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  1. Current advances in liver surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon Melissa Chan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatobiliary surgery has taken a big step forward in recent decades especially in the minimally invasive approach for hepatectomy. From being sceptical at the beginning of the 1990s when laparoscopic surgery had become prevalent, to now, where laparoscopic hepatectomy has been well-established, especially in minor hepatectomies; this new technique has evolved rapidly over the past 20-years demonstrating better short-term outcomes and equivalent oncological outcomes in selected patients and in expert hands. Laparoscopic hepatectomy is indeed, more difficult to master than the open procedure with restrictions in working space, difficulty in haemostasis and the potential risk of gas embolism. However, with better visibility of the operative field around the liver, especially beneath the costal margin, the magnified view and theoretical advantage of pneumoperitoneum acting as haemostatic pressure have made laparoscopic hepatectomy increasingly popular. Another important advancement is the new surgical technique of associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS. This procedure induces more rapid liver hypertrophy within a median period of 9-days, allowing resection to be performed in candidates with borderline functional liver remnant and at an earlier date. However, studies have shown that ALPPS is associated with a relatively higher rate of morbidity and mortality. Therefore, it remains a highly controversial treatment option and more studies have to be performed to establish its usefulness and define its role in liver surgery.

  2. Halo current diagnostic system of experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, D. L.; Shen, B.; Sun, Y.; Qian, J. P., E-mail: jpqian@ipp.ac.cn; Wang, Y.; Xiao, B. J. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China); Granetz, R. S. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The design, calibration, and installation of disruption halo current sensors for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak are described in this article. All the sensors are Rogowski coils that surround conducting structures, and all the signals are analog integrated. Coils with two different cross-section sizes have been fabricated, and their mutual inductances are calibrated. Sensors have been installed to measure halo currents in several different parts of both the upper divertor (tungsten) and lower divertor (graphite) at several toroidal locations. Initial measurements from disruptions show that the halo current diagnostics are working well.

  3. Halo current diagnostic system of experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D. L.; Shen, B.; Granetz, R. S.; Sun, Y.; Qian, J. P.; Wang, Y.; Xiao, B. J.

    2015-10-01

    The design, calibration, and installation of disruption halo current sensors for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak are described in this article. All the sensors are Rogowski coils that surround conducting structures, and all the signals are analog integrated. Coils with two different cross-section sizes have been fabricated, and their mutual inductances are calibrated. Sensors have been installed to measure halo currents in several different parts of both the upper divertor (tungsten) and lower divertor (graphite) at several toroidal locations. Initial measurements from disruptions show that the halo current diagnostics are working well.

  4. Advanced Eddy current NDE steam generator tubing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakhtiari, S.

    1999-03-29

    As part of a multifaceted project on steam generator integrity funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Argonne National Laboratory is carrying out research on the reliability of nondestructive evaluation (NDE). A particular area of interest is the impact of advanced eddy current (EC) NDE technology. This paper presents an overview of work that supports this effort in the areas of numerical electromagnetic (EM) modeling, data analysis, signal processing, and visualization of EC inspection results. Finite-element modeling has been utilized to study conventional and emerging EC probe designs. This research is aimed at determining probe responses to flaw morphologies of current interest. Application of signal processing and automated data analysis algorithms has also been addressed. Efforts have focused on assessment of frequency and spatial domain filters and implementation of more effective data analysis and display methods. Data analysis studies have dealt with implementation of linear and nonlinear multivariate models to relate EC inspection parameters to steam generator tubing defect size and structural integrity. Various signal enhancement and visualization schemes are also being evaluated and will serve as integral parts of computer-aided data analysis algorithms. Results from this research will ultimately be substantiated through testing on laboratory-grown and in-service-degraded tubes.

  5. Review: Colchicine, current advances and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAHENDRA KUMAR RAI

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Ade R, Rai MK. 2010. Colchicine, current advances and future prospects. Nusantara Bioscience 2: 90-96. Colchicine is a toxic natural compound and secondary metabolite commonly produced by plants like Colchicum autumnale and Gloriosa superba. It is originally used to treat rheumatic complaints, especially gout, and still finds its uses for these purposes today despite dosing issues concerning its toxicity. It is also prescribed for its cathartic and emetic effects. Initially oral colchicine has not been approved as a drug by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA. But now FDA approved colchicine as a drug for some disorders. Colchicine's present medicinal use is in the treatment of gout and familial mediterranean fever. It is also being investigated for its use as an anticancer drug. In neurons, axoplasmic transport is disrupted by colchicine. Due to all the pharmacological application of colchicine, there is urgent need to enhance the properties and increase the production of colchicine with the help of in vitro technologies. The present review is mainly focused on the chemistry of colchicine, its medicinal uses and toxicity.

  6. Current advances in retroviral gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Youngsuk; Noh, Moon Jong; Lee, Kwan Hee

    2011-06-01

    There have been major changes since the incidents of leukemia development in X-SCID patients after the treatments using retroviral gene therapy. Due to the risk of oncogenesis caused by retroviral insertional activation of host genes, most of the efforts focused on the lentiviral therapies. However, a relative clonal dominance was detected in a patient with β-thalassemia Major, two years after the subject received genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells using lentiviral vectors. This disappointing result of the recent clinical trial using lentiviral vector tells us that the current and most advanced vector systems does not have enough safety. In this review, various safety features that have been tried for the retroviral gene therapy are introduced and the possible new ways of improvements are discussed. Additional feature of chromatin insulators, co-transduction of a suicidal gene under the control of an inducible promoter, conditional expression of the transgene only in appropriate target cells, targeted transduction, cell type-specific expression, targeted local administration, splitting of the viral genome, and site specific insertion of retroviral vector are discussed here.

  7. Recent Advances in Studies of Current Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanter, Yaroslav M.

    This is a brief review of recent activities in the field of current noise intended for newcomers. We first briefly discuss main properties of shot noise in nanostructures, and then turn to recent developments, concentrating on issues related to experimental progress: non-symmetrized cumulants and quantum noise; counting statistics; super-Poissonian noise; current noise and interferometry

  8. Vertebral morphometry: current methods and recent advances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guglielmi, G. [University of Foggia, Department of Radiology, Foggia (Italy); Scientific Institute Hospital, Department of Radiology, San Giovanni Rotondo (Italy); Diacinti, D. [University La Sapienza, Department of Radiology, Roma (Italy); Kuijk, C. van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Aparisi, F. [Hospital Dr Peset, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Valencia (Spain); Krestan, C. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Adams, J.E. [University, Imaging Science and Biomedical Engineering, Manchester (United Kingdom); Link, T.M. [University of California, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Vertebral fractures are the hallmark of osteoporosis and are associated with increased morbility and mortality. Because a majority of vertebral fractures often occur in absence of specific trauma and are asymptomatic, their identification is radiographic. The two most widely used methods to determine the severity of vertebral fractures are the visual semiquantitative (SQ) assessment and the morphometric quantitative approach, involving the measurements of vertebral body heights. The measurements may be made on conventional spinal radiographs (MRX: morphometric X-ray radiography) or on images obtained from dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans (MXA: morphometric X-ray absorptiometry).The availability of a rapid, low-dose method for assessment of vertebral fractures, using advanced fan-beam DXA devices, provides a practical method for integrated assessment of BMD and vertebral fracture status. The visual or morphometric assessment of lateral DXA spine images may have a potential role for use as a prescreening tool, excluding normal subjects prior to performing conventional radiographs. (orig.)

  9. Frontotemporal dementias: Recent advances and current controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyton Cristian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal dementia (FTD syndromes comprise a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative conditions characterized by atrophy in the frontal and temporal lobes. Three main clinical variants are recognized: Behavioral variant (bv-FTD, Semantic dementia (SD, and Progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA. However, logopenic/phonological (LPA variant has been recently described, showing a distinctive pattern of brain atrophy and often associated to Alzheimer′s disease pathology. The diagnosis of FTD is challenging, since there is clinical, pathological, and genetic overlap between the variants and other neurodegenerative diseases, such as motoneuron disease (MND and corticobasal degeneration (CBD. In addition, patients with gene mutations (tau and progranulin display an inconsistent clinical phenotype and the correspondence between the clinical variant and its pathology is unpredictable. New cognitive tests based on social cognition and emotional recognition together with advances in molecular pathology and genetics have contributed to an improved understanding. There is now a real possibility of accurate biomarkers for early diagnosis. The present review concentrates on new insights and debates in FTD.

  10. Advanced Hot Section Materials and Coatings Test Rig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Davis

    2006-09-30

    Phase I of the Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig Program has been successfully completed. Florida Turbine Technologies has designed and planned the implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. Potential uses of this rig include investigations into environmental attack of turbine materials and coatings exposed to syngas, erosion, and thermal-mechanical fatigue. The principle activities during Phase 1 of this project included providing several conceptual designs for the test section, evaluating various syngas-fueled rig combustor concepts, comparing the various test section concepts and then selecting a configuration for detail design. Conceptual definition and requirements of auxiliary systems and facilities were also prepared. Implementation planning also progressed, with schedules prepared and future project milestones defined. The results of these tasks continue to show rig feasibility, both technically and economically.

  11. Current distribution in ESD diodes; Cross section corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J. C.; Gomer, R.

    1986-06-01

    The electron current distribution in diodes consisting of a rectangular crystal and an electron emitting filament parallel to and in front of it, used in several electron stimulated desorption (ESD) experiments has been determined by means of a dummy crystal constructed from uniformly transparent Lektromesh and a moveable, suitably constructed fine probe. It was found that for straight filaments the distribution was uniform along the narrow, but nearly triangular along the long dimension of the crystal. Calculated log signal versus time curves in ESD show considerable curvature, as often observed experimentally with such geometries. Filaments with a straight center, but coiled and shielded end sections provide uniform current distributions. When such filaments are used the curvature of the log signal versus time curves disappears for Kr desorption from W(110) but is still seen for oxygen desorption. The absolute fraction of filament current hitting the front surface of a crystal was also determined for various geometries by using a thin suppressor mesh in front of the dummy crystal. Cross sections for CO, O, and Kr ESD from W(110) were redetermined with a coiled end section filament. After correction for the fractions of current to the crystal and current non-uniformities previous results are in fairly reasonable agreement with the new values, except for the CO measurements of Leung, Vass, and Gomer, which are still high by a factor of 5. The new measurements permit a recalculation of excitation cross sections for neutral desorption. It is found that the latter are substantially smaller than corresponding gas phase values.

  12. Behavioral cardiology: current advances and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanski, Alan

    2014-07-08

    Growing epidemiological evidence identifies key domains relevant to behavioral cardiology, including health behaviors, emotions, mental mindsets, stress management, social connectedness, and a sense of purpose. Each of these domains exists along a continuum, ranging from positive factors that promote health, to negative factors, which are pathophysiological. To date, there has been relatively little translation of this growing knowledge base into cardiology practice. Four initiatives are proposed to meet this challenge: 1) promulgating greater awareness of the potency of psychosocial risks factors; 2) overcoming a current "artificial divide" between conventional and psychosocial risk factors; 3) developing novel cost-effective interventions using Internet and mobile health applications, group-based counseling, and development of tiered-care behavioral management; and 4) in recognition that "one size does not fit all" with respect to behavioral interventions, developing specialists who can counsel patients in multidisciplinary fashion and use evidence-based approaches for promoting patient motivation and execution of health goals. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Advanced robotics for medical rehabilitation current state of the art and recent advances

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Shane

    2016-01-01

    Focussing on the key technologies in developing robots for a wide range of medical rehabilitation activities – which will include robotics basics, modelling and control, biomechanics modelling, rehabilitation strategies, robot assistance, clinical setup/implementation as well as neural and muscular interfaces for rehabilitation robot control – this book is split into two parts; a review of the current state of the art, and recent advances in robotics for medical rehabilitation. Both parts will include five sections for the five key areas in rehabilitation robotics: (i) the upper limb; (ii) lower limb for gait rehabilitation (iii) hand, finger and wrist; (iv) ankle for strains and sprains; and (v) the use of EEG and EMG to create interfaces between the neurological and muscular functions of the patients and the rehabilitation robots. Each chapter provides a description of the design of the device, the control system used, and the implementation and testing to show how it fulfils the needs of that specific ...

  14. Interest and preferences for using advanced physical activity tracking devices: results of a national cross-sectional survey

    OpenAIRE

    Alley, Stephanie; Schoeppe, Stephanie; Guertler, Diana; Jennings, Cally; Duncan, Mitch J; Vandelanotte, Corneel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Pedometers are an effective self-monitoring tool to increase users' physical activity. However, a range of advanced trackers that measure physical activity 24 hours per day have emerged (eg, Fitbit). The current study aims to determine people's current use, interest and preferences for advanced trackers. Design and participants A cross-sectional national telephone survey was conducted in Australia with 1349 respondents. Outcome measures Regression analyses were used to determine wh...

  15. Women in science: Current advances and challenges in Belarus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashlykova-Bushkevich, Iya I.

    2015-12-01

    Women constitute 49% of all natural scientists in Belarus. However, fewer than 18% of Belarusian natural scientists who hold a doctor of science degree are women. The proportion of women decreases with increasing rank at universities and institutes in Belarus. Gender imbalance at the level of full professor is striking at just 17.5% women, and illuminates the vertical segregation of women in the natural sciences. This report reviews the positions of women in science in Belarus to draw out current advances and challenges encountered by female scientists in the former socialist country. New statistical data are broken down by gender and aimed at advancing the general agenda for women in science.

  16. Current Advanced Power Generation Technologies and Options for China (1)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ In China,electricity consumption keeps growing at a high speed and installed capacity will be doubled in the next fifteen years.As the world second CO2 producer and also a member of Kyoto Protocol,how to balance energy needs and environmental protection responsibility in the future is a serious problem for China.As such,there are a number of technology choices for today's electric power generation.After discussing the current advanced power generation technologies based on Chinese energy structure and current conditions of power industry,this paper gives a reference to the technology options for China in the future.

  17. Leakage Currents and Gas Generation in Advanced Wet Tantalum Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Currently, military grade, established reliability wet tantalum capacitors are among the most reliable parts used for space applications. This has been achieved over the years by extensive testing and improvements in design and materials. However, a rapid insertion of new types of advanced, high volumetric efficiency capacitors in space systems without proper testing and analysis of degradation mechanisms might increase risks of failures. The specifics of leakage currents in wet electrolytic capacitors is that the conduction process is associated with electrolysis of electrolyte and gas generation resulting in building up of internal gas pressure in the parts. The risk associated with excessive leakage currents and increased pressure is greater for high value advanced wet tantalum capacitors, but it has not been properly evaluated yet. In this work, in Part I, leakages currents in various types of tantalum capacitors have been analyzed in a wide range of voltages, temperatures, and time under bias. Gas generation and the level of internal pressure have been calculated in Part II for different case sizes and different hermeticity leak rates to assess maximal allowable leakage currents. Effects related to electrolyte penetration to the glass seal area have been studied and the possibility of failures analyzed in Part III. Recommendations for screening and qualification to reduce risks of failures have been suggested.

  18. Current Advanced Power Generation Technologies and Options for China (2)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Nubo; Mohsen Assadi; Yang Cheng

    2008-01-01

    @@ In China,electricity consumption keeps growing at a high speed and installed capacity will be doubled in the next fifteen years.As the world second CO2 producer and also a member of Kyoto Protocol,how to balance energy needs arid environmental protection responsibility in the future is a serious problem for China.As such,there are a number of technology choices for today's electric power generation.After discussing the current advanced power generation technologies based on Chinese energy structure and current conditions of power industry,this paper gives a reference to the technology options for China in the future.Here published is the second part of the paper.

  19. Computation of charged current neutrino-Te reactions cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakstara, V.; Kosmas, T. S.; Sinatkas, J.

    2016-08-01

    Neutrino-nucleus reactions, involving both neutral current (NC) and charged current (CC) interactions are important probes in modern neutrino physics searches. In the present work, we study the concrete CC reactions 130 Te(vℓ,ℓ-)130 I and 130 Te(ṽℓ,ℓ+)130Sb which are of current experimental interest for the CUORE and COBRA experiments operating at Gran Sasso underground laboratory in Italy. The nuclear wave functions for the required initial and final nuclear states are derived by employing the proton-neutron (p-n) quasi-particle random phase approximation (QRPA) which has been previously tested in our neutral-current v-nucleus studies for Te isotopes.

  20. Current advances and future perspectives in extrusion-based bioprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbolat, Ibrahim T; Hospodiuk, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Extrusion-based bioprinting (EBB) is a rapidly growing technology that has made substantial progress during the last decade. It has great versatility in printing various biologics, including cells, tissues, tissue constructs, organ modules and microfluidic devices, in applications from basic research and pharmaceutics to clinics. Despite the great benefits and flexibility in printing a wide range of bioinks, including tissue spheroids, tissue strands, cell pellets, decellularized matrix components, micro-carriers and cell-laden hydrogels, the technology currently faces several limitations and challenges. These include impediments to organ fabrication, the limited resolution of printed features, the need for advanced bioprinting solutions to transition the technology bench to bedside, the necessity of new bioink development for rapid, safe and sustainable delivery of cells in a biomimetically organized microenvironment, and regulatory concerns to transform the technology into a product. This paper, presenting a first-time comprehensive review of EBB, discusses the current advancements in EBB technology and highlights future directions to transform the technology to generate viable end products for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  1. Current Advances in the Medical Application of Nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Slevin, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology promises new medical therapies, more rapid and sensitive diagnostic and investigative tools for normal and diseased tissues, and new materials for tissue engineering. This e-book highlights the major current uses, new technologies and future perspectives of nanotechnology in relation to medical applications. Sections in this e-book include nanobiological approaches to imaging, diagnosis and treatment of disease using targeted monoclonal antibodies and siRNA, the medical use of nanomaterials, to nanoelectronic biosensors, and possible future applications of molecular nanotechnolo

  2. Current advances in the fabrication of microneedles for transdermal delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indermun, Sunaina; Luttge, Regina; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; du Toit, Lisa C; Modi, Girish; Pillay, Viness

    2014-07-10

    The transdermal route is an excellent site for drug delivery due to the avoidance of gastric degradation and hepatic metabolism, in addition to easy accessibility. Although offering numerous attractive advantages, many available transdermal systems are not able to deliver drugs and other compounds as desired. The use of hypodermic needles, associated with phobia, pain and accidental needle-sticks has been used to overcome the delivery limitation of macromolecular compounds. The means to overcome the disadvantages of hypodermic needles has led to the development of microneedles for transdermal delivery. However, since the initial stages of microneedle fabrication, recent research has been conducted integrating various fabrication techniques for generating sophisticated microneedle devices for transdermal delivery including progress on their commercialization. A concerted effort has been made within this review to highlight the current advances of microneedles, and to provide an update of pharmaceutical research in the field of microneedle-assisted transdermal drug delivery systems.

  3. Contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography: advance and current status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Sung Il [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Ki [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) technology has undergone a great deal of progress along with the color and power Doppler imaging, three-dimensional imaging, electronic scanning, tissue harmonic imaging, and elastography, and one of the most important developments is the ability to acquire contrast-enhanced images. The blood flow in small vessels and the parenchymal microvasculature of the target lesion can be observed non-invasively by contrast-enhanced EUS (CE-EUS). Through a hemodynamic analysis, CE-EUS permits the diagnosis of various gastrointestinal diseases and differential diagnoses between benign and malignant tumors. Recently, mechanical innovations and the development of contrast agents have increased the use of CE-EUS in the diagnostic field, as well as for the assessment of the efficacy of therapeutic agents. The advances in and the current status of CE-EUS are discussed in this review.

  4. Contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography: advance and current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Ill Jang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS technology has undergone a great deal of progress along with the color and power Doppler imaging, three-dimensional imaging, electronic scanning, tissue harmonic imaging, and elastography, and one of the most important developments is the ability to acquire contrast-enhanced images. The blood flow in small vessels and the parenchymal microvasculature of the target lesion can be observed non-invasively by contrast-enhanced EUS (CE-EUS. Through a hemodynamic analysis, CE-EUS permits the diagnosis of various gastrointestinal diseases and differential diagnoses between benign and malignant tumors. Recently, mechanical innovations and the development of contrast agents have increased the use of CE-EUS in the diagnostic field, as well as for the assessment of the efficacy of therapeutic agents. The advances in and the current status of CE-EUS are discussed in this review.

  5. Current advances in diagnostic methods of Acanthamoeba keratitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yuehua; Feng Xianmin; Jiang Linzhe

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this article was to review the current advances in diagnostic methods for Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK).Data sources Data used in this review were retrieved from PubMed (1970-2013).The terms "Acanthamoeba keratitis" and "diagnosis" were used for the literature search.Study selection Data from published articles regarding AK and diagnosis in clinical trials were identified and reviewed.Results The diagnostic methods for the eight species implicated in AK were reviewed.Among all diagnostic procedures,corneal scraping and smear examination was an essential diagnostic method.Polymerase chain reaction was the most sensitive and accurate detection method.Culturing of Acanthamoeba was a reliable method for final diagnosis of AK.Confocal microscopy to detect Acanthamoeba was also effective,without any invasive procedure,and was helpful in the early diagnosis of AK.Conclusion Clinically,conjunction of various diagnostic methods to diagnose AK was necessary.

  6. Conceptual knowledge representation: A cross-section of current research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Timothy T; Wolmetz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    How is conceptual knowledge encoded in the brain? This special issue of Cognitive Neuropsychology takes stock of current efforts to answer this question through a variety of methods and perspectives. Across this work, three questions recur, each fundamental to knowledge representation in the mind and brain. First, what are the elements of conceptual representation? Second, to what extent are conceptual representations embodied in sensory and motor systems? Third, how are conceptual representations shaped by context, especially linguistic context? In this introductory article we provide relevant background on these themes and introduce how they are addressed by our contributing authors.

  7. Drugs in development for toxoplasmosis: advances, challenges, and current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alday PH

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available P Holland Alday,1 Joseph Stone Doggett1,2 1Division of Infectious Diseases, Oregon Health & Science University, 2Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Portland, OR, USA Abstract: Toxoplasma gondii causes fatal and debilitating brain and eye diseases. Medicines that are currently used to treat toxoplasmosis commonly have toxic side effects and require prolonged courses that range from weeks to more than a year. The need for long treatment durations and the risk of relapsing disease are in part due to the lack of efficacy against T. gondii tissue cysts. The challenges for developing a more effective treatment for toxoplasmosis include decreasing toxicity, achieving therapeutic concentrations in the brain and eye, shortening duration, eliminating tissue cysts from the host, safety in pregnancy, and creating a formulation that is inexpensive and practical for use in resource-poor areas of the world. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made in identifying and developing new compounds for the treatment of toxoplasmosis. Unlike clinically used medicines that were repurposed for toxoplasmosis, these compounds have been optimized for efficacy against toxoplasmosis during preclinical development. Medicines with enhanced efficacy as well as features that address the unique aspects of toxoplasmosis have the potential to greatly improve toxoplasmosis therapy. This review discusses the facets of toxoplasmosis that are pertinent to drug design and the advances, challenges, and current status of preclinical drug research for toxoplasmosis. Keywords: Toxoplasma gondii, therapeutics, preclinical medicine, experimental medicine, mechanism of action, Apicomplexa

  8. Drugs in development for toxoplasmosis: advances, challenges, and current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alday, P Holland; Doggett, Joseph Stone

    2017-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii causes fatal and debilitating brain and eye diseases. Medicines that are currently used to treat toxoplasmosis commonly have toxic side effects and require prolonged courses that range from weeks to more than a year. The need for long treatment durations and the risk of relapsing disease are in part due to the lack of efficacy against T. gondii tissue cysts. The challenges for developing a more effective treatment for toxoplasmosis include decreasing toxicity, achieving therapeutic concentrations in the brain and eye, shortening duration, eliminating tissue cysts from the host, safety in pregnancy, and creating a formulation that is inexpensive and practical for use in resource-poor areas of the world. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made in identifying and developing new compounds for the treatment of toxoplasmosis. Unlike clinically used medicines that were repurposed for toxoplasmosis, these compounds have been optimized for efficacy against toxoplasmosis during preclinical development. Medicines with enhanced efficacy as well as features that address the unique aspects of toxoplasmosis have the potential to greatly improve toxoplasmosis therapy. This review discusses the facets of toxoplasmosis that are pertinent to drug design and the advances, challenges, and current status of preclinical drug research for toxoplasmosis. PMID:28182168

  9. HIV Vaccine: Recent Advances, Current Roadblocks, and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muni Rubens

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV/AIDS is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. In spite of successful interventions and treatment protocols, an HIV vaccine would be the ultimate prevention and control strategy. Ever since identification of HIV/AIDS, there have been meticulous efforts for vaccine development. The specific aim of this paper is to review recent vaccine efficacy trials and associated advancements and discuss the current challenges and future directions. Recombinant DNA technologies greatly facilitated development of many viral products which were later incorporated into vectors for effective vaccines. Over the years, a number of scientific approaches have gained popularity and include the induction of neutralizing antibodies in late 1980s, induction of CD8 T cell in early 1990s, and combination approaches currently. Scientists have hypothesized that stimulation of right sequences of somatic hypermutations could induce broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs capable of effective neutralization and viral elimination. Studies have shown that a number of host and viral factors affect these processes. Similarly, eliciting specific CD8 T cells immune responses through DNA vaccines hold future promises. In summary, future studies should focus on the continuous fight between host immune responses and ever-evasive viral factors for effective vaccines.

  10. Hepatocellular carcinoma:current management and recent advances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan-Yee Lau; Eric C. H. Lai

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major health problem worldwide. It is the iffth most common cancer in the world, and the third most common cause of cancer-related death. Without speciifc treatment, the prognosis is very poor. The goal of management is"cancer control"-a reduction in its incidence and mortality as well as an improvement in the quality of life of patients with HCC and their families. This article aims to review the current management of HCC and its recent advances. DATA SOURCES:A MEDLINE database search was performed to identify relevant article using the keywords"hepatocellular carcinoma", "hepatectomy", "liver transplantation", and"local ablative therapy". Additional papers and book chapters were identiifed by a manual search of the references from the key articles. RESULTS:Liver resection and liver transplantation remain the options that give the best chance of a cure. Recent evidence suggests that local ablative therapy may offer comparable survival results in patients with small HCC, and preserved liver function. Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is the most promising palliative modality for unresectable HCC, but other techniques, such as transarterial radioembolization (TARE), and local ablative therapy, have also shown comparable results. CONCLUSIONS:Early diagnosis of HCC remains a key goal in improving the prognosis of patients. During the last two decades, operative mortality and surgical outcome of liver resection and liver transplantation for HCC have improved. Progress also has been made in multi-modality therapy which can increase the chance of survival and improve the quality of life for patients with advanced HCC.

  11. Advanced Curation: Solving Current and Future Sample Return Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, M.; Calaway, M.; Evans, C.; McCubbin, F.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Curation is a wide-ranging and comprehensive research and development effort at NASA Johnson Space Center that identifies and remediates sample related issues. For current collections, Advanced Curation investigates new cleaning, verification, and analytical techniques to assess their suitability for improving curation processes. Specific needs are also assessed for future sample return missions. For each need, a written plan is drawn up to achieve the requirement. The plan draws while upon current Curation practices, input from Curators, the analytical expertise of the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) team, and suitable standards maintained by ISO, IEST, NIST and other institutions. Additionally, new technologies are adopted on the bases of need and availability. Implementation plans are tested using customized trial programs with statistically robust courses of measurement, and are iterated if necessary until an implementable protocol is established. Upcoming and potential NASA missions such as OSIRIS-REx, the Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM), sample return missions in the New Frontiers program, and Mars sample return (MSR) all feature new difficulties and specialized sample handling requirements. The Mars 2020 mission in particular poses a suite of challenges since the mission will cache martian samples for possible return to Earth. In anticipation of future MSR, the following problems are among those under investigation: What is the most efficient means to achieve the less than 1.0 ng/sq cm total organic carbon (TOC) cleanliness required for all sample handling hardware? How do we maintain and verify cleanliness at this level? The Mars 2020 Organic Contamination Panel (OCP) predicts that organic carbon, if present, will be present at the "one to tens" of ppb level in martian near-surface samples. The same samples will likely contain wt% perchlorate salts, or approximately 1,000,000x as much perchlorate oxidizer as organic carbon

  12. The immutability of the critical current under any sample cross-sectional form modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogolyubov, N.A. [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, Lavrent' eva 3, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: bna@che.nsk.su

    2008-11-24

    The temperature and size dependences of the critical currents in bismuth-based high-temperature superconducting ceramic samples consisting of randomly oriented grains have been studied in zero magnetic field. It is shown that the critical current is a function of the sample cross-sectional area only. At constant sample cross-sectional area the value of the critical current is independent of any variation of a sample cross-sectional shape. At the same time the distributions of the critical current density and induced magnetic field in ceramics are functions of the sample cross-sectional shape. These values very in accordance with a change of the sample cross-sectional shape (at constant cross-sectional area i.e. at constant value of the critical current). The field and current distributions in the rectangular sample are reported.

  13. Preface: Special Topic Section on Advanced Electronic Structure Methods for Solids and Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaelides, Angelos, E-mail: angelos.michaelides@ucl.ac.uk [London Centre for Nanotechnology and Department of Chemistry, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Martinez, Todd J. [Department of Chemistry and the PULSE Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Alavi, Ali [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany and Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom); Kresse, Georg [Faculty of Physics and Center for Computational Materials Science, Department of Physics, University of Vienna, Sensengasse 8/12, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Manby, Frederick R. [Centre for Computational Chemistry, School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-14

    This Special Topic section on Advanced Electronic Structure Methods for Solids and Surfaces contains a collection of research papers that showcase recent advances in the high accuracy prediction of materials and surface properties. It provides a timely snapshot of a growing field that is of broad importance to chemistry, physics, and materials science.

  14. Operational advances in ring current modeling using RAM-SCB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welling, Daniel T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jordanova, Vania K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zaharia, Sorin G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morley, Steven K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-03

    The Ring current Atmosphere interaction Model with Self-Consistently calculated 3D Magnetic field (RAM-SCB) combines a kinetic model of the ring current with a force-balanced model of the magnetospheric magnetic field to create an inner magnetospheric model that is magnetically self consistent. RAM-SCB produces a wealth of outputs that are valuable to space weather applications. For example, the anisotropic particle distribution of the KeV-energy population calculated by the code is key for predicting surface charging on spacecraft. Furthermore, radiation belt codes stand to benefit substantially from RAM-SCB calculated magnetic field values and plasma wave growth rates - both important for determining the evolution of relativistic electron populations. RAM-SCB is undergoing development to bring these benefits to the space weather community. Data-model validation efforts are underway to assess the performance of the system. 'Virtual Satellite' capability has been added to yield satellite-specific particle distribution and magnetic field output. The code's outer boundary is being expanded to 10 Earth Radii to encompass previously neglected geosynchronous orbits and allow the code to be driven completely by either empirical or first-principles based inputs. These advances are culminating towards a new, real-time version of the code, rtRAM-SCB, that can monitor the inner magnetosphere conditions on both a global and spacecraft-specific level. This paper summarizes these new features as well as the benefits they provide the space weather community.

  15. Current advances in synchrotron radiation instrumentation for MX experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, Robin L.; Juanhuix, Jordi; Fuchs, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Following pioneering work 40 years ago, synchrotron beamlines dedicated to macromolecular crystallography (MX) have improved in almost every aspect as instrumentation has evolved. Beam sizes and crystal dimensions are now on the single micron scale while data can be collected from proteins with molecular weights over 10 MDa and from crystals with unit cell dimensions over 1000 Å. Furthermore it is possible to collect a complete data set in seconds, and obtain the resulting structure in minutes. The impact of MX synchrotron beamlines and their evolution is reflected in their scientific output, and MX is now the method of choice for a variety of aims from ligand binding to structure determination of membrane proteins, viruses and ribosomes, resulting in a much deeper understanding of the machinery of life. A main driving force of beamline evolution have been advances in almost every aspect of the instrumentation comprising a synchrotron beamline. In this review we aim to provide an overview of the current status of instrumentation at modern MX experiments. The most critical optical components are discussed, as are aspects of endstation design, sample delivery, visualisation and positioning, the sample environment, beam shaping, detectors and data acquisition and processing.

  16. Current Pharmacological Advances in the Treatment of Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andry Papastylianou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest is defined as the sudden cessation of spontaneous ventilation and circulation. Within 15 seconds of cardiac arrest, the patient loses consciousness, electroencephalogram becomes flat after 30 seconds, pupils dilate fully after 60 seconds, and cerebral damage takes place within 90–300 seconds. It is essential to act immediately as irreversible damage can occur in a short time. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is an attempt to restore spontaneous circulation through a broad range of interventions which are early defibrillation, high-quality and uninterrupted chest compressions, advanced airway interventions, and pharmacological interventions. Drugs should be considered only after initial shocks have been delivered (when indicated and chest compressions and ventilation have been started. During cardiopulmonary resuscitation, no specific drug therapy has been shown to improve survival to hospital discharge after cardiac arrest, and only few drugs have a proven benefit for short-term survival. This paper reviews current pharmacological treatment of cardiac arrest. There are three groups of drugs relevant to the management of cardiac arrest: vasopressors, antiarrhythmics, and other drugs such as sodium bicarbonate, calcium, magnesium, atropine, fibrinolytic drugs, and corticosteroids.

  17. Advanced Ceramics for NASA's Current and Future Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.

    2006-01-01

    Ceramic composites and monolithics are widely recognized by NASA as enabling materials for a variety of aerospace applications. Compared to traditional materials, ceramic materials offer higher specific strength which can enable lighter weight vehicle and engine concepts, increased payloads, and increased operational margins. Additionally, the higher temperature capabilities of these materials allows for increased operating temperatures within the engine and on the vehicle surfaces which can lead to improved engine efficiency and vehicle performance. To meet the requirements of the next generation of both rocket and air-breathing engines, NASA is actively pursuing the development and maturation of a variety of ceramic materials. Anticipated applications for carbide, nitride and oxide-based ceramics will be presented. The current status of these materials and needs for future goals will be outlined. NASA also understands the importance of teaming with other government agencies and industry to optimize these materials and advance them to the level of maturation needed for eventual vehicle and engine demonstrations. A number of successful partnering efforts with NASA and industry will be highlighted.

  18. Current advances in gene therapy for the treatment of genodermatoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Heather A; McMillan, James R; Qiao, Hongjiang; Akiyama, Masashi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2009-12-01

    Gene therapy provides the possibility of long term treatment for the severest of congenital disorders. In this review we will examine the recent advances in gene therapy for genodermatoses. Congenital diseases of the skin exhibit a wide range of severity and underlying causes and there are many possible therapeutic avenues. Gene therapy approaches can follow three paths-in vivo, ex vivo and fetal gene therapy, though the later is currently theoretical only it can provide potential results for even the most severe congenital diseases. All approaches utilize the many different vector systems available, including viral and the emerging use of non- viral integrating vectors. In addition, the use of RNAi based techniques to prevent dominant mutant protein expression has been explored as a therapy for specific dominant disorders such as keratin mutation disorders. Progress has been rapid in the past few years with some initial successful clinical trials reported. However, there are still some issues surrounding long term expression, transgene sustainability and safety issues that need to be addressed to further shift from experimental to clinically therapeutic applications. With the continuing development, merger and refinement of existing techniques there is an ever increasing likelihood of gene therapies becoming available for the more severe genodermatoses within the next decade or shortly thereafter.

  19. Medicinal mushroom science: Current perspectives, advances, evidences, and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon P Wasser

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The main target of the present review is to draw attention to the current perspectives, advances, evidences, challenges, and future development of medicinal mushroom science in the 21 st century. Medicinal mushrooms and fungi are thought to possess approximately 130 medicinal functions, including antitumor, immunomodulating, antioxidant, radical scavenging, cardiovascular, anti-hypercholesterolemic, antiviral, antibacterial, anti-parasitic, antifungal, detoxification, hepatoprotective, and antidiabetic effects. Many, if not all, higher Basidiomycetes mushrooms contain biologically active compounds in fruit bodies, cultured mycelium, and cultured broth. Special attention is paid to mushroom polysaccharides. The data on mushroom polysaccharides and different secondary metabolites are summarized for approximately 700 species of higher hetero- and homobasidiomycetes. Numerous bioactive polysaccharides or polysaccharide-protein complexes from the medicinal mushrooms described appear to enhance innate and cell-mediated immune responses, and exhibit antitumor activities in animals and humans. Whilst the mechanism of their antitumor actions is still not completely understood, stimulation and modulation of key host immune responses by these mushroom compounds appear central. Polysaccharides and low-molecular-weight secondary metabolites are particularly important due to their antitumor and immunostimulating properties. Several of the mushroom compounds have been subjected to Phase I, II, and III clinical trials, and are used extensively and successfully in Asia to treat various cancers and other diseases. Special attention is given to many important unsolved problems in the study of medicinal mushrooms.

  20. Current Advances in Detection and Treatment of Babesiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosqueda, J; Olvera-Ramírez, A; Aguilar-Tipacamú, G; Cantó, GJ

    2012-01-01

    Babesiosis is a disease with a world-wide distribution affecting many species of mammals principally cattle and man. The major impact occurs in the cattle industry where bovine babesiosis has had a huge economic effect due to loss of meat and beef production of infected animals and death. Nowadays to those costs there must be added the high cost of tick control, disease detection, prevention and treatment. In almost a century and a quarter since the first report of the disease, the truth is: there is no a safe and efficient vaccine available, there are limited chemotherapeutic choices and few low-cost, reliable and fast detection methods. Detection and treatment of babesiosis are important tools to control babesiosis. Microscopy detection methods are still the cheapest and fastest methods used to identify Babesia parasites although their sensitivity and specificity are limited. Newer immunological methods are being developed and they offer faster, more sensitive and more specific options to conventional methods, although the direct immunological diagnoses of parasite antigens in host tissues are still missing. Detection methods based on nucleic acid identification and their amplification are the most sensitive and reliable techniques available today; importantly, most of those methodologies were developed before the genomics and bioinformatics era, which leaves ample room for optimization. For years, babesiosis treatment has been based on the use of very few drugs like imidocarb or diminazene aceturate. Recently, several pharmacological compounds were developed and evaluated, offering new options to control the disease. With the complete sequence of the Babesia bovis genome and the B. bigemina genome project in progress, the post-genomic era brings a new light on the development of diagnosis methods and new chemotherapy targets. In this review, we will present the current advances in detection and treatment of babesiosis in cattle and other animals, with additional

  1. 14 CFR Section 15 - Objective Classification-Income Taxes for Current Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Objective Classification-Income Taxes for Current Period Section 15 Section 15 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF... CERTIFICATED AIR CARRIERS Profit and Loss Classification Section 15 Objective Classification—Income Taxes for...

  2. Advanced Neutron Source Cross Section Libraries (ANSL-V): ENDF/B-V based multigroup cross-section libraries for advanced neutron source (ANS) reactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, W.E. III; Arwood, J.W.; Greene, N.M.; Moses, D.L.; Petrie, L.M.; Primm, R.T. III; Slater, C.O.; Westfall, R.M.; Wright, R.Q.

    1990-09-01

    Pseudo-problem-independent, multigroup cross-section libraries were generated to support Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Reactor design studies. The ANS is a proposed reactor which would be fueled with highly enriched uranium and cooled with heavy water. The libraries, designated ANSL-V (Advanced Neutron Source Cross Section Libraries based on ENDF/B-V), are data bases in AMPX master format for subsequent generation of problem-dependent cross-sections for use with codes such as KENO, ANISN, XSDRNPM, VENTURE, DOT, DORT, TORT, and MORSE. Included in ANSL-V are 99-group and 39-group neutron, 39-neutron-group 44-gamma-ray-group secondary gamma-ray production (SGRP), 44-group gamma-ray interaction (GRI), and coupled, 39-neutron group 44-gamma-ray group (CNG) cross-section libraries. The neutron and SGRP libraries were generated primarily from ENDF/B-V data; the GRI library was generated from DLC-99/HUGO data, which is recognized as the ENDF/B-V photon interaction data. Modules from the AMPX and NJOY systems were used to process the multigroup data. Validity of selected data from the fine- and broad-group neutron libraries was satisfactorily tested in performance parameter calculations.

  3. Technological advances in perioperative monitoring: Current concepts and clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilkoti, Geetanjali; Wadhwa, Rachna; Saxena, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Minimal mandatory monitoring in the perioperative period recommended by Association of Anesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland and American Society of Anesthesiologists are universally acknowledged and has become an integral part of the anesthesia practice. The technologies in perioperative monitoring have advanced, and the availability and clinical applications have multiplied exponentially. Newer monitoring techniques include depth of anesthesia monitoring, goal-directed fluid therapy, transesophageal echocardiography, advanced neurological monitoring, improved alarm system and technological advancement in objective pain assessment. Various factors that need to be considered with the use of improved monitoring techniques are their validation data, patient outcome, safety profile, cost-effectiveness, awareness of the possible adverse events, knowledge of technical principle and ability of the convenient routine handling. In this review, we will discuss the new monitoring techniques in anesthesia, their advantages, deficiencies, limitations, their comparison to the conventional methods and their effect on patient outcome, if any.

  4. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are cross-sectionally associated with insulin secretion in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forbes, Josephine M; Sourris, Karly C; de Courten, Maximilian;

    2013-01-01

    It has been postulated that chronic exposure to high levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), in particular from dietary sources, can impair insulin secretion. In the present study, we investigated the cross-sectional relationship between AGEs and acute insulin secretion during an intrav......It has been postulated that chronic exposure to high levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), in particular from dietary sources, can impair insulin secretion. In the present study, we investigated the cross-sectional relationship between AGEs and acute insulin secretion during...

  5. First Measurement of Charged Current Cross Sections at HERA with Longitudinally Polarised Positrons

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A; Anthonis, T; Antunovic, B; Aplin, S; Asmone, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Babaev, A; Backovic, S; Bähr, J; Baghdasaryan, A; Baranov, P; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Baudrand, S; Baumgartner, S; Becker, J; Beckingham, M; Behnke, O; Behrendt, O; Belousov, A; Berger, C; Berger, N; Bizot, J C; Boenig, M O; Boudry, V; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brisson, V; Bruncko, Dusan; Büsser, F W; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cox, B E; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Dau, W D; Daum, K; De Boer, Y; Delcourt, B; Del Degan, M; de Roeck, A; Desch, Klaus; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichler, R; Eisele, F; Elsen, E; Erdmann, W; Essenov, S; Falkewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Finke, L; Fleischer, M; Fleischmann, P; Flucke, G; Fomenko, A; Foresti, I; Franke, G; Frisson, T; Gabathuler, E; Garutti, E; Gayler, J; Gerlich, C; Ghazaryan, S; Ginzburgskaya, S; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Görlich, L; Goettlich, M; Gogitidze, N; Gorbounov, S; Goyon, C; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Gregori, M; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Gwilliam, C; Haidt, D; Hajduk, L; Hansson, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henderson, R C W; Henschel, H; Herrera-Corral, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R P; Hovhannisyan, A; Hreus, T; Hussain, S; Ibbotson, M; Ismail, M; Jacquet, M; Janauschek, L; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jönsson, L B; Johnson, D P; Jung, A W; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Klimkovich, T; Kluge, T; Knies, G; Knutsson, A; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Krüger, K; Kuckens, J; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastoviicka, T; Lastoviicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Lindfeld, L; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Lobodzinska, E; Loktionova, N; López-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lucaci-Timoce, A I; Lüders, H; Lüke, D; Lux, T; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malden, N; Malinovskii, E I; Mangano, S; Marage, P; Marshall, R; Martisikova, M; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Meer, D; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Milstead, D; Mladenov, D; Mohamed, A; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, M U; Müller, K; Murn, P; Nankov, K; Naroska, Beate; Naumann, T; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nozicka, M; Oganezov, R; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Papadopoulou, T D; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Peng, H; Pérez, E; Perez-Astudillo, D; Perieanu, A; Petrukhin, A; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Portheault, B; Povh, B; Prideaux, P; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Reisert, B; Reimer, P; Rimmer, A; Risler, C; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salvaire, F; Sankey, D P C; Sauvan, E; Schatzel, S; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schöning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sedlak, K; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Sloan, T; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Yu; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stiewe, J; Strauch, I; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Tomasz, F; Traynor, D; Truöl, P; Tsakov, I; Tsipolitis, G; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Tzamariudaki, E; Urban, K; Urban, M; Usik, A; Utkin, D; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas-Trevino, A; Vazdik, Ya A; Veelken, C; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; Wacker, K; Wagner, J; Weber, G; Weber, R; Wegener, D; Werner, C; Wessels, M; Wessling, B; Wigmore, C; Wissing, C; Wolf, R; Wünsch, E; Xella, S M; Yan, W; Yeganov, V; Zaicek, J; Zaleisak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhelezov, A; Zhokin, A; Zhu, Y C; Zimmermann, J; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F

    2006-01-01

    Data taken with positrons of different longitudinal polarisation states in collision with unpolarised protons at HERA are used to measure the total cross sections of the charged current process, e^+ p \\to \\bar{\

  6. A field guide to current advances in paediatric movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira-Moriyama, Laura; Lin, Jean-Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Recent advances in neurogenetics, neuroimmunology and nonpharmacological treatments have reshaped the field of paediatric movement disorders. In this review, we put recent findings into context providing a framework to enable navigation of the expanding literature in this field. Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis has proven to be a significant cause of treatable movement disorder in children and to present a multifaceted link with herpes simplex encephalitis. The growing use of next-generation sequencing in both research and clinical practice has unravelled an expanding number of genes related to paediatric movement disorders as well as expanding spectrums of variable expressivity and phenotypic pleiotropy for various genes. Behavioural therapies have been proven efficacious in Tourette's syndrome and are likely to be helpful in complex motor stereotypies. Management of dystonia remains a clinical priority and challenge. The rapid advance of translational medicine has had major impacts on the field of paediatric movement disorders including diagnosis and treatment of these conditions.

  7. Advanced launcher for lower hybrid current drive on Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibet, Ph.; Kazarian, F.; Agarici, G.; Deck, C.; Doceul, L.; Froissard, Ph.; Garampon, L.; Goniche, M.; Mailloux, J.; Portafaix, C.; Rey, G.; Samaille, F.; Simoncini, J.; Tonon, G. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Durand, D.; Vial, A.; Rousset, E. [SICN, Centre Technique de Veurey (France)

    1998-07-01

    A new advanced launcher is being built for LHCD on Tore Supra in order to inject 4 MW for pulse of 1000 s at 3.7 GHz and a power density of 25 MW/m{sup 2}. After a description of the antenna, the construction procedure is depicted. The main constraints are given. Results of the RF tests of the first multijunction andmode converter are presented. (author)

  8. Cancer and Radiation Therapy: Current Advances and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajamanickam Baskar, Kuo Ann Lee, Richard Yeo, Kheng-Wei Yeoh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years remarkable progress has been made towards the understanding of proposed hallmarks of cancer development and treatment. However with its increasing incidence, the clinical management of cancer continues to be a challenge for the 21st century. Treatment modalities comprise of radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and hormonal therapy. Radiation therapy remains an important component of cancer treatment with approximately 50% of all cancer patients receiving radiation therapy during their course of illness; it contributes towards 40% of curative treatment for cancer. The main goal of radiation therapy is to deprive cancer cells of their multiplication (cell division potential. Celebrating a century of advances since Marie Curie won her second Nobel Prize for her research into radium, 2011 has been designated the Year of Radiation therapy in the UK. Over the last 100 years, ongoing advances in the techniques of radiation treatment and progress made in understanding the biology of cancer cell responses to radiation will endeavor to increase the survival and reduce treatment side effects for cancer patients. In this review, principles, application and advances in radiation therapy with their biological end points are discussed.

  9. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are cross-sectionally associated with insulin secretion in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Josephine M; Sourris, Karly C; de Courten, Maximilian P J; Dougherty, Sonia L; Chand, Vibhasha; Lyons, Jasmine G; Bertovic, David; Coughlan, Melinda T; Schlaich, Markus P; Soldatos, Georgia; Cooper, Mark E; Straznicky, Nora E; Kingwell, Bronwyn A; de Courten, Barbora

    2014-02-01

    It has been postulated that chronic exposure to high levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), in particular from dietary sources, can impair insulin secretion. In the present study, we investigated the cross-sectional relationship between AGEs and acute insulin secretion during an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and following a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in healthy humans. We report the cross-sectional association between circulating AGE concentrations and insulin secretory function in healthy humans (17 F: 27 M, aged 30 ± 10 years) with a wide range of BMI (24.6-31.0 kg/m(2)). Higher circulating concentrations of AGEs were related to increased first phase insulin secretion during IVGTT (r = 0.43; p AGE (RAGE) isoforms (r = -0.39; p < 0.01). In conclusion, in healthy humans, we show a cross-sectional association between advanced glycation end products and acute insulin secretion during glucose tolerance testing.

  10. Advanced induction motor drive control with single current sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adžić Evgenije M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes induction motor drive control method which uses minimal number of sensors, providing only DC-link current as a feedback signal. Improved DC-link current sampling scheme and modified asymmetrical switching pattern cancels characteristic waveform errors which exist in all three reconstructed motor line-currents. Motor linecurrent harmonic content is reduced to an acceptable level, eliminating torque and speed oscillations which were inherent for conventional single sensor drives. Consequently, use of single current sensor and line-current reconstruction technique is no longer acceptable only for low and medium performance drives, but also for drives where priority is obtaining a highly accurate, stable and fast response. Proposed control algorithm is validated using induction motor drive hardware prototype based on TMS320F2812 digital signal processor. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 042004 and by the Provincial Secretariat for Science and Technological Development of AP Vojvodina under contract No. 114-451-3508/2013-04

  11. Charged-current inclusive neutrino cross sections in the SuperScaling model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, M. V., E-mail: martin.inrne@gmail.com [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Grupo de Física Nuclear, Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid E-28040 (Spain); Megias, G. D.; Caballero, J. A. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Sevilla, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); González-Jiménez, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Moreno, O.; Donnelly, T. W. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Laboratory for Nuclear Science and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Barbaro, M. B. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Torino and INFN, Sezione di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Antonov, A. N. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Moya de Guerra, E.; Udías, J. M. [Grupo de Física Nuclear, Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid E-28040 (Spain)

    2016-03-25

    SuperScaling model (SuSA) predictions to neutrino-induced charged-current π{sup +} production in the Δ-resonance region are explored under MiniBooNE experimental conditions. The SuSA charged-current π{sup +} results are in good agreement with data on neutrino flux-averaged double-differential cross sections. The SuSA model for quasielastic scattering and its extension to the pion production region are used for predictions of charged-current inclusive neutrino-nucleus cross sections. Results are also compared with the T2K experimental data for inclusive scattering.

  12. Model inverse calculation of current distributions in the cross-section of a superconducting cable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usak, P. [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Department of Electrodynamics of Superconductors, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia)]. E-mail: elekusak@savba.sk; Sastry, P.V.P.S.S. [Center for Advanced Power Systems, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Schwartz, J. [Center for Advanced Power Systems, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)

    2006-02-01

    The solution of an inverse problem for magnetic field mapping, and the related current distribution in the cross-section of a superconducting cable are generally not unique. Nevertheless, for many natural configurations of a transport current distribution in the cross-section of a superconducting cable, the resulting magnetic field can be used for the reconstruction of a current distribution even in the presence of noise to a degree. We show it using several examples. To perform the inverse calculation, the Tichonov method of regularization was successfully applied. The approach was applied for superconducting cables, but its application is general.

  13. Current Status and Advancements in Research of Plantation Nutrient Cycling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Run; ZHANG Changshun; SUN Yongyu

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces concepts and current research status of plantation nutrients cyclings, and analyzes main contents of plantation nutrients cycling as nutrients contents, accumulation and distribution of nutrients elements, understory species and forest litter. At the same time, the paper summarizes the problems in plantation nutrients cycling and its prospects.

  14. Human toxocariasis: current advances in diagnostics, treatment, and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Gustavo Marçal Schmidt Garcia; Telmo, Paula de Lima; Mendonça, Marcelo; Moreira, Angela Nunes; McBride, Alan John Alexander; Scaini, Carlos James; Conceição, Fabricio Rochedo

    2014-09-01

    Toxocariasis is a neglected zoonosis caused by the nematodes Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati. This disease is widespread in many countries, reaching high prevalence independently of the economic conditions. However, the true number of cases of toxocariasis is likely to be underestimated owing to the lack of adequate surveillance programs. Although some diagnostic tests are available, their sensitivity and specificity need to be improved. In addition, treatment options for toxocariasis are limited and are non-specific. Toxocariasis is listed as one of the five most important neglected diseases by the CDC. This review presents recent advances related to the control of toxocariasis, including new immunodiagnostics, therapies, and drug formulations, as well as novel interventions using DNA vaccines, immunomodulators, and probiotics.

  15. Current advances in T-cell-based cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingjun; Yin, Bingnan; Wang, Helen Y; Wang, Rong-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide; due to the lack of ideal cancer biomarkers for early detection or diagnosis, most patients present with late-stage disease at the time of diagnosis, thus limiting the potential for successful treatment. Traditional cancer treatments, including surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy, have demonstrated very limited efficacy for patients with late-stage disease. Therefore, innovative and effective cancer treatments are urgently needed for cancer patients with late-stage and refractory disease. Cancer immunotherapy, particularly adoptive cell transfer, has shown great promise in the treatment of patients with late-stage disease, including those who are refractory to standard therapies. In this review, we will highlight recent advances and discuss future directions in adoptive cell transfer based cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Advanced test accelerator: a high-current induction linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, E.G.; Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1982-11-01

    The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) is a linear induction accelerator being built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The aim of the ATA, together with its associated physics program is the research and development necessary to resolve whether particle-beam propagation is possible. Since the accelerator is the tool needed to do the basic propagation experiment, many of its design parameters are specified by the physics. The accelerator parameters are: 50 MeV, 10 kA, 70 ns pulse width (FWHM), and a 1 kHz rep-rate during a ten-pulse burst. In addition, beam quality and pulse-to-pulse repeatability must be excellent. The unique features of the accelerator are the 10 kA beam and the 1 kHz burst frequency.

  17. Current advances in the cognitive neuroscience of music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitin, Daniel J; Tirovolas, Anna K

    2009-03-01

    The study of music perception and cognition is one of the oldest topics in experimental psychology. The last 20 years have seen an increased interest in understanding the functional neuroanatomy of music processing in humans, using a variety of technologies including fMRI, PET, ERP, MEG, and lesion studies. We review current findings in the context of a rich intellectual history of research, organized by the cognitive systems underlying different aspects of human musical behavior. We pay special attention to the perception of components of musical processing, musical structure, laterality effects, cultural issues, links between music and movement, emotional processing, expertise, and the amusias. Current trends are noted, such as the increased interest in evolutionary origins of music and comparisons of music and language. The review serves to demonstrate the important role that music can play in informing broad theories of higher order cognitive processes such as music in humans.

  18. Laboratory markers in ulcerative colitis: Current insights and future advances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michele; Cioffi; Antonella; De; Rosa; Rosalba; Serao; Ilaria; Picone; Maria; Teresa; Vietri

    2015-01-01

    of molecular biology tools(microarrays,proteomics and nanotechnology)have revolutionised the field of the biomarker discovery.The advances in bioinformatics coupled with cross-disciplinary collaborations have greatly enhanced our ability to retrieve,characterize and analyse large amounts of data generated by the technological advances.The techniques available for biomarkers development are genomics(single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping,pharmacogenetics and gene expression analyses)and proteomics.In the future,the additionof new serological markers will add significant benefit.Correlating serologic markers with genotypes and clinical phenotypes should enhance our understanding of pathophysiology of UC.

  19. Advanced metal alloy systems for massive high-current photocathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, V. G.; Kondrashev, A. I.; Maksimchuk, I. N.

    2010-03-01

    The physical principles of precise alloying are formulated with the aim of increasing the low quantum efficiency (QE) of suitable simple metals (Mg, Al, Cu) as well as of decreasing their electron work function ( e φ) in the UV spectral range. The new approach provides valuable information for elucidating the origin of photoemission enhancement in bulk metal-based alloy systems. Bulk in-situ nanoclustering promises to be the most effective way of producing a much higher QE and a lower e φ in simple metals. In this article we show that the quantum efficiency of the metal-based alloys Mg-Ba, Al-Li, and Cu-BaO is considerably higher than the simple metals Mg, Al, and Cu, respectively. The spectral characteristics of the Mg-Ba, Al-Li and Cu-BaO systems obey the well-known Fowler square law for a near-free-electron model. The advanced metal alloys systems are promising photocathode materials usable for generation of high brightness electron beams.

  20. Multi-jet cross sections in charged current e{sup {+-}}p scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2008-02-15

    Jet cross sections were measured in charged current deep inelastic e{sup {+-}}p scattering at high boson virtualities Q{sup 2} with the ZEUS detector at HERA II using an integrated luminosity of 0.36 fb{sup -1}. Differential cross sections are presented for inclusive-jet production as functions of Q{sup 2}, Bjorken x and the jet transverse energy and pseudorapidity. The dijet invariant mass cross section is also presented. Observation of three- and four-jet events in charged-current e{sup {+-}}p processes is reported for the first time. The predictions of next-to-leading-order (NLO) QCD calculations are compared to the measurements. The measured inclusive-jet cross sections are well described in shape and normalization by the NLO predictions. The data have the potential to constrain the u and d valence quark distributions in the proton if included as input to global fits. (orig.)

  1. Advances in Current Rating Techniques for Flexible Printed Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Twist Capsule Assemblies are power transfer devices commonly used in spacecraft mechanisms that require electrical signals to be passed across a rotating interface. Flexible printed circuits (flex tapes, see Figure 2) are used to carry the electrical signals in these devices. Determining the current rating for a given trace (conductor) size can be challenging. Because of the thermal conditions present in this environment the most appropriate approach is to assume that the only means by which heat is removed from the trace is thru the conductor itself, so that when the flex tape is long the temperature rise in the trace can be extreme. While this technique represents a worst-case thermal situation that yields conservative current ratings, this conservatism may lead to overly cautious designs when not all traces are used at their full rated capacity. A better understanding of how individual traces behave when they are not all in use is the goal of this research. In the testing done in support of this paper, a representative flex tape used for a flight Solar Array Drive Assembly (SADA) application was tested by energizing individual traces (conductors in the tape) in a vacuum chamber and the temperatures of the tape measured using both fine-gauge thermocouples and infrared thermographic imaging. We find that traditional derating schemes used for bundles of wires do not apply for the configuration tested. We also determine that single active traces located in the center of a flex tape operate at lower temperatures than those on the outside edges.

  2. Artificial Mitochondria Transfer: Current Challenges, Advances, and Future Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Caicedo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this review is to outline existing artificial mitochondria transfer techniques and to describe the future steps necessary to develop new therapeutic applications in medicine. Inspired by the symbiotic origin of mitochondria and by the cell’s capacity to transfer these organelles to damaged neighbors, many researchers have developed procedures to artificially transfer mitochondria from one cell to another. The techniques currently in use today range from simple coincubations of isolated mitochondria and recipient cells to the use of physical approaches to induce integration. These methods mimic natural mitochondria transfer. In order to use mitochondrial transfer in medicine, we must answer key questions about how to replicate aspects of natural transport processes to improve current artificial transfer methods. Another priority is to determine the optimum quantity and cell/tissue source of the mitochondria in order to induce cell reprogramming or tissue repair, in both in vitro and in vivo applications. Additionally, it is important that the field explores how artificial mitochondria transfer techniques can be used to treat different diseases and how to navigate the ethical issues in such procedures. Without a doubt, mitochondria are more than mere cell power plants, as we continue to discover their potential to be used in medicine.

  3. Measurement of the muon-neutrino charged-current cross section on water with zero pions

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Tianlu

    2016-01-01

    The Tokai to Kamioka (T2K) experiment is a 295-km long-baseline neutrino experiment aimed towards the measurement of neutrino oscillation parameters ${\\theta}_{13}$ and ${\\theta}_{23}$. Precise measurement of these parameters requires accurate knowledge of neutrino cross sections. We present a flux-averaged double differential measurement of the charged-current cross section on water with zero pions in the final state using the T2K off-axis near detector, ND280. A selection of $\

  4. Total Cross Sections at current/Future Colliders, conventional models and QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Fazal-e-Aleem, M

    1999-01-01

    Rise in total cross sections for elastic scattering generated immense interest both for experimental measurements and theoretical investigations. How will total cross section behave at LHC and Cosmic Ray energies is therefore in the limelight of our future measurements. Theoretical studies become even more interesting when we take into consideration the ratio of real and imaginary parts of the scattering amplitudes. We will briefly undertake the current results and future prospects in the light of conventional as well as QCD-based phenomenology.

  5. Current advancements and challenges in soil-root interactions modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Huber, Katrin; Abesha, Betiglu; Meunier, Felicien; Leitner, Daniel; Roose, Tiina; Javaux, Mathieu; Vanderborght, Jan; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Roots change their surrounding soil chemically, physically and biologically. This includes changes in soil moisture and solute concentration, the exudation of organic substances into the rhizosphere, increased growth of soil microorganisms, or changes in soil structure. The fate of water and solutes in the root zone is highly determined by these root-soil interactions. Mathematical models of soil-root systems in combination with non-invasive techniques able to characterize root systems are a promising tool to understand and predict the behaviour of water and solutes in the root zone. With respect to different fields of applications, predictive mathematical models can contribute to the solution of optimal control problems in plant recourse efficiency. This may result in significant gains in productivity, efficiency and environmental sustainability in various land use activities. Major challenges include the coupling of model parameters of the relevant processes with the surrounding environment such as temperature, nutrient concentration or soil water content. A further challenge is the mathematical description of the different spatial and temporal scales involved. This includes in particular the branched structures formed by root systems or the external mycelium of mycorrhizal fungi. Here, reducing complexity as well as bridging between spatial scales is required. Furthermore, the combination of experimental and mathematical techniques may advance the field enormously. Here, the use of root system, soil and rhizosphere models is presented through a number of modelling case studies, including image based modelling of phosphate uptake by a root with hairs, model-based optimization of root architecture for phosphate uptake from soil, upscaling of rhizosphere models, modelling root growth in structured soil, and the effect of root hydraulic architecture on plant water uptake efficiency and drought resistance.

  6. Current status of bevacizumab in advanced ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomao F

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Federica Tomao,1,* Anselmo Papa,2,* Luigi Rossi,2 Davide Caruso,2 Pierluigi Benedetti Panici,1 Martina Venezia,2 Silverio Tomao21Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Policlinico "Umberto I," Rome, Italy; 2Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Oncology Unit, "ICOT," Latina, Italy*Authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological cancer, mainly because of the delay in diagnosis. Recently, much effort has been put into investigating and introducing novel targeted agents into clinical practice, with the aim of improving prognosis and quality of life. Angiogenesis is a possible target. The aim of this review is to investigate the most common molecular pathways of angiogenesis, which have provided novel targets for tailored therapy in patients with ovarian cancer. These therapeutic strategies include monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine-kinase inhibitors. These drugs have as molecular targets vascular endothelial growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, platelet-derived growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, and angiopoietin. Bevacizumab was investigated in several Phase III studies, with interesting results. Today, there is strong evidence for introducing bevacizumab in the treatment of patients with advanced and recurrent ovarian cancer. Nevertheless, further investigations and large clinical trials are needed to understand the safety and effectiveness of bevacizumab, the optimal duration and timing of treatment, and activity in association with other chemotherapeutic and targeted agents. It also is necessary to identify biologic factors predictive of efficacy to choose the most appropriate antiangiogenic agent in the integrated treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer.Keywords: epithelial ovarian cancer, angiogenesis, bevacizumab, vascular endothelial growth factor, chemotherapy

  7. Current error vector based prediction control of the section winding permanent magnet linear synchronous motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong Junjie, E-mail: hongjjie@mail.sysu.edu.cn [School of Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Li Liyi, E-mail: liliyi@hit.edu.cn [Dept. Electrical Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150000 (China); Zong Zhijian; Liu Zhongtu [School of Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} The structure of the permanent magnet linear synchronous motor (SW-PMLSM) is new. {yields} A new current control method CEVPC is employed in this motor. {yields} The sectional power supply method is different to the others and effective. {yields} The performance gets worse with voltage and current limitations. - Abstract: To include features such as greater thrust density, higher efficiency without reducing the thrust stability, this paper proposes a section winding permanent magnet linear synchronous motor (SW-PMLSM), whose iron core is continuous, whereas winding is divided. The discrete system model of the motor is derived. With the definition of the current error vector and selection of the value function, the theory of the current error vector based prediction control (CEVPC) for the motor currents is explained clearly. According to the winding section feature, the motion region of the mover is divided into five zones, in which the implementation of the current predictive control method is proposed. Finally, the experimental platform is constructed and experiments are carried out. The results show: the current control effect has good dynamic response, and the thrust on the mover remains constant basically.

  8. Advances in modeling of lower hybrid current drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Nilsson, E.; Artaud, J.-F.; Ekedahl, A.; Goniche, M.; Hillairet, J.; Ding, B.; Li, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Shiraiwa, S.; Madi, M.

    2016-04-01

    First principle modeling of the lower hybrid (LH) current drive in tokamak plasmas is a longstanding activity, which is gradually gaining in accuracy thanks to quantitative comparisons with experimental observations. The ability to reproduce simulatenously the plasma current and the non-thermal bremsstrahlung radial profiles in the hard x-ray (HXR) photon energy range represents in this context a significant achievement. Though subject to limitations, ray tracing calculations are commonly used for describing wave propagation in conjunction with Fokker-Planck codes, as it can capture prominent features of the LH wave dynamics in a tokamak plasma-like toroidal refraction. This tool has been validated on several machines when the full absorption of the LH wave requires the transfer of a small fraction of power from the main lobes of the launched power spectrum to a tail at a higher parallel refractive index. Conversely, standard modeling based on toroidal refraction only becomes more challenging when the spectral gap is large, except if other physical mechanisms may dominate to bridge it, like parametric instabilities, as suggested for JET LH discharges (Cesario et al 2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. 92 175002), or fast fluctuations of the launched power spectrum or ‘tail’ LH model, as shown for Tore Supra (Decker et al 2014 Phys. Plasma 21 092504). The applicability of the heuristic ‘tail’ LH model is investigated for a broader range of plasma parameters as compared to the Tore Supra study and with different LH wave characteristics. Discrepancies and agreements between simulations and experiments depending upon the different models used are discussed. The existence of a ‘tail’ in the launched power spectrum significantly improves the agreement between modeling and experiments in plasma conditions for which the spectral gap is large in EAST and Alcator C-Mod tokamaks. For the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, the experimental evolution of the HXR profiles with density suggests

  9. First Measurement of the Muon Neutrino Charged Current Quasielastic Double Differential Cross Section

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A A; Bazarko, A O; Brice, S J; Brown, B C; Bugel, L; Cao, J; Coney, L; Conrad, J M; Cox, D C; Curioni, A; Djurcic, Z; Finley, D A; Fleming, B T; Ford, R; Garcia, F G; Garvey, G T; Grange, J; Green, C; Green, J A; Hart, T L; Hawker, E; Imlay, R; Johnson, R A; Karagiorgi, G; Kasper, P; Katori, T; Kobilarcik, T; Kourbanis, I; Koutsoliotas, S; Laird, E M; Linden, S K; Link, J M; Liu, Y; Liu, Y; Louis, W C; Mahn, K B M; Marsh, W; Mauger, C; McGary, V T; McGregor, G; Metcalf, W; Meyers, P D; Mills, F; Mills, G B; Monroe, J; Moore, C D; Mousseau, J; Nelson, R H; Nienaber, P; Nowak, J A; Osmanov, B; Ouedraogo, S; Patterson, R B; Pavlovic, Z; Perevalov, D; Polly, C C; Prebys, E; Raaf, J L; Ray, H; Roe, B P; Russell, A D; Sandberg, V; Schirato, R; Schmitz, D; Shaevitz, M H; Shoemaker, F C; Smith, D; Soderberg, M; Sorel, M; Spentzouris, P; Spitz, J; Stancu, I; Stefanski, R J; Sung, M; Tanaka, H A; Tayloe, R; Tzanov, M; Van de Water, R G; Wascko, M O; White, D H; Wilking, M J; Yang, H J; Zeller, G P; Zimmerman, E D

    2010-01-01

    A high-statistics sample of charged-current muon neutrino scattering events collected with the MiniBooNE experiment is analyzed to extract the first measurement of the double differential cross section ($\\frac{d^2\\sigma}{dT_\\mu d\\cos\\theta_\\mu}$) for charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) scattering on carbon. This result features minimal model dependence and provides the most complete information on this process to date. With the assumption of CCQE scattering, the absolute cross section as a function of neutrino energy ($\\sigma[E_\

  10. The current state of industry development in Ukraine: advance perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skyba Maryna Valeriyivna

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The current state of the industry of Ukraine are considered at the article. The author determined that the stabilization of the situation and further development of the industry need first of all cessation of hostilities. It is necessary to implement effective measures to combat corruption, the development of consistent, constructive and concerted action on the formation of institutions guaranteeing stability, predictability and transparency of the market rules and procedures that minimize the impact of shadow factors, and implementation of professional privatization and limitation of monopoly at the markets, forming a transparent, competitive business environment, the introduction of new energy saving technologies. These measures will help attract investment, increase production and improve enterprise profitability.

  11. Antepartum uterine rupture in previous caesarean sections presenting as advanced extrauterine pregnancies: lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramphal, Surandhra R; Moodley, Jagidesa

    2009-03-01

    In present day obstetric practice, rupture of a previously scarred uterus should be uncommon. It occurs in uterine pregnancy is made. We present a series of 7 cases, all of whom had one or more previous caesarean sections, were haemodynamically stable and were being managed expectantly, to illustrate the fact that ruptured uterus should be strongly considered in the differential diagnosis, even when the clinical signs and sonography are suggestive of an advanced extra-uterine pregnancy. The lessons in these cases fall into the following categories: 1. Ruptured uteri can occur in non-labouring women with previous lower segment caesarean sections. 2. Absence of signs of peritonism is possibly due to the fact that the pregnancy is extruded through the uterine rupture with the amniotic sac being intact and there is little or no bleeding into the abdominal cavity or vaginally. 3. Imaging techniques should focus on the size of the uterus, as an enlarged uterus in the background of an advanced extra-uterine pregnancy in a previously scarred uterus is highly suggestive of uterine rupture. Clinicians must strongly consider ruptured uteri in non labouring women with previous caesarean sections even when imaging modalities suggest an advanced extrauterine pregnancy. This will lead to earlier surgical treatment and appropriate information being provided to patients.

