WorldWideScience

Sample records for current sensing atomic

  1. Electrical transport properties of oligothiophene based molecular films studied by current sensing Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriksen, Bas L.M.; Martin, Florent; Qi, Yabing; Qi, Y.; Mauldin, Clayton; Vukmirovic, Nenad; Ren, JunFeng; Wormeester, Herbert; Katan, Allard J.; Altoe, Virginia; Aloni, Shaul; Frechet, Jean M.J.; Wang, Lin-Wang; Salmeron, Miquel

    2011-01-01

    Using conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CAFM) we have investigated the electrical conduction properties of monolayer films of a pentathiophene derivative on a SiO2/Si-p+ substrate. By a combination of current–voltage spectroscopy and current imaging we show that lateral charge transport

  2. Charge transfer on porous silicon membranes studied by current-sensing atomic force microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Xia; Qiang Miao; Jie Chao; Shou Jun Xiao; Hai Tao Wang; Zhong Dang Xiao

    2008-01-01

    A visible rectification effect on the current-voltage curves of metal/porous silicon/p-silicon has been observed by currentsensing atomic force microscopy.The current-voltage curves of porous silicon membranes with different porosities,prepared through variation of etching current density for a constant time,indicate that a higher porosity results in a higher resistance and thus a lower rectification,until the current reaches a threshold at a porosity>55%.We propose that the conductance mode in the porous silicon membrane with porosities>55% is mainly a hopping mechanism between nano-crystallites and an inverse static electric field between the porous silicon and p-Si interface blocks the electron injection from porous silicon to p-Si,but with porosities <55%,electron flows through a direct continuous channel between nano-crystallites.

  3. Electron transport in dodecylamine capped gold nanocluster films using current sensing atomic force microscope (C-AFM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Minakshi; Dey, Shirshendu; Date, Kalyani; Iyyer, S B; Dharmadhikaril, C V

    2009-09-01

    Electron transport across cataphoretically deposited dodecylamine capped gold nanocluster rough films on Si(111) substrate is investigated using current sensing atomic force microscopy. Contact mode images depict uniform deposition of agglomerates of gold nanoparticles. The current images display strong correlation with topographic images. The I-V measurement on a single agglomerate of approximately = 250 nm size at different forces exhibits force dependent threshold voltage. The electron transport from tip to sample is found to be ohmic in contrast to that from sample to tip which, exhibits Fowler-Nordheim behavior up to 35 nN force. At higher forces, the I-V behavior could be attributed to other electron transfer processes such as Schottky/Poole-Frenkel or trapping/detrapping, although no exact mechanism could be identified. The results are discussed in the light of models based on Coulomb blockaded collective charge transport in nanoparticle arrays duly accounting for the potential role of the capping layer.

  4. Electrical conductivity in Langmuir-Blodgett films of n-alkyl cyanobiphenyls using current sensing atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gayathri, H. N.; Suresh, K. A., E-mail: suresh@cnsms.res.in [Centre for Nano and Soft Matter Sciences, P. B. No. 1329, Jalahalli, Bangalore 560013 (India)

    2015-06-28

    We report our studies on the nanoscale electrical conductivity in monolayers of n-alkyl cyanobiphenyl materials deposited on solid surface. Initially, the 8CB, 9CB, and 10CB monolayer films were prepared by the Langmuir technique at air-water interface and characterized by surface manometry and Brewster angle microscopy. The monolayer films were transferred on to solid substrates by the Langmuir-Blodgett (L-B) technique. The 8CB, 9CB, and 10CB monolayer L-B films were deposited on freshly cleaved mica and studied by atomic force microscope (AFM), thereby measuring the film thickness as ∼1.5 nm. The electrical conductivity measurements were carried out on 9CB and 10CB monolayer L-B films deposited onto highly ordered pyrolytic graphite using current sensing AFM. The nanoscale current-voltage (I-V) measurements show a non-linear variation. The nature of the curve indicates electron tunneling to be the mechanism for electrical conduction. Furthermore, analysis of the I-V curve reveals a transition in the electron conduction mechanism from direct tunneling to injection tunneling. From the transition voltage, we have estimated the values of barrier height for 9CB and 10CB to be 0.71 eV and 0.37 eV, respectively. For both 9CB and 10CB, the effective mass of electron was calculated to be 0.021 m{sub e} and 0.065 m{sub e}, respectively. These parameters are important in the design of molecular electronic devices.

  5. Using Geometry To Sense Current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughan, Adam N; Abebe, Nathnael S; Zhao, Qing-Yuan; Berggren, Karl K

    2016-12-14

    We describe a superconducting three-terminal device that uses a simple geometric effect known as current crowding to sense the flow of current and actuate a readout signal. The device consists of a "Y"-shaped current combiner, with two currents (sense and bias) entering separately through the top arms of the "Y", intersecting, and then exiting together through the bottom leg of the "Y". When current is added to or removed from one of the arms (e.g., the sense arm), the superconducting critical current in the other arm (i.e., the bias arm) is modulated. The current in the sense arm can thus be determined by measuring the critical current of the bias arm, or inversely, the sense current can be used to modulate the state of the bias arm. The dependence of the bias critical current on the sense current occurs due to the geometric current crowding effect, which causes the sense current to interact locally with the bias arm. Measurement of the critical current in the bias arm does not break the superconducting state of the sense arm or of the bottom leg, and thus, quantized currents trapped in a superconducting loop were able to be repeatedly measured without changing the state of the loop. Current crowding is a universal effect in nanoscale superconductors, and so this device has potential for applicability across a broad range of superconducting technologies and materials. More generally, any technology in which geometrically induced flow crowding exists in the presence of a strong nonlinearity might make use of this type of device.

  6. Interacting Atomic Interferometry for Rotation Sensing Approaching the Heisenberg Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragole, Stephen; Taylor, Jacob M.

    2016-11-01

    Atom interferometers provide exquisite measurements of the properties of noninertial frames. While atomic interactions are typically detrimental to good sensing, efforts to harness entanglement to improve sensitivity remain tantalizing. Here we explore the role of interactions in an analogy between atomic gyroscopes and SQUIDs, motivated by recent experiments realizing ring-shaped traps for ultracold atoms. We explore the one-dimensional limit of these ring systems with a moving weak barrier, such as that provided by a blue-detuned laser beam. In this limit, we employ Luttinger liquid theory and find an analogy with the superconducting phase-slip qubit, in which the topological charge associated with persistent currents can be put into superposition. In particular, we find that strongly interacting atoms in such a system could be used for precision rotation sensing. We compare the performance of this new sensor to an equivalent noninteracting atom interferometer, and find improvements in sensitivity and bandwidth beyond the atomic shot-noise limit.

  7. Current Trends in Atomic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, James J.

    1983-01-01

    Atomic spectroscopy is the study of atoms/ions through their interaction with electromagnetic radiation, in particular, interactions in which radiation is absorbed or emitted with an internal rearrangement of the atom's electrons. Discusses nature of this field, its status and future, and how it is applied to other areas of physics. (JN)

  8. Current Trends in Atomic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, James J.

    1983-01-01

    Atomic spectroscopy is the study of atoms/ions through their interaction with electromagnetic radiation, in particular, interactions in which radiation is absorbed or emitted with an internal rearrangement of the atom's electrons. Discusses nature of this field, its status and future, and how it is applied to other areas of physics. (JN)

  9. Sensing Current and Forces with SPM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Y.; Maier, Sabine; Hendriksen, Bas; Salmeron, Miquel

    2010-07-02

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) are well established techniques to image surfaces and to probe material properties at the atomic and molecular scale. In this review, we show hybrid combinations of AFM and STM that bring together the best of two worlds: the simultaneous detection of atomic scale forces and conduction properties. We illustrate with several examples how the detection of forces during STM and the detection of currents during AFM can give valuable additional information of the nanoscale material properties.

  10. Ionization current sensing; Jonstroem-maetning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aengeby, Jakob; Goeras, Anders; Nytomt, Jan [Hoerbiger Control Systems AB, Aamaal, (Sweden)

    2012-05-15

    Ion current measurements give information on the combustion in the cylinders of an internal combustion engine in run time, cycle by cycle. Ion sense has been used in gasoline engines for many years for detection of knock and misfire, combustion stability and for air to fuel ratio estimation. However, the use of ion sense in industrial gas engines has been limited, despite the potential of ion sense. The objective with the project is to investigate which combustion process information that can be retrieved using ion sense applied to industrial lean burn engines using pre-chambers for the ignition in which case the spark plug is encapsulated in the pre-chamber. Experiments show that ion current measured in the pre-chamber can successfully be used to retrieve information from the in-cylinder combustion process. It is possible to detect misfire and to some extent knock. It is also possible to optimize the ignition and hence minimize emissions and optimize the performance by using the ion current measured in the pre- chamber. A statistical signal processing approach to use more than one ion current feature in the estimation of combustion parameters was evaluated on a heavy duty gas engine. By using more than one feature the performance of in cylinder air to fuel ratio estimation was improved.

  11. Sensing technology current status and future trends

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Subhas; Jayasundera, Krishanthi; Bhattacharyya, Nabarun

    2014-01-01

    This book is written for academic and industry professionals working in the field of sensing, instrumentation and related fields, and is positioned to give a snapshot of the current state of the art in sensing technology, particularly from the applied perspective.  The book is intended to give a broad overview of the latest developments, in addition to discussing the process through which researchers go through in order to develop sensors, or related systems, which will become more widespread in the future.  

  12. Nanoindentation: Toward the sensing of atomic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraxedas, J.; Garcia-Manyes, S.; Gorostiza, P.; Sanz, F.

    2002-04-01

    The mechanical properties of surfaces of layered materials (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite, InSe, and GaSe) and single-crystal ionic materials (NaCl, KBr, and KCl) have been investigated at the nanometer scale by using nanoindentations produced with an atomic force microscope with ultrasharp tips. Special attention has been devoted to the elastic response of the materials before the onset of plastic yield. A new model based on an equivalent spring constant that takes into account the changes in in-plane interactions on nanoindentation is proposed. The results of this model are well correlated with those obtained by using the Debye model of solid vibrations.

  13. Microwave electric field sensing with Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack, Daniel T.; Kunz, Paul D.; Meyer, David H.; Solmeyer, Neal

    2016-05-01

    Atoms form the basis of precise measurement for many quantities (time, acceleration, rotation, magnetic field, etc.). Measurements of microwave frequency electric fields by traditional methods (i.e. engineered antennas) have limited sensitivity and can be difficult to calibrate properly. Highly-excited (Rydberg) neutral atoms have very large electric-dipole moments and many dipole allowed transitions in the range of 1 - 500 GHz. It is possible to sensitively probe the electric field in this range using the combination of two quantum interference phenomena: electromagnetically induced transparency and the Autler-Townes effect. This technique allows for very sensitive field amplitude, polarization, and sub-wavelength imaging measurements. These quantities can be extracted by measuring properties of a probe laser beam as it passes through a warm rubidium vapor cell. Thus far, Rydberg microwave electrometry has relied upon the absorption of the probe laser. We report on our use of polarization rotation, which corresponds to the real part of the susceptibility, for measuring the properties of microwave frequency electric fields. Our simulations show that when a magnetic field is present and directed along the optical propagation direction a polarization rotation signal exists and can be used for microwave electrometry. One central advantage in using the polarization rotation signal rather than the absorption signal is that common mode laser noise is naturally eliminated leading to a potentially dramatic increase in signal-to-noise ratio.

  14. Adiabatic control of atomic dressed states for transport and sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, N. R.; Rey, A. M.

    2015-08-01

    We describe forms of adiabatic transport that arise for dressed-state atoms in optical lattices. Focusing on the limit of weak tunnel-coupling between nearest-neighbor lattice sites, we explain how adiabatic variation of optical dressing allows control of atomic motion between lattice sites: allowing adiabatic particle transport in a direction that depends on the internal state, and force measurements via spectroscopic preparation and readout. For uniformly filled bands these systems display topologically quantized particle transport. An implementation of the dressing scheme using optical transitions in alkaline-earth atoms is discussed as well as its favorable features for precise force sensing.

  15. A passive DC current sensing methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong F.; Liu, Huan; Li, Xiaodong; Li, Yang; Xian, Weikang

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposes a method for passive sensing a two-wire DC current without using any cord separator. In this method, a piezoelectric thin-film cantilever with a micro-magnet on its end is positioned near a power cord. The DC current in the power cord induces a magnetic field, which generates a magnetic force acting on the micro-magnet. Consequently, the piezoelectric cantilever is bent and induces an output voltage that is sensitive to small variations of DC currents. A prototype device has been fabricated and experimentally studied. It was found that the initial peak amplitude of the piezoelectric output voltage increases linearly with the DC current value upon "ON-OFF" switching. Compared to the Hall-effect based sensing, this method has the advantages of no need of driving voltage or cord separators even for two-wire appliance cords. Apart from the conventional consumer electronics, this method may have a wide application foreground in the new emerging fields, such as energy vehicles, lithium ion battery, or smart power grid.

  16. Effect of Unsaturated Sn Atoms on Gas-Sensing Property in Hydrogenated SnO2 Nanocrystals and Sensing Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Y; Wang, Y; Wang, M; Liu, J; Pei, C; Liu, B; Zhao, H; Liu, S; Yang, H

    2017-04-27

    Sensing reaction mechanism is crucial for enhancing the sensing performance of semiconductor-based sensing materials. Here we show a new strategy to enhancing sensing performance of SnO2 nanocrystals by increasing the density of unsaturated Sn atoms with dangling bonds at the SnO2 surface through hydrogenation. A concept of the surface unsaturated Sn atoms serving as active sites for the sensing reaction is proposed, and the sensing mechanism is described in detail at atomic and molecule level for the first time. Sensing properties of other metal oxide sensors and catalytic activity of other catalysts may be improved by using the hydrogenation strategy. The concept of the surface unsaturated metal atoms serving as active sites may be very useful for understanding the sensing and catalytic reaction mechanisms and designing advanced sensing sensors, catalysts and photoelectronic devices.

  17. Atomic-scale sensing of the magnetic dipolar field from single atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Taeyoung; Paul, William; Rolf-Pissarczyk, Steffen; Macdonald, Andrew J; Natterer, Fabian D; Yang, Kai; Willke, Philip; Lutz, Christopher P; Heinrich, Andreas J

    2017-05-01

    Spin resonance provides the high-energy resolution needed to determine biological and material structures by sensing weak magnetic interactions. In recent years, there have been notable achievements in detecting and coherently controlling individual atomic-scale spin centres for sensitive local magnetometry. However, positioning the spin sensor and characterizing spin-spin interactions with sub-nanometre precision have remained outstanding challenges. Here, we use individual Fe atoms as an electron spin resonance (ESR) sensor in a scanning tunnelling microscope to measure the magnetic field emanating from nearby spins with atomic-scale precision. On artificially built assemblies of magnetic atoms (Fe and Co) on a magnesium oxide surface, we measure that the interaction energy between the ESR sensor and an adatom shows an inverse-cube distance dependence (r(-3.01±0.04)). This demonstrates that the atoms are predominantly coupled by the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction, which, according to our observations, dominates for atom separations greater than 1 nm. This dipolar sensor can determine the magnetic moments of individual adatoms with high accuracy. The achieved atomic-scale spatial resolution in remote sensing of spins may ultimately allow the structural imaging of individual magnetic molecules, nanostructures and spin-labelled biomolecules.

  18. Sensing Atomic Motion from the Zero Point to Room Temperature with Ultrafast Atom Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, K G; Mizrahi, J; Wong-Campos, J D; Monroe, C

    2015-01-01

    We sense the motion of a trapped atomic ion using a sequence of state-dependent ultrafast momentum kicks. We use this atom interferometer to characterize a nearly-pure quantum state with $n=1$ phonon and accurately measure thermal states ranging from near the zero-point energy to $\\bar{n}\\sim 10^4$, with the possibility of extending at least 100 times higher in energy. The complete energy range of this method spans from the ground state to far outside of the Lamb-Dicke regime, where atomic motion is greater than the optical wavelength. These interferometric techniques are useful for characterizing ultrafast entangling gates between multiple trapped ions, and may also be used for sensing electromagnetic fields over a wide dynamic range.

  19. Atomic Bremsstrahlung: retrospectives, current status and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Amusia, M. Ya.

    2005-01-01

    We describe here the Atomic bremsstrahlung - emission of continuous spectrum electromagnetic radiation, which is generated in collisions of particles that have internal deformable structure that includes positively and negatively charged constituents. The deformation of one of or both colliding partners induces multiple, mainly dipole, time-dependent electrical moments that become a source of radiation. The history of Atomic bremsstrahlung invention is presented and it's unusual in comparison...

  20. Magnetically Guiding Atoms with Current-Carrying Conductors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘南春; 高伟建; 印建平

    2002-01-01

    We propose a novel magnetic guide for cold neutral atoms using some current-carrying conductors. The spatial distributions of the magnetic fields from a V-shaped or U-shaped current-carrying conductor are calculated, and the relationship between the resulting magnetic field and the parameters of the current-carrying conductors is analysed in detail. The result shows that these current-carrying conductors can be used to realize a single or a controllable double magnetic guide of cold atoms in the weak-field-seeking state, and to construct various atom-optical elements, and even to realize a single-mode atomic waveguiding under certain conditions.

  1. Optical Microcavity: Sensing down to Single Molecules and Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yu Su

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This review article discusses fundamentals of dielectric, low-loss, optical micro-resonator sensing, including figures of merit and a variety of microcavity designs, and future perspectives in microcavity-based optical sensing. Resonance frequency and quality (Q factor are altered as a means of detecting a small system perturbation, resulting in realization of optical sensing of a small amount of sample materials, down to even single molecules. Sensitivity, Q factor, minimum detectable index change, noises (in sensor system components and microcavity system including environments, microcavity size, and mode volume are essential parameters to be considered for optical sensing applications. Whispering gallery mode, photonic crystal, and slot-type microcavities typically provide compact, high-quality optical resonance modes for optical sensing applications. Surface Bloch modes induced on photonic crystals are shown to be a promising candidate thanks to large field overlap with a sample and ultra-high-Q resonances. Quantum optics effects based on microcavity quantum electrodynamics (QED would provide novel single-photo-level detection of even single atoms and molecules via detection of doublet vacuum Rabi splitting peaks in strong coupling.

  2. Optical microcavity: sensing down to single molecules and atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshie, Tomoyuki; Tang, Lingling; Su, Shu-Yu

    2011-01-01

    This review article discusses fundamentals of dielectric, low-loss, optical micro-resonator sensing, including figures of merit and a variety of microcavity designs, and future perspectives in microcavity-based optical sensing. Resonance frequency and quality (Q) factor are altered as a means of detecting a small system perturbation, resulting in realization of optical sensing of a small amount of sample materials, down to even single molecules. Sensitivity, Q factor, minimum detectable index change, noises (in sensor system components and microcavity system including environments), microcavity size, and mode volume are essential parameters to be considered for optical sensing applications. Whispering gallery mode, photonic crystal, and slot-type microcavities typically provide compact, high-quality optical resonance modes for optical sensing applications. Surface Bloch modes induced on photonic crystals are shown to be a promising candidate thanks to large field overlap with a sample and ultra-high-Q resonances. Quantum optics effects based on microcavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) would provide novel single-photo-level detection of even single atoms and molecules via detection of doublet vacuum Rabi splitting peaks in strong coupling.

  3. An electric current associated with gravity sensing in maize roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, T.; Leopold, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    The study of gravisensing would be greatly enhanced if physiological events associated with gravity sensing could be detected separately from subsequent growth processes. This report presents a means to discriminate sensing from the growth processes. By using a vibrating probe, we have found an electric current generated by the gravity sensing region of the root cap of maize (Zea mays cv Merit) in response to gravistimulation. On the upper surface of the root cap, the change from the endogenous current has a density of 0.55 microampere per square centimeter away from gravity. The onset of the current shift has a characteristic of lag of three to four minutes after gravistimulation, which corresponds to the presentation time for gravity sensing in this tissue. A description of the current provides some information about the sensing mechanism, as well as being a valuable means to detect gravity sensing independently of differential growth.

  4. Streaming current of a rotary atomizer for energy harvesting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Trieu; de Boer, Hans L.; Tran, T.; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Zengerle, R.

    2013-01-01

    We present the experimental results of an energy conversion system based on a rotary atomizer and the streaming current phenomenon. The advantage of using a rotary atomizer instead of a channel or membrane micropore as in conventional pressure-driven approached is that the centrifugal force exerted

  5. Streaming current of a rotary atomizer for energy harvesting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Trieu; Boer, de H.; Tran, T.; Berg, van den A.; Eijkel, J.C.T.; Zengerle, R.

    2013-01-01

    We present the experimental results of an energy conversion system based on a rotary atomizer and the streaming current phenomenon. The advantage of using a rotary atomizer instead of a channel or membrane micropore as in conventional pressure-driven approached is that the centrifugal force exerted

  6. Spectral confinement and current for atoms in strong magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fournais, Søren

    2007-01-01

    e study confinement of the ground state of atoms in strong magnetic fields to different subspaces related to the lowest Landau band. Using the results on confinement we can calculate the quantum current in the entire semiclassical region B<3......e study confinement of the ground state of atoms in strong magnetic fields to different subspaces related to the lowest Landau band. Using the results on confinement we can calculate the quantum current in the entire semiclassical region B

  7. Hot electron transport and current sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Mathew Cheeran

    The effect of hot electrons on momentum scattering rates in a two-dimensional electron gas is critically examined. It is shown that with hot electrons it is possible to explore the temperature dependence of individual scattering mechanisms not easily probed under equilibrium conditions; both the Bloch-Gruneisen (BG) phonon scattering phenomena and the reduction in impurity scattering are clearly observed. The theoretical calculations are consistent with the results obtained from hot electrons experiments. As a function of bias current, a resistance peak is formed in a 2DEG if the low temperature impurity limited mobilities muI( T = 0) is comparable to muph(TBG ) the phonon limited mobility at the critical BG temperature. In this case, as the bias current is increased, the electron temperature Te rises due to Joule heating and the rapid increase in phonon scattering can be detected before the effect of the reduction in impurity scattering sets in. If muI(T = 0) wire defined in a 2DEG. Concurrently, an appropriate current imaging technique to detect this transition is sought. A rigorous evaluation of magnetic force microscopy (MFM) as a possible candidate to detect Poiseuille electronic flow was conducted, and a method that exploits the mechanical resonance of the MFM cantilever was implemented to significantly improve its current sensitivity.

  8. Multiplexed ionic current sensing with glass nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Nicholas A W; Thacker, Vivek V; Hernández-Ainsa, Silvia; Fuentes-Perez, Maria E; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Liedl, Tim; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2013-05-21

    We report a method for simultaneous ionic current measurements of single molecules across up to 16 solid state nanopore channels. Each device, costing less than $20, contains 16 glass nanopores made by laser assisted capillary pulling. We demonstrate simultaneous multichannel detection of double stranded DNA and trapping of DNA origami nanostructures to form hybrid nanopores.

  9. Spin-polarized currents generated by magnetic Fe atomic chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zheng-Zhe; Chen, Xi

    2014-06-13

    Fe-based devices are widely used in spintronics because of high spin-polarization and magnetism. In this work, freestanding Fe atomic chains, the thinnest wires, were used to generate spin-polarized currents due to the spin-polarized energy bands. By ab initio calculations, the zigzag structure was found to be more stable than the wide-angle zigzag structure and had a higher ratio of spin-up and spin-down currents. By our theoretical prediction, Fe atomic chains have a sufficiently long thermal lifetime only at T ≦̸ 150 K, while C atomic chains are very stable even at T = 1000 K. This means that the spintronic devices based on Fe chains could work only at low temperatures. A system constructed by a short Fe chain sandwiched between two graphene electrodes could be used as a spin-polarized current generator, while a C chain could not be used in this way. The present work may be instructive and meaningful to further practical applications based on recent technical developments on the preparation of metal atomic chains (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 107 9055 (2010)).

  10. Current Status of Atomic Spectroscopy Databases at NIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramida, Alexander; Ralchenko, Yuri; Reader, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    NIST's Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center maintains several online databases on atomic spectroscopy. These databases can be accessed via the http://physics.nist.gov/PhysRefData web page. Our main database, Atomic Spectra Database (ASD), recently upgraded to v. 5.3, now contains critically evaluated data for about 250,000 spectral lines and 109,000 energy levels of almost all elements in the periodic table. This new version has added several thousand spectral lines and energy levels of Sn II, Mo V, W VIII, and Th I-III. Most of these additions contain critically evaluated transition probabilities important for astrophysics, technology, and fusion research. A new feature of ASD is providing line-ratio data for diagnostics of electron temperature and density in plasmas. Saha-Boltzmann plots have been modified by adding an experimental feature allowing the user to specify a multi-element mixture. We continue regularly updating our bibliography databases, ensuring comprehensive coverage of current literature on atomic spectra for energy levels, spectral lines, transition rates, hyperfine structure, isotope shifts, Zeeman and Stark effects. Our other popular databases, such as the Handbook of Basic Atomic Spectroscopy Data, searchable atlases of spectra of Pt-Ne and Th-Ne lamps, and non-LTE plasma-kinetics code comparisons, continue to be maintained.

  11. Current-induced dynamics in carbon atomic contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jing Tao; Gunst, Tue; Brandbyge, Mads

    2011-01-01

    voltage, which can be used to explore current-induced vibrational instabilities due the NC/BP forces. Furthermore, using tight-binding and the Brenner potential we illustrate how Langevin-type molecular-dynamics calculations including the Joule heating effect for the carbon-chain systems can be performed...... of molecular-scale contacts. Systems based on molecules bridging electrically gated graphene electrodes may offer an interesting test-bed for these effects. Results: We employ a semi-classical Langevin approach in combination with DFT calculations to study the current-induced vibrational dynamics of an atomic...... carbon chain connecting electrically gated graphene electrodes. This illustrates how the device stability can be predicted solely from the modes obtained from the Langevin equation, including the current-induced forces. We point out that the gate offers control of the current, independent of the bias...

  12. Eddy Current Sensing of Torque in Rotating Shafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varonis, Orestes J.; Ida, Nathan

    2013-12-01

    The noncontact torque sensing in machine shafts is addressed based on the stress induced in a press-fitted magnetoelastic sleeve on the shaft and eddy current sensing of the changes of electrical conductivity and magnetic permeability due to the presence of stress. The eddy current probe uses dual drive, dual sensing coils whose purpose is increased sensitivity to torque and decreased sensitivity to variations in distance between probe and shaft (liftoff). A mechanism of keeping the distance constant is also employed. Both the probe and the magnetoelastic sleeve are evaluated for performance using a standard eddy current instrument. An eddy current instrument is also used to drive the coils and analyze the torque data. The method and sensor described are general and adaptable to a variety of applications. The sensor is suitable for static and rotating shafts, is independent of shaft diameter and operational over a large range of torques. The torque sensor uses a differential eddy current measurement resulting in cancellation of common mode effects including temperature and vibrations.

  13. Current-induced dynamics in carbon atomic contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Tao Lü

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The effect of electric current on the motion of atoms still poses many questions, and several mechanisms are at play. Recently there has been focus on the importance of the current-induced nonconservative forces (NC and Berry-phase derived forces (BP with respect to the stability of molecular-scale contacts. Systems based on molecules bridging electrically gated graphene electrodes may offer an interesting test-bed for these effects.Results: We employ a semi-classical Langevin approach in combination with DFT calculations to study the current-induced vibrational dynamics of an atomic carbon chain connecting electrically gated graphene electrodes. This illustrates how the device stability can be predicted solely from the modes obtained from the Langevin equation, including the current-induced forces. We point out that the gate offers control of the current, independent of the bias voltage, which can be used to explore current-induced vibrational instabilities due the NC/BP forces. Furthermore, using tight-binding and the Brenner potential we illustrate how Langevin-type molecular-dynamics calculations including the Joule heating effect for the carbon-chain systems can be performed. Molecular dynamics including current-induced forces enables an energy redistribution mechanism among the modes, mediated by anharmonic interactions, which is found to be vital in the description of the electrical heating.Conclusion: We have developed a semiclassical Langevin equation approach that can be used to explore current-induced dynamics and instabilities. We find instabilities at experimentally relevant bias and gate voltages for the carbon-chain system.

  14. Guiding Neutral Atoms with Two Current-Carrying Wires and a Vertical Bias Field on the Atom Chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE Min; YAN Bo; LI Xiao-Lin; WANG Yu-Zhu

    2008-01-01

    @@ We demonstrate the guiding of neutral atoms with two parallel microfabricated current-carrying wires on the atom chip and a verticai magnetic bias field.The atoms are guided along a magnetic field minimum parallel to the current-carrying wires and confined in the other two directions.We describe in detail how the precooled atoms are efficiently loaded into the two-wire guide.

  15. Current development of UAV sense and avoid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhahir, A.; Razali, A.; Mohd Ajir, M. R.

    2016-10-01

    As unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are now gaining high interests from civil and commercialised market, the automatic sense and avoid (SAA) system is currently one of the essential features in research spotlight of UAV. Several sensor types employed in current SAA research and technology of sensor fusion that offers a great opportunity in improving detection and tracking system are presented here. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of SAA system development in general, as well as the current challenges facing UAV researchers and designers.

  16. Quantum memory, entanglement and sensing with room temperature atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, K; Wasilewski, W; Krauter, H; Fernholz, T; Nielsen, B M; Petersen, J M; Renema, J J; Balabas, M V; Wolf, M M; Mueller, J H; Polzik, E S [Niels Bohr Institute, Danish Quantum Optics Center QUANTOP, Copenhagen University, Blegdamsvej 17, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Owari, M; Plenio, M B [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Ulm, Albert-Einstein Allee 11, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Serafini, A [University College London, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Muschik, C A; Cirac, J I, E-mail: polzik@nbi.d [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-01-10

    Room temperature atomic ensembles in a spin-protected environment are useful systems both for quantum information science and metrology. Here we utilize a setup consisting of two atomic ensembles as a memory for quantum information initially encoded in the polarization state of two entangled light modes. We also use the ensembles as a radio frequency entanglement-assisted magnetometer with projection noise limited sensitivity below femtoTesla/{radical}Hz. The performance of the quantum memory as well as the magnetometer was improved by spin-squeezed or entangled atomic states generated by quantum non demolition measurements. Finally, we present preliminary results of long lived entangled atomic states generated by dissipation. With the method presented, one should be able to generate an entangled steady state.

  17. Atom-Based Sensing of Weak Radio Frequency Electric Fields Using Homodyne Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Santosh; Kübler, Harald; Sheng, Jiteng; Shaffer, James P

    2016-01-01

    We utilize a homodyne detection technique to achieve a new sensitivity limit for atom-based, absolute radio-frequency electric field sensing of $\\mathrm{5 \\mu V cm^{-1} Hz^{-1/2} }$. A Mach-Zehnder interferometer is used for the homodyne detection. With the increased sensitivity, we investigate the dominant dephasing mechanisms that affect the performance of the sensor. In particular, we present data on power broadening, collisional broadening and transit time broadening. Our results are compared to density matrix calculations. We show that photon shot noise in the signal readout is currently a limiting factor. We suggest that new approaches with superior readout with respect to photon shot noise are needed to increase the sensitivity further.

  18. Atom-Based Sensing of Weak Radio Frequency Electric Fields Using Homodyne Readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Fan, Haoquan; Kübler, Harald; Sheng, Jiteng; Shaffer, James P.

    2017-01-01

    We utilize a homodyne detection technique to achieve a new sensitivity limit for atom-based, absolute radio-frequency electric field sensing of 5 μV cm−1 Hz−1/2. A Mach-Zehnder interferometer is used for the homodyne detection. With the increased sensitivity, we investigate the dominant dephasing mechanisms that affect the performance of the sensor. In particular, we present data on power broadening, collisional broadening and transit time broadening. Our results are compared to density matrix calculations. We show that photon shot noise in the signal readout is currently a limiting factor. We suggest that new approaches with superior readout with respect to photon shot noise are needed to increase the sensitivity further. PMID:28218308

  19. Electric field sensing near the surface microstructure of an atom chip using cold Rydberg atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Carter, J D; Martin, J D D

    2012-01-01

    The electric fields near the heterogeneous metal/dielectric surface of an atom chip were measured using cold atoms. The atomic sensitivity to electric fields was enhanced by exciting the atoms to Rydberg states that are 10^8 times more polarizable than the ground state. We attribute the measured fields to charging of the insulators between the atom chip wires. Surprisingly, it is observed that these fields may be dramatically lowered with appropriate voltage biasing, suggesting configurations for the future development of hybrid quantum systems.

  20. Gravity sensing with Very Long Baseline Atom Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlippert, Dennis; Albers, Henning; Richardson, Logan L.; Nath, Dipankar; Meiners, Christian; Wodey, Etienne; Schubert, Christian; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst M.

    2016-05-01

    Very Long Baseline Atom Interferometry (VLBAI) has applications in high-accuracy absolute gravimetry, gravity-gradiometry, and for tests of fundamental physics. Extending the baseline of atomic gravimeters from tens of centimeters to meters opens the route towards competition with superconducting gravimeters. The VLBAI-test stand will consist of a 10m-baseline atom interferometer allowing for free fall times of seconds. In order to suppress environmental noise, the facility utilizes a state-of-the-art vibration isolation platform and a three-layer magnetic shield. We envisage a resolution of local gravitational acceleration of 5 .10-10 m/ s2 with sub-ppb inaccuracy. Operation as a gradiometer will allow to resolve the gravity gradient at a resolution of 5 .10-10 1/ s2. The operation of VLBAI as a differential dual-species gravimeter using ultracold mixtures of Yb and Rb atoms enables quantum tests of the universality of free fall (UFF) at an unprecedented level, with the potential to surpass the accuracy of the best experiments to date. We report on a quantum test of the UFF using two different chemical elements, 39 K and 87 Rb, reaching a 100 ppb inaccuracy and show the potential of UFF tests in VLBAI at an inaccuracy of 10-13 and beyond.

  1. High-accuracy current sensing circuit with current compensation technique for buck-boost converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Yuan; Deng, Wan-Ling; Huang, Jun-Kai

    2015-03-01

    A novel on-chip current sensing circuit with current compensation technique suitable for buck-boost converter is presented in this article. The proposed technique can sense the full-range inductor current with high accuracy and high speed. It is mainly based on matched current mirror and does not require a large proportion of aspect ratio between the powerFET and the senseFET, thus it reduces the complexity of circuit design and the layout mismatch issue without decreasing the power efficiency. The circuit is fabricated with TSMC 0.25 µm 2P5M mixed-signal process. Simulation results show that the buck-boost converter can be operated at 200 kHz to 4 MHz switching frequency with an input voltage from 2.8 to 4.7 V. The output voltage is 3.6 V, and the maximum accuracy for both high and low side sensing current reaches 99% within the load current ranging from 200 to 600 mA.

  2. Gravity sensing with Very Long Baseline Atom Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlippert, Dennis; Albers, Henning; Richardson, Logan L.; Nath, Dipankar; Meiners, Christian; Wodey, Étienne; Schubert, Christian; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst M.

    2016-04-01

    Very Long Baseline Atom Interferometry (VLBAI) represents a new class of atom optics experiments with applications in high-accuracy absolute gravimetry, gravity-gradiometry, and for tests of fundamental physics. Extending the baseline of atomic gravimeters from tens of centimeters to several meters opens the route towards competition with superconducting gravimeters. The VLBAI-test stand will consist of a 10m-baseline atom interferometer allowing for free fall times on the order of seconds, which will implemented in the Hannover Institut für Technologie (HITec) of the Leibniz Universität Hannover. In order to suppress environmental noise, the facility utilizes a state-of-the-art vibration isolation platform and a three-layer magnetic shield. We envisage a resolution of local gravitational acceleration of 5 ṡ 10-10 m/s2 with an inaccuracy < 10-9 m/s2. Operation as a gravity-gradiometer will allow to resolve the first-order gravity gradient with a resolution of 5 ṡ 10-10 1/s2. The operation of VLBAI as a differential dual-species gravimeter using ultracold mixtures of ytterbium and rubidium atoms enables quantum tests of the universality of free fall (UFF) at an unprecedented level [1], with the potential to surpass the accuracy of the best experiments to date [2]. We report on the first quantum test of the UFF using two different chemical elements, 39K and 87Rb [3], reaching a 100 ppb inaccuracy and show the potential of UFF tests in VLBAI at an inaccuracy of 10-13 and beyond. References J. Hartwig et al., New J. Phys. 17, 035011- (2015) S. Schlamminger et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 041101- (2008) D. Schlippert et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 203002 (2014)

  3. Current sensing for navigated electrosurgery: proof of concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, K.; Lasso, A.; Ungi, T.; Morin, E.; Fichtinger, G.

    2016-03-01

    PURPOSE: Tracked power-tools are routinely used in computer-assisted intervention and surgical systems. In order to properly perform temporal and spatial monitoring of the tracked tool with the navigation system, it is important to know when the tool, such as an electrosurgical cauterizer, is being activated during surgery. We have developed a general purpose current sensor that can be augmented to tracked surgical devices in order to inform the surgeon and the navigation system when the tool is activated. METHODS: Two non-invasive AC current sensors, two peak detector circuits, one voltage comparator circuit, and a microcontroller were used to detect when an electrosurgical cauterizer is being powered on and differentiate between the cut and coagulation modes. The system was tested by cauterizing various substances at varied power ratings. RESULTS: By comparing the ratio of amplitudes as well as the frequencies of the signals, the current sensing system is able to differentiate between on/off, cut/coagulation, as well as when cauterizer tissue. DISCUSSION: The current sensing system is able to detect when the cauterizer is being powered on and can differentiate between monopolar cut and coagulation modes. CONCLUSION: This system shows promise for detecting when the cauterizer is being powered on and in the future could be integrated with a navigation system in order to easily temporally monitor the electrosurgical tool.

  4. Nonlinear Sensing With Collective States of Ultracold Atoms in Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-02

    decimation algorithm , a method that takes into account quantum correlations. B.1. In collaboration with D. Blume and X.Y. Yin at Washington State...Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Nonlinear quantum sensing, quantum metrology, ultracold atoms, optical lattices REPORT...with applications to interaction-based quantum metrology, Physical Review A, (10 2014): 0. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.041602 Khan W Mahmud, Lei Jiang

  5. Plasmon-Enhanced Sensing: Current Status and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangtao Lv

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available By combining different plasmonic nanostructures with conventional sensing configurations, chemical/biosensors with significantly enhanced device performance can be achieved. The fast development of plasmon-assisted devices benefits from the advance of nanofabrication technology. In this review, we first briefly show the experimental configurations for testing plasmon enhanced sensing signals and then summarize the classic nanogeometries which are extensively used in sensing applications. By design, dramatic increment of optical signals can be obtained and further applied to gas, refractive index and liquid sensing.

  6. Laser agitates probability flow in atoms to form alternating current and its peak-dip phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, Huai-Yang

    2016-01-01

    By using trajectory-based approaches to quantum transition, it is found that laser can agitate the probability flow in atoms to form alternating current with the frequency of the laser. The detailed physical process of quantum transition is investigated, during which the alternating current in atomic probability flow becomes a key role connecting the external electromagnetic wave with the evolution of the quantum states in atoms. Computer was employed to simulate the physical process. The atomic alternating current may have the peak-dip phenomenon.

  7. Analysis and optimization of current sensing circuit for deep sub-micron SRAM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yiqi; Zhao Fazhan; Liu Mengxin; Lü Yinxue; Zhao Bohua; Han Zhensheng

    2011-01-01

    A quantitative yield analysis of a traditional current sensing circuit considering the random dopant fluctuation effect is presented.It investigates the impact of transistor size,falling time of control signal CS and threshold voltage of critical transistors on failure probability of current sensing circuit.On this basis,we present a final optimization to improve the reliability of current sense amplifier.Under 90 nm process,simulation shows that failure probability of current sensing circuit can be reduced by 80% after optimization compared with the normal situation and the delay time only increases marginally.

  8. Magnetic guide of cold atoms using a U-shaped current-carrying conductor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘南春; 印建平

    2003-01-01

    We propose a new scheme to magnetically guide cold neutral atoms using a U-shaped current carrying conductor.The spatial magnetic field distribution from the U-shaped current-carrying conductor and the relationship between the magnetic field and parameters of the U-shaped conductor are analysed.Our study shows that U-shaped current-carrying conductor can be used to realize single-or double-channel magnetic guiding of cold atoms in weak-field-seeking states and to construct wrious atom-optical elements.By using Monte Carlo simulations,the dynamic process of the guided atomic-beam splitting in an atomic-beam splitter composed by the U-shaped current-carrying conductor is studied,and some results are presented.

  9. Acid-sensing ion channel 3 matches the acid-gated current in cardiac ischemia-sensing neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Sutherland, Stephani P.; Christopher J. Benson; Adelman, John P.; McCleskey, Edwin W.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac afferents are sensory neurons that mediate angina, pain that occurs when the heart receives insufficient blood supply for its metabolic demand (ischemia). These neurons display enormous acid-evoked depolarizing currents, and they fire action potentials in response to extracellular acidification that accompanies myocardial ischemia. Here we show that acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3), but no other known acid-sensing ion channel, reproduces the functional featur...

  10. Nonlocally sensing the magnetic states of nanoscale antiferromagnets with an atomic spin sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shichao; Malavolti, Luigi; Burgess, Jacob A. J.; Droghetti, Andrea; Rubio, Angel; Loth, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    The ability to sense the magnetic state of individual magnetic nano-objects is a key capability for powerful applications ranging from readout of ultradense magnetic memory to the measurement of spins in complex structures with nanometer precision. Magnetic nano-objects require extremely sensitive sensors and detection methods. We create an atomic spin sensor consisting of three Fe atoms and show that it can detect nanoscale antiferromagnets through minute, surface-mediated magnetic interaction. Coupling, even to an object with no net spin and having vanishing dipolar stray field, modifies the transition matrix element between two spin states of the Fe atom–based spin sensor that changes the sensor’s spin relaxation time. The sensor can detect nanoscale antiferromagnets at up to a 3-nm distance and achieves an energy resolution of 10 μeV, surpassing the thermal limit of conventional scanning probe spectroscopy. This scheme permits simultaneous sensing of multiple antiferromagnets with a single-spin sensor integrated onto the surface. PMID:28560346

  11. Current-induced atomic dynamics, instabilities, and Raman signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jing Tao; Brandbyge, Mads; Hedegard, Per

    2012-01-01

    We derive and employ a semiclassical Langevin equation obtained from path integrals to describe the ionic dynamics of a molecular junction in the presence of electrical current. The electronic environment serves as an effective nonequilibrium bath. The bath results in random forces describing Jou...... of these in the Raman signals....

  12. Atomic clocks: A brief history and current status of research in India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Poonam Arora; Amrita Awasthi; Vattikonda Bharath; Aishik Acharya; Suchi Yadav; Aashish Agarwal; Amitava Sen Gupta

    2014-02-01

    Frequency corresponding to the energy difference between designated levels of an atom provides precise reference for making a universally accurate clock. Since the middle of the 20th century till now, there have been tremendous efforts in the field of atomic clocks making time the most accurately measured physical quantity. National Physical Laboratory India (NPLI) is the nation’s timekeeper and is developing an atomic fountain clock which will be a primary frequency standard. The fountain is currently operational and is at the stage of complete frequency evaluation. In this paper, a brief review on atomic time along with some of the recent results from the fountain clock will be discussed.

  13. Development of fiber-optic current sensing technique and its applications in electric power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Kiyoshi

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the development and applications of a fiber-optic electric current sensing technique with the stable properties and compact, simple, and flexible structure of the sensing device. The special characteristics of the sensors were achieved by use of the special low birefringence fiber as the Faraday-effect sensing element and were also achieved with creation of sensing schemes which matched with the features of the fiber. Making use of the excellent features of the sensing technique, various current monitoring devices and systems were developed and applied practically for the control and maintenance in the electric power facility. In this paper, the design and performance of the sensing devices are introduced first. After that, examples of the application systems practically applied are also introduced, including fault section/point location systems for power transmission cable lines.

  14. Direct observation of chiral currents and magnetic reflection in atomic flux lattices

    CERN Document Server

    An, Fangzhao Alex; Gadway, Bryce

    2016-01-01

    The prospect of studying topologically nontrivial phases with the precision and control of atomic physics has driven the development of many techniques for engineering artificial magnetic fields and spin-orbit interactions in atomic gases. Recently, the idea of engineering nontrivial topology through the use of discrete internal (or external) atomic states as effective "artificial dimensions" has garnered attraction for its versatility and promise of immunity from sources of heating. Here, we directly engineer tunable artificial gauge fields through the local control of tunneling phases in an effectively two-dimensional manifold of discrete atomic momentum states. We demonstrate the ability to engineer homogeneous artificial gauge fields of arbitrary value, directly imaging the site-resolved dynamics of induced chiral currents. We furthermore engineer the first inhomogeneous artificial gauge fields for cold atoms, enabling the observation of magnetic reflection of atoms incident upon a step-like variation of ...

  15. Continuous Compressed Sensing for Surface Dynamical Processes with Helium Atom Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alex; Tamtögl, Anton; Calvo-Almazán, Irene; Hansen, Anders

    2016-06-01

    Compressed Sensing (CS) techniques are used to measure and reconstruct surface dynamical processes with a helium spin-echo spectrometer for the first time. Helium atom scattering is a well established method for examining the surface structure and dynamics of materials at atomic sized resolution and the spin-echo technique opens up the possibility of compressing the data acquisition process. CS methods demonstrating the compressibility of spin-echo spectra are presented for several measurements. Recent developments on structured multilevel sampling that are empirically and theoretically shown to substantially improve upon the state of the art CS techniques are implemented. In addition, wavelet based CS approximations, founded on a new continuous CS approach, are used to construct continuous spectra. In order to measure both surface diffusion and surface phonons, which appear usually on different energy scales, standard CS techniques are not sufficient. However, the new continuous CS wavelet approach allows simultaneous analysis of surface phonons and molecular diffusion while reducing acquisition times substantially. The developed methodology is not exclusive to Helium atom scattering and can also be applied to other scattering frameworks such as neutron spin-echo and Raman spectroscopy.

  16. Magnetic focusing of cold atomic beam with a 2D array of current-carrying wires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Liu; Min Yun; Jianping Yin

    2006-01-01

    @@ A new scheme to realize a two-dimensional (2D) array of magnetic micro-lenses for a cold atomic beam,formed by an array of square current-carrying wires,is proposed.We calculate the spatial distributions of the magnetic fields from the array of current-carrying wires and the magnetic focusing potential for cold rubidium atoms,and study the dynamic focusing processes of cold atoms passing through the magnetic micro-lens array and its focusing properties by using Monte-Carlo simulations and trajectory tracing method.The result shows that the proposed micro-lens array can be used to focus effectively a cold atomic beam,even to load ultracold atoms or a BEC sample into a 2D optical lattice formed by blue detuned hollow beams.

  17. Atomic clock with nuclear transition: current status in TU Wien

    OpenAIRE

    Kazakov, G. A.; Schreitl, M.; Winkler, G.; Sterba, J. H.; Steinhauser, G; Schumm, T.

    2011-01-01

    The nucleus of 229Thorium presents a unique isomer state of very low energy and long lifetime, current estimates are around 7.8 eV and seconds to hours respectively. This nuclear transitions therefore is a promising candidate for a novel type of frequency standard and several groups worldwide have set out to investigate this system. Our aim is to construct a "solid state nuclear clock", i.e. a frequency standard where Thorium ions are implanted into Calciumfluoride crystals transparent in vac...

  18. Controllable Persistent Atom Current of Bose-Einstein Condensates in an Optical Lattice Ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Gong-Ping; LIANG Jiu-Qing

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the macroscopic quantum state of Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices is studied by solving the periodic Gross-Pitaevskii equation in one-dimensional geometry. It is shown that an exact solution seen to be a travelling wave of excited macroscopic quantum states resultes in a persistent atom current, which can be controlled by adjusting of the barrier height of the optical periodic potential. A critical condition to generate the travelling wave is demonstrated and we moreover propose a practical experiment to realize the persistent atom current in a toroidal atom waveguide.

  19. Magnetic field and temperature sensing with atomic-scale spin defects in silicon carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, H; Soltamov, V A; Fuchs, F; Simin, D; Sperlich, A; Baranov, P G; Astakhov, G V; Dyakonov, V

    2014-07-04

    Quantum systems can provide outstanding performance in various sensing applications, ranging from bioscience to nanotechnology. Atomic-scale defects in silicon carbide are very attractive in this respect because of the technological advantages of this material and favorable optical and radio frequency spectral ranges to control these defects. We identified several, separately addressable spin-3/2 centers in the same silicon carbide crystal, which are immune to nonaxial strain fluctuations. Some of them are characterized by nearly temperature independent axial crystal fields, making these centers very attractive for vector magnetometry. Contrarily, the zero-field splitting of another center exhibits a giant thermal shift of -1.1 MHz/K at room temperature, which can be used for thermometry applications. We also discuss a synchronized composite clock exploiting spin centers with different thermal response.

  20. Real time drift measurement for colloidal probe atomic force microscope: a visual sensing approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuliang, E-mail: wangyuliang@buaa.edu.cn; Bi, Shusheng [Robotics Institute, School of Mechanical Engineering and Automation, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Wang, Huimin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2041 College Rd., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Drift has long been an issue in atomic force microscope (AFM) systems and limits their ability to make long time period measurements. In this study, a new method is proposed to directly measure and compensate for the drift between AFM cantilevers and sample surfaces in AFM systems. This was achieved by simultaneously measuring z positions for beads at the end of an AFM colloidal probe and on sample surface through an off-focus image processing based visual sensing method. The working principle and system configuration are presented. Experiments were conducted to validate the real time drift measurement and compensation. The implication of the proposed method for regular AFM measurements is discussed. We believe that this technique provides a practical and efficient approach for AFM experiments requiring long time period measurement.

  1. Origin of current-induced forces in an atomic gold wire: A first-principles study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandbyge, Mads; Stokbro, Kurt; Taylor, Jeremy Philip;

    2003-01-01

    We address the microscopic origin of the current-induced forces by analyzing results of first principles density functional calculations of atomic gold wires connected to two gold electrodes with different electrochemical potentials. We find that current induced forces are closely related...

  2. High-bandwidth multimode self-sensing in bimodal atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Ruppert

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Using standard microelectromechanical system (MEMS processes to coat a microcantilever with a piezoelectric layer results in a versatile transducer with inherent self-sensing capabilities. For applications in multifrequency atomic force microscopy (MF-AFM, we illustrate that a single piezoelectric layer can be simultaneously used for multimode excitation and detection of the cantilever deflection. This is achieved by a charge sensor with a bandwidth of 10 MHz and dual feedthrough cancellation to recover the resonant modes that are heavily buried in feedthrough originating from the piezoelectric capacitance. The setup enables the omission of the commonly used piezoelectric stack actuator and optical beam deflection sensor, alleviating limitations due to distorted frequency responses and instrumentation cost, respectively. The proposed method benefits from a more than two orders of magnitude increase in deflection to strain sensitivity on the fifth eigenmode leading to a remarkable signal-to-noise ratio. Experimental results using bimodal AFM imaging on a two component polymer sample validate that the self-sensing scheme can therefore be used to provide both the feedback signal, for topography imaging on the fundamental mode, and phase imaging on the higher eigenmode.

  3. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  4. Room temperature sensing of O2 and CO by atomic layer deposition prepared ZnO films coated with Pt nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkens, I.J.M.; Blauw, M.A.; Verheijen, M.A.; Roozeboom, F.; Kessels, W.M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Ultralow-power gas sensing devices need to operate without an energy consuming heater element. This requires the design of sensing devices that are so efficient that they can operate at room temperature (RT). Here, we report on the RT sensing performance of atomic layer deposition (ALD) prepared i-Z

  5. Assessment of flow and cure monitoring using direct current and alternating current sensing in vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Uday K.; Jadhav, Nitesh C.; Hosur, Mahesh V.; Gillespie, John W., Jr.; Fink, Bruce K.

