WorldWideScience

Sample records for current scientific understanding

  1. Scientific progress: Knowledge versus understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellsén, Finnur

    2016-04-01

    What is scientific progress? On Alexander Bird's epistemic account of scientific progress, an episode in science is progressive precisely when there is more scientific knowledge at the end of the episode than at the beginning. Using Bird's epistemic account as a foil, this paper develops an alternative understanding-based account on which an episode in science is progressive precisely when scientists grasp how to correctly explain or predict more aspects of the world at the end of the episode than at the beginning. This account is shown to be superior to the epistemic account by examining cases in which knowledge and understanding come apart. In these cases, it is argued that scientific progress matches increases in scientific understanding rather than accumulations of knowledge. In addition, considerations having to do with minimalist idealizations, pragmatic virtues, and epistemic value all favor this understanding-based account over its epistemic counterpart.

  2. Figuring out a scientific understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Clive

    1993-12-01

    This article attempts to place analogy and metaphor within the wider context of all figurative language, and to trace the relationship between that kind of expression and the supposedly literal and direct accounts of nature that scientists have built up.I explore the functions of figures of speech in the development of new scientific ideas, and trace how they fade or die as each area of scientific knowledge matures. What we then take to be the literal words of scientific description are in effect the remnants of old figures of speech that have grown so familiar that their earlier metaphorical quality is easily overlooked. The conventional separation of figurative and literal cannot be sustained, and a new understanding of their relationship is needed.The practical implications of this analysis are to do with how we can reactivate the dormant metaphors in ordinary scientific language, so that learners may hear again the human voice of scientists who developed the ways of talking we now take for granted. To reactivate the system of thought behind any established way of talking, we must be able to get the learners to understand that language works as a medium of interpretation and persuasion, and not simply a system of descriptive labeling. These two views of language are compared and contrasted.

  3. Taming theory with thought experiments: Understanding and scientific progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Michael T

    2016-08-01

    I claim that one way thought experiments contribute to scientific progress is by increasing scientific understanding. Understanding does not have a currently accepted characterization in the philosophical literature, but I argue that we already have ways to test for it. For instance, current pedagogical practice often requires that students demonstrate being in either or both of the following two states: 1) Having grasped the meaning of some relevant theory, concept, law or model, 2) Being able to apply that theory, concept, law or model fruitfully to new instances. Three thought experiments are presented which have been important historically in helping us pass these tests, and two others that cause us to fail. Then I use this operationalization of understanding to clarify the relationships between scientific thought experiments, the understanding they produce, and the progress they enable. I conclude that while no specific instance of understanding (thus conceived) is necessary for scientific progress, understanding in general is.

  4. Speaking with Numbers: Scientific Literacy and Public Understanding of Science

    OpenAIRE

    SEVGİ, Levent

    2006-01-01

    Public understanding of science and scientific literacy is discussed. Scientific method, scientific process and scientific filter are reviewed accordingly. Basic terms of measurement and numerical calculation are outlined. Finally, fundamental requirements of scientific literacy and critical response skills are presented.

  5. Developing students' understanding of scientific modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Christine Virginia

    Teaching students to create and use scientific models as well as to understand their nature has become an increasingly important goal in science education. This thesis reports on the evaluation of the Model-Enhanced ThinkerTools curriculum, a ten and a half week physics curriculum designed to develop students' understanding of scientific modeling. In the curricular trials, eight classes of seventh grade students participated in model-oriented activities such as creating non-Newtonian computer microworlds to embody their conceptual models of force and motion, evaluating the accuracy and plausibility of their models, and reflecting on the nature of models. Analysis of pre- and post-curricular assessments as well as student research books, project reports, and in-depth interviews indicate that students had a significantly better understanding of the nature and utility of models after completing the Model-Enhanced ThinkerTools curriculum. Students also gained an understanding of a number of processes for developing and evaluating models. While interacting with the software and engaging in reflective discussions about the nature of models, students learned that models can include abstract representations and that models are useful for predicting events and testing ideas. Students also demonstrated sophisticated understanding of models in their interviews several months after the curriculum, particularly about the nature and. utility of models. Further, the curriculum developed students' conceptual models of force and motion as well as their inquiry skills and epistemological beliefs about the nature of scientific knowledge and learning. Correlations among the four pre/post curricular assessments suggest that modeling knowledge may play a role in the acquisition of the other types of knowledge. These results indicate that, while modeling knowledge may be difficult to develop, progress can be made by engaging students in generating and reflecting on the nature of models

  6. Scientific Challenges for Understanding the Quantum Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-10-16

    A workshop titled "Scientific Challenges for Understanding the Quantum Universe" was held December 9-11, 2008, at the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center-National Accelerator Laboratory. The primary purpose of the meeting was to examine how computing at the extreme scale can contribute to meeting forefront scientific challenges in particle physics, particle astrophysics and cosmology. The workshop was organized around five research areas with associated panels. Three of these, "High Energy Theoretical Physics," "Accelerator Simulation," and "Experimental Particle Physics," addressed research of the Office of High Energy Physics’ Energy and Intensity Frontiers, while the"Cosmology and Astrophysics Simulation" and "Astrophysics Data Handling, Archiving, and Mining" panels were associated with the Cosmic Frontier.

  7. Understanding Scientific Misconduct: What Do We Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowledge: Creation, Diffusion, Utilization, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Ten articles in this special section address the incidence and nature of scientific misconduct in the research publication process. Discussed are definitions of the problem, its prevalence, policies which may be developed to address ethical issues, and the results of a survey of the scientific community. (EA)

  8. Understanding Peer Review of Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of American Universities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    An important factor in the success of America's national research system is that federal funds for university-based research are awarded primarily through peer review, which uses panels of scientific experts, or "peers," to evaluate the quality of grant proposals. In this competitive process, proposals compete for resources based on their…

  9. Understanding the Impact of an Apprenticeship-Based Scientific Research Program on High School Students' Understanding of Scientific Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydeniz, Mehmet; Baksa, Kristen; Skinner, Jane

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the impact of an apprenticeship program on high school students' understanding of the nature of scientific inquiry. Data related to seventeen students' understanding of science and scientific inquiry were collected through open-ended questionnaires. Findings suggest that although engagement in authentic…

  10. Understanding the Impact of an Apprenticeship-Based Scientific Research Program on High School Students' Understanding of Scientific Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydeniz, Mehmet; Baksa, Kristen; Skinner, Jane

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the impact of an apprenticeship program on high school students' understanding of the nature of scientific inquiry. Data related to seventeen students' understanding of science and scientific inquiry were collected through open-ended questionnaires. Findings suggest that although engagement in authentic…

  11. Between understanding and appreciation. Current science communication in Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Hvidtfelt Nielsen

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I use the concepts “understanding of science” and “appreciation of science” to analyze selected case studies of current science communication in Denmark. The Danish science communication system has many similarities with science communication in other countries: the increasing political and scientific interest in science communication, the co-existence of many different kinds of science communication, and the multiple uses of the concepts of understanding vs. appreciation of science. I stress the international aspects of science communication, the national politico-scientific context as well as more local contexts as equally important conditions for understanding current Danish science communication.

  12. Dialogic Framing of Scientific Content for Conceptual and Epistemic Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Michael J.; Wargo, Brian M.

    2012-01-01

    This article draws on M. M. Bakhtin's (1981) notion of dialogism to articulate what it means to understand a scientific idea. In science, understanding an idea is both conceptual and epistemic and is exhibited by an ability to use it in explanation and argumentation. Some distillation of these activities implies that dialogic understanding of a…

  13. Science Teachers’ Understanding of Scientific Inquiry In Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adisendjaja, Y. H.; Rustaman, N. Y.; Redjeki, S.; Satori, D.

    2017-02-01

    Inquiry is a main goal of science education reform around the world. This study investigated science teachers’ understanding of scientific inquiry in teacher professional development program. The content of the program was focused on the nature of science and scientific inquiry. The program was conducted once in a week, every Saturday for 4 weeks, so it took about 30 hours. Twenty five science teachers from 3 districts with 5-25 years’ experience were followed this program. Views About Scientific Inquiry modified was administered to all participants before and after TPD. VASI consists of 8 questions: 1) Scientific investigations all begin with a question and do not necessarily test a hypothesis, 2) There is no single set or sequence of steps followed in all investigations, 3) Inquiry procedures are guided by the question asked, 4) All scientists performing the same procedures may not get the same results, 5) Inquiry procedures can influence results, 6) Research conclusions must be consistent with the data collected, 7) Scientific data are not the same as scientific evidence, and 8) Explanations are developed from a combination of collected data and what is already known. Then, all responses are categorized as informed, partially informed, and naive. Results indicated that most of science teachers were not have good understanding of scientific inquiry. 30 hours teacher professional programs led to small measurable enhancements in teachers’ understanding of scientific inquiry. Based on these findings, preservice and in-service program should focus on science education reform include scientific inquiry.

  14. Scientific Literacy: The Role of Goal-Directed Reading and Evaluation in Understanding Scientific Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, M. Anne; Richter, Tobias; Rouet, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we examine the mental processes and representations that are required of laypersons when learning about science issues from texts. We begin by defining scientific literacy as the ability to understand and critically evaluate scientific content in order to achieve one's goals. We then present 3 challenges of learning from…

  15. Between understanding and appreciation. Current science communication in Denmark

    OpenAIRE

    Kristian Hvidtfelt Nielsen.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper I use the concepts “understanding of science” and “appreciation of science” to analyze selected case studies of current science communication in Denmark. The Danish science communication system has many similarities with science communication in other countries: the increasing political and scientific interest in science communication, the co-existence of many different kinds of science communication, and the multiple uses of the concepts of understanding vs. appreciation of sci...

  16. Predictors of scientific understanding of middle school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strate, Joshua Matthew

    The purpose of this study was to determine if middle school student scientific understanding could be predicted by the variables: standardized 5th grade score in science, standardized 5th grade score in mathematics, standardized 5th grade score in reading, student attitude towards science, socioeconomic status, gender, and ethnicity. The areas of the comprehensive literature review were trends in science learning and teaching, research in the K-12 science education arena, what factors have influenced K-12 science education, scientific understanding, what research has been done on K-12 scientific understanding, and what factors have influenced science understanding in the K-12 arenas. Based on the results of the literature review, the researcher of this study examined a sample of middle school 8th grade students. An Attitude Towards Science Survey (SATS) Simpson & Oliver (1990) and a Survey of Scientific Understandings (Klapper, DeLucia, & Trent, 1993) were administered to these 116 middle school 8th grade students drawn from a total population of 1109 who attend this middle school in a typical county in Florida during the 2010- 2011 school year. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to test each sub-hypothesis and to provide a model that attempted to predict student scientific understanding. Seven null sub-hypotheses were formed to determine if there were significant relationships between student scientific understanding and the abovementioned variables. The results of the tests of the seven null sub-hypotheses showed that the sub-hypothesis that involved socioeconomic status was rejected, which indicated that the socioeconomic status of a family does influence the level of scientific understanding of a student. Low SES students performed lower on the scientific understanding survey, on average, than high SES students. This study can be a source of information for teachers in low-income schools by recognizing potential areas of concern for low

  17. Understanding Scientific Texts: From Structure to Process and General Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensar, Ferhat; Sallabas, Muhammed Eyyüp

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the historical development of experimental research on learning processes from scientific texts has been introduced. Then a detailed analysis of the main contributions of cognitive science has been provided and the theoretical developments that are considered to have had a major role in the comprehension and understanding of…

  18. Socioscientific Issues: A Path Towards Advanced Scientific Literacy and Improved Conceptual Understanding of Socially Controversial Scientific Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzino, Dean William

    This thesis investigates the use of socioscientific issues (SSI) in the high school science classroom as an introduction to argumentation and socioscientific reasoning, with the goal of improving students' scientific literacy (SL). Current research is reviewed that supports the likelihood of students developing a greater conceptual understanding of scientific theories as well as a deeper understanding of the nature of science (NOS), through participation in informal and formal forms of argumentation in the context of SSI. Significant gains in such understanding may improve a student's ability to recognize the rigor, legitimacy, and veracity of scientific claims and better discern science from pseudoscience. Furthermore, students that participate in significant SSI instruction by negotiating a range of science-related social issues can make significant gains in content knowledge and develop the life-long skills of argumentation and evidence-based reasoning, goals not possible in traditional lecture-based science instruction. SSI-based instruction may therefore help students become responsible citizens. This synthesis also suggests that that the improvements in science literacy and NOS understanding that develop from sustained engagement in SSI-based instruction will better prepare students to examine and scrutinize socially controversial scientific theories (i.e., evolution, global warming, and the Big Bang).

  19. On multi-level thinking and scientific understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Michael Edgeworth

    2017-10-01

    Professor Duzheng YE's name has been familiar to me ever since my postdoctoral years at MIT with Professors Jule CHARNEY and Norman PHILLIPS, back in the late 1960s. I had the enormous pleasure of meeting Professor YE personally in 1992 in Beijing. His concern to promote the very best science and to use it well, and his thinking on multi-level orderly human activities, reminds me not only of the communication skills we need as scientists but also of the multi-level nature of science itself. Here I want to say something (a) about what science is; (b) about why multi-level thinking—and taking more than one viewpoint—is so important for scientific as well as for other forms of understanding; and (c) about what is meant, at a deep level, by "scientific understanding" and trying to communicate it, not only with lay persons but also across professional disciplines. I hope that Professor YE would approve.

  20. Current understanding of the aeronomy of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Andrew F.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper provides a short overview of our current understanding of the upper atmosphere/ionosphere of Mars including the escaping neutral atmosphere to space that plays a key role in the current state of the Mars upper atmosphere. The proper definition of the word "aeronomy" relates to the upper atmosphere where ionization is important. Currently there is a paucity of measurements of the internal physical structure of the Martian upper atmosphere/ionosphere. Much that we know has been deduced from theoretical models that predict many more things than thus far measured. The newest Mars orbital missions, the US MAVEN and Indian MOM missions, just beginning their science analyses, will provide the measurements needed to fully characterize the aeronomy of Mars.

  1. Resistance to AHAS inhibitor herbicides: current understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qin; Powles, Stephen B

    2014-09-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) inhibitor herbicides currently comprise the largest site-of-action group (with 54 active ingredients across five chemical groups) and have been widely used in world agriculture since they were first introduced in 1982. Resistance evolution in weeds to AHAS inhibitors has been rapid and identified in populations of many weed species. Often, evolved resistance is associated with point mutations in the target AHAS gene; however non-target-site enhanced herbicide metabolism occurs as well. Many AHAS gene resistance mutations can occur and be rapidly enriched owing to a high initial resistance gene frequency, simple and dominant genetic inheritance and lack of major fitness cost of the resistance alleles. Major advances in the elucidation of the crystal structure of the AHAS (Arabidopsis thaliana) catalytic subunit in complex with various AHAS inhibitor herbicides have greatly improved current understanding of the detailed molecular interactions between AHAS, cofactors and herbicides. Compared with target-site resistance, non-target-site resistance to AHAS inhibitor herbicides is less studied and hence less understood. In a few well-studied cases, non-target-site resistance is due to enhanced rates of herbicide metabolism (metabolic resistance), mimicking that occurring in tolerant crop species and often involving cytochrome P450 monooxygenases. However, the specific herbicide-metabolising, resistance-endowing genes are yet to be identified in resistant weed species. The current state of mechanistic understanding of AHAS inhibitor herbicide resistance is reviewed, and outstanding research issues are outlined.

  2. Measurements of student understanding on complex scientific reasoning problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Alisa Sau-Lin

    While there has been much discussion of cognitive processes underlying effective scientific teaching, less is known about the response nature of assessments targeting processes of scientific reasoning specific to biology content. This study used multiple-choice (m-c) and short-answer essay student responses to evaluate progress in high-order reasoning skills. In a pilot investigation of student responses on a non-content-based test of scientific thinking, it was found that some students showed a pre-post gain on the m-c test version while showing no gain on a short-answer essay version of the same questions. This result led to a subsequent research project focused on differences between alternate versions of tests of scientific reasoning. Using m-c and written responses from biology tests targeted toward the skills of (1) reasoning with a model and (2) designing controlled experiments, test score frequencies, factor analysis, and regression models were analyzed to explore test format differences. Understanding the format differences in tests is important for the development of practical ways to identify student gains in scientific reasoning. The overall results suggested test format differences. Factor analysis revealed three interpretable factors---m-c format, genetics content, and model-based reasoning. Frequency distributions on the m-c and open explanation portions of the hybrid items revealed that many students answered the m-c portion of an item correctly but gave inadequate explanations. In other instances students answered the m-c portion incorrectly yet demonstrated sufficient explanation or answered the m-c correctly and also provided poor explanations. When trying to fit test score predictors for non-associated student measures---VSAT, MSAT, high school grade point average, or final course grade---the test scores accounted for close to zero percent of the variance. Overall, these results point to the importance of using multiple methods of testing and of

  3. Radiodermatitis: A Review of Our Current Understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manni; Alavi, Afsaneh; Wong, Rebecca; Akita, Sadanori

    2016-06-01

    Radiodermatitis (radiation dermatitis, radiation-induced skin reactions, or radiation injury) is a significant side effect of ionizing radiation delivered to the skin during cancer treatment as well as a result of nuclear attacks and disasters, such as that which occurred in Fukushima in 2011. More specifically, 95 % of cancer patients receiving radiation therapy will develop some form of radiodermatitis, including erythema, dry desquamation, and moist desquamation. These radiation skin reactions result in a myriad of complications, including delays in treatment, diminished aesthetic appeal, and reduced quality of life. Recent technological advancements and novel treatment regimens have only been successful in partly ameliorating these adverse side effects. This article examines the current knowledge surrounding the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, differential diagnoses, prevention, and management of radiodermatitis. Future research should examine therapies that incorporate the current understanding of the pathophysiology of radiodermatitis while measuring effectiveness using objective and universal outcome measures.

