a hydromagnetic plasma gun . The Physics of Fluids, 3(1):134–135, January-February 1960. [3] R.G. Jahn...Jahn and K.E. Clark. A large dielecteic vacuum facility. AIAA Jour- nal, 1966. [16] L.C. Burkhardt and R.H. Lovberg. Current sheet in a coaxial plasma

  10. Unsteady magnetic reconnection in laboratory experiments with current sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Anna

    2009-11-01

    According to present notion, unsteady magnetic reconnection in current sheets (CS) is basic to dramatic natural phenomena: solar and stellar flares, substorms in the Earth and other planetary magnetospheres, as well as to disruptive instabilities in tokamak plasmas. We present a review of laboratory experiments studying evolution of CS formed in 3D and 2D magnetic configurations with an X line, in the CS-3D device. Usually CS exists during an extended period in a metastable stage, without essential changes of its structure and parameters. Under certain conditions this stage may be suddenly interrupted by unsteady phase of magnetic reconnection, which manifests itself in a rapid change of the magnetic field topology, current redistribution, excitation of pulsed electric fields, and other dynamic effects. The unsteady phase results in effective conversion of magnetic energy into the energy of plasma and accelerated particles, and may finally bring about the CS disruption. In the context of the solar flares, a metastable CS is associated with a pre-flare situation, while CS disruption -- with the flare itself. The physical mechanisms triggering the unsteady magnetic reconnection in the laboratory produced current sheets are discussed. Supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project # 09-02-00971).

  11. Current sheets at three-dimensional magnetic nulls: Effect of compressibility

    CERN Document Server

    Pontin, D I; Galsgaard, K

    2007-01-01

    The nature of current sheet formation in the vicinity of three-dimensional magnetic null points is investigated. The particular focus is upon the effect of the compressibility of the plasma on the qualitative and quantitative properties of the current sheet. It is found that as the incompressible limit is approached, the collapse of the null point is suppressed, and instead an approximately planar current sheet aligned to the fan plane is present. Both the peak current and peak reconnection rate are reduced. The results imply that previous analytical solutions for steady-state reconnection at fan current sheets are dynamically accessible, while spine current sheet solutions are not.

  12. Magnetic guide field generation in collisionless current sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Baumjohann

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In thin (Δ< few λi collisionless current sheets in a space plasma like the magnetospheric tail or magnetopause current layer, magnetic fields can grow from thermal fluctuation level by the action of the non-magnetic Weibel instability (Weibel, 1959. The instability is driven by the counter-streaming electron inflow from the "ion diffusion" (ion inertial Hall region into the inner current (electron inertial region after thermalisation by the two-stream instability. Under magnetospheric tail conditions it takes ~50 e-folding times (~100 s for the Weibel field to reach observable amplitudes |bW|~1 nT. In counter-streaming inflows these fields are of guide field type.

  13. Large-scale Modeling of the Greenland Ice Sheet on Long Timescales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solgaard, Anne Munck

    the steady-state response of the Greenland ice sheet to a warmer climate. The threshold of irreversible decay was found to lie between a temperature increase of 4-5 K relative to present day when basal sliding was neglected in the ice-sheet model. Introducing basal sliding into the ice-sheet model shifted...... and climate model is included shows, however, that a Föhn effect is activated and hereby increasing temperatures inland and inhibiting further ice-sheet expansion into the interior. This indicates that colder than present temperatures are needed in order for the ice sheet to regrow to the current geometry...

  14. Fully coupled ice sheet-earth system model: How does the Greenlandic ice sheet interact in a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodehacke, C.; Mikolajewicz, U.; Vizcaino, M.

    2012-04-01

    As ice sheets belong to the slowest climate components, they are usually not interactively coupled in current climate models. Therefore, long-term climate projections are incomplete and only the consideration of ice sheet interactions allows tackling fundamental questions, such as how do ice sheets modify the reaction of the climate systems under a strong CO2 forcing? The earth system model MPI-ESM, with the atmosphere model ECHAM6 and ocean model MPIOM, is coupled to the modified ice sheet model PISM. This ice sheet model, which is developed at the University of Fairbanks, represents the ice sheet of Greenland at a horizontal resolution of 10 km. The coupling is performed by calculating the surface mass balance based on 6-hourly atmospheric data to determine the boundary condition for the ice sheet model. The response of the ice sheet to this forcing, which includes orographic changes and fresh water fluxes, are passed back to the ESM. In contrast to commonly used strategies, we use a mass conserving scheme and do therefore neither apply flux corrections nor utilize anomaly coupling. Under a strong CO2 forcing a disintegrating Greenlandic ice sheet contributes to a rising sea level and has the potential to alter the formation of deep water masses in the adjacent formation sites Labrador Sea and Nordic Seas. We will present results for an idealized forcing with a growing atmospheric CO2 concentration that rises by 1% per year until four-times the pre-industrial level has been reached. We will discuss the reaction of the ice sheet and immediate responses of the ocean to ice loss.

  15. High current density sheet-like electron beam generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow-Miller, Cora; Korevaar, Eric; Schuster, John

    Sheet electron beams are very desirable for coupling to the evanescent waves in small millimeter wave slow-wave circuits to achieve higher powers. In particular, they are critical for operation of the free-electron-laser-like Orotron. The program was a systematic effort to establish a solid technology base for such a sheet-like electron emitter system that will facilitate the detailed studies of beam propagation stability. Specifically, the effort involved the design and test of a novel electron gun using Lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) as the thermionic cathode material. Three sets of experiments were performed to measure beam propagation as a function of collector current, beam voltage, and heating power. The design demonstrated its reliability by delivering 386.5 hours of operation throughout the weeks of experimentation. In addition, the cathode survived two venting and pump down cycles without being poisoned or losing its emission characteristics. A current density of 10.7 A/sq cm. was measured while operating at 50 W of ohmic heating power. Preliminary results indicate that the nearby presence of a metal plate can stabilize the beam.

  16. Continuous development of current sheets near and away from magnetic nulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Bhattacharyya, R.

    2016-04-01

    The presented computations compare the strength of current sheets which develop near and away from the magnetic nulls. To ensure the spontaneous generation of current sheets, the computations are performed congruently with Parker's magnetostatic theorem. The simulations evince current sheets near two dimensional and three dimensional magnetic nulls as well as away from them. An important finding of this work is in the demonstration of comparative scaling of peak current density with numerical resolution, for these different types of current sheets. The results document current sheets near two dimensional magnetic nulls to have larger strength while exhibiting a stronger scaling than the current sheets close to three dimensional magnetic nulls or away from any magnetic null. The comparative scaling points to a scenario where the magnetic topology near a developing current sheet is important for energetics of the subsequent reconnection.

  17. THIN CURRENT SHEETS AND ASSOCIATED ELECTRON HEATING IN TURBULENT SPACE PLASMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chasapis, A.; Retinò, A.; Sahraoui, F.; Canu, P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, F-91128 (France); Vaivads, A.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V. [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala (Sweden); Sundkvist, D. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Greco, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria (Italy); Sorriso-Valvo, L., E-mail: alexandros.chasapis@lpp.polytechnique.fr [IMIP-CNR, U.O.S. LICRYL di Cosenza (Italy)

    2015-05-01

    Intermittent structures, such as thin current sheets, are abundant in turbulent plasmas. Numerical simulations indicate that such current sheets are important sites of energy dissipation and particle heating occurring at kinetic scales. However, direct evidence of dissipation and associated heating within current sheets is scarce. Here, we show a new statistical study of local electron heating within proton-scale current sheets by using high-resolution spacecraft data. Current sheets are detected using the Partial Variance of Increments (PVI) method which identifies regions of strong intermittency. We find that strong electron heating occurs in high PVI (>3) current sheets while no significant heating occurs in low PVI cases (<3), indicating that the former are dominant for energy dissipation. Current sheets corresponding to very high PVI (>5) show the strongest heating and most of the time are consistent with ongoing magnetic reconnection. This suggests that reconnection is important for electron heating and dissipation at kinetic scales in turbulent plasmas.

  18. Models for polythermal ice sheets and glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Ian J.; Schoof, Christian

    2017-02-01

    Polythermal ice sheets and glaciers contain both cold ice and temperate ice. We present two new models to describe the temperature and water content of such ice masses, accounting for the possibility of gravity- and pressure-driven water drainage according to Darcy's law. Both models are based on the principle of energy conservation; one additionally invokes the theory of viscous compaction to calculate pore water pressure, and the other involves a modification of existing enthalpy gradient methods to include gravity-driven drainage. The models self-consistently predict the evolution of temperature in cold ice and of water content in temperate ice. Numerical solutions are described, and a number of illustrative test problems are presented, allowing comparison with existing methods. The suggested models are simple enough to be incorporated in existing ice-sheet models with little modification.

  19. Reconnection at three dimensional magnetic null points: Effect of current sheet asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyper, P. F.; Jain, Rekha

    2013-05-01

    Asymmetric current sheets are likely to be prevalent in both astrophysical and laboratory plasmas with complex three dimensional (3D) magnetic topologies. This work presents kinematic analytical models for spine and fan reconnection at a radially symmetric 3D null (i.e., a null where the eigenvalues associated with the fan plane are equal) with asymmetric current sheets. Asymmetric fan reconnection is characterized by an asymmetric reconnection of flux past each spine line and a bulk flow of plasma across the null point. In contrast, asymmetric spine reconnection is characterized by the reconnection of an equal quantity of flux across the fan plane in both directions. The higher modes of spine reconnection also include localized wedges of vortical flux transport in each half of the fan. In this situation, two definitions for reconnection rate become appropriate: a local reconnection rate quantifying how much flux is genuinely reconnected across the fan plane and a global rate associated with the net flux driven across each semi-plane. Through a scaling analysis, it is shown that when the ohmic dissipation in the layer is assumed to be constant, the increase in the local rate bleeds from the global rate as the sheet deformation is increased. Both models suggest that asymmetry in the current sheet dimensions will have a profound effect on the reconnection rate and manner of flux transport in reconnection involving 3D nulls.

  20. Reconnection at three dimensional magnetic null points: Effect of current sheet asymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyper, P. F.; Jain, Rekha [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, South Yorkshire S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-15

    Asymmetric current sheets are likely to be prevalent in both astrophysical and laboratory plasmas with complex three dimensional (3D) magnetic topologies. This work presents kinematic analytical models for spine and fan reconnection at a radially symmetric 3D null (i.e., a null where the eigenvalues associated with the fan plane are equal) with asymmetric current sheets. Asymmetric fan reconnection is characterized by an asymmetric reconnection of flux past each spine line and a bulk flow of plasma across the null point. In contrast, asymmetric spine reconnection is characterized by the reconnection of an equal quantity of flux across the fan plane in both directions. The higher modes of spine reconnection also include localized wedges of vortical flux transport in each half of the fan. In this situation, two definitions for reconnection rate become appropriate: a local reconnection rate quantifying how much flux is genuinely reconnected across the fan plane and a global rate associated with the net flux driven across each semi-plane. Through a scaling analysis, it is shown that when the ohmic dissipation in the layer is assumed to be constant, the increase in the local rate bleeds from the global rate as the sheet deformation is increased. Both models suggest that asymmetry in the current sheet dimensions will have a profound effect on the reconnection rate and manner of flux transport in reconnection involving 3D nulls.

  1. Evidence for two separate heliospheric current sheets of cylindrical shape during MID-2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.-M. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Young, P. R. [College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Muglach, K., E-mail: yi.wang@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: pyoung@ssd5.nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: karin.muglach@nasa.gov [Code 674, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    During the reversal of the Sun's polar fields at sunspot maximum, outward extrapolations of magnetograph measurements often predict the presence of two or more current sheets extending into the interplanetary medium, instead of the single heliospheric current sheet (HCS) that forms the basis of the standard 'ballerina skirt' picture. By comparing potential-field source-surface models of the coronal streamer belt with white-light coronagraph observations, we deduce that the HCS was split into two distinct structures with circular cross sections during mid-2012. These cylindrical current sheets were centered near the heliographic equator and separated in longitude by roughly 180°; a corresponding four-sector polarity pattern was observed at Earth. Each cylinder enclosed a negative-polarity coronal hole that was identifiable in extreme ultraviolet images and gave rise to a high-speed stream. The two current sheet systems are shown to be a result of the dominance of the Sun's nonaxisymmetric quadrupole component, as the axial dipole field was undergoing its reversal during solar cycle 24.

  2. Evidence for Two Separate Heliospheric Current Sheets of Cylindrical Shape During Mid-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.-M.; Young, P. R.; Muglach, K.

    2014-01-01

    During the reversal of the Sun's polar fields at sunspot maximum, outward extrapolations of magnetograph measurements often predict the presence of two or more current sheets extending into the interplanetary medium, instead of the single heliospheric current sheet (HCS) that forms the basis of the standard "ballerina skirt" picture. By comparing potential-field source-surface models of the coronal streamer belt with white-light coronagraph observations, we deduce that the HCS was split into two distinct structures with circular cross sections during mid-2012. These cylindrical current sheets were centered near the heliographic equator and separated in longitude by roughly 180° a corresponding four-sector polarity pattern was observed at Earth. Each cylinder enclosed a negative-polarity coronal hole that was identifiable in extreme ultraviolet images and gave rise to a high-speed stream. The two current sheet systems are shown to be a result of the dominance of the Sun's nonaxisymmetric quadrupole component, as the axial dipole field was undergoing its reversal during solar cycle 24.

  3. Exploring reconnection, current sheets, and dissipation in a laboratory MHD turbulence experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX) can serve as a testbed for studying MHD turbulence in a controllable laboratory setting, and in particular, explore the phenomena of reconnection, current sheets and dissipation in MHD turbulence. Plasma with turbulently fluctuating magnetic and velocity fields can be generated using a plasma gun source and launched into a flux-conserving cylindrical tunnel. No background magnetic field is applied so internal fields are allowed to evolve dynamically. Point measurements of magnetic and velocity fluctuations yield broadband power-law spectra with a steepening breakpoint indicative of the onset of a dissipation scale. The frequency range at which this steepening occurs can be correlated to the ion inertial scale of the plasma, a length which is characteristic of the size of current sheets in MHD plasmas and suggests a connection to dissipation. Observation of non-Gaussian intermittent jumps in magnetic field magnitude and angle along with measurements of ion temperature bursts suggests the presence of current sheets embedded within the turbulent plasma, and possibly even active reconnection sites. Additionally, structure function analysis coupled with appeals to fractal scaling models support the hypothesis that current sheets are associated with dissipation in this system.

  4. Substorm onset: Current sheet avalanche and stop layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2015-03-01

    A new scenario is presented for the onset of a substorm and the nature of the breakup arc. There are two main components, current sheet avalanche and stop layer. The first refers to an earthward flow of plasma and magnetic flux from the central current sheet of the tail, triggered spontaneously or by some unknown interaction with an auroral streamer or a suddenly appearing eastward flow at the end of the growth phase. The second offers a mechanism to stop the flow abruptly at the interface between magnetosphere and tail and extract momentum and energy to be partially processed locally and partially transmitted as Poynting flux toward the ionosphere. The stop layer has a width of the order of the ion inertial length. The different dynamics of the ions entering freely and the magnetized electrons create an electric polarization field which stops the ion flow and drives a Hall current by which flow momentum is transferred to the magnetic field. A simple formalism is used to describe the operation of the process and to enable quantitative conclusions. An important conclusion is that by necessity the stop layer is also highly structured in longitude. This offers a natural explanation for the coarse ray structure of the breakup arc as manifestation of elementary paths of energy and momentum transport. The currents aligned with the rays are balanced between upward and downward directions. While the avalanche is invoked for explaining the spontaneous substorm onset at the inner edge of the tail, the expansion of the breakup arc for many minutes is taken as evidence for a continued formation of new stop layers by arrival of flow bursts from the near-Earth neutral line. This is in line with earlier conclusions about the nature of the breakup arc. Small-scale structure, propagation speed, and energy flux are quantitatively consistent with observations. However, the balanced small-scale currents cannot constitute the substorm current wedge. The source of the latter must be

  5. Additional acceleration of solar-wind particles in current sheets of the heliosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zharkova, V. [Northumbria Univ., Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mathematics and Information Systems; Khabarova, O. [RAS (IZMIRAN), Moscow (Russian Federation). Heliophysical Lab.

    2015-09-01

    Particles of fast solar wind in the vicinity of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) or in a front of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) often reveal very peculiar energy or velocity profiles, density distributions with double or triple peaks, and well-defined streams of electrons occurring around or far away from these events. In order to interpret the parameters of energetic particles (both ions and electrons) measured by the WIND spacecraft during the HCS crossings, a comparison of the data was carried out with 3-D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations for the relevant magnetic topology (Zharkova and Khabarova, 2012). The simulations showed that all the observed particle-energy distributions, densities, ion peak velocities, electron pitch angles and directivities can be fitted with the same model if the heliospheric current sheet is in a status of continuous magnetic reconnection. In this paper we present further observations of the solar-wind particles being accelerated to rather higher energies while passing through the HCS and the evidence that this acceleration happens well before the appearance of the corotating interacting region (CIR), which passes through the spacecraft position hours later. We show that the measured particle characteristics (ion velocity, electron pitch angles and the distance at which electrons are turned from the HCS) are in agreement with the simulations of additional particle acceleration in a reconnecting HCS with a strong guiding field as measured by WIND. A few examples are also presented showing additional acceleration of solarwind particles during their passage through current sheets formed in a front of ICMEs. This additional acceleration at the ICME current sheets can explain the anticorrelation of ion and electron fluxes frequently observed around the ICME's leading front. Furthermore, it may provide a plausible explanation of the appearance of bidirectional ''strahls'' (field-aligned most

  6. Formation and Reconnection of Three-Dimensional Current Sheets in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, J. K.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2010-01-01

    Current-sheet formation and magnetic reconnection are believed to be the basic physical processes responsible for much of the activity observed in astrophysical plasmas, such as the Sun s corona. We investigate these processes for a magnetic configuration consisting of a uniform background field and an embedded line dipole, a topology that is expected to be ubiquitous in the corona. This magnetic system is driven by a uniform horizontal flow applied at the line-tied photosphere. Although both the initial field and the driver are translationally symmetric, the resulting evolution is calculated using a fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) simulation with adaptive mesh refinement that resolves the current sheet and reconnection dynamics in detail. The advantage of our approach is that it allows us to apply directly the vast body of knowledge gained from the many studies of 2D reconnection to the fully 3D case. We find that a current sheet forms in close analogy to the classic Syrovatskii 2D mechanism, but the resulting evolution is different than expected. The current sheet is globally stable, showing no evidence for a disruption or a secondary instability even for aspect ratios as high as 80:1. The global evolution generally follows the standard Sweet- Parker 2D reconnection model except for an accelerated reconnection rate at a very thin current sheet, due to the tearing instability and the formation of magnetic islands. An interesting conclusion is that despite the formation of fully 3D structures at small scales, the system remains close to 2D at global scales. We discuss the implications of our results for observations of the solar corona. Subject Headings: Sun: corona Sun: magnetic fields Sun: reconnection

  7. Numerical Simulation of Current Sheet Formation in a Quasi-Separatrix Layer using Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    CERN Document Server

    Effenberger, Frederic; Arnold, Lukas; Grauer, Rainer; Dreher, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    The formation of a thin current sheet in a magnetic quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) is investigated by means of numerical simulation using a simplified ideal, low-$\\beta$, MHD model. The initial configuration and driving boundary conditions are relevant to phenomena observed in the solar corona and were studied earlier by Aulanier et al., A&A 444, 961 (2005). In extension to that work, we use the technique of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to significantly enhance the local spatial resolution of the current sheet during its formation, which enables us to follow the evolution into a later stage. Our simulations are in good agreement with the results of Aulanier et al. up to the calculated time in that work. In a later phase, we observe a basically unarrested collapse of the sheet to length scales that are more than one order of magnitude smaller than those reported earlier. The current density attains correspondingly larger maximum values within the sheet. During this thinning process, which is finally limite...

  8. Modeling the Fracture of Ice Sheets on Parallel Computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waisman, Haim [Columbia University; Tuminaro, Ray [Sandia National Labs

    2013-10-10

    The objective of this project was to investigate the complex fracture of ice and understand its role within larger ice sheet simulations and global climate change. This objective was achieved by developing novel physics based models for ice, novel numerical tools to enable the modeling of the physics and by collaboration with the ice community experts. At the present time, ice fracture is not explicitly considered within ice sheet models due in part to large computational costs associated with the accurate modeling of this complex phenomena. However, fracture not only plays an extremely important role in regional behavior but also influences ice dynamics over much larger zones in ways that are currently not well understood. To this end, our research findings through this project offers significant advancement to the field and closes a large gap of knowledge in understanding and modeling the fracture of ice sheets in the polar regions. Thus, we believe that our objective has been achieved and our research accomplishments are significant. This is corroborated through a set of published papers, posters and presentations at technical conferences in the field. In particular significant progress has been made in the mechanics of ice, fracture of ice sheets and ice shelves in polar regions and sophisticated numerical methods that enable the solution of the physics in an efficient way.

  9. Global properties of magnetotail current sheet flapping: THEMIS perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Runov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A sequence of magnetic field oscillations with an amplitude of up to 30 nT and a time scale of 30 min was detected by four of the five THEMIS spacecraft in the magnetotail plasma sheet. The probes P1 and P2 were at X=−15.2 and −12.7 RE and P3 and P4 were at X=−7.9 RE. All four probes were at −6.5>Y>−7.5 RE (major conjunction. Multi-point timing analysis of the magnetic field variations shows that fronts of the oscillations propagated flankward (dawnward and Earthward nearly perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic maximum variation (B1 at velocities of 20–30 km/s. These are typical characteristics of current sheet flapping motion. The observed anti-correlation between ∂B1/∂t and the Z-component of the bulk velocity make it possible to estimate a flapping amplitude of 1 to 3 RE. The cross-tail scale wave-length was found to be about 5 RE. Thus the flapping waves are steep tail-aligned structures with a lengthwise scale of >10 RE. The intermittent plasma motion with the cross-tail velocity component changing its sign, observed during flapping, indicates that the flapping waves were propagating through the ambient plasma. Simultaneous observations of the magnetic field variations by THEMIS ground-based magnetometers show that the flapping oscillations were observed during the growth phase of a substorm.

  10. Peristaltic Pumping near Post-CME Supra-Arcade Current Sheets

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, Roger B; McKenzie, David E

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of temperature and density near supra-arcade current sheets suggest that plasma on unreconnected field lines may experience some degree of "pre-heating" and "pre-densification" prior to their reconnection. Models of patchy reconnection allow for heating and acceleration of plasma along reconnected field lines but do not offer a mechanism for transport of thermal energy across field lines. Here we present a model in which a reconnected flux tube retracts, deforming the surrounding layer of unreconnected field. The deformation creates constrictions that act as peristaltic pumps, driving plasma flow along affected field lines. Under certain circumstances these flows lead to shocks that can extend far out into the unreconnected field, altering the plasma properties in the affected region. These findings have direct implications for observations in the solar corona, particularly in regard to such phenomena as high temperatures near current sheets in eruptive solar flares and wakes seen in the form of ...

  11. Thin Current Sheets and Associated Electron Heating in Turbulent Space Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasapis, A.; Retinò, A.; Sahraoui, F.; Vaivads, A.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Sundkvist, D.; Greco, A.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Canu, P.

    2015-05-01

    Intermittent structures, such as thin current sheets, are abundant in turbulent plasmas. Numerical simulations indicate that such current sheets are important sites of energy dissipation and particle heating occurring at kinetic scales. However, direct evidence of dissipation and associated heating within current sheets is scarce. Here, we show a new statistical study of local electron heating within proton-scale current sheets by using high-resolution spacecraft data. Current sheets are detected using the Partial Variance of Increments (PVI) method which identifies regions of strong intermittency. We find that strong electron heating occurs in high PVI (>3) current sheets while no significant heating occurs in low PVI cases (5) show the strongest heating and most of the time are consistent with ongoing magnetic reconnection. This suggests that reconnection is important for electron heating and dissipation at kinetic scales in turbulent plasmas.

  12. Groundwater flow modelling under ice sheet conditions. Scoping calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaquet, O.; Namar, R. (In2Earth Modelling Ltd (Switzerland)); Jansson, P. (Dept. of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-10-15

    program DarcyTools in order to evaluate the current conceptual model for groundwater flow under ice sheet conditions, as well as to provide some guidance to the field investigations. For this first modelling phase, coupled processes are not considered for the modelling of the groundwater flow system under ice sheet conditions; e.g. density driven flow, thermal and geomechanical effects as well as coupling with a dynamical ice sheet model shall be investigated in the next phase

  13. Ice flow Modelling of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lisbeth Tangaa

    simulations of the Greenland ice sheet using ice sheet models offers the possibility of deriving reconstructions of past ice sheet topography, flow and extent, consistent with the dynamics of ice flow and the imposed climate forcing. The large-scale response of the ice sheet modelled by such approaches can...... core derived temperature and precipitation histories have a long history of being used in studies of the past evolution of the Greenland ice sheet, acting as climatic forcing of the ice sheet models. However, the conversion from the isotopic records to past temperatures remain challenging, owing...... to both uncertain processes and depositional histories. Using five different temperature reconstructions derived from isotope records of Greenlandic ice cores, the influence of the paleo records on the simulated ice sheet was investigated using a high-resolution, large-scale ice sheet model (PISM...

  14. Reconnection at 3D Magnetic Null Points: Effect of Current Sheet Asymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Wyper, Peter F

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetric current sheets are likely to be prevalent in both astrophysical and laboratory plasmas with complex three dimensional (3D) magnetic topologies. This work presents kinematic analytical models for spine and fan reconnection at a symmetric 3D null with asymmetric current sheets. Asymmetric fan reconnection is characterized by an asymmetric reconnection of flux past each spine line and a bulk flow of plasma across the null point. In contrast, asymmetric spine reconnection is inherently equal and opposite in how flux is reconnected across the fan plane. The higher modes of spine reconnection also include localized wedges of vortical flux transport in each half of the fan. In this situation, two definitions for reconnection rate become appropriate: a local reconnection rate quantifying how much flux is genuinely reconnected across the fan plane and a global rate associated with the net flux driven across each semi-plane. Through a scaling analysis it is shown that when the ohmic dissipation in the layer ...

  15. Plasmoid formation in the elongated current sheet during transient CHI on HIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Masayoshi; Fujita, Akihiro; Matsui, Takahiro; Kikuchi, Yusuke; Fukumoto, Naoyuki; Kanki, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    The Transient-Coaxial Helicity Injection (T-CHI) is a promising candidate for the non-inductive plasma start-up on Spherical Torus (ST). The problem of the flux closure in the T-CHI is important and related to understand the physics of fast magnetic reconnection. The recent MHD simulation (F. Ebrahimi and R. Raman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 205003 (2015)) on T-CHI for NSTX predicts the formation and breakup of an elongated Sweet-Parker (S-P) current sheet and a transient to plasmoid instability. According to this simulation, the reconnection rate based on the plasmoid instability is faster than that by S-P model and becomes nearly independent of the Lundquist number S. In this meeting, we will present that the formation of multiple X-points and plasmoids has been observed in T-CHI start-up plasmas on HIST. The stronger external guide (toroidal) magnetic field makes plasma less compressible, leading to slower reconnection time and longer current sheet. The experimental observation shows that 2/3 plasmoids are generated in the elongated current sheet with the narrow width comparable to the ion skin depth or the ion sound gyro-radius. The small plasmoids develop to a large-scale flux structure due to a current inward diffusion during the decay phase.

  16. The effect of diffusion on the current-sheet speed in a magnetically driven shock tube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, C.T.; Popovic, M.; Korsbech, Uffe

    1970-01-01

    The lowering of the current-sheet speed in a magnetically driven shock tube is attributed to the diffusion effect of the current and not to the anchoring of a large fraction of the total current near the driving end.......The lowering of the current-sheet speed in a magnetically driven shock tube is attributed to the diffusion effect of the current and not to the anchoring of a large fraction of the total current near the driving end....

  17. Statistical research on the motion properties of the magnetotail current sheet:Cluster observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.REME; E.LUCEK

    2010-01-01

    The origin of the flapping motion of the earth’s magnetotail current sheet is one of the most important problems in the magnetotail dynamics.Using Cluster data,we make a statistical research on the motion properties of the magnetotail current sheet of 2001 and 2003.We calculate the velocities of the magnetotail current sheet using new methods and obtain the distribution of the magnetotail current sheet velocities in the X-Y plane in GSE coordinate system.Our results show that although most of the current sheets were propagating toward the tail flanks and those of the exceptions lay in dusk side,which is consistent with previous studies,the proportions of the current sheet which were propagating toward midnight (where |YGSE|=0) were higher than those in previous studies.Motions of the current sheet in the middle area (|YGSE|<8 Re) of the magnetotail are investigated.Relatively high value of the Z component of the velocity further confirms that the middle area of the magnetotail might be a source region for the motion of the current sheets which were propagating towards the tail flanks.According to our case studies,the way the current sheets propagated toward midnight area differs significantly from that toward dusk and dawn side,from which we infer that there might be two different kinds of current sheet motions originated from different sources.The statistical results of this paper may give some clues for further studies on the origin of the flapping motion of the magnetotail current sheet.

  18. Current sheets at three-dimensional magnetic nulls: Effect of compressibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontin, D. I.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Galsgaard, K.

    2007-05-01

    The nature of current sheet formation in the vicinity of three-dimensional (3D) magnetic null points is investigated. The particular focus is upon the effect of the compressibility of the plasma on the qualitative and quantitative properties of the current sheet. An initially potential 3D null is subjected to shearing perturbations, as in a previous paper [Pontin et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 052106 (2007)]. It is found that as the incompressible limit is approached, the collapse of the null point is suppressed and an approximately planar current sheet aligned to the fan plane is present instead. This is the case regardless of whether the spine or fan of the null is sheared. Both the peak current and peak reconnection rate are reduced. The results have a bearing on previous analytical solutions for steady-state reconnection in incompressible plasmas, implying that fan current sheet solutions are dynamically accessible, while spine current sheet solutions are not.

  19. Dynamo-driven plasmoid formation from a current-sheet instability

    CERN Document Server

    Ebrahimi, F

    2016-01-01

    Axisymmetric current-carrying plasmoids are formed in the presence of nonaxisymmetric fluctuations during nonlinear three-dimensional resistive MHD simulations in a global toroidal geometry. We utilize the helicity injection technique to form an initial poloidal flux in the presence of a toroidal guide field. As helicity is injected, two types of current sheets are formed from 1) the oppositely directed field lines in the injector region (primary reconnecting current sheet), and 2) the poloidal flux compression near the plasma edge (edge current sheet). We first find that nonaxisymmetic fluctuations arising from the current-sheet instability isolated near the plasma edge have tearing parity but can nevertheless grow fast (on the poloidal Alfven time scale). These modes saturate by breaking up the current sheet. Second, for the first time a dynamo poloidal flux amplification is observed at the reconnetion site (in the region of the oppositely directed magnetic field). This fluctuation-induced flux amplificatio...

  20. Heliospheric current sheet and effects of its interaction with solar cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malova, H. V.; Popov, V. Yu.; Grigorenko, E. E.; Dunko, A. V.; Petrukovich, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    The effects of interaction of solar cosmic rays (SCRs) with the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) in the solar wind are analyzed. A self-consistent kinetic model of the HCS is developed in which ions with quasiadiabatic dynamics can present. The HCS is considered an equilibrium embedded current structure in which two main plasma species with different temperatures (the low-energy background plasma of the solar wind and the higher energy SCR component) contribute to the current. The obtained results are verified by comparing with the results of numerical simulations based on solving equations of motion by the particle tracing method in the given HCS magnetic field with allowance for SCR particles. It is shown that the HCS is a relatively thin multiscale current configuration embedded in a thicker plasma layer. In this case, as a rule, the shear (tangential to the sheet current) component of the magnetic field is present in the HCS. Taking into account high-energy SCR particles in the HCS can lead to a change of its configuration and the formation of a multiscale embedded structure. Parametric family of solutions is considered in which the current balance in the HCS is provided at different SCR temperatures and different densities of the high-energy plasma. The SCR densities are determined at which an appreciable (detectable by satellites) HCS thickening can occur. Possible applications of this modeling to explain experimental observations are discussed.

  1. The Role of Current Sheets in Solar Eruptive Events: An ISSI International Team Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, Steven T.; Poletto, Giannina

    2006-01-01

    Current sheets (CSs) are a prerequisite for magnetic reconnection. An International Space Science Institute (ISSI, of Bern, Switzerland) research team will work to empirically define current sheet properties in the solar atmosphere and their signatures in the interplanetary medium, and to understand their role in the development of solar eruptive events. The project was inspired by recently acquired ground and space based observations that reveal CS signatures at the time of flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), in the chromosphere, in the corona and in the interplanetary medium. At the same time, theoretical studies predict the formation of CSs in different models and configurations, but theories and observational results have not yet developed an interaction efficient enough to allow us to construct a unified scenario. The team will generate synergy between observers, data analysts, and theoreticians, so as to enable a significant advance in understanding of current sheet behavior and properties. A further motivation for studying CSs is related to the expected electric fields in CSs that may be the source of solar energetic particles (SEPs). The team has 14 members from Europe and the US. The first meeting is in October 2006 and the second is late in 2007.

  2. An ice sheet model validation framework for the Greenland ice sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Stephen F.; Hoffman, Matthew J.; Bonin, Jennifer A.; Howat, Ian M.; Neumann, Thomas; Saba, Jack; Tezaur, Irina; Guerber, Jeffrey; Chambers, Don P.; Evans, Katherine J.; Kennedy, Joseph H.; Lenaerts, Jan; Lipscomb, William H.; Perego, Mauro; Salinger, Andrew G.; Tuminaro, Raymond S.; van den Broeke, Michiel R.; Nowicki, Sophie M. J.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a new ice sheet model validation framework - the Cryospheric Model Comparison Tool (CmCt) - that takes advantage of ice sheet altimetry and gravimetry observations collected over the past several decades and is applied here to modeling of the Greenland ice sheet. We use realistic simulations performed with the Community Ice Sheet Model (CISM) along with two idealized, non-dynamic models to demonstrate the framework and its use. Dynamic simulations with CISM are forced from 1991 to 2013, using combinations of reanalysis-based surface mass balance and observations of outlet glacier flux change. We propose and demonstrate qualitative and quantitative metrics for use in evaluating the different model simulations against the observations. We find that the altimetry observations used here are largely ambiguous in terms of their ability to distinguish one simulation from another. Based on basin-scale and whole-ice-sheet-scale metrics, we find that simulations using both idealized conceptual models and dynamic, numerical models provide an equally reasonable representation of the ice sheet surface (mean elevation differences of digital elevation models used for model initial conditions, and biases resulting from firn dynamics, which are not explicitly accounted for in the models or observations. On the other hand, we find that the gravimetry observations used here are able to unambiguously distinguish between simulations of varying complexity, and along with the CmCt, can provide a quantitative score for assessing a particular model and/or simulation. The new framework demonstrates that our proposed metrics can distinguish relatively better from relatively worse simulations and that dynamic ice sheet models, when appropriately initialized and forced with the right boundary conditions, demonstrate a predictive skill with respect to observed dynamic changes that have occurred on Greenland over the past few decades. An extensible design will allow for continued use

  3. VESL: The Virtual Earth Sheet Laboratory for Ice Sheet Modeling and Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, D. L. C.; Larour, E. Y.; Quinn, J. D.; Halkides, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    We introduce the Virtual Earth System Laboratory (VESL), a scientific modeling and visualization tool delivered through an integrated web portal for dissemination of data, simulation of physical processes, and promotion of climate literacy. The current prototype leverages NASA's Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM), a state-of-the-art polar ice sheet dynamics model developed at the Jet Propulsion Lab and UC Irvine. We utilize the Emscripten source-to-source compiler to convert the C/C++ ISSM engine core to JavaScript, and bundled pre/post-processing JS scripts to be compatible with the existing ISSM Python/Matlab API. Researchers using VESL will be able to effectively present their work for public dissemination with little-to-no additional post-processing. This will allow for faster publication in peer-reviewed journals and adaption of results for educational applications. Through future application of this concept to multiple aspects of the Earth System, VESL has the potential to broaden data applications in the geosciences and beyond. At this stage, we seek feedback from the greater scientific and public outreach communities regarding the ease of use and feature set of VESL, as we plan its expansion, and aim to achieve more rapid communication and presentation of scientific results.

  4. Current Sheet Formation in a Conical Theta Pinch Faraday Accelerator with Radio-frequency Assisted Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Hallock, Ashley K.; Choueiri, Edgar Y.

    2008-01-01

    Data from an inductive conical theta pinch accelerator are presented to gain insight into the process of inductive current sheet formation in the presence of a preionized background gas produced by a steady-state RF-discharge. The presence of a preionized plasma has been previously shown to allow for current sheet formation at lower discharge voltages and energies than those found in other pulsed inductive accelerator concepts, leading to greater accelerator efficiencies at lower power levels. Time-resolved magnetic probe measurements are obtained for different background pressures and pulse energies to characterize the effects of these parameters on current sheet formation. Indices are defined that describe time-resolved current sheet characteristics, such as the total current owing in the current sheet, the time-integrated total current ('strength'), and current sheet velocity. It is found that for a given electric field strength, maximums in total current, strength, and velocity occur for one particular background pressure. At other pressures, these current sheet indices are considerably smaller. The trends observed in these indices are explained in terms of the principles behind Townsend breakdown that lead to a dependence on the ratio of the electric field to the background pressure. Time-integrated photographic data are also obtained at the same experimental conditions, and qualitatively they compare quite favorably with the time-resolved magnetic field data.

  5. Current and future darkening of the Greenland ice sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, Marco; Stroeve, Julienne; Fettweis, Xavier; Warren, Stephen; Doherty, Sarah; Noble, Erik; Alexander, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Surface melting over the Greenland ice sheet (GIS) promotes snow grains growth, reducing albedo and further enhancing melting through the increased amount of absorbed solar radiation. Using a combination of remote sensing data and outputs of a regional climate model, we show that albedo over the GIS decreased significantly from 1996 to 2012. Further, we show that most of this darkening can be accounted for by enhanced snow grain growth and the expansion of areas where bare ice is exposed, both of which are driven by increases in snow warming. An analysis of the impact of light-absorbing impurities on albedo trends detected from spaceborne measurements was inconclusive because the estimated impact for concentrations of impurities of order of magnitude found in Greenland is within the albedo uncertainty retrievable from space-based instruments. However, neither models nor observations show an increase in pollutants (black carbon and associated organics) in the atmosphere over the GIS in this time period. Additionally, we could not identify trends in the number of fires over North America and Russia, assumed to be among the sources of soot for Greenland. We did find that a 'dark band' of tilted ice plays a crucial role in decreasing albedo along the west margin, and there is some indication that dust deposition to the GIS may be decreasing albedo in this region but this is not conclusive. In addition to looking at the direct impact of impurities on albedo, we estimated the impact of impurities on albedo via their influence on grain growth and found it is relatively small (~ 1- 2 %), though more sophisticated analysis needs to be carried out. Projections obtained under different warming scenarios consistently point to a continued darkening, with anomalies in albedo driven solely by the effects of climate warming of as much as -0.12 along the west margin of the GIS by the end of this century (with respect to year 2000). Projected darkening is likely underestimated

  6. In situ observations of ion scale current sheet and associated electron heating in Earth's magnetosheath turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasapis, Alexandros; Retinò, Alessandro; Sahraoui, Fouad; Greco, Antonella; Vaivads, Andris; Sundkvist, David; Canu, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Magnetic reconnection occurs in thin current sheets that form in turbulent plasmas. Numerical simulations indicate that turbulent reconnection contributes to the dissipation of magnetic field energy and results in particle heating and non-thermal acceleration. Yet in situ measurements are required to determine its importance as a dissipation mechanism at those scales. The Earth's magnetosheath downstream of the quasi-parallel shock is a turbulent near-Earth environment that offers a privileged environment for such a study. Here we present a study of the properties of thin current sheets by using Cluster data. We studied the distribution of the current sheets as a function of their magnetic shear angle, the PVI index and the electron heating. The properties of the observed current sheets were different for high shear (θ > 90 degrees) and low shear current sheets (θ < 90 degrees). These high-shear current sheets account for about ˜ 20% of the total and have an average thickness comparable to the ion inertial length. Enhancement of electron temperature within these current sheets suggest that they are important for local electron heating and energy dissipation.

  7. Flapping current sheet motions in magnetotail excited by non-adiabatic ions: case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, X., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    The current sheet is a crucial region of the magnetotail, where energy reserve and release take place. The origin of the up-down motions of the current sheet, referred to as flapping motions, is among the most fundamental issues of magnetotail dynamics. Observational evidences suggest that the flapping motion is a kind of internal excited kink-like waves, but its particular propagating features such as the low phase speeds and the propagating direction from the tail center toward flanks do not match any local generation mechanisms previously established so far. Here we report observations of the current sheet flapping motions induced by non-adiabatic ions in the magnetic field configurations with a finite guiding component, whose population present periodic hemispherical asymmetries. Three type of current sheet flapping event in this paper will be discussed. This current sheet flapping phenomenon implies that the excitation mechanism of the current sheet flapping motions is a self-circulation process between the non-adiabatic ion population and the current sheet equilibrium itself.

  8. The current sheet tiled and non-adiabatic ions effect on the flapping motion in magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, XinHua

    2016-04-01

    The current sheet is a crucial region of the magnetotail, where energy reserve and release take place. The origin of the up-down motions of the current sheet, referred to as flapping motions, is among the most fundamental issues of magnetotail dynamics. Observational evidences suggest that the flapping motion is a kind of internal excited kink-like waves, but its particular propagating features such as the low phase speeds and the propagating direction from the tail center toward flanks do not match any local generation mechanisms previously established so far. Here we report observations of the current sheet flapping motions induced by non-adiabatic ions in the magnetic field configurations with a finite guiding component, whose population present periodic hemispherical asymmetries. These flapping motion current sheet cases often observed tiled. The current sheet flapping phenomenon implies that the excitation mechanism of the current sheet flapping motions is a self-circulation process between the non-adiabatic ion population and the current sheet equilibrium itself.

  9. Friction Model for FEM Simulation of Sheet Metal Forming Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keum, Y. T.; Wagoner, R. H.; Lee, J. K.

    2004-06-01

    In order to find the effect of frictional characteristics, lubricant viscosity, tool geometry, and forming speed on the sheet metal forming, a friction tester was designed and manufactured. Friction tests were performed using drawing oils, various tool radii and forming speeds for aluminum alloy sheets, galvanized steels sheets and cold rolled steel sheets. From the experimental observation, the mathematical friction model considering lubricant viscosity, sheet surface roughness and hardness, punch corner radii, and punch speed is developed. By comparing the punch load found by FEM using the proposed friction model with that of experimental measurement when the steel sheets are formed in 2-D geometry in dry and lubricating conditions, the validity and accuracy of the mathematical friction model are demonstrated.

  10. Nonlinear evolution of three-dimensional instabilities of thin and thick electron scale current sheets: Plasmoid formation and current filamentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Neeraj; Büchner, Jörg [Max Planck/Princeton Center for Plasma Physics, Göttingen (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Justus-Von-Liebig-Weg-3, Göttingen (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    Nonlinear evolution of three dimensional electron shear flow instabilities of an electron current sheet (ECS) is studied using electron-magnetohydrodynamic simulations. The dependence of the evolution on current sheet thickness is examined. For thin current sheets (half thickness =d{sub e}=c/ω{sub pe}), tearing mode instability dominates. In its nonlinear evolution, it leads to the formation of oblique current channels. Magnetic field lines form 3-D magnetic spirals. Even in the absence of initial guide field, the out-of-reconnection-plane magnetic field generated by the tearing instability itself may play the role of guide field in the growth of secondary finite-guide-field instabilities. For thicker current sheets (half thickness ∼5 d{sub e}), both tearing and non-tearing modes grow. Due to the non-tearing mode, current sheet becomes corrugated in the beginning of the evolution. In this case, tearing mode lets the magnetic field reconnect in the corrugated ECS. Later thick ECS develops filamentary structures and turbulence in which reconnection occurs. This evolution of thick ECS provides an example of reconnection in self-generated turbulence. The power spectra for both the thin and thick current sheets are anisotropic with respect to the electron flow direction. The cascade towards shorter scales occurs preferentially in the direction perpendicular to the electron flow.

  11. The origin of the warped heliospheric current sheet. Scientific technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, J.M.; Scherrer, P.H.; Hoeksema, J.T.

    1980-03-01

    The warped heliospheric current sheet in early 1976 is calculated from the observed photospheric magnetic field using a potential field method. Comparisons with measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field polarity in early 1976 obtained at several locations in the heliosphere at Helios I, Helios II, Pioneer XI and Earth show a rather detailed agreement between the computed current sheet and the observations. It appears that the large-scale structure of the warped heliospheric current sheet is determined by the structure of the photospheric magnetic field, and that 'ballerina skirt' effects may add small-scale ripples.

  12. Refreezing on the Greenland ice sheet: a model comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Christian; Reijmer, Carleen; van den Broeke, Michiel; Ligtenberg, Stefan; Kuipers Munneke, Peter; Noël, Brice

    2016-04-01

    Mass loss of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) is an important contributor to global sea level rise. Besides calving, surface melt is the dominant source of mass loss. However, only part of the surface melt leaves the ice sheet as runoff whereas the other part percolates into the snow cover and refreezes. Due to this process, part of the meltwater is (intermediately) stored. Refreezing thus impacts the surface mass balance of the ice sheet but it also affects the vertical structure of the snow cover due to transport of mass and energy. Due to the sparse availability of in situ data and the demand of future projections, it is inevitable to use numerical models to simulate refreezing and related processes. Currently, the magnitude of refrozen mass is neither well constrained nor well validated. In this study, we model the snow and firn layer, and compare refreezing on the GrIS as modelled with two different numerical models. Both models are forced with meteorological data from the regional climate model RACMO 2 that has been shown to simulate realistic conditions for Greenland. One model is the UU/IMAU firn densification model (FDM) that can be used both in an on- and offline mode with RACMO 2. The other model is SNOWPACK; a model originally designed to simulate seasonal snow cover in alpine conditions. In contrast to FDM, SNOWPACK accounts for snow metamorphism and microstructure and contains a more physically based snow densification scheme. A first comparison of the models indicates that both seem to be able to capture the general spatial and temporal pattern of refreezing. Spatially, refreezing occurs mostly in the ablation zone and decreases in the accumulation zone towards the interior of the ice sheet. Below the equilibrium line altitude (ELA) where refreezing occurs in seasonal snow cover on bare ice, the storage effect is only intermediate. Temporal patterns on a seasonal range indicate two peaks in refreezing; one at the beginning of the melt season where

  13. Generation of a new Greenland Ice Sheet Digital Elevation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, S.; Csatho, B. M.; Schenk, A. F.; Babonis, G. S.; Scambos, T. A.; Haran, T. M.; Kjaer, K. H.; Korsgaard, N. J.

    2011-12-01

    Currently available Digital Elevation Models(DEMs) of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) were originally derived from radar altimetry data, e.g. Bamber (Bamber et al., 2001) and later improved by photoclinometry to fill the regions between orbits (Scambos and Haran, 2002). The elevation error of these DEMs is a few meters in the higher part (above 2000 m) of the ice sheet, but it can be as much as 50-100 meters in marginal regions. The relatively low resolution and accuracy poses a problem, especially for ice sheet modeling. Although accurate elevation data have been collected by airborne and spaceborne laser altimetry (airborne: Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) (1993-present), Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor(LVIS) (2007,2009 and 2011); spaceborne: Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) (2003-2009)) and DEMs have been derived from stereo satellite imagery (e.g., SPOT (40 m), ASTER (15 m)), a high resolution, consistent DEM of GrIS is not yet available. This is due to various problems, such as different error sources in the data and different dates of data acquisition. In order to overcome these difficulties, we generated a multi-resolution DEM of GrIS, reflecting June 2008 conditions, by fusing a photoclinometry DEM, SPOT and ASTER DEMs as well as elevations from ICESat, ATM and LVIS laser altimetry. The new multi-resolution DEM has a resolution of 40 m x 40 m in the marginal ice sheet regions and 250 m elsewhere. The ice sheet margin is mapped from SPOT and Landsat imagery and SPOT DEMs are used to cover the complex topography of ice sheet marginal regions. The accuracy of SPOT DEMs is approximately ± 6 m except in the areas covered by clouds regions, where the SPOT elevations were replaced by ASTER DEMs. The ASTER DEMs were checked and improved by the DEM derived from aerial photography from the 1980s. A new photoclinometry DEM, derived from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery

  14. Exposure age and ice-sheet model constraints on Pliocene East Antarctic ice sheet dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Masako; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Obrochta, Stephen; Saito, Fuyuki; Moriwaki, Kiichi; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-24

    The Late Pliocene epoch is a potential analogue for future climate in a warming world. Here we reconstruct Plio-Pleistocene East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) variability using cosmogenic nuclide exposure ages and model simulations to better understand ice sheet behaviour under such warm conditions. New and previously published exposure ages indicate interior-thickening during the Pliocene. An ice sheet model with mid-Pliocene boundary conditions also results in interior thickening and suggests that both the Wilkes Subglacial and Aurora Basins largely melted, offsetting increased ice volume. Considering contributions from West Antarctica and Greenland, this is consistent with the most recent IPCC AR5 estimate, which indicates that the Pliocene sea level likely did not exceed +20 m on Milankovitch timescales. The inception of colder climate since ∼3 Myr has increased the sea ice cover and inhibited active moisture transport to Antarctica, resulting in reduced ice sheet thickness, at least in coastal areas.

  15. Automatically extracting sheet-metal features from solid model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志坚; 李建军; 王义林; 李材元; 肖祥芷

    2004-01-01

    With the development of modern industry,sheet-metal parts in mass production have been widely applied in mechanical,communication,electronics,and light industries in recent decades; but the advances in sheet-metal part design and manufacturing remain too slow compared with the increasing importance of sheet-metal parts in modern industry. This paper proposes a method for automatically extracting features from an arbitrary solid model of sheet-metal parts; whose characteristics are used for classification and graph-based representation of the sheet-metal features to extract the features embodied in a sheet-metal part. The extracting feature process can be divided for valid checking of the model geometry,feature matching,and feature relationship. Since the extracted features include abundant geometry and engineering information,they will be effective for downstream application such as feature rebuilding and stamping process planning.

  16. Automatically extracting sheet-metal features from solid model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志坚; 李建军; 王义林; 李材元; 肖祥芷

    2004-01-01

    With the development of modern industry, sheet-metal parts in mass production have been widely applied in mechanical, communication, electronics, and light industries in recent decades; but the advances in sheet-metal part design and manufacturing remain too slow compared with the increasing importance of sheet-metal parts in modern industry. This paper proposes a method for automatically extracting features from an arbitrary solid model of sheet-metal parts; whose characteristics are used for classification and graph-based representation of the sheet-metal features to extract the features embodied in a sheet-metal part. The extracting feature process can be divided for valid checking of the model geometry, feature matching, and feature relationship. Since the extracted features include abundant geometry and engineering information, they will be effective for downstream application such as feature rebuilding and stamping process planning.

  17. In Situ Observations of Ion Scale Current Sheets and Associated Electron Heating in Turbulent Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasapis, A.; Retino, A.; Sahraoui, F.; Greco, A.; Vaivads, A.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Sundkvist, D. J.; Canu, P.

    2014-12-01

    We present a statistical study of ion-scale current sheets in turbulent space plasma. The study was performed using in situ measurements from the Earth's magnetosheath downstream of the quasi-parallel shock. Intermittent structures were identified using the Partial Variance of Increments method. We studied the distribution of the identified structures as a function of their magnetic shear angle, the PVI index and the electron heating. The properties of the observed current sheets were different for high (>3) and low (3) structures that accounted for ~20% of the total. Those current sheets have high magnetic shear (>90 degrees) and were observed mostly in close proximity to the bow shock with their numbers reducing towards the magnetopause. Enhancement of the estimated electron temperature within these current sheets suggest that they are important for local electron heating and energy dissipation.