  12. Preemptive analgesia II: recent advances and current trends.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, D J

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: This two-part review summarizes the current knowledge of physiological mechanisms, pharmacological modalities and controversial issues surrounding preemptive analgesia. SOURCE: Articles from 1966 to present were obtained from the MEDLINE databases. Search terms included analgesia, preemptive; neurotransmitters; pain, postoperative; hyperalgesia; sensitization, central nervous system; pathways, nociception; anesthetic techniques; analgesics, agents. Principal findings: In Part I of this review article, techniques and agents that attenuate or prevent central and peripheral sensitization were reviewed. In Part II, the conditions required for effective preemptive techniques are evaluated. Specifically, preemptive analgesia may be defined as an antinociceptive treatment that prevents establishment of altered central processing of afferent input from sites of injury. The most important conditions for establishment of effective preemptive analgesia are the establishment of an effective level of antinociception before injury, and the continuation of this effective analgesic level well into the post-injury period to prevent central sensitization during the inflammatory phase. Although single-agent therapy may attenuate the central nociceptive processing, multi-modal therapy is more effective, and may be associated with fewer side effects compared with the high-dose, single-agent therapy. CONCLUSION: The variable patient characteristics and timing of preemptive analgesia in relation to surgical noxious input require individualization of the technique(s) chosen. Multi-modal analgesic techniques appear more effective.

  13. Current Advances in the Metabolomics Study on Lotus Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mingzhi; Liu, Ting; Guo, Mingquan

    2016-01-01

    Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera), which is distributed widely throughout Asia, Australia and North America, is an aquatic perennial that has been cultivated for over 2,000 years. It is very stimulating that almost all parts of lotus have been consumed as vegetable as well as food, especially the seeds. Except for the nutritive values of lotus, there has been increasing interest in its potential as functional food due to its rich secondary metabolites, such as flavonoids and alkaloids. Not only have these metabolites greatly contributed to the biological process of lotus seeds, but also have been reported to possess multiple health-promoting effects, including antioxidant, anti-amnesic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-tumor activities. Thus, comprehensive metabolomic profiling of these metabolites is of key importance to help understand their biological activities, and other chemical biology features. In this context, this review will provide an update on the current technological platforms, and workflow associated with metabolomic studies on lotus seeds, as well as insights into the application of metabolomics for the improvement of food safety and quality, assisting breeding, and promotion of the study of metabolism and pharmacokinetics of lotus seeds; meanwhile it will also help explore new perspectives and outline future challenges in this fast-growing research subject.

  14. Cutaneous wound healing: Current concepts and advances in wound care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Kenneth C; Guha, Somes Chandra

    2014-01-01

    A non-healing wound is defined as showing no measurable signs of healing for at least 30 consecutive treatments with standard wound care.[1] It is a snapshot of a patient's total health as well as the ongoing battle between noxious factors and the restoration of optimal macro and micro circulation, oxygenation and nutrition. In practice, standard therapies for non-healing cutaneous wounds include application of appropriate dressings, periodic debridement and eliminating causative factors.[2] The vast majority of wounds would heal by such approach with variable degrees of residual morbidity, disability and even mortality. Globally, beyond the above therapies, newer tools of healing are selectively accessible to caregivers, for various logistical or financial reasons. Our review will focus on the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), as used at our institution (CAMC), and some other modalities that are relatively accessible to patients. HBOT is a relatively safe and technologically simpler way to deliver care worldwide. However, the expense for including HBOT as standard of care for recognized indications per UHMS(Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society) may vary widely from country to country and payment system.[3] In the USA, CMS (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services) approved indications for HBOT vary from that of the UHMS for logistical reasons.[1] We shall also briefly look into other newer therapies per current clinical usage and general acceptance by the medical community. Admittedly, there would be other novel tools with variable success in wound healing worldwide, but it would be difficult to include all in this treatise. PMID:25593414

  15. Cutaneous wound healing: Current concepts and advances in wound care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth C Klein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A non-healing wound is defined as showing no measurable signs of healing for at least 30 consecutive treatments with standard wound care. [1] It is a snapshot of a patient′s total health as well as the ongoing battle between noxious factors and the restoration of optimal macro and micro circulation, oxygenation and nutrition. In practice, standard therapies for non-healing cutaneous wounds include application of appropriate dressings, periodic debridement and eliminating causative factors. [2] The vast majority of wounds would heal by such approach with variable degrees of residual morbidity, disability and even mortality. Globally, beyond the above therapies, newer tools of healing are selectively accessible to caregivers, for various logistical or financial reasons. Our review will focus on the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT, as used at our institution (CAMC, and some other modalities that are relatively accessible to patients. HBOT is a relatively safe and technologically simpler way to deliver care worldwide. However, the expense for including HBOT as standard of care for recognized indications per UHMS(Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society may vary widely from country to country and payment system. [3] In the USA, CMS (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services approved indications for HBOT vary from that of the UHMS for logistical reasons. [1] We shall also briefly look into other newer therapies per current clinical usage and general acceptance by the medical community. Admittedly, there would be other novel tools with variable success in wound healing worldwide, but it would be difficult to include all in this treatise.

  16. Validation of multigroup neutron cross sections and calculational methods for the advanced neutron source against the FOEHN critical experiments measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, L.A.; Gallmeier, F.X. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Energy, TN (United States); Gehin, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The FOEHN critical experiment was analyzed to validate the use of multigroup cross sections and Oak Ridge National Laboratory neutronics computer codes in the design of the Advanced Neutron Source. The ANSL-V 99-group master cross section library was used for all the calculations. Three different critical configurations were evaluated using the multigroup KENO Monte Carlo transport code, the multigroup DORT discrete ordinates transport code, and the multigroup diffusion theory code VENTURE. The simple configuration consists of only the fuel and control elements with the heavy water reflector. The intermediate configuration includes boron endplates at the upper and lower edges of the fuel element. The complex configuration includes both the boron endplates and components in the reflector. Cross sections were processed using modules from the AMPX system. Both 99-group and 20-group cross sections were created and used in two-dimensional models of the FOEHN experiment. KENO calculations were performed using both 99-group and 20-group cross sections. The DORT and VENTURE calculations were performed using 20-group cross sections. Because the simple and intermediate configurations are azimuthally symmetric, these configurations can be explicitly modeled in R-Z geometry. Since the reflector components cannot be modeled explicitly using the current versions of these codes, three reflector component homogenization schemes were developed and evaluated for the complex configuration. Power density distributions were calculated with KENO using 99-group cross sections and with DORT and VENTURE using 20-group cross sections. The average differences between the measured values and the values calculated with the different computer codes range from 2.45 to 5.74%. The maximum differences between the measured and calculated thermal flux values for the simple and intermediate configurations are {approx} 13%, while the average differences are < 8%.

  17. Estimating time to pregnancy from current durations in a cross-sectional sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Niels; Kvist, Kajsa; Hartvig, Helle;

    2002-01-01

    A new design for estimating the distribution of time to pregnancy is proposed and investigated. The design is based on recording current durations in a cross-sectional sample of women, leading to statistical problems similar to estimating renewal time distributions from backward recurrence times...

  18. Estimating time to pregnancy from current durations in a cross-sectional sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Niels; Kvist, Kajsa; Hartvig, Helle;

    2002-01-01

    A new design for estimating the distribution of time to pregnancy is proposed and investigated. The design is based on recording current durations in a cross-sectional sample of women, leading to statistical problems similar to estimating renewal time distributions from backward recurrence times....

  19. Neutrino and antineutrino inclusive charged-current cross section measurement with the MINOS near detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Debdatta [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents the measurement of energy dependence of the neutrino-nucleon inclusive charged current cross section on an isoscalar target in the range 3-50 GeV for neutrinos and 5-50 GeV energy range for antineutrinos. The data set was collected with the MINOS Near Detector using the wide band NuMI beam at Fermilab. The size of the charged current sample is 1.94 x 106 neutrino events and 1.60 x 105 antineutrino events. The flux has been extracted using a low hadronic energy sub-sample of the charged current events. The energy dependence of the cross section is obtained by dividing the charged current sample with the extracted flux. The neutrino and antineutrino cross section exhibits a linear dependence on energy at high energy but shows deviations from linear behavior at low energy. We also present a measurement of the ratio of antineutrino to neutrino inclusive cross section.

  20. Measurement of the $Z/A$ dependence of neutrino charged-current total cross-sections

    CERN Document Server

    Kayis-Topaksu, A; Van Dantzig, R; De Jong, M; Konijn, J; Melzer, O; Oldeman, R G C; Pesen, E; Van der Poel, C A F J; Spada, F R; Visschers, J L; Güler, M; Serin-Zeyrek, M; Kama, S; Sever, R; Tolun, P; Zeyrek, M T; Armenise, N; Catanesi, M G; De Serio, M; Ieva, M; Muciaccia, M T; Radicioni, E; Simone, S; Bülte, A; Winter, Klaus; El-Aidi, R; Van de Vyver, B; Vilian, P; Wilquet, G; Saitta, B; Di Capua, E; Ogawa, S; Shibuya, H; Artamonov, A V; Brunner, J; Chizhov, M; Cussans, D G; Doucet, M; Fabre, Jean-Paul; Hristova, I R; Kawamura, T; Kolev, D; Litmaath, M; Meinhard, H; Panman, J; Papadopoulos, I M; Ricciardi, S; Rozanov, A; Saltzberg, D; Tsenov, R V; Uiterwijk, J W E; Zucchelli, P; Goldberg, J; Chikawa, M; Arik, E; Song, J S; Yoon, C S; Kodama, K; Ushida, N; Aoki, S; Hara, T; Delbar, T; Favart, D; Grégoire, G; Kalinin, S; Makhlyoueva, I V; Gorbunov, P; Khovanskii, V D; Shamanov, V V; Tsukerman, I; Bruski, N; Frekers, D; Rondeshagen, D; Wolff, T; Hoshino, K; Kawada, J; Komatsu, M; Miyanishi, M; Nakamura, M; Nakano, T; Narita, K; Niu, K; Niwa, K; Nonaka, N; Sato, O; Toshito, T; Buontempo, S; Cocco, A G; D'Ambrosio, N; De Lellis, G; De Rosa, G; Di Capua, F; Ereditato, A; Fiorillo, G; Marotta, A; Messina, M; Migliozzi, P; Pistillo, C; Santorelli, R; Scotto-Lavina, L; Strolin, P; Tioukov, V; Nakamura, K; Okusawa, T; Dore, U; Loverre, P F; Ludovici, L; Maslennikov, A L; Righini, P; Rosa, G; Santacesaria, R; Satta, A; Barbuto, E; Bozza, C; Grella, G; Romano, G; Sirignano, C; Sorrentino, S; Sato, Y; Tezuka, I

    2003-01-01

    A relative measurement of total cross-sections is reported for polyethylene, marble, iron, and lead targets for the inclusive charged-current reaction nu_mu + N -> mu^- + X. The targets, passive blocks of ~100kg each, were exposed simultaneously to the CERN SPS wide-band muon-neutrino beam over a period of 18 weeks. Systematics effects due to differences in the neutrino flux and detector efficiency for the different target locations were minimised by changing the position of the four targets on their support about every two weeks. The relative neutrino fluxes on the targets were monitored within the same experiment using charged-current interactions in the calorimeter positioned directly downstream of the four targets. From a fit to the Z/A dependence of the total cross-sections a value is deduced for the effective neutron-to-proton cross-section ratio.

  1. Cross Sections of Charged Current Neutrino Scattering off 132Xe for the Supernova Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Divari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The total cross sections as well as the neutrino event rates are calculated in the charged current neutrino and antineutrino scattering off 132Xe isotope at neutrino energies Ev<100 MeV. Transitions to excited nuclear states are calculated in the framework of quasiparticle random-phase approximation. The contributions from different multipoles are shown for various neutrino energies. Flux-averaged cross sections are obtained by convolving the cross sections with a two-parameter Fermi-Dirac distribution. The flux-averaged cross sections are also calculated using terrestrial neutrino sources based on conventional sources (muon decay at rest or on low-energy beta-beams.

  2. Treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma: recent advances and current role of immunotherapy, surgery, and cryotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennitto, Alessia; Verzoni, Elena; Calareso, Giuseppina; Spreafico, Carlo; Procopio, Giuseppe

    2017-01-21

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the 10th most common cancer in Western countries. The prognosis of metastatic disease is unfavorable but may be different according to several risk factors, such as histology and clinical features (Karnofsky performance status, time from nephrectomy, hemoglobin level, neutrophils and thrombocytes count, lactate dehydrogenase and calcium serum value, sites and extension of the disease). In this review, we focused on some recent developments in the use of immunotherapy, surgery and cryotherapy in the treatment of advanced disease. While RCC is unresponsive to chemotherapy, recent advances have emerged with the development of targeted agents and innovative immunotherapy-based treatments. Surgical resection remains the standard of care for patients with small renal lesions but in patients with significant comorbidities ablative therapies such as cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation may lead to local cancer control and avoid surgical complications and morbidity. In the setting of metastatic RCC, radical nephrectomy, or cytoreductive nephrectomy, is considered a palliative surgery, usually part of a multimodality treatment approach that requires systemic treatments.

  3. Profiling of the injected charge drift current transients by cross-sectional scanning technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaubas, E., E-mail: eugenijus.gaubas@ff.vu.lt; Ceponis, T.; Pavlov, J.; Baskevicius, A. [Institute of Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio av. 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2014-02-07

    The electric field distribution and charge drift currents in Si particle detectors are analyzed. Profiling of the injected charge drift current transients has been implemented by varying charge injection position within a cross-sectional boundary of the particle detector. The obtained profiles of the induction current density and duration of the injected charge drift pulses fit well the simulated current variations. Induction current transients have been interpreted by different stages of the bipolar and monopolar drift of the injected carriers. Profiles of the injected charge current transients registered in the non-irradiated and neutron irradiated Si diodes are compared. It has been shown that the mixed regime of the competing processes of drift, recombination, and diffusion appears in the measured current profiles on the irradiated samples. The impact of the avalanche effects can be ignored based on the investigations presented. It has been shown that even a simplified dynamic model enabled us to reproduce the main features of the profiled transients of induced charge drift current.

  4. Profiling of the injected charge drift current transients by cross-sectional scanning technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaubas, E.; Ceponis, T.; Pavlov, J.; Baskevicius, A.

    2014-02-01

    The electric field distribution and charge drift currents in Si particle detectors are analyzed. Profiling of the injected charge drift current transients has been implemented by varying charge injection position within a cross-sectional boundary of the particle detector. The obtained profiles of the induction current density and duration of the injected charge drift pulses fit well the simulated current variations. Induction current transients have been interpreted by different stages of the bipolar and monopolar drift of the injected carriers. Profiles of the injected charge current transients registered in the non-irradiated and neutron irradiated Si diodes are compared. It has been shown that the mixed regime of the competing processes of drift, recombination, and diffusion appears in the measured current profiles on the irradiated samples. The impact of the avalanche effects can be ignored based on the investigations presented. It has been shown that even a simplified dynamic model enabled us to reproduce the main features of the profiled transients of induced charge drift current.

  5. The tunneling magnetoresistance current dependence on cross sectional area, angle and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z. H., E-mail: zhaohui@physics.umanitoba.ca; Bai, Lihui; Hu, C.-M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, R3T 2N2 Canada (Canada); Hemour, S.; Wu, K. [École Polytechnique de Montréal, Montréal, H3T 1J4 Canada (Canada); Fan, X. L.; Xue, D. S. [The Key Lab for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Houssameddine, D. [Everspin Technologies, 1347 N. Alma School Road, Chandler, Arizona 85224 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    The magnetoresistance of a MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) was studied experimentally. The magnetoresistance as a function of current was measured systematically on MTJs for various MgO cross sectional areas and at various temperatures from 7.5 to 290.1 K. The resistance current dependence of the MTJ was also measured for different angles between the two ferromagnetic layers. By considering particle and angular momentum conservation of transport electrons, the current dependence of magnetoresistance can be explained by the changing of spin polarization in the free magnetic layer of the MTJ. The changing of spin polarization is related to the magnetoresistance, its angular dependence and the threshold current where TMR ratio equals zero. A phenomenological model is used which avoid the complicated barrier details and also describes the data.

  6. The tunneling magnetoresistance current dependence on cross sectional area, angle and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. H. Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The magnetoresistance of a MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ was studied experimentally. The magnetoresistance as a function of current was measured systematically on MTJs for various MgO cross sectional areas and at various temperatures from 7.5 to 290.1 K. The resistance current dependence of the MTJ was also measured for different angles between the two ferromagnetic layers. By considering particle and angular momentum conservation of transport electrons, the current dependence of magnetoresistance can be explained by the changing of spin polarization in the free magnetic layer of the MTJ. The changing of spin polarization is related to the magnetoresistance, its angular dependence and the threshold current where TMR ratio equals zero. A phenomenological model is used which avoid the complicated barrier details and also describes the data.

  7. Measurements of neutron cross sections for advanced nuclear energy systems at n_TOF (CERN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbagallo M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The n_TOF facility operates at CERN with the aim of addressing the request of high accuracy nuclear data for advanced nuclear energy systems as well as for nuclear astrophysics. Thanks to the features of the neutron beam, important results have been obtained on neutron induced fission and capture cross sections of U, Pu and minor actinides. Recently the construction of another beam line has started; the new line will be complementary to the first one, allowing to further extend the experimental program foreseen for next measurement campaigns.

  8. Measurement of the Neutrino Neutral-Current Elastic Differential Cross Section

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2010-01-01

    We report a measurement of the flux-averaged neutral-current elastic differential cross section for neutrinos scattering on mineral oil (CH$_2$) as a function of four-momentum transferred squared. It is obtained by measuring the kinematics of recoiling nucleons with kinetic energy greater than 50~MeV which are readily detected in MiniBooNE. This differential cross-section distribution is fit with fixed nucleon form factors apart from an axial mass, $M_{A}$, that provides a best fit for $M_A= 1.39\\pm0.11$~GeV. Additionally, single protons with kinetic energies above 350 MeV can be distinguished from neutrons and multiple nucleon events. Using this marker, the strange quark contribution to the neutral-current axial vector form factor at $Q^2 = 0$, $\\Delta s$, is found to be $\\Delta s=0.08\\pm0.26$.

  9. A Measurement Of The Neutrino Neutral Current Pion Cross Section At Miniboone

    CERN Document Server

    Raaf, Jennifer L

    2005-01-01

    The MiniBooNE neutrino beam and detector at Fermilab are used to study the production of neutral current π0 events. The cross sections for neutrino interactions with mineral oil (CH2) are reported for resonantly produced and coherently produced single π0 events. We measure a resonant single π0 cross section of σ(ν μ N → νμ N π0) = (0.0129±0.0011 (stat.)±0.0043 (syst.)) × 10-36 cm2/CH 2 at a mean neutrino energy of 1.26 GeV. We measure a coherent single π 0 cross section of σ(νμ A → νμ A π0) = (0.00077±0.00016 (stat.)±0.00036 (cyst.)) × 10-36 cm2/CH 2 at mean neutrino energy 1.12 GeV.

  10. A Measurement of the charged-current interaction cross section of the tau neutrino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maher, Emily O' Connor; /Minnesota U.

    2005-01-01

    The Fermilab experiment E872 (DONUT) was designed to make the first observation of the tau neutrino charged-current interaction. Using a hybrid emulsion-spectrometer detector, the tau lepton was identified by its single-prong or trident decay. Six interactions were observed, of which five were in the deep inelastic scattering region. These five interaction were used to measure the charged-current cross section of the tau neutrino. To minimize uncertainties, the tau neutrino cross section was measured relative to the electron neutrino cross section. The result {sigma}{sub {nu}{sub {tau}}N}{sup const}/{sigma}{sub {nu}{sub e}N}{sup const} = 0.77 {+-} 0.39 is consistent with 1.0, which is predicted by lepton universality. The tau neutrino cross section was also measured for 115 GeV neutrinos, which was the average energy of the interacted tau neutrinos. The result {sigma}{sub {nu}{sub {tau}}N}{sup exp} = 45 {+-} 21 x 10{sup -38} cm{sup 2} is consistent with the standard model prediction calculated in this thesis, {sigma}{sub {tau}N}{sup SM} = 48 {+-} 5 x 10{sup -38} cm{sup 2}.

  11. A Measurement Of The Charged-current Interaction Cross Section Of The Tau Neutrino

    CERN Document Server

    Maher, E O

    2005-01-01

    The Fermilab experiment E872 (DONUT) was designed to make the first observation of the tau neutrino charged-current interaction. Using a hybrid emulsion-spectrometer detector, the tau lepton was identified by its single- prong or trident decay. Six interactions were observed, of which five were in the deep inelastic scattering region. These five interaction were used to measure the charged-current cross section of the tau neutrino. To minimize uncertainties, the tau neutrino cross section was measured relative to the electron neutrino cross section. The result sconstn tNsconst neN=0.77±0.39 is consistent with 1.0, which is predicted by lepton universality. The tau neutrino cross section was also measured for 115 GeV neutrinos, which was the average energy of the interacted tau neutrinos. The result sexpnt N=45±21×10-38 cm2 is consistent with the standard model prediction calculated in this thesis, sSMnt N=48±5×10-38 cm2.

  12. A Measurement of the Charged-Current Interaction Cross Section of the Tau Neutrino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maher, Emily O' Connor [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2007-02-01

    The Fermilab experiment E872 (DONUT) was designed to make the first observation of the tau neutrino charged-current interaction. Using a hybrid emulsion-spectrometer detector, the tau lepton was identified by its single-prong or trident decay. Six interactions were observed, of which five were in the deep inelastic scattering region. These five interaction were used to measure the charged-current cross section of the tau neutrino. To minimize uncertainties, the tau neutrino cross section was measured relative to the electron neutrino cross section. The result σντNconstνeNconst = 0.77 ± 0.39 is consistent with 1.0, which is predicted by lepton universality. The tau neutrino cross section was also measured for 115 GeV neutrinos, which was the average energy of the interacted tau neutrinos. The result σντNexp = 45 ± 21 x 10-38 cm2 is consistent with the standard model prediction calculated in this thesis, σντNSM = 48 ± 5 x 10-38 cm2.

  13. Raman spectroscopic evaluation of efficacy of current paraffin wax section dewaxing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faoláin, Eoghan O; Hunter, Mary B; Byrne, Joe M; Kelehan, Peter; Lambkin, Helen A; Byrne, Hugh J; Lyng, Fiona M

    2005-01-01

    During a spectroscopic study to identify biochemical changes in cervical tissue with the onset of carcinogenesis, residual paraffin wax contributions were observed on almost all dewaxed formalin-fixed paraffin-processed (FFPP) tissue sections examined. Subsequently, the present study was formulated to evaluate the efficacy of current dewaxing agents using Raman spectroscopy. Three cervical FFPP sections were subjected to each of the protocols. Sections were dewaxed using four common dewaxing protocols, namely, xylene, Histoclear, heat-mediated antigen retrieval (HMAR) using xylene and citrate buffer, and Trilogy (combined deparaffinization and unmasking of antigens). The potential for hexane as a dewaxing agent was also evaluated. Sections were dewaxed in multiple dewaxing cycles using xylene, Histoclear, and hexane. Residual paraffin wax contributions remained at 1062 cm(-1), 1296 cm(-1), and 1441 cm(-1). HMAR using xylene and citrate buffer, and HMAR using Trilogy, showed a similar efficacy, resulting in incomplete removal of wax. Hexane was shown to be the most effective dewaxing agent, resulting in almost complete removal of wax. Immunohistochemistry was carried out on dewaxed slides, and those dewaxed with hexane displayed a stronger positivity (approximately 28%). Implications for histopathology and immunohistochemistry are considered, as well as problems that residual wax poses for spectroscopic evaluation of dewaxed FFPP sections with a view to disease diagnosis.

  14. Particle-driven gravity currents in non-rectangular cross section channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemach, T., E-mail: tamar.zemach@yahoo.com [Department of Computer Science, Tel-Hai College, Tel-Hai (Israel)

    2015-10-15

    We consider a high-Reynolds-number gravity current generated by suspension of heavier particles in fluid of density ρ{sub i}, propagating along a channel into an ambient fluid of the density ρ{sub a}. The bottom and top of the channel are at z = 0, H, and the cross section is given by the quite general −f{sub 1}(z) ≤ y ≤ f{sub 2}(z) for 0 ≤ z ≤ H. The flow is modeled by the one-layer shallow-water equations obtained for the time-dependent motion which is produced by release from rest of a fixed volume of mixture from a lock. We solve the problem by the finite-difference numerical code to present typical height h(x, t), velocity u(x, t), and volume fraction of particles (concentration) ϕ(x, t) profiles. The methodology is illustrated for flow in typical geometries: power-law (f(z) = z{sup α} and f(z) = (H − z){sup α}, where α is positive constant), trapezoidal, and circle. In general, the speed of propagation of the flows driven by suspensions decreases compared with those driven by a reduced gravity in homogeneous currents. However, the details depend on the geometry of the cross section. The runout length of suspensions in channels of power-law cross sections is analytically predicted using a simplified depth-averaged “box” model. The present approach is a significant generalization of the classical gravity current problem. The classical formulation for a rectangular channel is now just a particular case, f(z) = const., in the wide domain of cross sections covered by this new model.

  15. Bioinformatics Methods and Tools to Advance Clinical Care. Findings from the Yearbook 2015 Section on Bioinformatics and Translational Informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soualmia, L F; Lecroq, T

    2015-08-13

    To summarize excellent current research in the field of Bioinformatics and Translational Informatics with application in the health domain and clinical care. We provide a synopsis of the articles selected for the IMIA Yearbook 2015, from which we attempt to derive a synthetic overview of current and future activities in the field. As last year, a first step of selection was performed by querying MEDLINE with a list of MeSH descriptors completed by a list of terms adapted to the section. Each section editor has evaluated separately the set of 1,594 articles and the evaluation results were merged for retaining 15 articles for peer-review. The selection and evaluation process of this Yearbook's section on Bioinformatics and Translational Informatics yielded four excellent articles regarding data management and genome medicine that are mainly tool-based papers. In the first article, the authors present PPISURV a tool for uncovering the role of specific genes in cancer survival outcome. The second article describes the classifier PredictSNP which combines six performing tools for predicting disease-related mutations. In the third article, by presenting a high-coverage map of the human proteome using high resolution mass spectrometry, the authors highlight the need for using mass spectrometry to complement genome annotation. The fourth article is also related to patient survival and decision support. The authors present datamining methods of large-scale datasets of past transplants. The objective is to identify chances of survival. The current research activities still attest the continuous convergence of Bioinformatics and Medical Informatics, with a focus this year on dedicated tools and methods to advance clinical care. Indeed, there is a need for powerful tools for managing and interpreting complex, large-scale genomic and biological datasets, but also a need for user-friendly tools developed for the clinicians in their daily practice. All the recent research and

  16. Advanced Technology Section semiannual progress report, April 1-September 30, 1977. Volume 1. Biotechnology and environmental programs. [Lead Abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitt, W.W. Jr.; Mrochek, J.E. (comps.)

    1980-06-01

    Research efforts in six areas are reported. They include: centrifugal analyzer development; advanced analytical systems; environmental research; bioengineering research;bioprocess development and demonstration; and, environmental control technology. Individual abstracts were prepared for each section for ERA/EDB. (JCB)

  17. QCD analysis of neutral and charged current cross sections and search for contact interactions at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirumov, Hayk

    2013-11-15

    A QCD analysis of the inclusive deep inelastic ep scattering cross section measured by the H1 experiment at HERA is presented. The data correspond to a total integrated luminosity of about 0.5 fb{sup -1} and covers a kinematic range of 0.5 GeV{sup 2} - 30000 GeV{sup 2} in the negative four-momentum transfer Q{sup 2} and 3 . 10{sup -5} - 0.65 in Bjorken x. The performed QCD analysis of the double differential neutral and charged current cross sections results in a set of parton distribution functions H1PDF 2012. The precise data from HERA II period in the kinematic region of high Q{sup 2} considerably improve the accuracy of the PDFs at the high x. In addition a search for signs of new physics using single differential neutral current cross section measurements at high Q{sup 2} is performed. The observed good agreement of the analysed data with the Standard Model predictions allows to set constraints on various new physics models within the framework of contact interactions. Limits are derived on the compositeness scale for general contact interactions, on the ratio of mass to the Yukawa coupling for heavy leptoquark models, on the effective Plank-mass scale in the large extra dimension models and on the quark radius.

  18. Analysis of ground fault current distribution along nonuniform multi-section lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buccheri, P.L.; Mangione, S. [Department of Electrical, Electronic and Telecommunication Engineering, Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2008-09-15

    In case of a substation supplied by a combined overhead-cable line, most of the ground fault current flows through the cable sheaths and discharges into the soil surrounding the point of discontinuity, where cables are connected to the overhead line. In the paper a new method is presented for computing the ground fault current distribution in case of feeding line consisting of two or more different sections, i.e. part overhead and part underground cable. Besides the calculation of the earth current at the fault location, the leakage current at the transit/transition stations as well as at the overhead line towers can be evaluated, in order to ensure proper safety conditions. Based on the two-port theory, the method allows to take into account all the relevant conductively and inductively coupled parameters which take part to the fault current distribution. A computer program based on the proposed method has been developed and some application examples are reported. (author)

  19. Inclusive dijet cross sections in neutral current deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences; Univ. College London (United Kingdom); Cracow Univ. of Technology (Poland). Faculty of Physics, Mathematics and Applied Computer Science; Abt, I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Adamczyk, L. [AGH-Univ. of Science and Technology, Cracow (PL). Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science] (and others)

    2010-10-15

    Single- and double-differential inclusive dijet cross sections in neutral current deep inelastic ep scattering have been measured with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 374 pb{sup -1}. The measurement was performed at large values of the photon virtuality, Q{sup 2}, between 125 and 20 000 GeV{sup 2}. The jets were reconstructed with the k{sub T} cluster algorithm in the Breit reference frame and selected by requiring their transverse energies in the Breit frame, E{sup jet}{sub T,B}, to be larger than 8 GeV. In addition, the invariant mass of the dijet system, M{sub jj}, was required to be greater than 20 GeV. The cross sections are described by the predictions of next-to-leading-order QCD. (orig.)

  20. Neutral Current Coherent Cross Sections -- Implications on Gaseous Spherical TPC's for detecting SN and Earth neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Giomataris, Y

    2016-01-01

    The detection of galactic supernova (SN) neutrinos represents one of the future frontiers of low-energy neutrino physics and astrophysics. The neutron coherence of neutral currents (NC) allows quite large cross sections in the case of neutron rich targets, which can be exploited in detecting earth and sky neutrinos by measuring nuclear recoils. They are relatively cheap and easy to maintain. The relevant NC cross sections are not dependent on flavor conversions and, thus, their measurement will provide useful information about the neutrino source. In particular they will yield information about the primary neutrino fluxes and perhaps about the spectrum after flavor conversions in neutrino sphere.They might also provide some clues about the neutrino mass hierarchy. The advantages of large gaseous low threshold and high resolution detectors with time projection counters (TPC) are discussed.

  1. Measurement of neutral current cross-sections at high Bjorken- with the ZEUS detector at HERA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Inderpal Singh; on behalf of the ZEUS Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    A new method is employed to measure the neutral current cross-section up to Bjorken values of 1 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 187 pb-1 of electron–proton collisions and 142 pb-1 of positron–proton collisions, at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. Cross-sections have been extracted for 2 > 575 GeV2. A much improved precision with respect to the previous ZEUS publication, which used only 16.7 pb-1 of electron–proton collisions and 65.1 pb-1 of positron–proton collisions, is achieved, owing to the large data sample and improved kinematic reconstruction methods. The measurement is well-described by different theory predictions.

  2. A Review & Assessment of Current Operating Conditions Allowable Stresses in ASME Section III Subsection NH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. W. Swindeman

    2009-12-14

    The current operating condition allowable stresses provided in ASME Section III, Subsection NH were reviewed for consistency with the criteria used to establish the stress allowables and with the allowable stresses provided in ASME Section II, Part D. It was found that the S{sub o} values in ASME III-NH were consistent with the S values in ASME IID for the five materials of interest. However, it was found that 0.80 S{sub r} was less than S{sub o} for some temperatures for four of the materials. Only values for alloy 800H appeared to be consistent with the criteria on which S{sub o} values are established. With the intent of undertaking a more detailed evaluation of issues related to the allowable stresses in ASME III-NH, the availabilities of databases for the five materials were reviewed and augmented databases were assembled.

  3. Inclusive dijet cross sections in neutral current deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, H.; Gueta, O.; Ingbir, R.; Kananov, S.; Levy, A.; Stern, A. [Tel Aviv Univ., Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, School of Physics, Tel Aviv (Israel); Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Reisert, B.; Schmidke, W.B. [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Adamczyk, L.; Bold, T.; Gach, G.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Kisielewska, D.; Przybycien, M.; Suszycki, L. [AGH-Univ. of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Cracow (Poland); Adamus, M.; Plucinski, P.; Tymieniecka, T. [Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Warsaw (Poland); Aggarwal, R.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Singh, I. [Panjab Univ., Dept. of Physics, Chandigarh (India); Antonelli, S.; Basile, M.; Bindi, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Contin, A.; De Pasquale, S.; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A. [Univ. Bologna (Italy); INFN Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cindolo, F.; Corradi, M.; Iacobucci, G.; Margotti, A.; Nania, R.; Polini, A. [INFN Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Antonov, A.; Dolgoshein, B.A.; Gladkov, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Stifutkin, A.; Suchkov, S. [Moscow Engineering Physics Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Arneodo, M.; Ruspa, M. [Univ. del Piemonte Orientale, Novara, Torino (Italy); INFN, Torino (Italy); Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bokhonov, V.; Dolinska, G.; Gogota, O.; Kadenko, I.; Korol, I.; Kuprash, O.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Makarenko, I.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Salii, A.; Tomalak, O.; Viazlo, O.; Volynets, O.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhmak, N.; Zolko, M. [National Academy of Sciences, Inst. for Nuclear Research, Kiev (Ukraine); Kiev National Univ., Kiev (Ukraine); Bachynska, O.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Blohm, C.; Borras, K.; Bot, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Coppola, N.; Fang, S.; Geiser, A.; Goettlicher, P.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Huettmann, A.; Januschek, F.; Kahle, B.; Katkov, I.I.; Klein, U.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany)] (and others)

    2010-12-15

    Single- and double-differential inclusive dijet cross sections in neutral current deep inelastic ep scattering have been measured with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 374 pb{sup -1}. The measurement was performed at large values of the photon virtuality, Q{sup 2}, between 125 and 20 000 GeV{sup 2}. The jets were reconstructed with the k{sub T} cluster algorithm in the Breit reference frame and selected by requiring their transverse energies in the Breit frame, E{sup jet}{sub T,} {sub B}, to be larger than 8 GeV. In addition, the invariant mass of the dijet system, M{sub jj}, was required to be greater than 20 GeV. The cross sections are described by the predictions of next-to-leading-order QCD. (orig.)

  4. Performance of current measurement system in poloidal field power supply for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D. M.; Li, J.; Wan, B. N.; Lu, Z.; Wang, L. S.; Jiang, L.; Lu, C. H.; Huang, J.

    2016-11-01

    As one of the core subsystems of the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), the poloidal field power system supplies energy to EAST's superconducting coils. To measure the converter current in the poloidal field power system, a current measurement system has been designed. The proposed measurement system is composed of a Rogowski coil and a newly designed integrator. The results of the resistor-inductor-capacitor discharge test and the converter equal current test show that the current measurement system provides good reliability and stability, and the maximum error of the proposed system is less than 1%.

  5. Neutral and charged current cross section measurements and searches for new physics at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Malden, N; Abramowicz, H; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Adler, V; Aghuzumtsyan, G; Antonioli, P; Antonov, A; Arneodo, M; Bailey, D S; Bamberger, A; Barakbaev, A N; Barbagli, G; Barbi, M; Bari, G; Barreiro, F; Bartsch, D; Basile, M; Bauerdick, L A T; Behrens, U; Bell, M; Bellagamba, L; Benen, A; Bertolin, A; Bhadra, S; Bloch, I; Bodmann, B; Bold, T; Boos, E G; Borras, K; Boscherini, D; Brock, I; Brook, N H; Brugnera, R; Brümmer, N; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bussey, P J; Butterworth, J M; Bylsma, B; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carli, T; Carlin, R; Catterall, C D; Chekanov, S; Chiochia, V; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Cloth, P; Cole, J E; Collins-Tooth, C; Contin, A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Coppola, N; Cormack, C; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Cottrell, A; D'Agostini, Giulio; Dal Corso, F; Danilov, P; Dannheim, D; De Pasquale, S; Dementiev, R K; Derrick, M; Deshpande, Abhay A; Devenish, R C E; Dhawan, S; Dolgoshein, B A; Doyle, A T; Drews, G; Durkin, L S; Dusini, S; Eisenberg, Y; Ermolov, P F; Eskreys, Andrzej; Ferrando, J; Ferrero, M I; Figiel, J; Filges, D; Foster, B; Foudas, C; Fourletov, S; Fourletova, J; Fricke, U; Fusayasu, T; Gabareen, A; Gallo, E; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Genta, C; Gialas, I; Giusti, P; Gladilin, L K; Gladkov, D; Glasman, C; Gliga, S; Goers, S; Golubkov, Yu A; Goncalo, R; González, O; Göttlicher, P; Grabowska-Bold, I; Grijpink, S; Grzelak, G; Gutsche, O; Gwenlan, C; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hall-Wilton, R; Hamatsu, R; Hamilton, J; Hanlon, S; Hart, J C; Hartmann, H; Hartner, G; Hartner, G F; Heaphy, E A; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Helbich, M; Heusch, C A; Hilger, E; Hillert, S; Hirose, T; Hochman, D; Holm, U; Iacobucci, G; Iga, Y; Inuzuka, M; Irrgang, P; Jakob, H P; Jones, T W; Kagawa, S; Kahle, B; Kaji, H; Kananov, S; Kappes, A; Kataoka, Y; Yamazaki, M; Katkov, I I; Katz, U F; Kcira, D; Khein, L A; Kim, J Y; Kim, Y K; Kind, O; Kisielewska, D; Kitamura, S; Klimek, K; Koffeman, E; Kohno, T; Kooijman, P; Koop, T; Korzhav, I A; Kotanski, A; Kötz, U; Kowal, A M; Kowal, M; Kowalski, H; Kowalski, T; Krakauer, D; Kramberger, G; Kreisel, A; Krumnack, N; Kuze, M; Kuzmin, V A; Labarga, L; Labes, H; Lainesse, J; Lammers, S; Lee, J H; Lee, S W; Lelas, D; Levchenko, B B; Levman, G M; Levy, A; Li, L; Lightwood, M S; Lim, H; Lim, I T; Limentani, S; Ling, T Y; Liu, X; Löhr, B; Lohrmann, E; Loizides, J H; Long, K R; Longhin, A; Lukina, O Yu; Lupi, A; Luzniak, P; Maddox, E; Magill, S; Mankel, R; Margotti, A; Marini, G; Martin, J F; Mastroberardino, A; Matsuzawa, K; Mattingly, M C K; McCubbin, N A; Mellado, B; Melzer-Pellmann, I A; Menary, S R; Metlica, F; Meyer, U; Milite, M; Mirea, A; Monaco, V; Montanari, A; Moritz, M; Musgrave, B; Nagano, K; Nania, R; Nguyen, C N; Nigro, A; Ning, Y; Nishimura, T; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Oh, B Y; Olkiewicz, K; Pac, M Y; Padhi, S; Paganis, S; Palmonari, F; Parenti, A; Park, I H; Patel, S; Paul, E; Pavel, N; Pawlak, J M; Pelfer, P G; Pellegrino, A; Pesci, A; Petrucci, M C; Piotrzkowski, K; Plucinsky, P P; Pokrovskiy, N S; Polini, A; Posocco, M; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M B; Rautenberg, J; Raval, A; Reeder, D D; Ren, Z; Renner, R; Repond, J; Riveline, U; Karshon, M; Robins, S; Rodrigues, E; Rosin, M; Rurua, L; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Salehi, H; Sartorelli, G; Savin, A A; Saxon, D H; Schagen, S; Schioppa, M; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Sciulli, F; Scott, J; Selonke, F; Shcheglova, L M; Skillicorn, I O; Slominski, W; Smith, W H; Soares, M; Solano, A; Son, D; Sosnovtsev, V V; Stairs, D G; Stanco, L; Standage, J; Stifutkin, A; Stoesslein, U; Stonjek, S; Stopa, P; Straub, P B; Suchkov, S; Susinno, G; Suszycki, L; Sutton, M R; Sztuk, J; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Tandler, J; Tapper, A D; Tapper, R J; Tassi, E; Tawara, T; Terron, J; Tiecke, H G; Tokushuku, K; Tsurugai, T; Turcato, M; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Ukleja, J; Vázquez, M; Velthuis, J J; Vlasov, N N; Voss, K C; Walczak, R; Walsh, R; Wang, M; Weber, A; Wessoleck, H; West, B J; Whitmore, J J; Wick, K; Wiggers, L; Wills, H H; Wing, M; Wolf, G; Yamada, S; Yamashita, T; Yoshida, R; Youngman, C; Zawiejski, L; Zeuner, W; Zhautykov, B O; Zichichi, A; Ziegler, A; Zotkin, S A; De Wolf, E; Del Peso, J; Malden, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    HERA is the only high energy electron-proton collider in the world today and hence has unique opportunities both to probe the structure of the proton and to search for physics beyond the Standard Model. Results are presented for measurements of both neutral and charged current cross sections, and for searches for exotic processes involving direct electron-quark interactions (leptoquarks and R-parity violating SUSY), generic coupling models (contact interactions) and exclusive final states (isolated leptons and missing PT, single top production and pentaquarks). Exclusion limits on proposed models are set where no deviation from Standard Model predictions are found.

  6. Unpolarized neutral current e{sup {+-}}p cross section measurements at the H1 experiment, HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib, Shiraz Z.

    2009-11-15

    Measurements of the unpolarized inclusive neutral current reduced cross section in e{sup {+-}}p scattering at a center of mass energy {radical}(s) {approx_equal} 319 GeV are presented. The data was collected by the H1 detector during the HERA II running phase, after the 2000 luminosity upgrade, and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 145 pb{sup -1} and 167 pb{sup -1} for the e{sup -}p and e{sup +}p periods respectively. The cross section measurements were made for the negative four-momentum transfer squared range 65{<=} Q{sup 2}{<=}30000 GeV{sup 2} and Bjorken-x range 0.00085{<=}x{<=}0.65. Dedicated measurements at inelasticity y=0.75 and Q{sup 2}{<=}800 GeV{sup 2} are also made. The details of the analysis are presented here. The cross section measurements presented here are found to agree with previously published data as well as predictions determined from various NLO QCD fits. Scaling violation of the F{sub 2} structure function as well differences between the e{sup -} and e{sup +} cross sections at high Q{sup 2} due to the xF{sub 3} structure function have been observed. The cross sections in the range Q{sup 2}{<=}800 GeV{sup 2} at inelasticity y=0.75 suggest non-zero values of the longitudinal structure function F{sub L}. (orig.)

  7. Advanced Tokamak current density profiles for non-inductive Tore Supra operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazarian-Vibert, F.; Litaudon, X.; Arslanbekov, R.; Bibet, P.; Froissard, P.; Goniche, M.; Hoang, G.T.; Joffrin, E.; Moreau, D.; Peysson, Y.; Rey, G. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee

    1995-12-31

    This document deals with the advanced Tokamak concept concerning self consistent hollow current density profiles. Several Lower Hybrid experiments performed on Tore Supra are presented: the feasibility of the constant-flux operation mode is demonstrated and a new improved confinement regime with a reversed shear has been obtained. (TEC). 12 refs., 5 figs.

  8. A Measurement of the Neutrino Neutral Current Pi0 Cross Section at MiniBooNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raaf, Jennifer Lynne

    2005-05-01

    The MiniBooNE neutrino beam and detector at Fermilab are used to study the production of neutral current {pi}{sup 0} events. The cross sections for neutrino interactions with mineral oil (CH{sub 2}) are reported for resonantly produced and coherently produced single {pi}{sup 0} events. We measure a resonant single {pi}{sup 0} cross section of {sigma}({nu}{sub {mu}} N {pi}{sup 0}) = (0.0129 {+-} 0.0011(stat.) {+-} 0.0043(syst.)) x 10{sup -36} cm{sup 2}/CH{sub 2} at a mean neutrino energy of 1.26 GeV. We measure a coherent single {pi}{sup 0} cross section of {sigma}({nu}{sub {mu}} A {yields} {nu}{sub {mu}} A {pi}{sup 0}) = (0.00077 {+-} 0.00016 (stat.) {+-} 0.00036 (syst.)) x 10{sup -36} cm{sup 2}/CH{sub 2} at mean neutrino energy 1.12 GeV.

  9. Measurement of the Muon Neutrino Inclusive Charged Current Cross Section on Iron using the MINOS Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loiacono, Laura Jean [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) facility at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) produces an intense muon neutrino beam used by the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS), a neutrino oscillation experiment, and the Main INjector ExpeRiment v-A, (MINERv A), a neutrino interaction experiment. Absolute neutrino cross sections are determined via σv = N vv , where the numerator is the measured number of neutrino interactions in the MINOS Detector and the denominator is the flux of incident neutrinos. Many past neutrino experiments have measured relative cross sections due to a lack of precise measurements of the incident neutrino flux, normalizing to better established reaction processes, such as quasielastic neutrino-nucleon scattering. But recent measurements of neutrino interactions on nuclear targets have brought to light questions about our understanding of nuclear effects in neutrino interactions. In this thesis the vμ inclusive charged current cross section on iron is measured using the MINOS Detector. The MINOS detector consists of alternating planes of steel and scintillator. The MINOS detector is optimized to measure muons produced in charged current vμ interactions. Along with muons, these interactions produce hadronic showers. The neutrino energy is measured from the total energy the particles deposit in the detector. The incident neutrino flux is measured using the muons produced alongside the neutrinos in meson decay. Three ionization chamber monitors located in the downstream portion of the NuMI beamline are used to measure the muon flux and thereby infer the neutrino flux by relation to the underlying pion and kaon meson flux. This thesis describes the muon flux instrumentation in the NuMI beam, its operation over the two year duration of this measurement, and the techniques used to derive the neutrino flux.

  10. Measurement of the Muon Neutrino Inclusive Charged Current Cross Section on Iron using the MINOS Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loiacono, Laura Jean [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) facility at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) produces an intense muon neutrino beam used by the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS), a neutrino oscillation experiment, and the Main INjector ExpeRiment v-A, (MINERv A), a neutrino interaction experiment. Absolute neutrino cross sections are determined via σv = N vv , where the numerator is the measured number of neutrino interactions in the MINOS Detector and the denominator is the flux of incident neutrinos. Many past neutrino experiments have measured relative cross sections due to a lack of precise measurements of the incident neutrino flux, normalizing to better established reaction processes, such as quasielastic neutrino-nucleon scattering. But recent measurements of neutrino interactions on nuclear targets have brought to light questions about our understanding of nuclear effects in neutrino interactions. In this thesis the vμ inclusive charged current cross section on iron is measured using the MINOS Detector. The MINOS detector consists of alternating planes of steel and scintillator. The MINOS detector is optimized to measure muons produced in charged current vμ interactions. Along with muons, these interactions produce hadronic showers. The neutrino energy is measured from the total energy the particles deposit in the detector. The incident neutrino flux is measured using the muons produced alongside the neutrinos in meson decay. Three ionization chamber monitors located in the downstream portion of the NuMI beamline are used to measure the muon flux and thereby infer the neutrino flux by relation to the underlying pion and kaon meson flux. This thesis describes the muon flux instrumentation in the NuMI beam, its operation over the two year duration of this measurement, and the techniques used to derive the neutrino flux.

  11. Cesarean section in the People’s Republic of China: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng XL

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Xing Lin Feng,1 Ying Wang,1 Lin An,2 Carine Ronsmans3 1Department of Health Policy and Administration, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Women, Children and Adolescent Health, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, England Objective: To review the current knowledge on the prevalence, reasons, and consequences of cesarean sections in the People’s Republic of China. Methods: Peer-reviewed articles were systematically searched on PubMed. The following Chinese databases were comprehensively searched: the China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang, and the VIP information. The databases were searched from inception to September 1, 2013. Two reviewers independently screened the titles and abstracts for eligibility. Full texts of eligible papers were reviewed, where relevant references were hand-searched and reviewed. Findings: Sixty articles were included from PubMed, 17 articles were intentionally picked out from Chinese journals, and five additional articles were added, for a total of 82 articles for the analysis. With a current national rate near 40%, the literature consistently reported a rapid rise of cesarean sections in the People’s Republic of China in the past decades, irrespective of where people lived or their socioeconomic standing. Nonclinical factors were considered as the main drivers fueling the rise of cesareans in the People’s Republic of China. There was a lively debate on whether women’s preferences or providers’ distorted financial incentives affected the rise in cesarean sections. However, recent evidence suggests that it might be the People’s Republic of China’s health development approach – focusing on specialized care and marginalizing primary care – that is playing a role. Although 30 articles

  12. Thymus is enlarged in children with current atopic dermatitis. A cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne Braae; Andersen, G.; Jeppesen, D.L.;

    2005-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common skin disorder of unknown aetiology with peak incidence in early childhood. The disease is associated with peripheral T-cell accumulation in the skin. The thymus is a key organ of the cellular immune response early in life. We hypothesized that atopic dermatitis...... is associated with an unbalanced establishment of the peripheral T-lymphocyte system. This cross-sectional study was performed to compare thymus sizes in patients with atopic dermatitis and healthy controls. Thirty-seven children with current atopic dermatitis were enrolled and compared with 29 healthy controls....... An interview and medical examination were performed by one doctor, an ultrasound scan was performed within 3 days of the examination, and the thymus index, a marker of thymus size, was measured. The thymus index was on average 32% higher (95% CI 3%-67%) in children with active atopic dermatitis compared...

  13. Analysis of Advanced Fuel Assemblies and Core Designs for the Current and Next Generations of LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragusa, Jean; Vierow, Karen

    2011-09-01

    The objective of the project is to design and analyze advanced fuel assemblies for use in current and future light water reactors and to assess their ability to reduce the inventory of transuranic elements, while preserving operational safety. The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel can delay or avoid the need for a second geological repository in the US. Current light water reactor fuel assembly designs under investigation could reduce the plutonium inventory of reprocessed fuel. Nevertheless, these designs are not effective in stabilizing or reducing the inventory of minor actinides. In the course of this project, we developed and analyzed advanced fuel assembly designs with improved thermal transmutation capability regarding transuranic elements and especially minor actinides. These designs will be intended for use in thermal spectrum (e.g., current and future fleet of light water reactors in the US). We investigated various fuel types, namely high burn-up advanced mixed oxides and inert matrix fuels, in various geometrical designs that are compliant with the core internals of current and future light water reactors. Neutronic/thermal hydraulic effects were included. Transmutation efficiency and safety parameters were used to rank and down-select the various designs.

  14. Charged-current quasielastic neutrino cross sections on $^{12}$C with realistic spectral and scaling functions

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, M V; Caballero, J A; Megias, G D; Barbaro, M B; de Guerra, E Moya; Udias, J M

    2014-01-01

    Charge-current quasielastic (CCQE) (anti)neutrino scattering cross sections on a $^{12}$C target are analyzed using a spectral function $S(p,{\\cal E})$ that gives a scaling function in accordance with the ($e,e'$) scattering data. The spectral function accounts for the nucleon-nucleon (NN) correlations, it has a realistic energy dependence and natural orbitals (NO's) from the Jastrow correlation method are used in its construction. In all calculations the standard value of the axial mass $M_A= 1.032$ GeV/c$^2$ is used. The results are compared with those when NN correlations are not included, as in the Relativistic Fermi Gas (RFG) model, or when harmonic-oscillator (HO) single-particle wave functions are used instead of NO's. The role of the final-state interactions (FSI) on the theoretical spectral and scaling functions, as well as on the cross sections is accounted for. A comparison of the results for the cases with and without FSI, as well as to results from the phenomenological scaling function obtained f...

  15. Current status of advanced gastrointestinal endoscopy training fellowships in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Heller

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stephen J Heller, Jeffrey L TokarDepartment of Medicine, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Rapid growth in the field of advanced gastrointestinal endoscopy has led to an increase in specialized therapeutic endoscopy fellowships. The cornerstones of these programs are training in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP and endoscopic ultrasound. These procedures are more complex and challenging to master than routine colonoscopy and upper endoscopy, and in the case of ERCP, higher risk. The concentration of the educational experience in the hands of relatively fewer trainees with specialized interest in advanced endoscopy has resulted in providing a focused cohort of graduating fellows with higher case volumes in training, which likely enhances diagnostic and therapeutic success and safer performance of these procedures. Endoscopic simulators, although not currently in widespread use, have the potential to improve advanced procedural training without jeopardizing patient safety.Keywords: gastrointestinal endoscopy, training, procedures, safety 

  16. Cesarean section in the People’s Republic of China: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xing Lin; Wang, Ying; An, Lin; Ronsmans, Carine

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the current knowledge on the prevalence, reasons, and consequences of cesarean sections in the People’s Republic of China. Methods Peer-reviewed articles were systematically searched on PubMed. The following Chinese databases were comprehensively searched: the China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang, and the VIP information. The databases were searched from inception to September 1, 2013. Two reviewers independently screened the titles and abstracts for eligibility. Full texts of eligible papers were reviewed, where relevant references were hand-searched and reviewed. Findings Sixty articles were included from PubMed, 17 articles were intentionally picked out from Chinese journals, and five additional articles were added, for a total of 82 articles for the analysis. With a current national rate near 40%, the literature consistently reported a rapid rise of cesarean sections in the People’s Republic of China in the past decades, irrespective of where people lived or their socioeconomic standing. Nonclinical factors were considered as the main drivers fueling the rise of cesareans in the People’s Republic of China. There was a lively debate on whether women’s preferences or providers’ distorted financial incentives affected the rise in cesarean sections. However, recent evidence suggests that it might be the People’s Republic of China’s health development approach – focusing on specialized care and marginalizing primary care – that is playing a role. Although 30 articles were identified studying the consequences of cesareans, the methodologies are in general weak and the themes are out of focus. Conclusion The overuse of cesareans is rising alarmingly in the People’s Republic of China and has become a real public health problem. No consensus has been made on the leverage factors that drive the cesarean epidemic, particularly for those nonclinical factors. The more macro level structural factors may have played a part

  17. Regeneration of tissues of the oral complex: current clinical trends and research advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thomas T; Mui, Brennan; Mehrabzadeh, Mahsa; Chea, Yannie; Chaudhry, Zoya; Chaudhry, Kamran; Tran, Simon D

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative therapy in oral health care is limited by both the body's natural capacity for regeneration and the materials and methods currently available. Research on various aspects of regenerative therapy, such as tissue engineering and stem cell and gene therapy, has produced promising results. Compelling advances, ranging from the discovery and characterization of stem cell populations in oral tissue to the engineering and transplantation of whole tooth structures, could result in exciting new treatment methods for clinicians in the near future. In this review, we discuss the limitations of natural healing and regeneration of various tissues of the oral complex, including teeth, periodontium and salivary glands, and summarize current treatment methods for tissue damage as well as research advances in oral tissue regeneration.

  18. Review and Assessment of Neutron Cross Section and Nubar Covariances for Advanced Reactor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maslov,V.M.; Oblozinsky, P.; Herman, M.

    2008-12-01

    In January 2007, the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) produced a set of preliminary neutron covariance data for the international project 'Nuclear Data Needs for Advanced Reactor Systems'. The project was sponsored by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), Paris, under the Subgroup 26 of the International Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC). These preliminary covariances are described in two recent BNL reports. The NNDC used a simplified version of the method developed by BNL and LANL that combines the recent Atlas of Neutron Resonances, the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE and the Bayesian code KALMAN with the experimental data used as guidance. There are numerous issues involved in these estimates of covariances and it was decided to perform an independent review and assessment of these results so that better covariances can be produced for the revised version in future. Reviewed and assessed are uncertainties for fission, capture, elastic scattering, inelastic scattering and (n,2n) cross sections as well as prompt nubars for 15 minor actinides ({sup 233,234,236}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238,240,241,242}Pu, {sup 241,242m,243}Am and {sup 242,243,244,245}Cm) and 4 major actinides ({sup 232}Th, {sup 235,238}U and {sup 239}Pu). We examined available evaluations, performed comparison with experimental data, taken into account uncertainties in model parameterization and made use state-of-the-art nuclear reaction theory to produce the uncertainty assessment.

  19. Measurement of fission cross-section of actinides at n_TOF for advanced nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Calviani, Marco; Montagnoli, G; Mastinu, P

    2009-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the determination of high accuracy neutron-induced fission cross-sections of various isotopes - all of which radioactive - of interest for emerging nuclear technologies. The measurements had been performed at the CERN neutron time-of-flight facility n TOF. In particular, in this work, fission cross-sections on 233U, the main fissile isotope of the Th/U fuel cycle, and on the minor actinides 241Am, 243Am and 245Cm have been analyzed. Data on these isotopes are requested for the feasibility study of innovative nuclear systems (ADS and Generation IV reactors) currently being considered for energy production and radioactive waste transmutation. The measurements have been performed with a high performance Fast Ionization Chamber (FIC), in conjunction with an innovative data acquisition system based on Flash-ADCs. The first step in the analysis has been the reconstruction of the digitized signals, in order to extract the information required for the discrimination between fission fragm...

  20. Laparoscopic simulation training in gynaecology: Current provision and staff attitudes - a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Christy; Fox, Robert; Hinshaw, Kim; Draycott, Timothy J; James, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore current provision of laparoscopic simulation training, and to determine attitudes of trainers and trainees to the role of simulators in surgical training across the UK. An anonymous cross-sectional survey with cluster sampling was developed and circulated. All Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) Training Programme Directors (TPD), College Tutors (RCT) and Trainee representatives (TR) across the UK were invited to participate. One hundred and ninety-six obstetricians and gynaecologists participated. Sixty-three percent of hospitals had at least one box trainer, and 14.6% had least one virtual-reality simulator. Only 9.3% and 3.6% stated that trainees used a structured curriculum on box and virtual-reality simulators, respectively. Respondents working in a Large/Teaching hospital (p = 0.008) were more likely to agree that simulators enhance surgical training. Eighty-nine percent agreed that simulators improve the quality of training, and should be mandatory or desirable for junior trainees. Consultants (p = 0.003) and respondents over 40 years (p = 0.011) were more likely to hold that a simulation test should be undertaken before live operation. Our data demonstrated, therefore, that availability of laparoscopic simulators is inconsistent, with limited use of mandatory structured curricula. In contrast, both trainers and trainees recognise a need for greater use of laparoscopic simulation for surgical training.

  1. Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of electrochemical capacitors for advanced vehicle applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vimmerstedt, L J; Hammel, C J

    1997-04-01

    Electrochemical capacitors are a candidate for traction power assists in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Other advanced automotive applications, while not the primary focus of current development efforts, are also possible. These include load leveling high-energy batteries, power conditioning electronics, electrically hated catalysts, electric power steering, and engine starter power. Higher power and longer cycle life are expected for electrochemical capacitors than for batteries. Evaluation of environmental, health, and safety (EH and S) issues of electrochemical capacitors is an essential part of the development and commercialization of electrochemical capacitors for advanced vehicles. This report provides an initial EH and S assessment. This report presents electrochemical capacitor electrochemistry, materials selection, intrinsic material hazards, mitigation of those hazards, environmental requirements, pollution control options, and shipping requirements. Most of the information available for this assessment pertains to commercial devices intended for application outside the advanced vehicle market and to experiment or prototype devices. Electrochemical capacitors for power assists in HEVs are not produced commercially now. Therefore, materials for advanced vehicle electrochemical capacitors may change, and so would the corresponding EH and S issues. Although changes are possible, this report describes issues for likely electrochemical capacitor designs.

  2. Fieldcrest Cannon, Inc. Advanced Technical Preparation. Statistical Process Control (SPC). Safety Section: Modules 1-3. Instructor Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averitt, Sallie D.

    These three modules, which were developed for use by instructors in a manufacturing firm's advanced technical preparation program, contain the materials required to present the safety section of the plant's adult-oriented, job-specific competency-based training program. The 3 modules contain 12 lessons on the following topics: lockout/tagout…

  3. Fieldcrest Cannon, Inc. Advanced Technical Preparation. Statistical Process Control (SPC). Safety Section: Modules 1-3. Instructor Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averitt, Sallie D.

    These three modules, which were developed for use by instructors in a manufacturing firm's advanced technical preparation program, contain the materials required to present the safety section of the plant's adult-oriented, job-specific competency-based training program. The 3 modules contain 12 lessons on the following topics: lockout/tagout…

  4. High-grade glioma management and response assessment—recent advances and current challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M.N.; Sharma, A.M.; Pitz, M.; Loewen, S.K.; Quon, H.; Poulin, A.; Essig, M.

    2016-01-01

    The management of high-grade gliomas (hggs) is complex and ever-evolving. The standard of care for the treatment of hggs consists of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. However, treatment options are influenced by multiple factors such as patient age and performance status, extent of tumour resection, biomarker profile, and tumour histology and grade. Follow-up cranial magnetic resonance imaging (mri) to differentiate treatment response from treatment effect can be challenging and affects clinical decision-making. An assortment of advanced radiologic techniques—including perfusion imaging with dynamic susceptibility contrast mri, dynamic contrast-enhanced mri, diffusion-weighted imaging, proton spectroscopy, mri subtraction imaging, and amino acid radiotracer imaging—can now incorporate novel physiologic data, providing new methods to help characterize tumour progression, pseudoprogression, and pseudoresponse. In the present review, we provide an overview of current treatment options for hgg and summarize recent advances and challenges in imaging technology. PMID:27536188

  5. Current advances in DNA repair: regulation of enzymes and pathways involved in maintaining genomic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neher, Tracy M; Turchi, John J

    2011-06-15

    Novel discoveries in the DNA repair field have lead to continuous and rapid advancement of our understanding of not only DNA repair but also DNA replication and recombination. Research in the field transcends numerous areas of biology, biochemistry, physiology, and medicine, making significant connections across these broad areas of study. From early studies conducted in bacterial systems to current analyses in eukaryotic systems and human disease, the innovative research into the mechanisms of repair machines and the consequences of ineffective DNA repair has impacted a wide scientific community. This Forum contains a select mix of primary research articles in addition to a number of timely reviews covering a subset of DNA repair pathways where recent advances and novel discoveries are improving our understanding of DNA repair, its regulation, and implications to human disease.

  6. Inclusive neutral current ep cross sections with HERA II and two-dimensional unfolding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, David-Johannes

    2011-06-15

    In this thesis, the inclusive neutral current ep {yields} eX cross section at small e{sup -} scattering angles has been measured using the electromagnetic SpaCal calorimeter in the backward region of the H1 detector. This calorimeter constructed of lead and scintillating fiber was designed to measure the scattered electron with high resolution in both energy and polar angle. The analysis comprises the kinematic range of 0.06 < y{sub e} < 0.6 for the inelasticity and 14 GeV{sup 2} < Q{sub e}{sup 2} < 110 GeV{sup 2} for the squared momentum exchange. The data sample consists of positron proton collisions of the years 2006 and 2007, adding up to an integrated luminosity of {proportional_to}141 pb{sup -1}. Due to the high luminosity of the HERA II run phase the accuracy is no longer limited by the data statistics but rather by the detector resolution and systematics. The migration becomes increasingly influential; an effect which leads to distortions of the measured distribution as well as to statistical correlations between adjacent data points. At this stage, the correction of detector effects as well as the precise determination of statistical correlations become important features of a rigorous error treatment. In this analysis two-dimensional unfolding has been applied. This is a novel approach to H1 inclusive cross section measurements, which are usually based on a bin-by-bin efficiency correction (bin-by-bin method). With unfolding, the detector effect to the measurements is modelled by a linear transformation (''response matrix'') which is used to correct any distortion of the data. The inclusion of off-diagonal elements results in a coherent assessment of the statistical uncertainties and correlations. The model dependence can be optimally evaluated. In this context, the bin-by-bin method can be viewed as an approximation based on a diagonal response matrix. In a scenario of limited detector resolution, the unfolded data distributions will

  7. Measurement of charged and neutral current e$^{-}$p deep inelastic scattering cross sections at high Q$^{2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Derrick, Malcolm; Magill, S; Mikunas, D; Musgrave, B; Repond, J; Stanek, R; Talaga, R L; Zhang, H; Ayad, R; Bari, G; Basile, M; Bellagamba, L; Boscherini, D; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruni, P; Cara Romeo, G; Castellini, G; Chiarini, M; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Contin, A; Corradi, M; Gialas, I; Giusti, P; Iacobucci, G; Laurenti, G; Levi, G; Margotti, A; Massam, Thomas; Nania, R; Nemoz, C; Palmonari, F; Polini, A; Sartorelli, G; Timellini, R; Zamora-Garcia, Yu E; Zichichi, Antonino; Bargende, A; Crittenden, James Arthur; Desch, Klaus; Diekmann, B; Doeker, T; Eckert, M; Feld, L; Frey, A; Geerts, M; Geitz, G; Grothe, M; Haas, T; Hartmann, H; Haun, D; Heinloth, K; Hilger, E; Jakob, H P; Katz, U F; Mari, S M; Mass, A; Mengel, S; Mollen, J; Paul, E; Rembser, C; Schattevoy, R; Schramm, D; Stamm, J; Wedemeyer, R; Campbell-Robson, S; Cassidy, A; Dyce, N; Foster, B; George, S; Gilmore, R; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Llewellyn, T J; Morgado, C J S; Norman, D J P; O'Mara, J A; Tapper, R J; Wilson, S S; Yoshida, R; Rau, R R; Arneodo, M; Iannotti, L; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Bernstein, A M; Caldwell, A; Cartiglia, N; Parsons, J A; Ritz, S; Sciulli, F; Straub, P B; Wai, L; Yang, S; Zhu, Q; Borzemski, P; Chwastowski, J; Eskreys, Andrzej; Piotrzkowski, K; Zachara, M; Zawiejski, L; Adamczyk, L; Bednarek, B; Jelen, K; Kisielewska, D; Kowalski, T; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E; Suszycki, L; Zajac, J; Kotanski, Andrzej; Przybycien, M B; Bauerdick, L A T; Behrens, U; Beier, H; Bienlein, J K; Coldewey, C; Deppe, O; Desler, K; Drews, G; Flasinski, M; Gilkinson, D J; Glasman, C; Göttlicher, P; Grosse-Knetter, J; Gutjahr, B; Hain, W; Hasell, D; Hessling, H; Hultschig, H; Iga, Y; Joos, P; Kasemann, M; Klanner, Robert; Koch, W; Köpke, L; Kötz, U; Kowalski, H; Labs, J; Ladage, A; Löhr, B; Loewe, M; Lüke, D; Manczak, O; Ng, J S T; Nickel, S; Notz, D; Ohrenberg, K; Roco, M T; Rohde, M; Roldán, J; Schneekloth, U; Schulz, W; Selonke, F; Stiliaris, E; Surrow, B; Voss, T; Westphal, D; Wolf, G; Youngman, C; Zhou, J F; Grabosch, H J; Kharchilava, A I; Leich, A; Mattingly, M C K; Meyer, A; Schlenstedt, S; Wulff, N; Barbagli, G; Pelfer, P G; Anzivino, Giuseppina; Maccarrone, G D; De Pasquale, S; Votano, L; Bamberger, Andreas; Eisenhardt, S; Freidhof, A; Söldner-Rembold, S; Schröder, J; Trefzger, T M; Brook, N H; Bussey, Peter J; Doyle, A T; Fleck, I; Saxon, D H; Utley, M L; Wilson, A S; Dannemann, A; Holm, U; Horstmann, D; Neumann, T; Sinkus, R; Wick, K; Badura, E; Burow, B D; Hagge, L; Lohrmann, E; Mainusch, J; Milewski, J; Nakahata, M; Pavel, N; Poelz, G; Schott, W; Zetsche, F; Bacon, Trevor C; Butterworth, Ian; Gallo, E; Harris, V L; Hung, B Y H; Long, K R; Miller, D B; Morawitz, P P O; Prinias, A; Sedgbeer, J K; Whitfield, A F; Mallik, U; McCliment, E; Wang, M Z; Wang, S M; Wu, J T; Zhang, Y; Cloth, P; Filges, D; An Shiz Hong; Hong, S M; Nam, S W; Park, S K; Suh, M H; Yon, S H; Imlay, R; Kartik, S; Kim, H J; McNeil, R R; Metcalf, W; Nadendla, V K; Barreiro, F; Cases, G; Graciani, R; Hernández, J M; Hervás, L; Labarga, L; Del Peso, J; Puga, J; Terrón, J; De Trocóniz, J F; Smith, G R; Corriveau, F; Hanna, D S; Hartmann, J; Hung, L W; Lim, J N; Matthews, C G; Patel, P M; Sinclair, L E; Stairs, D G; Saint-Laurent, M G; Ullmann, R T; Zacek, G; Bashkirov, V; Dolgoshein, B A; Stifutkin, A; Bashindzhagian, G L; Ermolov, P F; Gladilin, L K; Golubkov, Yu A; Kobrin, V D; Kuzmin, V A; Proskuryakov, A S; Savin, A A; Shcheglova, L M; Solomin, A N; Zotov, N P; Botje, M; Chlebana, F S; Dake, A P; Engelen, J; De Kamps, M; Kooijman, P M; Kruse, A; Tiecke, H G; Verkerke, W; Vreeswijk, M; Wiggers, L; De Wolf, E; Van Woudenberg, R; Acosta, D; Bylsma, B G; Durkin, L S; Honscheid, K; Li Chuan; Ling, T Y; McLean, K W; Murray, W N; Park, I H; Romanowsky, T A; Seidlein, R; Bailey, D S; Blair, G A; Byrne, A; Cashmore, Roger J; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Daniels, D C; Devenish, R C E; Harnew, N; Lancaster, M; Luffman, P; Lindemann, L; McFall, J D; Nath, C; Noyes, V A; Quadt, A; Uijterwaal, H; Walczak, R; Wilson, F F; Yip, T; Abbiendi, G; Bertolin, A; Brugnera, R; Carlin, R; Dal Corso, F; De Giorgi, M; Dosselli, U; Limentani, S; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Stanco, L; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Bulmahn, J; Butterworth, J M; Feild, R G; Oh, B Y; Whitmore, J; D'Agostini, Giulio; Marini, G; Nigro, A; Tassi, E; Hart, J C; McCubbin, N A; Prytz, K; Shah, T P; Short, T L; Barberis, E; Dubbs, T; Heusch, C A; Van Hook, M; Hubbard, B; Lockman, W; Rahn, J T; Sadrozinski, H F W; Seiden, A; Biltzinger, J; Seifert, R J; Walenta, Albert H; Zech, G; Abramowicz, H; Briskin, G M; Dagan, S; Levy, A; Hasegawa, T; Hazumi, M; Ishii, T; Kuze, M; Mine, S; Nagasawa, Y; Nakao, M; Susuki, I; Tokushuku, K; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Chiba, M; Hamatsu, R; Hirose, T; Homma, K; Kitamura, S; Nakamitsu, Y; Yamauchi, K; Cirio, R; Costa, M; Ferrero, M I; Lamberti, L; Maselli, S; Peroni, C; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Dardo, M; Bailey, D C; Bandyopadhyay, D; Bénard, F; Brkic, M; Crombie, M B; Gingrich, D M; Hartner, G F; Joo, K K; Levman, G M; Martin, J F; Orr, R S; Sampson, C R; Teuscher, R; Catterall, C D; Jones, T W; Kaziewicz, P B; Lane, J B; Saunders, R L; Shulman, J; Blankenship, K; Kochocki, J A; Lu, B; Mo, L W; Bogusz, W; Charchula, K; Ciborowski, J; Gajewski, J; Grzelak, G; Kasprzak, M; Krzyzanowski, M; Muchorowski, K; Nowak, R J; Pawlak, J M; Tymieniecka, T; Wróblewski, A K; Zakrzewski, J A; Zarnecki, A F; Adamus, M; Eisenberg, Y; Karshon, U; Revel, D; Zer-Zion, D; Ali, I; Badgett, W F; Behrens, B H; Dasu, S; Fordham, C; Foudas, C; Goussiou, A; Loveless, R J; Reeder, D D; Silverstein, S; Smith, W H; Vaiciulis, A W; Wodarczyk, M; Tsurugai, T; Bhadra, S; Cardy, M L; Fagerstroem, C P; Frisken, W R; Furutani, K M; Khakzad, M; Schmidke, W B

    1995-01-01

    Deep inelastic e^-p scattering has been studied in both the charged-current (CC) and neutral-current (NC) reactions at momentum transfers squared, Q^2, between 400 GeV^2 and the kinematic limit of 87500 GeV^2 using the ZEUS detector at the HERA ep collider. The CC and NC total cross sections, the NC to CC cross section ratio, and the differential cross sections, d\\sigma/dQ^2 , are presented. For Q^2 \\simeq M_W^2, where M_W is the mass of the W boson, the CC and NC cross sections have comparable magnitudes, demonstrating the equal strengths of the weak and electromagnetic interactions at high Q^2. The Q^2 dependence of the CC cross section determines the mass term in the CC propagator to be M_{W} = 76 \\pm 16 \\pm 13~GeV.