    2000-12-01

    Vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) is an emerging manufacturing technique that holds promise as an affordable alternative to traditional autoclave molding and automated fiber placement for producing large-scale structural parts. In VARTM, the fibrous preform is laid on a single-sided tool, which is then bagged along with the infusion and vacuum lines. The resin is then infused through the preform, which causes simultaneous wetting in its in-plane and transverse directions. An effective sensing technique is essential so that comprehensive information pertaining to the wetting of the preform, arrival of resin at various locations, cure gradients associated with thickness and presence of dry spots may be monitored. In the current work, direct current (dc) and alternating current sensing/monitoring techniques were adopted for developing a systematic understanding of the resin position and cure on plain weave S2-glass preforms with Dow Derakane vinyl ester VE 411-350, Shell EPON RSL 2704/2705 and Si-AN epoxy as the matrix systems. A SMARTweave dc sensing system was utilized to conduct parametric studies: (a) to compare the flow and cure of resin through the stitched and non-stitched preforms; (b) to investigate the influence of sensor positioning, i.e. top, middle and bottom layers; and (c) to investigate the influence of positioning of the process accessories, i.e. resin infusion point and vacuum point on the composite panel. The SMARTweave system was found to be sensitive to all the parametric variations introduced in the study. Furthermore, the results obtained from the SMARTweave system were compared to the cure monitoring studies conducted by using embedded interdigitated (IDEX) dielectric sensors. The results indicate that SMARTweave sensing was a viable alternative to obtaining resin position and cure, and was more superior in terms of obtaining global information, in contrast to the localized dielectric sensing approach.

  6. Random phase approximation with second-order screened exchange for current-carrying atomic states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wuming; Zhang, Liang; Trickey, S. B.

    2016-12-01

    The direct random phase approximation (RPA) and RPA with second-order screened exchange (SOSEX) have been implemented with complex orbitals as a basis for treating open-shell atoms. Both RPA and RPA+SOSEX are natural implicit current density functionals because the paramagnetic current density implicitly is included through the use of complex orbitals. We confirm that inclusion of the SOSEX correction improves the total energy accuracy substantially compared to RPA, especially for smaller-Z atoms. Computational complexity makes post self-consistent-field (post-SCF) evaluation of RPA-type expressions commonplace, so orbital basis origins and properties become important. Sizable differences are found in correlation energies, total atomic energies, and ionization energies for RPA-type functionals evaluated in the post-SCF fashion with orbital sets obtained from different schemes. Reference orbitals from Kohn-Sham calculations with semi-local functionals are more suitable for RPA+SOSEX to generate accurate total energies, but reference orbitals from exact exchange (non-local) yield essentially energetically degenerate open-shell atom ground states. RPA+SOSEX correlation combined with exact exchange calculated from a hybrid reference orbital set (half the exchange calculated from exact-exchange orbitals, the other half of the exchange from orbitals optimized for the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange functional) gives the best overall performance. Numerical results show that the RPA-like functional with SOSEX correction can be used as a practical implicit current density functional when current effects should be included.

  7. Sensing the Heliosheath from Inner Heliosphere via Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENA): a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, K.

    2008-12-01

    Recently, L. Wang, R. P. Lin, D. E. Larson and J. G. Luhmann reported the detection of 4-20 keV energetic neutral atoms (ENA), most likely H atoms, coming from the frontal lobe of the heliosphere (Nature, Vol. 454, p. 81-83, 3 July 2008). The detection was performed by the suprathermal electron (STE) sensor on the STEREO A and B spacecraft from June to October 2007. The report showed the ENA flux peaking at about 5 and 20 degrees in ecliptic longitude, respectively, on either side of the Apex, the direction of Sun's motion relative to the local interstellar medium. Each peak has a full-width at half-maximum of about 20 degrees, with the one at the lower ecliptic longitude having a peak flux about three times that of the peak at the higher ecliptic longitude. The same report also derived the spectral shape of the shock-accelerated pick-up ions in the heliosheath to be two power-law spectra with a knee at about 11 keV. Assuming a healiosheath thickness of 40 AU at Voyager 2's crossing of the termination shock, the extrapolation of this proton spectrum into higher energy meets the extrapolation of the ion spectrum measured by Voyager 1 at about 25 keV. These results, especially the double peaking in the ENA flux, appear puzzling to some theorists and modelers of the heliosphere. This talk shall review the analysis of the STE/STEREO data, and go on to discuss the interpretation of the data and its consequences concerning the thickness and shape of the heliosheath as well as the variation of the availability of shock-accelerated ions in the frontal portion of the termination shock. We also compare this most recent ENA observation and implication on the heliosheath with the earlier observation of heliospheric neutral H atoms by SOHO in the energy interval 55-88 keV and the information on the heliosheath deduced from it. If we accept the analysis by Wang et al., then the STE/STEREO observation not only confirms that ion populations in the remotest regions of our

  8. Energy-minimum sub-threshold self-timed circuits using current-sensing completion detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akgun, O. C.; Rodrigues, J. N.; Sparsø, Jens

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses the design of self-timed energy-minimum circuits, operating in the sub-VT domain and a generic implementation template using bundled-data circuitry and current sensing completion detection (CSCD). Furthermore, a fully decoupled latch controller was developed, which integrates...... with the current-sensing circuitry. Different configurations that utilise the proposed latch controller are highlighted. A contemporary synchronous electronic design automation tools-based design flow, which transforms a synchronous design into a corresponding self-timed circuit, is outlined. Different use cases...... of the CSCD system are examined. The design flow and the current-sensing technique are validated by the implementation of a self-timed version of a wavelet-based event detector for cardiac pacemaker applications in a standard 65 nm CMOS process. The chip was fabricated and verified to operate down to 250 m...

  9. Current Trends and Research Challenges in Spectrum-Sensing for Cognitive Radios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roopali Garg

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The ever increasing demand of wireless communication systems has led to search of suitable spectrum bands for transmission of data. The research in the past has revealed that radio spectrum is under-utilized in most of the scenarios. This prompted the scientist to seek a solution to utilize the spectrum efficiently. Cognitive Radios provided an answer to the problem by sensing the idle (licensed bands and allowing (secondary users to transmit in these idle spaces. Spectrum sensing forms the main block of cognition cycle. This paper reviews the current trends in research in the domain of spectrum sensing. The author describes the type of channel being modelled, diversity combining schemes used, optimal algorithms applied at fusion centre, spectrum sensing techniques employed. Further, the research challenges are discussed. It is presented that various attributes like sensing time, throughput, rate reliability, optimum cooperative users, sensing frequency etc. needs to be addressed. A trade-off needs to be established to optimize two opposing parameters like sensing and throughput.

  10. Self-Trapping State and Atomic Tunnelling Current of an Atomic Bose-Einstein Condensate Interacting with a Laser Field in a Double-Well Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Zhao-Xian; JIAO Zhi-Yong

    2002-01-01

    We present a theoretical treatment of dynamics of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensation interacting witha single-mode quantized travelling-wave laser field in a double-well potential. When the atom-field system is initiallyin a coherent state, expressions for the energy exchange between atoms and photons are derived. It is revealed thatatoms in the two wells can be in a self-trapping state when the tunnelling frequency satisfies two specific conditions,in which the resonant and far off-resonant cases are included. It is found that there is an alternating current with twodifferent sinusoidal oscillations between the two wells, but no dc characteristic of the atomic tunnelling current occurs.It should be emphasized that when without the laser field, both the population difference and the atomic tunnellingcurrent are only a single oscillation. But they will respectively become a superposition of two oscillations with differentoscillatory frequencies in the presence of the laser field. For the two oscillations of the population difference, one alwayshas an increment in the oscillatory frequency, the other can have an increment or a decrease under different cases. Theseconclusions are also suitable to those of the atomic tunnelling current. As a possible application, by measurement of theatomic tunnelling current between the two wells, the number of Bose-condensed atoms can be evaluated. lBy properlyselecting the laser field, the expected atomic tunnelling current can be obtained too.

  11. The immediate effects of lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current on pressure sense threshold and tactile sensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoosefinejad, Amin Kordi; Motealleh, Alireza; Abbasnia, Keramatollah

    2016-01-01

    Iontophoresis is the noninvasive delivery of ions using direct current. The direct current has some disadvantages such as skin burning. Interferential current is a kind of alternating current without limitations of direct current; so the purpose of this study is to investigate and compare the effects of lidocaine, interferential current and lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current. 30 healthy women aged 20-24 years participated in this randomized clinical trial study. Pressure, tactile and pain thresholds were evaluated before and after the application of treatment methods. Pressure, tactile and pain sensitivity increased significantly after the application of lidocaine alone (p < 0.005) and lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current (p < 0.0001). Lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current can increase perception threshold of pain, tactile stimulus and pressure sense more significantly than lidocaine and interferential current alone.

  12. Effects of discharge current and voltage on the high density of metastable helium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FengXian-Ping; DAndruczyk; BWJames; KTakiyama; SNamba; TOda

    2003-01-01

    Both hollow-cathode and Penning-type discharges were adopted toexcite helium atoms to a metastable state. Experimental data indicate that Penning discharge is more suitable for generating high fractions of metastables in a low-density helium hean for laser-induced fluorescence technique in measuring electric fields at the edge of a plasma. The metastable density increases with increasing helium gas pressure in the range of 1.33×10-2-66.7Pa. The highest metastable density of 3.8×1016m-3 is observed at a static gas pressure of 66.7Pa. An approximately linear relationship between the density of metastable helium atoms and the plasma discharge current is observed. Magnetic field plays a very important role in producing a high density of metastable atoms in Penning discharge.

  13. Effects of discharge current and voltage on the high density of metastable helium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Xian-Ping(冯贤平); D Andruczyk; B W James; K Takiyama; S Namba; T Oda

    2003-01-01

    Both hollow-cathode and Penning-type discharges were adopted to excite helium atoms to a metastable state.Experimental data indicate that Penning discharge is more suitable for generating high fractions of metastables in a low-density helium beam for laser-induced fluorescence technique in measuring electric fields at the edge of a plasma.The metastable density increases with increasing helium gas pressure in the range of 1.33× 10-2-66.7Pa. The highest metastable density of 3.8 × 1016m-3 is observed at a static gas pressure of 66.7Pa. An approximately linear relationship between the density of metastable helium atoms and the plasma discharge current is observed. Magnetic field plays a very important role in producing a high density of metastable atoms in Penning discharge.

  14. Self—Trapping State and Atomic Tunnelling Current of an Atomic Bose—Einstein Condensate Interacting with a Laser Field in a Double—Well Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUZhao-Xian; JIAOZhi-Yong

    2002-01-01

    We present a theoretical treatment of dynamics of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensation interacting with a single-mode quantized travelling-wave laser field in a double-well potential.When the atom-field system is initially in a coherent state,expressions for the energy exchange between atoms and photons are derived.It is revealed that atoms in the two wells can be in a self-trapping state when the tunnelling frequency satisfies two specific conditions,in which the resonant and far off-resonant cases are included.It is found that there is an alternating current with two different sinusoidal oscillations between the two wells,but no dc characteristic of the atomic tunnelling current occurs.It should be emphasized that when without the laser field,both the population difference and the atomic tunnelling current are only a single oscillation.But they will respectively become a superposition of two oscillations with different oscillatory frequencies in the presence of the laser field.For the two oscillations of the population difference,one always has an increment in the oscillatory frequency,the other can have an increment or a decrease under different cases.These conclusions are also suitable to those of the atomic tunnelling current.As a possible application,by measurement of the atomic tunnelling current between the two wells,the number of Bose-condensed atoms can be evaluated.By poperly selecting the laser field,the expected atomic tunnelling current can be obtained too.

  15. Inference of atomic oxygen concentration from remote sensing of optical aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, M. G.; McConnell, J. C.; Tobiska, W. K.; Gladstone, G. R.; Chakrabarti, S.; Schmidtke, G.

    1995-09-01

    A remote sensing method has been developed for the determination of the [O]/[O-MSIS] ratio in aurora, using ratios of the O I (557.7 nm) and N+2 (391.4 nm) emissions. It is shown that the method can be used for the analysis of measurements integrated along the line of sight, provided data only above the emission rate peak are used. The method is applied to the case of horizontal viewing from a vertically oriented rocket so that a large volume of space was sampled around the rocket. The method can potentially be applied to satellite limb images, provided some independent information about the location of the aurora is available, as it was for the rocket observations. Photometric measurements of the N+2 (391.4 nm) and O I (557.7 nm) emissions obtained during the Energy Budget Campaign 1980 on flight E-2 with the instrument EF11 and its reflight in 1981 were used in the analysis presented. During the first flight the rocket horizontally viewed two distinct aurorae, a nearby diffuse patch, and a more distant pulsating aurora. Results obtained by the same EF11 instrument on a second flight through an auroral arc in 1981 are also presented. Two types of atomic oxygen variability were found in both of the flights. In the first type, [O] is increased above [O-MSIS] by a factor of 1.5 at 180 km, is equal to the MSIS model at 160 km, and is less than MSIS below that; that is, the scale height of [O] was increased. The experimental I(557.7)/I(391.4) ratio was constant with altitude. In the second type, the [O] was depleted by about a factor of 2 over the altitude range of 120-180 km, while the I(557.7)/I(391.4) ratio decreased with altitude. The inferred atomic oxygen concentrations of 0.5 to 2 with respect to MSIS suggested different vertical flows on the two cases. Independent evidence is provided by atmospheric composition measurements made during the same campaign.

  16. Remote sensing of forest insect disturbances: Current state and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senf, Cornelius; Seidl, Rupert; Hostert, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    Insect disturbance are important agents of change in forest ecosystems around the globe, yet their spatial and temporal distribution and dynamics are not well understood. Remote sensing has gained much attention in mapping and understanding insect outbreak dynamics. Consequently, we here review the current literature on the remote sensing of insect disturbances. We suggest to group studies into three insect types: bark beetles, broadleaved defoliators, and coniferous defoliators. By so doing, we systematically compare the sensors and methods used for mapping insect disturbances within and across insect types. Results suggest that there are substantial differences between methods used for mapping bark beetles and defoliators, and between methods used for mapping broadleaved and coniferous defoliators. Following from this, we highlight approaches that are particularly suited for each insect type. Finally, we conclude by highlighting future research directions for remote sensing of insect disturbances. In particular, we suggest to: 1) Separate insect disturbances from other agents; 2) Extend the spatial and temporal domain of analysis; 3) Make use of dense time series; 4) Operationalize near-real time monitoring of insect disturbances; 5) Identify insect disturbances in the context of coupled human-natural systems; and 6) Improve reference data for assessing insect disturbances. Since the remote sensing of insect disturbances has gained much interest beyond the remote sensing community recently, the future developments identified here will help integrating remote sensing products into operational forest management. Furthermore, an improved spatiotemporal quantification of insect disturbances will support an inclusion of these processes into regional to global ecosystem models.

  17. Remote sensing of forest insect disturbances: Current state and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senf, Cornelius; Seidl, Rupert; Hostert, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    Insect disturbance are important agents of change in forest ecosystems around the globe, yet their spatial and temporal distribution and dynamics are not well understood. Remote sensing has gained much attention in mapping and understanding insect outbreak dynamics. Consequently, we here review the current literature on the remote sensing of insect disturbances. We suggest to group studies into three insect types: bark beetles, broadleaved defoliators, and coniferous defoliators. By so doing, we systematically compare the sensors and methods used for mapping insect disturbances within and across insect types. Results suggest that there are substantial differences between methods used for mapping bark beetles and defoliators, and between methods used for mapping broadleaved and coniferous defoliators. Following from this, we highlight approaches that are particularly suited for each insect type. Finally, we conclude by highlighting future research directions for remote sensing of insect disturbances. In particular, we suggest to: 1) Separate insect disturbances from other agents; 2) Extend the spatial and temporal domain of analysis; 3) Make use of dense time series; 4) Operationalize near-real time monitoring of insect disturbances; 5) Identify insect disturbances in the context of coupled human-natural systems; and 6) Improve reference data for assessing insect disturbances. Since the remote sensing of insect disturbances has gained much interest beyond the remote sensing community recently, the future developments identified here will help integrating remote sensing products into operational forest management. Furthermore, an improved spatiotemporal quantification of insect disturbances will support an inclusion of these processes into regional to global ecosystem models.

  18. Wireless current sensing by near field induction from a spin transfer torque nano-oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramaswamy, B. [Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Algarin, J. M.; Waks, E., E-mail: edowaks@umd.edu [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics (IREAP), University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Weinberg, I. N. [Weinberg Medical Physics LLC, Bethesda, Maryland 20817 (United States); Chen, Y.-J.; Krivorotov, I. N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Katine, J. A. [HGST Research Center, San Jose, California 95135 (United States); Shapiro, B. [Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Institute for Systems Research (ISR), University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2016-06-13

    We demonstrate that spin transfer torque nano-oscillators (STNO) can act as wireless sensors for local current. The STNO acts as a transducer that converts weak direct currents into microwave field oscillations that we detect using an inductive coil. We detect direct currents in the range of 300–700 μA and report them wirelessly to a receiving induction coil at distances exceeding 6.5 mm. This current sensor could find application in chemical and biological sensing and industrial inspection.

  19. Modulation of periodic field on the atomic current in optical lattices with Landau-Zener tunneling considered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jie-Yun; Wang, Lan-Yu

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the atomic current in optical lattices under the presence of both constant and periodic external field with Landau-Zener tunneling considered. By simplifying the system to a two-band model, the atomic current is obtained based on the Boltzmann equations. We focus on three situations to discuss the influence of the Landau-Zener tunneling and periodic field on the atomic current. Numerical calculations show the atomic transient current would finally become the stable oscillation, whose amplitude and average value can be further adjusted by the periodic external field. It is concluded that the periodic external field could provide an effective modulation on the atomic current even when the Landau-Zener tunneling probability has almostly become a constant.

  20. Modulation of periodic field on the atomic current in optical lattices with Landau–Zener tunneling considered

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Jie-Yun, E-mail: jyyan@bupt.edu.cn; Wang, Lan-Yu, E-mail: lan_yu_wang@163.com

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the atomic current in optical lattices under the presence of both constant and periodic external field with Landau–Zener tunneling considered. By simplifying the system to a two-band model, the atomic current is obtained based on the Boltzmann equations. We focus on three situations to discuss the influence of the Landau–Zener tunneling and periodic field on the atomic current. Numerical calculations show the atomic transient current would finally become the stable oscillation, whose amplitude and average value can be further adjusted by the periodic external field. It is concluded that the periodic external field could provide an effective modulation on the atomic current even when the Landau–Zener tunneling probability has almostly become a constant.

  1. Formation and disruption of current paths of anodic porous alumina films by conducting atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyoshi, K., E-mail: oyoshi.keiji@nims.go.jp [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Nigo, S.; Inoue, J.; Sakai, O.; Kitazawa, H.; Kido, G. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    Anodic porous alumina (APA) films have a honeycomb cell structure of pores and a voltage-induced bi-stable switching effect. We have applied conducting atomic force microscopy (CAFM) as a method to form and to disrupt current paths in the APA films. A bi-polar switching operation was confirmed. We have firstly observed terminals of current paths as spots or areas typically on the center of the triangle formed by three pores. In addition, though a part of the current path showed repetitive switching, most of them were not observed again at the same position after one cycle of switching operations in the present experiments. This suggests that a part of alumina structure and/or composition along the current paths is modified during the switching operations.

  2. Novel Perturbation-Immune All-Fiber Optical Architecture for Current Sensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a novel all-fiber optical architecture for electric current or magnetic field sensing which is immune against temperature and vibration perturbations in a hazardous environment. The architecture is structured by employing the fiber-optic wave plates (quarter, half or full) of the patented invention of the senior author. Experimental results on prototype fiber-optic specimen and on a variety of optical fiber networks confirm the respective theoretical predictions.

  3. Spin Squeezing and Entanglement with Room Temperature Atoms for Quantum Sensing and Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Heng

    magnetometer at room temperature is reported. Furthermore, using spin-squeezing of atomic ensemble, the sensitivity of magnetometer is improved. Deterministic continuous variable teleportation between two distant atomic ensembles is demonstrated. The fidelity of teleportating dynamically changing sequence...... of spin states surpasses a classical benchmark, demonstrating the true quantum teleportation....

  4. Japan Returns to Atom. Current Status and Prospects of the Japanese Nuclear Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Tolak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In a year and a half after the events of March 2011, Japan excluded all their nuclear reactors, returning to fossil fuels as a basis in the energy field. The shock associated with nuclear disaster seemed to indicate an ultimate end of Japanese adventure with the atom. The situation has, however, significantly changed during the last several months, and the first nuclear reactor connected again to the electric network, is a proof of the change of the energy policy. The article aims to identify the current state of knowledge on the future of nuclear energy in the Japanese energy sector and adjustments proposed in the future energy mix. At the same time, it is an attempt to analyze the reasons that led the current Government of Prime Minister Abe to take very unpopular decisions to return to nuclear energy.

  5. Nuclear spin dependent atomic parity violation, nuclear anapole moments, and the hadronic axial neutral current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchiat, C.; Piketty, C.A. (Ecole Normale Superieure, 75 - Paris (France). Lab. de Physique Theorique)

    1991-01-01

    Left-right symmetries in atomic transitions, depending upon the nuclear spin, could be a source of information on the neutral hadronic axial current. We show that the relevant electroweak parameter can be extracted from experiment by measuring hyperfine component ratios which do not involve the knowledge of the atomic wave function. In the standard electroweak model, the parity violating electron-nucleus interaction associated with the hadronic axial neutral current is accidently suppressed and, as a consequence, dominated by the electron interaction with the nuclear anapole moment, which describes the effect of the parity violating nuclear forces on the nucleus electromagnetic current. One of our objectives was to identify the various physical mechanisms which determine the size of the nuclear anapole moments. As an important step, we have established a simple relation between the anapole moment and the nuclear spin magnetization. From this relation it follows that the computation of the anapole moment can be reduced to that of one-body operators. The basic tool is a unitary transformation W which eliminates the one-body parity violating potential from the nuclear hamiltonian. A particular attention was paid to nuclear correlation effects. They are treated semi-empirically in the independent pair approximation. The nuclear anapole moments of {sup 85}Rb, {sup 133}Cs, and {sup 209}Bi have been evaluated for three sets of parity violating meson-nucleon coupling constants, taking into account configuration mixing effects in a semi-empirical way. We suggest a possible strategy to disentangle the axial neutral current from the anapole moment contribution. (orig.).

  6. NiO/SiC nanocomposite prepared by atomic layer deposition used as a novel electrocatalyst for nonenzymatic glucose sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng; Tong, Xili; Wang, Guizhen; Gao, Zhe; Guo, Xiangyun; Qin, Yong

    2015-03-04

    NiO nanoparticles are deposited onto SiC particles by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The structure of the NiO/SiC hybrid material is investigated by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The size of the NiO nanoparticles is flexible and can be adjusted by altering the cycle number of the NiO ALD. Electrochemical measurements illustrate that NiO/SiC prepared with 600 cycles for NiO ALD exhibits the highest glucose sensing ability in alkaline electrolytes with a low detection limit of 0.32 μM (S/N = 3), high sensitivity of 2.037 mA mM(-1) cm(-2), a linear detection range from approximately 4 μM to 7.5 mM, and good stability. Its sensitivity is about 6 times of that for commercial NiO nanoparticles and NiO/SiC nanocomposites prepared by a traditional incipient wetness impregnation method. It is revealed that the superior electrochemical ability of ALD NiO/SiC is ascribed to the strong interaction between NiO and the SiC substrate and the high dispersity of NiO nanoparticles on the SiC surface. These results suggest that ALD is an effective way to deposit NiO on SiC for nonenzymatic glucose sensing.

  7. Direction- and Salt-Dependent Ionic Current Signatures for DNA Sensing with Asymmetric Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaikai; Bell, Nicholas A W; Kong, Jinglin; Tian, Yu; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2017-02-28

    Solid-state nanopores are promising tools for single-molecule detection of both DNA and proteins. In this study, we investigated the patterns of ionic current blockades as DNA translocates into or out of the geometric confinement of conically shaped pores across a wide range of salt conditions. We studied how the geometry of a nanopore affects the detected ionic current signal of a translocating DNA molecule over a wide range of salt concentration. The blockade level in the ionic current depends on the translocation direction at a high salt concentration, and at lower salt concentrations we find a nonintuitive ionic current decrease and increase within each single event for the DNA translocations exiting from confinement. We use a recently developed method for synthesizing DNA molecules with multiple position markers, which provides further experimental characterization by matching the position of the DNA in the pore with the observed ionic current signal. Finally, we employ finite element calculations to explain the shapes of the signals observed at all salt concentrations and show that the unexpected current decrease and increase are due to the competing effects of ion concentration polarization and geometric exclusion of ions. Our analysis shows that over a wide range of geometries, voltages, and salt concentrations, we are able to understand the ionic current signals of DNA in asymmetric nanopores, enabling signal optimization in molecular sensing applications.

  8. Some current uses of array processors for preprocessing of remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischel, D.

    1984-01-01

    The preparation of remotely sensed data sets into a form useful to the analyst is a significant computational task, involving the processing of spacecraft data (e.g., orbit, attitude, temperatures, etc.), decommutation of the video telemetry stream, radiometric correction and geometric correction. Many of these processes are extremely well suited for implementation on attached array processors. Currently, at Goddard Space Flight Center a number of computer systems provide such capability for earth observations or are under development as test beds for future ground segment support. Six such systems will be discussed.

  9. Study of fiber-optic current sensing based on degree of polarization measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Liu; Qing Ye; Jianxin Geng; Ronghui Qu; Zujie Fang

    2007-01-01

    A novel fiber-optic current sensing scheme is proposed by converting the Faraday rotation to the optical signal's degree of polarization (DOP) change. In this scheme, the lightwave passes through a fiber resonant cavity multiply and experiences Faraday rotation simultaneously. Its main merit is immunity from the environment disturbance to the fiber used in ordinary Faraday rotation sensor. Brief theoretical analysis and simulation are given to show its basic characteristics. Experimental results are demonstrated and the feasibility of the proposed method is also shown.

  10. Effect of current and atomized grain size distribution on the solidification of Plasma Transferred Arc coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Bond

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasma Transferred Arc (PTA is the only thermal spray process that results in a metallurgical bond, being frequently described as a hardfacing process. The superior properties of coatings have been related to the fine microstructures obtained, which are finer than those processed under similar heat input with welding techniques using wire feedstock. This observation suggests that the atomized feedstock plays a role on the solidification of coatings. In this study a model for the role of the powders grains in the solidification of PTA coatings is put forward and discussed. An experiment was setup to discuss the model which involved the deposition of an atomized Co-based alloy with different grain size distributions and deposition currents. X ray diffraction showed that there were no phase changes due to the processing parameters. Microstructure analysis by Laser Confocal Microscopy, dilution with the substrate steel and Vickers microhardness were used the characterized coatings and enriched the discussion confirming the role of the powdered feedstock on the solidification of coatings.

  11. High Current Density and Low Thermal Conductivity of Atomically Thin Semimetallic WTe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mleczko, Michal J; Xu, Runjie Lily; Okabe, Kye; Kuo, Hsueh-Hui; Fisher, Ian R; Wong, H-S Philip; Nishi, Yoshio; Pop, Eric

    2016-08-23

    Two-dimensional (2D) semimetals beyond graphene have been relatively unexplored in the atomically thin limit. Here, we introduce a facile growth mechanism for semimetallic WTe2 crystals and then fabricate few-layer test structures while carefully avoiding degradation from exposure to air. Low-field electrical measurements of 80 nm to 2 μm long devices allow us to separate intrinsic and contact resistance, revealing metallic response in the thinnest encapsulated and stable WTe2 devices studied to date (3-20 layers thick). High-field electrical measurements and electrothermal modeling demonstrate that ultrathin WTe2 can carry remarkably high current density (approaching 50 MA/cm(2), higher than most common interconnect metals) despite a very low thermal conductivity (of the order ∼3 Wm(-1) K(-1)). These results suggest several pathways for air-stable technological viability of this layered semimetal.

  12. A crossbar resistance switching memory readout scheme with sneak current cancellation based on a two-port current-mode sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Woorham; Yoon, Kyung Jean; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Jeong, Deog-Kyoon

    2016-12-02

    This paper describes a novel readout scheme that enables the complete cancellation of sneak currents in resistive switching random-access memory (RRAM) crossbar array. The current-mode readout is employed in the proposed readout, and a few critical advantages of the current-mode readout for crossbar RRAM are elucidated in this paper. The proposed scheme is based on a floating readout scheme for low power consumption, and one more sensing port is introduced using an additional reference word line. From the additional port, information on the sneak current amount is collected, and simple current-mode arithmetic operations are implemented to cancel out the sneak current from the sensing current. In addition, a simple method of handling the overestimated-sneak-current issue is described. The proposed scheme is verified using HSPICE simulation. Moreover, an example of a current-mode sense amplifier realizing the proposed cancelling technique is presented. The proposed sense amplifier can be implemented with less hardware overhead compared to the previous works.

  13. A crossbar resistance switching memory readout scheme with sneak current cancellation based on a two-port current-mode sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Woorham; Yoon, Kyung Jean; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Jeong, Deog-Kyoon

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes a novel readout scheme that enables the complete cancellation of sneak currents in resistive switching random-access memory (RRAM) crossbar array. The current-mode readout is employed in the proposed readout, and a few critical advantages of the current-mode readout for crossbar RRAM are elucidated in this paper. The proposed scheme is based on a floating readout scheme for low power consumption, and one more sensing port is introduced using an additional reference word line. From the additional port, information on the sneak current amount is collected, and simple current-mode arithmetic operations are implemented to cancel out the sneak current from the sensing current. In addition, a simple method of handling the overestimated-sneak-current issue is described. The proposed scheme is verified using HSPICE simulation. Moreover, an example of a current-mode sense amplifier realizing the proposed cancelling technique is presented. The proposed sense amplifier can be implemented with less hardware overhead compared to the previous works.

  14. Biofunctionalized Zinc Oxide Field Effect Transistors for Selective Sensing of Riboflavin with Current Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morley O. Stone

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Zinc oxide field effect transistors (ZnO-FET, covalently functionalized with single stranded DNA aptamers, provide a highly selective platform for label-free small molecule sensing. The nanostructured surface morphology of ZnO provides high sensitivity and room temperature deposition allows for a wide array of substrate types. Herein we demonstrate the selective detection of riboflavin down to the pM level in aqueous solution using the negative electrical current response of the ZnO-FET by covalently attaching a riboflavin binding aptamer to the surface. The response of the biofunctionalized ZnO-FET was tuned by attaching a redox tag (ferrocene to the 3’ terminus of the aptamer, resulting in positive current modulation upon exposure to riboflavin down to pM levels.

  15. Monolithic integration of GMR sensors for standard CMOS-IC current sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marcellis, A.; Reig, C.; Cubells-Beltrán, M.-D.; Madrenas, J.; Santos, J. D.; Cardoso, S.; Freitas, P. P.

    2017-09-01

    In this work we report on the development of Giant Magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors for off-line current measurements in standard integrated circuits. An ASIC has been specifically designed and fabricated in the well-known AMS-0.35 μm CMOS technology, including the electronic circuitry for sensor interfacing. It implements an oscillating circuit performing a voltage-to-frequency conversion. Subsequently, a fully CMOS-compatible low temperature post-process has been applied for depositing the GMR sensing devices in a full-bridge configuration onto the buried current straps. Sensitivity and resolution of these sensors have been investigated achieving experimental results that show a detection sensitivity of about 100 Hz/mA, with a resolution of about 5 μA.

  16. Electromechanical sensing of substrate charge hidden under atomic 2D crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Nicholas D; Robinson, Benjamin J; Fal'ko, Vladimir I; Novoselov, Konstantin S; Kolosov, Oleg V

    2014-06-11

    The functionality of graphene and other two-dimensional materials in electronic devices is highly influenced by the film-substrate charge transfer affecting local carrier density. We demonstrate that charges buried under the few layer graphene on/in the insulating substrate can be detected using electromechanical actuation of the conductive atomically thin layers, allowing measurements of areal density of film-substrate transferred charges under few layer graphene and MoS2 suspended films.

  17. Current trends in searches for new physics using measurements of parity violation and electric dipole moments in atoms and molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Dzuba, V A

    2010-01-01

    We review current status of the study of parity and time invariance phenomena in atoms, nuclei and molecules. We focus on three most promising areas of research: (i) parity non-conservation in a chain of isotopes, (ii) search for nuclear anapole moments, and (iii) search for permanent electric dipole moments (EDM) of atoms and molecules which are caused by either, electron EDM or nuclear $T,P$-odd moments such as nuclear EDM and nuclear Schiff moment.

  18. Note: Guaranteed collocated multimode control of an atomic force microscope cantilever using on-chip piezoelectric actuation and sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppert, Michael G.; Yong, Yuen K.

    2017-08-01

    The quality (Q) factor is an important parameter of the resonance of the microcantilever as it determines both imaging bandwidth and force sensitivity. The ability to control the Q factor of multiple modes is believed to be of great benefit for atomic force microscopy techniques involving multiple eigenmodes. In this paper, we propose a novel cantilever design employing multiple piezoelectric transducers which are used for separated actuation and sensing, leading to guaranteed collocation of the first eight eigenmodes up to 3 MHz. The design minimizes the feedthrough usually observed with these systems by incorporating a guard trace on the cantilever chip. As a result, a multimode Q controller is demonstrated to be able to modify the quality factor of the first two eigenmodes over up to four orders of magnitude without sacrificing robust stability.

  19. Morphology and current-voltage characteristics of nanostructured pentacene thin films probed by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorba, S; Le, Q T; Watkins, N J; Yan, L; Gao, Y

    2001-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy was used to study the growth modes (on SiO2, MoS2, and Au substrates) and the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of organic semiconductor pentacene. Pentacene films grow on SiO2 substrate in a layer-by-layer manner with full coverage at an average thickness of 20 A and have the highest degree of molecular ordering with large dendritic grains among the pentacene films deposited on the three different substrates. Films grown on MoS2 substrate reveal two different growth modes, snowflake-like growth and granular growth, both of which seem to compete with each other. On the other hand, films deposited on Au substrate show granular structure for thinner coverages (no crystal structure) and dendritic growth for higher coverages (crystal structure). I-V measurements were performed with a platinum tip on a pentacene film deposited on a Au substrate. The I-V curves on pentacene film reveal symmetric tunneling type character. The field dependence of the current indicates that the main transport mechanism at high field intensities is hopping (Poole-Frenkel effect). From these measurements, we have estimated a field lowering coefficient of 9.77 x 10(-6) V-1/2 m1/2 and an ideality factor of 18 for pentacene.

  20. A theoretical analysis of parity violation induced by neutral currents in atomic cesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchiat, C.; Piketty, C. A.; Pignon, D.

    1983-07-01

    In this paper we give a theoretical analysis of the parity violation phenomena in nS - n'S transitions in atomic cesium induced by the electron-nucleus neutral-current interaction. The actual observation of parity violation consists in the measurement of an interference between the p.v. electric dipole amplitude Elpv with the electric amplitude induced by a static electric field. Our theoretical work must then include a calculation of the diagonal and non-diagonal polarizabilities of the states of atomic cesium. We have used a one-electron model proposed by Norcross which incorporates some many-body effects like the electric screening induced by the core polarization in a semi-empirical way. Our calculated values of the diagonal and non-diagonal polarizabilities of the nS states are in good agreement with the existing measurements; this confirms the already well-established success of the model in predicting the radiative transitions in cesium. We present theoretical arguments supported by detailed numerical computations showing that the one-particle matrix element of the parity-violating electron-nucleus interaction and the parity-violating electric dipole amplitude Elpv itself weakly depend on the shape of the one-electron potential provided the binding energies of the valence states are reproduced accurately. Furthermore it turns out that because of a compensation mechanism, the parity-violating transition is induced by the radiation field outside the ion core region where the screening can be described simply in terms of the measurable cesium ion polarizability. Our results are then used to extract, from the Ecole Normale Supérieure experiment, a value of the weak charge Qw = -57.1 ± 9.4 (r.m.s. statistical deviation) ± 4.7 (systematic uncertainty). This number is to be compared with the prediction of the Weinberg-Salam model with electro-weak radiative corrections: Qw = -68.6 ± 3.0. A general discussion of the uncertainties of the atomic physics

  1. Non-Destructive Current Sensing for Energy Efficiency Monitoring in Buildings with Environmental Certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Lia Toledo Moreira; Mota, Alexandre de Assis; Coiado, Lorenzo Campos

    2015-07-10

    Nowadays, buildings environmental certifications encourage the implementation of initiatives aiming to increase energy efficiency in buildings. In these certification systems, increased energy efficiency arising from such initiatives must be demonstrated. Thus, a challenge to be faced is how to check the increase in energy efficiency related to each of the employed initiatives without a considerable building retrofit. In this context, this work presents a non-destructive method for electric current sensing to assess implemented initiatives to increase energy efficiency in buildings with environmental certification. This method proposes the use of a sensor that can be installed directly in the low voltage electrical circuit conductors that are powering the initiative under evaluation, without the need for reforms that result in significant costs, repair, and maintenance. The proposed sensor consists of three elements: an air-core transformer current sensor, an amplifying/filtering stage, and a microprocessor. A prototype of the proposed sensor was developed and tests were performed to validate this sensor. Based on laboratory tests, it was possible to characterize the proposed current sensor with respect to the number of turns and cross-sectional area of the primary and secondary coils. Furthermore, using the Least Squares Method, it was possible to determine the efficiency of the air core transformer current sensor (the best efficiency found, considering different test conditions, was 2%), which leads to a linear output response.

  2. Non-Destructive Current Sensing for Energy Efficiency Monitoring in Buildings with Environmental Certification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Toledo Moreira Mota

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, buildings environmental certifications encourage the implementation of initiatives aiming to increase energy efficiency in buildings. In these certification systems, increased energy efficiency arising from such initiatives must be demonstrated. Thus, a challenge to be faced is how to check the increase in energy efficiency related to each of the employed initiatives without a considerable building retrofit. In this context, this work presents a non-destructive method for electric current sensing to assess implemented initiatives to increase energy efficiency in buildings with environmental certification. This method proposes the use of a sensor that can be installed directly in the low voltage electrical circuit conductors that are powering the initiative under evaluation, without the need for reforms that result in significant costs, repair, and maintenance. The proposed sensor consists of three elements: an air-core transformer current sensor, an amplifying/filtering stage, and a microprocessor. A prototype of the proposed sensor was developed and tests were performed to validate this sensor. Based on laboratory tests, it was possible to characterize the proposed current sensor with respect to the number of turns and cross-sectional area of the primary and secondary coils. Furthermore, using the Least Squares Method, it was possible to determine the efficiency of the air core transformer current sensor (the best efficiency found, considering different test conditions, was 2%, which leads to a linear output response.

  3. The current and potential role of satellite remote sensing in the campaign against malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazansky, Yaniv; Wood, Danielle; Sutherlun, Jacob

    2016-04-01

    Malaria and other vector borne diseases claim lives and cause illness, especially in less developed countries. Although well understood methods, such as spraying and insecticidal nets, are identified as effective deterrents to malaria transmission by mosquitoes, the nations that have the greatest burden from the disease also struggle to deploy such measures sufficiently. More targeted and up to date information is needed to identify which regions of malaria-endemic countries are most likely to be at risk of malaria in the near future. This will allow national governments, local officials and public health workers to deploy protective equipment and personnel where they are most needed. This paper explores the role of environmental data generated via satellite remote sensing as an ingredient to a Malaria Early Warning System. Data from remote sensing satellites can cover broad geographical areas frequently and consistently. Much of the relevant data may be accessed by malaria-endemic countries at minimal cost via international data sharing polices. While previous research studies have demonstrated the potential to assign malaria risk to a geographic region based on indicators from satellites and other sources, there is still a need to deploy such tools in a broader and more operational manner to inform decision making on malaria management. This paper describes current research on the use of satellite-based environmental data to predict malaria risk and examines the barriers and opportunities for implementing Malaria Early Warning Systems enabled by satellite remote sensing. A Systems Architecture Framework analyses the components of a Malaria Early Warning System and highlights the need for effective coordination across public and private sector organizations.

  4. A novel method for sensing rotational speed, linear displacement and current using superconducting BPSCCO magnetic sensor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T K Dey; A Ray; S K Ghatak

    2002-11-01

    For many decades, magnetic sensors have been of great assistance to mankind in variety of functions that include simple compass based navigational systems to devices that monitor the invisible biological activities. In industries magnetic sensors are in great demand for control and measurement of linear and rotary position sensing etc, because of its non destructive and contact less way of detection. Consequently, newer, smarter and cheaper materials are continuously being explored to suit the varied needs of technological requirements. In the present communication, the characteristics of a magnetic sensor, based on the non linear electromagnetic response of the weak links present in the polycrystalline BPSCCO superconductor are reported. The second harmonic response of sintered superconducting BPSCCO pellet in an alternating magnetic field at 40 kHz and 77 K being a strong linear function of low d.c. magnetic field has been utilized for the development of highly sensitive magnetic field sensors. The noise limited resolution of the sensor is found to be 3.16 × 10–9 T/√ Hz for $H_{a.c.}$ = 16 Oe and frequency 40 kHz. We further demonstrate that such HTSC based magnetic sensors are capable of sensing the rotational speed, small displacement and direct current with good resolution. The experimental methods and results obtained are discussed.

  5. Synthesis of SnO{sub 2} hollow microspheres from ultrasonic atomization and their role in hydrogen sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, L.A., E-mail: plalchand_phy_aml@yahoo.co.in [Nanomaterials Research Lab., Department of Physics, Pratap College, Amalner 425401, Maharashtra (India); Shinde, M.D.; Bari, A.R.; Deo, V.V. [Nanomaterials Research Lab., Department of Physics, Pratap College, Amalner 425401, Maharashtra (India)

    2011-04-25

    Nanostructured SnO{sub 2} hollow microspheres were synthesized using ultrasonic atomization technique. It is interesting that hollow microspheres could be prepared from ultrasonic atomization technique without any aid of template and surfactant. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) confirmed the material to be SnO{sub 2} having tetragonal structure. Average crystallite size calculated from X-ray diffractogram using Scherer's equation was found to be 8.45 nm. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to study the microscopic study of fine powder particles. Powder consists of hollow microspheres of average diameter of 0.58 {mu}m as well as nanoparticles of average diameter of 6 nm. The sensors fabricated from such powder show high hydrogen (1000 ppm) response (S = 2379) under the optimized experimental conditions. Sensor performance merits, such as, high hydrogen response, high hydrogen selectivity, short response time (2 s) and quick recovery time (15 s) may be due to both nanocrystallites and hollow microspheres associated in SnO{sub 2} sensing material. The dramatic change in gas response was explained by the rapid diffusion of the target gas through the nano-porous structure of SnO{sub 2} hollow microspheres.

  6. Magnetic Field Sensors Based on Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR Technology: Applications in Electrical Current Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Càndid Reig

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The 2007 Nobel Prize in Physics can be understood as a global recognition to the rapid development of the Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR, from both the physics and engineering points of view. Behind the utilization of GMR structures as read heads for massive storage magnetic hard disks, important applications as solid state magnetic sensors have emerged. Low cost, compatibility with standard CMOS technologies and high sensitivity are common advantages of these sensors. This way, they have been successfully applied in a lot different environments. In this work, we are trying to collect the Spanish contributions to the progress of the research related to the GMR based sensors covering, among other subjects, the applications, the sensor design, the modelling and the electronic interfaces, focusing on electrical current sensing applications.

  7. Single atom detection in ultracold quantum gases: a review of current progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Herwig

    2016-05-01

    The recent advances in single atom detection and manipulation in experiments with ultracold quantum gases are reviewed. The discussion starts with the basic principles of trapping, cooling and detecting single ions and atoms. The realization of single atom detection in ultracold quantum gases is presented in detail and the employed methods, which are based on light scattering, electron scattering, field ionization and direct neutral particle detection are discussed. The microscopic coherent manipulation of single atoms in a quantum gas is also covered. Various examples are given in order to highlight the power of these approaches to study many-body quantum systems.

  8. Theoretical analysis of parity violation induced by neutral currents in atomic cesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchiat, C.; Piketty, C.A.; Pignon, D. (Ecole Normale Superieure, 75 - Paris (France). Lab. de Physique Theorique)

    1983-07-04

    In this paper we give a theoretical analysis of the parity violation phenomena in nS-n'S transitions in atomic cesium induced by the electron-nucleus neutral-current interaction. The actual observation of parity violation consists in the measurement of an interference between the p.v. electric dipole amplitude E/sub 1/sup(pv) with the electric amplitude induced by a static electric field. Our theoretical work must then include a calculation of the diagonal and non-diagonal polarizabilities of the states of atomic cesium. We have used a one-electron model proposed by Norcross which incorporates some many-body effects like the electric screening induced by the core polarization in a semi-empirical way. Our calculated values of the diagonal and non-diagonal polarizabilities of the nS states are in good agreement with the existing measurements; this confirms the already well-established success of the model in predicting the radiative transitions in cesium. We present theoretical arguments supported by detailed numerical computations showing that the one-particle matrix element of the parity-violating electron-nucleus interaction and the parity-violating electric dipole amplitude E/sub 1/sup(pv) itself weakly depend on the shape of the one-electron potential provided the binding energies of the valence states are reproduced accurately. Furthermore it turns out that because of a compensation mechanism, the parity-violating transition is induced by the radiation field outside the ion core region where the screening can be described simply in terms of the measurable cesium ion polarizability. Our results are then used to extract, from the Ecole Normale Superieure experiment, a value of the weak charge Qsub(w)= -57.1+-9.4 (r.m.s. statistical deviation) +-4.7 (systematic uncertainty). This number is to be compared with the prediction of the Weinberg-Salam model with electro-weak radiative corrections: Qsub(w)=-68.6+-3.0.

  9. Sensory perception in cetaceans: Part I – Current knowledge about dolphin senses as a representative species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothee eKremers

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A large part of the literature on sensory perception and behavior in dolphins is devoted to its well-developed vocal and echolocation abilities. In this review, we aim to augment current knowledge by examining the literature on dolphins’ entire Merkwelt (which refers to everything a subject perceives, creating a crucial part of the subject’s Umwelt. We will show that despite extensive knowledge on audition, aspects such as context relatedness, the social function of vocalizations or socio-sexual recognition, remain poorly understood. Therefore, we propose areas for further lines of investigation. Recent studies have shown that the sensory world of dolphins might well be much more diverse than initially thought. Indeed, although underwater and aerial visual systems differ in dolphins, they have both been shown to be important. Much debated electro- and magnetoreception appear to be functional senses according to recent studies. Finally, another neglected area is chemoreception. We will summarize neuroanatomical and physiological data on olfaction and taste, as well as corresponding behavioral evidence. Taken together, we will identify a number of technical and conceptual reasons for why chemosensory data appear contradictory, which is much debated in the literature. In summary, this article aims to provide both an overview of the current knowledge on dolphin perception, but also offer a basis for further discussion and potential new lines of research.

  10. Medical Dosimetric Registry of Russian Atomic Industry Employees: Current Status and Perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilyin, L. A.; Kiselev, M. F.; Panfilov, A. P.; Kochetkov, O. A.; Ivanov, A. A.; Grinev, M. P.; Soloviev, V. Y.; Semenov, V. G.; Tukov, A. R.; Koshuurnikova, N. A.; Takhauov, R. M.; Melnikov, G. Y.

    2004-07-01

    Epidemiological studies of nuclear industry personnel contain the significant abilities to assess the prolonged radiation exposure effects in the human health. The clarification of these assessments and following improvements of the scientific justification of radiation regulation require the expansion of factual basis of the research currently, Branch Medical Dosimetric Registry (BMDR) of atomic industry and nuclear power employees is under the development in Russian to compose a number of regional registries. This work is coordinated by the State Research Center- Institute of Biophysics (Moscow). The first phase of this project was devoted to the forming of the regional registry of Mayak PA employees (Ozersk, South Uranl region). the employee registries of Siberian Chemical Plant (SCP, Seversk, Tomsk region) and Mountain Chemical Plant (MCP, Zheleznogorsk, Krasnoyarsk region) are at the finalization. At later phases, BMDR will be added by the information on other enterprises and on operating NPP too. The paper describes the structure, general issues of the forming and current status of BMDR. The comparison of major BMDR features versus LSS registry (which is the one of basic components for international radiation protection recommendations and current radiation protection standards) demonstrates that BMDR information can be more preferable to assess the significance of the man made radiation at high and intermediate dose ranges. Particularly, the number of employees (20-40 year age range) exposed to doses specific to detectable radiation health effects (above 2000 mSv) is almost ten times more than that for LSS cohort. Besides, the health monitoring was elaborated since the employment start point (Whereas, since year 5 for LSS cohort). BMDR dose records were measured (against LSS reconstructed doses) and the employee exposure duration was equal to years and decade (alternatively to momentary exposure recorded in LSS). BMDR data quantity and quality correspond to

  11. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Remote Sensing for Field-Based Crop Phenotyping: Current Status and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guijun Yang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Phenotyping plays an important role in crop science research; the accurate and rapid acquisition of phenotypic information of plants or cells in different environments is helpful for exploring the inheritance and expression patterns of the genome to determine the association of genomic and phenotypic information to increase the crop yield. Traditional methods for acquiring crop traits, such as plant height, leaf color, leaf area index (LAI, chlorophyll content, biomass and yield, rely on manual sampling, which is time-consuming and laborious. Unmanned aerial vehicle remote sensing platforms (UAV-RSPs equipped with different sensors have recently become an important approach for fast and non-destructive high throughput phenotyping and have the advantage of flexible and convenient operation, on-demand access to data and high spatial resolution. UAV-RSPs are a powerful tool for studying phenomics and genomics. As the methods and applications for field phenotyping using UAVs to users who willing to derive phenotypic parameters from large fields and tests with the minimum effort on field work and getting highly reliable results are necessary, the current status and perspectives on the topic of UAV-RSPs for field-based phenotyping were reviewed based on the literature survey of crop phenotyping using UAV-RSPs in the Web of Science™ Core Collection database and cases study by NERCITA. The reference for the selection of UAV platforms and remote sensing sensors, the commonly adopted methods and typical applications for analyzing phenotypic traits by UAV-RSPs, and the challenge for crop phenotyping by UAV-RSPs were considered. The review can provide theoretical and technical support to promote the applications of UAV-RSPs for crop phenotyping.

  12. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Remote Sensing for Field-Based Crop Phenotyping: Current Status and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guijun; Liu, Jiangang; Zhao, Chunjiang; Li, Zhenhong; Huang, Yanbo; Yu, Haiyang; Xu, Bo; Yang, Xiaodong; Zhu, Dongmei; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Ruyang; Feng, Haikuan; Zhao, Xiaoqing; Li, Zhenhai; Li, Heli; Yang, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Phenotyping plays an important role in crop science research; the accurate and rapid acquisition of phenotypic information of plants or cells in different environments is helpful for exploring the inheritance and expression patterns of the genome to determine the association of genomic and phenotypic information to increase the crop yield. Traditional methods for acquiring crop traits, such as plant height, leaf color, leaf area index (LAI), chlorophyll content, biomass and yield, rely on manual sampling, which is time-consuming and laborious. Unmanned aerial vehicle remote sensing platforms (UAV-RSPs) equipped with different sensors have recently become an important approach for fast and non-destructive high throughput phenotyping and have the advantage of flexible and convenient operation, on-demand access to data and high spatial resolution. UAV-RSPs are a powerful tool for studying phenomics and genomics. As the methods and applications for field phenotyping using UAVs to users who willing to derive phenotypic parameters from large fields and tests with the minimum effort on field work and getting highly reliable results are necessary, the current status and perspectives on the topic of UAV-RSPs for field-based phenotyping were reviewed based on the literature survey of crop phenotyping using UAV-RSPs in the Web of Science™ Core Collection database and cases study by NERCITA. The reference for the selection of UAV platforms and remote sensing sensors, the commonly adopted methods and typical applications for analyzing phenotypic traits by UAV-RSPs, and the challenge for crop phenotyping by UAV-RSPs were considered. The review can provide theoretical and technical support to promote the applications of UAV-RSPs for crop phenotyping.