  18. LASCO White-Light Observations of Eruptive Current Sheets Trailing CMEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, David F.; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2016-12-01

    Many models of eruptive flares or coronal mass ejections (CMEs) involve formation of a current sheet connecting the ejecting CME flux rope with a magnetic loop arcade. However, there is very limited observational information on the properties and evolution of these structures, hindering progress in understanding eruptive activity from the Sun. In white-light images, narrow coaxial rays trailing the outward-moving CME have been interpreted as current sheets. Here, we undertake the most comprehensive statistical study of CME-rays to date. We use SOHO/LASCO data, which have a higher cadence, larger field of view, and better sensitivity than any previous coronagraph. We compare our results to a previous study of Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) CMEs, in 1984 - 1989, having candidate magnetic disconnection features at the CME base, about half of which were followed by coaxial bright rays. We examine all LASCO CMEs during two periods of minimum and maximum activity in Solar Cycle 23, resulting in many more events, ˜130 CME-rays, than during SMM. Important results include: The occurrence rate of the rays is ˜11 % of all CMEs during solar minimum, but decreases to ˜7 % at solar maximum; this is most likely related to the more complex coronal background. The rays appear on average 3 - 4 hours after the CME core, and are typically visible for three-fourths of a day. The mean observed current sheet length over the ray lifetime is ˜12 R_{⊙}, with the longest current sheet of 18.5 R_{⊙}. The mean CS growth rates are 188 km s^{-1} at minimum and 324 km s^{-1} at maximum. Outward-moving blobs within several rays, which are indicative of reconnection outflows, have average velocities of ˜350 km s^{-1} with small positive accelerations. A pre-existing streamer is blown out in most of the CME-ray events, but half of these are observed to reform within ˜1 day. The long lifetime and long lengths of the CME-rays challenge our current understanding of the evolution of the magnetic

  19. Dynamo-driven plasmoid formation from a current-sheet instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, F.

    2016-12-01

    Axisymmetric current-carrying plasmoids are formed in the presence of nonaxisymmetric fluctuations during nonlinear three-dimensional resistive MHD simulations in a global toroidal geometry. We utilize the helicity injection technique to form an initial poloidal flux in the presence of a toroidal guide field. As helicity is injected, two types of current sheets are formed from (1) the oppositely directed field lines in the injector region (primary reconnecting current sheet), and (2) the poloidal flux compression near the plasma edge (edge current sheet). We first find that nonaxisymmetric fluctuations arising from the current-sheet instability isolated near the plasma edge have tearing parity but can nevertheless grow fast (on the poloidal Alfven time scale). These modes saturate by breaking up the current sheet. Second, for the first time, a dynamo poloidal flux amplification is observed at the reconnection site (in the region of the oppositely directed magnetic field). This fluctuation-induced flux amplification increases the local Lundquist number, which then triggers a plasmoid instability and breaks the primary current sheet at the reconnection site. The plasmoids formation driven by large-scale flux amplification, i.e., a large-scale dynamo, observed here has strong implications for astrophysical reconnection as well as fast reconnection events in laboratory plasmas.

  20. The role of oxygen ions in the formation of a bifurcated current sheet in the magnetotail

    CERN Document Server

    Dalena, S; Zimbardo, G; Veltri, P

    2010-01-01

    Cluster observations in the near-Earth magnetotail have shown that sometimes the current sheet is bifurcated, i.e. it is divided in two layers. The influence of magnetic turbulence on ion motion in this region is investigated by numerical simulation, taking into account the presence of both protons and oxygen ions. The magnetotail current sheet is modeled as a magnetic field reversal with a normal magnetic field component $B_n$, plus a three-dimensional spectrum of magnetic fluctuations $\\delta {\\bf B}$, which represents the observed magnetic turbulence. The dawn-dusk electric field E$_y$ is also included. A test particle simulation is performed using different values of $\\delta {\\bf B}$, E$_y$ and injecting two different species of particles, O$^+$ ions and protons. O$^+$ ions can support the formation of a double current layer both in the absence and for large values of magnetic fluctuations ($\\delta B/B_0 = 0.0$ and $\\delta B/B_0 \\geq 0.4$, where B$_0$ is the constant magnetic field in the magnetospheric l...

  1. Observational Study on Current Sheet of Magnetic Reconnection in Two Solar Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang-wei, Cai; Ning, Wu; Jun, Lin

    2016-07-01

    The coronal magnetic configuration behind coronal mass ejections (CMEs) can commonly be stretched severely, thus to push the magnetic fields with opposite polarities to approach each other, and to form a current sheet of magnetic reconnection. The current sheet in solar eruptions is not only an important region to convert the magnetic free energy into thermal energy, plasma kinetic energy, and energetic particle beams, but also plays a role to connect CMEs and flares. In the CME events of 2003 January 3 and 2003 November 4, the development of current sheet has been observed in both cases. We have investigated the dynamic features and physical properties of current sheet in the two events, based on the data of LASCO (Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph) and UVCS (Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer) on board of SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory), and the Hα data from BBSO (Big Bear Solar Observatory) and YNAO (Yunnan Astronomical Observatory). The existence of ions with a high degree of ionization, such as Fe+17 and Si+11, indicates a high temperature up to 3×106 ∼5×106 K in the region of current sheet. A direct measurement shows that the thickness of current sheet varies between 1.3×104 and 1.1×105 km, which increases first and then decreases with time. Using the CHIANTI code (v.7.1), we have further calculated the average values of electron temperature and corresponding emission measure (EM) respectively to be 3.86×106 K and 6.1×1024 cm-5 in the current sheet of the 2003 January 3 event. We also find that the current sheet twisted forth and back quasi-periodically during the eruption event on 2003 November 4 by analyzing the observational data from SOHO/UVCS.

  2. Properties and Distribution of Current Sheets in Accretion Disk Coronae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvesen, Greg; Begelman, M. C.; Simon, J. B.; Beckwith, K.

    2013-04-01

    Theoretical models involving the interplay of a geometrically thin, optically thick accretion disk embedded in an extended coronal atmosphere may describe black hole X-ray binaries across all spectral states. Buoyant magnetic field generated in the accretion disk is continuously supplied to the corona by a dynamo process driven by the magnetorotational instability. This rising field leads to the formation of a magnetic pressure-dominated, low-density, geometrically thick corona where substantial accretion energy is dissipated, likely by collisionless magnetic reconnection, perhaps even generating outflows. Despite the potential importance of magnetic reconnection in shaping the energetics and kinematics of the corona, studies of multiple reconnection sites in a large volume are currently prohibited by the computational expense required to properly treat the microphysical nature of reconnection. Under the assumption that coronal structure is determined by ideal magnetohydrodynamics, we analyze local simulations of accretion disks (i.e., shearing boxes) performed with the ATHENA code, where the spatial domains are extended to capture 'mesoscale' structures that are dynamically important in accretion disk evolution. We employ a location routine to identify zones of enhanced current density, which trace likely sites of magnetic reconnection. We describe the positions, orientations, sizes, shapes, strengths, and kinematics of these regions and correlate them with the spatial distribution of numerical dissipation. Statistical distributions of these various properties of current density zones are presented to determine the heights within the corona that contribute most to the dissipation rate, the flow properties associated with reconnection sites, and representative parameters for future large volume reconnection simulations.

  3. Modeling sheet-flow sand transport under progressive surface waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, W.M.

    2013-01-01

    In the near-shore zone, energetic sea waves generate sheet-flow sand transport. In present day coastal models, wave-induced sheet-flow sand transport rates are usually predicted with semi-empirical transport formulas, based on extensive research on this phenomenon in oscillatory flow tunnels. Howeve

  4. Current sheet formation and non-ideal behaviour at three-dimensional magnetic null points

    CERN Document Server

    Pontin, D I; Galsgaard, K

    2007-01-01

    The nature of the evolution of the magnetic field, and of current sheet formation, at three-dimensional (3D) magnetic null points is investigated. A kinematic example is presented which demonstrates that there is no possible choice of boundary conditions which renders the evolution of the field ideal at the null, when the ratios of the null eigenvalues are time-dependent. Resistive MHD simulations are described which demonstrate that this evolution is generic. A 3D null is subjected to boundary driving by shearing motions, and it is shown that a current sheet localised at the null is formed. The qualitative and quantitative properties of the current sheet are discussed. Accompanying the sheet development is the growth of a localised parallel electric field, one of the signatures of magnetic reconnection. Finally, the relevance of the results to a recent theory of turbulent reconnection are discussed.

  5. Numerical Modelling of Electric Conductance of a thin Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojmir Kollar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the numeric modelling of total resistance of a thin sheet, with local conductivity in randomlydistributed grains higher then is that of the basic matrix, is presented. The 2D model is formed by a structure of longitudinaland transversal conductors interconnected in nodes of a square net. In all nodes, using iteration procedure, the potential isdetermined from which the conductance of sheet is computed between two touching electrodes. The described model can beused to imitate the behaviour of heterogeneous thin conducting sheets prepared by different techniques. The model wasverified in some cases where the net resistance is well known from the theory.

  6. A Two-Fluid Study of Oblique Tearing Modes in a Force-Free Current Sheet

    CERN Document Server

    Akcay, Cihan; Lukin, Vyacheslav S; Liu, Yi-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic simulations have demonstrated that three-dimensional reconnection in collisionless regimes proceeds through the formation and interaction of magnetic flux ropes, which are generated due to the growth of tearing instabilities at multiple resonance surfaces. Since kinetic simulations are intrinsically expensive, it is desirable to explore the feasibility of reduced two-fluid models to capture this complex evolution, particularly, in the strong guide field regime, where two-fluid models are better justified. With this goal in mind, this paper compares the evolution of the collisionless tearing instability in a force-free current sheet with a two-fluid model and fully kinetic simulations. Our results indicate that the most unstable modes are oblique for guide fields larger than the reconnecting field, in agreement with the kinetic results. The standard two-fluid tearing theory is extended to address the tearing instability at oblique angles. The resulting theory yields a flat oblique spectrum and underest...

  7. Greenland Ice Sheet Mass Loss from GRACE Monthly Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Louise Sandberg; Forsberg, René

    2010-01-01

    model ICE-5G and on ground measurements made in Scandinavia. We find that the PGR signal corresponds to a mass change signal of approximately -4 Gt per year. We conclude that there are large differences between these estimated mass change models. We find a total mass loss of 189, 146 and 67 Gt......The Greenland ice sheet is currently experiencing a net mass loss. There are however large discrepancies between the published qualitative mass loss estimates, based on different data sets and methods. There are even large differences between the results based on the same data sources...... these monthly global gravity models, we first calculate the gravity trend from these. When isolating the gravity trend signal, which is caused by the ice mass change, we first subtract the signal produced by the postglacial rebound (PGR) in Greenland. This is done by a simple method based on the ice history...

  8. Mercury's cross-tail current sheet: Structure, X-line location and stress balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Gangkai; Slavin, James A.; Jia, Xianzhe; Raines, Jim M.; Imber, Suzanne M.; Sun, Wei-Jie; Gershman, Daniel J.; DiBraccio, Gina A.; Genestreti, Kevin J.; Smith, Andy W.

    2017-01-01

    The structure, X-line location, and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stress balance of Mercury's magnetotail were examined between -2.6 MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) measurements from 319 central plasma sheet (CPS) crossings. The mean plasma β in the CPS calculated from MESSENGER data is 6. The CPS magnetic field was southward (i.e., tailward of X-line) 2-18% of the time. Extrapolation of downtail variations in BZ indicates an average X-line location at -3 RM. Modeling of magnetic field measurements produced a cross-tail current sheet (CS) thickness, current density, and inner CS edge location of 0.39 RM, 92 nA/m2 and -1.22 RM, respectively. Application of MHD stress balance suggests that heavy planetary ions may be important in maintaining stress balance within Mercury's CPS. Qualitative similarities between Mercury's and Earth's magnetotail are remarkable given the differences in upstream conditions, internal plasma composition, finite gyro-radius scaling, and Mercury's lack of ionosphere.

  9. Streaming sausage, kink and tearing instabilities in a current sheet with applications to the earth's magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, L. C.; Wang, S.; Wei, C. Q.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1988-01-01

    This paper investigates the growth rates and eigenmode structures of the streaming sausage, kink, and tearing instabilities in a current sheet with a super-Alfvenic flow. The growth rates and eigenmode structures are first considered in the ideal incompressible limit by using a four-layer model, as well as a more realistic case in which all plasma parameters and the magnetic field vary continuously along the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field and plasma flow. An initial-value method is applied to obtain the growth rate and eigenmode profiles of the fastest growing mode, which is either the sausage mode or kink mode. It is shown that, in the earth's magnetotail, where super-Alfvenic plasma flows are observed in the plasma sheet and the ratio between the plasma and magnetic pressures far away from the current layer is about 0.1-0.3 in the lobes, the streaming sausage and streaming tearing instabilities, but not kink modes, are likely to occur.

  10. Chaotic scattering of pitch angles in the current sheet of the magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, G. R.; Chen, J.

    1992-01-01

    The modified Harris field model is used to investigate the process of pitch angle scattering by a current sheet. The relationship between the incoming asymptotic pitch angle alpha(in) and the outgoing asymptotic pitch angle alpha(out) is studied from first principles by numerically integrating the equation of motion. Evidence that charged particles undergo chaotic scattering by the current sheet is found. For fixed alpha(in), it is shown that alpha(out) exhibits sensitive dependence on the energy parameter in certain energy ranges. For a fixed energy parameter value in the same energy ranges, alpha(out) sensitively depends on alpha(in). For other energy values, alpha(out) does not show sensitive dependence on alpha(in) for most phase angles. A distribution of alpha(in) is mapped from the asymptotic region to the midplane, and it is found that the resulting particle distribution should have beam structures with well-collimated pitch angles near each resonance energy value. Implications for the particle distribution functions in the earth's magnetotail are discussed.

  11. Streaming sausage, kink and tearing instabilities in a current sheet with applications to the earth's magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, L. C.; Wang, S.; Wei, C. Q.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1988-01-01

    This paper investigates the growth rates and eigenmode structures of the streaming sausage, kink, and tearing instabilities in a current sheet with a super-Alfvenic flow. The growth rates and eigenmode structures are first considered in the ideal incompressible limit by using a four-layer model, as well as a more realistic case in which all plasma parameters and the magnetic field vary continuously along the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field and plasma flow. An initial-value method is applied to obtain the growth rate and eigenmode profiles of the fastest growing mode, which is either the sausage mode or kink mode. It is shown that, in the earth's magnetotail, where super-Alfvenic plasma flows are observed in the plasma sheet and the ratio between the plasma and magnetic pressures far away from the current layer is about 0.1-0.3 in the lobes, the streaming sausage and streaming tearing instabilities, but not kink modes, are likely to occur.

  12. Field reversing magnetotail current sheets: earth, Venus, and Comet Giacobini-Zinner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McComas, D.J.

    1986-09-01

    This dissertation examines the field reversing magnetotail current sheets at the earth, Venus, and Comet Giacobini-Zinner. In the near earth study a new analysis technique is developed to calculate the detailed current density distributions within the cross tail current sheet for the first time. This technique removes the effects of a variable sheet velocity by inverting intersatellite timings between the co-orbiting satellites ISEE-1 and -2. Case studies of three relatively geomagnetically quiet crossings are made; sheet thicknesses and peak current densities are approx.1-5 x 10/sup 4/ km and approx.5-50 nA/m/sup 2/. Current density distributions reveal a high density central region, lower density shoulders, and considerable fine structure throughout. In the Venus study another new analysis technique is developed to reconstruct the average tail configuration from a correlation between field magnitude and draping angle in a large statistical data set. In the comet study, high resolution magnetic field and plasma electron data from the ICE traversal of Giacobini-Zinner are combined for the first time to determine the tail/current sheet geometry and calculate certain important but unmeasured local ion and upstream properties. Pressure balance across the tail gives ion temperatures and betas of approx.1.2 x 10/sup 5/ K and approx.40 in the center of the current sheet to approx.1 x 10/sup 6/ K and approx.3 in the outer lobes. Axial stress balance shows that the velocity shear upstream near the nucleus is >6 (approx.1 at ICE), and that a region of strongly enhanced mass loading (ion source rate approx.24 times that upstream from lobes) exists upstream from the current sheet. The integrated downtail mass flux is approx.2.6 x 10/sup 26/ H/sub 2/O+/sec, which is only approx.1% of the independently determined total cometary efflux. 79 refs., 37 figs.

  13. Surface Energy and Mass Balance Model for Greenland Ice Sheet and Future Projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojian

    The Greenland Ice Sheet contains nearly 3 million cubic kilometers of glacial ice. If the entire ice sheet completely melted, sea level would raise by nearly 7 meters. There is thus considerable interest in monitoring the mass balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Each year, the ice sheet gains ice from snowfall and loses ice through iceberg calving and surface melting. In this thesis, we develop, validate and apply a physics based numerical model to estimate current and future surface mass balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet. The numerical model consists of a coupled surface energy balance and englacial model that is simple enough that it can be used for long time scale model runs, but unlike previous empirical parameterizations, has a physical basis. The surface energy balance model predicts ice sheet surface temperature and melt production. The englacial model predicts the evolution of temperature and meltwater within the ice sheet. These two models can be combined with estimates of precipitation (snowfall) to estimate the mass balance over the Greenland Ice Sheet. We first compare model performance with in-situ observations to demonstrate that the model works well. We next evaluate how predictions are degraded when we statistically downscale global climate data. We find that a simple, nearest neighbor interpolation scheme with a lapse rate correction is able to adequately reproduce melt patterns on the Greenland Ice Sheet. These results are comparable to those obtained using empirical Positive Degree Day (PDD) methods. Having validated the model, we next drove the ice sheet model using the suite of atmospheric model runs available through the CMIP5 atmospheric model inter-comparison, which in turn built upon the RCP 8.5 (business as usual) scenarios. From this exercise we predict how much surface melt production will increase in the coming century. This results in 4-10 cm sea level equivalent, depending on the CMIP5 models. Finally, we try to bound melt water

  14. A Tailward Moving Current Sheet Normal Magnetic Field Front Followed by an Earthward Moving Dipolarization Front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, K.-J.; Goldstein, M. L.; Moore, T. E.; Walsh, B. M.; Baishev, D. G.; Moiseyev, A. V.; Shevtsov, B. M.; Yumoto, K.

    2014-01-01

    A case study is presented using measurements from the Cluster spacecraft and ground-based magnetometers that show a substorm onset propagating from the inner to outer plasma sheet. On 3 October 2005, Cluster, traversing an ion-scale current sheet at the near-Earth plasma sheet, detected a sudden enhancement of Bz, which was immediately followed by a series of flux rope structures. Both the local Bz enhancement and flux ropes propagated tailward. Approximately 5 min later, another Bz enhancement, followed by a large density decrease, was observed to rapidly propagate earthward. Between the two Bz enhancements, a significant removal of magnetic flux occurred, possibly resulting from the tailward moving Bz enhancement and flux ropes. In our scenario, this flux removal caused the magnetotail to be globally stretched so that the thinnest sheet formed tailward of Cluster. The thinned current sheet facilitated magnetic reconnection that quickly evolved from plasma sheet to lobe and generated the later earthward moving dipolarization front (DF) followed by a reduction in density and entropy. Ground magnetograms located near the meridian of Cluster's magnetic foot points show two-step bay enhancements. The positive bay associated with the first Bz enhancement indicates that the substorm onset signatures propagated from the inner to the outer plasma sheet, consistent with the Cluster observation. The more intense bay features associated with the later DF are consistent with the earthward motion of the front. The event suggests that current disruption signatures that originated in the near-Earth current sheet propagated tailward, triggering or facilitating midtail reconnection, thereby preconditioning the magnetosphere for a later strong substorm enhancement.

  15. Present and future changes of ice sheets in a coupled ice sheet-climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapsch, Marie; Ziemen, Florian; Mikolajewicz, Uwe

    2017-04-01

    The future evolution of the ice sheets covering Greenland and Antarctica is of importance, as ice sheets hold more than 99% of the Earths' freshwater. If released into the oceans, this freshwater could significantly impact the global climate, most prominently the oceanic overturning circulation and the sea-level. To model past and future climate change it is therefore important to integrate ice sheet models (ISMs) into state-of-the-art Earth System Models (ESMs), in order to account for the full range of feedback processes between ice sheets and other climate components. However, the coupling of ISMs into ESMs remains challenging, especially due to the required downscaling of the surface mass balance (SMB) from the low resolution atmospheric grid of the ESM onto the high resolution ice sheet topography. Here we present results from model simulations with the Max Planck Institute ESM (MPI-ESM) coupled to the Parallel ISM (PISM; http://www.pism-docs.org). To bridge the gap between the different model resolutions of the atmospheric component of MPI-ESM and PISM a sophisticated energy balance model (EBM) is used to calculate and downscale the SMB. The modeled SMB for present-day climate conditions shows good agreement with SMB reconstructions from regional climate modeling (e.g. RACMO, MAR). To estimate the effect of different downscaling methods, simulations performed with the EBM are compared to simulations that use a commonly applied positive degree day approach. These comparisons are shown for simulations with present day as well as increasing greenhouse gas concentrations.

  16. Numerical study of magnetic reconnection process near in- terplanetary current sheet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The third order accurate upwind compact difference scheme has been applied to the numerical study of the magnetic reconnection process possibly occurring near the interplanetary current sheet, under the framework of the two-dimensional compressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Our results here show that the driven reconnection near the current sheet can occur within 10-30 min for the interplanetary high magnetic Reynolds number, RM =2 000-10 000, the stable magnetic reconnection structure can be formed in hour-order of magnitude, and there are some ba- sic properties such as the multiple X-line reconnections, vortical velocity structures, filament current systems, split-ting and collapse of the high-density plasma bulk. These results are helpful in understanding and identifying the magnetic reconnection phenomena near the interplanetary current sheets.

  17. Investigation of scaling properties of a thin current sheet by means of particle trajectories study

    CERN Document Server

    Sasunov, Yu L; Alexeev, I I; Belenkaya, E S; Semenov, V S; Kubyshkin, I V; Mingalev, O V

    2015-01-01

    A thin current sheet (TCS), with the width of an order of thermal proton gyroradius, appears a fundamental physical object which plays an important role in structuring of major magnetospheric current systems (magnetotail, magnetodisk, etc.). The TCSs are nowadays under extensive study by means of space missions and theoretical models. We consider a simple model of the TCS separating two half-spaces occupied by a homogenous magnetic field of opposite sign tangential to the TCS; a small normal component of the magnetic field is prescribed. An analytical solution for the electric current and plasma density in the close vicinity of the TCS has been obtained and compared with numerical simulation. The number density and the electric current profiles have two maxima each. The characteristic spatial scale $z_S$ of the maxima location was investigated as a function of initial pitch-angle of an incoming charge particle. The effect of the thermal dispersion of the incoming proton beam have been taken into consideration...

  18. Collisionless reconnection: Mechanism of self-ignition in thin current sheets

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The spontaneous onset of magnetic reconnection in thin plane collisionless current sheets is shown to result from a thermal-anisotropy driven non-relativistic magnetic electron Weibel-mode, generating seed-magnetic field X-points in the centre of the current layer. The proposed mechanism is of larger generality. It also works in the presence of magnetic guide fields.

  19. Collisionless reconnection: Mechanism of self-ignition in thin current sheets

    CERN Document Server

    Treumann, R A; Baumjohann, W

    2010-01-01

    The spontaneous onset of magnetic reconnection in thin collisionless current sheets is shown to result from a thermal-anisotropy driven magnetic Weibel-mode, generating seed-magnetic field {\\sf X}-points in the centre of the current layer.

  20. Collisionless reconnection: mechanism of self-ignition in thin plane homogeneous current sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treumann, R. A.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.

    2010-10-01

    The spontaneous onset of magnetic reconnection in thin plane collisionless current sheets is shown to result from a thermal-anisotropy driven non-relativistic magnetic electron Weibel-mode, generating seed-magnetic field X-points in the centre of the current layer. The proposed mechanism is of larger generality. It also works in the presence of magnetic guide fields.

  1. Properties of current sheet thinning at x ˜- 10 to -12 RE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Angelopoulos, V.; Runov, A.; Petrokovich, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    We report on Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) observations of current sheet thinning in Earth's magnetotail at around x =- 10 to -12 Earth radii. The THEMIS spacecraft configuration in October-December 2015 allows us to construct both gradients that contribute to the cross-tail current density jy=μ0-1(∂Bx/∂z-∂Bz/∂x) (GSM coordinates). For 17 events when the spacecraft observed a gradual Bz decrease and jy increase, we find the following average scaling relations: for the current density jy˜Bz-7/4, for the lobe magnetic field BL˜Bz-1/4, and for the plasma density ni˜Bz-3/4. We show that the temperature of ions and electrons decreases and the plasma pressure gradient ∂p/∂x rapidly increases during current sheet thinning. The scale Lx=(∂lnp/∂x)-1 decreases a few thousand kilometers. We also consider current carriers in thinning current sheets: both ion and electron current-dominated current sheets, preferentially located near dusk and midnight, respectively, are found.

  2. Detection of thin current sheets and associated reconnection in the Earth's turbulent magnetosheath using cluster multi-point measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasapis, Alexandros; Retino, Alessandro; Sahraoui, Fouad; Greco, Antonella; Vaivads, Andris; Sundkvist, David; Canu, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic reconnection occurs in turbulent plasma within a large number of volume-filling thin current sheets and is one major candidate for energy dissipation of turbulent plasma. Such dissipation results in particle heating and non-thermal particle acceleration. In situ observations are needed to study the detailed properties of thin current sheets and associated reconnection, in order to determine its importance as a dissipation mechanism at small scales. In particular, multi-point measurements are crucial to unambiguously identify spatial scales (e.g current sheet thickness) and estimate key quantities such as E*J. Here we present a study of the properties of thin current sheets detected in the Earths magnetosheath downstream of the quasi-parallel shock by using Cluster spacecraft data. The current sheets were detected by the rotation of the magnetic field as computed by four-point measurements. We study the distribution of current sheets as a function of the magnetic shear angle θ, their duration and the waiting time between consecutive current sheets. We found that high shear (θ > 90 degrees) current sheets show different properties with respect to low shear current sheets (θ < 90 degrees). These high-shear current sheets account for about ˜ 20% of the total and have an average thickness comparable to the ion inertial length. We also compare our four-point detection method with other single-point methods (e.g. Partial Variance of Increments - PVI) and we discuss the results of such comparison.

  3. The generation of rapid solar flare hard X-ray and microwave fluctuations in current sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    The generation of rapid fluctuations, or spikes, in hard X-ray and microwave bursts via the disruption of electron heating and acceleration in current sheets is studied. It is found that 20 msec hard X-ray fluctuations can be thermally generated in a current sheet if the resistivity in the sheet is highly anomalous, the plasma density in the emitting region is relatively high, and the volume of the emitting region is greater than that of the current sheet. A specific mechanism for producing the fluctuations, involving heating in the presence of ion acoustic turbulence and a constant driving electric field, and interruption of the heating by a strong two-stream instability, is discussed. Variations upon this mechanism are also discussed. This mechanism also modulates electron acceleration, as required for the microwave spike emission. If the hard X-ray emission at energies less than approx. 1000 keV is nonthermal bremsstrahlung, the coherent modulation of electron acceleration in a large number of current sheets is required.

  4. Thin current sheets caused by plasma flow gradients in space plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickeler, D.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2011-12-01

    To understand complex space plasma systems like the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling, we need to have a good knowledge of the slowly evolving equilibrium state. The slow change of external constraints on the system (for example boundary conditions or other external parameters) lead in many cases to the formation of current sheets. These current sheets can trigger micro-instabilities, which cause resistivity on fluid scales. Consequently resistive instabilities like magnetic reconnection can occur and the systems evolves dynamically. Therefore such a picture of quasi-magneto-hydro-static changes can explain the quasy-static phase of many space plasma before an eruption occurs. Within this work we extend the theory by the inclusion of a nonlinear stationary plasma flows. Our analysis shows that stationary plasma flows with strong flow gradients (for example the solar wind magnetosphere coupling) can be responsible for the existence or generation of current sheets.

  5. Generation of a new Greenland Ice Sheet Digital Elevation Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagarajan, Sudhagar; Csatho, Beata M; Schenk, Anton F

    Currently available Digital Elevation Models(DEMs) of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) were originally derived from radar altimetry data, e.g. Bamber (Bamber et al., 2001) and later improved by photoclinometry to fill the regions between orbits (Scambos and Haran, 2002). The elevation error...... m)), a high resolution, consistent DEM of GrIS is not yet available. This is due to various problems, such as different error sources in the data and different dates of data acquisition. In order to overcome these difficulties, we generated a multi-resolution DEM of GrIS, reflecting June 2008...... in an updated DEM. Finally, all elevations were corrected using elevation changes determined by SERAC (Surface Elevation Reconstruction And Change detection), to achieve a common reference date. Airborne laser altimetry elevations are used to evaluate the accuracy of the new GrIS DEM....

  6. Coupling of climate models and ice sheet models by surface mass balance gradients: application to the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Helsen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available It is notoriously difficult to couple surface mass balance (SMB results from climate models to the changing geometry of an ice sheet model. This problem is traditionally avoided by using only accumulation from a climate model, and parameterizing the meltwater run-off as a function of temperature, which is often related to surface elevation (Hs. In this study, we propose a new strategy to calculate SMB, to allow a direct adjustment of SMB to a change in ice sheet topography and/or a change in climate forcing. This method is based on elevational gradients in the SMB field as computed by a regional climate model. Separate linear relations are derived for ablation and accumulation, using pairs of Hs and SMB within a minimum search radius. The continuously adjusting SMB forcing is consistent with climate model forcing fields, also for initially non-glaciated areas in the peripheral areas of an ice sheet. When applied to an asynchronous coupled ice sheet – climate model setup, this method circumvents traditional temperature lapse rate assumptions. Here we apply it to the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS. Experiments using both steady-state forcing and glacial-interglacial forcing result in realistic ice sheet reconstructions.

  7. Spontaneous current sheets in magnetic fields with applications to stellar X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Eugene N

    1994-01-01

    Expanding upon the ideas first proposed in his seminal book Cosmical Magnetic Fields, Eugene N. Parker here offers the first in-depth treatment of the magnetohydrodynamic theory of spontaneous magnetic discontinuities. In detailing his theory of the spontaneous formation of tangential discontinuities (current sheets) in a magnetic field embedded in highly conducting plasma, Parker shows how it can be used to explain the activity of the external magnetic fields of planets, stars, interstellar gas clouds, and galaxies, as well as the magnetic fields in laboratory plasmas. Provocative and fascinating, Spontaneous Current Sheets in Magnetic Fields presents a bold new theory that will excite interest and discussion throughout the space physics community.

  8. Modelling heterogeneous meltwater percolation on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligtenberg, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) has experienced an increase of surface meltwater production over the last decades, with the latest record set in the summer of 2012. For current and future ice sheet mass balance assessments, it is important to quantify what part of this meltwater reaches the ocean and contributes to sea level change. Meltwater produced at the surface has several options: it can infiltrate the local firn pack, where it is either stored temporarily or refrozen, or it can run off along the surface or via en-glacial drainage systems. In this study, we focus on the first; more specifically, in which manner meltwater percolates the firn column. Over the past years, GrIS research has shown that meltwater does not infiltrate the firn pack homogeneously (i.e. matrix flow), but that inhomogeneities in horizontal firn layers causes preferential flow paths for meltwater (i.e. piping). Although this process has been observed and studied on a few isolated sites, it has never been examined on the entire GrIS. To do so, we use the firn model IMAU-FDM with new parameterizations for preferential flow, impermeable ice lenses and sub-surface runoff. At the surface, IMAU-FDM is forced with realistic climate data from the regional climate model RACMO2.3. The model results are evaluated with temperatures and density measurements from firn cores across the GrIS. By allowing for heterogeneous meltwater percolation, the model is able to store heat and mass much deeper in the firn column. This is, however, in part counteracted by the inclusion of impermeability of ice lenses, which causes part of the meltwater to run off horizontally.

  9. The effect of wall friction on the current-sheet speed of a magnetically driven shock tube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, C.T.

    1971-01-01

    The effect of wall friction on the current-sheet speed is examined by taking some plausible forms of the friction into consideration. The analysis shows that the current-sheet always attains a steady state regardless of the types of friction concerned. It further shows that the experimentally...... observed velocity limitation of the current-sheet at discharge conditions of high voltage and low pressure might be attributed to a friction drag varying linearly with the driving current and the current-sheet speed....

  10. "Ideally" unstable current sheets and the triggering of fast magnetic reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Tenerani, Anna; Pucci, Fulvia; Landi, Simone; Rappazzo, Antonio Franco

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is thought to be the dynamical mechanism underlying many explosive phenomena observed both in space and in the laboratory, though the question of how fast magnetic reconnection is triggered in such high Lundquist ($S$) number plasmas has remained elusive. It has been well established that reconnection can develop over timescales faster than those predicted traditionally once kinetic scales are reached. It has also been shown that, within the framework of resistive Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), fast reconnection is achieved for thin enough sheets via the onset of the so-called plasmoid instability. The latter was discovered in studies specifically devoted to the Sweet-Parker current sheet, either as an initial condition or an apparent transient state developing in nonlinear studies. On the other hand, a fast tearing instability can grow on an ideal, i.e., $S$-independent, timescale (dubbed "ideal" tearing) within current sheets whose aspect ratio scales with the macroscopic Lundquist number...

  11. Laboratory Investigations of Current Sheets at the Electron Skin Depth Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincena, S.; Gekelman, W.

    2005-12-01

    Laboratory Investigations of Current Sheets at the Electron Skin Depth Scale. Theoretical investigations, in situ spacecraft and rocket missions, and laboratory studies form an essential triad for understanding the variety of current sheet phenomena found in space plasmas. In the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA, the formation dynamics, equilibrium state, and wave-mediated disruptions of current sheets can be studied with great spatial and temporal resolution using a variety of probes as well as non-invasive laser induced fluorescence and other optical diagnostics. The LAPD is aptly suited for studying current sheets flowing in a magnetized background plasma which is capable of supporting Alfvén waves. The cylindrical device is 20m long and one meter in diameter with a solenoidal magnetic field as high as 3000 Gauss. For the parameters in this experiment, the plasma column is ten shear Alfvén wavelengths along the field and 100 electron inertial lengths (δe) (or 200 ρi) in the perpendicular direction. An electron current sheet is created in the plasma by placing a thin copper plate in the plasma column at one end of the device and pulsing this plate positive with respect to the chamber wall. The current sheet extends for the length of the device and has an initial cross-field size of roughly 45 δe by 0.5δe. A parallel flow of ions is observed with similar dimensions and moves in the same direction as the electrons in the current sheet with a velocity of 0.2 times the ion sound speed. A much weaker sheared perpendicular flow is also measured. Cross-sections of the ion flow are measured at several axial locations over a distance of six meters. Second, as the ion flow increases in magnitude, a much broader (8ρi) density depletion (n=0.25nO) develops around the flow. The gradient scale length of the depletion shortens until the spontaneous growth of drift waves occurs. This disrupts the electron current and ion flow, and leads to cross-field transport of

  12. Light manipulation with flat and conformal inhomogeneous dispersive impedance sheets: an efficient FDTD modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafar-Zanjani, Samad; Cheng, Jierong; Mosallaei, Hossein

    2016-04-10

    An efficient auxiliary differential equation method for incorporating 2D inhomogeneous dispersive impedance sheets in the finite-difference time-domain solver is presented. This unique proposed method can successfully solve optical problems of current interest involving 2D sheets. It eliminates the need for ultrafine meshing in the thickness direction, resulting in a significant reduction of computation time and memory requirements. We apply the method to characterize a novel broad-beam leaky-wave antenna created by cascading three sinusoidally modulated reactance surfaces and also to study the effect of curvature on the radiation characteristic of a conformal impedance sheet holographic antenna. Considerable improvement in the simulation time based on our technique in comparison with the traditional volumetric model is reported. Both applications are of great interest in the field of antennas and 2D sheets.

  13. Instability of current sheets with a localized accumulation of magnetic flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, P. L.

    2015-06-01

    The longstanding problem of whether a current sheet with curved magnetic field lines associated with a small "normal" Bz component is stable is investigated using two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations, employing closed boundary conditions analogous to those normally assumed in energy principle calculations. Energy principle arguments [Sitnov and Schindler, Geophys. Res. Lett. 37, L08102 (2010)] have suggested that an accumulation of magnetic flux at the tailward end of a thin current sheet could produce a tearing instability. Two classes of such current sheet configurations are probed: one with a monotonically increasing Bz profile and the other with a localized Bz "hump." The former is found to be stable (in 2D) over any reasonable time scale, while the latter is prone to an ideal-like instability that shifts the hump peak in the direction of the curvature normal and erodes the field on the opposite side. The growth rate of this instability is smaller by an order of magnitude than previous suggestions of an instability in an open system. An example is given that suggests that such an unstable hump configuration is unlikely to be produced by external driving of a current sheet with no Bz accumulation even in the presence of open boundary conditions.

  14. Three-dimensional particle simulation of plasma instabilities and collisionless reconnection in a current sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horiuchi, Ritoku; Sato, Tetsuya [Theory and Computer Simulation Center, National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    Generation of anomalous resistivity and dynamical development of collisionless reconnection in the vicinity of a magnetically neutral sheet are investigated by means of a three-dimensional particle simulation. For no external driving source, two different types of plasma instabilities are excited in the current layer. The lower hybrid drift instability (LHDI) is observed to grow in the periphery of current layer in an early period, while a drift kink instability (DKI) is triggered at the neutral sheet in a late period as a result of the nonlinear deformation of the current sheet by the LHDI. A reconnection electric field grows at the neutral sheet in accordance with the excitation of the DKI. When an external driving field exists, the convective electric field penetrates into the current layer through the particle kinetic effect and collisionless reconnection is triggered by the convective electric field earlier than the DKI is excited. It is also found that the anisotropic ion distribution is formed through the anomalous ion heating by the DKI. (author)

  15. Models of current sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angst, Sebastian; Engelke, Lukas; Winterer, Markus; Wolf, Dietrich E.

    2017-06-01

    Densification of (semi-)conducting particle agglomerates with the help of an electrical current is much faster and more energy efficient than traditional thermal sintering or powder compression. Therefore, this method becomes more and more common among experimentalists, engineers, and in industry. The mechanisms at work at the particle scale are highly complex because of the mutual feedback between current and pore structure. This paper extends previous modelling approaches in order to study mixtures of particles of two different materials. In addition to the delivery of Joule heat throughout the sample, especially in current bottlenecks, thermoelectric effects must be taken into account. They lead to segregation or spatial correlations in the particle arrangement. Various model extensions are possible and will be discussed.

  16. Two vortex-blob regularization models for vortex sheet motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Sung-Ik

    2014-04-01

    Evolving vortex sheets generally form singularities in finite time. The vortex blob model is an approach to regularize the vortex sheet motion and evolve past singularity formation. In this paper, we thoroughly compare two such regularizations: the Krasny-type model and the Beale-Majda model. It is found from a linear stability analysis that both models have exponentially decaying growth rates for high wavenumbers, but the Beale-Majda model has a faster decaying rate than the Krasny model. The Beale-Majda model thus gives a stronger regularization to the solution. We apply the blob models to the two example problems: a periodic vortex sheet and an elliptically loaded wing. The numerical results show that the solutions of the two models are similar in large and small scales, but are fairly different in intermediate scales. The sheet of the Beale-Majda model has more spiral turns than the Krasny-type model for the same value of the regularization parameter δ. We give numerical evidences that the solutions of the two models agree for an increasing amount of spiral turns and tend to converge to the same limit as δ is decreased. The inner spiral turns of the blob models behave differently with the outer turns and satisfy a self-similar form. We also examine irregular motions of the sheet at late times and find that the irregular motions shrink as δ is decreased. This fact suggests a convergence of the blob solution to the weak solution of infinite regular spiral turns.

  17. Constitutive modelling of aluminium alloy sheet at warm forming temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurukuri, S.; Worswick, M. J.; Winkler, S.

    2016-08-01

    The formability of aluminium alloy sheet can be greatly improved by warm forming. However predicting constitutive behaviour under warm forming conditions is a challenge for aluminium alloys due to strong, coupled temperature- and rate-sensitivity. In this work, uniaxial tensile characterization of 0.5 mm thick fully annealed aluminium alloy brazing sheet, widely used in the fabrication of automotive heat exchanger components, is performed at various temperatures (25 to 250 °C) and strain rates (0.002 and 0.02 s-1). In order to capture the observed rate- and temperature-dependent work hardening behaviour, a phenomenological extended-Nadai model and the physically based (i) Bergstrom and (ii) Nes models are considered and compared. It is demonstrated that the Nes model is able to accurately describe the flow stress of AA3003 sheet at different temperatures, strain rates and instantaneous strain rate jumps.

  18. Collisionless reconnection: mechanism of self-ignition in thin plane homogeneous current sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Treumann

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The spontaneous onset of magnetic reconnection in thin plane collisionless current sheets is shown to result from a thermal-anisotropy driven non-relativistic magnetic electron Weibel-mode, generating seed-magnetic field X-points in the centre of the current layer. The proposed mechanism is of larger generality. It also works in the presence of magnetic guide fields.

  19. A two-fluid study of oblique tearing modes in a force-free current sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akçay, Cihan, E-mail: akcay@lanl.gov; Daughton, William [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Lukin, Vyacheslav S. [National Science Foundation, Arlington, Virginia 22230 (United States); Liu, Yi-Hsin [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Kinetic simulations have demonstrated that three-dimensional reconnection in collisionless regimes proceeds through the formation and interaction of magnetic flux ropes, which are generated due to the growth of tearing instabilities at multiple resonance surfaces. Since kinetic simulations are intrinsically expensive, it is desirable to explore the feasibility of reduced two-fluid models to capture this complex evolution, particularly, in the strong guide field regime, where two-fluid models are better justified. With this goal in mind, this paper compares the evolution of the collisionless tearing instability in a force-free current sheet with a two-fluid model and fully kinetic simulations. Our results indicate that the most unstable modes are oblique for guide fields larger than the reconnecting field, in agreement with the kinetic results. The standard two-fluid tearing theory is extended to address the tearing instability at oblique angles. The resulting theory yields a flat oblique spectrum and underestimates the growth of oblique modes in a similar manner to kinetic theory relative to kinetic simulations.

  20. The penetration of ions into the magnetosphere through the magnetopause turbulent current sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Taktakishvili

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of numerical modeling of magnetosheath ion motion in the magnetopause current sheet (MCS in the presence of magnetic fluctuations. Our model of magnetic field turbulence has a power law spectrum in the wave vector space, reaches maximum intensity in the center of MCS, and decreases towards the magnetosheath and magnetosphere boundaries. We calculated the density profile across the MCS. We also calculated the number of particles entering the magnetosphere, reflected from the magnetopause and escaping from the flanks, as a function of the fluctuation level of the turbulence and magnetic field shear parameter. All of these quantities appeared to be strongly dependent on the fluctuation level, but not on the magnetic field shear parameter. For the highest fluctuation levels the number of particles entering the magnetosphere does not exceed 15% of the total number of particles launched from the magnetosheath side of the MCS; the modeling also reproduced the effective reflection of the magnetosheath flow from very high levels of magnetic fluctuations.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetosheath; magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; turbulence

  1. Forced current sheet structure, formation and evolution: application to magnetic reconnection in the magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Domrin

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available By means of a simulation model, the earlier predicted nonlinear kinetic structure, a Forced Kinetic Current Sheet (FKCS, with extremely anisotropic ion distributions, is shown to appear as a result of a fast nonlinear process of transition from a previously existing equilibrium. This occurs under triggering action of a weak MHD disturbance that is applied at the boundary of the simulation box. In the FKCS, current is carried by initially cold ions which are brought into the CS by convection from both sides, and accelerated inside the CS. The process then appears to be spontaneously self-sustained, as a MHD disturbance of a rarefaction wave type propagates over the background plasma outside the CS. Comparable to the Alfvénic discontinuity in MHD, transformation of electromagnetic energy into the energy of plasma flows occurs at the FKCS. But unlike the MHD case, ``free" energy is produced here: dissipation should occur later, through particle interaction with turbulent waves generated by unstable ion distribution being formed by the FKCS action. In this way, an effect of magnetic field ``annihilation" appears, required for fast magnetic reconnection. Application of the theory to observations at the magnetopause and in the magnetotail is considered.

  2. Characterisation and modelling of the plastic material behaviour and its application in sheet metal forming simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vegter, H.; ten Horn, Carel H.L.J.; An, Yuguo; Atzema, E.H.; Atzema, Eisso H.; Pijlman, H.H.; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Huetink, Han; Onate, E; Owen, D.R.J

    2003-01-01

    The application of simulation models in sheet metal forming in automotive industry has proven to be beneficial to reduce tool costs in the designing stage and for optimising current processes. Moreover, it is a promising tool for a material supplier to optimise material choice and development for

  3. Uncertainty Quantification for Large-Scale Ice Sheet Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghattas, Omar [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2016-02-05

    This report summarizes our work to develop advanced forward and inverse solvers and uncertainty quantification capabilities for a nonlinear 3D full Stokes continental-scale ice sheet flow model. The components include: (1) forward solver: a new state-of-the-art parallel adaptive scalable high-order-accurate mass-conservative Newton-based 3D nonlinear full Stokes ice sheet flow simulator; (2) inverse solver: a new adjoint-based inexact Newton method for solution of deterministic inverse problems governed by the above 3D nonlinear full Stokes ice flow model; and (3) uncertainty quantification: a novel Hessian-based Bayesian method for quantifying uncertainties in the inverse ice sheet flow solution and propagating them forward into predictions of quantities of interest such as ice mass flux to the ocean.

  4. On the drift-sausage mode in one-dimensional current sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Peter H.; Lui, A. T. Y.

    2001-02-01

    This article presents a two-fluid stability analysis of Harris current sheet equilibrium under the assumption of charge quasi-neutrality. It is found that the charge neutrality condition leads to sausage-type fluctuations, which propagate along the direction of the cross-field current flow, hence the drift-sausage mode. It is also shown that solutions which correspond to kink-type perturbations do not exist under the present assumption of charge neutrality. In view of the fact that a substantial body of simulation works exist which report predominantly kink-like perturbations, and that analytical theories which do not assume charge quasi-neutrality predict that the kink-type mode is a dominant unstable mode, it is concluded that the assumption of quasi-neutrality may be a poor choice in describing the stability of Harris current sheet equilibrium.

  5. On the radial force balance in the quiet time magnetotail current sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Angelopoulos, V.; Runov, A.

    2016-05-01

    Using Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions spacecraft observations of the quite magnetotail current sheet within the r∈[9,35]RE region (r is the radial distance from Earth and RE is Earth's radius), we investigate the thermal plasma pressure distribution along the magnetotail. Taking advantage of flapping motions of an ensemble of current sheets at various distances, we estimate the current density magnitude jy (in GSM coordinates). Comparing the tension force jyBz (Bz is the magnetic field component) with the radial gradient of the plasma pressure demonstrates that this gradient is only a small fraction, ˜10-15%, of the Ampere force exerted on the cross-tail current, in the r > 15RE region. We also estimate the contribution of the electron temperature anisotropy to the pressure balance: in the r > 15RE region the corresponding force can balance only 10-15% of the observed tension force jyBz. Thus, we conclude that about 70% of the tension force is not balanced by the combination of isotropic radial pressure gradient or the electron anisotropy. We discuss mechanisms that could be responsible for balancing the magnetotail current sheet.

  6. Shallow ice approximation, second order shallow ice approximation, and full Stokes models: A discussion of their roles in palaeo-ice sheet modelling and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, N.; Ahlkrona, J.; Gowan, E. J.; Lötstedt, P.; Lea, J. M.; Noormets, R.; von Sydow, L.; Dowdeswell, J. A.; Benham, T.

    2016-09-01

    Full Stokes ice sheet models provide the most accurate description of ice sheet flow, and can therefore be used to reduce existing uncertainties in predicting the contribution of ice sheets to future sea level rise on centennial time-scales. The level of accuracy at which millennial time-scale palaeo-ice sheet simulations resolve ice sheet flow lags the standards set by Full Stokes models, especially, when Shallow Ice Approximation (SIA) models are used. Most models used in paleo-ice sheet modeling were developed at a time when computer power was very limited, and rely on several assumptions. At the time there was no means of verifying the assumptions by other than mathematical arguments. However, with the computer power and refined Full Stokes models available today, it is possible to test these assumptions numerically. In this paper, we review (Ahlkrona et al., 2013a) where such tests were performed and inaccuracies in commonly used arguments were found. We also summarize (Ahlkrona et al., 2013b) where the implications of the inaccurate assumptions are analyzed for two paleo-models - the SIA and the SOSIA. We review these works without resorting to mathematical detail, in order to make them accessible to a wider audience with a general interest in palaeo-ice sheet modelling. Specifically, we discuss two implications of relevance for palaeo-ice sheet modelling. First, classical SIA models are less accurate than assumed in their original derivation. Secondly, and contrary to previous recommendations, the SOSIA model is ruled out as a practicable tool for palaeo-ice sheet simulations. We conclude with an outlook concerning the new Ice Sheet Coupled Approximation Level (ISCAL) method presented in Ahlkrona et al. (2016), that has the potential to match the accuracy standards of full Stokes model on palaeo-timescales of tens of thousands of years, and to become an alternative to hybrid models currently used in palaeo-ice sheet modelling. The method is applied to an ice

  7. Modeling Abrupt Change in Global Sea Level Arising from Ocean - Ice-Sheet Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, David M

    2011-09-24

    It is proposed to develop, validate, and apply a coupled ocean ice-sheet model to simulate possible, abrupt future change in global sea level. This research is to be carried out collaboratively between an academic institute and a Department of Energy Laboratory (DOE), namely, the PI and a graduate student at New York University (NYU) and climate model researchers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The NYU contribution is mainly in the area of incorporating new physical processes into the model, while the LANL efforts are focused on improved numerics and overall model development. NYU and LANL will work together on applying the model to a variety of modeling scenarios of recent past and possible near-future abrupt change to the configuration of the periphery of the major ice sheets. The project's ultimate goal is to provide a robust, accurate prediction of future global sea level change, a feat that no fully-coupled climate model is currently capable of producing. This proposal seeks to advance that ultimate goal by developing, validating, and applying a regional model that can simulate the detailed processes involved in sea-level change due to ocean ice-sheet interaction. Directly modeling ocean ice-sheet processes in a fully-coupled global climate model is not a feasible activity at present given the near-complete absence of development of any such causal mechanism in these models to date.

  8. Current Sheets in the Corona and the Complexity of Slow Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, Spiro

    2010-01-01

    The origin of the slow solar wind has long been one of the most important problems in solar/heliospheric physics. Two observational constraints make this problem especially challenging. First, the slow wind has the composition of the closed-field corona, unlike the fast wind that originates on open field lines. Second, the slow wind has substantial angular extent, of order 30 degrees, which is much larger than the widths observed for streamer stalks or the widths expected theoretically for a dynamic heliospheric current sheet. We propose that the slow wind originates from an intricate network of narrow (possibly singular) open-field corridors that emanate from the polar coronal hole regions. Using topological arguments, we show that these corridors must be ubiquitous in the solar corona. The total solar eclipse in August 2008, near the lowest point of cycle 23 affords an ideal opportunity to test this theory by using the ultra-high resolution Predictive Science's (PSI) eclipse model for the corona and wind. Analysis of the PSI eclipse model demonstrates that the extent and scales of the open-field corridors can account for both the angular width of the slow wind and its closed-field composition. We discuss the implications of our slow wind theory for the structure of the corona and heliosphere at solar minimum and describe further observational and theoretical tests.

  9. Multiscale modeling of thermal conductivity of polycrystalline graphene sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Bohayra; Pötschke, Markus; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2014-03-21

    We developed a multiscale approach to explore the effective thermal conductivity of polycrystalline graphene sheets. By performing equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations, the grain size effect on the thermal conductivity of ultra-fine grained polycrystalline graphene sheets is investigated. Our results reveal that the ultra-fine grained graphene structures have thermal conductivity one order of magnitude smaller than that of pristine graphene. Based on the information provided by the EMD simulations, we constructed finite element models of polycrystalline graphene sheets to probe the thermal conductivity of samples with larger grain sizes. Using the developed multiscale approach, we also investigated the effects of grain size distribution and thermal conductivity of grains on the effective thermal conductivity of polycrystalline graphene. The proposed multiscale approach on the basis of molecular dynamics and finite element methods could be used to evaluate the effective thermal conductivity of polycrystalline graphene and other 2D structures.