  8. Advanced computer techniques for inverse modeling of electric current in cardiac tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, S.A.; Romero, L.A.; Diegert, C.F.

    1996-08-01

    For many years, ECG`s and vector cardiograms have been the tools of choice for non-invasive diagnosis of cardiac conduction problems, such as found in reentrant tachycardia or Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. Through skillful analysis of these skin-surface measurements of cardiac generated electric currents, a physician can deduce the general location of heart conduction irregularities. Using a combination of high-fidelity geometry modeling, advanced mathematical algorithms and massively parallel computing, Sandia`s approach would provide much more accurate information and thus allow the physician to pinpoint the source of an arrhythmia or abnormal conduction pathway.

  9. Targeted therapy for advanced gastric cancer: A review of current status and future prospects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ozkan; Kanat; Bert; O’Neil; Safi; Shahda

    2015-01-01

    In the West in particular, the vast majority of gastric cancer(GC) patients present with advanced-stage disease. Although combination chemotherapy is stillthe most important component of treatment for these patients, it confers a modest survival advantage. Recently, increased knowledge of the key molecular signaling pathways involved in gastric carcinogenesis has led to the discovery of specific molecular-targeted therapeutic agents. Some of these agents such as trastuzumab and ramucirumab have changed the treatment paradigm for this disease. In this paper, we will summarize the current clinical status of targeted drug therapy in the management of GC.

  10. The relatives' perspective on advanced cancer care in Denmark. A cross-sectional survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Anna T; Ross, Lone; Petersen, Morten A

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve advanced cancer care, evaluations are necessary. An important element of such evaluations is the perspective of the patient's relatives who have the role of being caregivers as well as co-users of the health care system. The aims were to investigate the scale structure...... of the FAMCARE scale, to investigate satisfaction with advanced cancer care from the perspective of the relatives of a representative sample of advanced cancer patients, and to investigate whether some sub-groups of relatives were more dissatisfied than others....

  11. Advanced Readout System IC Current Mode Semi-Gaussian Shapers Using CCIIs and OTAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Noulis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel CMOS current mode shapers for front-end electronics are proposed. In particular, six semi-Gaussian shaper implementations based on second generation current conveyors and operational transconductance amplifiers are designed using advanced filter design techniques. Although all shaper architectures are fully integrated, they satisfy a relatively large peaking time. The topologies are analytically compared in terms of noise performance, power consumption, total harmonic distortion (THD, and dynamic range (DR in order to examine which is the most preferable in readout applications. Design technique selection criteria are proposed in relation to the shaper structures performance. Analysis is supported by simulations results using SPICE in a 0.6 μm process by Austria Mikro Systeme (AMS.

  12. Are advance directives helpful for good end of life decision making: a cross sectional survey of health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peicius, Eimantas; Blazeviciene, Aurelija; Kaminskas, Raimondas

    2017-06-05

    This paper joins the debate over changes in the role of health professionals when applying advance directives to manage the decision-making process at the end of life care. Issues in relation to advance directives occur in clinical units in Lithuania; however, it remains one of the few countries in the European Union (EU) where the discussion on advance directives is not included in the health-care policy-making agenda. To encourage the discussion of advance directives, a study was designed to examine health professionals' understanding and preferences related to advance directives. In addition, the study sought to explore the views of health care professionals of the application of Advance Directives (AD) in clinical practice in Lithuania. A cross-sectional survey was conducted by interviewing 478 health professionals based at major health care centers in Kaunas district, Lithuania. The design of the study included the use of a questionnaire developed for this study and validated by a pilot study. The collected data were analyzed using standard descriptive statistical methods. The analysis of knowledge about AD revealed some statistically significant differences when comparing the respondents' profession and gender. The analysis also indicated key emerging themes among respondents including tranquility of mind, the longest possible life expectancy and freedom of choice. Further, the study findings revealed that more than half of the study participants preferred to express their will while alive by using advance directives. The study findings revealed a low level of knowledge on advance directives among health professionals. Most health professionals agreed that AD's improved end-of-life decision making while the majority of physicians appreciated AD as the best tool for sharing responsibilities in clinical practice in Lithuania. More physicians than nurses preferred the presence of advance directives to support their decision making in end-of-life situations.

  13. Influence of various physics phenomena on fast-wave current drive in advanced tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batchelor, D.B.; Jaeger, E.F.; Carter, M.D.; Goldfinger, R.C.; Stallings, D.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-12-31

    The need for some type of noninductive current drive in advanced tokamaks has been recognized for some time. In reactor-grade plasmas, as envisioned in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), high density and temperature may limit the penetration of lower hybrid (LH) waves to only the outer layers of the plasma. Fast waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF), however, can easily penetrate to the center of such high-density plasmas. With sufficient directivity in the launched wave spectrum, currents can be driven by combined damping of the fast waves on resonant electrons through electron Landau damping (ELD) and transit-time magnetic pumping (TTMP). Experiments to study the feasibility of fast-wave current drive (FWCD) have only recently begun, but theoretical predictions look promising. In this paper we analyze the influence of the relevant physics phenomena, which are not necessarily independent, on current drive performance. Such phenomena include diffraction and other nongeometrical optics processes, k{sub ||} modification, single-pass absorption, and antenna characteristics, such as poloidal extent and poloidal location. To do this, we apply a two-and-one-half dimensional (2 1/2-D), full-wave code (PICES) for modeling ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) and current drive based on the poloidal mode expansion method and the reduced-order expansion. By 2 1/2-D, we mean that 3-D wave fields are calculated in axisymmetric geometry (2-D solution domain - r, {theta}), while the correct toroidal dependence of the antenna source currents is obtained from a 2-D (r, {phi}) recessed antenna code. The model includes the poloidal and toroidal structure of the antennas, the modification of the k{sub ||} spectrum due to the poloidal magnetic field, and a nonperturbative solution for E{sub ||}. A semianalytical model for current drive, including trapped electron effects, is employed. (author) 10 refs., 4 figs.

  14. JSC Advanced Curation: Research and Development for Current Collections and Future Sample Return Mission Demands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, M. D.; Allen, C. C.; Calaway, M. J.; Evans, C. A.; Stansbery, E. K.

    2015-01-01

    Curation of NASA's astromaterials sample collections is a demanding and evolving activity that supports valuable science from NASA missions for generations, long after the samples are returned to Earth. For example, NASA continues to loan hundreds of Apollo program samples to investigators every year and those samples are often analyzed using instruments that did not exist at the time of the Apollo missions themselves. The samples are curated in a manner that minimizes overall contamination, enabling clean, new high-sensitivity measurements and new science results over 40 years after their return to Earth. As our exploration of the Solar System progresses, upcoming and future NASA sample return missions will return new samples with stringent contamination control, sample environmental control, and Planetary Protection requirements. Therefore, an essential element of a healthy astromaterials curation program is a research and development (R&D) effort that characterizes and employs new technologies to maintain current collections and enable new missions - an Advanced Curation effort. JSC's Astromaterials Acquisition & Curation Office is continually performing Advanced Curation research, identifying and defining knowledge gaps about research, development, and validation/verification topics that are critical to support current and future NASA astromaterials sample collections. The following are highlighted knowledge gaps and research opportunities.

  15. Respiratory health effects of opencast coalmining: a cross sectional study of current workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, R G; Miller, B G; Groat, S K; Hagen, S; Cowie, H A; Johnston, P P; Hutchison, P A; Soutar, C A

    1997-06-01

    To identify whether there is evidence of pneumoconiosis and other respiratory health effects associated with exposure to respirable mixed dust and quartz in United Kingdom opencast coalmines. A cross sectional study of current workers (1224 men, 25 women) was carried out at nine large and medium sized opencast sites in England, Scotland, and Wales. To characterise a range of occupational groups within the industry, full shift measurements of personal exposures to respirable dust and quartz were taken. Up to three surveys were carried out at each site, covering all four seasons. For the purposes of comparisons with health indices these groups were further condensed into five broad combined occupational groups. Full sized chest radiographs, respiratory symptoms, occupational history questionnaires, and simple spirometry were used to characterise the respiratory health of the workforce. Logistic or multiple regression techniques were used to examine relations between indices of exposure and respiratory health. None of the group geometric mean dust concentrations, based on 626 valid dust samples, exceeded 1 mg.m-3, and 99% of all quartz concentrations were below 0.4 mg.m-3, the current maximum exposure limit. The highest quartz concentrations were experienced by the rock drilling team and drivers of bulldozers (used to move earth and stone from layers of coal). There were clear differences in mean respirable dust and quartz concentrations between occupational groups. These were consistent across the different sites, but depended in part on the day of measurement. The variations between sites were not much greater than between days, suggesting that differences between sites were at least partly explained by differences in conditions at the time of the measurements. The prevalence of radiographic small opacities profusion category > or = 1/0, based on the median of three readings, was 4.4%. Five men had category 2 pneumoconiosis and two men (including one of these five

  16. Current Practices in Global/International Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences: Home/Host Country or Site/Institution Considerations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Naser Z Alsharif; Adnan Dakkuri; Jeanine P Abrons; Dennis Williams; David N Ombengi; HaiAn Zheng; Sara Al-Dahir; Toyin Tofade; Suzanna Gim; Mary Beth O'Connell; Anna Ratka; Emily Dornblaser

    2016-01-01

      International outreach by schools and colleges of pharmacy is increasing. In this paper, we provide current practice guidelines to establish and maintain successful global/international advanced pharmacy practice experiences (G/I APPEs...

  17. Measurements of the Inclusive Neutrino and Antineutrino Charged Current Cross Sections in MINERvA Using the Low-$\

    CERN Document Server

    DeVan, J; Aliaga, L; Altinok, O; Bellantoni, L; Bercellie, A; Betancourt, M; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Cai, T; Carneiro, M F; da Motta, H; Devan, J; Dytman, S A; Díaz, G A; Eberly, B; Endress, E; Felix, J; Fields, L; Fine, R; Gago, A M; Galindo, R; Gallagher, H; Ghosh, A; Gran, R; Harris, D A; Higuera, A; Hurtado, K; Kleykamp, J; Kordosky, M; Le, T; Maher, E; Manly, S; Mann, W A; Marshall, C M; Caicedo, D A Martinez; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McGowan, A M; Messerly, B; Miller, J; Mislivec, A; Morfín, J G; Mousseau, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Norrick, A; Nuruzzaman,; Paolone, V; Park, J; Patrick, C E; Perdue, G N; Ramirez, M A; Ransome, R D; Ray, H; Rimal, D; Rodrigues, P A; Ruterbories, D; Schellman, H; Salinas, C J Solano; Sultana, M; Falero, S Sánchez; Tice, B G; Valencia, E; Wolcott, J; Wospakrik, M; Zhang, D

    2016-01-01

    The total cross sections are important ingredients for the current and future neutrino oscillation experiments. We present measurements of the total charged-current neutrino and antineutrino cross sections on scintillator (CH) in the NuMI low-energy beamline using an {\\em in situ} prediction of the shape of the flux as a function of neutrino energy from 2--50 GeV. This flux prediction takes advantage of the fact that neutrino and antineutrino interactions with low nuclear recoil energy ($\

  18. Current use of intraosseous infusion in Danish emergency departments: a cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molin, Rune; Hallas, Peter; Brabrand, Mikkel;

    2010-01-01

    Intraosseous infusion (IOI) is recommended when intravenous access cannot be readily established in both pediatric and adult resuscitation. We evaluated the current use of IOI in Danish emergency departments (EDs).......Intraosseous infusion (IOI) is recommended when intravenous access cannot be readily established in both pediatric and adult resuscitation. We evaluated the current use of IOI in Danish emergency departments (EDs)....

  19. Plasma Shape and Current Density Profile Control in Advanced Tokamak Operating Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wenyu

    The need for new sources of energy is expected to become a critical problem within the next few decades. Nuclear fusion has sufficient energy density to potentially supply the world population with its increasing energy demands. The tokamak is a magnetic confinement device used to achieve controlled fusion reactions. Experimental fusion technology has now reached a level where tokamaks are able to produce about as much energy as is expended in heating the fusion fuel. The next step towards the realization of a nuclear fusion tokamak power plant is ITER, which will be capable of exploring advanced tokamak (AT) modes, characterized by a high fusion gain and plasma stability. The extreme requirements of the advanced modes motivates researchers to improve the modeling of the plasma response as well as the design of feedback controllers. This dissertation focuses on several magnetic and kinetic control problems, including the plasma current, position and shape control, and data-driven and first-principles-driven modeling and control of plasma current density profile and the normalized plasma pressure ratio betaN. The plasma is confined within the vacuum vessel by an external electromagnetic field, produced primarily by toroidal and poloidal field coils. The outermost closed plasma surface or plasma boundary is referred to as the shape of the plasma. A central characteristic of AT plasma regimes is an extreme elongated shape. The equilibrium among the electromagnetic forces acting on an elongated plasma is unstable. Moreover, the tokamak performance is improved if the plasma is located in close proximity to the torus wall, which guarantees an efficient use of available volume. As a consequence, feedback control of the plasma position and shape is necessary. In this dissertation, an Hinfinity-based, multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) controller for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is developed, which is used to control the plasma position, shape, and X

  20. Microstructural understanding and critical current optimization of advanced high field superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonney, L.A.; Willis, T.C.; Larbalestier, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    It is of great importance to improve critical current density, J[sub c] in A15 superconductors for high field magnet applications. Most current work to improve J[sub c] in A15 wires concentrates on increasing the overall J[sub c] by increasing the fraction of superconducting phase in the wire, by improving the uniformity of the superconductor cross section along the length of the wire and by adjusting the strainstate of the A15 layer. The goal of the A15 work in this group was to investigate the intrinsic J[sub c] of the A15 layer itself. To do this, a better understanding of factors controlling the intrinsic J[sub c]of the Nb[sub 3]Sn was pursued.

  1. Measurement of Neutrino and Antineutrino Total Charged-Current Cross Sections on Carbon with MINERvA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Lu [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This thesis presents a measurement of charged-current inclusive cross sections of muon neutrino and antineutrino interaction on carbon, and antineutrino to neutrino cross section ratio, r, in the energy range 2 - 22 GeV, with data collected in the MINERA experiment. The dataset corresponds to an exposure of 3.2 x 1020 protons on target (POT) for neutrinos and 1.01020 POT for antineutrinos. Measurement of neutrino and antineutrino charged-current inclusive cross sections provides essential constraints for future long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment at a few GeV energy range. Our measured antineutrino cross section has an uncertainty in the range 6.1% - 10.5% and is the most precise measurement below 6 GeV to date. The measured r has an uncertainty of 5.0% - 7.5%. This is the rst measurement below 6 GeV since Gargamelle in 1970s. The cross sections are measured as a function of neutrino energy by dividing the eciency corrected charged-current sample with extracted uxes. Fluxes are obtained using the low- method, which uses low hadronic energy subsamples of charged-current inclusive sample to extract ux. Measured cross sections show good agreement with the prediction of neutrino interaction models above 7 GeV, and are about 10% below the model below 7 GeV. The measured r agrees with the GENIE model [1] over the whole energy region. The measured cross sections and r are compared with world data.

  2. The charged current neutrino cross section for solar neutrinos, and background to \\BBz\\ experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Ejiri, H

    2013-01-01

    Solar neutrinos can interact with the source isotope in neutrinoless double beta decay experiments through charged current and neutral current interactions. The charged-current product nucleus will then beta decay with a Q-value larger than the double beta decay Q-value. As a result, this process can populate the region of interest and be a background to the double beta decay signal. In this paper we estimate the solar neutrino capture rates on three commonly used double beta decay isotopes, \

  3. Current Animal Models of Postoperative Spine Infection and Potential Future Advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrakis, A I; Loftin, A H; Lord, E L; Hu, Y; Manegold, J E; Dworsky, E M; Scaduto, A A; Bernthal, N M

    2015-01-01

    Implant related infection following spine surgery is a devastating complication for patients and can potentially lead to significant neurological compromise, disability, morbidity, and even mortality. This paper provides an overview of the existing animal models of postoperative spine infection and highlights the strengths and weaknesses of each model. In addition, there is discussion regarding potential modifications to these animal models to better evaluate preventative and treatment strategies for this challenging complication. Current models are effective in simulating surgical procedures but fail to evaluate infection longitudinally using multiple techniques. Potential future modifications to these models include using advanced imaging technologies to evaluate infection, use of bioluminescent bacterial species, and testing of novel treatment strategies against multiple bacterial strains. There is potential to establish a postoperative spine infection model using smaller animals, such as mice, as these would be a more cost-effective screening tool for potential therapeutic interventions.

  4. Current Animal Models of Postoperative Spine Infection and Potential Future Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eStavrakis

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Implant related infection following spine surgery is a devastating complication for patients and can potentially lead to significant neurological compromise, disability, morbidity, and even mortality. This paper provides an overview of the existing animal models of postoperative spine infection and highlights the strengths and weaknesses of each model. In addition there is discussion regarding potential modifications to these animal models to better evaluate preventative and treatment strategies for this challenging complication. Current models are effective in simulating surgical procedures but fail to evaluate infection longitudinally using multiple techniques. Potential future modifications to these models include using advanced imaging technologies to evaluate infection, use of bioluminescent bacterial species, and testing of novel treatment strategies against multiple bacterial strains. There is potential to establish a postoperative spine infection model using smaller animals, such as mice, as these would be a more cost-effective screening tool for potential therapeutic interventions.

  5. Current practices and reform proposals for the regulation of advanced medicinal products in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Sowmya; Bubela, Tania

    2015-01-01

    We describe the Canadian regulatory framework for evaluating advanced medicinal products based on current policies, guidance documents and regulations and analyze proposed reforms. Our analysis is based on a documentary review supplemented by discussions with Health Canada officials. We present an overview of the Canadian regulatory framework for cell and gene therapy, medical devices and manufacturing facilities. We use the approval of Prochymal™ to highlight Canada's conditional marketing approval system. Finally, we discuss proposed changes to the regulatory framework in response to identified gaps, stakeholder consultations and international harmonization initiatives. Based on our analyses, we suggest that Canadian regulators have taken a reasonable approach in applying their regulatory framework without compromising on product safety.

  6. Current Advancements and Strategies in Tissue Engineering for Wound Healing: A Comprehensive Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jasmine; Walsh, Claire; Yue, Dominic; Dardik, Alan; Cheema, Umber

    2017-01-01

    Significance: With an aging population leading to an increase in diabetes and associated cutaneous wounds, there is a pressing clinical need to improve wound-healing therapies. Recent Advances: Tissue engineering approaches for wound healing and skin regeneration have been developed over the past few decades. A review of current literature has identified common themes and strategies that are proving successful within the field: The delivery of cells, mainly mesenchymal stem cells, within scaffolds of the native matrix is one such strategy. We overview these approaches and give insights into mechanisms that aid wound healing in different clinical scenarios. Critical Issues: We discuss the importance of the biomimetic niche, and how recapitulating elements of the native microenvironment of cells can help direct cell behavior and fate. Future Directions: It is crucial that during the continued development of tissue engineering in wound repair, there is close collaboration between tissue engineers and clinicians to maintain the translational efficacy of this approach. PMID:28616360

  7. Food-borne trematodiasis: current chemotherapy and advances with artemisinins and synthetic trioxolanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, Jennifer; Utzinger, Jürg

    2007-11-01

    Over 40 million people are infected with food-borne trematodes and 750 million are at risk of food-borne trematodiasis, and yet this tropical disease is neglected. The current arsenal for the treatment and control of food-borne trematodiasis comprises praziquantel and triclabendazole, which were developed 20-30 years ago. The safety, therapeutic profiles and concern about resistance of these two drugs are summarized here. Recent advances with the artemisinins, which are best known for their antimalarial and antischistosomal properties, and the synthetic trioxolanes in different trematode-rodent models are reviewed. Lastly, prospects for the development of a safe, efficacious, inexpensive and broad-spectrum trematocidal drug are considered.

  8. An eddy-current model for three-dimensional nondestructive evaluation of advanced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, Harold A.; Murphy, R. Kim; Sabbagh, Elias H.

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a rigorous electromagnetic model and an inversion algorithm for the three-dimensional NDE of advanced composite materials. This approach extends Victor Technologies' work in eddy-current NDE of conventional metals, and allows one to determine in localized regions the fiber-resin ratio in graphite-epoxy, and to determine those anomalies, e.g., delaminations, broken fibers, moisture content, etc., that can be reconstructed by our inversion method. In developing the model, we apply rigorous electromagnetic theory to determine a Green's function for a slab of anisotropic composite material, and then determine the integral relations for the forward and inverse problems using the Green's function. We will give examples of the solution of forward problems using this model.

  9. Current Advances in Antitubercular Drug Discovery: Potent Prototypes and New Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos Fernandes, Guilherme Felipe; Jornada, Daniela Hartmann; de Souza, Paula Carolina; Chin, Chung Man; Pavan, Fernando Rogerio; Dos Santos, Jean Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by bacterium of the Mycobacterium genus, mainly by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). The World Health Organization aims to substantially reduce the number of cases in the coming years; however, the increased number of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extremely drug-resistant (XDR) forms of the bacterium and the lack of treatment for latent tuberculosis are challenges to be overcome. In this review, we have identified the most potent compounds described in the literature during recent years with MIC values < 7 µM, low toxicity and a high selective index. In addition, emerging targets in MTB are presented to provide new perspectives for the discovery of new antitubercular drugs. This review aims to summarize the current advances in and promote insights into antitubercular drug discovery.

  10. Advances for prosthetic technology from historical perspective to current status to future application

    CERN Document Server

    LeMoyne, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on the advances in transtibial prosthetic technology and targets research in the evolution of the powered prosthesis such as the BiOM, which was derived from considerable research and development at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The concept of the book spans the historical evolution of prosthetic applications from passive to new and futuristic robotic prosthetic technologies.  The author describes the reasons for amputation, surgical procedures, and an historical perspective of the prosthesis for the lower limb. He also addresses the phases and sub-phases of gait and compensatory mechanisms arising for a transtibial prosthesis and links the compensatory mechanisms to long-term morbidities.  The general technologies for gait analysis central to prosthetic design and the inherent biomechanics foundations for analysis are also explored.  The book reports on recent-past to current-term applications with passive elastic prostheses.  The core of the book deals with futuristic robo...

  11. Elastic, excitation, ionization and charge transfer cross sections of current interest in fusion energy research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, D.R.; Krstic, P.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. TN (United States). Physics Div.

    1997-01-01

    Due to the present interest in modeling and diagnosing the edge and divertor plasma regions in magnetically confined fusion devices, we have sought to provide new calculations regarding the elastic, excitation, ionization, and charge transfer cross sections in collisions among relevant ions, neutrals, and isotopes in the low-to intermediate-energy regime. We summarize here some of our recent work. (author)

  12. Measurement of charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised electron beam at HERA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Nicholass, D.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cindolo, F.; Corradi, M.; Iacobucci, G.; Margotti, A.; Nania, R.; Polini, A.; Antonelli, S.; Basile, M.; Bindi, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Contin, A.; Pasquale, S. De; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A.; Bartsch, D.; Brock, I.; Hartmann, H.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.-P.; Jungst, M.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Samson, U.; Schonberg, V.; Shehzadi, R.; Wlasenko, M.; Brook, N. H.; Heath, G. P.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Singh, I.; Capua, M.; Fazio, S.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Tassi, E.; Kim, J. Y.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Kamaluddin, B.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Ning, Y.; Ren, Z.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Galas, A.; Olkiewicz, K.; Pawlik, B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bold, T.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Kisielewska, D.; Lukasik, J.; Przybycien, M.; Suszycki, L.; Kotanski, A.; Slominski, W.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Blohm, C.; Bonato, A.; Borras, K.; Ciesielski, R.; Coppola, N.; Fourletova, J.; Geiser, A.; Gottlicher, P.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Huttmann, A.; Januschek, F.; Kahle, B.; Katkov, I. I.; Klein, U.; Kotz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohr, B.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Miglioranzi, S.; Montanari, A.; Namsoo, T.; Notz, D.; Parenti, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Schneekloth, U.; Spiridonov, A.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Theedt, T.; Ukleja, J.; Wolf, G.; Wrona, K.; Yagues Molina, A. G.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Drugakov, V.; Lohmann, W.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Pelfer, P. G.; Bamberger, A.; Dobur, D.; Karstens, F.; Vlasov, N. N.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Dunne, W.; Forrest, M.; Rosin, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Gialas, I.; Papageorgiu, K.; Holm, U.; Klanner, R.; Lohrmann, E.; Perrey, H.; Schleper, P.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Sztuk, J.; Stadie, H.; Turcato, M.; Foudas, C.; Fry, C.; Long, K. R.; Tapper, A. D.; Matsumoto, T.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Boos, E. G.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Aushev, V.; Bachynska, O.; Borodin, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kozulia, A.; Libov, V.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Makarenko, I.; Sorokin, Iu.; Verbytskyi, A.; Volynets, O.; Son, D.; de Favereau, J.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Barreiro, F.; Glasman, C.; Jimenez, M.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Ron, E.; Soares, M.; Terron, J.; Uribe-Estrada, C.; Zambrana, M.; Corriveau, F.; Schwartz, J.; Walsh, R.; Tsurugai, T.; Antonov, A.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Gladkov, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Stifutkin, A.; Suchkov, S.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Khein, L. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Zotkin, D. S.; Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Kollar, D.; Reisert, B.; Schmidke, W. B.; Grigorescu, G.; Keramidas, A.; Kooijman, P.; Pellegrino, A.; Tiecke, H.; Vazquez, M.; Brummer, N.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Lee, A.; Ling, T. Y.; Allfrey, P. D.; Bell, M. A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Ferrando, J.; Foster, B.; Gwenlan, C.; Horton, K.; Oliver, K.; Robertson, A.; Walczak, R.; Bertolin, A.; Dal Corso, F.; Dusini, S.; Longhin, A.; Stanco, L.; Bellan, P.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Garfagnini, A.; Limentani, S.; Oh, B. Y.; Raval, A.; Whitmore, J. J.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cole, J. E.; Hart, J. C.; Abramowicz, H.; Ingbir, R.; Kananov, S.; Stern, A.; Kuze, M.; Maeda, J.; Hori, R.; Kagawa, S.; Okazaki, N.; Tawara, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Kaji, H.; Kitamura, S.; Ota, O.; Ri, Y. D.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Monaco, V.; Sacchi, R.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Arneodo, M.; Ruspa, M.; Fourletov, S.; Stewart, T. P.; Boutle, S. K.; Butterworth, J. M.; Jones, T. W.; Loizides, J. H.; Wing, M.; Brzozowska, B.; Ciborowski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kulinski, P.; Luzniak, P.; Malka, J.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Perlanski, W.; Tymieniecka, T.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Plucinski, P.; Ukleja, A.; Eisenberg, Y.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Brownson, E.; Reeder, D. D.; Savin, A. A.; Smith, W. H.; Wolfe, H.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C. D.; Hartner, G.; Menary, S.; Noor, U.; Standage, J.; Whyte, J.

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of the cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering in e(-)p collisions with longitudinally polarised electron beams are presented. The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 175 pb(-1) collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at a centr

  13. Measurement of the Inclusive Electron Neutrino Charged Current Cross Section on Carbon with the T2K Near Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Aihara, H; Akiri, T; Andreopoulos, C; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bass, M; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Berardi, V; Berger, B E; Berkman, S; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F d M; Blondel, A; Bojechko, C; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Buchanan, N; Calland, R G; Rodríguez, J Caravaca; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Coleman, S J; Collazuol, G; Connolly, K; Cremonesi, L; Dabrowska, A; Danko, I; Das, R; Davis, S; de Perio, P; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Dewhurst, D; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Drapier, O; Duboyski, T; Duffy, K; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Emery-Schrenk, S; Ereditato, A; Escudero, L; Finch, A J; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Giffin, S; Giganti, C; Gilje, K; Goeldi, D; Golan, T; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Gudin, D; Hadley, D R; Haesler, A; Haigh, M D; Hamilton, P; Hansen, D; Hara, T; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayato, Y; Hearty, C; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hignight, J; Hillairet, A; Himmel, A; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ieva, M; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Irvine, T J; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Iwai, E; Iwamoto, K; Iyogi, K; Izmaylov, A; Jacob, A; Jamieson, B; Johnson, R A; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Jung, C K; Kabirnezhad, M; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Kanazawa, Y; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Katori, T; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kilinski, A; Kim, J; Kisiel, J; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, T; Koch, L; Kolaceke, A; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W; Kubo, H; Kudenko, Y; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Lamont, I; Larkin, E; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lazos, M; Lindner, T; Lister, C; Litchfield, R P; Longhin, A; Ludovici, L; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Martynenko, S; Maruyama, T; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Metelko, C; Mijakowski, P; Miller, C A; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Missert, A; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Murakami, A; Murdoch, M; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Palladino, V; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pickard, L; Guerra, E S Pinzon; Pistillo, C; Plonski, P; Poplawska, E; Popov, B; Posiadala, M; Poutissou, J -M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reeves, M; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Rodrigues, P A; Rojas, P; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Ruterbories, D; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Sánchez, F; Sato, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schoppmann, S; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Shustrov, Y; Sinclair, P; Smith, B; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Still, B; Suda, Y; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, M M; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorley, A; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Totsuka, Y; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Waldron, A V; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Williamson, Z; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Wongjirad, T; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yuan, T; Yu, M; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Żmuda, J

    2014-01-01

    The T2K off-axis near detector, ND280, is used to make the first differential cross-section measurements of electron neutrino charged current interactions at energies ~1 GeV as a function of electron momentum, electron scattering angle and four-momentum transfer of the interaction. The total flux-averaged $\

  14. Investigation of Advanced Counterrotation Blade Configuration Concepts for High Speed Turboprop Systems. Task 3: Advanced Fan Section Grid Generator Final Report and Computer Program User's Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Andrew J.; Delaney, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure is studied for generating three-dimensional grids for advanced turbofan engine fan section geometries. The procedure constructs a discrete mesh about engine sections containing the fan stage, an arbitrary number of axisymmetric radial flow splitters, a booster stage, and a bifurcated core/bypass flow duct with guide vanes. The mesh is an h-type grid system, the points being distributed with a transfinite interpolation scheme with axial and radial spacing being user specified. Elliptic smoothing of the grid in the meridional plane is a post-process option. The grid generation scheme is consistent with aerodynamic analyses utilizing the average-passage equation system developed by Dr. John Adamczyk of NASA Lewis. This flow solution scheme requires a series of blade specific grids each having a common axisymmetric mesh, but varying in the circumferential direction according to the geometry of the specific blade row.

  15. Measurement of neutral current e{sup {+-}}p cross sections at high Bjorken x with the ZEUS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). School of Physics; Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Abt, I. [Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Adamczyk, L. [AGH-Univ. of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland). Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science; Collaboration: ZEUS Collaboration; and others

    2013-12-15

    The neutral current e{sup {+-}}p cross section has been measured up to values of Bjorken x{approx_equal}1 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 187 pb{sup -1} of e{sup -}p and 142 pb{sup -1} of e{sup +}p collisions at {radical}(s)=318 GeV. Differential cross sections in x and Q{sup 2}, the exchanged boson virtuality, are presented for Q{sup 2}{>=}725 GeV{sup 2}. An improved reconstruction method and greatly increased amount of data allows a finer binning in the high-x region of the neutral current cross section and leads to a measurement with much improved precision compared to a similar earlier analysis. The measurements are compared to Standard Model expectations based on a variety of recent parton distribution functions.

  16. Measurement of neutral current e+/-p cross sections at high Bjorken x with the ZEUS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, H; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Aggarwal, R; Antonelli, S; Arslan, O; Aushev, V; Aushev, Y; Bachynska, O; Barakbaev, A N; Bartosik, N; Behnke, O; Behr, J; Behrens, U; Bertolin, A; Bhadra, S; Bloch, I; Bokhonov, V; Boos, E G; Borras, K; Brock, I; Brugnera, R; Bruni, A; Brzozowska, B; Bussey, P J; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Catterall, C D; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Agostini, G D; Dementiev, R K; Devenish, R C E; Dolinska, G; Drugakov, V; Dusini, S; Ferrando, J; Figiel, J; Foster, B; Gach, G; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Gizhko, A; Gladilin, L K; Gogota, O; Golubkov, Yu A; Grebenyuk, J; Gregor, I; Grzelak, G; Gueta, O; Guzik, M; Hain, W; Hartner, G; Hochman, D; Hori, R; Ibrahim, Z A; Iga, Y; Ishitsuka, M; Iudin, A; Januschek, F; Kadenko, I; Kananov, S; Kanno, T; Karshon, U; Kaur, M; Kaur, P; Khein, L A; Kisielewska, D; Klanner, R; Klein, U; Kondrashova, N; Kononenko, O; Korol, Ie; Korzhavina, I A; Kotanski, A; Koetz, U; Kovalchuk, N; Kowalski, H; Kuprash, O; Kuze, M; Levchenko, B B; Levy, A; Libov, V; Limentani, S; Lisovyi, M; Lobodzinska, E; Lohmann, W; Loehr, B; Lohrmann, E; Longhin, A; Lontkovskyi, D; Lukina, O Yu; Maeda, J; Makarenko, I; Malka, J; Martin, J F; Mergelmeyer, S; Idris, F Mohamad; Mujkic, K; Myronenko, V; Nagano, K; Nigro, A; Nobe, T; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Olkiewicz, K; Onishchuk, Yu; Paul, E; Perlanski, W; Perrey, H; Pokrovskiy, N S; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M; Raval, A; Roloff, P; Rubinsky, I; Ruspa, M; Samojlov, V; Saxon, D H; Schioppa, M; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Schwartz, J; Shcheglova, L M; Shevchenko, R; Shkola, O; Singh, I; Skillicorn, I O; Slominski, W; Sola, V; Solano, A; Spiridonov, A; Stanco, L; Stefaniuk, N; Stern, A; Stewart, T P; Stopa, P; Sztuk-Dambietz, J; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Tassi, E; Temiraliev, T; Tokushuku, K; Tomaszewska, J; Trofymov, A; Trusov, V; Tsurugai, T; Turcato, M; Turkot, O; Tymieniecka, T; Verbytskyi, A; Viazlo, O; Walczak, R; Abdullah, W A T Wan; Wichmann, K; Wing, M; Wolf, G; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Zakharchuk, N; Zarnecki, A F; Zawiejski, L; Zenaiev, O; Zhautykov, B O; Zhmak, N; Zotkin, D S

    2013-01-01

    The neutral current e+/-p cross section has been measured up to values of Bjorken x of approximately 1 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 187 inv. pb of e-p and 142 inv. pb of e+p collisions at sqrt(s) = 318GeV. Differential cross sections in x and Q2, the exchanged boson virtuality, are presented for Q2 geq 725GeV2. An improved reconstruction method and greatly increased amount of data allows a finer binning in the high-x region of the neutral current cross section and leads to a measurement with much improved precision compared to a similar earlier analysis. The measurements are compared to Standard Model expectations based on a variety of recent parton distribution functions.

  17. Advanced in situ spectroscopic techniques and their applications in environmental biogeochemistry: introduction to the special section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombi, Enzo; Hettiarachchi, Ganga M; Scheckel, Kirk G

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the molecular-scale complexities and interplay of chemical and biological processes of contaminants at solid, liquid, and gas interfaces is a fundamental and crucial element to enhance our understanding of anthropogenic environmental impacts. The ability to describe the complexity of environmental biogeochemical reaction mechanisms relies on our analytical ability through the application and developmemnt of advanced spectroscopic techniques. Accompanying this introductory article are nine papers that either review advanced in situ spectroscopic methods or present original research utilizing these techniques. This collection of articles summarizes the challenges facing environmental biogeochemistry, highlights the recent advances and scientific gaps, and provides an outlook into future research that may benefit from the use of in situ spectroscopic approaches. The use of synchrotron-based techniques and other methods are discussed in detail, as is the importance to integrate multiple analytical approaches to confirm results of complementary procedures or to fill data gaps. We also argue that future direction in research will be driven, in addition to recent analytical developments, by emerging factors such as the need for risk assessment of new materials (i.e., nanotechnologies) and the realization that biogeochemical processes need to be investigated in situ under environmentally relevant conditions.

  18. Measurement of neutrino induced charged current neutral pion production cross section at SciBooNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catala-Perez, Juan [Univ. of Valencia (Spain)

    2014-01-01

    SciBooNE is a neutrino scattering experiment located in the Booster Neutrino Beam at Fermilab. It collected data from June 2007 to August 2008 to accurately measure muon neutrino and anti-neutrino cross sections on carbon around 1 GeV neutrino energy. In this thesis we present the results on the measurement of the muon neutrino cross section resulting in a μ- plus a single π0 final state (CC- π0 channel). The present work will show the steps taken to achieve this result: from the reconstruction improvements to the background extraction. The flux-averaged CC - π0 production cross section measurement obtained in this thesis < σCC- π0 > Φ = (5.6 ± 1.9fit ± 0.7beam ± 0.5int - 0.7det) × 10-40 cm2/N at an average energy of 0.89 GeV is found to agree well both with the expectation from the Monte Ca

  19. 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 2: Advanced special functions models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R. B.; Banerjee, P. K.

    1987-01-01

    This Annual Status Report presents the results of work performed during the third year of the 3-D Inelastic Analysis Methods for Hot Sections Components program (NASA Contract NAS3-23697). The objective of the program is to produce a series of computer codes that permit more accurate and efficient three-dimensional analyses of selected hot section components, i.e., combustor liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. The computer codes embody a progression of mathematical models and are streamlined to take advantage of geometrical features, loading conditions, and forms of material response that distinguish each group of selected components.

  20. Current diffusive ballooning mode in a Tokamak with a noncircular cross section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagi, Masatoshi; Itoh, Sanae [Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Fukuyama, Atsushi; Itoh, Kimitaka

    1997-02-01

    The eigenvalue equation for the current diffusive ballooning mode in tokamaks is derived taking the geometrical effects, i.e., triangularity and ellipticity into account. The stability boundary is obtained in the strong ballooning limit. It is found that the ellipticity plays an important role on the stability of the current diffusive ballooning mode. On the other hand, the effect of the stabilization by the triangularity appears indirectly through the magnetic well term. The geometrical effect on the transport coefficient is also discussed. (author)

  1. Targeting Bone Metabolism in Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer: Current Options and Controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilman Todenhöfer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining bone health remains a clinical challenge in patients with prostate cancer (PC who are at risk of developing metastatic bone disease and increased bone loss due to hormone ablation therapy. In patients with cancer-treatment induced bone loss (CTIBL, antiresorptive agents have been shown to improve bone mineral density (BMD and to reduce the risk of fractures. For patients with bone metastases, both zoledronic acid and denosumab delay skeletal related events (SREs in the castration resistant stage of disease. Novel agents targeting the Wnt inhibitors dickkopf-1 and sclerostin are currently under investigation for the treatment of osteoporosis and malignant bone disease. New antineoplastic drugs such as abiraterone, enzalutamide, and Radium-223 are capable of further delaying SREs in patients with advanced PC. The benefit of antiresorptive treatment for patients with castration sensitive PC appears to be limited. Recent trials on the use of zoledronic acid for the prevention of bone metastases failed to be successful, whereas denosumab delayed the occurrence of bone metastases by a median of 4.1 months. Currently, the use of antiresorptive drugs to prevent bone metastases still remains a field of controversies and further trials are needed to identify patient subgroups that may profit from early therapy.

  2. GRAPEVINE VIRUS DISEASES:ECONOMIC IMPACT AND CURRENT ADVANCES IN VIRAL PROSPECTION AND MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCOS FERNANDO BASSO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Grapevine (Vitis spp. is a major vegetative propagated fruit crop with high socioeconomic importance worldwide. It is susceptible to several graft-transmitted agents that cause several diseases and substantial crop losses, reducing fruit quality and plant vigor, and shorten the longevity of vines. The vegetative propagation and frequent exchanges of propagative material among countries contribute to spread these pathogens, favoring the emergence of complex diseases. Its perennial life cycle further accelerates the mixing and introduction of several viral agents into a single plant. Currently, approximately 65 viruses belonging to different families have been reported infecting grapevines, but not all cause economically relevant diseases. The grapevine leafroll, rugose wood complex, leaf degeneration and fleck diseases are the four main disorders having worldwide economic importance. In addition, new viral species and strains have been identified and associated with economically important constraints to grape production. In Brazilian vineyards, eighteen viruses, three viroids and two virus-like diseases had already their occurrence reported and were molecularly characterized. Here, we review the current knowledge of these viruses, report advances in their diagnosis and prospection of new species, and give indications about the management of the associated grapevine diseases.

  3. Current Advance and Future Prospects of Tissue Engineering Approach to Dentin/Pulp Regenerative Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Gong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in biomaterial science and tissue engineering technology have greatly spurred the development of regenerative endodontics. This has led to a paradigm shift in endodontic treatment from simply filling the root canal systems with biologically inert materials to restoring the infected dental pulp with functional replacement tissues. Currently, cell transplantation has gained increasing attention as a scientifically valid method for dentin-pulp complex regeneration. This multidisciplinary approach which involves the interplay of three key elements of tissue engineering—stem cells, scaffolds, and signaling molecules—has produced an impressive number of favorable outcomes in preclinical animal studies. Nevertheless, many practical hurdles need to be overcome prior to its application in clinical settings. Apart from the potential health risks of immunological rejection and pathogenic transmission, the lack of a well-established banking system for the isolation and storage of dental-derived stem cells is the most pressing issue that awaits resolution and the properties of supportive scaffold materials vary across different studies and remain inconsistent. This review critically examines the classic triad of tissue engineering utilized in current regenerative endodontics and summarizes the possible techniques developed for dentin/pulp regeneration.

  4. Current Advance and Future Prospects of Tissue Engineering Approach to Dentin/Pulp Regenerative Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ting; Heng, Boon Chin; Lo, Edward Chin Man; Zhang, Chengfei

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in biomaterial science and tissue engineering technology have greatly spurred the development of regenerative endodontics. This has led to a paradigm shift in endodontic treatment from simply filling the root canal systems with biologically inert materials to restoring the infected dental pulp with functional replacement tissues. Currently, cell transplantation has gained increasing attention as a scientifically valid method for dentin-pulp complex regeneration. This multidisciplinary approach which involves the interplay of three key elements of tissue engineering-stem cells, scaffolds, and signaling molecules-has produced an impressive number of favorable outcomes in preclinical animal studies. Nevertheless, many practical hurdles need to be overcome prior to its application in clinical settings. Apart from the potential health risks of immunological rejection and pathogenic transmission, the lack of a well-established banking system for the isolation and storage of dental-derived stem cells is the most pressing issue that awaits resolution and the properties of supportive scaffold materials vary across different studies and remain inconsistent. This review critically examines the classic triad of tissue engineering utilized in current regenerative endodontics and summarizes the possible techniques developed for dentin/pulp regeneration.

  5. Current Advance and Future Prospects of Tissue Engineering Approach to Dentin/Pulp Regenerative Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ting; Heng, Boon Chin; Lo, Edward Chin Man; Zhang, Chengfei

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in biomaterial science and tissue engineering technology have greatly spurred the development of regenerative endodontics. This has led to a paradigm shift in endodontic treatment from simply filling the root canal systems with biologically inert materials to restoring the infected dental pulp with functional replacement tissues. Currently, cell transplantation has gained increasing attention as a scientifically valid method for dentin-pulp complex regeneration. This multidisciplinary approach which involves the interplay of three key elements of tissue engineering—stem cells, scaffolds, and signaling molecules—has produced an impressive number of favorable outcomes in preclinical animal studies. Nevertheless, many practical hurdles need to be overcome prior to its application in clinical settings. Apart from the potential health risks of immunological rejection and pathogenic transmission, the lack of a well-established banking system for the isolation and storage of dental-derived stem cells is the most pressing issue that awaits resolution and the properties of supportive scaffold materials vary across different studies and remain inconsistent. This review critically examines the classic triad of tissue engineering utilized in current regenerative endodontics and summarizes the possible techniques developed for dentin/pulp regeneration. PMID:27069484

  6. Pulmonary hypertension in adults with congenital heart disease and Eisenmenger syndrome: current advanced management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alto, Michele; Diller, Gerhard-Paul

    2014-09-01

    The presence of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) increases morbidity and reduces survival in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). PAH-CHD is a heterogeneous condition, depending on the type of the underlying defect and previous repair strategies. There is growing evidence of the benefits of PAH-specific therapy in the PAH-CHD population, but despite recent advances mortality rates remain relatively high. In the last years, an increasing focus has been placed on patients with PAH-CHD and net left-to-right shunt. Currently, there are limited data to guide the management of these patients and uncertainty on the cut-off values for eventual defect closure. Pregnancy conveys significant risks in PAH-CHD patients: appropriate counselling and care, including psychological support and a multidisciplinary team, should be part of the routine management of women with PAH-CHD of reproductive age. Some subgroups, such as patients with Down's syndrome, Fontan circulation and 'segmental' pulmonary hypertension, present particular challenges in terms of management and therapy. The current review focuses on contemporary treatment strategies in PAH-CHD patients with particular emphasis on challenging patient groups and conditions.

  7. High Current ESD Test of Advanced Triple Junction Solar Array Coupon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie

    2014-01-01

    Testing was conducted on an Advanced Triple Junction (ATJ) coupon that was part of a risk reduction effort in the development of a high-powered solar array design by Space Systems Loral, LLC (SSL). The ATJ coupon was a small, 4-cell, two-string configuration of flight-type design that has served as the basic test coupon design used in previous SSL environmental aging campaigns. The objective of the present test was to evaluate the performance of the coupon after being subjected to induced electrostatic discharge (ESD) testing at two string voltages (100 V, 150 V) and four string currents (1.65 A, 2.0 A, 2.475 A, and 3.3 A). An ESD test circuit, unique to SSL solar array design, was built that simulates the effect of missing cells and strings in a full solar panel with special primary arc flashover circuitry. A total of 73 primary arcs were obtained that included 7 temporary sustained arcs (TSA) events. The durations of the TSAs ranged from 50 micro-seconds to 2.75 milli-seconds. All TSAs occurred at a string voltage of 150 V. Post-ESD functional testing showed that no degradation occurred due to the TSA events. These test results point to a robust design for application to a high-current, high-power mission.

  8. The incidence of complications after cesarean section in HIV-infected women with advanced WHO stages of HIV disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Shevchenko

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of HIV infection in Ukraine is 1.6% overall, with antenatal prevalence of 0.52%, the highest in Europe. According to national protocol, cesarean section has been recommended for women with viral load above 50 copies/mL to further prevent vertical transmission of HIV. The aim of our study was to compare the infectious complication rates after cesarean delivery in HIV-infected women with advanced WHO stages of HIV disease who received HAART, and HIV-infected women with I or II WHO stages. Materials and methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on data derived from 150 HIV-infected women with advanced WHO stages of HIV disease (group I and 150 HIV-infected women with I or II WHO stages (group II, who underwent cesarean delivery. Postoperative infectious morbidity in both groups was analyzed according to whether the cesarean section was an elective or emergent delivery. Descriptive, comparison analyses were performed. Results: There was no significant difference between the both groups in terms of gravidity, parity, number of previous cesarean sections, estimated gestational age at time of delivery. It has been shown that HIV-infected women from the group I have 2 times more factors for the appearance of postpartum infectious complications, such as anemia, the urinary tract infection, sexually transmitted infections. Both groups of women were statistically more likely to experience postpartum endometritis when being delivered by emergent cesarean section than by elective cesarean section (14.6% versus 4.6%, respectively in the group I and 5.3% versus 0.5%, respectively, in the group II, superficial or deep wound breakdown (22.6% versus 4.6%, respectively, in the first group and 5.3% versus 2.6%, respectively, in the second group. Septic pelvic thrombophlebitis was only in 2% of HIV-infected women from the group I. Urinary tract infection had 25% HIV-infected women in the both groups. Overall, the rate of postpartum infectious

  9. Compton Scattering Cross Sections in Strong Magnetic Fields: Advances for Neutron Star Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ickes, Jesse; Gonthier, Peter L.; Eiles, Matthew; Baring, Matthew G.; Wadiasingh, Zorawar

    2014-08-01

    Various telescopes including RXTE, INTEGRAL, Suzaku and Fermi have detected steady non-thermal X-ray emission in the 10 ~ 200 keV band from strongly magnetic neutron stars known as magnetars. Magnetic inverse Compton scattering is believed to be a leading candidate for the production of this intense X-ray radiation. Generated by electrons possessing ultra-relativistic energies, this leads to attractive simplifications of the magnetic Compton cross section. We have recently addressed such a case by developing compact analytic expressions using correct spin-dependent widths acquired through the implementation of Sokolov & Ternov (ST) basis states, focusing specifically on ground state-to-ground state scattering. Such scattering in magnetar magnetospheres can cool electrons down to mildly-relativistic energies. Moreover, soft gamma-ray flaring in magnetars may well involve strong Comptonization in expanding clouds of mildly-relativistic pairs. These situations necessitate the development of more general magnetic scattering cross sections, where the incoming photons acquire substantial incident angles relative to the field in the rest frame of the electron, and the intermediate state can be excited to arbitrary Landau levels. Here, we highlight results from such a generalization using ST formalism. The cross sections treat the plethora of harmonic resonances associated with various cyclotron transitions between Landau states. Polarization dependence of the cross section for the four scattering modes is illustrated and compared with the non-relativistic Thompson cross section with classical widths. Results will find application to various neutron star problems, including computation of Eddington luminosities and polarization mode-switching rates in transient magnetar fireballs.We express our gratitude for the generous support of Michigan Space Grant Consortium, the National Science Foundation (grants AST-0607651, AST-1009725, AST-1009731 and PHY/DMR-1004811), and the

  10. Some medical and other risk factors for current cesarean section in a Jakarta hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang Poedjiningsih

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available For the last year the prevalence of cesarean section (CS increased in several countries as well as in Indonesia. In Indonesia there was no comprehensive study on risk factors related to CS. This case-control study was conducted at Fatmawati Hospital in Jakarta from 1 July 200 until 31 January 2001. Data was extracted from available medical records. Ceserean section was defined as a delivery through laparotomy. The control group consisted of subjects having vaginal deliveries. For each cases were selected randomly a control based on the date before or after 18 October 2000. Subject who had fetal distress had 544-folds increased risk to be CS relative to those who did not have fetal distress [adjusted odds ratio (OR = 544.86; 95% confidence intervals (CI = 71.85- 4131.78]. Furthermore, relative those who did not have dystocia, those who had dystocia had 143 times increased risk to be CS (adjusted OR = 52.86; 95% CI = 52.86 - 391.17. In term of previous CS, subjects who ever had previous CS had 30 times increased risk to be CS compared with the subjects who never had CS (adjusted OR = 30.23; 95% CI = 12.06 - 75.57. In contrast, compared with those who non cash payment, those who paid in cash had a lowered risk of 80% (adjusted OR = 0.20; 95% CI = 0.11-0.34. In conclusion, previous CS, dystocia, pre eclampsia, other medical indications, fetal distress, and non cash hospitalization expences increased risk of CS. (Med J Indones 2001; 10: 230-4Keywords: cesarean section, risk factors

  11. Cross-sectional imaging of biliary tumors: current clinical status and future developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zech, Christoph J.; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Reiser, Maximilian; Helmberger, Thomas [Institute of Clinical Radiology, Munich University Hospitals-Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377, Munich (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, including hilar cholangiocarcinoma, is a relatively rare diagnosis. However, it frequently has been associated with major problems in diagnostics and clinical management from its first comprehensive description by Klatskin up until today. In this article, cholangiocarcinoma, representing the most common biliary tumor, as well as the differential diagnoses of benign and malignant biliary obstruction, will be discussed. The latest improvements of cross-sectional imaging modalities (sonography, CT, MRI and PET) and their diagnostic values for detection and staging will be displayed. A practical imaging-based diagnostic approach to obstructive biliary disease will be proposed. (orig.)

  12. Current distribution in ESD (Electron Stimulated Desorption) diodes. Cross section corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J. C.; Gomer, R.

    1985-11-01

    The electron current distribution in diodes consisting of a rectangular crystal and an electron emitting filament parallel to and in front of it, used in several electron stimulated desorption (ESD) experiments has been determined by means of a dummy crystal constructed from uniformly transparent Lektromesh and a moveable, suitably constructed fine probe. It was found that for straight filaments the distribution was uniform along the narrow, but nearly triangular along the long dimension of the crystal.

  13. Malignant gliomas: current perspectives in diagnosis, treatment, and early response assessment using advanced quantitative imaging methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed R

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Rafay Ahmed,1 Matthew J Oborski,2 Misun Hwang,1 Frank S Lieberman,3 James M Mountz11Department of Radiology, 2Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 3Department of Neurology and Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USAAbstract: Malignant gliomas consist of glioblastomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, anaplastic oligodendrogliomas and anaplastic oligoastrocytomas, and some less common tumors such as anaplastic ependymomas and anaplastic gangliogliomas. Malignant gliomas have high morbidity and mortality. Even with optimal treatment, median survival is only 12–15 months for glioblastomas and 2–5 years for anaplastic gliomas. However, recent advances in imaging and quantitative analysis of image data have led to earlier diagnosis of tumors and tumor response to therapy, providing oncologists with a greater time window for therapy management. In addition, improved understanding of tumor biology, genetics, and resistance mechanisms has enhanced surgical techniques, chemotherapy methods, and radiotherapy administration. After proper diagnosis and institution of appropriate therapy, there is now a vital need for quantitative methods that can sensitively detect malignant glioma response to therapy at early follow-up times, when changes in management of nonresponders can have its greatest effect. Currently, response is largely evaluated by measuring magnetic resonance contrast and size change, but this approach does not take into account the key biologic steps that precede tumor size reduction. Molecular imaging is ideally suited to measuring early response by quantifying cellular metabolism, proliferation, and apoptosis, activities altered early in treatment. We expect that successful integration of quantitative imaging biomarker assessment into the early phase of clinical trials could provide a novel approach for testing new therapies

  14. Familial determinants of current smoking among adolescents of Lithuania: a cross-sectional survey 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaborskis, Apolinaras; Sirvyte, Dainora

    2015-09-14

    Understanding the role of the family in shaping adolescent health risk behaviours has recently been given increased attention. This study investigated association between current smoking and a range of familial factors in a representative sample of Lithuanian adolescents. Study subjects (N = 3696) were adolescents aged 13- and 15-years from the schools in Lithuania who were surveyed in Spring 2014 according to the methodology of the cross-national Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC). A standard HBSC international questionnaire was translated into Lithuanian and used anonymously to obtain information about current smoking patterns and family life (family structure, quality of communication in family, parental monitoring, bonding, parenting style, family time, etc.). Logistic regression was used to assess association between smoking and familial variables. The prevalence of current smoking was 16.5 % (20.8 % in boys and 11.9 % in girls; P satisfaction with family relationships (OR = 1.89; 95 % CI: 1.27-2.83), low school-related parental support (OR = 1.40; 95 % CI: 1.01-1.95), easy communication with the father (OR = 0.56; 95 % CI: 0.38-0.80) and often use of electronic media for communication with parents (OR = 0.66; 95 % CI: 0.50-0.88). The last two determinants showed an inverse effect than it was hypothesized. Higher prevalence of smoking among adolescents of Lithuania is associated with a non- intact family structure as well as weaker parental support and bonding. Family life practices are critical components to be incorporated in prevention and intervention programs for adolescent smoking in Lithuania.

  15. Theme section on mesophotic coral ecosystems: advances in knowledge and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loya, Yossi; Eyal, Gal; Treibitz, Tali; Lesser, Michael P.; Appeldoorn, Richard

    2016-03-01

    The Second International Mesophotic Coral Ecosystems (MCEs) workshop was held in Eilat, Israel, October 26-31, 2014. Here we provide an account of: (1) advances in our knowledge of MCE ecology, including the central question of the potential vertical connectivity between MCEs and shallow-water reefs (SWRs), and that of the validity of the deep-reef refugia hypothesis (DRRH); (2) the contribution of the 2014 MCE workshop to the central question presented in (1), as well as its contribution to novel MCE studies on corals, sponges, fish, and crabs; and (3) gaps, priorities, and recommendations for future research stemming from the workshop. Despite their close proximity to well-studied SWRs, and the growing evidence of their importance, our scientific knowledge of MCEs is still in its infancy. During the last five years, we have witnessed an ever-increasing scientific interest in MCEs, expressed in the exponential increase in the number of publications studying this unique environment. The emerging consensus is that lower MCE benthic assemblages represent unique communities, either of separate species or genetically distinct individuals within species, and any significant support for the DRRH will be limited to upper MCEs. Determining the health and stability of MCEs, their biodiversity, and the degree of genetic connectivity among SWRs and MCEs, will ultimately indicate the ability of MCEs to contribute to the resilience of SWRs and help to guide future management and conservation strategies. MCEs deserve therefore management consideration in their own right. With the technological advancements taking place in recent years that facilitate access to MCEs, the prospects for exciting and innovative discoveries resulting from MCE research, spanning a wide variety of fields, are immense.

  16. First Measurement of the Muon Anti-Neutrino Charged Current Quasielastic Double-Differential Cross-Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grange, Joseph M. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation presents the first measurement of the muon antineutrino charged current quasi-elastic double-differential cross section. These data significantly extend the knowledge of neutrino and antineutrino interactions in the GeV range, a region that has recently come under scrutiny due to a number of conflicting experimental results. To maximize the precision of this measurement, three novel techniques were employed to measure the neutrino background component of the data set. Representing the first measurements of the neutrino contribution to an accelerator-based antineutrino beam in the absence of a magnetic field, the successful execution of these techniques carry implications for current and future neutrino experiments.

  17. High Current ESD Test of Advanced Triple Junction Solar Array Coupon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie

    2015-01-01

    A test was conducted on an Advanced Triple Junction (ATJ) coupon that was part of a risk reduction effort in the development of a high-powered solar array design by SSL. The ATJ coupon was a small, 4-cell, two-string configuration that has served as the basic test coupon design used in previous SSL environmental aging campaigns. The coupon has many attributes of the flight design; e.g., substrate structure with graphite face sheets, integrated by-pass diodes, cell interconnects, RTV grout, wire routing, etc. The objective of the present test was to evaluate the performance of the coupon after being subjected to induced electrostatic discharge testing at two string voltages (100 V, 150 V) and four array current (1.65 A, 2.0 A, 2.475 A, and 3.3 A). An ESD test circuit, unique to SSL solar array design, was built that simulates the effect of missing cells and strings in a full solar panel with special primary arc flashover circuitry. A total of 73 primary arcs were obtained that included 7 temporary sustained arcs (TSA) events. The durations of the TSAs ranged from 50 micros to 2.9 ms. All TSAs occurred at a string voltage of 150 V. Post-test Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS), Dark I-V, and By-Pass Diode tests showed that no degradation occurred due to the TSA events. In addition, the post-test insulation resistance measured was > 50 G-ohms between cells and substrate. These test results indicate a robust design for application to a high-current, high-power mission application.

  18. Measurement of high-Q2 charged current cross sections in e-p deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, T; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Aghuzumtsyan, G; Antonioli, P; Antonov, A; Arneodo, M; Bailey, D S; Bamberger, A; Barakbaev, A N; Barbagli, G; Barbi, M; Bari, G; Barreiro, F; Bartsch, D; Bashkirov, V; Basile, M; Bauerdick, L A T; Bednarek, B; Behrens, U; Bell, M; Bellagamba, L; Benen, A; Bertolin, A; Bhadra, S; Bodmann, B; Bokel, C; Boogert, S; Boos, E G; Borras, K; Boscherini, D; Brock, I; Brook, N H; Brugnera, R; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Brümmer, N; Bussey, P J; Butterworth, J M; Bylsma, B; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carli, T; Carlin, R; Cartiglia, N; Catterall, C D; Chekanov, S; Chiochia, V; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Cirio, R; Cloth, P; Cole, J E; Collins-Tooth, C; Contin, A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Coppola, N; Cormack, C; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Costa, M; Crittenden, James Arthur; D'Agostini, Giulio; Dagan, S; Dal Corso, F; Danilov, P; Dannheim, D; De Pasquale, S; De Wolf, E; Del Peso, J; Dementiev, R K; Derrick, M; Deshpande, Abhay A; Devenish, R C E; Dhawan, S; Dolgoshein, B A; Doyle, A T; Drews, G; Durkin, L S; Dusini, S; Eisenberg, Y; Engelen, J; Ermolov, P F; Eskreys, Andrzej; Ferrando, J; Ferrero, M I; Figiel, J; Filges, D; Foster, B; Foudas, C; Fourletov, S; Fourletova, J; Fox-Murphy, A; Fricke, U; Fusayasu, T; Gabareen, A; Galea, R; Gallo, E; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Genta, C; Gialas, I; Gilmore, J; Ginsburg, C M; Giusti, P; Gladilin, L K; Gladkov, D; Glasman, C; Göbel, F; Goers, S; Golubkov, Yu A; Goncalo, R; González, O; Grabowska-Bold, I; Grijpink, S; Grzelak, G; Gutsche, O; Gwenlan, C; Göttlicher, P; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hall-Wilton, R; Hamatsu, R; Hanlon, S; Hart, J C; Hartmann, H; Hartner, G F; Heaphy, E A; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Helbich, M; Heusch, C A; Hilger, E; Hillert, S; Hirose, T; Hochman, D; Holm, U; Hughes, V W; Iacobucci, G; Iga, Y; Inuzuka, M; Irrgang, P; Jakob, H P; Jelen, K; Jones, T W; Kananov, S; Kappes, A; Karshon, U; Katkov, I I; Katz, U F; Kcira, D; Kerger, R; Khein, L A; Kim, C L; Kim, J Y; Kim, Y K; Kind, O; Kisielewska, D; Kitamura, S; Klimek, K; Koffeman, E; Kohno, T; Kooijman, P; Koop, T; Korzhav, I A; Kotanski, A; Kowal, A M; Kowal, M; Kowalski, H; Kowalski, T; Krakauer, D A; Kreisel, A; Krumnack, N; Kuze, M; Kuzmin, V A; Kötz, U; Labarga, L; Labes, H; Lammers, S; Lane, J B; Lee, J H; Lee, S W; Lelas, D; Levchenko, B B; Levi, G; Levman, G M; Levy, A; Li, L; Lightwood, M S; Lim, H; Lim, I T; Limentani, S; Ling, T Y; Liu, X; Lohrmann, E; Loizides, J H; Long, K R; Longhin, A; Lopez-Duran Viani, A; Lukina, O Yu; Lupi, A; Löhr, B; Maddox, E; Magill, S; Mankel, R; Margotti, A; Marini, G; Martin, J F; Martínez, M; Maselli, S; Mastroberardino, A; Mat, T; Matsuzawa, K; Mattingly, M C K; Mc, G J; McCubbin, N A; Mellado, B; Menary, S R; Metlica, F; Meyer, A; Milite, M; Miller, D B; Mindur, B; Mirea, A; Monaco, V; Moritz, M; Musgrave, B; Nagano, K; Nania, R; Nigro, A; Nishimura, T; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Ochs, A; Oh, B Y; Olkiewicz, K; Pac, M Y; Padhi, S; Paganis, S; Palmonari, F; Parenti, A; Park, I H; Paul, E; Pavel, N; Pawlak, J M; Pelfer, P G; Pellegrino, A; Pellmann, I A; Peroni, C; Pesci, A; Petrucci, M C; Plucinsky, P P; Pokrovskiy, N S; Polini, A; Posocco, M; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M B; Raach, H; Rautenberg, J; Raval, A; Redondo, I; Reeder, D D; Renner, R; Repond, J; Rigby, M; Robins, S; Rodrigues, E; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E; Ruske, O; Ruspa, M; Sabetfakhri, A; Sacchi, R; Saint-Laurent, M G; Salehi, H; Sartorelli, G; Saull, P R B; Savin, A A; Saxon, D H; Schagen, S; Schioppa, M; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Schnurbusch, H; Sciulli, F; Scott, J; Selonke, F; Shcheglova, L M; Skillicorn, I O; Slominski, W; Smalska, B; Smith, W H; Soares, M; Solano, A; Son, D; Sosnovtsev, V V; Staiano, A; Stairs, D G; Stanco, L; Standage, J; Stifutkin, A; Stonjek, S; Stopa, P; Straub, P B; Suchkov, S; Surrow, B; Susinno, G; Suszycki, L; Sutton, M R; Sztuk, J; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Tandler, J; Tap, A D; Tapper, R J; Tassi, E; Terron, J; Tiecke, H G; Tokushuku, K; Tsurugai, T; Tuning, N; Turcato, M; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Ukleja, J; Umemori, K; Velthuis, J J; Vlasov, N N; Voss, K C; Vázquez, M; Walczak, R; Walker, R; Weber, A; Wes, H; West, B J; Whitmore, J J; Wichmann, R; Wick, K; Wiggers, L; Wills, H H; Wing, M; Wolf, G; Yamada, S; Yamashita, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yoshida, R; Youngman, C; Zakrzewski, J A; Zeuner, W; Zhautykov, B O; Zichichi, A; Ziegler, A; Zotkin, S A

    2002-01-01

    Cross sections for e-p charged current deep inelastic scattering have been measured at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV with an integrated luminosity of 16.4 pb-1 using the ZEUS detector at HERA. Differential cross-sections d\\sigma/dQ2, d\\sigma/dx and d\\sigma/dy are presented for Q2>200 GeV2. In addition, d2\\sigma/dxdQ2 was measured in the kinematic range 280 GeV2 < Q2 < 30000 GeV2 and 0.015 < x < 0.42. The predictions of the Standard Model agree well with the measured cross sections. The mass of the W boson, determined from a fit to d\\sigma/dQ2, is MW=80.3 \\pm 2.1 (stat.) \\pm 1.2 (syst.) \\pm 1.0 (PDF) GeV.

  19. Current Advances in Thyroid Cancer Management. Are We Ready for the Epidemic Rise of Diagnoses?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Rusinek

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A rising incidence of thyroid cancers (TCs mainly small tumors, observed during recent years, lead to many controversies regarding treatment strategies. TCs represent a distinct molecular background and clinical outcome. Although in most cases TCs are characterized by a good prognosis, there are some aggressive forms, which do not respond to standard treatment. There are still some questions, which have to be resolved to avoid dangerous simplifications in the clinical management. In this article, we focused on the current advantages in preoperative molecular diagnostic tests and histopathological examination including noninvasive follicular thyroid neoplasm with papillary-like nuclear features (NIFTP. We discussed the controversies regarding the extent of thyroid surgery and adjuvant radioiodine therapy, as well as new treatment modalities for radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (RR-DTC. Considering medullary thyroid cancer (MTC, we analyzed a clinical management based on histopathology and RET (ret proto-oncogene mutation genotype, disease follow-up with a special attention to serum calcitonin doubling time as an important prognostic marker, and targeted therapy applied in advanced MTC. In addition, we provided some data regarding anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC, a highly lethal neoplasm, which lead to death in nearly 100% of patients due to the lack of effective treatment options.