  13. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Remote Sensing for Field-Based Crop Phenotyping: Current Status and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guijun; Liu, Jiangang; Zhao, Chunjiang; Li, Zhenhong; Huang, Yanbo; Yu, Haiyang; Xu, Bo; Yang, Xiaodong; Zhu, Dongmei; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Ruyang; Feng, Haikuan; Zhao, Xiaoqing; Li, Zhenhai; Li, Heli; Yang, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Phenotyping plays an important role in crop science research; the accurate and rapid acquisition of phenotypic information of plants or cells in different environments is helpful for exploring the inheritance and expression patterns of the genome to determine the association of genomic and phenotypic information to increase the crop yield. Traditional methods for acquiring crop traits, such as plant height, leaf color, leaf area index (LAI), chlorophyll content, biomass and yield, rely on manual sampling, which is time-consuming and laborious. Unmanned aerial vehicle remote sensing platforms (UAV-RSPs) equipped with different sensors have recently become an important approach for fast and non-destructive high throughput phenotyping and have the advantage of flexible and convenient operation, on-demand access to data and high spatial resolution. UAV-RSPs are a powerful tool for studying phenomics and genomics. As the methods and applications for field phenotyping using UAVs to users who willing to derive phenotypic parameters from large fields and tests with the minimum effort on field work and getting highly reliable results are necessary, the current status and perspectives on the topic of UAV-RSPs for field-based phenotyping were reviewed based on the literature survey of crop phenotyping using UAV-RSPs in the Web of Science™ Core Collection database and cases study by NERCITA. The reference for the selection of UAV platforms and remote sensing sensors, the commonly adopted methods and typical applications for analyzing phenotypic traits by UAV-RSPs, and the challenge for crop phenotyping by UAV-RSPs were considered. The review can provide theoretical and technical support to promote the applications of UAV-RSPs for crop phenotyping. PMID:28713402

  14. Cannabinoids inhibit acid-sensing ion channel currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Qiang Liu

    Full Text Available Local acidosis has been found in various pain-generating conditions such as inflammation and tissue injury. Cannabinoids exert a powerful inhibitory control over pain initiation via peripheral cognate receptors. However, the peripheral molecular targets responsible for the antinociceptive effects of cannabinoids are still poorly understood. Here, we have found that WIN55,212-2, a cannabinoid receptor agonist, inhibits the activity of native acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons. WIN55,212-2 dose-dependently inhibited proton-gated currents mediated by ASICs. WIN55,212-2 shifted the proton concentration-response curve downwards, with an decrease of 48.6±3.7% in the maximum current response but with no significant change in the EC(50 value. The inhibition of proton-gated current induced by WIN55,212-2 was almost completely blocked by the selective CB1 receptor antagonist AM 281, but not by the CB2 receptor antagonist AM630. Pretreatment of forskolin, an AC activator, and the addition of cAMP also reversed the inhibition of WIN55,212-2. Moreover, WIN55,212-2 altered acid-evoked excitability of rat DRG neurons and decreased the number of action potentials induced by acid stimuli. Finally, WIN55,212-2 attenuated nociceptive responses to injection of acetic acid in rats. These results suggest that WIN55,212-2 inhibits the activity of ASICs via CB1 receptor and cAMP dependent pathway in rat primary sensory neurons. Thus, cannabinoids can exert their analgesic action by interaction with ASICs in the primary afferent neurons, which was novel analgesic mechanism of cannabinoids.

  15. Evidence for non-conservative current-induced forces in the breaking of Au and Pt atomic chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Sabater

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This experimental work aims at probing current-induced forces at the atomic scale. Specifically it addresses predictions in recent work regarding the appearance of run-away modes as a result of a combined effect of the non-conservative wind force and a ‘Berry force’. The systems we consider here are atomic chains of Au and Pt atoms, for which we investigate the distribution of break down voltage values. We observe two distinct modes of breaking for Au atomic chains. The breaking at high voltage appears to behave as expected for regular break down by thermal excitation due to Joule heating. However, there is a low-voltage breaking mode that has characteristics expected for the mechanism of current-induced forces. Although a full comparison would require more detailed information on the individual atomic configurations, the systems we consider are very similar to those considered in recent model calculations and the comparison between experiment and theory is very encouraging for the interpretation we propose.

  16. Evidence for non-conservative current-induced forces in the breaking of Au and Pt atomic chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabater, Carlos; Untiedt, Carlos; van Ruitenbeek, Jan M

    2015-01-01

    This experimental work aims at probing current-induced forces at the atomic scale. Specifically it addresses predictions in recent work regarding the appearance of run-away modes as a result of a combined effect of the non-conservative wind force and a 'Berry force'. The systems we consider here are atomic chains of Au and Pt atoms, for which we investigate the distribution of break down voltage values. We observe two distinct modes of breaking for Au atomic chains. The breaking at high voltage appears to behave as expected for regular break down by thermal excitation due to Joule heating. However, there is a low-voltage breaking mode that has characteristics expected for the mechanism of current-induced forces. Although a full comparison would require more detailed information on the individual atomic configurations, the systems we consider are very similar to those considered in recent model calculations and the comparison between experiment and theory is very encouraging for the interpretation we propose.

  17. Current status of kinematically complete studies of basic fragmentation processes in atomic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, M. [Department of Physics, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65409 (United States)], E-mail: schulz@mst.edu; Moshammer, R.; Fischer, D.; Duerr, M.; Ullrich, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Hasan, A. [Department of Physics, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65409 (United States); Department of Physics, UAE University, P.O. Box 17551, Alain, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Ciappina, M.F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik komplexer Systeme, Noethnizer Str. 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Kirchner, T. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, TU Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 10, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2009-01-15

    Recent developments on kinematically complete experiments on basic atomic fragmentation processes are reviewed. Comparisons between theoretical and experimental fully differential cross sections for single ionization of light atoms by charged particle impact are analyzed. Furthermore, a method developed very recently, four-particle Dalitz plots, is discussed in context of double ionization. The extraordinary power of these plots is their capability to provide a comprehensive picture of the momentum exchange between all four final-state particles in a single spectrum.

  18. Current Research in Lidar Technology Used for the Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comerón, Adolfo; Muñoz-Porcar, Constantino; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Rodríguez-Gómez, Alejandro; Sicard, Michaël

    2017-06-20

    Lidars are active optical remote sensing instruments with unique capabilities for atmospheric sounding. A manifold of atmospheric variables can be profiled using different types of lidar: concentration of species, wind speed, temperature, etc. Among them, measurement of the properties of aerosol particles, whose influence in many atmospheric processes is important but is still poorly stated, stands as one of the main fields of application of current lidar systems. This paper presents a review on fundamentals, technology, methodologies and state-of-the art of the lidar systems used to obtain aerosol information. Retrieval of structural (aerosol layers profiling), optical (backscatter and extinction coefficients) and microphysical (size, shape and type) properties requires however different levels of instrumental complexity; this general outlook is structured following a classification that attends these criteria. Thus, elastic systems (detection only of emitted frequencies), Raman systems (detection also of Raman frequency-shifted spectral lines), high spectral resolution lidars, systems with depolarization measurement capabilities and multi-wavelength instruments are described, and the fundamentals in which the retrieval of aerosol parameters is based is in each case detailed.

  19. High Current Density Effect on In-situ Atomic Migration Characteristics of a BiTe Thin Film System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seunghyun; Park, Yong-Jin; Joo, Young-Chang; Park, Young-Bae

    2013-10-01

    Understanding fundamental atomic migration characteristics of multicomponent chalcogenide materials such as GeSbTe (GST) and BiTe are important in order to investigate the failure mechanism related to the electrical reliability of thermoelectric materials under high current density. In this work, high current density effect on the in-situ atomic migration characteristics of the BiTe thermoelectric thin films was conducted by real-time observation inside an scanning electron microscope chamber. Under the high current density conditions ranging from 0.83×106 to 1.0×106 A/cm2 at 100 °C, Te migrated toward the cathode, and Bi migrated toward the anode because the electrostatic force was dominant by very high Joule heating effect.

  20. Current State of Web Sites in Science Education--Focus on Atomic Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuvi, Inbal; Nachmias, Rafi

    2001-01-01

    Explores to what extent the web's advanced graphical tools and computational power are implemented in science education. Focuses on the pedagogical and technological characteristics of web sites attempting to teach the subject of atomic structure. (Contains 33 references.) (Author/YDS)

  1. Improving the electrical performance of a conductive atomic force microscope with a logarithmic current-to-voltage converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, L.; Lanza, M.; Porti, M.; Grifoll, J.; Nafría, M.; Aymerich, X.

    2008-07-01

    A new configuration of conductive atomic force microscope (CAFM) is presented, which is based in a standard CAFM where the typical I-V converter has been replaced by a logI-V amplifier. This substitution extends the current dynamic range from 1-100pAto1pA -1mA. With the broadening of the current dynamic range, the CAFM can access new applications, such as the reliability evaluation of metal-oxide-semiconductor gate dielectrics. As an example, the setup has been tested by analyzing breakdown spots induced in SiO2 layers.

  2. Current progress in developing the nonlinear ionization theory of atoms and ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnakov, B. M.; Mur, V. D.; Popruzhenko, S. V.; Popov, V. S.

    2015-01-01

    We review the status of the theory of ionization of atoms and ions by intense laser radiation (Keldysh's theory). We discuss the applicability of the theory, its relation to the Landau-Dykhne method, and its application to the ionization of atoms by ultrashort nonmonochromatic laser pulses of an arbitrary shape. The semiclassical imaginary time method is applied to describe electron sub-barrier motion using classical equations of motion with an imaginary time t\\to i t for an electron in the field of an electromagnetic wave. We also discuss tunneling interference of transition amplitudes, a phenomenon occurring due to the existence of several saddle points in the complex time plane and leading to fast oscillations in the momentum distribution of photoelectrons. Nonperturbatively taking the Coulomb interaction between an outgoing electron and the atomic residual into account causes significant changes in the photoelectron momentum distribution and in the level ionization rates, the latter usually increasing by orders of magnitude for both tunneling and multiquantum ionization. The effect of a static magnetic field on the ionization rate and the magnetic cumulation process is examined. The theory of relativistic tunneling is discussed, relativistic and spin corrections to the ionization rate are calculated, and the applicability limits of the nonrelativistic Keldysh theory are determined. Finally, the application of the Fock method to the covariant description of nonlinear ionization in the relativistic regime is discussed.

  3. A low-cost, scalable, current-sensing digital headstage for high channel count μECoG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumpis, Michael; Insanally, Michele; Zou, Jialin; Elsharif, Ashraf; Ghomashchi, Ali; Sertac Artan, N; Froemke, Robert C; Viventi, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    High channel count electrode arrays allow for the monitoring of large-scale neural activity at high spatial resolution. Implantable arrays featuring many recording sites require compact, high bandwidth front-end electronics. In the present study, we investigated the use of a small, light weight, and low cost digital current-sensing integrated circuit for acquiring cortical surface signals from a 61-channel micro-electrocorticographic (μECoG) array. We recorded both acute and chronic μECoG signal from rat auditory cortex using our novel digital current-sensing headstage. For direct comparison, separate recordings were made in the same anesthetized preparations using an analog voltage headstage. A model of electrode impedance explained the transformation between current- and voltage-sensed signals, and was used to reconstruct cortical potential. We evaluated the digital headstage using several metrics of the baseline and response signals. The digital current headstage recorded neural signal with similar spatiotemporal statistics and auditory frequency tuning compared to the voltage signal. The signal-to-noise ratio of auditory evoked responses (AERs) was significantly stronger in the current signal. Stimulus decoding based on true and reconstructed voltage signals were not significantly different. Recordings from an implanted system showed AERs that were detectable and decodable for 52 d. The reconstruction filter mitigated the thermal current noise of the electrode impedance and enhanced overall SNR. We developed and validated a novel approach to headstage acquisition that used current-input circuits to independently digitize 61 channels of μECoG measurements of the cortical field. These low-cost circuits, intended to measure photo-currents in digital imaging, not only provided a signal representing the local cortical field with virtually the same sensitivity and specificity as a traditional voltage headstage but also resulted in a small, light headstage that can

  4. A low-cost, scalable, current-sensing digital headstage for high channel count μECoG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumpis, Michael; Insanally, Michele; Zou, Jialin; Elsharif, Ashraf; Ghomashchi, Ali; Sertac Artan, N.; Froemke, Robert C.; Viventi, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Objective. High channel count electrode arrays allow for the monitoring of large-scale neural activity at high spatial resolution. Implantable arrays featuring many recording sites require compact, high bandwidth front-end electronics. In the present study, we investigated the use of a small, light weight, and low cost digital current-sensing integrated circuit for acquiring cortical surface signals from a 61-channel micro-electrocorticographic (μECoG) array. Approach. We recorded both acute and chronic μECoG signal from rat auditory cortex using our novel digital current-sensing headstage. For direct comparison, separate recordings were made in the same anesthetized preparations using an analog voltage headstage. A model of electrode impedance explained the transformation between current- and voltage-sensed signals, and was used to reconstruct cortical potential. We evaluated the digital headstage using several metrics of the baseline and response signals. Main results. The digital current headstage recorded neural signal with similar spatiotemporal statistics and auditory frequency tuning compared to the voltage signal. The signal-to-noise ratio of auditory evoked responses (AERs) was significantly stronger in the current signal. Stimulus decoding based on true and reconstructed voltage signals were not significantly different. Recordings from an implanted system showed AERs that were detectable and decodable for 52 d. The reconstruction filter mitigated the thermal current noise of the electrode impedance and enhanced overall SNR. Significance. We developed and validated a novel approach to headstage acquisition that used current-input circuits to independently digitize 61 channels of μECoG measurements of the cortical field. These low-cost circuits, intended to measure photo-currents in digital imaging, not only provided a signal representing the local cortical field with virtually the same sensitivity and specificity as a traditional voltage headstage but

  5. Current and anticipated uses of thermal hydraulic codes at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akimoto, Hajime; Kukita; Ohnuki, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-07-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is conducting several research programs related to thermal-hydraulic and neutronic behavior of light water reactors (LWRs). These include LWR safety research projects, which are conducted in accordance with the Nuclear Safety Commission`s research plan, and reactor engineering projects for the development of innovative reactor designs or core/fuel designs. Thermal-hydraulic and neutronic codes are used for various purposes including experimental analysis, nuclear power plant (NPP) safety analysis, and design assessment.

  6. Current mapping of low-energy (120 eV) helium and hydrogen irradiated tungsten by conductive atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongyu; Endo, Takashi; Bi, Zhenghua; Yan, Weibin; Ohnuki, Somei; Yang, Qi; Ni, Weiyuan; Liu, Dongping

    2017-04-01

    Both conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) and transmission electron microscopy have been used to characterize the defects or He bubbles in low-energy (120 eV) H and He irradiated tungsten (W). By a comparative study, we find that the current mapping from CAFM is very sensitive in the detection of nanometer-sized defects in low-energy H and He irradiated W. Our calculation confirms that the resistance change in H and He irradiated W is strongly affected by the distance between atomic force microscopy tip and defects/He bubbles. CAFM can accurately detect defects/He bubbles in the W surface layer, however, it is infeasible to measure them in the deep layer (>20 nm), especially due to the existence of defects in the surface layer.

  7. Current Issues and Trends in Multidimensional Sensing Technologies for Digital Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Noriko; Ohki, Hidehiro; Kato, Kunihito; Koshimizu, Hiroyasu; Sagawa, Ryusuke; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Yamashita, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Manabu

    Multidimensional sensing (MDS) technologies have numerous applications in the field of digital media, including the development of audio and visual equipment for human-computer interaction (HCI) and manufacture of data storage devices; furthermore, MDS finds applications in the fields of medicine and marketing, i.e., in e-marketing and the development of diagnosis equipment.

  8. Direct current force sensing device based on compressive spring, permanent magnet, and coil-wound magnetostrictive/piezoelectric laminate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Chung Ming; Or, Siu Wing; Ho, S L

    2013-12-01

    A force sensing device capable of sensing dc (or static) compressive forces is developed based on a NAS106N stainless steel compressive spring, a sintered NdFeB permanent magnet, and a coil-wound Tb(0.3)Dy(0.7)Fe(1.92)/Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 magnetostrictive∕piezoelectric laminate. The dc compressive force sensing in the device is evaluated theoretically and experimentally and is found to originate from a unique force-induced, position-dependent, current-driven dc magnetoelectric effect. The sensitivity of the device can be increased by increasing the spring constant of the compressive spring, the size of the permanent magnet, and/or the driving current for the coil-wound laminate. Devices of low-force (20 N) and high-force (200 N) types, showing high output voltages of 262 and 128 mV peak, respectively, are demonstrated at a low driving current of 100 mA peak by using different combinations of compressive spring and permanent magnet.

  9. Dual-cut graphene transistors with constant-current regions fabricated by the atomic force microscope anode oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chong-Rong; Dou, Kun Peng; Wang, Cheng-Hung; Chang, Chung-En; Kaun, Chao-Cheng; Wu, Chao-Hsin; Lin, Shih-Yen

    2017-01-01

    Graphene bandgap opening is an important issue for the application of this material. We have demonstrated that by atomic force microscope (AFM) anode oxidation, long nonconductive oxidation lines can be fabricated on graphene surfaces. By using this fabrication technique with the dual-cut transistor architecture, the phenomenon of constant-current regions near the Dirac point can be observed in devices at room temperature when the cut separation is smaller than 100 nm. The results may provide evidence of the phenomenon of graphene bandgap opening at room temperature. The theoretical bandgap values are further estimated by density-function-derived tight-binding calculations.

  10. Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing for Analysis of Landscape Ecological Processes: Current Insights and Trends. Chapter 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.

    2014-01-01

    NASA or NOAA Earth-observing satellites are not the only space-based TIR platforms. The European Space Agency (ESA), the Chinese, and other countries have in orbit or plan to launch TIR remote sensing systems. Satellite remote sensing provides an excellent opportunity to study land-atmosphere energy exchanges at the regional scale. A predominant application of TIR data has been in inferring evaporation, evapotranspiration (ET), and soil moisture. In addition to using TIR data for ET and soil moisture analysis over vegetated surfaces, there is also a need for using these data for assessment of drought conditions. The concept of ecological thermodynamics provides a quantification of surface energy fluxes for landscape characterization in relation to the overall amount of energy input and output from specific land cover types.

  11. Salt stress sensing and early signalling events in plant roots: Current knowledge and hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabala, Sergey; Wu, Honghong; Bose, Jayakumar

    2015-12-01

    Soil salinity is a major environmental constraint to crop production. While the molecular identity and functional expression of Na(+) transport systems mediating Na(+) exclusion from the cytosol has been studied in detail, far less is known about the mechanisms by which plants sense high Na(+) levels in the soil and the rapid signalling events that optimise plant performance under saline conditions. This review aims to fill this gap. We first discuss the nature of putative salt stress sensors, candidates which include Na(+) transport systems, mechanosensory proteins, proteins with regulatory Na(+) binding sites, sensing mediated by cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, purine receptors, annexin and voltage gating. We suggest that several transport proteins may be clustered together to form a microdomain in a lipid raft, allowing rapid changes in the activity of an individual protein to be translated into stress-induced Ca(2+) and H2O2 signatures. The pathways of stress signalling to downstream targets are discussed, and the kinetics and specificity of salt stress signalling between glycophytes and halophytes is compared. We argue that these sensing mechanisms operate in parallel, providing plants with a robust system for decoding information about the specific nature and severity of the imposed salt stress.

  12. Deposition and Characterization of Molybdenum Thin Film Using Direct Current Magnetron and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhtade Mustafa Aqil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, pure molybdenum (Mo thin film has been deposited on blank Si substrate by DC magnetron sputtering technique. The deposition condition for all samples has not been changed except for the deposition time in order to study the influence of time on the thickness and surface morphology of molybdenum thin film. The surface profiler has been used to measure the surface thickness. Atomic force microscopy technique was employed to investigate the roughness and grain structure of Mo thin film. The thickness and grain of molybdenum thin film layer has been found to increase with respect to time, while the surface roughness decreases. The average roughness, root mean square roughness, surface skewness, and surface kurtosis parameters are used to analyze the surface morphology of Mo thin film. Smooth surface has been observed. From grain analysis, a uniform grain distribution along the surface has been found. The obtained results allowed us to decide the optimal time to deposit molybdenum thin film layer of 20–100 nm thickness and subsequently patterned as electrodes (source/drain in carbon nanotube-channel transistor.

  13. Attoclock reveals natural coordinates of the laser-induced tunnelling current flow in atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeiffer, Adrian N.; Cirelli, Claudio; Smolarski, Mathias;

    2012-01-01

    the attoclock technique4 to obtain experimental information about the electron tunnelling geometry (the natural coordinates of the tunnelling current flow) and exit point. We confirm vanishing tunnelling delay time, show the importance of the inclusion of Stark shifts5, 6 and report on multi-electron effects...

  14. Atomization and merging of two Al and W wires driven by a 1 kA, 10 ns current pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Li, Xingwen; Lu, Yihan; Lebedev, S. V.; Yang, Zefeng; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2016-11-01

    Possibility of preconditioning of wires in wire array Z-pinch loads by an auxiliary low-level current pulse was investigated in experiments with two aluminum or two polyimide-coated tungsten wires. It was found that the application of a 1 kA, 10 ns current pulse could convert all the length of the Al wires (1 cm long, 15 μm diameter) and ˜70% of length of the W wires (1 cm long, 15 μm diameter, 2 μm polyimide coating) into a gaseous state via ohmic heating. The expansion and merging of the wires, positioned at separations of 1-3 mm, were investigated with two-wavelength (532 nm and 1064 nm) laser interferometry. The gasified wire expanded freely in a vacuum and its density distribution at different times could be well described using an analytic model for the expansion of the gas into vacuum. Under an energy deposition around its atomization enthalpy of the wire material, the aluminum vapor column had an expansion velocity of 5-7 km/s, larger than the value of ˜4 km/s from tungsten wires. The dynamic atomic polarizabilities of tungsten for 532 nm and 1064 nm were also estimated.

  15. Remote sensing of atomic oxygen - Some observational difficulties in the use of the forbidden O I 1173-A and O I 1641-A transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdman, P. W.; Zipf, E. C.

    1987-01-01

    Recent sounding rocket and satellite studies suggest that simultaneous measurements of the O I 989-A and 1304-A resonance lines and of the forbidden 1172.6-A and 1641.3-A transitions would form the basis of a useful remote sensing technique for measuring the O I density and optical opacity of a planetary or stellar atmosphere. Because the 1172.6-A and 1641.3-A emissions are weak lines and are emitted in a wavelength region rich in spectral features, it is important to determine whether typical flight instruments can make measurements with sufficient spectral purity so that the remote sensing observations will yield accurate results. A detailed, high-resolution study of the far UV emission features in the regions surrounding the atomic oxygen transitions at 1172.6 and 1641.3 A was made. These spectra, which were excited by electron impact on O2 and N2, are presented in an attempt to display some potential sources of interference in aeronomical measurements of these O I lines. Both atomic and molecular emissions are found, and the spectral resolution necessary to make unambiguous measurements is discussed.

  16. Non-contact current and voltage sensing method using a clamshell housing and a ferrite cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Gary D.; El-Essawy, Wael; Ferreira, Alexandre Peixoto; Keller, Thomas Walter; Rubio, Juan C.; Schappert, Michael

    2016-04-26

    A method of measurement using a detachable current and voltage sensor provides an isolated and convenient technique for to measuring current passing through a conductor such as an AC branch circuit wire, as well as providing an indication of an electrostatic potential on the wire, which can be used to indicate the phase of the voltage on the wire, and optionally a magnitude of the voltage. The device includes a housing that contains the current and voltage sensors, which may be a ferrite cylinder with a hall effect sensor disposed in a gap along the circumference to measure current, or alternative a winding provided through the cylinder along its axis and a capacitive plate or wire disposed adjacent to, or within, the ferrite cylinder to provide the indication of the voltage.

  17. Research Initiatives for Materials State Sensing (RIMSS) Task Order 0020: High Frequency Eddy Current NDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    coatings using eddy current techniques”, AIP Conference Proceedings , Vol. 1430, 2012, pp 441. 7. F. M. Smits, “Measurement of sheet resistivities with... Conference 2014: 27 October - 30 October, Charleston, SC, USA. “High-Frequency Eddy Current System for Analyzing Wet Conductive Coatings during...Processing”. 3. QNDE 2014 (ORAL PRESENTATION), 41st Annual Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation: Conference Boise Centre

  18. NODC Standard Format Coastal Ocean Wave and Current (F181) Data from the Atlantic Remote Sensing Land/Ocean Experiment (ARSLOE) (1980) (NODC Accession 0014202)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains time series coastal ocean wave and current data collected during the Atlantic Remote Sensing Land/Ocean Experiment (ARSLOE). ARSLOE was...

  19. Drain Current Modulation of a Single Drain MOSFET by Lorentz Force for Magnetic Sensing Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasenjit Chatterjee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a detailed analysis of the drain current modulation of a single-drain normal-gate n channel metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (n-MOSFET under an on-chip magnetic field. A single-drain n-MOSFET has been fabricated and placed in the center of a square-shaped metal loop which generates the on-chip magnetic field. The proposed device designed is much smaller in size with respect to the metal loop, which ensures that the generated magnetic field is approximately uniform. The change of drain current and change of bulk current per micron device width has been measured. The result shows that the difference drain current is about 145 µA for the maximum applied magnetic field. Such changes occur from the applied Lorentz force to push out the carriers from the channel. Based on the drain current difference, the change in effective mobility has been detected up to 4.227%. Furthermore, a detailed investigation reveals that the device behavior is quite different in subthreshold and saturation region. A change of 50.24 µA bulk current has also been measured. Finally, the device has been verified for use as a magnetic sensor with sensitivity 4.084% (29.6 T−1, which is very effective as compared to other previously reported works for a single device.

  20. From Nose to Brain: Un-Sensed Electrical Currents Applied in the Nose Alter Activity in Deep Brain Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Tali; Shushan, Sagit; Ravia, Aharon; Hahamy, Avital; Secundo, Lavi; Weissbrod, Aharon; Ben-Yakov, Aya; Holtzman, Yael; Cohen-Atsmoni, Smadar; Roth, Yehudah; Sobel, Noam

    2016-09-02

    Rules linking patterns of olfactory receptor neuron activation in the nose to activity patterns in the brain and ensuing odor perception remain poorly understood. Artificially stimulating olfactory neurons with electrical currents and measuring ensuing perception may uncover these rules. We therefore inserted an electrode into the nose of 50 human volunteers and applied various currents for about an hour in each case. This induced assorted non-olfactory sensations but never once the perception of odor. To validate contact with the olfactory path, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure resting-state brain activity in 18 subjects before and after un-sensed stimulation. We observed stimulation-induced neural decorrelation specifically in primary olfactory cortex, implying contact with the olfactory path. These results suggest that indiscriminate olfactory activation does not equate with odor perception. Moreover, this effort serendipitously uncovered a novel path for minimally invasive brain stimulation through the nose.

  1. Development of a resonant repeater tag for the enhancement of sensitivity and specificity in a wireless eddy current sensing scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Byungki; Andringa, Matthew; Wood, Sharon; Neikirk, Dean P.

    2006-03-01

    Eddy current sensing has been successfully used in various applications from testing heat exchange tubes for nuclear power plants to assessing dielectric thickness on printed circuit boards. However, in civil infrastructures cosmetic or cementitious surface material often keeps the probe or reader coil from accessing conductive medium inside the structure, resulting in reduced coupling as the distance increases between the DUT (device under test) and probe. Thus, the direct application of existing eddy current sensing technique is not very useful to detect flaws in civil infrastructures. To address this weak coupling problem, a simple scheme is proposed in which a resonant passive repeater tag is placed between the reader coil and the conducting test target. In this paper, the feasibility of detecting defects like cracks or fractures in conductive medium using a passive resonant tag and remote inductive pick-up as a method of interrogation is shown. Experimental data taken from simple setups to demonstrate the advantage of the proposed scheme are presented.

  2. Stratospheric Joule heating by lightning continuing current inferred from radio remote sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fullekrug, M.; Ignaccolo, M.; Kuvshinov, A.

    2006-01-01

    to ground deposits electrical energy into the stratosphere resulting from quasi-static ( Joule) heating. The energy deposition is dominated by the lightning continuing current, and it is similar to 10(-5) J/m(3) at 30 km height. It is speculated that the initiation of blue jets and gigantic jets...

  3. NASA's Current and Next Generation Coastal Remote Sensing Missions and Coral Reef Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guild, Liane S.

    2015-01-01

    The LLILAS Faculty Research Initiative presents a two-day symposium, Caribbean Coral Reefs at Risk. This international symposium examines the current state and future of coral reef conservation efforts throughout the Caribbean from the perspective of government agencies, nongovernment organizations, and academia.

  4. Bi-directional high-side current sense circuit for switch mode power supplies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekhtiari, Marzieh; Bruun, Erik; Andersen, Michael A. E.;

    2014-01-01

    and secondary sides of the transformer which is internally implemented inside the transformer. Therefore, curren t must be measured from the high voltage line in the presence of hig h input switching voltage. This paper proposes a resistive current s ensing circuit based on discrete components useful for input...

  5. Surface soil moisture retrievals from remote sensing: Current status, products & future trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulos, George P.; Ireland, Gareth; Barrett, Brian

    Advances in Earth Observation (EO) technology, particularly over the last two decades, have shown that soil moisture content (SMC) can be measured to some degree or other by all regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, and a variety of techniques have been proposed to facilitate this purpose. In this review we provide a synthesis of the efforts made during the last 20 years or so towards the estimation of surface SMC exploiting EO imagery, with a particular emphasis on retrievals from microwave sensors. Rather than replicating previous overview works, we provide a comprehensive and critical exploration of all the major approaches employed for retrieving SMC in a range of different global ecosystems. In this framework, we consider the newest techniques developed within optical and thermal infrared remote sensing, active and passive microwave domains, as well as assimilation or synergistic approaches. Future trends and prospects of EO for the accurate determination of SMC from space are subject to key challenges, some of which are identified and discussed within. It is evident from this review that there is potential for more accurate estimation of SMC exploiting EO technology, particularly so, by exploring the use of synergistic approaches between a variety of EO instruments. Given the importance of SMC in Earth's land surface interactions and to a large range of applications, one can appreciate that its accurate estimation is critical in addressing key scientific and practical challenges in today's world such as food security, sustainable planning and management of water resources. The launch of new, more sophisticated satellites strengthens the development of innovative research approaches and scientific inventions that will result in a range of pioneering and ground-breaking advancements in the retrievals of soil moisture from space.

  6. Thermal infrared remote sensing for riverscape analysis of water temperature heterogeneity: current research and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, S.; Hannah, D. M.; Malcolm, I.; Bergeron, N.; St-Hilaire, A.

    2016-12-01

    Climate change will increase summer water temperatures in northern latitude rivers. It is likely that this will have a negative impact on fish species such as salmonids, which are sensitive to elevated temperatures. Salmonids currently avoid heat stress by opportunistically using cool water zones that arise from the spatio-temporal mosaic of thermal habitats present within rivers. However, there is a general lack of information about the processes driving this thermal habitat heterogeneity or how these spatio-temporal patterns might vary under climate change. In this paper, we document how thermal infrared imaging has previously been used to better understand the processes driving river temperature patterns. We then identify key knowledge gaps that this technology can help to address in the future. First, we demonstrate how repeat thermal imagery has revealed the role of short-term hydrometeorological variability in influencing longitudinal river temperature patterns, showing that precipitation depth is strongly correlated with the degree of longitudinal temperature heterogeneity. Second, we document how thermal infrared imagery of a large watershed in Eastern Canada has shed new light on the landscape processes driving the spatial distribution of cool water patches, revealing that the distribution of cool patches is strongly linked to channel confinement, channel curvature and the proximity of dry tributary valleys. Finally, we detail gaps in current understanding of spatio-temporal patterns of river temperature heterogeneity. We explain how advances in unmanned aerial vehicle technology and deterministic temperature modelling will be combined to address these current limitations, shedding new light on the landscape processes driving geographical variability in patterns of river temperature heterogeneity. We then detail how such advances will help to identify rivers that will be resilient to future climatic warming, improving current and future strategies for

  7. Spin-current Seebeck effect in an interacting quantum dot: Atomic approximation for the Anderson impurity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, E.; Silva-Valencia, J.; Franco, R.; Siqueira, E. C.; Figueira, M. S.

    2015-11-01

    We study the spin-current Seebeck effect through an immersed gate defined quantum dot, employing the U-finite atomic method for the single impurity Anderson model. Our description qualitatively confirms some of the results obtained by an earlier Hartree-Fock work, but as our calculation includes the Kondo effect, some new features will appear in the spin-current Seebeck effect S, which as a function of the gate voltage present an oscillatory shape. At intermediate temperatures, our results show a three zero structure and at low temperatures, our results are governed by the emergence of the Kondo peak in the transmittance, which defines the behavior of the shape of the S coefficient as a function of the parameters of the model. The oscillatory behavior obtained by the Hartree-Fock approximation reproduces the shape obtained by us in a non-interacting system (U=0). The S sign is sensitive to different polarization of the quantum dot, and as a consequence the device could be employed to experimentally detect the polarization states of the system. Our results also confirm that the large increase of S upon increasing U, obtained by the mean field approximation, is correct only for low temperatures. We also discuss the role of the Kondo peak in defining the behavior of the spin thermopower at low temperatures.

  8. Urban Automation Networks: Current and Emerging Solutions for Sensed Data Collection and Actuation in Smart Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Carles; Paradells, Josep

    2015-09-10

    Urban Automation Networks (UANs) are being deployed worldwide in order to enable Smart City applications. Given the crucial role of UANs, as well as their diversity, it is critically important to assess their properties and trade-offs. This article introduces the requirements and challenges for UANs, characterizes the main current and emerging UAN paradigms, provides guidelines for their design and/or choice, and comparatively examines their performance in terms of a variety of parameters including coverage, power consumption, latency, standardization status and economic cost.

  9. Urban Automation Networks: Current and Emerging Solutions for Sensed Data Collection and Actuation in Smart Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Carles; Paradells, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Urban Automation Networks (UANs) are being deployed worldwide in order to enable Smart City applications. Given the crucial role of UANs, as well as their diversity, it is critically important to assess their properties and trade-offs. This article introduces the requirements and challenges for UANs, characterizes the main current and emerging UAN paradigms, provides guidelines for their design and/or choice, and comparatively examines their performance in terms of a variety of parameters including coverage, power consumption, latency, standardization status and economic cost. PMID:26378534

  10. Urban Automation Networks: Current and Emerging Solutions for Sensed Data Collection and Actuation in Smart Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carles Gomez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Urban Automation Networks (UANs are being deployed worldwide in order to enable Smart City applications. Given the crucial role of UANs, as well as their diversity, it is critically important to assess their properties and trade-offs. This article introduces the requirements and challenges for UANs, characterizes the main current and emerging UAN paradigms, provides guidelines for their design and/or choice, and comparatively examines their performance in terms of a variety of parameters including coverage, power consumption, latency, standardization status and economic cost.

  11. Active induction balance method for metal detector sensing head utilizing transmitter-bucking and dual current source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambruš, D.; Vasić, D.; Bilas, V.

    2013-06-01

    A central problem in a design of frequency domain electromagnetic induction sensors used in landmine detection is an effective suppression of a direct inductive coupling between the transmitter and the receiver coil (induction balance, IB). In sensing heads based on the transmitter-bucking configuration, IB is achieved by using two concentric transmitter coils with opposing exciter fields in order to create a central magnetic cavity for the receiver coil. This design has numerous advantages over other IB methods in terms of detection sensitivity, spatial resolution, sensor dimensions and suitability for model-based measurements. However, very careful design and precise sensing head geometry are required if a single excitation source is used for driving both transmitter coils. In this paper we analyze the IB sensitivity to small perturbations of geometrical properties of coils. We propose a sensor design with dual current source and active induction balance scheme which overcomes the limitations of geometry-based balancing and potentially provides more efficient compensation of soil effects.

  12. Carbon nanotubes randomly decorated with gold clusters: from nano{sup 2}hybrid atomic structures to gas sensing prototypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlier, J-C; Zanolli, Z [Unite de Physico-Chimie et de Physique des Materiaux (PCPM), European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility (ETSF), Universite Catholique de Louvain, Place Croix du Sud 1, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Arnaud, L; Avilov, I V; Felten, A; Pireaux, J-J [Centre de Recherche en Physique de la Matiere et du Rayonnement (PMR-LISE), Facultes Universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix, 61 Rue de Bruxelles, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Delgado, M [Sensotran, s.l., Avenida Remolar 31, E-08820 El Prat de Llobregat, Barcelona (Spain); Demoisson, F; Reniers, F [Service de Chimie Analytique et Chimie des Interfaces (CHANI), Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Faculte des Sciences, CP255, Boulevard du Triomphe 2, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Espinosa, E H; Ionescu, R; Leghrib, R; Llobet, E [Department of Electronic Engineering, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Avenida Paisos Catalans 26, E-43007 Tarragona (Spain); Ewels, C P; Suarez-Martinez, I [Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), Universite de Nantes, 2 rue de la Houssiniere-BP 32229, F-44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Guillot, J; Mansour, A; Migeon, H-N [Departement Science et Analyse des Materiaux, Centre de Recherche Public-Gabriel Lippmann, rue du Brill 41, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Watson, G E, E-mail: jean-jacques.pireaux@fundp.ac.b [Vega Science Trust, Unit 118, Science Park SQ, Brighton, BN1 9SB (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-16

    Carbon nanotube surfaces, activated and randomly decorated with metal nanoclusters, have been studied in uniquely combined theoretical and experimental approaches as prototypes for molecular recognition. The key concept is to shape metallic clusters that donate or accept a fractional charge upon adsorption of a target molecule, and modify the electron transport in the nanotube. The present work focuses on a simple system, carbon nanotubes with gold clusters. The nature of the gold-nanotube interaction is studied using first-principles techniques. The numerical simulations predict the binding and diffusion energies of gold atoms at the tube surface, including realistic atomic models for defects potentially present at the nanotube surface. The atomic structure of the gold nanoclusters and their effect on the intrinsic electronic quantum transport properties of the nanotube are also predicted. Experimentally, multi-wall CNTs are decorated with gold clusters using (1) vacuum evaporation, after activation with an RF oxygen plasma and (2) colloid solution injected into an RF atmospheric plasma; the hybrid systems are accurately characterized using XPS and TEM techniques. The response of gas sensors based on these nano{sup 2}hybrids is quantified for the detection of toxic species like NO{sub 2}, CO, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}.

  13. The aminoglycosides modulate the acid-sensing ionic channel currents in dorsal root ganglion neurons from the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Aníbal; López-Ramírez, Omar; Vega, Rosario; Soto, Enrique

    2010-02-01

    Acid-sensing ionic channels (ASICs) have been shown to have a significant role in a growing number of physiological and pathological processes, such as nociception, synaptic transmission and plasticity, mechanosensation, and acidosis-induced neuronal injury. The discovery of pharmacological agents targeting ASICs has significant therapeutic potential and use as a research tool. In our work, we studied the action of transient perfusion (5-15 s) of aminoglycosides (AGs) (streptomycin and neomycin) on the proton-gated ionic currents in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of the rat and in human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells. In DRG neurons, streptomycin and neomycin (30 microM) produced a significant, concentration-dependent, and reversible reduction in the amplitude of the proton-gated current, and a slowing of the desensitization rate of the ASIC current. Gentamycin (30 microM) also showed a significant reversible action on the ASIC currents. The curves of the pH effect for streptomycin and neomycin indicated that their effect was not significantly affected by pH. In HEK-293 cells, streptomycin (30 microM) produced a significant reduction in the amplitude of the proton-gated current. Neomycin and gentamycin had no significant action. Reduction of extracellular Ca(2+) concentration produced a significant increase in the action of streptomycin and neomycin on the desensitization time course of ASIC currents. These results indicate that ASICs are molecular targets for AGs, which may contribute to the understanding of their actions on excitable cells. Moreover, AGs may constitute a source to develop novel molecules with a greater affinity, specificity, and selectivity for the different ASIC subunits.

  14. Quantum galvanometer by interfacing a vibrating nanowire and cold atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Kálmán, O.; Kiss, T.; Fortágh, J.; Domokos, P.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluate the coupling of a Bose-Einstein condensate of ultracold, paramagnetic atoms to the magnetic field of the current in a mechanically vibrating carbon nanotube within the frame of a full quantum theory. We find that the interaction is strong enough to sense quantum features of the nanowire current noise spectrum by means of hyperfine-state-selective atom counting. Such a non-destructive measurement of the electric current via its magnetic field corresponds to the classical galvanomet...

  15. An investigation of the role of current and future remote sensing data systems in numerical meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diak, George R.; Smith, William L.

    1993-01-01

    The goals of this research endeavor have been to develop a flexible and relatively complete framework for the investigation of current and future satellite data sources in numerical meteorology. In order to realistically model how satellite information might be used for these purposes, it is necessary that Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) be as complete as possible. It is therefore desirable that these experiments simulate in entirety the sequence of steps involved in bringing satellite information from the radiance level through product retrieval to a realistic analysis and forecast sequence. In this project we have worked to make this sequence realistic by synthesizing raw satellite data from surrogate atmospheres, deriving satellite products from these data and subsequently producing analyses and forecasts using the retrieved products. The accomplishments made in 1991 are presented. The emphasis was on examining atmospheric soundings and microphysical products which we expect to produce with the launch of the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), slated for flight in mid 1994.

  16. A preliminary study of the statistical analyses and sampling strategies associated with the integration of remote sensing capabilities into the current agricultural crop forecasting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, F.; Christie, R.

    1975-01-01

    Extending the crop survey application of remote sensing from small experimental regions to state and national levels requires that a sample of agricultural fields be chosen for remote sensing of crop acreage, and that a statistical estimate be formulated with measurable characteristics. The critical requirements for the success of the application are reviewed in this report. The problem of sampling in the presence of cloud cover is discussed. Integration of remotely sensed information about crops into current agricultural crop forecasting systems is treated on the basis of the USDA multiple frame survey concepts, with an assumed addition of a new frame derived from remote sensing. Evolution of a crop forecasting system which utilizes LANDSAT and future remote sensing systems is projected for the 1975-1990 time frame.

  17. A Novel Technique for Maximum Power Point Tracking of a Photovoltaic Based on Sensing of Array Current Using Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Zoghby, Helmy M.; Bendary, Ahmed F.

    2016-10-01

    Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) is now widely used method in increasing the photovoltaic (PV) efficiency. The conventional MPPT methods have many problems concerning the accuracy, flexibility and efficiency. The MPP depends on the PV temperature and solar irradiation that randomly varied. In this paper an artificial intelligence based controller is presented through implementing of an Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) to obtain maximum power from PV. The ANFIS inputs are the temperature and cell current, and the output is optimal voltage at maximum power. During operation the trained ANFIS senses the PV current using suitable sensor and also senses the temperature to determine the optimal operating voltage that corresponds to the current at MPP. This voltage is used to control the boost converter duty cycle. The MATLAB simulation results shows the effectiveness of the ANFIS with sensing the PV current in obtaining the MPPT from the PV.

  18. Remote sensing of cloud top pressure/height from SEVIRI: analysis of ten current retrieval algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, U.; Walther, A.; Baum, B.; Bennartz, R.; Bugliaro, L.; Derrien, M.; Francis, P. N.; Heidinger, A.; Joro, S.; Kniffka, A.; Le Gléau, H.; Lockhoff, M.; Lutz, H.-J.; Meirink, J. F.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Roebeling, R.; Thoss, A.; Platnick, S.; Watts, P.; Wind, G.

    2014-09-01

    The role of clouds remains the largest uncertainty in climate projections. They influence solar and thermal radiative transfer and the earth's water cycle. Therefore, there is an urgent need for accurate cloud observations to validate climate models and to monitor climate change. Passive satellite imagers measuring radiation at visible to thermal infrared (IR) wavelengths provide a wealth of information on cloud properties. Among others, the cloud top height (CTH) - a crucial parameter to estimate the thermal cloud radiative forcing - can be retrieved. In this paper we investigate the skill of ten current retrieval algorithms to estimate the CTH using observations from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) onboard Meteosat Second Generation (MSG). In the first part we compare ten SEVIRI cloud top pressure (CTP) data sets with each other. The SEVIRI algorithms catch the latitudinal variation of the CTP in a similar way. The agreement is better in the extratropics than in the tropics. In the tropics multi-layer clouds and thin cirrus layers complicate the CTP retrieval, whereas a good agreement among the algorithms is found for trade wind cumulus, marine stratocumulus and the optically thick cores of the deep convective system. In the second part of the paper the SEVIRI retrievals are compared to CTH observations from the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) instruments. It is important to note that the different measurement techniques cause differences in the retrieved CTH data. SEVIRI measures a radiatively effective CTH, while the CTH of the active instruments is derived from the return time of the emitted radar or lidar signal. Therefore, some systematic differences are expected. On average the CTHs detected by the SEVIRI algorithms are 1.0 to 2.5 km lower than CALIOP observations, and the correlation coefficients between the SEVIRI and the CALIOP data sets range between 0.77 and 0.90. The

  19. Remote sensing of cloud top pressure/height from SEVIRI: analysis of ten current retrieval algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Hamann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of clouds remains the largest uncertainty in climate projections. They influence solar and thermal radiative transfer and the earth's water cycle. Therefore, there is an urgent need for accurate cloud observations to validate climate models and to monitor climate change. Passive satellite imagers measuring radiation at visible to thermal infrared wavelengths provide a wealth of information on cloud properties. Among others, the cloud top height (CTH – a crucial parameter to estimate the thermal cloud radiative forcing – can be retrieved. In this paper we investigate the skill of ten current retrieval algorithms to estimate the CTH using observations from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI onboard Meteosat Second Generation (MSG. In the first part we compare the ten SEVIRI cloud top pressure (CTP datasets with each other. The SEVIRI algorithms catch the latitudinal variation of the CTP in a similar way. The agreement is better in the extratropics than in the tropics. In the tropics multi-layer clouds and thin cirrus layers complicate the CTP retrieval, whereas good agreement is found for the cores of the deep convective system having a high optical depth. Furthermore, a good agreement between the algorithms is observed for trade wind cumulus and marine stratocumulus clouds. In the second part of the paper the SEVIRI retrievals are compared to CTH observations from the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP and Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR instruments. It is important to note that the different measurement techniques cause differences in the retrieved CHT data. SEVIRI measures a radiatively effective CTH, while the CTH of the active instruments is derived from the return time of the emitted signal. Therefore some systematic diffrences are expected. On average the CTHs detected by the SEVIRI algorithms are 1.0 to 2.5 km lower than CALIOP observations, and the correlation coefficients between the

  20. Remote sensing of cloud top pressure/height from SEVIRI: analysis of ten current retrieval algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Hamann

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The role of clouds remains the largest uncertainty in climate projections. They influence solar and thermal radiative transfer and the earth's water cycle. Therefore, there is an urgent need for accurate cloud observations to validate climate models and to monitor climate change. Passive satellite imagers measuring radiation at visible to thermal infrared (IR wavelengths provide a wealth of information on cloud properties. Among others, the cloud top height (CTH – a crucial parameter to estimate the thermal cloud radiative forcing – can be retrieved. In this paper we investigate the skill of ten current retrieval algorithms to estimate the CTH using observations from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI onboard Meteosat Second Generation (MSG. In the first part we compare ten SEVIRI cloud top pressure (CTP data sets with each other. The SEVIRI algorithms catch the latitudinal variation of the CTP in a similar way. The agreement is better in the extratropics than in the tropics. In the tropics multi-layer clouds and thin cirrus layers complicate the CTP retrieval, whereas a good agreement among the algorithms is found for trade wind cumulus, marine stratocumulus and the optically thick cores of the deep convective system. In the second part of the paper the SEVIRI retrievals are compared to CTH observations from the Cloud–Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP and Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR instruments. It is important to note that the different measurement techniques cause differences in the retrieved CTH data. SEVIRI measures a radiatively effective CTH, while the CTH of the active instruments is derived from the return time of the emitted radar or lidar signal. Therefore, some systematic differences are expected. On average the CTHs detected by the SEVIRI algorithms are 1.0 to 2.5 km lower than CALIOP observations, and the correlation coefficients between the SEVIRI and the CALIOP data sets range between

  1. Remote Sensing of Cloud Top Height from SEVIRI: Analysis of Eleven Current Retrieval Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, U.; Walther, A.; Baum, B.; Bennartz, R.; Bugliaro, L.; Derrien, M.; Francis, P. N.; Heidinger, A.; Joro, S.; Kniffka, A.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The role of clouds remains the largest uncertainty in climate projections. They influence solar and thermal radiative transfer and the earth's water cycle. Therefore, there is an urgent need for accurate cloud observations to validate climate models and to monitor climate change. Passive satellite imagers measuring radiation at visible to thermal infrared (IR) wavelengths provide a wealth of information on cloud properties. Among others, the cloud top height (CTH) - a crucial parameter to estimate the thermal cloud radiative forcing - can be retrieved. In this paper we investigate the skill of ten current retrieval algorithms to estimate the CTH using observations from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) onboard Meteosat Second Generation (MSG). In the first part we compare ten SEVIRI cloud top pressure (CTP) data sets with each other. The SEVIRI algorithms catch the latitudinal variation of the CTP in a similar way. The agreement is better in the extratropics than in the tropics. In the tropics multi-layer clouds and thin cirrus layers complicate the CTP retrieval, whereas a good agreement among the algorithms is found for trade wind cumulus, marine stratocumulus and the optically thick cores of the deep convective system. In the second part of the paper the SEVIRI retrievals are compared to CTH observations from the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) instruments. It is important to note that the different measurement techniques cause differences in the retrieved CTH data. SEVIRI measures a radiatively effective CTH, while the CTH of the active instruments is derived from the return time of the emitted radar or lidar signal. Therefore, some systematic differences are expected. On average the CTHs detected by the SEVIRI algorithms are 1.0 to 2.5 kilometers lower than CALIOP observations, and the correlation coefficients between the SEVIRI and the CALIOP data sets range between 0.77 and 0

  2. Remote Sensing of Cloud Top Height from SEVIRI: Analysis of Eleven Current Retrieval Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, U.; Walther, A.; Baum, B.; Bennartz, R.; Bugliaro, L.; Derrien, M.; Francis, P. N.; Heidinger, A.; Joro, S.; Kniffka, A.; Le Gleau, H.; Lockhoff, M.; Lutz, H.-J.; Meirink, J. F.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Roebeling, R.; Thoss, A.; Platnick, S.; Watts, P.; Wind, G.