  10. Suitability of sheet bending modelling techniques in CAPP applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Streppel, A.H.; de Vin, L.J.; de Vin, L.J.; Brinkman, J.; Brinkman, J.; Kals, H.J.J.

    1993-01-01

    The use of CNC machine tools, together with decreasing lot sizes and stricter tolerance prescriptions, has led to changes in sheet-metal part manufacturing. In this paper, problems introduced by the difference between the actual material behaviour and the results obtained from analytical models and

  11. Results of the Marine Ice Sheet Model Intercomparison Project, MISMIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Pattyn

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Predictions of marine ice-sheet behaviour require models that are able to robustly simulate grounding line migration. We present results of an intercomparison exercise for marine ice-sheet models. Verification is effected by comparison with approximate analytical solutions for flux across the grounding line using simplified geometrical configurations (no lateral variations, no effects of lateral buttressing. Unique steady state grounding line positions exist for ice sheets on a downward sloping bed, while hysteresis occurs across an overdeepened bed, and stable steady state grounding line positions only occur on the downward-sloping sections. Models based on the shallow ice approximation, which does not resolve extensional stresses, do not reproduce the approximate analytical results unless appropriate parameterizations for ice flux are imposed at the grounding line. For extensional-stress resolving "shelfy stream" models, differences between model results were mainly due to the choice of spatial discretization. Moving grid methods were found to be the most accurate at capturing grounding line evolution, since they track the grounding line explicitly. Adaptive mesh refinement can further improve accuracy, including fixed grid models that generally perform poorly at coarse resolution. Fixed grid models, with nested grid representations of the grounding line, are able to generate accurate steady state positions, but can be inaccurate over transients. Only one full-Stokes model was included in the intercomparison, and consequently the accuracy of shelfy stream models as approximations of full-Stokes models remains to be determined in detail, especially during transients.

  12. Instabilities of collisionless current sheets revisited: the role of anisotropic heating

    CERN Document Server

    Muñoz, P A; Büchner, J

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the influence of the anisotropic heating on the spontaneous instability and evolution of thin Harris-type collisionless current sheets, embedded in antiparallel magnetic fields. In particular, we explore the influence of the macroparticle shape-function using a 2D version of the PIC code ACRONYM. We also investigate the role of the numerical collisionality due to the finite number of macroparticles in PIC codes. It is shown that it is appropriate to choose higher order shape functions of the macroparticles compared to a larger number of macroparticles per cell. This allows to estimate better the anisotropic electron heating due to the collisions of macroparticles in a PIC code. Temperature anisotropies can stabilize the tearing mode instability and trigger additional current sheet instabilities. We found a good agreement between the analytically derived threshold for the stabilization of the anisotropic tearing mode and other instabilities, either spontaneously developing or initi...

  13. Magnetic reconnection and tearing in a 3D current sheet about a solar coronal null

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontin, David; Wyper, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Three-dimensional magnetic null points are ubiquitous in the solar corona and in any generic mixed-polarity magnetic field. We discuss the nature of flux transfer during reconnection an isolated coronal null point, that occurs across the fan plane when a current sheet forms about the null. We then go on to discuss the breakup of the current sheet via a non-linear tearing-type instability and show that the instability threshold corresponds to a Lundquist number comparable to the 2D case. We also discuss the resulting topology of the magnetic field, which involves a layer in which open and closed magnetic fields are effectively mixed, with implications for particle transport.

  14. Multiple current sheet systems in the outer heliosphere: Energy release and turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, David; Matteini, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    In the outer heliosphere, beyond the solar wind termination shock, it is expected that the warped heliospheric current sheet forms a region of closely-packed, multiple, thin current sheets. Such a system may be subject to the ion-kinetic tearing instability, and hence generate magnetic islands and hot populations of ions associated with magnetic reconnection. Reconnection processes in this environment have important implications for local particle transport, and for particle acceleration at reconnection sites and in turbulence. We study this complex environment by means of three-dimensional hybrid simulations over long time scales, in order to capture the evolution from linear growth of the tearing instability to a fully developed turbulent state at late times. The final state develops from the highly ordered initial state via both forward and inverse cascades. Component and spectral anisotropy in the magnetic fluctuations is present when a guide field is included. The inclusion of a population of new-born in...

  15. 3-d resistive MHD simulations of magnetic reconnection and the tearing mode instability in current sheets

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, G C; Pelletier, Guy

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection plays a critical role in many astrophysical processes where high energy emission is observed, e.g. particle acceleration, relativistic accretion powered outflows, pulsar winds and probably in dissipation of Poynting flux in GRBs. The magnetic field acts as a reservoir of energy and can dissipate its energy to thermal and kinetic energy via the tearing mode instability. We have performed 3d nonlinear MHD simulations of the tearing mode instability in a current sheet. Results from a temporal stability analysis in both the linear regime and weakly nonlinear (Rutherford) regime are compared to the numerical simulations. We observe magnetic island formation, island merging and oscillation once the instability has saturated. The growth in the linear regime is exponential in agreement with linear theory. In the second, Rutherford regime the island width grows linearly with time. We find that thermal energy produced in the current sheet strongly dominates the kinetic energy. Finally preliminary ...

  16. Active current sheets and hot flow anomalies in Mercury's bow shock

    CERN Document Server

    Uritsky, V M; Boardsen, S A; Sundberg, T; Raines, J M; Gershman, D J; Collinson, G; Sibeck, D; Khazanov, G V; Anderson, B J; Korth, H

    2013-01-01

    Hot flow anomalies (HFAs) represent a subset of solar wind discontinuities interacting with collisionless bow shocks. They are typically formed when the normal component of motional (convective) electric field points toward the embedded current sheet on at least one of its sides. The core region of an HFA contains hot and highly deflected ion flows and rather low and turbulent magnetic field. In this paper, we report first observations of HFA-like events at Mercury identified over a course of two planetary years. Using data from the orbital phase of the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission, we identify a representative ensemble of active current sheets magnetically connected to Mercury's bow shock. We show that some of these events exhibit unambiguous magnetic and particle signatures of HFAs similar to those observed earlier at other planets, and present their key physical characteristics. Our analysis suggests that Mercury's bow shock does not only mediate the flo...

  17. Current sheet flapping motions in the tailward flow of magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingyu; Lu, Quanming; Volwerk, Martin; Vörös, Zoltán.; Ma, Xuanye; Wang, Shui

    2016-08-01

    The feature and origin of current sheet flapping motions are one of most interesting issues of magnetospheric dynamics. In this paper we report the flapping motion of the current sheet detected in the tailward flow of a magnetic reconnection event on 7 February 2009. This flapping motion with frequency about 12 mHz was accompanied by magnetic turbulence. The observations by the tail-elongated fleet of five Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms probes indicate that these flapping oscillations were rather confined within the tailward flow than were due to a global process. This flapping motion could be due to the instability driven by the free energy associated with the ion temperature anisotropy in the tailward flow. Our observations indicate that the flapping motion in the tailward flow could have a different generation mechanism with that in the earthward flow.

  18. Compensation of the Persistent Current Multipoles in the LHC Dipoles by making the Coil Protection Sheet from Soft Magnetic Material

    CERN Document Server

    Völlinger, C

    2000-01-01

    This note presents a scheme for compensating the persistent current multipole errors of the LHC dipoles by making the coil protection sheets from soft magnetic material of 0.5 mm thickness. The material properties assumed in this study are those of iron sheets with a very low content of impurities (99.99% pure Fe). The non-linearities in the upramp cycle on the b3 multipole component can be reduced by the factor of four (while decreasing the b5 variation by the factor of two. Using sheets of slightly different thicknesses offers a tuning possibility for the series magnet coils and can compensate deviations arising from cables of different suppliers. The calculation method is based on a semi-analytical hysteresis model for hard superconductors and an M(B) - iteration using the method of coupled boundary elements - finite elements (BEM - FEM). It is now possible to compute persistent current multipole errors of geometries with arbitrarily shaped iron yokes and thin layers of soft magnetic material such as tunin...

  19. Plasmoid ejection and secondary current sheet generation from magnetic reconnection in laser-plasma interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Quan-Li; Wang, Shou-Jun; Lu, Quan-Ming; Huang, Can; Yuan, Da-Wei; Liu, Xun; Lin, Xiao-Xuan; Li, Yu-Tong; Wei, Hui-Gang; Zhong, Jia-Yong; Shi, Jian-Rong; Jiang, Shao-En; Ding, Yong-Kun; Jiang, Bo-Bin; Du, Kai; He, Xian-Tu; Yu, M Y; Liu, C S; Wang, Shui; Tang, Yong-Jian; Zhu, Jian-Qiang; Zhao, Gang; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Zhang, Jie

    2012-05-25

    Reconnection of the self-generated magnetic fields in laser-plasma interaction was first investigated experimentally by Nilson et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 255001 (2006)] by shining two laser pulses a distance apart on a solid target layer. An elongated current sheet (CS) was observed in the plasma between the two laser spots. In order to more closely model magnetotail reconnection, here two side-by-side thin target layers, instead of a single one, are used. It is found that at one end of the elongated CS a fanlike electron outflow region including three well-collimated electron jets appears. The (>1 MeV) tail of the jet energy distribution exhibits a power-law scaling. The enhanced electron acceleration is attributed to the intense inductive electric field in the narrow electron dominated reconnection region, as well as additional acceleration as they are trapped inside the rapidly moving plasmoid formed in and ejected from the CS. The ejection also induces a secondary CS.

  20. Magnetar Giant Flares in Multipolar Magnetic Fields --- II. Flux Rope Eruptions With Current Sheets

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    We propose a physical mechanism to explain giant flares and radio afterglows in terms of a magnetospheric model containing both a helically twisted flux rope and a current sheet (CS). With the appearance of CS, we solve a mixed boundary value problem to get the magnetospheric field based on a domain decomposition method. We investigate properties of the equilibrium curve of the flux rope when the CS is present in background multipolar fields. In response to the variations at the magnetar surface, it quasi-statically evolves in stable equilibrium states. The loss of equilibrium occurs at a critical point and, beyond that point, it erupts catastrophically. New features show up when the CS is considered. Especially, we find two kinds of physical behaviors, i.e., catastrophic state transition and catastrophic escape. Magnetic energy would be released during state transitions. The released magnetic energy is sufficient to drive giant flares. The flux rope would go away from the magnetar quasi-statically, which is ...

  1. Observations of Thin Current Sheets in the Solar Wind and Their Role in Magnetic Energy Dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, S.; Goldstein, M. L.; Dorelli, J.; Sahraoui, F.; Gurgiolo, C. A.; Karimabadi, H.; Mozer, F.; Wendel, D. E.; TenBarge, J.; Roytershteyn, V.

    2013-12-01

    A recent analysis of 450 vec/s resolution data from the STAFF search-coil magnetometer on board Cluster has revealed, for the first time, the presence of thin current sheets and discontinuities from the proton Larmor scale down to the electron Larmor scale in the solar wind. This is in the range of scales where a cascade of energy consistent with highly oblique kinetic Alfvénic fluctuations (KAW), eventually dissipated by electron Landau damping, has been detected. The current sheets have been found to have a size between 20-200 km, indicating that they are very localized. We will compare the observations with results coming from 2D Hall MHD, Gyrokinetic, and full Particle-in-Cell turbulence simulations. Preliminary work has highlighted promising qualitative agreement between the properties of the structures observed in the Cluster data and the current sheets generated in the simulations. With the aim of investigating the role played by those structures in dissipating the magnetic energy in the solar wind, E●J has been computed within each magnetic discontinuity. This has been made possible via a combined analysis of both STAFF-SC magnetic field data and the electric field data from the Electric Fields and Wave instrument (EFW). We describe procedures used to reduce the noise in the EFW data. The results obtained represent an effort to clarify the processes involved in the dissipation of magnetic energy in the solar wind.

  2. Polarized synchrotron emission from the equatorial current sheet in gamma-ray pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Cerutti, Benoît; Philippov, Alexander A

    2016-01-01

    Polarization is a powerful diagnostic tool to constrain the site of the high-energy pulsed emission and particle acceleration in gamma-ray pulsars. Recent particle-in-cell simulations of pulsar magnetosphere suggest that high-energy emission results from particles accelerated in the equatorial current sheet emitting synchrotron radiation. In this study, we re-examine the simulation data to compute the phase-resolved polarization properties. We find that the emission is mildly polarized and that there is an anticorrelation between the flux and the degree of linear polarization (on-pulse: ~15%, off-pulse: ~30%). The decrease of polarization during pulses is mainly attributed to the formation of caustics in the current sheet. Each pulse of light is systematically accompanied by a rapid swing of the polarization angle due to the change of the magnetic polarity when the line of sight passes through the current sheet. The optical polarization pattern observed in the Crab can be well-reproduced for a pulsar inclinat...

  3. Spectroscopic observations of evolving flare ribbon substructure suggesting origin in current sheet waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannon, Sean R.; Longcope, Dana; Qiu, Jiong

    2015-04-01

    A flare ribbon is the chromospheric image of reconnection at a coronal current sheet. The dynamics and structure of the ribbon can thus reveal properties of the current sheet, including motion of the reconnecting flare loops. We present imaging and spectroscopic observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the evolution of a flare ribbon at high spatial resolution and time cadence. These reveal small-scale substructure in the ribbon, which manifest as oscillations in both position and Doppler velocities. We consider various alternative explanations for these oscillations, including modulation of chromospheric evaporation flows. Among these we find the best support for some form of elliptical wave localized to the coronal current sheet, such as a tearing mode or Kelvin-Helmholtz instability.IRIS is a NASA Small Explorer mission developed and operated by Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory. This work is supported by contract 8100002702 from Lockheed Martin to Montana State University, a Montana Space Grant Consortium fellowship, and by NASA through HSR.

  4. Two-dimensional field model for single-sheet tester

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanyi, A

    2003-01-01

    The investigation of the magnetic field in a circular-shaped single-sheet tester is developed under circular polarised field intensity as well as flux density. The non-linear anisotropy of the material is represented by a vector realisation of the Jiles-Atherton hysteresis operator. The monitored data of the components in the field vectors are simulated with the averaged values of the field resulted by the numerical analysis of the non-linear eddy current problem.

  5. Finite Element Modeling of Metasurfaces with Generalized Sheet Transition Conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Sandeep, Srikumar; Caloz, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    A modeling of metasurfaces in the finite element method (FEM) based on generalized sheet transition conditions (GSTCs) is presented. The discontinuities in electromagnetic fields across a metasurface as represented by the GSTC are modeled by assigning nodes to both sides of the metasurface. The FEM-GSTC formulation in both 1D and 2D domains is derived and implemented. The method is extended to handle more general bianistroptic metasurfaces. The formulations are validated by several illustrative examples.

  6. Cryosphere Science Outreach using the Ice Sheet System Model and a Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, D. L. C.; Halkides, D. J.; Larour, E. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the role of Cryosphere Science within the larger context of Sea Level Rise is both a technical and educational challenge that needs to be addressed if the public at large is to trulyunderstand the implications and consequences of Climate Change. Within this context, we propose a new approach in which scientific tools are used directly inside a mobile/website platform geared towards Education/Outreach. Here, we apply this approach by using the Ice Sheet System Model, a state of the art Cryosphere model developed at NASA, and integrated within a Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory, with the goal is to outreach Cryospherescience to K-12 and College level students. The approach mixes laboratory experiments, interactive classes/lessons on a website, and a simplified interface to a full-fledged instance of ISSM to validate the classes/lessons. This novel approach leverages new insights from the Outreach/Educational community and the interest of new generations in web based technologies and simulation tools, all of it delivered in a seamlessly integrated web platform. This work was performed at the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory undera contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cryosphere Science Program.

  7. Measurement of ion velocity profiles in a magnetic reconnection layer via current sheet jogging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, G.; Yoo, J.; Yamada, M.; Ji, H.; Dorfman, S.; Lawrence, E.; Myers, C.; Tharp, T.

    2011-10-01

    In many laboratory plasmas, constructing stationary Langmuir and Mach probe arrays with resolution on the order of electron skin depth is technically difficult, and can introduce significant plasma perturbations. However, complete two- dimensional profiles of plasma density, electron temperature, and ion flow are important for studying the transfer of energy from magnetic fields to particles during magnetic reconnection. Through the use of extra ``Shaping Field'' coils in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, the inward motion of the current sheet in the reconnection layer can be accelerated, or ``jogged,'' allowing the measurement of different points across the sheet with stationary probes. By acquiring data from Langmuir probes and Mach probes at different locations in the MRX with respect to the current sheet center, profiles of electron density and temperature and a vector plot of two-dimensional ion velocity in the plane of reconnection are created. Results from probe measurements will be presented and compared to profiles generated from computer simulation.

  8. Plasmoid and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in Sweet-Parker current sheets

    CERN Document Server

    Loureiro, N F; Uzdensky, D A

    2012-01-01

    A 2D linear theory of the instability of Sweet-Parker (SP) current sheets is developed in the framework of Reduced MHD. A local analysis is performed taking into account the dependence of a generic equilibrium profile on the outflow coordinate. The plasmoid instability [Loureiro et al, Phys. Plasmas {\\bf 14}, 100703 (2007)] is recovered, i.e., current sheets are unstable to the formation of a large-wave-number chain of plasmoids ($k_{\\rm max}\\Lsheet \\sim S^{3/8}$, where $k_{\\rm max}$ is the wave-number of fastest growing mode, $S=\\Lsheet V_A/\\eta$ is the Lundquist number, $\\Lsheet$ is the length of the sheet, $V_A$ is the Alfv\\'en speed and $\\eta$ is the plasma resistivity), which grows super-Alfv\\'enically fast ($\\gmax\\tau_A\\sim S^{1/4}$, where $\\gmax$ is the maximum growth rate, and $\\tau_A=\\Lsheet/V_A$). For typical background profiles, the growth rate and the wave-number are found to {\\it increase} in the outflow direction. This is due to the presence of another mode, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability...

  9. NUMERICAL VALIDATION OF COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR SHEET CAVITATING FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A computational modeling for the sheet cavitating flows is presented. The cavitation model is implemented in a viscous Navier-Stokes solver. The cavity interface and shape are determined using an iterative procedure matching the cavity surface to a constant pressure boundary. The pressure distribution, as well as its gradient on the wall, is taken into account in updating the cavity shape iteratively. Numerical computations are performed for the sheet cavitating flows at a range of cavitation numbers across the hemispheric headform/cylinder body with different grid numbers. The influence of the relaxation factor in the cavity shape updating scheme for the algorithm accuracy and reliability is conducted through comparison with other two cavity shape updating numerical schemes.The results obtained are reasonable and the iterative procedure of cavity shape updating is quite stable, which demonstrate the superiority of the proposed cavitation model and algorithms.

  10. Acceleration and transport of ions in turbulent current sheets: formation of non-maxwelian energy distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Artemyev

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to particle acceleration in turbulent current sheet (CS. Our results show that the mechanism of CS particle interaction with electromagnetic turbulence can explain the formation of power law energy distributions. We study the ratio between adiabatic acceleration of particles in electric field in the presence of stationary turbulence and acceleration due to electric field in the case of dynamic turbulence. The correlation between average energy gained by particles and average particle residence time in the vicinity of the neutral sheet is discussed. It is also demonstrated that particle velocity distributions formed by particle-turbulence interaction are similar in essence to the ones observed near the far reconnection region in the Earth's magnetotail.

  11. Prototypical model for tensional wrinkling in thin sheets

    KAUST Repository

    Davidovitch, B.

    2011-10-31

    The buckling and wrinkling of thin films has recently seen a surge of interest among physicists, biologists, mathematicians, and engineers. This activity has been triggered by the growing interest in developing technologies at ever-decreasing scales and the resulting necessity to control the mechanics of tiny structures, as well as by the realization that morphogenetic processes, such as the tissue-shaping instabilities occurring in animal epithelia or plant leaves, often emerge from mechanical instabilities of cell sheets. Although the most basic buckling instability of uniaxially compressed plates was understood by Euler more than two centuries ago, recent experiments on nanometrically thin (ultrathin) films have shown significant deviations from predictions of standard buckling theory. Motivated by this puzzle, we introduce here a theoretical model that allows for a systematic analysis of wrinkling in sheets far from their instability threshold. We focus on the simplest extension of Euler buckling that exhibits wrinkles of finite length--a sheet under axisymmetric tensile loads. The first study of this geometry, which is attributed to Lamé, allows us to construct a phase diagram that demonstrates the dramatic variation of wrinkling patterns from near-threshold to far-from-threshold conditions. Theoretical arguments and comparison to experiments show that the thinner the sheet is, the smaller is the compressive load above which the far-from-threshold regime emerges. This observation emphasizes the relevance of our analysis for nanomechanics applications.

  12. Explosive Magnetic Reconnection in Double-current Sheet Systems: Ideal versus Resistive Tearing Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baty, Hubert

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic reconnection associated with the tearing instability occurring in double-current sheet systems is investigated within the framework of resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in a two-dimensional Cartesian geometry. A special emphasis on the existence of fast and explosive phases is taken. First, we extend the recent theory on the ideal tearing mode of a single-current sheet to a double-current layer configuration. A linear stability analysis shows that, in long and thin systems with (length to shear layer thickness) aspect ratios scaling as {S}L9/29 (S L being the Lundquist number based on the length scale L), tearing modes can develop on a fast Alfvénic timescale in the asymptotic limit {S}L\\to ∞ . The linear results are confirmed by means of compressible resistive MHD simulations at relatively high S L values (up to 3× {10}6) for different current sheet separations. Moreover, the nonlinear evolution of the ideal double tearing mode (IDTM) exhibits a richer dynamical behavior than its single-tearing counterpart, as a nonlinear explosive growth violently ends up with a disruption when the two current layers interact trough the merging of plasmoids. The final outcome of the system is a relaxation toward a new state, free of magnetic field reversal. The IDTM dynamics is also compared to the resistive double tearing mode dynamics, which develops in similar systems with smaller aspect ratios, ≳ 2π , and exhibits an explosive secondary reconnection, following an initial slow resistive growth phase. Finally, our results are used to discuss the flaring activity in astrophysical magnetically dominated plasmas, with a particular emphasis on pulsar systems.

  13. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a current-vortex sheet at a 3D magnetic null

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyper, P. F.; Pontin, D. I.

    2013-03-01

    We report here, for the first time, an observed instability of a Kelvin-Helmholtz nature occurring in a fully three-dimensional (3D) current-vortex sheet at the fan plane of a 3D magnetic null point. The current-vortex layer forms self-consistently in response to foot point driving around the spine lines of the null. The layer first becomes unstable at an intermediate distance from the null point, with the instability being characterized by a rippling of the fan surface and a filamentation of the current density and vorticity in the shear layer. Owing to the 3D geometry of the shear layer, a branching of the current filaments and vortices is observed. The instability results in a mixing of plasma between the two topologically distinct regions of magnetic flux on either side of the fan separatrix surface, as flux is reconnected across this surface. We make a preliminary investigation of the scaling of the system with the dissipation parameters. Our results indicate that the fan plane separatrix surface is an ideal candidate for the formation of current-vortex sheets in complex magnetic fields and, therefore, the enhanced heating and connectivity change associated with the instabilities of such layers.

  14. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a current-vortex sheet at a 3D magnetic null

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyper, P. F. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Pontin, D. I. [Division of Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-15

    We report here, for the first time, an observed instability of a Kelvin-Helmholtz nature occurring in a fully three-dimensional (3D) current-vortex sheet at the fan plane of a 3D magnetic null point. The current-vortex layer forms self-consistently in response to foot point driving around the spine lines of the null. The layer first becomes unstable at an intermediate distance from the null point, with the instability being characterized by a rippling of the fan surface and a filamentation of the current density and vorticity in the shear layer. Owing to the 3D geometry of the shear layer, a branching of the current filaments and vortices is observed. The instability results in a mixing of plasma between the two topologically distinct regions of magnetic flux on either side of the fan separatrix surface, as flux is reconnected across this surface. We make a preliminary investigation of the scaling of the system with the dissipation parameters. Our results indicate that the fan plane separatrix surface is an ideal candidate for the formation of current-vortex sheets in complex magnetic fields and, therefore, the enhanced heating and connectivity change associated with the instabilities of such layers.

  15. 3D electrostatic gyrokinetic electron and fully kinetic ion simulation of lower-hybrid drift instability of Harris current sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Lin, Yu; Wang, Xueyi; Tummel, Kurt; Chen, Liu

    2016-07-01

    The eigenmode stability properties of three-dimensional lower-hybrid-drift-instabilities (LHDI) in a Harris current sheet with a small but finite guide magnetic field have been systematically studied by employing the gyrokinetic electron and fully kinetic ion (GeFi) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation model with a realistic ion-to-electron mass ratio mi/me . In contrast to the fully kinetic PIC simulation scheme, the fast electron cyclotron motion and plasma oscillations are systematically removed in the GeFi model, and hence one can employ the realistic mi/me . The GeFi simulations are benchmarked against and show excellent agreement with both the fully kinetic PIC simulation and the analytical eigenmode theory. Our studies indicate that, for small wavenumbers, ky, along the current direction, the most unstable eigenmodes are peaked at the location where k →.B → =0 , consistent with previous analytical and simulation studies. Here, B → is the equilibrium magnetic field and k → is the wavevector perpendicular to the nonuniformity direction. As ky increases, however, the most unstable eigenmodes are found to be peaked at k →.B → ≠0 . In addition, the simulation results indicate that varying mi/me , the current sheet width, and the guide magnetic field can affect the stability of LHDI. Simulations with the varying mass ratio confirm the lower hybrid frequency and wave number scalings.

  16. Macroscopic fields in thin ferromagnetic sheets taking into account eddy currents and Landau-Lifshitz magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, Luc; Olyslager, Frank; Melkebeek, Jan

    2004-05-01

    The paper deals with a numerical model for the evaluation of the electromagnetic behavior in thin magnetic sheets. Therefore, we consider Maxwell's equations together with a nonlinear magnetic constitutive law described by the Landau-Lifshitz equation. We present a suitable numerical approximation based upon a finite element-finite difference method. At each time step in the numerical scheme, the magnetization dynamics is calculated analytically by introducing for each finite element node a transformation towards a local coordinate system.

  17. Influence of the initial parameters of the magnetic field and plasma on the spatial structure of the electric current and electron density in current sheets formed in helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrovskaya, G. V., E-mail: galya-ostr@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Markov, V. S.; Frank, A. G., E-mail: annfrank@fpl.gpi.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The influence of the initial parameters of the magnetic field and plasma on the spatial structure of the electric current and electron density in current sheets formed in helium plasma in 2D and 3D magnetic configurations with X-type singular lines is studied by the methods of holographic interferometry and magnetic measurements. Significant differences in the structures of plasma and current sheets formed at close parameters of the initial plasma and similar configurations of the initial magnetic fields are revealed.

  18. Formability models for warm sheet metal forming analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Sen

    Several closed form models for the prediction of strain space sheet metal formability as a function of temperature and strain rate are proposed. The proposed models require only failure strain information from the uniaxial tension test at an elevated temperature setting and failure strain information from the traditionally defined strain space forming limit diagram at room temperature, thereby featuring the advantage of offering a full forming limit description without having to carry out expensive experimental studies for multiple modes of deformation under the elevated temperature. The Power law, Voce, and Johnson-Cook hardening models are considered along with the yield criterions of Hill's 48 and Logan-Hosford yield criteria. Acceptable correlations between the theory and experiment are reported for all the models under a plane strain condition. Among all the proposed models, the model featuring Johnson-Cook hardening model and Logan-Hosford yield behavior (LHJC model) was shown to best correlate with experiment. The sensitivity of the model with respect to various forming parameters is discussed. This work is significant to those aiming to incorporate closed-form formability models directly into numerical simulation programs for the purpose of design and analysis of products manufactured through the warm sheet metal forming process. An improvement based upon Swift's diffuse necking theory, is suggested in order to enhance the reliability of the model for biaxial stretch conditions. Theory relating to this improvement is provided in Appendix B.

  19. Double peak structure and diamagnetic wings of the magnetotail current sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zimbardo

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent Cluster observations in the magnetotail at about 20 Earth radii downtail have unambiguously shown that sometimes the current sheet is bifurcated, i.e. it is divided in two layers. We report numerical simulations of the ion dynamics in a quasi-neutral sheet in the presence of magnetic turbulence, which is often observed in the magnetotail, and for various anisotropies of the ion distribution function. Ions are injected at the boundary of the simulation box with a velocity distribution corresponding to a shifted Maxwellian. The simulation parameters, are adjusted to be similar to those of Cluster observations. We find that even for moderate fluctuation levels, the computed current density profile develops a double peak, in agreement with the observations. By varying the anisotropy of the injected distribution function, we are able to reproduce, for weak anisotropy, the magnetic field overshoots which are sometimes observed prior to magnetotail traversals. Therefore, we suggest an ion current profile with a double peak due to magnetic turbulence, and with possible diamagnetic current wings, present in the case of weak anisotropy of the ion distribution function.

  20. The Onset of Magnetic Reconnection: Tearing Instability in Current Sheets with a Guide Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daldorff, Lars K. S.; Klimchuk, James A.; Leake, James E.; Knizhnik, Kalman

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic reconnection is fundamental to many solar phenomena, ranging from coronal heating, to jets, to flares and CMEs. A poorly understood yet crucial aspect of reconnection is that it does not occur until magnetic stresses have built to sufficiently high levels for significant energy release. If reconnection were to happen too soon, coronal heating would be weak and flares would be small. As part of our program to study the onset conditions for magnetic reconnection, we have investigated the instability of current sheets to tearing. Surprisingly little work has been done on this problem for sheets that include a guide field, i.e., for which the field rotates by less than 180 degrees. This is the most common situation on the Sun. We present numerical 3D resistive MHD simulations of several sheets and show how the behavior depends on the shear angle (rotation). We compare our results to the predictions of linear theory and discuss the nonlinear evolution in terms of plasmoid formation and the interaction of different oblique tearing modes. The relevance to the Sun is explained.

  1. Hindcasting to measure ice sheet model sensitivity to initial states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Aschwanden

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent observations of the Greenland ice sheet indicate rapid mass loss at an accelerating rate with an increasing contribution to global mean sea level. Ice sheet models are used for projections of such future contributions of ice sheets to sea level, but the quality of projections is difficult to measure directly. Realistic initial states are crucial for accurate simulations. To test initial states we use hindcasting, i.e. forcing a model with known or closely-estimated inputs for past events to see how well the output matches observations. By simulating the recent past of Greenland, and comparing to observations of ice thickness, ice discharge, surface speeds, mass loss and surface elevation changes for validation, we find that the short term model response is strongly influenced by the initial state. We show that the dynamical state can be mis-represented despite a good agreement with some observations, stressing the importance of using multiple observations. Some initial states generate good agreement with measured mass time series in the hindcast period, and good agreement with present-day kinematic fields. We suggest hindcasting as a methodology for careful validation of initial states that can be done before making projections on decadal to century time-scales.

  2. Magnetar giant flares in multipolar magnetic fields. II. Flux rope eruptions with current sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lei [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China); Yu, Cong, E-mail: muduri@shao.ac.cn, E-mail: cyu@ynao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for the Structure and Evolution of Celestial Object, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2014-11-20

    We propose a physical mechanism to explain giant flares and radio afterglows in terms of a magnetospheric model containing both a helically twisted flux rope and a current sheet (CS). With the appearance of a CS, we solve a mixed boundary value problem to get the magnetospheric field based on a domain decomposition method. We investigate properties of the equilibrium curve of the flux rope when the CS is present in background multipolar fields. In response to the variations at the magnetar surface, it quasi-statically evolves in stable equilibrium states. The loss of equilibrium occurs at a critical point and, beyond that point, it erupts catastrophically. New features show up when the CS is considered. In particular, we find two kinds of physical behaviors, i.e., catastrophic state transition and catastrophic escape. Magnetic energy would be released during state transitions. This released magnetic energy is sufficient to drive giant flares, and the flux rope would, therefore, go away from the magnetar quasi-statically, which is inconsistent with the radio afterglow. Fortunately, in the latter case, i.e., the catastrophic escape, the flux rope could escape the magnetar and go to infinity in a dynamical way. This is more consistent with radio afterglow observations of giant flares. We find that the minor radius of the flux rope has important implications for its eruption. Flux ropes with larger minor radii are more prone to erupt. We stress that the CS provides an ideal place for magnetic reconnection, which would further enhance the energy release during eruptions.

  3. THEMIS multispacecraft observations of a reconnecting magnetosheath current sheet with symmetric boundary conditions and a large guide field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øieroset, M.; Phan, T. D.; Shay, M. A.; Haggerty, C. C.; Fujimoto, M.; Angelopoulos, V.; Eastwood, J. P.; Mozer, F. S.

    2017-08-01

    We report three spacecraft observations of a reconnecting magnetosheath current sheet with a guide field of unity, with THEMIS D (THD) and THEMIS E (THE)/THEMIS A (THA) observing oppositely directed reconnection exhausts, indicating the presence of an X line between the spacecraft. The near-constant convective speed of the magnetosheath current sheet allowed the direct translation of the observed time series into spatial profiles. THD observed asymmetries in the plasma density and temperature profiles across the exhaust, characteristics of symmetric reconnection with a guide field. The exhausts at THE and THA, on the other hand, were not the expected mirror image of the THD exhaust in terms of the plasma and field profiles. They consisted of a main outflow at the center of the current sheet, flanked by oppositely directed flows at the two edges of the current sheet, suggesting the presence of a second X line, whose outflow wraps around the outflow from the first X line.

  4. The Topological Inner Structure of Chern-Simons Tensor Current and the World-Sheet of Strings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Yi-Shi; YANG Jie

    2005-01-01

    @@ Using the decomposition theory of U(1) gauge potential and φ-mapping topological current theory, we investigate the topological inner structure of Chern-Simons tensor current. It is proven that the U(1) Chern-Simons tensor current in four-dimensional manifold is just the topological current of creating the string world-sheets.

  5. Electrostatic Solitary Waves in the Solar Wind: Evidence for Instability at Solar Wind Current Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, David M.; Newman, David L.; Wilson, Lynn Bruce; Goetz, Keith; Kellogg, Paul J.; Kerstin, Kris

    2013-01-01

    A strong spatial association between bipolar electrostatic solitary waves (ESWs) and magnetic current sheets (CSs) in the solar wind is reported here for the first time. This association requires that the plasma instabilities (e.g., Buneman, electron two stream) which generate ESWs are preferentially localized to solar wind CSs. Distributions of CS properties (including shear angle, thickness, solar wind speed, and vector magnetic field change) are examined for differences between CSs associated with ESWs and randomly chosen CSs. Possible mechanisms for producing ESW-generating instabilities at solar wind CSs are considered, including magnetic reconnection.

  6. MHD Flow with Hall current and Joule Heating Effects over an Exponentially Stretching Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasacharya, D.; Jagadeeshwar, P.

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the present paper is to study the influence of Hall current and Joule heating on flow, heat and mass transfer over an exponentially stretching sheet in a viscous fluid. Using similarity transformations the governing nonlinear coupled equations are converted into ordinary differential equations. These equations are linearized using the successive linearization method and then solved using the Chebyshev pseudo spectral method. The influence of magnetic parameter, Hall parameter, suction/injection parameter and slip parameter on the physical quantities are presented graphically. The obtained results are compared with the previously published results for special cases.

  7. Chaotic jumps in the generalized first adiabatic invariant in current sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittnacher, M. J.; Whipple, E. C.

    1991-01-01

    The present study examines how the changes in the generalized first adiabatic invariant J derived from the separatrix crossing theory can be incorporated into the drift variable approach to generating distribution functions. A method is proposed for determining distribution functions for an ensemble of particles following interaction with the tail current sheet by treating the interaction as a scattering problem characterized by changes in the invariant. Generalized drift velocities are obtained for a 1D tail configuration by using the generalized first invariant. The invariant remained constant except for the discrete changes caused by chaotic scattering as the particles cross the separatrix.

  8. Existence of three-dimensional ideal-magnetohydrodynamic equilibria with current sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loizu, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Hudson, S. R.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Lazerson, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Helander, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    We consider the linear and nonlinear ideal plasma response to a boundary perturbation in a screw pinch. We demonstrate that three-dimensional, ideal-MHD equilibria with continuously nested flux-surfaces and with discontinuous rotational-transform across the resonant rational-surfaces are well defined and can be computed both perturbatively and using fully nonlinear equilibrium calculations. This rescues the possibility of constructing MHD equilibria with current sheets and continuous, smooth pressure profiles. The results predict that, even if the plasma acts as a perfectly conducting fluid, a resonant magnetic perturbation can penetrate all the way into the center of a tokamak without being shielded at the resonant surface.

  9. Secondary magnetic islands generated by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a reconnecting current sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermo, R L; Drake, J F; Swisdak, M

    2012-06-22

    Magnetic islands or flux ropes produced by magnetic reconnection have been observed on the magnetopause, in the magnetotail, and in coronal current sheets. Particle-in-cell simulations of magnetic reconnection with a guide field produce elongated electron current layers that spontaneously produce secondary islands. Here, we explore the seed mechanism that gives birth to these islands. The most commonly suggested theory for island formation is the tearing instability. We demonstrate that in our simulations these structures typically start out, not as magnetic islands, but as electron flow vortices within the electron current sheet. When some of these vortices first form, they do not coincide with closed magnetic field lines, as would be the case if they were islands. Only after they have grown larger than the electron skin depth do they couple to the magnetic field and seed the growth of finite-sized islands. The streaming of electrons along the magnetic separatrix produces the flow shear necessary to drive an electron Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and produce the initial vortices. The conditions under which this instability is the dominant mechanism for seeding magnetic islands are explored.

  10. Thin current sheets caused by plasma flow gradients in space and astrophysical plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Nickeler

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Strong gradients in plasma flows play a major role in space and astrophysical plasmas. A typical situation is that a static plasma equilibrium is surrounded by a plasma flow, which can lead to strong plasma flow gradients at the separatrices between field lines with different magnetic topologies, e.g., planetary magnetospheres, helmet streamers in the solar corona, or at the boundary between the heliosphere and interstellar medium. Within this work we make a first step to understand the influence of these flows towards the occurrence of current sheets in a stationary state situation. We concentrate here on incompressible plasma flows and 2-D equilibria, which allow us to find analytic solutions of the stationary magnetohydrodynamics equations (SMHD. First we solve the magnetohydrostatic (MHS equations with the help of a Grad-Shafranov equation and then we transform these static equilibria into a stationary state with plasma flow. We are in particular interested to study SMHD-equilibria with strong plasma flow gradients perpendicular to separatrices. We find that induced thin current sheets occur naturally in such situations. The strength of the induced currents depend on the Alfvén Mach number and its gradient, and on the magnetic field.

  11. Capabilities and performance of Elmer/Ice, a new-generation ice sheet model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Gagliardini

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The Fourth IPCC Assessment Report concluded that ice sheet flow models, in their current state, were unable to provide accurate forecast for the increase of polar ice sheet discharge and the associated contribution to sea level rise. Since then, the glaciological community has undertaken a huge effort to develop and improve a new generation of ice flow models, and as a result a significant number of new ice sheet models have emerged. Among them is the parallel finite-element model Elmer/Ice, based on the open-source multi-physics code Elmer. It was one of the first full-Stokes models used to make projections for the evolution of the whole Greenland ice sheet for the coming two centuries. Originally developed to solve local ice flow problems of high mechanical and physical complexity, Elmer/Ice has today reached the maturity to solve larger-scale problems, earning the status of an ice sheet model. Here, we summarise almost 10 yr of development performed by different groups. Elmer/Ice solves the full-Stokes equations, for isotropic but also anisotropic ice rheology, resolves the grounding line dynamics as a contact problem, and contains various basal friction laws. Derived fields, like the age of the ice, the strain rate or stress, can also be computed. Elmer/Ice includes two recently proposed inverse methods to infer badly known parameters. Elmer is a highly parallelised code thanks to recent developments and the implementation of a block preconditioned solver for the Stokes system. In this paper, all these components are presented in detail, as well as the numerical performance of the Stokes solver and developments planned for the future.

  12. Electrodynamics in a Very Thin Current Sheet Leading to Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nagendra; Deverapalli, Chakri; Khazanov, George

    2006-01-01

    We study the formation of a very thin current sheet (CS) and associated plasma electrodynamics using three-dimensional (3-D) particle-in-cell simulations with ion to electron mass ratio M/m=1836. The CS is driven by imposed anti-parallel magnetic fields. The noteworthy features of the temporal evolution of the CS are the following: (i) Steepening of the magnetic field profile B,(z) in the central part of the CS, (ii) Generation of three-peak current distribution with the largest peak in the CS center as B,(z) steepens, (iii) Generation of converging electric fields forming a potential well in the CS center in which ions are accelerated. (iv) Electron and ion heating in the central part of the CS by current-driven instabilities (CDI). (v) Re-broadening of the CS due to increased kinetic plasma pressure in the CS center. (vi) Generation of electron temperature anisotropy with temperature perpendicular to the magnetic field being larger than the parallel one. (vii) Current disruption by electron trapping in an explosively growing electrostatic instability (EGEI) and electron tearing instability (ETI). (viii)The onset of EGEI coincides with an increase in the electron temperature above the temperature of the initially hot ions as well as the appearance of new shear in the electron drift velocity. (ix) Bifurcation of the central CS by the current disruption. (x) Magnetic reconnection (MR) beginning near the null in B, and spreading outward. (xi) Generation of highly energized electrons reaching relativistic speeds and having isotropic pitch-angle distribution in the region of reconnected magnetic fields. We compare some of these features of the current sheet with results from laboratory and space experiments.

  13. Electrodynamics in a very thin current sheet leading to magnetic reconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Singh

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the formation of a very thin current sheet (CS and associated plasma electrodynamics using three-dimensional (3-D particle-in-cell simulations with ion to electron mass ratio M/m=1836. The CS is driven by imposed anti-parallel magnetic fields. The noteworthy features of the temporal evolution of the CS are the following: (i Steepening of the magnetic field profile Bx(z in the central part of the CS, (ii Generation of three-peak current distribution with the largest peak in the CS center as Bx(z steepens, (iii Generation of converging electric fields forming a potential well in the CS center in which ions are accelerated. (iv Electron and ion heating in the central part of the CS by current-driven instabilities (CDI. (v Re-broadening of the CS due to increased kinetic plasma pressure in the CS center. (vi Generation of electron temperature anisotropy with temperature perpendicular to the magnetic field being larger than the parallel one. (vii Current disruption by electron trapping in an explosively growing electrostatic instability (EGEI and electron tearing instability (ETI. (viiiThe onset of EGEI coincides with an increase in the electron temperature above the temperature of the initially hot ions as well as the appearance of new shear in the electron drift velocity. (ix Bifurcation of the central CS by the current disruption. (x Magnetic reconnection (MR beginning near the null in Bx and spreading outward. (xi Generation of highly energized electrons reaching relativistic speeds and having isotropic pitch-angle distribution in the region of reconnected magnetic fields. We compare some of these features of the current sheet with results from laboratory and space experiments.

  14. Hindcasting to measure ice sheet model sensitivity to initial states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Aschwanden

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Validation is a critical component of model development, yet notoriously challenging in ice sheet modeling. Here we evaluate how an ice sheet system model responds to a given forcing. We show that hindcasting, i.e. forcing a model with known or closely estimated inputs for past events to see how well the output matches observations, is a viable method of assessing model performance. By simulating the recent past of Greenland, and comparing to observations of ice thickness, ice discharge, surface speeds, mass loss and surface elevation changes for validation, we find that the short term model response is strongly influenced by the initial state. We show that the thermal and dynamical states (i.e. the distribution of internal energy and momentum can be misrepresented despite a good agreement with some observations, stressing the importance of using multiple observations. In particular we identify rates of change of spatially dense observations as preferred validation metrics. Hindcasting enables a qualitative assessment of model performance relative to observed rates of change. It thereby reduces the number of admissible initial states more rigorously than validation efforts that do not take advantage of observed rates of change.

  15. Damage Mechanics in the Community Ice Sheet Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, R.; Cathles, L. M. M., IV; Bassis, J. N.; Lipscomb, W. H.; Price, S. F.

    2016-12-01

    Half of the mass that floating ice shelves lose to the ocean comes from iceberg calving, which is a difficult process to simulate accurately. This is especially true in the large-scale ice dynamics models that couple changes in the cryosphere to climate projections. Damage mechanics provide a powerful technique with the potential to overcome this obstacle by describing how fractures in ice evolve over time. Here, we demonstrate the application of a damage model to ice shelves that predicts realistic geometries. We incorporated this solver into the Community Ice Sheet Model, a three dimensional ice sheet model developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The damage mechanics formulation that we use comes from a first principles-based evolution law for the depth of basal and surface crevasses and depends on the large scale strain rate, stress state, and basal melt. We show that under idealized conditions it produces ice tongue lengths that match well with observations for a selection of natural ice tongues, including Erebus, Drygalski, and Pine Island in Antarctica, as well as Petermann in Greenland. We also apply the model to more generalized ideal ice shelf geometries and show that it produces realistic calving front positions. Although our results are preliminary, the damage mechanics model that we developed provides a promising first principles method for predicting ice shelf extent and how the calving margins of ice shelves respond to climate change.

  16. 3D reconnection due to oblique modes: a simulation of Harris current sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lapenta

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulations in three dimensions of a Harris current sheet with mass ratio, mi/me = 180, and current sheet thickness, pi/L = 0.5, suggest the existence of a linearly unstable oblique mode, which is independent from either the drift-kink or the tearing instability. The new oblique mode causes reconnection independently from the tearing mode. During the initial linear stage, the system is unstable to the tearing mode and the drift kink mode, with growth rates that are accurately described by existing linear theories. How-ever, oblique modes are also linearly unstable, but with smaller growth rates than either the tearing or the drift-kink mode. The non-linear stage is first reached by the drift-kink mode, which alters the initial equilibrium and leads to a change in the growth rates of the tearing and oblique modes. In the non-linear stage, the resulting changes in magnetic topology are incompatible with a pure tearing mode. The oblique mode is shown to introduce a helical structure into the magnetic field lines.

  17. Numerical experiments on the detailed energy conversion and spectrum studies in a corona current sheet

    CERN Document Server

    Ni, Lei; Mei, Zhixing; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study the energy conversion and spectra in a corona current sheet by 2.5-dimensional MHD numerical simulations. Numerical results show that many Petschek-like fine structures with slow-mode shocks mediated by plasmoid instabilities develop during the magnetic reconnection process. The termination shocks can also be formed above the primary magnetic island and at the head of secondary islands. These shocks play important roles in generating thermal energy in a corona current sheet. For a numerical simulation with initial conditions close to the solar corona environment, the ratio of the generated thermal energy to the total dissipated magnetic energy is around $1/5$ before secondary islands appear. After secondary islands appear, the generated thermal energy starts to increase sharply and this ratio can reach a value about $3/5$. In an environment with a relatively lower plasma density and plasma $\\beta$, the plasma can be heated to a much higher temperature. After secondary islands appear, t...

  18. MODELING OF HIGH STORAGE SHEET DEPOT WITH PLANT SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Jardzioch

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturing processes are becoming increasingly automated. Introduction of innovative solutions often necessitate processing very large number of signals from various devices. Correctness tests of the components configuration becomes a compiled operation requiring vast expenditure of time and knowledge. The models may be a mathematical reflection of the actual object. Many actions can be computer-assisted to varying degree. One example is construction of simulation models. These can also be simulation models developed in advanced software. The stages of creating a model may be purely random. This paper aims at a closer analysis of the simulation model based on the high storage sheet depot modeling using Plant Simulation software. The results of analysis can be used for optimization, but this stage is a separate issue.

  19. Optimization of Cultured Human Corneal Endothelial Cell Sheet Transplantation and Post-Operative Sheet Evaluation in a Rabbit Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Shima, Nobuyuki; Kimoto, Miwa; Ebihara, Nobuyuki; Murakami, Akira; Yamagami, Satoru

    2016-09-01

    To optimize cultured human corneal endothelial cell (cHCEC) sheet transplantation technique for maintenance of cHCEC viability. cHCEC sheets cultured on a collagen scaffold were covered with or without Viscoat® and exposed to humidified air in the incubator. cHCEC sheets with or without Viscoat® were transplanted into cadaveric porcine eyes by the DSAEK technique with full air tamponade and incubated for various time periods. Then cell viability was determined by using the live/dead assay kit. cHCEC sheets with Viscoat® were transplanted into rabbit eyes and the sheets were histologically evaluated before and 14 days after transplantation. A collagen scaffold and Viscoat® were effective for protecting cHCEC from damage due to air exposure in vitro. All cells died after 18 hours of air exposure in porcine eyes in Viscoat® untreated control. In contrast, Viscoat® treatment sustained full cell viability following 2 hours and could maintain approximately 80% viability after 18 hours. In a rabbit model, transplanted cHCEC sheet with Viscoat® maintained cell density at 2803 ± 229 mm(2) (18% cell loss) and expression of N-cadherin, zonula occludens-1, and actin-filament localized to cell boundary as similar as donor HCEC. Viscoat® can contribute to cHCEC protection from damage caused by exposure to air.

  20. Full Stokes finite-element modeling of ice sheets using a graphics processing unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddik, H.; Greve, R.

    2016-12-01

    Thermo-mechanical simulation of ice sheets is an important approach to understand and predict their evolution in a changing climate. For that purpose, higher order (e.g., ISSM, BISICLES) and full Stokes (e.g., Elmer/Ice, http://elmerice.elmerfem.org) models are increasingly used to more accurately model the flow of entire ice sheets. In parallel to this development, the rapidly improving performance and capabilities of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) allows to efficiently offload more calculations of complex and computationally demanding problems on those devices. Thus, in order to continue the trend of using full Stokes models with greater resolutions, using GPUs should be considered for the implementation of ice sheet models. We developed the GPU-accelerated ice-sheet model Sainō. Sainō is an Elmer (http://www.csc.fi/english/pages/elmer) derivative implemented in Objective-C which solves the full Stokes equations with the finite element method. It uses the standard OpenCL language (http://www.khronos.org/opencl/) to offload the assembly of the finite element matrix on the GPU. A mesh-coloring scheme is used so that elements with the same color (non-sharing nodes) are assembled in parallel on the GPU without the need for synchronization primitives. The current implementation shows that, for the ISMIP-HOM experiment A, during the matrix assembly in double precision with 8000, 87,500 and 252,000 brick elements, Sainō is respectively 2x, 10x and 14x faster than Elmer/Ice (when both models are run on a single processing unit). In single precision, Sainō is even 3x, 20x and 25x faster than Elmer/Ice. A detailed description of the comparative results between Sainō and Elmer/Ice will be presented, and further perspectives in optimization and the limitations of the current implementation.

  1. Antarctic polar plateau vertical electric field variations across heliocentric current sheet crossings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, G. B.; Tinsley, B. A.; Klekociuk, A. R.; Troshichev, O. A.; Frank-Kamenetsky, A. V.; Duldig, M. L.; Bering, E. A.; Clem, J. M.