  4. Children's understanding of scientific concepts: A developmental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickerton, Gillian Valerie

    Combining theory-oriented inquiry and research that aims to improve instruction is a major goal of neo-Piagetian theory. Within this tradition, Case's (1992) developmental model enables educational researchers to conduct a detailed analysis of the structural and conceptual changes that occur in children's representation of knowledge in different domains at various points in their development. In so doing, it is now possible for educators to first assess children's "entering competence" in a specific subject and then set developmentally realistic instructional goals. Using Case's (1992) model as a theoretical framework, a developmental study was conducted investigating children's understanding of scientific phenomena, specifically buoyancy, at the ages of 6, 8, and 10 years. The main goal was to determine whether or not children's conceptual levels of understanding change systematically with age in a progressive manner consistent with neo-Piagetian stages of development hypothesized by Case. Participants attended one elementary school in a suburban school district near Vancouver, B.C. Sixty children were individually administered a set of five buoyancy tasks that varied in level of difficulty and involved objects of different weights, shapes and sizes. Each student was asked to predict whether an object would float or sink in different liquids and to support their prediction with an explanation. Analyses using the neo-Piagetian approach of articulating the semantic and syntactic nature of children's mental structures were conducted on the students' responses. Shape, size, weight and substance were identified as the semantic components of buoyancy which are syntactically related Using Case's dimensional metric for classifying different levels of conceptual understanding of buoyancy, the results of the study confirmed that children's understanding of buoyancy did progress through the developmental sequence as hypothesized. The structural progression from

  5. 76 FR 17962 - Strengthening the Scientific Understanding of Climate Change Impacts on Freshwater Resources of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... Geological Survey Strengthening the Scientific Understanding of Climate Change Impacts on Freshwater... titled ``Strengthening the Scientific Understanding of Climate Change Impacts on Freshwater Resources of the United States''. The report reviews key issues related to freshwater resource data and...

  6. Current Understandings of Plant Nonhost Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Ah; Lee, Hye-Young; Seo, Eunyoung; Lee, Joohyun; Kim, Saet-Byul; Oh, Soohyun; Choi, Eunbi; Choi, Eunhye; Lee, So Eui; Choi, Doil

    2017-01-01

    Nonhost resistance, a resistance of plant species against all nonadapted pathogens, is considered the most durable and efficient immune system of plants but yet remains elusive. The underlying mechanism of nonhost resistance has been investigated at multiple levels of plant defense for several decades. In this review, we have comprehensively surveyed the latest literature on nonhost resistance in terms of preinvasion, metabolic defense, pattern-triggered immunity, effector-triggered immunity, defense signaling, and possible application in crop protection. Overall, we summarize the current understanding of nonhost resistance mechanisms. Pre- and postinvasion is not much deviated from the knowledge on host resistance, except for a few specific cases. Further insights on the roles of the pattern recognition receptor gene family, multiple interactions between effectors from nonadapted pathogen and plant factors, and plant secondary metabolites in host range determination could expand our knowledge on nonhost resistance and provide efficient tools for future crop protection using combinational biotechnology approaches. [Formula: see text] Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license .

  7. Scientific understanding and clinical management of Dupuytren disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Barbara; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2010-12-01

    Dupuytren disease (DD) is a fibroproliferative disorder of unknown etiology that often results in shortening and thickening of the palmar fascia, leading to permanent and irreversible flexion contracture of the digits. This Review provides a detailed update of the scientific understanding of DD and its clinical management, with perspectives on emerging research and therapy. Established risk factors include genetic predisposition and ethnicity, as well as sex and age. Several environmental risk factors (some considered controversial) include smoking, alcohol intake, trauma, diabetes, epilepsy and use of anticonvulsant drugs, and exposure to vibration. DD has been variously attributed to the presence of oxygen free radicals, trauma to the palmar fascia, or aberrant immune responses with altered antigen presentation, or to interactions between these proposed mechanisms. The presence of immune cells and related phenomena in DD-affected tissue suggests that DD is possibly immune-related. Mechanically, digital contracture is caused by myofibroblasts in the DD palmar fascia; however, the exact origin of this cell type remains unknown. The mainstay of treatment is surgical release or excision of the affected palmodigital tissue, but symptoms often recur. Nonsurgical correction of DD contractures can be achieved by Clostridium histolyticum collagenase injection, although the long-term safety and recurrence rate of this procedure requires further assessment.

  8. Annotation of Articles from Scientific American and Student Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, John, II

    1976-01-01

    Reports on a study in which high school biology students were divided into two groups: one read "Scientific American" articles and the other group read annotated "Scientific American" articles. Although there was no significant difference between means on an achievement measure of the groups, the author reports that students preferred the…

  9. Current understanding in pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tess McPherson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been advances in our understanding of the complex pathogenesis of atopic eczema over the past few decades. This article examines the multiple factors which are implicated in this process.

  10. Progress in understanding halo current at JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccardo, V.; Arnoux, G.; Beaumont, P.; Hacquin, S.; Hobirk, J.; Howell, D.; Huber, A.; Joffrin, E.; Koslowski, R.; Lam, N.; Leggate, H.; Rachlew, E.; Sergienko, G.; Stephen, A.; Todd, T.; Zerbini, M.; Delogu, R.; Grando, L.; Marcuzzi, D.; Peruzzo, S.; Pomaro, N.; Sonato, P.; JET EFDA Contributors

    2009-05-01

    The poloidal distribution of the halo current density on the top dump plate in JET can now be measured thanks to a new set of Rogowskii coils. These are the first measurements in JET able to offer an insight in the width of the halo current interaction with the wall. Therefore they offer both validation of the assumption made for JET disruption design criteria and one additional point in the extrapolation of the expected halo current width, and hence halo current density (and related local electro-mechanical loads on in-vessel components) for ITER. During upward events, the measured current density is consistent with the measured total poloidal halo current. The halo footprint extends over most of the upper dump plate, converting to a halo current flux tube width of ~100 mm. A set of four toridal field pick-up coils installed 90° apart now allows a more accurate measurement of the poloidal halo current, in particular its toroidal peaking factor, and direct comparison between halo and plasma asymmetries.

  11. Scientists and Scientific Thinking: Understanding Scientific Thinking through an Investigation of Scientists Views about Superstitions and Religious Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, Richard K.; Lay, Mark C.; Taylor, Neil

    2008-01-01

    Scientific literacy is explored in this paper which describes two studies that seek to understand a particular feature of the nature of science; namely scientists' habits of mind. The research investigated scientists' views of scientific evidence and how scientists judge evidence claims. The first study is concerned with scientists' views of what…

  12. How the World Gains Understanding of a Planet: Analysis of Scientific Understanding in Earth Sciences and of the Communication of Earth-Scientific Explanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voute, S.; Kleinhans, M. G.; de Regt, H.

    2010-12-01

    A scientific explanation for a phenomenon is based on relevant theory and initial and background conditions. Scientific understanding, on the other hand, requires intelligibility, which means that a scientist can recognise qualitative characteristic consequences of the theory without doing the actual calculations, and apply it to develop further explanations and predictions. If explanation and understanding are indeed fundamentally different, then it may be possible to convey understanding of earth-scientific phenomena to laymen without the full theoretical background. The aim of this thesis is to analyze how scientists and laymen gain scientific understanding in Earth Sciences, based on the newest insights in the philosophy of science, pedagogy, and science communication. All three disciplines have something to say about how humans learn and understand, even if at very different levels of scientists, students, children or the general public. If different disciplines with different approaches identify and quantify the same theory in the same manner, then there is likely to be something “real” behind the theory. Comparing methodology and learning styles of the different disciplines within the Earth Sciences and by critically analyze earth-scientific exhibitions in different museums may provide insight in the different approaches for earth-scientific explanation and communication. In order to gain earth-scientific understanding, a broad suite of tools is used, such as maps and images, symbols and diagrams, cross-sections and sketches, categorization and classification, modelling, laboratory experiments, (computer) simulations and analogies, remote sensing, and fieldwork. All these tools have a dual nature, containing both theoretical and embodied components. Embodied knowledge is created by doing the actual modelling, intervening in experiments and doing fieldwork. Scientific practice includes discovery and exploration, data collection and analyses, verification

  13. Between understanding and appreciation. Current science communication in Denmark (Danish original version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Hvidtfelt Nielsen

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I use the concepts “understanding of science” and “appreciation of science” to analyze selected case studies of current science communication in Denmark. The Danish science communication system has many similarities with science communication in other countries: the increasing political and scientific interest in science communication, the co-existence of many different kinds of science communication, and the multiple uses of the concepts of understanding vs. appreciation of science. I stress the international aspects of science communication, the national politico-scientific context as well as more local contexts as equally important conditions for understanding current Danish science communication.

  14. New stage of scientific understanding of homeopathic phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly Alekseevich Komissarenko

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Statements that homeopathy failed scientific testing and that it is a mock-science based on placebo effect are frequent in modern mass media. Their authors disregard not only results of many studies but also the effect of homeopathy in coma patients, infants, animals, germs and plants. Homeopathy is criticised due to lack of statistically acceptable studies and an accepted effect mechanism laid out in principles of modern science. However, homeopathy not only stood the time test but also showed potential for further implementation. Scientific studies, active use of homeopathy in medical practice help to resolve crisis in modern therapy by of treatment and prevention cost efficiency

  15. Science and Creativity: The Importance of Ontology for Scientific Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lee

    2010-01-01

    The history of science presented by Hisham B. Ghassib (2010) on his article, "Where Does Creativity Fit into a Productivist Industrial Model of Knowledge Production?," reveals the significance of knowledge generating action throughout human history. Ghassib's (2010) paper explores the embedded nature of scientific practise and in doing so offers…

  16. Concussions in soccer: a current understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Michael L; Kasasbeh, Aimen S; Baird, Lissa Catherine; Amene, Chiazo; Skeen, Jeff; Marshall, Larry

    2012-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant public health problem in the United States, with approximately 1.5-2 million TBIs occurring each year. However, it is believed that these figures underestimate the true toll of TBI. Soccer is the most popular sport in the world and has a following of millions in the United States. Soccer is a sport not traditionally identified as high-risk for concussions, yet several studies have shown that concussion rates in soccer are comparable to, and often exceed those of, other contact sports. As many as 22% of all soccer injuries are concussions. Soccer is a sport not traditionally identified as high risk for concussions, yet several studies have shown that concussion rates in soccer are comparable to, and often exceed those of, other contact sports. As many as 22% of all soccer injuries are concussions. Head injury during soccer is usually the result of either "direct contact" or contact with the ball while "heading" the ball. Relationships between the number of headers sustained in a single season and the degree of cognitive impairment (attention and visual/verbal memory) have been demonstrated. It is also likely that multiple concussions may cause cumulative neuropsychologic impairment in soccer players. Although our understanding of risk factors for sports-related concussions is far from complete, there is great potential for prevention in sports-related concussions. Several measures must be taken to avert the development of concussions in soccer and, when they take place, reduce their effects. These include the development and testing of effective equipment during play, the maintenance of regulatory standards for all such equipment, educating young athletes on the safe and appropriate techniques used during play, and strict adherence to the rules of competition. In spite of such preventive measures, concussions in soccer will continue to occur. Considering the frequency of concussions in soccer, the serious sequelae of

  17. Hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome: current understandings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvin, Stéphane; Bellavoine, Vanina; Merdariu, Dana; Delanoë, Catherine; Elmaleh-Bergés, Monique; Gressens, Pierre; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile

    2012-09-01

    Hemiconvulsion-Hemiplegia (HH) syndrome is an uncommon consequence of prolonged focal febrile convulsive seizures in infancy and early childhood. It is characterized by the occurrence of prolonged clonic seizures with unilateral predominance occurring in a child and followed by the development of hemiplegia. Neuroradiological studies showed unilateral edematous swelling of the epileptic hemisphere at the time of initial status epilepticus (SE). This acute phase is followed by characteristic cerebral hemiatrophy with subsequent appearance of epilepsy, so called Hemiconvulsion-Hemiplegia-Epilepsy (HHE) syndrome. The etiologies and the underlying mechanisms remain to be understood. Using a review of the literature, we summarized the data of the last 20 years. It appears that idiopathic HH/HHE syndrome is the most common reported form. The basic science data suggest that immature brain is relatively resistant to SE-induced cell injury. Several factors might contribute to the pathogenesis of HH/HHE syndrome: 1. prolonged febrile seizure in which inflammation may worsen the level of cell injury; 2. inflammation and prolonged ictal activity that act on blood-brain-barrier permeability; 3. predisposing factors facilitating prolonged seizure such as genetic factors or focal epileptogenic lesion. However, these factors cannot explain the elective involvement of an entire hemisphere. We draw new hypothesis that may explain the involvement of one hemisphere such as maturation of brain structure such as corpus callosum or genetic factors (CACNA1A gene) that are specifically discussed. An early diagnosis and a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of HHE are needed to improve the outcome of this condition.

  18. Gliomatosis Cerebri: Current Understanding and Controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surabhi Ranjan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Gliomatosis cerebri (GC is a rare, extensively infiltrating glioma involving multiple contiguous lobes of the brain. This lethal disease affects all age groups, and the majority of patients have a poor outcome despite aggressive treatment. Despite its initial recognition in 1938, GC remains a controversial entity with little consensus in its definition, histology, or treatment. The majority of GC tumors are astrocytic, although mixed phenotypes have been identified. Treatment of GC is challenging as surgery is generally not an option due to the extensive areas of brain involved, the benefit of radiation therapy is unclear, and no chemotherapy has proven efficacy. Due to the rarity of the disease and its heterogeneity, both at histopathological and molecular levels, it is difficult to conduct clinical trials tailored for this diagnosis. This review summarizes our current knowledge, examines clinical studies focusing on the treatment of GC, highlights ongoing challenges, and discusses the recent molecular insights into adult and pediatric GC. We conclude that, although no longer recognized as a distinct pathological entity, GC represents a unique disease phenotype. Given the histologic and molecular overlap with other diffuse gliomas, the research emphasis should be on investigating its unique invasive biology.

  19. Cirrhosis and autoimmune liver disease: Current understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Grant, Charlotte R

    2016-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) constitute the classic autoimmune liver diseases (AILDs). While AIH target the hepatocytes, in PBC and PSC the targets of the autoimmune attack are the biliary epithelial cells. Persistent liver injury, associated with chronic AILD, leads to un-resolving inflammation, cell proliferation and the deposition of extracellular matrix proteins by hepatic stellate cells and portal myofibroblasts. Liver cirrhosis, and the resultant loss of normal liver function, inevitably ensues. Patients with cirrhosis have higher risks or morbidity and mortality, and that in the decompensated phase, complications of portal hypertension and/or liver dysfunction lead to rapid deterioration. Accurate diagnosis and monitoring of cirrhosis is, therefore of upmost importance. Liver biopsy is currently the gold standard technique, but highly promising non-invasive methodology is under development. Liver transplantation (LT) is an effective therapeutic option for the management of end-stage liver disease secondary to AIH, PBC and PSC. LT is indicated for AILD patients who have progressed to end-stage chronic liver disease or developed intractable symptoms or hepatic malignancy; in addition, LT may also be indicated for patients presenting with acute liver disease due to AIH who do not respond to steroids. PMID:27729952

  20. Understanding Scientific Methodology in the Historical and Experimental Sciences via Language Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodick, Jeff; Argamon, Shlomo; Chase, Paul

    2009-08-01

    A key focus of current science education reforms involves developing inquiry-based learning materials. However, without an understanding of how working scientists actually do science, such learning materials cannot be properly developed. Until now, research on scientific reasoning has focused on cognitive studies of individual scientific fields. However, the question remains as to whether scientists in different fields fundamentally rely on different methodologies. Although many philosophers and historians of science do indeed assert that there is no single monolithic scientific method, this has never been tested empirically. We therefore approach this problem by analyzing patterns of language used by scientists in their published work. Our results demonstrate systematic variation in language use between types of science that are thought to differ in their characteristic methodologies. The features of language use that were found correspond closely to a proposed distinction between Experimental Sciences (e.g., chemistry) and Historical Sciences (e.g., paleontology); thus, different underlying rhetorical and conceptual mechanisms likely operate for scientific reasoning and communication in different contexts.

  1. (Mis)understanding Science: The Problem with Scientific Breakthroughs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, James P

    2016-09-01

    On Saturday morning, February 28, 1953, the mystery of heredity appeared secure. Humans hadn't the faintest idea of how genetic information was transmitted-how the uncanny resemblance between mother and daughter, grandfather and grandson was conveyed across generations. Yet, by that Saturday afternoon, two individuals, James Watson and Francis Crick, had glimpsed the solution to these mysteries. The story of Watson and Crick's great triumph has been told and retold and has rightly entered the pantheon of scientific legend. But Watson and Crick's breakthrough was just that: a rupture and dramatic discontinuity in human knowledge that solved a deep mystery, the likes of which occurs, perhaps, a couple of times each century. And that's the problem. The story is just so good and so irresistible that it has misled generations of scientists about what to expect regarding a life in science. And more damaging, the resulting breakthrough mentality misleads the public, the media, and society's decision-makers about how science really works, all to the detriment of scientific progress and our society's well-being.