  20. Advanced model of eddy-current NDE inverse problem with sparse grid algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liming; Sabbagh, Harold A.; Sabbagh, Elias H.; Murphy, R. Kim; Bernacchi, William

    2017-02-01

    In model-based inverse problem, some unknown parameters need to be estimated. These parameters are used not only to characterize the physical properties of cracks, but also to describe the position of the probes (such as lift off and angles) in the calibration. After considering the effect of the position of the probes in the inverse problem, the accuracy of the inverse result will be improved. With increasing the number of the parameters in the inverse problems, the burden of calculations will increase exponentially in the traditional full grid method. The sparse grid algorithm, which was introduced by Sergey A. Smolyak, was used in our work. With this algorithm, we obtain a powerful interpolation method that requires significantly fewer support nodes than conventional interpolation on a full grid. In this work, we combined sparse grid toolbox TASMANIAN, which is produced by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and professional eddy-current NDE software, VIC-3D R◯, to solve a specific inverse problem. An advanced model based on our previous one is used to estimate length and depth of the crack, lift off and two angles of the position of probes. Considering the calibration process, pseudorandom noise is considered in the model and statistical behavior is discussed.

  1. Advanced Steels for Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding in Current Light Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebak, Raul B.

    After the March 2011 Fukushima events, the U.S. Congress directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to focus efforts on the development of fuel cladding materials with enhanced accident tolerance. In comparison with the stand-ard UO2-Zirconium based system, the new fuels need to tolerate loss of active cooling in the core for a considerably longer time period while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operation conditions. Advanced steels such as iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys are being investigated for degradation behavior both under normal operation conditions in high temperature water (e.g. 288°C) and under accident conditions for reaction with steam up to 1400°C. Commercial and experimental alloys were tested for several periods of time in 100% superheated steam from 800°C to 1475°C. Results show that FeCrAl alloys significantly outperform the resistance in steam of the current zirconium alloys.

  2. The Current Role of Carotid Duplex Ultrasonography in the Management of Carotid Atherosclerosis: Foundations and Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly R. Byrnes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of atherosclerotic carotid occlusive disease for stroke prevention has entered a time of dramatic change. Improvements in medical management have begun to challenge traditional interventional approaches to asymptomatic carotid stenosis. Simultaneously, carotid artery stenting (CAS has emerged as an alternative to carotid endarterectomy (CE. Finally, multiple factors beyond degree of stenosis and symptom status now mitigate clinical decision making. These factors include brain perfusion, plaque morphology, and patency of intracranial collaterals (circle of Willis. With all of these changes, it seems prudent to review the role of carotid duplex ultrasonography in the management of atherosclerotic carotid occlusive disease for stroke prevention. Carotid duplex ultrasonography (CDU for initial and serial imaging of the carotid bifurcation remains an essential component in the management of carotid bifurcation disease. However, correlative axial imaging modalities (computer tomographic angiography (CTA and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA increasingly aid in the assessment of individual stroke risk and are important in treatment decisions. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1 to discuss foundations and advances in CDU and (2 to evaluate the current role of CDU, in light of other imaging modalities, in the clinical management of carotid atherosclerosis.

  3. Measurement of the Antineutrino to Neutrino Charged-Current Interaction Cross Section Ratio in MINERvA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, L.; et al.

    2017-01-17

    We present measurements of the neutrino and antineutrino total charged-current cross sections on carbon and their ratio using the MINERvA scintillator-tracker. The measurements span the energy range 2-22 GeV and were performed using forward and reversed horn focusing modes of the Fermilab low-energy NuMI beam to obtain large neutrino and antineutrino samples. The flux is obtained using a sub-sample of charged-current events at low hadronic energy transfer along with precise higher energy external neutrino cross section data overlapping with our energy range between 12-22 GeV. We also report on the antineutrino-neutrino cross section ratio, Rcc, which does not rely on external normalization information. Our ratio measurement, obtained within the same experiment using the same technique, benefits from the cancellation of common sample systematic uncertainties and reaches a precision of 5% at low energy. Our results for the antineutrino-nucleus scattering cross section and for Rcc are the most precise to date in the energy range $E_{\

  4. Utilization of Advanced Diagnostic Methods for Texture and Rut Depth Analysis on a Testing Pavement Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabej, Martin; Grinč, Michal; Kotek, Peter; Kováč, Matúš; Decký, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Qualitative characteristics of pavement in wide range reflects the pavement serviceability, which is a summary of the characteristics of the pavement, providing a fast, smooth, economical and especially safe driving of motor-vehicles. The target factor of pavement serviceability and safety of roads represents the quality of their surface properties. In the framework of research activities performed in the Research Centre founded under the auspices of University of Žilina, individual parameters of pavement serviceability were monitored by pavement surface scanning. This paper describes the creation of a 3D - road surface model and its analysis and evaluation from the viewpoint of two pavement serviceability parameters - the rut depth and texture. Measurements were performed on an experimental pavement section used contemporary in an Accelerated Pavement Testing experiment. The long-term goal is to ascertain functions predicting degradation of these two pavement serviceability parameters.

  5. Neutron cross-sections for advanced nuclear systems: the n_TOF project at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbagallo, M.; Mastromarco, M.; Colonna, N.; Altstadt, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bécares, V.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Calviani, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Carrapiço, C.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Chin, M.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Duran, I.; Dressler, R.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Ferrari, A.; Fraval, K.; Ganesan, S.; García, A. R.; Giubrone, G.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González-Romero, E.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Hernández-Prieto, A.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Karadimos, D.; Kivel, N.; Koehler, P.; Krtička, M.; Kroll, J.; Lampoudis, C.; Langer, C.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Leong, L. S.; Losito, R.; Manousos, A.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P. F.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Mondalaers, W.; Paradela, C.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Plompen, A.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego, A.; Rubbia, C.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Sarmento, R.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vermeulen, M. J.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Ware, T.; Weigand, M.; Weiß, C.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.

    2014-12-01

    The study of neutron-induced reactions is of high relevance in a wide variety of fields, ranging from stellar nucleosynthesis and fundamental nuclear physics to applications of nuclear technology. In nuclear energy, high accuracy neutron data are needed for the development of Generation IV fast reactors and accelerator driven systems, these last aimed specifically at nuclear waste incineration, as well as for research on innovative fuel cycles. In this context, a high luminosity Neutron Time Of Flight facility, n_TOF, is operating at CERN since more than a decade, with the aim of providing new, high accuracy and high resolution neutron cross-sections. Thanks to the features of the neutron beam, a rich experimental program relevant to nuclear technology has been carried out so far. The program will be further expanded in the near future, thanks in particular to a new high-flux experimental area, now under construction.

  6. Utilization of Advanced Diagnostic Methods for Texture and Rut Depth Analysis on a Testing Pavement Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slabej Martin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative characteristics of pavement in wide range reflects the pavement serviceability, which is a summary of the characteristics of the pavement, providing a fast, smooth, economical and especially safe driving of motor-vehicles. The target factor of pavement serviceability and safety of roads represents the quality of their surface properties. In the framework of research activities performed in the Research Centre founded under the auspices of University of Žilina, individual parameters of pavement serviceability were monitored by pavement surface scanning. This paper describes the creation of a 3D - road surface model and its analysis and evaluation from the viewpoint of two pavement serviceability parameters - the rut depth and texture. Measurements were performed on an experimental pavement section used contemporary in an Accelerated Pavement Testing experiment. The long-term goal is to ascertain functions predicting degradation of these two pavement serviceability parameters.

  7. Neutron cross-sections for advanced nuclear systems: the n_TOF project at CERN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbagallo M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of neutron-induced reactions is of high relevance in a wide variety of fields, ranging from stellar nucleosynthesis and fundamental nuclear physics to applications of nuclear technology. In nuclear energy, high accuracy neutron data are needed for the development of Generation IV fast reactors and accelerator driven systems, these last aimed specifically at nuclear waste incineration, as well as for research on innovative fuel cycles. In this context, a high luminosity Neutron Time Of Flight facility, n_TOF, is operating at CERN since more than a decade, with the aim of providing new, high accuracy and high resolution neutron cross-sections. Thanks to the features of the neutron beam, a rich experimental program relevant to nuclear technology has been carried out so far. The program will be further expanded in the near future, thanks in particular to a new high-flux experimental area, now under construction.

  8. Measurement of high-Q{sup 2} neutral current cross-sections with longitudinally polarised positrons with the ZEUS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Trevor P.

    2012-07-15

    The cross sections for neutral current (NC) deep inelastic scattering (DIS) in e{sup +}p collisions with a longitudinally polarised positron beam are measured at high momentum transfer squared (Q{sup 2}>185 GeV{sup 2}) at the ZEUS detector at HERA. The HERA accelerator provides e{sup {+-}}p collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV, which allows the weak contribution to the NC process to be studied at high Q{sup 2}. The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 135.5 pb{sup -1} collected with the ZEUS detector in 2006 and 2007. The single differential NC cross sections d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}, d{sigma}/dx and d{sigma}/dy and the reduced cross section {sigma} are measured. The structure function xF{sub 3} is determined by combining the e{sup +}p NC reduced cross sections with the previously measured e{sup -}p measurements. The interference structure function xF{sub 3}{sup {gamma}Z} is extracted at Q{sup 2}=1500 GeV{sup 2}. The cross-section asymmetry between the positive and negative polarisation of the positron beam is measured and the parity violation effects of the electroweak interaction are observed. The predictions of the Standard Model of particle physics agree well with the measurements. (orig.)

  9. Measurement of Neutrino and Antineutrino Charged-Current Inclusive Cross Sections with the MINERvA Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devan, Joshua D.

    Neutrinos are a nearly massless, neutral particle in the Standard Model that only interact via the weak interaction. Experimental confirmation of neutrino oscillations, in which a neutrino created as a particular type (electron, muon or tau) can be observed as a different type after propagating some distance, earned the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics. Neutrino oscillation experiments rely on accurate measurements of neutrino interactions with matter, such as that presented here. Neutrinos also provide a unique probe of the nucleus, complementary to electron scattering experiments. This thesis presents a measurement of the charged-current inclusive cross section for muon neutrinos and antineutrinos in the energy range 2 to 50 GeV with the MINERvA detector. MINERvA is a neutrino scattering experiment in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab, near Chicago. A cross section measures the probability of an interaction occurring, measured here as a function of neutrino energy. To extract a cross section from data, the observed rate of interactions is corrected for detector efficiency and divided by the number of scattering nucleons in the target and the flux of neutrinos in the beam. The neutrino flux is determined with the low- v method, which relies on the principle that the cross section for interactions with very low recoil energy is nearly constant as a function of neutrino energy. The measured cross section is compared with world data.

  10. Measurement of charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised electron beam at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (US)] (and others)

    2008-12-15

    Measurements of the cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering in e{sup -}p collisions with longitudinally polarised electron beams are presented. The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 175 pb{sup -1} collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The total cross section is given for positively and negatively polarised electron beams. The differential cross-sections d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}, d{sigma}/dx and d{sigma}/dy are presented for Q{sup 2}>200 GeV{sup 2}. The double-differential cross-section d{sup 2}{sigma}/dxdQ{sup 2} is presented in the kinematic range 280sections are compared with the predictions of the Standard Model. (orig.)

  11. Measurement of Neutral and Charged Current Cross Sections in Electron-Proton Collisions at High $Q^{2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Arkadov, V.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Ayyaz, I.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bassler, U.; Bate, P.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Benisch, T.; Berger, Christoph; Bernardi, G.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruckner, W.; Bruel, P.; Bruncko, D.; Burger, J.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burkhardt, H.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Cao, Jun; Carli, T.; Caron, S.; Chabert, E.; Clarke, D.; Clerbaux, B.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Foster, J.M.; Franke, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Ghazarian, S.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goodwin, C.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C.; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Jansen, D.M.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kastli, H.K.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Krasny, M.W.; Krehbiel, H.; Kroseberg, J.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, A.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Lahmann, R.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Magnussen, N.; Mahlke-Kruger, H.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Merkel, P.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mkrtchyian, T.; Mohr, R.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Nellen, G.; Newman, Paul R.; Nicholls, T.C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rabbertz, K.; Radel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Reyna, D.; Riess, S.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Royon, C.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, D.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Chekelian, V.I.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sievers, P.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Solochenko, V.; Solovev, Y.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Steinhart, J.; Stella, B.; Stellberger, A.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Swart, M.; Tasevsky, M.; Chernyshov, V.; Chetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tobien, N.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vassilev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wallny, R.; Walter, T.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Werner, M.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Wollatz, H.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; Zsembery, J.; zur Nedden, M.

    2001-01-01

    The inclusive e^-p single and double differential cross sections for neutral and charged current processes are measured with the H1 detector at HERA, in the range of four-momentum transfer squared Q^2 between 150 and 30000 GeV^2, and Bjorken x between 0.002 and 0.65. The data were taken in 1998 and 1999 with a centre-of-mass energy of 320 GeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 16.4 pb^(-1). The data are compared with recent measurements of the inclusive neutral and charged current e^+p cross sections. For Q^2>1000 GeV^2 clear evidence is observed for an asymmetry between e^+p and e^-p neutral current scattering and the generalised structure function xF_3 is extracted for the first time at HERA. A fit to the charged current data is used to extract a value for the W boson propagator mass. The data are found to be in good agreement with Standard Model predictions.

  12. Measurement of the Charged-Current Quasi-Elastic Cross-Section for Electron Neutrinos on a Hydrocarbon Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolcott, Jeremy [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Appearance-type neutrino oscillation experiments, which observe the transition from muon neutrinos to electron neutrinos, promise to help answer some of the fundamental questions surrounding physics in the post-Standard-Model era. Because they wish to observe the interactions of electron neutrinos in their detectors, and because the power of current results is typically limited by their systematic uncertainties, these experiments require precise estimates of the cross-section for electron neutrino interactions. Of particular interest is the charged-current quasi-elastic (CCQE) process, which gures signi cantly in the composition of the reactions observed at the far detector. However, no experimental measurements of this crosssection currently exist for electron neutrinos; instead, current experiments typically work from the abundance of muon neutrino CCQE cross-section data and apply corrections from theoretical arguments to obtain a prediction for electron neutrinos. Veri cation of these predictions is challenging due to the di culty of constructing an electron neutrino beam, but the advent of modern high-intensity muon neutrino beams|together with the percent-level electron neutrino impurity inherent in these beams| nally presents the opportunity to make such a measurement. We report herein the rst-ever measurement of a cross-section for an exclusive state in electron neutrino scattering, which was made using the MINER A detector in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. We present the electron neutrino CCQE di erential cross-sections, which are averaged over neutrinos of energies 1-10 GeV (with mean energy of about 3 GeV), in terms of various kinematic variables: nal-state electron angle, nal-state electron energy, and the square of the fourmomentum transferred to the nucleus by the neutrino , Q2. We also provide a total cross-section vs. neutrino energy. While our measurement of this process is found to be in agreement with the predictions of the GENIE

  13. Risk of Advanced Neoplasia in First-Degree Relatives with Colorectal Cancer: A Large Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Enrique; Gargallo, Carla; Lanas, Angel; Bujanda, Luis; Gimeno-García, Antonio Z.; Hernández-Guerra, Manuel; Nicolás-Pérez, David; Alonso-Abreu, Inmaculada; Morillas, Juan Diego; Balaguer, Francesc; Muriel, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Background First-degree relatives (FDR) of patients with colorectal cancer have a higher risk of developing colorectal cancer than the general population. For this reason, screening guidelines recommend colonoscopy every 5 or 10 y, starting at the age of 40, depending on whether colorectal cancer in the index-case is diagnosed at <60 or ≥60 y, respectively. However, studies on the risk of neoplastic lesions are inconclusive. The aim of this study was to determine the risk of advanced neoplasia (three or more non-advanced adenomas, advanced adenoma, or invasive cancer) in FDR of patients with colorectal cancer compared to average-risk individuals (i.e., asymptomatic adults 50 to 69 y of age with no family history of colorectal cancer). Methods and Findings This cross-sectional analysis includes data from 8,498 individuals undergoing their first lifetime screening colonoscopy between 2006 and 2012 at six Spanish tertiary hospitals. Of these individuals, 3,015 were defined as asymptomatic FDR of patients with colorectal cancer (“familial-risk group”) and 3,038 as asymptomatic with average-risk for colorectal cancer (“average-risk group”). The familial-risk group was stratified as one FDR, with one family member diagnosed with colorectal cancer at ≥60 y (n = 1,884) or at <60 y (n = 831), and as two FDR, with two family members diagnosed with colorectal cancer at any age (n = 300). Multiple logistic regression analysis was used for between-group comparisons after adjusting for potential confounders (age, gender, and center). Compared with the average-risk group, advanced neoplasia was significantly more prevalent in individuals having two FDR with colorectal cancer (odds ratio [OR] 1.90; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.36–2.66, p < 0.001), but not in those having one FDR with colorectal cancer diagnosed at ≥60 y (OR 1.03; 95% CI 0.83–1.27, p = 0.77) and <60 y (OR 1.19; 95% CI 0.90–1.58, p = 0.20). After the age of 50 y, men developed advanced

  14. A measurement of the neutral current neutrino-nucleon elastic cross section at MiniBooNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, David Christopher [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2008-02-01

    The neutral current neutrino-nucleon elastic interaction v N → v N is a fundamental process of the weak interaction ideally suited for characterizing the structure of the nucleon neutral weak current. This process comprises ~18% of neutrino events in the neutrino oscillation experiment, MiniBooNE, ranking it as the experiment's third largest process. Using ~10% of MiniBooNE's available neutrino data, a sample of these events were identified and analyzed to determine the differential cross section as a function of the momentum transfer of the interaction, Q2. This is the first measurement of a differential cross section with MiniBooNE data. From this analysis, a value for the nucleon axial mass MA was extracted to be 1.34 ± 0.25 GeV consistent with previous measurements. The integrated cross section for the Q2 range 0.189 → 1.13 GeV2 was calculated to be (8.8 ± 0.6(stat) ± 0.2(syst)) x 10-40 cm2.

  15. Current cigarette smoking is a reversible cause of elevated white blood cell count: Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Takakazu; Omata, Fumio; Tsuchihashi, Kenji; Higashioka, Kazuhiko; Koyamada, Ryosuke; Okada, Sadamu

    2016-12-01

    While cigarette smoking is a well-recognized cause of elevated white blood cell (WBC) count, studies on longitudinal effect of smoking cessation on WBC count are limited. We attempted to determine causal relationships between smoking and elevated WBC count by retrospective cross-sectional study consisting of 37,972 healthy Japanese adults who had a health check-up between April 1, 2008 and March 31, 2009 and longitudinal study involving 1730 current smokers who had more than four consecutive annual health check-ups between April 1, 2007 and March 31, 2012. In the cross-sectional study, younger age, male gender, increased body mass index, no alcohol habit, current smoking, and elevated C-reactive protein level were associated with elevated WBC count. Among these factors, current smoking had the most significant association with elevated WBC count. In subgroup analyses by WBC differentials, smoking was significantly associated with elevated counts of neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, and basophils. Ex-smoking was not associated with elevated WBC count. In the longitudinal study, both WBC and neutrophil counts decreased significantly in one year after smoking cessation and remained down-regulated for longer than next two years. There was no significant change in either WBC or neutrophil count in those who continued smoking. These findings clearly demonstrated that current smoking is strongly associated with elevated WBC count and smoking cessation leads to recovery of WBC count in one year, which is maintained for longer than subsequent two years. Thus, current smoking is a significant and reversible cause of elevated WBC count in healthy adults.

  16. Measurement of high-Q^2 charged current cross sections in e^+p deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, T; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Adler, V; Aghuzumtsyan, G; Antonioli, P; Antonov, A; Arneodo, M; Bailey, D S; Bamberger, A; Barakbaev, A N; Barbagli, G; Barbi, M; Bari, G; Barreiro, F; Bartsch, D; Basile, M; Bauerdick, L A T; Behrens, U; Bell, M; Bellagamba, L; Benen, A; Bertolin, A; Bhadra, S; Bloch, I; Bodmann, B; Bold, T; Boos, E G; Borras, K; Boscherini, D; Brock, I; Brook, N H; Brugnera, R; Brümmer, N; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bussey, P J; Butterworth, J M; Bylsma, B; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carli, T; Carlin, R; Catterall, C D; Chekanov, S; Chiochia, V; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Cloth, P; Cole, J E; Collins-Tooth, C; Contin, A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Coppola, N; Cormack, C; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Cottrell, A; D'Agostini, Giulio; Dal Corso, F; Danilov, P; Dannheim, D; De Pasquale, S; Dementiev, R K; Derrick, M; Deshpande, A A; Devenish, R C E; Dhawan, S; Dolgoshein, B A; Doyle, A T; Drews, G; Durkin, L S; Dusini, S; Eisenberg, Y; Ermolov, P F; Eskreys, Andrzej; Ferrando, J; Ferrero, M I; Figiel, J; Filges, D; Foster, B; Foudas, C; Fourletov, S; Fourletova, J; Fricke, U; Fusayasu, T; Gabareen, A; Gallo, E; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Genta, C; Gialas, I; Giusti, P; Gladilin, L K; Gladkov, D; Glasman, C; Gliga, S; Göbel, F; Goers, S; Golubkov, Yu A; Goncalo, R; González, O; Göttlicher, P; Grabowska-Bold, I; Grijpink, S; Grzelak, G; Gutsche, O; Gwenlan, C; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hall-Wilton, R; Hamatsu, R; Hamilton, J; Hanlon, S; Hart, J C; Hartmann, H; Hartner, G; Hartner, G F; Heaphy, E A; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Helbich, M; Heusch, C A; Hilger, E; Hillert, S; Hirose, T; Hochman, D; Holm, U; Iacobucci, G; Iga, Y; Inuzuka, M; Irrgang, P; Jakob, H P; Jones, T W; Kagawa, S; Kahle, B; Kananov, S; Kappes, A; Karshon, U; Katkov, I I; Katz, U F; Kcira, D; Khein, L A; Kim, J Y; Kim, Y K; Kind, O; Kisielewska, D; Kitamura, S; Klimek, K; Koffeman, E; Kohno, T; Kooijman, P; Koop, T; Korzhav--, I A; Kotanski, A; Kötz, U; Kowal, A M; Kowal, M; Kowalski, H; Kowalski, T; Krakauer, D A; Kram, G; Kreisel, A; Krumnack, N; Kuze, M; Kuzmin, V A; Labarga, L; Labes, H; Lainesse, J; Lammers, S; Lee, J H; Lee, S W; Lelas, D; Levchenko, B B; Levman, G M; Levy, A; Li, L; Lightwood, M S; Lim, H; Lim, I T; Limentani, S; Ling, T Y; Liu, X; Löhr, B; Lohrmann, E; Loizides, J H; Long, K R; Longhin, A; Lukina, O Yu; Lupi, A; Maddox, E; Magill, S; Mankel, R; Margotti, A; Marini, G; Martin, J F; Mastroberardino, A; Matsuzawa, K; Mattingly, M C K; McCubbin, N A; Mellado, B; Melzer-Pellmann, I A; Menary, S R; Metlica, F; Meyer, U; Milite, M; Mirea, A; Monaco, V; Moritz, M; Musgrave, B; Nagano, K; Nania, R; Nguyen, C N; Nigro, A; Ning, Y; Nishimura, T; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Oh, B Y; Olkiewicz, K; Pac, M Y; Padhi, S; Paganis, S; Palmonari, F; Parenti, A; Park, I H; Patel, S; Paul, E; Pavel, N; Pawlak, J M; Pelfer, P G; Pellegrino, A; Pesci, A; Petrucci, M C; Piotrzkowski, K; Plucinsky, P P; Pokrovskiy, N S; Polini, A; Posocco, M; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M B; Rautenberg, J; Raval, A; Reeder, D D; Ren, Z; Renner, R; Repond, J; Robins, S; Rodrigues, E; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Salehi, H; Sartorelli, G; Savin, A A; Saxon, D H; Schagen, S; Schioppa, M; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Sciulli, F; Scott, J; Selonke, F; Shcheglova, L M; Skillicorn, I O; Slominski, W; Smith, W H; Soares, M; Solano, A; Son, D; Sosnovtsev, V V; Stairs, D G; Stanco, L; Standage, J; Stifutkin, A; Stoesslein, U; Stonjek, S; Stopa, P; Straub, P B; Suchkov, S; Susinno, G; Suszycki, L; Sutton, M R; Sztuk, J; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Tandler, J; Tapper, A D; Tapper, R J; Tassi, E; Tawara, T; Terron, J; Tiecke, H G; Tokushuku, K; Tsurugai, T; Turcato, M; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Ukleja, J; Vázquez, M; Velthuis, J J; Vlasov, N N; Voss, K C; Walczak, R; Wang, M; Weber, A; Wessoleck, H; West, B J; Whitmore, J J; Wick, K; Wiggers, L; Wills, H H; Wing, M; Wolf, G; Yamada, S; Yamashita, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yoshida, R; Youngman, C; Zawiejski, L; Zeuner, W; Zhautykov, B O; Zichichi, A; Ziegler, A; Zotkin, S A; De Wolf, E

    2003-01-01

    Cross sections for e^+p charged current deep inelastic scattering at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV have been determined with an integrated luminosity of 60.9pb^-1 collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA. The differential cross sections dsigma/dQ^2, dsigma/dx and dsigma/dy for Q^2>200 GeV^2 are presented. In addition, d^2sigma/dxdQ^2 has been measured in the kinematic range 280 GeV^2 < Q^2 < 17000 GeV^2 and 0.008 < x < 0.42. The predictions of the Standard Model agree well with the measured cross sections. The mass of the W boson propagator is determined to be M_W=78.9 +/- 2.0 (stat.) +/- 1.8 (syst.) +2.0 -1.8 (PDF) GeV from a fit to dsigma/dQ^2. The chiral structure of the Standard Model is also investigated in terms of the (1-y)^2 dependence of the the double-differential cross section. The structure-function F_2^CC has been extracted by combining the measurements presented here with previous ZEUS results from e^-p scattering, extending the measurement obtained in a neutrino-nucleus scatter...

  17. HERA Inclusive Neutral and Charged Current Cross Sections and a New PDF Fit, HERAPDF 2.0

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    In this talk, I present the brand new results from the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations on the combination of all previously published inclusive deep inelastic cross sections at HERA for neutral and charged current $e^\\pm p$ scattering for zero beam polarisation and the corresponding parton distributions functions, HERAPDF 2.0, at up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO). The results also include a new precise determination at next-to-leading order (NLO) of the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_s(M^2_Z)=0.1184\\pm 0.0016$ (excluding scale uncertainties) based on a simultaneous fit to the combined inclusive cross section data and jet production data.

  18. Measurement of neutral current cross sections at high Bjorken-x with the ZEUS detector at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2006-07-15

    A new method is employed to measure the neutral current cross section up to Bjorken-x values of one with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 65.1 pb{sup -1} for e{sup +}p collisions and 16.7 pb{sup -1} for e{sup -}p collisions at {radical}(s)=318 GeV and 38.6 pb{sup -1} for e{sup +}p collisions at {radical}(s)=300 GeV. Cross sections have been extracted for Q{sup 2}{>=}648 GeV{sup 2} and are compared to predictions using different parton density functions. For the highest x bins, the data have a tendency to lie above the expectations using recent parton density function parametrizations. (orig.)

  19. Measurement of High-$Q^{2}$ Neutral-Current $e^{+}p$ Deep Inelastic Scattering Cross-Sections at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Abramowicz, H; Acosta, D; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Ahn, S H; Amelung, C; An Shiz Hong; Anselmo, F; Antonioli, P; Arneodo, M; Bacon, Trevor C; Badgett, W F; Bailey, D C; Bailey, D S; Bamberger, A; Barbagli, G; Bari, G; Barreiro, F; Barret, O; Bashindzhagian, G L; Bashkirov, V; Basile, M; Bauerdick, L A T; Bednarek, B; Behrens, U; Bellagamba, L; Bertolin, A; Bhadra, S; Bienlein, J K; Blaikley, H E; Bohnet, I; Bokel, C; Boogert, S; Bornheim, A; Borzemski, P; Boscherini, D; Botje, M; Breitweg, J; Brock, I; Brook, N H; Brugnera, R; Brümmer, N; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Burgard, C; Burow, B D; Bussey, P J; Butterworth, J M; Bylsma, B; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlin, R; Cartiglia, N; Cashmore, R J; Castellini, G; Catterall, C D; Chapin, D; Chekanov, S; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Cirio, R; Cloth, P; Coboken, K; Coldewey, C; Cole, J E; Contin, A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Coppola, N; Cormack, C; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Costa, M; Cottingham, W N; Crittenden, J; Cross, R; D'Agostini, G; Dagan, S; Dal Corso, F; Dardo, M; De Pasquale, S; Deffner, R; Deppe, O; Derrick, M; Deshpande, Abhay A; Desler, K; Devenish, R C E; Dhawan, S; Dolgoshein, B A; Dondana, S; Dosselli, U; Doyle, A T; Drews, G; Dulinski, Z; Durkin, L S; Dusini, S; Eckert, M; Edmonds, J K; Eisenberg, Y; Eisenhardt, S; Engelen, J; Epperson, D E; Ermolov, P F; Eskreys, Andrzej; Fagerstroem, C P; Fernández, J P; Ferrero, M I; Figiel, J; Filges, D; Foster, B; Foudas, C; Fox-Murphy, A; Fricke, U; Frisken, W R; Fusayasu, T; Gadaj, T; Galea, R; Gallo, E; García, G; Garfagnini, A; Gendner, N; Gialas, I; Gilmore, J; Ginsburg, C M; Giusti, P; Gladilin, L K; Glasman, C; Göbel, F; Golubkov, Yu A; Göttlicher, P; Grabosch, H J; Graciani, R; Grosse-Knetter, J; Grzelak, G; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hall-Wilton, R; Hamatsu, R; Hanna, D S; Harnew, N; Hart, J C; Hartmann, H; Hartmann, J; Hartner, G F; Hasell, D; Hayes, M E; Heaphy, E A; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Hebbel, K; Heinloth, K; Heinz, L; Hernández, J M; Heusch, C A; Hilger, E; Hirose, T; Hochman, D; Holm, U; Homma, K; Hong, S J; Howell, G; Hughes, V W; Iacobucci, G; Iannotti, L; Iga, Y; Inuzuka, M; Ishii, T; Jakob, H P; Jelen, K; Jeoung, H Y; Jing, Z; Johnson, K F; Jones, T W; Kananov, S; Kappes, A; Karshon, U; Kasemann, M; Katz, U F; Kcira, D; Kerger, R; Khakzad, M; Khein, L A; Kim, C L; Kim, J Y; Kisielewska, D; Kitamura, S; Klanner, Robert; Klimek, K; Koch, W; Koffeman, E; Kooijman, P; Koop, T; Korotkova, N A; Korzhavina, I A; Kotanski, A; Kötz, U; Kowal, A M; Kowalski, H; Kowalski, T; Krakauer, D; Kreisel, A; Kuze, M; Kuzmin, V A; Labarga, L; Lamberti, L; Lane, J B; Laurenti, G; Lee, J H; Lee, S B; Lee, S W; Levi, G; Levman, G M; Levy, A; Lim, H; Lim, I T; Limentani, S; Lindemann, L; Ling, T Y; Liu, W; Löhr, B; Lohrmann, E; Long, K R; Lopez-Duran Viani, A; Lukina, O Yu; Ma, K J; Maccarrone, G; MacDonald, N; Magill, S; Mallik, U; Margotti, A; Marini, G; Markun, P; Martin, J F; Martínez, M; Maselli, S; Massam, Thomas; Mastroberardino, A; Matsushita, T; Mattingly, M C K; Mattingly, S E K; McCance, G J; McCubbin, N A; McFall, J D; Mellado, B; Menary, S; Meyer, A; Meyer-Larsen, A; Milewski, J; Milite, M; Miller, D B; Monaco, V; Mönig, K; Monteiro, T; Morandin, M; Moritz, M; Murray, W N; Musgrave, B; Nagano, K; Nam, S W; Nania, R; Nigro, A; Nishimura, T; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Noyes, V A; Nylander, P; Ochs, A; Oh, B Y; Okrasinski, J R; Olkiewicz, K; Orr, R S; Pac, M Y; Padhi, S; Palmonari, F; Park, I H; Park, S K; Parsons, J A; Paul, E; Pavel, N; Pawlak, J M; Pawlak, R; Pelfer, Pier Giovanni; Pellegrino, A; Pelucchi, F; Peroni, C; Pesci, A; Petrucci, M C; Pfeiffer, M; Piccioni, D; Piotrzkowski, K; Poelz, G; Polenz, S; Polini, A; Posocco, M; Prinias, A; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M B; Puga, J; Quadt, A; Raach, H; Raso, M; Rautenberg, J; Redondo, I; Reeder, D D; Repond, J; Ritz, S; Riveline, M; Rohde, M; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E; Ruske, O; Ruspa, M; Sabetfakhri, A; Sacchi, R; Sadrozinski, H F W; Salehi, H; Sampson, S; Sartorelli, G; Saull, P R B; Savin, A A; Saxon, D H; Schechter, A; Schioppa, M; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Schnurbusch, H; Schwarzer, O; Sciulli, F; Scott, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Seiden, A; Selonke, F; Shah, T P; Shcheglova, L M; Sideris, D; Sievers, M; Simmons, D; Sinclair, L E; Skillicorn, I O; Smalska, B; Smith, W H; Solano, A; Solomin, A N; Son, D; Saint-Laurent, M G; Staiano, A; Stairs, D G; Stanco, L; Stanek, R; Stifutkin, A; Stonjek, S; Straub, P B; Strickland, E; Stroili, R; Susinno, G; Suszycki, L; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, I; Tandler, J; Tapper, A D; Tapper, R J; Tassi, E; Terron, J; Tiecke, H G; Tokushuku, K; Toothacker, W S; Tsurugai, T; Tuning, N; Tymieniecka, T; Umemori, K; Vaiciulis, A W; Velthuis, J J; Verkerke, W; Voci, C; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Votano, L; Walczak, R; Walker, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D S; Waugh, R; Weber, A; Whitmore, J J; Wichmann, R; Wick, K; Wieber, H; Wiggers, L; Wildschek, T; Williams, D C; Wills, H H; Wing, M; Wodarczyk, M; Wolf, G; Wölfle, S; Wollmer, U; Wróblewski, A K; Yamada, S; Yamashita, T; Yamauchi, K; Yamazaki, Y; Yoshida, R; Youngman, C; Zajac, J; Zakrzewski, J A; Zamora Garcia, Y; Zawiejski, L; Zetsche, F; Zeuner, W; Zhu, Q; Zichichi, Antonino; Zotkin, S A; De Wolf, E; Del Peso, J; Van Sighem, A

    1999-01-01

    The e^+p neutral-current deep inelastic scattering differential cross-sections $d\\sigma/dQ^2$, for Q^2 > 400 GeV^2, $d\\sigma/dx$ and $d\\sigma/dy$, for Q^2 > 400, 2500 and 10000 GeV^2, have been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA. The data sample of 47.7 pb^-1 was collected at a center-of-mass energy of 300 GeV. The cross-section, $d\\sigma/dQ^2$, falls by six orders of magnitude between Q^2 = 400 and 40000 GeV^2. The predictions of the Standard Model are in very good agreement with the data. Complementing the observations of time-like Z^0 contributions to fermion-antifermion annihilation, the data provide direct evidence for the presence of Z^0 exchange in the space-like region explored by deep inelastic scattering.

  20. Measurement of neutral current cross sections at high Bjorken-$x$ with the ZEUS detector at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Chekanov, S; Magill, S; Miglioranzi, S; Musgrave, B; Nicholass, D; Repond, J; Yoshida, R; Mattingly, M C K; Pavel, USAN; Yagues-Molina, A G; Antonelli, S; Antonioli, P; Bari, G; Basile, M; Bellagamba, L; Bindi, M; Boscherini, D; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Contin, A; Corradi, M; De Pasquale, S; Iacobucci, G; Margotti, A; Nania, R; Polini, A; Rinaldi, L; Sartorelli, G; Zichichi, A; Aghuzumtsyan, G; Bartsch, D; Brock, I; Goers, S; Hartmann, H; Hilger, E; Jakob, H P; Jüngst, M; Kind, O M; Paul, E; Rautenberg, J; Renner, R; Samson, U; Schonberg, V; Wang, M; Wlasenko, M; Brook, N H; Heath, G P; Morris, J D; Namsoo, T; Capua, M; Fazio, S; Mastroberardino, A; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Tassi, E; Kim, J Y; Ma, K J; Ibrahim, Z A; Kamaluddin, B; Wan-Abdullah, W A T; Ning, Y; Ren, Z; Sciulli, F; Chwastowski, J; Eskreys, Andrzej; Figiel, J; Galas, A; Gil, M; Olkiewicz, K; Stopa, P; Zaw, I; Adamczyk, L; Bold, T; Grabowska-Bold, I; Kisielewska, D; Lukasik, J; Przybycien, M B; Suszycki, L; Kotanski, A; Slominski, W; Adler, V; Behrens, U; Bloch, I; Bonato, A; Borras, K; Coppola, N; Fourletova, J; Geiser, A; Gladkov, D; Göttlicher, P; Gregor, I; Gutsche, O; Haas, T; Hain, W; Horn, C; Kahle, B; Kötz, U; Kowalski, H; Lim, H; Lobodzinska, E; Löhr, B; Mankel, R; Melzer--, I A; Pellmann; Montanari, A; Nguyen, C N; Notz, D; Nuncio-Quiroz, A E; Santamarta, R; Schneekloth, U; Spiridonov, A A; Stadie, H; Stösslein, U; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Theedt, T; Watt, G; Wolf, G; Wrona, K; Youngman, C; Zeuner, W; Schlenstedt, S; Barbagli, G; Gallo, E; Pelfer, P G; Bamberger, A; Dobur, D; Karstens, F; Vlasov, N N; Germany; Bussey, P J; Doyle, A T; Dunne, W; Ferrando, J; Saxon, D H; Skillicorn, I O; Gialas, I; Greece; Gosau, T; Holm, U; Klanner, Robert; Lohrmann, E; Salehi, H; Schleper, P; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Sztuk, J; Wichmann, K; Wick, K; Foudas, C; Fry, C; Long, K R; Tapper, A D; Kataoka, M; Matsumoto, T; Nagano, K; Tokushuku, K; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Barakbaev, A N; Boos, E G; Dossanov, A; Pokrovskiy, N S; Zhautykov, B O; Son, D; De Favereau, J; Piotrzkowski, K; Barreiro, F; Glasman, C; Jiménez, M; Labarga, L; Del Peso, J; Ron, E; Terron, J; Zambrana, M; Corriveau, F; Liu, C; Walsh, R; Zhou, C; Tsurugai, T; Antonov, A; Dolgoshein, B A; Rubinsky, I; Sosnovtsev, V V; Stifutkin, A; Suchkov, S; Dementiev, R K; Ermolov, P F; Gladilin, L K; Katkov, I I; Khein, L A; Korzhavina, I A; Kuzmin, V A; Levchenko, B B; Lukina, O Yu; Proskuryakov, A S; Shcheglova, L M; Zotkin, D S; Zotkin, S A; Abt, I; Büttner, C; Caldwell, A; Kollar, D; Schmidke, W B; Sutiak, J; Grigorescu, G; Keramidas, A; Koffeman, E; Kooijman, P; Pellegrino, A; Tiecke, H G; Vázquez, M; Wiggers, L; Brümmer, N; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Lee, A; Ling, T Y; Allfrey, P D; Bell, M A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Cottrell, A; Devenish, R C E; Foster, B; Gwenlan, C; Korcsak-Gorzo, K; Patel, S; Roberfroid, V; Robertson, A; Straub, P B; Uribe-Estrada, C; Walczak, R; Bellan, P M; Bertolin, A; Brugnera, R; Carlin, R; Ciesielski, R; Dal Corso, F; Dusini, S; Garfagnini, A; Limentani, S; Longhin, A; Stanco, L; Turcato, M; Raval, A; Whitmore, J J; Iga, Y; D'Agostini, G; Marini, G; Nigro, A; Cole, J E; Hart, J C; Abramowicz, H; Gabareen, A; Ingbir, R; Kananov, S; Levy, A; Kuze, M; Hori, R; Kagawa, S; Shimizu, S; Tawara, T; Hamatsu, R; Kaji, H; Kitamura, S; Ri, Y D; Ferrero, M I; Monaco, V; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Arneodo, M; Ruspa, M; Fourletov, S; Martin, J F; Boutle, S K; Butterworth, J M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jones, T W; Loizides, J H; Sutton, M R; Targett-Adams, C; Wing, M; Brzozowska, B; Ciborowski, J; Grzelak, G; Kulinski, P; Luzniak, P; Malka, J; Nowak, R J; Pawlak, J M; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Ukleja, J; Adamus, M; Plucinsky, P P; Eisenberg, Y; Giller, I; Hochman, D; Karshon, U; Rosin, M; Brownson, E; Danielson, T; Everett, A; Kcira, D; Reeder, D D; Ryan, P; Savin, A A; Smith, W H; Wolfe, H

    2007-01-01

    A new method is employed to measure the neutral current cross section up to Bjorken-$x$ values of one with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 65.1 $\\pbi$ for $e^+p$ collisions and 16.7 $\\pbi$ for $e^-p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=318$ $\\gev$ and 38.6 $\\pbi$ for $e^+p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=300$ $\\gev$. Cross sections have been extracted for $Q^2 \\ge 648$ $\\gev^{2}$ and are compared to predictions using different parton density functions. For the highest $x$ bins, the data have a tendency to lie above the expectations using recent parton density function parametrizations.

  1. Measurements of the neutral current e{sup {+-}}p cross sections using longitudinally polarised lepton beams at HERA II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikiforov, A.

    2007-01-18

    This thesis presents inclusive e{sup {+-}}p single and double differential cross sections for neutral current deep inelastic scattering measured as functions of the four-momentum transfer squared Q{sup 2} and the Bjorken variable x in interactions of longitudinally polarised leptons with unpolarised protons using the H1 detector at HERA II. An overview of the phenomenology of deep inelastic scattering is given and the experimental apparatus as well as the measurement and analysis procedures are described. The analysis is based on e{sup +}p data taken in 2003-04 and e{sup -}p data taken in 2005 at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}(s)=318 GeV, with integrated luminosities of 47.6 pb{sup -1} and 98.4 pb{sup -1} for the e{sup +}p and e{sup -}p samples, respectively. The cross sections are measured in the range of 200current interactions and to determine the structure function xF{sub 3}. The new HERA II data are combined together with previously published data from HERA I to determine the structure function xF{sub 3} with improved precision. Furthermore, this measurement is combined with the corresponding ZEUS measurement to provide the most accurate measurement of the interference structure function xF{sup {gamma}}{sup Z}{sub 3}, which is sensitive to the valence quark distributions down to low values of x. The data on polarised cross section asymmetries A{sup {+-}} are also combined with the ZEUS data. This leads to the first observation of parity violation in neutral current e{sup {+-}}p scattering at distances down to 10{sup -18} m. The data are well described by the Standard Model predictions. (orig.)

  2. Estimate of the theoretical uncertainty of the cross sections for nucleon knockout in neutral-current neutrino-oxygen interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ankowski, Artur M; Benhar, Omar; Caballero, Juan A; Giusti, Carlotta; González-Jiménez, Raúl; Megias, Guillermo D; Meucci, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Free nucleons propagating in water are known to produce gamma rays, which form a background to the searches for diffuse supernova neutrinos and sterile neutrinos carried out with Cherenkov detectors. As a consequence, the process of nucleon knockout induced by neutral-current quasielastic interactions of atmospheric (anti)neutrinos with oxygen needs to be under control at the quantitative level in the background simulations of the ongoing and future experiments. In this paper, we provide a quantitative assessment of the uncertainty associated with the theoretical description of the nuclear cross sections, estimating it from the discrepancies between the predictions of different models.

  3. Measurement of Neutrino-Nucleon Neutral-Current Elastic Scattering Cross-section at SciBooNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takei, Hideyuki [Tokyo Inst. of Technology (Japan)

    2009-02-01

    In this thesis, results of neutrino-nucleon neutral current (NC) elastic scattering analysis are presented. Neutrinos interact with other particles only with weak force. Measurement of cross-section for neutrino-nucleon reactions at various neutrino energy are important for the study of nucleon structure. It also provides data to be used for beam flux monitor in neutrino oscillation experiments. The cross-section for neutrino-nucleon NC elastic scattering contains the axial vector form factor GA(Q2) as well as electromagnetic form factors unlike electromagnetic interaction. GA is propotional to strange part of nucleon spin (Δs) in Q2 → 0 limit. Measurement of NC elastic cross-section with smaller Q2 enables us to access Δs. NC elastic cross-sections of neutrino-nucleon and antineutrino-nucleon were measured earlier by E734 experiment at Brookheaven National Laboratory (BNL) in 1987. In this experiment, cross-sections were measured in Q2 > 0.4 GeV2 region. Result from this experiment was the only published data for NC elastic scattering cross-section published before our experiment. SciBooNE is an experiment for the measurement of neutrino-nucleon scattering cross-secitons using Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) at FNAL. BNB has energy peak at 0.7 GeV. In this energy region, NC elastic scattering, charged current elastic scattering, charged current pion production, and neutral current pion production are the major reaction branches. SciBar, electromagnetic calorimeter, and Muon Range Detector are the detectors for SciBooNE. The SciBar consists of finely segmented scintillators and 14336 channels of PMTs. It has a capability to reconstruct particle track longer than 8 cm and separate proton from muons and pions using energy deposit information. Signal of NC elastic scattering is a single proton track. In vp → vp process, the recoil proton is detected. On the other hand, most of vn → vn is

  4. Measurement of the neutrino-oxygen neutral-current interaction cross section by observing nuclear deexcitation γ rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K.; Adam, J.; Aihara, H.; Akiri, T.; Andreopoulos, C.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bass, M.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Bentham, S. W.; Berardi, V.; Berger, B. E.; Berkman, S.; Bertram, I.; Bhadra, S.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blondel, A.; Bojechko, C.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buchanan, N.; Calland, R. G.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Coleman, S. J.; Collazuol, G.; Connolly, K.; Cremonesi, L.; Dabrowska, A.; Danko, I.; Das, R.; Davis, S.; de Perio, P.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Dewhurst, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Drapier, O.; Duboyski, T.; Duffy, K.; Dufour, F.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery-Schrenk, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escudero, L.; Finch, A. J.; Fiorentini Aguirre, G. A.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Gaudin, A.; Giffin, S.; Giganti, C.; Gilje, K.; Goeldi, D.; Golan, T.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Gudin, D.; Hadley, D. R.; Haegel, L.; Haesler, A.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayato, Y.; Hearty, C.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hignight, J.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ieva, M.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Ives, S. J.; Iwai, E.; Iwamoto, K.; Iyogi, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Johnson, R. A.; Johnson, S.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kabirnezhad, M.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Kanazawa, Y.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Katori, T.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kilinski, A.; Kim, J.; King, S.; Kisiel, J.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Kolaceke, A.; Konaka, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koseki, K.; Koshio, Y.; Kreslo, I.; Kropp, W.; Kubo, H.; Kudenko, Y.; Kumaratunga, S.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Laihem, K.; Lamont, I.; Larkin, E.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lee, K. P.; Licciardi, C.; Lindner, T.; Lister, C.; Litchfield, R. P.; Longhin, A.; Ludovici, L.; Macaire, M.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Martynenko, S.; Maruyama, T.; Marzec, J.; Mathie, E. L.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Mefodiev, A.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Miller, C. A.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Monfregola, L.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murakami, A.; Murdoch, M.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nagasaki, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakai, T.; Nakamura, K.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Nantais, C.; Naples, D.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Nowak, J.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Ovsyannikova, T.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Payne, D.; Pearce, G. F.; Perevozchikov, O.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickard, L.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Plonski, P.; Poplawska, E.; Popov, B.; Posiadala-Zezula, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Redij, A.; Reeves, M.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Riccio, C.; Retiere, F.; Robert, A.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rojas, P.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Ruterbories, D.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sato, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schoppmann, S.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shaker, F.; Shiozawa, M.; Short, S.; Shustrov, Y.; Sinclair, P.; Smith, B.; Smith, R. J.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Still, B.; Suda, Y.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Szeglowski, T.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, M. M.; Taylor, I. J.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L. F.; Thorley, A.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Ueno, K.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Waldron, A. V.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Williamson, Z.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wongjirad, T.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yano, T.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yuan, T.; Yu, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.; T2K Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    We report the first measurement of the neutrino-oxygen neutral-current quasielastic (NCQE) cross section. It is obtained by observing nuclear deexcitation γ rays which follow neutrino-oxygen interactions at the Super-Kamiokande water Cherenkov detector. We use T2K data corresponding to 3.01 ×1 020 protons on target. By selecting only events during the T2K beam window and with well-reconstructed vertices in the fiducial volume, the large background rate from natural radioactivity is dramatically reduced. We observe 43 events in the 4-30 MeV reconstructed energy window, compared with an expectation of 51.0, which includes an estimated 16.2 background events. The background is primarily nonquasielastic neutral-current interactions and has only 1.2 events from natural radioactivity. The flux-averaged NCQE cross section we measure is 1.55 ×1 0-38 cm2 with a 68% confidence interval of (1.22 ,2.20 )×1 0-38 cm2 at a median neutrino energy of 630 MeV, compared with the theoretical prediction of 2.01 ×1 0-38 cm2 .

  5. A Measurement of the Neutrino Neutral Current π0 Cross Section at MiniBooNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raaf, Jennifer Lynne [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The MiniBooNE neutrino beam and detector at Fermilab are used to study the production of neutral current π0 events. The cross sections for neutrino interactions with mineral oil (CH2) are reported for resonantly produced and coherently produced single π0 events. We measure a resonant single π0 cross section of σ(vμ N π0) = (0.0129 ± 0.0011(stat.) ± 0.0043(syst.)) x 10-36 cm2/CH2 at a mean neutrino energy of 1.26 GeV. We measure a coherent single π0 cross section of σ(vμ A → vμ A π0) = (0.00077 ± 0.00016 (stat.) ± 0.00036 (syst.)) x 10-36 cm2/CH2 at mean neutrino energy 1.12 GeV.

  6. Measurement of Neutrino and Antineutrino Charged-Current Inclusive Cross Sections with the MINERvA Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devan, Joshua D. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinos are a nearly massless, neutral particle in the Standard Model that only interact via the weak interaction. Experimental confirmation of neutrino oscillations, in which a neutrino created as a particular type (electron, muon or tau) can be observed as a different type after propagating some distance, earned the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics. Neutrino oscillation experiments rely on accurate measurements of neutrino interactions with matter, such as that presented here. Neutrinos also provide a unique probe of the nucleus, complementary to electron scattering experiments. This thesis presents a measurement of the charged-current inclusive cross section for muon neutrinos and antineutrinos in the energy range 2 to 50 GeV with the MINERvA detector. MINERvA is a neutrino scattering experiment in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab, near Chicago. A cross section measures the probability of an interaction occurring, measured here as a function of neutrino energy. To extract a cross section from data, the observed rate of interactions is corrected for detector efficiency and divided by the number of scattering nucleons in the target and the flux of neutrinos in the beam. The neutrino flux is determined with the low-$\

  7. Advanced Monte Carlo procedure for the IFMIF d-Li neutron source term based on evaluated cross section data

    CERN Document Server

    Simakov, S P; Moellendorff, U V; Schmuck, I; Konobeev, A Y; Korovin, Y A; Pereslavtsev, P

    2002-01-01

    A newly developed computational procedure is presented for the generation of d-Li source neutrons in Monte Carlo transport calculations based on the use of evaluated double-differential d+ sup 6 sup , sup 7 Li cross section data. A new code M sup c DeLicious was developed as an extension to MCNP4C to enable neutronics design calculations for the d-Li based IFMIF neutron source making use of the evaluated deuteron data files. The M sup c DeLicious code was checked against available experimental data and calculation results of M sup c DeLi and MCNPX, both of which use built-in analytical models for the Li(d, xn) reaction. It is shown that M sup c DeLicious along with newly evaluated d+ sup 6 sup , sup 7 Li data is superior in predicting the characteristics of the d-Li neutron source. As this approach makes use of tabulated Li(d, xn) cross sections, the accuracy of the IFMIF d-Li neutron source term can be steadily improved with more advanced and validated data.

  8. Measurement of high-Q(2) neutral current deep inelastic e(-) p scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised electron beam at HERA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Nicholass, D.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cindolo, F.; Corradi, M.; Iacobucci, G.; Margotti, A.; Nania, R.; Polini, A.; Antonelli, S.; Basile, M.; Bindi, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Contin, A.; De Pasquale, S.; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A.; Bartsch, D.; Brock, I.; Hartmann, H.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H. P.; Juengst, M.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Samson, U.; Schoenberg, V.; Shehzadi, R.; Wlasenko, M.; Brook, N. H.; Heath, G. P.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Singh, I.; Capua, M.; Fazio, S.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Tassi, E.; Kim, J. Y.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Kamaluddin, B.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Ning, Y.; Ren, Z.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Galas, A.; Olkiewicz, K.; Pawlik, B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bold, T.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Kisielewska, D.; Lukasik, J.; Przybycien, M.; Suszycki, L.; Kotanski, A.; Slominski, W.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Blohm, C.; Bonato, A.; Borras, K.; Ciesielski, R.; Coppola, N.; Fourletova, J.; Geiser, A.; Goettlicher, P.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Huettmann, A.; Januschek, F.; Kahle, B.; Katkov, I. I.; Klein, U.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loehr, B.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Miglioranzi, S.; Montanari, A.; Namsoo, T.; Notz, D.; Parenti, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Schneekloth, U.; Spiridonov, A.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Theedt, T.; Ukleja, J.; Wolf, G.; Wrona, K.; Molina, A. G. Yagues; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Drugakov, V.; Lohmann, W.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Pelfer, P. G.; Bamberger, A.; Dobur, D.; Karstens, F.; Vlasov, N. N.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Dunne, W.; Forrest, M.; Rosin, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Gialas, I.; Papageorgiu, K.; Holm, U.; Klanner, R.; Lohrmann, E.; Perrey, H.; Schleper, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Sztuk, J.; Stadie, H.; Turcato, M.; Foudas, C.; Fry, C.; Long, K. R.; Tapper, A. D.; Matsumoto, T.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Boos, E. G.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Aushev, V.; Bachynska, O.; Borodin, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kozulia, A.; Libov, V.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Makarenko, I.; Sorokin, Iu.; Verbytskyi, A.; Volynets, O.; Son, D.; de Favereau, J.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Barreiro, F.; Glasman, C.; Jimenez, M.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Ron, E.; Soares, M.; Terron, J.; Uribe-Estrada, C.; Zambrana, M.; Corriveau, F.; Schwartz, J.; Walsh, R.; Tsurugai, T.; Antonov, A.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Gladkov, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Stifutkin, A.; Suchkov, S.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Khein, L. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Zotkin, D. S.; Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Kollar, D.; Reisert, B.; Schmidke, W. B.; Grigorescu, G.; Keramidas, A.; Kooijman, P.; Pellegrino, A.; Tiecke, H.; Vazquez, M.; Bruemmer, N.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Lee, A.; Ling, T. Y.; Allfrey, P. D.; Bell, M. A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Ferrando, J.; Foster, B.; Gwenlan, C.; Horton, K.; Oliver, K.; Robertson, A.; Walczak, R.; Bertolin, A.; Dal Corso, F.; Dusini, S.; Longhin, A.; Stanco, L.; Bellan, P.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Garfagnini, A.; Limentani, S.; Oh, B. Y.; Raval, A.; Whitmore, J. J.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cole, J. E.; Hart, J. C.; Abramowicz, H.; Ingbir, R.; Kananov, S.; Stern, A.; Kuze, M.; Maeda, J.; Hori, R.; Kagawa, S.; Okazaki, N.; Tawara, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Kaji, H.; Kitamura, S.; Ota, O.; Ri, Y. D.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Monaco, V.; Sacchi, R.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Arneodo, M.; Ruspa, M.; Fourletov, S.; Stewart, T. P.; Boutle, S. K.; Butterworth, J. M.; Jones, T. W.; Loizides, J. H.; Wing, M.; Brzozowska, B.; Ciborowski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kulinski, P.; Luzniak, P.; Malka, J.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Perlanski, W.; Tymieniecka, T.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Plucinski, P.; Ukleja, A.; Eisenberg, Y.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Brownson, E.; Reeder, D. D.; Savin, A. A.; Smith, W. H.; Wolfe, H.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C. D.; Hartner, G.; Menary, S.; Noor, U.; Standage, J.; Whyte, J.

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of the neutral current cross sections for deep inelastic scattering in e(-) p collisions at HERA with a longitudinally polarised electron beam are presented. The single-differential cross-sections d sigma/dQ(2), d sigma/dx and d sigma/dy and the double-differential cross sections in Q(2

  9. Measurement of high-Q(2) neutral current deep inelastic e(+) p scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarized positron beam at HERA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bold, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Bruemmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; Del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Goettlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Huettmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H. -P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Juengst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Loehr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoenberg, V.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terron, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vazquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yaguees-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of neutral current cross sections for deep inelastic scattering in e(+)p collisions at HERA with a longitudinally polarized positron beam are presented. The single-differential cross-sections d sigma=dQ(2), d sigma=dx and d sigma=dy and the reduced cross section (sigma) over tilde are m

  10. Differential geometry based model for eddy current inspection of U-bend sections in steam generator tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Rosell, Anders; Udpa, Lalita; Udpa, Satish; Tamburrino, Antonello

    2017-02-01

    The modeling of U-Bend segment in steam generator tubes for predicting eddy current probe signals from cracks, wear and pitting in this region poses challenges and is non-trivial. Meshing the geometry in the cartesian coordinate system might require a large number of elements to model the U-bend region. Also, since the lift-off distance between the probe and tube wall is usually very small, a very fine mesh is required near the probe region to accurately describe the eddy current field. This paper presents a U-bend model using differential geometry principles that exploit the result that Maxwell's equations are covariant with respect to changes of coordinates and independent of metrics. The equations remain unaltered in their form, regardless of the choice of the coordinates system, provided the field quantities are represented in the proper covariant and contravariant form. The complex shapes are mapped into simple straight sections, while small lift-off is mapped to larger values, thus reducing the intrinsic dimension of the mesh and stiffness matrix. In this contribution, the numerical implementation of the above approach will be discussed with regard to field and current distributions within the U-bend tube wall. For the sake of simplicity, a two dimensional test case will be considered. The approach is evaluated in terms of efficiency and accuracy by comparing the results with that obtained using a conventional FE model in cartesian coordinates.

  11. Faculty Development for Advancing Community Engagement in Higher Education: Current Trends and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Marshall; Plaxton-Moore, Star

    2017-01-01

    This research involved the conduct of a conceptual review of 28 refereed journal articles and a survey of campus centers for community engagement staff to identify salient features and trends of existing faculty development programming designed to advance service-learning and community engagement in higher education. Results of this investigation…

  12. Current status and future prospective of advanced radiation resistant oxide dispersion strengthened steel (ARROS) development for nuclear reactor system applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Kyu; Noh, Sang Hoon; Kang, Suk Hoon; Park, Jin Ju; Jin, Hyun Ju; Lee, Min Ku; Jang, Jin Sugn; Rhee, Chang Kyu [Nuclear Materials Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    As one of the Gen-IV nuclear energy systems, a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) is being developed at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. As a long-term national research project, advanced radiation resistant oxide dispersion strengthened steel (ARROS) is being developed as an in-core fuel cladding tube material for a SFR in the future. In this paper, the current status of ARROS development is reviewed and its future prospective is discussed.

  13. Current Practices in Global/International Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences: Home/Host Country or Site/Institution Considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Alsharif, Naser Z.; Dakkuri, Adnan; Abrons, Jeanine P.; Williams, Dennis; Ombengi, David N.; Zheng, HaiAn; Al-Dahir, Sara; Tofade, Toyin; Gim, Suzanna; O’Connell, Mary Beth; Ratka, Anna; Dornblaser, Emily

    2016-01-01

    International outreach by schools and colleges of pharmacy is increasing. In this paper, we provide current practice guidelines to establish and maintain successful global/international advanced pharmacy practice experiences (G/I APPEs) with specific recommendations for home/host country and host site/institution. The paper is based on a literature review (2000-2014) in databases and Internet searches with specific keywords or terms. Educational documents such as syllabi and memoranda of unde...

  14. Current Practices in Global/International Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences: Home/Host Country or Site/Institution Considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Alsharif, Naser Z.; Dakkuri, Adnan; Abrons, Jeanine P.; Williams, Dennis; Ombengi, David N.; Zheng, HaiAn; Al-Dahir, Sara; Tofade, Toyin; Gim, Suzanna; O’Connell, Mary Beth; Ratka, Anna; Dornblaser, Emily

    2016-01-01

    International outreach by schools and colleges of pharmacy is increasing. In this paper, we provide current practice guidelines to establish and maintain successful global/international advanced pharmacy practice experiences (G/I APPEs) with specific recommendations for home/host country and host site/institution. The paper is based on a literature review (2000-2014) in databases and Internet searches with specific keywords or terms. Educational documents such as syllabi and memoranda of unde...

  15. Measurement of the Antineutrino Double-Differential Charged-Current Quasi-Elastic Scattering Cross Section at MINERvA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick, Cheryl [Northwestern U.

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation neutrino oscillation experiments, such as DUNE and Hyper-Kamiokande, hope to measure charge-parity (CP) violation in the lepton sector. In order to do this, they must dramatically reduce their current levels of uncertainty, particularly those due to neutrino-nucleus interaction models. As CP violation is a measure of the difference between the oscillation properties of neutrinos and antineutrinos, data about how the less-studied antineutrinos interact is especially valuable. We present the MINERvA experiment's first double-differential scattering cross sections for antineutrinos on scintillator, in the few-GeV range relevant to experiments such as DUNE and NOvA. We also present total antineutrino-scintillator quasi-elastic cross sections as a function of energy, which we compare to measurements from previous experiments. As well as being useful to help reduce oscillation experiments' uncertainty, our data can also be used to study the prevalence of various cor relation and final-state interaction effects within the nucleus. We compare to models produced by different model generators, and are able to draw first conclusions about the predictions of these models.

  16. Measuring Muon-Neutrino Charged-Current Differential Cross Sections with a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitz, Joshua B. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2011-01-01

    More than 80 years after its proposed existence, the neutrino remains largely mysterious and elusive. Precision measurements of the neutrino's properties are just now beginning to take place. Such measurements are required in order to determine the mass of the neutrino, how many neutrinos there are, if neutrinos are different than anti-neutrinos, and more. Muon-neutrino charged-current differential cross sections on an argon target in terms of the outgoing muon momentum and angle are presented. The measurements have been taken with the ArgoNeuT Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) experiment. ArgoNeuT is the first LArTPC to ever take data in a low energy neutrino beam, having collected thousands of neutrino and anti-neutrino events in the NuMI beamline at Fermilab. The results are relevant for long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments searching for non-zero $\\theta_{13}$, CP-violation in the lepton sector, and the sign of the neutrino mass hierarchy, among other things. Furthermore, the differential cross sections are important for understanding the nature of the neutrino-nucleus interaction in general. These measurements represent a significant step forward for LArTPC technology as they are among the first neutrino physics results with such a device.

  17. Charged-current quasielastic neutrino scattering cross sections on 12C with realistic spectral and scaling functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, M. V.; Antonov, A. N.; Caballero, J. A.; Megias, G. D.; Barbaro, M. B.; de Guerra, E. Moya; Udías, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Charge-current quasielastic (anti)neutrino scattering cross sections on a 12C target are analyzed using a spectral function S (p,E) that gives a scaling function in accordance with the (e ,e') scattering data. The spectral function accounts for the nucleon-nucleon (NN) correlations, it has a realistic energy dependence, and natural orbitals (NOs) from the Jastrow correlation method are used in its construction. In all calculations the standard value of the axial mass MA=1.032 GeV/c2 is used. The results are compared with those when NN correlations are not included, as in the relativistic Fermi gas model, or when harmonic-oscillator single-particle wave functions are used instead of NOs. The role of the final-state interactions (FSIs) on the theoretical spectral and scaling functions, as well as on the cross sections, is accounted for. A comparison of the results for the cases with and without FSI, as well as to results from the phenomenological scaling function obtained from the superscaling analysis, is carried out. Our calculations based on the impulse approximation underpredict the MiniBooNE data but agree with the data from the NOMAD experiment. The possible missing ingredients in the considered theoretical models are discussed.

  18. Current advances and strategies towards fully automated sample preparation for regulated LC-MS/MS bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Naiyu; Jiang, Hao; Zeng, Jianing

    2014-09-01

    Robotic liquid handlers (RLHs) have been widely used in automated sample preparation for liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) bioanalysis. Automated sample preparation for regulated bioanalysis offers significantly higher assay efficiency, better data quality and potential bioanalytical cost-savings. For RLHs that are used for regulated bioanalysis, there are additional requirements, including 21 CFR Part 11 compliance, software validation, system qualification, calibration verification and proper maintenance. This article reviews recent advances in automated sample preparation for regulated bioanalysis in the last 5 years. Specifically, it covers the following aspects: regulated bioanalysis requirements, recent advances in automation hardware and software development, sample extraction workflow simplification, strategies towards fully automated sample extraction, and best practices in automated sample preparation for regulated bioanalysis.

  19. Anxiety and depression in patients with advanced macular degeneration: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimarolli, Verena R; Casten, Robin J; Rovner, Barry W; Heyl, Vera; Sörensen, Silvia; Horowitz, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) - despite advances in prevention and medical treatment options - remains prevalent among older adults, often resulting in functional losses that negatively affect the mental health of older adults. In particular, the prevalence of both anxiety and depression in patients with AMD is high. Along with medical treatment options, low vision rehabilitation and AMD-specific behavioral and self-management programs have been developed and have demonstrated effectiveness in improving the mental health of AMD patients. This article reviews the prevalence of anxiety and depression in patients with advanced AMD, discusses potential mechanisms accounting for the development of depression and anxiety in AMD patients, presents the state-of the-art of available interventions for addressing anxiety and depression in AMD patients, and delineates recommendations for eye care professionals regarding how to screen for these two prevalent mental health problems and how to facilitate appropriate treatment for patients with AMD.

  20. Current views and practice of faculty members and consultants regarding ′Publications in India′: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri S Kurdi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: There is an increasing enthusiasm and pressure to submit scientific articles to journals for publication due to official policies. This has led to increased stress on authors and editors and in issues like plagiarism. We planned a cross-sectional study with an aim to explore the current publication related views and practice of faculty members and consultants. Methods: We conducted a questionnaire based prospective survey with 22 questions divided into parts. Print and electronic versions were sent to around 18,270 members in total, a majority of whom were anaesthesiologists and 600 members responded to our questionnaire. A database was created and analysed using Microsoft Excel. Results: About 80% felt that online journals were better read than print journals. Eighty eight percent agreed that publications improve academic skills. The Medical Council of India requirements to publish in reputed journals were cited as the main reasons for plagiarism. The publication rule had become a burden for 46% respondents. Review articles were most likely to be read though clinical investigations were considered to be of maximum academic significance. Review/publishing time followed by author requirements and journal indexing were the points our respondents liked to see most when choosing a journal for article submission. Conclusion: Our survey results depict the current author related views and trends in publication practice which may guide in evidence-based policy making.

  1. A descriptive cross-sectional international study to explore current practices in the assessment, prevention and treatment of skin tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Kimberly; Baranoski, Sharon; Holloway, Samantha; Langemo, Diane; Regan, Mary

    2014-08-01

    This study presents the results of a descriptive, cross-sectional, online international survey in order to explore current practices in the assessment, prediction, prevention and treatment of skin tears (STs). A total of 1127 health care providers (HCP) from 16 countries completed the survey. The majority of the respondents (69·6%, n = 695) reported problems with the current methods for the assessment and documentation of STs with an overwhelming majority (89·5%, n = 891) favouring the development of a simplified method of assessment. Respondents ranked equipment injury during patient transfer and falls as the main causes of STs. The majority of the samples indicated that they used non-adhesive dressings (35·89%, n = 322) to treat a ST, with the use of protective clothing being the most common method of prevention. The results of this study led to the establishment of a consensus document, classification system and a tool kit for use by practitioners. The authors believe that this survey was an important first step in raising the global awareness of STs and to stimulate discussion and research of these complex acute wounds.

  2. Social Media, Big Data, and Mental Health: Current Advances and Ethical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Mike; O'Connor, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Mental health (including substance abuse) is the fifth greatest contributor to the global burden of disease, with an economic cost estimated to be US $2.5 trillion in 2010, and expected to double by 2030. Developing information systems to support and strengthen population-level mental health monitoring forms a core part of the World Health Organization's Comprehensive Action Plan 2013-2020. In this paper, we review recent work that utilizes social media "big data" in conjunction with associated technologies like natural language processing and machine learning to address pressing problems in population-level mental health surveillance and research, focusing both on technological advances and core ethical challenges.

  3. Advanced National Seismic System—Current status, development opportunities, and priorities for 2017–2027

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2017-05-25

    SummaryEarthquakes pose a threat to the safety of over 143 million people living in the United States. Earthquake impacts can be significantly reduced if communities understand their risk and take proactive steps to mitigate that risk. The Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) is a cooperative effort to collect and analyze seismic and geodetic data on earthquakes, issue timely and reliable notifications of their occurrence and impacts, and provide data for earthquake research and the hazard and risk assessments that are the foundation for creating an earthquakeresilient nation.