    2006-03-01

    A superposed epoch analysis of variations of the vertical electric field measured at Vostok (78.5°S, 107°E; magnetic latitude 83.6°S) during 1998 2002 heliocentric current sheet (HCS) crossings yields no significant variation other than an association imposed by polar-cap potential differences above the site. This result contradicts published reports of a reduction ˜15% in electric field 1 3 days after HCS crossings, an observation initially made ˜30 years ago. If such a reduction had been caused by reductions in stratospheric ionising radiation, the presence of polar stratospheric clouds (PSC) would seem necessary for the occurrence of this effect. PSCs would increase the resistance of the stratosphere thus making ionisation in that region significant in the context of the ionosphere ground current flow, in a manner analogous to the role of volcanic aerosols in the stratosphere in the explanation of the weakening of northern hemisphere winter cyclones associated with HCS crossings, the so-called ‘Wilcox effect’. However, separating the present data to correspond to the likely presence of PSC above Vostok also does not yield the reported reduction. Significant increases or decreases of the vertical electric field emerge from the observations when the HCS crossings are separated into sets depending on whether the solar wind magnetic field changes from ‘toward-to-away’ (increase of ˜11%) and ‘away-to-toward’ (decrease of ˜8%). Polar-cap potential changes above the site, inferred from solar wind parameters using the Weimer model, also show such step functions that reverse with the sign of HCS transition and are broadly consistent with the measured electric field increases or decreases. Remaining differences between the measurements and the model are consistent with a somewhat stronger solar wind speed and/or magnetic activity influence on polar-cap convection above Vostok than is predicted by the model. Variations in ground-level neutron counts, a

  2. The potential of cell sheet technique on the development of hepatocellular carcinoma in rat models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Katsuhisa; Abumaree, Mohammed; Mohd Zin, Nur Khatijah; Shimizu, Tatsuya

    2017-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is considered the 3rd leading cause of death by cancer worldwide with the majority of patients were diagnosed in the late stages. Currently, there is no effective therapy. The selection of an animal model that mimics human cancer is essential for the identification of prognostic/predictive markers, candidate genes underlying cancer induction and the examination of factors that may influence the response of cancers to therapeutic agents and regimens. In this study, we developed a HCC nude rat models using cell sheet and examined the effect of human stromal cells (SCs) on the development of the HCC model and on different liver parameters such as albumin and urea. Methods Transplanted cell sheet for HCC rat models was fabricated using thermo-responsive culture dishes. The effect of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (UC-MSCs) and human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) on the developed tumour was tested. Furthermore, development of tumour and detection of the liver parameter was studied. Additionally, angiogenesis assay was performed using Matrigel. Results HepG2 cells requires five days to form a complete cell sheet while HepG2 co-cultured with UC-MSCs or BM-MSCs took only three days. The tumour developed within 4 weeks after transplantation of the HCC sheet on the liver of nude rats. Both UC-MSCs and BM-MSCs improved the secretion of liver parameters by increasing the secretion of albumin and urea. Comparatively, the UC-MSCs were more effective than BM-MSCs, but unlike BM-MSCs, UC-MSCs prevented liver tumour formation and the tube formation of HCC. Conclusions Since this is a novel study to induce liver tumour in rats using hepatocellular carcinoma sheet and stromal cells, the data obtained suggest that cell sheet is a fast and easy technique to develop HCC models as well as UC-MSCs have therapeutic potential for liver diseases. Additionally, the data procured indicates that stromal cells enhanced

  3. Assessing the predictability of a coupled climate-ice sheet model system for the response of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adalgeirsdottir, G.; Stendel, M.; Bueler, E.; Christensen, J. H.; Drews, M.; Mottram, R.

    2009-04-01

    The wild card for reliable sea level rise prediction is the contribution of the Greenland Ice Sheet. There is an urgent need to determine the predictability of models that simulate the response of Greenland Ice Sheet to rising temperatures and the amount of freshwater flux that can be expected into the ocean. Modelling efforts have been limited by poorly known boundary and initial conditions, low resolution and lack of presentation of fast flowing ice streams. We address these limitations by building a model system consisting of a high resolution regional climate model (HIRHAM4), that has been run for the period 1950-2080 at 25 km, and Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM), which simulates spatially and temporally varying ice streams by combining the solutions of the Shallow Shelf and Shallow Ice Approximations. The surface mass balance is simulated with a positive-degree-day method. The important and poorly constrained model component is the past climate forcing, which serves the purpose of initializing the model by simulating the present ice sheet and observed rate of mass changes. Simulated gradients of mass loss due to warming trends of past decade and prediction for the future are presented as well as estimated sensitivities due to the various model component uncertainties.

  4. Kinetic thin current sheets: their formation in relation to magnetotail mesoscale turbulent dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Kropotkin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of the magnetotail plasma sheet (PS features nonlinear structures on two totally different scales. There are very thin current sheets (CS on kinetic scale of the ion gyroradius. And there are intense plasma flow and magnetic field variations on mesoscales (a few earth radii; those are interpreted as mostly 2-D MHD turbulence. On the other hand, the specific nature of slow large scale magnetotail evolution leads to large differences in the PS properties and those of the lobe plasma. As a result, while fast reconnection bursts in the tail provide quasi-stationary fast mesoscale reconfigurations in the lobes, they cannot however be accompanied by restructuring of CS on the same fast time scale. Violations of force balance in the PS are thus generated. Simulation using a hybrid code and starting with such imbalance, provides an evidence of very thin kinetic CS structures formation, embedded into the much thicker PS. The momentum balance gets locally restored by means of ion acceleration up to the Alfvénic velocity. The process provides an effective mechanism for transformation of magnetic energy accumulated in the magnetotail, into energy of plasma flows. The fast flows may drive turbulence on shorter spatial scales. In their turn, these motions may serve as an origin for new neutral line generation, and reconnection. Application to substorm phenomenology is discussed.

  5. Visco-resistive plasmoid instability in Sweet-Parker current sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Daniela; Comisso, Luca

    2016-10-01

    The linear analysis by Loureiro et al. is generalized to investigate the plasmoid instability in visco-resistive Sweet-Parker sheets. We cover both the linear and nonlinear growth of the plasmoids. The linear growth rate and the wavenumber scale as S 1 / 4 (1 +Pm)- 5 / 8 and S 3 / 8 (1 +Pm)- 3 / 16 with respect to the Lundquist number S and the magnetic Prandtl number Pm. The growth of the plasmoids slows down from an exponential growth to an algebraic growth when they enter into the nonlinear regime. The time-scale of the nonlinear growth of the plasmoids is found to be τNL S - 3 / 16 (1 +Pm)19/32τA , L . We also discuss how the plasmoid instability can enable fast magnetic reconnection in visco-resistive plasmas. In this regime, the global reconnection rate is shown to be 0.01vA , uBu (1 +Pm)- 1 / 2. The same author will present another poster in a closely related topic: ``Generalized Plasmoid Instability in Time Evolving Current Sheets''. Hence, we request the committee to ensure that these 2 posters are placed alongside each other.

  6. Three-dimensional evolution of a relativistic current sheet: triggering of magnetic reconnection by the guide field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenitani, S; Hoshino, M

    2005-08-26

    The linear and nonlinear evolution of a relativistic current sheet of pair (e(+/-)) plasmas is investigated by three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. In a Harris configuration, it is obtained that the magnetic energy is fast dissipated by the relativistic drift kink instability (RDKI). However, when a current-aligned magnetic field (the so-called "guide field") is introduced, the RDKI is stabilized by the magnetic tension force and it separates into two obliquely propagating modes, which we call the relativistic drift-kink-tearing instability. These two waves deform the current sheet so that they trigger relativistic magnetic reconnection at a crossover thinning point. Since relativistic reconnection produces a lot of nonthermal particles, the guide field is of critical importance to study the energetics of a relativistic current sheet.

  7. Ice-sheet modelling accelerated by graphics cards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brædstrup, Christian Fredborg; Damsgaard, Anders; Egholm, David Lundbek

    2014-11-01

    Studies of glaciers and ice sheets have increased the demand for high performance numerical ice flow models over the past decades. When exploring the highly non-linear dynamics of fast flowing glaciers and ice streams, or when coupling multiple flow processes for ice, water, and sediment, researchers are often forced to use super-computing clusters. As an alternative to conventional high-performance computing hardware, the Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) is capable of massively parallel computing while retaining a compact design and low cost. In this study, we present a strategy for accelerating a higher-order ice flow model using a GPU. By applying the newest GPU hardware, we achieve up to 180× speedup compared to a similar but serial CPU implementation. Our results suggest that GPU acceleration is a competitive option for ice-flow modelling when compared to CPU-optimised algorithms parallelised by the OpenMP or Message Passing Interface (MPI) protocols.

  8. Modeling of Unsteady Sheet Cavitation on Marine Propeller Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyros A. Kinnas

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Unsteady sheet cavitation is very common on marine propulsor blades. The authors summarize a lifting-surface and a surface-panel model to solve for the unsteady cavitating flow around a propeller that is subject to nonaxisymmetric inflow. The time-dependent extent and thickness of the cavity were determined by using an iterative method. The cavity detachment was determined by applying the smooth detachment criterion in an iterative manner. A nonzeroradius developed vortex cavity model was utilized at the tip of the blade, and the trailing wake geometry was determined using a fully unsteady wake-alignment process. Comparisons of predictions by the two models and measurements from several experiments are given.

  9. A computational model for He{sup +} ions in a magnetized sheet plasma: comparative analysis between model and experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blantocas, Gene Q. [West Visayas State Univ., Lapaz, Iloilo City (Philippines); Ramos, Henry J. [Univ. of the Phillippines, College of Science, National Inst. of Physics, Deliman Quezon City (Philippines); Wada, Motoi [Doshisha Univ., Dept. of Engineering, Kyoto (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    An E x B probe was used to extract He{sup +} ions from a magnetized steady sheet plasma. Plasma parameters T{sub e}, n{sub e} and extracted He{sup +} ion current were analyzed vis-a-vis a modified Saha population density equation of the collisional-radiative model. Numerical calculations show that at low discharge currents and in the hot electron region of the sheet plasma, relative densities of He{sup +} ions show some degree of correlation with ion current profiles established experimentally using the E x B probe. Both experimental and computational results indicate a division of the plasma into two distinct regions each with different formation mechanisms of He{sup +} ions. (author)

  10. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a current-vortex sheet at a 3D magnetic null

    CERN Document Server

    Wyper, P F

    2013-01-01

    We report here, for the first time, an observed instability of a Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) nature occurring in a fully three-dimensional (3D) current-vortex sheet at the fan plane of a 3D magnetic null point. The current-vortex layer forms self-consistently in response to foot point driving around the spine lines of the null. The layer first becomes unstable at an intermediate distance from the null point, with the instability being characterized by a rippling of the fan surface and a filamentation of the current density and vorticity in the shear layer. Owing to the 3D geometry of the shear layer, a branching of the current filaments and vortices is observed. The instability results in a mixing of plasma between the two topologically distinct regions of magnetic flux on either side of the fan separatrix surface, as flux is reconnected across this surface. We make a preliminary investigation of the scaling of the system with the dissipation parameters. Our results indicate that the fan plane separatrix surface is...

  11. Plasmoid and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in Sweet-Parker current sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, N F; Schekochihin, A A; Uzdensky, D A

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) linear theory of the instability of Sweet-Parker (SP) current sheets is developed in the framework of reduced magnetohydrodynamics. A local analysis is performed taking into account the dependence of a generic equilibrium profile on the outflow coordinate. The plasmoid instability [Loureiro et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 100703 (2007)] is recovered, i.e., current sheets are unstable to the formation of a large-wave-number chain of plasmoids (k(max)L(CS)~S(3/8), where k(max) is the wave number of fastest growing mode, S=L(CS)V(A)/η is the Lundquist number, L(CS) is the length of the sheet, V(A) is the Alfvén speed, and η is the plasma resistivity), which grows super Alfvénically fast (γ(max)τ(A)~S(1/4), where γ(max) is the maximum growth rate, and τ(A)=L(CS)/V(A)). For typical background profiles, the growth rate and the wave number are found to increase in the outflow direction. This is due to the presence of another mode, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability, which is triggered at the periphery of the layer, where the outflow velocity exceeds the Alfvén speed associated with the upstream magnetic field. The KH instability grows even faster than the plasmoid instability γ(max)τ(A)~k(max)L(CS)~S(1/2). The effect of viscosity (ν) on the plasmoid instability is also addressed. In the limit of large magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm=ν/η, it is found that γ(max)~S(1/4)Pm(-5/8) and k(max)L(CS)~S(3/8)Pm(-3/16), leading to the prediction that the critical Lundquist number for plasmoid instability in the Pm>1 regime is S(crit)~10(4)Pm(1/2). These results are verified via direct numerical simulation of the linearized equations, using an analytical 2D SP equilibrium solution.

  12. Heating Mechanisms in the Low Solar Atmosphere through Magnetic Reconnection in Current Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Lei; Lin, Jun; Roussev, Ilia I.; Schmieder, Brigitte

    2016-12-01

    We simulate several magnetic reconnection processes in the low solar chromosphere/photosphere; the radiation cooling, heat conduction and ambipolar diffusion are all included. Our numerical results indicate that both the high temperature (≳8 × 104 K) and low temperature (˜104 K) magnetic reconnection events can happen in the low solar atmosphere (100-600 km above the solar surface). The plasma β controlled by plasma density and magnetic fields is one important factor to decide how much the plasma can be heated up. The low temperature event is formed in a high β magnetic reconnection process, Joule heating is the main mechanism to heat plasma and the maximum temperature increase is only several thousand Kelvin. The high temperature explosions can be generated in a low β magnetic reconnection process, slow and fast-mode shocks attached at the edges of the well developed plasmoids are the main physical mechanisms to heat the plasma from several thousand Kelvin to over 8 × 104 K. Gravity in the low chromosphere can strongly hinder the plasmoid instability and the formation of slow-mode shocks in a vertical current sheet. Only small secondary islands are formed; these islands, however, are not as well developed as those in the horizontal current sheets. This work can be applied to understand the heating mechanism in the low solar atmosphere and could possibly be extended to explain the formation of common low temperature Ellerman bombs (˜104 K) and the high temperature Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) bombs (≳8 × 104) in the future.

  13. A balanced water layer concept for subglacial hydrology in large-scale ice sheet models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Goeller

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available There is currently no doubt about the existence of a widespread hydrological network under the Antarctic Ice Sheet, which lubricates the ice base and thus leads to increased ice velocities. Consequently, ice models should incorporate basal hydrology to obtain meaningful results for future ice dynamics and their contribution to global sea level rise. Here, we introduce the balanced water layer concept, covering two prominent subglacial hydrological features for ice sheet modeling on a continental scale: the evolution of subglacial lakes and balance water fluxes. We couple it to the thermomechanical ice-flow model RIMBAY and apply it to a synthetic model domain. In our experiments we demonstrate the dynamic generation of subglacial lakes and their impact on the velocity field of the overlaying ice sheet, resulting in a negative ice mass balance. Furthermore, we introduce an elementary parametrization of the water flux–basal sliding coupling and reveal the predominance of the ice loss through the resulting ice streams against the stabilizing influence of less hydrologically active areas. We point out that established balance flux schemes quantify these effects only partially as their ability to store subglacial water is lacking.

  14. A balanced water layer concept for subglacial hydrology in large scale ice sheet models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeller, S.; Thoma, M.; Grosfeld, K.; Miller, H.

    2012-12-01

    There is currently no doubt about the existence of a wide-spread hydrological network under the Antarctic ice sheet, which lubricates the ice base and thus leads to increased ice velocities. Consequently, ice models should incorporate basal hydrology to obtain meaningful results for future ice dynamics and their contribution to global sea level rise. Here, we introduce the balanced water layer concept, covering two prominent subglacial hydrological features for ice sheet modeling on a continental scale: the evolution of subglacial lakes and balance water fluxes. We couple it to the thermomechanical ice-flow model RIMBAY and apply it to a synthetic model domain inspired by the Gamburtsev Mountains, Antarctica. In our experiments we demonstrate the dynamic generation of subglacial lakes and their impact on the velocity field of the overlaying ice sheet, resulting in a negative ice mass balance. Furthermore, we introduce an elementary parametrization of the water flux-basal sliding coupling and reveal the predominance of the ice loss through the resulting ice streams against the stabilizing influence of less hydrologically active areas. We point out, that established balance flux schemes quantify these effects only partially as their ability to store subglacial water is lacking.

  15. GEOPHYSICS, ASTRONOMY, AND ASTROPHYSICS: Cluster Observation of Electrostatic Solitary Waves around Magnetic Null Point in Thin Current Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi-You; Deng, Xiao-Hua; Zhou, Meng; Yuan, Zhi-Gang; Wang, Jing-Fang; Lin, Xi; Lin, Min-Hui; Fu, Song

    2010-01-01

    Electrostatic solitary waves (ESWs) are observed in the vicinity of the magnetic null of the widely studied magnetic reconnection taking place at the near-earth tail when current sheet becomes dramatic thinning during substorm time on 1 October 2001. We use the Imada method for the 2-D reconnection model and study the characteristics of ESWs near the X-line region and the magnetic null points. The result shows that the amplitude of the observed ESWs in the vicinity of X-line region ranges from 0.1 mV/m to 5 mV/m, and the amplitude is larger near the magnetic null points. The generation mechanism and the role of ESWs associated with magnetic reconnection are also discussed.

  16. Friction and lubrication modeling in sheet metal forming simulations of a Volvo XC90 inner door

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigvant, M.; Pilthammar, J.; Hol, J.; Wiebenga, J. H.; Chezan, T.; Carleer, B.; van den Boogaard, A. H.

    2016-11-01

    The quality of sheet metal formed parts is strongly dependent on the tribology, friction and lubrication conditions that are acting in the actual production process. Although friction is of key importance, it is currently not considered in detail in stamping simulations. This paper presents a selection of results considering friction and lubrication modeling in sheet metal forming simulations of the Volvo XC90 right rear door inner. For this purpose, the TriboForm software is used in combination with the AutoForm software. Validation of the simulation results is performed using door inner parts taken from the press line in a full-scale production run. The results demonstrate the improved prediction accuracy of stamping simulations by accounting for accurate friction and lubrication conditions, and the strong influence of friction conditions on both the part quality and the overall production stability.

  17. Climate Model Dependency and Understanding the Antarctic Ice Sheet during the Warm Late Pliocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Aisling; de Boer, Bas; Bernales, Jorge; Hunter, Stephen; Haywood, Alan

    2016-04-01

    In the context of future climate change, understanding the nature and behaviour of ice sheets during warm intervals of Earth history is fundamentally important. A warm period in the Late Pliocene (3.264 to 3.025 million years before present) can serve as a potential analogue for projected future climates. Although Pliocene ice locations and extents are still poorly constrained, a significant contribution to sea-level rise should be expected from both the Greenland ice sheet and the West and East Antarctic ice sheets based on palaeo sea-level reconstructions and geological evidence. Following a five year international project PLISMIP (Pliocene Ice Sheet Modeling Intercomparison Project) we present the final set of results which quantify uncertainty in climate model-based predictions of the Antarctic ice sheet. In this study we use an ensemble of climate model forcings within a multi-ice sheet model framework to assess the climate (model) dependency of large scale features of the Antarctic ice sheet. Seven coupled atmosphere-ocean climate models are used to derive surface temperature, precipitation and oceanic forcing that drive three ice sheet models (over the grounded and floating domain). Similar to results presented over Greenland, we show that the reconstruction of the Antarctic ice sheet is sensitive to which climate model is used to provide the forcing field. Key areas of uncertainty include West Antarctica, the large subglacial basins of East Antarctica and the overall thickness of the continental interior of East Antarctica. We relate the results back to geological proxy data, such as those relating to exposure rates which provide information on potential ice sheet thickness. Finally we discuss as to whether the choice of modelling framework (i.e. climate model and ice sheet model used) or the choice of boundary conditions causes the greatest uncertainty in ice sheet reconstructions of the warm Pliocene.

  18. Hydrostatic grounding line parameterization in ice sheet models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Seroussi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of grounding line migration is essential to simulate accurately the behavior of marine ice sheets and investigate their stability. Here, we assess the sensitivity of numerical models to the parameterization of the grounding line position. We run the MISMIP3D benchmark experiments using a two-dimensional shelfy-stream approximation (SSA model with different mesh resolutions and different sub-element parameterizations of grounding line position. Results show that different grounding line parameterizations lead to different steady state grounding line positions as well as different retreat/advance rates. Our simulations explain why some vertically depth-averaged model simulations exhibited behaviors similar to full-Stokes models in the MISMIP3D benchmark, while the vast majority of simulations based on SSA showed results deviating significantly from full-Stokes results. The results reveal that differences between simulations performed with and without sub-element parameterization are as large as those performed with different approximations of the stress balance equations and that the reversibility test can be passed at much lower resolutions than the steady-state grounding line position. We conclude that fixed grid models that do not employ such a parameterization should be avoided, as they do not provide accurate estimates of grounding line dynamics, even at high spatial resolution. For models that include sub-element grounding line parameterization, a mesh resolution lower than 2 km should be employed.

  19. Data assimilation and prognostic whole ice sheet modelling with the variationally derived, higher order, open source, and fully parallel ice sheet model VarGlaS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Brinkerhoff

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a novel, higher order, finite element ice sheet model called VarGlaS (Variational Glacier Simulator, which is built on the finite element framework FEniCS. Contrary to standard procedure in ice sheet modelling, VarGlaS formulates ice sheet motion as the minimization of an energy functional, conferring advantages such as a consistent platform for making numerical approximations, a coherent relationship between motion and heat generation, and implicit boundary treatment. VarGlaS also solves the equations of enthalpy rather than temperature, avoiding the solution of a contact problem. Rather than include a lengthy model spin-up procedure, VarGlaS possesses an automated framework for model inversion. These capabilities are brought to bear on several benchmark problems in ice sheet modelling, as well as a 500 yr simulation of the Greenland ice sheet at high resolution. VarGlaS performs well in benchmarking experiments and, given a constant climate and a 100 yr relaxation period, predicts a mass evolution of the Greenland ice sheet that matches present-day observations of mass loss. VarGlaS predicts a thinning in the interior and thickening of the margins of the ice sheet.

  20. Ice sheet model dependency of the simulated Greenland Ice Sheet in the mid-Pliocene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenig, S. J.; Dolan, A. M.; De Boer, B.; Stone, E. J.; Hill, D. J.; Deconto, R. M.; Abe-Ouchi, A.; Lunt, D. J.; Pollard, D.; Quiquet, A.; Saito, F.; Savage, J.; Van De Wal, R.

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of the nature and behavior of ice sheets in past warm periods is important for constraining the potential impacts of future climate change. The Pliocene warm period (between 3.264 and 3.025 Ma) saw global temperatures similar to those projected for future climates; nevertheless, Pl

  1. Earthward electric field and its reversal in the near-Earth current sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Angelopoulos, V.; Runov, A.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2016-11-01

    Using Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms observations (radial distance r from 9 to 35 Earth radii, RE), we investigate ion and electron contributions to the cross-tail current density in the magnetotail current sheet. We analyze plasma pressure measurements (including the contribution from high-energy particles) and estimate the magnitudes of ion and electron diamagnetic drifts. In the downtail, r > 15RE, region, ion (electron) diamagnetic drifts are shown to provide more than 50% (less than 25%) of the cross-tail current density at the neutral plane, Bx=0. Conversely, in the near-Earth region, r≤15RE, the ion (electron) diamagnetic drift contribution to the cross-tail current density is 20% (50%). The directly measured duskward (dawnward) component of the ion (electron) velocity, vyi (-vye), where y is the GSM direction, is very small (quite large) in the downtail region but large (small) in the near-Earth region. This systematic discrepancy between the expected values of vyi, -vye (based on estimates of diamagnetic drifts) and the direct measurements of the velocity, vyi, -vye, is consistent with a contribution to the total velocity by an E × B drift caused by an electric field oriented parallel to the x axis, Ex. To decrease the ion (increase the electron) total drift to agree with the measured flows in the downtail region and increase (decrease) this total drift to match the measurements in the near-Earth region, this Ex would need to be directed earthward at r > 15RE and tailward at r≤15RE. Such an Ex distribution is consistent with the equatorial projection of the Harang discontinuity.

  2. Marine ice sheet model performance depends on basal sliding physics and sub-shelf melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladstone, Rupert Michael; Warner, Roland Charles; Galton-Fenzi, Benjamin Keith; Gagliardini, Olivier; Zwinger, Thomas; Greve, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    Computer models are necessary for understanding and predicting marine ice sheet behaviour. However, there is uncertainty over implementation of physical processes at the ice base, both for grounded and floating glacial ice. Here we implement several sliding relations in a marine ice sheet flow-line model accounting for all stress components and demonstrate that model resolution requirements are strongly dependent on both the choice of basal sliding relation and the spatial distribution of ice shelf basal melting.Sliding relations that reduce the magnitude of the step change in basal drag from grounded ice to floating ice (where basal drag is set to zero) show reduced dependence on resolution compared to a commonly used relation, in which basal drag is purely a power law function of basal ice velocity. Sliding relations in which basal drag goes smoothly to zero as the grounding line is approached from inland (due to a physically motivated incorporation of effective pressure at the bed) provide further reduction in resolution dependence.A similar issue is found with the imposition of basal melt under the floating part of the ice shelf: melt parameterisations that reduce the abruptness of change in basal melting from grounded ice (where basal melt is set to zero) to floating ice provide improved convergence with resolution compared to parameterisations in which high melt occurs adjacent to the grounding line.Thus physical processes, such as sub-glacial outflow (which could cause high melt near the grounding line), impact on capability to simulate marine ice sheets. If there exists an abrupt change across the grounding line in either basal drag or basal melting, then high resolution will be required to solve the problem. However, the plausible combination of a physical dependency of basal drag on effective pressure, and the possibility of low ice shelf basal melt rates next to the grounding line, may mean that some marine ice sheet systems can be reliably simulated at

  3. Towards Industrial Application of Damage Models for Sheet Metal Forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doig, M.; Roll, K.

    2011-05-01

    Due to global warming and financial situation the demand to reduce the CO2-emission and the production costs leads to the permanent development of new materials. In the automotive industry the occupant safety is an additional condition. Bringing these arguments together the preferable approach for lightweight design of car components, especially for body-in-white, is the use of modern steels. Such steel grades, also called advanced high strength steels (AHSS), exhibit a high strength as well as a high formability. Not only their material behavior but also the damage behavior of AHSS is different compared to the performances of standard steels. Conventional methods for the damage prediction in the industry like the forming limit curve (FLC) are not reliable for AHSS. Physically based damage models are often used in crash and bulk forming simulations. The still open question is the industrial application of these models for sheet metal forming. This paper evaluates the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model and the model of Lemaitre within commercial codes with a goal of industrial application.

  4. Enthalpy benchmark experiments for numerical ice sheet models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kleiner

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We present benchmark experiments to test the implementation of enthalpy and the corresponding boundary conditions in numerical ice sheet models. The first experiment tests particularly the functionality of the boundary condition scheme and the basal melt rate calculation during transient simulations. The second experiment addresses the steady-state enthalpy profile and the resulting position of the cold–temperate transition surface (CTS. For both experiments we assume ice flow in a parallel-sided slab decoupled from the thermal regime. Since we impose several assumptions on the experiment design, analytical solutions can be formulated for the proposed numerical experiments. We compare simulation results achieved by three different ice flow-models with these analytical solutions. The models agree well to the analytical solutions, if the change in conductivity between cold and temperate ice is properly considered in the model. In particular, the enthalpy gradient at the cold side of the CTS vanishes in the limit of vanishing conductivity in the temperate ice part as required from the physical jump conditions at the CTS.

  5. X-ray emission from the base of a current sheet in the wake of a CME

    CERN Document Server

    Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Lin, Robert P

    2011-01-01

    Following a CME which started on 2002 November 26, RHESSI, the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, observed for 12 hours an X-ray source above the solar limb, at altitudes between 0.1 and 0.3 RS above the photosphere. The GOES baseline was remarkably high throughout this event. The X-ray source's temperature peaked around 10-11 MK, and its emission measure increased throughout this time interval. Higher up, at 0.7 RS, hot (initially >8 MK) plasma has been observed by UVCS on SoHO for 2.3 days. This hot plasma was interpreted as the signature of a current sheet trailing the CME (Bemporad et al. 2006). The thermal energy content of the X-ray source is more than an order of magnitude larger than in the current sheet. Hence, it could be the source of the hot plasma in the current sheet, although current sheet heating by magnetic reconnection within it cannot be discounted. To better characterize the X-ray spectrum, we have used novel techniques (back-projection based and visibility-based) for long inte...

  6. Sheet metal forming optimization by using surrogate modeling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hu; Ye, Fan; Chen, Lei; Li, Enying

    2017-01-01

    Surrogate assisted optimization has been widely applied in sheet metal forming design due to its efficiency. Therefore, to improve the efficiency of design and reduce the product development cycle, it is important for scholars and engineers to have some insight into the performance of each surrogate assisted optimization method and make them more flexible practically. For this purpose, the state-of-the-art surrogate assisted optimizations are investigated. Furthermore, in view of the bottleneck and development of the surrogate assisted optimization and sheet metal forming design, some important issues on the surrogate assisted optimization in support of the sheet metal forming design are analyzed and discussed, involving the description of the sheet metal forming design, off-line and online sampling strategies, space mapping algorithm, high dimensional problems, robust design, some challenges and potential feasible methods. Generally, this paper provides insightful observations into the performance and potential development of these methods in sheet metal forming design.

  7. Firn meltwater retention on the Greenland Ice Sheet: a model comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Christian R.; Reijmer, Carleen H.; van den Broeke, Michiel R.; Wever, Nander; Forster, Richard R.; Koenig, Lora S.; Kuipers Munneke, Peter; Lehning, Michael; Lhermitte, Stef; Ligtenberg, Stefan R. M.; Miège, Clément; Noël, Brice P. Y.

    2017-01-01

    Runoff has recently become the main source of mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet and is an important contributor to global sea level rise. Linking runoff to surface meltwater production is complex, as meltwater can be retained within the firn by refreezing or perennial liquid water storage. To constrain these uncertainties, the outputs of two offline snow/firn models of different complexity (IMAU-FDM and SNOWPACK) are compared to assess the sensitivity of meltwater retention to the model formulation (e.g., densification, irreducible water content, vertical resolution). Results indicate that model differences are largest in areas where firn aquifers form, i.e., particularly along the south-eastern margin of the ice sheet. The IMAU-FDM simulates higher densification rates for such climatic conditions and prescribes a lower irreducible water content than SNOWPACK. As a result, the model predicts substantially lower amounts of refreezing and liquid water storage. SNOWPACK performs better for this area, confirmed both by density profiles from firn cores and radar-inferred observations. Refreezing integrated over the entire ice sheet and averaged for the period 1960 - 2014 amounts to 216 Gt a-1 (IMAU-FDM) and 242 Gt a-1 (SNOWPACK), which is 41% and 46% of the total liquid water input (snowmelt and rainfall). The mean areal extents of perennial firn aquifers for 2010 - 2014 simulated by the models are 55,700 km2 (IMAU-FDM) and 90,200 km2 (SNOWPACK). Discrepancies between modeled firn profiles and observations emphasize the importance of processes currently not accounted for in most snow/firn models, such as vertical heterogeneous percolation, ponding of water on impermeable layers, lateral (sub-)surface water flow, and the issue of ill-constrained refreezing conditions at the base of firn aquifers.

  8. Laboratory study of magnetic reconnection with a density asymmetry across the current sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jongsoo; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Myers, Clayton E; Chen, Li-Jen

    2014-08-29

    The effects of a density asymmetry across the current sheet on anti-parallel magnetic reconnection are studied systematically in a laboratory plasma. Despite a significant density ratio of up to 10, the in-plane magnetic field profile is not significantly changed. On the other hand, the out-of-plane Hall magnetic field profile is considerably modified; it is almost bipolar in structure with the density asymmetry, as compared to quadrupolar in structure with the symmetric configuration. Moreover, the ion stagnation point is shifted to the low-density side, and the electrostatic potential profile also becomes asymmetric with a deeper potential well on the low-density side. Nonclassical bulk electron heating together with electromagnetic fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range is observed near the low-density-side separatrix. The dependence of the ion outflow and reconnection electric field on the density asymmetry is measured and compared with theoretical expectations. The measured ion outflow speeds are about 40% of the theoretical values.

  9. Energy dynamics and current sheet structure in fluid and kinetic simulations of decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Makwana, K D; Li, H; Daughton, W; Cattaneo, F

    2014-01-01

    Simulations of decaying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are performed with a fluid and a kinetic code. The initial condition is an ensemble of long-wavelength, counter-propagating, shear-Alfv\\'{e}n waves, which interfere and rapidly generate strong MHD turbulence. The total energy is conserved and the rate of turbulent energy decay is very similar in both codes, although the fluid code has numerical dissipation whereas the kinetic code has kinetic dissipation. The inertial range power spectrum index is similar in both the codes. The fluid code shows a perpendicular wavenumber spectral slope of $k_{\\perp}^{-1.3}$. The kinetic code shows a spectral slope of $k_{\\perp}^{-1.5}$ for smaller simulation domain, and $k_{\\perp}^{-1.3}$ for larger domain. We estimate that collisionless damping mechanisms in the kinetic code can account for the dissipation of the observed nonlinear energy cascade. Current sheets are geometrically characterized. Their lengths and widths are in good agreement between the two codes. T...

  10. Modelling of sand transport under wave-generated sheet flows with a RANS diffusion model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassan, Wael; Ribberink, Jan S.

    2010-01-01

    A 1DV-RANS diffusion model is used to study sand transport processes in oscillatory flat-bed/sheet flow conditions. The central aim is the verification of the model with laboratory data and to identify processes controlling the magnitude and direction (‘onshore’/‘offshore’) of the net time-averaged

  11. Effect of the initial plasma parameters on the structure of the current sheets developing in two-dimensional magnetic fields with a null line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovskaya, G. V.; Frank, A. G.; Bogdanov, S. Yu.

    2010-07-01

    The effect of the initial plasma parameters on the structure of the plasma of the current sheets that form in two-dimensional magnetic fields with a null line is studied by holographic interferometry. The evolution of the plasma sheets that develop in an initial low-density plasma, where a gas is mainly ionized by a pulse current passing through the plasma and initiating the formation of a current sheet, has been comprehensively studied for the first time. At the early stage of evolution, the spatial structure of such a plasma sheet differs substantially from the classic current sheets forming in a dense plasma. Nevertheless, extended plasma sheets with similar parameters form eventually irrespective of the initial plasma density.

  12. A statistical study of the THEMIS satellite data for plasma sheet electrons carrying auroral upward field-aligned currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Shiokawa, K.; McFadden, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    The magnetospheric electron precipitation along the upward field-aligned currents without the potential difference causes diffuse aurora, and the magnetospheric electrons accelerated by a field-aligned potential difference cause the intense and bright type of aurora, namely discrete aurora. In this study, we are trying to find out when and where the aurora can be caused with or without electron acceleration. We statistically investigate electron density, temperature, thermal current, and conductivity in the plasma sheet using the data from the electrostatic analyzer (ESA) onboard the THEMIS-D satellite launched in 2007. According to Knight (Planet. Space Sci., 1973) and Lyons (JGR, 1980), the thermal current, jth(∝ nT^(1/2) where n is electron density and T is electron temperature in the plasma sheet), represents the upper limit to field aligned current that can be carried by magnetospheric electrons without field-aligned potential difference. The conductivity, K(∝ nT^(-1/2)), represents the efficiency of the upward field-aligned current (j) that the field-aligned potential difference (V) can produce (j=KV). Therefore, estimating jth and K in the plasma sheet is important in understanding the ability of plasma sheet electrons to carry the field-aligned current which is driven by various magnetospheric processes such as flow shear and azimuthal pressure gradient. Similar study was done by Shiokawa et al. (2000) based on the auroral electron data obtained by the DMSP satellites above the auroral oval and the AMPTE/IRM satellite in the near Earth plasma sheet at 10-18 Re on February-June 1985 and March-June 1986 during the solar minimum. The purpose of our study is to examine auroral electrons with pitch angle information inside 12 Re where Shiokawa et al. (2000) did not investigate well. For preliminary result, we found that in the dawn side inner magnetosphere (source of the region 2 current), electrons can make sufficient thermal current without field

  13. LIVVkit: An extensible, python-based, land ice verification and validation toolkit for ice sheet models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Joseph H.; Bennett, Andrew R.; Evans, Katherine J.; Price, Stephen; Hoffman, Matthew; Lipscomb, William H.; Fyke, Jeremy; Vargo, Lauren; Boghozian, Adrianna; Norman, Matthew; Worley, Patrick H.

    2017-06-01

    To address the pressing need to better understand the behavior and complex interaction of ice sheets within the global Earth system, significant development of continental-scale, dynamical ice sheet models is underway. Concurrent to the development of the Community Ice Sheet Model (CISM), the corresponding verification and validation (V&V) process is being coordinated through a new, robust, Python-based extensible software package, the Land Ice Verification and Validation toolkit (LIVVkit). Incorporated into the typical ice sheet model development cycle, it provides robust and automated numerical verification, software verification, performance validation, and physical validation analyses on a variety of platforms, from personal laptops to the largest supercomputers. LIVVkit operates on sets of regression test and reference data sets, and provides comparisons for a suite of community prioritized tests, including configuration and parameter variations, bit-for-bit evaluation, and plots of model variables to indicate where differences occur. LIVVkit also provides an easily extensible framework to incorporate and analyze results of new intercomparison projects, new observation data, and new computing platforms. LIVVkit is designed for quick adaptation to additional ice sheet models via abstraction of model specific code, functions, and configurations into an ice sheet model description bundle outside the main LIVVkit structure. Ultimately, through shareable and accessible analysis output, LIVVkit is intended to help developers build confidence in their models and enhance the credibility of ice sheet models overall.

  14. CURRENT SHEET REGULATION OF SOLAR NEAR-RELATIVISTIC ELECTRON INJECTION HISTORIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agueda, N.; Sanahuja, B. [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona (Spain); Vainio, R. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki (Finland); Dalla, S. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire (United Kingdom); Lario, D. [Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University (United States)

    2013-03-10

    We present a sample of three large near-relativistic (>50 keV) electron events observed in 2001 by both the ACE and the Ulysses spacecraft, when Ulysses was at high-northern latitudes (>60 Degree-Sign ) and close to 2 AU. Despite the large latitudinal distance between the two spacecraft, electrons injected near the Sun reached both heliospheric locations. All three events were associated with large solar flares, strong decametric type II radio bursts and accompanied by wide (>212 Degree-Sign ) and fast (>1400 km s{sup -1}) coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We use advanced interplanetary transport simulations and make use of the directional intensities observed in situ by the spacecraft to infer the electron injection profile close to the Sun and the interplanetary transport conditions at both low and high latitudes. For the three selected events, we find similar interplanetary transport conditions at different heliolatitudes for a given event, with values of the mean free path ranging from 0.04 AU to 0.27 AU. We find differences in the injection profiles inferred for each spacecraft. We investigate the role that sector boundaries of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) have on determining the characteristics of the electron injection profiles. Extended injection profiles, associated with coronal shocks, are found if the magnetic footpoints of the spacecraft lay in the same magnetic sector as the associated flare, while intermittent sparse injection episodes appear when the spacecraft footpoints are in the opposite sector or a wrap in the HCS bounded the CME structure.

  15. Fact Sheet: Documenting Ground-Water Models Selection at Site Contaminated with Radioactive Substance

    Science.gov (United States)

    This fact sheet summarizes the report by a joint Interagency Environmental Pathway Modeling Working Group. It was designed to be used by technical staff responsible for identifying and implementing flow and transport models to support cleanup decisions.

  16. A parallel high-order accurate finite element nonlinear Stokes ice sheet model and benchmark experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leng, Wei [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Ju, Lili [University of South Carolina; Gunzburger, Max [Florida State University; Price, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ringler, Todd [Los Alamos National Laboratory,

    2012-01-01

    The numerical modeling of glacier and ice sheet evolution is a subject of growing interest, in part because of the potential for models to inform estimates of global sea level change. This paper focuses on the development of a numerical model that determines the velocity and pressure fields within an ice sheet. Our numerical model features a high-fidelity mathematical model involving the nonlinear Stokes system and combinations of no-sliding and sliding basal boundary conditions, high-order accurate finite element discretizations based on variable resolution grids, and highly scalable parallel solution strategies, all of which contribute to a numerical model that can achieve accurate velocity and pressure approximations in a highly efficient manner. We demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of our model by analytical solution tests, established ice sheet benchmark experiments, and comparisons with other well-established ice sheet models.

  17. Exactly Solvable Model for Helix-Coil-Sheet Transitions in Protein Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Schreck, John S

    2010-01-01

    In view of the important role helix-sheet transitions play in protein aggregation, we introduce a simple model to study secondary structural transitions of helix-coil-sheet systems using a Potts model starting with an effective Hamiltonian. This energy function depends on four parameters that approximately describe entropic and enthalpic contributions to the stability of a polypeptide in helical and sheet conformations. The sheet structures involve long-range interactions between residues which are far in sequence, but are in contact in real space. Such contacts are included in the Hamiltonian. Using standard statistical mechanical techniques, the partition function is solved exactly using transfer matrices. Based on this model, we study thermodynamic properties of polypeptides, including phase transitions between helix, sheet, and coil structures.

  18. Antarctic ice volume for the last 740 ka calculated with a simple ice sheet model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    2005-01-01

    Fluctuations in the volume of the Antarctic ice sheet for the last 740 ka are calculated by forcing a simple ice sheet model with a sea-level history (from a composite deep sea δ18O record) and a temperature history (from the Dome C deuterium record). Antarctic ice volume reaches maximum values of a

  19. Modelling the long-term impact of surface warming on Greenland ice sheet mass loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuting; Anker Pedersen, Rasmus; Madsen, Marianne S.; Svendsen, Synne H.; Langen, Peter L.

    2017-04-01

    Projections of future sea level changes require understanding of the response of the Greenland ice sheet to future climate change. Numerous feedbacks between the ice sheet and the climate system mean that comprehensive model setups are required to simulate the concurrent ice sheet and climate changes. Here, the ice sheet response to a warming climate has been studied using a model setup consisting of an earth system model (EC-Earth) interactively coupled to an ice sheet model (PISM). The coupled system has been employed for a 1400-year simulation forced by historical radiative forcing from 1850 onward continued along an extended RCP8.5 scenario to beyond year 3200. The simulation reveals that the rate of mass loss from the Greenland ice sheet increases substantially after 2100. The mass loss hereafter continues at a steady rate, even as the warming rate gradually levels off. As the coupled setup does not include the direct impact of oceanic forcing, the mass loss is due to the combination of a negative surface mass balance and a dynamic response to the surface warming. Increased melt exceeds regional precipitation increases in the surface mass balance, while the surface warming increases the enthalpy (per unit volume) of the ice sheet potentially impacting the rheology and thereby the ice flow. The relative roles of the surface mass balance changes and the dynamic response of the ice flow are further investigated using additional ice sheet model sensitivity experiments, where the ice sheet is forced by the time-varying surface mass balance from the coupled model. We aim to quantify the impact of the simulated surface warming on the ice flow by means of a hybrid simulation where the ice sheet is forced by the surface mass balance from the coupled setup while keeping the ice surface temperature constant. This allows for assessment of the impact of the surface mass balance change, isolated from the dynamical response to the warming surface.

  20. Modeling of Firn Compaction for Estimating Ice-Sheet Mass Change from Observed Ice-Sheet Elevation Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Zwally, H. Jay

    2011-01-01

    Changes in ice-sheet surface elevation are caused by a combination of ice-dynamic imbalance, ablation, temporal variations in accumulation rate, firn compaction and underlying bedrock motion. Thus, deriving the rate of ice-sheet mass change from measured surface elevation change requires information on the rate of firn compaction and bedrock motion, which do not involve changes in mass, and requires an appropriate firn density to associate with elevation changes induced by recent accumulation rate variability. We use a 25 year record of surface temperature and a parameterization for accumulation change as a function of temperature to drive a firn compaction model. We apply this formulation to ICESat measurements of surface elevation change at three locations on the Greenland ice sheet in order to separate the accumulation-driven changes from the ice-dynamic/ablation-driven changes, and thus to derive the corresponding mass change. Our calculated densities for the accumulation-driven changes range from 410 to 610 kg/cu m, which along with 900 kg/cu m for the dynamic/ablation-driven changes gives average densities ranging from 680 to 790 kg/cu m. We show that using an average (or "effective") density to convert elevation change to mass change is not valid where the accumulation and the dynamic elevation changes are of opposite sign.

  1. Regions of negative Bz in the Tsyganenko 1989 model neutral sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, E. F.; Rostoker, G.; Huang, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    A disturbing feature of the Tsyganenko (1989) model magnetic field, namely the occurrence of negative Bz in the model neutral sheet is pointed out. On the basis of observations of Bz in the neutral sheet it is concluded that this is an artifact of the model and not a real effect. This feature of the model should be considered when the model is used either to infer mappings from the ionosphere to the vicinity of the neutral sheet or as a tool in theoretical studies. It is proposed that in the development of future models, it would be useful for the distribution of Bz in the neutral sheet to be imposed as a constraint on the model.

  2. 太阳爆发过程中的大尺度磁重联电流片:理论和观测%Large-Scale Reconnecting Current Sheets in Solar Eruptions: Theories and Observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴宁; 李燕; 沈呈彩; 林隽

    2012-01-01

    sheets form and develop in a highly dynamical fashion in an eruptive process. Theoretical calculations indicate that the current sheet in major eruptive processes could evolve and extend in length at speed up to 102 km·s-1, and observational results suggest rapid evolution of the current sheet as well. In such a process, the scale, especially the thickness, of the current sheet should not be as simple as the Larmor radius of particles. Instead various plasma instabilities inevitably occur and play an important role in governing the scale of the current sheet. Consistent with the above theoretical argument, the combination of observations from LASCO, EIT, UVCS on board SOHO detected directly the CME/flare current sheet soon after the basic framework of the catastrophe model of solar eruptions had constructed, and confirmed that the current sheet predicted by the model does exist and is observable in major eruptions. Plasma blobs flowing with the reconnection outflow inside the current sheet sunward and anti-sunward were observed subsequently, indicating that magnetic re-connection is occurring or has occurred. The reconnection inflow observed in the eruption marks the location and orientation of the current sheet, and helped estimate the apparent thickness of the current sheet for the first time. The result is astonishing, which shows that the CME/flare current sheet could be as thick as a few times 104 km! A set of follow-ups by different instruments, one of them is even on the ground, and in different wavelengths consistently provided clear evidence bringing the sheet thickness to range from a few times 104 km to a few times 105 km! The impact of projection effects on measurements surely exists, and causes the sheet to look thicker than it actually is. The geometric structure and relatively tenuous material of the current sheet yields that its size and emission are easily dominated by other large-scale and bright structures nearby. So detailed analyses showed that in

  3. Process control for sheet-metal stamping process modeling, controller design and shop-floor implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Yongseob; Ulsoy, A Galip

    2014-01-01

    Process Control for Sheet-Metal Stamping presents a comprehensive and structured approach to the design and implementation of controllers for the sheet metal stamping process. The use of process control for sheet-metal stamping greatly reduces defects in deep-drawn parts and can also yield large material savings from reduced scrap. Sheet-metal forming is a complex process and most often characterized by partial differential equations that are numerically solved using finite-element techniques. In this book, twenty years of academic research are reviewed and the resulting technology transitioned to the industrial environment. The sheet-metal stamping process is modeled in a manner suitable for multiple-input multiple-output control system design, with commercially available sensors and actuators. These models are then used to design adaptive controllers and real-time controller implementation is discussed. Finally, experimental results from actual shopfloor deployment are presented along with ideas for further...

  4. Toward a unified dynamic model for dykes and cone sheets in volcanic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, Olivier; Burchardt, Steffi; Hallot, Erwan; Mourgues, Régis; Bulois, Cédric

    2014-05-01

    Igneous sheet intrusions, such as dykes and cone sheets, represent various geometries of magma channels through the crust. In many volcanoes, they coexist as parts of complex plumbing systems and are likely fed by common sources. How they form is fundamental regarding volcanic hazards, but yet no dynamic model simulates and predicts satisfactorily the diversity of sheet intrusions observed in volcanic systems. Here we present scaled laboratory experiments that reproduced dyke and cone sheet intrusion geometries under controlled conditions. Combined to a parametric study, a dimensional analysis shows that two dimensionless numbers Π1 and Π2 govern the formation of these intrusions. Π1 is geometrical and describes the geometry of the magma source; Π2 is dynamical and compares the local viscous stresses in the flowing magma to the host-rock strength. Plotting our experiments against these two numbers results in a phase diagram evidencing a dyke and a cone-sheet field, separated by a sharp transition that fits a power law. This result shows that dykes and cone sheets correspond to two distinct physical regimes of magma emplacement in the Earth's crust. Cone sheets preferentially form when their source is shallow relative to their size, when the magma influx (or viscosity) is large, or when the host rock is weak. In addition, both dykes and cone sheets may form from the same source, the shift from one regime to the other being then controlled by magma dynamics, i.e. different values of Π2. We compare our phase diagram to geological data and show that the extrapolated empirical dyke-to-cone sheet transition predicts the occurrence of dykes and cone sheets in various natural volcanic settings. This study thus provides a unified dynamic model of sheet intrusions emplacement and captures fundamental mechanisms of magma transport in the Earth's crust.

  5. Ion motion in the current sheet with sheared magnetic field – Part 1: Quasi-adiabatic theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Artemyev

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a theory of trapped ion motion in the magnetotail current sheet with a constant dawn–dusk component of the magnetic field. Particle trajectories are described analytically using the quasi-adiabatic invariant corresponding to averaging of fast oscillations around the tangential component of the magnetic field. We consider particle dynamics in the quasi-adiabatic approximation and demonstrate that the principal role is played by large (so called geometrical jumps of the quasi-adiabatic invariant. These jumps appear due to the current sheet asymmetry related to the presence of the dawn–dusk magnetic field. The analytical description is compared with results of numerical integration. We show that there are four possible regimes of particle motion. Each regime is characterized by certain ranges of values of the dawn–dusk magnetic field and particle energy. We find the critical value of the dawn–dusk magnetic field, where jumps of the quasi-adiabatic invariant vanish.

  6. 3D MHD simulation of post--flare supra--arcade downflows in a turbulent current sheet medium

    CERN Document Server

    Cécere, M; Costa, A; Schneiter, M

    2014-01-01

    Supra--arcade downflows (SADs) are sunward, generally dark, plasma density depletions originated above posteruption flare arcades. In this paper using 3D MHD simulations we investigate if the SAD cavities can be produced by a direct combination of the tearing mode and Kelvin--Helmholtz instabilities leading to a turbulent current sheet (CS) medium or if the current sheet is merely the background where SADs are produced triggered by an impulsive deposition of energy. We find that to give account of the observational dark lane structures an addition of local energy provided by a reconnection event is required. This local reconnection can trigger a nonlinear internal wave dynamic, generated by the bouncing and interfering of shocks and expansion waves that compose relatively stable voids.

  7. Generation of a new Greenland Ice Sheet Digital Elevation Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagarajan, Sudhagar; Csatho, Beata M; Schenk, Anton F

    and spaceborne laser altimetry (airborne: Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) (1993-present), Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor(LVIS) (2007,2009 and 2011); spaceborne: Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) (2003-2009)) and DEMs have been derived from stereo satellite imagery (e.g., SPOT (40 m), ASTER (15...... conditions, by fusing a photoclinometry DEM, SPOT and ASTER DEMs as well as elevations from ICESat, ATM and LVIS laser altimetry. The new multi-resolution DEM has a resolution of 40 m x 40 m in the marginal ice sheet regions and 250 m elsewhere. The ice sheet margin is mapped from SPOT and Landsat imagery...... and SPOT DEMs are used to cover the complex topography of ice sheet marginal regions. The accuracy of SPOT DEMs is approximately $\\pm 6$ m except in the areas covered by clouds regions, where the SPOT elevations were replaced by ASTER DEMs. The ASTER DEMs were checked and improved by the DEM derived from...

  8. Modelling Greenland ice sheet inception and sustainability during the Late Pliocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contoux, C.; Dumas, C.; Ramstein, G.; Jost, A.; Dolan, A. M.

    2015-08-01

    Understanding the evolution and dynamics of ice sheet growth during past warm periods is a very important topic considering the potential total removal of the Greenland ice sheet. In this regard, one key event is the full glaciation of Greenland that occurred at the end of the Pliocene warm period, which remains partially unexplained. Previous modelling studies succeeded in reproducing this full glaciation either by imposing an unrealistically low CO2 value or by imposing a partial ice sheet over the surface of Greenland. Although they highlight some fundamental mechanisms, none of these studies are fully satisfactory because they do not reflect realistic conditions occurring during the Late Pliocene. Through a series of simulations with the IPSL-CM5A coupled climate model used to force the GRISLI ice sheet model, we show that a drop in CO2 levels does not lead to an abrupt inception of the Greenland ice sheet. High ablation rates in central and northern Greenland combined with low accumulation prevent such an abrupt inception. Ice sheet inception occurs when low summer insolation and CO2 levels below modern values are combined, the Greenland ice sheet being restricted to the southeast region, where high topography favours this build-up. This ice sheet experiences only partial melting during summer insolation maxima combined with high CO2 levels. Further growth of the ice sheet with recoupling experiments is important at 360 and 280 ppm during insolation minima. Thus, the full glaciation at 2.6 Ma could be the result of a cumulative build-up of the Greenland ice sheet over several orbital cycles, leading to progressively more intense glaciations during low summer insolation periods. Although this result could be a shortcoming of the modelling framework itself, the gradual glacial inception interpreted from the oxygen isotope record could support our scenario.