  2. A process approach to children's understanding of scientific concepts : A longitudinal case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, Steffie van der; Steenbeek, Henderien; Dijk, Marijn van; Geert, Paul van

    2014-01-01

    Using a longitudinal study on childrens’ understanding of scientific concepts, we compare the relative importance of general (e.g., standardized test scores) and microgenetic measures (interaction patterns) to characterize the development of scientific understanding over 1.5 years. A researcher work

  3. The History of Liquid Ear Acupuncture and the Current Scientific State of the Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litscher, Daniela; Litscher, Gerhard

    2016-06-01

    This short review article presents a current overview of existing publications and scientific results regarding liquid (ear) acupuncture. The injection of liquids into defined acupuncture points of the ear is not a method commonly used in the Western world. The term liquid acupuncture has different definitions, which makes understanding each definition and differentiating one from the other difficult. General terms like pharmacopuncture, homeosiniatry, and liquid acupuncture, which all describe the method of injecting different kinds of drugs into a defined body acupuncture point, are used. This article presents the history of liquid acupuncture, as well as the current scientific state of the art, from the point of view of two European researchers. Some articles are discussed and a few practical examples are presented.

  4. Gender Differences in Lunar-Related Scientific and Mathematical Understandings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports an examination on gender differences in lunar phases understanding of 123 students (70 females and 53 males). Middle-level students interacted with the Moon through observations, sketching, journalling, two-dimensional and three-dimensional modelling, and classroom discussions. These lunar lessons were adapted from the Realistic…

  5. Coordinated scenarios for a transdisciplinary assessment of the scientific understanding of Arctic environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammann, C. M.; Holland, M. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Arctic is undergoing an exceptionally rapid transformation. Trying to predict or project the consequences of this change is pushing nearly every discipline in the physical, biogeochemical and social sciences towards the limits of their current understanding. Adequate data is missing to test and validate models for capturing a state of the Arctic system that we have not observed. But even more challenging is the systems-level evaluation, where impacts can quickly lead to unexpected outcomes with cascading repercussions throughout the different components and subcomponents of the environment. One approach to test our understanding, and to expose gaps in current observation strategies, modeling approaches as well as planning tools (e.g., forecast workflows, or decision frameworks) is to carefully design a small number of coordinated scenarios of plausible future states of the system, and then to study their diverse, potential impacts. A coordination of the scenarios is essential so that all disciplinary perspectives can be arranged around a common state, assumptions can be aligned, and a transdisciplinary conversation can be advanced from a common platform to form a comprehensive assessment of our knowledge. This presentation is a call to the community to join and assist the SEARCH program in designing effective scenarios that can be used for cross-cutting investigation of current limitations in our scientific understanding of how the Arctic environment might change, and what consequences these changes might bring to the physical, biological and social environments.

  6. On Understanding: Maxwell on the Methods of Illustration and Scientific Metaphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cat, Jordi

    In this paper I examine the notion and role of metaphors and illustrations in Maxwell's works in exact science as a pathway into a broader and richer philosophical conception of a scientist and scientific practice. While some of these notions and methods are still at work in current scientific research-from economics and biology to quantum computation and quantum field theory-, here I have chosen to attest to their entrenchment and complexity in actual science by attempting to make some conceptual sense of Maxwell's own usage; this endeavour includes situating Maxwell's conceptions and applications in his own culture of Victorian science and philosophy. I trace Maxwell's notions to the formulation of the problem of understanding, or interpreting, abstract representations such as potential functions and Lagrangian equations. I articulate the solution in terms of abstract-concrete relations, where the concrete, in tune with Victorian British psychology and engineering, includes the muscular as well as the pictorial. This sets the basis for a conception of understanding in terms of unification and concrete modelling, or representation. I examine the relation of illustration to analogies and metaphors on which this account rests. Lastly, I stress and explain the importance of context-dependence, its consequences for realism-instrumentalism debates, and Maxwell's own emphasis on method.

  7. Probing Student Understanding of Scientific Thinking in the Context of Introductory Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Richard N.; Cormier, Sebastien; Fernandez, Adiel

    2009-01-01

    Common forms of testing of student understanding of science content can be misleading about their understanding of the nature of scientific thinking. Observational astronomy integrated with related ideas of force and motion is a rich context to explore the correlation between student content knowledge and student understanding of the scientific…

  8. Between understanding and appreciation. Current science communication in Denmark (Danish original version)

    OpenAIRE

    Kristian Hvidtfelt Nielsen.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper I use the concepts “understanding of science” and “appreciation of science” to analyze selected case studies of current science communication in Denmark. The Danish science communication system has many similarities with science communication in other countries: the increasing political and scientific interest in science communication, the co-existence of many different kinds of science communication, and the multiple uses of the concepts of understanding vs. appreciation of sci...

  9. Teaching the Scientific Method Using Current News Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Laura K.; Mahan, Carolyn G.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a short (less than 50 minutes) activity using news articles from sources such as "Science Daily" to teach students the steps of the scientific method and the difference between primary and secondary literature sources. The flexibility in choosing news articles to examine allowed us to tailor the activity to the specific interests of…

  10. Understanding the validity of data : a knowledge-based network underlying research expertise in scientific disciplines.

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This article considers what might be taught to meet a widely held curriculum aim of students being able to understand research in a discipline. Expertise, which may appear as a ‘chain of practice’, is widely held to be underpinned by networks of understanding. Scientific research expertise is considered from this perspective. Within scientific disciplines, how research is conducted to solve different problems varies with concomitant effects on the validity of the data and the strengths of the...

  11. Measuring Student Understanding of the Process of Scientific Research through Three Modes of Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krok, Michelle; Rector, T.; Young, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    We have continued to develop "Research-Based Science Education" (RBSE) curriculum and assessment for a semester-long program in which undergraduate non-science majors participate in authentic research. The instruction is mainly astronomy-based, but can be used in any introductory science course. Currently, the curriculum is being used by five universities over an assortment of introductory science and astronomy classrooms. The primary goal of the RBSE curriculum is to develop a student's understanding of the nature and process of scientific research. We will present trends and misconceptions discovered based upon our analysis of Fall 2011 semester student responses to several types of assessments including weekly assigned reflective journal questions on the nature of science and pre/post semester concept maps. Additionally, gains observed from a pre/post semester survey of participatory students’ confidence on their science process skills abilities will be discussed.

  12. Korean Students' Perceptions of Scientific Practices and Understanding of Nature of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sae Yeol; Suh, Jee Kyung; Park, Soonhye

    2014-11-01

    Korean students have shown relatively little interest and confidence in learning science, despite being ranked in the top percentile in international evaluations of academic achievement in science such as the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study. Although research indicates a positive relationship between student perceptions of science and their science learning, this area has not been sufficiently explored in Korea. Particularly, even though both students' perceptions of scientific practice and their understanding of the nature of science (NOS) are influenced by their science learning experiences at schools, little research examines how this perception, understanding, and experience are related to one another. This study aimed to uncover Korean students' perceptions of school scientific practice through exploring their drawings, writings, and responses to questionnaires. Participants were 500 Korean students in 3rd, 7th, and 10th grades who were asked to complete an open-ended questionnaire. The results indicated that Korean students typically viewed school scientific practices as experimental activities or listening to lecture; and that most participants held an insufficient understanding of the NOS. Overall, no significant relationship emerged between students' perceptions of school scientific practice and their understanding of the NOS. Our findings highlight the need to help both teachers and students understand the potential breadth of school scientific practices, beyond simple 'activity mania.' This study also suggests that teachers must balance implicit and explicit instructional approaches to teaching about the NOS through scientific practices in school science contexts.

  13. Exploring the Changes in Students' Understanding of the Scientific Method Using Word Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulacar, Ozcan; Sinan, Olcay; Bowman, Charles R.; Yildirim, Yetkin

    2015-10-01

    A study is presented that explores how students' knowledge structures, as related to the scientific method, compare at different student ages. A word association test comprised of ten total stimulus words, among them experiment, science fair, and hypothesis, is used to probe the students' knowledge structures. Students from grades four, five, and eight, as well as first-year college students were tested to reveal their knowledge structures relating to the scientific method. Younger students were found to have a naïve view of the science process with little understanding of how science relates to the real world. However, students' conceptions about the scientific process appear to be malleable, with science fairs a potentially strong influencer. The strength of associations between words is observed to change from grade to grade, with younger students placing science fair near the center of their knowledge structure regarding the scientific method, whereas older students conceptualize the scientific method around experiment.

  14. Probing student understanding of scientific thinking in the context of introductory astrophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard N. Steinberg

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Common forms of testing of student understanding of science content can be misleading about their understanding of the nature of scientific thinking. Observational astronomy integrated with related ideas of force and motion is a rich context to explore the correlation between student content knowledge and student understanding of the scientific thinking about that content. In this paper, we describe this correlation in detail with a focus on a question about the relative motion of the Sun and the Earth. We find that high achieving high school students throughout New York City struggle with what constitutes scientific justification and thought processes, but can improve these skills tremendously in an inquiry-oriented summer astronomy-physics program.

  15. Current Scientific Evidence for a Polarized Cardiovascular Endurance Training Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydren, Jay R; Cohen, Bruce S

    2015-12-01

    Recent publications have provided new scientific evidence for a modern aerobic or cardiovascular endurance exercise prescription that optimizes the periodization cycle and maximizes potential endurance performance gains in highly trained individuals. The traditional threshold, high volume, and high-intensity training models have displayed limited improvement in actual race pace in (highly) trained individuals while frequently resulting in overreaching or overtraining (physical injury and psychological burnout). A review of evidence for replacing these models with the proven polarized training model seems warranted. This review provides a short history of the training models, summarizes 5 key studies, and provides example training programs for both the pre- and in-season periods. A polarized training program is characterized by an undulating nonlinear periodization model with nearly all the training time spent at a "light" (≤13) and "very hard" (≥17) pace with very limited time at "hard" (14-16) or race pace (6-20 Rating of Perceived Exertion [RPE] scale). To accomplish this, the polarization training model has specific high-intensity workouts separated by one or more long slow distance workouts, with the exercise intensity remaining below ventilatory threshold (VT) 1 and/or blood lactate of less than 2 mM (A.K.A. below race pace). Effect sizes for increasing aerobic endurance performance for the polarized training model are consistently superior to that of the threshold training model. Performing a polarized training program may be best accomplished by: going easy on long slow distance workouts, avoiding "race pace" and getting after it during interval workouts.

  16. Scientific thinking in elementary school: Children's social cognition and their epistemological understanding promote experimentation skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterhaus, Christopher; Koerber, Susanne; Sodian, Beate

    2017-03-01

    Do social cognition and epistemological understanding promote elementary school children's experimentation skills? To investigate this question, 402 children (ages 8, 9, and 10) in 2nd, 3rd, and 4th grades were assessed for their experimentation skills, social cognition (advanced theory of mind [AToM]), epistemological understanding (understanding the nature of science), and general information-processing skills (inhibition, intelligence, and language abilities) in a whole-class testing procedure. A multiple indicators multiple causes model revealed a significant influence of social cognition (AToM) on epistemological understanding, and a McNemar test suggested that children's development of AToM is an important precursor for the emergence of an advanced, mature epistemological understanding. Children's epistemological understanding, in turn, predicted their experimentation skills. Importantly, this relation was independent of the common influences of general information processing. Significant relations between experimentation skills and inhibition, and between epistemological understanding, intelligence, and language abilities emerged, suggesting that general information processing contributes to the conceptual development that is involved in scientific thinking. The model of scientific thinking that was tested in this study (social cognition and epistemological understanding promote experimentation skills) fitted the data significantly better than 2 alternative models, which assumed nonspecific, equally strong relations between all constructs under investigation. Our results support the conclusion that social cognition plays a foundational role in the emergence of children's epistemological understanding, which in turn is closely related to the development of experimentation skills. Our findings have significant implications for the teaching of scientific thinking in elementary school and they stress the importance of children's epistemological understanding in

  17. The current state of public understanding of nanotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldron, Anna M [Cornell University, Nanobiotechnology Center (United States)], E-mail: amw37@cornell.edu; Spencer, Douglas [Edu, Inc. (United States); Batt, Carl A [Cornell University (United States)

    2006-10-15

    The growing importance of nanotechnology in industry and society has not been accompanied by a widespread understanding of the subject among the general public. Simple questions to initially probe the smallest thing that people can see and can think of reveals a divide in the understanding of the general public. A survey of 1500 individuals ranging in age from 6 to 74 has revealed a lack of knowledge of nanotechnology and especially a lack of understanding of the context of nanotechnology in the world that is too small to see. Survey findings are corroborated by in-depth interviews with 400 adults in studies of nanoscience literacy commisioned by University of California, Berkeley and Cornell in 2002 and 2004, respectively. In general, with the exception of 14-28 year olds, over 60% of respondents say they have never heard of nano or nanotechnology. The results suggest that the general public, especially middle-school children, has no firm foundation to understand nanotechnology and likely will continue to be equally impressed by credible scientific information as well as pure fictional accounts of nanotechnology.

  18. Fostering Students' Meta-understanding of Scientific Principles as Scientific Thinking : In the Case of a 6th Grade Unit about "Combustion"

    OpenAIRE

    坂本, 美紀; 村山, 功; 山口, 悦司; 稲垣, 成哲; 大島, 純; 大島, 律子; 中山, 迅; 竹中, 真希子; 山本, 智一; 藤本, 雅司; 竹下, 裕子; 橘, 早苗

    2007-01-01

    Students sometimes fail to give a theory-based explanation of phenomena after they learn scientific principles. The present study investigated the optimum method to train students in scientific thinking in elementary school science lessons. We conducted three experimental lessons to foster students' meta-understanding of scientific principles about combustion. Sixth graders collaboratively inquired into the difficult-to-understand phenomena of combustion for a theory-based explanation. Based ...

  19. ON THE USING OF SCIENTIFIC DATA FOR UNDERSTANDING AND INTERPRETATION OF HADITH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O s m a n ORUÇHAN

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Muslim scholars were made great efforts on understanding and interpretation of the Prophet Muhammad's cultural heritage, during the Islamic history.They were made also use of experiences, observations and scientific data for understanding and interpret ation of Hadith texts. In the last two centuries, they were used the scientific data more intensely. The Muslim scholars were adopted two different approaches to this issue: According to the first approach, the hadiths are revealed knowledges. For this rea son, The Hadiths cannot be criticized by using the information that product of the human mind and senses, but the scientific data that supports the Hadith can be used in interpreting of hadith. According to second approach, the traditions should be utilize d in every age again. Many of the scholars involved in this approach were used that scientific data for critisizm of Hadith texts. In this paper, both approachs’s arguments are discussed and methodological recommendations on understanding and interpretatio n of the hadith on the use of scientific data is presented .

  20. USING SCIENTIFIC PAPERS TO STIMULATE THE STUDY OF BIOCHEMISTRY AND THE UNDERSTANDING OF SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE CONSTRUCTION: THE RESEARCH ON ADRENOLEUKODYSTROPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Gagianone

    2015-08-01

    understanding of mechanisms completely unknown by the time of LO development and also the comprehension of scientific knowledge construction through a playful and participative activity.AcknowledgementsWe thank Prograd-UFF for scholarship supply.Key wordsAdrenoleukodystrophy; Biochemistry teaching; scientific knowledge

  1. Scaffolded Instruction Improves Student Understanding of the Scientific Method & Experimental Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Costa, Allison R.; Schlueter, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Implementation of a guided-inquiry lab in introductory biology classes, along with scaffolded instruction, improved students' understanding of the scientific method, their ability to design an experiment, and their identification of experimental variables. Pre- and postassessments from experimental versus control sections over three semesters…

  2. The Public Understanding of Scientific Information: Communicating, Interpreting, and Applying the Science of Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Stephen P.; Phillips, Linda M.

    2003-01-01

    Research is conducted in abstract contexts that inhibit practical application. In addition, research results are often uncertain and always circumscribed. Lay people have difficulty interpreting results for use in particular situations. The media could play a significant role in the public understanding of scientific information if it would report…

  3. How Some College Students Represent Their Understandings of the Nature of Scientific Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagher, Zoubeida R.; Brickhouse, Nancy W.; Shipman, Harry; Letts, William J.