  4. Current views and advances on Paediatric Virology: An update for paediatric trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    MAMMAS, IOANNIS N.; GREENOUGH, ANNE; THEODORIDOU, MARIA; KRAMVIS, ANNA; CHRISTAKI, ILIANA; KOUTSAFTIKI, CHRYSSIE; KOUTSAKI, MARIA; PORTALIOU, DIMITRA M.; KOSTAGIANNI, GEORGIA; PANAGOPOULOU, PARASKEVI; SOURVINOS, GEORGE; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric Virology is a bold new scientific field, which combines Paediatrics with Virology, Epidemiology, Molecular Medicine, Evidence-based Medicine, Clinical Governance, Quality Improvement, Pharmacology and Immunology. The Workshop on Paediatric Virology, which took place on Saturday October 10, 2015 in Athens, Greece, provided an overview of recent views and advances on viral infections occurring in neonates and children. It was included in the official programme of the 20th World Congress on Advances in Oncology and the 18th International Symposium on Molecular Medicine, which attracted over 500 delegates from the five continents. During the Workshop, the topics covered included the challenges of vaccine implementation against human papillomaviruses in countries under financial crisis, strategies for eradicating poliomyelitis and its 60th vaccine anniversary, as well as the debate on the association between autism and vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella. Among the non-vaccine related topics, emphasis was given to viral infections in prematurely born infants and their long-term outcomes, new paediatric intensive care management options for bronchiolitis related to respiratory syncytial virus, the clinical implications of hepatitis B virus and cytomegalovirus genotyping, the Ebola virus threat and preparedness in Paediatric Emergency Departments, oral, oropharynx, laryngeal, nasal and ocular viral infections and Merkel cell polyomavirus as a novel emerging virus of infancy and childhood. In this review, we provide selected presentations and reports discussed at the Workshop. PMID:26889211

  5. Relationship of Clinical and Pathologic Nodal Staging in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer: Current Controversies in Daily Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Felice, Francesca; Musio, Daniela; Bulzonetti, Nadia; Raffetto, Nicola; Tombolini, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Systemic neo-adjuvant therapy plays a primary role in the management of locally advanced breast cancer. Without having any negative effect in overall survival, induction chemotherapy potentially assures a surgery approach in unresectable disease or a conservative treatment in technically resectable disease and acts on a well-vascularized tumor bed, without the modifications induced by surgery. A specific issue has a central function in the neo-adjuvant setting: lymph nodes status. It still represents one of the strongest predictors of long-term prognosis in breast cancer. The discussion of regional radiation therapy should be a matter of debate, especially in a pathological complete response. Currently, the indication for radiotherapy is based on the clinical stage before the surgery, even for the irradiation of the loco-regional lymph nodes. Regardless of pathological down-staging, radiation therapy is accepted as standard adjuvant treatment in locally advanced breast cancer. PMID:25247013

  6. Advanced launcher design options for electron cyclotron current drive on ITER based on remote steering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graswinckel, M. R.; Bongers, W. A.; M.R. de Baar,; van den Berg, M. A.; Denisov, G.; Donne, A. J. H.; Elzendoorn, B. S. Q.; Goede, A. P. H.; Heidinger, R.; Kuzikov, S.; Kruijt, O. G.; Kruizinga, B.; Moro, A.; Poli, E.; Ronden, D. M. S.; Saibene, G.; Thoen, D. J.; Verhoeven, A. G. A.

    2008-01-01

    Electron cyclotron current drive will become the main scheme on ITER for the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) and the control of sawtooth oscillations. The effectiveness of this scheme forms the basis for the requirements of the ITER Upper Port Launcher. These requirements include

  7. Eddy Current, Magnetic Particle and Hardness Testing, Aviation Quality Control (Advanced): 9227.04.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This unit of instruction includes the principles of eddy current, magnetic particle and hardness testing; standards used for analyzing test results; techniques of operating equipment; interpretation of indications; advantages and limitations of these methods of testing; care and calibration of equipment; and safety and work precautions. Motion…

  8. Synthetic biology and molecular genetics in non-conventional yeasts: Current tools and future advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, James M; Alper, Hal S

    2016-04-01

    Coupling the tools of synthetic biology with traditional molecular genetic techniques can enable the rapid prototyping and optimization of yeast strains. While the era of yeast synthetic biology began in the well-characterized model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it is swiftly expanding to include non-conventional yeast production systems such as Hansenula polymorpha, Kluyveromyces lactis, Pichia pastoris, and Yarrowia lipolytica. These yeasts already have roles in the manufacture of vaccines, therapeutic proteins, food additives, and biorenewable chemicals, but recent synthetic biology advances have the potential to greatly expand and diversify their impact on biotechnology. In this review, we summarize the development of synthetic biological tools (including promoters and terminators) and enabling molecular genetics approaches that have been applied in these four promising alternative biomanufacturing platforms. An emphasis is placed on synthetic parts and genome editing tools. Finally, we discuss examples of synthetic tools developed in other organisms that can be adapted or optimized for these hosts in the near future.

  9. Social Media, Big Data, and Mental Health: Current Advances and Ethical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Mike; O’Connor, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Mental health (including substance abuse) is the fifth greatest contributor to the global burden of disease, with an economic cost estimated to be US $2.5 trillion in 2010, and expected to double by 2030. Developing information systems to support and strengthen population-level mental health monitoring forms a core part of the World Health Organization’s Comprehensive Action Plan 2013–2020. In this paper, we review recent work that utilizes social media “big data” in conjunction with associated technologies like natural language processing and machine learning to address pressing problems in population-level mental health surveillance and research, focusing both on technological advances and core ethical challenges. PMID:27042689

  10. [Current status and future prospect of internal medicine treatment for advanced esophageal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F; Fan, Q X

    2016-09-23

    Esophageal cancer (EC) is one of common malignant tumors, and the incidence and mortality of EC in China rank the first place in the world. Because of the occult onset, the early atypical symptoms, and the lack of effective early diagnostic methods, most of patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage of the disease and lost the chance of surgery. Comprehensive treatment including palliative medical treatment, molecular targeted therapy, immunotherapy and so on is appropriate for these patients. How to choose the chemotherapy regimen and formulate reasonable treatment plan has become a hot spot in clinical research. Molecular targeted drugs have become a new developmental direction in cancer treatment because of their high specificity and antitumor activity, but the effects on esophageal cancer remain controversial. With the development of immune check point blockade treatment, breakthrough has been made in tumor immunotherapy, which has become an important means in cancer comprehensive treatment and shown a good prospect of treatment.

  11. Entanglement in continuous-variable systems: recent advances and current perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adesso, Gerardo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Roma ' La Sapienza' , Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy); Illuminati, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, Universita degli Studi di Salerno, Via Ponte don Melillo, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2007-07-13

    We review the theory of continuous-variable entanglement with special emphasis on foundational aspects, conceptual structures and mathematical methods. Much attention is devoted to the discussion of separability criteria and entanglement properties of Gaussian states, for their great practical relevance in applications to quantum optics and quantum information, as well as for the very clean framework that they allow for the study of the structure of nonlocal correlations. We give a self-contained introduction to phase-space and symplectic methods in the study of Gaussian states of infinite-dimensional bosonic systems. We review the most important results on the separability and distillability of Gaussian states and discuss the main properties of bipartite entanglement. These include the extremal entanglement, minimal and maximal, of two-mode mixed Gaussian states, the ordering of two-mode Gaussian states according to different measures of entanglement, the unitary (reversible) localization and the scaling of bipartite entanglement in multimode Gaussian states. We then discuss recent advances in the understanding of entanglement sharing in multimode Gaussian states, including the proof of the monogamy inequality of distributed entanglement for all Gaussian states. Multipartite entanglement of Gaussian states is reviewed by discussing its qualification by different classes of separability, and the main consequences of the monogamy inequality, such as the quantification of genuine tripartite entanglement in three-mode Gaussian states, the promiscuous nature of entanglement sharing in symmetric Gaussian states and the possible coexistence of unlimited bipartite and multipartite entanglement. We finally review recent advances and discuss possible perspectives on the qualification and quantification of entanglement in non-Gaussian states, a field of research that is to a large extent yet to be explored.

  12. Current Advances in the Computational Simulation of the Formation of Low-Mass Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, R I; Inutsuka, S; Padoan, P; Tomisaka, K

    2005-10-24

    Developing a theory of low-mass star formation ({approx} 0.1 to 3 M{sub {circle_dot}}) remains one of the most elusive and important goals of theoretical astrophysics. The star-formation process is the outcome of the complex dynamics of interstellar gas involving non-linear interactions of turbulence, gravity, magnetic field and radiation. The evolution of protostellar condensations, from the moment they are assembled by turbulent flows to the time they reach stellar densities, spans an enormous range of scales, resulting in a major computational challenge for simulations. Since the previous Protostars and Planets conference, dramatic advances in the development of new numerical algorithmic techniques have been successfully implemented on large scale parallel supercomputers. Among such techniques, Adaptive Mesh Refinement and Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics have provided frameworks to simulate the process of low-mass star formation with a very large dynamic range. It is now feasible to explore the turbulent fragmentation of molecular clouds and the gravitational collapse of cores into stars self-consistently within the same calculation. The increased sophistication of these powerful methods comes with substantial caveats associated with the use of the techniques and the interpretation of the numerical results. In this review, we examine what has been accomplished in the field and present a critique of both numerical methods and scientific results. We stress that computational simulations should obey the available observational constraints and demonstrate numerical convergence. Failing this, results of large scale simulations do not advance our understanding of low-mass star formation.

  13. Calculation of a Tunnel Cross Section Subjected to Fire – with a New Advanced Transient Concrete Model for Reinforced Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Schneider

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the structural application of a new thermal induced strain model for concrete – the TIS-Model. An advanced transient concrete model (ATCM is applied with the material model of the TIS-Model. The non-linear model comprises thermal strain, elastic strain, plastic strain and transient temperature strains, and load history modelling of restraint concrete structures subjected to fire.The calculations by finite element analysis (FEA were done using the SAFIR structural code. The FEA software was basically new with respect to the material modelling derived to use the new TIS-Model (as a transient model considers thermal induced strain. The equations of the ATCM consider a lot of capabilities, especially for considering irreversible effects of temperature on some material properties. By considering the load history during heating up, increasing load bearing capacity may be obtained due to higher stiffness of the concrete. With this model, it is possible to apply the thermal-physical behaviour of material laws for calculation of structures under extreme temperature conditions.A tunnel cross section designed and built by the cut and cover method is calculated with a tunnel fire curve. The results are compared with the results of a calculation with the model of the Eurocode 2 (EC2-Model. The effect of load history in highly loaded structures under fire load will be investigated.A comparison of this model with the ordinary calculation system of Eurocode 2 (EC2 shows that a better evaluation of the safety level was achieved with the new model. This opens a space for optimizing concrete structure design with transient temperature conditions up to 1000 °C. 

  14. Treatment patterns of advanced malignant melanoma (stage III-IV) - A review of current standards in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, Mark; Malvehy, Josep; Lebbe, Céleste; Heron, Louise; Amelio, Justyna; Szabo, Zsolt; Schadendorf, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    With the recent emergence of immunotherapies and novel targeted treatments for advanced and metastatic melanoma such as selective B-Raf inhibitors and checkpoint inhibitors, the treatment landscape in Europe has changed considerably. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of current treatment pathways in Europe for the treatment of advanced melanoma, unresectable stage III-IV. A literature search of four databases was conducted to identify publications reporting on the treatment patterns of advanced and metastatic melanoma (stage III-IV) in European populations. Seven full-text publications and two conference abstracts reported on observational studies of melanoma treatment practices in France, Italy and the United Kingdom. Treatment patterns were identified for two time periods: 2005-2009 and 2011-2012. Common treatments reported for both periods included chemotherapy with dacarbazine, fotemustine or temozolomide. The main differences between the two periods were the introduction and prescription of immunotherapy ipilimumab and targeted therapy vemurafenib between 2011 and 2012. Across the three countries studied, the types of treatments prescribed between 2005 and 2009 were relatively similar, however, with noticeable differences in the frequency and priority of administration. Treatment practices for advanced melanoma vary markedly across different European countries and continue to evolve with the introduction of new therapies. The results of this review highlight a considerable evidence gap with regards to recent treatment patterns for advanced melanoma in Europe, especially post-2011 after the introduction of novel therapeutic agents, and more recently with the introduction of programmed cell death 1 inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Current advances in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease: focused on considerations targeting Aβ and tau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Qi Yang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder that impairs mainly the memory and cognitive function in elderly. Extracellular beta amyloid deposition and intracellular tau hyperphosphorylation are the two pathological events that are thought to cause neuronal dysfunction in AD. Since the detailed mechanisms that underlie the pathogenesis of AD are still not clear, the current treatments are those drugs that can alleviate the symptoms of AD patients. Recent studies have indicated that these symptom-reliving drugs also have the ability of regulating amyloid precursor protein processing and tau phosphorylation. Thus the pharmacological mechanism of these drugs may be too simply-evaluated. This review summarizes the current status of AD therapy and some potential preclinical considerations that target beta amyloid and tau protein are also discussed.

  16. Gate Leakage Current Reduction With Advancement of Graded Barrier AlGaN/GaN HEMT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palash Das

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The gate leakage current reduction solution of AlGaN/GaN HEMT device issue has been addressed in this paper with compositional grading of AlGaN barrier layer. This work is also conjugated with the critical thickness limitation of heterostructure material growth. Hence, critical thickness calculation of AlGaN over GaN has been kept in special view. 1D Schrodinger and Poisson solver was used to calculate the 2DEG concentration and effective location to use it in the ATLAS device simulator for the predictions. The proposed Al0.50Ga0.50N/Al0.35Ga0.65N/Al0.20Ga0.80N/GaN HEMT structure exhibits the leakage current of the order of around 15 nA/mm at gate voltage of 1 V.

  17. Current role of non-anesthesiologist administered propofol sedation in advanced interventional endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burtea, Daniela Elena; Dimitriu, Anca; Maloş, Anca Elena

    2015-01-01

    the patients and medical personnel. Current guidelines support the use of propofol sedation, which has the same rate of adverse effects as traditional sedation with benzodiazepines and/or opioids, but decreases the procedural and recovery time. Non-anesthesiologist administered propofol sedation has become......, improved satisfaction for patients and doctors, as well as decreased recovery and discharge time. Despite the advantages of non-anesthesiologist administered propofol, there is still a continuous debate related to the successful generalization of the procedures....

  18. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Stroke Rehabilitation: A Review of Recent Advancements

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Gomez Palacio Schjetnan; Jamshid Faraji; Metz, Gerlinde A.; Masami Tatsuno; Artur Luczak

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a promising technique to treat a wide range of neurological conditions including stroke. The pathological processes following stroke may provide an exemplary system to investigate how tDCS promotes neuronal plasticity and functional recovery. Changes in synaptic function after stroke, such as reduced excitability, formation of aberrant connections, and deregulated plastic modifications, have been postulated to impede recovery from stroke. Howe...

  19. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Stroke Rehabilitation: A Review of Recent Advancements

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Gomez Palacio Schjetnan; Jamshid Faraji; Metz, Gerlinde A; Masami Tatsuno; Artur Luczak

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a promising technique to treat a wide range of neurological conditions including stroke. The pathological processes following stroke may provide an exemplary system to investigate how tDCS promotes neuronal plasticity and functional recovery. Changes in synaptic function after stroke, such as reduced excitability, formation of aberrant connections, and deregulated plastic modifications, have been postulated to impede recovery from stroke. Howe...

  20. Anxiety and depression in patients with advanced macular degeneration: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cimarolli VR

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Verena R Cimarolli,1 Robin J Casten,2 Barry W Rovner,3–5 Vera Heyl,6 Silvia Sörensen,7,8 Amy Horowitz9 1Research Institute on Aging, Jewish Home Lifecare, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 3Department of Neurology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 4Department of Psychiatry, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 5Department of Ophthalmology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 6Institute of Special Education, University of Education, Heidelberg, Germany; 7Warner School of Education and Human Development, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA; 8Department of Ophthalmology, Flaum Eye Institute, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY, USA; 9Graduate School of Social Service, Fordham University, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD – despite advances in prevention and medical treatment options – remains prevalent among older adults, often resulting in functional losses that negatively affect the mental health of older adults. In particular, the prevalence of both anxiety and depression in patients with AMD is high. Along with medical treatment options, low vision rehabilitation and AMD-specific behavioral and self-management programs have been developed and have demonstrated effectiveness in improving the mental health of AMD patients. This article reviews the prevalence of anxiety and depression in patients with advanced AMD, discusses potential mechanisms accounting for the development of depression and anxiety in AMD patients, presents the state-of the-art of available interventions for addressing anxiety and depression in AMD patients, and delineates recommendations for eye care professionals regarding how to

  1. Advanced hyphenated chromatographic-mass spectrometry in mycotoxin determination: current status and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peiwu; Zhang, Zhaowei; Hu, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometric techniques are essential for advanced research in food safety and environmental monitoring. These fields are important for securing the health of humans and animals, and for ensuring environmental security. Mycotoxins, toxic secondary metabolites of filamentous fungi, are major contaminants of agricultural products, food and feed, biological samples, and the environment as a whole. Mycotoxins can cause cancers, nephritic and hepatic diseases, various hemorrhagic syndromes, and immune and neurological disorders. Mycotoxin-contaminated food and feed can provoke trade conflicts, resulting in massive economic losses. Risk assessment of mycotoxin contamination for humans and animals generally depends on clear identification and reliable quantitation in diversified matrices. Pioneering work on mycotoxin quantitation using mass spectrometry (MS) was performed in the early 1970s. Now, unambiguous confirmation and quantitation of mycotoxins can be readily achieved with a variety hyphenated techniques that combine chromatographic separation with MS, including liquid chromatography (LC) or gas chromatography (GC). With the advent of atmospheric pressure ionization, LC-MS has become a routine technique. Recently, the co-occurrence of multiple mycotoxins in the same sample has drawn an increasing amount of attention. Thus, modern analyses must be able to detect and quantitate multiple mycotoxins in a single run. Improvements in tandem MS techniques have been made to achieve this purpose. This review describes the advanced research that has been done regarding mycotoxin determination using hyphenated chromatographic-MS techniques, but is not a full-circle survey of all the literature published on this topic. The present work provides an overview of the various hyphenated chromatographic-MS-based strategies that have been applied to mycotoxin analysis, with a focus on recent developments. The use of chromatographic-MS to measure levels of mycotoxins, including

  2. [Advances in highly conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer: past, current, and future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Makishima, Hirokazu; Mizumoto, Masashi; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2012-01-01

    Recent advance in the field of radiation oncology, especially in medical physics for radiation therapy (RT), has considerably improved treatment outcomes of various cancers including prostate cancer with regard to both of tumor control and morbidity. Three-dimensionally conformal RT with image-guided radiotherapeutic modalities for accurate tumor localization, such as brachytherapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and charged particle beam RT can thereby deliver a large dose to the tumor and allow the sparing of surrounding normal tissues. It is thought that prostate cancer is one of representative cancers which have been treated with RT as a curative intent and benefited from novel conformal RT techniques. Because the number of prostate cancer patients has been increasing year by year in Japan as results from wide spread of PSA screening and rapid change in life style, RT has been recently playing much more important roles in the curative treatment for patients with prostate cancer. Hence, we will review the outcomes of RT for prostate cancer and introduce the benefit of modern RT modalities from clinical aspect. In addition, our future prospect to further yield better disease control with minimum morbidity compared with present RT will be also mentioned in the report.

  3. Current status and recent advances of liver transplantation from donation after cardiac death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, M Thamara Pr; Bramhall, Simon R

    2011-11-27

    The last decade saw increased organ donation activity from donors after cardiac death (DCD). This contributed to a significant proportion of transplant activity. Despite certain drawbacks, liver transplantation from DCD donors continues to supplement the donor pool on the backdrop of a severe organ shortage. Understanding the pathophysiology has provided the basis for modulation of DCD organs that has been proven to be effective outside liver transplantation but remains experimental in liver transplantation models. Research continues on how best to further increase the utility of DCD grafts. Most of the work has been carried out exploring the use of organ preservation using machine assisted perfusion. Both ex-situ and in-situ organ perfusion systems are tested in the liver transplantation setting with promising results. Additional techniques involved pharmacological manipulation of the donor, graft and the recipient. Ethical barriers and end-of-life care pathways are obstacles to widespread clinical application of some of the recent advances to practice. It is likely that some of the DCD offers are in fact probably "prematurely" offered without ideal donor management or even prior to brain death being established. The absolute benefits of DCD exist only if this form of donation supplements the existing deceased donor pool; hence, it is worthwhile revisiting organ donation process enabling us to identify counter remedial measures.

  4. Current status of decommissioning projects and their strategies in advanced countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, U. S.; Lee, K. W.; Hwang, D. S.; Park, S. K.; Hwang, S. T.; Paik, S. T.; Park, J. H.; Choi, Y. D.; Chung, K. H.; Lee, K. I.; Hong, S. B

    2007-06-15

    At the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(KAERI), two projects for decommissioning of the research reactors and uranium conversion plant are carried out. The number of nuclear facilities to be dismantled will be much increased in future and the decommissioning industries will be enlarged. Keeping pace with this increasing tendency, each country formulated their own strategies and regulation systems, and applied their own technologies. The international organizations such as the IAEA and the OECD/NEA also prepared standards in technologies and regulation upon decommissioning and recommended to adopt them to the decommissioning projects. These strategies and technologies are very different country by country due to the different site dependent conditions and it will not be reasonable to evaluate their merits and weakness. The world wide status of the decommissioning, highlighted on that of 5 countries of USA, UK, France, Germany and Japan because they are advanced counties in nuclear industries, are summarized and their site specific conditions are evaluated. The scopes of the evaluation are decommissioning strategies, licensing procedures and requirements focused on decommissioning plan, waste management, technology development and so on. The detailed decommissioning progresses of several typical example sites were introduced. The activities on decommissioning field of the international organization, increased according to the enlarged decommissioning industries, are also summarized.

  5. Current Practices in Global/International Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences: Preceptor and Student Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornblaser, Emily K; Ratka, Anna; Gleason, Shaun E; Ombengi, David N; Tofade, Toyin; Wigle, Patricia R; Zapantis, Antonia; Ryan, Melody; Connor, Sharon; Jonkman, Lauren J; Ochs, Leslie; Jungnickel, Paul W; Abrons, Jeanine P; Alsharif, Naser Z

    2016-04-25

    The objective of this article is to describe the key areas of consideration for global/international advanced pharmacy practice experience (G/I APPE) preceptors, students and learning objectives. At the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP), the GPE SIG prepared and presented an initial report on the G/IAPPE initiatives. Round table discussions were conducted at the 2014 AACP Annual Meeting to document GPE SIG member input on key areas in the report. Literature search of PubMed, Google Scholar and EMBASE with keywords was conducted to expand this report. In this paper, considerations related to preceptors and students and learning outcomes are described. Preceptors for G/I APPEs may vary based on the learning outcomes of the experience. Student learning outcomes for G/I APPEs may vary based on the type of experiential site. Recommendations and future directions for development of G/IAPPEs are presented. Development of a successful G/I APPE requires significant planning and consideration of appropriate qualifications for preceptors and students.

  6. New advanced launcher for lower hybrid current drive on Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibet, Ph.; Agarici, G.; Chantant, M.; Cordier, J.J.; Deck, C.; Doceul, L.; Durocher, A.; Ekedahl, A.; Froissard, Ph.; Garguiolo, L.; Garampon, L.; Goniche, M.; Hertout, P.; Kazarian, F.; Lafon, D.; Portafaix, C.; Rey, G.; Samaille, F.; Surle, F.; Tonon, G

    2000-11-01

    A new actively cooled advanced launcher is being built for Tore Supra LHCD to inject 4 MW during 1000 s at 3.7 GHz, at a power density of 25 MW/m{sup 2} (a conservative value observed in Tore Supra experiments). It is made from an array of 6x48 active and 6x9 passive waveguides. The design uses technologies which are relevant for a next step machine such that it can: (i) withstand a plasma radiated flux of 0.15 MW/m{sup 2}; (ii) radiate power with spectra having peak N// values of 2.02{+-}0.35; (iii) withstand a total torque of 8.6 10{sup 4} N m during disruptions; (iv) allow an antenna 20 cm radial stroke adjustable in real time, (v) withstand a convected power flux of 10 MW/m{sup 2} on its guard limiter made of CFC tiles. A prototype of each new component of this antenna has been tested successfully at the nominal power with a pulse length of 1000 s.

  7. Current state of type 1 diabetes immunotherapy: incremental advances, huge leaps, or more of the same?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Brett; Trucco, Massimo; Giannoukakis, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Thus far, none of the preclinically successful and promising immunomodulatory agents for type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) has conferred stable, long-term insulin independence to diabetic patients. The majority of these immunomodulators are humanised antibodies that target immune cells or cytokines. These as well as fusion proteins and inhibitor proteins all share varying adverse event occurrence and severity. Other approaches have included intact putative autoantigens or autoantigen peptides. Considerable logistical outlays have been deployed to develop and to translate humanised antibodies targeting immune cells, cytokines, and cytokine receptors to the clinic. Very recent phase III trials with the leading agent, a humanised anti-CD3 antibody, call into question whether further development of these biologics represents a step forward or more of the same. Combination therapies of one or more of these humanised antibodies are also being considered, and they face identical, if not more serious, impediments and safety issues. This paper will highlight the preclinical successes and the excitement generated by phase II trials while offering alternative possibilities and new translational avenues that can be explored given the very recent disappointment in leading agents in more advanced clinical trials.

  8. Current State of Type 1 Diabetes Immunotherapy: Incremental Advances, Huge Leaps, or More of the Same?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Phillips

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thus far, none of the preclinically successful and promising immunomodulatory agents for type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM has conferred stable, long-term insulin independence to diabetic patients. The majority of these immunomodulators are humanised antibodies that target immune cells or cytokines. These as well as fusion proteins and inhibitor proteins all share varying adverse event occurrence and severity. Other approaches have included intact putative autoantigens or autoantigen peptides. Considerable logistical outlays have been deployed to develop and to translate humanised antibodies targeting immune cells, cytokines, and cytokine receptors to the clinic. Very recent phase III trials with the leading agent, a humanised anti-CD3 antibody, call into question whether further development of these biologics represents a step forward or more of the same. Combination therapies of one or more of these humanised antibodies are also being considered, and they face identical, if not more serious, impediments and safety issues. This paper will highlight the preclinical successes and the excitement generated by phase II trials while offering alternative possibilities and new translational avenues that can be explored given the very recent disappointment in leading agents in more advanced clinical trials.

  9. Enhancing Neurosurgical Education in Low- and Middle-income Countries: Current Methods and New Advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kevin E; Bernstein, Ilia; Kato, Yoko; Kawase, Takeshi; Hodaie, Mojgan

    2016-11-15

    Low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) face a critical shortage of basic surgical services. Adequate neurosurgical services can have a far-reaching positive impact on society's health care and, consequently, the economic development in LMICs. Yet surgery, and specifically neurosurgery has been a long neglected sector of global health. This article reviews the current efforts to enhance neurosurgery education in LMICs and outlines ongoing approaches for improvement. In addition, we introduce the concept of a sustainable and cost-effective model to enhance neurosurgical resources in LMICs and describe the process and methods of online curriculum development.

  10. Enhancing Neurosurgical Education in Low- and Middle-income Countries: Current Methods and New Advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIANG, Kevin E; BERNSTEIN, Ilia; KATO, Yoko; KAWASE, Takeshi; HODAIE, Mojgan

    2016-01-01

    Low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) face a critical shortage of basic surgical services. Adequate neurosurgical services can have a far-reaching positive impact on society’s health care and, consequently, the economic development in LMICs. Yet surgery, and specifically neurosurgery has been a long neglected sector of global health. This article reviews the current efforts to enhance neurosurgery education in LMICs and outlines ongoing approaches for improvement. In addition, we introduce the concept of a sustainable and cost-effective model to enhance neurosurgical resources in LMICs and describe the process and methods of online curriculum development. PMID:27616319

  11. Advances in sediment transport under combined action of waves and currents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongjun Lu; Shouqian Li; Liqin Zuo; Huaixiang Liu; J.A. Roelvink

    2015-01-01

    The coastal zone continuously changes due to natural processes and human activities. In order to understand and predict these morphological changes, an accurate description of sediment transport, caused by waves and currents (tidal or wave-induced), is important. This paper presents a review of the state-of-the-art knowledge in this field, including sediment incipient motion, bed forms, bed roughness, bed-load transport, suspended-load transport, equilibrium sediment concentration, and sheet flow. Some possible research fields and topics for future study also are proposed.

  12. Advanced education in prosthodontics: residents' perspectives on their current training and future goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sowygh, Zeyad H; Sukotjo, Cortino

    2010-02-01

    The purposes of this study were to identify current prosthodontic residents' demographics and to document prosthodontic residents' perspectives on their clinical training and future goals. A 52-item survey was created and distributed to prosthodontic residents in the United States on February 8, 2007. The data collected were analyzed; the means and standard deviations were calculated and ranked. Statistical analysis was conducted using Chi-square and Mann-Whitney analysis (p = 0.05). A 43% response rate was achieved, representing approximately 48% of the total population of prosthodontic residents in the United States. The majority of residents ranked clinical education as the most important factor in selecting their programs, were satisfied with their training, and planned to pursue the certification of the American Board of Prosthodontics. When asked how often they planned to work, 4 days a week was the most common answer. This is the first report identifying current prosthodontic residents' demographics and their perspectives on their clinical training and future goals. Several trends were identified, indicating a bright future for the specialty. By knowing the students' perceptions regarding their training and future goals, the American College of Prosthodontists and/or program directors will be able to use this information to improve residency programs and the specialty.

  13. Recent advances in high current vacuum arc ion sources for heavy ion fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Qi Nian Sheng; Prasad, R R; Krishnan, M S; Anders, A; Kwan, J; Brown, I

    2001-01-01

    For a heavy ion fusion induction linac driver, a source of heavy ions with charge states 1+-3+, approx 0.5 A current beams, approx 20 mu s pulse widths and approx 10 Hz repetition rates is required. Thermionic sources have been the workhorse for the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) program to date, but suffer from heating problems for large areas and contamination. They are limited to low (contact) ionization potential elements and offer relatively low ion fluxes with a charge state limited to 1+. Gas injection sources suffer from partial ionization and deleterious neutral gas effects. The above shortcomings of the thermionic ion sources can be overcome by a vacuum arc ion source. The vacuum arc ion source is a good candidate for HIF applications. It is capable of providing ions of various elements and different charge states in short and long pulse bursts and high beam current density. Under a Phase-I STTR from DOE, the feasibility of the vacuum arc ion source for the HIF applications was investigated. We have modifie...

  14. Extrapolating power-ramp performance criteria for current and advanced CANDU fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tayal, M.; Chassie, G.G

    2000-06-01

    To improve the precision and accuracy of power-ramp performance criteria for high-burnup fuel, we have examined in-reactor fuel performance data as well as out-reactor test data. The data are consistent with some of the concepts used in the current formulations for defining fuel failure thresholds, such as size of power-ramp and extent of burnup. Our review indicates that there is a need to modify some other aspects of the current formulations; therefore, a modified formulation is presented in this paper. The improvements mainly concern corrodent concentration and its relationships with threshold stress for failure. The new formulation is consistent with known and expected trends such as strength of Zircaloy in corrosive environment, timing of the release of fission products to the pellet-to-sheath gap, CANLUB coating, and fuel burnup. Because of the increased precision and accuracy, the new formulation is better able to identify operational regimes that are at risk of power-ramp failures; this predictive ability provides enhanced protection to fuel against power-ramp defects. At die same time, by removing unnecessary conservatisms in other areas, the new formulation permits a greater range of defect-free operational envelope as well as larger operating margins in regions that are, in fact, not prone to power-ramp failures. (author)

  15. Current technological advances in magnetic resonance with critical impact for clinical diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Val M

    2013-12-01

    The last 5 years of technological advances with major impact on clinical magnetic resonance (MR) are discussed, with greater emphasis on those that are most recent. These developments have already had a critical positive effect on clinical diagnosis and therapy and presage continued rapid improvements for the next 5 years. This review begins with a discussion of 2 topics that encompass the breadth of MR, in terms of anatomic applications, contrast media, and MR angiography. Subsequently, innovations are discussed by anatomic category, picking the areas with the greatest development, starting with the brain, moving forward to the liver and kidney, and concluding with the musculoskeletal system, breast, and prostate. Two final topics are then considered, which will likely, with time, become independent major fields in their own right, interventional MR and MR positron emission tomography (PET).The next decade will bring a new generation of MR contrast media, with research focused on substantial improvements (>100-fold) in relaxivity (contrast effect), thus providing greater efficacy, safety, and tissue targeting. Magnetic resonance angiography will see major advances because of the use of compressed sensing, in terms of spatial and temporal resolution, with movement away from nondynamic imaging. The breadth of available techniques and tissue contrast has greatly expanded in brain imaging, benefiting both from the introduction of new basic categories of imaging techniques, such as readout-segmented echo planar imaging and 3D fast spin echo imaging with variable flip angles, and from new refinements specific to anatomic areas, such as double inversion recovery and MP2RAGE. Liver imaging has benefited from the development of techniques to easily and rapidly assess lipid, and will see, overall, a marked improvement in the next 5 years from new techniques on the verge of clinical introduction, such as controlled aliasing in parallel imaging results in higher acceleration

  16. ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT- CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, R.

    2013-02-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations

  17. Current advances in delivery of biotherapeutics across the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajadhyaksha, Manoj; Boyden, Tracey; Liras, Jennifer; El-Kattan, Ayman; Brodfuehrer, Joanne

    2011-06-01

    Significant efforts through genomic approaches have been dedicated toward the identification of novel protein-protein interactions as promising therapeutic targets for indications such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and neuropsychiatric disorders. Additionally, the number of biotherapeutic agents entering the Pharmaceutical sector continues to increase and according to EvaluatePharma's "World Preview 2014" report, "the compounded annual growth rate of biologics is expected to be 8.5 percent from 2008-2014, eight to 10 times greater than the growth rate of small molecules". However, there are limited examples of success in developing biotherapeutic modalities for central nervous system (CNS) diseases in the drug development pipeline. A primary reason for the lack of application of biotherapeutics to neuroscience targets, is that the blood-brain barrier (BBB) isolates and protects CNS structures creating a unique biochemically and immunologically privileged environment, therefore passage of macromolecules across this barrier has additional challenges. An understanding of the anatomical and physiological properties of this barrier with respect to penetration of biotherapeutics is presented in this review document. In this summary, recent advances in biotherapeutic delivery mechanisms across the BBB including transcranial brain drug delivery, focused ultrasound technology, nasal delivery, absorptive endocytosis, and receptor mediated endocytosis are evaluated using an industrial perspective. With acknowledgement that each approach has advantages and disadvantages, this review discusses the opportunities and challenges that are encountered during application of these methods across a variety of therapeutic areas such as, pain, obesity, neuroscience, and oncology. Utilizing an industrial perspective, including consideration of cost of goods and commercial feasibility for these approaches, this review highlights technology features which would enable industry

  18. Therapeutic Mechanisms of Lithium in Bipolar Disorder: Recent Advances and Current Understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhi, Gin S; Outhred, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Lithium is the most effective and well established treatment for bipolar disorder, and it has a broad array of effects within cellular pathways. However, the specific processes through which therapeutic effects occur and are maintained in bipolar disorder remain unclear. This paper provides a timely update to an authoritative review of pertinent findings that was published in CNS Drugs in 2013. A literature search was conducted using the Scopus database, and was limited by year (from 2012). There has been a resurgence of interest in lithium therapy mechanisms, perhaps driven by technical advancements in recent years that permit the examination of cellular mechanisms underpinning the effects of lithium-along with the reuptake of lithium in clinical practice. Recent research has further cemented glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) inhibition as a key mechanism, and the inter-associations between GSK3β-mediated neuroprotective, anti-oxidative and neurotransmission mechanisms have been further elucidated. In addition to highly illustrative cellular research, studies examining higher-order biological systems, such as circadian rhythms, as well as employing innovative animal and human models, have increased our understanding of how lithium-induced changes at the cellular level possibly translate to changes at behavioural and clinical levels. Neural circuitry research is yet to identify clear mechanisms of change in bipolar disorder in response to treatment with lithium, but important structural findings have demonstrated links to the modulation of cellular mechanisms, and peripheral marker and pharmacogenetic studies are showing promising findings that will likely inform the exploration for predictors of lithium treatment response. With a deeper understanding of lithium's therapeutic mechanisms-from the cellular to clinical levels of investigation-comes the opportunity to develop predictive models of lithium treatment response and identify novel drug targets, and

  19. Current advances in molecular, biochemical, and computational modeling analysis of microalgal triacylglycerol biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenka, Sangram K; Carbonaro, Nicole; Park, Rudolph; Miller, Stephen M; Thorpe, Ian; Li, Yantao

    2016-01-01

    Triacylglycerols (TAGs) are highly reduced energy storage molecules ideal for biodiesel production. Microalgal TAG biosynthesis has been studied extensively in recent years, both at the molecular level and systems level through experimental studies and computational modeling. However, discussions of the strategies and products of the experimental and modeling approaches are rarely integrated and summarized together in a way that promotes collaboration among modelers and biologists in this field. In this review, we outline advances toward understanding the cellular and molecular factors regulating TAG biosynthesis in unicellular microalgae with an emphasis on recent studies on rate-limiting steps in fatty acid and TAG synthesis, while also highlighting new insights obtained from the integration of multi-omics datasets with mathematical models. Computational methodologies such as kinetic modeling, metabolic flux analysis, and new variants of flux balance analysis are explained in detail. We discuss how these methods have been used to simulate algae growth and lipid metabolism in response to changing culture conditions and how they have been used in conjunction with experimental validations. Since emerging evidence indicates that TAG synthesis in microalgae operates through coordinated crosstalk between multiple pathways in diverse subcellular destinations including the endoplasmic reticulum and plastids, we discuss new experimental studies and models that incorporate these findings for discovering key regulatory checkpoints. Finally, we describe tools for genetic manipulation of microalgae and their potential for future rational algal strain design. This comprehensive review explores the potential synergistic impact of pathway analysis, computational approaches, and molecular genetic manipulation strategies on improving TAG production in microalgae.

  20. Comparison of advanced optical imaging techniques with current otolaryngology diagnostics for improved middle ear assessment (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Ryan M.; Shelton, Ryan L.; Monroy, Guillermo L.; Spillman, Darold R.; Novak, Michael A.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-02-01

    Otolaryngologists utilize a variety of diagnostic techniques to assess middle ear health. Tympanometry, audiometry, and otoacoustic emissions examine the mobility of the tympanic membrane (eardrum) and ossicles using ear canal pressure and auditory tone delivery and detection. Laser Doppler vibrometry provides non-contact vibrational measurement, and acoustic reflectometry is used to assess middle ear effusion using sonar. These technologies and techniques have advanced the field beyond the use of the standard otoscope, a simple tissue magnifier, yet the need for direct visualization of middle ear disease for superior detection, assessment, and management remains. In this study, we evaluated the use of portable optical coherence tomography (OCT) and pneumatic low-coherence interferometry (LCI) systems with handheld probe delivery to standard tympanometry, audiometry, otoacoustic emissions, laser Doppler vibrometry, and acoustic reflectometry. Comparison of these advanced optical imaging techniques and current diagnostics was conducted with a case study subject with a history of unilateral eardrum trauma. OCT and pneumatic LCI provide novel dynamic spatiotemporal structural data of the middle ear, such as the thickness of the eardrum and quantitative detection of underlying disease pathology, which could allow for more accurate diagnosis and more appropriate management than currently possible.

  1. Recent advances in protein kinase inhibition: current molecular scaffolds used for inhibitor synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, D R; Lydon, N B; Nunes, J J

    1999-07-01

    Early efforts to discover and develop protein kinase inhibitors have focused largely on a small group of oncology targets such as the EGFR and PKC enzymes. More recently, hundreds of protein kinases have been identified at the genetic level, many of which are now being assigned functions in a variety of signaling pathways. Additionally, mutagenesis and X-ray crystallographic studies have further defined common structural features associated with binding of the ATP cofactor within a conserved ATP binding cleft. These studies have also demonstrated significant differences in the ATP binding cleft between individual kinases, providing a molecular basis for understanding and exploiting inhibitor specificity. The current review will focus on recent developments in the field of ATP site-directed inhibitors with particular emphasis on the major scaffolds being derivatized to take advantage of variable regions of the active site.

  2. Current role of non-anesthesiologist administered propofolsedation in advanced interventional endoscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Complex and lengthy endoscopic examinations likeendoscopic ultrasonography and/or endoscopic retrogradecholangiopancreatography benefit from deepsedation, due to an enhanced quality of examinations,reduced discomfort and anxiety of patients, as well asincreased satisfaction for both the patients and medicalpersonnel. Current guidelines support the use ofpropofol sedation, which has the same rate of adverseeffects as traditional sedation with benzodiazepines and/or opioids, but decreases the procedural and recoverytime. Non-anesthesiologist administered propofolsedation has become an option in most of the countries,due to limited anesthesiology resources and theincreasing evidence from prospective studies and metaanalysesthat the procedure is safe with a similar rate ofadverse events with traditional sedation. The advantagesinclude a high quality of endoscopic examination,improved satisfaction for patients and doctors, as wellas decreased recovery and discharge time. Despitethe advantages of non-anesthesiologist administeredpropofol, there is still a continuous debate related to thesuccessful generalization of the procedures.

  3. Immunotherapy for B-cell lymphoma: current status and prospective advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurit eHollander

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma has progressed significantly over the last decades. However, the majority of patients remain incurable, and novel therapies are needed. Because immunotherapy ideally offers target selectivity, an ever increasing number of immunotherapies, both passive and active, are undergoing development. The champion of passive immunotherapy to date is the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab that revolutionized the standard of care for lymphoma. The great success of rituximab catalyzed the development of new passive immunotherapy strategies that are currently undergoing clinical evaluation. These include improvement of rituximab efficacy, newer generation anti-CD20 antibodies, drug-conjugated and radiolabelled anti-CD20 antibodies, monoclonal antibodies targeting non-CD20 lymphoma antigens, and bispecific antibodies. Active immunotherapy aims at inducing long-lasting antitumor immunity, thereby limiting the likelihood of relapse. Current clinical studies of active immunotherapy for lymphoma consist largely of vaccination and immune checkpoint blockade. A variety of protein- and cell-based vaccines are being tested in ongoing clinical studies. Recently completed phase III clinical trials of an idiotype protein vaccine suggest that the vaccine may have clinical activity in a subset of patients. Efforts to enhance the efficacy of active immunotherapy are ongoing with an emphasis on optimization of antigen delivery and presentation of vaccines and modulation of the immune system toward counteracting immunosuppression, using antibodies against immune regulatory checkpoints. This article discusses results of the various immunotherapy approaches applied to date for B-cell lymphoma and the ongoing trials to improve their effect.

  4. Current advances in mathematical modeling of anti-cancer drug penetration into tumor tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MunJu eKim

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Delivery of anti-cancer drugs to tumor tissues, including their interstitial transport and cellular uptake, is a complex process involving various biochemical, mechanical, and biophysical factors. Mathematical modeling provides a means through which to understand this complexity better, as well as to examine interactions between contributing components in a systematic way via computational simulations and quantitative analyses. In this review, we present the current state of mathematical modeling approaches that address phenomena related to drug delivery. We describe how various types of models were used to predict spatio-temporal distributions of drugs within the tumor tissue, to simulate different ways to overcome barriers to drug transport, or to optimize treatment schedules. Finally, we discuss how integration of mathematical modeling with experimental or clinical data can provide better tools to understand the drug delivery process, in particular to examine the specific tissue- or compound-related factors that limit drug penetration through tumors. Such tools will be important in designing new chemotherapy targets and optimal treatment strategies, as well as in developing non-invasive diagnosis to monitor treatment response and detect tumor recurrence.

  5. The role of germ cell loss during primordial follicle assembly: a review of current advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuan-Chao; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Dyce, Paul W; Shen, Wei; Chen, Hong

    2017-01-01

    In most female mammals, early germline development begins with the appearance of primordial germ cells (PGCs), and develops to form mature oocytes following several vital processes. It remains well accepted that significant germ cell apoptosis and oocyte loss takes place around the time of birth. The transition of the ovarian environment from fetal to neonatal, coincides with the loss of germ cells and the timing of follicle formation. All told it is common to lose approximately two thirds of germ cells during this transition period. The current consensus is that germ cell loss can be attributed, at least in part, to programmed cell death (PCD). Recently, autophagy has been implicated as playing a part in germ cell loss during the time of parturition. In this review, we discuss the major opinions and mechanisms of mammalian ovarian PCD during the process of germ cell loss. We also pay close attention to the function of autophagy in germ cell loss, and speculate that autophagy may also serve as a critical and necessary process during the establishment of primordial follicle pool.

  6. Advances in hepatitis C therapy: What is the current state - what come’s next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zopf, Steffen; Kremer, Andreas E; Neurath, Markus F; Siebler, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects 80-160 million people worldwide and is one of the leading causes of chronic liver disease. It is only a few years ago that standard treatment regimes were based on pegylated interferon alpha and ribavirin. However, treatment of HCV has undergone a revolutionary change in recent years. The admission of the nucleotide polymerase inhibitor Sofosbuvir enabled an interferon-free regimen with direct antiviral agents (DAA). Meanwhile seven DAAs are available and can be applied in several combinations for 8 to 24 wk depending on HCV genotype and patient characteristics such as cirrhosis and chronic renal failure. High rates of sustained virological response (SVR) rates can be achieved with these novel drugs. Even in difficult to treat populations such as patients with liver cirrhosis, HCV-human immunodeficiency virus co-infections, after liver transplantion, or with chronic kidney disease comparable high rates of SVR can be achieved. The anticipated 2nd generation DAAs are strikingly effective in patients so far classified as difficult to treat including decompensated liver cirrhosis or post-transplant patients. These 2nd generations DAAs will have higher resistance barriers, higher antiviral effects and a pan-genotypic spectrum. This review highlights the current state of the art of antiviral treatment in hepatitis C and gives an outlook for upcoming therapies. PMID:26839638

  7. Current companion diagnostics in advanced colorectal cancer; getting a bigger and better piece of the pie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loree, Jonathan M; Kopetz, Scott; Raghav, Kanwal P S

    2017-02-01

    While the treatment of colorectal cancer continues to rely heavily on conventional cytotoxic therapy, an increasing number of targeted agents are under development. Many of these treatments require companion diagnostic tests in order to define an appropriate population that will derive benefit. In addition, a growing number of biomarkers provide prognostic information about a patient's malignancy. As we learn more about these biomarkers and their assays, selecting the appropriate companion diagnostic becomes increasingly important. In the case of many biomarkers, there are numerous assays which could provide the same information to a treating physician, however each assay has strengths and weaknesses. Institutions must balance cost, assay sensitivity, turn-around time, and labor resources when selecting which assay to offer. In this review we will discuss the current state of companion diagnostics available in metastatic colorectal cancer and explore emerging biomarkers and their assays. We will focus on KRAS, BRAF, HER2, and PIK3CA testing, as well as microsatellite stability assessment and multigene panels.

  8. Current role of non-anesthesiologist administered propofol sedation in advanced interventional endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtea, Daniela Elena; Dimitriu, Anca; Maloş, Anca Elena; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2015-08-10

    Complex and lengthy endoscopic examinations like endoscopic ultrasonography and/or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography benefit from deep sedation, due to an enhanced quality of examinations, reduced discomfort and anxiety of patients, as well as increased satisfaction for both the patients and medical personnel. Current guidelines support the use of propofol sedation, which has the same rate of adverse effects as traditional sedation with benzodiazepines and/or opioids, but decreases the procedural and recovery time. Non-anesthesiologist administered propofol sedation has become an option in most of the countries, due to limited anesthesiology resources and the increasing evidence from prospective studies and meta-analyses that the procedure is safe with a similar rate of adverse events with traditional sedation. The advantages include a high quality of endoscopic examination, improved satisfaction for patients and doctors, as well as decreased recovery and discharge time. Despite the advantages of non-anesthesiologist administered propofol, there is still a continuous debate related to the successful generalization of the procedures.

  9. Lower GI bleeding: a review of current management, controversies and advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Andrew J; Tuffaha, Hussein; Malik, Arshad

    2016-02-01

    Lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is defined as bleeding distal to the ligament of Treitz. In the UK, it represents approximately 3 % of all surgical referrals to the hospital. This review aims to provide review of the current evidence regarding the management of this condition. Literature was searched using Medline, Pubmed, and Cochrane for relevant evidence by two researchers. This was conducted in a manner that enabled a narrative review of the evidence covering the aetiology, clinical assessment and management options of continuously bleeding patients. The majority of patients with acute lower GI bleeding can be treated conservatively. In cases where ongoing bleeding occurs, colonoscopy is still the first line of investigation and treatment. Failure of endoscopy and persistent instability warrant angiography, possibly preceded by CT angiography and proceeding to superselective embolisation. Failure of embolisation warrants surgical intervention. There are still many unanswered questions. In particular, the development of a more reliable predictive tool for mortality, rebleeding and requirement for surgery needs to be the ultimate priority. There are a small number of encouraging developments on combination therapy with regard to angiography, endoscopy and surgery. Additionally, the increasing use of haemostatic agents provides an additional tool for the management of bleeding endoscopically in difficult situations.

  10. Current advances in ant venom proteins causing hypersensitivity reactions in the Asia-Pacific region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srisong, Hathairat; Daduang, Sakda; Lopata, Andreas L

    2016-01-01

    The main insects causing allergy reactions to stinging insect in humans are Apidae (bees), Vespidae (wasps, yellow jackets and hornets) and Formicidae (ants). Their venom stings are composed of various biologically active peptides and protein components, some of which can cause toxicity or anaphylaxis in humans. The protein venom demonstrate some common allergenic activity such as for fire ants and vespids, which have two common allergens that are phospholipase A1 (enzymatic activity) and antigen 5 with unknown biological activity. The common allergens seem to share some degree of immunological cross-reactivity, particularly when the sequence homology is above 70%. Therefore immunotherapeutic approaches targeting more than one specific species are of interest. Recent widespread increases of various ant species in many countries have resulted in higher number of reported about serious allergic reactions to stings. Most insect-allergy related cases have been reported for species from Solenopsis, Myrmecia and Pachycondyla genera, and their stings can often result in human fatalities. In addition, stinging ants can have serious health effects on livestock, agricultural damage adversely affecting the biodiversity of the region. This review discusses the impact of important ant species on human health in the Asia-Pacific region along with the molecular immunological aspects of the identified venoms and current status of diagnostics and therapeutics. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Current and advanced NO/sub x/-control technology for coal-fired industrial boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-01

    A NOx-control-technology assessment study of coal-fired industrial boilers was conducted to examine the effectiveness of combustion-modification methods, including low excess air, staged combustion, and burner modifications. Boiler types considered included overfed and underfed stokers, spreader stokers, pulverized-coal and coal-fired cyclone units. Significant variations in NOx emissions occur with boiler type, firing method, and coal type; a relative comparison of emission-control performance, cost, and operational considerations is presented for each method. Baseline (as-found) emissions from grate-fired stokers were shown to be in the range of 200 to 300 ppM. Similarly, as-found emissions from suspension-fired units were quite low (350 to 600 ppM) as compared to comparably designed utility-sized units. Low excess air was shown to be the most effective method on existing units, reducing emissions by approximately 10%. Evaluation of staged combustion and burner modification, however, were limited due to current boiler designs. Major hardware modification/design and implementation are necessary before the potential of these techniques can be fully evaluated. The study emphasized the numerous operational factors that are of major importance to the user in selecting and implementing a combustion-modification program, including energy considerations, incremental capital and operating costs, corrosion, secondary pollutants, and retrofit potential.

  12. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Stroke Rehabilitation: A Review of Recent Advancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez Palacio Schjetnan, Andrea; Faraji, Jamshid; Metz, Gerlinde A.; Tatsuno, Masami; Luczak, Artur

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a promising technique to treat a wide range of neurological conditions including stroke. The pathological processes following stroke may provide an exemplary system to investigate how tDCS promotes neuronal plasticity and functional recovery. Changes in synaptic function after stroke, such as reduced excitability, formation of aberrant connections, and deregulated plastic modifications, have been postulated to impede recovery from stroke. However, if tDCS could counteract these negative changes by influencing the system's neurophysiology, it would contribute to the formation of functionally meaningful connections and the maintenance of existing pathways. This paper is aimed at providing a review of underlying mechanisms of tDCS and its application to stroke. In addition, to maximize the effectiveness of tDCS in stroke rehabilitation, future research needs to determine the optimal stimulation protocols and parameters. We discuss how stimulation parameters could be optimized based on electrophysiological activity. In particular, we propose that cortical synchrony may represent a biomarker of tDCS efficacy to indicate communication between affected areas. Understanding the mechanisms by which tDCS affects the neural substrate after stroke and finding ways to optimize tDCS for each patient are key to effective rehabilitation approaches. PMID:23533955

  13. Current Advances in Epigenetic Modification and Alteration during Mammalian Ovarian Folliculogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zengxiang Pan; Jinbi Zhang; Qifa Li; Yinxia Li; Fangxiong Shi; Zhuang Xie; Honglin Liu

    2012-01-01

    During the growth and development of mammalian ovarian follicles,the activation and deactivation of mass genes are under the synergistic control of diverse modifiers through genetic and epigenetic events.Many factors regulate gene activity and functions through epigenetic modification without altering the DNA sequence,and the common mechanisms may include but arc not limited to: DNA methylation,histone modifications (e.g.,acetylation,deacetylation,phosphorylation,methylation,and ubiquitination),and RNA-associated silencing of gene expression by noncoding RNA.Over the past decade,substantial progress has been achieved in studies involving the epigenetic alterations during mammalian germ cell development.A number of candidate regulatory factors have been identified.This review focuses on the current available information of epigenetic alterations (e.g.,DNA methylation,histone modification,noncoding-RNA-mediated regulation) during mammalian folliculogenesis and recounts when and how epigenetic patterns are differentially established,maintained,or altered in this process.Based on different types of epigenetic regulation,our review follows the temporal progression of events during ovarian folliculogenesis and describes the epigenetic changes and their contributions to germ cell—specific functions at each stage (i.e.,primordial folliculogenesis (follicle formation),follicle maturation,and follicular atresia).

  14. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Stroke Rehabilitation: A Review of Recent Advancements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Gomez Palacio Schjetnan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is a promising technique to treat a wide range of neurological conditions including stroke. The pathological processes following stroke may provide an exemplary system to investigate how tDCS promotes neuronal plasticity and functional recovery. Changes in synaptic function after stroke, such as reduced excitability, formation of aberrant connections, and deregulated plastic modifications, have been postulated to impede recovery from stroke. However, if tDCS could counteract these negative changes by influencing the system’s neurophysiology, it would contribute to the formation of functionally meaningful connections and the maintenance of existing pathways. This paper is aimed at providing a review of underlying mechanisms of tDCS and its application to stroke. In addition, to maximize the effectiveness of tDCS in stroke rehabilitation, future research needs to determine the optimal stimulation protocols and parameters. We discuss how stimulation parameters could be optimized based on electrophysiological activity. In particular, we propose that cortical synchrony may represent a biomarker of tDCS efficacy to indicate communication between affected areas. Understanding the mechanisms by which tDCS affects the neural substrate after stroke and finding ways to optimize tDCS for each patient are key to effective rehabilitation approaches.

  15. Current management of motor fluctuations in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease treated chronically with levodopa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melamed, E; Zoldan, J; Galili-Mosberg, R; Ziv, I; Djaldetti, R

    1999-01-01

    Motor fluctuations after long-term administration of levodopa may be due to central pharmacodynamic mechanisms such as reduced striatal synthesis and storage of dopamine from exogenous levodopa and subsensitization of postsynaptic dopaminergic receptors. Peripheral pharmacokinetic mechanisms may be equally important, particularly in motor fluctuations of the "delayed on" (increased time latencies from dose intake to start-up of clinical benefit) and "no-on" (complete failure of a levodopa dose to exert an "on" response) types. Levodopa itself has a very poor solubility. In addition, there is delayed gastric emptying in many advanced patients. Therefore, an oral dose of levodopa may remain in the stomach for long periods of time before it passes into the duodenum where there is immediate absorption. Consequently, in order to overcome response fluctuations caused by impaired pharmacokinetic mechanisms and to improve its absorption, we recommend that levodopa be taken in multiple small doses, on an empty stomach, preferably crushed and mixed with a lot of liquid. Protein intake should be minimized. Prokinetic drugs such as prepulsid (Cisaprid) could be used to facilitate gastric motility and levodopa transit time. Administration of crushed levodopa through nasoduodenal or gastrojejunostomy tubes may be helpful in certain circumstances. Bypassing the stomach with subcutaneous injections of apomorphine may provide dramatic rescue from difficult "off" situations. Oral and s.c. administration of novel, extremely soluble prodrugs of levodopa, e.g., levodopa ethylester, may offer a new approach to overcome difficulties in levodopa absorption. Addition of dopamine agonists, MAO-B inhibitors, COMT inhibitors and controlled release levodopa preparations may be helpful in prolonging the duration of efficacy of each single levodopa dose. Levodopa, administered orally, usually combined with peripheral dopa decarboxylase inhibitors, continues to be the most widely-used and most

  16. Desire for predictive testing for Alzheimer's disease and impact on advance care planning: a cross-sectional study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sheffrin, Meera; Stijacic Cenzer, Irena; Steinman, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    .... Using a nationally representative sample, we explored who would take a free and definitive test predictive of Alzheimer's disease, and examined how using such a test may impact advance care planning...

  17. Current advances in biomarkers for targeted therapy in triple-negative breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleisher B

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Brett Fleisher,1 Charlotte Clarke,2 Sihem Ait-Oudhia1 1Department of Pharmaceutics, Center for Pharmacometrics and Systems Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, University of Florida, Orlando, FL, 2Department of Translational Research, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is a complex heterogeneous disease characterized by the absence of three hallmark receptors: human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, estrogen receptor, and progesterone receptor. Compared to other breast cancer subtypes, TNBC is more aggressive, has a higher prevalence in African-Americans, and more frequently affects younger patients. Currently, TNBC lacks clinically accepted targets for tailored therapy, warranting the need for candidate biomarkers. BiomarkerBase, an online platform used to find biomarkers reported in clinical trials, was utilized to screen all potential biomarkers for TNBC and select only the ones registered in completed TNBC trials through clinicaltrials.gov. The selected candidate biomarkers were classified as surrogate, prognostic, predictive, or pharmacodynamic (PD and organized by location in the blood, on the cell surface, in the cytoplasm, or in the nucleus. Blood biomarkers include vascular endothelial growth factor/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and interleukin-8 (IL-­8; cell surface biomarkers include EGFR, insulin-like growth factor binding protein, c-Kit, c-Met, and PD-L1; cytoplasm biomarkers include PIK3CA, pAKT/S6/p4E-BP1, PTEN, ALDH1, and the PIK3CA/AKT/mTOR-related metabolites; and nucleus biomarkers include BRCA1, the glucocorticoid receptor, TP53, and Ki67. Candidate biomarkers were further organized into a “cellular protein network” that demonstrates potential connectivity. This review provides an inventory and reference point for promising biomarkers for breakthrough targeted therapies in TNBC. Keywords: anti-cancer directed pharmacotherapy, difficult

  18. Animal models of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: current perspectives and recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Jennie Ka Ching; Zhang, Xiang; Yu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a continuous spectrum of diseases characterized by excessive lipid accumulation in hepatocytes. NAFLD progresses from simple liver steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and, in more severe cases, to liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Because of its growing worldwide prevalence, various animal models that mirror both the histopathology and the pathophysiology of each stage of human NAFLD have been developed. The selection of appropriate animal models continues to be one of the key questions faced in this field. This review presents a critical analysis of the histopathology and pathogenesis of NAFLD, the most frequently used and recently developed animal models for each stage of NAFLD and NAFLD-induced HCC, the main mechanisms involved in the experimental pathogenesis of NAFLD in different animal models, and a brief summary of recent therapeutic targets found by the use of animal models. Integrating the data from human disease with those from animal studies indicates that, although current animal models provide critical guidance in understanding specific stages of NAFLD pathogenesis and progression, further research is necessary to develop more accurate models that better mimic the disease spectrum, in order to provide both increased mechanistic understanding and identification/testing of novel therapeutic approaches. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  19. The Development of Perioperative Practices for Liver Transplantation: Advances and Current Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merceds Susan Mandell

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation is a young medical specialty that has grown rapidly over the past 50 years. Anesthesiologists, surgeons and hepatologists are all essential partners in the process of determining patient outcome. Each specialty has made landmark improvements in patient outcome. However, there is still variability in practice patterns in each of the 3 major specialties. This review will use a historic perspective to explore the unique forces that shaped specific transplant practices and those that gave rise to differences in perioperative practices. Anesthesiologists and surgeons have made significant improvements in the management of blood loss, and coagulation monitoring and intervention. This has improved operative survival and early patient outcome. Perioperative survival has improved despite a worldwide shortage of donor organs and a trend to transplant sicker patients. A smaller pool of donor organs is required to meet the needs of an expanding waiting list. The innovations to reduce deaths on the transplant wait list are reviewed along with their impact on overall patient outcome. The evolving organ shortage is the pinnacle point in shaping future transplant practices. Currently, institutional-specific practices may be reinforced by the informal “tutorship” that is used to train physicians and by the resources available at each site of practice. However, there is evidence that specific intraoperative practices such as the use of a low central venous pressure, selection of vasopressors and certain surgical techniques can modify patient outcome. Further investigation is needed to determine whether the good or the bad associated with each practice prevails and in what unique circumstance.

  20. Advanced ceramic matrix composite materials for current and future propulsion technology applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, S.; Beyer, S.; Knabe, H.; Immich, H.; Meistring, R.; Gessler, A.

    2004-08-01

    Current rocket engines, due to their method of construction, the materials used and the extreme loads to which they are subjected, feature a limited number of load cycles. Various technology programmes in Europe are concerned, besides developing reliable and rugged, low cost, throwaway equipment, with preparing for future reusable propulsion technologies. One of the key roles for realizing reusable engine components is the use of modern and innovative materials. One of the key technologies which concern various engine manufacturers worldwide is the development of fibre-reinforced ceramics—ceramic matrix composites. The advantages for the developers are obvious—the low specific weight, the high specific strength over a large temperature range, and their great damage tolerance compared to monolithic ceramics make this material class extremely interesting as a construction material. Over the past years, the Astrium company (formerly DASA) has, together with various partners, worked intensively on developing components for hypersonic engines and liquid rocket propulsion systems. In the year 2000, various hot-firing tests with subscale (scale 1:5) and full-scale nozzle extensions were conducted. In this year, a further decisive milestone was achieved in the sector of small thrusters, and long-term tests served to demonstrate the extraordinary stability of the C/SiC material. Besides developing and testing radiation-cooled nozzle components and small-thruster combustion chambers, Astrium worked on the preliminary development of actively cooled structures for future reusable propulsion systems. In order to get one step nearer to this objective, the development of a new fibre composite was commenced within the framework of a regionally sponsored programme. The objective here is to create multidirectional (3D) textile structures combined with a cost-effective infiltration process. Besides material and process development, the project also encompasses the development of

  1. A Study of Current Interseismic Deformation of San Andreas Fault, San Bernardino Mountain section, using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nee, P.; Funning, G. J.

    2010-12-01

    The San Andreas fault (SAF) system accommodates a significant fraction of the relative movement between the Pacific and North American plates. In the past 250 years, no significant earthquake was recorded on the southernmost section of the SAF, and thus there exists a substantial ongoing earthquake hazard. Estimates of its slip deficit rate, made with various geologic and geodetic observations typically fall in the range 15-25 mm/yr, in the vicinity of the San Bernadino Mountains. Assuming the fault system slips at a constant rate of 20mm/yr, a slip deficit of 5 m would have accumulated since the last event, equivalent to a potential Mw 7.5 or larger earthquake. To understand how much strain is accumulating on the southern SAF system during the current interseismic period, we investigate the surface deformation using radar interferometry. We use the entire catalog of ERS and Envisat Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data from a descending track well oriented for the SAF (track 399). 53 images from ERS spanning 1992 to late 2000, and 50 images from Envisat spanning 2003 to 2010 are used. We perform ratemap inversion (Biggs et al. 2007, GJI) to obtain an estimate of interseismic slip deficit rate, and Persistent Scatterer InSAR (PSI) analysis to investigate the tectonic and non-tectonic surface displacements across the region. The ratemap inversion algorithm involves simultaneous estimation of long wavelength orbital errors, construction of a ratemap by finding the best fitting rate of each pixel, and estimation of slip deficit rate using a half-space elastic dislocation model (Okada 1985, BSSA) calculated from a representative fault model. We constructed and tested different conceptual models based on the SCEC rectangular community fault model (CFM-R). We find that our ERS data are strongly affected by the postseismic deformation of the 1992 Mw 7.3 Landers Earthquake. We therefore estimate the slip rate using the Envisat dataset, which is much less affected by the

  2. System analysis with improved thermo-mechanical fuel rod models for modeling current and advanced LWR materials in accident scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Ian Edward

    A nuclear reactor systems code has the ability to model the system response in an accident scenario based on known initial conditions at the onset of the transient. However, there has been a tendency for these codes to lack the detailed thermo-mechanical fuel rod response models needed for accurate prediction of fuel rod failure. This proposed work will couple today's most widely used steady-state (FRAPCON) and transient (FRAPTRAN) fuel rod models with a systems code TRACE for best-estimate modeling of system response in accident scenarios such as a loss of coolant accident (LOCA). In doing so, code modifications will be made to model gamma heating in LWRs during steady-state and accident conditions and to improve fuel rod thermal/mechanical analysis by allowing axial nodalization of burnup-dependent phenomena such as swelling, cladding creep and oxidation. With the ability to model both burnup-dependent parameters and transient fuel rod response, a fuel dispersal study will be conducted using a hypothetical accident scenario under both PWR and BWR conditions to determine the amount of fuel dispersed under varying conditions. Due to the fuel fragmentation size and internal rod pressure both being dependent on burnup, this analysis will be conducted at beginning, middle and end of cycle to examine the effects that cycle time can play on fuel rod failure and dispersal. Current fuel rod and system codes used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are compilations of legacy codes with only commonly used light water reactor materials, Uranium Dioxide (UO2), Mixed Oxide (U/PuO 2) and zirconium alloys. However, the events at Fukushima Daiichi and Three Mile Island accident have shown the need for exploration into advanced materials possessing improved accident tolerance. This work looks to further modify the NRC codes to include silicon carbide (SiC), an advanced cladding material proposed by current DOE funded research on accident tolerant fuels (ATF). Several

  3. Neutral current cross-section measurement at low 2 and high with the ZEUS detector at HERA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prabhdeep Kaur; on behalf of the ZEUS Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    The measurements of the reduced cross-sections for $e^{+} p$ deep inelastic scattering at high inelasticities for three different centre-of-mass energies, 318, 251 and 225 GeV have been extended to lower momentum transferred squared, 2. The analysis of satellite vertex events allows one to extend the cross-section measurement at high y down to 2 = 4.5 GeV2, substantially lower that the previously published cross-section measurement from which the longitudinal structure function, $F_{L}$, was extracted.

  4. Studies of challenge in lower hybrid current drive capability at high density regime in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, B. J.; Li, M. H.; Li, Y. C.; Wang, M.; Liu, F. K.; Shan, J. F.; Li, J. G.; Wan, B. N.; Wan

    2017-02-01

    Aiming at a fusion reactor, two issues must be solved for the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD), namely good lower hybrid wave (LHW)-plasma coupling and effective current drive at high density. For this goal, efforts have been made to improve LHW-plasma coupling and current drive capability at high density in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). LHW-plasma coupling is improved by means of local gas puffing and gas puffing from the electron side is taken as a routine way for EAST to operate with LHCD. Studies of high density experiments suggest that low recycling and high lower hybrid (LH) frequency are preferred for LHCD experiments at high density, consistent with previous results in other machines. With the combination of 2.45 GHz and 4.6 GHz LH waves, a repeatable high confinement mode plasma with maximum density up to 19~\\text{m}-3$ was obtained by LHCD in EAST. In addition, in the first stage of LHCD cyclic operation, an alternative candidate for more economical fusion reactors has been demonstrated in EAST and further work will be continued.

  5. Measurements of the inclusive neutrino and antineutrino charged current cross sections in MINERvA using the low-ν flux method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devan, J.; Ren, L.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; da Motta, H.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Endress, E.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Gallagher, H.; Ghosh, A.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Hurtado, K.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman, Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Minerva Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    The total cross sections are important ingredients for the current and future neutrino oscillation experiments. We present measurements of the total charged-current neutrino and antineutrino cross sections on scintillator (CH) in the NuMI low-energy beamline using an in situ prediction of the shape of the flux as a function of neutrino energy from 2-50 GeV. This flux prediction takes advantage of the fact that neutrino and antineutrino interactions with low nuclear recoil energy (ν ) have a nearly constant cross section as a function of incident neutrino energy. This measurement is the lowest energy application of the low-ν flux technique, the first time it has been used in the NuMI antineutrino beam configuration, and demonstrates that the technique is applicable to future neutrino beams operating at multi-GeV energies. The cross section measurements presented are the most precise measurements to date below 5 GeV.

  6. Introduction to special section of the Journal of Family Psychology, advances in mixed methods in family psychology: integrative and applied solutions for family science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisner, Thomas S; Fiese, Barbara H

    2011-12-01

    Mixed methods in family psychology refer to the systematic integration of qualitative and quantitative techniques to represent family processes and settings. Over the past decade, significant advances have been made in study design, analytic strategies, and technological support (such as software) that allow for the integration of quantitative and qualitative methods and for making appropriate inferences from mixed methods. This special section of the Journal of Family Psychology illustrates how mixed methods may be used to advance knowledge in family science through identifying important cultural differences in family structure, beliefs, and practices, and revealing patterns of family relationships to generate new measurement paradigms and inform clinical practice. Guidance is offered to advance mixed methods research in family psychology through sound principles of peer review.

  7. Current Advances in the Biochemical and Physiological Aspects of the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with Thiazolidinediones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemán-González-Duhart, D.; Tamay-Cach, F.; Álvarez-Almazán, S.

    2016-01-01

    The present review summarizes the current advances in the biochemical and physiological aspects in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) with thiazolidinediones (TZDs). DM2 is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia, triggering the abnormal activation of physiological pathways such as glucose autooxidation, polyol's pathway, formation of advance glycation end (AGE) products, and glycolysis, leading to the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and proinflammatory cytokines, which are responsible for the micro- and macrovascular complications of the disease. The treatment of DM2 has been directed toward the reduction of hyperglycemia using different drugs such as insulin sensitizers, as the case of TZDs, which are able to lower blood glucose levels and circulating triglycerides by binding to the nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) as full agonists. When TZDs interact with PPARγ, the receptor regulates the transcription of different genes involved in glucose homeostasis, insulin resistance, and adipogenesis. However, TZDs exhibit some adverse effects such as fluid retention, weight gain, hepatotoxicity, plasma-volume expansion, hemodilution, edema, bone fractures, and congestive heart failure, which limits their use in DM2 patients. PMID:27313601

  8. Influence of the 2009 financial crisis on detection of advanced pulmonary tuberculosis in Osaka city, Japan: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Danno, Katsura; Komukai, Jun; Yoshida, Hideki; Matsumoto, Kenji; Koda, Shinichi; Terakawa, Kazuhiko; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between the economic recession and the detection of advanced cases of pulmonary tuberculosis in Osaka city from 2007 to 2009. Design A repeated cross-sectional study. Setting Osaka city has been the highest tuberculosis burden area in Japan. After the previous global financial crisis, the unemployment rate in Osaka prefecture has deteriorated from 5.3% in 2008 to 6.6% in 2009. Participants During the study period, 3406 pulmonary tuberculosis cases were...