  9. Radiation from a current sheet at the interface between a conventional medium and anisotropic negative refractive medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yuan You

    2009-08-01

    In this paper we investigate the radiation from a current sheet at the interface between semiinfinite isotropic positive refractive medium and anisotropic negative refractive medium. The distribution of the electric and magnetic fields in two regions and Poynting vectors associated with propagating and evanescent waves are calculated. The reasons for the singularity of the electric or magnetic field are briefly provided if the waves are evanescent in two media.

  10. Optimization Of Pulsed Current Parameters To Minimize Pitting Corrosion İn Pulsed Current Micro Plasma Arc Welded Aısı 304l Sheets Using Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondapalli Siva Prasad

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Austenitic stainless steel sheets have gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of components, which require high temperature resistance and corrosion resistance, such as metal bellows used in expansion joints in aircraft, aerospace and petroleum industry. In case of single pass welding of thinner sections of this alloy, Pulsed Current Micro Plasma Arc Welding (PCMPAW was found beneficial due to its advantages over the conventional continuous current process. This paper highlights the development of empirical mathematical equations using multiple regression analysis, correlating various process parameters to pitting corrosion rates in PCMPAW of AISI 304L sheets in 1 Normal HCl. The experiments were conducted based on a five factor, five level central composite rotatable design matrix. A Genetic Algorithm (GA was developed to optimize the process parameters for minimizing the pitting corrosion rates.

  11. Current Sheet Structures Observed by the TESIS EUV Telescope during a Flux Rope Eruption on the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, A. A.; Ulyanov, A. S.; Kuzin, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    We use the TESIS EUV telescope to study the current sheet signatures observed during flux rope eruption. The special feature of the TESIS telescope was its ability to image the solar corona up to a distance of 2 {R}⊙ from the Sun’s center in the Fe 171 Å line. The Fe 171 Å line emission illuminates the magnetic field lines, and the TESIS images reveal the coronal magnetic structure at high altitudes. The analyzed coronal mass ejection (CME) had a core with a spiral—flux rope—structure. The spiral shape indicates that the flux rope radius varied along its length. The flux rope had a complex temperature structure: cold legs (70,000 K, observed in He 304 Å line) and a hotter core (0.7 MK, observed in Fe 171 Å line). Such a structure contradicts the common assumption that the CME core is a cold prominence. When the CME impulsively accelerated, a dark double Y-structure appeared below the flux rope. The Y-structure timing, location, and morphology agree with the previously performed MHD simulations of the current sheet. We interpreted the Y-structure as a hot envelope of the current sheet and hot reconnection outflows. The Y-structure had a thickness of 6.0 Mm. Its length increased over time from 79 Mm to more than 411 Mm.

  12. Effects on magnetic reconnection of a density asymmetry across the current sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. Tanaka

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The magnetopause (MP reconnection is characterized by a density asymmetry across the current sheet. The asymmetry is expected to produce characteristic features in the reconnection layer. Here we present a comparison between the Cluster MP crossing reported by Retinò et al. (2006 and virtual observations in two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation results. The simulation, which includes the density asymmetry but has zero guide field in the initial condition, has reproduced well the observed features as follows: (1 The prominent density dip region is detected at the separatrix region (SR on the magnetospheric (MSP side of the MP. (2 The intense electric field normal to the MP is pointing to the center of the MP at the location where the density dip is detected. (3 The ion bulk outflow due to the magnetic reconnection is seen to be biased towards the MSP side. (4 The out-of-plane magnetic field (the Hall magnetic field has bipolar rather than quadrupolar structure, the latter of which is seen for a density symmetric case. The simulation also showed rich electron dynamics (formation of field-aligned beams in the proximity of the separatrices, which was not fully resolved in the observations. Stepping beyond the simulation-observation comparison, we have also analyzed the electron acceleration and the field line structure in the simulation results. It is found that the bipolar Hall magnetic field structure is produced by the substantial drift of the reconnected field lines at the MSP SR due to the enhanced normal electric field. The field-aligned electrons at the same MSP SR are identified as the gun smokes of the electron acceleration in the close proximity of the X-line. We have also analyzed the X-line structure obtained in the simulation to find that the density asymmetry leads to a steep density gradient in the in-flow region, which may lead to a non-stationary behavior of the X-line when three-dimensional freedom is taken into account.

  13. Rotator cuff repair using cell sheets derived from human rotator cuff in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Yoshifumi; Mifune, Yutaka; Inui, Atsuyuki; Sakata, Ryosuke; Muto, Tomoyuki; Takase, Fumiaki; Ueda, Yasuhiro; Kataoka, Takeshi; Kokubu, Takeshi; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2017-02-01

    To achieve biological regeneration of tendon-bone junctions, cell sheets of human rotator-cuff derived cells were used in a rat rotator cuff injury model. Human rotator-cuff derived cells were isolated, and cell sheets were made using temperature-responsive culture plates. Infraspinatus tendons in immunodeficient rats were resected bilaterally at the enthesis. In right shoulders, infraspinatus tendons were repaired by the transosseous method and covered with the cell sheet (sheet group), whereas the left infraspinatus tendons were repaired in the same way without the cell sheet (control group). Histological examinations (safranin-O and fast green staining, isolectin B4, type II collagen, and human-specific CD31) and mRNA expression (vascular endothelial growth factor; VEGF, type II collagen; Col2, and tenomodulin; TeM) were analyzed 4 weeks after surgery. Biomechanical tests were performed at 8 weeks. In the sheet group, proteoglycan at the enthesis with more type II collagen and isolectin B4 positive cells were seen compared with in the control group. Human specific CD31-positive cells were detected only in the sheet group. VEGF and Col2 gene expressions were higher and TeM gene expression was lower in the sheet group than in the control group. In mechanical testing, the sheet group showed a significantly higher ultimate failure load than the control group at 8 weeks. Our results indicated that the rotator-cuff derived cell sheet could promote cartilage regeneration and angiogenesis at the enthesis, with superior mechanical strength compared with the control. Treatment for rotator cuff injury using cell sheets could be a promising strategy for enthesis of tendon tissue engineering. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:289-296, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Mapping of a Hydrological Ice Sheet Drainage Basin on the West Greenland Ice Sheet Margin from ERS-1/2 SAR Interferometry, Ice-Radar Measurement, and Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlstrøm, Andreas P.; Bøggild, C.E.; Stenseng, L.

    2002-01-01

    The hydrological ice-sheet basin draining into the Tasersiaq lake, West Greenland (66°13'N, 50°30'W), was delineated, First using standard digital elevation models (DEMs) for ice-sheet surface and bedrock, and subsequently using a new high-resolution dataset, with a surface DEM derived from repeat...... importance of the potential of the ice overburden pressure compared to the bedrock topography. The meltwater run-off for the basin delineations was modelled with an energy-balance model calibrated with observed ice-sheet ablation and compared to a 25 year time series of measured basin run-off. The standard...

  15. Representing Greenland ice sheet freshwater fluxes in climate models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenaerts, Jan T M; Le Bars, Dewi; Van Kampenhout, Leo; Vizcaino, Miren; Enderlin, Ellyn M.; Van Den Broeke, Michiel R.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a long-term (1850-2200) best estimate of Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) freshwater runoff that improves spatial detail of runoff locations and temporal resolution. Ice discharge is taken from observations since 2000 and assumed constant in time. Surface meltwater runoff is retrieved from

  16. Representing Greenland ice sheet freshwater fluxes in climate models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenaerts, J.T.M.; Le Bars, D.; Van Kampenhout, L.; Vizcaino, M.; Enderlin, E.M.; Van den Broeke, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a long-term (1850–2200) best estimate of Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) freshwater runoff that improves spatial detail of runoff locations and temporal resolution. Ice discharge is taken from observations since 2000 and assumed constant in time. Surface meltwater runoff is retrieved from

  17. Strain path dependency in sheet metal. Experiments and models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Riel, M.

    2009-01-01

    Sheet metal forming processes are used to create products that have a high stiffness combined with a small weight. To determine the settings of such a production process, fundamental knowledge of the mechanical behaviour of the metal and of the process itself is required. With the introduction of

  18. Representing Greenland ice sheet freshwater fluxes in climate models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenaerts, J.T.M.; Le Bars, D.; Van Kampenhout, L.; Vizcaino, M.; Enderlin, E.M.; Van den Broeke, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a long-term (1850–2200) best estimate of Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) freshwater runoff that improves spatial detail of runoff locations and temporal resolution. Ice discharge is taken from observations since 2000 and assumed constant in time. Surface meltwater runoff is retrieved from

  19. Representing Greenland ice sheet freshwater fluxes in climate models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenaerts, Jan T M; Le Bars, Dewi; Van Kampenhout, Leo; Vizcaino, Miren; Enderlin, Ellyn M.; Van Den Broeke, Michiel R.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a long-term (1850-2200) best estimate of Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) freshwater runoff that improves spatial detail of runoff locations and temporal resolution. Ice discharge is taken from observations since 2000 and assumed constant in time. Surface meltwater runoff is retrieved from

  20. A simple and realistic model system for studying hydrogen bonds in beta-sheets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Hinnemann, Berit; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the interaction between peptide chains at the level of state-of-the-art ab initio density functional theory. We propose an interacting periodic polypeptide model for studying the interactions in beta-sheets and apply this to glycine and alanine peptide chains in both parallel...... and antiparallel structures. The calculated structures of alanine are compared to x-ray structures of beta-sheets and the model is found to reproduce the geometry of the hydrogen bonds very well both concerning parallel and antiparallel beta-sheets. We investigate the structures of both the N-H...O=C and the C...

  1. Research Program of International Geophysical Year (Igy-1957 Have Ended In the Millennium Beginning By Discovery of the Theoretical Current Sheets in the Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostapenko V. A.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We declare about the discovery in the Nature of theoretical current sheets by S. I. Syrovatskij. The first “natural” current sheet was discovered in flare spectrum, calculated and researched experimentally. The current sheets (CS are found in chromosphere and downward levels in optical range data. The main problem of physics of solar flares has been solved. Magnetic field energy is a primary source of active processes in solar plasma. Current sheet (CS of S. I. Syrovatskij is the mechanism of magnetic energy transformation into plasma energy. The current sheet is not discovered in a flare, as expected. As a matter of fact, solar flare is in itself a current sheet, its direct observed development in chromosphere plasma. Continuous current sheet radiation is the «black» (BLF and the «white» (WLF flare (like light of Sun photosphere. It is the negative hydrogen ion excitation upon reaching hydrogen plasma density of ˃5 1017 cm -3

  2. The gauging of two-dimensional bosonic sigma models on world-sheets with defects

    CERN Document Server

    Gawedzki, Krzysztof; Waldorf, Konrad

    2013-01-01

    We extend our analysis of the gauging of rigid symmetries in bosonic two-dimensional sigma models with Wess-Zumino terms in the action to the case of world-sheets with defects. A structure that permits a non-anomalous coupling of such sigma models to world-sheet gauge fields of arbitrary topology is analysed, together with obstructions to its existence, and the classification of its inequivalent choices.

  3. Field-aligned currents observed by MMS in the near-Earth plasma sheet during large-scale substorm dipolarizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Rumi; Nagai, Tsugunobu; Giles, Barbara; Le Contel, Olivier; Stawarz, Julia; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Artemyev, Anton

    2017-04-01

    During substorms significant energy conversion has been reported to take place at the sharp dipolarization front in the flow braking region where the probability of observing bursty bulk flows (BBFs) significantly drops. On 10 August 2016, MMS traversed the pre-midnight near-Earth plasma sheet when dipolarization disturbances were detected in an extended nightside local time region by Cluster, Geotail, GOES 13, 14 and 15, and the Van Allen Probes. In an expanding plasma sheet during the dipolarization, MMS detected sub-ion scale field-aligned current layers that are propagating both Earthward (equatorward) as well as tailward (outward). These multi-scale multi-point observations enable a unique investigation of both the meso-scale evolution of the disturbances and the detailed kinetic structures of the fronts and boundaries relevant to the dipolarizations.

  4. Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fact Sheets are available in both English and Spanish and can be downloaded for free. Currently available ... Antiviral Medications to Treat or Prevent Influenza (the Flu) PDF | Espanol PDF Apremilast (Otezla®) PDF | Espanol PDF ...

  5. Three-dimensional Geometry of a Current Sheet in the High Solar Corona: Evidence for Reconnection in the Late Stage of the Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ryun-Young; Vourlidas, Angelos; Webb, David

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by the standard flare model, ray-like structures in the wake of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have been often interpreted as proxies of the reconnecting current sheet connecting the CME with the postflare arcade. We present the three-dimensional properties of a post-CME ray derived from white light images taken from three different viewing perspectives on 2013 September 21. By using a forward modeling method, the direction, cross section, and electron density are determined within the heliocentric distance range of 5-9 R ⊙. The width and depth of the ray are 0.42 ± 0.08 R ⊙ and 1.24 ± 0.35 R ⊙, respectively, and the electron density is (2.0 ± 0.5) × 104 cm-3, which seems to be constant with height. Successive blobs moving outward along the ray are observed around 13 hr after the parent CME onset. We model the three-dimensional geometry of the parent CME with the Gradual Cylindrical Shell model and find that the CME and ray are coaxial. We suggest that coaxial post-CME rays, seen in coronagraph images, with successive formation of blobs could be associated with current sheets undergoing magnetic reconnection in the late stage of CMEs.

  6. A model of the western Laurentide Ice Sheet, using observations of glacial isostatic adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowan, Evan J.; Tregoning, Paul; Purcell, Anthony; Montillet, Jean-Philippe; McClusky, Simon

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of a new numerical model of the late glacial western Laurentide Ice Sheet, constrained by observations of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA), including relative sea level indicators, uplift rates from permanent GPS stations, contemporary differential lake level change, and postglacial tilt of glacial lake level indicators. The later two datasets have been underutilized in previous GIA based ice sheet reconstructions. The ice sheet model, called NAICE, is constructed using simple ice physics on the basis of changing margin location and basal shear stress conditions in order to produce ice volumes required to match GIA. The model matches the majority of the observations, while maintaining a relatively realistic ice sheet geometry. Our model has a peak volume at 18,000 yr BP, with a dome located just east of Great Slave Lake with peak thickness of 4000 m, and surface elevation of 3500 m. The modelled ice volume loss between 16,000 and 14,000 yr BP amounts to about 7.5 m of sea level equivalent, which is consistent with the hypothesis that a large portion of Meltwater Pulse 1A was sourced from this part of the ice sheet. The southern part of the ice sheet was thin and had a low elevation profile. This model provides an accurate representation of ice thickness and paleo-topography, and can be used to assess present day uplift and infer past climate.

  7. GLIMMER Antarctic Ice Sheet Model,an experimental research of moving boundary condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Xueyuan; Sun Bo; Zhang Zhanhai; Li Yuansheng; Yang Qinghua

    2008-01-01

    A 3 D coupled ice sheet model,GLIMMER model is introduced,and an idealized ice sheet experiment under the EISMINT 1 criterion of moving boundary condition is presented.The results of the experiment reveal that for a steady state ice sheet profile the characteristic curves describe the process of evolution which are accordant with theoretical estimates.By solving the coupled thermodynamics equations of ice sheet,one may find the characteristic curves which derived from the conservation of the mass,energy and momentum to the ice flow profile.At the same time,an agreement,approximate to the GLIMMER case and the confirmed theoretical results,is found.Present study is explorihg work to introduceand discuss the handicaps of EISMINT criterion and GLIMMER,and prospect a few directions of the GLIMMER model.

  8. Evaluating ice sheet model performance over the last glacial cycle using paleo data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Alexander; Alvarez-Solas, Jorge; Montoya, Marisa

    2015-04-01

    Estimating the past evolution of ice sheets is important for improving our understanding of their role in the Earth system and for quantifying their contribution to sea-level changes. Limited but significant paleo data and proxies are available to give insights into past changes that are valid, at least, on a local scale. Meanwhile, models can be used to provide a mechanistic picture of ice sheet changes. Combined data-model comparisons are therefore useful exercises that allow models to be confronted with real-world information and lead to better understanding of the mechanisms driving changes. In turn, models can potentially be used to validate the data by providing a physical explanation for observed phenomena. Here we focus on the evolution of the Greenland ice sheet through the last glacial cycle to highlight common problems and potential opportunities for data-model comparisons. We will present several examples of how present generation model results are inconsistent with estimates from paleo data, either in terms of the boundary forcing given to the model or the resulting characteristics of the ice sheet. We also propose a set of data-model comparisons as the starting point for developing a more standardized paleo model performance check. Incorporating such a test into modeling efforts could generate new insights in coupled climate - ice sheet modeling.

  9. Coupled Models and Parallel Simulations for Three-Dimensional Full-Stokes Ice Sheet Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Huai; Ju, Lili

    2011-01-01

    A three-dimensional full-Stokes computational model is considered for determining the dynamics, temperature, and thickness of ice sheets. The governing thermomechanical equations consist of the three-dimensional full-Stokes system with nonlinear rheology for the momentum, an advective-diffusion energy equation for temperature evolution, and a mass conservation equation for icethickness changes. Here, we discuss the variable resolution meshes, the finite element discretizations, and the parallel algorithms employed by the model components. The solvers are integrated through a well-designed coupler for the exchange of parametric data between components. The discretization utilizes high-quality, variable-resolution centroidal Voronoi Delaunay triangulation meshing and existing parallel solvers. We demonstrate the gridding technology, discretization schemes, and the efficiency and scalability of the parallel solvers through computational experiments using both simplified geometries arising from benchmark test problems and a realistic Greenland ice sheet geometry.

  10. Modelled Growth and Decay of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet Through the Last Glacial Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, S. J.; Banwell, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Cordilleran Ice Sheet in western North America had an enigmatic evolution during the last glacial cycle, developing out of sync with the larger Laurentide and global glaciation. The geological record suggests that the ice sheet emerged late, ca. 45 ka, growing to be a fully-established ice sheet in isotope stages 3 and 2 and deglaciating late in the glacial cycle. This has been a challenge to model, and is a paleoclimatic curiosity, because the western Cordillera of North America is heavily glacierized today, and one would intuitively expect it to act as an inception centre for the Pleistocene ice sheets. The region receives heavy precipitation, and modest cooling should induce large-scale glacier expansion. Indeed, a Cordilleran Ice Sheet quickly nucleates in isotope substage 5d in most ice sheet modeling studies to date, and is a resilient feature throughout the glaciation. The fact that a full-scale Cordilleran Ice Sheet did not develop until relatively late argues for either: (a) ice sheet models that have been inadequate in resolving the process of alpine-style glaciation, i.e., the coalescence of alpine icefields, or (b) a climatic history in western North America that deviated strongly from the hemispheric-scale cooling which drove the growth of the Laurentide and Scandinavian Ice Sheets, as recorded in Greenland. We argue that reasonable reconstructions of Cordilleran Ice Sheet growth and decay implicate a combination of these two considerations. Sufficient model resolution is required to capture the valley-bottom melt that suppresses icefield coalescence, while early-glacial cooling must have been modest in the Pacific sector of North America. We argue for a persistent warm, dry climate relative to that in eastern North America and the Atlantic sector, likely associated with positive feedbacks between atmospheric circulation and the nascent Laurentide Ice Sheet (i.e., peristent circulation patterns similar to those of 2014-2015). This must have been

  11. Miocene to recent ice elevation variations from the interior of the West Antarctic ice sheet: Constraints from geologic observations, cosmogenic nuclides and ice sheet modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy; Ackert, Robert P.; Pope, Allen E.; Pollard, David; DeConto, Robert M.

    2012-07-01

    Observations of long-term West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) behavior can be used to test and constrain dynamic ice sheet models. Long-term observational constraints are however, rare. Here we present the first constraints on long-term (Miocene-Holocene) WAIS elevation from the interior of the ice sheet near the WAIS divide. We use geologic observations and measurements of cosmogenic 21Ne and 10Be in bedrock surfaces to constrain WAIS elevation variations to WAIS elevations to have been similar to, or lower than present, since the beginning of the Pliocene warm period. We use a continental ice sheet model to simulate the history of ice cover at our sampling sites and thereby compute the expected concentration of the cosmogenic nuclides. The ice sheet model indicates that during the past 5 Ma interior WAIS elevations of >65 m above present-day ice levels at the Ohio Range occur only rarely during brief ice sheet highstands, consistent with the observed cosmogenic nuclide data. Furthermore, the model's prediction that highstand elevations have increased on average since the Pliocene is in good agreement with the cosmogenic nuclide data that indicate the highest ice elevation over the past 5 Ma was reached during the highstand at 11 ka. Since the simulated cosmogenic nuclide concentrations derived from the model's ice elevation history are in good agreement with our measurements, we suggest that the model's prediction of more frequent collapsed-WAIS states and smaller WAIS volumes during the Pliocene are also correct.

  12. The three-dimensional evolution of ion-scale current sheets: tearing and drift-kink instabilities in the presence of proton temperature anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Gingell, Peter; Matteini, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    We present the first three-dimensional hybrid simulations of the evolution of ion-scale current sheets, with an investigation of the role of temperature anisotropy and associated kinetic instabilities on the growth of the tearing instability and particle heating. We confirm the ability of the ion cyclotron and firehose instabilities to enhance or suppress reconnection, respectively. The simulations demonstrate the emergence of persistent three-dimensional structures, including patchy reconnection sites and the fast growth of a narrow-band drift-kink instability, which suppresses reconnection for thin current sheets with weak guide fields. Potential observational signatures of the three-dimensional evolution of solar wind current sheets are also discussed. We conclude that kinetic instabilities, arising from non-Maxwellian ion populations, are significant to the evolution of three-dimensional current sheets, and two-dimensional studies of heating rates by reconnection may therefore over-estimate the ability of...

  13. Small-scale magnetic islands in the solar wind and their role in particle acceleration. Part 1: Dynamics of magnetic islands near the heliospheric current sheet

    CERN Document Server

    Khabarova, O; Li, G; Roux, J A le; Webb, G M; Dosch, A; Malandraki, O E

    2015-01-01

    Increases of ion fluxes in the keV-MeV range are sometimes observed near the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) during periods when other sources are absent. These resemble solar energetic particle (SEP) events, but the events are weaker and apparently local. Conventional explanations based on either shock acceleration of charged particles or particle acceleration due to magnetic reconnection at interplanetary current sheets are not persuasive. We suggest instead that recurrent magnetic reconnection occurs at the HCS and smaller current sheets in the solar wind (Zharkova & Khabarova 2012), of which a consequence is particle energization by the dynamically evolving secondary current sheets and magnetic islands (Zank et al. 2014; Drake et al. 2006a). The effectiveness of the trapping and acceleration process associated with magnetic islands depends in part on the topology of the HCS. We show that the HCS possesses ripples superimposed on the large-scale flat or wavy structure. We conjecture that the ripples c...

  14. An improved Antarctic dataset for high resolution numerical ice sheet models (ALBMAP v1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Le Brocq

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The dataset described in this paper (ALBMAP has been created for the purposes of high-resolution numerical ice sheet modelling of the Antarctic Ice Sheet. It brings together data on the ice sheet configuration (e.g. ice surface and ice thickness and boundary conditions, such as the surface air temperature, accumulation and geothermal heat flux. The ice thickness and basal topography is based on the BEDMAP dataset (Lythe et al., 2001, however, there are a number of inconsistencies within BEDMAP and, since its release, more data has become available. The dataset described here addresses these inconsistencies, including some novel interpolation schemes for sub ice-shelf cavities, and incorporates some major new datasets. The inclusion of new datasets is not exhaustive, this considerable task is left for the next release of BEDMAP, however, the data and procedure documented here provides another step forward and demonstrates the issues that need addressing in a continental scale dataset useful for high resolution ice sheet modelling. The dataset provides an initial condition that is as close as possible to present-day ice sheet configuration, aiding modelling of the response of the Antarctic Ice Sheet to various forcings, which are, at present, not fully understood.

  15. Evidence for a current sheet forming in the wake of a Coronal Mass Ejection from multi-viewpoint coronagraph observations

    OpenAIRE

    Patsourakos, S.; Vourlidas, A.

    2010-01-01

    Ray-like features observed by coronagraphs in the wake of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are sometimes interpreted as the white light counterparts of current sheets (CSs) produced by the eruption. The 3D geometry of these ray-like features is largely unknown and its knowledge should clarify their association to the CS and place constraints on CME physics and coronal conditions. With this study we test these important implications for the first time. An example of such a post-CME ray was observ...

  16. Effect of strain on the critical current density of Bi-2223 thick films sandwiched between Ag sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, J.H. (Academia Sinica, Hefei (China). Inst. of Solid State Physics); Kong, Q.P. (Academia Sinica, Hefei (China). Inst. of Solid State Physics); Wang, S.X. (Academia Sinica, Hefei, Anhui (China). Inst. of Plasma Physics); Han, H.M. (Academia Sinica, Hefei, Anhui (China). Inst. of Plasma Physics)

    1994-08-16

    The tapes of (Bi, Pb)[sub 2]Sr[sub 2]Ca[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub x] (Bi-2223) thick film sandwiched between Ag sheets are known to have very high J[sub c]. In this note, the stress-strain behaviour and the strain dependence of critical current density of the Ag/Bi-2223/Ag tapes are investigated. The microstructure of superconducting thick films subjected to various amounts of deformation was examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). (orig.)

  17. Using paleoclimate data to improve models of the Antarctic Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, M. A.; Phipps, S. J.; Roberts, J. L.; White, D.

    2016-12-01

    Ice sheet models are the most descriptive tools available to simulate the future evolution of the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS), including its contribution towards changes in global sea level. However, our knowledge of the dynamics of the coupled ice-ocean-lithosphere system is inevitably limited, in part due to a lack of observations. Furthemore, to build computationally efficient models that can be run for multiple millennia, it is necessary to use simplified descriptions of ice dynamics. Ice sheet modeling is therefore an inherently uncertain exercise. The past evolution of the AIS provides an opportunity to constrain the description of physical processes within ice sheet models and, therefore, to constrain our understanding of the role of the AIS in driving changes in global sea level. We use the Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM) to demonstrate how paleoclimate data can improve our ability to predict the future evolution of the AIS. A large, perturbed-physics ensemble is generated, spanning uncertainty in the parameterizations of four key physical processes within ice sheet models: ice rheology, ice shelf calving, and the stress balances within ice sheets and ice shelves. A Latin hypercube approach is used to optimally sample the range of uncertainty in parameter values. This perturbed-physics ensemble is used to simulate the evolution of the AIS from the Last Glacial Maximum ( 21,000 years ago) to present. Paleoclimate records are then used to determine which ensemble members are the most realistic. This allows us to use data on past climates to directly constrain our understanding of the past contribution of the AIS towards changes in global sea level. Critically, it also allows us to determine which ensemble members are likely to generate the most realistic projections of the future evolution of the AIS.

  18. Accurate and stable time stepping in ice sheet modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Gong; von Sydow, Lina

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we introduce adaptive time step control for simulation of evolution of ice sheets. The discretization error in the approximations is estimated using "Milne's device" by comparing the result from two different methods in a predictor-corrector pair. Using a predictor-corrector pair the expensive part of the procedure, the solution of the velocity and pressure equations, is performed only once per time step and an estimate of the local error is easily obtained. The stability of the numerical solution is maintained and the accuracy is controlled by keeping the local error below a given threshold using PI-control. Depending on the threshold, the time step $\\Delta t$ is bound by stability requirements or accuracy requirements. Our method takes a shorter $\\Delta t$ than an implicit method but with less work in each time step and the solver is simpler. The method is analyzed theoretically with respect to stability and applied to the simulation of a 2D ice slab and a 3D circular ice sheet. %The automatic...

  19. Accurate and stable time stepping in ice sheet modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gong; Lötstedt, Per; von Sydow, Lina

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we introduce adaptive time step control for simulation of the evolution of ice sheets. The discretization error in the approximations is estimated using "Milne's device" by comparing the result from two different methods in a predictor-corrector pair. Using a predictor-corrector pair the expensive part of the procedure, the solution of the velocity and pressure equations, is performed only once per time step and an estimate of the local error is easily obtained. The stability of the numerical solution is maintained and the accuracy is controlled by keeping the local error below a given threshold using PI-control. Depending on the threshold, the time step Δt is bound by stability requirements or accuracy requirements. Our method takes a shorter Δt than an implicit method but with less work in each time step and the solver is simpler. The method is analyzed theoretically with respect to stability and applied to the simulation of a 2D ice slab and a 3D circular ice sheet. The stability bounds in the experiments are explained by and agree well with the theoretical results.

  20. A digital elevation model of the Greenland ice sheet and validation with airborne laser altimeter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamber, Jonathan L.; Ekholm, Simon; Krabill, William B.

    1997-01-01

    A 2.5 km resolution digital elevation model (DEM) of the Greenland ice sheet was produced from the 336 days of the geodetic phase of ERS-1. During this period the altimeter was operating in ice-mode over land surfaces providing improved tracking around the margins of the ice sheet. Combined with the high density of tracks during the geodetic phase, a unique data set was available for deriving a DEM of the whole ice sheet. The errors present in the altimeter data were investigated via a comparison with airborne laser altimeter data obtained for the southern half of Greenland. Comparison with coincident satellite data showed a correlation with surface slope. An explanation for the behavior of the bias as a function of surface slope is given in terms of the pattern of surface roughness on the ice sheet.

  1. VARIATIONAL PRINCIPLES FOR NONLOCAL CONTINUUM MODEL OF ORTHOTROPIC GRAPHENE SHEETS EMBEDDED IN AN ELASTIC MEDIUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarp Adali

    2012-01-01

    Equations governing the vibrations and buckling of multilayered orthotropic graphene sheets can be expressed as a system of n partial differential equations where n refers to the number of sheets.This description is based on the continuum model of the graphene sheets which can also take the small scale effects into account by employing a nonlocal theory.In the present article a variational principle is derived for the nonlocal elastic theory of rectangular graphene sheets embedded in an elastic medium and undergoing transverse vibrations.Moreover the graphene sheets are subject to biaxial compression.Rayleigh quotients are obtained for the frequencies of freely vibrating graphene sheets and for the buckling load. The influence of small scale effects on the frequencies and the buckling load can be observed qualiatively from the expressions of the Rayleigh quotients.Elastic medium is modeled as a combination of Winkler and Pasternak foundations acting on the top and bottom layers of the mutilayered nano-structure.Natural boundary conditions of the problem are derived using the variational principle formulated in the study.It is observed that free boundaries lead to coupled boundary conditions due to nonlocal theory used in the continuum formulation while the local (classical) elasticity theory leads to uncoupled boundary conditions.The mathematical methods used in the study involve calculus of variations and the semi-inverse method for deriving the variational integrals.

  2. A Hybrid Vortex Sheet / Point Vortex Model for Unsteady Separated Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darakananda, Darwin; Eldredge, Jeff D.; Colonius, Tim; Williams, David R.

    2015-11-01

    The control of separated flow over an airfoil is essential for obtaining lift enhancement, drag reduction, and the overall ability to perform high agility maneuvers. In order to develop reliable flight control systems capable of realizing agile maneuvers, we need a low-order aerodynamics model that can accurately predict the force response of an airfoil to arbitrary disturbances and/or actuation. In the present work, we integrate vortex sheets and variable strength point vortices into a method that is able to capture the formation of coherent vortex structures while remaining computationally tractable for control purposes. The role of the vortex sheet is limited to tracking the dynamics of the shear layer immediately behind the airfoil. When parts of the sheet develop into large scale structures, those sections are replaced by variable strength point vortices. We prevent the vortex sheets from growing indefinitely by truncating the tips of the sheets and transfering their circulation into nearby point vortices whenever the length of sheet exceeds a threshold. We demonstrate the model on a variety of canonical problems, including pitch-up and impulse translation of an airfoil at various angles of attack. Support by the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research (FA9550-14-1-0328) with program manager Dr. Douglas Smith is gratefully acknowledged.

  3. The sea level response to ice sheet freshwater forcing in the Community Earth System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slangen, Aimée B. A.; Lenaerts, Jan T. M.

    2016-10-01

    We study the effect of a realistic ice sheet freshwater forcing on sea-level change in the fully coupled Community Earth System Model (CESM) showing not only the effect on the ocean density and dynamics, but also the gravitational response to mass redistribution between ice sheets and the ocean. We compare the ‘standard’ model simulation (NO-FW) to a simulation with a more realistic ice sheet freshwater forcing (FW) for two different forcing scenario’s (RCP2.6 and RCP8.5) for 1850-2100. The effect on the global mean thermosteric sea-level change is small compared to the total thermosteric change, but on a regional scale the ocean steric/dynamic change shows larger differences in the Southern Ocean, the North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean (locally over 0.1 m). The gravitational fingerprints of the net sea-level contributions of the ice sheets are computed separately, showing a regional pattern with a magnitude that is similar to the difference between the NO-FW and FW simulations of the ocean steric/dynamic pattern. Our results demonstrate the importance of ice sheet mass loss for regional sea-level projections in light of the projected increasing contribution of ice sheets to future sea-level rise.

  4. Outreach/education interface for Cryosphere models using the Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larour, E. Y.; Halkides, D. J.; Romero, V.; Cheng, D. L.; Perez, G.

    2014-12-01

    In the past decade, great strides have been made in the development of models capable of projecting the future evolution of glaciers and the polar ice sheets in a changing climate. These models are now capable of replicating some of the trends apparent in satellite observations. However, because this field is just now maturing, very few efforts have been dedicated to adapting these capabilities to education. Technologies that have been used in outreach efforts in Atmospheric and Oceanic sciences still have not been extended to Cryospheric Science. We present a cutting-edge, technologically driven virtual laboratory, geared towards outreach and k-12 education, dedicated to the polar ice sheets on Antarctica and Greenland, and their role as major contributors to sea level rise in coming decades. VISL (Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory) relies on state-of-the art Web GL rendering of polar ice sheets, Android/iPhone and web portability using Javascript, as well as C++ simulations (back-end) based on the Ice Sheet System Model, the NASA model for simulating the evolution of polar ice sheets. Using VISL, educators and students can have an immersive experience into the world of polar ice sheets, while at the same exercising the capabilities of a state-of-the-art climate model, all of it embedded into an education experience that follows the new STEM standards for education.This work was performed at the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cryosphere Science Program.

  5. Can Milankovitch orbital variations initiate the growth of ice sheets in a general circulation model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rind, D.; Peteet, D.; Kukla, G.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of initiating the growth of ice sheets by solar insolation variations is examined. The study is conducted using a climate model with three different orbital configurations corresponding to 116,000 and 106,000 yr before the present and a modified insolation field with greater reductions in summer insolation at high northern latitudes. Despite the reduced summer and fall insolation, the model fails to maintain snow cover through the summer at locations of suspected ice sheet initiation. The results suggest that there is a discrepancy between the model's response to Milankovitch perturbations and the geophysical evidence of ice sheet initiation. If the model results are correct, the growth of ice shown by geophysical evidence would have occurred in an extremely ablative environment, demanding a complicated strategy.

  6. Current Sheet Structures Observed by the TESIS EUV Telescope During A Flux Rope Eruption on the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Reva, Anton; Kuzin, Ssergey

    2016-01-01

    We use the TESIS EUV telescope to study the current sheet signatures observed during flux rope eruption. The special feature of the TESIS telescope was its ability to image the solar corona up to a distance of 2 $R_\\odot$ from the Sun's center in the Fe 171 \\AA\\ line. The Fe 171 \\AA\\ line emission illuminates the magnetic field lines, and the TESIS images reveal the coronal magnetic structure at high altitudes. The analyzed CME had a core with a spiral-flux rope-structure. The spiral shape indicates that the flux rope radius varied along its length. The flux rope had a complex temperature structure: cold legs (70 000 K, observed in He 304 \\AA\\ line) and a hotter core (0.7 MK, observed in Fe 171 \\AA\\ line). Such structure contradicts the common assumption that the CME core is a cold prominence. When the CME impulsively accelerated, a dark double Y-structure appeared below the flux rope. The Y-structure timing, location, and morphology agree with the previously performed MHD simulations of the current sheet. We...

  7. Modelling of the ring current in Saturn's magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampieri, G.; Dougherty, M.

    2004-02-01

    . The existence of a ring current inside Saturn's magnetosphere was first suggested by smith80 and ness81,ness82, in order to explain various features in the magnetic field observations from the Pioneer 11 and Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft. connerney83 formalized the equatorial current model, based on previous modelling work of Jupiter's current sheet and estimated its parameters from the two Voyager data sets. Here, we investigate the model further, by reconsidering the data from the two Voyager spacecraft, as well as including the Pioneer 11 flyby data set. First, we obtain, in closed form, an analytic expression for the magnetic field produced by the ring current. We then fit the model to the external field, that is the difference between the observed field and the internal magnetic field, considering all the available data. In general, through our global fit we obtain more accurate parameters, compared to previous models. We point out differences between the model's parameters for the three flybys, and also investigate possible deviations from the axial and planar symmetries assumed in the model. We conclude that an accurate modelling of the Saturnian disk current will require taking into account both of the temporal variations related to the condition of the magnetosphere, as well as non-axisymmetric contributions due to local time effects.

  8. Studying Sediment Transport in Oscillatory Sheet Flow by using a Large Eddy Simulation Eulerian Two-phase Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Z.; Hsu, T. J.; Chauchat, J.; Revil-Baudard, T.

    2016-12-01

    Coastal morphological evolution is caused by a wide range of coupled cross-shore and alongshore sediment transport processes associated with short waves, infragravity waves and wave-induced currents. However, the fundamental transport mechanisms occur within the thin bottom boundary layer and are dictated by turbulence-sediment interaction and inter-granular interactions. Recently, a turbulence-averaged two-phase Eulerian sediment transport model, called sedFoam, was developed and validated for U-tube sheet flows (Cheng et al., 2016). With closures of particle stresses and fluid-particle interactions, the model is able to resolve full profiles of sediment transport from the immobile bed, to the concentrated near-bed transport layer and up to dilute transport without conventional bedload/suspended load assumptions. In this study, we further extend this model with a 3D large eddy simulation (LES) approach, where substantial amount of the turbulence-sediment interaction is directly resolved. In the present LES model, a dynamic Smagorinsky sub-grid stress closure is adopted for both fluid and sediment phases, and the sub-grid contribution to the fluid-particle interactions is included by a sub-grid drift velocity in drag model (Ozel et al., 2013). The model is validated with high-resolution measurements in a unidirectional steady sheet flow experiment (Revil-Baudard et al. 2015). We further apply the LES Eulerian two-phase model to medium and fine sand in oscillatory sheet flows (O'Donoghue & Wright, 2004). The LES model performance for the medium sand is similar to the turbulence-averaged model, except that the LES model seems to be superior to the turbulence-averaged model during acceleration and decelerating phases. In addition, the LES model is able to capture the enhanced transport layer thickness for fine sand, which may be related to the burst events near the flow reversal. We further confirm that this phenomenon is absent for medium sand.

  9. Improving Climate Literacy Using The Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM): A Prototype Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory For Use In K-12 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkides, D. J.; Larour, E. Y.; Perez, G.; Petrie, K.; Nguyen, L.

    2013-12-01

    Statistics indicate that most Americans learn what they will know about science within the confines of our public K-12 education system and the media. Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) aim to remedy science illiteracy and provide guidelines to exceed the Common Core State Standards that most U.S. state governments have adopted, by integrating disciplinary cores with crosscutting ideas and real life practices. In this vein, we present a prototype ';Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory' (I-Lab), geared to K-12 students, educators and interested members of the general public. I-Lab will allow users to perform experiments using a state-of-the-art dynamical ice sheet model and provide detailed downloadable lesson plans, which incorporate this model and are consistent with NGSS Physical Science criteria for different grade bands (K-2, 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12). The ultimate goal of this website is to improve public climate science literacy, especially in regards to the crucial role of the polar ice sheets in Earth's climate and sea level. The model used will be the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM), an ice flow model developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and UC Irvine, that simulates the near-term evolution of polar ice sheets (Greenland and Antarctica) and includes high spatial resolution capabilities and data assimilation to produce realistic simulations of ice sheet dynamics at the continental scale. Open sourced since 2011, ISSM is used in cutting edge cryosphere research around the globe. Thru I-Lab, students will be able to access ISSM using a simple, online graphical interface that can be launched from a web browser on a computer, tablet or smart phone. The interface will allow users to select different climate conditions and watch how the polar ice sheets evolve in time under those conditions. Lesson contents will include links to background material and activities that teach observation recording, concept articulation, hypothesis formulation and testing, and

  10. Drifting snow climate of the Greenland ice sheet: a study with a regional climate model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenaerts, J.T.M.; van den Broeke, M.R.; van Angelen, J.H.; van Meijgaard, E.; Déry, S.J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the drifting snow climate of the Greenland ice sheet, using output from a high-resolution ( 11 km) regional climate model. Because reliable direct observations of drifting snow do not exist, we evaluate the modeled near-surface climate instead, using automatic weather station (AW

  11. Modelling of pleistocene European ice sheets: the effect of upslope precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanberg, J.A.M.; Oerlemans, J.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented from a numerical model of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet, in which the effect of upslope precipitation is included explicitly. The model is forced by changing the environmental conditions, formulated in terms of the annual mean temperature and the annual temperature range. These fa

  12. Drifting snow climate of the Greenland ice sheet: a study with a regional climate model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenaerts, J.T.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314850163; van den Broeke, M.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073765643; van Angelen, J.H.; van Meijgaard, E.; Déry, S.J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the drifting snow climate of the Greenland ice sheet, using output from a high-resolution ( 11 km) regional climate model. Because reliable direct observations of drifting snow do not exist, we evaluate the modeled near-surface climate instead, using automatic weather station (AW

  13. Using palaeoclimate data to improve models of the Antarctic Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Steven; King, Matt; Roberts, Jason; White, Duanne

    2017-04-01

    Ice sheet models are the most descriptive tools available to simulate the future evolution of the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS), including its contribution towards changes in global sea level. However, our knowledge of the dynamics of the coupled ice-ocean-lithosphere system is inevitably limited, in part due to a lack of observations. Furthemore, to build computationally efficient models that can be run for multiple millennia, it is necessary to use simplified descriptions of ice dynamics. Ice sheet modelling is therefore an inherently uncertain exercise. The past evolution of the AIS provides an opportunity to constrain the description of physical processes within ice sheet models and, therefore, to constrain our understanding of the role of the AIS in driving changes in global sea level. We use the Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM) to demonstrate how palaeoclimate data can improve our ability to predict the future evolution of the AIS. A 50-member perturbed-physics ensemble is generated, spanning uncertainty in the parameterisations of three key physical processes within the model: (i) the stress balance within the ice sheet, (ii) basal sliding and (iii) calving of ice shelves. A Latin hypercube approach is used to optimally sample the range of uncertainty in parameter values. This perturbed-physics ensemble is used to simulate the evolution of the AIS from the Last Glacial Maximum ( 21,000 years ago) to present. Palaeoclimate records are then used to determine which ensemble members are the most realistic. This allows us to use data on past climates to directly constrain our understanding of the past contribution of the AIS towards changes in global sea level. Critically, it also allows us to determine which ensemble members are likely to generate the most realistic projections of the future evolution of the AIS.

  14. Slip Model Used for Prediction of r Value of BCC Metal Sheets from ODF Coefficients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Different slip models were used for prediction of rvalue of BCC metal sheets from ODF coefficients. According to the maximum plastic work theory developed by Bishop and Hill, it is expected that the higher of Taylor factors given by a slip model, the better predictio nobtained based on the model. From this point of view, a composed slip model of BCC metals was presented. Based on the model, the agreement of predicted rvalues for deep drawing steels with experimental ones is excellent.

  15. [Training and development of the nursing staff: a model of spread sheet cost].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerico, Marli de Carvalho; Castilho, Valéria

    2004-09-01

    This paper presents a model of spread sheet cost for training and development programs to the nursing staff in a hospital organization. Significant items of the total cost have been considered in relation to its elaboration and proper functioning. This model is divided into four parts: Item 1--data related to the training programs; Item 2--direct costs of these programs; Item 3--indirect costs (Continuum Educational Center structure), and Item 4--cost amount. The use of spread sheet cost may provide knowledge and managementfor the nurses and nurse managers. However, the related costs should be reviewed according to each service.

  16. Unusual surface morphology from digital elevation models of the Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekholm, Simon; Keller, K.; Bamber, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    In this study of the North Greenland ice sheet, we have used digital elevation models to investigate the topographic signatures of a large ice flow feature discovered in 1993 and a unique surface anomaly which we believe has not been observed previously. The small scale topography of the flow...... feature is revealed in striking detail in a high-pass filtered elevation model. Furthermore, ice penetrating radar show that the sub-stream bed is rough with undulation amplitude increasing downstream. The new feature consists of two large depressions in the ice sheet connected by a long curving trench...

  17. FELIX: advances in modeling forward and inverse ice-sheet problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunzburger, Max; Hoffman, Mattew; Leng, Wei; Perego, Mauro; Price, Stephen; Salinger, Andrew; Stadler, Georg; Ju, Lili

    2013-04-01

    Several models of different complexity and accuracy have been proposed for describing ice-sheet dynamics. We introduce a parallel, finite element framework for implementing these models, which range from the "shallow ice approximation" up through nonlinear Stokes flow. These models make up the land ice dynamical core of FELIX, which is being developed under the Community Ice Sheet Model. We present results from large-scale simulations of the Greenland ice-sheet, compare models of differing complexity and accuracy, and explore different solution methods for the resulting linear and nonlinear systems. We also address the problem of finding an optimal initial state for Greenland ice-sheet via estimating the spatially varying linear-friction coefficient at the ice-bedrock interface. The problem, which consists of minimizing the mismatch between a specified and computed surface mass balance and/or the mismatch between observed and modeled surface velocities, is solved as an optimal control problem constrained by the governing model equations.

  18. Bayesian calibration of a post-LGM model of Laurentide ice-sheet evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, L.; Peltier, W. R.

    2003-04-01

    Though numerous inferences have been made with regard to the deglaciation history of the Wisconsin North American ice sheet complex, no attempt has been made to place objective confidence ranges on these inferences. Furthermore, past efforts to reconstruct the Wisconsin deglaciation history have relied on restricted discipline-specific constraints. Approaches based on dynamical glacial models have ignored geophysical constraints such as Relative Sea Level histories. Geophysical based reconstructions, on the other hand, have ignored glaciological self-consistency and Marine Limit data. To remedy this situation, we present a Bayesian calibration of a 3D thermo-mechanically coupled ice-sheet systems model using: 1) a large set of Relative Sea Level observations (from 415 sites), 2) Marine Limit observations, 3) a North-South transect of gravity measurements, 4) direct observations of the present day rate of basal uplift at Yellowknife, 5) and a new high-resolution ice margin chronology derived from geological and geomorphological observations. Given the large parameter space (O(20) parameters), Bayesian neural networks, trained from a thousand runs of the ice-sheet systems model, are employed to simulate the glacial model within the statistical analyses. The end result is a posterior distribution for model parameters (and thereby modelled glacial histories) given the observational data sets that thereby also takes into account data uncertainty. Strong support is provided for a multi-domed Laurentide ice-sheet. We also identify key dynamical processes (ie most relevant model parameters) along with critical geographic regions in need of further data.

  19. The Most Intense Electron-Scale Current Sheets in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podesta, John J.

    2017-04-01

    Previous analysis of magnetohydrodynamic-scale currents in high-speed solar wind near 1 AU suggests that the most intense current-carrying structures occur at electron scales and are characterized by average current densities on the order of 1 pA/cm2. Here, this prediction is verified by examining the effects of the measurement bandwidth and/or measurement resolution on the analysis of synthetic solar wind signals. Assuming Taylor's hypothesis holds for the energetically dominant fluctuations at kinetic scales, the results show that when νc≫ νb, where νc is the measurement bandwidth and νb ≈ 1/3 Hz is the break frequency, the average scale of the most intense fluctuations in the current density proxy is approximately 1/νc, and the average peak current density is a weakly increasing function that scales approximately like νc^{0.1}.

  20. Magnetic Reconnection in the Heliospheric Current Sheet: The Implications of the Different Environments Seen by the VoyagerSpacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisdak, M. M.; Drake, J. F.; Opher, M.

    2014-12-01

    The magnetic field abutting the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) is primarily in the azimuthal direction, either east-to-west or west-to-east. Mis-alignment of the solar rotational and magnetic axesleads to the characteristic ballerina-skirt shape of the HCS and during the solar cycle there can be large excursions in the sheet's latitudinal extent. Voyager 2's observations of energetic electrondropouts are related to its crossing of this boundary. Magnetic reconnection is also thought to occur as the HCS compresses and narrows between the termination shock and the heliopause. Near theequator the two HCS field alignments are present in roughly equal amounts, while near the edges the distribution can be considerably skewed. This will lead to substantial differences in the environmentsof the two Voyager spacecraft since Voyager 1 is north of the equator, but firmly in the sector region, while Voyager 2 is south of the equator and skirting the edges of the sector region. We presentparticle-in-cell simulations demonstrating the consequences of the reconnection of asymmetric amounts of flux. In particular, we will discuss Voyager 2's remaining time in the heliosphere -- including theimplications for the solar wind velocity, energetic particle transport, and the expected structure of Voyager 2's heliopause crossing -- and compare it with the data collected from Voyager 1.

  1. Experimental study of nonlinear interaction of plasma flow with charged thin current sheets: 1. Boundary structure and motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Amata

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We study plasma transport at a thin magnetopause (MP, described hereafter as a thin current sheet (TCS, observed by Cluster at the southern cusp on 13 February 2001 around 20:01 UT. The Cluster observations generally agree with the predictions of the Gas Dynamic Convection Field (GDCF model in the magnetosheath (MSH up to the MSH boundary layer, where significant differences are seen. We find for the MP a normal roughly along the GSE x-axis, which implies a clear departure from the local average MP normal, a ~90 km thickness and an outward speed of 35 km/s. Two populations are identified in the MSH boundary layer: the first one roughly perpendicular to the MSH magnetic field, which we interpret as the "incident" MSH plasma, the second one mostly parallel to B. Just after the MP crossing a velocity jet is observed with a peak speed of 240 km/s, perpendicular to B, with MA=3 and β>10 (peak value 23. The magnetic field clock angle rotates by 70° across the MP. Ex is the main electric field component on both sides of the MP, displaying a bipolar signature, positive on the MSH side and negative on the opposite side, corresponding to a ~300 V electric potential jump across the TCS. The E×B velocity generally coincides with the perpendicular velocity measured by CIS; however, in the speed jet a difference between the two is observed, which suggests the need for an extra flow source. We propose that the MP TCS can act locally as an obstacle for low-energy ions (<350 eV, being transparent for ions with larger gyroradius. As a result, the penetration of plasma by finite gyroradius is considered as a possible source for the jet. The role of reconnection is briefly discussed. The electrodynamics of the TCS along with mass and momentum transfer across it are further discussed in the companion paper by Savin et al. (2006.