    2004-01-01

    This study explores college students' representations about the nature of theories during their enrollment in a large astronomy course with instruction designed to address a number of nature of science issues. We focus our investigation on how nine students represent their understanding of theory, how they distinguish between scientific theories…

  4. Articulating Scientific Practice: Understanding Dean Hamer's "Gay Gene" Study as Overlapping Material, Social and Rhetorical Registers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Rhetoricians have tried to develop a better understanding of the connection between words and things, but these attempts often employ a logic of representation that undermines a full examination of materiality and the complexity of scientific practice. A logic of articulation offers a viable alternative by focusing attention on the linkages…

  5. Effects of Representation Sequences and Spatial Ability on Students' Scientific Understandings about the Mechanism of Breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsin-Kai; Lin, Yu-Fen; Hsu, Ying-Shao

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of representation sequences and spatial ability on students' scientific understandings about the mechanism of breathing in human beings. 130 seventh graders were assigned to two groups with different sequential combinations of static and dynamic representations: SD group (i.e., viewing…

  6. Effects of Representation Sequences and Spatial Ability on Students' Scientific Understandings about the Mechanism of Breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsin-Kai; Lin, Yu-Fen; Hsu, Ying-Shao

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of representation sequences and spatial ability on students' scientific understandings about the mechanism of breathing in human beings. 130 seventh graders were assigned to two groups with different sequential combinations of static and dynamic representations: SD group (i.e., viewing…

  7. Current understanding of the neurobiology of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiriţă, Anca Livia; Gheorman, Victor; Bondari, Dan; Rogoveanu, Ion

    2015-01-01

    Depression is highly prevalent worldwide and associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Approximately 340 million people worldwide suffer from depression at any given time. Based on estimates from the World Health Organization (WHO), depression is responsible for the greatest proportion of burden associated with non-fatal health outcomes and accounts for approximately 12% total years lived with disability. Probably no single risk factor can be completely isolated in major depressive disorder (MDD), as interactions between many sources of vulnerability are the most likely explanation. Buttressing the identification of grief, demoralization, hopelessness and styles of psychological coping of the depressed patient are vital, ongoing scientific developments that flow from an increased understanding of this interplay amongst the immune system, endocrine system and brain. The rapidly accumulating body of neurobiological knowledge has catalyzed fundamental changes in how we conceptualize depressive symptoms and has important implications regarding the treatment and even prevention of depressive symptoms in patients.

  8. How some college students represent their understandings of the nature of scientific theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagher, Zoubeida R.; Brickhouse, Nancy W.; Shipman, Harry; Letts, William J.

    2004-06-01

    This study explores college students' representations about the nature of theories during their enrollment in a large astronomy course with instruction designed to address a number of nature of science issues. We focus our investigation on how nine students represent their understanding of theory, how they distinguish between scientific theories and non-scientific theories, and how they reason about specific theories. Students' notions of theory were classified under four main categories: (1) hypothesis, (2) idea with evidence, (3) explanation, and (4) explanation based on evidence. Students' condition for deciding whether a given idea is a scientific theory or not were classified under six criteria: content domain, convention, evidence, mathematical content, methodology, and tentativeness. Students expressed slight levels of variation between their reasoning about scientific theories in general and specific theories they learned in the course. Despite increased sophistication in some students' representations, this study affirms the complex dimensions involved in teaching and assessing student understanding about theories. The implications of this study underscore the need to explicitly address the nature of proof in science and issues of tentativeness and certainty students associate with scientific theories, and provide students with more opportunities to utilize the language of science.

  9. Pre-service elementary teachers' understanding of scientific inquiry and its role in school science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaroglu, Esra

    The purpose of this research was to explore pre-service elementary teachers' developing understanding of scientific inquiry within the context of their elementary science teaching and learning. More specifically, the study examined 24 pre-service elementary teachers' emerging understanding of (1) the nature of science and scientific inquiry; (2) the "place" of scientific inquiry in school science; and (3) the roles and responsibilities of teachers and students within an inquiry-based learning environment. Data sources consisted primarily of student-generated artifacts collected throughout the semester, including pre/post-philosophy statements and text-based materials collected from electronic dialogue journals. Individual data sources were open-coded to identify concepts and categories expressed by students. Cross-comparisons were conducted and patterns were identified. Assertions were formed with these patterns. Findings are hopeful in that they suggest pre-service teachers can develop a more contemporary view of scientific inquiry when immersed in a context that promotes this perspective. Not surprisingly, however, the prospective teachers encountered a number of barriers when attempting to translate their emerging ideas into practice. More research is needed to determine which teacher preparation experiences are most powerful in supporting pre-service teachers as they construct a framework for science teaching and learning that includes scientific inquiry as a central component.

  10. Understanding the Dialectical Relations Between Everyday Concepts and Scientific Concepts Within Play-Based Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleer, Marilyn

    2009-03-01

    In recent times there has been an enormous interest in Vygotsky’s writing on conceptual development, particularly his insights on the differences between everyday and scientific thinking. In drawing upon cultural-historical theory, this paper seeks to examine the relations between everyday concepts and scientific concepts within playful contexts, such as preschools, with a view to better understanding how very young children develop conceptual understandings in science. This paper presents an overview of a study which sought to map the transformation and appropriation of scientific concepts within two early childhood settings. Approximately ten weeks of data gathering took place, with video recordings, field notes, photographic documentation, and child and teacher interviews for recording child concept formation within these naturalistic settings. The findings indicate that when teacher programs are more oriented towards concepts rather than materials, children’s play is focused on conceptual connections. Importantly, the study showed that: It was possible to map the multiple and dynamic levels or stratas of thinking that a child or group of children may exhibit within play-based contexts; An analysis of ‘unorganised heaps’ and ‘complexive thinking’ evident in conceptually or materially oriented play-based programs can be determined; the dialectical relations between everyday concepts and scientific concepts in play-based programs can be understood; and greater understanding about the nature of concept formation in situated playful contexts have been possible.

  11. Scientific Understanding: Lacey's `Critical Self-Consciousness' Seen as Echoes of J.D. Bernal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Roger T.

    From a consideration of the nature of scientific understanding and the control of nature Lacey proposes a set of criteria by which the reform of science teaching might be guided. He uses the term critical self-consciousness to describe the development of learner's appreciation of the character of scientific activity, its applications, and the choices citizens face in society. By this latter he means responsible participation, presumably in the debates surrounding the character of scientific activity, its applications, and the choices inherent in these. In this paper I show that Lacey's vision of the schooling of science through the development of critical self-consciousness has been articulated by others at different epochs, and probably from different ideological perspectives. Knowledge of these will help Lacey in his search for an education in science which promotes citizens' participation rather than alienating them from decision-making in society.

  12. Instructional games: Scientific language use, concept understanding, and attitudinal development of middle school learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongillo, Geraldine

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to discover the influence of instructional games on middle school learners' use of scientific language, concept understanding, and attitude toward learning science. The rationale for this study stemmed from the lack of research concerning the value of play as an instructional strategy for older learners. Specifically, the study focused on the ways in which 6 average ability 7th grade students demonstrated scientific language and concept use during gameplay. The data were collected for this 6-week study in a southern New Jersey suburban middle school and included audio recordings of the 5 games observed in class, written documents (e.g., student created game questions, self-evaluation forms, pre- and post-assessments, and the final quiz) interviews, and researcher field notes. Data were coded and interpreted borrowing from the framework for scientific literacy developed by Bybee (1997). Based on the findings, the framework was modified to reflect the level of scientific understanding demonstrated by the participants and categorized as: Unacquainted, Nominal, Functional, and Conceptual. Major findings suggested that the participants predominantly achieved the Functional level of scientific literacy (i.e., the ability to adequately and appropriately use scientific language in both written and oral discourse) during games. Further, it was discovered that the participants achieved the Conceptual level of scientific literacy during gameplay. Through games participants were afforded the opportunity to use common, everyday language to explore concepts, promoted through peer collaboration. In games the participants used common language to build understandings that exceeded Nominal or token use of the technical vocabulary and concepts. Additionally, the participants reported through interviews and self-evaluation forms that their attitude (patterns included: Motivation, Interest, Fun, Relief from Boredom, and an Alternate Learning

  13. Current Understanding and Therapy of Asthma Workshop Summary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kuender D. Yang; Yu-Zhi Chen; Shau-Ku Huang

    2004-01-01

    The prevalence of asthma has increased globally in the past 2 decades. To address this critical issue, a workshop on "Current Understanding and Therapy of Asthma" was recently held in Beijing, as a part of the 10th International Conference of the Society of Chinese Bioscientists in America (SCBA). Several pertinent topics were addressed by leading experts from China, Taiwan, Japan and the US, which include epidemiology, the molecular genetic mechanism, pathogenesis, treatment and prevention of asthma. This article highlights the issues presented and discussed in this ground-breaking symposium emphasizing this important public health problem in the Chinese population. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(6):436-439.

  14. Current Understanding and Therapy of Asthma Workshop Summary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KuenderD.Yangt; Yu-ZhiChen; Shau-KuHuang

    2004-01-01

    The prevalence of asthma has increased globally in the past 2 decades. To address this critical issue, a workshop on “Current Understanding and Therapy of Asthma” was recently held in Beijing, as a part of the 10th International Conference of the Society of Chinese Bioscientists in America (SCBA). Several pertinent topics were addressed by leading experts from China, Taiwan, Japan and the US, which include epidemiology, the molecular genetic mechanism, pathogenesis, treatment and prevention of asthma. This article highlights the issues presented and discussed in this ground-breaking symposium emphasizing this important public health problem in the Chinese population. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(6):436-439.

  15. Uncertainty of current understanding regarding OBT formation in plants

    CERN Document Server

    Melintescu, Anca

    2016-01-01

    The radiological impact models are important tools for supporting nuclear safety. For tritium, a special radionuclide entering the life cycle, the processes involved in its transport into the environment are complex and not well enough understood. The tritiated water (HTO) enters the plants by atmospheric and root pathway and is converted to organically bound tritium (OBT) in exchangeable and non-exchangeable forms. The observed OBT/HTO ratios in crops exhibit a large variability and contradict the current models for routine releases. If a spike release (i.e. short time but intense atmospheric release higher than the normal release rate) occurs during routine emission, the dose to public is higher than for normal routine emission. The experimental data for a short and intense atmospheric contamination of wheat are presented together with the models predictions. Although the current understanding of processes involved in OBT formation in plants is still insufficient, considering the non-equilibrium situation i...

  16. Scientific truth or false hope? Understanding Alzheimer's disease from an aging perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Maleski, Jerome J; Sawmiller, Darrell R

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we argue that the current official definition for Alzheimer's disease is misleading, since it defines senile dementia (SD), a long-known incurable senile/geriatric condition, as a discrete/curable disease. This overly optimistic definition was incepted in the 1970s amid the public's fear of the upcoming SD crisis and desperate hope for a cure. Scientifically, however, it has overturned Alois Alzheimer's age-based concept for disease classification-the essence of modern Geriatric Medicine and the National Institute of Aging. Thus, the current definition for SD, though socially and politically appealing, would be scientifically flawed. As an authoritative study guideline, it has caused profound and far-reaching confusions in research by misleading attention to the presumptive pathogenic/erroneous factors as drug targets for "silver bullets". Such well-intentioned studies would generate numerous data, but render SD a scientific and logical enigma. In this context we discuss: 1) why and how senile conditions including SD differ from discrete diseases by origin, thus also by study paradigm and intervention strategy; 2) why senile conditions may not be explained by abnormal/pathogenic factors, but logically should be explained by "normal" elements in life, perhaps advanced aging plus risk factors; and 3) why the "amyloid-β toxicity" controversy, a simple scientific issue, has lasted for so long. Finally, we ask: can scientific inquiry preserve its integrity and objectivity under social pressure? It appears that these fundamental questions warrant serious attention if the scientific nature of SD is to be eventually understood.

  17. Understanding current causes of women's underrepresentation in science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceci, Stephen J; Williams, Wendy M

    2011-02-22

    Explanations for women's underrepresentation in math-intensive fields of science often focus on sex discrimination in grant and manuscript reviewing, interviewing, and hiring. Claims that women scientists suffer discrimination in these arenas rest on a set of studies undergirding policies and programs aimed at remediation. More recent and robust empiricism, however, fails to support assertions of discrimination in these domains. To better understand women's underrepresentation in math-intensive fields and its causes, we reprise claims of discrimination and their evidentiary bases. Based on a review of the past 20 y of data, we suggest that some of these claims are no longer valid and, if uncritically accepted as current causes of women's lack of progress, can delay or prevent understanding of contemporary determinants of women's underrepresentation. We conclude that differential gendered outcomes in the real world result from differences in resources attributable to choices, whether free or constrained, and that such choices could be influenced and better informed through education if resources were so directed. Thus, the ongoing focus on sex discrimination in reviewing, interviewing, and hiring represents costly, misplaced effort: Society is engaged in the present in solving problems of the past, rather than in addressing meaningful limitations deterring women's participation in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics careers today. Addressing today's causes of underrepresentation requires focusing on education and policy changes that will make institutions responsive to differing biological realities of the sexes. Finally, we suggest potential avenues of intervention to increase gender fairness that accord with current, as opposed to historical, findings.

  18. Current understanding of organically bound tritium (OBT) in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S B; Baglan, N; Davis, P A

    2013-12-01

    It has become increasingly recognized that organically bound tritium (OBT) is the more significant tritium fraction with respect to understanding tritium behaviour in the environment. There are many different terms associated with OBT; such as total OBT, exchangeable OBT, non-exchangeable OBT, soluble OBT, insoluble OBT, tritiated organics, and buried tritium, etc. A simple classification is required to clarify understanding within the tritium research community. Unlike for tritiated water (HTO), the environmental quantification and behaviour of OBT are not well known. Tritiated water cannot bio-accumulate in the environment. However, it is not clear whether or not this is the case for OBT. Even though OBT can be detected in terrestrial biological materials, aquatic biological materials and soil samples, its behaviour is still in question. In order to evaluate the radiation dose from OBT accurately, further study will be required to understand OBT measurements and determine OBT fate in the environment. The relationship between OBT speciation and the OBT/HTO ratio in environmental samples will be useful in this regard, providing information on the previous tritium exposure conditions in the environment and the current tritium dynamics. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cultures of Diversity: Considering Scientific and Humanistic Understandings in Introductory Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Andrew M.; Simmons, Zachary L.; Downs, Andrew; Pitzer, Mark R.

    2017-01-01

    Teachers of psychology tend to agree that learning about diversity is an important goal for undergraduate psychology courses. There is significantly less agreement about what aspects of diversity psychology students should understand. The current research proposes and investigates two potentially distinct ways students might understand diversity:…

  20. Mismatches between 'scientific' and 'non-scientific' ways of knowing and their contributions to public understanding of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulak, Anna

    2011-06-01

    As differentiation within scientific disciplines increases, so does differentiation between the sciences and other ways of knowing. This distancing between 'scientific' and 'non-scientific' cultures reflects differences in what are considered valid and reliable approaches to acquiring knowledge and has played a major role in recent science-oriented controversies. Scientists' reluctance to actively engage in science communication, coupled with journalists' reliance on the norms of balance, conflict, and human interest in covering scientific issues, have combined to exacerbate public mistrust of science on issues like the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. The failure of effective communications between scientists and non-scientists has hindered the progress of both effective science and effective policy. In order to better bridge the gap between the 'scientific' and 'non-scientific' cultures, renewed efforts must be made to encourage substantive public engagement, with the ultimate goal of facilitating an open, democratic policy-making process.

  1. Exploring prospective secondary science teachers' understandings of scientific inquiry and Mendelian genetics concepts using computer simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, Mustafa

    The primary objective of this case study was to examine prospective secondary science teachers' developing understanding of scientific inquiry and Mendelian genetics. A computer simulation of basic Mendelian inheritance processes (Catlab) was used in combination with small-group discussions and other instructional scaffolds to enhance prospective science teachers' understandings. The theoretical background for this research is derived from a social constructivist perspective. Structuring scientific inquiry as investigation to develop explanations presents meaningful context for the enhancement of inquiry abilities and understanding of the science content. The context of the study was a teaching and learning course focused on inquiry and technology. Twelve prospective science teachers participated in this study. Multiple data sources included pre- and post-module questionnaires of participants' view of scientific inquiry, pre-posttests of understandings of Mendelian concepts, inquiry project reports, class presentations, process videotapes of participants interacting with the simulation, and semi-structured interviews. Seven selected prospective science teachers participated in in-depth interviews. Findings suggest that while studying important concepts in science, carefully designed inquiry experiences can help prospective science teachers to develop an understanding about the types of questions scientists in that field ask, the methodological and epistemological issues that constrain their pursuit of answers to those questions, and the ways in which they construct and share their explanations. Key findings included prospective teachers' initial limited abilities to create evidence-based arguments, their hesitancy to include inquiry in their future teaching, and the impact of collaboration on thinking. Prior to this experience the prospective teachers held uninformed views of scientific inquiry. After the module, participants demonstrated extended expertise in

  2. Understanding current causes of women's underrepresentation in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Wendy M.

    2011-01-01

    Explanations for women's underrepresentation in math-intensive fields of science often focus on sex discrimination in grant and manuscript reviewing, interviewing, and hiring. Claims that women scientists suffer discrimination in these arenas rest on a set of studies undergirding policies and programs aimed at remediation. More recent and robust empiricism, however, fails to support assertions of discrimination in these domains. To better understand women's underrepresentation in math-intensive fields and its causes, we reprise claims of discrimination and their evidentiary bases. Based on a review of the past 20 y of data, we suggest that some of these claims are no longer valid and, if uncritically accepted as current causes of women's lack of progress, can delay or prevent understanding of contemporary determinants of women's underrepresentation. We conclude that differential gendered outcomes in the real world result from differences in resources attributable to choices, whether free or constrained, and that such choices could be influenced and better informed through education if resources were so directed. Thus, the ongoing focus on sex discrimination in reviewing, interviewing, and hiring represents costly, misplaced effort: Society is engaged in the present in solving problems of the past, rather than in addressing meaningful limitations deterring women's participation in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics careers today. Addressing today's causes of underrepresentation requires focusing on education and policy changes that will make institutions responsive to differing biological realities of the sexes. Finally, we suggest potential avenues of intervention to increase gender fairness that accord with current, as opposed to historical, findings. PMID:21300892

  3. Publication Ethics and the Emerging Scientific Workforce: Understanding ‘Plagiarism’ in a Global Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Carrie; Zhao, Hui; McHugh, Michelle K.