    2014-01-01

    The role of clouds remains the largest uncertainty in climate projections. They influence solar and thermal radiative transfer and the earth's water cycle. Therefore, there is an urgent need for accurate cloud observations to validate climate models and to monitor climate change. Passive satellite imagers measuring radiation at visible to thermal infrared (IR) wavelengths provide a wealth of information on cloud properties. Among others, the cloud top height (CTH) - a crucial parameter to estimate the thermal cloud radiative forcing - can be retrieved. In this paper we investigate the skill of ten current retrieval algorithms to estimate the CTH using observations from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) onboard Meteosat Second Generation (MSG). In the first part we compare ten SEVIRI cloud top pressure (CTP) data sets with each other. The SEVIRI algorithms catch the latitudinal variation of the CTP in a similar way. The agreement is better in the extratropics than in the tropics. In the tropics multi-layer clouds and thin cirrus layers complicate the CTP retrieval, whereas a good agreement among the algorithms is found for trade wind cumulus, marine stratocumulus and the optically thick cores of the deep convective system. In the second part of the paper the SEVIRI retrievals are compared to CTH observations from the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) instruments. It is important to note that the different measurement techniques cause differences in the retrieved CTH data. SEVIRI measures a radiatively effective CTH, while the CTH of the active instruments is derived from the return time of the emitted radar or lidar signal. Therefore, some systematic differences are expected. On average the CTHs detected by the SEVIRI algorithms are 1.0 to 2.5 kilometers lower than CALIOP observations, and the correlation coefficients between the SEVIRI and the CALIOP data sets range between 0.77 and 0

  3. Current-voltage curves of atomic-sized transition metal contacts: An explanation of why Au is ohmic and Pt is not

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S.K.; Brandbyge, Mads; Hansen, K.

    2002-01-01

    We present an experimental study of current-voltage (I-V) curves on atomic-sized Au and Pt contacts formed under cryogenic vacuum (4.2 K). Whereas I-V curves for Au are almost Ohmic, the conductance G=I/V for Pt decreases with increasing voltage, resulting in distinct nonlinear I-V behavior...

  4. Improved sensing characteristics of methane over ZnO nano sheets upon implanting defects and foreign atoms substitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Tanveer; Kaewmaraya, Thanayut; Khan, Mehwish; Chakraborty, Sudip; Shafiq Islam, Muhammad; Amornkitbamrung, Vittaya; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2017-10-01

    Thanks to the growing interests of metal oxide sensors in environmental and industrial uses, this study presents the sensing mechanism of methane gas (CH4) on recently synthesized two-dimensional form of ZnO, ZnO nano sheets (ZnO-NS). The adsorption energy of CH4 on pristine ZnO-NS, calculated by means of van der Waals corrected first-principles calculations, is found to be insufficient restricting its application as an efficient nano sensor. However, the creation of (O/Zn) vacancies and the substitution of foreign dopants into ZnO-NS considerably intensify the binding energy of CH4. Through a comprehensive energetic analysis, it is observed that among all the substituents, boron (B), sulphur (S) and gallium (Ga) improves the binding of CH4 to 2.75, 6.1 and 7.5 times respectively than its values on pristine ZnO-NS. In addition to the CH4 binding energies falling ideally between physisorption and chemisorption range, a prominent variation in the electronic properties before and after CH4 exposure indicates the promise of substituted Zn-NS as a useful nano sensors.

  5. Synthesis of carbon nanotube-nickel nanocomposites using atomic layer deposition for high-performance non-enzymatic glucose sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Taejin; Kim, Soo Hyeon; Lee, Chang Wan; Kim, Hangil; Choi, Sang-Kyung; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Eunkyoung; Park, Jusang; Kim, Hyungjun

    2015-01-15

    A useful strategy has been developed to fabricate carbon-nanotube-nickel (CNT-Ni) nanocomposites through atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Ni and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of functionalized CNTs. Various techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), were used to characterize the morphology and the structure of as-prepared samples. It was confirmed that the products possess uniform Ni nanoparticles that are constructed by finely controlled deposition of Ni onto oxygen or bromine functionalized CNT surface. Electrochemical studies indicate that the CNT-Ni nanocomposites exhibit high electrocatalytic activity for glucose oxidation in alkaline solutions, which enables the products to be used in enzyme-free electrochemical sensors for glucose determination. It was demonstrated that the CNT-Ni nanocomposite-based glucose biosensor offers a variety of merits, such as a wide linear response window for glucose concentrations of 5 μM-2 mM, short response time (3 s), a low detection limit (2 μM), high sensitivity (1384.1 μA mM(-1) cm(-2)), and good selectivity and repeatability.

  6. Remote Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Khorram, Siamak; Koch, Frank H; van der Wiele, Cynthia F

    2012-01-01

    Remote Sensing provides information on how remote sensing relates to the natural resources inventory, management, and monitoring, as well as environmental concerns. It explains the role of this new technology in current global challenges. "Remote Sensing" will discuss remotely sensed data application payloads and platforms, along with the methodologies involving image processing techniques as applied to remotely sensed data. This title provides information on image classification techniques and image registration, data integration, and data fusion techniques. How this technology applies to natural resources and environmental concerns will also be discussed.

  7. Non-contact online thickness measurement system for metal films based on eddy current sensing with distance tracking technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Wang, Hongbo; Feng, Zhihua

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes an online, non-contact metal film thickness measurement system based on eddy current sensing. The slope of the lift-off curve (LOC) is used for characterizing target thickness. Theoretical derivation was conducted to prove that the slope is independent of the lift-off variation. In practice, the measurement has some immunity to the lift-off, but not perfect. The slope of LOC is still affected at some extent by the lift-off. Hence, a height tracking system was also proposed, which could stabilize the distance between the sensor and the target and significantly reduce the lift-off effect. The height tracking system contains a specially designed probe, which could vibrate rapidly to obtain a fast measurement speed, and its height can be adjusted up and down continuously to stabilize the lift-off. The sensor coil in the thickness measurement system was also used as the height sensor in the height tracking system. Several experiments were conducted to test the system performances under static and dynamic conditions. This measurement system demonstrated significant advantages, such as simple and clear conversion between the slope of LOC and target thickness, high resolution and stability, and minimized effect of lift-off variation.

  8. The Current Status of Research on GNSS-R Remote Sensing Technology in China and Future Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li Huang; Xia Qing; Yin Cong; Wan Wei

    2013-01-01

    .... In recent years, development of the navigation satellite remote sensing applications using GNSS as a external illuminator, it has been forming a new Global Navigation Satellite System METeorology (GNSS/MET...

  9. What controls open-pore and residual currents in the first sensing zone of alpha-hemolysin nanopore? Combined experimental and theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Biase, Pablo M.; Ervin, Eric N.; Pal, Prithwish; Samoylova, Olga; Markosyan, Suren; Keehan, Michael G.; Barrall, Geoffrey A.; Noskov, Sergei Yu.

    2016-06-01

    The electrophoretic transport of single-stranded DNA through biological nanopores such as alpha-hemolysin (αHL) is a promising and cost-effective technology with the potential to revolutionize genomics. The rational design of pores with the controlled polymer translocation rates and high contrast between different nucleotides could improve significantly nanopore sequencing applications. Here, we apply a combination of theoretical and experimental methods in an attempt to elucidate several selective modifications in the pore which were proposed to be central for the effective discrimination between purines and pyrimidines. Our nanopore test set includes the wild type αHL and six mutants (E111N/M113X/K147N) in which the cross-section and chemical functionality of the first constriction zone of the pore are modified. Electrophysiological recordings were combined with all-atom Molecular Dynamics simulations (MD) and a recently developed Brownian Dynamics (BROMOC) protocol to investigate residual ion currents and pore-DNA interactions for two homo-polymers e.g. poly(dA)40 or poly(dC)40 blocking the pore. The calculated residual currents and contrast in the poly(dA)40/poly(dC)40 blocked pore are in qualitative agreement with the experimental recordings. We showed that a simple structural metric allows rationalization of key elements in the emergent contrast between purines and pyrimidines in the modified αHL mutants. The shape of the pore and its capacity for hydrogen bonding to a translocated polynucleotide are two essential parameters for contrast optimization. To further probe the impact of these two factors in the ssDNA sensing, we eliminated the effect of the primary constriction using serine substitutions (i.e. E111S/M113S/T145S/K147S) and increased the hydrophobic volume of the central residue in the secondary constriction (L135I). This pore modification sharply increased the contrast between Adenine (A) and Cytosine (C).The electrophoretic transport of single

  10. Tumor radiosensitizers - current status of development of various approaches: Report of an International Atomic Energy Agency meeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsman, Michael Robert; Bohm, Lothar; Margison, Geoffrey P.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) held a Technical Meeting of Consultants to (1) discuss a selection of relatively new agents, not those well-established in clinical practice, that operated through a variety of mechanisms to sensitize tumors to radiation and (2) to compare...... and contrast their tumor efficacy, normal tissue toxicity, and status of development regarding clinical application. The aim was to advise the IAEA as to which developing agent or class of agents would be worth promoting further, by supporting additional laboratory research or clinical trials...... and for clinical trials that would be suitable for industrialized countries, as well as trials that were considered more appropriate for developing countries.PURPOSE: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) held a Technical Meeting of Consultants to (1) discuss a selection of relatively new agents, not those...

  11. Tumor radiosensitizers - current status of development of various approaches: Report of an International Atomic Energy Agency meeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsman, Michael Robert; Bohm, Lothar; Margison, Geoffrey P.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) held a Technical Meeting of Consultants to (1) discuss a selection of relatively new agents, not those well-established in clinical practice, that operated through a variety of mechanisms to sensitize tumors to radiation and (2) to compare...... and contrast their tumor efficacy, normal tissue toxicity, and status of development regarding clinical application. The aim was to advise the IAEA as to which developing agent or class of agents would be worth promoting further, by supporting additional laboratory research or clinical trials...... and for clinical trials that would be suitable for industrialized countries, as well as trials that were considered more appropriate for developing countries.PURPOSE: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) held a Technical Meeting of Consultants to (1) discuss a selection of relatively new agents, not those...

  12. Development of rapid slurry methods for flame and direct current plasma emission and graphite furnace atomic absorption analysis of solid animal tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fietkau, R.

    1986-01-01

    Studies are presented describing developments in the rapid, direct atomic spectrochemical analysis of meat samples by the technique of slurry atomization. The number of elements that can be determined in meat slurry samples has been increased and the concentration range that can be detected extended to included analysis at the part per billion as well as the percent level. Slurry atomization involves the rapid preparation procedure whereby the sample is simple homogenized with deionized distilled water prior to analysis. In this manner, rapid, quantitative analysis of hot dogs (processed meat) for dietary salt (Na, K) was achieved by premixed air-natural gas flame emission spectrometry. Quantitative analysis of mechanically separated meat for residual bone fragments (as Ca) was attained using a simple photometer when the premixed air-acetylene flame was used. The phosphate interference of the Ca emission signal was overcome by placing an insert in the spray chamber which decreased the droplet size of the aerosol reaching the flame. Slight matrix modification in the form of 2% nitric acid was necessary to solubilize the Ca from the bone fragments. Determining elements present at very low concentrations i.e. part per billion levels, in homogenized beef liver was evaluated using graphite furnace atomic absorption and shown to be viable for determinations of Pb, Cd, Cr, and Ni. Qualitative multielement analysis of several types of meat slurries by direct current plasma (DCP) emission spectrometry using both photographic and electronic modes of detection was reported for the first time.

  13. Omega currents in voltage-gated ion channels: what can we learn from uncovering the voltage-sensing mechanism using MD simulations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarek, Mounir; Delemotte, Lucie

    2013-12-17

    Ion channels conduct charged species through otherwise impermeable biological membranes. Their activity supports a number of physiological processes, and genetic mutations can disrupt their function dramatically. Among these channels, voltage gated cation channels (VGCCs) are ubiquitous transmembrane proteins involved in electrical signaling. In addition to their selectivity for ions, their function requires membrane-polarization-dependent gating. Triggered by changes in the transmembrane voltage, the activation and deactivation of VGCCs proceed through a sensing mechanism that prompts motion of conserved positively charged (basic) residues within the S4 helix of a four-helix bundle, the voltage sensor domain (VSD). Decades of experimental investigations, using electrophysiology, molecular biology, pharmacology, and spectroscopy, have revealed details about the function of VGCCs. However, in 2005, the resolution of the crystal structure of the activated state of one member of the mammalian voltage gated potassium (Kv) channels family (the Kv1.2) enabled researchers to make significant progress in understanding the structure-function relationship in these proteins on a molecular level. In this Account, we review the use of a complementary technique, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, that has offered new insights on this timely issue. Starting from the "open-activated state" crystal structure, we have carried out large-scale all atom MD simulations of the Kv1.2 channel embedded in its lipidic environment and submitted to a hyperpolarizing (negative) transmembrane potential. We then used steered MD simulations to complete the full transition to the resting-closed state. Using these procedures, we have followed the operation of the VSDs and uncovered three intermediate states between their activated and deactivated conformations. Each conformational state is characterized by its network of salt bridges and by the occupation of the gating charge transfer center by a

  14. Current status of the AMS facility at the Tono Geoscience Center of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito-Kokubu, Y., E-mail: kokubu.yoko@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Toki, Gifu 509-5102 (Japan); Nishizawa, A.; Suzuki, M.; Ohwaki, Y.; Nishio, T. [Pesco Corp., Ltd., Toki, Gifu 509-5123 (Japan); Matsubara, A.; Saito, T.; Ishimaru, T.; Umeda, K.; Hanaki, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Toki, Gifu 509-5102 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    The JAEA-AMS-TONO system is routinely used for {sup 14}C measurements at Tono Geoscience Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and applied to neotectonics and hydrogeology, in support of research on geosphere stability applicable to the long-term isolation of high-level radioactive waste. {sup 10}Be AMS has been developed for geochronological studies to estimate sedimentation rates and exposure age of basement rocks, incorporating a gas ionization detector with a large-volume gas absorber cell. Test measurements on {sup 14}C and {sup 10}Be reference materials show the system's performance and suitability for application in the geosciences.

  15. Quantum fluid dynamics based current-density functional study of a helium atom in a strong time-dependent magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikas, Hash(0x125f4490)

    2011-02-01

    Evolution of the helium atom in a strong time-dependent (TD) magnetic field ( B) of strength up to 1011 G is investigated through a quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) based current-density functional theory (CDFT). The TD-QFD-CDFT computations are performed through numerical solution of a single generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation employing vector exchange-correlation potentials and scalar exchange-correlation density functionals that depend both on the electronic charge-density and the current-density. The results are compared with that obtained from a B-TD-QFD-DFT approach (based on conventional TD-DFT) under similar numerical constraints but employing only scalar exchange-correlation potential dependent on electronic charge-density only. The B-TD-QFD-DFT approach, at a particular TD magnetic field-strength, yields electronic charge- and current-densities as well as exchange-correlation potential resembling with that obtained from the time-independent studies involving static (time-independent) magnetic fields. However, TD-QFD-CDFT electronic charge- and current-densities along with the exchange-correlation potential and energy differ significantly from that obtained using B-TD-QFD-DFT approach, particularly at field-strengths >109 G, representing dynamical effects of a TD field. The work concludes that when a helium atom is subjected to a strong TD magnetic field of order >109 G, the conventional TD-DFT based approach differs "dynamically" from the CDFT based approach under similar computational constraints.

  16. Utilization of Hydrologic Remote Sensing Data in Land Surface Modeling and Data Assimilation: Current Status and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sujay V.; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Reichl, Rolf; Harrison, Kenneth; Santanello, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in remote sensing technologies have enabled the monitoring and measurement of the Earth's land surface at an unprecedented scale and frequency. The myriad of these land surface observations must be integrated with the state-of-the-art land surface model forecasts using data assimilation to generate spatially and temporally coherent estimates of environmental conditions. These analyses are of critical importance to real-world applications such as agricultural production, water resources management and flood, drought, weather and climate prediction. This need motivated the development of NASA Land Information System (LIS), which is an expert system encapsulating a suite of modeling, computational and data assimilation tools required to address challenging hydrological problems. LIS integrates the use of several community land surface models, use of ground and satellite based observations, data assimilation and uncertainty estimation techniques and high performance computing and data management tools to enable the assessment and prediction of hydrologic conditions at various spatial and temporal scales of interest. This presentation will focus on describing the results, challenges and lessons learned from the use of remote sensing data for improving land surface modeling, within LIS. More specifically, studies related to the improved estimation of soil moisture, snow and land surface temperature conditions through data assimilation will be discussed. The presentation will also address the characterization of uncertainty in the modeling process through Bayesian remote sensing and computational methods.

  17. Determination of trace amounts of molybdenum in plant tissue by solvent extraction-atomic-absorption and direct-current plasma emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajunen, L H; Kubin, A

    1986-03-01

    Methods are presented for determination of molybdenum in plant tissue by flame and graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry and direct-current argon-plasma emission spectrometry. The samples are digested in HNO(3)-H(2)SO(4)-HC1O(4) mixture, and Mo is separated and concentrated by chelation and extraction. Three organic solvents (methyl isobutyl ketone, di-isobutyl ketone and isoamyl alcohol) and two ligands (8-hydroxyquinoline and toluene-3,4-dithiol) were studied. The procedure were tested on pine needle and birch leaf samples.

  18. Atomic magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Peter [Albuquerque, NM; Johnson, Cort N [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-07-03

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which uses a pump light beam at a D1 or D2 transition of an alkali metal vapor to magnetically polarize the vapor in a heated cell, and a probe light beam at a different D2 or D1 transition to sense the magnetic field via a polarization rotation of the probe light beam. The pump and probe light beams are both directed along substantially the same optical path through an optical waveplate and through the heated cell to an optical filter which blocks the pump light beam while transmitting the probe light beam to one or more photodetectors which generate electrical signals to sense the magnetic field. The optical waveplate functions as a quarter waveplate to circularly polarize the pump light beam, and as a half waveplate to maintain the probe light beam linearly polarized.

  19. Quantum fluid dynamics based current-density functional study of a helium atom in a strong time-dependent magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikas [Quantum Chemistry Group, Department of Chemistry and Centre of Advanced Studies in Chemistry, Panjab University, 160014 Chandigrah (India)

    2011-02-15

    Evolution of the helium atom in a strong time-dependent (TD) magnetic field (B) of strength up to 10{sup 11} G is investigated through a quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) based current-density functional theory (CDFT). The TD-QFD-CDFT computations are performed through numerical solution of a single generalized nonlinear Schroedinger equation employing vector exchange-correlation potentials and scalar exchange-correlation density functionals that depend both on the electronic charge-density and the current-density. The results are compared with that obtained from a B-TD-QFD-DFT approach (based on conventional TD-DFT) under similar numerical constraints but employing only scalar exchange-correlation potential dependent on electronic charge-density only. The B-TD-QFD-DFT approach, at a particular TD magnetic field-strength, yields electronic charge- and current-densities as well as exchange-correlation potential resembling with that obtained from the time-independent studies involving static (time-independent) magnetic fields. However, TD-QFD-CDFT electronic charge- and current-densities along with the exchange-correlation potential and energy differ significantly from that obtained using B-TD-QFD-DFT approach, particularly at field-strengths >10{sup 9} G, representing dynamical effects of a TD field. The work concludes that when a helium atom is subjected to a strong TD magnetic field of order >10{sup 9} G, the conventional TD-DFT based approach differs 'dynamically' from the CDFT based approach under similar computational constraints. (author)

  20. Current-Sensing and Voltage-Feedback Driving Method for Large-Area High-Resolution Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    In, Hai‑Jung; Choi, Byong‑Deok; Chung, Ho‑Kyoon; Kwon, Oh‑Kyong

    2006-05-01

    There is the problem of picture quality nonuniformity due to thin film transistor (TFT) characteristic variations throughout a panel of large-area high-resolution active matrix organic light emitting diodes. The current programming method could solve this issue, but it also requires very long charging time of a data line at low gray shades. Therefore, we propose a new driving method and a pixel circuit with emission-current sensing and feedback operation in order to resolve these problems. The proposed driving method and pixel circuit successfully compensate threshold voltage and mobility variations of TFTs and overcome the data line charging problem. Simulation results show that emission current deviations of the proposed driving method are less than 1.7% with ± 10.0% mobility and ± 0.3 V threshold voltage variations of pixel-driving TFTs, which means the proposed driving method is applicable to large-area high-resolution applications.

  1. Probing a Device's Active Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studniarek, Michał; Halisdemir, Ufuk; Schleicher, Filip; Taudul, Beata; Urbain, Etienne; Boukari, Samy; Hervé, Marie; Lambert, Charles-Henri; Hamadeh, Abbass; Petit-Watelot, Sebastien; Zill, Olivia; Lacour, Daniel; Joly, Loïc; Scheurer, Fabrice; Schmerber, Guy; Da Costa, Victor; Dixit, Anant; Guitard, Pierre André; Acosta, Manuel; Leduc, Florian; Choueikani, Fadi; Otero, Edwige; Wulfhekel, Wulf; Montaigne, François; Monteblanco, Elmer Nahuel; Arabski, Jacek; Ohresser, Philippe; Beaurepaire, Eric; Weber, Wolfgang; Alouani, Mébarek; Hehn, Michel; Bowen, Martin

    2017-05-01

    Materials science and device studies have, when implemented jointly as "operando" studies, better revealed the causal link between the properties of the device's materials and its operation, with applications ranging from gas sensing to information and energy technologies. Here, as a further step that maximizes this causal link, the paper focuses on the electronic properties of those atoms that drive a device's operation by using it to read out the materials property. It is demonstrated how this method can reveal insight into the operation of a macroscale, industrial-grade microelectronic device on the atomic level. A magnetic tunnel junction's (MTJ's) current, which involves charge transport across different atomic species and interfaces, is measured while these atoms absorb soft X-rays with synchrotron-grade brilliance. X-ray absorption is found to affect magnetotransport when the photon energy and linear polarization are tuned to excite FeO bonds parallel to the MTJ's interfaces. This explicit link between the device's spintronic performance and these FeO bonds, although predicted, challenges conventional wisdom on their detrimental spintronic impact. The technique opens interdisciplinary possibilities to directly probe the role of different atomic species on device operation, and shall considerably simplify the materials science iterations within device research. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Current Situation and Education Exploration of Vocational Students' Sense of Responsibility%高职生责任意识现状及其教育探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁晓军; 朱琦

    2012-01-01

    高等职业院校培养的是高素质技能型专门人才,他们的责任意识直接关系到自身职业能力的获取以及经济社会的发展。当前,高职生责任意识的缺失已成为现阶段我国高职教育中一个不可忽视的问题。本文在分析高职生责任意识现状及其缺失原因的基础上,提出了相应的对策建议。%The vocational institutions cultivate high-quality skilled expertise, their sense of responsibility is directly related to their own professional ability as well as the economic and social development. Currently, the lack of the sense of responsibility of the vocational high school students has become a problem can not be ignored at this stage of higher vocational education in China. In this paper, based on the analysis of vocational high school students a sense of responsibility to the status quo and its deletion causes, put forward corresponding suggestions.

  3. From Nose to Brain: Un-Sensed Electrical Currents Applied in the Nose Alter Activity in Deep Brain Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, Tali; Shushan, Sagit; Ravia, Aharon; Hahamy, Avital; Secundo, Lavi; Weissbrod, Aharon; Ben-Yakov, Aya; Holtzman, Yael; Cohen-Atsmoni, Smadar; Roth, Yehudah; Sobel, Noam

    2016-01-01

    Rules linking patterns of olfactory receptor neuron activation in the nose to activity patterns in the brain and ensuing odor perception remain poorly understood. Artificially stimulating olfactory neurons with electrical currents and measuring ensuing perception may uncover these rules. We therefore inserted an electrode into the nose of 50 human volunteers and applied various currents for about an hour in each case. This induced assorted non-olfactory sensations but never once the perceptio...

  4. Demand specifying variables and current ventilation rate requirements with respect to the future use of voc sensing for dcv control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolarik, Jakub

    Demand Controlled Ventilation (DCV) is a well established principle to provide a certain indoor environmental quality, defined both in the terms of air quality and thermal comfort. This is accomplished by adjusting the supplied airflow rate according to a certain demand indicator, which conventio......Demand Controlled Ventilation (DCV) is a well established principle to provide a certain indoor environmental quality, defined both in the terms of air quality and thermal comfort. This is accomplished by adjusting the supplied airflow rate according to a certain demand indicator, which...... conventionally has been the temperature or the CO2-concentration. When compared to schedule driven ventilation, application of DCV can lead to substantial energy savings. However, CO2 is the pollutant related to human occupancy and it does not provide any indication of so called building-related pollution...... be also taken into account in the ventilation control. Recent development in gas sensing technology resulted in a new generation of relatively cheap and practically applicable sensors that can offer measurements of some of the pollutants mentioned above – mainly Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC...

  5. Sensing temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Piali; Garrity, Paul

    2013-04-22

    Temperature is an omnipresent physical variable reflecting the rotational, vibrational and translational motion of matter, what Richard Feynman called the "jiggling" of atoms. Temperature varies across space and time, and this variation has dramatic effects on the physiology of living cells. It changes the rate and nature of chemical reactions, and it alters the configuration of the atoms that make up nucleic acids, proteins, lipids and other biomolecules, significantly affecting their activity. While life may have started in a "warm little pond", as Charles Darwin mused, the organisms that surround us today have only made it this far by devising sophisticated systems for sensing and responding to variations in temperature, and by using these systems in ways that allow them to persist and thrive in the face of thermal fluctuation.

  6. Polarization curve measurements combined with potential probe sensing for determining current density distribution in vanadium redox-flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Maik; Bredemeyer, Niels; Tenhumberg, Nils; Turek, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Potential probes are applied to vanadium redox-flow batteries for determination of effective felt resistance and current density distribution. During the measurement of polarization curves in 100 cm2 cells with different carbon felt compression rates, alternating potential steps at cell voltages between 0.6 V and 2.0 V are applied. Polarization curves are recorded at different flow rates and states of charge of the battery. Increasing compression rates lead to lower effective felt resistances and a more uniform resistance distribution. Low flow rates at high or low state of charge result in non-linear current density distribution with high gradients, while high flow rates give rise to a nearly linear behavior.

  7. Atoms Talking to SQUIDs

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffman, J E; Kim, Z; Wood, A K; Anderson, J R; Dragt, A J; Hafezi, M; Lobb, C J; Orozco, L A; Rolston, S L; Taylor, J M; Vlahacos, C P; Wellstood, F C

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme to couple trapped $^{87}$Rb atoms to a superconducting flux qubit through a magnetic dipole transition. We plan to trap atoms on the evanescent wave outside an ultrathin fiber to bring the atoms to less than 10 $\\mu$m above the surface of the superconductor. This hybrid setup lends itself to probing sources of decoherence in superconducting qubits. Our current plan has the intermediate goal of coupling the atoms to a superconducting LC resonator.

  8. Flexible heat-flow sensing sheets based on the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect using one-dimensional spin-current conducting films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirihara, Akihiro; Kondo, Koichi; Ishida, Masahiko; Ihara, Kazuki; Iwasaki, Yuma; Someya, Hiroko; Matsuba, Asuka; Uchida, Ken-ichi; Saitoh, Eiji; Yamamoto, Naoharu; Kohmoto, Shigeru; Murakami, Tomoo

    2016-03-15

    Heat-flow sensing is expected to be an important technological component of smart thermal management in the future. Conventionally, the thermoelectric (TE) conversion technique, which is based on the Seebeck effect, has been used to measure a heat flow by converting the flow into electric voltage. However, for ubiquitous heat-flow visualization, thin and flexible sensors with extremely low thermal resistance are highly desired. Recently, another type of TE effect, the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE), has aroused great interest because the LSSE potentially offers favourable features for TE applications such as simple thin-film device structures. Here we demonstrate an LSSE-based flexible TE sheet that is especially suitable for a heat-flow sensing application. This TE sheet contained a Ni0.2Zn0.3Fe2.5O4 film which was formed on a flexible plastic sheet using a spray-coating method known as "ferrite plating". The experimental results suggest that the ferrite-plated film, which has a columnar crystal structure aligned perpendicular to the film plane, functions as a unique one-dimensional spin-current conductor suitable for bendable LSSE-based sensors. This newly developed thin TE sheet may be attached to differently shaped heat sources without obstructing an innate heat flux, paving the way to versatile heat-flow measurements and management.

  9. Flexible heat-flow sensing sheets based on the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect using one-dimensional spin-current conducting films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirihara, Akihiro; Kondo, Koichi; Ishida, Masahiko; Ihara, Kazuki; Iwasaki, Yuma; Someya, Hiroko; Matsuba, Asuka; Uchida, Ken-Ichi; Saitoh, Eiji; Yamamoto, Naoharu; Kohmoto, Shigeru; Murakami, Tomoo

    2016-03-01

    Heat-flow sensing is expected to be an important technological component of smart thermal management in the future. Conventionally, the thermoelectric (TE) conversion technique, which is based on the Seebeck effect, has been used to measure a heat flow by converting the flow into electric voltage. However, for ubiquitous heat-flow visualization, thin and flexible sensors with extremely low thermal resistance are highly desired. Recently, another type of TE effect, the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE), has aroused great interest because the LSSE potentially offers favourable features for TE applications such as simple thin-film device structures. Here we demonstrate an LSSE-based flexible TE sheet that is especially suitable for a heat-flow sensing application. This TE sheet contained a Ni0.2Zn0.3Fe2.5O4 film which was formed on a flexible plastic sheet using a spray-coating method known as “ferrite plating”. The experimental results suggest that the ferrite-plated film, which has a columnar crystal structure aligned perpendicular to the film plane, functions as a unique one-dimensional spin-current conductor suitable for bendable LSSE-based sensors. This newly developed thin TE sheet may be attached to differently shaped heat sources without obstructing an innate heat flux, paving the way to versatile heat-flow measurements and management.

  10. Current mapping of nonpolar a-plane and polar c-plane GaN films by conductive atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shengrui; Jiang, Teng; Lin, Zhiyu; Zhao, Ying; Yang, Linan; Zhang, Jincheng; Li, Peixian; Hao, Yue

    2016-10-01

    Nonpolar (11-20) a-plane GaN and polar (0001) c-plane GaN films have been grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on r-plane (1-102) and c-plane (0001) sapphire substrates, respectively. Conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) has been used to investigate the local conductivity of the films. C-AFM shows enhanced current conduction within the etch pits of c-plane GaN and triangular pits of a-plane GaN. The results indicate that the off-axis planes are more electrically active than c-plane and a-plane. Surprisingly, the C-AFM values in triangular pit of the a-plane GaN are much smaller than that in etch pits of the c-plane GaN. The dislocations type related current leakage mechanism is revealed for polar c-plane and nonpolar a-plane GaN films.

  11. Effect of atomic layer deposition temperature on current conduction in Al2O3 films formed using H2O oxidant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraiwa, Atsushi; Matsumura, Daisuke; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    To develop high-performance, high-reliability gate insulation and surface passivation technologies for wide-bandgap semiconductor devices, the effect of atomic layer deposition (ALD) temperature on current conduction in Al2O3 films is investigated based on the recently proposed space-charge-controlled field emission model. Leakage current measurement shows that Al2O3 metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors formed on the Si substrates underperform thermally grown SiO2 capacitors at the same average field. However, using equivalent oxide field as a more practical measure, the Al2O3 capacitors are found to outperform the SiO2 capacitors in the cases where the capacitors are negatively biased and the gate material is adequately selected to reduce virtual dipoles at the gate/Al2O3 interface. The Al2O3 electron affinity increases with the increasing ALD temperature, but the gate-side virtual dipoles are not affected. Therefore, the leakage current of negatively biased Al2O3 capacitors is approximately independent of the ALD temperature because of the compensation of the opposite effects of increased electron affinity and permittivity in Al2O3. By contrast, the substrate-side sheet of charge increases with increasing ALD temperature above 210 °C and hence enhances the current of positively biased Al2O3 capacitors more significantly at high temperatures. Additionally, an anomalous oscillatory shift of the current-voltage characteristics with ALD temperature was observed in positively biased capacitors formed by low-temperature (≤210 °C) ALD. This shift is caused by dipoles at the Al2O3/underlying SiO2 interface. Although they have a minimal positive-bias leakage current, the low-temperature-grown Al2O3 films cause the so-called blisters problem when heated above 400 °C. Therefore, because of the absence of blistering, a 450 °C ALD process is presently the most promising technology for growing high-reliability Al2O3 films.

  12. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    OpenAIRE

    Herbert Crepaz; Li Yuan Ley; Rainer Dumke

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage...

  13. Estimation of cycle-resolved in-cylinder pressure and air-fuel ratio using spark plug ionization current sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B.; Guezennec, Y.G.; Rizzoni, G. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States). Center for Automotive Research and Intelligent Transportation

    2001-10-01

    In recent years, several new sensor technologies have been developed and implemented within automotive industries due to the increasing requirements for improved engine performance and emission reduction. It requires detailed and specified knowledge of the combustion process inside the engine cylinder along with a sophisticated technique in engine diagnostics and control. During the last few years, the ionization current signal detection has been the emerging technology in the new sensor developments, in which the spark plug is used as a combustion probe, to improve the performance and emissions of an automobile engine. In this paper, a novel methodology will be presented which allows the cycle-resolved as well as the meanvalue estimation of the air-fuel ratio and in-cylinder pressure based on the ionization current signal measurements. The implementation details of this methodology as well as extensive results will be presented for a wide range of air-fuel ratios. The main advantage of this new approach to process the ionization signal is its strong potential for real-time estimation of the air-fuel ratio and combustion diagnostics of individual cylinders and engine cycles. All the complex physics during the actual events (combustion process, ion generation, engine dynamics, etc.) are automatically self-extracted by this technique from acquired data in an initial off-line mapping phase. Once this has been performed, the air-fuel ratio and in-cylinder pressure can easily be estimated for each individual cylinder and combustion event in real-time with few computational requirements. Hence, this methodology has a high potential for the real-time combustion diagnostics and engine control based on the air-fuel ratio and in-cylinder pressure, while eliminating the requirements for installing expensive air-fuel ratio and in-cylinder pressure sensors. The results indicate that estimation of the cycle-resolved air-fuel ratio and in-cylinder pressure is reasonably accurate

  14. Remote sensing of sea surface nutrient in the frontal zone of Changjiang diluted water and the Taiwan Warm Current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiaoyu; LIN Yi'an; HE Xianqiang; WANG Difeng; GONG fang; ZHANG Wei

    2007-01-01

    Field investigation was carried out during 4 to 15 April 2001 around the Changjiang River Estuary. The similar distribution of sea surface nutrients and suspended sediment (SS) concentration is attributed to the physical mixing of Changjiang diluted water (CDW) with the Taiwan Warm Current (TWC). On the basis of the observed positive relationship between total phosphorus (TP) and SS concentration, the sea surface TP is inversed from satellite SS data. SS is believed to be an ideal eutrophic state assessing index substitution for TP, the eutrophication classification critical value of SS adopted in this research was based on the linear model: cTP=0.000 6cSSsat+0.016 3, r2=0.564 5, n=32. Although lack of in-situ chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) measurement, a good relationship was observed between the in-situ DIN (dissolved inorganic nitrogen) concentration with near real time SeaWiFS absorption coefficient of CDOM (ACD) data: cDIN=1.406 5AACBsat-0.035 9,r2=0.741 5,n=16. This empirical regression algorithm was also utilized for inversing the DIN concentration from SeaWiFS ACD data, and for establishing the eutrophication classification critical value of satellite ACD data. The established remote eutrophication classification system was later used for seawater eutrophic state assessment. The evaluation suggested that the Zhoushan Fishing Ground especially the western border is affected seriously with the nutrient input. The nutrient is mainly from the terrestrial source transported by the Changjiang River runoff. The seawater quality classification precision was assessed by in-situ data, which suggested the seawater quality distribution is similar to the two classification systems, and the remote classification error is below 25%.

  15. Atomic physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, A.E.; Kukla, K.; Cheng, S. [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    In a collaboration with the Atomic Physics group at Argonne and the University of Toledo, the Atomic Physics group at the University of Notre Dame is measuring the fine structure transition energies in highly-charged lithium-like and helium-like ions using beam-foil spectroscopy. Precise measurements of 2s-2p transition energies in simple (few-electron) atomic systems provide stringent tests of several classes of current atomic- structure calculations. Analyses of measurements in helium-like Ar{sup 16+} have been completed, and the results submitted for publication. A current goal is to measure the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} - 1s2p{sup 3}P{sub 0} transition wavelength in helium-like Ni{sup 26+}. Measurements of the 1s2s{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} - 1s2p{sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2} transition wavelengths in lithium-like Kr{sup 33+} is planned. Wavelength and lifetime measurements in copper-like U{sup 63+} are also expected to be initiated. The group is also participating in measurements of forbidden transitions in helium-like ions. A measurement of the lifetime of the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} state in Kr{sup 34+} was published recently. In a collaboration including P. Mokler of GSI, Darmstadt, measurements have been made of the spectral distribution of the 2E1 decay continuum in helium-like Kr{sup 34+}. Initial results have been reported and further measurements are planned.

  16. Remote Sensing of Icy Galilean Moon Surface and Atmospheric Composition Using Low Energy (1 eV-4 keV) Neutral Atom Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, M. R.; Sittler, E.; Chornay, D.; Cooper, J. F.; Coplan, M.; Johnson, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a low energy neutral atom imager suitable for composition measurements Europa and other icy Galilean moons in the Jovian magnetosphere. This instrument employs conversion surface technology and is sensitive to either neutrals converted to negative ions, neutrals converted to positive ions and the positive ions themselves depending on the power supply. On a mission such as the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO), two back-to-back sensors would be flown with separate power supplies fitted to the neutral atom and iodneutral atom sides. This will allow both remote imaging of 1 eV atmospheres, and in situ measurements of ions at similar energies in the moon ionospheres and Jovian magnetospheric plasma. The instrument provides composition measurements of the neutrals and ions that enter the spectrometer with a mass resolution dependent on the time-of-flight subsystem and capable of resolving molecules. The lower energy neutrals, up to tens of eV, arise from atoms and molecules sputtered off the moon surfaces and out of the moon atmospheres by impacts of more energetic (keV to MeV) ions from the magnetosphere. Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) models are used to convert measured neutral abundances to compositional distributions of primary and trace species in the sputtered surfaces and atmospheres. The escaping neutrals can also be detected as ions after photo- or plasma-ionization and pickup. Higher energy, keV neutrals come from charge exchange of magnetospheric ions in the moon atmospheres and provide information on atmospheric structure. At the jovicentric orbits of the icy moons the presence of toroidal gas clouds, as detected at Europa's orbit, provide M e r opportunities to analyze both the composition of neutrals and ions originating from the moon surfaces, and the characteristics of magnetospheric ions interacting with neutral cloud material. Charge exchange of low energy ions near the moons, and directional distributions of the resultant neutrals

  17. History of the recommended atomic-weight values from 1882 to 1997: A comparision of differences from current values to the estimated uncertainties of earlier values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, T.B.; Peiser, H.S.

    1998-01-01

    International commissions and national committees for atomic weights (mean relative atomic masses) have recommended regularly updated, best values for these atomic weights as applicable to terrestrial sources of the chemical elements. Presented here is a historically complete listing starting with the values in F. W. Clarke's 1882 recalculation, followed by the recommended values in the annual reports of the American Chemical Society's Atomic Weights Commission. From 1903, an International Commission published such reports and its values (scaled to an atomic weight of 16 for oxygen) are here used in preference to those of national committees of Britain, Germany, Spain, Switzerland, and the U.S.A. We have, however, made scaling adjustments from Ar(16O) to Ar(12C) where not negligible. From 1920, this International Commission constituted itself under the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). Since then, IUPAC has published reports (mostly biennially) listing the recommended atomic weights, which are reproduced here. Since 1979, these values have been called the "standard atomic weights" and, since 1969, all values have been published, with their estimated uncertainties. Few of the earlier values were published with uncertainties. Nevertheless, we assessed such uncertainties on the basis of our understanding of the likely contemporary judgement of the values' reliability. While neglecting remaining uncertainties of 1997 values, we derive "differences" and a retrospective index of reliability of atomic-weight values in relation to assessments of uncertainties at the time of their publication. A striking improvement in reliability appears to have been achieved since the commissions have imposed upon themselves the rule of recording estimated uncertainties from all recognized sources of error.

  18. Mobile Sensing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Macias

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rich-sensor smart phones have made possible the recent birth of the mobile sensing research area as part of ubiquitous sensing which integrates other areas such as wireless sensor networks and web sensing. There are several types of mobile sensing: individual, participatory, opportunistic, crowd, social, etc. The object of sensing can be people-centered or environment-centered. The sensing domain can be home, urban, vehicular… Currently there are barriers that limit the social acceptance of mobile sensing systems. Examples of social barriers are privacy concerns, restrictive laws in some countries and the absence of economic incentives that might encourage people to participate in a sensing campaign. Several technical barriers are phone energy savings and the variety of sensors and software for their management. Some existing surveys partially tackle the topic of mobile sensing systems. Published papers theoretically or partially solve the above barriers. We complete the above surveys with new works, review the barriers of mobile sensing systems and propose some ideas for efficiently implementing sensing, fusion, learning, security, privacy and energy saving for any type of mobile sensing system, and propose several realistic research challenges. The main objective is to reduce the learning curve in mobile sensing systems where the complexity is very high.

  19. Mobile Sensing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, Elsa; Suarez, Alvaro; Lloret, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Rich-sensor smart phones have made possible the recent birth of the mobile sensing research area as part of ubiquitous sensing which integrates other areas such as wireless sensor networks and web sensing. There are several types of mobile sensing: individual, participatory, opportunistic, crowd, social, etc. The object of sensing can be people-centered or environment-centered. The sensing domain can be home, urban, vehicular… Currently there are barriers that limit the social acceptance of mobile sensing systems. Examples of social barriers are privacy concerns, restrictive laws in some countries and the absence of economic incentives that might encourage people to participate in a sensing campaign. Several technical barriers are phone energy savings and the variety of sensors and software for their management. Some existing surveys partially tackle the topic of mobile sensing systems. Published papers theoretically or partially solve the above barriers. We complete the above surveys with new works, review the barriers of mobile sensing systems and propose some ideas for efficiently implementing sensing, fusion, learning, security, privacy and energy saving for any type of mobile sensing system, and propose several realistic research challenges. The main objective is to reduce the learning curve in mobile sensing systems where the complexity is very high. PMID:24351637

  20. Current Situation of Modern College Students'Sense of Responsibility%当代大学生责任感现状分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈秀珍; 吉家文

    2015-01-01

    目的:了解当代大学生责任感现状。方法:编制大学生责任感问卷,以海南省4所高校的849名大学生作为研究对象,实施了问卷调查。结果:通过因素分析抽取出5个因素,即国家责任感、社会责任感、家庭责任感、集体责任感、他人责任感。专科院校学生的国家责任感、集体责任感分值显著高于本科院校( t=-3.332,-3.471;P<0.01),而本科院校学生的社会责任感分值则显著高于专科院校(t=2.026,P<0.05)。男生的家庭责任感、集体责任感分值均显著高于女生( t=2.264,3.475;P<0.01)。结论:大学生的责任感由国家、社会、家庭、集体、他人5个方面组成,并有人口学因素影响。%Objective:To understand current situation and basic trend of modern college students 'sense of responsibility .Methods:849 students completed a questionnaire survey at the four colleges and universities in Hainan Province .Results:The five factors:national responsibility , social responsibility , family responsibility ,group responsibility and the responsibility towards other people , were obtained with factor analysis .Through the survey ,it was found that junior college students got significantly lower values on national responsibility and social responsibility (t=-3.332,-3.471;P<0.01),but significantly higher value on social responsibility than undergraduates (t=2.026,P<0.05);male students got significantly higher values on family responsibility and group responsibility than female students (t=2.264,3.475;P<0.05,P<0.01).Conclusion:The responsibility sense of modern college students is affected by five factors:National responsibility ,social responsibility ,family responsibility ,group responsibility and the re-sponsibility towards other people ,and can be influenced by demographic factors .

  1. Capability for Fine Tuning of the Refractive Index Sensing Properties of Long-Period Gratings by Atomic Layer Deposited Al2O3 Overlays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Śmietana

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an application of thin aluminum oxide (Al2O3 films obtained using atomic layer deposition (ALD for fine tuning the spectral response and refractive-index (RI sensitivity of long-period gratings (LPGs induced in optical fibers. The technique allows for an efficient and well controlled deposition at monolayer level (resolution ~ 0.12 nm of excellent quality nano-films as required for optical sensors. The effect of Al2O3 deposition on the spectral properties of the LPGs is demonstrated experimentally and numerically. We correlated both the increase in Al2O3 thickness and changes in optical properties of the film with the shift of the LPG resonance wavelength and proved that similar films are deposited on fibers and oxidized silicon reference samples in the same process run. Since the thin overlay effectively changes the distribution of the cladding modes and thus also tunes the device’s RI sensitivity, the tuning can be simply realized by varying number of cycles, which is proportional to thickness of the high-refractive-index (n > 1.6 in infrared spectral range Al2O3 film. The advantage of this approach is the precision in determining the film properties resulting in RI sensitivity of the LPGs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that an ultra-precise method for overlay deposition has been applied on LPGs for RI tuning purposes and the results have been compared with numerical simulations based on LP mode approximation.

  2. Atomic & Molecular Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-07-12

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Atomic & Molecular Interactions was held at Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  3. Two distinct voltage-sensing domains control voltage sensitivity and kinetics of current activation in CaV1.1 calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuluc, Petronel; Benedetti, Bruno; Coste de Bagneaux, Pierre; Grabner, Manfred; Flucher, Bernhard E

    2016-06-01

    Alternative splicing of the skeletal muscle CaV1.1 voltage-gated calcium channel gives rise to two channel variants with very different gating properties. The currents of both channels activate slowly; however, insertion of exon 29 in the adult splice variant CaV1.1a causes an ∼30-mV right shift in the voltage dependence of activation. Existing evidence suggests that the S3-S4 linker in repeat IV (containing exon 29) regulates voltage sensitivity in this voltage-sensing domain (VSD) by modulating interactions between the adjacent transmembrane segments IVS3 and IVS4. However, activation kinetics are thought to be determined by corresponding structures in repeat I. Here, we use patch-clamp analysis of dysgenic (CaV1.1 null) myotubes reconstituted with CaV1.1 mutants and chimeras to identify the specific roles of these regions in regulating channel gating properties. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrate that the structure and/or hydrophobicity of the IVS3-S4 linker is critical for regulating voltage sensitivity in the IV VSD, but by itself cannot modulate voltage sensitivity in the I VSD. Swapping sequence domains between the I and the IV VSDs reveals that IVS4 plus the IVS3-S4 linker is sufficient to confer CaV1.1a-like voltage dependence to the I VSD and that the IS3-S4 linker plus IS4 is sufficient to transfer CaV1.1e-like voltage dependence to the IV VSD. Any mismatch of transmembrane helices S3 and S4 from the I and IV VSDs causes a right shift of voltage sensitivity, indicating that regulation of voltage sensitivity by the IVS3-S4 linker requires specific interaction of IVS4 with its corresponding IVS3 segment. In contrast, slow current kinetics are perturbed by any heterologous sequences inserted into the I VSD and cannot be transferred by moving VSD I sequences to VSD IV. Thus, CaV1.1 calcium channels are organized in a modular manner, and control of voltage sensitivity and activation kinetics is accomplished by specific molecular mechanisms

  4. Sensing at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna; Hierold, Christofer

    2013-11-01

    properties are an important indicator for sensing. In search of a better understanding of these systems Zhang et al from Southern Illinois University inspect the role of Joule heating, exothermal reactions and heat dissipation in gas sensing using nanowires [7]. The mechanisms behind electrical chemical sensors are also further scrutinized in a kinetics study by Joan Ramon Morante from the University of Barcelona in Spain. 'In spite of the growing commercial success many basic issues remain still open and under discussion limiting the broad use of this technology,' he explains. He discusses surface chemical reaction kinetics and the experimental results for different representative gas molecules to gain an insight into the chemical to electrical transduction mechanisms taking place [8]. Perhaps one of the most persistent targets in sensing research is increasing the sensitivity. Gauging environmental health issues around the commercial use of nanomaterials places high demands on low-level detection and spurred a collaboration of researchers in the UK, Croatia and Canada to look into the use of particle-impact voltammetry for detecting nanoparticles in environmental media [9]. At the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in the US, researchers have applied wave transform analysis techniques to the oscillations of an atomic force microscopy cantilever and tailored a time-frequency-domain filter to identify the region of highest vibrational energy [10]. The approach allows them to improve the signal to noise ratio by a factor 32 on current high-performance devices. In addition, researchers in Korea report how doping NiO nanofibres can improve the sensitivity to a number of gases, including ethanol, where the response was enhanced by as much as a factor of 217.86 [11]. Biomedicine is one of the largest industries for the application of nanotechnology in sensing. Demonstrating the state of the art, researchers in China use silicon wafers decorated with gold nanoparticles for

  5. High data-rate atom interferometers through high recapture efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, Grant; Rakholia, Akash Vrijal; McGuinness, Hayden

    2015-01-27

    An inertial sensing system includes a magneto-optical trap (MOT) that traps atoms within a specified trapping region. The system also includes a cooling laser that cools the trapped atoms so that the atoms remain within the specified region for a specified amount of time. The system further includes a light-pulse atom interferometer (LPAI) that performs an interferometric interrogation of the atoms to determine phase changes in the atoms. The system includes a controller that controls the timing of MOT and cooling laser operations, and controls the timing of interferometric operations to substantially recapture the atoms in the specified trapping region. The system includes a processor that determines the amount inertial movement of the inertial sensing system based on the determined phase changes in the atoms. Also, a method of inertial sensing using this inertial sensing system includes recapture of atoms within the MOT following interferometric interrogation by the LPAI.

  6. Optical remote sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Prasad, Saurabh; Chanussot, Jocelyn

    2011-01-01

    Optical remote sensing relies on exploiting multispectral and hyper spectral imagery possessing high spatial and spectral resolutions respectively. These modalities, although useful for most remote sensing tasks, often present challenges that must be addressed for their effective exploitation. This book presents current state-of-the-art algorithms that address the following key challenges encountered in representation and analysis of such optical remotely sensed data: challenges in pre-processing images, storing and representing high dimensional data, fusing different sensor modalities, patter

  7. Calcium sensing in exocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Wu, Bingbing; Han, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    an increase in intracellular calcium levels. Besides the triggering role, calcium signaling modulates the precise amount and kinetics of vesicle release. Thus, it is a central question to understand the molecular machineries responsible for calcium sensing in exocytosis. Here we provide an overview of our...... current understanding of calcium sensing in neurotransmitter release and hormone secretion....

  8. Atomic energy

    CERN Multimedia

    1996-01-01

    Interviews following the 1991 co-operation Agreement between the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) of the Government of India and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) concerning the participation in the Large Hadron Collider Project (LHC) . With Chidambaram, R, Chairman, Atomic Energy Commission and Secretary, Department of Atomic Energy, Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) of the Government of India and Professor Llewellyn-Smith, Christopher H, Director-General, CERN.

  9. Atom chips

    CERN Document Server

    Reichel, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a stimulating and multifaceted picture of a rapidly developing field. The first part reviews fundamentals of atom chip research in tutorial style, while subsequent parts focus on the topics of atom-surface interaction, coherence on atom chips, and possible future directions of atom chip research. The articles are written by leading researchers in the field in their characteristic and individual styles.

  10. Quantum galvanometer by interfacing a vibrating nanowire and cold atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kálmán, O; Kiss, T; Fortágh, J; Domokos, P

    2012-01-11

    We evaluate the coupling of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of ultracold, paramagnetic atoms to the magnetic field of the current in a mechanically vibrating carbon nanotube within the frame of a full quantum theory. We find that the interaction is strong enough to sense quantum features of the nanowire current noise spectrum by means of hyperfine-state-selective atom counting. Such a nondestructive measurement of the electric current via its magnetic field corresponds to the classical galvanometer scheme, extended to the quantum regime of charge transport. The calculated high sensitivity of the interaction in the nanowire-BEC hybrid systems opens up the possibility of quantum control, which may be further extended to include other relevant degrees of freedom.