  2. Polar conic current sheets as sources and channels of energetic particles in the high-latitude heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabarova, Olga; Malova, Helmi; Kislov, Roman; Zelenyi, Lev; Obridko, Vladimir; Kharshiladze, Alexander; Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Sokół, Justyna; Grzedzielski, Stan; Fujiki, Ken'ichi; Malandraki, Olga

    2017-04-01

    The existence of a large-scale magnetically separated conic region inside the polar coronal hole has been predicted by the Fisk-Parker hybrid heliospheric magnetic field model in the modification of Burger and co-workers (Burger et al., ApJ, 2008). Recently, long-lived conic (or cylindrical) current sheets (CCSs) have been found from Ulysses observations at high heliolatitudes (Khabarova et al., ApJ, 2017). The characteristic scale of these structures is several times lesser than the typical width of coronal holes, and the CCSs can be observed at 2-3 AU for several months. CCS crossings in 1994 and 2007 are characterized by sharp decreases in the solar wind speed and plasma beta typical for predicted profiles of CCSs. In 2007, a CCS was detected directly over the South Pole and strongly highlighted by the interaction with comet McNaught. The finding is confirmed by restorations of solar coronal magnetic field lines that reveal the occurrence of conic-like magnetic separators over the solar poles both in 1994 and 2007. Interplanetary scintillation data analysis also confirms the existence of long-lived low-speed regions surrounded by the typical polar high-speed solar wind in solar minima. The occurrence of long-lived CCSs in the high-latitude solar wind could shed light on how energetic particles reach high latitudes. Energetic particle enhancements up to tens MeV were observed by Ulysses at edges of CCSs both in 1994 and 2007. In 1994 this effect was clearer, probably due to technical reasons. Accelerated particles could be produced either by magnetic reconnection at the edges of a CCS in the solar corona or in the solar wind. We discuss the role of high-latitude CCSs in propagation of energetic particles in the heliosphere and revisit previous studies of energetic particle enhancements at high heliolatitudes. We also suggest that the existence of a CCS can modify the distribution of the solar wind as a function of heliolatitude and consequently impact ionization

  3. Estimating Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance contribution to future sea level rise using the regional atmospheric climate model MAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Fettweis

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We report future projections of Surface Mass Balance (SMB over the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS obtained with the regional climate model MAR, forced by the outputs of three CMIP5 General Circulation Models (GCMs when considering two different warming scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5. The GCMs selected in this study have been chosen according to their ability to simulate the current climate over Greenland. Our results indicate that in a warmer climate (i the mass gained due to increased precipitation over GrIS does not compensate the mass lost through increased run-off; (ii the surface melt increases non-linearly with rising temperatures due to the positive feedback between surface albedo and melt, associated with the expansion of bare ice zones which, in addition, decreases the ice sheet refreezing capacity; (iii most of the precipitation is expected to fall as rainfall in summer, which further increases surface melt; (iv no considerable change is expected on the length of the melting season, since heavier winter snowfall dampens the melt increase at the end of spring; (v the increase of meltwater run-off versus temperature anomalies is dependent of the GCM-forced MAR ability to simulate the current climate; (vi the MAR-simulated SMB changes can be approximated using the annual accumulated snowfall and summer 600 hPa temperature increase simulated by the forcing GCMs. In view of the large range in the CMIP5 future projections for the same future scenario, the GCM-based SMB approximations allow us to estimate what future projections are most likely within the CMIP5 multi-model ensemble. In 2100, the ensemble mean projects a sea level rise, resulting from a GrIS SMB decrease, estimated to be +4 ± 2 cm and +9 ± 4 cm for the RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 scenarios, respectively. The GrIS SMB should remain positive with respect to RCP 4.5 scenario and becomes negative around 2070 in the case of the RCP 8.5 scenario since a global warming >+3 °C is needed

  4. Modeling the effect of the stress demagnetization phenomenon on the magnetic properties in a no Fe-Si 3% sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakhlef Malika

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is the modeling of the stress demagnetization effect on the magnetic properties in a non-oriented Fe-Si 3% sheet under different external stresses. The magneto-mechanical model used for magnetic hysteresis is based on a model originally formulated by Sablik-Jiles-Atherthon (S.J.A.. This latter has been modified by including both the stress demagnetization factor and the eddy current effects. The influence of the stress demagnetization term SDT on the magnetostrictive behavior of the material is also modeled. The proposed model has been validated by extensive simulations at different stresses, namely compressive and tensile stresses. Simulation results obtained by this model are very close to those published in the literature. Using the proposed model, very satisfactory performance has been achieved.

  5. A New Ice-sheet / Ocean Interaction Model for Greenland Fjords using High-Order Discontinuous Galerkin Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopera, M. A.; Maslowski, W.; Giraldo, F.

    2015-12-01

    One of the key outstanding challenges in modeling of climate change and sea-level rise is the ice-sheet/ocean interaction in narrow, elongated and geometrically complicated fjords around Greenland. To address this challenge we propose a new approach, a separate fjord model using discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods, or FDG. The goal of this project is to build a separate, high-resolution module for use in Earth System Models (ESMs) to realistically represent the fjord bathymetry, coastlines, exchanges with the outside ocean, circulation and fine-scale processes occurring within the fjord and interactions at the ice shelf interface. FDG is currently at the first stage of development. The DG method provides FDG with high-order accuracy as well as geometrical flexibility, including the capacity to handle non-conforming adaptive mesh refinement to resolve the processes occurring near the ice-sheet/ocean interface without introducing prohibitive computational costs. Another benefit of this method is its excellent performance on multi- and many-core architectures, which allows for utilizing modern high performance computing systems for high-resolution simulations. The non-hydrostatic model of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation will account for the stationary ice-shelf with sub-shelf ocean interaction, basal melting and subglacial meltwater influx and with boundary conditions at the surface to account for floating sea ice. The boundary conditions will be provided to FDG via a flux coupler to emulate the integration with an ESM. Initially, FDG will be tested for the Sermilik Fjord settings, using real bathymetry, boundary and initial conditions, and evaluated against available observations and other model results for this fjord. The overarching goal of the project is to be able to resolve the ice-sheet/ocean interactions around the entire coast of Greenland and two-way coupling with regional and global climate models such as the Regional Arctic System Model (RASM

  6. Internal pinch instability at the edge of an inviscid current sheet

    CERN Document Server

    Priede, Jānis

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents numerical analysis a pinch-type instability in a semi-infinite planar layer of inviscid conducting liquid bounded by solid walls and carrying a uniform electric current. The instability resembles the Tayler instability in astrophysics and can presumably disrupt the operation of the recently developed liquid metal batteries (Wang et al. 2014 Nature 514, 348). We show that the instability in liquid metals, which are relatively poor conductors, significantly differs from that in a well conducting fluid. In the latter, instability is dominated by the current perturbation resulting from the advection of the magnetic field. In the former, the instability is dominated by the magnetic field perturbation resulting from the diffusion of the electric current perturbation. As a result, in liquid metals, instability develops on the magnetic response time scale, which depends on the conductivity, and is much longer than the Alfv\\'en time scale, on which the instability develops in a well conducting flui...

  7. Eddy current testing of metallic sheets with defects using force measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brauer Hartmut

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of determining defects in structures using eddy current methods was investigated. The goal of this work is to demonstrate that the forces generated by the eddy currents and acting back on the magnet system can be used to detect defects in the object. Numerical simulations and experimental investigations have been performed. This novel technique has been found to be sensitive enough to detect even deep defects in an Aluminium bar moving relative to the field-generating magnet system.

  8. Greenland ice sheet model parameters constrained using simulations of the Eemian Interglacial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Robinson

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Using a new approach to force an ice sheet model, we performed an ensemble of simulations of the Greenland Ice Sheet evolution during the last two glacial cycles, with emphasis on the Eemian Interglacial. This ensemble was generated by perturbing four key parameters in the coupled regional climate-ice sheet model and by introducing additional uncertainty in the prescribed "background" climate change. The sensitivity of the surface melt model to climate change was determined to be the dominant driver of ice sheet instability, as reflected by simulated ice sheet loss during the Eemian Interglacial period. To eliminate unrealistic parameter combinations, constraints from present-day and paleo information were applied. The constraints include (i the diagnosed present-day surface mass balance partition between surface melting and ice discharge at the margin, (ii the modeled present-day elevation at GRIP; and (iii the modeled elevation reduction at GRIP during the Eemian. Using these three constraints, a total of 360 simulations with 90 different model realizations were filtered down to 46 simulations and 20 model realizations considered valid. The paleo constraint eliminated more sensitive melt parameter values, in agreement with the surface mass balance partition assumption. The constrained simulations resulted in a range of Eemian ice loss of 0.4–4.4 m sea level equivalent, with a more likely range of about 3.7–4.4 m sea level if the GRIP δ18O isotope record can be considered an accurate proxy for the precipitation-weighted annual mean temperatures.

  9. Large-scale Ice Discharge Events in a Pure Ice Sheet Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alverson, K.; Legrand, P.; Papa, B. D.; Mysak, L. A.; Wang, Z.

    2004-05-01

    Sediment cores in the North Atlantic show evidence of periodic large-scale ice discharge events between 60 ka and 10 ka BP. These events occurred with a typical period between 5 kyr and 10 kyr. During each event, a significant amount of ice was discharged from the Hudson Bay region through the Hudson Strait and into the North Atlantic. This input of freshwater through the melting of icebergs is thought to have strongly affected the Atlantic thermohaline circulation. One theory is that these periodic ice discharge events represent an internal oscillation of the ice sheet under constant forcing. A second theory requires some variable external forcing on an unstable ice sheet to produce a discharge event. Using the ice sheet model of Marshall, an attempt is made to simulate periodic large-scale ice discharge events within the framework of the first theory. In this case, ice sheet surges and large-scale discharge events occur as a free oscillation of the ice sheet. An analysis of the activation of ice surge events and the thermodynamic controls on these events is also made.

  10. Approaches To Modelling Of Elastic Modulus Degradation In Sheet Metal Forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrh, Marko; Halilovič, Miroslav; Štok, Boris

    2007-04-01

    Strain recovery after removal of forming loads, commonly defined as springback, is of great concern in sheet metal forming, in particular with regard to proper prediction of the final shape of the part. To control the problem a lot of work has been done, either by minimizing the springback on the material side or by increasing the estimation precision in corresponding process simulations. Unfortunately, by currently available software springback still cannot be adequately predicted, because most analyses of springback are using linear, isotropic and constant Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio. But, as it was measured and reported, none of it is true. The aim of this work is to propose an upgraded mechanical model which takes evolution of damage and related orthotropic stiffness degradation into account. Damage is considered by inclusion of ellipsoidal cavities, and their influence on the stiffness degradation is taken in accordance with the Mori-Tanaka theory, adopting the GTN model for plastic flow. With regard to the case in which damage in material is neglected it is shown in the article how the springback of a formed part differs, when we take orthotropic damage evolution into consideration.

  11. SIX SIGMA OPTIMIZATION IN SHEET METAL FORMING BASED ON DUAL RESPONSE SURFACE MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yuqiang; CUI Zhenshan; ZHANG Dongjuan; RUAN Xueyu; CHEN Jun

    2006-01-01

    Iterations in optimization and numerical simulation for the sheet metal forming process may lead to extensive computation. In addition, uncertainties in materials or processing parameters may have great influence on the design quality. A six sigma optimization method is proposed, by combining the dual response surface method (DRSM) and six sigma philosophy, to save computation cost and improve reliability and robustness of parts. Using this method, statistical technology,including the design of experiment and analysis of variance, approximate model and six sigma philosophy are integrated together to achieve improved quality. Two sheet metal forming processes are provided as examples to illustrate the proposed method.

  12. Monitoring DC stray current interference of steel sheet pile structures in railway environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peelen, W.H.A.; Neeft, E.A.C.; Leegwater, G.; Kanten-Roos, W. van; Courage, W.M.G.

    2011-01-01

    Steel structures near DC powered railways are expected to be affected by stray current interference. This causes accelerated corrosion rates. Therefore steel is often not used as a building material in these cases, although certain advantages over the alternative material concrete exist. These

  13. Monitoring DC stray current interference of steel sheet pile structures in railway environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peelen, W.H.A.; Neeft, E.A.C.; Leegwater, G.; Kanten-Roos, W. van; Courage, W.M.G.

    2011-01-01

    Steel structures near DC powered railways are expected to be affected by stray current interference. This causes accelerated corrosion rates. Therefore steel is often not used as a building material in these cases, although certain advantages over the alternative material concrete exist. These advan

  14. BRITICE-CHRONO: Constraining rates and style of marine-influenced ice sheet decay to provide a data-rich playground for ice sheet modellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Chris

    2014-05-01

    Uncertainty exists regarding the fate of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets and how they will respond to forcings from sea level and atmospheric and ocean temperatures. If we want to know more about the mechanisms and rate of change of shrinking ice sheets, then why not examine an ice sheet that has fully disappeared and track its retreat through time? If achieved in enough detail such information could become a data-rich playground for improving the next breed of numerical ice sheet models to be used in ice and sea level forecasting. We regard that the last British-Irish Ice Sheet is a good target for this work, on account of its small size, density of information and with its numerous researchers already investigating it. BRITICE-CHRONO is a large (>45 researchers) NERC-funded consortium project comprising Quaternary scientists and glaciologists who will search the seafloor around Britain and Ireland and parts of the landmass in order to find and extract samples of sand, rock and organic matter that can be dated (OSL; Cosmogenic; 14C) to reveal the timing and rate of change of the collapsing British-Irish Ice Sheet. The purpose is to produce a high resolution dataset on the demise on an ice sheet - from the continental shelf edge and across the marine to terrestrial transition. Some 800 new date assessments will be added to those that already exist. This poster reports on the hypotheses that underpin the work. Data on retreat will be collected by focusing on 8 transects running from the continental shelf edge to a short distance (10s km) onshore and acquiring marine and terrestrial samples for geochronometric dating. The project includes funding for 587 radiocarbon, 140 OSL and 158 TCN samples for surface exposure dating; with sampling accomplished by two research cruises and 16 fieldwork campaigns. Results will reveal the timing and rate of change of ice margin recession for each transect, and combined with existing landform and dating databases, will be

  15. Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance: evaluating simulations and making projections with regional climate models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rae, J.G.L.; Aðalgeirsdóttir, G.; Edwards, T.L.; Fettweis, X.; Gregory, J.M.; Hewitt, H.T.; Lowe, J.A.; Lucas-Picher, P.; Mottram, R.H.; Payne, A.J.; Ridley, J.K.; Shannon, S.R.; van de Berg, W.J.; van de Wal, R.S.W.; van den Broeke, M.R.

    2012-01-01

    Four high-resolution regional climate models (RCMs) have been set up for the area of Greenland, with the aim of providing future projections of Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance (SMB), and its contribution to sea level rise, with greater accuracy than is possible from coarser-resolution gener

  16. Climate of the Greenland ice sheet using a high-resolution climate model - Part 1: Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, J.; van den Broeke, M.R.; van Meijgaard, E.; van de Berg, W.J.; Box, J.E.; Steffen, K.

    2010-01-01

    A simulation of 51 years (1957-2008) has been performed over Greenland using the regional atmospheric climate model (RACMO2/GR) at a horizontal grid spacing of 11 km and forced by ECMWF re-analysis products. To better represent processes affecting ice sheet surface mass balance, such as meltwater re

  17. Response of the Antarctic Ice Sheet to a climatic warming: a model study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    1982-01-01

    It is generally believed that the increasing C02 content of the atmosphere will lead to a substantial climatic warming in the polar regions. In this study the effect of consequent changes in the ice accumulation rate over the Antarctic Ice Sheet is investigated by means of a numerical ice flow model

  18. Unusual surface morphology from digital elevation models of the Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekholm, Simon; Keller, K.; Bamber, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    In this study of the North Greenland ice sheet, we have used digital elevation models to investigate the topographic signatures of a large ice flow feature discovered in 1993 and a unique surface anomaly which we believe has not been observed previously. The small scale topography of the flow...

  19. Temperature thresholds for degree-day modelling of Greenland ice sheet melt rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broeke, M.R.; Bus, C.; Ettema, J.; Smeets, P.

    2010-01-01

    [1] Degree‐day factors (DDFs) are calculated for the ice sheet ablation zone in southwest Greenland, using measurements of automatic weather stations and a regional atmospheric climate model. The rapid increase of DDFs for snow and ice towards higher elevations is caused by the increasing dominance

  20. Benchmark experiments for higher-order and full-Stokes ice sheet models (ISMIP–HOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Pattyn

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of the first ice sheet model intercomparison project for higher-order and full-Stokes ice sheet models. These models are compared and verified in a series of six experiments of which one has an analytical solution obtained from a perturbation analysis. The experiments are applied to both 2-D and 3-D geometries; five experiments are steady-state diagnostic, and one has a time-dependent prognostic solution. All participating models give results that are in close agreement. A clear distinction can be made between higher-order models and those that solve the full system of equations. The full-Stokes models show a much smaller spread, hence are in better agreement with one another and with the analytical solution.

  1. Evaluation of ductile failure models in Sheet Metal Forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaral Rui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, combination of equivalent plastic strain and stress triaxiality parameters are taken into account when performing characterization of material ductility. Some well-established models like Lemaitre model, GTN based models and many others perform relatively well at high-triaxiality stress states but fail to give adequate answers to low-triaxiality states. In this work, three damage models are presented, applied and assessed to a cross-shaped component. Concerning material, AA5182-O, corresponding damage parameters are characterized by an inverse analysis procedure for each damage model.

  2. The sea-level fingerprint of the Antarctic ice sheet: an ensemble GIA modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spada, Giorgio; Galassi, Gaia; Melini, Daniele

    2017-04-01

    During the last decade, Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) modelling has seen a considerable development, stimulated by the increasing number and quality of sea-level observations and of various geodetic constraints. The fundamental equation of GIA (the Sea Level Equation) accounts for a number of physical ingredients that make GIA modelling quite realistic, such as rotational effects on sea-level change, the migration of the shorelines, and the time-evolving topography in the presence of marine based ice. However, concerning the spatiotemporal distribution of the late-Pleistocene ice sheets, the GIA models published in the literature by different groups are characterised by significantly different features. These are the volumes of the ice sheets at the Last Glacial Maximum, the presence and the duration of abrupt melting episodes (meltwater pulses) and the timing of the end of deglaciation. These differences can be mainly attributed to the different sets of proxies employed to constrain the melting chronology and, sometimes, to different assumptions about the Earth's viscosity profile. One of most important sources of uncertainty is the melting chronology of the Antarctic ice sheet, which is poorly constrained by the limited amount of relative sea-level data available in the near field of the ice sheet. To test whether the GIA models developed so far for the deglaciation of Antarctic ice sheet are converging or not towards a unique solution, here we collectively consider the models of the melting history of Antarctica published in the literature so far and for each of them we solve the Sea Level Equation. Following a multi-model ensemble approach, we estimate the ensemble mean and its uncertainty, in terms of the geometry and of the time history of the sea-level fingerprints.

  3. Modelling sheet erosion on steep slopes in the loess region of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bing; Wang, Zhanli; Zhang, Qingwei; Shen, Nan; Liu, June

    2017-10-01

    The relationship of sheet erosion rate (SE), slope gradient (S) and rainfall intensity (I), and hydraulic parameters, such as flow velocity (V), shear stress (τ), stream power (Ω) and unit stream power (P), was investigated to derive an accurate experimental model. The experiment was conducted at slopes of 12.23%, 17.63%, 26.8%, 36.4%, 40.4% and 46.63% under I of 48, 60, 90, 120, 138 and 150 mm h-1, respectively, using simulated rainfall. Results showed that sheet erosion rate increased as a power function with rainfall intensity and slope gradient with R2 = 0.95 and Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency (NSE) = 0.87. Sheet erosion rate was more sensitive to rainfall intensity than to slope gradient. It increased as a power function with flow velocity, which was satisfactory for predicting sheet erosion rate with R2 = 0.95 and NSE = 0.81. Shear stress and stream power could be used to predict sheet erosion rate accurately with a linear function equation. Stream power (R2 = 0.97, NSE = 0.97) was a better predictor of sheet erosion rather than shear stress (R2 = 0.90, NSE = 0.89). However, a prediction based on unit stream power was poor. The new equation (i.e. SE = 7.5 ×1012S1.43I3.04 and SE = 0.06 Ω - 0.0003 and SE = 0.011 τ - 0.01) would improve water erosion estimation on loess hillslopes of China.

  4. On the unitarity of gauged non-compact world-sheet supersymmetric WZNW models

    CERN Document Server

    Bjornsson, Jonas

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we generalize our investigation of the unitarity of non-compact WZNW models connected to hermitian symmetric spaces to the N=1 world-sheet supersymmetric extension of these models. We will prove that these models are unitary in a BRST approach for antidominant highest weight representations if, and only if, the level and weights of the gauged subalgebra are integers. We will find new critical string theories in 7 and 9 space-time dimensions.

  5. Dynamic Current Sheet Formation and Evolution with Application to Inter-(Super)granular Flow Lanes and Quasi-Homologous Jet Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Justin K.; Velli, M.

    2011-05-01

    The coronal magnetic field structure is an immensely complex system constantly driven away from equilibrium by global drivers such as photospheric flow, flux emergence/cancellation at the lower boundary, helicity injection and transport, etc. In low-beta plasma systems, such as solar corona, the Maxwell stresses dominate forces and therefore the system dynamics. General Poynting stress injection (i.e., flux injection, helicity injection, translational motions, or any combination thereof) results in (possibly large) geometric deformations of the magnetic field, such that the Maxwell stresses distribute as uniformly as possible, constrained by the distorted geometry and topology of the bounding separatricies. Since the topological connectivity is discontinuous across these separatrix surfaces, the magnetic stresses will be discontinuous there as well, manifesting as current sheets within the field. The solar magnetic field undergoes major geometric expansion passing from the photosphere, through the chromosphere, into the corona. No matter the specific details, a mixed polarity distribution at the lower boundary and the divergence-free condition require invariant topological features such as an X-line and separatricies to exist between fields emanating from separate regions of the photosphere. We present the results of fully-3D numerical simulations of a simplified low-beta model of this field expansion. A symmetric injection of Maxwell stresses into this geometry inflates strongly line-tied fields, generating a region of large current densities and magnetic energy dissipation. Elsewhere the injected stresses accumulate along the existing separatricies. There is no evidence of reconnection dynamics until after the initial left-right parity is broken. Once the symmetry breaks, the X-line deforms explosively into a Syrovatskii-type current sheet, leading to a succession of quasi-homologous jet dynamics. The bursty-oscillations of these jets occur as the stresses within

  6. Last Interglacial climate and sea-level evolution from a coupled ice sheet-climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goelzer, Heiko; Huybrechts, Philippe; Loutre, Marie-France; Fichefet, Thierry

    2016-12-01

    As the most recent warm period in Earth's history with a sea-level stand higher than present, the Last Interglacial (LIG, ˜ 130 to 115 kyr BP) is often considered a prime example to study the impact of a warmer climate on the two polar ice sheets remaining today. Here we simulate the Last Interglacial climate, ice sheet, and sea-level evolution with the Earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM v.1.3, which includes dynamic and fully coupled components representing the atmosphere, the ocean and sea ice, the terrestrial biosphere, and the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. In this setup, sea-level evolution and climate-ice sheet interactions are modelled in a consistent framework.Surface mass balance change governed by changes in surface meltwater runoff is the dominant forcing for the Greenland ice sheet, which shows a peak sea-level contribution of 1.4 m at 123 kyr BP in the reference experiment. Our results indicate that ice sheet-climate feedbacks play an important role to amplify climate and sea-level changes in the Northern Hemisphere. The sensitivity of the Greenland ice sheet to surface temperature changes considerably increases when interactive albedo changes are considered. Southern Hemisphere polar and sub-polar ocean warming is limited throughout the Last Interglacial, and surface and sub-shelf melting exerts only a minor control on the Antarctic sea-level contribution with a peak of 4.4 m at 125 kyr BP. Retreat of the Antarctic ice sheet at the onset of the LIG is mainly forced by rising sea level and to a lesser extent by reduced ice shelf viscosity as the surface temperature increases. Global sea level shows a peak of 5.3 m at 124.5 kyr BP, which includes a minor contribution of 0.35 m from oceanic thermal expansion. Neither the individual contributions nor the total modelled sea-level stand show fast multi-millennial timescale variations as indicated by some reconstructions.

  7. Greenland Ice Sheet seasonal and spatial mass variability from model simulations and GRACE (2003-2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Patrick M.; Tedesco, Marco; Schlegel, Nicole-Jeanne; Luthcke, Scott B.; Fettweis, Xavier; Larour, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Improving the ability of regional climate models (RCMs) and ice sheet models (ISMs) to simulate spatiotemporal variations in the mass of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is crucial for prediction of future sea level rise. While several studies have examined recent trends in GrIS mass loss, studies focusing on mass variations at sub-annual and sub-basin-wide scales are still lacking. At these scales, processes responsible for mass change are less well understood and modeled, and could potentially play an important role in future GrIS mass change. Here, we examine spatiotemporal variations in mass over the GrIS derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites for the January 2003-December 2012 period using a "mascon" approach, with a nominal spatial resolution of 100 km, and a temporal resolution of 10 days. We compare GRACE-estimated mass variations against those simulated by the Modèle Atmosphérique Régionale (MAR) RCM and the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM). In order to properly compare spatial and temporal variations in GrIS mass from GRACE with model outputs, we find it necessary to spatially and temporally filter model results to reproduce leakage of mass inherent in the GRACE solution. Both modeled and satellite-derived results point to a decline (of -178.9 ± 4.4 and -239.4 ± 7.7 Gt yr-1 respectively) in GrIS mass over the period examined, but the models appear to underestimate the rate of mass loss, especially in areas below 2000 m in elevation, where the majority of recent GrIS mass loss is occurring. On an ice-sheet-wide scale, the timing of the modeled seasonal cycle of cumulative mass (driven by summer mass loss) agrees with the GRACE-derived seasonal cycle, within limits of uncertainty from the GRACE solution. However, on sub-ice-sheet-wide scales, some areas exhibit significant differences in the timing of peaks in the annual cycle of mass change. At these scales, model biases, or processes not accounted for by models related

  8. Evaluation of dermal substitute in a novel co-transplantation model with autologous epidermal sheet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guofeng Huang

    Full Text Available The development of more and more new dermal substitutes requires a reliable and effective animal model to evaluate their safety and efficacy. In this study we constructed a novel animal model using co-transplantation of autologous epidermal sheets with dermal substitutes to repair full-thickness skin defects. Autologous epidermal sheets were obtained by digesting the basement membrane (BM and dermal components from rat split-thickness skins in Dispase II solution (1.2 u/ml at 4 °C for 8, 10 and 12 h. H&E, immunohistochemical and live/dead staining showed that the epidermal sheet preserved an intact epidermis without any BM or dermal components, and a high percentage of viable cells (92.10 ± 4.19% and P63 positive cells (67.43 ± 4.21% under an optimized condition. Porcine acellular dermal matrixes were co-transplanted with the autologous epidermal sheets to repair full-thickness skin defects in Sprague-Dawley rats. The epidermal sheets survived and completely re-covered the wounds within 3 weeks. Histological staining showed that the newly formed stratified epidermis attached directly onto the dermal matrix. Inflammatory cell infiltration and vascularization of the dermal matrix were not significantly different from those in the subcutaneous implantation model. Collagen IV and laminin distributed continuously at the epidermis and dermal matrix junction 4 weeks after transplantation. Transmission electron microscopy further confirmed the presence of continuous lamina densa and hemidesmosome structures. This novel animal model can be used not only to observe the biocompatibility of dermal substitutes, but also to evaluate their effects on new epidermis and BM formation. Therefore, it is a simple and reliable model for evaluating the safety and efficacy of dermal substitutes.

  9. Failure analysis of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets based on the extended GTN damage model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui-ze; Chen, Zhang-hua; Li, Yu-jie; Dong, Chao-fang

    2013-12-01

    Based on the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model and Hill's quadratic anisotropic yield criterion, a combined experimental-numerical study on fracture initiation in the process of thermal stamping of Mg alloy AZ31 sheets was carried out. The aim is to predict the formability of thermal stamping of the Mg alloy sheets at different temperatures. The presented theoretical framework was implemented into a VUMAT subroutine for ABAQUS/EXPLICIT. Internal damage evolution due to void growth and coalescence developed at different temperatures in the Mg alloy sheets was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Moreover, the thermal effects on the void growth, coalescence, and fracture behavior of the Mg alloy sheets were analyzed by the extended GTN model and forming limit diagrams (FLD). Parameters employed in the GTN model were determined from tensile tests and numerical iterative computation. The distribution of major and minor principal strains in the specimens was determined from the numerical results. Therefore, the corresponding forming limit diagrams at different stress levels and temperatures were drawn. The comparison between the predicted forming limits and the experimental data shows a good agreement.

  10. Failure analysis of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets based on the extended GTN damage model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-ze Wang; Zhang-hua Chen; Yu-jie Li; Chao-fang Dong

    2013-01-01

    Based on the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model and Hill’s quadratic anisotropic yield criterion, a combined experimental-numerical study on fracture initiation in the process of thermal stamping of Mg alloy AZ31 sheets was carried out. The aim is to predict the formability of thermal stamping of the Mg alloy sheets at diff erent temperatures. The presented theoretical framework was implemented into a VUMAT subroutine for ABAQUS/EXPLICIT. Internal damage evolution due to void growth and coalescence developed at diff erent temperatures in the Mg alloy sheets was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Moreover, the thermal eff ects on the void growth, coalescence, and fracture behavior of the Mg alloy sheets were analyzed by the extended GTN model and forming limit diagrams (FLD). Parameters employed in the GTN model were determined from tensile tests and numerical iterative computation. The distribution of major and minor principal strains in the specimens was determined from the numerical results. Therefore, the corresponding forming limit diagrams at diff erent stress levels and temperatures were drawn. The comparison between the predicted forming limits and the experimental data shows a good agreement.

  11. Benchmark experiments for higher-order and full Stokes ice sheet models (ISMIP-HOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Pattyn

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of the first ice sheet model intercomparison project for higher-order and full Stokes ice sheet models. These models are validated in a series of six benchmark experiments of which one has an analytical solution under simplifying assumptions. Five of the tests are diagnostic and one experiment is prognostic or time dependent, for both 2-D and 3-D geometries. The results show a good convergence of the different models even for high aspect ratios. A clear distinction can be made between higher-order models and those that solve the full system of equations. The latter show a significantly better agreement with each other as well as with analytical solutions, which demonstrates that they are hardly influenced by the used numerics.

  12. Development and Applications of the Community Ice Sheet Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, Matthew J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lipscomb, William H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Price, Stephen F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Jesse [University of Montana; Sacks, William [National Center for Atmospheric Research

    2012-07-23

    The initial goals of the project are: (1) create a model for land ice that includes relevant and necessary dynamics, physical processes, and couplings; and (2) apply that model to say something more substantial about SLR in Lme for IPCC AR5 (AR6?).

  13. Application of GRACE to the assessment of model-based estimates of monthly Greenland Ice Sheet mass balance (2003-2012)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlegel, Nicole Jeanne; Wiese, David N.; Larour, Eric Y.; Watkins, Michael M.; Box, Jason E.; Fettweis, Xavier; Van Den Broeke, Michiel R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073765643

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying the Greenland Ice Sheet's future contribution to sea level rise is a challenging task that requires accurate estimates of ice sheet sensitivity to climate change. Forward ice sheet models are promising tools for estimating future ice sheet behavior, yet confidence is low because evaluati

  14. Implementation of virtual models from sheet metal forming simulation into physical 3D colour models using 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junk, S.

    2016-08-01

    Today the methods of numerical simulation of sheet metal forming offer a great diversity of possibilities for optimization in product development and in process design. However, the results from simulation are only available as virtual models. Because there are any forming tools available during the early stages of product development, physical models that could serve to represent the virtual results are therefore lacking. Physical 3D-models can be created using 3D-printing and serve as an illustration and present a better understanding of the simulation results. In this way, the results from the simulation can be made more “comprehensible” within a development team. This paper presents the possibilities of 3D-colour printing with particular consideration of the requirements regarding the implementation of sheet metal forming simulation. Using concrete examples of sheet metal forming, the manufacturing of 3D colour models will be expounded upon on the basis of simulation results.

  15. Non-contact characterization of hybrid aluminium/carbon-fibre-reinforced plastic sheets using multi-frequency eddy-current sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, W.; Li, X.; Withers, P. J.; Peyton, A. J.

    2010-10-01

    The characterization of hybrid aluminium/carbon-fibre-reinforced plastic (CFRP) sheets using multi-frequency eddy-current sensors is presented in this paper. Both air-cored circular sensors and highly directional ferrite-cored sensors are designed for bulk conductivity measurements and directionality characterization. An analytical model describing the interaction of the circular sensors with the hybrid planar structure is developed. Finite element (FE) models that take into account the anisotropicity of CFRP have also been proposed. Both models are in good agreement with experimental results. The features of the sensor output signals are analysed and explained. It is proved that an anisotropic model (tensor expression for conductivity) is appropriate for the CFRP materials under investigation. A formula to link the bulk conductivity with the conductivity tensor is proposed and verified. Lift-off effects are also discussed. It is believed that this is amongst the first published reports of using eddy-current techniques for characterizing the hybrid aluminium/CFRP material.

  16. Greenland Ice Sheet seasonal and spatial mass variability from model simulations and GRACE (2003–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Improving the ability of regional climate models (RCMs and ice sheet models (ISMs to simulate spatiotemporal variations in the mass of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS is crucial for prediction of future sea level rise. While several studies have examined recent trends in GrIS mass loss, studies focusing on mass variations at sub-annual and sub-basin-wide scales are still lacking. Here, we examine spatiotemporal variations in mass over the GrIS derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE satellites for the 2003–2012 period using a "mascon" approach, with a nominal spatial resolution of 100 km, and a temporal resolution of 10 days. We compare GRACE-estimated mass variations against those simulated by the Modèle Atmosphérique Régionale (MAR RCM and the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM. In order to properly compare spatial and temporal variations in GrIS mass from GRACE with model outputs, we find it necessary to spatially and temporally filter model results to reproduce leakage of mass inherent in the GRACE solution. Both modeled and satellite-derived results point to a decline (of −179 and −240 Gt yr−1 respectively in GrIS mass over the period examined, but the models appear to underestimate the rate of mass loss, especially in areas below 2000 m in elevation, where the majority of recent GrIS mass loss is occurring. On an ice-sheet wide scale, the timing of the modeled seasonal cycle of cumulative mass (driven by summer mass loss agrees with the GRACE-derived seasonal cycle, within limits of uncertainty from the GRACE solution. However, on sub-ice-sheet-wide scales, there are significant differences in the timing of peaks in the annual cycle of mass change. At these scales, model biases, or unaccounted-for processes related to ice dynamics or hydrology may lead to the observed differences. This highlights the need for further evaluation of modelled processes at regional and seasonal scales, and further study of ice sheet

  17. Modeling Antarctic Ice Sheet retreat in warm climates: a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, D.; Deconto, R. M.; Gasson, E.

    2016-12-01

    Early modeling of Antarctic Ice Sheet size vs. climate focused on asymmetry between retreat and growth, with much greater warming needed to cause retreat from full ice cover, due to Height Mass Balance Feedback and albedo feedback. This led to a long-standing model-data conflict, with models needing 1000 to2000 ppmv atmospheric CO2 to produce retreat from full size, vs. proxy data of large ice fluctuations despite much lower CO2 since the Miocene.Subsequent modeling with marine ice physics found that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet could undergo repeated warm-period collapses with realistic past forcing. However, that yields only 3 to 7 m equivalent sea-level rise above modern, compared to 10 to 20 m or more suggested by some geologic data. Large subglacial basins in East Antarctica could be vulnerable to the same processes,but did not retreat in most models due to narrower and shallower sills.After recent modifications, some ice sheet models were able to produce warm-period collapse of major East Antarctic basins, with sea-level rise of up to 15 m. The modifications are (i) hydrofracturing by surface melt, and structural failure of ice cliffs, or (ii) numerical treatment at the grounding line. In these models, large retreat occurs both for past warmintervals, and also for future business-as-usual scenarios.Some interpretations of data in the late Oligocene and Miocene suggest yet larger fluctuations, between 50 to 100% of modern Antarctic size. That would require surface-melt driven retreat of some terrestrial East Antarctic ice, despite the hysteresis issue raised above. A recent study using a coupled climate-ice sheet model found that with a finer climate gridand more frequent coupling exchange, substantial retreat of terrestrial Antarctica can occur with 500 to 840 ppmv CO2, much lower than in earlier models. This will allow meaningful interactions between modeling and deeper-time geologic interpretations since the late Oligocene.

  18. An approach to computing discrete adjoints for MPI-parallelized models applied to Ice Sheet System Model 4.11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larour, Eric; Utke, Jean; Bovin, Anton; Morlighem, Mathieu; Perez, Gilberto

    2016-11-01

    Within the framework of sea-level rise projections, there is a strong need for hindcast validation of the evolution of polar ice sheets in a way that tightly matches observational records (from radar, gravity, and altimetry observations mainly). However, the computational requirements for making hindcast reconstructions possible are severe and rely mainly on the evaluation of the adjoint state of transient ice-flow models. Here, we look at the computation of adjoints in the context of the NASA/JPL/UCI Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM), written in C++ and designed for parallel execution with MPI. We present the adaptations required in the way the software is designed and written, but also generic adaptations in the tools facilitating the adjoint computations. We concentrate on the use of operator overloading coupled with the AdjoinableMPI library to achieve the adjoint computation of the ISSM. We present a comprehensive approach to (1) carry out type changing through the ISSM, hence facilitating operator overloading, (2) bind to external solvers such as MUMPS and GSL-LU, and (3) handle MPI-based parallelism to scale the capability. We demonstrate the success of the approach by computing sensitivities of hindcast metrics such as the misfit to observed records of surface altimetry on the northeastern Greenland Ice Stream, or the misfit to observed records of surface velocities on Upernavik Glacier, central West Greenland. We also provide metrics for the scalability of the approach, and the expected performance. This approach has the potential to enable a new generation of hindcast-validated projections that make full use of the wealth of datasets currently being collected, or already collected, in Greenland and Antarctica.

  19. Current Challenges in Dynamo Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatzmaier, G. A.

    2001-12-01

    Three-dimensional, dynamically self-consistent, numerical simulations have been used for two decades to study the generation of global magnetic fields in the deep fluid interiors of planets and stars. In particular, the number of geodynamo models has increased significantly within the last five years. These simulations of magnetic field generation by laminar convection have provided considerable insight to the dynamo process and have produced large-scale fields similar to those observed. However, no global convective dynamo simulation has yet been able to afford the spatial resolution required to simulate turbulent convection, which surely must exist in these low-viscosity fluids. They have all employed greatly enhanced eddy diffusivities to stabilize the low resolution numerical solutions and crudely account for the transport and mixing by the unresolved turbulence. A grand challenge for the next generation of geodynamo models is to produce a simulation with the thermal and viscous (eddy) diffusivities set no larger than the actual magnetic diffusivity of the Earth's fluid core (2 m2/s), while using the core's dimensions, mass, rotation rate and heat flow. This would correspond to the Ekman and magnetic Ekman numbers both set to 10-9 and the Rayleigh number being many orders of magnitude greater than critical. Dynamo models for stars and planets present an additional complication: the large variation of density with radius. A grand challenge for the next generation of these models is to reach similarly low Ekman numbers and high Rayleigh numbers with a density that decreases by at least three orders of magnitude from the base of the convection zone to the model's outer boundary. The advances in numerical methods and massively parallel computing needed to meet these challenges will be discussed.

  20. Deglacial to Holocene history of ice-sheet retreat and bottom current strength on the western Barents Sea shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantzsch, Hendrik; Hanebuth, Till J. J.; Horry, Jan; Grave, Marina; Rebesco, Michele; Schwenk, Tilmann

    2017-10-01

    High-resolution sediment echosounder data combined with radiocarbon-dated sediment cores allowed us to reconstruct the Late Quaternary stratigraphic architecture of the Kveithola Trough and surrounding Spitsbergenbanken. The deposits display the successive deglacial retreat of the Svalbard-Barents Sea Ice Sheet. Basal subglacial till indicates that the grounded ice sheet covered both bank and trough during the Late Weichselian. A glaciomarine blanket inside the trough coinciding with laminated plumites on the bank formed during the initial ice-melting phase from at least 16.1 to 13.5 cal ka BP in close proximity to the ice margin. After the establishment of open-marine conditions at around 13.5 cal ka BP, a sediment drift developed in the confined setting of the Kveithola Trough, contemporary with crudely laminated mud, an overlying lag deposit, and modern bioclastic-rich sand on Spitsbergenbanken. The Kveithola Drift shows a remarkable grain-size coarsening from the moat towards the southern flank of the trough. This trend contradicts the concept of a separated drift (which would imply coarser grain sizes in proximity of the moat) and indicates that the southern bank is the main sediment source for the coarse material building up the Kveithola Drift. This depocenter represents, therefore, a yet undescribed combination of off-bank wedge and confined drift. Although the deposits inside Kveithola Trough and on Spitsbergenbanken display different depocenter geometries, time-equivalent grain-size changes imply a region-wide sediment-dynamic connection. We thus relate a phase of coarsest sediment supply (8.8-6.3 cal ka BP) to an increase in bottom current strength, which might be related to a stronger Atlantic Water inflow from the Southeast across the bank leading to winnowing and off-bank export of sandy sediments.

  1. Comparison of GTN Damage Models for Sheet Metal Forming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhi-ying; DONG Xiang-huai

    2008-01-01

    The Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) damage model was developed basing on anisotropic yield criterion to predict the damage evolution for anisotropic voided ductile materials.Hill's quadratic anisotropic yield criterion (1948) and Barlat's 3-component anisotropic yield criterion (1989) were used to describe the anisotropy of the matrix.User defined subroutines were developed using the above models.Taking the benchmark of NUMISHEET'93 square cup deep drawing as an example,the effect of matrix plastic anisotropy on a ductile material was studied.The predicted result by Barlat'89-GTN model has a better agreement with the experimental data than that by Hill'48-GTN and the original GTN model.

  2. Using an Earth System Model to Better Understand Ice Sheet Variability Through the Pleistocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, C. R.; Poulsen, C. J.; Pollard, D.

    2015-12-01

    We use an Earth System model with a dynamic land-ice component to explore several inconsistencies between traditional Milankovitch theory and δ18O sediment records of the Pleistocene. Our model results show that a combination of albedo feedbacks, seasonal offset of precession forcing, and orbital cycle duration differences can explain much of the 41-kyr glacial cycles that characterize the early Pleistocene. The obliquity-controlled changes in annual average high-latitude insolation produce large variations in arctic vegetation-type and sea-ice cover, which amplify the land-ice response. In contrast, the seasonal nature of the precession insolation signal dampens net ice-melt. For instance, when precession enhances ice melt in the spring, it reduces ice melt in the fall, and vice versa. The lower frequency of obliquity cycles in combination with amplified climate sensitivity due to albedo feedbacks help produce a larger ice-volume response to cycles of obliquity compared to precession, despite precession contributing more to variations in high-latitude summer insolation. In addition, we can simulate the appearance of a 100-kyr ice-volume signal by reducing basal sliding in the ice sheet model. Model experiments with enhanced basal drag have greater ice sheet elevation because the ice sheets are not able to flow as quickly, leading to increased ice thickness at the expense of ice extent. These thicker ice sheets have colder surface temperatures, receive more snowfall, and do not readily advance past the ice equilibrium line. Greater high-latitude summer insolation from the combination of high obliquity and precession/eccentricity is then necessary to cause complete ice sheet retreat. This research lends support to the regolith hypothesis, which proposes gradual erosion of high-latitude northern hemisphere regolith by multiple cycles of glaciation helped cause the mid-Pleistocene transition.

  3. Process modelling and die design concepts for forming aircraft sheet parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatipoğlu, H. A.; Alkaş, C. O.

    2016-08-01

    This study is about typical sheet metal forming processes applied in aerospace industry including flexform, stretch form and stretch draw. Each process is modelled by using finite element method for optimization. Tensile, bulge, forming limit and friction tests of commonly used materials are conducted for defining the hardening curves, yield loci, anisotropic constants, forming limit curves and friction coefficients between die and sheet. Process specific loadings and boundary conditions are applied to each model. The models are then validated by smartly designed experiments that characterize the related forming processes. Lastly, several examples are given in which those models are used to predict the forming defects before physical forming and necessary die design and process parameter changes are applied accordingly for successful forming operations.

  4. Simulation of ultra-thin sheet metal forming using phenomenological and crystal plasticity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzima, F.; Manach, PY; Balan, T.; Tabourot, L.; Toutain, S.; Diot, JL

    2016-08-01

    Micro-forming of ultra-thin sheet metals raises numerous challenges. In this investigation, the predictions of state-of-the-art crystal plasticity (CP) and phenomenological models are compared in the framework of industrial bending-dominated forming processes. Sheet copper alloys 0.1mm-thick are considered, with more than 20 grains through the thickness. Consequently, both model approaches are valid on theoretical ground. The phenomenological models’ performance was conditioned by the experimental database used for parameter identification. The CP approach was more robust with respect to parameter identification, while allowing for a less flexible description of kinematic hardening, at the cost of finer mesh and specific grain-meshing strategies. The conditions for accurate springback predictions with CP-based models are investigated, in an attempt to bring these models at the robustness level required for industrial application.

  5. Modelling the Antarctic Ice Sheet during the Mid-Pliocene using the Adaptive Mesh Resolution Model, BISICLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, A. T.; Cornford, S. L.; Lunt, D. J.; Payne, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Paleo ice sheet models provide valuable tools to test our understanding of the cryosphere-ocean-climate system and how it might respond under warm conditions. However, the long time scales and uncertainty in boundary conditions required for paleo simulations usually necessitates the use of highly parameterised and simplified model techniques, and not the use of state-of-the-art models. One such state-of-the-art model which has been used for the present day is BISICLES which, due to its adaptive mesh refinement capabilities, can explicitly model highly localised and dynamic features such as grounding line migration and ice streams. We will show results testing the suitability of using such a model for a paleo application, including the model's sensitivity to uncertainty in the ice volume, bedrock properties and climatic/oceanic forcing. We will also show preliminary results of modelling the Antarctic Ice Sheet state at the Mid-Pliocene, a period when the ice sheet is expected to have contributed many metres worth of global mean sea level increase. We will highlight the range of ice mass loss under different parameterisation and forcing schemes and the level of agreement with previous data and modelling studies, e.g. Miller et al (2012) and DeConto & Pollard (2016). It remains too computationally expensive to run BISICLES for a full glacial-interglacial cycle for example, but this model could still prove valuable for assessing the role of highly dynamic features in past ice sheets. This work will help bridge a gap in understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the simpler models used in paleo ice sheet modelling compared to the state-of-the-art models used for present day and future prediction.

  6. Prediction of strain localization in sheet metal forming using elastoplastic-damage model and localization criterion

    OpenAIRE

    Haddag, Badis; ABED-MERAIM, Farid; BALAN, Tudor

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the strain localization during the plastic deformation of sheets metals. This phenomenon is precursor for the fracture of drawing parts, thus its prediction using advanced behavior models is important in order to obtain safe final parts. Most often, an accurate prediction of localization during forming process requires damage to be included in the simulation. For this purpose, an advanced, anisotropic elastoplastic model, combining isotropic and kinematic hard...

  7. Computer Modeling of Carbon Metabolism Enables Biofuel Engineering (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-09-01

    In an effort to reduce the cost of biofuels, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has merged biochemistry with modern computing and mathematics. The result is a model of carbon metabolism that will help researchers understand and engineer the process of photosynthesis for optimal biofuel production.

  8. OBLIMAP 2.0 : A fast climate model-ice sheet model coupler including online embeddable mapping routines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reerink, Thomas J.; Jan Van De Berg, Willem; Van De Wal, Roderik S W

    2016-01-01

    This paper accompanies the second OBLIMAP open-source release. The package is developed to map climate fields between a general circulation model (GCM) and an ice sheet model (ISM) in both directions by using optimal aligned oblique projections, which minimize distortions. The curvature of the surfa

  9. Modeling and simulation of the drying of thin sheets in a continuous infrared dryer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhib, R.; Broadbent, A.D.; Therien, N. (Sherbrooke Univ., PQ (Canada))

    1994-10-01

    A differential model describing the dynamics of the infrared drying process has been set up from mass and energy balances between the moving wet material, the radiant emitters, and the air forced inside the dryer. The objective of the study is to provide a predictive model that can be used to assess the dynamic behavior of the infrared drying of a thin sheet of porous material (e.g. paper or textile). The process output responses to changes in material velocity, heating power, and water content of the entering sheet are presented. Thin sheets of bleached cotton were used to calibrate the model, and experiments were conducted to cover the entire range of operating conditions of an infrared pilot-plant dryer. The model consists of a set of four coupled hyperbolic partial differential equations describing the variations of the air and web temperatures and humidities as a function of time and space along the dryer length. The model predictions agreed well with the experimental data. Model predictions using arithmetic averages for the parameters, and parameters correlated with operational variables, are also presented and discussed. 30 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Groundwater flow modelling under ice sheet conditions in Greenland (phase II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaquet, Olivier; Namar, Rabah; Siegel, Pascal [In2Earth Modelling Ltd, Lausanne (Switzerland); Jansson, Peter [Dept. of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-11-15

    Within the framework of the GAP project, this second phase of geosphere modelling has enabled the development of an improved regional model that has led to a better representation of groundwater flow conditions likely to occur under ice sheet conditions. New data in relation to talik geometry and elevation, as well as to deformation zones were integrated in the geosphere model. In addition, more realistic hydraulic properties were considered for geosphere modelling; they were taken from the Laxemar site in Sweden. The geological medium with conductive deformation zones was modelled as a 3D continuum with stochastically hydraulic properties. Surface and basal glacial meltwater rates provided by a dynamic ice sheet model were assimilated into the groundwater flow model using mixed boundary conditions. The groundwater flow system is considered to be governed by infiltration of glacial meltwater in heterogeneous faulted crystalline rocks in the presence of permafrost and taliks. The characterisation of the permafrost-depth distribution was achieved using a coupled description of flow and heat transfer under steady state conditions. Using glaciological concepts and satellite data, an improved stochastic model was developed for the description at regional scale for the subglacial permafrost distribution in correlation with ice velocity and bed elevation data. Finally, the production of glacial meltwater by the ice sheet was traced for the determination of its depth and lateral extent. The major improvements are related to the type and handling of the subglacial boundary conditions. The use of meltwater rates provided by an ice sheet model applied as input to a mixed boundary condition enables to produce a more plausible flow field in the Eastern part of the domain, in comparison to previous modelling results (Jaquet et al. 2010). In addition, the integration of all potential taliks within the modelled domain provides a better characterisation of the likely groundwater

  11. Vibrational characteristics of graphene sheets elucidated using an elastic network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Hyeok; Kim, Daejoong; Choi, Jae Boong; Kim, Moon Ki

    2014-08-01

    Recent studies of graphene have demonstrated its great potential for highly sensitive resonators. In order to capture the intrinsic vibrational characteristics of graphene, we propose an atomistic modeling method called the elastic network model (ENM), in which a graphene sheet is modeled as a mass-spring network of adjacent atoms connected by various linear springs with specific bond ratios. Normal mode analysis (NMA) reveals the various vibrational features of bi-layer graphene sheets (BLGSs) clamped at two edges. We also propose a coarse-graining (CG) method to extend our graphene study into the meso- and macroscales, at which experimental measurements and synthesis of graphene become practical. The simulation results show good agreement with experimental observations. Therefore, the proposed ENM approach will not only shed light on the theoretical study of graphene mechanics, but also play an important role in the design of highly-sensitive graphene-based resonators.

  12. The neglect of cliff instability can underestimate warming period melting in Antarctic ice sheet models

    CERN Document Server

    Ruckert, Kelsey L; Pollard, Dave; Guan, Yawen; Wong, Tony E; Forest, Chris E; Keller, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The response of the Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) to changing climate forcings is an important driver of sea-level changes. Anthropogenic climate changes may drive a sizeable AIS tipping point response with subsequent increases in coastal flooding risks. Many studies analyzing flood risks use simple models to project the future responses of AIS and its sea-level contributions. These analyses have provided important new insights, but they are often silent on the effects of potentially important processes such as Marine Ice Sheet Instability (MISI) or Marine Ice Cliff Instability (MICI). These approximations can be well justified and result in more parsimonious and transparent model structures. This raises the question how this approximation impacts hindcasts and projections. Here, we calibrate a previously published AIS model, which neglects the effects of MICI, using a combination of observational constraints and a Bayesian inversion method. Specifically, we approximate the effects of missing MICI by comparing ou...