    2013-01-01

    Scientific publication has long been dominated by the English language and is rapidly moving towards near complete hegemony of English, while the majority of the world’s publishing scientists are not native English speakers. This imbalance has important implications for training in and enforcement of publication ethics, particularly with respect to plagiarism. A lack of understanding of what constitutes plagiarism and the use of a linguistic support strategy known as patchwriting can lead to inadvertent misuse of source material by non-native speakers writing in English as well as to unfounded accusations of intentional scientific misconduct on the part of these authors. A rational and well-informed dialogue about this issue is needed among both native English speaking and non-native English speaking writers, editors, educators, and administrators. Recommendations for educating and training are provided. PMID:22104051

  4. Perspective: publication ethics and the emerging scientific workforce: understanding "plagiarism" in a global context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Carrie; Zhao, Hui; McHugh, Michelle K

    2012-01-01

    English has long been the dominant language of scientific publication, and it is rapidly approaching near-complete hegemony. The majority of the scientists publishing in English-language journals are not native English speakers, however. This imbalance has important implications for training concerning ethics and enforcement of publication standards, particularly with respect to plagiarism. The authors suggest that lack of understanding of what constitutes plagiarism and the use of a linguistic support strategy known as "patchwriting" can lead to inadvertent misuse of source material by nonnative speakers writing in English as well as to unfounded accusations of intentional scientific misconduct on the part of these authors. They propose that a rational and well-informed dialogue about this issue is needed among editors, educators, administrators, and both native-English-speaking and nonnative-English-speaking writers. They offer recommendations for creating environments in which such dialogue and training can occur.

  5. Pressure ulcers: Current understanding and newer modalities of treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Surajit; Mishra, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the mechanism, symptoms, causes, severity, diagnosis, prevention and present recommendations for surgical as well as non-surgical management of pressure ulcers. Particular focus has been placed on the current understandings and the newer modalities for the treatment of pressure ulcers. The paper also covers the role of nutrition and pressure-release devices such as cushions and mattresses as a part of the treatment algorithm for preventing and quick healing process of these wounds. Pressure ulcers develop primarily from pressure and shear; are progressive in nature and most frequently found in bedridden, chair bound or immobile people. They often develop in people who have been hospitalised for a long time generally for a different problem and increase the overall time as well as cost of hospitalisation that have detrimental effects on patient's quality of life. Loss of sensation compounds the problem manifold, and failure of reactive hyperaemia cycle of the pressure prone area remains the most important aetiopathology. Pressure ulcers are largely preventable in nature, and their management depends on their severity. The available literature about severity of pressure ulcers, their classification and medical care protocols have been described in this paper. The present treatment options include various approaches of cleaning the wound, debridement, optimised dressings, role of antibiotics and reconstructive surgery. The newer treatment options such as negative pressure wound therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, cell therapy have been discussed, and the advantages and disadvantages of current and newer methods have also been described. PMID:25991879

  6. Pressure ulcers: Current understanding and newer modalities of treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surajit Bhattacharya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the mechanism, symptoms, causes, severity, diagnosis, prevention and present recommendations for surgical as well as non-surgical management of pressure ulcers. Particular focus has been placed on the current understandings and the newer modalities for the treatment of pressure ulcers. The paper also covers the role of nutrition and pressure-release devices such as cushions and mattresses as a part of the treatment algorithm for preventing and quick healing process of these wounds. Pressure ulcers develop primarily from pressure and shear; are progressive in nature and most frequently found in bedridden, chair bound or immobile people. They often develop in people who have been hospitalised for a long time generally for a different problem and increase the overall time as well as cost of hospitalisation that have detrimental effects on patient′s quality of life. Loss of sensation compounds the problem manifold, and failure of reactive hyperaemia cycle of the pressure prone area remains the most important aetiopathology. Pressure ulcers are largely preventable in nature, and their management depends on their severity. The available literature about severity of pressure ulcers, their classification and medical care protocols have been described in this paper. The present treatment options include various approaches of cleaning the wound, debridement, optimised dressings, role of antibiotics and reconstructive surgery. The newer treatment options such as negative pressure wound therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, cell therapy have been discussed, and the advantages and disadvantages of current and newer methods have also been described.

  7. Using Scientific Argumentation in a Science Methods Course to Improve Preservice Teachers' Understanding of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, J. L.; Bleicher, R. E.; Soden, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Given that K-12 students have numerous alternative conceptions, it is critical that teachers have an understanding of the fundamental science underlying climate change (Feldman et al., 2010). Many teachers, however, do not demonstrate adequate understanding of these concepts (Daskolia et al., 2006). Argumentation has been identified as a mechanism for conceptual change (Mercer et al., 2004). Even with several educational initiatives promoting and supporting the use of argumentation as an instructional practice, teachers often struggle to implement argumentation in the classroom (Sampson & Blanchard, 2012). To remedy both issues above, we have designed an innovative methods course to provide background in climate change knowledge and argumentation instruction. In our methods course, we utilize Climate Science Investigations (CSI), an online, interactive series of modules and teaching resources funded by a NASA grant to support teachers learning about the basic science concepts underlying climate change. A key assignment is to develop and present an evidence-based scientific argument. The teachers were assigned a typical question and claim of climate skeptics and asked to conduct research on the scientific findings to prepare a counter-argument (rebuttal). This study examined changes in 60 preservice teachers' knowledge and perceptions about climate change after participation in the course. The teachers' understanding of fundamental concepts increased significantly. Their perceptions about climate change became more aligned to those of climate scientists. Findings suggest that scientific argumentation can play an effective role in the preparation of science educators. In addition to reporting findings in more detail, methods course activities, particularly in argumentation, will be shared in our presentation.

  8. Physiology of Penile Erection—A Brief History of the Scientific Understanding up till the Eighties of the 20th Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mels F. van Driel, MD, PhD

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: As the Renaissance's innovative research defined neural and vascular physiologic phenomena responsible for penile erection. The concepts from animal experimentations in Europe in the 19th century significantly contributed to the current understanding of penile erection. van Driel MF. Physiology of penile erection—a brief history of the scientific understanding up till the eighties of the 20th century. Sex Med 2015;3:343–351.

  9. Meteorological Conditions Causing Jet-Engine Poweloss Events: Current Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strapp, J. W.; Ratvasky, T. P.

    2009-09-01

    The aviation industry is currently investigating a regular occurrence of jet engine-powerloss events which have now been attributed to the ingestion of atmospheric ice particles, usually in the vicinity of deep convection. There is a limited amount of information on the cloud microphysical properties near the cores of deep convection due to the potential hazards of flying in these areas, and due to the fact that it is a very challenging environment for current instrumentation. Most of the information that has been used to deduce the details of the conditions that cause engine powerloss has been extracted from the event-aircraft flight data recorders, pilot interviews, ground radar and satellite, a series of flight test programs in the 1950s and again in the 1990s, and the most recently available limited data from the cloud physics community. These have led to the conclusion that engine events occur due to flight through high mass concentrations of ice particles, probably with ice water contents (IWCs) in excess of 2 grams per cubic meter, and perhaps as high as 8. The limited microphysical data available has been used to suggest a median mass diameter of the ice particles of ~200 microns, with some evidence that it may be as low as 40 microns. These small particle sizes in the presence of high mass concentration is consistent with the lack of radar echoes > 20 dBZ observed on the pilot's radar, a consistent observation during engine events. The Engine Harmonization Working Group, an industry/regulator/government committee investigating engine powerloss, has concluded that the level of understanding of the properties of these clouds is inadequate to provide guidance to industry for engine design and testing. In order to address this issue, NASA and Environment Canada are planning to instrument an aircraft to make measurements in high IWC regions of tropical monsoon and continental convection. There is also a significant effort to upgrade and develop new

  10. Improving Understanding of the Agulhas Current and Its Global Climate Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, Lisa; Biastoch, Arne

    2010-05-01

    Working Group on the Climatic Importance of the Greater Agulhas System; Portland, Oregon, 20-21 February 2010; The first meeting of the new Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research (SCOR) Working Group 136 was held to discuss recent developments in understanding the greater Agulhas Current system and future research directions. The overarching goal of the working group is to improve understanding and awareness of the regional and global climate impacts of the Agulhas Current, a major western boundary current that flows along the east coast of Africa, and its interocean leakage. In addition to studying modern circulation, the working group is motivated by recent paleodata that suggest that through the currents' southern influence on the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), changes in the leakage of warm and salty Agulhas waters into the Atlantic may have triggered the end of ice ages. In terms of global climate, this arguably puts the importance of the greater Agulhas system on a par with Heinrich (land-ice release) events and high-latitude deepwater formation.

  11. Modelling Monsoons: Understanding and Predicting Current and Future Behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, A; Sperber, K R; Slingo, J M; Meehl, G A; Mechoso, C R; Kimoto, M; Giannini, A

    2008-09-16

    including, but not limited to, the Mei-Yu/Baiu sudden onset and withdrawal, low-level jet orientation and variability, and orographic forced rainfall. Under anthropogenic climate change many competing factors complicate making robust projections of monsoon changes. Without aerosol effects, increased land-sea temperature contrast suggests strengthened monsoon circulation due to climate change. However, increased aerosol emissions will reflect more solar radiation back to space, which may temper or even reduce the strength of monsoon circulations compared to the present day. A more comprehensive assessment is needed of the impact of black carbon aerosols, which may modulate that of other anthropogenic greenhouse gases. Precipitation may behave independently from the circulation under warming conditions in which an increased atmospheric moisture loading, based purely on thermodynamic considerations, could result in increased monsoon rainfall under climate change. The challenge to improve model parameterizations and include more complex processes and feedbacks pushes computing resources to their limit, thus requiring continuous upgrades of computational infrastructure to ensure progress in understanding and predicting the current and future behavior of monsoons.

  12. THE EFFECTS OF NATIONAL SCIENTIFIC STYLE ON THE UNDERSTANDING OF SCIENTIFIC INNOVATION--SPECIAL RELATIVITY, A CASE HISTORY. FINAL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GOLDBERG, STANLEY

    COMPARED ARE THE RESPONSES TO EINSTEIN'S THEORY OF RELATIVITY IN FOUR COUNTRIES BETWEEN THE YEARS 1905 AND 1911. THE COUNTRIES STUDIED ARE GERMANY, FRANCE, ENGLAND, AND THE UNITED STATES. ON THE BASIS OF THE RESPONSE, NATIONAL SCIENTIFIC STYLES ARE IDENTIFIED, AND THESE STYLES ARE RELATED TO PREVIOUS NATIONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF DOING SCIENCE AND…

  13. Explicitly Targeting Pre-Service Teacher Scientific Reasoning Abilities and Understanding of Nature of Science through an Introductory Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Kathleen; Schen, Melissa; Bao, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Development of a scientifically literate citizenry has become a national focus and highlights the need for K-12 students to develop a solid foundation of scientific reasoning abilities and an understanding of nature of science, along with appropriate content knowledge. This implies that teachers must also be competent in these areas; but…

  14. Effect of Two-Tier Diagnostic Tests on Promoting Learners' Conceptual Understanding of Variables in Conducting Scientific Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çil, Emine

    2015-01-01

    Taking a test generally improves the retention of the material tested. This is a phenomenon commonly referred to as testing effect. The present research investigated whether two-tier diagnostic tests promoted student teachers' conceptual understanding of variables in conducting scientific experiments, which is a scientific process skill. In this…

  15. Students' Participation in an Interdisciplinary, Socioscientific Issues Based Undergraduate Human Biology Major and Their Understanding of Scientific Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, Jennifer L.; Sadler, Troy D.; Sherwood, Robert D.; Schlegel, Whitney M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether Socioscientific Issues (SSI) based learning environments affect university students' epistemological understanding of scientific inquiry differently from traditional science educational contexts. We identify and compare conceptions of scientific inquiry of students participating in an…

  16. Explicitly Targeting Pre-Service Teacher Scientific Reasoning Abilities and Understanding of Nature of Science through an Introductory Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Kathleen; Schen, Melissa; Bao, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Development of a scientifically literate citizenry has become a national focus and highlights the need for K-12 students to develop a solid foundation of scientific reasoning abilities and an understanding of nature of science, along with appropriate content knowledge. This implies that teachers must also be competent in these areas; but…

  17. An Inquiry-Based Laboratory Module to Promote Understanding of the Scientific Method and Bacterial Conjugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie B. Berkmen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Students are engaged and improve their critical thinking skills in laboratory courses when they have the opportunity to design and conduct inquiry-based experiments that generate novel results. A discovery-driven project for a microbiology, genetics, or multidisciplinary research laboratory course was developed to familiarize students with the scientific method. In this multi-lab module, students determine whether their chosen stress conditions induce conjugation and/or cell death of the model BSL-1 Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Through consultation of the primary literature, students identify conditions or chemicals that can elicit DNA damage, the SOS response, and/or cellular stress.  In groups, students discuss their selected conditions, develop their hypotheses and experimental plans, and formulate their positive and negative controls. Students then subject the B. subtilis donor cells to the stress conditions, mix donors with recipients to allow mating, and plate serial dilutions of the mixtures on selective plates to measure how the treatments affect conjugation frequency and donor cell viability.  Finally, students analyze and discuss their collective data in light of their controls. The goals of this module are to encourage students to be actively involved in the scientific process while contributing to our understanding of the conditions that stimulate horizontal gene transfer in bacteria.

  18. An analysis of scientific understandings of preservice elementary teacher education students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginns, Ian S.; Watters, James J.

    This article reports an investigation of the intuitive scientific ideas and understandings of 321 preservice elementary teacher education students enrolled in the 2nd year of a 3-year program. The sample completed a physical science concept challenge instrument by responding, in writing, to open-ended questions about the concepts of floating/sinking, the nature of matter, air pressure and its effects, and the balance beam. Subjects' responses and explanations were analyzed, and response categories established. The results reveal that the majority of subjects, with the exception of a high proportion of those who had a successful senior high school background in physics and chemistry, have misunderstandings in these basic concept areas. It is argued that teachers should have a sound conceptual knowledge base in order to implement effective problem-solving strategies in the elementary science classroom. The importance of teaching science in elementary schools is widely acknowledged, therefore, teacher educators must identify and implement more effective strategies for science instruction in preservice teacher education courses that will enable all students to construct scientifically accurate concept knowledge.

  19. Current understanding of the pseudospin symmetry in atomic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcos, S; Niembro, R [Departamento de Fisica Moderna, Universidad de Cantabria, E-39005 Santander (Spain); Lopez-Quelle, M [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Cantabria, E-39005 Santander (Spain); Savushkin, L N [Department of Physics, St. Petersburg University for Telecommunications, 191065 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)], E-mail: narcoss@unican.es

    2008-08-15

    We use the relativistic mean field framework to analyse the reliability of the explanation of the pseudospin symmetry (PSS) that has been accepted, quite generally, by the scientific community, in the last decade. We make a comparative analysis of the mechanisms responsible for the breaking of the spin and pseudospin symmetries that shows the different nature of these symmetries. We propose an explanation of the PSS, also valid in the nonrelativistic limit, in which the effect of the deviation of the single-particle central potential from a harmonic oscillator on the breaking of the degeneracy of pseudospin doublets is partially compansated by the effect of the spin-orbit interaction.

  20. [Idiopathic epiretinal membrane: definition, classification, current understanding of pathogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomareva, E N; Kazarian, A A

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic epiretinal membrane is a result of a complex biomechanical interaction of the retina and vitreous. This paper discusses classification problems, epidemiological data of multicenter studies, and current hypotheses of epiretinal membrane pathogenesis.

  1. A new method of CCD dark current correction via extracting the dark information from scientific images

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Bin; Hu, Yi; Liu, Qiang; Wang, Lifan; Wei, Peng

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a new method to correct dark current at relatively high temperatures for Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) images when dark frames cannot be obtained on the telescope. For images taken with the Antarctic Survey Telescopes (AST3) in 2012, due to the low cooling efficiency, the median CCD temperature was -46$^\\circ$C, resulting in a high dark current level of about 3$e^-$/pix/sec, even comparable to the sky brightness (10$e^-$/pix/sec). If not corrected, the nonuniformity of the dark current could even overweight the photon noise of the sky background. However, dark frames could not be obtained during the observing season because the camera was operated in frame-transfer mode without a shutter, and the telescope was unattended in winter. Here we present an alternative, but simple and effective method to derive the dark current frame from the scientific images. Then we can scale this dark frame to the temperature at which the scientific images were taken, and apply the dark frame corrections to the s...

  2. Current Approaches to the Understanding of Early Infantile Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, David L.