  11. Atomic polarizabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Mitroy, J. [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); Clark, Charles W. [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States); Kozlov, M. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  12. Current Fear of Crime, Sense of Community, and Loneliness in Italian Adolescents: The Role of Autonomous Mobility and Play during Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prezza, Miretta; Pacilli, Maria Giuseppina

    2007-01-01

    A structural equation model was used to examine the role of autonomous mobility and play in public and semipublic places in childhood to predict adolescents' sense of community, fear of crime, and, through the mediation of these two last psychosocial factors, feelings of loneliness. Participants included 789 Italian students (469 females and 320…

  13. Ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Hofferberth, S.; Haller, E.

    2005-01-01

    Miniaturized potentials near the surface of atom chips can be used as flexible and versatile tools for the manipulation of ultracold atoms on a microscale. The full scope of possibilities is only accessible if atom-surface distances can be reduced to microns. We discuss experiments in this regime...

  14. Ultrasensitive magnetometer using a single atom

    CERN Document Server

    Baumgart, I; Retzker, A; Plenio, M B; Wunderlich, Ch

    2014-01-01

    Precision sensing, and in particular high precision magnetometry, is a central goal of research into quantum technologies. For magnetometers often trade-offs exist between sensitivity, spatial resolution, and frequency range. The precision, and thus the sensitivity of magnetometry scales as $1/\\sqrt {T_2}$ with the phase coherence time, $T_2$, of the sensing system playing the role of a key determinant. Adapting a dynamical decoupling scheme that allows for extending $T_2$ by orders of magnitude and merging it with a magnetic sensing protocol, we achieve a measurement sensitivity even for high frequency fields close to the standard quantum limit. Using a single atomic ion as a sensor, we experimentally attain a sensitivity of $4$ pT Hz$^{-1/2}$ for an alternating-current (AC) magnetic field near 14 MHz. Based on the principle demonstrated here, this unprecedented sensitivity combined with spatial resolution in the nanometer range and tuneability from direct-current to the gigahertz range could be used for mag...

  15. Ultrasensitive Magnetometer using a Single Atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, I; Cai, J-M; Retzker, A; Plenio, M B; Wunderlich, Ch

    2016-06-17

    Precision sensing, and in particular high precision magnetometry, is a central goal of research into quantum technologies. For magnetometers, often trade-offs exist between sensitivity, spatial resolution, and frequency range. The precision, and thus the sensitivity of magnetometry, scales as 1/sqrt[T_{2}] with the phase coherence time T_{2} of the sensing system playing the role of a key determinant. Adapting a dynamical decoupling scheme that allows for extending T_{2} by orders of magnitude and merging it with a magnetic sensing protocol, we achieve a measurement sensitivity even for high frequency fields close to the standard quantum limit. Using a single atomic ion as a sensor, we experimentally attain a sensitivity of 4.6  pT/sqrt[Hz] for an alternating-current magnetic field near 14 MHz. Based on the principle demonstrated here, this unprecedented sensitivity combined with spatial resolution in the nanometer range and tunability from direct current to the gigahertz range could be used for magnetic imaging in as of yet inaccessible parameter regimes.

  16. Adjustable microchip ring trap for cold atoms and molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, Paul M; Squires, Matthew B; Scoville, James A; Carlson, Evan J; Buchwald, Walter R; Miller, Steven M

    2009-01-01

    We describe the design and function of a circular magnetic waveguide for deBroglie waves produced from wires on a microchip. The guide is a two-dimensional magnetic minimum for trapping weak-field seeking states of atoms or molecules with a magnetic dipole moment. The design consists of seven circular wires sharing a common radius. We describe the design, the time-dependent currents of the wires and show that it is possible to form a circular waveguide with adjustable height and gradient while minimizing perturbation resulting from leads or wire crossings. This maximal area geometry is suited for rotation sensing with atom interferometry via the Sagnac effect using either cold atoms, molecules and Bose-condensed systems.

  17. Theoretical atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, Harald

    2017-01-01

    This expanded and updated well-established textbook contains an advanced presentation of quantum mechanics adapted to the requirements of modern atomic physics. It includes topics of current interest such as semiclassical theory, chaos, atom optics and Bose-Einstein condensation in atomic gases. In order to facilitate the consolidation of the material covered, various problems are included, together with complete solutions. The emphasis on theory enables the reader to appreciate the fundamental assumptions underlying standard theoretical constructs and to embark on independent research projects. The fourth edition of Theoretical Atomic Physics contains an updated treatment of the sections involving scattering theory and near-threshold phenomena manifest in the behaviour of cold atoms (and molecules). Special attention is given to the quantization of weakly bound states just below the continuum threshold and to low-energy scattering and quantum reflection just above. Particular emphasis is laid on the fundamen...

  18. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxford, Theodore J.

    1993-01-01

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal.

  19. 一种适用于Buck型DC/DC变换器的高精度片上电流采样电路%Integrated High-accuracy On-chip Current Sensing Circuit for Current-mode Control CMOS DC-DC Buck Converter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴了; 郭苗苗

    2011-01-01

    Current sensing circuit is one of the most important component parts of current-control DC/DC convertor,its accuracy and response speed acquires more and more attention.We proposed a novel current sensing circuit in this paper, which does not use the operational amplifier, simplify the circuit structure, reducing power consumption, at the same time, the introduction of the compensation current further improves the sensing accuracy.Designed the circuit based on 0.5 μm CMOS process, HSPICE simulation results show that the circuit has a high sensing accuracy up to 99.9%, and as workload, input voltage and temperature changes, the fluctuation of sensing accuracy of the circuit is very small.%电流采样电路作为电流控制的DC/DC变换器重要组成部件之一,其精度和响应速度已受到越来越高的重视.提出的电流采样电路没有使用运算放大器,简化了电路结构,降低了功耗.同时,电路中引入的补偿电流进一步提高了采样的精度.基于0.5μm CMOS工艺实现该电路,HSPICE模拟仿真结果表明该电路具有较高的采样精度,最高可达99.9%,且在负载、输入电压、温度变化时,采样精度波动很小.

  20. An investigation of current and future satellite and in-situ data for the remote sensing of the land surface energy balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diak, George R.

    1994-01-01

    This final report from the University of Wisconsin-Madison Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) summarizes a research program designed to improve our knowledge of the water and energy balance of the land surface through the application of remote sensing and in-situ data sources. The remote sensing data source investigations to be detailed involve surface radiometric ('skin') temperatures and also high-spectral-resolution infrared radiance data from atmospheric sounding instruments projected to be available at the end of the decade, which have shown promising results for evaluating the land-surface water and energy budget. The in-situ data types to be discussed are measurements of the temporal changes of the height of the planetary boundary layer and measurements of air temperature within the planetary boundary layer. Physical models of the land surface, planetary boundary layer and free atmosphere have been used as important tools to interpret the in-situ and remote sensing signals of the surface energy balance. A prototype 'optimal' system for combining multiple data sources into a three-dimensional estimate of the surface energy balance was developed and first results from this system will be detailed. Potential new sources of data for this system and suggested continuation research will also be discussed.

  1. Characterization of AlN/AlGaN/GaN:C heterostructures grown on Si(111) using atom probe tomography, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and vertical current-voltage measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Martin, E-mail: martin.huberVIH@infineon.com [Infineon Technologies Austria AG, Siemensstrasse 2, A-9500 Villach, Austria and Institute of Semiconductor and Solid State Physics, Johannes Kepler University, Altenbergerstrasse 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Daumiller, Ingo; Andreev, Andrei; Silvestri, Marco; Knuuttila, Lauri; Lundskog, Anders [Infineon Technologies Austria AG, Siemensstrasse 2, A-9500 Villach (Austria); Wahl, Michael; Kopnarski, Michael [IFOS Institut fuer Oberflaechen- und Schichtanalytik GmbH, Trippstadter Strasse 120, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Bonanni, Alberta [Institute of Semiconductor and Solid State Physics, Johannes Kepler University, Altenbergerstrasse 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria)

    2016-03-28

    Complementary studies of atom probe tomography, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and vertical current-voltage measurements are carried out in order to unravel the influence of C-doping of GaN on the vertical leakage current of AlN/AlGaN/GaN:C heterostructures. A systematic increment of the vertical blocking voltage at a given current density is observed in the structures, when moving from the nominally undoped conditions—corresponding to a residual C-background of ∼10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3}—to a C-content of ∼10{sup 19 }cm{sup −3} in the GaN layer. The value of the vertical blocking voltage saturates for C concentrations higher than ∼10{sup 19 }cm{sup −3}. Atom probe tomography confirms the homogeneity of the GaN:C layers, demonstrating that there is no clustering at C-concentrations as high as 10{sup 20 }cm{sup −3}. It is inferred that the vertical blocking voltage saturation is not likely to be related to C-clustering.

  2. Atom Chip for Transporting and Merging Magnetically Trapped Atom Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Hänsel, W; Hommelhoff, P; Hänsch, T W

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate an integrated magnetic ``atom chip'' which transports cold trapped atoms near a surface with very high positioning accuracy. Time-dependent currents in a lithographic conductor pattern create a moving chain of magnetic potential wells; atoms are transported in these wells while remaining confined in all three dimensions. We achieve fluxes up to 10^6 /s with a negligible heating rate. An extension of this ``atomic conveyor belt'' allows the merging of magnetically trapped atom clouds by unification of two Ioffe-Pritchard potentials. Under suitable conditions, the clouds merge without loss of phase space density. We demonstrate this unification process experimentally.

  3. On-chip optical trapping for atomic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Maximillian A.; Salim, Evan; Farkas, Daniel; Duggan, Janet; Ivory, Megan; Anderson, Dana

    2014-09-01

    To simplify applications that rely on optical trapping of cold and ultracold atoms, ColdQuanta is developing techniques to incorporate miniature optical components onto in-vacuum atom chips. The result is a hybrid atom chip that combines an in-vacuum micro-optical bench for optical control with an atom chip for magnetic control. Placing optical components on a chip inside of the vacuum system produces a compact system that can be targeted to specific experiments, in this case the generation of optical lattices. Applications that can benefit from this technology include timekeeping, inertial sensing, gravimetry, quantum information, and emulation of quantum many-body systems. ColdQuanta's GlasSi atom chip technology incorporates glass windows in the plane of a silicon atom chip. In conjunction with the in-vacuum micro-optical bench, optical lattices can be generated within a few hundred microns of an atom chip window through which single atomic lattice sites can be imaged with sub-micron spatial resolution. The result is a quantum gas microscope that allows optical lattices to be studied at the level of single lattice sites. Similar to what ColdQuanta has achieved with magneto-optical traps (MOTs) in its miniMOT system and with Bose- Einstein condensates (BECs) in its RuBECi(R) system, ColdQuanta seeks to apply the on-chip optical bench technology to studies of optical lattices in a commercially available, turnkey system. These techniques are currently being considered for lattice experiments in NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) slated for flight on the International Space Station.

  4. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Born, Max

    1989-01-01

    The Nobel Laureate's brilliant exposition of the kinetic theory of gases, elementary particles, the nuclear atom, wave-corpuscles, atomic structure and spectral lines, electron spin and Pauli's principle, quantum statistics, molecular structure and nuclear physics. Over 40 appendices, a bibliography, numerous figures and graphs.

  5. Atomic Calligraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imboden, Matthias; Pardo, Flavio; Bolle, Cristian; Han, Han; Tareen, Ammar; Chang, Jackson; Christopher, Jason; Corman, Benjamin; Bishop, David

    2013-03-01

    Here we present a MEMS based method to fabricate devices with a small number of atoms. In standard semiconductor fabrication, a large amount of material is deposited, after which etching removes what is not wanted. This technique breaks down for structures that approach the single atom limit, as it is inconceivable to etch away all but one atom. What is needed is a bottom up method with single or near single atom precision. We demonstrate a MEMS device that enables nanometer position controlled deposition of gold atoms. A digitally driven plate is swept as a flux of gold atoms passes through an aperture. Appling voltages on four comb capacitors connected to the central plate by tethers enable nanometer lateral precision in the xy plane over 15x15 sq. microns. Typical MEMS structures have manufacturing resolutions on the order of a micron. Using a FIB it is possible to mill apertures as small as 10 nm in diameter. Assuming a low incident atomic flux, as well as an integrated MEMS based shutter with microsecond response time, it becomes possible to deposit single atoms. Due to their small size and low power consumption, such nano-printers can be mounted directly in a cryogenic system at ultrahigh vacuum to deposit clean quench condensed metallic structures.

  6. Analysis and design of high performance current-sensing circuit in current-control-mode DC-DC converter%电流模式DC-DC转换器中高性能电流检测电路的分析与设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李林华; 黄太宏; 李为民; 张潭; 赵建明

    2012-01-01

      在电流模式控制的DC-DC转换器电路中,电流检测电路是其重要的组成模拟单元之一.文章分析了目前电流检测电路的优缺点,给出了一种高性能无额外功率损耗的高精度电流检测电路的设计方法,并在HHNEC BCD 0.35μm的工艺下,用Spectre进行了仿真验证.结果表明,该电路结构简单、易于实现,并已成功应用于某型Boost DC-DC电压转换电路中.%  Current-sensing circuit is one of the important analog units in a current-control-mode DC-DC converter. This paper analyzes the advantages and disadvantages of commonly current-sensing circuit. And then a high performance high-precision current-sensing circuit without additional power consumption is designed. This circuit is simulated with Spectre simulator which is based on HHNEC BCD 0.35μm process model. The results show that the advantages of this circuit is simple and easily realized. This circuit has been integrated successfully into some Boost DC-DC convertor chips.

  7. MTO: Sensing Across the Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-04

    ME MS LNA LNA MEMS B P F 1600 B P F 800 t e x t LO 820/1620 Log A mp 650-1000 Example ASP Architecture On the Horizon: Antennas Challenges • Chu...for Absolute Reference (COUGAR) Lal Fiber optic resonator gyroscope architecture for ultra-high precision rotation sensing Chip-Scale Atomic Clock...Covert sensing with bionic platforms • Underwater surveillance/SONAR Approved for Public Release, Distribution Unlimited Recent Accomplishments

  8. Template-assisted synthesis of III-nitride and metal-oxide nano-heterostructures using low-temperature atomic layer deposition for energy, sensing, and catalysis applications (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biyikli, Necmi; Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla; Eren, Hamit; Haider, Ali; Uyar, Tamer; Kayaci, Fatma; Guler, Mustafa Ozgur; Garifullin, Ruslan; Okyay, Ali K.; Ulusoy, Gamze M.; Goldenberg, Eda

    2015-08-01

    Recent experimental research efforts on developing functional nanostructured III-nitride and metal-oxide materials via low-temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD) will be reviewed. Ultimate conformality, a unique propoerty of ALD process, is utilized to fabricate core-shell and hollow tubular nanostructures on various nano-templates including electrospun nanofibrous polymers, self-assembled peptide nanofibers, metallic nanowires, and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). III-nitride and metal-oxide coatings were deposited on these nano-templates via thermal and plasma-enhanced ALD processes with thickness values ranging from a few mono-layers to 40 nm. Metal-oxide materials studied include ZnO, TiO2, HfO2, ZrO2, and Al2O3. Standard ALD growth recipes were modified so that precursor molecules have enough time to diffuse and penetrate within the layers/pores of the nano-template material. As a result, uniform and conformal coatings on high-surface area nano-templates were demonstrated. Substrate temperatures were kept below 200C and within the self-limiting ALD window, so that temperature-sensitive template materials preserved their integrity III-nitride coatings were applied to similar nano-templates via plasma-enhanced ALD (PEALD) technique. AlN, GaN, and InN thin-film coating recipes were optimized to achieve self-limiting growth with deposition temperatures as low as 100C. BN growth took place only for >350C, in which precursor decomposition occured and therefore growth proceeded in CVD regime. III-nitride core-shell and hollow tubular single and multi-layered nanostructures were fabricated. The resulting metal-oxide and III-nitride core-shell and hollow nano-tubular structures were used for photocatalysis, dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC), energy storage and chemical sensing applications. Significantly enhanced catalysis, solar efficiency, charge capacity and sensitivity performance are reported. Moreover, core-shell metal-oxide and III-nitride materials

  9. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Crepaz, Herbert; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  10. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-10-20

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  11. Graphene nanopore devices for DNA sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Chris A; Drndić, Marija

    2012-01-01

    We describe here a method for detecting the translocation of individual DNA molecules through nanopores created in graphene membranes. The devices consist of 1-5-nm thick graphene membranes with electron-beam sculpted nanopores from 5 to 10 nm in diameter. Due to the thin nature of the graphene membranes, and the reduced electrical resistance, we observe larger blocked currents than for traditional solid-state nanopores. We also show how ionic current noise levels can be reduced with the atomic-layer deposition of a few nanometers of titanium dioxide over the graphene surface. Unlike traditional solid-state nanopore materials that are insulating, graphene is an excellent electrical conductor, and its use opens the door to a new future class of nanopore devices in which electronic sensing and control is performed directly at the pore.

  12. Kinetic Atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David B.

    1981-01-01

    Surveys the research of scientists like Joule, Kelvin, Maxwell, Clausius, and Boltzmann as it comments on the basic conceptual issues involved in the development of a more precise kinetic theory and the idea of a kinetic atom. (Author/SK)

  13. THE IDEA IS TO USEMODIS IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE CURRENT LIMITED LANDSAT CAPABILITY, COMMERCIAL SATELLITES, ANDUNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES (UAV), IN A MULTI-STAGE APPROACH TO MEET EPA INFORMATION NEEDS.REMOTE SENSING OVERVIEW: EPA CAPABILITIES, PRIORITY AGENCY APPLICATIONS, SENSOR/AIRCRAFT CAPABILITIES, COST CONSIDERATIONS, SPECTRAL AND SPATIAL RESOLUTIONS, AND TEMPORAL CONSIDERATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA remote sensing capabilities include applied research for priority applications and technology support for operational assistance to clients across the Agency. The idea is to use MODIS in conjunction with the current limited Landsat capability, commercial satellites, and Unma...

  14. THE IDEA IS TO USEMODIS IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE CURRENT LIMITED LANDSAT CAPABILITY, COMMERCIAL SATELLITES, ANDUNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES (UAV), IN A MULTI-STAGE APPROACH TO MEET EPA INFORMATION NEEDS.REMOTE SENSING OVERVIEW: EPA CAPABILITIES, PRIORITY AGENCY APPLICATIONS, SENSOR/AIRCRAFT CAPABILITIES, COST CONSIDERATIONS, SPECTRAL AND SPATIAL RESOLUTIONS, AND TEMPORAL CONSIDERATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA remote sensing capabilities include applied research for priority applications and technology support for operational assistance to clients across the Agency. The idea is to use MODIS in conjunction with the current limited Landsat capability, commercial satellites, and Unma...

  15. [Study on the method for the determination of trace boron, molybdenum, silver, tin and lead in geochemical samples by direct current arc full spectrum direct reading atomic emission spectroscopy (DC-Arc-AES)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zhi-hong; Yao, Jian-zhen; Tang, Rui-ling; Zhang, Xue-mei; Li, Wen-ge; Zhang, Qin

    2015-02-01

    The method for the determmation of trace boron, molybdenum, silver, tin and lead in geochemical samples by direct current are full spectrum direct reading atomic emission spectroscopy (DC-Arc-AES) was established. Direct current are full spectrum direct reading atomic emission spectrometer with a large area of solid-state detectors has functions of full spectrum direct reading and real-time background correction. The new electrodes and new buffer recipe were proposed in this paper, and have applied for national patent. Suitable analytical line pairs, back ground correcting points of elements and the internal standard method were selected, and Ge was used as internal standard. Multistage currents were selected in the research on current program, and each current set different holding time to ensure that each element has a good signal to noise ratio. Continuous rising current mode selected can effectively eliminate the splash of the sample. Argon as shielding gas can eliminate CN band generating and reduce spectral background, also plays a role in stabilizing the are, and argon flow 3.5 L x min(-1) was selected. Evaporation curve of each element was made, and it was concluded that the evaporation behavior of each element is consistent, and combined with the effects of different spectrographic times on the intensity and background, the spectrographic time of 35s was selected. In this paper, national standards substances were selected as a standard series, and the standard series includes different nature and different content of standard substances which meet the determination of trace boron, molybdenum, silver, tin and lead in geochemical samples. In the optimum experimental conditions, the detection limits for B, Mo, Ag, Sn and Pb are 1.1, 0.09, 0.01, 0.41, and 0.56 microg x g(-1) respectively, and the precisions (RSD, n=12) for B, Mo, Ag, Sn and Pb are 4.57%-7.63%, 5.14%-7.75%, 5.48%-12.30%, 3.97%-10.46%, and 4.26%-9.21% respectively. The analytical accuracy was

  16. Closed-Form Solutions of the Thomas-Fermi in Heavy Atoms and the Langmuir-Blodgett in Current Flow ODEs in Mathematical Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstathios E. Theotokoglou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two kinds of second-order nonlinear, ordinary differential equations (ODEs appearing in mathematical physics are analyzed in this paper. The first one concerns the Thomas-Fermi (TF equation, while the second concerns the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB equation in current flow. According to a mathematical methodology recently developed, the exact analytic solutions of both TF and LB ODEs are proposed. Both of these are nonlinear of the second order and by a series of admissible functional transformations are reduced to Abel’s equations of the second kind of the normal form. The closed form solutions of the TF and LB equations in the phase and physical plane are given. Finally a new interesting result has been obtained related to the derivative of the TF function at the limit.

  17. Nuclear spin dependent parity violating electron-nucleus interaction in heavy atoms. The anapole moment and the perturbation of the hadronic vector neutral current by the hyperfine interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchiat, C.; Piketty, C.A. (Lab. de Physique Theorique, Ecole Normale Superieure, 75 - Paris (France))

    1991-10-24

    We present first a computation of the nuclear anapole moment of thallium by a method developed previously by the authors. Then we perform a detailed analysis of the spin dependent parity violating electron-nucleon potential generated by the hyperfine coupling perturbation upon the pseudoscalar interaction of the electron with the weak charge of the nucleus. This effect is found to be of order {alpha}G{sub F}A{sup 2/3} and represents, depending upon the nucleus, (10-70)% of the anapole moment contribution. In the case of thallium, it compensates almost exactly the contribution associated with the axial hadronic neutral current. This fact, together with other arguments given in the paper, makes thallium a favoured candidate for the anapole moment search provided accurate enough experiments can be performed. (orig.).

  18. Nuclear spin dependent parity violating electron-nucleus interaction in heavy atoms. The anapole moment and the perturbation of the hadronic vector neutral current by the hyperfine interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchiat, C.; Piketty, C. A.

    1991-10-01

    We present first a computation of the nuclear anapole moment of thallium by a method developed previously by the authors. Then we perform a detailed analysis of the spin dependent parity violating electron-nucleon potential generated by the hyperfine coupling perturbation upon the pseudoscalar interaction of the electron with the weak charge of the nucleus. This effect is found to be of order αG FA {2}/{3} and represents, depending upon the nucleus, (10-70)% of the anapole moment contribution. In the case of thallium, it compensates almost exactly the contribution associated with the axial hadronic neutral current. This fact, together with other arguments given in the paper, makes thallium a favoured candidate for the anapole moment search provided accurate enough experiments can be performed.

  19. Glucose Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2006-01-01

    Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Glucose Sensing is the eleventh volume in the popular series Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy, edited by Drs. Chris D. Geddes and Joseph R. Lakowicz. This volume incorporates authoritative analytical fluorescence-based glucose sensing reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. Glucose Sensing is an essential reference for any lab working in the analytical fluorescence glucose sensing field. All academics, bench scientists, and industry professionals wishing to take advantage of the latest and greatest in the continuously emerging field of glucose sensing, and diabetes care & management, will find this volume an invaluable resource. Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy Volume 11, Glucose Sensing Chapters include: Implantable Sensors for Interstitial Fluid Smart Tattoo Glucose Sensors Optical Enzyme-based Glucose Biosensors Plasmonic Glucose Sens...

  20. Interface potential sensing from adsorption of human serum albumin (HSA) on carbon nanotube (CNT) monitored by zero current potentiometry for HSA determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan; Wu, Yi; Song, Jun-Feng

    2015-10-15

    In this work, the adsorption of human serum albumin (HSA) on the bare multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT) was investigated by a new electrochemical method, termed as zero current potentiometry. For this, a MWNT strip was prepared by directly adhering MWNTs on the transparent adhesive tape surface. Moreover, when HSA adsorbed onto MWNT at the MWNT/solution interface, an interface potential Ψ yielded. The interface potential Ψ as the zero current potential Ezcp simply related to it was monitored by zero current potentiometry. The relationship between the zero current potential Ezcp, the HSA concentration and others was established in simple stoichiometric relation. Based on this, both the adsorption of HSA on MWNT and the HSA determination can be studied. For the HSA determination, the theoretic conclusion consisted with experimental results. The zero current potential Ezcp was proportional to the HSA concentration in the range of 2.8 × 10(-8) - 3.4 × 10(-7)M with the limit of detection 2 × 10(-8)M. The linear regression equation was Ezcp/V (vs, SCE) = (0.159 ± 0.01) + (0.358 ± 0.02) × 10(6)CHSA (µM). This determination was fast, high sensitive and good selective.

  1. The Theory of Atom Lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Ballagh, R.; Savage, C. M.

    2000-01-01

    We review the current theory of atom lasers. A tutorial treatment of second quantisation and the Gross-Pitaevskii equation is presented, and basic concepts of coherence are outlined. The generic types of atom laser models are surveyed and illustrated by specific examples. We conclude with detailed treatments of the mechanisms of gain and output coupling.

  2. Intelligent hand-portable proliferation sensing system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieckman, S.L.; Bostrom, G.A.; Waterfield, L.G.; Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; Ahuja, S.; Raptis, A.C.

    1997-08-01

    Argonne National Laboratory, with support from DOE`s Office of Nonproliferation and National Security, is currently developing an intelligent hand-portable sensor system. This system is designed specifically to support the intelligence community with the task of in-field sensing of nuclear proliferation and related activities. Based upon pulsed laser photo-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry technology, this novel sensing system is capable of quickly providing a molecular or atomic analysis of specimens. The system is capable of analyzing virtually any gas phase molecule, or molecule that can be induced into the gas phase by (for example) sample heating. This system has the unique advantages of providing unprecedented portability, excellent sensitivity, tremendous fieldability, and a high performance/cost ratio. The system will be capable of operating in a highly automated manner for on-site inspections, and easily modified for other applications such as perimeter monitoring aboard a plane or drone. The paper describes the sensing system.

  3. Atomic theories

    CERN Document Server

    Loring, FH

    2014-01-01

    Summarising the most novel facts and theories which were coming into prominence at the time, particularly those which had not yet been incorporated into standard textbooks, this important work was first published in 1921. The subjects treated cover a wide range of research that was being conducted into the atom, and include Quantum Theory, the Bohr Theory, the Sommerfield extension of Bohr's work, the Octet Theory and Isotopes, as well as Ionisation Potentials and Solar Phenomena. Because much of the material of Atomic Theories lies on the boundary between experimentally verified fact and spec

  4. Atomic Force Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  5. Graphene Hybrid Materials in Gas Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Latif

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Graphene, a two dimensional structure of carbon atoms, has been widely used as a material for gas sensing applications because of its large surface area, excellent conductivity, and ease of functionalization. This article reviews the most recent advances in graphene hybrid materials developed for gas sensing applications. In this review, synthetic approaches to fabricate graphene sensors, the nano structures of hybrid materials, and their sensing mechanism are presented. Future perspectives of this rapidly growing field are also discussed.

  6. Remote Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richard S., Jr.; Southworth, C. Scott

    1983-01-01

    The Landsat Program became the major event of 1982 in geological remote sensing with the successful launch of Landsat 4. Other 1982 remote sensing accomplishments, research, publications, (including a set of Landsat worldwide reference system index maps), and conferences are highlighted. (JN)

  7. Make Sense?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyrd-Jones, Richard; Törmälä, Minna

    Purpose: An important part of how we sense a brand is how we make sense of a brand. Sense-making is naturally strongly connected to how we cognize about the brand. But sense-making is concerned with multiple forms of knowledge that arise from our interpretation of the brand-related stimuli...... sense of brands is related to who people think they are in their context and this shapes what they enact and how they interpret the brand (Currie & Brown, 2003; Weick, Sutcliffe, & Obstfeld, 2005; Weick, 1993). Our subject of interest in this paper is how stakeholders interpret and ascribe meaning...... to the brand and how these meaning narratives play out over time to create meta-narratives that drive brand meaning co-creation. In this paper we focus on the concept of brand identity since it is at the level of identity that the brand creates meaning for individuals (Kapferer, 2012; Csaba & Bengtsson, 2006)....

  8. Atomic-level Electron Microscopy of Metal and Alloy Electrocatalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deiana, Davide

    by means of ex situ Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) in combination with in situ indirect nanoplasmonic sensing. Secondly, electron microscopy imaging and spectroscopy have been used for the characterisation of novel metal alloy nanoparticle electrocatalysts for the Oxygen Reduction......This thesis presents the application of transmission electron microscopy techniques towards the characterisation of novel metal nanoparticle catalysts. Two main subjects have been covered: first, the sintering-resistance behaviour of monomodal mass-selected Pt cluster catalysts have been studied...... peroxide H2O2. The active surface is predicted to be formed by reactive Pt or Pd atoms surrounded by more inert Hg atoms. Electrochemical measurements on the two catalysts have shown performance exceeding the current state-of-the-art in both forms of extended surface and nanoparticles. Electron microscopy...

  9. Atom chip gravimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Christian; Abend, Sven; Gebbe, Martina; Gersemann, Matthias; Ahlers, Holger; Müntinga, Hauke; Matthias, Jonas; Sahelgozin, Maral; Herr, Waldemar; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst

    2016-04-01

    Atom interferometry has developed into a tool for measuring rotations [1], accelerations [2], and testing fundamental physics [3]. Gravimeters based on laser cooled atoms demonstrated residual uncertainties of few microgal [2,4] and were simplified for field applications [5]. Atomic gravimeters rely on the interference of matter waves which are coherently manipulated by laser light fields. The latter can be interpreted as rulers to which the position of the atoms is compared. At three points in time separated by a free evolution, the light fields are pulsed onto the atoms. First, a coherent superposition of two momentum states is produced, then the momentum is inverted, and finally the two trajectories are recombined. Depending on the acceleration the atoms experienced, the number of atoms detected in the output ports will change. Consequently, the acceleration can be determined from the output signal. The laser cooled atoms with microkelvin temperatures used in state-of-the-art gravimeters impose limits on the accuracy [4]. Therefore, ultra-cold atoms generated by Bose-Einstein condensation and delta-kick collimation [6,7] are expected to be the key for further improvements. These sources suffered from a low flux implying an incompatible noise floor, but a competitive performance was demonstrated recently with atom chips [8]. In the compact and robust setup constructed for operation in the drop tower [6] we demonstrated all steps necessary for an atom chip gravimeter with Bose-Einstein condensates in a ground based operation. We will discuss the principle of operation, the current performance, and the perspectives to supersede the state of the art. The authors thank the QUANTUS cooperation for contributions to the drop tower project in the earlier stages. This work is supported by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under grant numbers DLR 50WM

  10. Quantum enhanced optical sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schäfermeier, Clemens

    The work in this thesis is embedded in the framework of quantum metrology and explores quantum effects in solid state emitters and optical sensing. Specifically, the thesis comprises studies on silicon vacancy centres in nanodiamonds, phase measurements and cavity optomechanics utilising optical...... squeezed states, and a theoretical study on quantum amplifiers. Due to its similarity to single atoms, colour centres in diamond are ideal objects for exploring and exploiting quantum effects, because they are comparably easy to produce, probe and maintain. While nitrogen vacancy centres are the most...... identified spectral diffusion as the main hindrance in extending spin coherence times. Overcoming this issue will provide a promising candidate as an emitter for quantum information. Next, the question of how squeezed states of light can improve optical sensing was addressed. For this purpose, a squeezed...

  11. Carbon for sensing devices

    CERN Document Server

    Tagliaferro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This book reveals why carbon is playing such an increasingly prominent role as a sensing material. The various steps that transform a raw material in a sensing device are thoroughly presented and critically discussed.  The authors deal with all aspects of carbon-based sensors, starting from the various hybridization and allotropes of carbon, with specific focus on micro and nanosized carbons (e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene) and their growth processes. The discussion then moves to the role of functionalization and the different routes to achieve it. Finally, a number of sensing applications in various fields are presented, highlighting the connection with the basic properties of the various carbon allotropes.  Readers will benefit from this book’s bottom-up approach, which starts from the local bonding in carbon solids and ends with sensing applications, linking the local hybridization of carbon atoms and its modification by functionalization to specific device performance. This book is a must-have in th...

  12. Estimation of ocean surface currents from maximum cross correlation applied to GOCI geostationary satellite remote sensing data over the Tsushima (Korea) Straits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, M. A.; Quartly, G. D.; Shutler, J. D.; Miller, P. I.; Yoshikawa, Y.

    2016-09-01

    Attempts to automatically estimate surface current velocities from satellite-derived thermal or visible imagery face the limitations of data occlusion due to cloud cover, the complex evolution of features and the degradation of their surface signature. The Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) provides a chance to reappraise such techniques due to its multiyear record of hourly high-resolution visible spectrum data. Here we present the results of applying a Maximum Cross Correlation (MCC) technique to GOCI data. Using a combination of simulated and real data we derive suitable processing parameters and examine the robustness of different satellite products, those being water-leaving radiance and chlorophyll concentration. These estimates of surface currents are evaluated using High Frequency (HF) radar systems located in the Tsushima (Korea) Strait. We show the performance of the MCC approach varies depending on the amount of missing data and the presence of strong optical contrasts. Using simulated data it was found that patchy cloud cover occupying 25% of the image pair reduces the number of vectors by 20% compared to using perfect images. Root mean square errors between the MCC and HF radar velocities are of the order of 20 cm s-1. Performance varies depending on the wavelength of the data with the blue-green products out-performing the red and near infra-red products. Application of MCC to GOCI chlorophyll data results in similar performance to radiances in the blue-green bands. The technique has been demonstrated using specific examples of an eddy feature and tidal induced features in the region.

  13. 增益可调通用高精度负载电流检测电路%Universal high accuracy and gain-adj ustable load current sensing circuit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王泽宇; 来新泉

    2016-01-01

    为了实现量化电流检测及提高检测精度,提出了一种负载电流检测电路。通过采用具有完全对称结构的共模负反馈以及差模正反馈检测架构,实现了对由制造工艺所引起失调的良好抑制,同时在电源轨范围内可对微小误差信号具有极其稳定且任意可调的放大倍数。该电路采用30 V 双极-CMOS-DMOS工艺实现,仿真及实测结果证明在各工艺角下,-40°~125°温度范围内检测误差均小于±3%。%To quantify and improve the accuracy of load current detection,a load current sensing cir-cuit was proposed.By adopting a completely symmetrical common-mode negative feedback (CMNF) as well as the differential-mode positive feedback (DMPF)technique,the offset induced by process was greatly restrained.What′s more,the tiny sensing signal was able to be reliably amplified by an arbitrary time within the power rail.This proposed technique has been realized and verified in a 30 V bipolar-CMOS-DMOS (BCD)process,simulation as well as practical results show that the detection error can be less than ±3% with the temperature ranges from -40°to 125°.

  14. Atomic rivals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a memoir of rivalries among the Allies over the bomb, by a participant and observer. Nuclear proliferation began in the uneasy wartime collaboration of the United States, England, Canada, and Free France to produce the atom bomb. Through the changes of history, a young French chemist had a role in almost every act of this international drama. This memoir is based on Goldschmidt's own recollections, interviews with other leading figures, and 3,000 pages of newly declassified documents in Allied archives. From his own start as Marie Curie's lab assistant, Goldschmidt's career was closely intertwined with Frances complicated rise to membership in the nuclear club. As a refugee from the Nazis, he became part of the wartime nuclear energy project in Canada and found himself the only French scientist to work (although briefly) on the American atom bomb project.

  15. SIXTH SENSE TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to explain the development of the technology by describing current hot concept in its field. The thesis describes the trend of development and current phase of the technology. The trend was described by explaining the concept of sixth sense technology and the effort that have been applied for this technology. As the concept is new, finding the suitable material related to the subject matter was the challenge for this project. The objective was completed by condu...

  16. A magnetic guide for cold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Richmond, J A; Cantwell, B P; Opat, G I

    1998-01-01

    We propose a novel method for guiding cold, neutral atoms using static magnetic fields. A theoretical study of the magnetic field produced by a tube consisting of two identical, interwound solenoids carrying equal but opposite currents is presented. This field is almost zero throughout the centre of the tube, but it increases with exponential rapidity as one approaches the walls formed by the current carrying wires. Hence, cold atoms passing through the tube may be reflected by magnetic mirror effects near the walls. Applying this technique to a free-falling cloud of magneto-optically cooled caesium atoms we hope to construct atomic guides to facilitate the manipulation of cold atomic beams.

  17. Global Cropland Area Database (GCAD) derived from Remote Sensing in Support of Food Security in the Twenty-first Century: Current Achievements and Future Possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teluguntla, Pardhasaradhi G.; Thenkabail, Prasad S.; Xiong, Jun N.; Gumma, Murali Krishna; Giri, Chandra; Milesi, Cristina; Ozdogan, Mutlu; Congalton, Russ; Tilton, James; Sankey, Temuulen Tsagaan; Massey, Richard; Phalke, Aparna; Yadav, Kamini

    2015-01-01

    The precise estimation of the global agricultural cropland- extents, areas, geographic locations, crop types, cropping intensities, and their watering methods (irrigated or rainfed; type of irrigation) provides a critical scientific basis for the development of water and food security policies (Thenkabail et al., 2012, 2011, 2010). By year 2100, the global human population is expected to grow to 10.4 billion under median fertility variants or higher under constant or higher fertility variants (Table 1) with over three quarters living in developing countries, in regions that already lack the capacity to produce enough food. With current agricultural practices, the increased demand for food and nutrition would require in about 2 billion hectares of additional cropland, about twice the equivalent to the land area of the United States, and lead to significant increases in greenhouse gas productions (Tillman et al., 2011). For example, during 1960-2010 world population more than doubled from 3 billion to 7 billion. The nutritional demand of the population also grew swiftly during this period from an average of about 2000 calories per day per person in 1960 to nearly 3000 calories per day per person in 2010. The food demand of increased population along with increased nutritional demand during this period (1960-2010) was met by the “green revolution” which more than tripled the food production; even though croplands decreased from about 0.43 ha/capita to 0.26 ha/capita (FAO, 2009). The increase in food production during the green revolution was the result of factors such as: (a) expansion in irrigated areas which increased from 130 Mha in 1960s to 278.4 Mha in year 2000 (Siebert et al., 2006) or 399 Mha when you do not consider cropping intensity (Thenkabail et al., 2009a, 2009b, 2009c) or 467 Mha when you consider cropping intensity (Thenkabail et al., 2009a; Thenkabail et al., 2009c); (b) increase in yield and per capita food production (e.g., cereal production

  18. Characterisation of recently retrieved aerial photographs of Ethiopia (1935-1941) and their fusion with current remotely sensed imagery for retrospective geomorphological analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyssen, Jan; Gebremeskel, Gezahegne; Mohamed, Sultan; Petrie, Gordon; Seghers, Valérie; Meles Hadgu, Kiros; De Maeyer, Philippe; Haile, Mitiku; Frankl, Amaury

    2013-04-01

    8281 assemblages of aerial photographs (APs) acquired by the 7a Sezione Topocartografica during the Italian occupation of Ethiopia (1935-1941) have recently been discovered, scanned and organised. The oldest APs of the country that are known so far were taken in the period 1958-1964. The APs of the 1930s were analysed for their technical characteristics, scale, flight lines, coverage, use in topographic mapping, and potential future uses. The APs over Ethiopia in 1935-1941 are presented as assemblages on approx. 50 cm x 20 cm cardboard tiles, each holding a label, one nadir-pointing photograph flanked by two low-oblique photographs and one high-oblique photograph. The four APs were exposed simultaneously and were taken across the flight line; the high-oblique photograph is presented alternatively at left and at right; there is approx. 60% overlap between subsequent sets of APs. One of Santoni's glass plate multi-cameras was used, with focal length of 178 mm, flight height at 4000-4500 m a.s.l., which results in an approximate scale of 1:11 500 for the central photograph and 1:16 000 to 1:18 000 for the low-oblique APs. The surveyors oriented themselves with maps of Ethiopia at 1:400 000 scale, compiled in 1934. The flights present a dense AP coverage of Northern Ethiopia, where they were acquired in the context of upcoming battles with the Ethiopian army. Several flights preceded the later advance of the Italian army southwards towards the capital Addis Ababa. Further flights took place in central Ethiopia for civilian purposes. As of 1936, the APs were used to prepare highly detailed topographic maps at 1:100 000 scale. These APs (1935-1941) together with APs of 1958-1964, 1994 and recent high-resolution satellite imagery are currently being used in spatially explicit change studies of land cover, land management and (hydro)geomorphology in Ethiopia over a time span of almost 80 years, the first results of which will be presented.

  19. The Atomic orbitals of the topological atom

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos-Cordoba, Eloy; Salvador Sedano, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    The effective atomic orbitals have been realized in the framework of Bader's atoms in molecules theory for a general wavefunction. This formalism can be used to retrieve from any type of calculation a proper set of orthonormalized numerical atomic orbitals, with occupation numbers that sum up to the respective Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) atomic populations. Experience shows that only a limited number of effective atomic orbitals exhibit significant occupation numbers. These c...

  20. Sensing of RNA viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2012-01-01

    pathogen-associated molecular patterns have emerged in great detail. This review presents an overview of our current knowledge regarding the receptors used to detect RNA virus invasion, the molecular structures these receptors sense, and the involved downstream signaling pathways.......Our knowledge regarding the contribution of the innate immune system in recognizing and subsequently initiating a host response to an invasion of RNA virus has been rapidly growing over the last decade. Descriptions of the receptors involved and the molecular mechanisms they employ to sense viral...

  1. DNA-Based Nanopore Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Wu, Hai-Chen

    2016-12-05

    Nanopore sensing is an attractive, label-free approach that can measure single molecules. Although initially proposed for rapid and low-cost DNA sequencing, nanopore sensors have been successfully employed in the detection of a wide variety of substrates. Early successes were mostly achieved based on two main strategies by 1) creating sensing elements inside the nanopore through protein mutation and chemical modification or 2) using molecular adapters to enhance analyte recognition. Over the past five years, DNA molecules started to be used as probes for sensing rather than substrates for sequencing. In this Minireview, we highlight the recent research efforts of nanopore sensing based on DNA-mediated characteristic current events. As nanopore sensing is becoming increasingly important in biochemical and biophysical studies, DNA-based sensing may find wider applications in investigating DNA-involving biological processes. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Backaction-driven transport of Bloch oscillating atoms in ring cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldwin, J; Venkatesh, B Prasanna; O'Dell, D H J

    2014-08-15

    We predict that an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate strongly coupled to an intracavity optical lattice can undergo resonant tunneling and directed transport when a constant and uniform bias force is applied. The bias force induces Bloch oscillations, causing amplitude and phase modulation of the lattice which resonantly modifies the site-to-site tunneling. For the right choice of parameters a net atomic current is generated. The transport velocity can be oriented oppositely to the bias force, with its amplitude and direction controlled by the detuning between the pump laser and the cavity. The transport can also be enhanced through imbalanced pumping of the two counterpropagating running wave cavity modes. Our results add to the cold atoms quantum simulation toolbox, with implications for quantum sensing and metrology.

  3. Prospects of charged-oscillator quantum-state generation with Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Robin; Minář, Jiří; Hofferberth, Sebastian; Lesanovsky, Igor

    2016-10-01

    We explore the possibility of engineering quantum states of a charged mechanical oscillator by coupling it to a stream of atoms in superpositions of high-lying Rydberg states. Our scheme relies on the driving of a two-phonon resonance within the oscillator by coupling it to an atomic two-photon transition. This approach effectuates a controllable open system dynamics on the oscillator that in principle permits versatile dissipative creation of squeezed and other nonclassical states which are central to sensing applications or for studies of fundamental questions concerning the boundary between classical and quantum-mechanical descriptions of macroscopic objects. We show that these features survive thermal coupling of the oscillator with the environment. We perform a detailed feasibility study finding that current state-of-the-art parameters result in atom-oscillator couplings which are too weak to efficiently implement the proposed oscillator state preparation protocol. Finally, we comment on ways to circumvent the present limitations.

  4. Relativistic effects in atom gravimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yu-Jie; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Hu, Zhong-Kun

    2017-01-01

    Atom interferometry is currently developing rapidly, which is now reaching sufficient precision to motivate laboratory tests of general relativity. Thus, it is extremely significant to develop a general relativistic model for atom interferometers. In this paper, we mainly present an analytical derivation process and first give a complete vectorial expression for the relativistic interferometric phase shift in an atom interferometer. The dynamics of the interferometer are studied, where both the atoms and the light are treated relativistically. Then, an appropriate coordinate transformation for the light is performed crucially to simplify the calculation. In addition, the Bordé A B C D matrix combined with quantum mechanics and the "perturbation" approach are applied to make a methodical calculation for the total phase shift. Finally, we derive the relativistic phase shift kept up to a sensitivity of the acceleration ˜1 0-14 m/s 2 for a 10 -m -long atom interferometer.

  5. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  6. Current limiter circuit system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witcher, Joseph Brandon; Bredemann, Michael V.

    2017-09-05

    An apparatus comprising a steady state sensing circuit, a switching circuit, and a detection circuit. The steady state sensing circuit is connected to a first, a second and a third node. The first node is connected to a first device, the second node is connected to a second device, and the steady state sensing circuit causes a scaled current to flow at the third node. The scaled current is proportional to a voltage difference between the first and second node. The switching circuit limits an amount of current that flows between the first and second device. The detection circuit is connected to the third node and the switching circuit. The detection circuit monitors the scaled current at the third node and controls the switching circuit to limit the amount of the current that flows between the first and second device when the scaled current is greater than a desired level.

  7. Atomic memory access hardware implementations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jung Ho; Erez, Mattan; Dally, William J

    2015-02-17

    Atomic memory access requests are handled using a variety of systems and methods. According to one example method, a data-processing circuit having an address-request generator that issues requests to a common memory implements a method of processing the requests using a memory-access intervention circuit coupled between the generator and the common memory. The method identifies a current atomic-memory access request from a plurality of memory access requests. A data set is stored that corresponds to the current atomic-memory access request in a data storage circuit within the intervention circuit. It is determined whether the current atomic-memory access request corresponds to at least one previously-stored atomic-memory access request. In response to determining correspondence, the current request is implemented by retrieving data from the common memory. The data is modified in response to the current request and at least one other access request in the memory-access intervention circuit.

  8. Current Trends in Nuclear and Radiation Sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harold R. McHugh and William Quam

    2009-05-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of radiation detector history, a summary of the present state of the art, and some speculation on future developments in this field. Trends in the development of radiation detectors over the years are analyzed. Rapid progress in detection technology was experienced between WWII and the 1970s. Since then, fewer dramatic improvements have been seen. The authors speculate about the reasons for this trend and where the technology might take us in the next 20 years. Requirements for radiation detection equipment have changed drastically since 9/11; this demand is likely to accelerate detector development in the near future.

  9. Making Sense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golding, Clinton

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author provides a self-portrait of his intellectual life. He states that overall his approach to teaching and researching is about "making sense" where inadequate or incongruous conceptions fall into place or are transformed so they are congruous and adequate. In his teaching the author applies the methods of…

  10. Pervasive sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, David J.

    2000-11-01

    The coordinated exploitation of modern communication, micro- sensor and computer technologies makes it possible to give global reach to our senses. Web-cameras for vision, web- microphones for hearing and web-'noses' for smelling, plus the abilities to sense many factors we cannot ordinarily perceive, are either available or will be soon. Applications include (1) determination of weather and environmental conditions on dense grids or over large areas, (2) monitoring of energy usage in buildings, (3) sensing the condition of hardware in electrical power distribution and information systems, (4) improving process control and other manufacturing, (5) development of intelligent terrestrial, marine, aeronautical and space transportation systems, (6) managing the continuum of routine security monitoring, diverse crises and military actions, and (7) medicine, notably the monitoring of the physiology and living conditions of individuals. Some of the emerging capabilities, such as the ability to measure remotely the conditions inside of people in real time, raise interesting social concerns centered on privacy issues. Methods for sensor data fusion and designs for human-computer interfaces are both crucial for the full realization of the potential of pervasive sensing. Computer-generated virtual reality, augmented with real-time sensor data, should be an effective means for presenting information from distributed sensors.

  11. High Atom Number in Microsized Atom Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Final Performance Report on ONR Grant N00014-12-1-0608 High atom number in microsized atom traps for the period 15 May 2012 through 14 September...TYPE Final Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 05/15/2012-09/14/2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High atom number in microsized atom traps...forces for implementing a small-footprint, large-number atom -chip instrument. Bichromatic forces rely on absorption and stimulated emission to produce

  12. Detecting Neutral Atoms on an Atom Chip

    OpenAIRE

    Wilzbach, M.; Haase, A.; Schwarz, M; Heine, D.; Wicker, K.; Liu, X; Brenner, K. -H.; Groth, S.; Fernholz, Th.; Hessmo, B.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2006-01-01

    Detecting single atoms (qubits) is a key requirement for implementing quantum information processing on an atom chip. The detector should ideally be integrated on the chip. Here we present and compare different methods capable of detecting neutral atoms on an atom chip. After a short introduction to fluorescence and absorption detection we discuss cavity enhanced detection of single atoms. In particular we concentrate on optical fiber based detectors such as fiber cavities and tapered fiber d...

  13. Compressive sensing in medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Christian G; Sidky, Emil Y

    2015-03-10

    The promise of compressive sensing, exploitation of compressibility to achieve high quality image reconstructions with less data, has attracted a great deal of attention in the medical imaging community. At the Compressed Sensing Incubator meeting held in April 2014 at OSA Headquarters in Washington, DC, presentations were given summarizing some of the research efforts ongoing in compressive sensing for x-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging systems. This article provides an expanded version of these presentations. Sparsity-exploiting reconstruction algorithms that have gained popularity in the medical imaging community are studied, and examples of clinical applications that could benefit from compressive sensing ideas are provided. The current and potential future impact of compressive sensing on the medical imaging field is discussed.

  14. Conversational sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Alun; Gwilliams, Chris; Parizas, Christos; Pizzocaro, Diego; Bakdash, Jonathan Z.; Braines, Dave

    2014-05-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies, mobile devices and context-aware user interfaces have made it pos- sible to represent information fusion and situational awareness for Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) activities as a conversational process among actors at or near the tactical edges of a network. Motivated by use cases in the domain of Company Intelligence Support Team (CoIST) tasks, this paper presents an approach to information collection, fusion and sense-making based on the use of natural language (NL) and controlled nat- ural language (CNL) to support richer forms of human-machine interaction. The approach uses a conversational protocol to facilitate a ow of collaborative messages from NL to CNL and back again in support of interactions such as: turning eyewitness reports from human observers into actionable information (from both soldier and civilian sources); fusing information from humans and physical sensors (with associated quality metadata); and assisting human analysts to make the best use of available sensing assets in an area of interest (governed by man- agement and security policies). CNL is used as a common formal knowledge representation for both machine and human agents to support reasoning, semantic information fusion and generation of rationale for inferences, in ways that remain transparent to human users. Examples are provided of various alternative styles for user feedback, including NL, CNL and graphical feedback. A pilot experiment with human subjects shows that a prototype conversational agent is able to gather usable CNL information from untrained human subjects.