  13. Uncertainty quantification of Antarctic contribution to sea-level rise using the fast Elementary Thermomechanical Ice Sheet (f.ETISh) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulthuis, Kevin; Arnst, Maarten; Pattyn, Frank; Favier, Lionel

    2017-04-01

    Uncertainties in sea-level rise projections are mostly due to uncertainties in Antarctic ice-sheet predictions (IPCC AR5 report, 2013), because key parameters related to the current state of the Antarctic ice sheet (e.g. sub-ice-shelf melting) and future climate forcing are poorly constrained. Here, we propose to improve the predictions of Antarctic ice-sheet behaviour using new uncertainty quantification methods. As opposed to ensemble modelling (Bindschadler et al., 2013) which provides a rather limited view on input and output dispersion, new stochastic methods (Le Maître and Knio, 2010) can provide deeper insight into the impact of uncertainties on complex system behaviour. Such stochastic methods usually begin with deducing a probabilistic description of input parameter uncertainties from the available data. Then, the impact of these input parameter uncertainties on output quantities is assessed by estimating the probability distribution of the outputs by means of uncertainty propagation methods such as Monte Carlo methods or stochastic expansion methods. The use of such uncertainty propagation methods in glaciology may be computationally costly because of the high computational complexity of ice-sheet models. This challenge emphasises the importance of developing reliable and computationally efficient ice-sheet models such as the f.ETISh ice-sheet model (Pattyn, 2015), a new fast thermomechanical coupled ice sheet/ice shelf model capable of handling complex and critical processes such as the marine ice-sheet instability mechanism. Here, we apply these methods to investigate the role of uncertainties in sub-ice-shelf melting, calving rates and climate projections in assessing Antarctic contribution to sea-level rise for the next centuries using the f.ETISh model. We detail the methods and show results that provide nominal values and uncertainty bounds for future sea-level rise as a reflection of the impact of the input parameter uncertainties under

  14. The mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet: sensitivity to climate change as revealed by energy-balance modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    1991-01-01

    The sensitivity of the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet to climate change is studied with an energy-balance model of the ice/snow surface, applied at 200 m elevation intervals for four characteristic regions of the ice sheet. Solar radiation, longwave radiation, turbulent heat fluxes and refr

  15. Advances in Constitutive and Failure Models for Sheet Forming Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jeong Whan; Stoughton, Thomas B.

    2016-08-01

    Non-Associated Flow Rule (Non-AFR) can be used as a convenient way to account for anisotropic material response in metal deformation processes, making it possible for example, to eliminate the problem of the anomalous yielding in equibiaxial tension that is mistakenly attributed to limitations of the quadratic yield function, but may instead be attributed to the Associated Flow Rule (AFR). Seeing as in Non-AFR based models two separate functions can be adopted for yield and plastic potential, there is no constraint to which models are used to describe each of them. In this work, the flexible combination of two different yield criteria as yield function and plastic potential under Non-AFR is proposed and evaluated. FE simulations were carried so as to verify the accuracy of the material directionalities predicted using these constitutive material models. The stability conditions for non-associated flow connected with the prediction of yield point elongation are also reviewed. Anisotropic distortion hardening is further incorporated under non-associated flow. It has been found that anisotropic hardening makes the noticeable improvements for both earing and spring-back predictions. This presentation is followed by a discussion of the topic of the forming limit & necking, the evidence in favor of stress analysis, and the motivation for the development of a new type of forming limit diagram based on the polar effective plastic strain (PEPS) diagram. In order to connect necking to fracture in metals, the stress-based necking limit is combined with a stress- based fracture criterion in the principal stress, which provides an efficient method for the analysis of necking and fracture limits. The concept for the PEPS diagram is further developed to cover the path-independent PEPS fracture which is compatible with the stress-based fracture approach. Thus this fracture criterion can be utilized to describe the post-necking behavior and to cover nonlinear strain-path. Fracture

  16. Dependence of anomalous resistivity on bulk drift velocity of electrons in the reconnecting current sheets in solar flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui-Ping Wu; Guang-Li Huang; Hai-Sheng Ji

    2010-01-01

    Anomalous resistivity is critical for triggering fast magnetic reconnection in the nearly collisionless coronal plasma.Its nonlinear dependence on bulk drift velocity is usually assumed in MHD simulations.However,the mechanism for the production of anomalous resistivity and its evolution is still an open question.We numerically solved the one dimension Vlasov equation with the typical solar coronal parameters and realistic mass ratios to infer the relationship between anomalous resistivity and bulk drift velocity of electrons in the reconnecting current sheets as well as its nonlinear characteristics.Our principal findings are summarized as follows: 1)the relationship between the anomalous resistivity and bulk drift velocity of electrons relative to ions may be described as ηmax = 0.03724(vd/ve)5.702 Ω m for vd/ve in the range of 1.4-2.0 and ηmax = 0.8746(vd/ve)1.284 Ωm for vd/ve in the range of 2.5-4.5; 2)if drift velocity is just slightly larger than the threshold of ion-acoustic instability,the anomalous resistivity due to the wave-particle interactions is enhanced by about five orders as compared with classic resistivity due to Coulomb collisions.With the increase of drift velocity from 1.4ve to 4.5ve,the anomalous resistivity continues to increase 100 times; 3)in the rise phase of unstable waves,the anomalous resistivity has the same order as the one estimated from quasi-linear theory; after saturation of unstable waves,the anomalous resistivity decreases at least about one order as compared with its peak value; 4)considering that the final velocity of electrons ejected out of the reconnecting current sheet(RCS)decreases with the distance from the neutral point in the neutral plane,the anomalous resistivity decreases with the distance from the neutral point,which is favorable for the Petschek-like reconnection to take place.

  17. Failure Analysis of Warm Stamping of Magnesium Alloy Sheet Based on an Anisotropic Damage Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, P. J.; Chen, Z. H.; Dong, C. F.

    2014-11-01

    Based on the frame work of continuum damage mechanics, a research work of anisotropic damage evolution in warm stamping process of magnesium alloy sheets has been carried out by means of a combined experimental-numerical method. The aim was to predict formability of warm stamping of AZ31 Mg alloy sheets by taking the thermal and damage effects into account. In the presented work, a temperature-dependent anisotropic yield function suitable for cold rolling sheet metals together with an anisotropic damage model was implemented into the a VUMAT subroutine for ABAQUS/EXPLICIT. The evolution of internal damage in the form of void growth and coalescence in AZ31 Mg alloy sheet was observed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Moreover, a coupled thermo-mechanical simulation of the stamping process was performed using the implemented code at different temperatures. The parameters employed in the simulation were determined by the standard tensile tests and algebraic manipulation. The overall anisotropic damage process from crack initiation to final propagation in local area of blank was simulated. Numerical results show that the prediction of the site of crack initiation and the orientation of crack propagation are consistent with the data observed in warm stamping experiments.

  18. Modeling of tool path for the CNC sheet cutting machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petunin, Aleksandr A.

    2015-11-01

    In the paper the problem of tool path optimization for CNC (Computer Numerical Control) cutting machines is considered. The classification of the cutting techniques is offered. We also propose a new classification of toll path problems. The tasks of cost minimization and time minimization for standard cutting technique (Continuous Cutting Problem, CCP) and for one of non-standard cutting techniques (Segment Continuous Cutting Problem, SCCP) are formalized. We show that the optimization tasks can be interpreted as discrete optimization problem (generalized travel salesman problem with additional constraints, GTSP). Formalization of some constraints for these tasks is described. For the solution GTSP we offer to use mathematical model of Prof. Chentsov based on concept of a megalopolis and dynamic programming.

  19. THERMAL FIELD MODELING IN THE MIG / MAG - CMT BRAZE-WELDING PROCESS OF GALVANIZED SHEETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GHEORGHE SIMA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with some technical aspects of the optimization process braze-welding of galvanized steel sheet with a thickness of 0.7-1.5 mm. The braze-welding process is presented systemic, highlighting the input and output variables (of the zinc layer and intermetallic layer characteristics. It is presented the test for statistical analysis performed on a four-level factorial experiment aimed at studying the influence of the main simultaneously welding parameters of the welding technology CMT (Cold Metal Transfer: determining an optimal welding current IS, welding speed vS, boos current Ina and arc length correction factor l0.

  20. Autologous preconditioned mesenchymal stem cell sheets improve left ventricular function in a rabbit old myocardial infarction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yuya; Shirasawa, Bungo; Takeuchi, Yuriko; Kawamura, Daichi; Nakamura, Tamami; Samura, Makoto; Nishimoto, Arata; Ueno, Koji; Morikage, Noriyasu; Hosoyama, Tohru; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) constitute one of the most powerful tools for therapeutic angiogenesis in infarcted hearts. However, conventional MSC transplantation approaches result in insufficient therapeutic effects due to poor retention of graft cells in severe ischemic diseases. Cell sheet technology has been developed as a new method to prolong graft cell retention even in ischemic tissue. Recently, we demonstrated that hypoxic pretreatment enhances the therapeutic efficacy of cell sheet implantation in infarcted mouse hearts. In this study, we investigated whether hypoxic pretreatment activates the therapeutic functions of bone marrow-derived MSC (BM-MSC) sheets and improves cardiac function in rabbit infarcted hearts following autologous transplantation. Production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was increased in BM-MSC monolayer sheets and it peaked at 48 h under hypoxic culture conditions (2% O2). To examine in vivo effects, preconditioned autologous BM-MSC sheets were implanted into a rabbit old myocardial infarction model. Implantation of preconditioned BM-MSC sheets accelerated angiogenesis in the peri-infarcted area and decreased the infarcted area, leading to improvement of the left ventricular function of the infarcted heart. Importantly, the therapeutic efficacy of the preconditioned BM-MSC sheets was higher than that of standardly cultured sheets. Thus, implantation of autologous preconditioned BM-MSC sheets is a feasible approach for enhancing therapeutic angiogenesis in chronically infarcted hearts. PMID:27347329

  1. Modeling of Current Transformers Under Saturation Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Prochazka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available During a short circuit the input signal of the relay can be distort by the magnetic core saturation of the current transformer. It is useful to verify the behavior of CT by a mathematical model. The paper describes one phase and three phase models and it presents some methods of how to analyze and classify a deformed secondary current

  2. Modelling the Isotopic Response to Antarctic Ice Sheet Change During the Last Interglacial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Max; Sime, Louise; Singarayer, Joy; Tindall, Julia; Valdes, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Ice sheet changes can exert major control over spatial water isotope variations in Antarctic surface snow. Consequently a significant mass loss or gain of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) would be expected to cause changes in the water isotope record across Antarctic ice core sites. Analysis of sea level indicators for the last interglacial (LIG), around 125 to 128 ka, suggest a global sea level peak 6 to 9 m higher than present. Recent NEEM Greenland ice core results imply that Greenland likely provided a modest ~2m contribution towards this global sea level rise. This implies that a WAIS contribution is necessary to explain the LIG sea level maxima. In addition, Antarctic ice core records suggest that Antarctic air temperatures during the LIG were up to 6°C warmer than present. Climate models have been unable to recreate such warmth when only orbital and greenhouse gas forcing are considered. Thus changes to the Antarctic ice sheet and ocean circulation may be required to reconcile model simulations with ice core data. Here we model the isotopic response to differing WAIS deglaciation scenarios, freshwater hosing, and sea ice configurations using a fully coupled General Circulation Model (GCM) to help interpret Antarctic ice core records over the LIG. This approach can help isolate the contribution of individual processes and feedbacks to final isotopic signals recorded in Antarctic ice cores.

  3. Manufactured solutions and the verification of three-dimensional Stokes ice-sheet models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Leng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The manufactured solution technique is used for the verification of computational models in many fields. In this paper, we construct manufactured solutions for the three-dimensional, isothermal, nonlinear Stokes model for flows in glaciers and ice sheets. The solution construction procedure starts with kinematic boundary conditions and is mainly based on the solution of a first-order partial differential equation for the ice velocity that satisfies the incompressibility condition. The manufactured solutions depend on the geometry of the ice sheet, basal sliding parameters, and ice softness. Initial conditions are taken from the periodic geometry of a standard problem of the ISMIP-HOM benchmark tests. The upper surface is altered through the manufactured solution procedure to generate an analytic solution for the time-dependent flow problem. We then use this manufactured solution to verify a parallel, high-order accurate, finite element Stokes ice-sheet model. Simulation results from the computational model show good convergence to the manufactured analytic solution.

  4. The Greenland ice sheet during LGM – a model based on field observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Svend Visby; Kjeldsen, Kristian Kjellerup; Kjær, Kurt H.;

    The issue is complicated by the circumstance that during LGM (Last glacial maximum) the ice sheet margins around the whole perimeter stood on the shelf and “classical” evidence, such as large moraine belts, extensive sandurs and major drainage diversions do not apply. The first estimates were therefore...... based on observations on land, such as weathering limits on coastal mountains, major moraine belts, and altitudes of marine limits. Extrapolation from this gave estimates of LGM ice cover on the shelf ranging from inner to outer shelf, often under the assumption that it had to be either or...... combine this new evidence with the older observations. This model is conservative because it is, as far as possible, based on tangible evidence minimising the amount of speculation. The LGM ice sheet in this model covered c. 2.7 mio km2, 65% more than the present. Two thirds of this excess relative...

  5. Efficient Model Order Reduction for the Dynamics of Nonlinear Multilayer Sheet Structures with Trial Vector Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Witteveen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical response of multilayer sheet structures, such as leaf springs or car bodies, is largely determined by the nonlinear contact and friction forces between the sheets involved. Conventional computational approaches based on classical reduction techniques or the direct finite element approach have an inefficient balance between computational time and accuracy. In the present contribution, the method of trial vector derivatives is applied and extended in order to obtain a-priori trial vectors for the model reduction which are suitable for determining the nonlinearities in the joints of the reduced system. Findings show that the result quality in terms of displacements and contact forces is comparable to the direct finite element method but the computational effort is extremely low due to the model order reduction. Two numerical studies are presented to underline the method’s accuracy and efficiency. In conclusion, this approach is discussed with respect to the existing body of literature.

  6. Heat and mass transfer in nanofluid thin film over an unsteady stretching sheet using Buongiorno's model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qasim, M.; Khan, Z. H.; Lopez, R. J.; Khan, W. A.

    2016-01-01

    The heat and mass transport of a nanofluid thin film over an unsteady stretching sheet has been investigated. This is the first paper on nanofluid thin film flow caused by unsteady stretching sheet using Buongiorno's model. The model used for the nanofluid film incorporates the effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. The self-similar non-linear ordinary differential equations are solved using Maple's built-in BVP solver. The results for pure fluid are found to be in good agreement with the literature. Present analysis shows that free surface temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction increase with both unsteadiness and magnetic parameters. The results reveal that effect of both nanofluid parameters and viscous dissipation is to reduce the heat transfer rate.

  7. A customized light sheet microscope to measure spatio-temporal protein dynamics in small model organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Rieckher

    Full Text Available We describe a customizable and cost-effective light sheet microscopy (LSM platform for rapid three-dimensional imaging of protein dynamics in small model organisms. The system is designed for high acquisition speeds and enables extended time-lapse in vivo experiments when using fluorescently labeled specimens. We demonstrate the capability of the setup to monitor gene expression and protein localization during ageing and upon starvation stress in longitudinal studies in individual or small groups of adult Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes. The system is equipped to readily perform fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP, which allows monitoring protein recovery and distribution under low photobleaching conditions. Our imaging platform is designed to easily switch between light sheet microscopy and optical projection tomography (OPT modalities. The setup permits monitoring of spatio-temporal expression and localization of ageing biomarkers of subcellular size and can be conveniently adapted to image a wide range of small model organisms and tissue samples.

  8. Analysis of the RPE sheet in the rd10 retinal degeneration model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yi [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-04

    The normal RPE sheet in the C57Bl/6J mouse is subclassified into two major tiling patterns: A regular generally hexagonal array covering most of the surface and a 'soft network' near the ciliary body made of irregularly shaped cells. Physics models predict these two patterns based on contractility and elasticity of the RPE cell, and strength of cellular adhesion between cells. We hypothesized and identified major changes in RPE regular hexagonal tiling pattern in rdl0 compared to C57BL/6J mice. RPE sheet damage was extensive but occurred in rd10 later than expected, after most retinal degeneration. RPE sheet changes occur in zones with a bullseye pattern. In the posterior zone around the optic nerve RPE cells take on larger irregular and varied shapes to form an intact monolayer. In mid periphery, there is a higher than normal density of cells that progress into involuted layers of RPE under the retina. The periphery remains mostly normal until late stages of degeneration. The number of neighboring cells varies widely depending on zone and progression. RPE morphology continues to deteriorate long after the photoreceptors have degenerated. The RPE cells are bystanders to the rd10 degeneration within photo receptors, and the collateral damage to the RPE sheet resembles stimulation of migration or chemotaxis. Quantitative measures of the tiling patterns and histopathology detected here, scripted in a pipeline written in Perl and Cell Profiler (an open source Matlab plugin), are directly applicable to RPE sheet images from noninvasive fundus autofluorescence (FAF), adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-cSLO), and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) of patients with early stage AMD or RP.

  9. Absorption of calcium ions on oxidized graphene sheets and study its dynamic behavior by kinetic and isothermal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Fathy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sorption of calcium ion from the hard underground water using novel oxidized graphene (GO sheets was studied in this paper. Physicochemical properties and microstructure of graphene sheets were investigated using Raman spectrometer, thermogravimetry analyzer, transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscope. The kinetics adsorption of calcium on graphene oxide sheets was examined using Lagergren first and second orders. The results show that the Lagergren second-order was the best-fit model that suggests the conception process of calcium ion adsorption on the Go sheets. For isothermal studies, the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were used at temperatures ranging between 283 and 313 K. Thermodynamic parameters resolved at 283, 298 and 313 K indicating that the GO adsorption was exothermic spontaneous process. Finally, the graphene sheets show high partiality toward calcium particles and it will be useful in softening and treatment of hard water.

  10. Paradigmatic flow for small-scale magnetohydrodynamics: properties of the ideal case and the collision of current sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E; Brachet, M E; Pouquet, A; Mininni, P D; Rosenberg, D

    2008-12-01

    We propose two sets of initial conditions for magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in which both the velocity and the magnetic fields have spatial symmetries that are preserved by the dynamical equations as the system evolves. When implemented numerically they allow for substantial savings in CPU time and memory storage requirements for a given resolved scale separation. Basic properties of these Taylor-Green flows generalized to MHD are given, and the ideal nondissipative case is studied up to the equivalent of 2048;{3} grid points for one of these flows. The temporal evolution of the logarithmic decrements delta of the energy spectrum remains exponential at the highest spatial resolution considered, for which an acceleration is observed briefly before the grid resolution is reached. Up to the end of the exponential decay of delta , the behavior is consistent with a regular flow with no appearance of a singularity. The subsequent short acceleration in the formation of small magnetic scales can be associated with a near collision of two current sheets driven together by magnetic pressure. It leads to strong gradients with a fast rotation of the direction of the magnetic field, a feature also observed in the solar wind.

  11. An ice flow modeling perspective on bedrock adjustment patterns of the Greenland ice sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Olaizola

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the launch in 2002 of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE satellites, several estimates of the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS have been produced. To obtain ice mass changes, the GRACE data need to be corrected for the effect of deformation changes of the Earth's crust. Recently, a new method has been proposed where ice mass changes and bedrock changes are simultaneously solved. Results show bedrock subsidence over almost the entirety of Greenland in combination with ice mass loss which is only half of the currently standing estimates. This subsidence can be an elastic response, but it may however also be a delayed response to past changes. In this study we test whether these subsidence patterns are consistent with ice dynamical modeling results. We use a 3-D ice sheet–bedrock model with a surface mass balance forcing based on a mass balance gradient approach to study the pattern and magnitude of bedrock changes in Greenland. Different mass balance forcings are used. Simulations since the Last Glacial Maximum yield a bedrock delay with respect to the mass balance forcing of nearly 3000 yr and an average uplift at present of 0.3 mm yr−1. The spatial pattern of bedrock changes shows a small central subsidence as well as more intense uplift in the south. These results are not compatible with the gravity based reconstructions showing a subsidence with a maximum in central Greenland, thereby questioning whether the claim of halving of the ice mass change is justified.

  12. Simulation of the last glacial cycle with a coupled climate ice-sheet model of intermediate complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ganopolski

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A new version of the Earth system model of intermediate complexity, CLIMBER-2, which includes the three-dimensional polythermal ice-sheet model SICOPOLIS, is used to simulate the last glacial cycle forced by variations of the Earth's orbital parameters and atmospheric concentration of major greenhouse gases. The climate and ice-sheet components of the model are coupled bi-directionally through a physically-based surface energy and mass balance interface. The model accounts for the time-dependent effect of aeolian dust on planetary and snow albedo. The model successfully simulates the temporal and spatial dynamics of the major Northern Hemisphere (NH ice sheets, including rapid glacial inception and strong asymmetry between the ice-sheet growth phase and glacial termination. Spatial extent and elevation of the ice sheets during the last glacial maximum agree reasonably well with palaeoclimate reconstructions. A suite of sensitivity experiments demonstrates that simulated ice-sheet evolution during the last glacial cycle is very sensitive to some parameters of the surface energy and mass-balance interface and dust module. The possibility of a considerable acceleration of the climate ice-sheet model is discussed.

  13. The influence of ice sheets on temperature during the past 38 million years inferred from a one-dimensional ice sheet-climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stap, Lennert B.; van de Wal, Roderik S. W.; de Boer, Bas; Bintanja, Richard; Lourens, Lucas J.

    2017-09-01

    Since the inception of the Antarctic ice sheet at the Eocene-Oligocene transition (˜ 34 Myr ago), land ice has played a crucial role in Earth's climate. Through feedbacks in the climate system, land ice variability modifies atmospheric temperature changes induced by orbital, topographical, and greenhouse gas variations. Quantification of these feedbacks on long timescales has hitherto scarcely been undertaken. In this study, we use a zonally averaged energy balance climate model bidirectionally coupled to a one-dimensional ice sheet model, capturing the ice-albedo and surface-height-temperature feedbacks. Potentially important transient changes in topographic boundary conditions by tectonics and erosion are not taken into account but are briefly discussed. The relative simplicity of the coupled model allows us to perform integrations over the past 38 Myr in a fully transient fashion using a benthic oxygen isotope record as forcing to inversely simulate CO2. Firstly, we find that the results of the simulations over the past 5 Myr are dependent on whether the model run is started at 5 or 38 Myr ago. This is because the relation between CO2 and temperature is subject to hysteresis. When the climate cools from very high CO2 levels, as in the longer transient 38 Myr run, temperatures in the lower CO2 range of the past 5 Myr are higher than when the climate is initialised at low temperatures. Consequently, the modelled CO2 concentrations depend on the initial state. Taking the realistic warm initialisation into account, we come to a best estimate of CO2, temperature, ice-volume-equivalent sea level, and benthic δ18O over the past 38 Myr. Secondly, we study the influence of ice sheets on the evolution of global temperature and polar amplification by comparing runs with ice sheet-climate interaction switched on and off. By passing only albedo or surface height changes to the climate model, we can distinguish the separate effects of the ice-albedo and surface

  14. Evolution and structure of the plasma of current sheets forming in two-dimensional magnetic fields with a null line at low initial gas ionization and their interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovskaya, G. V.; Frank, A. G.

    2012-04-01

    An analysis of the experimental data obtained by holographic interferometry in our work [1] makes it possible to explain most of the observed specific features of the structure and evolution of the plasma sheets developing in a two-dimensional magnetic field with a null line in a plasma with a low initial degree of ionization (≈10-4). The following two processes are shown to play a key role here: additional gas ionization in an electric field and the peculiarities of plasma dynamics in a current sheet expanding in time.

  15. Ground vibrations due to pile and sheet pile driving : prediction models of today

    OpenAIRE

    Deckner, Fanny; Viking, Kenneth; Hintze, Staffan

    2012-01-01

    As part of aconstruction work pile and sheet pile driving unavoidably generates vibrations.As of today construction works are often located in urban areas and along withsociety’s increasing concern of environmental impact the need for vibrationprediction prior to construction is of immediate interest. This study presents a review of the predictionmodels existing today. For prediction of ground vibrations from pile and sheetpile driving there are roughly three different types of models; empiri...

  16. Modelling the liquid-water vein system within polar ice sheets as a potential microbial habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dani, K. G. Srikanta; Mader, Heidy M.; Wolff, Eric W.; Wadham, Jemma L.

    2012-06-01

    Based on the fundamental and distinctive physical properties of polycrystalline ice Ih, the chemical and temperature profiles within the polar ice sheets, and the observed selective partitioning of bacteria into liquid water filled veins in the ice, we consider the possibility that microbial life could survive and be sustained within glacial systems. Here, we present a set of modelled vertical profiles of vein diameter, vein chemical concentration, and vein water volume variability across a range of polar ice sheets using their ice core chemical profiles. A sensitivity analysis of VeinsInIce1.0, the numerical model used in this study shows that the ice grain size and the local borehole temperature are the most significant factors that influence the intergranular liquid vein size and the amount of freeze-concentrated impurities partitioned into the veins respectively. Model results estimate the concentration and characteristics of the chemical broth in the veins to be a potential extremophilic microbial medium. The vein sizes are estimated to vary between 0.3 μm to 8 μm across the vertical length of many polar ice sheets and they may contain up to 2 μL of liquid water per litre of solid ice. The results suggest that these veins in polar ice sheets could accommodate populations of psychrophilic and hyperacidophilic ultra-small bacteria and in some regions even support the habitation of unicellular eukaryotes. This highlights the importance of understanding the potential impact of englacial microbial metabolism on polar ice core chemical profiles and provides a model for similar extreme habitats elsewhere in the universe.

  17. Calibration of Gurson-type models for porous sheet metals with anisotropic non-quadratic plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gologanu, M.; Kami, A.; Comsa, D. S.; Banabic, D.

    2016-08-01

    The growth and coalescence of voids in sheet metals are not only the main active mechanisms in the final stages of fracture in a necking band, but they also contribute to the forming limits via changes in the normal directions to the yield surface. A widely accepted method to include void effects is the development of a Gurson-type model for the appropriate yield criterion, based on an approximate limit analysis of a unit cell containing a single spherical, spheroidal or ellipsoidal void. We have recently [2] obtained dissipation functions and Gurson-type models for porous sheet metals with ellipsoidal voids and anisotropic non-quadratic plasticity, including yield criteria based on linear transformations (Yld91 and Yld2004-18p) and a pure plane stress yield criteria (BBC2005). These Gurson-type models contain several parameters that depend on the void and cell geometries and on the selected yield criterion. Best results are obtained when these key parameters are calibrated via numerical simulations using the same unit cell and a few representative loading conditions. The single most important such loading condition corresponds to a pure hydrostatic macroscopic stress (pure pressure) and the corresponding velocity field found during the solution of the limit analysis problem describes the expansion of the cavity. However, for the case of sheet metals, the condition of plane stress precludes macroscopic stresses with large triaxiality or ratio of mean stress to equivalent stress, including the pure hydrostatic case. Also, pure plane stress yield criteria like BBC2005 must first be extended to 3D stresses before attempting to develop a Gurson-type model and such extensions are purely phenomenological with no due account for the out- of-plane anisotropic properties of the sheet. Therefore, we propose a new calibration method for Gurson- type models that uses only boundary conditions compatible with the plane stress requirement. For each such boundary condition we use

  18. The impact of iceberg calving on climate: a model study with a fully coupled ice-sheet - climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugelmayer, Marianne; Roche, Didier; Renssen, Hans

    2013-04-01

    In the current period of climate change the understanding of the interactions between different parts of the climate system gets more and more important. The ice-sheets and ice-shelves, an important part of this system, experienced strong changes in the geological past, ranging from fully ice free to ice covered - thereby altering the whole climate. In the present climate, thousands of icebergs are released every year from Greenland and Antarctica, acting as a moving source of freshwater and a sink of latent heat. As a consequence, these icebergs alter the oceans' stratification and facilitate the formation of sea ice, thus influencing the state of the ocean and of the atmosphere. Up to now, the impact of icebergs on climate has been addressed in different studies which utilize climate models using freshwater and latent heat fluxes to parameterize icebergs. Mostly these fluxes were equally distributed around the coast. However, more recently iceberg modules were integrated into climate models to take into account the temporal and spatial distribution of the iceberg melting. In the presented study, an earth system model of intermediate complexity - iLOVECLIM - that includes a 3D dynamic - thermodynamic iceberg module (Jongma et al., 2008) is coupled to the Grenoble ice shelves and land ice model - GRISLI (Ritz et al., 1997, 2001). In GRISLI, ice sheets evolve according to the precipitation and temperature received from iLOVECLIM. In turn, GRISLI provides its topography and the ice mask to the atmospheric component of iLOVECLIM and all freshwater fluxes (ablation and calving) to its oceanic component. The ablation is directly put into the uppermost layer of the ocean, whereas the calving is used to generate icebergs at the calving sites following the size distribution of Bigg et al. (1997). Using this model set-up we analyse the evolution and the equilibrium state of the Greenland ice-sheet under pre-industrial conditions within three different coupling methods. All

  19. Future projections of the Greenland ice sheet energy balance driving the surface melt, developed using the regional climate MAR model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Franco

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 25 km-simulations are performed over the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS throughout the 20th and 21st centuries, using the regional climate model MAR forced by four RCP scenarios from two CMIP5 global circulation models, in order to investigate the projected changes of the surface energy balance (SEB components driving the surface melt. Analysis of 2000–2100 melt anomalies compared to melt results over 1980–1999 reveals an exponential relationship of the GrIS surface melt rate simulated by MAR to the near-surface temperature (TAS anomalies, mainly due to the surface albedo positive feedback associated with the extension of bare ice areas in summer. On the GrIS margins, the future melt anomalies are rather driven by stronger sensible heat fluxes, induced by enhanced warm air advections over the ice sheet. Over the central dry snow zone, the increase of melt surpasses the negative feedback from heavier snowfall inducing therefore a decrease of the summer surface albedo even at the top of the ice sheet. In addition to the incoming longwave flux increase associated to the atmosphere warming, MAR projects an increase of the cloud cover decreasing the ratio of the incoming shortwave versus longwave radiation and dampening the albedo feedback. However, it should be noted that this trend in the cloud cover is contrary to that simulated by ERA-INTERIM-forced MAR over current climate, where the observed melt increase since the 1990's seems rather to be a consequence of more anticyclonic atmospheric conditions. Finally, no significant change is projected in the length of the melt season. This timing highlights the importance of solar radiation in the melt SEB.

  20. Leveraging Cloud Technology to Provide a Responsive, Reliable and Scalable Backend for the Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory Using the Ice Sheet System Model and Amazon's Elastic Compute Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, G. L.; Larour, E. Y.; Halkides, D. J.; Cheng, D. L. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory(VISL) is a Cryosphere outreach effort byscientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory(JPL) in Pasadena, CA, Earth and SpaceResearch(ESR) in Seattle, WA, and the University of California at Irvine (UCI), with the goal of providing interactive lessons for K-12 and college level students,while conforming to STEM guidelines. At the core of VISL is the Ice Sheet System Model(ISSM), an open-source project developed jointlyat JPL and UCI whose main purpose is to model the evolution of the polar ice caps in Greenland and Antarctica. By using ISSM, VISL students have access tostate-of-the-art modeling software that is being used to conduct scientificresearch by users all over the world. However, providing this functionality isby no means simple. The modeling of ice sheets in response to sea and atmospheric temperatures, among many other possible parameters, requiressignificant computational resources. Furthermore, this service needs to beresponsive and capable of handling burst requests produced by classrooms ofstudents. Cloud computing providers represent a burgeoning industry. With majorinvestments by tech giants like Amazon, Google and Microsoft, it has never beeneasier or more affordable to deploy computational elements on-demand. This isexactly what VISL needs and ISSM is capable of. Moreover, this is a promisingalternative to investing in expensive and rapidly devaluing hardware.

  1. Initial Steps Toward a Hydrologic "Watershed" Model for the Ablation Zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, M. G.; Smith, L. C.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Pitcher, L. H.; Overstreet, B. T.; Chu, V. W.; Ryan, J.; Yang, K.

    2015-12-01

    Surface meltwater production on the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is a well-documented phenomenon but we lack understanding of the physical mechanisms that control the production, transport, and fate of the meltwater. To address this, we present initial steps toward the development of a novel hydrologic model for supraglacial streamflow on the GrIS. Ice ablation and surface meteorology were measured during a 6-day field campaign in a 112 km2 ablation zone of southwest Greenland. We modeled ablation using SnowModel, an energy balance snow- and ice-ablation model. The required model inputs included standard surface meteorology and a digital elevation model (DEM), and the model outputs include all components of the energy balance and surface meltwater production for each grid cell in the ice-sheet watershed. Our next steps toward developing a complete hydrologic model for supraglacial streamflow in the ablation zone of the GrIS include the application of the meltwater-routing model HydroFlow to compare with in-situ measurements of supraglacial river discharge.

  2. Analytical drain current model for amorphous IGZO thin-film transistors in abovethreshold regime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Hongyu; Zheng Xueren

    2011-01-01

    An analytical drain current model is presented for amorphous In-Ga-Zn-oxide thin-film transistors in the above-threshold regime,assuming an exponential trap states density within the bandgap.Using a charge sheet approximation,the trapped and free charge expressions are calculated,then the surface potential based drain current expression is developed.Moreover,threshold voltage based drain current expressions are presented using the Taylor expansion to the surface potential based drain current expression.The calculated results of the surface potential based and threshold voltage based drain current expressions are compared with experimental data and good agreements are achieved.

  3. Scalable adaptive methods for forward and inverse continental ice sheet modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, T.; Ghattas, O.; Stadler, G.; Petra, N.

    2013-12-01

    The simulation of continental ice flow is challenging due to (1) localized regions of fast flow that are separated from slow regions by thin transition zones, (2) the complex and anisotropic geometry of continental ice sheets, (3) stress singularities occurring at the grounding line, and (4) the nonlinear rheology of ice. We present an inexact Newton method for the solution of an adaptive higher-order accurate finite element discretization of the nonlinear Stokes equations that model ice flow. The Newton linearizations are solved using a Krylov method with a block preconditioner with algebraic multigrid for the viscous block and an incomplete factorization smoother. The basal boundary conditions play a crucial role in modeling the dynamics of polar ice sheets. These are typically formulated as Robin-type boundary conditions with a basal friction coefficient, which subsumes several physical processes. This coefficient is uncertain, since it cannot be observed or measured. Hence, it must be inferred from surface ice velocity observations. We formulate this inference problem in a Bayesian framework and present results for the maximum a posteriori (MAP) point computed with different prior knowledge/regularization. Using a low rank Hessian approximation of the negative log posterior, we construct a Gaussian approximation of the posterior distribution for the friction coefficient. This allow us to compute the pointwise variance field and samples for the basal friction coefficient for continental-scale ice sheet problems.

  4. Theoretical studies on the binding energy of β-sheet models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,B3LYP and MP2 methods are used to investigate the binding energy of seventeen antiparallel and parallel β-sheet models. The results indicate that the binding energy obtained from B3LYP calculations is weaker than that obtained from MP2 calculations but the relative binding energy yielded by B3LYP is almost the same as that by MP2. For the antiparallel β-sheets in which two N―H···O═C hydrogen bonds can form either a large hydrogen-bonded ring or a small hydrogen-bonded ring,the binding energy increases obviously when one large ring unit is added,whereas it only changes slightly when one small ring unit is added because of the secondary electrostatic repulsive interaction existing in the small ring unit which is estimated to be about 20 kJ/mol. For the parallel β-sheet models,the binding energy increases almost exactly linearly with the increase of the chain length.

  5. Calculation of mass discharge of the Greenland ice sheet in the Earth System Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. O. Rybak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mass discharge calculation is a challenging task for the ice sheet modeling aimed at evaluation of their contribution to the global sea level rise during past interglacials, as well as one of the consequences of future climate change. In Greenland, ablation is the major source of fresh water runoff. It is approximately equal to the dynamical discharge (iceberg calving. Its share might have still larger during the past interglacials when the margins of the GrIS retreated inland. Refreezing of the melted water and its retention are two poorly known processes playing as a counterpart of melting and, thus, exerting influence on the run off. Interaction of ice sheets and climate is driven by energy and mass exchange processes and is complicated by numerous feed-backs. To study the complex of these processes, coupling of an ice sheet model and a climate model (i.e. models of the atmosphere and the ocean in one model is required, which is often called the Earth System Model (ESM. Formalization of processes of interaction between the ice sheets and climate within the ESM requires elaboration of special techniques to deal with dramatic differences in spatial and temporal variability scales within each of three ESM’s blocks. In this paper, we focus on the method of coupling of a Greenland ice sheet model (GrISM with the climate model INMCM having been developed in the Institute of Numerical Mathematics of Russian Academy of Sciences. Our coupling approach consists in applying of a special buffer model, which serves as an interface between GrISM and INMCM. A simple energy and water exchange model (EWBM-G allows realistic description of surface air temperature and precipitation fields adjusted to a relief of elevation of the GrIS surface. In a series of diagnostic numerical experiments with the present-day GrIS geometry and the modeled climate we studied sensitivity of the modeled surface mass balance and run off to the key EWBM-G parameters and compared

  6. Modelling of friction anisotropy of deepdrawing sheet in ABAQUS/EXPLICIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Stachowicz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experimental and numerical results of rectangular cup drawing of steel sheets. The aim of the experimental study was to analyze material behavior under deformation. The received results were further used to verify the results from numerical simulation by taking friction and material anisotropy into consideration. A 3D parametric finite element (FE model was built using the FE-package ABAQUS/Standard. ABAQUS allows analyzing physical models of real processes putting special emphasis on geometrical non-linearities caused by large deformations, material non-linearities and complex friction conditions. Frictional properties of the deep drawing quality steel sheet were determined by using the pin-on-disc tribometer. It shows that the friction coefficient value depends on the measured angle from the rolling direction and corresponds to the surface topography. A quadratic Hill anisotropic yield criterion was compared with Huber-Mises yield criterion having isotropic hardening. Plastic anisotropy is the result of the distortion of the yield surface shape due to the material microstructural state. The sensitivity of constitutive laws to the initial data characterizing material behavior isalso presented. It is found that plastic anisotropy of the matrix in ductile sheet metal has influence on deformation behavior of the material. If the material and friction anisotropy are taken into account in the finite element analysis, this approach undoubtedly gives the most approximate numerical results to real processes. This paper is the first part of the study of numerical investigation using ABAQUS and mainly deals with the most influencing parameters in a forming process to simulate the sheet metal forming of rectangular cup.

  7. Numerical modeling of transformer inrush currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardelli, E.; Faba, A.

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents an application of a vector hysteresis model to the prediction of the inrush current due the arbitrary initial excitation of a transformer after a fault. The approach proposed seems promising in order to predict the transient overshoot in current and the optimal time to close the circuit after the fault.

  8. Numerical modeling of transformer inrush currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardelli, E. [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Perugia, I-06125 Perugia (Italy); Center for Electric and Magnetic Applied Research (Italy); Faba, A., E-mail: faba@unipg.it [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Perugia, I-06125 Perugia (Italy); Center for Electric and Magnetic Applied Research (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    This paper presents an application of a vector hysteresis model to the prediction of the inrush current due the arbitrary initial excitation of a transformer after a fault. The approach proposed seems promising in order to predict the transient overshoot in current and the optimal time to close the circuit after the fault.

  9. CMEs from AR 10365: Morphology and Physical Parameters of the Ejections and of the Associated Current Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schettino, G.; Poletto, G.; Romoli, M.

    2010-01-01

    We study the evolution and physical parameters of three consecutive coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that occurred at the west limb of the Sun on 2003 June 2 at 00:30, 08:54, 16:08 UT, respectively. The Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment (LASCO) CME catalog shows that the CMEs entered the C2 field of view with position angles within a 5° interval. This suggests a common origin for the ejections, to be identified with the magnetic system associated with the active region that lies below the CMEs. The close proximity in time and source location of the events prompted us to analyze LASCO white light data and Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) spectra with the aim of identifying similarities and differences among the three CMEs. It turns out that two of them display the typical three-part structure, while no conclusion can be drawn about the morphology of the third ejection. The CMEs plasma is "cool," i.e., electron temperatures in the CMEs front are of the order of 2 × 105 K, with no significant variation between different events. However, ejection speeds vary by a factor of ~1.5 between consecutive events and electron densities (more precisely emission measures) by a factor of ~6 between the first CME and the second and third CMEs. In the aftermath of all events, we found evidence of current sheets (CSs) both in LASCO and UVCS. We give here the CS physical parameters (electron temperature, density, and kinetic temperature) and follow, in one of the events, their temporal evolution over a 6 hr time interval. A discussion of our results, in the framework of previous findings, concludes the paper.

  10. Numerical models for the prediction of failure for multilayer fusion Al-alloy sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorji, Maysam; Berisha, Bekim; Hora, Pavel [ETH Zurich, Institute of Virtual Manufacturing, Zurich (Switzerland); Timm, Jürgen [Novelis Switzerland SA, 3960 Sierre (Switzerland)

    2013-12-16

    Initiation and propagation of cracks in monolithic and multi-layer aluminum alloys, called “Fusion”, is investigated. 2D plane strain finite element simulations are performed to model deformation due to bending and to predict failure. For this purpose, fracture strains are measured based on microscopic pictures of Nakajima specimens. In addition to, micro-structure of materials is taken into account by introducing a random grain distribution over the sheet thickness as well as a random distribution of the measured yield curve. It is shown that the performed experiments and the introduced FE-Model are appropriate methods to highlight the advantages of the Fusion material, especially for bending processes.

  11. Finite element modelling of high air pressure forming processes for polymer sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, W.-G.; Warby, M. K.; Whiteman, J. R.; Abbott, S.; Shorter, W.; Warwick, P.; Wright, T.; Munro, A.; Munro, B.

    In this paper we describe the mathematical modelling and computational simulation of the high air pressure (HAP) thermoforming process which is used in the creation of thin walled polymeric structures. This involves, using data from material tests, an elastic-plastic constitutive equation valid for large deformations and a constrained deformation in which there is frictional contact between the polymeric sheet and a constraining surface (the mould surface). Despite a number of simplifying assumptions and some uncertainities in the mathematical model the finite element computations presented predict quite well the actual shape and thickness distribution which are found on sample products.

  12. Reconstructing the Last Glacial Maximum ice sheet in the Weddell Sea embayment, Antarctica, using numerical modelling constrained by field evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Brocq, A. M.; Bentley, M. J.; Hubbard, A.; Fogwill, C. J.; Sugden, D. E.; Whitehouse, P. L.

    2011-09-01

    The Weddell Sea Embayment (WSE) sector of the Antarctic ice sheet has been suggested as a potential source for a period of rapid sea-level rise - Meltwater Pulse 1a, a 20 m rise in ˜500 years. Previous modelling attempts have predicted an extensive grounding line advance in the WSE, to the continental shelf break, leading to a large equivalent sea-level contribution for the sector. A range of recent field evidence suggests that the ice sheet elevation change in the WSE at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is less than previously thought. This paper describes and discusses an ice flow modelling derived reconstruction of the LGM ice sheet in the WSE, constrained by the recent field evidence. The ice flow model reconstructions suggest that an ice sheet consistent with the field evidence does not support grounding line advance to the continental shelf break. A range of modelled ice sheet surfaces are instead produced, with different grounding line locations derived from a novel grounding line advance scheme. The ice sheet reconstructions which best fit the field constraints lead to a range of equivalent eustatic sea-level estimates between approximately 1.4 and 3 m for this sector. This paper describes the modelling procedure in detail, considers the assumptions and limitations associated with the modelling approach, and how the uncertainty may impact on the eustatic sea-level equivalent results for the WSE.

  13. Estimates of current debris from flux models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-01-01

    Flux models that balance accuracy and simplicity are used to predict the growth of space debris to the present. Known and projected launch rates, decay models, and numerical integrations are used to predict distributions that closely resemble the current catalog-particularly in the regions containing most of the debris.

  14. Physically-based in silico light sheet microscopy for visualizing fluorescent brain models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellah, Marwan; Bilgili, Ahmet; Eilemann, Stefan; Markram, Henry; Schürmann, Felix

    2015-01-01

    We present a physically-based computational model of the light sheet fluorescence microscope (LSFM). Based on Monte Carlo ray tracing and geometric optics, our method simulates the operational aspects and image formation process of the LSFM. This simulated, in silico LSFM creates synthetic images of digital fluorescent specimens that can resemble those generated by a real LSFM, as opposed to established visualization methods producing visually-plausible images. We also propose an accurate fluorescence rendering model which takes into account the intrinsic characteristics of fluorescent dyes to simulate the light interaction with fluorescent biological specimen. We demonstrate first results of our visualization pipeline to a simplified brain tissue model reconstructed from the somatosensory cortex of a young rat. The modeling aspects of the LSFM units are qualitatively analysed, and the results of the fluorescence model were quantitatively validated against the fluorescence brightness equation and characteristic emission spectra of different fluorescent dyes. Modelling and simulation.

  15. Data-driven constraints on ice sheet model boundary conditions and comparison to borehole observations in Western Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meierbachtol, T. W.; Harper, J. T.; Johnson, J. V.; Humphrey, N. F.; Brinkerhoff, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    The utility of ice sheet models as prognostic tools relies on an accurate assessment of initial conditions. Ice sheet models reaching an initial state using assimilation techniques are inherently sensitive to the description of processes governing behavior at the ice-air and ice-bed boundaries. Propagation of uncertainty in these boundary condition effects exerts a strong control on the ice sheet thermal profile, which in turn impacts the basal thermal regime and partitioning of surface velocity into deformational and sliding components. With this in mind, correct implementation of boundary conditions when simulating ice flow is critical. Here, using the higher order numerical ice sheet model VarGlaS, we investigate the sensitivity of model output to field-based adjustments in surface and basal boundary conditions, using full thickness thermal profiles in the ice sheet ablation zone as a metric for comparison. Our measured temperature profiles provide a unique constraint by permitting evaluation of the integrated effect of necessary model assumptions and boundary conditions over long spatial scales greater than 100 km. We implement the study over a three-dimensional catchment of the Greenland ice sheet extending from the land terminating outlet glacier Isunnguata Sermia, east to the ice sheet divide. An initial reference case is generated from the surface and basal boundary fields of the SeaRise dataset. We then drive surface boundary changes using near-surface temperature measurements spanning 2 years in the ablation zone, and by scaling measurements of firn warming in western Greenland in the accumulation zone. Basal heat flux corrections follow direct measurement in a bedrock borehole adjacent to the study domain. Results show the downstream impact of substantial warming in the accumulation zone is limited by the ice sheet flow field, resulting in small changes to model temperatures in the vicinity of measured profiles.

  16. Behavioral modeling of Digitally Adjustable Current Amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Josef Polak; Lukas Langhammer; Jan Jerabek

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the digitally adjustable current amplifier (DACA) and its analog behavioral model (ABM), which is suitable for both ideal and advanced analyses of the function block using DACA as active element. There are four levels of this model, each being suitable for simulation of a certain degree of electronic circuits design (e.g. filters, oscillators, generators). Each model is presented through a schematic wiring in the simulation program OrCAD, including a description of equat...

  17. Modeling Greenland ice sheet present-day and near-future runoff contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peano, Daniele; Colleoni, Florence; Masina, Simona

    2014-05-01

    The last IPCC report [AR5, IPCC] has shown an increasing contribution from Greenland melting to global sea-level over the last decade, increasing from 0.09 mm/year (period 1992-2001) to 0.59 mm/year (period 2002-2011). Given its strategic location, i.e. close to the main North Atlantic ocean convection sites, it is therefore of importance to better assess ice sheet melting and its impact on regional ocean processes. So far, runoff estimate from ice sheet has been poorly constrained (e.g. [Hanna et al., 2005], [Hanna et al., 2008]) and most of the time the few estimates comes from regional atmospheric models or general circulation models (e.g. [Edwards et al., 2013], [Fettweis et al., 2013]). Here, we present the results from the implementation of a routing scheme into the thermo-mechanical ice sheet-ice shelves model GRISLI [Ritz et al, 2001], applied to the Greenland ice sheet mass evolution over the 20th and 21st centuries. The routing scheme is based on the "multiple flow direction" developed by [Quinn et al., 1991]. We further improved this scheme by considering topographic depressions as possible "lakes" to be filled by meltwater. In this way, when a depression is filled, only the extra water is routed towards the Greenland coasts. This allow us to obtain an estimate of the total amount of freshwater reaching the ocean at each time step of the model integration, as well as a time-varying spatial distribution of the runoff along the coasts of Greenland. This routing scheme is applied in routing both surface and basal meltwater. Surface meltwater is computed by means of a PDD method [Fausto et al., 2007] on which only a fraction is considered for routing while the basal melting rate is part of the heat balance at the ice-bed interface. Runoff is simulated on a 5km x 5km horizontal grid and validation is performed over the 20th century using mean annual total precipitation and air temperature at 2 meters from Era-Interim reanalysis [Dee et al., 2011]. Near future

  18. Dynamical ice sheet model coupling with the GEOS-5 AGCM: A preliminary assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullather, R. I.; Zhao, B.; Nowicki, S.; Suarez, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Dynamical ice sheet models (ISMs) have been developed to address well-known limitations in eustatic change prediction capabilities. Coupling ISMs to an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) is not straightforward, due in part to the extreme difference in spatial scales between the ISM mesh and AGCM grid. In given locations, ISM element edge lengths may be a few km or less, while the AGCM typically has grid spacings on the order of 10s to 100s of km. The Goddard Earth Observing System Model, version 5 (GEOS-5) is a finite-volume AGCM and employs a cube-sphere atmospheric grid (nominally 1° resolution) and a catchment-based land surface scheme that operates on sub-grid scale areas, or tiles, that describe surface characteristics. The land surface component communicates with the atmosphere on a semi-implicit time step via the exchange grid. In this study, coupling between the AGCM and the ISM is facilitated through sub-grid scale land surface tiles that are defined for each element of the ISM. The ISM used here is the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM) from NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Univ. California at Irvine, which has been adapted for the Greenland Ice Sheet using the 72,320-element Schlagel mesh and using a shallow ice approximation. In the AGCM, land surface tiles are uniquely characterized through a simple downscaling parameterization of surface temperature within each AGCM grid box using a defined lapse rate. On each land surface tile, GEOS-5 employs an advanced snow hydrology model for improved representation of the ice sheet surface mass balance. This preliminary assessment focuses on the differences in the AGCM surface mass balance and surface temperature fields resulting from the downscaling measures employed in the context of an exchange grid, semi-implicit coupling with the atmosphere, and the response of the ISM. Differences in AGCM computational performance with the addition of Greenland tiles is examined, and comparative advantages of

  19. Calculation of Forming Limits for Sheet Metal using an Enhanced Continuous Damage Fracture Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Trung; Kim, Dae-Young; Kim, Heon Young

    2011-08-01

    An enhanced continuous damage fracture model was introduced in this paper to calculate forming limits of sheet metal. The fracture model is a combination of a fracture criterion and a continuum damage constitutive law. A modified McClintock void growth fracture criterion was incorporated with a coupled damage-plasticity Gurson-type constitutive law. Also, by introducing a Lode angle dependent parameter to define the loading asymmetry condition, the shear effect was phenomenologically taken into account. The proposed fracture model was implemented using user-subroutines in commercial finite element software. The model was calibrated and correlated by the uniaxial tension, shear and notched specimens tests. Application of the fracture model for the LDH tests was discussed and the simulation results were compared with the experimental data.

  20. Continuum Plate Theory and Atomistic Modeling to Find the Flexural Rigidity of a Graphene Sheet Interacting with a Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. Roberts

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a combination of continuum modeling, atomistic simulations, and numerical optimization, we estimate the flexural rigidity of a graphene sheet. We consider a rectangular sheet that is initially parallel to a rigid substrate. The sheet interacts with the substrate by van der Waals forces and deflects in response to loading on a pair of opposite edges. To estimate the flexural rigidity, we model the graphene sheet as a continuum and numerically solve an appropriate differential equation for the transverse deflection. This solution depends on the flexural rigidity. We then use an optimization procedure to find the value of the flexural rigidity that minimizes the difference between the numerical solutions and the deflections predicted by atomistic simulations. This procedure predicts a flexural rigidity of 0.26 nN nm=1.62 eV.

  1. Development of a Prediction Model Based on RBF Neural Network for Sheet Metal Fixture Locating Layout Design and Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongqi; Yang, Bo; Kang, Yonggang; Yang, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Fixture plays an important part in constraining excessive sheet metal part deformation at machining, assembly, and measuring stages during the whole manufacturing process. However, it is still a difficult and nontrivial task to design and optimize sheet metal fixture locating layout at present because there is always no direct and explicit expression describing sheet metal fixture locating layout and responding deformation. To that end, an RBF neural network prediction model is proposed in this paper to assist design and optimization of sheet metal fixture locating layout. The RBF neural network model is constructed by training data set selected by uniform sampling and finite element simulation analysis. Finally, a case study is conducted to verify the proposed method.