    This review of the literature provides summaries of the genetic, neurophysiological, and biochemical approaches to understanding autism, with special reference to neuroanatomic, cognitive, and neuropsychological studies of this disorder. Available instruments for the assessment of autism and various treatment alternatives including drug therapy,…

  3. The Immunologic Complexity of Growing Up with Malaria—Is Scientific Understanding Coming of Age?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    In the current issue of Clinical and Vaccine Immunology, Mandala et al. report changes in lymphocyte populations in children with uncomplicated malaria, severe malarial anemia, and cerebral malaria compared to controls (W. L. Mandala et al., Clin Vaccine Immunol 23:95–103, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/CVI.00564-15). This commentary discusses the importance of understanding both helpful and detrimental aspects of the antimalarial immune response that are critical to malaria vaccine development and considers how these responses may relate to antimalarial vaccine safety and efficacy. PMID:26677199

  4. Preservice special education teachers' understandings, enactments, views, and plans for scientific inquiry: Issues and hopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Rajlakshmi

    This study examined the understandings, enactments, views, and plans for scientific inquiry held by preservice special education teachers enrolled in a K--8 general science methods course. Sixteen participants from four special education concentration areas---Mild to Moderate Educational Needs, Moderate to Intense Educational Needs, Mild to Moderate Educational Needs with Language Arts and Reading Emphasis, and Early Childhood Intervention---participated in this study. Qualitative data were collected from questionnaires, interviews, teaching videos, lesson plans, planning commentaries, and reflection papers. Data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach (Strauss & Corbin, 1990) and compared against the theoretical view of inquiry as conceptualized by the National Research Council (NRC, 2000). The participants held unique interpretations of inquiry that only partially matched with the theoretical insights provided by the NRC. The participants' previous science learning experiences and experiences in special education played an important role in shaping their conceptualizations of inquiry as learned in the science methods class. The impacts of such unique interpretations are discussed with reference to both science education and special education, and implications for teacher education are provided.

  5. Understanding Texts with the Help of Experimentation: The Example of Cupellation in Arabic Scientific Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moureau, Sébastien; Thomas, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    The article aims to show how experimentation can help us understand historical texts, by focusing on the specific case of cupellation in Arabic scientific literature. It also provides new information about cupellation in the Arab-Muslim Middle Ages. The article consists of translations of three of the most detailed accounts of cupellation: Hamdānī's Kitāb al-jawharatayn al-'atīqatayn (first half of the fourth/tenth century), Maslama b. Qāsim al-Qurṭubī, Rutbat al-ḥakīm (339-342/950-953), and Manṣūr b. Ba'ra, Kitāb kashf al-asrār al-'ilmiyya bi-dār al-ḍarb al-miṣriyya (615-635/1218-1238). These are accompanied by commentaries based on a series of experiments carried out in the course of archaeological research on cupellation, which are here used to shed new light on the medieval texts and resolve several problems in interpreting them.

  6. Traditional Chinese medicine formulas for irritable bowel syndrome: from ancient wisdoms to scientific understandings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hai-Tao; Zhong, Linda; Tsang, Siu-Wai; Lin, Ze-Si; Bian, Zhao-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) serves as the most common alternative therapeutic approach for Western medicine and benefits IBS patients globally. Due to the lack of scientific evidence in the past, TCM formulas were not internationally well recognized as promising IBS remedies. In this review, firstly, we present the etiology and therapy of IBS in terms of traditional Chinese medical theory. Secondly, we summarize the clinical randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of TCM formulas for IBS patients that are available in the literature (from 1998 to September 2013), in which 14 RCTs conducted of high quality were discussed in detail. Of the 14 selected trials, 12 of those concluded that TCM formulas provided superior improvement in the global symptoms of IBS patients over the placebo or conventional medicines. As well, all 14 RCTs suggested that TCM formulas have good safety and tolerability. Last but not least, we explore the pharmacological mechanisms of the anti-IBS TCM formulas available in the literature (from 1994 to September, 2013). Collectively, in combating IBS symptoms, most TCM formulas exert multi-targeting actions including the regulation of neurotransmitters and hormones in the enteric nervous system (ENS), modulation of smooth muscle motility in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, modulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, attenuation of intestinal inflammation and restoration of intestinal flora, etc. In conclusion, TCM formulas appear to be promising for IBS treatment. This review provides a useful reference for the public in furthering a better understanding and acceptance of TCM formulas as IBS remedies.

  7. Guiding students to develop an understanding of scientific inquiry: a science skills approach to instruction and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Elisa M

    2014-01-01

    New approaches for teaching and assessing scientific inquiry and practices are essential for guiding students to make the informed decisions required of an increasingly complex and global society. The Science Skills approach described here guides students to develop an understanding of the experimental skills required to perform a scientific investigation. An individual teacher's investigation of the strategies and tools she designed to promote scientific inquiry in her classroom is outlined. This teacher-driven action research in the high school biology classroom presents a simple study design that allowed for reciprocal testing of two simultaneous treatments, one that aimed to guide students to use vocabulary to identify and describe different scientific practices they were using in their investigations-for example, hypothesizing, data analysis, or use of controls-and another that focused on scientific collaboration. A knowledge integration (KI) rubric was designed to measure how students integrated their ideas about the skills and practices necessary for scientific inquiry. KI scores revealed that student understanding of scientific inquiry increased significantly after receiving instruction and using assessment tools aimed at promoting development of specific inquiry skills. General strategies for doing classroom-based action research in a straightforward and practical way are discussed, as are implications for teaching and evaluating introductory life sciences courses at the undergraduate level.

  8. [Current state of the scientific activity of the Aachen group concerning number processing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlfs-Domínguez, P

    The research group from Willmes and colleagues is one of the most advanced research groups in cognitive neuroscience. The use and nature of the numeric magnitude representation constitutes one of the study objects of the mentioned research group. This mental representation provokes a great controversy among the members of the scientific community studying number processing and arithmetic. As a consequence, there are several different theoretical models concerning number processing. In this work, we have reviewed some of the scientific studies realized by the Aachen group concerning number processing, with the aim to expound the current state of its activity. In the works from Willmes and colleagues, we can notice a logic sequence, regarding the formulation of work hypothesis. The course of evolution of their activity starts studying number processing and arithmetic on German listener population and continues with a progressive integration of the German deaf population into their work. There is, as well, an emergent trend in this group to research number processing at the classroom. This means to examine the underlying mental representations in the education field. The information included in the studies analyzed here, leads to several scientific questions which need to be researched in future studies, and questions and complements what has been supported by other research groups.

  9. Current understanding of the neuropathophysiology of pain in chronic pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amporn; Atsawarungruangkit; Supot; Pongprasobchai

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis(CP) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the pancreas. The main symptom of patients with CP is chronic and severe abdominal pain. However, the pathophysiology of pain in CP remains obscure.Traditionally, researchers believed that the pain was caused by anatomical changes in pancreatic structure. However, treatment outcomes based on such beliefs are considered unsatisfactory. The emerging explanations of pain in CP are trending toward neurobiological theories. This article aims to review current evidence regarding the neuropathophysiology of pain in CP and its potential implications for the development of new treatments for pain in CP.

  10. International migration flows. Framework for understanding and current features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colectivo IOÉ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The present article aims to outline a framework for the understanding of the present international migratory flows as well as to outline their main traits. In order to do this, we first group together the different migratory flows produced since the sixteenth century up to the mid seventies in the twentieth  century, stopping then for a closer look at the present situation which register the impact of economic globalization, translating it into an increase of said flows and, above all, to their enormous diversification. To end, we make a brief balance of the present period and a critical evaluation on the meaning of one of the flows which attracts most attention, economic migrations south-north, because these are the ones which have the most impact on developed countries.

  11. Asthma in the Elderly: Current Understanding and Future Research Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanania, Nicola A.; King, Monroe J.; Braman, Sidney S.; Saltoun, Carol; Wise, Robert A.; Enright, Paul; Falsey, Ann A; Mathur, Sameer K.; Ramsdell, Joe W.; Rogers, Linda; Stempel, David A.; Lima, John J.; Fish, James E.; Wilson, Sandra R.; Boyd, Cynthia; Patel, Kushang V.; Irvin, Charles G.; Yawn, Barbara P.; Halm, Ethan A; Wasserman, Stephen I.; Sands, Mark F.; Ershler, William B.; Ledford, Dennis K.

    2011-01-01

    Asthma in the elderly (AIE) is under diagnosed and under treated and there is a paucity of knowledge. The National Institute on Aging convened this workshop to identify what is known, what gaps in knowledge remain and suggest research directions needed to improve the understanding and care of AIE. Asthma presenting at an advanced age often has similar clinical and physiologic consequences as seen with younger individuals but co-morbid illnesses and the psychosocial effects of aging may affect the diagnosis, clinical presentation and care of asthma in this population. At least two phenotypes exist among elderly asthma; those with long-standing asthma have more severe airflow limitation and less complete reversibility than those with late-onset asthma. Many challenges exist in the recognition and treatment of asthma in the elderly. Furthermore, the pathophysiological mechanisms of AIE are likely to be different from those seen in young asthmatics and these differences may influence the clinical course and outcomes of asthma in this population. PMID:21872730

  12. Sill induced hydrothermal venting: A summary of our current understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerram, Dougal; Svenesn, Henrik; Planke, Sverre; Millett, John; Reynolds, Pete

    2017-04-01

    Hydrothermal vent structures which are predominantly related with the emplacement of large (>1000 km3) intrusions into the sub-volcanic basins represent a specific style of piercement structure, where climate-forcing gases can be transferred into the atmosphere and hydrosphere. In this case, the types and volumes of gas produced by intrusions is heavily dependent on the host-rock sediment properties that they intrude through. The distribution of vent structures can be shown to be widespread in Large Igneous Provinces for example on both the Norwegian and the Greenland margins of the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP). In this overview we assess the distribution, types and occurrence of hydrothermal vent structures associated with LIPs. There is particular focus on those within the NAIP using mapped examples from offshore seismic data as well as outcrop analogues, highlighting the variability of these structures and their deposits. As the availability of 3D data from offshore and onshore increases, the full nature of the volcanic stratigraphy from the subvolcanic intrusive complexes, through the main eruption cycles into the piercing vent structures, can be realised along the entirety of volcanic rifted margins and LIPs. This will help greatly in our understanding of the evolving palaeo-environments, and climate contributions during the evolution of these short lived massive volcanic events.

  13. The Vaginal Microbiome: Current Understanding and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David H; Marrazzo, Jeanne M

    2016-08-15

    This article summarizes the highlights of the expert technical consultation on bacterial vaginosis (BV), sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease and held in Washington, DC, on 8-9 April 2015. Many issues touched on in this article are discussed in much greater detail in the 6 preceding articles in this supplement to The Journal of Infectious Diseases There was a consensus among the meeting attendees concerning the most important research issues in the field: the pathogenesis of the syndrome, way to optimize treatment, and the relative roles of sexual transmission and endogenous infection in BV epidemiology. This article concludes with a listing of BV and genitourinary tract research priorities that were discussed and agreed on by attendees. The most important of these included better characterization of vaginal microbiome community state subtypes, application of advanced "-omic" technologies to improve understanding of BV pathogenesis, further investigation of the relationships between the male and female genitourinary tract microbiomes, and the development of new drugs for BV treatment. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. The autophagosome: current understanding of formation and maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannack LVJC

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Lilith VJC Mannack, Jon D Lane Cell Biology Laboratories, School of Biochemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK Abstract: Autophagy is an important and highly conserved catabolic process with roles in development, homeostasis, and cellular stress responses. It describes various distinct pathways for the delivery of cytoplasmic materials (including misfolded protein aggregates and some organelles to the lysosome for degradation and component recycling. The best understood form of autophagy (macroautophagy describes the de novo assembly, maturation, and trafficking of a unique double membrane-bound organelle – the autophagosomes – that sequesters cytoplasmic materials and ultimately merges with the lysosomal compartment to form a degradative autolysosome. To rapidly assemble such a structure in response to stimuli, cells express a family of dedicated autophagy-related (ATG gene products that act sequentially to control membrane events leading first to the nucleation of an isolation membrane or phagophore, followed by phagophore expansion, and sealing to form an autophagosome that traffics to – and ultimately fuses with – the lysosome. These molecules are activated in response to upstream signaling pathways (notably, the mechanistic target of rapamycin [mTOR] pathway, and comprise protein and lipid kinases, putative membrane coats, and unique ubiquitin-like conjugation systems. In concert, a barrage of accessory proteins involved in various membrane trafficking pathways focused on the endosomal compartment are co-opted at the assembly site to facilitate autophagosome biogenesis. Understanding the integrated pathways that coordinate autophagosome assembly at the molecular level will be crucial if we are to realize the potential for autophagy manipulation in future disease therapies. Keywords: autophagy, ATG proteins, lysosome, phagophore, omegasome, autolysosome, membrane trafficking, ULK1, mTOR, PI(3 kinase, PI3P, LIR motif

  15. Catatonia: Our current understanding of its diagnosis, treatment and pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Sean A; Mazurek, Michael F; Rosebush, Patricia I

    2016-01-01

    Catatonia is a psychomotor syndrome that has been reported to occur in more than 10% of patients with acute psychiatric illnesses. Two subtypes of the syndrome have been identified. Catatonia of the retarded type is characterized by immobility, mutism, staring, rigidity, and a host of other clinical signs. Excited catatonia is a less common presentation in which patients develop prolonged periods of psychomotor agitation. Once thought to be a subtype of schizophrenia, catatonia is now recognized to occur with a broad spectrum of medical and psychiatric illnesses, particularly affective disorders. In many cases, the catatonia must be treated before any underlying conditions can be accurately diagnosed. Most patients with the syndrome respond rapidly to low-dose benzodiazepines, but electroconvulsive therapy is occasionally required. Patients with longstanding catatonia or a diagnosis of schizophrenia may be less likely to respond. The pathobiology of catatonia is poorly understood, although abnormalities in gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate signaling have been suggested as causative factors. Because catatonia is common, highly treatable, and associated with significant morbidity and mortality if left untreated, physicians should maintain a high level of suspicion for this complex clinical syndrome. Since 1989, we have systematically assessed patients presenting to our psychiatry service with signs of retarded catatonia. In this paper, we present a review of the current literature on catatonia along with findings from the 220 cases we have assessed and treated. PMID:28078203

  16. Catatonia: Our current understanding of its diagnosis, treatment and pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Sean A; Mazurek, Michael F; Rosebush, Patricia I

    2016-12-22

    Catatonia is a psychomotor syndrome that has been reported to occur in more than 10% of patients with acute psychiatric illnesses. Two subtypes of the syndrome have been identified. Catatonia of the retarded type is characterized by immobility, mutism, staring, rigidity, and a host of other clinical signs. Excited catatonia is a less common presentation in which patients develop prolonged periods of psychomotor agitation. Once thought to be a subtype of schizophrenia, catatonia is now recognized to occur with a broad spectrum of medical and psychiatric illnesses, particularly affective disorders. In many cases, the catatonia must be treated before any underlying conditions can be accurately diagnosed. Most patients with the syndrome respond rapidly to low-dose benzodiazepines, but electroconvulsive therapy is occasionally required. Patients with longstanding catatonia or a diagnosis of schizophrenia may be less likely to respond. The pathobiology of catatonia is poorly understood, although abnormalities in gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate signaling have been suggested as causative factors. Because catatonia is common, highly treatable, and associated with significant morbidity and mortality if left untreated, physicians should maintain a high level of suspicion for this complex clinical syndrome. Since 1989, we have systematically assessed patients presenting to our psychiatry service with signs of retarded catatonia. In this paper, we present a review of the current literature on catatonia along with findings from the 220 cases we have assessed and treated.

  17. Understanding and Affecting Science Teacher Candidates' Scientific Reasoning in Introductory Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Richard; Cormier, Sebastien

    2013-01-01

    This study reports on a content course for science immersion teacher candidates that emphasized authentic practice of science and thinking scientifically in the context of introductory astrophysics. We explore how 122 science teacher candidates spanning three cohorts did and did not reason scientifically and how this evolved in our program. Our…

  18. Understanding and Affecting Science Teacher Candidates' Scientific Reasoning in Introductory Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Richard; Cormier, Sebastien

    2013-01-01

    This study reports on a content course for science immersion teacher candidates that emphasized authentic practice of science and thinking scientifically in the context of introductory astrophysics. We explore how 122 science teacher candidates spanning three cohorts did and did not reason scientifically and how this evolved in our program. Our…

  19. Adjuvants to local anesthetics: Current understanding and future trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Amlan; Nag, Deb Sanjay; Sahu, Seelora; Samaddar, Devi Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Although beneficial in acute and chronic pain management, the use of local anaesthetics is limited by its duration of action and the dose dependent adverse effects on the cardiac and central nervous system. Adjuvants or additives are often used with local anaesthetics for its synergistic effect by prolonging the duration of sensory-motor block and limiting the cumulative dose requirement of local anaesthetics. The armamentarium of local anesthetic adjuvants have evolved over time from classical opioids to a wide array of drugs spanning several groups and varying mechanisms of action. A large array of opioids ranging from morphine, fentanyl and sufentanyl to hydromorphone, buprenorphine and tramadol has been used with varying success. However, their use has been limited by their adverse effect like respiratory depression, nausea, vomiting and pruritus, especially with its neuraxial use. Epinephrine potentiates the local anesthetics by its antinociceptive properties mediated by alpha-2 adrenoreceptor activation along with its vasoconstrictive properties limiting the systemic absorption of local anesthetics. Alpha 2 adrenoreceptor antagonists like clonidine and dexmedetomidine are one of the most widely used class of local anesthetic adjuvants. Other drugs like steroids (dexamethasone), anti-inflammatory agents (parecoxib and lornoxicam), midazolam, ketamine, magnesium sulfate and neostigmine have also been used with mixed success. The concern regarding the safety profile of these adjuvants is due to its potential neurotoxicity and neurological complications which necessitate further research in this direction. Current research is directed towards a search for agents and techniques which would prolong local anaesthetic action without its deleterious effects. This includes novel approaches like use of charged molecules to produce local anaesthetic action (tonicaine and n butyl tetracaine), new age delivery mechanisms for prolonged bioavailability (liposomal

  20. Promoting the Understanding of Scientific Reasoning, Mathematical Modeling and Data Analysis: A Course for Astrophysics Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Dennis; Ford, S.