  9. Modeling Nitrogen Losses in Conventional and Advanced Soil-Based Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems under Current and Changing Climate Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Morales

    Full Text Available Most of the non-point source nitrogen (N load in rural areas is attributed to onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS. Nitrogen compounds cause eutrophication, depleting the oxygen in marine ecosystems. OWTS rely on physical, chemical and biological soil processes to treat wastewater and these processes may be affected by climate change. We simulated the fate and transport of N in different types of OWTS drainfields, or soil treatment areas (STA under current and changing climate scenarios, using 2D/3D HYDRUS software. Experimental data from a mesocosm-scale study, including soil moisture content, and total N, ammonium (NH4+ and nitrate (NO3- concentrations, were used to calibrate the model. A water content-dependent function was used to compute the nitrification and denitrification rates. Three types of drainfields were simulated: (1 a pipe-and-stone (P&S, (2 advanced soil drainfields, pressurized shallow narrow drainfield (PSND and (3 Geomat (GEO, a variation of SND. The model was calibrated with acceptable goodness-of-fit between the observed and measured values. Average root mean square error (RSME ranged from 0.18 and 2.88 mg L-1 for NH4+ and 4.45 mg L-1 to 9.65 mg L-1 for NO3- in all drainfield types. The calibrated model was used to estimate N fluxes for both conventional and advanced STAs under current and changing climate conditions, i.e. increased soil temperature and higher water table. The model computed N losses from nitrification and denitrification differed little from measured losses in all STAs. The modeled N losses occurred mostly as NO3- in water outputs, accounting for more than 82% of N inputs in all drainfields. Losses as N2 were estimated to be 10.4% and 9.7% of total N input concentration for SND and Geo, respectively. The highest N2 losses, 17.6%, were estimated for P&S. Losses as N2 increased to 22%, 37% and 21% under changing climate conditions for Geo, PSND and P&S, respectively. These findings can provide

  10. Modeling Nitrogen Losses in Conventional and Advanced Soil-Based Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems under Current and Changing Climate Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Ivan; Cooper, Jennifer; Amador, José A; Boving, Thomas B

    2016-01-01

    Most of the non-point source nitrogen (N) load in rural areas is attributed to onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS). Nitrogen compounds cause eutrophication, depleting the oxygen in marine ecosystems. OWTS rely on physical, chemical and biological soil processes to treat wastewater and these processes may be affected by climate change. We simulated the fate and transport of N in different types of OWTS drainfields, or soil treatment areas (STA) under current and changing climate scenarios, using 2D/3D HYDRUS software. Experimental data from a mesocosm-scale study, including soil moisture content, and total N, ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-) concentrations, were used to calibrate the model. A water content-dependent function was used to compute the nitrification and denitrification rates. Three types of drainfields were simulated: (1) a pipe-and-stone (P&S), (2) advanced soil drainfields, pressurized shallow narrow drainfield (PSND) and (3) Geomat (GEO), a variation of SND. The model was calibrated with acceptable goodness-of-fit between the observed and measured values. Average root mean square error (RSME) ranged from 0.18 and 2.88 mg L-1 for NH4+ and 4.45 mg L-1 to 9.65 mg L-1 for NO3- in all drainfield types. The calibrated model was used to estimate N fluxes for both conventional and advanced STAs under current and changing climate conditions, i.e. increased soil temperature and higher water table. The model computed N losses from nitrification and denitrification differed little from measured losses in all STAs. The modeled N losses occurred mostly as NO3- in water outputs, accounting for more than 82% of N inputs in all drainfields. Losses as N2 were estimated to be 10.4% and 9.7% of total N input concentration for SND and Geo, respectively. The highest N2 losses, 17.6%, were estimated for P&S. Losses as N2 increased to 22%, 37% and 21% under changing climate conditions for Geo, PSND and P&S, respectively. These findings can provide practitioners

  11. Current metabolomics: technological advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, Sastia P; Yamamoto, Shinya; Tsugawa, Hiroshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2013-07-01

    Metabolomics, the global quantitative assessment of metabolites in a biological system, has played a pivotal role in various fields of science in the post-genomic era. Metabolites are the result of the interaction of the system's genome with its environment and are not merely the end product of gene expression, but also form part of the regulatory system in an integrated manner. Therefore, metabolomics is often considered a powerful tool to provide an instantaneous snapshot of the physiology of a cell. The power of metabolomics lies on the acquisition of analytical data in which metabolites in a cellular system are quantified, and the extraction of the most meaningful elements of the data by using various data analysis tool. In this review, we discuss the latest development of analytical techniques and data analyses methods in metabolomics study.

  12. Incremental Innovation and Progress in Advanced Squamous Cell Lung Cancer: Current Status and Future Impact of Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Corey J; Obasaju, Coleman; Bunn, Paul; Bonomi, Philip; Gandara, David; Hirsch, Fred R; Kim, Edward S; Natale, Ronald B; Novello, Silvia; Paz-Ares, Luis; Pérol, Maurice; Reck, Martin; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Reynolds, Craig H; Socinski, Mark A; Spigel, David R; Wakelee, Heather; Mayo, Carlos; Thatcher, Nick

    2016-12-01

    Squamous cell lung cancer (sqCLC) is an aggressive form of cancer that poses many therapeutic challenges. Patients tend to be older, present at a later stage, and have a high incidence of comorbidities, which can compromise treatment delivery and exacerbate toxicity. In addition, certain agents routinely available for nonsquamous cell histologic subtypes, such as bevacizumab and pemetrexed, are contraindicated or lack efficacy in sqCLC. Therapeutic progress has been much slower for advanced sqCLC, with median survival times of approximately 9 to 11 months in most studies. Herein, we discuss the current therapeutic landscape for patients with sqCLC versus with nonsquamous NSCLC. Current evidence indicates that new targeted treatments, notably monoclonal antibodies such as ramucirumab and necitumumab, and immunotherapies such as nivolumab and pembrolizumab can provide survival prolongation, although the benefits are still relatively modest. These incremental improvements, all realized since 2012, in aggregate, will very likely have a clinically meaningful impact for patients with sqCLC. We also discuss recent genomic studies of sqCLC that have identified potentially actionable molecular targets, as well as the relevant targeted agents in clinical development. Finally, we discuss the magnitude of survival benefit and the risk-to-benefit ratio that would prove clinically meaningful in this underserved patient population with unmet needs.

  13. Association between current smoking and cognitive impairment depends on age: A cross-sectional study in Xi'an, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Shang, Suhang; Li, Pei; Deng, Meiying; Chen, Chen; Jiang, Yu; Dang, Liangjun; Qu, Qiumin

    2017-09-08

    Cigarette smoking is a modifiable risk factor for cognitive impairment, while the relationship between current smoking and cognitive impairment is not fully understood. The objectives were to identify a possible association between current smoking and cognitive impairment depending on age in the Chinese rural population. Data for the study consisted of 1,782 participants (40 years and older) who lived in a rural village in the vicinity of Xi'an, China. Data about smoking history and cognitive function were collected. Cognitive function was scored by the Mini-Mental State Examination. The effect of age on the relationship between current smoking and cognitive impairment was analyzed with interaction and stratified analysis by logistic regression models. Interaction analysis showed that current smoking is positively related with cognitive impairment (odds ratio [OR]=9.067; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.305-62.979; P=.026). However, the interaction term, age by current smoking, is negatively related with cognitive impairment (OR=0.969; 95%CI 0.939-0.999; P=.045). Stratified logistic regression showed that in the 40-65 years of age sublayer, OR of current smoking is 1.966 (P=.044), whereas in the>65 years of age sublayer, the OR is 0.470 (P=.130). This means that the association between current smoking and cognitive impairment with age might be positive (OR>1) in lower age sublayers, but no significant difference in higher age sublayers. In conclusion, current smoking might be positively associated with cognitive impairment in the middle-aged but the relationship declines with increasing age. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Advances in quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Sabin, John R

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Quantum Chemistry presents surveys of current topics in this rapidly developing field that has emerged at the cross section of the historically established areas of mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology. It features detailed reviews written by leading international researchers. This volume focuses on the theory of heavy ion physics in medicine.Advances in Quantum Chemistry presents surveys of current topics in this rapidly developing field that has emerged at the cross section of the historically established areas of mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology. It features

  15. Measurement of high-Q (2) charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised positron beam at HERA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bold, T.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Boutle, S. K.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Bruemmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Fourletov, S.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Goettlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Horton, K.; Huettmann, A.; Iacobucci, G.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H. -P.; Januschek, F.; Jimenez, M.; Jones, T. W.; Juengst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kamaluddin, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kulinski, P.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Loehr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Loizides, J. H.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Luzniak, P.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Mastroberardino, A.; Matsumoto, T.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Miglioranzi, S.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nicholass, D.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Ota, O.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Ron, E.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoenberg, V.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terron, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomalak, O.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uribe-Estrada, C.; Vazquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Volynets, O.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Whitmore, J. J.; Whyte, J.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yaguees-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolko, M.; Zotkin, D. S.; Zulkapli, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of the cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering in e (+) p collisions with a longitudinally polarised positron beam are presented. The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 132 pb(-1) collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at a ce

  16. 78 FR 1166 - Service Rules for the Advanced Wireless Services in the H Block-Implementing Section 6401 of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-08

    .... Nature and Extent of Confidentiality: There is no need for confidentiality. Needs and Uses: The... to our expectation, the record results in a determination that licensing the Upper H Block, the Lower... intended section 6401(b)(4) to avoid harmful interference to the millions of existing customers of...

  17. Static Properties and Current-Driven Dynamics of Domain Walls in Perpendicular Magnetocrystalline Anisotropy Nanostrips with Rectangular Cross-Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Martinez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The current-induced domain wall motion along thin ferromagnetic strips with high perpendicular magnetocrystalline anisotropy is studied by means of full micromagnetic simulations and the extended one-dimensional model, taking into account thermal effects and edge roughness. A slow creep regime, where the motion is controlled by wall pinning and thermal activation, and a flow regime with linear variation of the DW velocity, are observed. In asymmetric stacks, where the Rashba spin-orbit field stabilizes the domain wall against turbulent transformations, the steady linear regime is extended to higher currents, leading to higher velocities than in single-layer or symmetric stacks. The pinning and depinning at and from a local constriction were also studied. The results indicate that engineering pinning sites in these strips provide an efficient pathway to achieve both high stability against thermal fluctuations and low-current depinning avoiding Joule heating. Finally, the current-driven dynamics of a pinned domain wall is examined, and both the direct and the alternating contributions to the induced voltage signal induced are characterized. It was confirmed that the direct contribution to the voltage signal can be linearly enhanced with the number of pinned walls, an observation which could be useful to develop domain-wall-based nano-oscillators.

  18. Nurses' knowledge of advance directives and perceived confidence in end-of-life care: a cross-sectional study in five countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Alice; McCarthy, Geraldine; Weathers, Elizabeth; Friedman, M Isabel; Gallo, Katherine; Ehrenfeld, Mally; Chan, Sophia; Li, William H C; Poletti, Piera; Zanotti, Renzo; Molloy, D William; McGlade, Ciara; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Itzhaki, Michal

    2016-06-01

    Nurses' knowledge regarding advance directives may affect their administration and completion in end-of-life care. Confidence among nurses is a barrier to the provision of quality end-of-life care. This study investigated nurses' knowledge of advance directives and perceived confidence in end-of-life care, in Hong Kong, Ireland, Israel, Italy and the USA using a cross-sectional descriptive design (n = 1089). In all countries, older nurses and those who had more professional experience felt more confident managing patients' symptoms at end-of-life and more comfortable stopping preventive medications at end-of-life. Nurses in the USA reported that they have more knowledge and experience of advance directives compared with other countries. In addition, they reported the highest levels of confidence and comfort in dealing with end-of-life care. Although legislation for advance directives does not yet exist in Ireland, nurses reported high levels of confidence in end-of-life care.

  19. Nurses' knowledge of advance directives and perceived confidence in end-of-life care: a cross-sectional study in five countries.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coffey, Alice

    2016-01-28

    Nurses\\' knowledge regarding advance directives may affect their administration and completion in end-of-life care. Confidence among nurses is a barrier to the provision of quality end-of-life care. This study investigated nurses\\' knowledge of advance directives and perceived confidence in end-of-life care, in Hong Kong, Ireland, Israel, Italy and the USA using a cross-sectional descriptive design (n = 1089). In all countries, older nurses and those who had more professional experience felt more confident managing patients\\' symptoms at end-of-life and more comfortable stopping preventive medications at end-of-life. Nurses in the USA reported that they have more knowledge and experience of advance directives compared with other countries. In addition, they reported the highest levels of confidence and comfort in dealing with end-of-life care. Although legislation for advance directives does not yet exist in Ireland, nurses reported high levels of confidence in end-of-life care.

  20. COMETS2: An advanced MATLAB toolbox for the numerical analysis of electric fields generated by transcranial direct current stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chany; Jung, Young-Jin; Lee, Sang Jun; Im, Chang-Hwan

    2017-02-01

    Since there is no way to measure electric current generated by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) inside the human head through in vivo experiments, numerical analysis based on the finite element method has been widely used to estimate the electric field inside the head. In 2013, we released a MATLAB toolbox named COMETS, which has been used by a number of groups and has helped researchers to gain insight into the electric field distribution during stimulation. The aim of this study was to develop an advanced MATLAB toolbox, named COMETS2, for the numerical analysis of the electric field generated by tDCS. COMETS2 can generate any sizes of rectangular pad electrodes on any positions on the scalp surface. To reduce the large computational burden when repeatedly testing multiple electrode locations and sizes, a new technique to decompose the global stiffness matrix was proposed. As examples of potential applications, we observed the effects of sizes and displacements of electrodes on the results of electric field analysis. The proposed mesh decomposition method significantly enhanced the overall computational efficiency. We implemented an automatic electrode modeler for the first time, and proposed a new technique to enhance the computational efficiency. In this paper, an efficient toolbox for tDCS analysis is introduced (freely available at http://www.cometstool.com). It is expected that COMETS2 will be a useful toolbox for researchers who want to benefit from the numerical analysis of electric fields generated by tDCS. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Hierarchical micro-lamella-structured 3D porous copper current collector coated with tin for advanced lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyeji; Um, Ji Hyun; Choi, Hyelim; Yoon, Won-Sub; Sung, Yung-Eun; Choe, Heeman

    2017-03-01

    A Novel 3D porous Sn-Cu architecture is prepared as an anode material for use in an advanced lithium-ion battery. Micro-lamellar-structured 3D porous Cu foam, which is electroless-plated with Sn as an active material, is used as anode current collector. Compared to Sn-coated Cu foil, the 3D Sn-Cu foam exhibits superior Li-ion capacity and stable capacity retention, demonstrating the advantage of 3D porous architecture by preserving its structural integrity. In addition, the effect of heat-treatment after Sn plating is investigated. Sn/Sn6Cu5 and SnO2/Cu10Sn3 were formed on and in the 3D Sn-Cu foam under the heat-treatment at 150 °C and 500 °C, respectively. The development of Cu10Sn3 in the 3D Sn-Cu foam heat-treated at 500 °C can be a key factor for the enhanced cyclic stability because the Cu10Sn3 inactively reacts with Li-ion and alleviates the volume expansion of SnO2 as an inactive matrix.

  2. Endoscopic ultrasound for the characterization and staging of rectal cancer. Current state of the method. Technological advances and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersak, Mariana M; Badea, Radu; Graur, Florin; Hajja, Nadim Al; Furcea, Luminita; Dudea, Sorin M

    2015-06-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound is the most accurate type of examination for the assessment of rectal tumors. Over the years, the method has advanced from gray-scale examination to intravenous contrast media administration and to different types of elastography. The multimodal approach of tumors (transrectal, transvaginal) is adapted to each case. 3D ultrasound is useful for spatial representation and precise measurement of tumor formations, using CT/MR image reconstruction; color elastography is useful for tumor characterization and staging; endoscopic ultrasound using intravenous contrast agents can help study the amount of contrast agent targeted at the level of the tumor formations and contrast wash-in/wash-out time, based on the curves displayed on the device. The transvaginal approach often allows better visualization of the tumor than the transrectal approach. Performing the procedure with the rectal ampulla distended with contrast agent may be seen as an optimization of the examination methodology. All these aspects are additional methods for gray-scale endoscopic ultrasound, capable of increasing diagnostic accuracy. This paper aims at reviewing the progress of transrectal and transvaginal ultrasound, generically called endoscopic ultrasound, for rectal tumor diagnosis and staging, with emphasis on the current state of the method and its development trends.

  3. Innate and adaptive immunity in the development of depression: An update on current knowledge and technological advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapakoski, Rita; Ebmeier, Klaus P; Alenius, Harri; Kivimäki, Mika

    2016-04-01

    The inflammation theory of depression, proposed over 20years ago, was influenced by early studies on T cell responses and since then has been a stimulus for numerous research projects aimed at understanding the relationship between immune function and depression. Observational studies have shown that indicators of immunity, especially C reactive protein and proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin 6, are associated with an increased risk of depressive disorders, although the evidence from randomized trials remains limited and only few studies have assessed the interplay between innate and adaptive immunity in depression. In this paper, we review current knowledge on the interactions between central and peripheral innate and adaptive immune molecules and the potential role of immune-related activation of microglia, inflammasomes and indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase in the development of depressive symptoms. We highlight how combining basic immune methods with more advanced 'omics' technologies would help us to make progress in unravelling the complex associations between altered immune function and depressive disorders, in the identification of depression-specific biomarkers and in developing immunotherapeutic treatment strategies that take individual variability into account.

  4. Current Practices in Global/International Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences: Home/Host Country or Site/Institution Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsharif, Naser Z; Dakkuri, Adnan; Abrons, Jeanine P; Williams, Dennis; Ombengi, David N; Zheng, HaiAn; Al-Dahir, Sara; Tofade, Toyin; Gim, Suzanna; O'Connell, Mary Beth; Ratka, Anna; Dornblaser, Emily

    2016-04-25

    International outreach by schools and colleges of pharmacy is increasing. In this paper, we provide current practice guidelines to establish and maintain successful global/international advanced pharmacy practice experiences (G/I APPEs) with specific recommendations for home/host country and host site/institution. The paper is based on a literature review (2000-2014) in databases and Internet searches with specific keywords or terms. Educational documents such as syllabi and memoranda of understanding (MoUs) from pharmacy programs were also examined. In addition, a preliminary draft was developed and the findings and recommendations were reviewed in a 90-minute roundtable discussion at the 2014 American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Annual Meeting. Recommendations for the host country include travel considerations (eg, passport, visa, air travel), safety, housing, transportation, travel alerts and warnings, health issues, and financial considerations. For the home country, considerations for establishment of G/I APPE site (eg, vetting process, MoU, site expectations) are described. The paper is a resource for development of new G/I APPEs and provides guidance for continuous quality improvement of partnerships focusing on G/I pharmacy education.

  5. Parameter estimation of anisotropic Manning's n coefficient for advanced circulation (ADCIRC) modeling of estuarine river currents (lower St. Johns River)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demissie, Henok K.; Bacopoulos, Peter

    2017-05-01

    A rich dataset of time- and space-varying velocity measurements for a macrotidal estuary was used in the development of a vector-based formulation of bottom roughness in the Advanced Circulation (ADCIRC) model. The updates to the parallel code of ADCIRC to include directionally based drag coefficient are briefly discussed in the paper, followed by an application of the data assimilation (nudging analysis) to the lower St. Johns River (northeastern Florida) for parameter estimation of anisotropic Manning's n coefficient. The method produced converging estimates of Manning's n values for ebb (0.0290) and flood (0.0219) when initialized with uniform and isotropic setting of 0.0200. Modeled currents, water levels and flows were improved at observation locations where data were assimilated as well as at monitoring locations where data were not assimilated, such that the method increases model skill locally and non-locally with regard to the data locations. The methodology is readily transferrable to other circulation/estuary models, given pre-developed quality mesh/grid and adequate data available for assimilation.

  6. The temporary and accumulated effects of transcranial direct current stimulation for the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Lei, Xiaoguang; Yan, Ting; Li, Hongwei; Huang, Baihui; Li, Ling; Xu, Liqi; Liu, Li; Chen, Nanhui; Lü, Longbao; Ma, Yuanye; Xu, Lin; Li, Jiali; Wang, Zhengbo; Zhang, Baorong; Hu, Xintian

    2015-07-29

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a useful noninvasive technique of cortical brain stimulation for the treatment of neurological disorders. Clinical research has demonstrated tDCS with anodal stimulation of primary motor cortex (M1) in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients significantly improved their motor function. However, few studies have been focused on the optimization of parameters which contributed significantly to the treatment effects of tDCS and exploration of the underline neuronal mechanisms. Here, we used different stimulation parameters of anodal tDCS on M1 for the treatment of aged advanced PD monkeys induced with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) administration, and then analyzed the temporary and accumulated effects of tDCS treatment. The results indicated anodal tDCS on M1 very significantly improved motor ability temporarily; importantly, the treatment effects of anodal tDCS on M1 were quantitatively correlated to the accumulated stimulation instead of the stimuli intensity or duration respectively. In addition, c-fos staining showed tDCS treatment effects activated the neurons both in M1 and substantia nigra (SN). Therefore, we propose that long time and continue anodal tDCS on M1 is a better strategy to improve the motor symptoms of PD than individual manipulation of stimuli intensity or duration.

  7. Cross section of the charged current reaction sup 12 C(. nu. sub e , e sup - ) sup 12 N sub g. s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodmann, B.; Burtak, F.; Finckh, E.; Glombik, A.; Hanika, T.; Hoessl, J.; Kretschmer, W.; Meyer, R.; Schilling, F. (Physikalisches Inst., Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany)); Booth, N.E. (Dept. of Nuclear Physics, Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom)); Dodd, A. (Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton (United Kingdom)); Drexlin, G.; Eberhard, V.; Eitel, K.; Gemmeke, H.; Giorginis, G.; Grandegger, W.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Maschuw, R.; Plischke, P.; Rapp, J.; Raupp, F.; Wochele, J.; Wolf, J.; Woelfle, S.; Zeitnitz, B. (Inst. fuer Kernphysik 1, Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany) Inst. fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Univ. Karlsruhe (Germany)); Edgington, J.A.; Gorringe, T.; Malik, A.; Seligmann, B. (Physics Dept., Queen Mary and Westfield Coll., London (United Kingdom)); KARMEN Collaboration

    1992-04-30

    The charged current nuclear transition {sup 12}C({nu}{sub e}, e{sup -}){sup 12}N{sub g.s.} has been observed in the KARMEN experiment. The flux average cross section for {nu}{sub e} from {mu}{sup +} decay at rest is determined to be <{sigma}>=(8.1{+-}0.9(stat.){+-}0.75(syst.))x10{sup -42} cm{sup 2}. For the first time also the energy dependence of the cross section has been measured for neutrino energies up to 50 MeV. (orig.).

  8. A first measurement of the charged current DIS cross sections with longitudinally polarised electrons in the H1 experiment at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunovic, B.

    2007-07-01

    The analysis presented in this thesis is based on data from electron-proton collisions with longitudinally polarised electron beams at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}(s)=319 GeV. The data were taken with the H1 detector at the HERA collider in the year 2005 corresponding to two polarisation states: a left-handed electron polarisation of -27% and a right-handed electron polarisation of +37%, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 68.6 pb{sup -1} and 29.6 pb{sup -1}, respectively. The inclusive total deep inelastic charged current cross section and the differential cross sections are measured for both helicities in the kinematic domain Q{sup 2}>400 GeV{sup 2} and y<0.9. The entire analysis chain necessary for the determination of the cross sections is described with emphasis on the understanding of the performance of the Liquid Argon trigger system. The experimental results obtained are consistent with the predictions of the Standard Model. In particular, the measurement of the total polarised charged current cross section confirms the Standard Model expectation that there are no weak charged current interactions mediated by a hypothetical right-handed W boson. In addition, a measurement of the charged current structure function F{sup cc}{sub 2} has been performed at the H1 experiment for the first time. The measurements are well described by the theoretical expectations based on parton distributions derived from inclusive neutral current measurements in H1, and are in agreement with published data from the ZEUS (e{sup {+-}}p) and CCFR (anti {nu}{sub {mu}}Fe) experiments. (orig.)

  9. Age at menarche and current substance use among Canadian adolescent girls: results of a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Sahab Ban

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Substance use is among the key public health threats that find its genesis during adolescence. Timing of puberty has been lately researched as a potential predictor of subsequent substance abuse. The present study, therefore, aims to assess the effect of age at menarche on current practices of smoking, alcohol drinking and drug use among 14-15 year old Canadian girls. Methods The analysis of the study was based on all female respondents aged 14 to 15 years during Cycle 4 (2000/2001 of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children & Youth (NLSCY. The main independent variable was age at menarche assessed as the month and year of the occurrence of the first menstrual cycle. The dependent variables were current smoking, heavy alcohol drinking in the past 12 months and drug use in the past 12 months. Three logistic regression models were performed to investigate the association between age at menarche and each of the substance use outcomes, adjusting for possible confounders. Bootstrapping was performed to account for the complex sampling design. Results The total weighted sample included in the analysis represented 295,042 Canadian girls. The prevalence of current smokers, heavy drinkers (drunk in the past 12 months and drug users in the past 12 months was approximately 22%, 38% and 26%, respectively. After adjusting of all potential confounders, no association was found between age at menarche and any of the substance use outcomes. School performance and relationship with the father, however, stood out as the main variables to be associated with smoking, heavy drinking and drug use. Conclusions Qualitative studies understanding the social and psychological changes experienced by early maturing Canadian adolescents are warranted to identify other correlates or pathways to substance use in this higher risk population.

  10. The effects of current density ratio and reflectivity on the gain, saturation and noise characteristics of a two-section MQW RSOA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Huali; Huang Lirong; Jiang Guiying

    2013-01-01

    A 1.3 μm two-section multi-quantum well reflective semiconductor optical amplifier is designed and fabricated.The impacts of injection current density ratio and the reflectivity of the reflective facet on gain,saturation and noise characteristics are studied theoretically and experimentally.The results indicate that the gain and saturation power can be easily manipulated by changing the current density ratio; and better gain and noise characteristics can be obtained when the reflectivity is appropriately selected.

  11. High-$Q^{2}$ neutral current cross sections in $e^{+}p$ deep inelastic scattering at $\\sqrt{s}$=318 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, H; Adamus, M; Adler, V; Aghuzumtsyan, G; Antonioli, P; Antonov, A; Arneodo, M; Bailey, D S; Bamberger, A; Barakbaev, A N; Barbagli, G; Barbi, M; Bari, G; Barreiro, F; Bartsch, D; Basile, M; Behrens, U; Bell, M; Bellagamba, L; Benen, A; Bertolin, A; Bhadra, S; Bloch, I; Bold, T; Boos, E G; Borras, K; Boscherini, D; Brock, I; Brook, N H; Brugnera, R; Brümmer, N; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bussey, P J; Butterworth, J M; Bylsma, B; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carli, T; Carlin, R; Catterall, C D; Chekanov, S; Chiochia, V; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Cloth, P; Cole, J E; Collins-Tooth, C; Contin, A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Coppola, N; Cormack, C; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Cottrell, A; D'Agostini, Giulio; Dal Corso, F; Danilov, P; Dannheim, D; De Pasquale, S; Dementiev, R K; Derrick, M; Deshpande, A A; Devenish, R C E; Dhawan, S; Dobur, D; Dolgoshein, B A; Doyle, A T; Drews, G; Durkin, L S; Dusini, S; Eisenberg, Y; Ermolov, P F; Eskreys, Andrzej; Ferrando, J; Ferrero, M I; Figiel, J; Filges, D; Foster, B; Foudas, C; Fourletov, S; Fourletova, J; Fricke, U; Fusayasu, T; Gabareen, A; Galas, A; Gallo, E; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Genta, C; Gialas, I; Giusti, P; Gladilin, L K; Gladkov, D; Glasman, C; Gliga, S; Goers, S; Golubkov, Yu A; Goncalo, R; González, O; Gosau, T; Göttlicher, P; Grabowska-Bold, I; Grijpink, S; Grzelak, G; Gutsche, O; Gwenlan, C; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hall-Wilton, R; Hamatsu, R; Hamilton, J; Hanlon, S; Hart, J C; Hartmann, H; Hartner, G; Heaphy, E A; Heath, G P; Helbich, M; Heusch, C A; Hilger, E; Hillert, S; Hirose, T; Hochman, D; Holm, U; Iacobucci, G; Iga, Y; Inuzuka, M; Irrgang, P; Jakob, H P; Jones, T W; Kagawa, S; Kahle, B; Kaji, H; Kananov, S; Kappes, A; Karstens, F; Kataoka, M; Katkov, I I; Kcira, D; Khein, L A; Kim, J Y; Kim, Y K; Kind, O; Kisielewska, D; Kitamura, S; Koffeman, E; Kohno, T; Kooijman, P; Koop, T; Korzhav--, I A; Kotanski, A; Kötz, U; Kowal, A M; Kowal, M; Kowalski, H; Kowalski, T; Krakauer, D A; Kramberger, G; Kreisel, A; Krumnack, N; Kuze, M; Kuzmin, V A; Labarga, L; Labes, H; Lainesse, J; Lammers, S; Lee, J H; Lelas, D; Levchenko, B B; Levy, A; Li, L; Lightwood, M S; Lim, H; Lim, I T; Limentani, S; Ling, T Y; Liu, X; Löhr, B; Lohrmann, E; Loizides, J H; Long, K R; Longhin, A; Lopez-Duran Viani, A; Lukina, O Yu; Luzniak, P; Maddox, E; Magill, S; Mankel, R; Margotti, A; Marini, G; Martin, J F; Mastroberardino, A; Matsuzawa, K; Mattingly, M C K; McCubbin, N A; Mellado, B; Melzer-Pellmann, I A; Menary, S R; Metlica, F; Meyer, U; Miglioranzi, S; Milite, M; Mirea, A; Monaco, V; Montanari, A; Moritz, M; Mus, B; Nagano, K; Namsoo, T; Nania, R; Nguyen, C N; Nigro, A; Ning, Y; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Nuncio-Quiroz, A E; Oh, B Y; Olkiewicz, K; Pac, M Y; Padhi, S; Paganis, S; Palmonari, F; Parenti, A; Park, I H; Patel, S; Paul, E; Pavel, N; Pawlak, J M; Pelfer, P G; Pellegrino, A; Pesci, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Plucinsky, P P; Pokrovskiy, N S; Polini, A; Posocco, M; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M B; Rautenberg, J; Raval, A; Reeder, D D; Ren, Z; Renner, R; Repond, J; Riveline, U Karshon M; Robins, S; Rosin, M; Rurua, L; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Salehi, H; Sartorelli, G; Savin, A A; Saxon, D H; Schagen, S; Schioppa, M; Schlenstedt, S; Schleper, P; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Schnurbusch, H; Sciulli, F; Shcheglova, L M; Skillicorn, I O; Slominski, W; Smith, W H; Soares, M; Solano, A; Son, D; Sosnovtsev, V V; Stairs, D G; Stanco, L; Standage, J; Stifutkin, A; Stonjek, S; Stopa, P; Stösslein, U; Straub, P B; Suchkov, S; Susinno, G; Suszycki, L; Sutton, M R; Sztuk, J; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Tandler, J; Tapper, A D; Targett-Adams, C; Tassi, E; Tawara, T; Terron, J; Tiecke, H G; Tokushuku, K; Tsurugai, T; Turcato, M; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Ukleja, J; Vázquez, M; Velthuis, J J; Vlasov, N N; Voss, K C; Walczak, R; Walsh, R; Wang, M; Weber, A; Whitmore, J J; Wichmann, K; Wick, K; Wiggers, L; Wing, M; Wolf, G; Yamada, S; Yamashita, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yoshida, R; Youngman, C; Zambrana, M; Zawiejski, L; Zeuner, W; Zhautykov, B O; Zichichi, A; Ziegler, A; Zotkin, S A; De Wolf, E; Del Peso, J

    2004-01-01

    Cross sections for e^+p neutral current deep inelastic scattering have been measured at a centre-of-mass energy of sqrt{s}=318 GeV with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 63.2 pb^-1. The double-differential cross section, d^2sigma/dxdQ^2, is presented for 200 GeV^2 200 GeV^2. The effect of Z-boson exchange is seen in dsigma/dx measured for Q^2 > 10000 GeV^2. The data presented here were combined with ZEUS e^+p neutral current data taken at sqrt{s}=300 GeV and the structure function F_2^{em} was extracted. All results agree well with the predictions of the Standard Model.

  12. Measurements of the Total Charge-Changing Cross Sections for Collisions of Fast Ions with Target Gas Using High Current Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covo, Michel Kireeff; Molvik, Arthur W.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Shnidman, Ariel; Vujic, Jasmina L.

    2009-04-13

    The sum of ionization and charge-exchange cross sections of several gas targets (H2, N2, He, Ne, Kr, Xe, Ar, and water vapor) impacted by 1MeV K+ beam are measured. In a high current ion beam, the self-electric field of the beam is high enough that ions produced from the gas ionization or charge exchange by the ion beam are quickly swept to the sides of accelerator. The flux of the expelled ions is measured by a retarding field analyzer. This allows accurate measuring of the total charge-changing cross sections (ionization plus charge exchange) of the beam interaction with gas. Cross sections for H2, He, and N2 are simulated using classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method and compared with the experimental results, showing good agreement.

  13. Screening for colorectal cancer and advanced colorectal neoplasia in kidney transplant recipients: cross sectional prevalence and diagnostic accuracy study of faecal immunochemical testing for haemoglobin and colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Michael G; Teo, Edward; Cole, Stephen R; Chan, Choy-Yoke; McDonald, Stephen P; Russ, Graeme R; Young, Graeme P; Bampton, Peter A; Coates, P Toby

    2012-07-25

    To investigate whether screening kidney transplant recipients aged over 50 years for colorectal cancer with a faecal immunochemical test for haemoglobin might be justified, by determining the prevalence of advanced colorectal neoplasia and evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of faecal haemoglobin testing compared with colonoscopy in a population of kidney transplant recipients at otherwise average risk. Cross sectional prevalence and diagnostic accuracy study with index test of faecal haemoglobin and reference standard of colonoscopy. Outpatient clinics in metropolitan and regional hospitals in South Australia. 229 kidney transplant recipients aged 50 years and over, who were at least 6 months (mean 9.0 (SD 8.4) years) post-transplant and otherwise at average risk of colorectal cancer, completed the study between June 2008 and October 2011. Faecal immunochemical testing (Enterix Insure) for human haemoglobin, followed by colonoscopy with histological evaluation of retrieved samples. Prevalence of advanced colorectal neoplasia, defined as an adenoma at least 10 mm in diameter, villous features, high grade dysplasia, or colorectal cancer; sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of faecal haemoglobin testing for advanced neoplasia compared with colonoscopy. Advanced colorectal neoplasia was found in 29 (13%, 95% confidence interval 9% to 18%) participants, including 2% (n=4) with high grade dysplasia and 2% (n=5) with colorectal cancer. Faecal testing for haemoglobin was positive in 12% (n=28); sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for advanced neoplasia were 31.0% (15.3% to 50.8%), 90.5% (85.6% to 94.2%), 32.1% (15.9% to 52.4%), and 90.1% (85.1% to 93.8%). Colonoscopy was well tolerated, with no significant adverse outcomes. To identify one case of advanced neoplasia, 8 (6 to 12) colonoscopies were needed. Kidney transplant recipients aged over 50 years have a high prevalence of advanced colorectal neoplasia. Faecal haemoglobin

  14. Measurement of high-Q{sup 2} charged current cross sections in e{sup +}p deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rautenberg, J.

    2004-06-01

    Cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering have been measured in e{sup +}p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The data collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA in the running periods 1999 and 2000 correspond to an integrated luminosity of 61 pb{sup -1}. Single differential cross sections d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}, d{sigma}/dx and d{sigma}/dy have been measured for Q{sup 2}>200 GeV{sup 2}, as well as the double differential reduced cross section d{sup 2}{sigma}/dxdQ{sup 2} in the kinematic range 280 GeV{sup 2}current deep inelastic scattering cross sections. The helicity structure is investigated in particular. The mass of the space-like W boson propagator has been determined from a fit to d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}. (orig.)

  15. Classification of caesarean section and normal vaginal deliveries using foetal heart rate signals and advanced machine learning algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergus, Paul; Hussain, Abir; Al-Jumeily, Dhiya; Huang, De-Shuang; Bouguila, Nizar

    2017-07-06

    Visual inspection of cardiotocography traces by obstetricians and midwives is the gold standard for monitoring the wellbeing of the foetus during antenatal care. However, inter- and intra-observer variability is high with only a 30% positive predictive value for the classification of pathological outcomes. This has a significant negative impact on the perinatal foetus and often results in cardio-pulmonary arrest, brain and vital organ damage, cerebral palsy, hearing, visual and cognitive defects and in severe cases, death. This paper shows that using machine learning and foetal heart rate signals provides direct information about the foetal state and helps to filter the subjective opinions of medical practitioners when used as a decision support tool. The primary aim is to provide a proof-of-concept that demonstrates how machine learning can be used to objectively determine when medical intervention, such as caesarean section, is required and help avoid preventable perinatal deaths. This is evidenced using an open dataset that comprises 506 controls (normal virginal deliveries) and 46 cases (caesarean due to pH ≤ 7.20-acidosis, n = 18; pH > 7.20 and pH machine-learning algorithms are trained, and validated, using binary classifier performance measures. The findings show that deep learning classification achieves sensitivity = 94%, specificity = 91%, Area under the curve = 99%, F-score = 100%, and mean square error = 1%. The results demonstrate that machine learning significantly improves the efficiency for the detection of caesarean section and normal vaginal deliveries using foetal heart rate signals compared with obstetrician and midwife predictions and systems reported in previous studies.

  16. Current scenario of attitude and knowledge of physicians about rational prescription: A novel cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Mahajan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the last 30 years concepts in pharmacology have moved from Essential Medicines (EM to P-drugs via the Rational Use of Medicines (RUM, but no structured study has evaluated the level of understanding among the working clinicians about these concepts. Aim: The present study was designed to assess the attitude and knowledge of clinical practitioners about the concepts of RUM, EM, P-drugs, and sources of drug-information, across North India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in and around the teaching hospitals attached to Medical Colleges, enrolling 504 clinicians from six centers across North India to fill-up a questionnaire containing 25 questions. Statistical Analysis: The results were compiled using percentages and averages. Univariate analysis, which explores each variable in a data set separately, was carried out by using the Fisher′s exact test. Results: Only one-fourth of the participants claimed that they always prescribed Essential Medicine; no one could correctly count the number of drugs / drug combinations in the Indian Essential Drug list; only 15.1% of the clinicians wrote the generic names of drugs on the prescription slip; about one-third of clinicians were not fully aware about the adverse effects, drug interactions, and contraindications of the drugs they prescribed; about 83% of physicians admitted to relying on information from Medical Representatives and an interest in research activities seemed to be lost. Conclusion: Results show a sorry state of affairs among clinicians, as far as the level of understanding about EM, P-drugs, and RUM is concerned, and it points toward arranging more continuing medical education (CME for clinicians with regard to these concepts.

  17. Preliminary inter-model comparison of the Agulhas current with direct range doppler velocity estimates from Envisat's Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Backeberg, Bjorn C

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available , notably due to the transport of heat and salt from the Indian Ocean via the South Atlantic to the North Atlantic. In these contexts, advances in the quantitative understanding of the dominant processes and variability within the greater Agulhas Current...

  18. Feasibility and acceptability of advance care planning in elderly Italian and Greek speaking patients as compared to English-speaking patients: an Australian cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detering, Karen; Sutton, Elizabeth; Fraser, Scott; Wallis, Kasey; Silvester, William; Mawren, Daveena; Whiteside, Kathryn

    2015-08-28

    To assess the feasibility and acceptability of facilitated advance care planning (ACP) discussions in elderly Italian and Greek-speaking inpatients compared to English-speaking inpatients. This cross-sectional study with convenience sampling was conducted in Melbourne, Australia, and recruited hospital inpatients with medical decision-making capacity, aged 65 years or above, who spoke Greek (25 patients), Italian (24 patients) or English (63 patients). Facilitated ACP was offered, aiming to assists patients to consider and discuss their goals, values, beliefs and future treatment wishes with their family and doctor; to help them consider how they would like healthcare decisions made in the future if they become unable to do this for themselves; and to complete advance care directives. The completion of ACP discussions, their duration, advance care directive completion and utilisation of interpreters. Of 112 patients, 109 (97%) had at least one discussion, 63 (54%) completed advance care directives, either nominating a substitute decision-maker, documenting their wishes or both, and 76 (68%) included family in discussions. The median duration of discussions for all patients was slightly more than 1 h, over two visits. There were no differences between the Greek-speaking and the Italian-speaking patients, or between the Non-English speaking and the English-speaking patients in any of these measures. Only 14 non-English speaking patients, (30%) utilised interpreters, but when utilised, patients were much more likely (pspeaking patients is feasible, acceptable and is similar to that for English-speaking patients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Advances in methods of commercial FBR core characteristics analyses. Investigations of a treatment of the double-heterogeneity and a method to calculate homogenized control rod cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugino, Kazuteru [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Iwai, Takehiko

    1998-07-01

    A standard data base for FBR core nuclear design is under development in order to improve the accuracy of FBR design calculation. As a part of the development, we investigated an improved treatment of double-heterogeneity and a method to calculate homogenized control rod cross sections in a commercial reactor geometry, for the betterment of the analytical accuracy of commercial FBR core characteristics. As an improvement in the treatment of double-heterogeneity, we derived a new method (the direct method) and compared both this and conventional methods with continuous energy Monte-Carlo calculations. In addition, we investigated the applicability of the reaction rate ratio preservation method as a advanced method to calculate homogenized control rod cross sections. The present studies gave the following information: (1) An improved treatment of double-heterogeneity: for criticality the conventional method showed good agreement with Monte-Carlo result within one sigma standard deviation; the direct method was consistent with conventional one. Preliminary evaluation of effects in core characteristics other than criticality showed that the effect of sodium void reactivity (coolant reactivity) due to the double-heterogeneity was large. (2) An advanced method to calculate homogenize control rod cross sections: for control rod worths the reaction rate ratio preservation method agreed with those produced by the calculations with the control rod heterogeneity included in the core geometry; in Monju control rod worth analysis, the present method overestimated control rod worths by 1 to 2% compared with the conventional method, but these differences were caused by more accurate model in the present method and it is considered that this method is more reliable than the conventional one. These two methods investigated in this study can be directly applied to core characteristics other than criticality or control rod worth. Thus it is concluded that these methods will

  20. Toward improved durability in advanced aircraft engine hot sections; Proceedings of the Thirty-third ASME International Gas Turbine and Aeroengine Congress and Exposition, Amsterdam, Netherlands, June 5-9, 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Daniel E. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The present conference on durability improvement methods for advanced aircraft gas turbine hot-section components discusses NASA's 'HOST' project, advanced high-temperature instrumentation for hot-section research, the development and application of combustor aerothermal models, and the evaluation of a data base and numerical model for turbine heat transfer. Also discussed are structural analysis methods for gas turbine hot section components, fatigue life-prediction modeling for turbine hot section materials, and the service life modeling of thermal barrier coatings for aircraft gas turbine engines.

  1. Measurement of charged-current e{sup +}p deep inelastic scattering cross sections at {radical}s=300 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagano, Kunihiro [Tokyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-02-01

    The charged-current e{sup +}p deep inelastic scattering cross sections were measured at {radical}s=300 GeV in the kinematic region Q{sup 2} > 200 GeV{sup 2}. The analysis is based on the 46.6 pb{sup -1} e{sup +}p collision data collected by ZEUS at HERA during the running years from 1994 to 1997. The single differential cross sections d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}, d{sigma}/dx and d{sigma}/dy were measured. Compared with our previous measurement, both the statistical and systematic errors were reduced. The explored kinematic region was extended to high Q{sup 2} and high x regions: d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2} was measured up to Q{sup 2}=30000 GeV{sup 2}, and d{sigma}/dx was measured up to x=0.65. The double differential cross section as a function of x and Q{sup 2}, d{sup 2}{sigma}/dxdQ{sup 2}, was also measured. This is the first measurement for the e{sup +}p charged-current interaction. The measured cross sections were compared with the Standard Model predictions obtained with CTEQ 4D, MRSA and GRV 94 parton density functions, respectively, which were evolved according to the next-to-leading-order QCD evolution equation. The cross sections were consistent with these predictions except for the high x region, x > or approx. 0.1, where d{sigma}/dx exhibited an excess. The double differential cross section d{sup 2}{sigma}/dxdQ{sup 2} exhibited this high-x excess in a wide range of Q{sup 2}. This observation suggests that the d-quark density in the high x region is underestimated in the current parton density functions. The propagator mass was extracted from d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2} as M{sub W}=83.4{+-}2.8(stat.){sub -2.1}{sup +1.6}(syst.){+-}2.7(pdf) GeV. This value is in agreement with the mass of W{sup {+-}}-boson obtained by the direct mass measurements at LEP and Tevatron. (author)

  2. Measurement of high-Q{sup 2} neutral current deep inelastic e{sup +}p scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised positron beam at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). School of Physics; Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Abt, I. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Adamczyk, L. [AGH-Univ. of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland). Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science] [and others; Collaboration: ZEUS Collaboration

    2012-08-15

    Measurements of neutral current cross sections for deep inelastic scattering in e{sup +}p collisions at HERA with a longitudinally polarised positron beam are presented. The single-differential cross-sections d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}, d{sigma}/dx and d{sigma}/dy and the reduced cross-section {sigma} were measured in the kinematic region Q{sup 2}>185 GeV{sup 2} and y<0.9, where Q{sup 2} is the four-momentum transfer squared, x the Bjorken scaling variable, and y the inelasticity of the interaction. The measurements were performed separately for positively and negatively polarised positron beams. The measurements are based on an integrated luminosity of 135.5 pb{sup -1} collected with the ZEUS detector in 2006 and 2007 at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The structure functions F{sub 3} and F{sup {gamma}Z}{sub 3} were determined by combining the e{sup +}p results presented in this paper with previously published e{sup -}p neutral current results. The asymmetry parameter A{sup +} is used to demonstrate the parity violation predicted in electroweak interactions. The measurements are well described by the predictions of the Standard Model.

  3. Measurement of the inclusive νμ charged current cross section on iron and hydrocarbon in the T2K on-axis neutrino beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K.; Adam, J.; Aihara, H.; Akiri, T.; Andreopoulos, C.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bass, M.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Berardi, V.; Berger, B. E.; Berkman, S.; Bhadra, S.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blondel, A.; Bojechko, C.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buchanan, N.; Calland, R. G.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Coleman, S. J.; Collazuol, G.; Connolly, K.; Cremonesi, L.; Dabrowska, A.; Danko, I.; Das, R.; Davis, S.; de Perio, P.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Dewhurst, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Drapier, O.; Duboyski, T.; Duffy, K.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery-Schrenk, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escudero, L.; Finch, A. J.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Giffin, S.; Giganti, C.; Gilje, K.; Goeldi, D.; Golan, T.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Gudin, D.; Hadley, D. R.; Haesler, A.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayato, Y.; Hearty, C.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hignight, J.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ieva, M.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Iwai, E.; Iwamoto, K.; Iyogi, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Johnson, R. A.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kabirnezhad, M.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Kanazawa, Y.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Katori, T.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kilinski, A.; Kim, J.; Kisiel, J.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Kolaceke, A.; Konaka, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koseki, K.; Koshio, Y.; Kreslo, I.; Kropp, W.; Kubo, H.; Kudenko, Y.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Laihem, K.; Lamont, I.; Larkin, E.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lindner, T.; Lister, C.; Litchfield, R. P.; Longhin, A.; Ludovici, L.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Martynenko, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Metelko, C.; Mijakowski, P.; Miller, C. A.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murakami, A.; Murdoch, M.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakamura, K.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Otani, M.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Payne, D.; Perevozchikov, O.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickard, L.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Plonski, P.; Poplawska, E.; Popov, B.; Posiadala, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Redij, A.; Reeves, M.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Retiere, F.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rojas, P.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Ruterbories, D.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sato, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schoppmann, S.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shiozawa, M.; Short, S.; Shustrov, Y.; Sinclair, P.; Smith, B.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Still, B.; Suda, Y.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Szeglowski, T.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, M. M.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L. F.; Thorley, A.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Waldron, A. V.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Williamson, Z.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wongjirad, T.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yano, T.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yuan, T.; Yu, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.; T2K Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    We report a measurement of the νμ inclusive charged current cross sections on iron and hydrocarbon in the Tokai-to-Kamioka (T2K) on-axis neutrino beam. The measured inclusive charged current cross sections on iron and hydrocarbon averaged over the T2K on-axis flux with a mean neutrino energy of 1.51 GeV are (1.444±0.002(stat)-0.157+0.189(syst))×10-38 cm2/nucleon and (1.379±0.009(stat)-0.147+0.178(syst))×10-38 cm2/nucleon, respectively, and their cross-section ratio is 1.047±0.007(stat)±0.035(syst). These results agree well with the predictions of the neutrino interaction model, and thus we checked the correct treatment of the nuclear effect for iron and hydrocarbon targets in the model within the measurement precisions.

  4. Measurement of high-Q{sup 2} neutral current deep inelastic e{sup -}p scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised electron beam at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2008-12-15

    Measurements of the neutral current cross sections for deep inelastic scattering in e{sup -}p collisions at HERA with a longitudinally polarised electron beam are presented. The single-differential cross-sections d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}, d{sigma}/dx and d{sigma}/dy and the double-differential cross sections in Q{sup 2} and x are measured in the kinematic region y < 0.9 and Q{sup 2} > 185GeV{sup 2} for both positively and negatively polarised electron beams and for each polarisation state separately. The measurements are based on an integrated luminosity of 169.9 pb{sup -1} taken with the ZEUS detector in 2005 and 2006 at a centre-of-mass energy of 318GeV. The structure functions xF{sub 3} and xF{sub 3}{sup {gamma}}{sup Z} are determined by combining the e{sup -}p results presented in this paper with previously measured e{sup +}p neutral current data. The asymmetry parameter A{sup -} is used to demonstrate the parity violating effects of electroweak interactions at large spacelike photon virtuality. The measurements agree well with the predictions of the Standard Model. (orig.)

  5. Measurement of high-Q{sup 2} charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised positron beam at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Faculty of Exact Sciences, School of Physics; Max-Planck-Inst., Munich (Germany); Abt, I. [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Adamczyk, L. [AGH-Univ. of Science and Technology, Cracow (PL). Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science] (and others)

    2010-08-15

    Measurements of the cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering in e{sup +}p collisions with a longitudinally polarised positron beam are presented. The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 132 pb{sup -1} collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The total cross section is presented at positive and negative values of the longitudinal polarisation of the positron beams. The single-differential cross sections d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}, d{sigma}/dx and d{sigma}/dy are presented for Q{sup 2}>200 GeV{sup 2}. The reduced cross-section {sigma} is presented in the kinematic range 200

  6. Measurement of high-Q{sup 2} charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised positron beam at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, H.; Ingbir, R.; Kananov, S.; Levy, A.; Stern, A. [Tel Aviv University, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, School of Physics, Tel Aviv (Israel); Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Reisert, B.; Schmidke, W.B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Adamczyk, L.; Bold, T.; Gach, G.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Kisielewska, D.; Przybycien, M.; Suszycki, L. [AGH-University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Cracow (Poland); Adamus, M.; Plucinski, P.; Tymieniecka, T. [Institute for Nuclear Studies, Warsaw (Poland); Aggarwal, R.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Singh, I. [Panjab University, Department of Physics, Chandigarh (India); Antonelli, S.; Basile, M.; Bindi, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Contin, A.; De Pasquale, S.; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A. [University Bologna (Italy); INFN Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cindolo, F.; Corradi, M.; Iacobucci, G.; Margotti, A.; Nania, R.; Polini, A. [INFN Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Antonov, A.; Dolgoshein, B.A.; Gladkov, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Stifutkin, A.; Suchkov, S. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Arneodo, M.; Ruspa, M. [Universita del Piemonte Orientale, Novara (Italy); INFN, Torino (Italy); Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bokhonov, V.; Dolinska, G.; Gogota, O.; Kadenko, I.; Korol, I.; Kuprash, O.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Makarenko, I.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Salii, A.; Tomalak, O.; Viazlo, O.; Volynets, O.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhmak, N.; Zolko, M. [National Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research, Kiev (Ukraine); Kiev National University, Kiev (Ukraine); Bachynska, O.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Blohm, C.; Borras, K.; Bot, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Coppola, N.; Fang, S.; Geiser, A.; Goettlicher, P.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Huettmann, A.; Januschek, F.; Kahle, B.; Katkov, I.I.; Klein, U. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany)] (and others)

    2010-12-15

    Measurements of the cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering in e {sup +} p collisions with a longitudinally polarised positron beam are presented. The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 132 pb{sup -1} collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The total cross section is presented at positive and negative values of the longitudinal polarisation of the positron beams. The single-differential cross-sections d{sigma}/dQ {sup 2}, d{sigma}/dx and d{sigma}/dy are presented for Q{sup 2}>200 GeV{sup 2}. The reduced cross-section {sigma} is presented in the kinematic range 200

  7. Measurement of neutral current deep inelastic e{sup +}p scattering cross sections with longitudinally polarized positrons with ZEUS at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wlasenko, Michal

    2009-05-15

    Measurements of neutral current deep inelastic scattering of protons colliding with longitudinally polarized positrons, performed with data recorded in years 2006 and 2007 with the ZEUS detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of L=113.3 pb{sup -1}, are presented. The single-differential cross sections d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}, d{sigma}/dx, d{sigma}/dy and the double-differential reduced cross section {sigma} were measured in the kinematic region of 185

  8. First Measurement of the Muon Neutrino Charged Current Single Pion Production Cross Section on Water with the T2K Near Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K.

    2017-01-01

    The T2K off-axis near detector, ND280, is used to make the first differential cross section measurements of muon neutrino charged current single positive pion production on a water target at energies ${\\sim}0.8$~GeV. The differential measurements are presented as a function of muon and pion kinematics, in the restricted phase-space defined by $p_{\\pi^+}>200$MeV/c, $p_{\\mu^-}>200$MeV/c, $\\cos \\theta_{\\pi^+}>0.3$ and $\\cos \\theta_{\\mu^-}>0.3$. The total flux integrated $\

  9. Current Molecular Targeted Therapy in Advanced Gastric Cancer: A Comprehensive Review of Therapeutic Mechanism, Clinical Trials, and Practical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaichun Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great progress in the treatment of gastric cancer, it is still the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Patients often miss the opportunity for a surgical cure, because the cancer has already developed into advanced cancer when identified. Compared to best supportive care, chemotherapy can improve quality of life and prolong survival time, but the overall survival is often short. Due to the molecular study of gastric cancer, new molecular targeted drugs have entered the clinical use. Trastuzumab, an antibody targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, can significantly improve survival in advanced gastric cancer patients with HER2 overexpression. Second-line treatment of advanced gastric cancer with ramucirumab, an antibody targeting VEGFR-2, alone or in combination with paclitaxel, has been proved to provide a beneficial effect. The VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, apatinib, can improve the survival of advanced gastric cancer patients after second-line chemotherapy failure. Unfortunately, none of the EGFR targeting antibodies (cetuximab or panitumumab, VEGF targeting monoclonal antibodies (bevacizumab, mTOR inhibitor (everolimus, or HGF/MET pathway targeting drugs has a significant survival benefit. Many other clinical trials based on molecular markers are underway. This review will summarize targeted therapies for advanced gastric cancer.

  10. Influence of the 2009 financial crisis on detection of advanced pulmonary tuberculosis in Osaka city, Japan: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danno, Katsura; Komukai, Jun; Yoshida, Hideki; Matsumoto, Kenji; Koda, Shinichi; Terakawa, Kazuhiko; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the association between the economic recession and the detection of advanced cases of pulmonary tuberculosis in Osaka city from 2007 to 2009. A repeated cross-sectional study. Osaka city has been the highest tuberculosis burden area in Japan. After the previous global financial crisis, the unemployment rate in Osaka prefecture has deteriorated from 5.3% in 2008 to 6.6% in 2009. During the study period, 3406 pulmonary tuberculosis cases were enrolled: 2530 males and 876 females; 1546 elderly cases (65 years and above) and 1860 young cases (under 65 years); 417 homeless cases and 2989 non-homeless cases. Patients' information included the sex, age, registry, health insurances, places of detection, sputum smear test results, patients' delay, doctors' delay and the grade of chest x-ray findings. They were statistically analysed between 2007 and 2008, two years before and just before the financial crisis, and between 2008 and 2009, just before and after the financial crisis. The total numbers of pulmonary tuberculosis cases were 1172 in 2007, 1083 in 2008 and 1151 in 2009. In health examinations for non-homeless people, higher number of cases in 2009 were sputum smear positive, had respiratory symptoms and showed advanced disease in chest x-rays than those in 2008, with a longer patients' delay. On the contrary, in health examination for homeless people, fewer cases of advanced pulmonary tuberculosis were found in 2009 than in 2008, with a shorter patients' delay. In clinical examinations, there was no trend towards a difference between non-homeless and homeless people. Although homeless people might be protected by public assistance, tuberculosis prevention and control need to be reinforced for the non-homeless population after the financial crisis.

  11. Comprehensive Peptide Ion Structure Studies Using Ion Mobility Techniques: Part 1. An Advanced Protocol for Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Collision Cross-Section Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassabi Kondalaji, Samaneh; Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Tafreshian, Amirmahdi; J. Valentine, Stephen

    2017-02-01

    Collision cross-section (CCS) measurements with a linear drift tube have been utilized to study the gas-phase conformers of a model peptide (acetyl-PAAAAKAAAAKAAAAKAAAAK). Extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been conducted to derive an advanced protocol for the generation of a comprehensive pool of in-silico structures; both higher energy and more thermodynamically stable structures are included to provide an unbiased sampling of conformational space. MD simulations at 300 K are applied to the in-silico structures to more accurately describe the gas-phase transport properties of the ion conformers including their dynamics. Different methods used previously for trajectory method (TM) CCS calculation employing the Mobcal software [1] are evaluated. A new method for accurate CCS calculation is proposed based on clustering and data mining techniques. CCS values are calculated for all in-silico structures, and those with matching CCS values are chosen as candidate structures. With this approach, more than 300 candidate structures with significant structural variation are produced; although no final gas-phase structure is proposed here, in a second installment of this work, gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange data will be utilized as a second criterion to select among these structures as well as to propose relative populations for these ion conformers. Here the need to increase conformer diversity and accurate CCS calculation is demonstrated and the advanced methods are discussed.

  12. Comprehensive Peptide Ion Structure Studies Using Ion Mobility Techniques: Part 1. An Advanced Protocol for Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Collision Cross-Section Calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassabi Kondalaji, Samaneh; Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Tafreshian, Amirmahdi; J Valentine, Stephen

    2017-05-01

    Collision cross-section (CCS) measurements with a linear drift tube have been utilized to study the gas-phase conformers of a model peptide (acetyl-PAAAAKAAAAKAAAAKAAAAK). Extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been conducted to derive an advanced protocol for the generation of a comprehensive pool of in-silico structures; both higher energy and more thermodynamically stable structures are included to provide an unbiased sampling of conformational space. MD simulations at 300 K are applied to the in-silico structures to more accurately describe the gas-phase transport properties of the ion conformers including their dynamics. Different methods used previously for trajectory method (TM) CCS calculation employing the Mobcal software [1] are evaluated. A new method for accurate CCS calculation is proposed based on clustering and data mining techniques. CCS values are calculated for all in-silico structures, and those with matching CCS values are chosen as candidate structures. With this approach, more than 300 candidate structures with significant structural variation are produced; although no final gas-phase structure is proposed here, in a second installment of this work, gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange data will be utilized as a second criterion to select among these structures as well as to propose relative populations for these ion conformers. Here the need to increase conformer diversity and accurate CCS calculation is demonstrated and the advanced methods are discussed. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  13. Comprehensive Peptide Ion Structure Studies Using Ion Mobility Techniques: Part 1. An Advanced Protocol for Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Collision Cross-Section Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassabi Kondalaji, Samaneh; Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Tafreshian, Amirmahdi; J. Valentine, Stephen

    2017-05-01

    Collision cross-section (CCS) measurements with a linear drift tube have been utilized to study the gas-phase conformers of a model peptide (acetyl-PAAAAKAAAAKAAAAKAAAAK). Extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been conducted to derive an advanced protocol for the generation of a comprehensive pool of in-silico structures; both higher energy and more thermodynamically stable structures are included to provide an unbiased sampling of conformational space. MD simulations at 300 K are applied to the in-silico structures to more accurately describe the gas-phase transport properties of the ion conformers including their dynamics. Different methods used previously for trajectory method (TM) CCS calculation employing the Mobcal software [1] are evaluated. A new method for accurate CCS calculation is proposed based on clustering and data mining techniques. CCS values are calculated for all in-silico structures, and those with matching CCS values are chosen as candidate structures. With this approach, more than 300 candidate structures with significant structural variation are produced; although no final gas-phase structure is proposed here, in a second installment of this work, gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange data will be utilized as a second criterion to select among these structures as well as to propose relative populations for these ion conformers. Here the need to increase conformer diversity and accurate CCS calculation is demonstrated and the advanced methods are discussed.

  14. Measurements of cross-section of charge current inclusive of antineutrino scattering off nucleons using carbon, iron, lead and scintillator at MINER$\

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakotondravohitra, Laza [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-08-18

    Neutrino physics is one of the most active fields in the domaine of high energy physics during the last century. The need of precise measurement of neutrino-nucleus interactions required by the neutrino oscillation experiments is a an exiting step. These measurements of cross-section are more than essential for neutrino oscillation experiment. Over the year, many measurements from varieties of experiments have been presented. MINERνA is one of the world leaders in measuring cross-section of neutrino and antineutrino -nucleus interactions. MINERνA is a neutrino-nucleus scattering experiment installed in the few-GeV NuMI beam line at Fermilab. In order to study nuclear dependence, MINERνA is endowed with different types of solid nuclear targets as well are liquid targets such as helium and water. This thesis presents measurements of cross-section of antineutrino scattering off nucleons using a variety of solid nuclear targets, carbon, iron, lead and also polystyrene scintillator (CH). The data set of antineutrino used for this analysis was taken between March and July 2010 with a total of 1.60X1020 protons on target. Charged current inclusive interactions were selected by requiring a positive muon and kinematics limitation of acceptance of the muon spectrometer are applied. The analysis requires neutrino energy between 2GeV et 20GeV and the angle of muon θmu < 17degree . The absolute cross-section # as function of neutrino energy and the differential cross-section dσ/ dxbj measured and shown the corresponding systematics for each nuclear targets. Data results are compared with prediction of the models implemented in the neutrino events generators GENIE 2.6.2 used by the experiment.

  15. Precision measurement of the cross section of charged-current and neutral current processes at large Q{sup 2} at HERA with the polarized-electron beam; Mesures de precision de la section efficace des processus courant charge et courant neutre a grand Q{sup 2} a HERA avec le faisceau d'electrons polarises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Trong Hieu

    2011-04-15

    The inclusive cross sections for both charged and neutral current processes have been measured in interactions of longitudinally polarized electrons (positrons) with unpolarized protons using the full data samples collected by H1 at HERA-II. The data taken at a center-of-mass energy of 319 GeV correspond to an integrated luminosity of 149.1 pb{sup -1} and 180.0 pb{sup -1} for e{sup -}p and e{sup +}p collisions, representing an increase in statistics of a factor of 10 and 2, respectively, over the data from HERA-I. The measured double differential cross sections d{sup 2}{sigma}/dxdQ{sup 2} cover more than two orders of magnitude in both Q{sup 2}, the negative four-momentum transfer squared, up to 30000 GeV{sup 2}, and Bjorken x, down to 0.003. The cross section data are compared to predictions of the Standard Model which is able to provide a good description of the data. The polarization asymmetry as a function of Q{sup 2} is measured with improved precision, confirming the previous observation of P violation effect in neutral current ep scattering at distances down to 10{sup -18} m. The total cross sections of the charged current process, for Q{sup 2} > 400 GeV{sup 2} and inelasticity y < 0.9 are measured for 4 independent data samples with e{sup {+-}} beams and different polarization values. Together with the corresponding cross section obtained from the previously published unpolarized data, the polarization dependence of the charged current cross section is measured and found to be in agreement with the Standard Model prediction with the absence of right-handed charged current. The cross sections are combined with previously published data from H1 to obtain the most precise unpolarized measurements. These are used to extract the structure function xF{sub 3}{sup {gamma}}{sup Z} which is sensitive to the valence quark distributions down to low x values. The new cross sections have also been used in a combined electroweak and QCD fit to significantly improve the

  16. Measurement of the inclusive νμ charged current cross section on carbon in the near detector of the T2K experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K.; Abgrall, N.; Aihara, H.; Akiri, T.; Albert, J. B.; Andreopoulos, C.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bass, M.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Bentham, S. W.; Berardi, V.; Berger, B. E.; Berkman, S.; Bertram, I.; Beznosko, D.; Bhadra, S.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blondel, A.; Bojechko, C.; Boyd, S.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Brook-Roberge, D. G.; Buchanan, N.; Calland, R. G.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Coleman, S. J.; Collazuol, G.; Connolly, K.; Cremonesi, L.; Curioni, A.; Dabrowska, A.; Danko, I.; Das, R.; Davis, S.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; de Perio, P.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Dobson, J.; Drapier, O.; Duboyski, T.; Dufour, F.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Dziomba, M.; Emery, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escudero, L.; Finch, A. J.; Frank, E.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Gaudin, A.; Giffin, S.; Giganti, C.; Gilje, K.; Golan, T.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Gudin, D.; Guzowski, P.; Hadley, D. R.; Haesler, A.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayato, Y.; Hearty, C.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hignight, J.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ieva, M.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Ives, S. J.; Iyogi, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Johnson, R. A.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Joo, K. K.; Jung, C. K.; Kaboth, A.; Kaji, H.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Kanazawa, Y.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khanam, F.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kilinski, A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, J.; Kim, S. B.; Kirby, B.; Kisiel, J.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, T.; Kogan, G.; Kolaceke, A.; Konaka, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koseki, K.; Koshio, Y.; Kowalik, K.; Kreslo, I.; Kropp, W.; Kubo, H.; Kudenko, Y.; Kumaratunga, S.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Laihem, K.; Laing, A.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lee, K. P.; Licciardi, C.; Lim, I. T.; Lindner, T.; Lister, C.; Litchfield, R. P.; Longhin, A.; Lopez, G. D.; Ludovici, L.; Macaire, M.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marchionni, A.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Maruyama, T.; Marzec, J.; Masliah, P.; Mathie, E. L.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; McLachlan, T.; Messina, M.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Miller, C. A.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Monfregola, L.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murakami, A.; Murdoch, M.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nagasaki, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakai, T.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, K.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Naples, D.; Nicholls, T. C.; Nielsen, C.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Obayashi, Y.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Otani, M.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Pac, M. Y.; Palladino, V.; Paolone, V.; Payne, D.; Pearce, G. F.; Perevozchikov, O.; Perkin, J. D.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Plonski, P.; Poplawska, E.; Popov, B.; Posiadala, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Reeves, M.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Retiere, F.; Robert, A.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Ruterbories, D.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Scully, D. I.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shibata, M.; Shiozawa, M.; Short, S.; Shustrov, Y.; Sinclair, P.; Smith, B.; Smith, R. J.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Still, B.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Szeglowski, T.; Szeptycka, M.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, M. M.; Tanaka, M.; Taylor, I. J.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L. F.; Thorley, A.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Ueno, K.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Waldron, A. V.; Walter, C. W.; Wang, J.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Williamson, Z.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wongjirad, T.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yuan, T.; Zalewska, A.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.

    2013-05-01

    T2K has performed the first measurement of νμ inclusive charged current interactions on carbon at neutrino energies of ˜1GeV where the measurement is reported as a flux-averaged double differential cross section in muon momentum and angle. The flux is predicted by the beam Monte Carlo and external data, including the results from the NA61/SHINE experiment. The data used for this measurement were taken in 2010 and 2011, with a total of 10.8×1019 protons-on-target. The analysis is performed on 4485 inclusive charged current interaction candidates selected in the most upstream fine-grained scintillator detector of the near detector. The flux-averaged total cross section is ⟨σCC⟩ϕ=(6.91±0.13(stat)±0.84(syst))×10-39(cm2)/(nucleon) for a mean neutrino energy of 0.85 GeV.