  15. "Bohr's Atomic Model."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willden, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    "Bohr's Atomic Model" is a small interactive multimedia program that introduces the viewer to a simplified model of the atom. This interactive simulation lets students build an atom using an atomic construction set. The underlying design methodology for "Bohr's Atomic Model" is model-centered instruction, which means the central model of the…

  16. The atomic orbitals of the topological atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Cordoba, Eloy; Salvador, Pedro; Mayer, István

    2013-06-07

    The effective atomic orbitals have been realized in the framework of Bader's atoms in molecules theory for a general wavefunction. This formalism can be used to retrieve from any type of calculation a proper set of orthonormalized numerical atomic orbitals, with occupation numbers that sum up to the respective Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) atomic populations. Experience shows that only a limited number of effective atomic orbitals exhibit significant occupation numbers. These correspond to atomic hybrids that closely resemble the core and valence shells of the atom. The occupation numbers of the remaining effective orbitals are almost negligible, except for atoms with hypervalent character. In addition, the molecular orbitals of a calculation can be exactly expressed as a linear combination of this orthonormalized set of numerical atomic orbitals, and the Mulliken population analysis carried out on this basis set exactly reproduces the original QTAIM atomic populations of the atoms. Approximate expansion of the molecular orbitals over a much reduced set of orthogonal atomic basis functions can also be accomplished to a very good accuracy with a singular value decomposition procedure.

  17. Atom Probe Tomography 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Thomas F.; Larson, David J.

    2012-08-01

    In the world of tomographic imaging, atom probe tomography (APT) occupies the high-spatial-resolution end of the spectrum. It is highly complementary to electron tomography and is applicable to a wide range of materials. The current state of APT is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on applications and data analysis as they apply to many fields of research and development including metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and organic materials. We also provide a brief review of the history and the instrumentation associated with APT and an assessment of the existing challenges in the field.

  18. Mobile robot sense net

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konolige, Kurt G.; Gutmann, Steffen; Guzzoni, Didier; Ficklin, Robert W.; Nicewarner, Keith E.

    1999-08-01

    Mobile robot hardware and software is developing to the point where interesting applications for groups of such robots can be contemplated. We envision a set of mobots acting to map and perform surveillance or other task within an indoor environment (the Sense Net). A typical application of the Sense Net would be to detect survivors in buildings damaged by earthquake or other disaster, where human searchers would be put a risk. As a team, the Sense Net could reconnoiter a set of buildings faster, more reliably, and more comprehensibly than an individual mobot. The team, for example, could dynamically form subteams to perform task that cannot be done by individual robots, such as measuring the range to a distant object by forming a long baseline stereo sensor form a pari of mobots. In addition, the team could automatically reconfigure itself to handle contingencies such as disabled mobots. This paper is a report of our current progress in developing the Sense Net, after the first year of a two-year project. In our approach, each mobot has sufficient autonomy to perform several tasks, such as mapping unknown areas, navigating to specific positions, and detecting, tracking, characterizing, and classifying human and vehicular activity. We detail how some of these tasks are accomplished, and how the mobot group is tasked.

  19. Kite Aerial Photography as a Tool for Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallee, Jeff; Meier, Lesley R.

    2010-01-01

    As humans, we perform remote sensing nearly all the time. This is because we acquire most of our information about our surroundings through the senses of sight and hearing. Whether viewed by the unenhanced eye or a military satellite, remote sensing is observing objects from a distance. With our current technology, remote sensing has become a part…

  20. Kite Aerial Photography as a Tool for Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallee, Jeff; Meier, Lesley R.

    2010-01-01

    As humans, we perform remote sensing nearly all the time. This is because we acquire most of our information about our surroundings through the senses of sight and hearing. Whether viewed by the unenhanced eye or a military satellite, remote sensing is observing objects from a distance. With our current technology, remote sensing has become a part…

  1. HORIZON SENSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry G. Stolarczyk

    2003-03-18

    With the aid of a DOE grant (No. DE-FC26-01NT41050), Stolar Research Corporation (Stolar) developed the Horizon Sensor (HS) to distinguish between the different layers of a coal seam. Mounted on mining machine cutter drums, HS units can detect or sense the horizon between the coal seam and the roof and floor rock, providing the opportunity to accurately mine the section of the seam most desired. HS also enables accurate cutting of minimum height if that is the operator's objective. Often when cutting is done out-of-seam, the head-positioning function facilitates a fixed mining height to minimize dilution. With this technology, miners can still be at a remote location, yet cut only the clean coal, resulting in a much more efficient overall process. The objectives of this project were to demonstrate the feasibility of horizon sensing on mining machines and demonstrate that Horizon Sensing can allow coal to be cut cleaner and more efficiently. Stolar's primary goal was to develop the Horizon Sensor (HS) into an enabling technology for full or partial automation or ''agile mining''. This technical innovation (R&D 100 Award Winner) is quickly demonstrating improvements in productivity and miner safety at several prominent coal mines in the United States. In addition, the HS system can enable the cutting of cleaner coal. Stolar has driven the HS program on the philosophy that cutting cleaner coal means burning cleaner coal. The sensor, located inches from the cutting bits, is based upon the physics principles of a Resonant Microstrip Patch Antenna (RMPA). When it is in proximity of the rock-coal interface, the RMPA impedance varies depending on the thickness of uncut coal. The impedance is measured by the computer-controlled electronics and then sent by radio waves to the mining machine. The worker at the machine can read the data via a Graphical User Interface, displaying a color-coded image of the coal being cut, and direct the machine

  2. Atomic phase diagram

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shichun

    2004-01-01

    Based on the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac-Cheng model, atomic phase diagram or electron density versus atomic radius diagram describing the interaction properties of atoms of different kinds in equilibrium state is developed. Atomic phase diagram is established based on the two-atoms model. Besides atomic radius, electron density and continuity condition for electron density on interfaces between atoms, the lever law of atomic phase diagram involving other physical parameters is taken into account, such as the binding energy, for the sake of simplicity.

  3. Low-Power Magnetic Current Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1989-01-01

    Direct current sensed via saturable-core reactor. Transducer senses direct current magnetically, providing isolation between input and output. Detecting-and-isolating element saturable reactor, where input current passes through one-turn control coil. Provides output of 0 to 3 Vdc for input current of 0 to 15 Adc and consumes power of 22 mW at 10 Adc input. Input sensed magnetically, output electrically isolated from input.

  4. Sensing with toroidal metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Manoj; Srivastava, Yogesh Kumar; Manjappa, Manukumara; Singh, Ranjan

    2017-03-01

    Localized electromagnetic excitation in the form of toroidal dipoles has recently been observed in metamaterial systems. The origin of the toroidal dipole lies in the currents flowing on the surface of a torus. Thus, the exotic toroidal excitations play an important role in determining the optical properties of a system. Toroidal dipoles also contribute towards enabling high quality factor subwavelength resonances in metamaterial systems which could be an excellent platform for probing the light matter interaction. Here, we demonstrate sensing with toroidal resonance in a two-dimensional terahertz metamaterial in which a pair of mirrored asymmetric Fano resonators possesses anti-aligned magnetic moments at an electromagnetic resonance that gives rise to a toroidal dipole. Our proof of concept demonstration opens up an avenue to explore the interaction of matter with toroidal multipoles that could have strong applications in the sensing of dielectrics and biomolecules.

  5. Cold Matter Assembled Atom-by-Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Endres, Manuel; Keesling, Alexander; Levine, Harry; Anschuetz, Eric R; Krajenbrink, Alexandre; Senko, Crystal; Vuletic, Vladan; Greiner, Markus; Lukin, Mikhail D

    2016-01-01

    The realization of large-scale fully controllable quantum systems is an exciting frontier in modern physical science. We use atom-by-atom assembly to implement a novel platform for the deterministic preparation of regular arrays of individually controlled cold atoms. In our approach, a measurement and feedback procedure eliminates the entropy associated with probabilistic trap occupation and results in defect-free arrays of over 50 atoms in less than 400 ms. The technique is based on fast, real-time control of 100 optical tweezers, which we use to arrange atoms in desired geometric patterns and to maintain these configurations by replacing lost atoms with surplus atoms from a reservoir. This bottom-up approach enables controlled engineering of scalable many-body systems for quantum information processing, quantum simulations, and precision measurements.

  6. Sensing our Environment: Remote sensing in a physics classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, Sivan; Schüttler, Tobias; Cohen-Zada, Aviv L.; Blumberg, Dan G.; Girwidz, Raimund; Maman, Shimrit

    2017-04-01

    Remote sensing is defined as data acquisition of an object, deprived physical contact. Fundamentally, most remote sensing applications are referred to as the use of satellite- or aircraft-based sensor technologies to detect and classify objects mainly on Earth or other planets. In the last years there have been efforts to bring the important subject of remote sensing into schools, however, most of these attempts focused on geography disciplines - restricting to the applications of remote sensing and to a less extent the technique itself and the physics behind it. Optical remote sensing is based on physical principles and technical devices, which are very meaningful from a theoretical point of view as well as for "hands-on" teaching. Some main subjects are radiation, atom and molecular physics, spectroscopy, as well as optics and the semiconductor technology used in modern digital cameras. Thus two objectives were outlined for this project: 1) to investigate the possibilities of using remote sensing techniques in physics teaching, and 2) to identify its impact on pupil's interest in the field of natural sciences. This joint project of the DLR_School_Lab, Oberpfaffenhofen of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the Earth and Planetary Image Facility (EPIF) at BGU, was conducted in 2016. Thirty teenagers (ages 16-18) participated in the project and were exposed to the cutting edge methods of earth observation. The pupils on both sides participated in the project voluntarily, knowing that at least some of the project's work had to be done in their leisure time. The pupil's project started with a day at EPIF and DLR respectively, where the project task was explained to the participants and an introduction to remote sensing of vegetation was given. This was realized in lectures and in experimental workshops. During the following two months both groups took several measurements with modern optical remote sensing systems in their home region with a special focus on flora

  7. The Chemi-Ionization Processes in Slow Collisions of Rydberg Atoms with Ground State Atoms: Mechanism and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Mihajlov, A. A.; Sreckovic, V. A.; Ignjatovic, Lj. M.; Klyucharev, A. N.

    2012-01-01

    In this article the history and the current state of research of the chemiionization processes in atom-Rydberg atom collisions is presented. The principal assumptions of the model of such processes based on the dipole resonance mechanism, as well as the problems of stochastic ionization in atom-Rydberg atom collisions, are exposed. The properties of the collision kinetics in atom beams of various types used in contemporary experimentations are briefly described. Results of the calculation of ...

  8. Structure Assisted Compressed Sensing Reconstruction of Undersampled AFM Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxvig, Christian Schou; Arildsen, Thomas; Larsen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    The use of compressed sensing in atomic force microscopy (AFM) can potentially speed-up image acquisition, lower probe-specimen interaction, or enable super resolution imaging. The idea in compressed sensing for AFM is to spatially undersample the specimen, i.e. only acquire a small fraction...

  9. Study on spectral structure of quantum remote sensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BI; Siwen; HAN; Jixia

    2006-01-01

    A study of the use of fine spectral structure in quantum remote sensing, including an expression, begins with a summary of present-day applications of spectrum remote sensing, which is followed by a theoretical discussion of the influence of electronic spin upon hydrogen-like atom energy levels and the calculation of spectral line in the absence of a circumstance field.

  10. Compressed sensing for body MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Li; Benkert, Thomas; Block, Kai Tobias; Sodickson, Daniel K; Otazo, Ricardo; Chandarana, Hersh

    2017-04-01

    The introduction of compressed sensing for increasing imaging speed in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has raised significant interest among researchers and clinicians, and has initiated a large body of research across multiple clinical applications over the last decade. Compressed sensing aims to reconstruct unaliased images from fewer measurements than are traditionally required in MRI by exploiting image compressibility or sparsity. Moreover, appropriate combinations of compressed sensing with previously introduced fast imaging approaches, such as parallel imaging, have demonstrated further improved performance. The advent of compressed sensing marks the prelude to a new era of rapid MRI, where the focus of data acquisition has changed from sampling based on the nominal number of voxels and/or frames to sampling based on the desired information content. This article presents a brief overview of the application of compressed sensing techniques in body MRI, where imaging speed is crucial due to the presence of respiratory motion along with stringent constraints on spatial and temporal resolution. The first section provides an overview of the basic compressed sensing methodology, including the notion of sparsity, incoherence, and nonlinear reconstruction. The second section reviews state-of-the-art compressed sensing techniques that have been demonstrated for various clinical body MRI applications. In the final section, the article discusses current challenges and future opportunities. 5 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:966-987. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. Laser-Free Cold-Atom Gymnastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Harvey; Feinberg, Benedict; Munger, Charles T., Jr.; Nishimura, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    We have performed beam transport simulations on ultra cold (2 μK) and cold (130 μK) neutral Cs atoms in the F = M = + 4 (magnetic weak-field seeking) ground state. We use inhomogeneous magnetic fields to focus and accelerate the atoms. Acceleration of neutral atoms by an inhomogeneous magnetic field was demonstrated by Stern and Gerlach in 1922. In the simulations, a two mm diameter cloud of atoms is released to fall under gravity. A magnetic coil focuses the falling atoms. After falling 41 cm, the atoms are reflected in the magnetic fringe field of a solenoid. They return to their starting height, about 0.7 s later, having passed a second time through the focusing coil. The simulations show that > 98 % of ultra cold Cs atoms and > 70 % of cold Cs atoms will survive at least 15 round trips (assuming perfect vacuum). More than 100 simulations were run to optimize coil currents and focusing coil diameter and height. Simulations also show that atoms can be launched into a fountain. An experimental apparatus to test the simulations, is being constructed. This technique may find application in atomic fountain clocks, interferometers, and gravitometers, and may be adaptable for use in microgravity. It may also work with Bose-Einstein condensates of paramagnetic atoms.

  12. Infrastructure sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Kenichi; Schooling, Jennifer

    2016-08-01

    Design, construction, maintenance and upgrading of civil engineering infrastructure requires fresh thinking to minimize use of materials, energy and labour. This can only be achieved by understanding the performance of the infrastructure, both during its construction and throughout its design life, through innovative monitoring. Advances in sensor systems offer intriguing possibilities to radically alter methods of condition assessment and monitoring of infrastructure. In this paper, it is hypothesized that the future of infrastructure relies on smarter information; the rich information obtained from embedded sensors within infrastructure will act as a catalyst for new design, construction, operation and maintenance processes for integrated infrastructure systems linked directly with user behaviour patterns. Some examples of emerging sensor technologies for infrastructure sensing are given. They include distributed fibre-optics sensors, computer vision, wireless sensor networks, low-power micro-electromechanical systems, energy harvesting and citizens as sensors.

  13. Ammonia sensing system based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viveiros, Duarte; Ferreira, João; Silva, Susana O.; Ribeiro, Joana; Flores, Deolinda; Santos, José L.; Frazão, Orlando; Baptista, José M.

    2015-06-01

    A sensing system in the near infrared region has been developed for ammonia sensing based on the wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) principle. The WMS is a rather sensitive technique for detecting atomic/molecular species, presenting the advantage that it can be used in the near-infrared region by using the optical telecommunications technology. In this technique, the laser wavelength and intensity were modulated by applying a sine wave signal through the injection current, which allowed the shift of the detection bandwidth to higher frequencies where laser intensity noise was typically lower. Two multi-pass cells based on free space light propagation with 160 cm and 16 cm of optical path length were used, allowing the redundancy operation and technology validation. This system used a diode laser with an emission wavelength at 1512.21 nm, where NH3 has a strong absorption line. The control of the NH3 gas sensing system, as well as acquisition, processing and data presentation was performed.

  14. Graphene Hybrid Materials in Gas Sensing Applications †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, Usman; Dickert, Franz L.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene, a two dimensional structure of carbon atoms, has been widely used as a material for gas sensing applications because of its large surface area, excellent conductivity, and ease of functionalization. This article reviews the most recent advances in graphene hybrid materials developed for gas sensing applications. In this review, synthetic approaches to fabricate graphene sensors, the nano structures of hybrid materials, and their sensing mechanism are presented. Future perspectives of this rapidly growing field are also discussed. PMID:26690156

  15. Enhancing the Sensing Properties of TiO2 Nanosheets with Exposed {001} Facets by a Hydrogenation and Sensing Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye; Liu, Junfang; Wang, Miao; Pei, Cuijin; Liu, Bin; Yuan, Yukun; Liu, Shengzhong; Yang, Heqing

    2017-02-06

    Hydrogenation is successfully employed to improve sensing performances of the gas sensors based on TiO2 nanosheets with exposed {001} facets for the first time. The hydrogenated TiO2 nanosheets show a significantly higher response toward ethanol, acetone, triethylamine, or formaldehyde than the samples without hydrogenation, and the response further increases with an increase of the hydrogenation temperature. The excellent sensing performances are ascribed to an increase of the density of unsaturated Ti5c atoms on the {001} surface resulting from the hydrogenation process. The unsaturated Ti5c atoms are considered to serve as sensing reaction active sites. They can generate noncontributing (free) electrons and adsorb oxygen molecules, and the detailed sensing mechanism is described at atomic and molecule level. The hydrogenated strategy may be employed to enhance the sensing performances of other metal oxide sensors and catalytic reaction activities of catalyst. The concept of the surface unsaturated metal atoms serving as sensing reaction active sites not only deepens the understanding of the sensing reaction and catalytic reaction mechanism but also provides new insights into the design of advanced gas sensing materials, catalysts, and photoelectronic devices.

  16. Neutral atom traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  17. The Atom: Time, Space and Spirit--Keys to Scientific Literacy Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonebarger, Bill

    Discoveries, background information, and facts concerning atomic structures and atomic energy are detailed in this booklet. The discussion considers time, space, and spirit. Time refers to a sense of history; space refers to geography; and spirit refers to life and thought. Several chapters regarding the concept of the atom, a time line of the…

  18. Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, James E

    2007-01-01

    Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection offers professionals and advanced students a comprehensive coverage of the major concepts that underlie the origins and transport of ionizing radiation in matter. Understanding atomic structure and the physical mechanisms of radiation interactions is the foundation on which much of the current practice of radiological health protection is based. The work covers the detection and measurement of radiation and the statistical interpretation of the data. The procedures that are used to protect man and the environment from the potential harmful effects of

  19. Ramsey interferometry with an atom laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, D; Debs, J E; Robins, N P; Figl, C; Altin, P A; Close, J D

    2009-11-09

    We present results on a free-space atom interferometer operating on the first order magnetically insensitive |F = 1,mF = 0) --> |F = 2,mF = 0) ground state transition of Bose-condensed (87)Rb atoms. A pulsed atom laser is output-coupled from a Bose-Einstein condensate and propagates through a sequence of two internal state beam splitters, realized via coherent Raman transitions between the two interfering states. We observe Ramsey fringes with a visibility close to 100% and determine the current and the potentially achievable interferometric phase sensitivity. This system is well suited to testing recent proposals for generating and detecting squeezed atomic states.

  20. Atom Lithography with a Chromium Atomic Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-Tao; LI Tong-Bao

    2006-01-01

    @@ Direct write atom lithography is a new technique in which resonant light is used to pattern an atomic beam and the nanostructures are formed when the atoms deposit on the substrate. We design an experiment setup to fabricate chromium nanolines by depositing an atomic beam of 52 Cr through an off-resonant laser standing wave with the wavelength of 425.55 nm onto a silicon substrate. The resulting nanolines exhibit a period of 215 ± 3 nm with height of 1 nm.

  1. Advanced laser remote sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, J.; Czuchlewski, S.; Karl, R. [and others

    1996-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Remote measurement of wind velocities is critical to a wide variety of applications such as environmental studies, weather prediction, aircraft safety, the accuracy of projectiles, bombs, parachute drops, prediction of the dispersal of chemical and biological warfare agents, and the debris from nuclear explosions. Major programs to develop remote sensors for these applications currently exist in the DoD and NASA. At present, however, there are no real-time, three-dimensional wind measurement techniques that are practical for many of these applications and we report on two new promising techniques. The first new technique uses an elastic backscatter lidar to track aerosol patterns in the atmosphere and to calculate three dimensional wind velocities from changes in the positions of the aerosol patterns. This was first done by Professor Ed Eloranta of the University of Wisconsin using post processing techniques and we are adapting Professor Eloranta`s algorithms to a real-time data processor and installing it in an existing elastic backscatter lidar system at Los Alamos (the XM94 helicopter lidar), which has a compatible data processing and control system. The second novel wind sensing technique is based on radio-frequency (RF) modulation and spatial filtering of elastic backscatter lidars. Because of their compactness and reliability, solid state lasers are the lasers of choice for many remote sensing applications, including wind sensing.

  2. Non-thermal hydrogen atoms in the terrestrial upper thermosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jianqi; Waldrop, Lara

    2016-12-06

    Model predictions of the distribution and dynamical transport of hydrogen atoms in the terrestrial atmosphere have long-standing discrepancies with ultraviolet remote sensing measurements, indicating likely deficiencies in conventional theories regarding this crucial atmospheric constituent. Here we report the existence of non-thermal hydrogen atoms that are much hotter than the ambient oxygen atoms in the upper thermosphere. Analysis of satellite measurements indicates that the upper thermospheric hydrogen temperature, more precisely the mean kinetic energy of the atomic hydrogen population, increases significantly with declining solar activity, contrary to contemporary understanding of thermospheric behaviour. The existence of hot hydrogen atoms in the upper thermosphere, which is the key to reconciling model predictions and observations, is likely a consequence of low atomic oxygen density leading to incomplete collisional thermalization of the hydrogen population following its kinetic energization through interactions with hot atomic or ionized constituents in the ionosphere, plasmasphere or magnetosphere.

  3. Eddy current thickness measurement apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, Gary J.; Sinclair, Frank; Soskov, Alexander; Buff, James S.

    2015-06-16

    A sheet of a material is disposed in a melt of the material. The sheet is formed using a cooling plate in one instance. An exciting coil and sensing coil are positioned downstream of the cooling plate. The exciting coil and sensing coil use eddy currents to determine a thickness of the solid sheet on top of the melt.

  4. Advanced atom chips with two metal layers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, James E.; Blain, Matthew Glenn; Benito, Francisco M.; Biedermann, Grant

    2010-12-01

    A design concept, device layout, and monolithic microfabrication processing sequence have been developed for a dual-metal layer atom chip for next-generation positional control of ultracold ensembles of trapped atoms. Atom chips are intriguing systems for precision metrology and quantum information that use ultracold atoms on microfabricated chips. Using magnetic fields generated by current carrying wires, atoms are confined via the Zeeman effect and controllably positioned near optical resonators. Current state-of-the-art atom chips are single-layer or hybrid-integrated multilayer devices with limited flexibility and repeatability. An attractive feature of multi-level metallization is the ability to construct more complicated conductor patterns and thereby realize the complex magnetic potentials necessary for the more precise spatial and temporal control of atoms that is required. Here, we have designed a true, monolithically integrated, planarized, multi-metal-layer atom chip for demonstrating crossed-wire conductor patterns that trap and controllably transport atoms across the chip surface to targets of interest.

  5. RF Jitter Modulation Alignment Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, L. F.; Fulda, P.; Diaz-Ortiz, M.; Perez Sanchez, G.; Ciani, G.; Voss, D.; Mueller, G.; Tanner, D. B.

    2017-01-01

    We will present the numerical and experimental results of a new alignment sensing scheme which can reduce the complexity of alignment sensing systems currently used, while maintaining the same shot noise limited sensitivity. This scheme relies on the ability of electro-optic beam deflectors to create angular modulation sidebands in radio frequency, and needs only a single-element photodiode and IQ demodulation to generate error signals for tilt and translation degrees of freedom in one dimension. It distances itself from current techniques by eliminating the need for beam centering servo systems, quadrant photodetectors and Gouy phase telescopes. RF Jitter alignment sensing can be used to reduce the complexity in the alignment systems of many laser optical experiments, including LIGO and the ALPS experiment.

  6. Detecting gas molecules via atomic magnetization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Heechae; Lee, Minho; Kim, Seungchul; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Chung, Yong-Chae

    2014-09-14

    Adsorptions of gas molecules were found to alter the directions and magnitudes of magnetic moments of transition metal (Co, Fe) atoms adsorbed on graphene. Using first-principles calculations, we demonstrated that magnetism of surface atoms can be used to identify the kind of existing gas molecules via spin-reorientation and/or demagnetizations caused by the reconfigurations of 3d electron energy levels of Co and Fe. We suggest for the first time that magnetic properties of transition metal-embedded nanostructures can be used in highly selective gas-sensing applications.

  7. Natural and artificial atoms for quantum computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buluta, Iulia; Ashhab, Sahel; Nori, Franco, E-mail: fnori@riken.jp [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    Remarkable progress towards realizing quantum computation has been achieved using natural and artificial atoms as qubits. This paper presents a brief overview of the current status of different types of qubits. On the one hand, natural atoms (such as neutral atoms and ions) have long coherence times, and could be stored in large arrays, providing ideal 'quantum memories'. On the other hand, artificial atoms (such as superconducting circuits or semiconductor quantum dots) have the advantage of custom-designed features and could be used as 'quantum processing units'. Natural and artificial atoms can be coupled with each other and can also be interfaced with photons for long-distance communications. Hybrid devices made of natural/artificial atoms and photons may provide the next-generation design for quantum computers.

  8. Atomic and molecular manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Mayne, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    Work with individual atoms and molecules aims to demonstrate that miniaturized electronic, optical, magnetic, and mechanical devices can operate ultimately even at the level of a single atom or molecule. As such, atomic and molecular manipulation has played an emblematic role in the development of the field of nanoscience. New methods based on the use of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) have been developed to characterize and manipulate all the degrees of freedom of individual atoms and molecules with an unprecedented precision. In the meantime, new concepts have emerged to design molecules and substrates having specific optical, mechanical and electronic functions, thus opening the way to the fabrication of real nano-machines. Manipulation of individual atoms and molecules has also opened up completely new areas of research and knowledge, raising fundamental questions of "Optics at the atomic scale", "Mechanics at the atomic scale", Electronics at the atomic scale", "Quantum physics at the atomic sca...

  9. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    2000-01-01

    This fifth volume of the successful series Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy continues to discuss and investigate the area of atomic spectroscopy.It begins with a description of the use of various atomic spectroscopic methods and applications of speciation studies in atomic spectroscopy. The emphasis is on combining atomic spectroscopy with gas and liquid chromatography. In chapter two the authors describe new developments in tunable lasers and the impact they will have on atomic spectroscopy. The traditional methods of detection, such as photography and the photomultiplier, and how they are being replaced by new detectors is discussed in chapter three. The very active area of glow discharge atomic spectrometry is presented in chapter four where, after a brief introduction and historical review, the use of glow discharge lamps for atomic spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are discussed. Included in this discussion is geometry and radiofrequency power. The future of this source in atomic spectroscopy is also dis...

  10. Microfabricated Waveguide Atom Traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu

    2017-09-01

    A nano - scale , microfabricated waveguide structure can in - principle be used to trap atoms in well - defined locations and enable strong photon - atom interactions . A neutral - atom platf orm based on this microfabrication technology will be pre - aligned , which is especially important for quantum - control applications. At present, there is still no reported demonstration of evanescent - field atom trapping using a microfabricated waveguide structure. We described the capabilities established by our team for future development of the waveguide atom - trapping technology at SNL and report our studies to overcome the technical challenges of loading cold atoms into the waveguide atom traps, efficient and broadband optical coupling to a waveguide, and the waveguide material for high - power optical transmission. From the atomic - physics and the waveguide modeling, w e have shown that a square nano - waveguide can be utilized t o achieve better atomic spin squeezing than using a nanofiber for first time.

  11. Reading and writing single-atom magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natterer, Fabian D.; Yang, Kai; Paul, William; Willke, Philip; Choi, Taeyoung; Greber, Thomas; Heinrich, Andreas J.; Lutz, Christopher P.

    2017-03-01

    The single-atom bit represents the ultimate limit of the classical approach to high-density magnetic storage media. So far, the smallest individually addressable bistable magnetic bits have consisted of 3–12 atoms. Long magnetic relaxation times have been demonstrated for single lanthanide atoms in molecular magnets, for lanthanides diluted in bulk crystals, and recently for ensembles of holmium (Ho) atoms supported on magnesium oxide (MgO). These experiments suggest a path towards data storage at the atomic limit, but the way in which individual magnetic centres are accessed remains unclear. Here we demonstrate the reading and writing of the magnetism of individual Ho atoms on MgO, and show that they independently retain their magnetic information over many hours. We read the Ho states using tunnel magnetoresistance and write the states with current pulses using a scanning tunnelling microscope. The magnetic origin of the long-lived states is confirmed by single-atom electron spin resonance on a nearby iron sensor atom, which also shows that Ho has a large out-of-plane moment of 10.1 ± 0.1 Bohr magnetons on this surface. To demonstrate independent reading and writing, we built an atomic-scale structure with two Ho bits, to which we write the four possible states and which we read out both magnetoresistively and remotely by electron spin resonance. The high magnetic stability combined with electrical reading and writing shows that single-atom magnetic memory is indeed possible.

  12. Reading and writing single-atom magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natterer, Fabian D; Yang, Kai; Paul, William; Willke, Philip; Choi, Taeyoung; Greber, Thomas; Heinrich, Andreas J; Lutz, Christopher P

    2017-03-08

    The single-atom bit represents the ultimate limit of the classical approach to high-density magnetic storage media. So far, the smallest individually addressable bistable magnetic bits have consisted of 3-12 atoms. Long magnetic relaxation times have been demonstrated for single lanthanide atoms in molecular magnets, for lanthanides diluted in bulk crystals, and recently for ensembles of holmium (Ho) atoms supported on magnesium oxide (MgO). These experiments suggest a path towards data storage at the atomic limit, but the way in which individual magnetic centres are accessed remains unclear. Here we demonstrate the reading and writing of the magnetism of individual Ho atoms on MgO, and show that they independently retain their magnetic information over many hours. We read the Ho states using tunnel magnetoresistance and write the states with current pulses using a scanning tunnelling microscope. The magnetic origin of the long-lived states is confirmed by single-atom electron spin resonance on a nearby iron sensor atom, which also shows that Ho has a large out-of-plane moment of 10.1 ± 0.1 Bohr magnetons on this surface. To demonstrate independent reading and writing, we built an atomic-scale structure with two Ho bits, to which we write the four possible states and which we read out both magnetoresistively and remotely by electron spin resonance. The high magnetic stability combined with electrical reading and writing shows that single-atom magnetic memory is indeed possible.

  13. Atomic Particle Detection, Understanding the Atom Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the booklets in the "Understanding the Atom Series" published by the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission for high school science teachers and their students. The instruments used to detect both particles and electromagnetic radiation that emerge from the nucleus are described. The counters reviewed include ionization chambers,…

  14. Affective multimodal mirror: sensing and eliciting laughter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melder, W.A.; Truong, K.P.; Uyl, M. den; Leeuwen, D.A. van; Neerincx, M.A.; Loos, L.R.; Stock Plum, B.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present a multimodal affective mirror that senses and elicits laughter. Currently, the mirror contains a vocal and a facial affect-sensing module, a component that fuses the output of these two modules to achieve a user-state assessment, a user state transition model, and a compone

  15. Laser spectroscopy of atomic radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groot, Alexander; Jungmann, Klaus; Santra, Bodhaditya; Willmann, Lorenz; Wilschut, Hans W. [KVI, University of Groningen (Netherlands)

    2009-07-01

    The heavy alkaline earth elements radium (Ra) offers a unique sensitivity to a parity and time reversal violating permanent electric dipole moments (EDM). In particular, Ra exhibits the largest known atomic enhancements factors for EDMs. The intrinsic sensitivity arises from the specific atomic and nuclear structure of Ra. All Ra isotopes with nuclear spin I are radioactive. The lifetimes are shorter than 15 d. Several Ra isotopes are available at the TRI{mu}P facility at KVI. For the exploitation of the sensitivity Ra atoms have to be collected in a neutral atom trap. The main laser cooling is done on the strong {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 1}P{sub 1} transition at 482.7 nm, similar to the laser cooling and trapping of the chemical homologue barium. Laser spectroscopy of the strong {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 1}P{sub 1} transitions is presented. The light at this wavelength is provided by frequency doubling of a Ti:sapphire laser in a KNbO{sub 3} crystal. Of particular interest is the decay branching of the excited state to the metastable D-states. Such measurements are indispensable input for current atomic structure calculations, which are necessary for the analysis of a EDM measurement using Ra.

  16. Precision Excited State Lifetime Measurements for Atomic Parity Violation and Atomic Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell, Jerry; Patterson, Brian; Gearba, Alina; Snell, Jeremy; Knize, Randy

    2016-05-01

    Measurements of excited state atomic lifetimes provide a valuable test of atomic theory, allowing comparisons between experimental and theoretical transition dipole matrix elements. Such tests are important in Rb and Cs, where atomic parity violating experiments have been performed or proposed, and where atomic structure calculations are required to properly interpret the parity violating effect. In optical lattice clocks, precision lifetime measurements can aid in reducing the uncertainty of frequency shifts due to the surrounding blackbody radiation field. We will present our technique for precisely measuring excited state lifetimes which employs mode-locked ultrafast lasers interacting with two counter-propagating atomic beams. This method allows the timing in the experiment to be based on the inherent timing stability of mode-locked lasers, while counter-propagating atomic beams provides cancellation of systematic errors due to atomic motion to first order. Our current progress measuring Rb excited state lifetimes will be presented along with future planned measurements in Yb.

  17. Wavefront Sensing via High Speed DSP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. Scott; Dean, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    Future light-weighted and segmented primary mirror systems require active optical control to maintain mirror positioning and figure to within nanometer tolerances. Current image-based wavefront sensing approaches rely on post-processing techniques to return an estimate of the aberrated optical wavefront with accuracies to the nanometer level. But the lag times between wavefront sensing, and then control, contributes to a significant latency in the wavefront sensing implementation. In this analysis we demonstrate accelerated image-based wavefront sensing performance using multiple digital signal processors (DSP's). The computational architecture is discussed as well as the heritage leading to the approach.

  18. Presenting the Bohr Atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haendler, Blanca L.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the importance of teaching the Bohr atom at both freshman and advanced levels. Focuses on the development of Bohr's ideas, derivation of the energies of the stationary states, and the Bohr atom in the chemistry curriculum. (SK)

  19. Single Atom Plasmonic Switch

    OpenAIRE

    Emboras, Alexandros; Niegemann, Jens; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2015-01-01

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moores law in the electronics industry. And while electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling-similar to electronics-is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled single atom plasmonic switch. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individ...

  20. Atomic Scale Plasmonic Switch

    OpenAIRE

    Emboras, A.; Niegemann, J.; Ma, P.; Haffner, C; Pedersen, A.; Luisier, M.; Hafner, C.; Schimmel, T.; Leuthold, J.

    2016-01-01

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moore’s law in the electronics industry. While electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling, similar to electronics, is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled plasmonic switch operating at the atomic scale. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocat...

  1. Atomic Storage States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪凯戈; 朱诗尧

    2002-01-01

    We present a complete description of atomic storage states which may appear in the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). The result shows that the spatial coherence has been included in the atomic collective operators and the atomic storage states. In some limits, a set of multimode atomic storage states has been established in correspondence with the multimode Fock states of the electromagnetic field. This gives a better understanding of the fact that, in BIT, the optical coherent information can be preserved and recovered.

  2. The Nature of Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Alan

    This monograph was written for the purpose of presenting physics to college students who are not preparing for careers in physics. It deals with the nature of atoms, and treats the following topics: (1) the atomic hypothesis, (2) the chemical elements, (3) models of an atom, (4) a particle in a one-dimensional well, (5) a particle in a central…

  3. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  4. TEM Video Compressive Sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Andrew J.; Kovarik, Libor; Abellan, Patricia; Yuan, Xin; Carin, Lawrence; Browning, Nigel D.

    2015-08-02

    One of the main limitations of imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution during in-situ TEM experiments is the frame rate of the camera being used to image the dynamic process. While the recent development of direct detectors has provided the hardware to achieve frame rates approaching 0.1ms, the cameras are expensive and must replace existing detectors. In this paper, we examine the use of coded aperture compressive sensing methods [1, 2, 3, 4] to increase the framerate of any camera with simple, low-cost hardware modifications. The coded aperture approach allows multiple sub-frames to be coded and integrated into a single camera frame during the acquisition process, and then extracted upon readout using statistical compressive sensing inversion. Our simulations show that it should be possible to increase the speed of any camera by at least an order of magnitude. Compressive Sensing (CS) combines sensing and compression in one operation, and thus provides an approach that could further improve the temporal resolution while correspondingly reducing the electron dose rate. Because the signal is measured in a compressive manner, fewer total measurements are required. When applied to TEM video capture, compressive imaging couled improve acquisition speed and reduce the electron dose rate. CS is a recent concept, and has come to the forefront due the seminal work of Candès [5]. Since the publication of Candès, there has been enormous growth in the application of CS and development of CS variants. For electron microscopy applications, the concept of CS has also been recently applied to electron tomography [6], and reduction of electron dose in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging [7]. To demonstrate the applicability of coded aperture CS video reconstruction for atomic level imaging, we simulate compressive sensing on observations of Pd nanoparticles and Ag nanoparticles during exposure to high temperatures and other environmental

  5. AFM's path to atomic resolution

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    We review progress in improving the spatial resolution of atomic force microscopy (AFM) under vacuum. After an introduction to the basic imaging principle and a conceptual comparison to scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we outline the main challenges of AFM as well as the solutions that have evolved in the first 20 years of its existence. Some crucial steps along AFM's path toward higher resolution are discussed, followed by an outlook on current and future applications.

  6. High resolution adaptive imaging of a single atom

    CERN Document Server

    Wong-Campos, J D; Neyenhuis, B; Mizrahi, J; Monroe, C

    2015-01-01

    We report the optical imaging of a single atom with nanometer resolution using an adaptive optical alignment technique that is applicable to general optical microscopy. By decomposing the image of a single laser-cooled atom, we identify and correct optical aberrations in the system and realize an atomic position sensitivity of $\\approx$ 0.5 nm/$\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}$ with a minimum uncertainty of 1.7 nm, allowing the direct imaging of atomic motion. This is the highest position sensitivity ever measured for an isolated atom, and opens up the possibility of performing out-of-focus 3D particle tracking, imaging of atoms in 3D optical lattices or sensing forces at the yoctonewton (10$^{-24}$ N) scale.

  7. Realization of a cryogenic interface to an ultracold atomic chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date, Aditya; Wang, Ke; Shaffer, Airlia; Patil, Yogesh Sharad; Schwab, Keith; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2016-05-01

    The control and manipulation of ultracold atoms in close proximity to cryogenic material surfaces opens up novel avenues for quantum sensing with cold atoms. However, integrating cryogenics with cold atomic systems presents the dual challenges of reducing thermal radiation load while allowing optimal optical access. Here, we present the realization of a unique interface between a cryogenic system and a room-temperature ultracold atomic chamber which allows for the optical trapping of cold atoms within microns of a sub-10 K cryogenic surface. Our interface serves as a platform for a cold-atoms based precision magnetic microscope for probing exotic condensed matter systems such as correlated electronic materials, as well as a platform for the realization of hybrid quantum systems. This work is supported by the DARPA QuASAR program through a grant from the ARO.

  8. Generation of W atomic states assisted by cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becerra-Castro, E M; Cardoso, W B; Avelar, A T; Baseia, B [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Goias, 74.001-970, Goiania (Brazil)], E-mail: wesleybcardoso@gmail.com

    2008-11-14

    We present an experimental scheme to generate a class of entangled atomic W states useful for perfect teleportation and superdense coding. It employs three two-level (Rydberg) atoms crossing two nonresonant cavities in such a way that the first and second (the second and third) atoms are entangled via atomic collision in the first (second) cavity. The experimental realization with current technology is discussed.

  9. Test of Nonlocality with an Atom-Field Entangled State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Shi-Biao

    2002-01-01

    We propose a scheme for the test of nonlocality with atom-field entanglement. An atom is sent through a cavity filled with a coherent field with a small amplitude. The dispersive interaction leads to atom-field entanglement.Then the field is driven by a classical current. The Bell inequality can be tested by the joint measurement of the parity of the field and the atomic state.

  10. Single Atom Plasmonic Switch

    CERN Document Server

    Emboras, Alexandros; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2015-01-01

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moores law in the electronics industry. And while electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling-similar to electronics-is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled single atom plasmonic switch. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or at most - a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ration of 10 dB and operation at room temperature with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of a CMOS compatible, integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the single-atom level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully i...

  11. Remote sensing for urban planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Bruce A.; Schmidt, Nicholas; Jensen, John R.; Cowen, Dave J.; Halls, Joanne; Narumalani, Sunil; Burgess, Bryan

    1994-01-01

    Utility companies are challenged to provide services to a highly dynamic customer base. With factory closures and shifts in employment becoming a routine occurrence, the utility industry must develop new techniques to maintain records and plan for expected growth. BellSouth Telecommunications, the largest of the Bell telephone companies, currently serves over 13 million residences and 2 million commercial customers. Tracking the movement of customers and scheduling the delivery of service are major tasks for BellSouth that require intensive manpower and sophisticated information management techniques. Through NASA's Commercial Remote Sensing Program Office, BellSouth is investigating the utility of remote sensing and geographic information system techniques to forecast residential development. This paper highlights the initial results of this project, which indicate a high correlation between the U.S. Bureau of Census block group statistics and statistics derived from remote sensing data.

  12. Remote Sensing of Environmental Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, G. W.

    1971-01-01

    Environmental pollution is a problem of international scope and concern. It can be subdivided into problems relating to water, air, or land pollution. Many of the problems in these three categories lend themselves to study and possible solution by remote sensing. Through the use of remote sensing systems and techniques, it is possible to detect and monitor, and in some cases, identify, measure, and study the effects of various environmental pollutants. As a guide for making decisions regarding the use of remote sensors for pollution studies, a special five-dimensional sensor/applications matrix has been designed. The matrix defines an environmental goal, ranks the various remote sensing objectives in terms of their ability to assist in solving environmental problems, lists the environmental problems, ranks the sensors that can be used for collecting data on each problem, and finally ranks the sensor platform options that are currently available.

  13. Atomic excitation and recombination in external fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayfeh, M.H.; Clark, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    This volume offers a timely look at Rydberg states of atoms in external fields and dielectronic recombination. Each topic provides authoritative coverage, presents a fresh account of a flourishing field of current atomic physics and introduces new opportunities for discovery and development. Topics considered include electron-atom scattering in external fields; observations of regular and irregular motion as exemplified by the quadratic zeeman effect and other systems; Rydberg atoms in external fields and the Coulomb geometry; crossed-field effects in the absorption spectrum of lithium in a magnetic field; precise studies of static electric field ionization; widths and shapes of stark resonances in sodium above the saddle point; studies of electric field effects and barium autoionizing resonances; autoionization and dielectronic recombination in plasma electric microfields; dielectronic recombination measurements on multicharged ions; merged beam studies of dielectronic recombination; Rydberg atoms and dielectronic recombination in astrophysics; and observations on dielectronic recombination.

  14. Sagnac interferometry with a single atomic clock

    CERN Document Server

    Stevenson, R; Bishop, T; Lesanovsky, I; Fernholz, T

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically discuss an implementation of a Sagnac interferometer with cold atoms. In contrast to currently existing schemes our protocol does not rely on any free propagation of atoms. Instead it is based on superpositions of fully confined atoms and state-dependent transport along a closed path. Using Ramsey sequences for an atomic clock, the accumulated Sagnac phase is encoded in the resulting population imbalance between two internal (clock) states. Using minimal models for the above protocol we analytically quantify limitations arising from atomic dynamics and finite temperature. We discuss an actual implementation of the interferometer with adiabatic radio-frequency potentials that is inherently robust against common mode noise as well as phase noise from the reference oscillator.

  15. Discriminative sensing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Keith

    2008-10-01

    The typical human vision system is able to discriminate between a million or so different colours, yet is able to do this with a chromatic sensor array that is fundamentally based on three different receptors, sensitive to light in the blue, green and red portions of the visible spectrum. Some biological organisms have extended capabilities, providing vision in the ultra-violet, whilst others, such as some species of mantis shrimp reportedly have sixteen different types of photo-receptors. In general the biological imaging sensor takes a minimalist approach to sensing its environment, whereas current optical engineering approaches follow a 'brute' force solution where the challenge of hyperspectral imaging is addressed by various schemes for spatial and spectral dispersion of radiation across existing detector arrays. This results in a problem for others to solve in the processing and communication of the generated hypercube of data. This paper explores the parallels between some of those biological systems and the various design concepts being developed for discriminative imaging, drawing on activity supported by the UK Electro-Magnetic Remote Sensing Defence Technology Centre (EMRS DTC).

  16. Investigations into ultrasound induced atomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramisetty, Kiran A; Pandit, Aniruddha B; Gogate, Parag R

    2013-01-01

    The present work deals with measurements of the droplet size distribution in an ultrasonic atomizer using photographic analysis with an objective of understanding the effect of different equipment parameters such as the operating frequency, power dissipation and the operating parameters such as the flow rate and liquid properties on the droplet size distribution. Mechanistic details about the atomization phenomena have also been established using photographic analysis based on the capture of the growth of the instability and sudden ejection of droplets with high velocity. Velocity of these droplets has been measured by capturing the motion of droplets as streaks. It has been observed that the droplet size decreases with an increase in the frequency of atomizer. Droplet size distribution was found to change from the narrow to wider range with an increase in the intensity of ultrasound. The drop size was found to decrease with an increase in the fluid viscosity. The current work has clearly highlighted the approach for the selection of operating parameters for achieving a desired droplet size distribution using ultrasonic atomization and has also established the controlling mechanisms for the formation of droplet. An empirical correlation for the prediction of the droplet size has been developed based on the liquid and equipment operating properties.

  17. Long range intermolecular forces in triatomic systems: connecting the atom-diatom and atom-atom-atom representations

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The long-range forces that act between three atoms are analysed in both atom-diatom and atom-atom-atom representations. Expressions for atom-diatom dispersion coefficients are obtained in terms of 3-body nonadditive coefficients. The anisotropy of atom-diatom C_6 dispersion coefficients arises primarily from nonadditive triple-dipole and quadruple-dipole forces, while pairwise-additive forces and nonadditive triple-dipole and dipole-dipole-quadrupole forces contribute significantly to atom-di...

  18. Characterization of high-k gate dielectrics by atomic-resolution electron microscopy: current progress and future prospects%高k栅介质原子分辨率的电镜表征:研究进展和展望

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱信华; 朱健民; 刘治国; 闵乃本

    2009-01-01

    As the downscaling of the feature sizes of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) devices enters into the "nuno" era, nanoscale structural characterization at device dimensions becomes critical. A full structural analysis of processed semiconductor devices reqnires an ability to determine atomic positions and local chemical elements and electronic structure. Highresolution (analytical) transmission electron microscopes (HR (A)TEM ), which provide the microscopy techniques such as diffraction contrast imaging (smplimde contrast imaging), high-resolution TEM imaging (phase contrast imaging), selected area electron diffraction and convergent beam electron diffraction, and X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), have become essential metrology tools in the semiconductor industry. Scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) with high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging (or Z-contrast incoherent imaging) can directly reveal the structure and chemistry of materials at the atomic scale, due to its imaging intensity being approximately proportional to the square of atomic number (Z) of element. By using Z-contrast imaging and high-resolved EELS spectroscopy, it is very powerful to determine the interfacial structures and the elemental/cbemical environment at/around interfaces within advanced CMOS gate stacks. In recent years the new development of aberration corrector (or, Cs-corrector) makes a revolutionizing the performance of HRTEM/STEM instruments, allowing one to achieve a spatial resolution better than 0.08 nm and an energy resolution better than 0.2 eV, thereby making the characterization of individual nanoscale device structure at sub-atomic scale available. The new generation HRTEM/STEM facility equipped with Cs-corrector will benefit high-k gate materials research in the new era. In this review, some basic principles and key features of atomic-resolution electron microscopy, and the associated high

  19. Atoms and molecules interacting with light atomic physics for the laser era

    CERN Document Server

    Straten, Peter van der

    2016-01-01

    This in-depth textbook with a focus on atom-light interactions prepares students for research in a fast-growing and dynamic field. Intended to accompany the laser-induced revolution in atomic physics, it is a comprehensive text for the emerging era in atomic, molecular and optical science. Utilising an intuitive and physical approach, the text describes two-level atom transitions, including appendices on Ramsey spectroscopy, adiabatic rapid passage and entanglement. With a unique focus on optical interactions, the authors present multi-level atomic transitions with dipole selection rules, and M1/E2 and multiphoton transitions. Conventional structure topics are discussed in some detail, beginning with the hydrogen atom and these are interspersed with material rarely found in textbooks such as intuitive descriptions of quantum defects. The final chapters examine modern applications and include many references to current research literature. The numerous exercises and multiple appendices throughout enable advanc...

  20. Laser cooling and trapping of atomic strontium for ultracold atom physics, high-precision spectroscopy and quantum sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Sorrentino, F.; Ferrari, G.; Poli, N.; Drullinger, R. E.; G. M. Tino

    2006-01-01

    This review describes the production of atomic strontium samples at ultra-low temperature and at high phase-space density, and their possible use for physical studies and applications. We describe the process of loading a magneto-optical trap from an atomic beam and preparing the sample for high precision measurements. Particular emphasis is given to the applications of ultracold Sr samples, spanning from optical frequency metrology to force sensing at micrometer scale.

  1. Electrostatic atomization: Effect of electrode materials on electrostatic atomizer performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Abhilash; Staszel, Christopher; Kashir, Babak; Perri, Anthony; Mashayek, Farzad; Yarin, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    Electrostatic atomization was studied experimentally with a pointed electrode in a converging nozzle. Experiments were carried out on poorly conductive canola oil where it was observed that electrode material may affect charge transfer. This points at the possible faradaic reactions that can occur at the surfaces of the electrodes. The supply voltage is applied to the sharp electrode and the grounded nozzle body constitutes the counter-electrode. The charge transfer is controlled by the electrochemical reactions on both the electrodes. The electrical performance study of the atomizer issuing a charged oil jet was conducted using three different nozzle body materials - brass, copper and stainless steel. Also, two sharp electrode materials - brass and stainless steel - were tested. The experimental results revealed that both the nozzle body material, as well as the sharp electrode material affected the spray and leak currents. Moreover, the effect of the sharp electrode material is quite significant. This research is supported by NSF Grant 1505276.

  2. Electric current locator

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Paul E [Corvallis, OR; Woodside, Charles Rigel [Corvallis, OR

    2012-02-07

    The disclosure herein provides an apparatus for location of a quantity of current vectors in an electrical device, where the current vector has a known direction and a known relative magnitude to an input current supplied to the electrical device. Mathematical constants used in Biot-Savart superposition equations are determined for the electrical device, the orientation of the apparatus, and relative magnitude of the current vector and the input current, and the apparatus utilizes magnetic field sensors oriented to a sensing plane to provide current vector location based on the solution of the Biot-Savart superposition equations. Description of required orientations between the apparatus and the electrical device are disclosed and various methods of determining the mathematical constants are presented.

  3. Nanoscale atomic waveguides with suspended carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Peano, V; Kasper, A; Egger, R

    2005-01-01

    We propose an experimentally viable setup for the realization of one-dimensional ultracold atom gases in a nanoscale magnetic waveguide formed by single doubly-clamped suspended carbon nanotubes. We show that all common decoherence and atom loss mechanisms are small guaranteeing a stable operation of the trap. Since the extremely large current densities in carbon nanotubes are spatially homogeneous, our proposed architecture allows to overcome the problem of fragmentation of the atom cloud. Adding a second nanowire allows to create a double-well potential with a moderate tunneling barrier which is desired for tunneling and interference experiments with the advantage of tunneling distances being in the nanometer regime.