    2014-01-01

    The NSF-supported “AstroCom NYC” program, a collaboration of the City University of New York, American Museum of Natural History (AMNH), and Columbia University has the explicit goal of increasing the participation of underrepresented minorities in astronomy and astrophysics by providing pedagogical mentoring and research experiences to undergraduate students. To supplement AstroCom scholars' undergraduate course work, and as a gateway to summer astrophysics research opportunities, we implemented a course called “Methods of Scientific Research” (MSR). The semester-long MSR course emphasizes the study of data using computers and other digital tools in a laboratory environment that encourages collaborative and active learning. We enroll early physical science majors and deliberately seek to inculcate habits of mind needed for science research, including assigning physical meaning to variables and measurements; engaging in mathematical modeling; quantifying error; eliminating bias; proposing hypotheses; creating predictions; testing predictions. Using laptop computers interfaced with probeware, students collect and analyze data using graphing software. Students study concepts such as motion, temperature, magnetism, electricity, gas pressure, and force with open-ended investigations where large data sets can be readily collected and replicated during a course meeting. Students are guided to examine data for patterns and trends, to make meaning of descriptive statistics such as means, standard deviations, maximum and minimum values, correlation coefficients and root mean square error values, and in general to understand, judge, and describe the studied phenomena based on data. A secondary goal of the course is to familiarize students with the facilities at AMNH, where they will do summer research as part of AstroCom NYC, in an effort to build a sense of belonging and to help them begin to self-identify as a scientist. We will discuss some our activities and

  1. A Descriptive Study of Pre-Service Science Teachers' Conceptual Understanding of Scientific Inquiry using Concept Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Kevin M.

    Future science teachers serve a critical role in creating a scientifically literate citizenry. Their knowledge and understanding of the process by which science works, scientific inquiry, is fundamental to this goal of science education. This descriptive research study investigated pre-service secondary science teachers' conceptual understanding of scientific inquiry using concept maps. Thirty participants constructed concept maps describing the interrelationships among twelve scientific inquiry concepts. The concept maps were analyzed to determine how participants structured, organized, associated, and described the relationships between these concepts. The majority of participants did organize and associate a chain of inquiry concepts with one another into a scientific method series. Participants displayed an overall low number of associations between the twelve inquiry concepts. Of the concept pairs that were associated with one another, there was a lack of consistency in the linking words used to describe the relationship between them. Implications for science educators in the development and design of teaching about inquiry in pre-service teacher education programs and professional development opportunities are examined. Recommendations for further study into the conceptual understanding of beginning science teachers are also discussed.

  2. Children’s understanding of scientific concepts : Combining a micro-developmental approach with a longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Steen, Steffie

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows that the social (teacher) and material environment (task) play an active part in children's learning process and cannot be viewed as a separate, outside-based influence on cognitive development. We illustrate this using a longitudinal study on children's understanding of scientific

  3. Exploring Learners' Beliefs about Science Reading and Scientific Epistemic Beliefs, and Their Relations with Science Text Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang-Ying; Chang, Cheng-Chieh; Chen, Li-Ling; Chen, Yi-Chun

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to explore learners' beliefs about science reading and scientific epistemic beliefs, and how these beliefs were associating with their understanding of science texts. About 400 10th graders were involved in the development and validation of the Beliefs about Science Reading Inventory (BSRI). To find the effects…

  4. Children’s understanding of scientific concepts : Combining a micro-developmental approach with a longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Steen, Steffie

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows that the social (teacher) and material environment (task) play an active part in children's learning process and cannot be viewed as a separate, outside-based influence on cognitive development. We illustrate this using a longitudinal study on children's understanding of scientific

  5. The Effects of Inquiry-Based Computer Simulation with Cooperative Learning on Scientific Thinking and Conceptual Understanding of Gas Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Sopiah; Shariff, Adilah

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of inquiry-based computer simulation with heterogeneous-ability cooperative learning (HACL) and inquiry-based computer simulation with friendship cooperative learning (FCL) on (a) scientific reasoning (SR) and (b) conceptual understanding (CU) among Form Four students in Malaysian Smart…

  6. Drama-Based Science Teaching and Its Effect on Students' Understanding of Scientific Concepts and Their Attitudes towards Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, Osama H.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of drama-based science teaching on students' understanding of scientific concepts and their attitudes towards science learning. The study also aimed to examine if there is an interaction between students' achievement level in science and drama-based instruction. The sample consisted of (87) of 7th grade students…

  7. Scientific Understanding from Long Term Observations: Insights from the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosz, J.

    2001-12-01

    estuaries below by removing all incoming freshwater. At Toolik Lake, long-term experiments of removing top predators from the good web of lakes showed dramatic alterations of lake populations of small fish and zooplankton. In New Mexico, LTER research on small mammal populations is successfully predicting rodent increases and the potential for increased zoonotic diseases such as Hantavirus and bubonic plague. This ability to forecast based on El Nino prediction is being used to increase scientific awareness and public health awareness through media based communication with the public. In Oregon, the Andrews Forest LTER program has had long, strong links with natural resource policy and management. Basic understanding of forest-stream interactions, characteristics of old-growth forests, roles of woody debris in temperate forest ecosystems, invertebrate biodiversity and ecosystem function have been incorporated in management guidelines, plans and regulations for public and private lands throughout the Pacific Northwest. Other examples of the values of long-term research and monitoring will be presented.

  8. Measuring currents in submarine canyons: technological and scientific progress in the past 30 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    The development and application of acoustic and optical technologies and of accurate positioning systems in the past 30 years have opened new frontiers in the submarine canyon research communities. This paper reviews several key advancements in both technology and science in the field of currents in submarine canyons since the1979 publication of Currents in Submarine Canyons and Other Sea Valleys by Francis Shepard and colleagues. Precise placements of high-resolution, high-frequency instruments have not only allowed researchers to collect new data that are essential for advancing and generalizing theories governing the canyon currents, but have also revealed new natural phenomena that challenge the understandings of the theorists and experimenters in their predictions of submarine canyon flow fields. Baroclinic motions at tidal frequencies, found to be intensified both up canyon and toward the canyon floor, dominate the flow field and control the sediment transport processes in submarine canyons. Turbidity currents are found to frequently occur in active submarine canyons such as Monterey Canyon. These turbidity currents have maximum speeds of nearly 200 cm/s, much smaller than the speeds of turbidity currents in geological time, but still very destructive. In addition to traditional Eulerian measurements, Lagrangian flow data are essential in quantifying water and sediment transport in submarine canyons. A concerted experiment with multiple monitoring stations along the canyon axis and on nearby shelves is required to characterize the storm-trigger mechanism for turbidity currents.

  9. Bridging the Gap between Scientific and Indigenous knowledge to Better Understand Social Impacts of Changing Rainfall Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, A. H.; Joachim, L.; Zhu, X.; Hammer, C.; Harris, M.; Griggs, D.

    2011-12-01

    The Murray-Darling Basin incorporates Australia's three longest rivers and is important for an agricultural industry worth more than $9 billion per annum, a rich biodiversity of habitat and species, and the very life of its traditional owners. The complex and sometimes enigmatic relationships between modes of variability and Australian regional rainfall distribution means that reliable projections of future water availability remain highly uncertain. Persistent drought, with associated heat stress and high fire danger, and episodic flooding rains present further challenges. Indeed, recent extremes likely herald a tipping point for the communities and ecosystems that rely on the river system. The Barmah-Millewa region in the Murray-Darling Basin is the heart of Yorta Yorta Traditional Tribal Lands. The Yorta Yorta continue to assert their inherent rights to country and have shown through oral, documentary and material evidence, that their social, spiritual, economic and cultural links with country have never been broken. Current water policy and practice, highly contested community consultation processes, cross-border governance issues and a changing social landscape create in this region a microcosm for understanding the complex demands of economic, environmental and cultural security along the Murray-Darling Basin as the climate changes. New approaches to bridging the gap between scientific and Indigenous epistemologies have emerged in recent years, including for example ecosystem-based adaptation (Vignola et al. 2009) and the analysis of cultural water flows (Weir 2010). The potential for innovation using these approaches has informed a study that investigates how the deep knowledge of country of the Yorta Yorta people can be combined with state of the art climate science to develop a better understanding of the competing demands on water resources in the Barmah-Millewa region now and in the future. An important dimension of this collaborative work with the Yorta

  10. Cancer Treatment-Related Cardiotoxicity: Understanding the Current State of Knowledge and Developing Future Research Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer Treatment-Related Cardiotoxicity: Understanding the Current State of Knowledge and Developing Future Research Priorities, a 2013 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  11. Understanding the Performance and Potential of Cloud Computing for Scientific Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadooghi, Iman; Hernandez Martin, Jesus; Li, Tonglin; Brandstatter, Kevin; Zhao, Yong; Maheshwari, Ketan; Pais Pitta de Lacerda Ruivo, Tiago; Timm, Steven; Garzoglio, Gabriele; Raicu, Ioan

    2015-04-01

    Commercial clouds bring a great opportunity to the scientific computing area. Scientific applications usually require significant resources, however not all scientists have access to sufficient high-end computing systems, may of which can be found in the Top500 list. Cloud Computing has gained the attention of scientists as a competitive resource to run HPC applications at a potentially lower cost. But as a different infrastructure, it is unclear whether clouds are capable of running scientific applications with a reasonable performance per money spent. This work studies the performance of public clouds and places this performance in context to price. We evaluate the raw performance of different services of AWS cloud in terms of the basic resources, such as compute, memory, network and I/O. We also evaluate the performance of the scientific applications running in the cloud. This paper aims to assess the ability of the cloud to perform well, as well as to evaluate the cost of the cloud running scientific applications. We developed a full set of metrics and conducted a comprehensive performance evlauation over the Amazon cloud. We evaluated EC2, S3, EBS and DynamoDB among the many Amazon AWS services. We evaluated the memory sub-system performance with CacheBench, the network performance with iperf, processor and network performance with the HPL benchmark application, and shared storage with NFS and PVFS in addition to S3. We also evaluated a real scientific computing application through the Swift parallel scripting system at scale. Armed with both detailed benchmarks to gauge expected performance and a detailed monetary cost analysis, we expect this paper will be a recipe cookbook for scientists to help them decide where to deploy and run their scientific applications between public clouds, private clouds, or hybrid clouds.

  12. Understanding the Correlations between Social Attention and Topic Trends of Scientific Publications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianlei Dong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We propose and apply a simplified nowcasting model to understand the correlations between social attention and topic trends of scientific publications. Design/methodology/approach: First, topics are generated from the obesity corpus by using the latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA algorithm and time series of keyword search trends in Google Trends are obtained. We then establish the structural time series model using data from January 2004 to December 2012, and evaluate the model using data from January 2013. We employ a state-space model to separate different non-regression components in an observational time series (i.e. the tendency and the seasonality and apply the “spike and slab prior” and stepwise regression to analyze the correlations between the regression component and the social media attention. The two parts are combined using Markov-chain Monte Carlo sampling techniques to obtain our results. Findings: The results of our study show that (1 the number of publications on child obesity increases at a lower rate than that of diabetes publications; (2 the number of publication on a given topic may exhibit a relationship with the season or time of year; and (3 there exists a correlation between the number of publications on a given topic and its social media attention, i.e. the search frequency related to that topic as identified by Google Trends. We found that our model is also able to predict the number of publications related to a given topic. Research limitations: First, we study a correlation rather than causality between topics' trends and social media. As a result, the relationships might not be robust, so we cannot predict the future in the long run. Second, we cannot identify the reasons or conditions that are driving obesity topics to present such tendencies and seasonal patterns, so we might need to do “field” study in the future. Third, we need to improve the efficiency of our model by finding more efficient

  13. The Effect of Constructivist Learning Using Scientific Approach on Mathematical Power and Conceptual Understanding of Students Grade IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmaryono, Imam; Suyitno, Hardi

    2016-02-01

    This study used a model of Concurrent Embedded with the aim of: (1) determine the difference between the conceptual understanding and mathematical power of students grade fourth who take the constructivist learning using scientific approach and direct learning, (2) determine the interaction between learning approaches and initial competence on the mathematical power and conceptual of understanding, and (3) describe the mathematical power of students grade fourth. This research was conducted in the fourth grade elementary school early 2015. Data initial competence and mathematical power obtained through tests, and analyzed using statistical tests multivariate and univariate. Statistical analysis of the results showed that: (1) There are differences in the concept of understanding and mathematical power among the students who follow the scientifically-based constructivist learning than students who take the Direct Learning in terms of students initial competency (F = 5.550; p = 0.007 skills. Researcher suggested that the learning of mathematics in schools using scientifically- based constructivist approach to improve the mathematical power of students and conceptual understanding.

  14. Scientific Visualisations for Developing Students' Understanding of Concepts in Chemistry: Some Findings and Some Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geelan, David; Mahaffy, Peter; Mukherjee, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Scientific visualisations such as computer-based animations and simulations are increasingly a feature of high school Science instruction. Visualisations are adopted enthusiastically by teachers and embraced by students, and there is good evidence that they are popular and well received. There is limited evidence, however, of how effective they…

  15. Early Science Education: Exploring Familiar Contexts To Improve the Understanding of Some Basic Scientific Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Isabel P.; Veiga, Luisa

    2001-01-01

    Argues that science education is a fundamental tool for global education and that it must be introduced in early years as a first step to a scientific culture for all. Describes testing validity of a didactic strategy for developing the learning of concepts, which was based upon an experimental work approach using everyday life contexts. (Author)

  16. Scientific Highlights of INDEPTH: Our Still-Evolving Understanding of Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemperer, S. L.; Science Teams, I.

    2011-12-01

    : INDEPTH field activities began in 1992 as a modest Sino-US reflection profile in the Tethyan Himalaya; after 20 years it has spanned the Tibet to cross the KunLun mountains. Three major field campaigns after the first modest test were each spring-boarded by a major discovery in the preceding phase, that in each case highlighted the value of a new scientific technique. INDEPTH-1 imaged the Main Himalayan Thrust for the first time, and wide-angle recording demonstrated India must penetrate north of the Indus-Tsangpo suture at mid-crustal levels. INDEPTH-2 additionally harnessed passive seismic and magneto-telluric recording to discover widespread crustal melting in the Lhasa terrane above subducting India, leading directly to the influential channel-flow model of the development of orogens. INDEPTH-3 crossed into the Qiangtang (northern Tibet), imaged the Indian slab descending into the mantle, and discovering the dramatic change in anisotropy properties of the lithosphere north and south of the Banggong-Nujiang suture. INDEPTH-4 focussed on the interaction of the Qaidam Basin with the high Tibetan plateau, by indentation into the weaker Tibetan crust of the Songpan-Ganzi terrane, and at greater depth provided new images of possible Asian subduction from the north beneath Tibet. Although INDEPTH has provided iconic images of the lithosphere, these have not always translated into agreement about fundamental concerns: the northern limit of Indian crust as part of Tibetan lithosphere (mantle suture) remains debated; and north of that mantle suture, the degree of crust-mantle coupling remains more in the realm of modelers than observational geophysics. Beyond the principal INDEPTH transect, dispersed MT studies in particular have been used to argue the essential collinearity of the Himalayan orogen, and these and passive seismic recordings have suggested relatively uniform plateau-wide processes controlled by a pervasively deforming crust. But as we have deployed more

  17. Using Exoplanet Models to Explore NGSS and the Nature of Science and as a Tool for Understanding the Scientific Results from NIRCam/JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebofsky, Larry A.; McCarthy, Donald W.; Higgins, Michelle L.; Lebofsky, Nancy R.

    2014-11-01

    Our Solar System is no longer unique. To date, about 1,800 planets are known to orbit over 1,100 other stars and nearly 50% are in multiple-planet systems. Planetary systems seem [to be] fairly common and astronomers are now finding Earth-sized planets in the Goldilocks Zone, suggesting there may be other habitable planets. To this end, characterizing the atmospheric chemistries of such planets is a major science goal of the NIRCam instrument on the James Webb Space Telescope.For NIRCam's E/PO program with the Girl Scouts of the USA, we have produced scale models and associated activities to compare the size, scale, and dynamics of the Solar System with several exoplanet systems. Our models illustrate the techniques used to investigate these systems: radial velocity, transits, direct observations, and gravitational microlensing. By comparing and contrasting these models, we place our Solar System in a more cosmic context and enable discussion of current questions within the scientific community: How do planetary systems form and evolve? Is our present definition of a planet a good definition in the context of other planetary systems? Are there other planets/moons that might harbor life as we know it?These models are appropriate for use in classrooms and conform to the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) through the Disciplinary Core Idea: Earth's Place in the Universe and Crosscutting Concepts—Patterns Scale, Portion, and Quantity; and Systems and System Models. NGSS also states that the Nature of Science (NOS) should be an “essential part” of science education. NOS topics include, for example, understanding that scientific investigations use a variety of methods, that scientific knowledge is based on empirical evidence, that scientific explanations are open to revision in light of new evidence, and an understanding the nature of scientific models.