  17. Measurement of the neutrino-oxygen neutral-current interaction cross section by observing nuclear de-excitation $\\gamma$-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Aihara, H; Akiri, T; Andreopoulos, C; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bass, M; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Bentham, S W; Berardi, V; Berger, B E; Berkman, S; Bertram, I; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F d M; Blondel, A; Bojechko, C; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Buchanan, N; Calland, R G; Rodríguez, J Caravaca; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Coleman, S J; Collazuol, G; Connolly, K; Cremonesi, L; Dabrowska, A; Danko, I; Das, R; Davis, S; de Perio, P; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Drapier, O; Duboyski, T; Duffy, K; Dufour, F; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Emery, S; Ereditato, A; Escudero, L; Finch, A J; Floetotto, L; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Gaudin, A; Giffin, S; Giganti, C; Gilje, K; Goeldi, D; Golan, T; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Gudin, D; Hadley, D R; Haesler, A; Haigh, M D; Hamilton, P; Hansen, D; Hara, T; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayato, Y; Hearty, C; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hignight, J; Hillairet, A; Himmel, A; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ieva, M; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Irvine, T J; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Ives, S J; Iwai, E; Iyogi, K; Izmaylov, A; Jacob, A; Jamieson, B; Johnson, R A; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Jung, C K; Kabirnezhad, M; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Kanazawa, Y; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kilinski, A; Kim, J; Kisiel, J; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, T; Koch, L; Kolaceke, A; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koseki, K; Koshio, Y; Kreslo, I; Kropp, W; Kubo, H; Kudenko, Y; Kumaratunga, S; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Laihem, K; Lamont, I; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lazos, M; Lee, K P; Licciardi, C; Lindner, T; Lister, C; Litchfield, R P; Longhin, A; Ludovici, L; Macaire, M; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Maruyama, T; Marzec, J; Mathie, E L; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Metelko, C; Mezzetto, M; Mijakowski, P; Miller, C A; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Mine, S; Missert, A; Miura, M; Monfregola, L; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Murakami, A; Murdoch, M; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nagasaki, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakai, T; Nakamura, K; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Naples, D; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Palladino, V; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Pearce, G F; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pickard, L; Guerra, E S Pinzon; Pistillo, C; Plonski, P; Poplawska, E; Popov, B; Posiadala, M; Poutissou, J -M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reeves, M; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Retiere, F; Robert, A; Rodrigues, P A; Rojas, P; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Ruterbories, D; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Sánchez, F; Sato, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schoppmann, S; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Shustrov, Y; Sinclair, P; Smith, B; Smith, R J; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Still, B; Suda, Y; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Szeglowski, T; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, M M; Taylor, I J; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorley, A; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Totsuka, Y; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Ueno, K; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Waldron, A V; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Williamson, Z; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Wongjirad, T; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yuan, T; Yu, M; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Żmuda, J

    2014-01-01

    We report the first measurement of the neutrino-oxygen neutral-current quasi-elastic (NCQE) cross section. It is obtained by observing nuclear de-excitation \\gamma-rays which follow neutrino-oxygen interactions at the Super-Kamiokande water Cherenkov detector. We use T2K data corresponding to $3.01 \\times 10^{20}$ protons on target. By selecting only events during the T2K beam window and with well-reconstructed vertices in the fiducial volume, the large background rate from natural radioactivity is dramatically reduced. We observe 43 events in the 4-30 MeV reconstructed energy window, compared with an expectation of 55.7, which includes an estimated 17.3 background events. The background is primarily non-quasielastic neutral-current interactions and has only 1.2 events from natural radioactivity. The flux-averaged NCQE cross section we measure is $1.35 \\times 10^{-38}$ cm$^2$ with a 68% confidence interval of $(1.06, 1.94) \\times 10^{-38}$ cm$^2$ at a median neutrino energy of 630 MeV, compared with the theor...

  18. MINERvA Measurement of Neutrino Charged-Current Cross Section Ratios of Nuclei C, Fe, and Pb to CH at Energies of a Few GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gran, Richard [Minnesota U., Duluth

    2016-06-02

    The MINERvA experiment is designed to measure neutrino cross sections for different nuclei using substantially similar fiducial and tracking environments. This allows for reduced systematics in the ratio to better see the evolution of the cross section with the size of the nucleus. The first such result is an inclusive charged current cross section ratio as a function of energy from and the kinematic quantity Bjorken x for nuclei Pb, Fe, and C relative to plastic scintillator CH. The measurement is made for neutrino energies from 2 to 20 GeV. In the past, charged lepton scattering ratios of heavier nuclei to deuterium have revealed interesting structure such as the EMC effect. These ratios were restricted to purely deep inelastic scattering data whereas these ratios to different nuclei in MINERvA are sensitive to the elastic scattering as well as resonance production regions. Significant deviations from the baseline scattering model are observed, and suggest new theory work to investigate these ratios.

  19. New interpretation for quantum mechanics: It is the mutual energy current composed of a retarded and an advanced waves instead of the probability

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Shuang-ren; Yang, Kang; Yang, Xingang; Yang, Xintie

    2016-01-01

    Quantum physics has the probability interpretation. From the knowledge of light, we know that wave is always spread out, and hence the electron wave should also spread out. That means the electron wave beam should like the light wave beam become diverged from the source. When the electron is received by an atom we thought the wave collapse. The place to collapse is depends on the probability calculated from the square of absolute value of the wave function. The recent new discovery tell us that the light is not just wave, it is a combination of waves, retarded potential and advanced potential. These two potentials together produce the mutual energy current or referred as M-current. Another light energy current is P-current related to Poynting vector. We found P-current doesn't carry any energy for light. The contribution of P-current to energy transfer can be omitted. The light energy is transferred only by M-current. The beam of M-current doesn't like the beam of P-current which is diverged from the source, ...

  20. Current Advances in the Carbon Nanotube/Thermotropic Main-Chain Liquid Crystalline Polymer Nanocomposites and Their Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Because of their extraordinary properties, such as high thermal stability, flame retardant, high chemical resistance and high mechanical strength, thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers (TLCPs have recently gained more attention while being useful for many applications which require chemical inertness and high strength. Due to the recent advance in nanotechnology, TLCPs are usually compounded with nanoparticles to form particulate composites to enhance their properties, such as barrier properties, electrical properties, mechanical properties and thermal properties. Carbon-based nanofillers such as carbon nanotube (CNT, graphene and graphene oxide are the most common fillers used for the TLCP matrices. In this review, we focus on recent advances in thermotropic main-chain liquid crystalline polymer nanocomposites incorporated with CNTs. However, the biggest challenges in the preparation of CNT/TLCP nanocomposites have been shown to be inherent in the dispersion of CNTs into the TLCP matrix, the alignment and control of CNTs in the TLCP matrix and the load-transfer between the TLCP matrix and CNTs. As a result, this paper reviews recent advances in CNT/TLCP nanocomposites through enhanced dispersion of CNTs in TLCPs as well as their improved interfacial adhesion with the TLCP matrices. Case studies on the important role of chemically modified CNTs in the TLCP/thermoplastic polymer blends are also included.

  1. Current smoking status may be associated with overt albuminuria in female patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okada Kenta

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are very few clinical reports that have compared the association between cigarette smoking and microangiopathy in Asian patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. The objective of this study was to assess the relationships between urinary protein concentrations and smoking and gender-based risk factors among patients with T1DM. Methods A cross-sectional study of 259 patients with T1DM (men/women = 90/169; mean age, 50.7 years who visited our hospital for more than 1 year between October 2010 and April 2011 was conducted. Participants completed a questionnaire about their smoking habits. Patient characteristics included gender, age, body mass index, blood pressure, hemoglobin A1c, lipid parameters, and microangiopathy. Diabetic nephropathy (DN was categorized as normoalbuminuria (NA, microalbuminuria (MA, or overt albuminuria (OA on the basis of the following urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR levels: NA, ACR levels less than 30 mg/g creatinine (Cr; MA, ACR levels between 30 and 299 mg/g Cr; and OA, ACR levels over 300 mg/g Cr. Results The percentages of current nonsmokers and current smokers with T1DM were 73.0% (n = 189 and 27.0% (n = 70, respectively. In addition, the percentage of males was higher than that of females (52.2% versus 13.6% in the current smoking population. The percentage of DN was 61.8% (n = 160 in patients with NA, 21.6% (n = 56 in patients with MA, and 16.6% (n = 43 in patients with OA. The percentage of males among OA patients was also higher than that of females (24.4% versus 12.4%. However, current smoking status was associated with OA in females with T1DM only [unadjusted odds ratio (OR, 4.13; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.45–11.73, P P  Conclusions Based on our results in this cross-sectional study of Asian patients with T1DM, smoking might be a risk factor for OA among female patients. Further research is needed of these gender-specific results.

  2. Current use of ultrasound for central vascular access in children and infants in the Nordic countries--a cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas C Risom; Rimstad, Ivan Jonassen; Tarpgaard, Mona;

    2015-01-01

    widespread across the Nordic countries. Close to 80% of respondents were using it "almost always" or "frequently" across all paediatric age groups for internal jugular vein cannulation. US was least frequently used when catheterizing the subclavian vein. The two most common reasons given when not using US....... METHODS: A cross-sectional survey using an online questionnaire was distributed to one anaesthesiologist at every hospital in the Nordic countries; a total of 177 anaesthesiologists were contacted from July till August 2012. RESULTS: The use of US for placing central venous catheters (CVCs) seems......PURPOSE: The use of ultrasound (US) guidance for central vascular access in children has been advocated as a safer approach compared to traditional landmark techniques. We therefore collected data on the current use of US for central vascular access in children and infants in the Nordic countries...

  3. Inclusive jet cross sections in the Breit frame in neutral current deep inelastic scattering at HERA and determination of $\\alpha_{s}$

    CERN Document Server

    Chekanov, S; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Adler, V; Aghuzumtsyan, G; Allfrey, P D; Antonioli, P; Antonov, A; Arneodo, M; Bailey, D S; Bamberger, A; Barakbaev, A N; Barbagli, G; Barbi, M; Bari, G; Barreiro, F; Bartsch, D; Basile, M; Behrens, U; Bell, M A; Bellagamba, L; Bellan, P M; Benen, A; Bertolin, A; Bhadra, S; Bloch, I; Bold, T; Boos, E G; Borras, K; Boscherini, D; Brock, I; Brook, N H; Brugnera, R; Brümmer, N; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bussey, P J; Butterworth, J M; Büttner, C; Bylsma, B; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carli, T; Carlin, R; Cassel, D G; Catterall, C D; Abramowicz, H; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Cole, J E; Collins-Tooth, C; Contin, A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Coppola, N; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Costa, M; Cottrell, A; Cui, Y; D'Agostini, G; Dal Corso, F; Danilov, P; De Pasquale, S; Dementiev, R K; Derrick, M; Devenish, R C E; Dhawan, S; Dobur, D; Dolgoshein, B A; Doyle, A T; Drews, G; Durkin, L S; Dusini, S; Eisenberg, Y; Ermolov, P F; Eskreys, Andrzej; Everett, A; Ferrando, J; Ferrero, M I; Figiel, J; Foster, B; Foudas, C; Fourletov, S; Fourletova, J; Fry, C; Gabareen, A; Galas, A; Gallo, E; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Genta, C; Gialas, I; Giusti, P; Gladilin, L K; Gladkov, D; Glasman, C; Göbel, F; Goers, S; Goncalo, R; González, O; Gosau, T; Göttlicher, P; Grabowska-Bold, I; Graciani-Díaz, R; Grigorescu, G; Grijpink, S; Groys, M; Grzelak, G; Gutsche, O; Gwenlan, C; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hall-Wilton, R; Hamatsu, R; Hamilton, J; Hanlon, S; Hart, C; Hartmann, H; Hartner, G; Heaphy, E A; Heath, G P; Helbich, M; Hilger, E; Hochman, D; Holm, U; Horn, C; Iacobucci, G; Iga, Y; Irrgang, P; Jakob, H P; Jiménez, M; Jones, T W; Kagawa, S; Kahle, B; Kaji, H; Kananov, S; Karshon, U; Karstens, F; Kasemann, M; Kataoka, M; Katkov, I I; Kcira, D; Keramidas, A; Khein, L A; Kim, J Y; Kind, O; Kisielewska, D; Kitamura, S; Koffeman, E; Kohno, T; Kooijman, P; Koop, T; Korzhavina, I A; Kotanski, A; Kötz, U; Kowal, A M; Kowalski, H; Kramberger, G; Kreisel, A; Krumnack, N; Kulinski, P; Kuze, M; Kuzmin, V A; Labarga, L; Lammers, S; Lelas, D; Levchenko, B B; Levy, A; Li, L; Lightwood, M S; Lim, H; Limentani, S; Ling, T Y; Liu, C; Liu, X; Löhr, B; Lohrmann, E; Loizides, J H; Long, K R; Longhin, A; Lukasik, J; Lukina, O Yu; Luzniak, P; Ma, K J; Maddox, E; Magill, S; Malka, J; Mankel, R; Margotti, A; Marini, G; Martin, J F; Martínez, M; Mastroberardino, A; Matsuzawa, K; Mattingly, M C K; Melzer-Pellmann, I A; Menary, S R; Metlica, F; Meyer, U; Miglioranzi, S; Milite, M; Mirea, A; Monaco, V; Montanari, A; Musgrave, B; Nagano, K; Namsoo, T; Nania, R; Nguyen, C N; Nigro, A; Ning, Y; Noor, U; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Nuncio-Quiroz, A E; Oh, B Y; Olkiewicz, K; Ota, O; Padhi, S; Palmonari, F; Patel, S; Paul, E; Pavel, Usan; Pawlak, J M; Pelfer, P G; Pellegrino, A; Pesci, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Plamondon, M; Plucinsky, P P; Pokrovskiy, N S; Polini, A; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M B; Rautenberg, J; Raval, A; Reeder, D D; Ren, Z; Renner, R; Repond, J; Ri, Y D; Rinaldi, L; Robins, S; Rosin, M; Ruspa, M; Ryan, P; Sacchi, R; Salehi, H; Santamarta, R; Sartorelli, G; Savin, A A; Saxon, D H; Schagen, S; Schioppa, M; Schlenstedt, S; Schleper, P; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Sciulli, F; Shcheglova, L M; Skillicorn, I O; Slominski, W; Smith, W H; Soares, M; Solano, A; Son, D; Sosnovtsev, V V; Stairs, D G; Stanco, L; Standage, J; Stifutkin, A; Stonjek, S; Stopa, P; Stösslein, U; Straub, P B; Suchkov, S; Susinno, G; Suszycki, L; Sutiak, J; Sutton, M R; Sztuk, J; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Tapper, A D; Targett-Adams, C; Tassi, E; Tawara, T; Terron, J; Tiecke, H G; Tokushuku, K; Tsurugai, T; Turcato, M; Tymieniecka, T; Tyszkiewicz, A; Ukleja, A; Ukleja, J; Vázquez, M; Vlasov, N N; Voss, K C; Walczak, R; Walsh, R; Wang, M; Whitmore, J J; Whyte, J; Wichmann, K; Wick, K; Wiggers, L; Wills, H H; Wing, M; Wlasenko, M; Wolf, G; Yagues-Molina, A G; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Yoshida, R; Youngman, C; Zambrana, M; Zawiejski, L; Zeuner, W; Zhautykov, B O; Zhou, C; Zichichi, A; Ziegler, A; Zotkin, D S; Zotkin, S A; De Favereau, J; De Wolf, E; Del Peso, J

    2002-01-01

    Inclusive jet differential cross sections have been measured in neutral current deep inelastic e+p scattering for boson virtualities Q**2>125 GeV**2. The data were taken using the ZEUS detector at HERA and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 38.6 pb-1. Jets were identified in the Breit frame using the longitudinally invariant K_T cluster algorithm. Measurements of differential inclusive jet cross sections are presented as functions of jet transverse energy (E_T,jet), jet pseudorapidity and Q**2, for jets with E_T,jet>8 GeV. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations agree well with the measurements both at high Q**2 and high E_T,jet. The value of alpha_s(M_Z), determined from an analysis of dsigma/dQ**2 for Q**2>500 GeV**2, is alpha_s(M_Z) = 0.1212 +/- 0.0017 (stat.) +0.0023 / -0.0031 (syst.) +0.0028 / -0.0027 (th.).

  4. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank-Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 2: Rotator Cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Iain R; LaPrade, Robert F; Musahl, Volker; Geeslin, Andrew G; Zlotnicki, Jason P; Mann, Barton J; Petrigliano, Frank A

    2016-03-01

    Rotator cuff tears are common and result in considerable morbidity. Tears within the tendon substance or at its insertion into the humeral head represent a considerable clinical challenge because of the hostile local environment that precludes healing. Tears often progress without intervention, and current surgical treatments are inadequate. Although surgical implants, instrumentation, and techniques have improved, healing rates have not improved, and a high failure rate remains for large and massive rotator cuff tears. The use of biologic adjuvants that contribute to a regenerative microenvironment have great potential for improving healing rates and function after surgery. This article presents a review of current and emerging biologic approaches to augment rotator cuff tendon and muscle regeneration focusing on the scientific rationale, preclinical, and clinical evidence for efficacy, areas for future research, and current barriers to advancement and implementation.

  5. The prevalence and correlates of meeting the current physical activity for health guidelines in older people: a cross-sectional study in Brazilian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagetti, Gislaine Cristina; Barbosa Filho, Valter Cordeiro; Moreira, Natália Boneti; de Oliveira, Valdomiro; Mazzardo, Oldemar; de Campos, Wagner

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the prevalence and correlates of meeting the current physical activity for health (PAfH) guidelines, proposed by the World Health Organization in 2010, in community-dwelling older women from Brazil. A cross-sectional study was performed with 1806 women (aged 60.0-92.7 years) who were randomly selected from eighteen care centers. The short version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire was used to determine the weekly time spent in physical activities, and this variable was categorized into three categories (0high blood pressure (OR=1.33, 95% CI: 1.09-1.62) were more likely to meet the current PAfH guidelines than their peers with primary incomplete education, negative self-rated health, and normal blood pressure. Increasing age was inversely associated with meeting the PAfH guidelines (odds ranging: 0.77-0.48). These results highlighted the elderly population subgroups, in a developing country, that needspecific guidelinesfor inclusion inhealth programs andmotivation toparticipate in physical activities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Fundamental Research Directed to Advanced High Temperature Coating Systems Beyond the Current State-of-the-Art Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    Transmission electron micrograph of implanted region of Mg-implanted NiCrAl (a) and corresponding selected area diffraction pattern. co z 4o E CU 4 -4 E C4 0.0...E C 4E 0 C0/o c w. 0 4 60 C4- ’d d d Inner Scale Outer Scale Un Implant~d N1 -18Cr - SAI, 95d2, 02148hra. Figure 33. Cross sections of NiCrAl

  7. Glass Property Models and Constraints for Estimating the Glass to be Produced at Hanford by Implementing Current Advanced Glass Formulation Efforts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, John D.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Skorski, Daniel C.; Matyas, Josef

    2013-07-31

    Recent glass formulation and melter testing data have suggested that significant increases in waste loading in HLW and LAW glasses are possible over current system planning estimates. The data (although limited in some cases) were evaluated to determine a set of constraints and models that could be used to estimate the maximum loading of specific waste compositions in glass. It is recommended that these models and constraints be used to estimate the likely HLW and LAW glass volumes that would result if the current glass formulation studies are successfully completed. It is recognized that some of the models are preliminary in nature and will change in the coming years. Plus the models do not currently address the prediction uncertainties that would be needed before they could be used in plant operations. The models and constraints are only meant to give an indication of rough glass volumes and are not intended to be used in plant operation or waste form qualification activities. A current research program is in place to develop the data, models, and uncertainty descriptions for that purpose. A fundamental tenet underlying the research reported in this document is to try to be less conservative than previous studies when developing constraints for estimating the glass to be produced by implementing current advanced glass formulation efforts. The less conservative approach documented herein should allow for the estimate of glass masses that may be realized if the current efforts in advanced glass formulations are completed over the coming years and are as successful as early indications suggest they may be. Because of this approach there is an unquantifiable uncertainty in the ultimate glass volume projections due to model prediction uncertainties that has to be considered along with other system uncertainties such as waste compositions and amounts to be immobilized, split factors between LAW and HLW, etc.

  8. Glass Property Models and Constraints for Estimating the Glass to be Produced at Hanford by Implementing Current Advanced Glass Formulation Efforts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kim, Dong-Sang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Skorski, Daniel C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Matyas, Josef [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Recent glass formulation and melter testing data have suggested that significant increases in waste loading in HLW and LAW glasses are possible over current system planning estimates. The data (although limited in some cases) were evaluated to determine a set of constraints and models that could be used to estimate the maximum loading of specific waste compositions in glass. It is recommended that these models and constraints be used to estimate the likely HLW and LAW glass volumes that would result if the current glass formulation studies are successfully completed. It is recognized that some of the models are preliminary in nature and will change in the coming years. Plus the models do not currently address the prediction uncertainties that would be needed before they could be used in plant operations. The models and constraints are only meant to give an indication of rough glass volumes and are not intended to be used in plant operation or waste form qualification activities. A current research program is in place to develop the data, models, and uncertainty descriptions for that purpose. A fundamental tenet underlying the research reported in this document is to try to be less conservative than previous studies when developing constraints for estimating the glass to be produced by implementing current advanced glass formulation efforts. The less conservative approach documented herein should allow for the estimate of glass masses that may be realized if the current efforts in advanced glass formulations are completed over the coming years and are as successful as early indications suggest they may be. Because of this approach there is an unquantifiable uncertainty in the ultimate glass volume projections due to model prediction uncertainties that has to be considered along with other system uncertainties such as waste compositions and amounts to be immobilized, split factors between LAW and HLW, etc.

  9. Current Issues Affecting the Practice of Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgeons: Results of the 2014 Workforce Survey of American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Pooya; Copley, Lawson; Ruch-Ross, Holly; Schwend, Richard M; Sawyer, Jeffrey R

    2016-09-22

    The opinions of the pediatric orthopaedic workforce are shaped by market forces, regulatory processes, and local experience. The purpose of this report is to summarize the findings of the recent Workforce Survey of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Section on Orthopaedics (SOOr). This submission has been reviewed and approved by the Board of Directors of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA). In 2014, the AAP generated a survey to assess perceptions of pediatric orthopaedic surgeons about current issues that affect practice. The survey was sent to 856 POSNA and 141 AAP-SOOr members. Responses were topically organized to report current workforce composition, practice patterns, and perceptions about electronic medical records (EMRs). Responses were collected from August to December, 2014, from 496 (50%) survey recipients including 83 of 141 (59%) AAP-SOOr members and 413 of 856 (48%) POSNA members. Analyses were restricted to the 397 respondents who reported that they are currently practicing pediatric orthopaedics. Nearly all of these (390/391, 100%) indicated that they provide direct patient care and work an average of 60 hours per week. Many (105/378, 28%) indicated that they would soon limit their practice or retire. A majority (299/394, 76%) indicated that they face competition in their geographic area, predominantly due to pediatric orthopaedic subspecialists (269/299, 90%). Major business changes had recently occurred or were anticipated by 21% of participants. Respondents reported that use of EMR makes them less efficient (252/397, 63%) and interferes with the patient-physician relationship (172/397, 43%). This workforce survey suggests that pediatric orthopaedic surgeons are concerned with challenges of competition despite concurrent increasing volume and complexity of referrals. External processes such as EMR changes are perceived to negatively impact practice efficiency and satisfaction.

  10. Current Aspect and Future Prospect of Human Gene Therapy in Childhood (Gene Therapy : Advances in Research and Treatment)

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Almost four years have passed since the first human gene therapy for adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency had been performed. Gene therapy protocols for cystic fibrosis, familial hypercholesterolaemia and hemophilia B were also started during this period. In this review, we reported and discussed the current aspect and the future prospect of gene therapy for inherited disease in childhood.

  11. An Official American Thoracic Society Research Statement : Current Challenges Facing Research and Therapeutic Advances in Airway Remodeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prakash, Y S; Halayko, Andrew J; Gosens, Reinoud; Panettieri Jr., Reynold A; Camoretti-Mercado, Blanca; Penn, Raymond B; Burgess, Janette K

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Airway remodeling (AR) is a prominent feature of asthma and other obstructive lung diseases that is minimally affected by current treatments. The goals of this Official American Thoracic Society (ATS) Research Statement are to discuss the scientific, technological, economic, and

  12. An Official American Thoracic Society Research Statement : Current Challenges Facing Research and Therapeutic Advances in Airway Remodeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prakash, Y S; Halayko, Andrew J; Gosens, Reinoud; Panettieri Jr., Reynold A; Camoretti-Mercado, Blanca; Penn, Raymond B; Burgess, Janette K

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Airway remodeling (AR) is a prominent feature of asthma and other obstructive lung diseases that is minimally affected by current treatments. The goals of this Official American Thoracic Society (ATS) Research Statement are to discuss the scientific, technological, economic, and regulato

  13. Advancing user experience research to facilitate and enable patient-centered research: current state and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Philip R O

    2013-01-01

    Human-computer interaction and related areas of user experience (UX) research, such as human factors, workflow evaluation, and data visualization, are thus essential to presenting data in ways that can further the analysis of complex data sets such as those used in patient-centered research. However, a review of available data on the state of UX research as it relates to patient-centered research demonstrates a significant underinvestment and consequently a large gap in knowledge generation. In response, this report explores trends in funding and research productivity focused on UX and patient-centered research and then presents a set of recommendations to advance innovation at this important intersection point. Ultimately, the aim is to catalyze a community-wide dialogue concerning future directions for research and innovation in UX as it applies to patient-centered research.

  14. Current Research on Consolidation Therapy and Follow-up Health Care in Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Runbo Zhong; Baohui Han; Bo Jin

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT Following concurrent radio-chemotherapy or first-line chemotherapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC), continuous maintenance therapy given to patients with stable disease (SD) and follow-up treatment is called consolidation therapy. Concerning NSCLC patients with a non-operable dry Stage-ⅢB (N3) disease, I.e. Contra-lateral mediastinal and hilar lymph node, or homolateral/contra-lateral scalene and Troisier sign, a 2 or 3-course of standard-dosage Taxotere consolidation therapy can be performed after concurrent radio-chemotherapy. In pursuance of evidence-based medicine (EBM), low-dose Taxoteremaintenance therapy, and biological targeted therapy of patients with appropriate symptoms are suitable for second-line therapy for moist of the Stage-ⅢB (malignant pleural effusion) and Ⅳpatients.

  15. Advances in alloimmune thrombocytopenia: perspectives on current concepts of human platelet antigens, antibody detection strategies, and genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tomoya; Hirayama, Fumiya

    2015-07-01

    Alloimmunisation to platelets leads to the production of antibodies against platelet antigens and consequently to thrombocytopenia. Numerous molecules located on the platelet surface are antigenic and induce immune-mediated platelet destruction with symptoms that can be serious. Human platelet antigens (HPA) cause thrombocytopenias, such as neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, post-transfusion purpura, and platelet transfusion refractoriness. Thirty-four HPA are classified into 28 systems. Assays to identify HPA and anti-HPA antibodies are critically important for preventing and treating thrombocytopenia caused by anti-HPA antibodies. Significant progress in furthering our understanding of HPA has been made in the last decade: new HPA have been discovered, antibody-detection methods have improved, and new genotyping methods have been developed. We review these advances and discuss issues that remain to be resolved as well as future prospects for preventing and treating immune thrombocytopenia.

  16. The temporary and accumulated effects of transcranial direct current stimulation for the treatment of advanced Parkinson’s disease monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Hao Li; Xiaoguang Lei; Ting Yan; Hongwei Li; Baihui Huang; Ling Li; Liqi Xu; Li Liu; Nanhui Chen; Longbao Lü; Yuanye Ma; Lin Xu; Jiali Li; Zhengbo Wang; Baorong Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a useful noninvasive technique of cortical brain stimulation for the treatment of neurological disorders. Clinical research has demonstrated tDCS with anodal stimulation of primary motor cortex (M1) in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients significantly improved their motor function. However, few studies have been focused on the optimization of parameters which contributed significantly to the treatment effects of tDCS and exploration of the under...

  17. An advanced phantom study assessing the feasibility of neuronal current imaging by ultra-low-field NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körber, Rainer; Nieminen, Jaakko O.; Höfner, Nora; Jazbinšek, Vojko; Scheer, Hans-Jürgen; Kim, Kiwoong; Burghoff, Martin

    2013-12-01

    In ultra-low-field (ULF) NMR/MRI, a common scheme is to magnetize the sample by a polarizing field of up to hundreds of mT, after which the NMR signal, precessing in a field on the order of several μT, is detected with superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). In our ULF-NMR system, we polarize with up to 50 mT and deploy a single-stage DC-SQUID current sensor with an integrated input coil which is connected to a wire-wound Nb gradiometer. We developed this system (white noise 0.50 fT/√{Hz}) for assessing the feasibility of imaging neuronal currents by detecting their effect on the ULF-NMR signal. Magnetoencephalography investigations of evoked brain activity showed neuronal dipole moments below 50 nAm. With our instrumentation, we have studied two different approaches for neuronal current imaging. In the so-called DC effect, long-lived neuronal activity shifts the Larmor frequency of the surrounding protons. An alternative strategy is to exploit fast neuronal activity as a tipping pulse. This so-called AC effect requires the proton Larmor frequency to match the frequency of the neuronal activity, which ranges from near-DC to ∼kHz. We emulated neuronal activity by means of a single dipolar source in a physical phantom, consisting of a hollow sphere filled with an aqueous solution of CuSO4 and NaCl. In these phantom studies, with physiologically relevant dipole depths, we determined resolution limits for our set-up for the AC and the DC effect of ∼10 μAm and ∼50 nAm, respectively. Hence, the DC effect appears to be detectable in vivo by current ULF-NMR technology.

  18. Current perspectives on the health risks associated with the consumption of advanced glycation end products: recommendations for dietary management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palimeri S

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sotiria Palimeri,* Eleni Palioura,* Evanthia Diamanti-KandarakisEndocrine Unit, Medical School University of Athens, Athens, Greece*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Advanced glycation end products (AGEs constitute a complex group of compounds produced endogenously during the aging process and under conditions of hyperglycemia and oxidative stress. AGEs also have an emerging exogenous origin. Cigarette smoke and diet are the two main exogenous sources of AGEs (glycotoxins. Modern Western diets are rich in AGEs which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several metabolic and degenerative disorders. Accumulating evidence underlies the beneficial effect of the dietary restriction of AGEs not only in animal studies but also in patients with diabetic complications and metabolic diseases. This article reviews the evidence linking dietary glycotoxins to several disorders from diabetic complications and renal failure to liver dysfunction, female reproduction, eye and cognitive disorders as well as cancer. Furthermore, strategies for AGE reduction are discussed with a focus on dietary modification.Keywords: AGEs, dietary glycotoxins, dietary restriction, PCOS, MSR-1, RAGE

  19. Clinical potential of nintedanib for the second-line treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rothschild SI

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sacha I Rothschild Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland Abstract: The therapeutic landscape in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is changing. The description of molecular alterations leading to NSCLC carcinogenesis and progression (so-called oncogenic driver mutations and the development of targeted agents interfering with the tumor-promoting intracellular signaling pathways have improved the outcome for many patients with advanced/metastatic NSCLC. However, many patients with stage IV NSCLC do not have one of the targetable predictive biomarkers, and are therefore in need of classical chemotherapy. This especially applies to squamous cell cancer. A platinum-based doublet chemotherapy is the standard of care for patients with stage IV NSCLC. As second-line therapies, docetaxel, pemetrexed, and the EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitor erlotinib have demonstrated benefit in Phase III randomized trials. Recently, the addition of the angiokinase inhibitor nintedanib to docetaxel has proven efficacious, and is a new treatment option in the second-line setting. Preclinical and clinical data of nintedanib for the treatment of lung cancer patients are reviewed here. Keywords: nintedanib, lung cancer, angiokinase inhibitor, VEGFR, PDGF, FGFR

  20. Pushing CT and MR Imaging to the Molecular Level for Studying the “Omics”: Current Challenges and Advancements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsuan-Ming Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past decade, medical imaging has made the transition from anatomical imaging to functional and even molecular imaging. Such transition provides a great opportunity to begin the integration of imaging data and various levels of biological data. In particular, the integration of imaging data and multiomics data such as genomics, metabolomics, proteomics, and pharmacogenomics may open new avenues for predictive, preventive, and personalized medicine. However, to promote imaging-omics integration, the practical challenge of imaging techniques should be addressed. In this paper, we describe key challenges in two imaging techniques: computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and then review existing technological advancements. Despite the fact that CT and MRI have different principles of image formation, both imaging techniques can provide high-resolution anatomical images while playing a more and more important role in providing molecular information. Such imaging techniques that enable single modality to image both the detailed anatomy and function of tissues and organs of the body will be beneficial in the imaging-omics field.

  1. Investigation on current situation of advanced schistosomiasis in Tongcheng City, Anhui Province%2010年桐城市晚期血吸虫病现状调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江龙志; 徐辉; 魏强

    2012-01-01

    2010年对桐城市晚期血吸虫病(晚血)分布现状进行调查,共确诊205例晚血,全市推算患病率为0.027%.病例主要分布在传播阻断村(67.32%),50~岁年龄组患者占97.07%,文盲和小学文化程度者占95.61%,92.20%的患者接受过病原学治疗.%This paper describes the investigation on the current situation and characteristics of advanced schistosomiasis in Tongcheng City,Anhui Province. There were 205 cases of advanced schislosomiasis with the estimated prevalence of 0.027% in the city. Most of advance schistosomiasis patients (67.32%) distributed in schistosomiasis transmission interrupted areas,97.07% of them were over 50 years old,95.61% of them were illiteracy and persons with low education level (primary school education),and 92.20% of them received anti-schistosomiasis treatment.

  2. Current advances in the diagnosis and treatment for abdominal trauma%腹部创伤的诊治进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田伏洲; 程龙

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal trauma is one of the most commonest events in warfare and other contingencies . There are many examining means for the diagnosis of abdominal trauma with the development of new advanced e -quipment.However,fast examination and diagnosis is critical for saving the lives of patients .During the last two decades ,we have made great progress in the appropriate application of preserved therapy ,minimally invasive therapy and damage control surgery in the treatment for abdominal trauma .These treatments are based on the conception that optimal treatment effectiveness should be obtained with minimal secondary attack .%腹部创伤是战时及意外事故中最常发生的事件之一。尽管随着新设备、新技术的开发应用,腹部创伤的检查手段增多,但利用体格检查和简单设备实现快速检诊仍是影响伤者预后甚至挽救生命的关键。在过去20年,非手术治疗、微创治疗、损伤控制外科技术在腹部创伤中的合理应用取得了重要进展。但无论是非手术治疗,还是微创治疗,还是损伤控制外科技术,其宗旨就是在保证伤者血液动力学稳定的基础上,以最小的二次创伤获得最佳的治疗效果。

  3. Top pair production cross section at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV and a search for v + a current in top quark decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera, S.; /Valencia U., IFIC

    2006-09-01

    Possible effects from physics beyond the Standard Model have been investigated in top quark decays from a data sample enriched in t{bar t} events produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with an integrated luminosity of approximately 700 pb{sup -1} and collected with the CDF II detector. The combined t{bar t} production cross section measurement 7.3 {+-} 0.9 pb agrees with the QCD NLO predictions: 6.7 {+-} 0.8 pb assuming m{sub top} = 175 GeV/c{sup 2}. The fraction of the V + A current in top quark decay, f{sub V+A}, is determined using the invariant mass of the charged lepton and the bottom quark jet in the decay chain t {yields} Wb {yields} {ell}{nu}b (where {ell} = e or {mu}). The measured value f{sub V+A} = - 0.06 {+-} 0.25 under the assumption m{sub top} = 175 GeV/c{sup 2} is in agreement with the Standard Model. They set an upper limit on f{sub V+A} of 0.29 at the 95% confidence level.

  4. Current data of targeted therapies for the treatment of triple-negative advanced breast cancer: empiricism or evidence-based?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrelli, Fausto; Cabiddu, Mary; Ghilardi, Mara; Barni, Sandro

    2009-10-01

    Approximately 10 - 15% of breast carcinomas (BCs) are known to be 'triple-negative (TN) receptor' (i.e., not expressing ER or PR and not exhibiting overexpression and/or gene amplification of HER2-neu). Triple-negative BCs comprise approximately 85% of all basal-type tumours. Classically, basal-like BCs have been characterised by low expression of ER, PR, and HER2 neu and high expression of CK5, CK14, caveolin-1, CAIX, p63, and EGFR (HER1), which reflects the mammary gland basal/myoepithelial cell component. Although there is no standard first-line chemotherapy regimen for metastatic TN BCs, anthracycline- and taxane-containing regimens are acceptable treatments. A large number of agents, including DNA-damaging agents, EGFR inhibitors, antiangiogenic agents and novel taxane formulations are currently being tested in clinical trials for first-line and pretreated patients. Limited experiences with platinum salts, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, cetuximab, bevacizumab and ixabepilone have been published in recent years and will be reported. Novel immunohistochemistry analysis for identification of basal like/TN phenotype are awaited to correctly select this population. The clinical trials investigating new agents have to be designed for a specific (and possibly large) subset of patients with BC. In the future, a gene array platform with greater sensitivity for distinguishing the various BC subtypes, as well as having the power to predict the molecular biology of the disease, will be an indispensible tool for treatment selection. Currently, treatment of TN BC is more empirical than evidence-based. The cornerstone of treatment is chemotherapy, but in the near future, novel target agents will emerge as possible partners.

  5. Advancing current approaches to disease management evaluation: capitalizing on heterogeneity to understand what works and for whom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elissen, Arianne M J; Adams, John L; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke; Duimel-Peeters, Inge G P; Spreeuwenberg, Cor; Linden, Ariel; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M

    2013-03-14

    Evaluating large-scale disease management interventions implemented in actual health care settings is a complex undertaking for which universally accepted methods do not exist. Fundamental issues, such as a lack of control patients and limited generalizability, hamper the use of the 'gold-standard' randomized controlled trial, while methodological shortcomings restrict the value of observational designs. Advancing methods for disease management evaluation in practice is pivotal to learn more about the impact of population-wide approaches. Methods must account for the presence of heterogeneity in effects, which necessitates a more granular assessment of outcomes. This paper introduces multilevel regression methods as valuable techniques to evaluate 'real-world' disease management approaches in a manner that produces meaningful findings for everyday practice. In a worked example, these methods are applied to retrospectively gathered routine health care data covering a cohort of 105,056 diabetes patients who receive disease management for type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Netherlands. Multivariable, multilevel regression models are fitted to identify trends in clinical outcomes and correct for differences in characteristics of patients (age, disease duration, health status, diabetes complications, smoking status) and the intervention (measurement frequency and range, length of follow-up). After a median one year follow-up, the Dutch disease management approach was associated with small average improvements in systolic blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein, while a slight deterioration occurred in glycated hemoglobin. Differential findings suggest that patients with poorly controlled diabetes tend to benefit most from disease management in terms of improved clinical measures. Additionally, a greater measurement frequency was associated with better outcomes, while longer length of follow-up was accompanied by less positive results. Despite concerted efforts to adjust

  6. Money income and poverty status in the United States: 1987 (advance data from the March 1988 Current Population Survey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welniak, E J; Littman, M S

    1988-08-01

    This report presents 1987 data on the income and poverty status of persons and families in the US. Data were drawn from the March 1988 Current Population Survey that studied 60,000 households nationwide. Income and poverty estimates in this report are based solely on money income before taxes and exclude noncash benefits such as food stamps, Medicare, medicaid, public housing, and other employer-provided fringe benefits. Some highlights of the data follow. 1) In 1987, median family income was $30,850, a 1% increase from 1986. This is the 5th consecutive year this figure has increased. 2) Median income of families with a female householder, no husband present, increased from $14,146 in 1986 to $14,620 in 1987, a 3.4% increase; this is the 2nd significant annual increase since 1979. 3) Real per capita income increased to $12,290 in 1987, a 1.6% increase over 1986. 4) The 32.5% of persons below the poverty level stayed at about the same number from 1986 to 1987. The poverty rate also stayed at about the same level, 13.6% in 1986 and 13.5% in 1987. 5) Both the number of poor and the poverty rate have declined since 1983 but remain above their recent low-point in 1978. 6) In 1987, 10.5% of Whites were in poverty, a decrease of .5% from 1986; 33.1% of Blacks were in poverty, an increase of 2%. 7) The Hispanic poverty rate showed no significant change, while the number in poverty increased by 353,000. 8) The poverty rate among persons living on farms was 12.6% in 1987, a decline of 7%.

  7. Expression and actions of GnIH and its orthologs in vertebrates: Current status and advanced knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Rahim; Shen, Yi; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Huang, Ke; Fu, Jun-Fen; Wahab, Fazal; Shahab, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    The physiology of reproduction is very complex and is regulated by multiple factors, including a number of hypothalamic neuropeptides. In last few decades, various neuropeptides have been discovered to be involved in stimulation or inhibition of reproduction. In 2000, Tsutsui and colleagues uncovered gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), a neuropeptide generating inhibitory drive to the reproductive axis, in the brain of Coturnix quail. Afterward, GnIH orthologs were discovered in other vertebrates from fish to mammals including human. In these vertebrates, all the discovered GnIH and its ortholgs have LPXRFamide (X=L or Q) sequence at C-terminus. GnIH orthologs of mammals and primates are also termed as RFamide-related peptide (RFRP)-1 and -3 that too have an LPXRFamide (X=L or Q) motif at their C-terminus. GnIH and its orthologs form a member of the RFamide peptide family. GnIH signals via its canonical G protein coupled receptor 147 (GPR147). Both GnIH and GPR147 are expressed in hypothalamus and other brain regions. Besides actions through the hypothalamic GnRH and kisspeptinergic neurons, GnIH-GPR147 signaling exerts inhibitory effect on the reproductive axis via pituitary gonadotropes and directly at gonadal level. Various factors including availability and quality of food, photoperiod, temperature, social interaction, various stresses and some diseases modulate GnIH-GPR147 signaling. In this review, we have discussed expression and actions of GnIH and its orthologs in vertebrates. Special emphasis is given on the role of GnIH-GPR147 signaling pathway in the regulation of reproduction. We have also reviewed and discussed currently available literature on the participation of GnIH-GPR147 signaling pathway in the stress modulation of reproduction.

  8. Current knowledge, attitude and behaviour of hand and food hygiene in a developed residential community of Singapore: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Junxiong; Chua, Shao Wei Jonathan Lumen; Hsu, Liyang

    2015-06-21

    Diarrhoea incidence has been increasing progressively over the past years in developed countries, including Singapore, despite the accessibility and availability to clean water, well-established sanitation infrastructures and regular hygiene promotion. The aim of this study is to determine the current knowledge, attitude and behaviour of hand and food hygiene, and the potential risk factors of diarrhoea in a residential community of Singapore. A cross-sectional study was conducted within a residential area in the west of Singapore from June to August 2013. A total of 1,156 household units were randomly sampled and invited to participate in an interviewer-assisted survey using standardised questionnaires. Descriptive, univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using descriptive statistics, Fisher's Exact test and multivariate logistic regression modelling, respectively. R program was used for all statistical analysis. All tests were conducted at 5% level of significance with 95% confidence intervals (CI) reported where applicable. A total of 240 units (20.8%) consented and responded to the survey invitation. About 77% of the expected knowledge and attitude were observed in at least 80% of the participants, compared to only about 31% of the expected behaviours and practises. Being single [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 2.29; 95% CI = 1.16-4.48], having flu in the past six month (AOR = 3.24; 95% CI = 1.74-6.06), preferred self-medication (AOR = 2.07; 95% CI = 1.06-4.12) were risk factors of diarrhoea. Washing hands with water before attending to children or sick persons (AOR = 0.30; 95% CI = 0.11-0.82), washing hands with water (AOR = 0.16; 95% CI = 0.05-0.45) and water with soap (AOR = 0.29; 95% CI = 0.12-0.72) after attending to children or sick persons, and hand washing between 30 s to a minute (AOR = 0.44; 95% CI = 0.20-0.90) were protective factors against diarrhoea. Good knowledge and attitude of the

  9. Current worldwide nuclear cardiology practices and radiation exposure: results from the 65 country IAEA Nuclear Cardiology Protocols Cross-Sectional Study (INCAPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Andrew J.; Pascual, Thomas N. B.; Mercuri, Mathew; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Vitola, João V.; Mahmarian, John J.; Better, Nathan; Bouyoucef, Salah E.; Hee-Seung Bom, Henry; Lele, Vikram; Magboo, V. Peter C.; Alexánderson, Erick; Allam, Adel H.; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H.; Flotats, Albert; Jerome, Scott; Kaufmann, Philipp A.; Luxenburg, Osnat; Shaw, Leslee J.; Underwood, S. Richard; Rehani, Madan M.; Kashyap, Ravi; Paez, Diana; Dondi, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Aims To characterize patient radiation doses from nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and the use of radiation-optimizing ‘best practices’ worldwide, and to evaluate the relationship between laboratory use of best practices and patient radiation dose. Methods and results We conducted an observational cross-sectional study of protocols used for all 7911 MPI studies performed in 308 nuclear cardiology laboratories in 65 countries for a single week in March–April 2013. Eight ‘best practices’ relating to radiation exposure were identified a priori by an expert committee, and a radiation-related quality index (QI) devised indicating the number of best practices used by a laboratory. Patient radiation effective dose (ED) ranged between 0.8 and 35.6 mSv (median 10.0 mSv). Average laboratory ED ranged from 2.2 to 24.4 mSv (median 10.4 mSv); only 91 (30%) laboratories achieved the median ED ≤ 9 mSv recommended by guidelines. Laboratory QIs ranged from 2 to 8 (median 5). Both ED and QI differed significantly between laboratories, countries, and world regions. The lowest median ED (8.0 mSv), in Europe, coincided with high best-practice adherence (mean laboratory QI 6.2). The highest doses (median 12.1 mSv) and low QI (4.9) occurred in Latin America. In hierarchical regression modelling, patients undergoing MPI at laboratories following more ‘best practices’ had lower EDs. Conclusion Marked worldwide variation exists in radiation safety practices pertaining to MPI, with targeted EDs currently achieved in a minority of laboratories. The significant relationship between best-practice implementation and lower doses indicates numerous opportunities to reduce radiation exposure from MPI globally. PMID:25898845

  10. Risk factors associated with current intimate partner violence at individual and relationship levels: a cross-sectional study among married rural migrant women in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Xiaowen; Lou, Chaohua

    2017-04-05

    To identify individual and relationship risk factors associated with current intimate partner violence (IPV) against married rural migrant women in Shanghai, China. Cross-sectional survey. Two subdistricts of one administrative district, Shanghai, China. A total of 958 married rural migrant women of reproductive age were selected using a community-based two-stage cluster sampling method in April and May of 2010. Data were collected using a modified questionnaire based on an instrument from the WHO Multi-country Study on Women's Health and Domestic Violence against Women. Adjusted odds ratio (AOR) and 95% CI from a multivariable logistic regression model were estimated to identify individual and relationship risk factors associated with different types of violence in the past 12 months. Women's low financial autonomy was associated with all types of violence (AORs ranged from 1.98 to 7.89, p6, pWomen's low financial autonomy and unstable employment status at an individual level, quarrelling with husband and history of husband beaten by family members at a relationship level were identified as the most robust risk factors for IPV among married rural migrant women. Efforts to prevent IPV among this population should be made to involve both women and their husbands, with a focus on improving financial autonomy and employment status of women, promoting problem-solving and interaction skills of the couples and changing their knowledge and attitudes towards gender norms and IPV. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. An Official American Thoracic Society Research Statement: Current Challenges Facing Research and Therapeutic Advances in Airway Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Y S; Halayko, Andrew J; Gosens, Reinoud; Panettieri, Reynold A; Camoretti-Mercado, Blanca; Penn, Raymond B

    2017-01-15

    Airway remodeling (AR) is a prominent feature of asthma and other obstructive lung diseases that is minimally affected by current treatments. The goals of this Official American Thoracic Society (ATS) Research Statement are to discuss the scientific, technological, economic, and regulatory issues that deter progress of AR research and development of therapeutics targeting AR and to propose approaches and solutions to these specific problems. This Statement is not intended to provide clinical practice recommendations on any disease in which AR is observed and/or plays a role. An international multidisciplinary group from within academia, industry, and the National Institutes of Health, with expertise in multimodal approaches to the study of airway structure and function, pulmonary research and clinical practice in obstructive lung disease, and drug discovery platforms was invited to participate in one internet-based and one face-to-face meeting to address the above-stated goals. Although the majority of the analysis related to AR was in asthma, AR in other diseases was also discussed and considered in the recommendations. A literature search of PubMed was performed to support conclusions. The search was not a systematic review of the evidence. Multiple conceptual, logistical, economic, and regulatory deterrents were identified that limit the performance of AR research and impede accelerated, intensive development of AR-focused therapeutics. Complementary solutions that leverage expertise of academia and industry were proposed to address them. To date, numerous factors related to the intrinsic difficulty in performing AR research, and economic forces that are disincentives for the pursuit of AR treatments, have thwarted the ability to understand AR pathology and mechanisms and to address it clinically. This ATS Research Statement identifies potential solutions for each of these factors and emphasizes the importance of educating the global research community as to the

  12. Development of inherent technologies for advanced PWR core - A study on the current status and the construction feasibility of critical facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Won Sik; Yang, Hyun Seok [Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea); Kim, Chang Hyo; Shim, Hyung Jin [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-03-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the appropriateness of constructing critical facilities in our country and to decide a course of constructing them if necessary by surveying the status and utilization of foreign facilities and by investigating the demand for domestic facilities. We investigated the status and the utilization of foreign critical facilities through literature survey and personal visitation. In our judgement, critical facilities are necessary for developing the advanced reactors and fuels which are being studied as parts of the Nuclear R and D Program by MOST. Considering the construction cost and the current state of domestic economy, however, it is unjustifiable to build three different types of critical facilities (the light water, the heavy water, and the fast critical facility). It appears to be reasonable to build a light water critical, considering the construction cost, degree of utilization, and other constraints. (author). 89 refs., 134 figs., 64 tabs.

  13. Research and Development of an Advanced Personal Load Carriage Measurement System: Phase 4. Section A: Executive Summary - Measurement Systems for Assessment of Personal Load Carriage Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-12-01

    SECTION F: Development of Calibration Jig for Tekscan ™ System ................................. 11 2.3 Clothe the Soldier Contracts...SECTION F: Development of Calibration Jig for Tekscan ™ System A local calibrator jig capable of applying known levels of load to known locations in

  14. Advances in Electrical Current Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    temperature rise at sliding electrical contacts ....................... 29 E. Rabinowicz (Cambridge, MA, U.S.A.) Thermal stability in graphite contacts...I. IR. McNab, J. L. Johnson, P. Reichner, J. J. Schreurs, P. K. Lee and E. Rabinowicz for * helpful discussions, the Westinghouse Research and...to express their appreciation to I. R, McNab, J. L. Johnson, P. Reichner, J. J. Schreurs, P. K. Lee and E. Rabinowicz forIhelpful discussions, the

  15. Current Capabilities at SNL for the Integration of Small Modular Reactors onto Smart Microgrids Using Sandia's Smart Microgrid Technology High Performance Computing and Advanced Manufacturing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Salvador B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Smart grids are a crucial component for enabling the nation’s future energy needs, as part of a modernization effort led by the Department of Energy. Smart grids and smart microgrids are being considered in niche applications, and as part of a comprehensive energy strategy to help manage the nation’s growing energy demands, for critical infrastructures, military installations, small rural communities, and large populations with limited water supplies. As part of a far-reaching strategic initiative, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) presents herein a unique, three-pronged approach to integrate small modular reactors (SMRs) into microgrids, with the goal of providing economically-competitive, reliable, and secure energy to meet the nation’s needs. SNL’s triad methodology involves an innovative blend of smart microgrid technology, high performance computing (HPC), and advanced manufacturing (AM). In this report, Sandia’s current capabilities in those areas are summarized, as well as paths forward that will enable DOE to achieve its energy goals. In the area of smart grid/microgrid technology, Sandia’s current computational capabilities can model the entire grid, including temporal aspects and cyber security issues. Our tools include system development, integration, testing and evaluation, monitoring, and sustainment.

  16. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank-Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 3: Articular Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotnicki, Jason P; Geeslin, Andrew G; Murray, Iain R; Petrigliano, Frank A; LaPrade, Robert F; Mann, Barton J; Musahl, Volker

    2016-04-01

    Focal chondral defects of the articular surface are a common occurrence in the field of orthopaedics. These isolated cartilage injuries, if not repaired surgically with restoration of articular congruency, may have a high rate of progression to posttraumatic osteoarthritis, resulting in significant morbidity and loss of function in the young, active patient. Both isolated and global joint disease are a difficult entity to treat in the clinical setting given the high amount of stress on weightbearing joints and the limited healing potential of native articular cartilage. Recently, clinical interest has focused on the use of biologically active compounds and surgical techniques to regenerate native cartilage to the articular surface, with the goal of restoring normal joint health and overall function. This article presents a review of the current biologic therapies, as discussed at the 2015 American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) Biologics Think Tank, that are used in the treatment of focal cartilage deficiencies. For each of these emerging therapies, the theories for application, the present clinical evidence, and specific areas for future research are explored, with focus on the barriers currently faced by clinicians in advancing the success of these therapies in the clinical setting.

  17. Foreign-trained dentists in advanced education in prosthodontics programs in the United States: demographics, perspectives on current training, and future goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sowygh, Zeyad H; Sukotjo, Cortino

    2011-02-01

    This study investigated the perspectives of foreign-trained dentists (FTDs) in comparison with US-trained Dentists (USTDs) in Advanced Education in Prosthodontics (AEP) programs on their current clinical training and future goals. This study was conducted by analyzing data from previously published literature. When appropriate, Chi-square statistical analysis was conducted to determine the influence of where the AEP residents earned their DMD/DDS degree (FTDs/USTDs) on all variables. Only results that yielded significant differences were discussed. A majority of both FTDs and USTDs were male. Most USTDs were married, while most FTDs were single. Most FTDs were not US citizens and most originated from Asia, followed by the Middle East, South America, and Europe. Significantly more FTDs had higher ranks in their dental schools, had more advanced degrees, and spent more time practicing before entering the AEP programs. In selecting AEP programs, FTDs placed significantly higher values on a program's reputation and research opportunities. During their AEP training, FTDs paid significantly higher tuition and received lower stipends, but obtained more financial support from families. On the other hand, USTDs received significantly more financial aid and earned income from part-time work, but had significantly higher total educational debts. USTDs showed a significantly higher interest in becoming a student member of the American College of Prosthodontists and participated actively in prosthodontics organizations. USTDs were more interested in becoming maxillofacial prosthodontists, while FTDs were more interested in pursuing academic careers. FTDs differed from USTDs in several ways. Because of their interests in academics and research, FTDs may potentially have a positive impact on the development of the prosthodontics discipline. This information may be beneficial for AEP program directors in accommodating the needs of FTDs, and for FTDs in better preparing for their

  18. Current status of the global change observation mission - water SHIZUKU (GCOM-W) and the advanced microwave scanning radiometer 2 (AMSR2) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Takashi; Kachi, Misako; Kasahara, Marehito

    2016-10-01

    Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) launched the Global Change Observation Mission - Water (GCOM-W) or "SHIZUKU" in 18 May 2012 (JST) from JAXA's Tanegashima Space Center. The GCOM-W satellite joins to NASA's A-train orbit since June 2012, and its observation is ongoing. The GCOM-W satellite carries the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2). The AMSR2 is a multi-frequency, total-power microwave radiometer system with dual polarization channels for all frequency bands, and successor microwave radiometer to the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) loaded on the NASA's Aqua satellite. The AMSR-E kept observation in the slower rotation speed (2 rotations per minute) for cross-calibration with AMSR2 since December 2012, its operation ended in December 2015. The AMSR2 is designed almost similarly as the AMSR-E. The AMSR2 has a conical scanning system with large-size offset parabolic antenna, a feed horn cluster to realize multi-frequency observation, and an external calibration system with two temperature standards. However, some important improvements are made. For example, the main reflector size of the AMSR2 is expanded to 2.0 m to observe the Earth's surface in higher spatial resolution, and 7.3-GHz channel is newly added to detect radio frequency interferences at 6.9 GHz. In this paper, we present a recent topic for the AMSR2 (i.e., RFI detection performances) and the current operation status of the AMSR2.

  19. The Process of Cessation Among Current Tobacco Smokers: A Cross-Sectional Data Analysis From 21 Countries, Global Adult Tobacco Survey, 2009-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbulo, Lazarous; Palipudi, Krishna M; Nelson-Blutcher, Glenda; Murty, Komanduri S; Asma, Samira

    2015-09-17

    We analyzed data from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) from 21 countries to categorize smokers by stages of cessation and highlight interventions that could be tailored to each stage. GATS is a nationally representative household survey that measures tobacco use and other key indicators by using a standardized protocol. The distribution of smokers into precontemplation, contemplation, and preparation stages varied by country. Using the stages of change model, each country can design and implement effective interventions suitable to its cultural, social, and economic situations to help smokers advance successfully through the stages of cessation.

  20. 田鼠巴贝虫病的诊断技术研究进展%Current advances in detecting techniques for Babesia microti infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张加; 陈家旭

    2013-01-01

    田鼠巴贝虫是引起人兽共患巴贝虫病的主要病原体之一.在全球散发的人巴贝虫病例报道中时常诊断出该病原体的存在.因此,由该病原体引起的人巴贝虫病逐渐引起了人们的重视,促进了对田鼠巴贝虫病的诊断研究.本文就目前国内外关于田鼠巴贝虫病的病原、分子生物学和免疫学诊断技术的最新进展做一综述.%Babesia microti,which is one of the mainly causative agents o[zoonotic babesiosis,has constantly been diagnosed in the sporadic case reports around the world.Human babesiosis,due to this pathogen,is gaining increased attention that facilitates the research in the detection of Babesia microti infection.This review will presents the current advances in detecting techniques for Babesia microti infection,including etiological techniques,molecular biological techniques and immunological techniques.

  1. Establishing an accurate diagnosis of a parotid lump: evaluation of the current biopsy methods - fine needle aspiration cytology, ultrasound-guided core biopsy, and intraoperative frozen section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, D C; Skelton, E; Moody, A B

    2015-09-01

    The optimum technique for histological confirmation of the nature of a parotid mass remains controversial. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC), which has traditionally been used, is associated with high non-diagnostic and false negative rates, and ultrasound (US)-guided core biopsy and frozen section have been explored as alternatives. US-guided core biopsy is more invasive than FNAC, but is safe, well-tolerated, and associated with improved diagnostic performance. Although frozen section offers better specificity than FNAC, it has a number of important drawbacks and cannot be considered as a primary diagnostic tool. US-guided core biopsy should be considered as the initial diagnostic technique of choice, and in units where the accuracy of FNAC is good it can be used when FNAC is equivocal or non-diagnostic. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Association between environmental factors and current asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema symptoms in school-aged children from Oropeza Province – Bolivia: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Solis-Soto, Maria Teresa; Patino, Armando; Nowak, Dennis; Radon, Katja

    2013-01-01

    Background: In recent years, the prevalence of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema symptoms in childhood has considerably increased in developing countries including Bolivia, possibly due to changes in lifestyle, environmental and domestic factors. This study aimed to assess the association between environmental factors and asthma, rhinoconjuctivitis and eczema symptoms in school-aged children from Oropeza Province in Chuquisaca, Bolivia. Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed in 2...

  3. ANSL-V: ENDF/B-V based multigroup cross-section libraries for Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor studies. Supplement 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, R.Q.; Renier, J.P.; Bucholz, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    The original ANSL-V cross-section libraries (ORNL-6618) were developed over a period of several years for the physics analysis of the ANS reactor, with little thought toward including the materials commonly needed for shielding applications. Materials commonly used for shielding applications include calcium barium, sulfur, phosphorous, and bismuth. These materials, as well as {sup 6}Li, {sup 7}Li, and the naturally occurring isotopes of hafnium, have been added to the ANSL-V libraries. The gamma-ray production and gamma-ray interaction cross sections were completely regenerated for the ANSL-V 99n/44g library which did not exist previously. The MALOCS module was used to collapse the 99n/44g coupled library to the 39n/44g broad- group library. COMET was used to renormalize the two-dimensional (2- D) neutron matrix sums to agree with the one-dimensional (1-D) averaged values. The FRESH module was used to adjust the thermal scattering matrices on the 99n/44g and 39n/44g ANSL-V libraries. PERFUME was used to correct the original XLACS Legendre polynomial fits to produce acceptable distributions. The final ANSL-V 99n/44g and 39n/44g cross-section libraries were both checked by running RADE. The AIM module was used to convert the master cross-section libraries from binary coded decimal to binary format (or vice versa).

  4. ANSL-V: ENDF/B-V based multigroup cross-section libraries for Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor studies. Supplement 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, R.Q.; Renier, J.P.; Bucholz, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    The original ANSL-V cross-section libraries (ORNL-6618) were developed over a period of several years for the physics analysis of the ANS reactor, with little thought toward including the materials commonly needed for shielding applications. Materials commonly used for shielding applications include calcium barium, sulfur, phosphorous, and bismuth. These materials, as well as {sup 6}Li, {sup 7}Li, and the naturally occurring isotopes of hafnium, have been added to the ANSL-V libraries. The gamma-ray production and gamma-ray interaction cross sections were completely regenerated for the ANSL-V 99n/44g library which did not exist previously. The MALOCS module was used to collapse the 99n/44g coupled library to the 39n/44g broad- group library. COMET was used to renormalize the two-dimensional (2- D) neutron matrix sums to agree with the one-dimensional (1-D) averaged values. The FRESH module was used to adjust the thermal scattering matrices on the 99n/44g and 39n/44g ANSL-V libraries. PERFUME was used to correct the original XLACS Legendre polynomial fits to produce acceptable distributions. The final ANSL-V 99n/44g and 39n/44g cross-section libraries were both checked by running RADE. The AIM module was used to convert the master cross-section libraries from binary coded decimal to binary format (or vice versa).

  5. A measurement of the muon neutrino charged current quasielastic-like cross section on a hydrocarbon target and final state interaction effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, Tammy [Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Presented is the analysis of the μ charged-current quasielastic-like interaction with a polystyrene (CH or hydrocarbon) target in the MINER A experiment, which was exposed to a neutrino beam that peaked at 3.5 GeV.

  6. Experimental Section: On the magnetic field distribution generated by a dipolar current source situated in a realistically shaped compartment model of the head

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijs, J.W.H.; Bosch, F.G.C.; Peters, M.J.; Lopes da silva, F.H.

    1987-01-01

    The magnetic field distribution around the head is simulated using a realistically shaped compartment model of the head. The model is based on magnetic resonance images. The 3 compartments describe the brain, the skull and the scalp. The source is represented by a current dipole situated in the

  7. Waves, currents and sea level variations along the Letipea - Sillamäe coastal section of the southern Gulf of Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ülo Suursaar

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Variations in the hydrodynamic conditions were studied on the basis of 336 days of measurements with a Doppler current profiler. With wave data as a calibration reference, a semi-empirical hindcast of wave parameters is presented in the fetch-limited near-shore area for the period 1966-2008. A resultant 4-6 cm s-1 westward current dominated along the coast. Occasional fast sub-surface westward currents under modest wind forcing, as well as asymmetrical vertical profiles for westward and eastward currents indicated the influence of upwelling-related baroclinic coastal jets. The average frequency of upwelling was estimated at 17%; some of the events were identified in near-homothermic winter conditions on the basis of salinity and multi-layer flow records. While the mean sea level trend at Narva-Jõesuu roughly approximated the global estimates for 1899-2009, the annual maximum sea level increase was 5-8 mm yr-1. Both mean and maximum wave heights declined as a result of decreasing winds from the north.

  8. Advance payments

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2003-01-01

    Administrative Circular N 8 makes provision for the granting of advance payments, repayable in several monthly instalments, by the Organization to the members of its personnel. Members of the personnel are reminded that these advances are only authorized in exceptional circumstances and at the discretion of the Director-General. In view of the current financial situation of the Organization, and in particular the loans it will have to incur, the Directorate has decided to restrict the granting of such advances to exceptional or unforeseen circumstances entailing heavy expenditure and more specifically those pertaining to social issues. Human Resources Division Tel. 73962

  9. ADVANCE PAYMENTS

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    Administrative Circular Nº 8 makes provision for the granting of advance payments, repayable in several monthly instalments, by the Organization to the members of its personnel. Members of the personnel are reminded that these advances are only authorized in exceptional circumstances and at the discretion of the Director-General. In view of the current financial situation of the Organization, and in particular the loans it will have to incur, the Directorate has decided to restrict the granting of such advances to exceptional or unforeseen circumstances entailing heavy expenditure and more specifically those pertaining to social issues. Human Resources Division Tel. 73962

  10. The study of the dependency of critical current density on cross section of sample in Bi1.6Pb0.4Sr2Ca2Cu3Oy and YBa2Cu3O7-& delta ceramic superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Zargar Shoushtari

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available  In this paper, the effect of the cross-section on the critical current density (Jc of a sample in ceramic superconductors YBa2Cu3O7-­δ (YBCO and Bi1.6Pb0.4Sr2Ca2cu3Oy (BPSCCO has been studied. Five orthorhombic bar samples of YBCO with cross-sections of 6.25, 7.67, 9.25, 11.76, 14.67 mm2­ and also five orthorhombic bar samples of BPSCCO with cross-section of 6.4, 9.01, 11.88, 13.86, 14.98 mm2­ with the same synthesis conditions by the solid state reaction method were prepared. After the preparation of the samples, the Meissner effect, the critical temperature (Tc, and the critical current density (Jc measurements, XRD and SEM have been done on the samples. The results of XRD show that the dominant phase in YBCO and BPSCCO are 123 and 2223, respectively. The results of Jc measurements in 77 K show that in both superconductors, the Jc decreases with increasing of cross-section (A. The type of dissipation obeys a power law with the relation . For a given cross-section, Jc of the BPSCCO sample is smaller than the YBCO sample.

  11. Current treatment status in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis and outcome of long term follow-up at advanced age:a Chinese single center study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI Han-jun; YUAN Jin-qing; CHEN Jue; LIU Hai-bo; YOU Shi-jie; GAO Run-lin; WU Yong-jian; YANG Yue-jin; XU Bo; CHEN Ji-lin; QIAO Shu-bin; LI Jian-jun; QIN Xue-wen; YAO Min

    2011-01-01

    Background Surgical aortic valve replacement is the standard treatment for patients with severe aortic stenosis, but some registries have indicated that 30% to 60% of these patients are not treated surgically, usually due to advanced age and/or comorbidities. This single center study in China investigated the current treatment status in the patients with severe aortic stenosis and evaluated the long term clinical outcome in advanced age patients whether or not undergoing aortic valve replacement.Methods Clinical data of 867 consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis between January 2000 and December 2006 were retrospectively analyzed. The patients ≥65 years old were followed up by telephone or information from medical records. The primary end-point was all-cause mortality.Results The patients' average age was (52±19) years (range, 1-91 years), and 34% were women. The percentages of the patients aged <15 years, between 15 and 34 years, between 35 and 54 years, between 55 and 64 years, between 65 and 74 years, and ≥75 years who underwent surgical aortic valve replacement were 82.3%, 87.2%, 88.8%, 78.2%,65.3% and 22.2% respectively. In the patients (n=256) ≥65 years old, 43.4% had New York Heart Association class Ⅲ and Ⅳ symptoms, 39.1% had hypertension, 33.2% had coronary heart disease, and 3.1% had stroke. In the patients not undergoing aortic valve replacement, 1.6% had renal insufficiency, 4.7% had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease,2.0% had critical hematopathy, and 0.4% had mammary cancer. A total of 186 (72.7%) patients finished the follow-up,and the average duration of the follow-up was (60±26) months. In the patients between 65 and 74 years old, the total deaths and cardiac deaths in the patients undergoing aortic valve replacement decreased significantly compared with those with conservative treatment (10.3% vs. 53.7%, P<0.001 and 6.3% vs. 50.7%, P<0.001). Similarly, in the patients ≥75

  12. Cesarean Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Cesarean Sections (C-Sections) KidsHealth > For Parents > Cesarean Sections (C-Sections) A A A What's in this ... babies in the United States are delivered via cesarean section (C-section). Even if you're envisioning a ...

  13. 'Sterility Testing of Blood Components and Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products' (Munich, April 29, 2010) Organized by the DGTI Section 'Safety in Hemotherapy' - Meeting Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Beate; Grabein, Beatrice

    2011-10-01

    Neither screening method completely detects all clinically relevant bacterial contaminations. The effect of sampling time and volume as well as standardization of the assay applied has also to be taken into account. Therefore, minimizing the risk of contamination during manufacture by measures such as donor selection, skin disinfection, division, and processing within closed systems remains crucial. In this context new concepts in sterility testing, especially with instable advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), are needed as well as reassessment of pathogen inactivation techniques. At present hemovigilance data indicate that shortening the shelf life of platelet concentrates as introduced in Germany 2008 reduced the risk of transfusion-transmitted bacterial infections to the same extent as bacterial screening as done in Canada or the Netherlands. The evolving methodological progress, e.g. by standardizing culture methods or enhancing detection systems, requires careful follow-up in parallel to hemovigilance data in order to ensure optimal bacterial safety in hemotherapy.

  14. Total cross sections for v/sub mu / and v/sub mu / charged-current interactions between 20 and 200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Bosetti, Peter C; Cundy, Donald C; Deden, H; Fritze, P; Grant, A; Grässler, Herbert; Hasert, F J; Hulth, P O; Klein, H; Kokott, Th; Morrison, Douglas Robert Ogston; Nellen, B; Pagiola, E; Pape, L; Schulte, R; Wünsch, B

    1982-01-01

    Exposures of the Ne/H/sub 2/ filled Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC) to a dichromatic neutrino (antineutrino) beam produced by 400 GeV protons of the CERN SPS yielded approximately 3100 events with a negative, and approximately 1100 with a positive, muon. The neutrino flux is determined from the muon flux in the shielding. Assuming a linear energy dependence of the cross section, the values sigma /E between 20 and 200 GeV are found to be 0.657+or-0.012 (stat.)+or-0.027 (syst.) and 0.309+or-0.009 (stat.)+or-0.013 (syst.) cm/sup 2/ (GeV nucleon)/sup -1/, for neutrinos and antineutrinos, respectively. The scaling variable q/sup 2//E decreases significantly with increasing energy both for neutrinos and antineutrinos.