  2. Flexible heat-flow sensing sheets based on the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect using one-dimensional spin-current conducting films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirihara, Akihiro; Kondo, Koichi; Ishida, Masahiko; Ihara, Kazuki; Iwasaki, Yuma; Someya, Hiroko; Matsuba, Asuka; Uchida, Ken-ichi; Saitoh, Eiji; Yamamoto, Naoharu; Kohmoto, Shigeru; Murakami, Tomoo

    2016-03-15

    Heat-flow sensing is expected to be an important technological component of smart thermal management in the future. Conventionally, the thermoelectric (TE) conversion technique, which is based on the Seebeck effect, has been used to measure a heat flow by converting the flow into electric voltage. However, for ubiquitous heat-flow visualization, thin and flexible sensors with extremely low thermal resistance are highly desired. Recently, another type of TE effect, the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE), has aroused great interest because the LSSE potentially offers favourable features for TE applications such as simple thin-film device structures. Here we demonstrate an LSSE-based flexible TE sheet that is especially suitable for a heat-flow sensing application. This TE sheet contained a Ni0.2Zn0.3Fe2.5O4 film which was formed on a flexible plastic sheet using a spray-coating method known as "ferrite plating". The experimental results suggest that the ferrite-plated film, which has a columnar crystal structure aligned perpendicular to the film plane, functions as a unique one-dimensional spin-current conductor suitable for bendable LSSE-based sensors. This newly developed thin TE sheet may be attached to differently shaped heat sources without obstructing an innate heat flux, paving the way to versatile heat-flow measurements and management.

  3. Flexible heat-flow sensing sheets based on the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect using one-dimensional spin-current conducting films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirihara, Akihiro; Kondo, Koichi; Ishida, Masahiko; Ihara, Kazuki; Iwasaki, Yuma; Someya, Hiroko; Matsuba, Asuka; Uchida, Ken-Ichi; Saitoh, Eiji; Yamamoto, Naoharu; Kohmoto, Shigeru; Murakami, Tomoo

    2016-03-01

    Heat-flow sensing is expected to be an important technological component of smart thermal management in the future. Conventionally, the thermoelectric (TE) conversion technique, which is based on the Seebeck effect, has been used to measure a heat flow by converting the flow into electric voltage. However, for ubiquitous heat-flow visualization, thin and flexible sensors with extremely low thermal resistance are highly desired. Recently, another type of TE effect, the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE), has aroused great interest because the LSSE potentially offers favourable features for TE applications such as simple thin-film device structures. Here we demonstrate an LSSE-based flexible TE sheet that is especially suitable for a heat-flow sensing application. This TE sheet contained a Ni0.2Zn0.3Fe2.5O4 film which was formed on a flexible plastic sheet using a spray-coating method known as “ferrite plating”. The experimental results suggest that the ferrite-plated film, which has a columnar crystal structure aligned perpendicular to the film plane, functions as a unique one-dimensional spin-current conductor suitable for bendable LSSE-based sensors. This newly developed thin TE sheet may be attached to differently shaped heat sources without obstructing an innate heat flux, paving the way to versatile heat-flow measurements and management.

  4. Simulation of Gravity Currents Using VOF Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹建锋; 黄钰期; 应新亚; 任安禄

    2002-01-01

    By the Volume of Fluid (VOF) multiphase flow model two-dimensional gravity currents with three phases including air are numerically simulated in this article. The necessity of consideration of turbulence effect for high Reynolds numbers is demonstrated quantitatively by LES (the Large Eddy Simulation) turbulence model. The gravity currents are simulated for h ≠ H as well as h = H, where h is the depth of the gravity current before the release and H is the depth of the intruded fluid. Uprising of swell occurs when a current flows horizontally into another lighter one for h ≠ H. The problems under what condition the uprising of swell occurs and how long it takes are considered in this article. All the simulated results are in reasonable agreement with the experimental results available.

  5. FRICTION MODELING OF Al-Mg ALLOY SHEETS BASED ON MULTIPLE REGRESSION ANALYSIS AND NEURAL NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirpa G. Lemu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article reports a proposed approach to a frictional resistance description in sheet metal forming processes that enables determination of the friction coefficient value under a wide range of friction conditions without performing time-consuming experiments. The motivation for this proposal is the fact that there exists a considerable amount of factors affect the friction coefficient value and as a result building analytical friction model for specified process conditions is practically impossible. In this proposed approach, a mathematical model of friction behaviour is created using multiple regression analysis and artificial neural networks. The regression analysis was performed using a subroutine in MATLAB programming code and STATISTICA Neural Networks was utilized to build an artificial neural networks model. The effect of different training strategies on the quality of neural networks was studied. As input variables for regression model and training of radial basis function networks, generalized regression neural networks and multilayer networks the results of strip drawing friction test were utilized. Four kinds of Al-Mg alloy sheets were used as a test material.

  6. Surrogate POD models for building forming limit diagrams of parameterized sheet metal forming applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdaoui, M.; Le Quilliec, Guénhaël; Breitkopf, Piotr; Villon, Pierre

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this work is to present a surrogate POD (Proper Orthogonal Decomposition) approach for building forming limit diagrams at minimum cost for parameterized sheet metal formed work-pieces. First, a Latin Hypercube Sampling is performed on the design parameter space. Then, at each design site, displacement fields are computed using the popular open-source finite element software Code_Aster. Then, the method of snapshots is used for POD mode determination. POD coefficients are interpolated using kriging. Furthermore, an error analysis of the surrogate POD model is performed on a validation set. It is shown that on the considered use case the accuracy of the surrogate POD model is excellent for the representation of finite element displacement fields. The validated surrogate POD model is then used to build forming limit diagrams (FLD) for any design parameter to assess the quality of stamped metal sheets. Using the surrogate POD model, the Green-Lagrange strain tensor is derived, then major and minor principal deformations are determined at Gauss points for each mesh element. Furthermore, a signed distance between the forming limit curve in rupture and the obtained cloud of points in the plane (ɛ2, ɛ1) is computed to assess the quality of the formed workpiece. The minimization of this signed distance allows determining the safest design for the chosen use case.

  7. Glacial isostatic adjustment associated with the Barents Sea ice sheet: A modelling inter-comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auriac, A.; Whitehouse, P. L.; Bentley, M. J.; Patton, H.; Lloyd, J. M.; Hubbard, A.

    2016-09-01

    The 3D geometrical evolution of the Barents Sea Ice Sheet (BSIS), particularly during its late-glacial retreat phase, remains largely ambiguous due to the paucity of direct marine- and terrestrial-based evidence constraining its horizontal and vertical extent and chronology. One way of validating the numerous BSIS reconstructions previously proposed is to collate and apply them under a wide range of Earth models and to compare prognostic (isostatic) output through time with known relative sea-level (RSL) data. Here we compare six contrasting BSIS load scenarios via a spherical Earth system model and derive a best-fit, χ2 parameter using RSL data from the four main terrestrial regions within the domain: Svalbard, Franz Josef Land, Novaya Zemlya and northern Norway. Poor χ2 values allow two load scenarios to be dismissed, leaving four that agree well with RSL observations. The remaining four scenarios optimally fit the RSL data when combined with Earth models that have an upper mantle viscosity of 0.2-2 × 1021 Pa s, while there is less sensitivity to the lithosphere thickness (ranging from 71 to 120 km) and lower mantle viscosity (spanning 1-50 × 1021 Pa s). GPS observations are also compared with predictions of present-day uplift across the Barents Sea. Key locations where relative sea-level and GPS data would prove critical in constraining future ice-sheet modelling efforts are also identified.

  8. Parameter and state estimation with a time-dependent adjoint marine ice sheet model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Goldberg

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available To date, assimilation of observations into large-scale ice models has consisted predominantly of time-independent inversions of surface velocities for basal traction, bed elevation, or ice stiffness, and has relied primarily on analytically-derived adjoints of diagnostic ice velocity models. To overcome limitations of such "snapshot" inversions, i.e. their inability to assimilate time-dependent data, or to produce initial states with minimum artificial drift and suitable for time-dependent simulations, we have developed an adjoint of a time-dependent parallel glaciological flow model. The model implements a hybrid shallow shelf-shallow ice stress balance, involves a prognostic equation for ice thickness evolution, and can represent the floating, fast-sliding, and frozen bed regimes of a marine ice sheet. The adjoint is generated by a combination of analytic methods and the use of algorithmic differentiation (AD software. Several experiments are carried out with idealized geometries and synthetic observations, including inversion of time-dependent surface elevations for past thicknesses, and simultaneous retrieval of basal traction and topography from surface data. Flexible generation of the adjoint for a range of independent uncertain variables is exemplified through sensitivity calculations of grounded ice volume to changes in basal melting of floating and basal sliding of grounded ice. The results are encouraging and suggest the feasibility, using real observations, of improved ice sheet state estimation and comprehensive transient sensitivity assessments.

  9. Reconstructing basal boundary conditions in a regional ice sheet model: Application to Jakobshavn Isbræ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habermann, M.; Maxwell, D. A.; Truffer, M.

    2012-04-01

    A crucial assumption in all ice sheet models concerns the nature and parametrization of the basal boundary condition. Direct observations on large spatial scales are not possible, but inverse methods can be used to determine the distribution of basal properties from surface measurements. We developed open-source iterative inverse algorithms and applied them to PISM, a hybrid ice sheet model that solves a combination of the Shallow Ice and Shallow Shelf Approximations. In a regional-scale model of Jakobshavn Isbræ, the fastest flowing ice stream of Greenland, we invert for basal stickiness over the entire drainage basin. The sensitivity of the reconstructed basal stickiness to the following modeling choices is evaluated: temperature distribution within the ice, definition of the misfit functional, tolerance for the stopping criterion and initial estimates of basal stickiness. The effects and the management of missing data are analyzed. In 2002 the floating tongue of Jakobshavn Isbræ disintegrated catastrophically, leading to increased speeds and rapid thinning of the inland ice. Detailed velocity maps from before and after this breakup allow us to compare retrieved basal parameters and to track the continuing evolution of the basal boundary condition.

  10. An object-oriented, coprocessor-accelerated model for ice sheet simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddik, H.; Greve, R.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, numerous models capable of modeling the thermo-dynamics of ice sheets have been developed within the ice sheet modeling community. Their capabilities have been characterized by a wide range of features with different numerical methods (finite difference or finite element), different implementations of the ice flow mechanics (shallow-ice, higher-order, full Stokes) and different treatments for the basal and coastal areas (basal hydrology, basal sliding, ice shelves). Shallow-ice models (SICOPOLIS, IcIES, PISM, etc) have been widely used for modeling whole ice sheets (Greenland and Antarctica) due to the relatively low computational cost of the shallow-ice approximation but higher order (ISSM, AIF) and full Stokes (Elmer/Ice) models have been recently used to model the Greenland ice sheet. The advance in processor speed and the decrease in cost for accessing large amount of memory and storage have undoubtedly been the driving force in the commoditization of models with higher capabilities, and the popularity of Elmer/Ice (http://elmerice.elmerfem.com) with an active user base is a notable representation of this trend. Elmer/Ice is a full Stokes model built on top of the multi-physics package Elmer (http://www.csc.fi/english/pages/elmer) which provides the full machinery for the complex finite element procedure and is fully parallel (mesh partitioning with OpenMPI communication). Elmer is mainly written in Fortran 90 and targets essentially traditional processors as the code base was not initially written to run on modern coprocessors (yet adding support for the recently introduced x86 based coprocessors is possible). Furthermore, a truly modular and object-oriented implementation is required for quick adaptation to fast evolving capabilities in hardware (Fortran 2003 provides an object-oriented programming model while not being clean and requiring a tricky refactoring of Elmer code). In this work, the object-oriented, coprocessor-accelerated finite element

  11. Numerical simulation of thick sheet slitting processes: Modelling using continuum damage mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghozzi, Y.; Labergere, C.; Saanouni, K.

    2013-05-01

    This work consists on the modelling and numerical simulation of specific cutting processes of thick sheets using advanced constitutive equations accounting for elastoplasticity with mixed hardening and ductile damage. Strong coupling between all the mechanical fields and the ductile damage is accounted for. First the complex kinematics of the slitting process is described. Then, the fully and strongly coupled constitutive equations are presented. Finally the influence of the main technological parameters of the slitting process is studied focusing in the minimization of the cutting forces.

  12. Experimental study of nonlinear interaction of plasma flow with charged thin current sheets: 2. Hall dynamics, mass and momentum transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Savin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Proceeding with the analysis of Amata et al. (2005, we suggest that the general feature for the local transport at a thin magnetopause (MP consists of the penetration of ions from the magnetosheath with gyroradius larger than the MP width, and that, in crossing it, the transverse potential difference at the thin current sheet (TCS is acquired by these ions, providing a field-particle energy exchange without parallel electric fields. It is suggested that a part of the surface charge is self-consistently produced by deflection of ions in the course of inertial drift in the non-uniform electric field at MP. Consideration of the partial moments of ions with different energies demonstrates that the protons having gyroradii of roughly the same size or larger than the MP width carry fluxes normal to MP that are about 20% of the total flow in the plasma jet under MP. This is close to the excess of the ion transverse velocity over the cross-field drift speed in the plasma flow just inside MP (Amata et al., 2005, which conforms to the contribution of the finite-gyroradius inflow across MP. A linkage through the TCS between different plasmas results from the momentum conservation of the higher-energy ions. If the finite-gyroradius penetration occurs along the MP over ~1.5 RE from the observation site, then it can completely account for the formation of the jet under the MP. To provide the downstream acceleration of the flow near the MP via the cross-field drift, the weak magnetic field is suggested to rotate from its nearly parallel direction to the unperturbed flow toward being almost perpendicular to the accelerated flow near the MP. We discuss a deceleration of the higher-energy ions in the MP normal direction due to the interaction with finite-scale electric field bursts in the magnetosheath flow frame, equivalent to collisions, providing a charge separation. These effective collisions, with a nonlinear frequency proxy of the order of the proton

  13. A new coupled ice sheet-climate model: description and sensitivity to model physics under Eemian, Last Glacial Maximum, late Holocene and modern climate conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Fyke

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The need to better understand long-term climate/ice sheet feedback loops is motivating efforts to couple ice sheet models into Earth System models which are capable of long-timescale simulations. In this paper we describe a coupled model, that consists of the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM and the Pennsylvania State University Ice model (PSUI. The climate model generates a surface mass balance (SMB field via a sub-gridded surface energy/moisture balance model that resolves narrow ice sheet ablation zones. The ice model returns revised elevation, surface albedo and ice area fields, plus coastal fluxes of heat and moisture. An arbitrary number of ice sheets can be simulated, each on their own high-resolution grid and each capable of synchronous or asynchronous coupling with the overlying climate model. The model is designed to conserve global heat and moisture. In the process of improving model performance we developed a procedure to account for modelled surface air temperature (SAT biases within the energy/moisture balance surface model and improved the UVic ESCM snow surface scheme through addition of variable albedos and refreezing over the ice sheet.

    A number of simulations for late Holocene, Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, and Eemian climate boundary conditions were carried out to explore the sensitivity of the coupled model and identify model configurations that best represented these climate states. The modelled SAT bias was found to play a significant role in long-term ice sheet evolution, as was the effect of refreezing meltwater and surface albedo. The bias-corrected model was able to reasonably capture important aspects of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets, including modern SMB and ice distribution. The simulated northern Greenland ice sheet was found to be prone to ice margin retreat at radiative forcings corresponding closely to those of the Eemian or the present-day.

  14. A new coupled ice sheet/climate model: description and sensitivity to model physics under Eemian, Last Glacial Maximum, late Holocene and modern climate conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Fyke

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The need to better understand long-term climate/ice sheet feedback loops is motivating efforts to couple ice sheet models into Earth System models which are capable of long-timescale simulations. In this paper we describe a coupled model that consists of the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM and the Pennsylvania State University Ice model (PSUI. The climate model generates a surface mass balance (SMB field via a sub-gridded surface energy/moisture balance model that resolves narrow ice sheet ablation zones. The ice model returns revised elevation, surface albedo and ice area fields, plus coastal fluxes of heat and moisture. An arbitrary number of ice sheets can be simulated, each on their own high-resolution grid and each capable of synchronous or asynchronous coupling with the overlying climate model. The model is designed to conserve global heat and moisture. In the process of improving model performance we developed a procedure to account for modelled surface air temperature (SAT biases within the energy/moisture balance surface model and improved the UVic ESCM snow surface scheme through addition of variable albedos and refreezing over the ice sheet.

    A number of simulations for late Holocene, Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, and Eemian climate boundary conditions were carried out to explore the sensitivity of the coupled model and identify model configurations that best represented these climate states. The modelled SAT bias was found to play a significant role in long-term ice sheet evolution, as was the effect of refreezing meltwater and surface albedo. The bias-corrected model was able to reasonably capture important aspects of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets, including modern SMB and ice distribution. The simulated northern Greenland ice sheet was found to be prone to ice margin retreat at radiative forcings corresponding closely to those of the Eemian or the present-day.

  15. Equilibrium sensitivities of the Greenland ice sheet inferred from the adjoint of the three- dimensional thermo-mechanical model SICOPOLIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimbach, P.; Bugnion, V.

    2008-12-01

    We present a new and original approach to understanding the sensitivity of the Greenland ice sheet to key model parameters and environmental conditions. At the heart of this approach is the use of an adjoint ice sheet model. MacAyeal (1992) introduced adjoints in the context of applying control theory to estimate basal sliding parameters (basal shear stress, basal friction) of an ice stream model which minimize a least-squares model vs. observation misfit. Since then, this method has become widespread to fit ice stream models to the increasing number and diversity of satellite observations, and to estimate uncertain model parameters. However, no attempt has been made to extend this method to comprehensive ice sheet models. Here, we present a first step toward moving beyond limiting the use of control theory to ice stream models. We have generated an adjoint of the three-dimensional thermo-mechanical ice sheet model SICOPOLIS of Greve (1997). The adjoint was generated using the automatic differentiation (AD) tool TAF. TAF generates exact source code representing the tangent linear and adjoint model of the parent model provided. Model sensitivities are given by the partial derivatives of a scalar-valued model diagnostic or "cost function" with respect to the controls, and can be efficiently calculated via the adjoint. An effort to generate an efficient adjoint with the newly developed open-source AD tool OpenAD is also under way. To gain insight into the adjoint solutions, we explore various cost functions, such as local and domain-integrated ice temperature, total ice volume or the velocity of ice at the margins of the ice sheet. Elements of our control space include initial cold ice temperatures, surface mass balance, as well as parameters such as appear in Glen's flow law, or in the surface degree-day or basal sliding parameterizations. Sensitivity maps provide a comprehensive view, and allow a quantification of where and to which variables the ice sheet model is

  16. Evaluation of the Surface Representation of the Greenland Ice Sheet in a General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullather, Richard I.; Nowicki, Sophie M. J.; Zhao, Bin; Suarez, Max J.

    2014-01-01

    Simulated surface conditions of the Goddard Earth Observing System model, version 5 (GEOS 5) atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) are examined for the contemporary Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS). A surface parameterization that explicitly models surface processes including snow compaction, meltwater percolation and refreezing, and surface albedo is found to remedy an erroneous deficit in the annual net surface energy flux and provide an adequate representation of surface mass balance (SMB) in an evaluation using simulations at two spatial resolutions. The simulated 1980-2008 GrIS SMB average is 24.7+/-4.5 cm yr(- 1) water-equivalent (w.e.) at.5 degree model grid spacing, and 18.2+/-3.3 cm yr(- 1) w.e. for 2 degree grid spacing. The spatial variability and seasonal cycle of the simulation compare favorably to recent studies using regional climate models, while results from 2 degree integrations reproduce the primary features of the SMB field. In comparison to historical glaciological observations, the coarser resolution model overestimates accumulation in the southern areas of the GrIS, while the overall SMB is underestimated. These changes relate to the sensitivity of accumulation and melt to the resolution of topography. The GEOS-5 SMB fields contrast with available corresponding atmospheric models simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). It is found that only a few of the CMIP5 AGCMs examined provide significant summertime runoff, a dominant feature of the GrIS seasonal cycle. This is a condition that will need to be remedied if potential contributions to future eustatic change from polar ice sheets are to be examined with GCMs.

  17. Manufactured solutions and the numerical verification of isothermal, nonlinear, three-dimensional Stokes ice-sheet models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Leng

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The technique of manufactured solutions is used for verification of computational models in many fields. In this paper we construct manufactured solutions for models of three-dimensional, isothermal, nonlinear Stokes flow in glaciers and ice sheets. The solution construction procedure starts with kinematic boundary conditions and is mainly based on the solution of a first-order partial differential equation for the ice velocity that satisfies the incompressibility condition. The manufactured solutions depend on the geometry of the ice sheet and other model parameters. Initial conditions are taken from the periodic geometry of a standard problem of the ISMIP-HOM benchmark tests and altered through the manufactured solution procedure to generate an analytic solution for the time-dependent flow problem. We then use this manufactured solution to verify a parallel, high-order accurate, finite element Stokes ice-sheet model. Results from the computational model show excellent agreement with the manufactured analytic solutions.

  18. Validation of formability of laminated sheet metal for deep drawing process using GTN damage model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Yongbin; Cha, Wan-gi; Kim, Naksoo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sogang University, 1 Sinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul, 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Sangjin [Mold/die and forming technology team, Product prestige research lab, LG electronics, 222, LG-ro, Jinwi-myeon, Pyeongtaek-si, Gyeonggi-do, 451-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-16

    In this study, we studied formability of PET/PVC laminated sheet metal which named VCM (Vinyl Coated Metal). VCM offers various patterns and good-looking metal steel used for appliances such as refrigerator and washing machine. But, this sheet has problems which are crack and peeling of film when the material is formed by deep drawing process. To predict the problems, we used finite element method and GTN (Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman) damage model to represent damage of material. We divided the VCM into 3 layers (PET film, adhesive and steel added PVC) in finite element analysis model to express the crack and peeling phenomenon. The material properties of each layer are determined by reverse engineering based on tensile test result. Furthermore, we performed the simple rectangular deep drawing and simulated it. The simulation result shows good agreement with drawing experiment result in position, punch stroke of crack occurrence. Also, we studied the fracture mechanism of PET film on VCM by comparing the width direction strain of metal and PET film.

  19. Validation of formability of laminated sheet metal for deep drawing process using GTN damage model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yongbin; Cha, Wan-gi; Ko, Sangjin; Kim, Naksoo

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we studied formability of PET/PVC laminated sheet metal which named VCM (Vinyl Coated Metal). VCM offers various patterns and good-looking metal steel used for appliances such as refrigerator and washing machine. But, this sheet has problems which are crack and peeling of film when the material is formed by deep drawing process. To predict the problems, we used finite element method and GTN (Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman) damage model to represent damage of material. We divided the VCM into 3 layers (PET film, adhesive and steel added PVC) in finite element analysis model to express the crack and peeling phenomenon. The material properties of each layer are determined by reverse engineering based on tensile test result. Furthermore, we performed the simple rectangular deep drawing and simulated it. The simulation result shows good agreement with drawing experiment result in position, punch stroke of crack occurrence. Also, we studied the fracture mechanism of PET film on VCM by comparing the width direction strain of metal and PET film.

  20. Constitutive model based on dislocation density and ductile fracture of monel 400 thin sheet under tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuanjie; Xue, Shaoxi; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Peng

    2017-02-01

    In micro-scaled plastic deformation, material strength and ductile fracture behaviors of thin sheet in tension are quite different from those in macro-scale. In this study, uniaxial tensile tests of Monel 400 thin sheets with different microstructures were carried out to investigate the plastic deformation size effect in micro-scale. The experimental results indicate that the flow stress and fracture strain departure from the traditional empirical formula when there are only fewer grains across the thickness. And the number of dimples on the fracture surface is getting smaller with the decreasing ratio of specimen thickness to grain size. Then, a constitutive model based on dislocation density considering the free surface effect in micro-scale is proposed to reveal the mechanism of the flow stress size effect. In addition, a model is proposed considering the surface roughening inducing the thickness nonuniform and the decrease of micro-voids resulting from the reduction of grain boundary density with the decreasing ratio of specimen thickness to grain size. The interactive effects of the surface roughening and the decrease of micro-voids result in the earlier fracture in micro tension of the specimen with fewer grains across the thickness.

  1. Simulation of The Weichselian Glaciation In Fennoscandia With The Ice-sheet Model Sicopolis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsström, P.-L.; Sallasmaa, O.; Greve, R.; Zwinger, T.

    In order to reconstruct the palaeo-glaciation in Fennoscandia during the last (Weich- selian) ice age, simulations with the dynamic/thermodynamic ice-sheet model SICOPOLIS are carried out. Model time is from 250 kyr BP until the present. Cli- matic forcing is based on present distributions of mean annual surface temperature and precipitation over the region, which are derived from the NCEP/NCAR Reanal- ysis Project and University of Delaware (GHCN and Legates &Wilmott, 1990) data sets. For the past, these distributions are modified due to climatic changes as reflected by the GRIP 18O record and changes in surface elevation. Emphasis is put on the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) ca. 20 kyr BP. It turns out that the glaciation patterns vary to some extent for the two different data sets and depend strongly on the param- eters which determine the past variations of surface temperature and precipitation. By comparing the results with geological reconstructions of maximum ice extent, reason- able values for these parameters can be estimated. We discuss the simulated dynamic and thermodynamic state of the Scandinavian ice sheet at the LGM and the timing and pattern of deglaciation during the transition to the Holocene.

  2. Comparison of traditional and enthalpy-based thermodynamics solvers in the polythermal ice sheet model SICOPOLIS

    CERN Document Server

    Greve, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    In order to model the thermal structure of polythermal ice sheets accurately, energy-conserving schemes and correct tracking of the cold-temperate transition surface (CTS) are necessary. We compare four different thermodynamics solvers in the ice sheet model SICOPOLIS (the previously available polythermal two-layer and cold-ice schemes and the newly implemented conventional and melting CTS one-layer enthalpy schemes) by running two scenarios of the EISMINT Phase 2 Simplified Geometry Experiments (Payne and others, 2000, J. Glaciol. 46, 227-238) with different set-ups. In terms of temperate ice layer thickness, CTS positioning and smoothness of temperature profiles across the CTS (a requirement for the assumed case of melting conditions), the polythermal two-layer scheme performs best, and thus its results are used as a reference against which the performance of the other schemes is tested. Both the cold-ice scheme and the conventional one-layer enthalpy scheme fail to produce a continuous temperature gradient...

  3. Application of a shear-modified GTN model to incremental sheet forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jacob; Malhotra, Rajiv; Liu, W. K.; Cao, Jian

    2013-12-01

    This paper investigates the effects of using a shear-modified Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model, which is based on the mechanics of voids, for simulating material behavior in the incremental forming process. The problem chosen for analysis is a simplified version of the NUMISHEET 2014 incremental forming benchmark test. The implications of the shear-modification of the model specifically for incremental sheet forming processes are confirmed using finite element analysis. It is shown that including the shear term has a significant effect on fracture timing in incremental forming, which is not well reflected in the observed tensile test simulations for calibration. The numerical implementation and the need for comprehensive calibration of the model are briefly discussed.

  4. JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-12-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local (usually state) level. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering America program to model wind energy jobs and impacts, JEDI has been expanded to biofuels, concentrating solar power, coal, and natural gas power plants. Based on project-specific and default inputs (derived from industry norms), JEDI estimates the number of jobs and economic impacts to a local area (usually a state) that could reasonably be supported by a power generation project. For example, JEDI estimates the number of in-state construction jobs from a new wind farm. This fact sheet provides an overview of the JEDI model as it pertains to wind energy projects.

  5. Thin-Sheet Inversion Modeling of Geomagnetic Deep Sounding Data Using MCMC Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendra Grandis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The geomagnetic deep sounding (GDS method is one of electromagnetic (EM methods in geophysics that allows the estimation of the subsurface electrical conductivity distribution. This paper presents the inversion modeling of GDS data employing Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC algorithm to evaluate the marginal posterior probability of the model parameters. We used thin-sheet model to represent quasi-3D conductivity variations in the heterogeneous subsurface. The algorithm was applied to invert field GDS data from the zone covering an area that spans from eastern margin of the Bohemian Massif to the West Carpathians in Europe. Conductivity anomalies obtained from this study confirm the well-known large-scale tectonic setting of the area.

  6. Behavioral modeling of Digitally Adjustable Current Amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Polak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the digitally adjustable current amplifier (DACA and its analog behavioral model (ABM, which is suitable for both ideal and advanced analyses of the function block using DACA as active element. There are four levels of this model, each being suitable for simulation of a certain degree of electronic circuits design (e.g. filters, oscillators, generators. Each model is presented through a schematic wiring in the simulation program OrCAD, including a description of equations representing specific functions in the given level of the simulation model. The design of individual levels is always verified using PSpice simulations. The ABM model has been developed based on practically measured values of a number of DACA amplifier samples. The simulation results for proposed levels of the ABM model are shown and compared with the results of the real easurements of the active element DACA.

  7. Recovering lateral variations in lithospheric strength from bedrock motion data using a coupled ice sheet-lithosphere model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, J. van den; Wal, R.S.W. van de; Oerlemans, J.

    2006-01-01

    A vertically integrated two-dimensional ice flow model was coupled to an elastic lithosphere-Earth model to study the effects of lateral variations in lithospheric strength on local bedrock adjustment. We used a synthetic bedrock profile and a synthetic climate to model a characteristic ice sheet

  8. Recovering lateral variationin lithospheric strength from bedrock motion data using a coupled ice sheet-lithosphere model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Berg, W.J.; van de Wal, R.S.W.; Oerlemans, J.

    2006-01-01

    A vertically integrated two-dimensional ice flow model was coupled to an elastic lithosphere-Earth model to study the effects of lateral variations in lithospheric strength on local bedrock adjustment. We used a synthetic bedrock profile and a synthetic climate to model a characteristic ice sheet

  9. Long-term ice sheet-climate interactions under anthropogenic greenhouse forcing simulated with a complex Earth System Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vizcaino, Miren [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany); University of California, Department of Geography, Berkeley, CA (United States); Mikolajewicz, Uwe; Maier-Reimer, Ernst [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany); Groeger, Matthias [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany); IFM-GEOMAR, Kiel (Germany); Schurgers, Guy [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany); Lund University, Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystems Analysis, Lund (Sweden); Winguth, Arne M.E. [Center for Climatic Research, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Madison (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Several multi-century and multi-millennia simulations have been performed with a complex Earth System Model (ESM) for different anthropogenic climate change scenarios in order to study the long-term evolution of sea level and the impact of ice sheet changes on the climate system. The core of the ESM is a coupled coarse-resolution Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Model (AOGCM). Ocean biogeochemistry, land vegetation and ice sheets are included as components of the ESM. The Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) decays in all simulations, while the Antarctic ice sheet contributes negatively to sea level rise, due to enhanced storage of water caused by larger snowfall rates. Freshwater flux increases from Greenland are one order of magnitude smaller than total freshwater flux increases into the North Atlantic basin (the sum of the contribution from changes in precipitation, evaporation, run-off and Greenland meltwater) and do not play an important role in changes in the strength of the North Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (NAMOC). The regional climate change associated with weakening/collapse of the NAMOC drastically reduces the decay rate of the GrIS. The dynamical changes due to GrIS topography modification driven by mass balance changes act first as a negative feedback for the decay of the ice sheet, but accelerate the decay at a later stage. The increase of surface temperature due to reduced topographic heights causes a strong acceleration of the decay of the ice sheet in the long term. Other feedbacks between ice sheet and atmosphere are not important for the mass balance of the GrIS until it is reduced to 3/4 of the original size. From then, the reduction in the albedo of Greenland strongly accelerates the decay of the ice sheet. (orig.)

  10. Assessing the Impact of Retreat Mechanisms in a Simple Antarctic Ice Sheet Model Using Bayesian Calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruckert, Kelsey L; Shaffer, Gary; Pollard, David; Guan, Yawen; Wong, Tony E; Forest, Chris E; Keller, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    The response of the Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) to changing climate forcings is an important driver of sea-level changes. Anthropogenic climate change may drive a sizeable AIS tipping point response with subsequent increases in coastal flooding risks. Many studies analyzing flood risks use simple models to project the future responses of AIS and its sea-level contributions. These analyses have provided important new insights, but they are often silent on the effects of potentially important processes such as Marine Ice Sheet Instability (MISI) or Marine Ice Cliff Instability (MICI). These approximations can be well justified and result in more parsimonious and transparent model structures. This raises the question of how this approximation impacts hindcasts and projections. Here, we calibrate a previously published and relatively simple AIS model, which neglects the effects of MICI and regional characteristics, using a combination of observational constraints and a Bayesian inversion method. Specifically, we approximate the effects of missing MICI by comparing our results to those from expert assessments with more realistic models and quantify the bias during the last interglacial when MICI may have been triggered. Our results suggest that the model can approximate the process of MISI and reproduce the projected median melt from some previous expert assessments in the year 2100. Yet, our mean hindcast is roughly 3/4 of the observed data during the last interglacial period and our mean projection is roughly 1/6 and 1/10 of the mean from a model accounting for MICI in the year 2100. These results suggest that missing MICI and/or regional characteristics can lead to a low-bias during warming period AIS melting and hence a potential low-bias in projected sea levels and flood risks.

  11. Assessing the Impact of Retreat Mechanisms in a Simple Antarctic Ice Sheet Model Using Bayesian Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Gary; Pollard, David; Guan, Yawen; Wong, Tony E.; Forest, Chris E.; Keller, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    The response of the Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) to changing climate forcings is an important driver of sea-level changes. Anthropogenic climate change may drive a sizeable AIS tipping point response with subsequent increases in coastal flooding risks. Many studies analyzing flood risks use simple models to project the future responses of AIS and its sea-level contributions. These analyses have provided important new insights, but they are often silent on the effects of potentially important processes such as Marine Ice Sheet Instability (MISI) or Marine Ice Cliff Instability (MICI). These approximations can be well justified and result in more parsimonious and transparent model structures. This raises the question of how this approximation impacts hindcasts and projections. Here, we calibrate a previously published and relatively simple AIS model, which neglects the effects of MICI and regional characteristics, using a combination of observational constraints and a Bayesian inversion method. Specifically, we approximate the effects of missing MICI by comparing our results to those from expert assessments with more realistic models and quantify the bias during the last interglacial when MICI may have been triggered. Our results suggest that the model can approximate the process of MISI and reproduce the projected median melt from some previous expert assessments in the year 2100. Yet, our mean hindcast is roughly 3/4 of the observed data during the last interglacial period and our mean projection is roughly 1/6 and 1/10 of the mean from a model accounting for MICI in the year 2100. These results suggest that missing MICI and/or regional characteristics can lead to a low-bias during warming period AIS melting and hence a potential low-bias in projected sea levels and flood risks. PMID:28081273

  12. Simultaneous observation of the poleward expansion of substorm electrojet activity and the tailward expansion of current sheet disruption in the near-earth magnetotail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, R.E. (Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States)); Koskinen, H.E.J.; Pulkkinen, T.I. (Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland)); Boesinger, T. (Univ. of Oulu (Finland)); McEntire, R.W.; Potemra, T.A. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States))

    1993-06-01

    This paper reports on observations of a magnetospheric substorm on June 7, 1985. This event was observed simultaneously by a number of different systems. Particle and magnetic field data were collected by AMPTE/CCE, located near the neutral sheet; magnetic field data was monitored by the EISCAT magnetometer cross; STARE radar data was also collected; and Pi 1 data from Sodankyla. The ground based systems observed the poleward and westward expansion of electrojet activity at the start of the storm. The satellite was able to see the storms onset, and record perturbations in the current sheet at the onset of the substorm, in addition to later perturbations, which the authors argue originates tailward of the satellite. Satellite measurements are shown to occur in conjunction with ground events.

  13. What can adjoint modelling tell about the response of the Greenland Ice Sheet to changes in basal sliding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Jonathan; Rutt, Ian; Murray, Tavi; Utke, Jean

    2013-04-01

    Studying the future behaviour of the Greenland Ice Sheet is important considering the ice sheet has a sea-level equivalent of 7 metres and the rate of mass loss from it is increasing (Velicogna, 2009). Examining the modelled response of the Greenland Ice Sheet to changes in forcing parameters can give insight into how it will behave in the future. The response of the ice sheet to specific changes in forcing parameters is referred to as the sensitivity. Being able to obtain model sensitivities in as little computation time as possible would be useful for examining the future response of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Adjoint models allow sensitivities to be obtained more efficiently than the conventional way, when considering spatially varying parameters. Conventionally, such sensitivities are obtained by perturbing a parameter at every grid point in turn and calculating the sensitivity at every grid point. Adjoint sensitivities, though, are calculated in a single step. This reduces the computational cost when obtaining sensitivities over large model domains. The adjoint method also has the advantage that it gives the exact value of the model sensitivity, rather than a finite difference approximation to it. We present the adjoint of a finite difference, shallow ice, thermomechanical ice sheet model with basal sliding, applied to the Greenland Ice Sheet. This adjoint model is obtained using the OpenAD automatic differentiation tool (Utke, 2006), which is open source. The adjoint model is validated by comparing adjoint and forward model sensitivities over 100 years. This work builds on the work of Heimbach (2009). We use the adjoint model to examine the sensitivity of the model to changes in basal sliding. About half the mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet occurs from surface runoff and half from dynamic mass loss (Broeke, 2009). Melt-water from Greenland Ice Sheet supra-glacial lakes can percolate to the bed through moulins. The melt-water that reaches the bed can then

  14. Numerical modeling of subglacial erosion and sediment transport beneath the Laurentide Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, A.; Bell, T.; Tarasov, L.

    2012-04-01

    Present-day sediment distribution offers a potentially strong constraint on past ice sheet evolution. However, glacial system models (GSMs) cannot address this while lacking physically-based representations of subglacial sediment generation and transport. Incorporation of these elements in GSMs is also required in order to understand the impact of changing sediment cover on glacial cycle dynamics. Towards this goal, we present a subglacial process model that incorporates mechanisms for sediment production, entrainment, transport, and deposition. An abrasion law based on Hallet's model and a quarrying law dependent on basal water pressure and bed roughness are used to calculate bedrock erosion. The incorporation of loose debris in the basal ice is modeled by regelation intrusion and basal freeze-on, depending on the thermal condition and the availability of water at the base. The entrained debris is subsequently transported along the ice sheet's internal velocity field and vertically mixed through a diffusion equation that accounts for folding and thrust faulting. The inclusion of vertical mixing lowers the basal debris concentration and allows more regelation entrainment. Soft bed deformation is included as an advective component within the subglacial sediment, the rheology of which is assumed to be weakly non-linear. Deposition occurs whenever the basal ice is debris-laden and the melting rate exceeds the entrainment rate. The model is coupled to the MUN 3D GSM, which includes a newly developed subglacial hydrology module. The GSM itself has been subject to Bayesian calibration for North American and Eurasian deglaciation and thus a probabilistic ensemble of deglacial chronologies is available. With this calibrated ensemble, we compare the range of calculated sediment thickness fields and cumulative erosion over the last glacial cycle against the present-day pattern of glacigenic sediment and the geological estimates of glacial erosion over North America

  15. Ductile Fracture of AHSS Sheets under Multi-axial Loading: Experiments and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunand, M.; Mohr, D.

    2011-08-01

    Fracture experiments on TRIP-assisted steel sheets covering a wide range of stress states (from shear to equibiaxial tension) are performed to create a comprehensive experimental database to calibrate and evaluate the shear-modified Gurson model (Nielsen and Tvergaard, 2010) and the Modified Mohr-Coulomb (MMC) fracture model (Bai and Wierzbicki, 2010). The experimental program includes notched tensile tests as well as fracture experiments on butterfly-shaped specimens under combined tension and shear loading. Both phenomenological fracture models are physics-inspired and take the effect of the first and third stress tensor invariants into account in predicting the onset of ductile fracture. The MMC model is based on the assumption that the initiation of fracture is determined by a critical stress state, while the shear-modified Gurson model assumes void growth as the governing mechanism. The model accuracy is quantified based on the predictions of the displacements to fracture for experiments which have not been used for calibration. It is found that the MMC model predictions agree well with all experiments (less than 4% error), while less accurate predictions are observed for the shear-modified Gurson model. A comparison of plots of the strain to fracture as a function of the stress triaxiality and the normalized third invariant reveals significant differences between the two models except within the vicinity of stress states that have been used for calibration.

  16. Flow past a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet in a nanofluid using two-phase model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairy Zaimi

    Full Text Available The steady two-dimensional flow and heat transfer over a stretching/shrinking sheet in a nanofluid is investigated using Buongiorno's nanofluid model. Different from the previously published papers, in the present study we consider the case when the nanofluid particle fraction on the boundary is passively rather than actively controlled, which make the model more physically realistic. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into nonlinear ordinary differential equations by a similarity transformation, before being solved numerically by a shooting method. The effects of some governing parameters on the fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics are graphically presented and discussed. Dual solutions are found to exist in a certain range of the suction and stretching/shrinking parameters. Results also indicate that both the skin friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number increase with increasing values of the suction parameter.

  17. Phase field modeling of grain structure evolution during directional solidification of multi-crystalline silicon sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H. K.; Lan, C. W.

    2017-10-01

    Evolution of grain structures and grain boundaries (GBs), especially the coincident site lattice GBs, during directional solidification of multi-crystalline silicon sheet are simulated by using a phase field model for the first time. Since the coincident site lattice GBs having lower mobility, tend to follow their own crystallographic directions despite thermal gradients, the anisotropic energy and mobility of GBs are considered in the model. Three basic interactions of GBs during solidification are examined and they are consistent with experiments. The twinning process for new grain formation is further added in the simulation by considering twin nucleation. The effect of initial distribution of GB types and grain orientations is also investigated for the twinning frequency and the evolution of grain size and GB types.

  18. Modeling of a planar FEL amplifier with a sheet relativistic electron beam

    CERN Document Server

    Ginzburg, N S; Peskov, N Yu; Arzhannikov, A V; Sinitsky, S L

    2002-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the modeling of a 75 GHz planar FEL-amplifier. This amplifier is driven by a sheet electron beam (1 MeV, 2 kA) produced by the U-3 accelerator (BINP). Different approaches based on non-averaged self-consistent system of equations as well as the averaged equations were used for the description of interaction between the electron beam and the TEM-mode of the planar waveguide. Both methods demonstrated similar results with maximum gains 24-25 db, corresponding to an output power of about 250-300 MW and an efficiency of 14-17%. The 2-D version of the PIC-code KARAT was used for additional modeling. KARAT-based simulations demonstrated a maximum gain up to 22 db, output power 160-170 MW and an efficiency of 9%. The reduction of gain can be explained by the space-charge effects.

  19. Cascading water underneath Wilkes Land, East Antarctic Ice Sheet, observed using altimetry and digital elevation models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Flament

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a major subglacial lake drainage close to the ice divide in Wilkes Land, East Antarctica, and the subsequent cascading of water underneath the ice sheet toward the coast. To analyze the event, we combined altimetry data from several sources and bedrock data. We estimated the total volume of water that drained from Lake CookE2 by differencing digital elevation models (DEM derived from ASTER and SPOT5 stereo-imagery. With 5.2 ± 0.5 km3, this is the largest single subglacial drainage event reported so far in Antarctica. Elevation differences between ICESat laser altimetry and the SPOT5 DEM indicate that the discharge lasted approximately 2 yr. A 13-m uplift of the surface, corresponding to a refilling of about 0.64 ± 0.32 km3, was observed between the end of the discharge in October 2008 and February 2012. Using Envisat radar altimetry, with its high 35-day temporal resolution, we monitored the subsequent filling and drainage of connected subglacial lakes located downstream. In particular, a transient temporal signal can be detected within the theoretical 500-km long flow paths computed with the BEDMAP2 data set. The volume of water traveling in this wave is in agreement with the volume that drained from Lake CookE2. These observations contribute to a better understanding of the water transport beneath the East Antarctic ice sheet.

  20. Manufactured analytical solutions for isothermal full-Stokes ice sheet models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sargent

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the detailed construction of an exact solution to time-dependent and steady-state isothermal full-Stokes ice sheet problems. The solutions are constructed for two-dimensional flowline and three-dimensional full-Stokes ice sheet models with variable viscosity. The construction is done by choosing for the specified ice surface and bed a velocity distribution that satisfies both mass conservation and the kinematic boundary conditions. Then a compensatory stress term in the conservation of momentum equations and their boundary conditions is calculated to make the chosen velocity distributions as well as the chosen pressure field into exact solutions. By substituting different ice surface and bed geometry formulas into the derived solution formulas, analytical solutions for different geometries can be constructed.

    The boundary conditions can be specified as essential Dirichlet conditions or as periodic boundary conditions. By changing a parameter value, the analytical solutions allow investigation of algorithms for a different range of aspect ratios as well as for different, frozen or sliding, basal conditions. The analytical solutions can also be used to estimate the numerical error of the method in the case when the effects of the boundary conditions are eliminated, that is, when the exact solution values are specified as inflow and outflow boundary conditions.

  1. Manufactured analytical solutions for isothermal full-Stokes ice sheet models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sargent

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We present the detailed construction of a manufactured analytical solution to time-dependent and steady-state isothermal full-Stokes ice sheet problems. The solutions are constructed for two-dimensional flowline and three-dimensional full-Stokes ice sheet models with variable viscosity. The construction is done by choosing for the specified ice surface and bed a velocity distribution that satisfies both mass conservation and the kinematic boundary conditions. Then a compensatory stress term in the conservation of momentum equations and their boundary conditions is calculated to make the chosen velocity distributions as well as the chosen pressure field into exact solutions. By substituting different ice surface and bed geometry formulas into the derived solution formulas, analytical solutions for different geometries can be constructed.

    The boundary conditions can be specified as essential Dirichlet conditions or as periodic boundary conditions. By changing a parameter value, the analytical solutions allow investigation of algorithms for a different range of aspect ratios as well as for different, frozen or sliding, basal conditions. The analytical solutions can also be used to estimate the numerical error of the method in the case when the effects of the boundary conditions are eliminated, that is, when the exact solution values are specified as inflow and outflow boundary conditions.

  2. Modeling the effect of doping on the catalyst-assisted growth and field emission properties of plasma-grown graphene sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Neha; Sharma, Suresh C.; Sharma, Rinku [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University (DTU), Shahbad Daulatpur, Bawana Road, Delhi-110042 (India)

    2016-08-15

    A theoretical model describing the effect of doping on the plasma-assisted catalytic growth of graphene sheet has been developed. The model accounts the charging rate of the graphene sheet, kinetics of all the plasma species, including the doping species, and the growth rate of graphene nuclei and graphene sheet due to surface diffusion, and accretion of ions on the catalyst nanoparticle. Using the model, it is observed that nitrogen and boron doping can strongly influence the growth and field emission properties of the graphene sheet. The results of the present investigation indicate that nitrogen doping results in reduced thickness and shortened height of the graphene sheet; however, boron doping increases the thickness and height of the graphene sheet. The time evolutions of the charge on the graphene sheet and hydrocarbon number density for nitrogen and boron doped graphene sheet have also been examined. The field emission properties of the graphene sheet have been proposed on the basis of the results obtained. It is concluded that nitrogen doped graphene sheet exhibits better field emission characteristics as compared to undoped and boron doped graphene sheet. The results of the present investigation are consistent with the existing experimental observations.

  3. Mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet - a study of ICESat data, surface density and firn compaction modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, L. S.; Simonsen, Sebastian Bjerregaard; Nielsen, K.;

    2010-01-01

    in estimating the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet. We find firn dynamics and surface densities to be important factors in deriving the mass loss from remote sensing altimetry. The volume change derived from ICESat data is corrected for firn compaction, vertical bedrock movement and an intercampaign...... elevation bias in the ICESat data. Subsequently, the corrected volume change is converted into mass change by surface density modelling. The firn compaction and density models are driven by a dynamically downscaled simulation of the HIRHAM5 regional climate model using ERA-Interim reanalysis lateral......ICESat has provided surface elevation measurements of the ice sheets since the launch in January 2003, resulting in a unique data set for monitoring the changes of the cryosphere. Here we present a novel method for determining the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet derived from ICESat...

  4. RESULTS OF CALCULATION-EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS OF ELECTRO-THERMAL RESISTIBILITY OF SHEET STEEL SAMPLES TO ACTION OF RATIONED COMPONENTS OF PULSED CURRENT OF ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Baranov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Calculation and experimental researches of the electro-thermal resistibility of the steel sheet samples to action standard pulse current components of the artificial lightning with amplitude-time parameters (ATP, corresponded the requirements of normative documents of USA for SAE ARP 5412 & SAE ARP 5416. Methodology. Electrophysics bases of technique of high tensions and large impulsive currents (LIC, and also scientific and technical bases of planning of devices of high-voltage impulsive technique and measuring in them LIC. Сurrent amplitude ImA=±200 kA (with a tolerance of ±10 %; current action integral JA=2∙106 A2•s (with a tolerance of ±20 %; time, corresponding to the amplitude of the current ImA, tmA≤50 microseconds; the duration of the current flow τpA≤500 microseconds. Results. The results of the evaluation of the calculated and experimental studies of electro-thermal resistance of the samples of plates measuring 0,5 m  0,5 m stainless steel 1 mm thickness to the action on them artificial lightning impulse currents with rationed ATP on the requirements of normative documents of USA for SAE ARP 5412 & SAE ARP 5416. A pulse A- component have a first amplitude 192 kA, the corresponding time of 34 μs, and the duration aperiodic component amplitude 804 A, corresponding to the time 9 ms. It has been shown that the long C- component current of artificial lightning can lead to keyhole these samples. The diameter of the holes in this thin steel sheet, which is formed during the flow of current C- components can reach 15 mm. The results of calculation and experiment agree within 28 %. Originality. For the first time in world practice on the generator large pulsed currents experimental studies of resistibility of sheet steel samples to the action of artificial lightning currents with critical parameters. Practical value. Using the results obtained in the practice of lightning protection will significantly improve the

  5. A hybrid boundary-integral/thin-sheet equation for subduction modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bingrui; Ribe, Neil M.

    2016-09-01

    Subducting oceanic lithosphere is an example of a thin sheet-like object whose characteristic lateral dimension greatly exceeds its thickness. Here we exploit this property to derive a new hybrid boundary-integral/thin sheet (BITS) representation of subduction that combines in a single equation all the forces acting on the sheet: gravity, internal resistance to bending and stretching, and the tractions exerted by the ambient mantle. For simplicity, we limit ourselves to 2-D. We solve the BITS equations using a discrete Lagrangian approach in which the sheet is represented by a set of vertices connected by edges. Instantaneous solutions for the sinking speed of a slab attached to a trailing flat sheet obey a scaling law of the form V/VStokes = fct(St), where VStokes is a characteristic Stokes sinking speed and St is the sheet's flexural stiffness. Time-dependent solutions for the evolution of the sheet's shape and thickness show that these are controlled by the viscosity ratio between the sheet and its surroundings. An important advantage of the BITS approach is the possibility of generalizing the sheet's rheology, either to a viscosity that varies along the sheet or to a non-Newtonian shear-thinning rheology.

  6. Characterization of the Greenland Ice Sheet evolution in a changing climate using a multi-model approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seroussi, H. L.; Morlighem, M.; Larour, E. Y.; Rignot, E. J.; Aubry, D.; Ben Dhia, H.

    2011-12-01

    Hybrid models that combine several ice flow approximations of varying order of complexity have the potential to improve continental-scale projections of ice sheet dynamics in a changing climate. Indeed, this approach allows the use of higher-order or full-Stokes models in critical areas, such as the vicinity of the grounding line, while being compatible with available computational resources as simpler models are employed in non-critical areas. Here, we use this approach to model the Greenland Ice Sheet and project its evolution for the next 500 years under different climate scenarios set up by the SeaRISE assessment. The model is initialized using data assimilation to constrain basal friction under the ice sheet and therefore starts from a configuration close to the present-day conditions. A set of experiments is then performed to assess the influence of changes in: 1) atmospheric conditions (air temperature and precipitation), 2) basal conditions (increase in basal lubrication due to enhanced melting) and 3) oceanic conditions (melting under ice shelves and at marine-terminated fronts). We employ the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM, http://issm.jpl.nasa.gov), a thermo-dynamic finite element model developed at JPL/UCI to perform these simulations. This work was performed at the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, University of California Irvine and Ecole Centrale Paris under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Modeling, Analysis and Prediction (MAP) Program.