  4. Modern atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, Vasant

    2015-01-01

    Much of our understanding of physics in the last 30-plus years has come from research on atoms, photons, and their interactions. Collecting information previously scattered throughout the literature, Modern Atomic Physics provides students with one unified guide to contemporary developments in the field. After reviewing metrology and preliminary material, the text explains core areas of atomic physics. Important topics discussed include the spontaneous emission of radiation, stimulated transitions and the properties of gas, the physics and applications of resonance fluorescence, coherence, cooling and trapping of charged and neutral particles, and atomic beam magnetic resonance experiments. Covering standards, a different way of looking at a photon, stimulated radiation, and frequency combs, the appendices avoid jargon and use historical notes and personal anecdotes to make the topics accessible to non-atomic physics students. Written by a leader in atomic and optical physics, this text gives a state-of-the...

  5. Mobile quantum sensing with spins in optically trapped nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awschalom, David D.

    2013-03-01

    The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color center in diamond has emerged as a powerful, optically addressable, spin-based probe of electromagnetic fields and temperature. For nanoscale sensing applications, the NV center's atom-like nature enables the close-range interactions necessary for both high spatial resolution and the detection of fields generated by proximal nuclei, electrons, or molecules. Using a custom-designed optical tweezers apparatus, we demonstrate three-dimensional position control of nanodiamonds in solution with simultaneous optical measurement of electron spin resonance (ESR)[3]. Despite the motion and random orientation of NV centers suspended in the optical trap, we observe distinct peaks in the ESR spectra from the ground-state spin transitions. Accounting for the random dynamics of the trapped nanodiamonds, we model the ESR spectra observed in an applied magnetic field and estimate the dc magnetic sensitivity based on the ESR line shapes to be 50 μT/√{ Hz }. We utilize the optically trapped nanodiamonds to characterize the magnetic field generated by current-carrying wires and ferromagnetic structures in microfluidic circuits. These measurements provide a pathway to spin-based sensing in fluidic environments and biophysical systems that are inaccessible to existing scanning probe techniques, such as the interiors of living cells. This work is supported by AFOSR and DARPA.

  6. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1997-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is primarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  7. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1995-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is promarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  8. The Software Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Javanainen, Juha

    2016-01-01

    By putting together an abstract view on quantum mechanics and a quantum-optics picture of the interactions of an atom with light, we develop a corresponding set of C++ classes that set up the numerical analysis of an atom with an arbitrary set of angular-momentum degenerate energy levels, arbitrary light fields, and an applied magnetic field. As an example, we develop and implement perturbation theory to compute the polarizability of an atom in an experimentally relevant situation.

  9. The Software Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javanainen, Juha

    2017-03-01

    By putting together an abstract view on quantum mechanics and a quantum-optics picture of the interactions of an atom with light, we develop a corresponding set of C++ classes that set up the numerical analysis of an atom with an arbitrary set of angular-momentum degenerate energy levels, arbitrary light fields, and an applied magnetic field. As an example, we develop and implement perturbation theory to compute the polarizability of an atom in an experimentally relevant situation.

  10. Atomicity in Electronic Commerce,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    tremendous demand for the ability to electronically buy and sell goods over networks. Electronic commerce has inspired a large variety of work... commerce . It then briefly surveys some major types of electronic commerce pointing out flaws in atomicity. We pay special attention to the atomicity...problems of proposals for digital cash. The paper presents two examples of highly atomic electronic commerce systems: NetBill and Cryptographic Postage Indicia.

  11. Atomic homodyne detection of weak atomic transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardena, Mevan; Elliott, D S

    2007-01-26

    We have developed a two-color, two-pathway coherent control technique to detect and measure weak optical transitions in atoms by coherently beating the transition amplitude for the weak transition with that of a much stronger transition. We demonstrate the technique in atomic cesium, exciting the 6s(2)S(1/2) --> 8s(2)S(1/2) transition via a strong two-photon transition and a weak controllable Stark-induced transition. We discuss the enhancement in the signal-to-noise ratio for this measurement technique over that of direct detection of the weak transition rate, and project future refinements that may further improve its sensitivity and application to the measurement of other weak atomic interactions.

  12. Atom probe crystallography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gault, Baptiste; Moody, Michael P; Cairney, Julie M; Ringer, Simon P

    2012-01-01

    This review addresses new developments in the emerging area of "atom probe crystallography", a materials characterization tool with the unique capacity to reveal both composition and crystallographic...

  13. Dephasing in an atom

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    When an atom in vacuum is near a surface of a dielectric the energy of a fluctuating electromagnetic field depends on a distance between them resulting, as known, in the force called van der Waals one. Besides this fluctuation phenomenon there is one associated with formation of a mean electric field which is equivalent to an order parameter. In this case atomic electrons are localized within atomic distances close to the atom and the total ground state energy is larger, compared to the bare ...

  14. Nano-bio-sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Carrara, Sandro

    2011-01-01

    This book examines state-of-the-art applications of nano-bio-sensing. It brings together researchers from nano-electronics and bio-technology, providing multidisciplinary content from nano-structures fabrication to bio-sensing applications.

  15. Helium atom scattering from surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    1992-01-01

    High resolution helium atom scattering can be applied to study a number of interesting properties of solid surfaces with great sensitivity and accuracy. This book treats in detail experimental and theoretical aspects ofthis method as well as all current applications in surface science. The individual chapters - all written by experts in the field - are devoted to the investigation of surface structure, defect shapes and concentrations, the interaction potential, collective and localized surface vibrations at low energies, phase transitions and surface diffusion. Over the past decade helium atom scattering has gained widespread recognitionwithin the surface science community. Points in its favour are comprehensiveunderstanding of the scattering theory and the availability of well-tested approximation to the rigorous theory. This book will be invaluable to surface scientists wishing to make an informed judgement on the actual and potential capabilities of this technique and its results.

  16. Positron-alkali atom scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mceachran, R. P.; Horbatsch, M.; Stauffer, A. D.; Ward, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron-alkali atom scattering was recently investigated both theoretically and experimentally in the energy range from a few eV up to 100 eV. On the theoretical side calculations of the integrated elastic and excitation cross sections as well as total cross sections for Li, Na and K were based upon either the close-coupling method or the modified Glauber approximation. These theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the total cross section for both Na and K. Resonance structures were also found in the L = 0, 1 and 2 partial waves for positron scattering from the alkalis. The structure of these resonances appears to be quite complex and, as expected, they occur in conjunction with the atomic excitation thresholds. Currently both theoretical and experimental work is in progress on positron-Rb scattering in the same energy range.

  17. Introduction to remote sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Cracknell, Arthur P

    2007-01-01

    Addressing the need for updated information in remote sensing, Introduction to Remote Sensing, Second Edition provides a full and authoritative introduction for scientists who need to know the scope, potential, and limitations in the field. The authors discuss the physical principles of common remote sensing systems and examine the processing, interpretation, and applications of data. This new edition features updated and expanded material, including greater coverage of applications from across earth, environmental, atmospheric, and oceanographic sciences. Illustrated with remotely sensed colo

  18. Full observation of single-atom dynamics in cavity QED

    CERN Document Server

    Mabuchi, H; Kimble, H J; Mabuchi, Hideo; Ye, Jun

    1998-01-01

    We report the use of broadband heterodyne spectroscopy to perform continuous measurement of the interaction energy between one atom and a high-finesse optical cavity, during individual transit events of $\\sim 250$ $\\mu$s duration. Measurements over a wide range of atom-cavity detunings reveal the transition from resonant to dispersive coupling, via the transfer of atom-induced signals from the amplitude to the phase of light transmitted through the cavity. By suppressing all sources of excess technical noise, we approach a measurement regime in which the broadband photocurrent may be interpreted as a classical record of conditional quantum evolution in the sense of recently developed quantum trajectory theories.

  19. Current-Induced Effects in Nanoscale Conductors

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    We present an overview of current-induced effects in nanoscale conductors with emphasis on their description at the atomic level. In particular, we discuss steady-state current fluctuations, current-induced forces, inelastic scattering and local heating. All of these properties are calculated in terms of single-particle wavefunctions computed using a scattering approach within the static density-functional theory of many-electron systems. Examples of current-induced effects in atomic and mole...

  20. Evanescent Wave Atomic Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezali, S.; Taleb, A.

    2008-09-01

    A research project at the "Laboratoire d'électronique quantique" consists in a theoretical study of the reflection and diffraction phenomena via an atomic mirror. This poster presents the principle of an atomic mirror. Many groups in the world have constructed this type of atom optics experiments such as in Paris-Orsay-Villetaneuse (France), Stanford-Gaithersburg (USA), Munich-Heidelberg (Germany), etc. A laser beam goes into a prism with an incidence bigger than the critical incidence. It undergoes a total reflection on the plane face of the prism and then exits. The transmitted resulting wave out of the prism is evanescent and repulsive as the frequency detuning of the laser beam compared to the atomic transition δ = ωL-ω0 is positive. The cold atomic sample interacts with this evanescent wave and undergoes one or more elastic bounces by passing into backward points in its trajectory because the atoms' kinetic energy (of the order of the μeV) is less than the maximum of the dipolar potential barrier ℏΩ2/Δ where Ω is the Rabi frequency [1]. In fact, the atoms are cooled and captured in a magneto-optical trap placed at a distance of the order of the cm above the prism surface. The dipolar potential with which interact the slow atoms is obtained for a two level atom in a case of a dipolar electric transition (D2 Rubidium transition at a wavelength of 780nm delivered by a Titane-Saphir laser between a fundamental state Jf = l/2 and an excited state Je = 3/2). This potential is corrected by an attractive Van der Waals term which varies as 1/z3 in the Lennard-Jones approximation (typical atomic distance of the order of λ0/2π where λ0 is the laser wavelength) and in 1/z4 if the distance between the atom and its image in the dielectric is big in front of λ0/2π. This last case is obtained in a quantum electrodynamic calculation by taking into account an orthornormal base [2]. We'll examine the role of spontaneous emission for which the rate is inversely

  1. Sense of moving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mark Schram; Grünbaum, Thor

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, we assume the existence of a sense of “movement activity” that arises when a person actively moves a body part. This sense is usually supposed to be part of sense of agency (SoA). The purpose of the chapter is to determine whether the already existing experimental paradigms can...

  2. Sensitive Detection of Individual Neutral Atoms in a Strong Coupling Cavity QED System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Peng-Fei; ZHANG Yu-Chi; LI Gang; DU Jin-Jin; ZHANG Yan-Feng; GUO Yan-Qiang; WANG Jun-Min; ZHANG Tian-Cai; LI Wei-Dong

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate real-time detection of individual cesium atoms by using a high-finesse optical micro-cavity in a strong coupling regime.A cloud of cesium atoms is trapped in a magneto-optical trap positioned at 5 mm above the micro-cavity center.The atoms fall down freely in gravitation after shutting off the magnetooptical trap and pass through the cavity.The cavity transmission is strongly affected by the atoms in the cavity, which enables the micro-cavity to sense the atoms individually.We detect the single atom transits either in the resonance or various detunings.The single atom vacuum-Rabi splitting is directly measured to be Ω = 2π × 23.9 MHz.The average duration of atom-cavity coupling of about 110μs is obtained according to the probability distribution of the atom transits.%@@ We experimentally demonstrate real-time detection of individual cesium atoms by using a high-finesse optical micro-cavity in a strong coupling regime.A cloud of cesium atoms is trapped in a magneto-optical trap positioned at 5mm above the micro-cavity center.The atoms fall down freely in gravitation after shutting off the magnetooptical trap and pass through the cavity.The cavity transmission is strongly affected by the atoms in the cavity, which enables the micro-cavity to sense the atoms individually.We detect the single atom transits either in the resonance or various detunings.The single atom vacuum-Rabi splitting is directly measured to be Ω=2π×23.9 MHz.The average duration of atom-cavity coupling of about 110μs is obtained according to the probability distribution of the atom transits.

  3. Atomic Scale Plasmonic Switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emboras, Alexandros; Niegemann, Jens; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Pedersen, Andreas; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2016-01-13

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moore's law in the electronics industry. While electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling, similar to electronics, is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled plasmonic switch operating at the atomic scale. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or, at most, a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ratio of 9.2 dB and operation at room temperature up to MHz with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of an integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the atomic level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully integrated and highly scalable chip platform, a platform where optics, electronics, and memory may be controlled at the single-atom level.

  4. Greek Atomic Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roller, Duane H. D.

    1981-01-01

    Focusing on history of physics, which began about 600 B.C. with the Ionian Greeks and reaching full development within three centuries, suggests that the creation of the concept of the atom is understandable within the context of Greek physical theory; so is the rejection of the atomic theory by the Greek physicists. (Author/SK)

  5. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  6. When Atoms Want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry students and teachers often explain the chemical reactivity of atoms, molecules, and chemical substances in terms of purposes or needs (e.g., atoms want or need to gain, lose, or share electrons in order to become more stable). These teleological explanations seem to have pedagogical value as they help students understand and use…

  7. When Atoms Want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry students and teachers often explain the chemical reactivity of atoms, molecules, and chemical substances in terms of purposes or needs (e.g., atoms want or need to gain, lose, or share electrons in order to become more stable). These teleological explanations seem to have pedagogical value as they help students understand and use…

  8. Tunneling Dynamics Between Atomic and Molecular Bose-Einstein Condensates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chang-Yong

    2004-01-01

    Tunneling dynamics of multi-atomic molecules between atomic and multi-atomic molecular Bose-Einstein condensates with Feshbach resonance is investigated.It is indicated that the tunneling in the two Bose-Einstein condensates depends on not only the inter-atomic-molecular nonlinear interactions and the initial number of atoms in these condensates,but also the tunneling coupling between the atomic condensate and the multi-atomic molecular condensate.It is discovered that besides oscillating tunneling current between the atomic condensate and the multi-atomic molecular condensate,the nonlinear multi-atomic molecular tunneling dynamics sustains a self-locked population imbalance:a macroscopic quantum self-trapping effect.The influence of de-coherence caused by non-condensate atoms on the tunneling dynamics is studied.It is shown that de-coherence suppresses the multi-atomic molecular tunneling.Moreover,the conception of the molecular Bose-Einstein condensate,which is different from the conventional single-atomic Bose-Einstein condensate,is specially emphasized in this paper.

  9. Atomic-Scale Confinement of Resonant Optical Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Johannes; Großmann, Swen; Tarakina, Nadezda V.; Häckel, Tim; Emmerling, Monika; Kamp, Martin; Huang, Jer-Shing; Biagioni, Paolo; Prangsma, Jord C.; Hecht, Bert

    2012-11-01

    In the presence of matter there is no fundamental limit preventing confinement of visible light even down to atomic scales. Achieving such confinement and the corresponding intensity enhancement inevitably requires simultaneous control over atomic-scale details of material structures and over the optical modes that such structures support. By means of self-assembly we have obtained side-by-side aligned gold nanorod dimers with robust atomically-defined gaps reaching below 0.5 nm. The existence of atomically-confined light fields in these gaps is demonstrated by observing extreme Coulomb splitting of corresponding symmetric and anti-symmetric dimer eigenmodes of more than 800 meV in white-light scattering experiments. Our results open new perspectives for atomically-resolved spectroscopic imaging, deeply nonlinear optics, ultra-sensing, cavity optomechanics as well as for the realization of novel quantum-optical devices.

  10. High-resolution adaptive imaging of a single atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Campos, J. D.; Johnson, K. G.; Neyenhuis, B.; Mizrahi, J.; Monroe, C.

    2016-09-01

    Optical imaging systems are used extensively in the life and physical sciences because of their ability to non-invasively capture details on the microscopic and nanoscopic scales. Such systems are often limited by source or detector noise, image distortions and human operator misjudgement. Here, we report a general, quantitative method to analyse and correct these errors. We use this method to identify and correct optical aberrations in an imaging system for single atoms and realize an atomic position sensitivity of ˜0.5 nm Hz-1/2 with a minimum uncertainty of 1.7 nm, allowing the direct imaging of atomic motion. This is the highest position sensitivity ever measured for an isolated atom and opens up the possibility of performing out-of-focus three-dimensional particle tracking, imaging of atoms in three-dimensional optical lattices or sensing forces at the yoctonewton (10-24 N) scale.

  11. Coaxial airblast atomizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardalupas, Y.; Whitelaw, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to quantify the characteristics of the sprays of coaxial injectors with particular emphasis on those aspects relevant to the performance of rocket engines. Measurements for coaxial air blast atomizers were obtained using air to represent the gaseous stream and water to represent the liquid stream. A wide range of flow conditions were examined for sprays with and without swirl for gaseous streams. The parameters varied include Weber number, gas flow rate, liquid flow rate, swirl, and nozzle geometry. Measurements were made with a phase Doppler velocimeter. Major conclusions of the study focused upon droplet size as a function of Weber number, effect of gas flow rate on atomization and spray spread, effect of nozzle geometry on atomization and spread, effect of swirl on atomization, spread, jet recirculation and breakup, and secondary atomization.

  12. Maximally Atomic Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Brzozowski

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The atoms of a regular language are non-empty intersections of complemented and uncomplemented quotients of the language. Tight upper bounds on the number of atoms of a language and on the quotient complexities of atoms are known. We introduce a new class of regular languages, called the maximally atomic languages, consisting of all languages meeting these bounds. We prove the following result: If L is a regular language of quotient complexity n and G is the subgroup of permutations in the transition semigroup T of the minimal DFA of L, then L is maximally atomic if and only if G is transitive on k-subsets of 1,...,n for 0 <= k <= n and T contains a transformation of rank n-1.

  13. Atomic diffusion in stars

    CERN Document Server

    Michaud, Georges; Richer, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This book gives an overview of atomic diffusion, a fundamental physical process, as applied to all types of stars, from the main sequence to neutron stars. The superficial abundances of stars as well as their evolution can be significantly affected. The authors show where atomic diffusion plays an essential role and how it can be implemented in modelling.  In Part I, the authors describe the tools that are required to include atomic diffusion in models of stellar interiors and atmospheres. An important role is played by the gradient of partial radiative pressure, or radiative acceleration, which is usually neglected in stellar evolution. In Part II, the authors systematically review the contribution of atomic diffusion to each evolutionary step. The dominant effects of atomic diffusion are accompanied by more subtle effects on a large number of structural properties throughout evolution. One of the goals of this book is to provide the means for the astrophysicist or graduate student to evaluate the importanc...

  14. Mapping sense(s) of place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovse, Astrid Ravn; Hovy, Dirk; Johannsen, Anders Trærup

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of studies point to the importance of critically investigating people’s sense(s) of place and their patterns of everyday mobility in relation to their linguistic practice (e.g., Johnstone 2010b, Britain 2013). Since sense of place is fundamentally a phenomenological entity......, the question of how to tap into this constitutes a methodological challenge to researchers (Latham 2003, Hall 2009). This paper presents an experimental method aimed at eliciting data on sense of place and everyday mobility in a feasible and low-tech manner through the use of mental maps and mobility maps....... During fieldwork among adolescents in a rural and an urban Danish setting, in a comparative study on connections between place, mobility and linguistic practice, it became clear that traditional sociolinguistic and ethnographic methods such as interviews and participant observation missed out important...

  15. Metal oxide nanostructures as gas sensing devices

    CERN Document Server

    Eranna, G

    2011-01-01

    Metal Oxide Nanostructures as Gas Sensing Devices explores the development of an integrated micro gas sensor that is based on advanced metal oxide nanostructures and is compatible with modern semiconductor fabrication technology. This sensor can then be used to create a compact, low-power, handheld device for analyzing air ambience. The book first covers current gas sensing tools and discusses the necessity for miniaturized sensors. It then focuses on the materials, devices, and techniques used for gas sensing applications, such as resistance and capacitance variations. The author addresses th

  16. Wind Predictability and Remote Sensing Techniques,

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report presents the unclassified findings from the Investigation of Airborne Wind Sensing Systems conducted under AIRTASK A30303/323/70F17311002. Included is a summary of the current accuracy of wind speed and direction forecasts, a list of possible methods for remote sensing meteorological data, a list of areas of application of the given methods and a list of contacts made for information relevant to this evaluation. (Author)

  17. 7th International Conference on Sensing Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Subhas; Jayasundera, Krishanthi

    2015-01-01

    This book is written for academic and industry professionals working in the field of sensing, instrumentation and related fields, and is positioned to give a snapshot of the current state of the art in sensing technology, particularly from the applied perspective. The book is intended to give broad overview of the latest developments, in addition to discussing the process through which researchers go through in order to develop sensors, or related systems, which will become more widespread in the future.

  18. The sense of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannenbaum, A S

    2001-08-21

    I propose that consciousness might be understood as the property of a system that functions as a sense in the biological meaning of that term. The theory assumes that, as a complex system, the sense of consciousness is not a fixed structure but implies structure with variations and that it evolved, as many new functions do, through the integration of simpler systems. The recognized exteroceptive and enteroceptive senses provide information about the organism's environment and about the organism itself that are important to adaptation. The sense of consciousness provides information about the brain and thus about the organism and its environment. It senses other senses and processes in the brain, selecting and relating components into a form that "makes sense"-where making sense is defined as being useful to the organism in its adaptation to the environment. The theory argues that this highly adaptive organizing function evolved with the growing complexity of the brain and that it might have helped resolve discrepancies created at earlier stages. Neural energies in the brain that are the input to the sense of consciousness, along with the processing subsystem of which they are a part, constitute the base of consciousness. Consciousness itself is an emergent effect of an organizing process achieved through the sense of consciousness. The sense of consciousness thus serves an organizing function although it is not the only means of organization in the brain. Its uniqueness lies in the character of the organization it creates with consciousness as a property of that organization. The paper relates the theory to several general conceptions-interactionism, epiphenomenalism and identity theory-and illustrates a number of testable hypotheses. Viewing consciousness as a property of a sense provides a degree of conceptual integration. Much of what we know about the evolution and role of the conventionally recognized senses should help us understand the evolution and role of

  19. 78 FR 58571 - Maine Yankee Atomic Power Company, Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, and The Yankee Atomic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... Atomic Power Company, Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, and The Yankee Atomic Electric Company... Power Company (Maine Yankee), Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company (Connecticut Yankee), and the Yankee Atomic Electric Company (Yankee Atomic) (together, ``licensees'' or ``the Yankee Companies'')...

  20. Linear atomic quantum coupler

    CERN Document Server

    El-Orany, Faisal A A

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we develop the notion of the linear atomic quantum coupler. This device consists of two modes propagating into two waveguides, each of them includes a localized and/or a trapped atom. These waveguides are placed close enough to allow exchanging energy between them via evanescent waves. Each mode interacts with the atom in the same waveguide in the standard way, i.e. as the Jaynes-Cummings model (JCM), and with the atom-mode in the second waveguide via evanescent wave. We present the Hamiltonian for the system and deduce the exact form for the wavefunction. We investigate the atomic inversions and the second-order correlation function. In contrast to the conventional linear coupler, the atomic quantum coupler is able to generate nonclassical effects. The atomic inversions can exhibit long revival-collapse phenomenon as well as subsidiary revivals based on the competition among the switching mechanisms in the system. Finally, under certain conditions, the system can yield the results of the two-m...

  1. Hybrid quantum systems of atoms and ions

    CERN Document Server

    Zipkes, Christoph; Palzer, Stefan; Sias, Carlo; Köhl, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, ultracold atoms have emerged as an exceptionally controllable experimental system to investigate fundamental physics, ranging from quantum information science to simulations of condensed matter models. Here we go one step further and explore how cold atoms can be combined with other quantum systems to create new quantum hybrids with tailored properties. Coupling atomic quantum many-body states to an independently controllable single-particle gives access to a wealth of novel physics and to completely new detection and manipulation techniques. We report on recent experiments in which we have for the first time deterministically placed a single ion into an atomic Bose Einstein condensate. A trapped ion, which currently constitutes the most pristine single particle quantum system, can be observed and manipulated at the single particle level. In this single-particle/many-body composite quantum system we show sympathetic cooling of the ion and observe chemical reactions of single particles in situ...

  2. Atomic precision tests and light scalar couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brax, Philippe [CEA, IPhT, CNRS, URA 2306, Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Inst. de Physique Theorique; Burrage, Clare [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Geneve Univ. (Switzerland). Dept. de Physique Theorique

    2010-10-15

    We calculate the shift in the atomic energy levels induced by the presence of a scalar field which couples to matter and photons. We find that a combination of atomic measurements can be used to probe both these couplings independently. A new and stringent bound on the matter coupling springs from the precise measurement of the 1s to 2s energy level difference in the hydrogen atom, while the coupling to photons is essentially constrained by the Lamb shift. Combining these constraints with current particle physics bounds we find that the contribution of a scalar field to the recently claimed discrepancy in the proton radius measured using electronic and muonic atoms is negligible. (orig.)

  3. Hybrid quantum systems of atoms and ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zipkes, Christoph; Ratschbacher, Lothar; Palzer, Stefan; Sias, Carlo; Koehl, Michael [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-10

    In recent years, ultracold atoms have emerged as an exceptionally controllable experimental system to investigate fundamental physics, ranging from quantum information science to simulations of condensed matter models. Here we go one step further and explore how cold atoms can be combined with other quantum systems to create new quantum hybrids with tailored properties. Coupling atomic quantum many-body states to an independently controllable single-particle gives access to a wealth of novel physics and to completely new detection and manipulation techniques. We report on recent experiments in which we have for the first time deterministically placed a single ion into an atomic Bose Einstein condensate. A trapped ion, which currently constitutes the most pristine single particle quantum system, can be observed and manipulated at the single particle level. In this single-particle/many-body composite quantum system we show sympathetic cooling of the ion and observe chemical reactions of single particles in situ.

  4. Atomic Structure Theory Lectures on Atomic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Walter R

    2007-01-01

    Atomic Structure Theory is a textbook for students with a background in quantum mechanics. The text is designed to give hands-on experience with atomic structure calculations. Material covered includes angular momentum methods, the central field Schrödinger and Dirac equations, Hartree-Fock and Dirac-Hartree-Fock equations, multiplet structure, hyperfine structure, the isotope shift, dipole and multipole transitions, basic many-body perturbation theory, configuration interaction, and correlation corrections to matrix elements. Numerical methods for solving the Schrödinger and Dirac eigenvalue problems and the (Dirac)-Hartree-Fock equations are given as well. B-spline basis sets are used to carry out sums arising in higher-order many-body calculations. Illustrative problems are provided, together with solutions. FORTRAN programs implementing the numerical methods in the text are included.

  5. Inside the Hydrogen Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Nowakowski, M; Fierro, D Bedoya; Manjarres, A D Bermudez

    2016-01-01

    We apply the non-linear Euler-Heisenberg theory to calculate the electric field inside the hydrogen atom. We will demonstrate that the electric field calculated in the Euler-Heisenberg theory can be much smaller than the corresponding field emerging from the Maxwellian theory. In the hydrogen atom this happens only at very small distances. This effect reduces the large electric field inside the hydrogen atom calculated from the electromagnetic form-factors via the Maxwell equations. The energy content of the field is below the pair production threshold.

  6. Atom trap trace analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O' Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-05-25

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications.

  7. Atom probe tomography today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Cerezo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to describe and illustrate the advances in the application of atom probe tomography that have been made possible by recent developments, particularly in specimen preparation techniques (using dual-beam focused-ion beam instruments but also of the more routine use of laser pulsing. The combination of these two developments now permits atomic-scale investigation of site-specific regions within engineering alloys (e.g. at grain boundaries and in the vicinity of cracks and also the atomic-level characterization of interfaces in multilayers, oxide films, and semiconductor materials and devices.

  8. Physics of the atom

    CERN Document Server

    Wehr, Russell M; Adair, Thomas W

    1984-01-01

    The fourth edition of Physics of the Atom is designed to meet the modern need for a better understanding of the atomic age. It is an introduction suitable for students with a background in university physics and mathematical competence at the level of calculus. This book is designed to be an extension of the introductory university physics course into the realm of atomic physics. It should give students a proficiency in this field comparable to their proficiency in mechanics, heat, sound, light, and electricity.

  9. Rydberg atoms in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Gnedin, Yu N; Ignjatovic, Lj M; Sakan, N M; Sreckovic, V A; Zakharov, M Yu; Bezuglov, N N; Klycharev, A N; 10.1016/j.newar.2009.07.003

    2012-01-01

    Elementary processes in astrophysical phenomena traditionally attract researchers attention. At first this can be attributed to a group of hemi-ionization processes in Rydberg atom collisions with ground state parent atoms. This processes might be studied as a prototype of the elementary process of the radiation energy transformation into electrical one. The studies of nonlinear mechanics have shown that so called regime of dynamic chaos should be considered as typical, rather than exceptional situation in Rydberg atoms collision. From comparison of theory with experimental results it follows that a such kind of stochastic dynamic processes, occurred during the single collision, may be observed.

  10. Atomic entanglement and decoherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genes, Claudiu

    The generation of entanglement in atomic systems plays a central topic in the fields of quantum information storage and processing. Moreover, a special category of entangled states of multi-atom ensembles, spin squeezed states, have been proven to lead to considerable improvement in the sensitivity of precision measurements compared to systems involving uncorrelated atoms. A treatment of entanglement in open systems is, however, incomplete without a precise description of the process of decoherence which necessarily accompanies it. The theory of entanglement and decoherence are the two main topics of this thesis. Methods are described for the generation of strong correlations in large atomic ensembles using either cavity quantum electrodynamics or measurement outcome conditioned quantum dynamics. Moreover, the description of loss of entanglement resulting from the coupling to a noise reservoir (electromagnetic vacuum) is explored. A spin squeezing parameter is used throughout this thesis as both a measure of entanglement strength and as an indication of the sensitivity improvement above the so-called standard quantum limit (sensitivity obtained with uncorrelated particles) in metrology. The first scheme considered consists of a single mode cavity field interacting with a collection of atoms for which spin squeezing is produced in both resonant and off-resonant regimes. In the resonant case, transfer of squeezing from a field state to the atoms is analyzed, while in the off-resonant regime squeezing is produced via an effective nonlinear interaction (one-axis twisting Hamiltonian). A second, more experimentally realistic case, is one involving the interaction of free space atoms with laser pulses; a projective measurement of a source field originating from atomic fluctuations provides a means of preparing atomic collective states such as spin squeezed and Schrodinger cat states. A new "unravelling" is proposed, that employs the detection of photon number in a single

  11. Atomic and molecular supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W.

    1997-12-01

    Atomic and molecular physics of supernovae is discussed with an emphasis on the importance of detailed treatments of the critical atomic and molecular processes with the best available atomic and molecular data. The observations of molecules in SN 1987A are interpreted through a combination of spectral and chemical modelings, leading to strong constraints on the mixing and nucleosynthesis of the supernova. The non-equilibrium chemistry is used to argue that carbon dust can form in the oxygen-rich clumps where the efficient molecular cooling makes the nucleation of dust grains possible. For Type Ia supernovae, the analyses of their nebular spectra lead to strong constraints on the supernova explosion models.

  12. EINSTEIN, SCHROEDINGER, AND ATOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider gravitation theory in multidimensional space. The model of the metric satisfying the basic requirements of quantum theory is proposed. It is shown that gravitational waves are described by the Liouville equation and the Schrodinger equation as well. The solutions of the Einstein equations describing the stationary states of arbitrary quantum and classical systems with central symmetry have been obtained. Einstein’s atom model has been developed, and proved that atoms and atomic nuclei can be represented as standing gravitational waves

  13. Single-atom nanoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Prati, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Single-Atom Nanoelectronics covers the fabrication of single-atom devices and related technology, as well as the relevant electronic equipment and the intriguing new phenomena related to single-atom and single-electron effects in quantum devices. It also covers the alternative approaches related to both silicon- and carbon-based technologies, also from the point of view of large-scale industrial production. The publication provides a comprehensive picture of the state of the art at the cutting edge and constitutes a milestone in the emerging field of beyond-CMOS technology. Although there are

  14. History of early atomic clocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, N.F. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Lyman Lab. of Physics

    2005-06-01

    This review of the history of early atomic clocks includes early atomic beam magnetic resonance, methods of separated and successive oscillatory fields, microwave absorption, optical pumping and atomic masers. (author)

  15. Atomical Grothendieck categories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Năstăsescu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the study of Gabriel dimension of a Grothendieck category, we introduce the concept of atomical Grothendieck category, which has only two localizing subcategories, and we give a classification of this type of Grothendieck categories.

  16. Atomic bomb health benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckey, T D

    2008-01-01

    Media reports of deaths and devastation produced by atomic bombs convinced people around the world that all ionizing radiation is harmful. This concentrated attention on fear of miniscule doses of radiation. Soon the linear no threshold (LNT) paradigm was converted into laws. Scientifically valid information about the health benefits from low dose irradiation was ignored. Here are studies which show increased health in Japanese survivors of atomic bombs. Parameters include decreased mutation, leukemia and solid tissue cancer mortality rates, and increased average lifespan. Each study exhibits a threshold that repudiates the LNT dogma. The average threshold for acute exposures to atomic bombs is about 100 cSv. Conclusions from these studies of atomic bomb survivors are: One burst of low dose irradiation elicits a lifetime of improved health.Improved health from low dose irradiation negates the LNT paradigm.Effective triage should include radiation hormesis for survivor treatment.

  17. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1998-01-01

    This volume continues the series'' cutting-edge reviews on developments in this field. Since its invention in the 1920s, electrostatic precipitation has been extensively used in industrial hygiene to remove dust and particulate matter from gases before entering the atmosphere. This combination of electrostatic precipitation is reported upon in the first chapter. Following this, chapter two reviews recent advances in the area of chemical modification in electrothermal atomization. Chapter three consists of a review which deal with advances and uses of electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry. Flow injection atomic spectroscopy has developed rapidly in recent years and after a general introduction, various aspects of this technique are looked at in chapter four. Finally, in chapter five the use of various spectrometric techniques for the determination of mercury are described.

  18. Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadeishi, T.; McLaughlin, R.

    1978-08-01

    The design and development of a Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer for trace element analysis are described. An instruction manual is included which details the operation, adjustment, and maintenance. Specifications and circuit diagrams are given. (WHK)

  19. Topics in atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhardt, Charles E

    2006-01-01

    The study of atomic physics propelled us into the quantum age in the early twentieth century and carried us into the twenty-first century with a wealth of new and, in some cases, unexplained phenomena. Topics in Atomic Physics provides a foundation for students to begin research in modern atomic physics. It can also serve as a reference because it contains material that is not easily located in other sources. A distinguishing feature is the thorough exposition of the quantum mechanical hydrogen atom using both the traditional formulation and an alternative treatment not usually found in textbooks. The alternative treatment exploits the preeminent nature of the pure Coulomb potential and places the Lenz vector operator on an equal footing with other operators corresponding to classically conserved quantities. A number of difficult to find proofs and derivations are included as is development of operator formalism that permits facile solution of the Stark effect in hydrogen. Discussion of the classical hydrogen...

  20. Atomic Interferometry Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) is a new technology which can be used for developing high performance laser components for atom-based sensors...

  1. Compressive Sensing Over Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Feizi, Soheil; Effros, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate some applications of compressive sensing over networks. We make a connection between compressive sensing and traditional information theoretic techniques in source coding and channel coding. Our results provide an explicit trade-off between the rate and the decoding complexity. The key difference of compressive sensing and traditional information theoretic approaches is at their decoding side. Although optimal decoders to recover the original signal, compressed by source coding have high complexity, the compressive sensing decoder is a linear or convex optimization. First, we investigate applications of compressive sensing on distributed compression of correlated sources. Here, by using compressive sensing, we propose a compression scheme for a family of correlated sources with a modularized decoder, providing a trade-off between the compression rate and the decoding complexity. We call this scheme Sparse Distributed Compression. We use this compression scheme for a general multi...

  2. Atom probe tomography today

    OpenAIRE

    Alfred Cerezo; Peter H. Clifton; Mark J. Galtrey; Humphreys, Colin J.; Kelly, Thomas. F.; David J. Larson; Sergio Lozano-Perez; Marquis, Emmanuelle A.; Oliver, Rachel A.; Gang Sha; Keith Thompson; Mathijs Zandbergen; Roger L. Alvis

    2007-01-01

    This review aims to describe and illustrate the advances in the application of atom probe tomography that have been made possible by recent developments, particularly in specimen preparation techniques (using dual-beam focused-ion beam instruments) but also of the more routine use of laser pulsing. The combination of these two developments now permits atomic-scale investigation of site-specific regions within engineering alloys (e.g. at grain boundaries and in the vicinity of cracks) and also...

  3. Optical atomic magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budker, Dmitry; Higbie, James; Corsini, Eric P

    2013-11-19

    An optical atomic magnetometers is provided operating on the principles of nonlinear magneto-optical rotation. An atomic vapor is optically pumped using linearly polarized modulated light. The vapor is then probed using a non-modulated linearly polarized light beam. The resulting modulation in polarization angle of the probe light is detected and used in a feedback loop to induce self-oscillation at the resonant frequency.

  4. Hirshfeld atom refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, Silvia C; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Dittrich, Birger; Grabowsky, Simon; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2014-09-01

    Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly-l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree-Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) are freely refined without constraints or restraints - even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu's), all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu's. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules), the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å(2) as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements - an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å.

  5. Atoms, molecules & elements

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Young scientists will be thrilled to explore the invisible world of atoms, molecules and elements. Our resource provides ready-to-use information and activities for remedial students using simplified language and vocabulary. Students will label each part of the atom, learn what compounds are, and explore the patterns in the periodic table of elements to find calcium (Ca), chlorine (Cl), and helium (He) through hands-on activities.

  6. Controllable Magnetic Focusing of Cold Atoms on a Chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yang; YUN Min; YIN Jian-Ping

    2006-01-01

    @@ We propose a new lens scheme to focus cold atoms by using a controllable inhomogeneous magnetic field from a square current-carrying wire fabricated on a chip. The spatial distributions of the magnetic field are calculated, and the results show that the generated magnetic field is a two-dimensional (2D) quadrupole one and can be used to focus cold atoms or a cold atomic beam. The dynamic processes of cold atoms passing through our square wire layout and its focusing properties are studied by using Monte Carlo simulations. Our study shows that the atomic clouds can be focused effectively by our magnetic lens scheme, and the focal lengthof the atomic lens and its radius of focused spot can be continuously changed by adjusting the current in the wires.

  7. REMOTE SENSING IN OCEANOGRAPHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    remote sensing from satellites. Sensing of oceanographic variables from aircraft began with the photographing of waves and ice. Since then remote measurement of sea surface temperatures and wave heights have become routine. Sensors tested for oceanographic applications include multi-band color cameras, radar scatterometers, infrared spectrometers and scanners, passive microwave radiometers, and radar imagers. Remote sensing has found its greatest application in providing rapid coverage of large oceanographic areas for synoptic and analysis and

  8. Intelligent environmental sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Subhas

    2015-01-01

    Developing environmental sensing and monitoring technologies become essential especially for industries that may cause severe contamination. Intelligent environmental sensing uses novel sensor techniques, intelligent signal and data processing algorithms, and wireless sensor networks to enhance environmental sensing and monitoring. It finds applications in many environmental problems such as oil and gas, water quality, and agriculture. This book addresses issues related to three main approaches to intelligent environmental sensing and discusses their latest technological developments. Key contents of the book include:   Agricultural monitoring Classification, detection, and estimation Data fusion Geological monitoring Motor monitoring Multi-sensor systems Oil reservoirs monitoring Sensor motes Water quality monitoring Wireless sensor network protocol  

  9. Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory deploys rugged, cutting-edge electro-optical instrumentation for the collection of various event signatures, with expertise in...

  10. Coherence brightened laser source for atmospheric remote sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, Andrew J; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Yuan, Luqi; Wang, Kai; Voronine, Dmitri V; Zheltikov, Aleksei M; Rostovtsev, Yuri; Sautenkov, Vladimir A; Sokolov, Alexei V; North, Simon W; Scully, Marlan O

    2012-09-18

    We have studied coherent emission from ambient air and demonstrated efficient generation of laser-like beams directed both forward and backward with respect to a nanosecond ultraviolet pumping laser beam. The generated optical gain is a result of two-photon photolysis of atmospheric O(2), followed by two-photon excitation of atomic oxygen. We have analyzed the temporal shapes of the emitted pulses and have observed very short duration intensity spikes as well as a large Rabi frequency that corresponds to the emitted field. Our results suggest that the emission process exhibits nonadiabatic atomic coherence, which is similar in nature to Dicke superradiance where atomic coherence is large and can be contrasted with ordinary lasing where atomic coherence is negligible. This atomic coherence in oxygen adds insight to the optical emission physics and holds promise for remote sensing techniques employing nonlinear spectroscopy.

  11. Coaxing shy particles into an atomic jar

    CERN Multimedia

    Hellemans, A

    2000-01-01

    A Dutch-American team claim they can produce anti-hydrogen atoms in far greater quantities than any other current method. They use rubidium ions to trap electrons by applying a pulsed electric field in a series of steps (1 page).

  12. Atomic Gases at Negative Kinetic Temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mosk, A.P.

    2005-01-01

    We show that thermalization of the motion of atoms at negative temperature is possible in an optical lattice, for conditions that are feasible in current experiments. We present a method for reversibly inverting the temperature of a trapped gas. Moreover, a negative-temperature ensemble can be coole

  13. Effective potentials for atom-atom interaction at low temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Bo

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the concept and design of effective atom-atom potentials that accurately describe any physical processes involving only states around the threshold. The existence of such potentials gives hope to a quantitative, and systematic, understanding of quantum few-atom and quantum many-atom systems at relatively low temperatures.

  14. Teleportation of Atomic States for Atoms in a Lambda Configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Guerra, E S

    2004-01-01

    In this article we discuss a scheme of teleportation of atomic states making use of three-level lambda atoms. The experimental realization proposed makes use of cavity QED involving the interaction of Rydberg atoms with a micromaser cavity prepared in a coherent state. We start presenting a scheme to prepare atomic EPR states involving two-level atoms via the interaction of these atoms with a cavity. In our scheme the cavity and some atoms play the role of auxiliary systems used to achieve the teleportation.

  15. Efimov Superchemistry:Quantum Dynamical Theory for Coherent Atom-Trimer Conversion in a Repulsive Atomic Bose-Einstein Condensate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING Hui; GENG Zhen-Duo

    2008-01-01

    @@ We show that by making a generalized atom-molecule dark state,coherent creation of triatomic molecules can be enhanced in a repulsive atomic Bose-Einstein condensate.The dynamics of heteronuclear trimer creation is significantJy different from the homonuclear case and further enhancement can be realized by controlling its chemical reaction channels,The possibility of manipulating atom-trimer conversion provides an appealing research area for current coherent matter-wave optics.

  16. Ultracold atoms and precise time standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Gretchen K; Phillips, William D

    2011-10-28

    Experimental techniques of laser cooling and trapping, along with other cooling techniques, have produced gaseous samples of atoms so cold that they are, for many practical purposes, in the quantum ground state of their centre-of-mass motion. Such low velocities have virtually eliminated effects such as Doppler shifts, relativistic time dilation and observation-time broadening that previously limited the performance of atomic frequency standards. Today, the best laser-cooled, caesium atomic fountain, microwave frequency standards realize the International System of Units (SI) definition of the second to a relative accuracy of ≈3×10(-16). Optical frequency standards, which do not realize the SI second, have even better performance: cold neutral atoms trapped in optical lattices now yield relative systematic uncertainties of ≈1×10(-16), whereas cold-trapped ions have systematic uncertainties of 9×10(-18). We will discuss the current limitations in the performance of neutral atom atomic frequency standards and prospects for the future.

  17. Cold atom microtraps above a videotape surface

    CERN Document Server

    Retter, J A

    2002-01-01

    Much progress has been made in the last two years towards miniaturizing magnetic traps for cold atoms. This will enable manipulation of coherent samples of atoms, such as Bose-Einstein condensates, or single atoms, on the scale of the atomic de Broglie wavelength. This thesis concerns an array of microscopic magnetic potentials formed close to the surface of magnetized videotape, when a uniform bias field is applied. The recorded magnetization is a 100 mu m sine wave, which covers a 12.5mm x 22mm piece of commercial videotape. This videotape is glued flat onto a thin glass substrate and is gold coated by evaporation so that atoms can be trapped close to the surface in a mirror-MOT. An 'atom chip' has been developed, incorporating the videotape and current-carrying wires located below the magnetized surface. A single wire and bias field create a magnetic tube potential, oriented parallel with the microtraps and with a quadrupole radial field. This allows the mirror-MOT to be compressed and distorted in order t...

  18. 7th International Conference on Sensing Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Subhas; Jayasundera, Krishanthi

    2015-01-01

    This book contains a collection of selected works stemming from the 2013 International Conference on Sensing Technology (ICST), which was held in Wellington, New Zealand. The purpose of the book is to distill the highlights of the conference, and therefore track the latest developments in sensing technologies. The book contents are broad, since sensors can be applied in many different areas. Therefore the book gives a broad overview of the latest developments, in addition to discussing the process through which researchers go through in order to develop sensors, or related systems, which will become more widespread in the future.The book is written for academic and industry professionals working in the field of sensing, instrumentation and related fields, and is positioned to give a snapshot of the current state of the art in sensing technology, particularly from the applied perspective. 

  19. Universal bosonic tetramers of dimer-atom-atom structure

    OpenAIRE

    Deltuva, A.

    2012-01-01

    Unstable four-boson states having an approximate dimer-atom-atom structure are studied using momentum-space integral equations for the four-particle transition operators. For a given Efimov trimer the universal properties of the lowest associated tetramer are determined. The impact of this tetramer on the atom-trimer and dimer-dimer collisions is analyzed. The reliability of the three-body dimer-atom-atom model is studied.

  20. Hyperspectral remote sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Eismann, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing is an emerging, multidisciplinary field with diverse applications that builds on the principles of material spectroscopy, radiative transfer, imaging spectrometry, and hyperspectral data processing. This book provides a holistic treatment that captures its multidisciplinary nature, emphasizing the physical principles of hyperspectral remote sensing.

  1. The sense of agency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritterband-Rosenbaum, Anina

    investigate the sense of agency. The central aspect of the thesis work was to understand if brain lesioned children, diagnosed with hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy (CP), have an altered sense of agency, and if this different experience has an influence on the feeling of control of their movements and their actual...

  2. Sense and Sensibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Austen, Jane

    2005-01-01

    Two sisters of opposing temperament but who share the pangs of tragic love provide the subjects for Sense and Sensibility. Elinor, practical and conventional, the epitome of sense, desires a man who is promised to another woman. Marianne, emotional and sentimental, the epitome of sensibility, loses

  3. Sense of participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohorques Montemayor, L.; Nevejan, C.I.M.; Brazier, F.M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the sense of participation of a spatially distributed individual—in the intersections of physical and mediated networks. This sense is fundamental to an individuals’ experience as a participant in systems designed to this purpose including today’s social media and new media gener

  4. Sense and Sensibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Austen, Jane

    2005-01-01

    Two sisters of opposing temperament but who share the pangs of tragic love provide the subjects for Sense and Sensibility. Elinor, practical and conventional, the epitome of sense, desires a man who is promised to another woman. Marianne, emotional and sentimental, the epitome of sensibility, loses

  5. Sense of participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohorques Montemayor, L.; Nevejan, C.I.M.; Brazier, F.M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the sense of participation of a spatially distributed individual—in the intersections of physical and mediated networks. This sense is fundamental to an individuals’ experience as a participant in systems designed to this purpose including today’s social media and new media

  6. Single-atom spintronics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Susan Z. HUA; Matthew R. SULLIVAN; Jason N. ARMSTRONG

    2006-01-01

    Recent work on magnetic quantum point contacts (QPCs) was discussed. Complete magnetoresistance loops across Co QPCs as small as a single atom was measured. The remarkable feature of these QPCs is the rapid oscillatory decay in magnetoresistance with the increase of contact size. In addition,stepwise or quantum magnetoresistance loops are observed,resulting from varying transmission probability of the available discrete conductance channels because the sample is cycled between the ferromagnetic (F) and antiferromagnetic (AF) aligned states. Quantized conductance combined with spin dependent transmission of electron waves gives rise to a multi-channel system with a quantum domain wall acting as a valve,i.e.,a quantum spin-valve. Behavior of a few-atom QPC is built on the behavior of a single-atom QPC and hence the summarization of results as 'single-atom spintronics'. An evolutionary trace of spin-dependent electron transmission from a single atom to bulk is provided,the requisite hallmarks of artefact-free magnetoresistance is established across a QPC - stepwise or quantum magnetoresistance loops and size dependent oscillatory magnetoresistance.

  7. Atomic Force Microscopy: A Powerful Tool to Address Scaffold Design in Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marica Marrese

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Functional polymers currently represent a basic component of a large range of biological and biomedical applications including molecular release, tissue engineering, bio-sensing and medical imaging. Advancements in these fields are driven by the use of a wide set of biodegradable polymers with controlled physical and bio-interactive properties. In this context, microscopy techniques such as Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM are emerging as fundamental tools to deeply investigate morphology and structural properties at micro and sub-micrometric scale, in order to evaluate the in time relationship between physicochemical properties of biomaterials and biological response. In particular, AFM is not only a mere tool for screening surface topography, but may offer a significant contribution to understand surface and interface properties, thus concurring to the optimization of biomaterials performance, processes, physical and chemical properties at the micro and nanoscale. This is possible by capitalizing the recent discoveries in nanotechnologies applied to soft matter such as atomic force spectroscopy to measure surface forces through force curves. By tip-sample local interactions, several information can be collected such as elasticity, viscoelasticity, surface charge densities and wettability. This paper overviews recent developments in AFM technology and imaging techniques by remarking differences in operational modes, the implementation of advanced tools and their current application in biomaterials science, in terms of characterization of polymeric devices in different forms (i.e., fibres, films or particles.

  8. Current concept on the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease-crosstalk between genetic and microbial factors: Pathogenic bacteria and altered bacterial sensing or changes in mucosal integrity take "toll"?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter Laszlo Lakatos; Simon Fischer; Laszlo Lakatos; Istvan Gal; Janos Papp

    2006-01-01

    The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)is only partially understood. Various environmental and host (e.g. genetic-, epithelial-, immune and nonimmune) factors are involved. It is a multifactorial polygenic disease with probable genetic heterogeneity.Some genes are associated with IBD itself, while others increase the risk of ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD) or are associated with disease location and/or behaviour. This review addresses recent advances in the genetics of IBD. The article discusses the current information on the crosstalk between microbial and genetic factors (e.g. NOD2/CARD15, SLC22A46A5 and DLG5). The genetic data acquired in recent years help in understanding the pathogenesis of IBD and can identify a number of potential targets for therapeutic intervention.In the future, genetics may help more accurately diagnose and predict disease course in IBD.

  9. 102ℏk large area atom interferometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiow, Sheng-wey; Kovachy, Tim; Chien, Hui-Chun; Kasevich, Mark A

    2011-09-23

    We demonstrate atom interferometers utilizing a novel beam splitter based on sequential multiphoton Bragg diffractions. With this sequential Bragg large momentum transfer (SB-LMT) beam splitter, we achieve high contrast atom interferometers with momentum splittings of up to 102 photon recoil momenta (102ℏk). To our knowledge, this is the highest momentum splitting achieved in any atom interferometer, advancing the state-of-the-art by an order of magnitude. We also demonstrate strong noise correlation between two simultaneous SB-LMT interferometers, which alleviates the need for ultralow noise lasers and ultrastable inertial environments in some future applications. Our method is intrinsically scalable and can be used to dramatically increase the sensitivity of atom interferometers in a wide range of applications, including inertial sensing, measuring the fine structure constant, and detecting gravitational waves.