  15. A precise measurement of the muon neutrino-nucleon inclusive charged current cross section off an isoscalar target in the energy range 2.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q.; Mishra, S. R.; Godley, A.; Petti, R.; Alekhin, S.; Astier, P.; Autiero, D.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Banner, M.; Bassompierre, G.; Benslama, K.; Besson, N.; Bird, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bobisut, F.; Bouchez, J.; Boyd, S.; Bueno, A.; Bunyatov, S.; Camilleri, L.; Cardini, A.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cavasinni, V.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Challis, R.; Chukanov, A.; Collazuol, G.; Conforto, G.; Conta, C.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cousins, R.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Prete, T.; de Santo, A.; di Lella, L.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Dumarchez, J.; Ellis, M.; Feldman, G. J.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrère, D.; Flaminio, V.; Fraternali, M.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Gangler, E.; Geiser, A.; Geppert, D.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.-J.; Gosset, J.; Gößling, C.; Gouanère, M.; Grant, A.; Graziani, G.; Guglielmi, A.; Hagner, C.; Hernando, J.; Hurst, P.; Hyett, N.; Iacopini, E.; Joseph, C.; Juget, F.; Kent, N.; Kim, J. J.; Kirsanov, M.; Klimov, O.; Kokkonen, J.; Kovzelev, A.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kulagin, S.; Lacaprara, S.; Lachaud, C.; Lakić, B.; Lanza, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Laveder, M.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Levy, J.-M.; Ling, J.; Linssen, L.; Ljubič, A.; Long, J.; Lupi, A.; Lyubushkin, V.; Marchionni, A.; Martelli, F.; Méchain, X.; Mendiburu, J.-P.; Meyer, J.-P.; Mezzetto, M.; Moorhead, G. F.; Naumov, D.; Nédélec, P.; Nefedov, Yu.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Peak, L. S.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Placci, A.; Polesello, G.; Pollmann, D.; Polyarush, A.; Poulsen, C.; Popov, B.; Rebuffi, L.; Rico, J.; Riemann, P.; Roda, C.; Rubbia, A.; Salvatore, F.; Samoylov, O.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, T.; Sconza, A.; Seaton, M.; Sevior, M.; Sillou, D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Sozzi, G.; Steele, D.; Stiegler, U.; Stipčević, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Tareb-Reyes, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Tereshchenko, V.; Toropin, A.; Touchard, A.-M.; Tovey, S. N.; Tran, M.-T.; Tsesmelis, E.; Ulrichs, J.; Vacavant, L.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Valuev, V.; Vannucci, F.; Varvell, K. E.; Veltri, M.; Vercesi, V.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Vieira, J.-M.; Vinogradova, T.; Weber, F. V.; Weisse, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Winton, L. J.; Yabsley, B. D.; Zaccone, H.; Zuber, K.; Zuccon, P.; NOMAD Collaboration

    2008-02-01

    We present a measurement of the muon neutrino-nucleon inclusive charged current cross section, off an isoscalar target, in the neutrino energy range 2.5 ⩽Eν ⩽ 40 GeV. The significance of this measurement is its precision, ±4% in 2.5 ⩽Eν ⩽ 10 GeV, and ±2.6% in 10 ⩽Eν ⩽ 40 GeV regions, where significant uncertainties in previous experiments still exist, and its importance to the current and proposed long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments.

  16. A precise measurement of the muon neutrino nucleon inclusive charged current cross section off an isoscalar target in the energy range 2.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    NOMAD Collaboration; Wu, Q.; Mishra, S. R.; Godley, A.; Petti, R.; Alekhin, S.; Astier, P.; Autiero, D.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Banner, M.; Bassompierre, G.; Benslama, K.; Besson, N.; Bird, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bobisut, F.; Bouchez, J.; Boyd, S.; Bueno, A.; Bunyatov, S.; Camilleri, L.; Cardini, A.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cavasinni, V.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Challis, R.; Chukanov, A.; Collazuol, G.; Conforto, G.; Conta, C.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cousins, R.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Prete, T.; de Santo, A.; di Lella, L.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Dumarchez, J.; Ellis, M.; Feldman, G. J.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrère, D.; Flaminio, V.; Fraternali, M.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Gangler, E.; Geiser, A.; Geppert, D.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.-J.; Gosset, J.; Gößling, C.; Gouanère, M.; Grant, A.; Graziani, G.; Guglielmi, A.; Hagner, C.; Hernando, J.; Hurst, P.; Hyett, N.; Iacopini, E.; Joseph, C.; Juget, F.; Kent, N.; Kim, J. J.; Kirsanov, M.; Klimov, O.; Kokkonen, J.; Kovzelev, A.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kulagin, S.; Lacaprara, S.; Lachaud, C.; Lakić, B.; Lanza, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Laveder, M.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Levy, J.-M.; Ling, J.; Linssen, L.; Ljubič, A.; Long, J.; Lupi, A.; Lyubushkin, V.; Marchionni, A.; Martelli, F.; Méchain, X.; Mendiburu, J.-P.; Meyer, J.-P.; Mezzetto, M.; Moorhead, G. F.; Naumov, D.; Nédélec, P.; Nefedov, Yu.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Peak, L. S.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Placci, A.; Polesello, G.; Pollmann, D.; Polyarush, A.; Poulsen, C.; Popov, B.; Rebuffi, L.; Rico, J.; Riemann, P.; Roda, C.; Rubbia, A.; Salvatore, F.; Samoylov, O.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, T.; Sconza, A.; Seaton, M.; Sevior, M.; Sillou, D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Sozzi, G.; Steele, D.; Stiegler, U.; Stipčević, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Tareb-Reyes, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Tereshchenko, V.; Toropin, A.; Touchard, A.-M.; Tovey, S. N.; Tran, M.-T.; Tsesmelis, E.; Ulrichs, J.; Vacavant, L.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Valuev, V.; Vannucci, F.; Varvell, K. E.; Veltri, M.; Vercesi, V.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Vieira, J.-M.; Vinogradova, T.; Weber, F. V.; Weisse, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Winton, L. J.; Yabsley, B. D.; Zaccone, H.; Zuber, K.; Zuccon, P.

    2008-02-01

    We present a measurement of the muon neutrino nucleon inclusive charged current cross section, off an isoscalar target, in the neutrino energy range 2.5⩽E⩽40 GeV. The significance of this measurement is its precision, ±4% in 2.5⩽E⩽10 GeV, and ±2.6% in 10⩽E⩽40 GeV regions, where significant uncertainties in previous experiments still exist, and its importance to the current and proposed long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments.

  17. A Cross-sectional Study of Current Doctors' Performance in a Modified Version of a Medical School Admission Aptitude Test: The UKCAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmur, James P; Lone, Nazir I; Stone, Oliver D; Webb, David J; Dhaun, Neeraj

    2016-05-01

    The 2-hour long United Kingdom Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) is used by many universities in the United Kingdom as part of their selection process for undergraduate medical and dentistry degrees. We aimed to compare the performance of senior doctors in primary and secondary care and across a range of specialties, in a modified version of the medical school entrance examination-the mUKCAT. Lay people were also included in the study. Despite its widespread use, this is the first study that examines the performance of senior clinicians in the UKCAT.The study used a prospective cross-sectional design. It used mock questions from the UKCAT website to generate an mUKCAT that was anticipated to take 15 minutes to complete. In all, 167 doctors at consultant, general practitioner (GP), or specialty trainee grade and 26 lay people took part.The overall mean mUKCAT score of all participants was 2486 (69.1%). Of the total cohort, 126 (65.3%) scored above our designated threshold of 2368 and were deemed to have passed the mUKCAT. Excluding lay people, 113 (67.7%) of the 167 doctors scored above that threshold. Medical specialty was associated with overall score (P = 0.003), with anesthetists/intensive care physicians scoring highest (n = 20, mean score 2660) and GPs scoring lowest (n = 38, mean score 2302). Academics outperformed nonacademics (mean score of academics, n = 44 vs nonacademics, n = 123: 2750 vs 2406; P < 0.001). Those clinicians in senior management positions scored lower than those in "standard" roles (mean score of senior management, n = 31 vs standard roles, n = 136: 2332 vs 2534, mean difference 202, 95% confidence interval 67-337, P = 0.004).In the situational judgement section, there was no evidence that specialty was associated with score (P = 0.15). Academics exhibited greater situational judgement than their nonacademic colleagues (academics vs nonacademics: 69.8 vs 63.6%; P = 0.01).The majority of senior

  18. Which tinnitus-related characteristics affect current health-related quality of life and depression? A cross-sectional cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidt, Steffi; Delsignore, Aba; Meyer, Martin; Rufer, Michael; Peter, Nicole; Drabe, Natalie; Kleinjung, Tobias

    2016-03-30

    Tinnitus is sometimes associated with lower health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and depressive symptoms. However, only limited evidence exists identifying which tinnitus characteristics are responsible for these associations. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess associations between tinnitus, HRQoL, depressive symptoms, subjective tinnitus loudness and audiometrically assessed tinnitus characteristics (e.g., hearing threshold). Two hundred and eight outpatients reporting tinnitus completed questionnaires on tinnitus (Tinnitus Handicap Inventory, THI), HRQoL (World-Health-Organisation Quality of Life Short Form Survey, WHOQOL-BREF), and depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory, BDI), and underwent audiometry. Patients with higher THI scores exhibited significantly lower HRQoL, and higher depression scores. THI total-score, THI subscales, and subjective tinnitus loudness explained significant variance of WHOQOL-BREF and BDI. Audiometrically measured features were not associated with WHOQOL-BREF or BDI. Overall, we confirmed findings that different features of tinnitus are associated with HRQoL and depressive symptoms but not with audiometrically assessed tinnitus characteristics. Consequently, physicians should evaluate THI total score, its sub-scores, and subjective tinnitus loudness to reliably and quickly identify patients who potentially suffer from depressive symptoms or significantly lower HRQoL. Supporting these patients early might help to prevent the development of reactive depressive symptoms and impairment of HRQoL. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Lack of current implantable cardioverter defibrillator guidelines application for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death in Latin American patients with heart failure: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Zuelgaray, Jorge; Pellizon, Oscar; Muratore, Claudio A; Oropeza, Elsa Silva; Rabinovich, Rafael; Ramos, José Luis; Tentori, Maria Cristina; Reyes, Nicolás; Aguayo, Rubén; Marin, Jorge; Peterson, Brett J

    2013-02-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluated the application of accepted international implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) guidelines for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death in patients with heart failure. The PLASMA (Probabilidad de Sufrir Muerte Arritmica) study was designed to characterize management of cardiac patients in Latin America. Twelve centres included 1958 consecutively admitted patients in cardiology units in 2008 and 2009. Discharged patients were evaluated for primary prevention, ICD indication and prescription by general cardiologists. Of 1711 discharged patients, 1525 (89%) had data available for evaluating indication status. Class I indications for ICD therapy were met for 153 (10%) patients based on collected data. Only 20 (13%, 95% confidence interval: 7.7-18.4%) patients with indication were prescribed an ICD. Patients prescribed an ICD were younger than patients who were not prescribed an ICD (62 vs. 68 years, P < 0.01). The reasons given by cardiologists for not prescribing an ICD for 133 patients with an indication were: indication criteria not met (75%), life expectancy <1 year (9.7%), rejection by the patient (5.2%), no medical coverage paying for the device (3.7%), psychiatric patient (2.2%), and other reasons (4.2%). In Latin America, international guidelines for primary prevention ICD implantation are not well followed. The main reason is that cardiologists believe that patients do not meet indication criteria, even though study data confirm that criteria are met. This poses a significant challenge and underlines the importance of continuous and improved medical education.

  20. Identifying patients with advanced chronic conditions for a progressive palliative care approach: a cross-sectional study of prognostic indicators related to end-of-life trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amblàs-Novellas, J; Murray, S A; Espaulella, J; Martinez-Muñoz, M; Blay, C; Gómez-Batiste, X

    2016-01-01

    Objectives 2 innovative concepts have lately been developed to radically improve the care of patients with advanced chronic conditions (PACC): early identification of palliative care (PC) needs and the 3 end-of-life trajectories in chronic illnesses (acute, intermittent and gradual dwindling). It is not clear (1) what indicators work best for this early identification and (2) if specific clinical indicators exist for each of these trajectories. The objectives of this study are to explore these 2 issues. Setting 3 primary care services, an acute care hospital, an intermediate care centre and 4 nursing homes in a mixed urban–rural district in Barcelona, Spain. Participants 782 patients (61.5% women) with a positive NECPAL CCOMS-ICO test, indicating they might benefit from a PC approach. Outcome measures The characteristics and distribution of the indicators of the NECPAL CCOMS-ICO tool are analysed with respect to the 3 trajectories and have been arranged by domain (functional, nutritional and cognitive status, emotional problems, geriatric syndromes, social vulnerability and others) and according to their static (severity) and dynamic (progression) properties. Results The common indicators associated with early end-of-life identification are functional (44.3%) and nutritional (30.7%) progression, emotional distress (21.9%) and geriatric syndromes (15.7% delirium, 11.2% falls). The rest of the indicators showed differences in the associations per illness trajectories (ppalliative approach. PMID:27645556

  1. [Cesarean section and eye disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karska-Basta, Izabella; Tarasiewicz, Marta; Kubicka-Trząska, Agnieszka; Miniewicz, Joanna; Romanowska-Dixon, Bożena

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a growing tendency for cesarean birth has been noted both, in Poland and worldwide. Non-obstetric problems constitute a large part of indications for cesarean section. Many ophthalmologists and obstetricians still believe that high myopia, the presence of peripheral retinal degenerations, history of retinal detachment surgery, diabetic retinopathy, or glaucoma are indications for surgical termination of pregnancy. However, these recommendations are not evidence-based. The literature offers no proof that high myopia and previous retinal surgery increase the risk of retinal detachment during spontaneous vaginal delivery. There is only one indication for cesarean section in myopic patients, i.e. the presence of choroidal neovascularization, which can cause subretinal bleeding with acute visual loss. Prolonged and intensified Valsalva maneuver during labor in patients with an active proliferative diabetic retinopathy may be an indication for an elective cesarean section. Uterine contractions during the second stage of vaginal delivery lead to a marked elevation of intraocular pressure. Intraocular pressure fluctuations during the delivery may damage retinal ganglion cells, resulting in further progression of visual field. Thus, glaucoma associated with advanced visual field changes is the next ophthalmic indication for cesarean section. The report presents the current state of knowledge concerning the effect of pregnancy on pre-existing ocular disorders and the influence of physiological changes on the clinical course of these diseases during the stages of natural delivery. The authors discuss also the ophthalmic indications for cesarean section.

  2. Current status of the clinical epidemiology of myocardial infarction in men and women: a national cross-sectional study in iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Ali; Soori, Hamid; Sajjadi, Homeira; Nasri, Hamid; Mehrabi, Yadollah; Etemad, Koorosh

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the main reason for mortality in men and women. Clinical epidemiology of myocardial infarction (MI) in men and women has not been yet studied in Iran, one of the largest Middle East countries in South-Western Asia. This study was conducted to determine the clinical epidemiology of MI in men and women in Iran. This hospital-based, cross-sectional study used the data of 20,750 MI patients in Iran in 2012 (the codes I22, I21, I24, and I25.2). Univariate comparisons used Chi-square test for categorical variables and t-test for continuous variables. P woman) were ≤18 years (mean age: 14.8 ± 1.9), out of whom only two men were diabetic. 22.2% (18% men and 33.4% women) of the patients had diabetes, 26.2% (28.5% men and 20.1% women) were smoker and 35.5% (28.6% men and 53.7% women) had hypertension. ST-segment elevation MI incidence was 2.8 times higher in men than women. Left bundle branch block was significantly more prevalent in men than women. Men used percutaneous coronary intervention more frequently than women did. No difference in coronary artery bypass graft was noted between men and women. Mortality incidence was approximately twice higher in men than women. The prevalence of chest pain was higher in women than men. The MI incidence pattern, mortality from MI, and risk factors prevalence are significantly different between men and women in Iran. More emphasis on these issues in training people and healthcare professionals seems to contribute partially to patients' timely referring to health care centers and preventing MI-associated mortalities.

  3. Patterns of dignity-related distress at the end of life: a cross-sectional study of patients with advanced cancer and care home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Sue; Davies, Joanna M; Gao, Wei; Higginson, Irene J

    2014-10-01

    To provide effective palliative care in different settings, it is important to understand and identify the sources of dignity-related distress experienced by people nearing the end of life. To describe and compare the sources of dignity-related distress reported by cancer patients and care home residents. Secondary analysis of merged data. Participants completed the Patient Dignity Inventory (assessing 25 sources of dignity-related distress) and measures of quality of life and depression. A total of 45 adult patients with advanced cancer referred to hospital-based palliative care teams in London, United Kingdom, and 60 residents living in one of 15 care homes in London. Care home residents were older and had poorer functioning. Both groups reported a wide range of dignity-related problems. Although the number or problems reported on the Patient Dignity Inventory was similar for the two groups (mean (standard deviation): 5.9 (5.5) for cancer patients and 4.1 (4.3) for care home residents, p = 0.07), there was a tendency for more cancer patients to report some existential problems. Experiencing physically distressing symptoms and functional limitations were prevalent problems for both groups. Patient Dignity Inventory problems were associated with poorer performance status and functioning for residents, with age and cognitive impairment for cancer patients and with poorer quality of life and depression for both groups. Although characteristics of the samples differed, similarities in the dignity-related problems reported by cancer patients and care home residents support research suggesting a common pathway towards death for malignant and non-malignant disease. A wider understanding of the sources of dignity-related distress would help clinicians provide more effective end-of-life care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Advanced Approaches to Greatly Reduce Hydrogen Gas Crossover Losses in PEM Electrolyzers Operating at High Pressures and Low Current Densities Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ElectroChem proposes technology advances in its unique PEM IFF water electrolyzer design to meet the NASA requirement for an electrolyzer that will operate very...

  5. Advanced Approaches to Greatly Reduce Hydrogen Gas Crossover Losses in PEM Electrolyzers Operating at High Pressures and Low Current Densities Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ElectroChem proposes a Phase II program to advance its very successful SBIR Phase I technology effort to the point of minimum hydrogen loss through the electrolyzer...

  6. Association between environmental factors and current asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema symptoms in school-aged children from Oropeza Province--Bolivia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis-Soto, María Teresa; Patiño, Armando; Nowak, Dennis; Radon, Katja

    2013-11-05

    In recent years, the prevalence of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema symptoms in childhood has considerably increased in developing countries including Bolivia, possibly due to changes in lifestyle, environmental and domestic factors. This study aimed to assess the association between environmental factors and asthma, rhinoconjuctivitis and eczema symptoms in school-aged children from Oropeza Province in Chuquisaca, Bolivia. A cross-sectional study was performed in 2340 children attending the fifth grade in 36 randomly selected elementary schools in Oropeza province. The prevalence of symptoms was determined using the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) questionnaire. Environmental factors were assessed by the ISAAC environmental questionnaire including questions related to exposure to pets, farm animals, indoor and outdoor pollution, presence of disease vectors at home and precarious household conditions. Generalized linear mixed-effects models were adjusted for age, sex and place of living. Thirty seven percent of children reported that at least one of their parents smoked at home. Wood or coal was used as cooking fuel in 19% of the homes and 29% reported intense truck traffic on the street where they lived. With respect to hygiene conditions, 86% reported exposure to dogs, 59% exposure to cats and 36% regular contact to farm animals. More than one precarious household condition was reported by 8% of children. In the adjusted model exposure to dog (adjusted OR 1.4; CI 95% 1.0-1.9), cat (1.2; 1.0-1.5), farm animals (1.5; 1.2-1.8); intense truck traffic (1.3; 1.0-1.6), parents smoking at home (1.2; 1.0-1.5), presence of disease vectors at home (fourth quartile vs. first quartile: 1.6; 1.2-2.3) and two or more precarious household conditions (1.5; 1.0-2.2) were significantly associated with rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms. The associations were similar for asthma and eczema symptoms; however it did not reach the level of statistical

  7. Pain Treatments for Nursing Home Residents with Advanced Dementia and Substantial Impaired Communication: A Cross-Sectional Analysis at Baseline of a Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Justina Yat Wa; Leung, Doris Y P

    2016-09-28

    OBJECTIVES : This is a cross-sectional analysis at baseline of a cluster randomized controlled trial to identify factors associated with the use of pharmacological and nonpharmacological pain treatments by nursing home residents with dementia and impaired communication. METHODS : One hundred thirty-four residents with dementia and impaired communication were recruited. Nine of them were excluded because data on their pain treatments were missing, resulting in 125 for analysis. Hierarchical generalized estimating equations analyses controlling for the clustering effect of nursing homes were used to identify factors associated with the use of pharmacological and nonpharmacological pain treatments. RESULTS : Although all participants had a confirmed pain condition, only 23 (18.4%) and 45 (36%) had received pharmacological or nonpharmacological pain treatments, respectively. Participants with a higher ability to communicate (P = 0.031) and fewer pain locations were found to be more likely to receive pain medications, with the impact of communication ability being greater among participants with better cognitive status than among those with poor cognitive status. Participants who had been living in the home longer and who were more dependent were less likely to receive nonpharmacological treatments. CONCLUSION : Suboptimal pain management was common among this population. Severe impairment in the ability to communicate is a major reason for the underuse of pain medications. Staff may become desensitized and fail to perceive subtle changes in the residents' behavior as indicative of pain, leading to the underadministering of nonpharmacological treatments. To improve this situation, it is suggested that observational pain assessments be systematically carried out in nursing homes.

  8. Advance Health Care Directives and “Public Guardian”: The Italian Supreme Court Requests the Status of Current and Not Future Inability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Paolo Busardò

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Advance health care decisions animate an intense debate in several European countries, which started more than 20 years ago in the USA and led to the adoption of different rules, based on the diverse legal, sociocultural and philosophical traditions of each society. In Italy, the controversial issue of advance directives and end of life’s rights, in the absence of a clear and comprehensive legislation, has been over time a subject of interest of the Supreme Court. Since 2004 a law introduced the “Public Guardian,” aiming to provide an instrument of assistance to the person lacking in autonomy because of an illness or incapacity. Recently, this critical issue has once again been brought to the interest of the Supreme Court, which passed a judgment trying to clarify the legislative application of the appointment of the Guardian in the field of advance directives.

  9. Skin autofluorescence, a novel marker for glycemic and oxidative stress-derived advanced glycation endproducts : An overview of current clinical studies, evidence, and limitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Douwe J.; Van de Water, Tara; Lutgers, Helen L.; Graaff, Reindert; Gans, Rijk O.; Zijlstra, Felix; Smit, Andries J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Advanced glycation endproducts (AGES) predict long-term complications in age-related diseases. However, there are no clinically applicable markers for measuring AGES in vivo. Methods: We have recently introduced the AGE-Reader (DiagnOptics B.V., Groningen, The Netherlands) to noninvasive

  10. Genitourinary imaging: Current and emerging applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O′ Donoghue P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses the current and emerging techniques in urinary tract imaging. Recent technical advances and novel discoveries make this an exciting but challenging time for urinary tract imaging. The first section describes the imaging of the adrenal gland which has made great strides in the last decade, the current major adrenal imaging modalities as well as new applications are discussed with particular attention to the role of imaging in the incidentally detected adrenal lesion. In the second section the role of ultrasound, computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance (MR in evaluation of the renal tract are discussed with the new technical advances leading to earlier detection and characterization of renal lesions. Complementary to this is the emerging role of CT and MR urography in assessment of the urinary tract and bladder in contrast to the demise of plain film studies/intravenous urography. The role of CT angiography in assessment of the renal vasculature is also discussed. The third section discusses the role of prostate imaging in the diagnosis, staging and management of prostate cancer. Transrectal ultrasonography, can be used to guide biopsy, CT is frequently used in staging, with bone scintigraphy and positron emission tomography having roles in advanced disease. Currently, all imaging modalities, especially MR are evolving to improve disease detection and staging. The final section discusses the recently encountered adverse reaction of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients post gadolinium-enhanced MRI and how to help prevent this adverse reaction.

  11. Genitourinary imaging: current and emerging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O' Donoghue, P M; McSweeney, S E; Jhaveri, K

    2010-01-01

    This review discusses the current and emerging techniques in urinary tract imaging. Recent technical advances and novel discoveries make this an exciting but challenging time for urinary tract imaging. The first section describes the imaging of the adrenal gland which has made great strides in the last decade, the current major adrenal imaging modalities as well as new applications are discussed with particular attention to the role of imaging in the incidentally detected adrenal lesion. In the second section the role of ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) in evaluation of the renal tract are discussed with the new technical advances leading to earlier detection and characterization of renal lesions. Complementary to this is the emerging role of CT and MR urography in assessment of the urinary tract and bladder in contrast to the demise of plain film studies/intravenous urography. The role of CT angiography in assessment of the renal vasculature is also discussed. The third section discusses the role of prostate imaging in the diagnosis, staging and management of prostate cancer. Transrectal ultrasonography, can be used to guide biopsy, CT is frequently used in staging, with bone scintigraphy and positron emission tomography having roles in advanced disease. Currently, all imaging modalities, especially MR are evolving to improve disease detection and staging. The final section discusses the recently encountered adverse reaction of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients post gadolinium-enhanced MRI and how to help prevent this adverse reaction.

  12. Measurement of the νμ Charged Current π+ to Quasi-Elastic Cross Section Ratio on Mineral Oil in a 0.8 GeV Neutrino Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linden, Steven K. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Charged current single pion production (CCπ+) and charged current quasi-elastic scattering (CCQE) are the most abundant interaction types for neutrinos at energies around 1 GeV, a region of great interest to oscillation experiments. The cross-sections for these processes, however, are not well understood in this energy range. This dissertation presents a measurement of the ratio of CCπ+ to CCQE cross-sections for muon neutrinos on mineral oil (CH2) in the MiniBooNE experiment. The measurement is presented here both with and without corrections for hadronic re-interactions in the target nucleus and is given as a function of neutrino energy in the range 0.4 GeV < Eν < 2.4 GeV. With more than 46,000 CCπ+ events collected in MiniBooNE, and with a fractional uncertainty of roughly 11% in the region of highest statistics, this measurement represents a dramatic improvement in statistics and precision over previous CCπ+ and CCQE measurements.

  13. Pregnancy outcomes in advanced maternal age pregnancies after taking measures to reduc-ing caesarean section rate%控制剖宫产率对高龄初产母婴结局影响的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹冬如; 张小燕; 包狄

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare pregnancy outcomes in advanced maternal age pregnancies after taking measures to reducing caesarean section rate. Method A total of 1062 pregnant women aged 35 years or older who gave birth in beijing haidian district maternal and children healthcare hospital from 2013 to 2014 were retrospectively studied. 490 Pregnant women aged 35 years and over delivered in 2014 were included in study group and those 572 patients delivered in 2013 were included in the control group. Pregnant complications,delivery mode,postpartum hemorrhage rate,neonatal asphyxia rate were compared in both groups. Result ①No statistically significant difference was ob-served in the frequency of premature rupture of membrane,gestational diabetes mellitus, placenta previa,uterine my-oma,hypertensive disorders, preterm birth, or macrosomia in both groups;②The caesarean section rate in study group was statistically significantly lower than that in the control group(51. 63%vs 68. 88%,P0. 05). Conclusion With the measures of strengthening prenatal and intrapartum care, it is possible to reducing the caesarean section rate in advanced maternal aged pregnancies.%目的:探讨采取控制剖宫产率相关措施对高龄初产妇母婴结局的影响。方法回顾性分析1062例高龄初产孕产妇临床资料,2014年分娩的490例高龄初产妇作为研究组,2013年分娩的高龄初产妇572例作为对照组,比较两组妊娠并发症、分娩方式、产后出血率、新生儿窒息率。结果①两组胎膜早破、妊娠期糖尿病、前置胎盘、子宫肌瘤、妊娠期高血压疾病、早产、巨大儿发生率差异无显著性(P>0.05);②研究组和对照组剖宫产率分别为51.63%、68.88%,两者比较差异有显著性(P0.05)。结论综合孕期和产时管理,将高龄初产孕妇剖宫产率控制在较合理的水平是可能的。

  14. Advances in pediatrics in 2014: current practices and challenges in allergy, gastroenterology, infectious diseases, neonatology, nutrition, oncology and respiratory tract illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffarelli, Carlo; Santamaria, Francesca; Cesari, Silvia; Sciorio, Elisa; Povesi-Dascola, Carlotta; Bernasconi, Sergio

    2015-10-31

    Major advances in the conduct of pediatric practice have been reported in the Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2014. This review highlights developments in allergy, gastroenterology, infectious diseases, neonatology, nutrition, oncology and respiratory tract illnesses. Investigations endorse a need to better educate guardians and improve nutritional management in food allergy. Management of hyperbilirubinemia in neonates and of bronchiolitis have been improved by position statements of scientific societies. Novel treatments for infant colic and inflammatory bowel diseases have emerged. Studies suggest the diagnostic utility of ultrasonography in diagnosing community-acquired pneumonia. Progress in infectious diseases should include the universal varicella vaccination of children. Recommendations on asphyxia and respiratory distress syndrome have been highlighted in neonatology. Studies have evidenced that malnutrition remains a common underestimated problem in developing countries, while exposure to cancer risk factors in children is not negligible in Western countries. Advances in our understanding of less common diseases such as cystic fibrosis, plastic bronchitis, idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis facilitate diagnosis and management. Researches have led to new therapeutic approaches in patent ductus arteriosus and pediatric malignancies.

  15. Advances in outcomes measurement in rehabilitation medicine: current initiatives from the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulsky, David S; Carlozzi, Noelle E; Cella, David

    2011-10-01

    The articles in this supplement present recent advances in the measurement of patient-reported health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) outcomes. Specifically, these articles highlight the combined efforts of the National Institutes of Health, National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Center on Medical Rehabilitation Research, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, and Department of Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development Service to improve HRQOL measurement. In addition, this supplement is intended to provide rehabilitation professionals with information about these efforts and the implications that these advances in outcomes measurement have for rehabilitation medicine and clinical practice. These new measurement scales use state-of-the-art method techniques, including item response theory and computerized adaptive testing. In addition, scale development involves both qualitative and quantitative methods, as well as the administration of items to hundreds or even thousands of research participants. The scales deliberately have been built with overlap of items between scales so that linkages and equivalency scores can be computed. Ultimately, these scales should facilitate direct comparison of outcomes instruments across studies and will serve as standard data elements across research trials without compromising the specificity of disease- or condition-targeted measures. This supplement includes the initial publications for many of these new measurement initiatives, each of which provides researchers and clinicians with better tools for evaluation of the efficacy of their interventions.

  16. Review on current advances, future challenges and consideration issues for post-combustion CO2 capture using amine-based absorbents☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiwu Liang; Kaiyun Fu; Raphael Idem; Paitoon Tontiwachwuthikul

    2016-01-01

    Among the current technologies for post-combustion CO2 capture, amine-based chemical absorption appears to be the most technologically mature and commercial y viable method. This review highlights the opportunities and challenges in post-combustion CO2 capture using amine-based chemical absorption technologies. In addi-tion, this review provides current types and emerging trends for chemical solvents. The issues and performance of amine solvents are reviewed and addressed in terms of thermodynamics, kinetics, mass transfer, regeneration and solvent management. This review also looks at emerging and future trends in post-combustion CO2 capture using chemical solvents in the near to mid-term.

  17. Advanced calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Widder, David V

    2012-01-01

    This classic text by a distinguished mathematician and former Professor of Mathematics at Harvard University, leads students familiar with elementary calculus into confronting and solving more theoretical problems of advanced calculus. In his preface to the first edition, Professor Widder also recommends various ways the book may be used as a text in both applied mathematics and engineering.Believing that clarity of exposition depends largely on precision of statement, the author has taken pains to state exactly what is to be proved in every case. Each section consists of definitions, theorem

  18. 蛹虫草国内外研究的新进展%Current advance on the research of Cordyceps militaris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑壮丽; 黄春花; 梅彩英; 韩日畴

    2011-01-01

    Cordyceps militaris is a traditional Chinese medicine with useful advantages on medicinal functions and industrial development. The present paper summarizes the research advance on artificial culture, strain breeding, molecular biology, and active components of pharmacological effect of C. militaris.%蛹虫草Cordyceps militaris具有多种药用功效,以及重要的经济价值,其人工培养已产业化.蛹虫草作为一种药食通用的虫生真菌被深入研究,在人工培养、菌种选育、分子生物学、活性成分等方面取得了良好的进展.本文根据最近的研究结果概述蛹虫草研究的进展.

  19. [Current Advances and Future Development of Thyroid Ultrasound Examination--Steps toward State-of-the-Art Laboratory Medicine in Fukushima].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimura, Hiroki

    2015-03-01

    Since the accidents at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant after the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, large quantities of radionuclides have leaked into the surrounding environment. Fukushima Prefecture started the Fukushima Health Management Survey Project including Thyroid Ultrasound Examination to screen for thyroid cancer in all residents aged 0 to 18 years at the time of the nuclear accident. This accident also led to increased interest in thyroid ultrasound examination in Japan. This article reviews the studies to establish ultrasound diagnostic criteria for thyroid nodules and the clinical guidelines of thyroid nodule management, both of which are fundamental to Thyroid Ultrasound Examination in Fukushima. This article also reviews a study designed to clarify the actual frequency of sonographically detected thyroid nodular lesions among Japanese children, which will become appropriate reference data to interpret the results from Thyroid Ultrasound Examination. Further advances in the screening and management of thyroid diseases are important responsibilities of clinicians and researchers in Fukushima.

  20. QCD and electroweak analysis and first measurement of neutral and charged current cross section with the polarised positron beam at HERA 2; Premiere mesure des sections efficaces de courant charge et neutre avec le faisceau de positrons polarise a HERA 2 et analyses QCD-electrofaibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portheault, B

    2005-03-15

    In 2003-2004 the HERA collider delivered e{sup +}p collisions with a longitudinally polarised positron beam. We prescribe the measurement of inclusive Neutral and Charged Current DIS (deep inelastic scattering) cross section using the H1 detector. The total Charged Current cross section for Q{sup 2} > 400 GeV{sup 2}, y < 0,9 is measured with a Right-handed (P = 0,33) sample of 15,3 pb{sup -1} and a Left-handed (P = -0,40) sample of 21,7 pb{sup -1} yielding {sigma}cc (P = +0,33) = 34,67 pb {+-} 1,94 pb (stat) {+-} 1,66 pb (sys) C.20) {sigma}cc(P = -0,40) = 13,80 pb {+-} 1,04 pb (stat) {+-} 0,94 pb (sys). C.21) This result is consistent with the proportionality of the cross section with respect to the polarisation, in good agreement with the Standard Model expectations. The second part of this work is devoted to QCD analysis of the proton structure. The H1 data alone are used to extract flavor separated parton densities. This analysis is further used as a basis to extract various electroweak parameters, such as the W boson mass and the quarks couplings to the Z. Then a global QCD analysis of DIS and Drell Yan data is realized, focusing on the strange sea asymmetry which is found to be small: {integral}{sub 0}{sup 1} x(s - s-bar)dx = (1,8 {+-} 3,8) x 10{sup -4}. The impact of new E866 data on high x partons densities is discussed and the extraction of the strong coupling is realized {alpha}s = 0,1197 {+-} (+0,0005 - 0,0007)(mod) {+-}0,006 (th). (author)

  1. Advances in bistatic radar

    CERN Document Server

    Willis, Nick

    2007-01-01

    Advances in Bistatic Radar updates and extends bistatic and multistatic radar developments since publication of Willis' Bistatic Radar in 1991. New and recently declassified military applications are documented. Civil applications are detailed including commercial and scientific systems. Leading radar engineers provide expertise to each of these applications. Advances in Bistatic Radar consists of two major sections: Bistatic/Multistatic Radar Systems and Bistatic Clutter and Signal Processing. Starting with a history update, the first section documents the early and now declassified military

  2. Advances in the study of current-use non-PBDE brominated flame retardants and dechlorane plus in the environment and humans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The fate of the high production volume,currently in use,and not regulated non-polybrominated diphenyl ether(PBDE) flame retardants,such as tetrabromobisphenol A(TBBPA) ,hexabromocyclododecane(HBCD) and dechlorane plus(DP),and the alternative flame retardants of PBDE,such as BTBPE and DBDPE,in the environment has attracted increasing attention and aroused concern due to the increasing regulation and phasing-out of PBDEs.This paper reviews the distribution,bioaccumulation,human exposure and environmental behavior of those non-PBDE flame retardants in various environmental compartments.The data gaps and needs for future research are discussed.

  3. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank-Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 1: Biologics Overview, Ligament Injury, Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPrade, Robert F; Geeslin, Andrew G; Murray, Iain R; Musahl, Volker; Zlotnicki, Jason P; Petrigliano, Frank; Mann, Barton J

    2016-12-01

    Biologic therapies, including stem cells, platelet-rich plasma, growth factors, and other biologically active adjuncts, have recently received increased attention in the basic science and clinical literature. At the 2015 AOSSM Biologics II Think Tank held in Colorado Springs, Colorado, a group of orthopaedic surgeons, basic scientists, veterinarians, and other investigators gathered to review the state of the science for biologics and barriers to implementation of biologics for the treatment of sports medicine injuries. This series of current concepts reviews reports the summary of the scientific presentations, roundtable discussions, and recommendations from this think tank.

  4. Analysis of the current status and related factors of caesarean section in Zhangjiagang%张家港市剖宫产现状与相关因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    查建梅; 褚光萍

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the current status and influencing factors of caesarean section in Zhangjiagang and to provide evidence for controlling caesarean section .Methods Retrospective study was conducted to understand the situation of caesarean section and the changes of caesarean section indications in Zhangjiagang from 2008 to 2012 with the monitoring data of delivery in maternal and child health annual report and questionnaires allocated randomly to pregnant women and medical staff .Results The rate of caesarean section in Zhangjiagang was always high, however, the high rate of caesarean section did not reduce prenatal mortality rate (r=0.500, P>0.05).The first 6 indications for cesarean section were social factors , scar uterus , intrauterine fetal distress , cephalopelvic disproportion , premature rupture of fetal membranes and umbilical cord around neck .Of all these factors , social factors came first .Survey among pregnant women showed significant differences between women with different delivery modes in the aspect of cognition on benefit of vaginal delivery (χ2 =15.225, P<0.01), support of family members on vaginal delivery (χ2 =73.569, P<0.01), mastering of nutrition knowledge during pregnancy (χ2 =11.367,P<0.05) and participating in natural delivery course (χ2 =13.300,P<0.01).Survey among medical staff showed that little understanding of long-term harm of caesarean section and social factors resulted in high rate of caesarean section .Conclusion The rate of caesarean section in Zhangjiagang has been at a relative high level .We should put more emphasis on health education among pregnant women, improving professional quality of medical staff and seeking for governmental support and social participation to reduce the rate of caesarean section so as to protect maternal and infant health .%目的:分析张家港市剖宫产现状及其影响因素,提出相关控制措施。方法采用张家港市2008至2012年的妇幼卫生年报分娩情况监测

  5. Particle sizes from sectional data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlas, Zbynek; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Jensen, Eva Bjørn Vedel

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new statistical method for obtaining information about particle size distributions from sectional data without specific assumptions about particle shape. The method utilizes recent advances in local stereology. We show how to estimate separately from sectional data the variance due t...

  6. Advancing Implementation of Evidence-Based Public Health in China: An Assessment of the Current Situation and Suggestions for Developing Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianwei; Jiang, Chenghua; Tan, Duxun; Yu, Dehua; Lu, Yuan; Sun, Pengfei; Pan, Ying; Zhang, Hanzhi; Wang, Zhaoxin; Yang, Beilei

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Existing research shows a serious scarcity of EBPH practice in China and other developing regions; as an exploratory study, this study aimed to assess the current EBPH implementation status in Shanghai of China qualitatively. Methods. Using semistructured key informant interviews, we examined the status of and impediments to the lagging EBPH in China. Data were analyzed based on the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR). Results. Chinese public health practitioners knew more about evidence-based medicine but less about EBPH. The situation was worse in community healthcare centers. Participants perceived that evidence sources were limited and the quality of evidence was low. Concerning the inner setting factors, the structural characteristics, networks and communications, implementation climate, and leadership engagement were confronted with many problems. Among the outer setting factors, external government policies and incentives and low patient compliance were the key problems. Additionally, public health practitioners in Shanghai lacked sufficient awareness of EBPH. Furthermore, the current project-based EBPH lacks a systematic implementation system. Conclusions. Existing practical perspectives on EBPH indicate a lag in the advocacy of this new ideology in China. It would be advisable for healthcare institutions to take the initiative to explore feasible and multiple methods of EBPH promotion.

  7. Advancing Implementation of Evidence-Based Public Health in China: An Assessment of the Current Situation and Suggestions for Developing Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwei Shi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Existing research shows a serious scarcity of EBPH practice in China and other developing regions; as an exploratory study, this study aimed to assess the current EBPH implementation status in Shanghai of China qualitatively. Methods. Using semistructured key informant interviews, we examined the status of and impediments to the lagging EBPH in China. Data were analyzed based on the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR. Results. Chinese public health practitioners knew more about evidence-based medicine but less about EBPH. The situation was worse in community healthcare centers. Participants perceived that evidence sources were limited and the quality of evidence was low. Concerning the inner setting factors, the structural characteristics, networks and communications, implementation climate, and leadership engagement were confronted with many problems. Among the outer setting factors, external government policies and incentives and low patient compliance were the key problems. Additionally, public health practitioners in Shanghai lacked sufficient awareness of EBPH. Furthermore, the current project-based EBPH lacks a systematic implementation system. Conclusions. Existing practical perspectives on EBPH indicate a lag in the advocacy of this new ideology in China. It would be advisable for healthcare institutions to take the initiative to explore feasible and multiple methods of EBPH promotion.

  8. Advancing Implementation of Evidence-Based Public Health in China: An Assessment of the Current Situation and Suggestions for Developing Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianwei; Tan, Duxun; Yu, Dehua; Lu, Yuan; Sun, Pengfei; Pan, Ying; Zhang, Hanzhi; Yang, Beilei

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Existing research shows a serious scarcity of EBPH practice in China and other developing regions; as an exploratory study, this study aimed to assess the current EBPH implementation status in Shanghai of China qualitatively. Methods. Using semistructured key informant interviews, we examined the status of and impediments to the lagging EBPH in China. Data were analyzed based on the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR). Results. Chinese public health practitioners knew more about evidence-based medicine but less about EBPH. The situation was worse in community healthcare centers. Participants perceived that evidence sources were limited and the quality of evidence was low. Concerning the inner setting factors, the structural characteristics, networks and communications, implementation climate, and leadership engagement were confronted with many problems. Among the outer setting factors, external government policies and incentives and low patient compliance were the key problems. Additionally, public health practitioners in Shanghai lacked sufficient awareness of EBPH. Furthermore, the current project-based EBPH lacks a systematic implementation system. Conclusions. Existing practical perspectives on EBPH indicate a lag in the advocacy of this new ideology in China. It would be advisable for healthcare institutions to take the initiative to explore feasible and multiple methods of EBPH promotion. PMID:27597958

  9. Current Situation and Advance of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation%经导管主动脉瓣置换术的现状及进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王森

    2013-01-01

    Severe aortic stenosis remains the main cause of morbidity and mortality in the older people . Transcatheter aortic valve im -plantation (TAVI) has become an alternative treatment for patients with high risk and contraindications for surgical valve replacement . After decades of development , the safety and efficacy of TAVI have been confirmed . An estimated 40 000 patients have received TAVI and a-chieved good results up to now. Accumulated experience,improved devices and advanced fusion imaging will promote TAVI to become a safe and effective approach for the treatment of aortic stenosis .%重度主动脉瓣狭窄是老年人中发病率及病死率较高的疾病,经导管主动脉瓣置换术已经成为具有手术禁忌及高风险患者的替代治疗.历经10年的发展,众多的临床研究证实了其安全性及有效性,截至目前,全球大约有4万名患者接受了这项治疗并取得良好的效果.介入治疗经验的积累、瓣膜装置的改进及融合显像的发展将推进经导管主动脉瓣置换术成为治疗主动脉瓣狭窄安全有效的方法.

  10. Money income and poverty status of families and persons in the United States: 1984 (advance data from the March 1985 Current Population Survey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welniak Ej; Winard, A I

    1985-08-01

    Estimates in this report are based on a sample that includes households from both the 1970 census-based sample design and the new 1980 census-based design. Estimates in this report for 1983 and 1984 reflect the introduction of new survey weighting procedures for the Spanish-origin population. Some highlights of the data follow. 1) For the 2nd year in a row, median family income increased faster than inflation according to results of the March 1985 Current Population Survey conducted by the US Bureau of the Census. 2) In 1984, median family income was $26,430, 7.7% higher than the 1983 median of $24,550. After adjusting for the 4.3% increase in consumer prices between 1983 and 1984, real median family income still shows a significant gain of 3.3%. Not since 1972 has family income increased at a faster rate. 3) There was a significant decline in the poverty population, reversing a trend of increases in poverty experienced in recent years. Between 1983 and 1984, the poverty population fell from 35.5 million to 33.7 million. The poverty rate in 1984 was 14.4%, significantly lower than the 1983 rate of 15.3%. The poverty threshold for a family of 4 in 1984 was $10,609.

  11. 12 CFR Appendix D to Part 325 - Capital Adequacy Guidelines for Banks: Internal-Ratings-Based and Advanced Measurement Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... transactions. Current exposure is also called replacement cost. Default—(1) Retail. (i) A retail exposure of a...-Ratings-Based and Advanced Measurement Approaches D Appendix D to Part 325 Banks and Banking FEDERAL... Advanced Measurement Approaches Part IGeneral Provisions Section 1Purpose, Applicability, Reservation...

  12. Money income and poverty status of families and persons in the United States: 1986 (advance data from the March 1987 Current Population Survey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welniak Ej; Littman, M S

    1987-07-01

    This report presents data on the income and poverty status of families and persons in the US for 1986. Data were compiled from information collected in the March 1987 Current Population Survey conducted by the Bureau of the Census. 60,500 households were surveyed nationwide. Highlights of the data follow. 1) In 1986, median family income was $29,460, 4.2% higher than the 1985 median of $27,740 after adjusting for inflation. 2) Since 1982, when the last economic recession ended, real median family income rose a total of 10.7%. 3) The median earnings of both men and women working year-round full-time increased significantly in real terms between 1985 and 1986. 4) In 1986, per capita income was $11,670, up 4% from 1985 in real terms. Whites averaged $12,350 per year, Blacks $7,210, and Hispanics $7000, all higher than in 1985. 5) The number of persons below the poverty level was 32.4 million in 1986. The difference between this figure and the 1985 estimate of 33.1 million is not statistically significant. 6) The poverty rate was 13.6% in 1986, compared to 14% in 1985. The 1986 poverty rate was 11% for Whites, 31% for Blacks, 27% for Hispanics, and 16% for persons of other races. 7) The number and percentage of persons in poverty have declined since the recent peak level of 1983, when the number of persons in poverty was 35.3 million and the poverty rate was 15.2%.

  13. Current chemotherapy and new advances in malignant pleural mesothelioma%恶性胸膜间皮瘤治疗新进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗凌; 吴聪

    2009-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive tumor of the pleura. The association between asbestos exposure and the development of MPM has been recognized. The current treatment of MPM includes surgery, radiotherapy,and chemotherapy, but its outcome remains unfavorable. The effects of surgery have not yet been defined because of a lack of randomized trials. The role of radiotherapy in the treatment of MPM remains controversial,as the radiosensitivity of malignant mesothelial cells is modest. The effects of chemotherapy is still relatively poor. Pemetrexed-cisplatin combination regimen has more favorable results in MPM therapy. Muhimodality therapy is regarded as the best treatment of MPM at present.%恶性胸膜间皮瘤是一种胸膜恶性肿瘤,已发现其发生与石棉暴露有关.目前治疗恶性胸膜间皮瘤的方法有手术治疗、化疗和放疗,但效果均不理想.外科手术由于缺乏随机对照研究,其效果仍不确切.放疗因为恶性间皮瘤细胞的放射敏感性一般.故也存在争议.化疗对恶性胸膜间皮瘤的治疗效果相对较差.联合应用培美曲唑与顺铂能达到较好效果.多模式治疗方案被认为是目前治疗恶性胸膜间皮瘤的首选.

  14. Current expert views on metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty. Consensus of the 6th advanced Hip resurfacing course, Ghent, Belgium, May 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Straeten, Catherine; De Smet, Koen A

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the consensus of an international faculty of expert metal-on-metal (MoM) hip resurfacing surgeons, with a combined experience of over 40,000 cases, on the current status of hip resurfacing arthroplasty. Indications, design and metallurgy issues, release of metal ions and adverse soft tissue reactions to particles, management of problematic cases and revisions, as well as required experience and training are covered. The overall consensus is that MoM hip resurfacing should not be banned and should be viewed separately from MoM total hip arthroplasty (THA) with a large diameter head because of the different design and wear behaviour related to the taper/trunnion connection. The use of hip resurfacing has decreased worldwide but specialist centres continue to advocate hip resurfacing in young and active male patients. Regarding age the general recommendation is to avoid hip resurfacing in men older than 65 and in women older than 55, depending on the patient activity and bone quality. Female gender is considered a relative contraindication. Most surgeons would not implant a MoM hip in women who would still like a child. Regardless of gender, there is a consensus not to perform hip resurfacing in case of a femoral head size smaller than 46 mm and in patients with renal insufficiency or with a known metal allergy. Regarding follow-up of hip resurfacing and detection of adverse local tissue reactions, metal ion measurements, MRI and ultrasound are advocated depending on the local expertise. The consensus is that hip resurfacing should be limited to high volume hip surgeons, who are experienced in hip resurfacing or trained to perform hip resurfacing in a specialist centre.

  15. Measurement of the Muon Neutrino Double-Differential Charged Current Quasi-Elastic Like Cross Section on a Hydrocarbon Target at Ev ~ 3.5 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurtado Anampa, Kenyi Paolo [Rio de Janeiro, CBPF

    2016-01-01

    The MINERvA Experiment (Main Injector Experiment v ₋ A interaction) [1] is a highly segmented detector of neutrinos, able to record events with high precision (over than thirteen million event in a four year run), using the NuMI Beam (Neutrino Main Injector) at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory [2]. This thesis presents a measurement of the Charged Current Quasi-Elastic Like1 vμ interaction on polystyrene scintillator (CH) in the MINERvA experiment with neutrino energies between 1.5 and 10 GeV. We use data taken between2 March 2010 and April 2012. The interactions were selected by requiring a negative muon, a reconstructed and identified proton, no michel electrons in the final state (in order to get rid of soft pions decaying) and a low calorimetric recoil energy away from the interaction vertex. The analysis is performed on 66,214 quasi-elastic like event candidates in the detectors tracker region with an estimated purity of 74%. The final measurement reported is a double differential cross sections in terms of the muon longitudinal and transversal momentum observables.

  16. Current major depressive syndrome measured with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI): results from a cross-sectional population-based study of adults in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maske, Ulrike E; Busch, Markus A; Jacobi, Frank; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Seiffert, Ingeburg; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Riedel-Heller, Steffi; Hapke, Ulfert

    2015-04-10

    Prevalence estimates for depression vary considerably by the type of assessment instrument, and there is limited information on their overlap in population-based samples. Our aim was to compare the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) as measures for current major depressive syndrome (MDS) in a large population-based sample. Data derived from the mental health module of the nationwide cross-sectional German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults (DEGS1-MH) (n = 4483; age 18-79 years). MDS in the past two weeks was assessed (a) using the PHQ-9 diagnostic algorithm (PHQ-MDS) and (b) based on CIDI information about the latest symptom occurrence (recency) (CIDI-MDS). Prevalences, overall concordance and percentages of overlap of both MDS measures were determined. Prevalences of affirmed PHQ-9 depression symptoms and the mean and median PHQ-9 sum scores were analyzed per measure. Prevalence of current MDS was 2.7% (95% CI: 2.0-3.6) for PHQ-MDS and 3.9% (95% CI: 3.1-5.0) for CIDI-MDS. The overall agreement between both measures was moderate (kappa: 0.43). Of all the participants, 1.5% (95% CI: 1.0-2.2) were classified as MDS cases by both measures, with 54.5% (95% CI: 42.7-65.9) of PHQ-MDS cases and 37.9% (95% CI: 27.8-49.1) of CIDI-MDS cases also being classified as MDS by the respective other MDS measure. However, 94.8% (95% CI: 93.6-95.8) of the participants were classified as non-MDS by both measures, with 97.5% (95% CI: 96.6-98.1) of non-PHQ-MDS and 98.7% (95% CI: 98.2-99.1) of non-CIDI-MDS being classified as non-MDS by the respective other MDS measure. The mean and median PHQ-9 sum score was higher in those with PHQ-MDS than in those with CIDI-MDS. Both measures have a high level of agreement for ruling out current MDS, but the overlap in their classification of cases is moderate. Our results indicate that they cannot be interpreted as equal measures of the same construct, suggesting

  17. Advances in dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Garry J P

    2014-05-01

    The dental market is replete with new resorative materials marketed on the basis of novel technological advances in materials chemistry, bonding capability or reduced operator time and/or technique sensitivity. This paper aims to consider advances in current materials, with an emphasis on their role in supporting contemporary clinical practice.

  18. Are current UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) obesity risk guidelines useful? Cross-sectional associations with cardiovascular disease risk factors in a large, representative English population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Faiza; Batty, G David

    2013-01-01

    The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has recently released obesity guidelines for health risk. For the first time in the UK, we estimate the utility of these guidelines by relating them to the established cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Health Survey for England (HSE) 2006, a population-based cross-sectional study in England was used with a sample size of 7225 men and women aged ≥35 years (age range: 35-97 years). The following CVD risk factor outcomes were used: hypertension, diabetes, total and high density lipoprotein cholesterol, glycated haemoglobin, fibrinogen, C-reactive protein and Framingham risk score. Four NICE categories of obesity were created based on body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC): no risk (up to normal BMI and low/high WC); increased risk (normal BMI & very high WC, or obese & low WC); high risk (overweight & very high WC, or obese & high WC); and very high risk (obese I & very high WC or obese II/III with any levels of WC. Men and women in the very high risk category had the highest odds ratios (OR) of having unfavourable CVD risk factors compared to those in the no risk category. For example, the OR of having hypertension for those in the very high risk category of the NICE obesity groupings was 2.57 (95% confidence interval 2.06 to 3.21) in men, and 2.15 (1.75 to 2.64) in women. Moreover, a dose-response association between the adiposity groups and most of the CVD risk factors was observed except total cholesterol in men and low HDL in women. Similar results were apparent when the Framingham risk score was the outcome of interest. In conclusion, the current NICE definitions of obesity show utility for a range of CVD risk factors and CVD risk in both men and women.

  19. Prosthetic advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Zach T; Potter, Benjamin K; Vandersea, James; Wolf, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Much of the current prosthetic technology is based on developments that have taken place during or directly following times of war. These developments have evolved and improved over the years, and now there are many more available options to provide a comfortable, cosmetic, and highly functional prosthesis. Even so, problems with fit and function persist. Recent developments have addressed some of the limitations faced by some military amputees. On-board microprocessor-controlled joints are making prosthetic arms and legs more responsive to environmental barriers and easier to control by the user. Advances in surgical techniques will allow more intuitive control and secure attachment to the prosthesis. As surgical techniques progress and permeate into standard practice, more sophisticated powered prosthetic devices will become commonplace, helping to restore neuromuscular loss of function. Prognoses following amputation will certainly rise, factoring into the surgeon's decision to attempt to save a limb versus perform an amputation.

  20. Frontotemporal dementias: Recent advances and current controversies

    OpenAIRE

    Leyton Cristian; Hodges John

    2010-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) syndromes comprise a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative conditions characterized by atrophy in the frontal and temporal lobes. Three main clinical variants are recognized: Behavioral variant (bv-FTD), Semantic dementia (SD), and Progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA). However, logopenic/phonological (LPA) variant has been recently described, showing a distinctive pattern of brain atrophy and often associated to Alzheimer′s disease pathology. The diagno...

  1. Updates on current advances in gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Jowy; Faustine; Sufian, Jomiany Tani

    2011-03-01

    Gene therapy is the attempt to treat diseases by means of genetic manipulation. Numerous challenges remain to be overcome before it becomes available as a safe and effective treatment option. Retroviruses and adenoviruses are among the most commonly used viral vectors in trials. The retrovirus introduces the gene it carries into the target cell genome while the adenovirus introduces the gene into the target cell nucleus without incorporating it into the target cell genome. Other viral vectors such as adeno-associated viruses, pseudotyped viruses and herpes simplex viruses, are also gaining popularity. Proposed non-viral methods for gene transfer include physical methods and the employment of chemical vectors (lipoplexes, polyplexes and inorganic nanoparticles). Recent studies have investigated potential applications of gene therapy in correcting genetic diseases, treating malignant disorders and for treatment of other diseases. Trials on gene therapy for SCID and Leber's congenital amaurosis have achieved considerable success, but the widely publicized adverse reaction in X-linked SCID patient receiving gene therapy raised concerns for safety profile of gene therapy. For that, several methods of improving safety and efficacy of gene therapy have been proposed. At present, the three main gene therapy strategies for treatment of cancer are application to oncolytic viruses, suicide-gene therapy and gene-based immunotherapy. Gendicine, the first approved anticancer drugs based on the use of gene therapy principle, is based on the use of oncolytic viruses. More evidence for wider clinical applications of gene therapy are expected as more gene therapy studies progress from the preclinical phase to clinical trial.

  2. Current Comparison of Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Piet; Trond Bjornard; Brent Dixon; Robert Hill; Gretchen Matthern; David Shropshire

    2007-04-01

    This paper compares potential nuclear fuel cycle strategies – once-through, recycling in thermal reactors, sustained recycle with a mix of thermal and fast reactors, and sustained recycle with fast reactors. Initiation of recycle starts the draw-down of weapons-usable material and starts accruing improvements for geologic repositories and energy sustainability. It reduces the motivation to search for potential second geologic repository sites. Recycle in thermal-spectru

  3. Venezuelan Counseling: Advancement and Current Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, George Davy

    2011-01-01

    In the worldwide community it is not well known that counseling and guidance professional practices have a long tradition in Venezuela. Therefore, this contribution's main purpose is to inform the international audience about past and contemporary counseling in Venezuela. Geographic, demographic, and cultural facts about Venezuela are provided.…

  4. ADVANCED FUELS CAMPAIGN 2013 ACCOMPLISHMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Not Listed

    2013-10-01

    The mission of the Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) is to perform Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) activities for advanced fuel forms (including cladding) to enhance the performance and safety of the nation’s current and future reactors; enhance proliferation resistance of nuclear fuel; effectively utilize nuclear energy resources; and address the longer-term waste management challenges. This includes development of a state-of-the art Research and Development (R&D) infrastructure to support the use of “goal-oriented science-based approach.” In support of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program, AFC is responsible for developing advanced fuels technologies to support the various fuel cycle options defined in the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap, Report to Congress, April 2010. Accomplishments made during fiscal year (FY) 2013 are highlighted in this report, which focuses on completed work and results. The process details leading up to the results are not included; however, the technical contact is provided for each section.

  5. Diverging effects of diabetes mellitus in patients with peripheral artery disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm and the role of advanced glycation end products: : ARTERY study. Protocol for a multicenter cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, L.C.; Boersema, J.; Hillebrands, J.L.; Schalkwijk, C.G.; Meerwaldt, R.; Breek, J.C.; Smit, A. J.; Zeebregts, C. J.; Lefrandt, J.D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is a well-defined risk factor for peripheral artery disease (PAD), but protects against the development and growth of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Diabetes mellitus is associated with arterial stiffening and peripheral arterial media sclerosis. Advanced glycation

  6. Caesarean section: an historical riddle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, S K

    2001-01-01

    Etymologically, the word 'Caesar' originates from the Latin word 'Caedaere' meaning - 'to cut'. So cutting remains the core point, but little is known about the real origin of the history of Caesarean Section. There is evidence that, the ancient Hindus excelled in surgery and many operations were performed, including caesarean section. This operation was mentioned several times in the Mishnah of Rabbi Judah, the first large commentary on the Hebrew Bible. There are also several mythological anecdotes in Hindu, Buddhist and Greek mythologies. The myth of caesarean section did not even escape the keen eyes of William Skakespeare. The landmarks, treatises and the advancement in this operative procedure are presented in this article.

  7. 宁夏玉豆间作现状及栽培技术研究进展%Advances in Researches of Current Situation and Cultivation Technology for Intercropping of Maize and Soybean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵志刚; 罗瑞萍

    2015-01-01

    Aiming at the development prospect of intercropping cultivation of maize and soybean as well as the current situa-tion of application of full mechanization home and abroad, the advances in the researches of maize and soybean intercrop-ping cultivation technology, maize and soybean intercropping integrated technology as well as the situation in the production demonstration and application of full mechanization are summarized. The core technologies with "selection, expansion, con-traction and control" as the main content are put forward, such as the expanding the row spacing and narrowing the plant spacing technology, chemical control technology and pest and disease control etc., as well as the full mechanization integrated cultivation technology.%针对玉米、大豆间作栽培发展前景及国内外玉豆间作全程机械化应用现状,综述了宁夏玉豆间作栽培技术研究进展、玉豆间作集成技术及其全程机械化生产示范与应用情况。提出了玉豆间作扩大行距、缩小株距技术,化控技术,病虫草害防治等“选、扩、缩、控”为主要内容的核心技术及全程机械化集成栽培技术。

  8. Evaluation of robotically controlled advanced endoscopic instruments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reilink, Rob; Kappers, Astrid M.L.; Stramigioli, Stefano; Misra, Sarthak

    Background Advanced flexible endoscopes and instruments with multiple degrees of freedom enable physicians to perform challenging procedures such as the removal of large sections of mucosal tissue. However, these advanced endoscopes are difficult to control and require several physicians to

  9. Advances in Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan BF, Sonveaux P

    2011-01-01

    The book "Advances in Cancer Therapy" is a new addition to the Intech collection of books and aims at providing scientists and clinicians with a comprehensive overview of the state of current knowledge and latest research findings in the area of cancer therapy. For this purpose research articles, clinical investigations and review papers that are thought to improve the readers' understanding of cancer therapy developments and/or to keep them up to date with the most recent advances in this fi...

  10. Enabling Technologies for Ceramic Hot Section Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkat Vedula; Tania Bhatia

    2009-04-30

    Silicon-based ceramics are attractive materials for use in gas turbine engine hot sections due to their high temperature mechanical and physical properties as well as lower density than metals. The advantages of utilizing ceramic hot section components include weight reduction, and improved efficiency as well as enhanced power output and lower emissions as a result of reducing or eliminating cooling. Potential gas turbine ceramic components for industrial, commercial and/or military high temperature turbine applications include combustor liners, vanes, rotors, and shrouds. These components require materials that can withstand high temperatures and pressures for long duration under steam-rich environments. For Navy applications, ceramic hot section components have the potential to increase the operation range. The amount of weight reduced by utilizing a lighter gas turbine can be used to increase fuel storage capacity while a more efficient gas turbine consumes less fuel. Both improvements enable a longer operation range for Navy ships and aircraft. Ceramic hot section components will also be beneficial to the Navy's Growth Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and VAATE (Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engines) initiatives in terms of reduced weight, cooling air savings, and capability/cost index (CCI). For DOE applications, ceramic hot section components provide an avenue to achieve low emissions while improving efficiency. Combustors made of ceramic material can withstand higher wall temperatures and require less cooling air. Ability of the ceramics to withstand high temperatures enables novel combustor designs that have reduced NO{sub x}, smoke and CO levels. In the turbine section, ceramic vanes and blades do not require sophisticated cooling schemes currently used for metal components. The saved cooling air could be used to further improve efficiency and power output. The objectives of this contract were to develop technologies critical for ceramic hot section

  11. Diverging effects of diabetes mellitus in patients with peripheral artery disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm and the role of advanced glycation end products:: ARTERY study. Protocol for a multicenter cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Vos, L.C. de; Boersema, J.; Hillebrands, J. L.; Schalkwijk, C. G.; Meerwaldt, R.; Breek, J.C.; Smit, A. J.; C. J. Zeebregts; Lefrandt, J.D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is a well-defined risk factor for peripheral artery disease (PAD), but protects against the development and growth of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Diabetes mellitus is associated with arterial stiffening and peripheral arterial media sclerosis. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are increased in diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. AGEs are known to form cross-links between proteins and are associated with arterial stiffness. Whether AGEs contr...

  12. Advanced healthcare materials

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    Advanced materials are attracting strong interest in the fundamental as well as applied sciences and are being extensively explored for their potential usage in a range of healthcare technological and biological applications. Advanced Healthcare Nanomaterials summarises the current status of knowledge in the fields of advanced materials for functional therapeutics, point-of-care diagnostics, translational materials, up and coming bio-engineering devices. The book highlights the key features which enable engineers to design stimuli-responsive smart nanoparticles, novel biomaterials, nan

  13. Current and emerging techniques in gastrointestinal imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McSweeney S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This review is devoted to current and emerging techniques in gastrointestinal (GI imaging. It is divided into three sections focusing on areas that are both interesting and challenging: imaging of the small bowel and appendix, imaging of the colon and rectum and finally liver and pancreas in the upper abdomen. The first section covers cross-sectional imaging of the small bowel using the techniques of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT (including CT enterography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The evaluation of mesenteric ischemia and GI tract bleeding using MDCT angiography is also reviewed. Current imaging practice in the evaluation of appendix is also reviewed and illustrated. The second section reviews CT and MR colonography and imaging of the rectum. It describes CT virtual colonoscopy (CTVC with emphasis on the advantages and disadvantages of the technique with discussion of the role of CTVC in screening. The intriguing topic of MR colonography (MRC is also reviewed. Imaging of the rectum with emphasis on imaging of rectal cancer is described with the roles of CT, MR, endoluminal ultrasound and positron emission tomography scanning discussed. The final section reviews current and emerging techniques in liver imaging with the role of ultrasound including contrast ultrasound, MDCT and MR (including contrast agents discussed. The new developments and applications of imaging of pancreatic disease are discussed with emphasis on the role of MDCT and MRI with gadolinium. This review highlights the current role and advancement of imaging techniques with new diagnostic and prognostic information pertinent to gastrointestinal disease continuing to emerge.

  14. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN ACL RECONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddie H. Fu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Current Concepts in ACL Reconstruction is a complete reference text composed of the most thorough collection of topics on the ACL and its surgical reconstruction compiled, with contributions from some of the world's experts and most experienced ACL surgeons. Various procedures mentioned throughout the text are also demonstrated in an accompanying video CD-ROM. PURPOSE Composing a single, comprehensive and complete information source on ACL including basic sciences, clinical issues, latest concepts and surgical techniques, from evaluation to outcome, from history to future, editors and contributors have targeted to keep the audience pace with the latest concepts and techniques for the evaluation and the treatment of ACL injuries. FEATURES The text is composed of 27 chapters in 6 sections. The first section is mostly about basic sciences, also history of the ACL, imaging, clinical approach to adolescent and pediatric patients are subjected. In the second section, Graft Choices and Arthroscopy Portals for ACL Reconstruction are mentioned. The third section is about the technique and the outcome of the single-bundle ACL reconstruction. The fourth chapter includes the techniques and outcome of the double-bundle ACL reconstruction. In the fifth chapter revision, navigation technology, rehabilitation and the evaluation of the outcome of ACL reconstruction is subjected. The sixth/the last chapter is about the future advances to reach: What We Have Learned and the Future of ACL Reconstruction. AUDIENCE Orthopedic residents, sports traumatology and knee surgery fellows, orthopedic surgeons, also scientists in basic sciences or clinicians who are studying or planning a research on ACL forms the audience group of this book. ASSESSMENT This is the latest, the most complete and comprehensive textbook of ACL reconstruction produced by the editorial work up of two pioneer and masters "Freddie H. Fu MD and Steven B. Cohen MD" with the contribution of world

  15. Advance care directives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... advance directive; Do-not-resuscitate - advance directive; Durable power of attorney - advance care directive; POA - advance care directive; Health care agent - advance care directive; Health care proxy - ...

  16. Advanced Multifunctional Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    and UV durability of then current chrome free TT-P-2756 SPTC • Leverage APC technology into SPTC • Coating uses same fluoropolyurethane technology...as APC currently used on C-17 • Leverage recent advances in chrome free corrosion inhibitor technology • State of the art chrome free corrosion...coat exposed metal Aluminum Base Metal Original Finish System Aged APC Topcoat Conversion Coat Chromic Acid Anodize Aluminum Cladding Original Primer

  17. Advanced higher English

    CERN Document Server

    Bridges, Ann

    2016-01-01

    The only book to support the compulsory Textual Analysis component of Advanced Higher English. Written by subject experts, this book contains short extracts of prose fiction, non-fiction, poetry and drama with analysis and commentary to assist students' understanding and their ability to critically assess their reading of literature. Short writing tasks, linked to the analysis of particular techniques, help to develop aspects of creative writing skills. The Textual Analysis component forms a compulsory section of the Advanced Higher English syllabus and accounts for 20% of the final grade;

  18. Advanced linear algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Cooperstein, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Linear Algebra, Second Edition takes a gentle approach that starts with familiar concepts and then gradually builds to deeper results. Each section begins with an outline of previously introduced concepts and results necessary for mastering the new material. By reviewing what students need to know before moving forward, the text builds a solid foundation upon which to progress. The new edition of this successful text focuses on vector spaces and the maps between them that preserve their structure (linear transformations). Designed for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate stud

  19. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2014-01-01

    Advances in Chemical Physics is the only series of volumes available that explores the cutting edge of research in chemical physics. This is the only series of volumes available that presents the cutting edge of research in chemical physics.Includes contributions from experts in this field of research.Contains a representative cross-section of research that questions established thinking on chemical solutions.Structured with an editorial framework that makes the book an excellent supplement to an advanced graduate class in physical chemistry or chemical physics.

  20. GHRSST L3C global sub-skin Sea Surface Temperature from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on Metop satellites (currently Metop-B) (GDS V2) produced by OSI SAF (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A global Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 3 Collated (L3C) dataset derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)...

  1. GHRSST L3C global sub-skin Sea Surface Temperature from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on Metop satellites (currently Metop-A) (GDS V2) produced by OSI SAF (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A global Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 3 Collated (L3C) dataset derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)...

  2. Advanced Turbine Systems Program. Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-03-01

    The Allison Gas Turbine Division (Allison) of General Motors Corporation conducted the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program feasibility study (Phase I) in accordance with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center`s (METC`s) contract DE-AC21-86MC23165 A028. This feasibility study was to define and describe a natural gas-fired reference system which would meet the objective of {ge}60% overall efficiency, produce nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions 10% less than the state-of-the-art without post combustion controls, and cost of electricity of the N{sup th} system to be approximately 10% below that of the current systems. In addition, the selected natural gas-fired reference system was expected to be adaptable to coal. The Allison proposed reference system feasibility study incorporated Allison`s long-term experience from advanced aerospace and military technology programs. This experience base is pertinent and crucial to the success of the ATS program. The existing aeroderivative technology base includes high temperature hot section design capability, single crystal technology, advanced cooling techniques, high temperature ceramics, ultrahigh turbomachinery components design, advanced cycles, and sophisticated computer codes.

  3. Advances in chemical physics advances in liquid crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Prigogine, Ilya; Vij, Jagdish K

    2009-01-01

    Prigogine and Rice's highly acclaimed series, Advances in Chemical Physics, provides a forum for critical, authoritative reviews of current topics in every area of chemical physics. Edited by J.K. Vij, this volume focuses on recent advances in liquid crystals with significant, up-to-date chapters authored by internationally recognized researchers in the field.