  10. Quantum magnetism through atomic assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spinelli, A.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis presents an experimental study of magnetic structures, composed of only a few atoms. Those structures are first built atom-by-atom and then locally probed, both with a low-temperature STM. The technique that we use to assemble them is vertical atom manipulation, while to study their phy

  11. Sensing Super-Position: Human Sensing Beyond the Visual Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluf, David A.; Schipper, John F.

    2007-01-01

    The coming decade of fast, cheap and miniaturized electronics and sensory devices opens new pathways for the development of sophisticated equipment to overcome limitations of the human senses. This paper addresses the technical feasibility of augmenting human vision through Sensing Super-position by mixing natural Human sensing. The current implementation of the device translates visual and other passive or active sensory instruments into sounds, which become relevant when the visual resolution is insufficient for very difficult and particular sensing tasks. A successful Sensing Super-position meets many human and pilot vehicle system requirements. The system can be further developed into cheap, portable, and low power taking into account the limited capabilities of the human user as well as the typical characteristics of his dynamic environment. The system operates in real time, giving the desired information for the particular augmented sensing tasks. The Sensing Super-position device increases the image resolution perception and is obtained via an auditory representation as well as the visual representation. Auditory mapping is performed to distribute an image in time. The three-dimensional spatial brightness and multi-spectral maps of a sensed image are processed using real-time image processing techniques (e.g. histogram normalization) and transformed into a two-dimensional map of an audio signal as a function of frequency and time. This paper details the approach of developing Sensing Super-position systems as a way to augment the human vision system by exploiting the capabilities of Lie human hearing system as an additional neural input. The human hearing system is capable of learning to process and interpret extremely complicated and rapidly changing auditory patterns. The known capabilities of the human hearing system to learn and understand complicated auditory patterns provided the basic motivation for developing an image-to-sound mapping system. The

  12. Sensing land pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, L. W.

    1971-01-01

    Land pollution is described in numerous ways by various societies. Pollutants of land are material by-products of human activity and range from environmentally ineffective to positively toxic. The pollution of land by man is centuries old and correlates directly with economy, technology and population. In order to remotely sense land pollution, standards or thresholds must be established. Examples of the potential for sensing land pollution and quality are presented. The technological capabilities for remotely sensed land quality is far advanced over the judgment on how to use the sensed data. Until authoritative and directive decisions on land pollution policy are made, sensing of pollutants will be a random, local and academic affair.

  13. How Stakeholder Sensing and Anticipations Shape the Firm’s Strategic Response Capability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallin, Carina Antonia; Andersen, Torben Juul; Ooi, Can-Seng

    We outline a strategic response capability framework drawing on cognitive neuroscience to explain stakeholder sensing and anticipations as essential input to environmental analysis. Stakeholders receive stimuli from ongoing interactions with the firm and thereby sense current environmental changes...

  14. Traceable quantum sensing and metrology relied up a quantum electrical triangle principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yan; Wang, Hengliang; Yang, Xinju; Wei, Jingsong

    2016-11-01

    Hybrid quantum state engineering in quantum communication and imaging1-2 needs traceable quantum sensing and metrology, which are especially critical to quantum internet3 and precision measurements4 that are important across all fields of science and technology-. We aim to set up a mode of traceable quantum sensing and metrology. We developed a method by specially transforming an atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) into a conducting atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) with a feedback control loop, wherein quantum entanglement enabling higher precision was relied upon a set-point, a visible light laser beam-controlled an interferometer with a surface standard at z axis, diffractometers with lateral standards at x-y axes, four-quadrant photodiode detectors, a scanner and its image software, a phase-locked pre-amplifier, a cantilever with a kHz Pt/Au conducting tip, a double barrier tunneling junction model, a STM circuit by frequency modulation and a quantum electrical triangle principle involving single electron tunneling effect, quantum Hall effect and Josephson effect5. The average and standard deviation result of repeated measurements on a 1 nm height local micro-region of nanomedicine crystal hybrid quantum state engineering surface and its differential pA level current and voltage (dI/dV) in time domains by using C-AFM was converted into an international system of units: Siemens (S), an indicated value 0.86×10-12 S (n=6) of a relative standard uncertainty was superior over a relative standard uncertainty reference value 2.3×10-10 S of 2012 CODADA quantized conductance6. It is concluded that traceable quantum sensing and metrology is emerging.

  15. Spin current

    CERN Document Server

    Valenzuela, Sergio O; Saitoh, Eiji; Kimura, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    In a new branch of physics and technology called spin-electronics or spintronics, the flow of electrical charge (usual current) as well as the flow of electron spin, the so-called 'spin current', are manipulated and controlled together. This book provides an introduction and guide to the new physics and application of spin current.

  16. Sampling the Hydrogen Atom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graves N.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A model is proposed for the hydrogen atom in which the electron is an objectively real particle orbiting at very near to light speed. The model is based on the postulate that certain velocity terms associated with orbiting bodies can be considered as being af- fected by relativity. This leads to a model for the atom in which the stable electron orbits are associated with orbital velocities where Gamma is n /α , leading to the idea that it is Gamma that is quantized and not angular momentum as in the Bohr and other models. The model provides a mechanism which leads to quantization of energy levels within the atom and also provides a simple mechanical explanation for the Fine Struc- ture Constant. The mechanism is closely associated with the Sampling theorem and the related phenomenon of aliasing developed in the mid-20th century by engineers at Bell labs.

  17. Sensing behaviour in healthcare design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorpe, Julia Rosemary; Hysse Forchhammer, Birgitte; Maier, Anja

    2017-01-01

    We are entering an era of distributed healthcare that should fit and respond to individual needs, behaviour and lifestyles. Designing such systems is a challenging task that requires continuous information about human behaviour on a large scale, for which pervasive sensing (e.g. using smartphones...... specifically on activity and location data that can easily be obtained from smartphones or wearables. We further demonstrate how these are applied in healthcare design using an example from dementia care. Comparing a current and proposed scenario exemplifies how integrating sensor-derived information about...... user behaviour can support the healthcare design goals of personalisation, adaptability and scalability, while emphasising patient quality of life....

  18. Sensing behaviour in healthcare design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorpe, Julia Rosemary; Hysse Forchhammer, Birgitte; Maier, Anja

    2017-01-01

    specifically on activity and location data that can easily be obtained from smartphones or wearables. We further demonstrate how these are applied in healthcare design using an example from dementia care. Comparing a current and proposed scenario exemplifies how integrating sensor-derived information about...... and wearables) presents exciting opportunities. While mobile sensing approaches are fuelling research in many areas, their use in engineering design remains limited. In this work, we present a collection of common behavioural measures from literature that can be used for a broad range of applications. We focus...

  19. Interactive Display under the Influence of Tactile Sense

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ge-yang; YAO Jing

    2010-01-01

    Humans have a variety of sense in dynamic environment,and tactile sensation is an important way apperceiving the world.It enhances the process of experience and the interaction between humans and environment.However,vision as a dominant sense impairs the variety of sense.In the display design,current designers often put more emphasi on structure,form,color,such other visual elements,consequently neglect the importance of the tactile sensation,which weakens real experience of humans.

  20. Quantum many-body dynamics of ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, Stefan

    2014-04-15

    number basis realized by a single-site detection. The analysis of the resulting quantum Zeno physics shows regimes for which the initial many-particle configurations are stabilized or destabilized, depending on the observation time interval and the interaction strength. In the second part, the measurement of the local current operator in an optical lattice is discussed. We propose a measurement protocol that combines single-site detection with already existing optical superlattices. The measurement outcomes can even be used to calculate spatial current-current correlations since the local currents are simultaneously measured at various positions. We illustrate the prospects of this new sensing method by a numerical study of the current statistics for interacting bosons in one and two dimensions. In the latter case, we discuss how the on-site interactions affect the equilibrium currents of bosons in an artificial magnetic field. We substantiate the feasibility of the protocol by considering possible error sources, restrictions in currently used single-site detection, and its applicability in experimental setups used to create artificial gauge fields.

  1. Smartphones for distributed multimode sensing: biological and environmental sensing and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feitshans, Tyler; Williams, Robert

    2013-05-01

    Active and Agile Environmental and Biological sensing are becoming obligatory to generate prompt warnings for the troops and law enforcements conducting missions in hostile environments. The traditional static sensing mesh networks which provide a coarse-grained (far-field) measurement of the environmental conditions like air quality, radiation , CO2, etc … would not serve the dynamic and localized changes in the environment, which requires a fine-grained (near-field) sensing solutions. Further, sensing the biological conditions of (healthy and injured) personnel in a contaminated environment and providing a personalized analysis of the life-threatening conditions in real-time would greatly aid the success of the mission. In this vein, under SATE and YATE programs, the research team at AFRL Tec^Edge Discovery labs had demonstrated the feasibility of developing Smartphone applications , that employ a suite of external environmental and biological sensors, which provide fine-grained and customized sensing in real-time fashion. In its current state, these smartphone applications leverage a custom designed modular standalone embedded platform (with external sensors) that can be integrated seamlessly with Smartphones for sensing and further provides connectivity to a back-end data architecture for archiving, analysis and dissemination of real-time alerts. Additionally, the developed smartphone applications have been successfully tested in the field with varied environmental sensors to sense humidity, CO2/CO, wind, etc…, ; and with varied biological sensors to sense body temperature and pulse with apt real-time analysis

  2. Korean atomic bomb victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasamoto, Yukuo

    2009-01-01

    After colonizing Korea, Japan invaded China, and subsequently initiated the Pacific War against the United States, Britain, and their allies. Towards the end of the war, U.S. warplanes dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, which resulted in a large number of Koreans who lived in Hiroshima and Nagasaki suffering from the effects of the bombs. The objective of this paper is to examine the history of Korea atomic bomb victims who were caught in between the U.S., Japan, the Republic of Korea (South Korea) and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea).

  3. Optically pumped atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Happer, William; Walker, Thad

    2010-01-01

    Covering the most important knowledge on optical pumping of atoms, this ready reference is backed by numerous examples of modelling computation for optical pumped systems. The authors show for the first time that modern scientific computing software makes it practical to analyze the full, multilevel system of optically pumped atoms. To make the discussion less abstract, the authors have illustrated key points with sections of MATLAB codes. To make most effective use of contemporary mathematical software, it is especially useful to analyze optical pumping situations in the Liouville spa

  4. Hirshfeld atom refinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia C. Capelli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly–l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree–Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs are freely refined without constraints or restraints – even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu's, all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu's. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules, the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å2 as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements – an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å.

  5. Atoms in Agriculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, Thomas S. [University of Tennessee

    1965-01-01

    Agriculture benefits from the applications of research. Radioactive techniques have been used to study soils, plants, microbes, insects, farm animals, and new ways to use and preserve foodstuffs. Radioactive atoms are not used directly by farmers but are used in research directed by the U. S. Department of Agriculture and Atomic Energy Commission, by the agricultural experiment stations of the various states, and by numerous public and private research institutions. From such research come improved materials and methods which are used on the farm.

  6. Using Atomic Clocks to Detect Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Loeb, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Atomic clocks have recently reached a fractional timing precision of $<10^{-18}$. We point out that an array of atomic clocks, distributed along the Earth's orbit around the Sun, will have the sensitivity needed to detect the time dilation effect of mHz gravitational waves (GWs), such as those emitted by supermassive black hole binaries at cosmological distances. Simultaneous measurement of clock-rates at different phases of a passing GW provides an attractive alternative to the interferometric detection of temporal variations in distance between test masses separated by less than a GW wavelength, currently envisioned for the eLISA mission.

  7. Atom Probe Tomography of Nanoscale Electronic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, David J.; Prosa, Ty J.; Perea, Daniel E.; Inoue, Hidekazu; Mangelinck, D.

    2016-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is a mass spectrometry based on time-of-flight measurements which also concurrently produces 3D spatial information. The reader is referred to any of the other papers in this volume or to the following references for further information 4–8. The current capabilities of APT, such as detecting a low number of dopant atoms in nanoscale devices or segregation at a nanoparticle interface, make this technique an important component in the nanoscale metrology toolbox. In this manuscript, we review some of the applications of APT to nanoscale electronic materials, including transistors and finFETs, silicide contact microstructures, nanowires, and nanoparticles.

  8. Design and Analysis of Hybrid CMOS SRAM Sense Amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karishma Bajaj

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Sense amplifiers are one of the very important peripheral components of CMOS memories. In a Hybrid Sense amplifier both current and voltage sensing techniques are used which makes it a better selection than a conventional current or voltage sense amplifiers. The hybrid sense amplifier works in three phases-Offset cancellation (200ps, Access phase (500ps and Evaluation phase. The offset cancellation is done simultaneously with word line decoding, so as to speed up the process. The sensing range of the hybrid sense amplifier is improved from 1.18mV to 92mV. Also hybrid sense amplifier consumes very low energy of about 6.84fj. This sense amplifier is analyzed with a column of 512 SRAM cells at 180nm technology node and compared to CMOS conventional voltage sense amplifier. The circuit consumes an average power of 1.57 µW with a negligible offset of 149.3µV.

  9. A Novel Controllable Beam Splitter for Guided Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘南春; 高伟建; 印建平

    2003-01-01

    We propose a novel atomic beamsplitter for guided atoms composed of a U-shaped current carrying conductor and an additional bias magnetic field, and study the dynamic process of atomic beam splitting in the beamsplitter by Monte Carlo simulations. Our study shows that the splitting ratio of the beamsplitter can be continuously adjusted from 0 to 1by changing the additional bias field. In addition, the transverse temperature of guided atoms at the outlets of the beamsplitter are also estimated and explained qualitatively.

  10. Immersing carbon nano-tubes in cold atomic gases

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the sympathetic relaxation of a free-standing, vibrating carbon nano-tube that is mounted on an atom chip and is immersed in a cloud of ultra-cold atoms. Gas atoms colliding with the nano-tube excite phonons via a Casimir-Polder potential. We use Fermi's Golden Rule to estimate the relaxation rates for relevant experimental parameters and develop a fully dynamic theory of relaxation for the multi-mode phononic field embedded in a thermal atomic reservoir. Based on currently ava...

  11. Temperature compensated and self-calibrated current sensor using reference current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Brubaker, Michael Allen; Yakymyshyn, Pamela Jane

    2008-01-22

    A method is described to provide temperature compensation and self-calibration of a current sensor based on a plurality of magnetic field sensors positioned around a current carrying conductor. A reference electrical current carried by a conductor positioned within the sensing window of the current sensor is used to correct variations in the output signal due to temperature variations and aging.

  12. Solar and Geothermal Energy: New Competition for the Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Luther J.

    1974-01-01

    Describes new emphasis on research into solar and geothermal energy resources by governmental action and recent legislation and the decreased emphasis on atomic power in supplementing current energy shortages. (BR)

  13. Solar and Geothermal Energy: New Competition for the Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Luther J.

    1974-01-01

    Describes new emphasis on research into solar and geothermal energy resources by governmental action and recent legislation and the decreased emphasis on atomic power in supplementing current energy shortages. (BR)

  14. [Odor sensing system and olfactory display].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2014-01-01

    In this review, an odor sensing system and an olfactory display are introduced into people in pharmacy. An odor sensing system consists of an array of sensors with partially overlapping specificities and pattern recognition technique. One of examples of odor sensing systems is a halitosis sensor which quantifies the mixture composition of three volatile sulfide compounds. A halitosis sensor was realized using a preconcentrator to raise sensitivity and an electrochemical sensor array to suppress the influence of humidity. Partial least squares (PLS) method was used to quantify the mixture composition. The experiment reveals that the sufficient accuracy was obtained. Moreover, the olfactory display, which present scents to human noses, is explained. A multi-component olfactory display enables the presentation of a variety of smells. The two types of multi-component olfactory display are described. The first one uses many solenoid valves with high speed switching. The valve ON frequency determines the concentration of the corresponding odor component. The latter one consists of miniaturized liquid pumps and a surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomizer. It enables the wearable olfactory display without smell persistence. Finally, the application of the olfactory display is demonstrated. Virtual ice cream shop with scents was made as a content of interactive art. People can enjoy harmony among vision, audition and olfaction. In conclusion, both odor sensing system and olfactory display can contribute to the field of human health care.

  15. Eddy current imaging with an atomic radio-frequency magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Wickenbrock, Arne; Blanchard, John W; Budker, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    We use a radio-frequency $^{85}$Rb alkali-vapor cell magnetometer based on a paraffin-coated cell with long spin-coherence time and a small, low-inductance driving coil to create highly resolved conductivity maps of different objects. We resolve sub-mm features in conductive objects, we characterize the frequency response of our technique, and by operating at frequencies up to 250 kHz we are able to discriminate between differently conductive materials based on the induced response. The method is suited to cover a wide range of driving frequencies and can potentially be used for detecting non-metallic objects with low DC conductivity.

  16. Eddy current imaging with an atomic radio-frequency magnetometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wickenbrock, Arne, E-mail: wickenbr@uni-mainz.de [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Leefer, Nathan; Blanchard, John W. [Helmholtz Institut Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Budker, Dmitry [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Helmholtz Institut Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-7300 (United States); Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-05-02

    We use a radio-frequency {sup 85}Rb alkali-vapor cell magnetometer based on a paraffin-coated cell with long spin-coherence time and a small, low-inductance driving coil to create highly resolved conductivity maps of different objects. We resolve sub-mm features in conductive objects, we characterize the frequency response of our technique, and by operating at frequencies up to 250 kHz we are able to discriminate between differently conductive materials based on the induced response. The method is suited to cover a wide range of driving frequencies and can potentially be used for detecting non-metallic objects with low DC conductivity.

  17. Current understanding of the pseudospin symmetry in atomic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcos, S; Niembro, R [Departamento de Fisica Moderna, Universidad de Cantabria, E-39005 Santander (Spain); Lopez-Quelle, M [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Cantabria, E-39005 Santander (Spain); Savushkin, L N [Department of Physics, St. Petersburg University for Telecommunications, 191065 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)], E-mail: narcoss@unican.es

    2008-08-15

    We use the relativistic mean field framework to analyse the reliability of the explanation of the pseudospin symmetry (PSS) that has been accepted, quite generally, by the scientific community, in the last decade. We make a comparative analysis of the mechanisms responsible for the breaking of the spin and pseudospin symmetries that shows the different nature of these symmetries. We propose an explanation of the PSS, also valid in the nonrelativistic limit, in which the effect of the deviation of the single-particle central potential from a harmonic oscillator on the breaking of the degeneracy of pseudospin doublets is partially compansated by the effect of the spin-orbit interaction.

  18. Remote Oxygen Sensing by Ionospheric Excitation (ROSIE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Kalogerakis

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The principal optical observable emission resulting from ionospheric modification (IM experiments is the atomic oxygen red line at 630 nm, originating from the O(1D–3P transition. Because the O(1D atom has a long radiative lifetime, it is sensitive to collisional relaxation and an observed decay faster than the radiative rate can be attributed to collisions with atmospheric species. In contrast to the common practice of ignoring O-atoms in interpreting such observations in the past, recent experimental studies on the relaxation of O(1D by O(3P have revealed the dominant role of oxygen atoms in controlling the lifetime of O(1D at altitudes relevant to IM experiments. Using the most up-to-date rate coefficients for collisional relaxation of O(1D by O, N2, and O2, it is now possible to analyze the red line decays observed in IM experiments and thus probe the local ionospheric composition. In this manner, we can demonstrate an approach to remotely detect O-atoms at the altitudes relevant to IM experiments, which we call remote oxygen sensing by ionospheric excitation (ROSIE. The results can be compared with atmospheric models and used to study the temporal, seasonal, altitude and spatial variation of ionospheric O-atom density in the vicinity of heating facilities. We discuss the relevance to atmospheric observations and ionospheric heating experiments and report an analysis of representative IM data.

  19. Multiple atomic scale solid surface interconnects for atom circuits and molecule logic gates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joachim, C; Martrou, D; Rezeq, M; Troadec, C; Jie, Deng; Chandrasekhar, N; Gauthier, S

    2010-03-05

    The scientific and technical challenges involved in building the planar electrical connection of an atomic scale circuit to N electrodes (N > 2) are discussed. The practical, laboratory scale approach explored today to assemble a multi-access atomic scale precision interconnection machine is presented. Depending on the surface electronic properties of the targeted substrates, two types of machines are considered: on moderate surface band gap materials, scanning tunneling microscopy can be combined with scanning electron microscopy to provide an efficient navigation system, while on wide surface band gap materials, atomic force microscopy can be used in conjunction with optical microscopy. The size of the planar part of the circuit should be minimized on moderate band gap surfaces to avoid current leakage, while this requirement does not apply to wide band gap surfaces. These constraints impose different methods of connection, which are thoroughly discussed, in particular regarding the recent progress in single atom and molecule manipulations on a surface.

  20. From Single Atoms to Engineered “Super-Atoms”: Interfacing Photons and Atoms in Free Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevhen Miroshnychenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades the development of laser cooling and trapping has revolutionized the field of quantum optics. Now we master techniques to control the quantum properties of atoms and light, even at a single atom and single photon level. Understanding and controlling interactions of atoms and light both on the microscopic single particle and on the macroscopic collective levels, are two of the very active directions of the current research in this field. The goal is to engineer quantum systems with tailored properties designed for specific applications. One of the ambitious applications on this way is interfacing quantum information for quantum communication and quantum computing. We summarize here theoretical ideas and experimental methods for interfacing atom-based quantum memories with single flying photons.

  1. Compressed sensing & sparse filtering

    CERN Document Server

    Carmi, Avishy Y; Godsill, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    This book is aimed at presenting concepts, methods and algorithms ableto cope with undersampled and limited data. One such trend that recently gained popularity and to some extent revolutionised signal processing is compressed sensing. Compressed sensing builds upon the observation that many signals in nature are nearly sparse (or compressible, as they are normally referred to) in some domain, and consequently they can be reconstructed to within high accuracy from far fewer observations than traditionally held to be necessary. Apart from compressed sensing this book contains other related app

  2. Atomic physics and reality

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    An account of the long standing debate between Niels Bohr and Albert Einstein regarding the validity of the quantum mechanical description of atomic phenomena.With physicts, John Wheeler (Texas), John Bell (CERN), David Rohm (London), Abner Shimony (Boston), Alain Aspect (Paris)

  3. Energy from the Atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patricia L.

    This curriculum guide was written to supplement fifth and sixth grade science units on matter and energy. It was designed to provide more in-depth material on the atom. The first part, "Teacher Guide," contains background information, biographical sketches of persons in the history of nuclear energy, vocabulary, answer sheets, management sheets…

  4. Atomically Traceable Nanostructure Fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Josh B; Dick, Don D; McDonnell, Stephen J; Bischof, Maia; Fu, Joseph; Owen, James H G; Owen, William R; Alexander, Justin D; Jaeger, David L; Namboodiri, Pradeep; Fuchs, Ehud; Chabal, Yves J; Wallace, Robert M; Reidy, Richard; Silver, Richard M; Randall, John N; Von Ehr, James

    2015-07-17

    Reducing the scale of etched nanostructures below the 10 nm range eventually will require an atomic scale understanding of the entire fabrication process being used in order to maintain exquisite control over both feature size and feature density. Here, we demonstrate a method for tracking atomically resolved and controlled structures from initial template definition through final nanostructure metrology, opening up a pathway for top-down atomic control over nanofabrication. Hydrogen depassivation lithography is the first step of the nanoscale fabrication process followed by selective atomic layer deposition of up to 2.8 nm of titania to make a nanoscale etch mask. Contrast with the background is shown, indicating different mechanisms for growth on the desired patterns and on the H passivated background. The patterns are then transferred into the bulk using reactive ion etching to form 20 nm tall nanostructures with linewidths down to ~6 nm. To illustrate the limitations of this process, arrays of holes and lines are fabricated. The various nanofabrication process steps are performed at disparate locations, so process integration is discussed. Related issues are discussed including using fiducial marks for finding nanostructures on a macroscopic sample and protecting the chemically reactive patterned Si(100)-H surface against degradation due to atmospheric exposure.

  5. Chiral atomically thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cheol-Joo; Sánchez-Castillo, A.; Ziegler, Zack; Ogawa, Yui; Noguez, Cecilia; Park, Jiwoong

    2016-06-01

    Chiral materials possess left- and right-handed counterparts linked by mirror symmetry. These materials are useful for advanced applications in polarization optics, stereochemistry and spintronics. In particular, the realization of spatially uniform chiral films with atomic-scale control of their handedness could provide a powerful means for developing nanodevices with novel chiral properties. However, previous approaches based on natural or grown films, or arrays of fabricated building blocks, could not offer a direct means to program intrinsic chiral properties of the film on the atomic scale. Here, we report a chiral stacking approach, where two-dimensional materials are positioned layer-by-layer with precise control of the interlayer rotation (θ) and polarity, resulting in tunable chiral properties of the final stack. Using this method, we produce left- and right-handed bilayer graphene, that is, a two-atom-thick chiral film. The film displays one of the highest intrinsic ellipticity values (6.5 deg μm-1) ever reported, and a remarkably strong circular dichroism (CD) with the peak energy and sign tuned by θ and polarity. We show that these chiral properties originate from the large in-plane magnetic moment associated with the interlayer optical transition. Furthermore, we show that we can program the chiral properties of atomically thin films layer-by-layer by producing three-layer graphene films with structurally controlled CD spectra.

  6. Atomic and Molecular Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-25

    The topics investigated experimentally and theoretically by the Pittsburgh Atomic Sciences Institute with applications to high power laser development and atmospheric IR backgrounds are enumerated. Reports containing the detailed scientific progress in these studies are cited. Finally, a list of the journal articles describing the results of the programs, with full references, is given.

  7. Single-Atom Electrocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chengzhou; Fu, Shaofang; Shi, Qiurong; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2017-05-23

    Recent years have witnessed the increasing production of the sustainable and renewable energy. The limitations of electrochemical performances are closely associated with the search for highly efficient electrocatalysts with more rational control of size, shape, composition and structure. Specifically, the rapidly emerging studies on single-atom catalysts (SACs) have sparked new interests in electrocatalysis because of the unique properties such as high catalytic activity, selectivity and 100% atom utilization. In this review, we introduce the innovative synthesis and advanced characterizations of SACs and primarily focus on their electrochemical applications in oxygen reduction/evolution reaction, hydrogen evolution reaction, hydrocarbon conversion reactions for fuel cells (methanol, ethanol and formic acid electrooxidation) and other related fields. Significantly, this unique single atom-depended electrocatalytic performance together with the underlying mechanism will also be discussed. Furthermore, future research directions and challenges are proposed to further realize the ultimate goal of tailoring single-atoms for electrochemical applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Atomic Particle Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1970-01-01

    This booklet tells how scientists observe the particles and electromagnetic radiation that emerges from an atomic nucleus. The equipment used falls into two general categories: counters which count each particle as it passes by, and track detectors, which make a photographic record of the particle's track.

  9. Atomism, Pragmatism, Holism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John P.

    1986-01-01

    Examines three world views influencing curriculum development--atomism (underpinning competency-based education), pragmatism (promoting inquiry-based approaches), amd holism (associated with confluent or Waldorf education). Holism embodies the perennial philosophy and attempts to integrate cognitive, affective, and transpersonal dimensions,…

  10. Experiments with Ξ- atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batty, C. J.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    1999-01-01

    Experiments with Ξ- atoms are proposed in order to study the nuclear interaction of Ξ hyperons. The production of Ξ- in the (K-,K+) reaction, the Ξ- stopping in matter, and its atomic cascade are incorporated within a realistic evaluation of the results expected for Ξ- x-ray spectra across the periodic table, using an assumed Ξ-nucleus optical potential Vopt. Several optimal targets for measuring the strong-interaction shift and width of the x-ray transition to the ``last'' atomic level observed are singled out: F, Cl, I, and Pb. The sensitivity of these observables to the parameters of Vopt is considered. The relevance of such experiments is discussed in the context of strangeness -2 nuclear physics and multistrange nuclear matter. Finally, with particular reference to searches for the H dibaryon, the properties of Ξ-d atoms are also discussed. The role of Stark mixing and its effect on S and P state capture of Ξ- by the deuteron together with estimates of the resulting probability for producing the H dibaryon are considered in detail.

  11. Ludwig Boltzmann: Atomic genius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cercignani, C. [Department of Mathematics, Politecnico di Milano (Italy)]. E-mail: carcer@mate.polimi.it

    2006-09-15

    On the centenary of the death of Ludwig Boltzmann, Carlo Cercignani examines the immense contributions of the man who pioneered our understanding of the atomic nature of matter. The man who first gave a convincing explanation of the irreversibility of the macroscopic world and the symmetry of the laws of physics was the Austrian physicist Ludwig Boltzmann, who tragically committed suicide 100 years ago this month. One of the key figures in the development of the atomic theory of matter, Boltzmann's fame will be forever linked to two fundamental contributions to science. The first was his interpretation of 'entropy' as a mathematically well-defined measure of the disorder of atoms. The second was his derivation of what is now known as the Boltzmann equation, which describes the statistical properties of a gas as made up of molecules. The equation, which described for the first time how a probability can evolve with time, allowed Boltzmann to explain why macroscopic phenomena are irreversible. The key point is that while microscopic objects like atoms can behave reversibly, we never see broken coffee cups reforming because it would involve a long series of highly improbable interactions - and not because it is forbidden by the laws of physics. (U.K.)

  12. Cold atoms as a coolant for levitated optomechanical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ranjit, Gambhir; Geraci, Andrew A

    2014-01-01

    Optically trapped dielectric objects are well suited for reaching the quantum regime of their center of mass motion in an ultra-high vacuum environment. We show that ground state cooling of an optically trapped nanosphere is achievable when starting at room temperature, by sympathetic cooling of a cold atomic gas optically coupled to the nanoparticle. Unlike cavity cooling in the resolved sideband limit, this system requires only a modest cavity finesse and it allows the cooling to be turned off, permitting subsequent observation of strongly-coupled dynamics between the atoms and sphere. Nanospheres cooled to their quantum ground state could have applications in quantum information science or in precision sensing.

  13. Sense of Control and Career Adaptability among Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Ryan D.

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined the direct relation of sense of control to career adaptability, as well as its ability to function as a mediator for other established predictors, with a sample of 1,991 undergraduate students. Students endorsing a greater sense of personal control were more likely to view themselves as adaptable to the world of work.…

  14. Ultra thin films for sensing and heating of microprobes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaitas, A.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation aims to advance the current state of cantilevers with integrated metal thermal and deflection sensing elements. Metallic sensing elements enable the use of alternative substrate materials (such as polymers), that tend to exhibit higher compliance properties and are more robust (les

  15. “Hard probes” of strongly-interacting atomic gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishida, Yusuke [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-18

    We investigate properties of an energetic atom propagating through strongly interacting atomic gases. The operator product expansion is used to systematically compute a quasiparticle energy and its scattering rate both in a spin-1/2 Fermi gas and in a spinless Bose gas. Reasonable agreement with recent quantum Monte Carlo simulations even at a relatively small momentum k/kF > 1.5 indicates that our large-momentum expansions are valid in a wide range of momentum. We also study a differential scattering rate when a probe atom is shot into atomic gases. Because the number density and current density of the target atomic gas contribute to the forward scattering only, its contact density (measure of short-range pair correlation) gives the leading contribution to the backward scattering. Therefore, such an experiment can be used to measure the contact density and thus provides a new local probe of strongly interacting atomic gases.

  16. Controlling interactions between highly magnetic atoms with Feshbach resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2014-09-01

    This paper reviews current experimental and theoretical progress in the study of dipolar quantum gases of ground and meta-stable atoms with a large magnetic moment. We emphasize the anisotropic nature of Feshbach resonances due to coupling to fast-rotating resonant molecular states in ultracold s-wave collisions between magnetic atoms in external magnetic fields. The dramatic differences in the distribution of resonances of magnetic (7)S3 chromium and magnetic lanthanide atoms with a submerged 4f shell and non-zero electron angular momentum is analyzed. We focus on dysprosium and erbium as important experimental advances have been recently made to cool and create quantum-degenerate gases for these atoms. Finally, we describe progress in locating resonances in collisions of meta-stable magnetic atoms in electronic P-states with ground-state atoms, where an interplay between collisional anisotropies and spin-orbit coupling exists.

  17. Controlling interactions between highly-magnetic atoms with Feshbach resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews current experimental and theoretical progress in the study of dipolar quantum gases of ground and meta-stable atoms with a large magnetic moment. We emphasize the anisotropic nature of Feshbach resonances due to coupling to fast-rotating resonant molecular states in ultracold s-wave collisions between magnetic atoms in external magnetic fields. The dramatic differences in the distribution of resonances of magnetic $^7$S$_3$ chromium and magnetic lanthanide atoms with a submerged 4f shell and non-zero electron angular momentum is analyzed. We focus on Dysprosium and Erbium as important experimental advances have been recently made to cool and create quantum-degenerate gases for these atoms. Finally, we describe progress in locating resonances in collisions of meta-stable magnetic atoms in electronic P states with ground-state atoms, where an interplay between collisional anisotropies and spin-orbit coupling exists.

  18. Atomic Information Technology Safety and Economy of Nuclear Power Plants

    CERN Document Server

    Woo, Taeho

    2012-01-01

    Atomic Information Technology revaluates current conceptions of the information technology aspects of the nuclear industry. Economic and safety research in the nuclear energy sector are explored, considering statistical methods which incorporate Monte-Carlo simulations for practical applications. Divided into three sections, Atomic Information Technology covers: • Atomic economics and management, • Atomic safety and reliability, and • Atomic safeguarding and security. Either as a standalone volume or as a companion to conventional nuclear safety and reliability books, Atomic Information Technology acts as a concise and thorough reference on statistical assessment technology in the nuclear industry. Students and industry professionals alike will find this a key tool in expanding and updating their understanding of this industry and the applications of information technology within it.

  19. Satellite Remote Sensing in Offshore Wind Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Badger, Merete; Astrup, Poul

    2013-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing of ocean surface winds are presented with focus on wind energy applications. The history on operational and research-based satellite ocean wind mapping is briefly described for passive microwave, scatterometer and synthetic aperture radar (SAR). Currently 6 GW installed...

  20. Remote sensing and today's forestry issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayn-Wittgenstein, L.

    1977-01-01

    The actual and the desirable roles of remote sensing in dealing with current forestry issues, such as national forest policy, supply and demand for forest products and competing demands for forest land are discussed. Topics covered include wood shortage, regional timber inventories, forests in tropical and temperate zones, Skylab photography, forest management and protection, available biomass studies, and monitoring.

  1. Ion-gap sensing for engine control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This article reports that in addition to detecting misfire to conform with California onboard diagnostic (OBD II) regulations, Delco Electronics and Mecel AB engineers are looking at ion-gap sensing to control knock, A/F ratio, and other possible engine control parameters. The combustion of fuel in an engine cylinder produces ions. Detection of those ions by the spark plug (ion-gap sensing), and use of the resulting ion currents, has been employed in engine management systems since 1988. Saab introduced the first application, for cam-phase sensing. The main driving force for ion-gap sensing is OBD II requirements for 100% misfire detection at all speeds and loads. The technique has been expanded in subsequent applications to include misfire, knock, and pre-ignition detection and control, and more recently in combustion-ion detection using a capacitance-type, ion-current measurement method. Use of the ion current`s wave shape to control knock allows elimination of the separate piezoelectric type (PZT) sensor. Future applications could provide additional engine-control features including air/fuel ratio measurement and control.

  2. Electromagnetically induced grating with Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Sobia; Ziauddin, Qamar, Shahid; Qamar, Sajid

    2016-09-01

    We present a scheme to realize electromagnetically induced grating in an ensemble of strongly interacting Rydberg atoms, which act as superatoms due to the dipole blockade mechanism. The ensemble of three-level cold Rydberg-dressed (87Rb) atoms follows a cascade configuration where a strong standing-wave control field and a weak probe pulse are employed. The diffraction intensity is influenced by the strength of the probe intensity, the control field strength, and the van der Waals (vdW) interaction. It is noticed that relatively large first-order diffraction can be obtained for low-input intensity with a small vdW shift and a strong control field. The scheme can be considered as an amicable solution to realize the atomic grating at the microscopic level, which can provide background- and dark-current-free diffraction.

  3. Modeling Atom Probe Tomography: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vurpillot, F., E-mail: francois.vurpillot@univ-rouen.fr [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, UMR CNRS 6634, Université de Rouen, Saint Etienne du Rouvray 76801 (France); Oberdorfer, C. [Institut für Materialwissenschaft, Lehrstuhl für Materialphysik, Universität Stuttgart, Heisenbergstr. 3, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Improving both the precision and the accuracy of Atom Probe Tomography reconstruction requires a correct understanding of the imaging process. In this aim, numerical modeling approaches have been developed for 15 years. The injected ingredients of these modeling tools are related to the basic physic of the field evaporation mechanism. The interplay between the sample nature and structure of the analyzed sample and the reconstructed image artefacts have pushed to gradually improve and make the model more and more sophisticated. This paper reviews the evolution of the modeling approach in Atom Probe Tomography and presents some future potential directions in order to improve the method. - Highlights: • The basics of field evaporation. • The main aspects of Atom Probe Tomography modeling. • The intrinsic limitations of the current method and future potential directions to improve the understanding of tip to image ion projection.

  4. Distributed Feedback Lasing with Cold Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Schilke, Alexander; Courteille, Philippe W; Guerin, William

    2011-01-01

    There is currently a strong interest in mirrorless lasing. In these systems, the electromagnetic feedback is provided either by disorder, i.e., multiple scattering in the gain medium itself, or by order, i.e., multiple Bragg reflection. This corresponds, respectively, to "random lasers" and "photonic crystal lasers". The crossover regime, between order and disorder, or correlated disorder, starts also to be fruitfully investigated. Here, we report one-dimensional photonic crystal lasing, i.e., distributed feedback lasing, with a cold atom cloud that provides simultaneously both gain and feedback. The atoms are trapped in a 1D lattice, giving a density modulation that creates a strong Bragg reflection under a small angle of incidence. Pumping the atoms with auxiliary beams induces four wave mixing that provides gain. The combination of both ingredients generates a mirrorless laser with a conical output emission, whose apex angle is tunable with the lattice periodicity through the Bragg condition.

  5. Inductively guided circuits for ultracold dressed atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Sinuco-Leon, German; Arnold, Aidan S; Garraway, Barry M

    2014-01-01

    We propose a flexible and robust scheme to create closed quasi-one dimensional guides for ultra-cold atoms through the dressing of hyperfine sub-levels of the atomic ground state. The dressing field is spatially modulated by inductive effects over a micro-engineered conducting loop, freeing the trapping region from leading wires in its proximity. We show that arrays of connected ring traps can also be created by carefully designing the shape of the conducting loop. We report on characteristics of the trap and mechanisms that limit the range of parameters available for experimental implementation, including non-adiabatic losses and heat dissipation by induced currents. We outline conditions to select appropriate parameters for operation of the trap with atom-chip technology.

  6. First Atomic Force Microscope Image from Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This calibration image presents three-dimensional data from the atomic force microscope on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander, showing surface details of a substrate on the microscope station's sample wheel. It will be used as an aid for interpreting later images that will show shapes of minuscule Martian soil particles. The area imaged by the microscope is 40 microns by 40 microns, small enough to fit on an eyelash. The grooves in this substrate are 14 microns (0.00055 inch) apart, from center to center. The vertical dimension is exaggerated in the image to make surface details more visible. The grooves are 300 nanometers (0.00001 inch) deep. This is the first atomic force microscope image recorded on another planet. It was taken on July 9, 2008, during the 44th Martian day, or sol, of the Phoenix mission since landing. Phoenix's Swiss-made atomic force microscope builds an image of the surface shape of a particle by sensing it with a sharp tip at the end of a spring, all microfabricated out of a silicon wafer. A strain gauge records how far the spring flexes to follow the contour of the surface. It can provide details of soil-particle shapes smaller than one-hundredth the width of a human hair. This is about 20 times smaller than what can be resolved with Phoenix's optical microscope, which has provided much higher-magnification imaging than anything seen on Mars previously. Both microscopes are part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer.

  7. Sensing response of copper phthalocyanine salt dispersed glass with organic vapours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridhi, R.; Sachdeva, Sheenam; Saini, G. S. S.; Tripathi, S. K., E-mail: surya@pu.ac.in [Department of Physics, Center of Advanced Study in Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160 014 (INDIA) Fax: +91-172-2783336; Tel.:+91-172-2544362 (India)

    2016-05-06

    Copper Phthalocyanine and other Metal Phthalocyanines are very flexible and tuned easily to modify their structural, spectroscopic, optical and electrical properties by either functionalizing them with various substituent groups or by replacing or adding a ligand to the central metal atom in the phthalocyanine ring and accordingly can be made sensitive and selective to various organic species or gaseous vapours. In the present work, we have dispersed Copper Phthalocyanine Salt (CuPcS) in sol-gel glass form using chemical route sol-gel method and studied its sensing mechanism with organic vapours like methanol and benzene and found that current increases onto their exposure with vapours. A variation in the activation energies was also observed with exposure of vapours.

  8. Coherent manipulation of an ensemble of nuclear spins in diamond for high precision rotation sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskula, Jean-Christophe; Saha, Kasturi; Ajoy, Ashok; Cappellaro, Paola

    2016-05-01

    Gyroscopes find wide applications in everyday life from navigation and inertial sensing to rotation sensors in hand-held devices and automobiles. Current devices, based on either atomic or solid-state systems, impose a choice between long-time stability and high sensitivity in a miniaturized system. We are building a solid-state spin gyroscope associated with the Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond take advantage of the efficient optical initialization and measurement offered by the NV electronic spin and the stability and long coherence time of the nuclear spin, which is preserved even at high defect density. In addition, we also investigate electro-magnetic noise monitoring and feedback schemes based on the coupling between the NV electronic and nuclear spin to achieve higher stability.

  9. Theory of long-range ultracold atom-molecule photoassociation

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Dulieu, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The creation of ultracold molecules is currently limited to diatomic species. In this letter we present a theoretical description of the photoassociation of ultracold atoms and molecules to create ultracold excited triatomic molecules, thus being a novel example of light-assisted ultracold chemical reaction. The calculation of the photoassociation rate of ultracold Cs atoms with ultracold Cs$_2$ molecules in their rovibrational ground state is reported, based on the solution of the quantum dynamics involving the atom-molecule long-range interactions, and assuming a model potential for the short-range physics. The rate for the formation of excited Cs$_3$ molecules is predicted to be comparable with currently observed atom-atom photoassociation rates. We formulate an experimental proposal to observe this process relying on the available techniques of optical lattices and standard photoassociation spectroscopy.

  10. Visual Sensing for Urban Flood Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Shi-Wei; Wu, Jyh-Horng; Lin, Fang-Pang; Hsu, Ching-Han

    2015-08-14

    With the increasing climatic extremes, the frequency and severity of urban flood events have intensified worldwide. In this study, image-based automated monitoring of flood formation and analyses of water level fluctuation were proposed as value-added intelligent sensing applications to turn a passive monitoring camera into a visual sensor. Combined with the proposed visual sensing method, traditional hydrological monitoring cameras have the ability to sense and analyze the local situation of flood events. This can solve the current problem that image-based flood monitoring heavily relies on continuous manned monitoring. Conventional sensing networks can only offer one-dimensional physical parameters measured by gauge sensors, whereas visual sensors can acquire dynamic image information of monitored sites and provide disaster prevention agencies with actual field information for decision-making to relieve flood hazards. The visual sensing method established in this study provides spatiotemporal information that can be used for automated remote analysis for monitoring urban floods. This paper focuses on the determination of flood formation based on image-processing techniques. The experimental results suggest that the visual sensing approach may be a reliable way for determining the water fluctuation and measuring its elevation and flood intrusion with respect to real-world coordinates. The performance of the proposed method has been confirmed; it has the capability to monitor and analyze the flood status, and therefore, it can serve as an active flood warning system.

  11. Visual Sensing for Urban Flood Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Wei Lo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing climatic extremes, the frequency and severity of urban flood events have intensified worldwide. In this study, image-based automated monitoring of flood formation and analyses of water level fluctuation were proposed as value-added intelligent sensing applications to turn a passive monitoring camera into a visual sensor. Combined with the proposed visual sensing method, traditional hydrological monitoring cameras have the ability to sense and analyze the local situation of flood events. This can solve the current problem that image-based flood monitoring heavily relies on continuous manned monitoring. Conventional sensing networks can only offer one-dimensional physical parameters measured by gauge sensors, whereas visual sensors can acquire dynamic image information of monitored sites and provide disaster prevention agencies with actual field information for decision-making to relieve flood hazards. The visual sensing method established in this study provides spatiotemporal information that can be used for automated remote analysis for monitoring urban floods. This paper focuses on the determination of flood formation based on image-processing techniques. The experimental results suggest that the visual sensing approach may be a reliable way for determining the water fluctuation and measuring its elevation and flood intrusion with respect to real-world coordinates. The performance of the proposed method has been confirmed; it has the capability to monitor and analyze the flood status, and therefore, it can serve as an active flood warning system.

  12. Etalon-induced baseline drift and correction in atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yingge; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-10-01

    Atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy are of significant interest in thin film growth as they can provide unobtrusive, element specific real-time flux sensing and control. The ultimate sensitivity and performance of these sensors are strongly affected by baseline drift. Here we demonstrate that an etalon effect resulting from temperature changes in optical viewport housings is a major source of signal instability, which has not been previously considered, and cannot be corrected using existing methods. We show that small temperature variations in the fused silica viewports can introduce intensity modulations of up to 1.5% which in turn significantly deteriorate AA sensor performance. This undesirable effect can be at least partially eliminated by reducing the size of the beam and tilting the incident light beam off the viewport normal.

  13. Etalon-induced Baseline Drift And Correction In Atom Flux Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Yingge; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-10-20

    Atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy are of significant interest in thin film growth as they can provide unobtrusive, element specific, real-time flux sensing and control. The ultimate sensitivity and performance of the sensors are strongly affected by the long-term and short term baseline drift. Here we demonstrate that an etalon effect resulting from temperature changes in optical viewport housings is a major source of signal instability which has not been previously considered or corrected by existing methods. We show that small temperature variations in the fused silica viewports can introduce intensity modulations of up to 1.5%, which in turn significantly deteriorate AA sensor performance. This undesirable effect can be at least partially eliminated by reducing the size of the beam and tilting the incident light beam off the viewport normal.

  14. Etalon-induced baseline drift and correction in atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Yingge, E-mail: yingge.du@pnnl.gov [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Chambers, Scott A. [Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    Atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy are of significant interest in thin film growth as they can provide unobtrusive, element specific real-time flux sensing and control. The ultimate sensitivity and performance of these sensors are strongly affected by baseline drift. Here we demonstrate that an etalon effect resulting from temperature changes in optical viewport housings is a major source of signal instability, which has not been previously considered, and cannot be corrected using existing methods. We show that small temperature variations in the fused silica viewports can introduce intensity modulations of up to 1.5% which in turn significantly deteriorate AA sensor performance. This undesirable effect can be at least partially eliminated by reducing the size of the beam and tilting the incident light beam off the viewport normal.

  15. Development of a compact cold-atom atomic clock based on coherent population trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanshan, Eric M.

    Field-grade atomic clocks capable of primary standard performance in compact physics packages would be of significant value in a variety of applications ranging from network synchronization and secure communications to GPS hold-over and inertial navigation. A cold-atom coherent population trapping (CACPT) clock featuring laser-cooled atoms and pulsed Ramsey interrogation is a strong candidate for this technology if the principal frequency shifts can be controlled and the performance degradation associated with miniaturization can be overcome. In this thesis, research focused on the development of this type of compact atomic clock is presented. To address the low atom numbers obtained in small cold-atom sources, experiments were performed in which an atomic beam was decelerated with bichromatic stimulated laser forces and loaded into a mm-scale magneto-optical trap, increasing the atom number by a factor of 12.5. A CACPT clock using the high-contrast lin||lin optical interrogation technique was developed and achieved a stability of 7 x 10-13 after one hour of integration. Doppler shifts in the clock are explained using a simple kinematic model and canceled by interrogating the atoms with a counter-propagating CPT configuration. Finally, a thorough characterization of the AC-stark effect in lin||lin CPT was performed. Observed shifts are explained in terms of contributions from coherent CPT-generating couplings and population transfer effects caused by optical pumping from incoherent light. Measurements are compared with existing and new theoretical treatments, and a laser configuration is identified that reduces clock drift from light shifts to less than 10-14 for the current system.

  16. Quorum sensing inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, T.; Givskov, Michael Christian; Nielsen, J.

    2005-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) systems comprise a new therapeutic target potentially substitutive or complementary to traditional antibiotic treatment of chronic diseases. One route to disrupt the previously established interrelationship between pathogenesis and QS is by blocking the dual functioning signal...

  17. Remote Sensing Information Gateway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remote Sensing Information Gateway, a tool that allows scientists, researchers and decision makers to access a variety of multi-terabyte, environmental datasets and to subset the data and obtain only needed variables, greatly improving the download time.

  18. Development of carbon electrodes for electrochemistry, solid-state electronics and multimodal atomic force microscopy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Kirstin Claire

    Carbon is one of the most remarkable elements due to its wide abundance on Earth and its many allotropes, which include diamond and graphite. Many carbon allotropes are conductive and in recent decades scientists have discovered and synthesized many new forms of carbon, including graphene and carbon nanotubes. The work in this thesis specifically focuses on the fabrication and characterization of pyrolyzed parylene C (PPC), a conductive pyrocarbon, as an electrode material for diodes, as a conductive coating for atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes and as an ultramicroelectrode (UME) for the electrochemical interrogation of cellular systems in vitro. Herein, planar and three-dimensional (3D) PPC electrodes were microscopically, spectroscopically and electrochemically characterized. First, planar PPC films and PPC-coated nanopipettes were utilized to detect a model redox species, Ru(NH3) 6Cl3. Then, free-standing PPC thin films were chemically doped, with hydrazine and concentrated nitric acid, to yield p- and n-type carbon films. Doped PPC thin films were positioned in conjunction with doped silicon to create Schottky and p-n junction diodes for use in an alternating current half-wave rectifier circuit. Pyrolyzed parylene C has found particular merit as a 3D electrode coating of AFM probes. Current sensing-atomic force microscopy imaging in air of nanoscale metallic features was undertaken to demonstrate the electronic imaging applicability of PPC AFM probes. Upon further insulation with parylene C and modification with a focused ion beam, a PPC UME was microfabricated near the AFM probe apex and utilized for electrochemical imaging. Subsequently, scanning electrochemical microscopy-atomic force microscopy imaging was undertaken to electrochemically quantify and image the spatial location of dopamine exocytotic release, elicited mechanically via the AFM probe itself, from differentiated pheochromocytoma 12 cells in vitro.

  19. Dense with Sense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aletras, Anthony H.; Ingkanisorn, W. Patricia; Mancini, Christine; Arai, Andrew E.

    2005-09-01

    Displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) with a low encoding strength phase-cycled meta-DENSE readout and a two fold SENSE acceleration ( R = 2) is described. This combination reduces total breath-hold times for increased patient comfort during cardiac regional myocardial contractility studies. Images from phantoms, normal volunteers, and a patient are provided to demonstrate the SENSE-DENSE combination of methods. The overall breath-hold time is halved while preserving strain map quality.

  20. Photoacoustic Sensing of Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    NOV 2013 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Photoacoustic Sensing of Explosives 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...2013www.ll.mit.edu Photoacoustic Sensing of Explosives (PHASE) is a promising new technology that detects trace explosive residues from significant... photoacoustic phenomena resulting from ultraviolet laser excitation. Exposed explosives are excited up to 100 meters away by using PHASE’s