  18. Plastic debris and policy: Using current scientific understanding to invoke positive change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rochman, Chelsea M.; Cook, A.M.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    Captain Charles Moore introduced the world to the "Great Pacific Garbage Patch" in the mid-1990s. Since then, there has been increasing interest from scientists, the public and policy makers regarding plastic debris in the environment. A focus article in the July issue of the Society of

  19. Assessing Pre-Service Science Teachers' Understanding of Scientific Argumentation: What Do They Know about Argumentation after Four Years of College Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydeniz, M.; Ozdilek, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess pre-service science teachers' understanding of science, scientific argumentation and the difference between scientific argumentation and scientific explanation. A total of 40 pre-service science teachers enrolled in a Turkish university completed a five-question questionnaire. The results showed that the…

  20. Scientific Thinking in Elementary School: Children's Social Cognition and Their Epistemological Understanding Promote Experimentation Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterhaus, Christopher; Koerber, Susanne; Sodian, Beate

    2017-01-01

    Do social cognition and epistemological understanding promote elementary school children's experimentation skills? To investigate this question, 402 children (ages 8, 9, and 10) in 2nd, 3rd, and 4th grades were assessed for their experimentation skills, social cognition (advanced theory of mind [AToM]), epistemological understanding (understanding…

  1. Away from ethnocentrism and anthropocentrism: towards a scientific understanding of "what makes us human".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesch, Christophe

    2010-06-01

    The quest to understand "what makes us human" has been heading towards an impasse, when comparative psychology compares primarily individuals that are not representative of their species. Captives experience such divergent socioecological niches that they cannot stand for their wild counterparts. Only after removing ethnocentrism and anthropocentrism will we be able to progress in our understanding of "what makes us human."

  2. A Whole Different Side of Geology: The Science of Reading and Mostly Understanding Scientific Articles for Beginning Geologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figg, S.

    2014-12-01

    The idea of reading and understanding scientific articles can be daunting to beginning geology students. A student driven question "How do I read a scientific paper?" became the catalyst for a 1-unit special topic course, specifically devoted to the process of reading scientific articles. Five students participated in the course, which focused on research articles pertaining to an upcoming field study in Death Valley. The course was divided into four main portions: locating articles, reading and understand scientific articles, applying of articles in the field, and creating an abstract. Articles were located electronically through the Palomar College library. The first step was to teach students how to navigate databases for the desired material. Part Two was the most challenging and time consuming: the process of reading, analyzing, and comprehending scholarly articles. What made the course interesting was the student driven approach to the articles. Under guidance of an instructor, students worked as a group, navigating two different articles while developing their own strategies to obtain the basic concepts of the article. Each student then had to analyze an additional two articles of their choosing. During this time observations were made on student confidence, methods developed to assist in understanding articles, student challenges and successes. Information gained from the articles was then applied during a five day field course in Death Valley. Each student gave a brief presentation about the two articles read independently, applying them to various settings in the Death Valley region. Upon returning from the trip, students were tasked with contacting an author from one of the papers. The final portion of the special topic course was for students to produce their own abstracts, requiring them to condense a semester's worth of work into a short amount of words. From this 1-unit course, students learned there is no one way to read a scientific article, and

  3. Understanding the Impact of Early Citers on Long-Term Scientific Impact

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Mayank; Jaiswal, Ajay; Shree, Priya; Pal, Arindam; Mukherjee, Animesh; Goyal, Pawan

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores an interesting new dimension to the challenging problem of predicting long-term scientific impact (LTSI) usually measured by the number of citations accumulated by a paper in the long-term. It is well known that early citations (within 1-2 years after publication) acquired by a paper positively affects its LTSI. However, there is no work that investigates if the set of authors who bring in these early citations to a paper also affect its LTSI. In this paper, we demonstrate...

  4. Understanding Performance of Parallel Scientific Simulation Codes using Open|SpeedShop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, K K

    2011-11-07

    Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Open SpeedShop's (OSS) is convenient to use for large, parallel, scientific simulation codes; (2) Large codes benefit from uninstrumented execution; (3) Many experiments can be run in a short time - might need multiple shots e.g. usertime for caller-callee, hwcsamp for HW counters; (4) Decent idea of code's performance is easily obtained; (5) Statistical sampling calls for decent number of samples; and (6) HWC data is very useful for micro-analysis but can be tricky to analyze.

  5. Relations between representational consistency, conceptual understanding of the force concept, and scientific reasoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasi Nieminen,

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous physics education research has raised the question of “hidden variables” behind students’ success in learning certain concepts. In the context of the force concept, it has been suggested that students’ reasoning ability is one such variable. Strong positive correlations between students’ preinstruction scores for reasoning ability (measured by Lawson’s Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning and their learning of forces [measured by the Force Concept Inventory (FCI] have been reported in high school and university introductory courses. However, there is no published research concerning the relation between students’ ability to interpret multiple representations consistently (i.e., representational consistency and their learning of forces. To investigate this, we collected 131 high school students’ pre- and post-test data of the Representational Variant of the Force Concept Inventory (for representational consistency and the FCI. The students’ Lawson pretest data were also collected. We found that the preinstruction level of students’ representational consistency correlated strongly with student learning gain of forces. The correlation (0.51 was almost equal to the correlation between Lawson prescore and learning gain of forces (0.52. Our results support earlier findings which suggest that scientific reasoning ability is a hidden variable behind the learning of forces. In addition, we suggest that students’ representational consistency may also be such a factor, and that this should be recognized in physics teaching.

  6. Scientific understanding of students in the picture : The evaluation of Video Feedback Coaching for upper grade teachers during science and technology education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vondel, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Scientific understanding of students in the picture Scientific understanding is becoming more important in today's society. Eliciting and stimulating these talents in the form of science and technology education will become increasingly incorporated in the Dutch school curriculum. Video Feedback Coa

  7. Influence of student-designed experiments with fast plants on their understanding of plants and of scientific inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akey, Ann Kosek

    2000-10-01

    This dissertation investigates the influence of student designed experiments with Fast Plants in an undergraduate agroecology course on the students' conceptual understanding of plant life cycles and on their procedural understanding of scientific experimentation. It also considers students' perspectives on the value of these experiences. Data sources included semi-structured interviews with students and the instructor, a written task, course evaluations, and observations of class meetings. Students came into the course having strong practical experience with plants from their agricultural backgrounds. Students did not always connect aspects of plant biology that they studied in class, particularly respiration and photosynthesis, to plant growth requirements. The instructor was able to bridge the gap between some practical knowledge and textbook knowledge with experiences other than the Fast Plant project. Most students held an incomplete picture of plant reproduction that was complicated by differences between agricultural and scientific vocabulary. There is need for teaching approaches that help students tie together their knowledge of plants into a cohesive framework. Experiences that help students draw on their background knowledge related to plants, and which give students the opportunity to examine and discuss their ideas, may help students make more meaningful connections. The Fast Plant project, a positive experience for most students, was seen by these undergraduate students as being more helpful in learning about scientific experimentation than about plants. The process of designing and carrying out their own experiments gave students insight into experimentation, provoked their curiosity, and resulted in a sense of ownership and accomplishment.

  8. Modeling Scientific Processes with Mathematics Equations Enhances Student Qualitative Conceptual Understanding and Quantitative Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchardt, Anita M.; Schunn, Christian D.

    2016-01-01

    Amid calls for integrating science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (iSTEM) in K-12 education, there is a pressing need to uncover productive methods of integration. Prior research has shown that increasing contextual linkages between science and mathematics is associated with student problem solving and conceptual understanding. However,…

  9. Understandings of Current Environmental Issues: Turkish Case Study in Six Teacher Education Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, Mustafa; Irez, Serhat; Dogan, Ozgur Kivilcan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to profile future science teachers' understandings of current environmental issues in the context of an education reform in Turkey. Knowledge base and understandings of elementary and secondary prospective science teachers about biodiversity, carbon cycle, global warming and ozone layer depletion were targeted in the…

  10. Implementation of Scientific Community Laboratories and Their Effect on Student Conceptual Learning, Attitudes, and Understanding of Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lark, Adam

    Scientific Community Laboratories, developed by The University of Maryland, have shown initial promise as laboratories meant to emulate the practice of doing physics. These laboratories have been re-created by incorporating their design elements with the University of Toledo course structure and resources. The laboratories have been titled the Scientific Learning Community (SLC) Laboratories. A comparative study between these SLC laboratories and the University of Toledo physics department's traditional laboratories was executed during the fall 2012 semester on first semester calculus-based physics students. Three tests were executed as pre-test and post-tests to capture the change in students' concept knowledge, attitudes, and understanding of uncertainty. The Force Concept Inventory (FCI) was used to evaluate students' conceptual changes through the semester and average normalized gains were compared between both traditional and SLC laboratories. The Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Physics (E-CLASS) was conducted to elucidate students' change in attitudes through the course of each laboratory. Finally, interviews regarding data analysis and uncertainty were transcribed and coded to track changes in the way students understand uncertainty and data analysis in experimental physics after their participation in both laboratory type. Students in the SLC laboratories showed a notable an increase conceptual knowledge and attitudes when compared to traditional laboratories. SLC students' understanding of uncertainty showed most improvement, diverging completely from students in the traditional laboratories, who declined throughout the semester.

  11. Physiology of Penile Erection—A Brief History of the Scientific Understanding up till the Eighties of the 20th Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    erection. The concepts from animal experimentations in Europe in the 19th century significantly contributed to the current understanding of penile erection. van Driel MF. Physiology of penile erection—a brief history of the scientific understanding up till the eighties of the 20th century. Sex Med 2015;3:343–351. PMID:26797073

  12. Physiology of Penile Erection-A Brief History of the Scientific Understanding up till the Eighties of the 20th Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Driel, Mels F

    2015-12-01

    significantly contributed to the current understanding of penile erection. van Driel MF. Physiology of penile erection-a brief history of the scientific understanding up till the eighties of the 20th century. Sex Med 2015;3:343-351.

  13. Understanding the Occurrence and Transport of Current-use Pesticides in the San Francisco Estuary Watershed

    OpenAIRE

    Kuivila, Kathryn; Hladik, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    The occurrence and potential effects of current-use pesticides are of concern in the San Francisco Estuary watershed but our understanding of the spatial and temporal distribution of contamination is limited. This paper summarizes almost two decades of historical data and uses it to describe our current knowledge of the processes controlling the occurrence of current-use pesticides in the watershed. Monitoring studies analyze fewer than half of the pesticides applied in the watershed and most...

  14. Does attainment of Piaget's formal operational level of cognitive development predict student understanding of scientific models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahti, Richard Dennis, II

    Knowledge of scientific models and their uses is a concept that has become a key benchmark in many of the science standards of the past 30 years, including the proposed Next Generation Science Standards. Knowledge of models is linked to other important nature of science concepts such as theory change which are also rising in prominence in newer standards. Effective methods of instruction will need to be developed to enable students to achieve these standards. The literature reveals an inconsistent history of success with modeling education. These same studies point to a possible cognitive development component which might explain why some students succeeded and others failed. An environmental science course, rich in modeling experiences, was used to test both the extent to which knowledge of models and modeling could be improved over the course of one semester, and more importantly, to identify if cognitive ability was related to this improvement. In addition, nature of science knowledge, particularly related to theories and theory change, was also examined. Pretest and posttest results on modeling (SUMS) and nature of science (SUSSI), as well as data from the modeling activities themselves, was collected. Cognitive ability was measured (CTSR) as a covariate. Students' gain in six of seven categories of modeling knowledge was at least medium (Cohen's d >.5) and moderately correlated to CTSR for two of seven categories. Nature of science gains were smaller, although more strongly correlated with CTSR. Student success at creating a model was related to CTSR, significantly in three of five sub-categories. These results suggest that explicit, reflective experience with models can increase student knowledge of models and modeling (although higher cognitive ability students may have more success), but successfully creating models may depend more heavily on cognitive ability. This finding in particular has implications in the grade placement of modeling standards and

  15. Current Efforts in European Projects to Facilitate the Sharing of Scientific Observation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredel, Henning; Rieke, Matthes; Maso, Joan; Jirka, Simon; Stasch, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    This presentation is intended to provide an overview of currently ongoing efforts in European projects to facilitate and promote the interoperable sharing of scientific observation data. This will be illustrated through two examples: a prototypical portal developed in the ConnectinGEO project for matching available (in-situ) data sources to the needs of users and a joint activity of several research projects to harmonise the usage of the OGC Sensor Web Enablement standards for providing access to marine observation data. ENEON is an activity initiated by the European ConnectinGEO project to coordinate in-situ Earth observation networks with the aim to harmonise the access to observations, improve discoverability, and identify/close gaps in European earth observation data resources. In this context, ENEON commons has been developed as a supporting Web portal for facilitating discovery, access, re-use and creation of knowledge about observations, networks, and related activities (e.g. projects). The portal is based on developments resulting from the European WaterInnEU project and has been extended to cover the requirements for handling knowledge about in-situ earth observation networks. A first prototype of the portal was completed in January 2017 which offers functionality for interactive discussion, information exchange and querying information about data delivered by different observation networks. Within this presentation, we will introduce the presented prototype and initiate a discussion about potential future work directions. The second example concerns the harmonisation of data exchange in the marine domain. There are many organisation who operate ocean observatories or data archives. In recent years, the application of the OGC Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) technology has become more and more popular to increase the interoperability between marine observation networks. However, as the SWE standards were intentionally designed in a domain independent manner

  16. The Effect of Cooperative Learning with DSLM on Conceptual Understanding and Scientific Reasoning among Form Four Physics Students with Different Motivation Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Hamzah

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Cooperative Learning with a Dual Situated Learning Model (CLDSLM and a Dual Situated Learning Model (DSLM on (a conceptual understanding (CU and (b scientific reasoning (SR among Form Four students. The study further investigated the effect of the CLDSLM and DSLM methods on performance in conceptual understanding and scientific reasoning among students with different motivation levels. A quasi-experimental method with the 3 x 2 Factorial Design was applied in the study. The sample consisted of 240 stu¬dents in six (form four classes selected from three different schools, i.e. two classes from each school, with students randomly selected and assigned to the treatment groups. The results showed that students in the CLDSLM group outperformed their counterparts in the DSLM group—who, in turn, significantly outperformed other students in the traditional instructional method (T group in scientific reasoning and conceptual understanding. Also, high-motivation (HM students in the CLDSLM group significantly outperformed their counterparts in the T groups in conceptual understanding and scientific reasoning. Furthermore, HM students in the CLDSLM group significantly outperformed their counterparts in the DSLM group in scientific reasoning but did not significantly outperform their counterparts on conceptual understanding. Also, the DSLM instructional method has significant positive effects on highly motivated students’ (a conceptual understanding and (b scientific reason¬ing. The results also showed that LM students in the CLDSLM group significantly outperformed their counterparts in the DSLM group and (T method group in scientific reasoning and conceptual understanding. However, the low-motivation students taught via the DSLM instructional method significantly performed higher than the low-motivation students taught via the T method in scientific reasoning. Nevertheless, they did not

  17. Few believe the world is flat: How embodiment is changing the scientific understanding of cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenberg, Arthur M

    2015-06-01

    Science has changed many of our dearly held and commonsensical (but incorrect) beliefs. For example, few still believe the world is flat, and few still believe the sun orbits the earth. Few still believe humans are unrelated to the rest of the animal kingdom, and soon few will believe human thinking is computer-like. Instead, as with all animals, our thoughts are based on bodily experiences, and our thoughts and behaviors are controlled by bodily and neural systems of perception, action, and emotion interacting with the physical and social environments. We are embodied; nothing more. Embodied cognition is about cognition formatted in sensorimotor experience, and sensorimotor systems make those thoughts dynamic. Even processes that seem abstract, such as language comprehension and goal understanding, are embodied. Thus, embodied cognition is not limited to 1 type of thought or another: It is cognition. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. The Merapi Interactive Project: Offering a Fancy Cross-Disciplinary Scientific Understanding of Merapi Volcano to a Wide Audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, J.; Kerlow, I.

    2015-12-01

    The Merapi volcano is of great interest to a wide audience as it is one of the most dangerous volcanoes worldwide and a beautiful touristic spot. The scientific literature available on that volcano both in Earth and Social sciences is rich but mostly inaccessible to the public because of the scientific jargon and the restricted database access. Merapi Interactive aims at developing clear information and attractive content about Merapi for a wide audience. The project is being produced by the Art and Media Group at the Earth Observatory of Singapore, and it takes the shape of an e-book. It offers a consistent, comprehensive, and jargon-filtered synthesis of the main volcanic-risk related topics about Merapi: volcanic mechanisms, eruptive history, associated hazards and risks, the way inhabitants and scientists deal with it, and what daily life at Merapi looks like. The project provides a background to better understand volcanoes, and it points out some interactions between scientists and society. We propose two levels of interpretation: one that is understandable by 10-year old kids and above and an expert level with deeper presentations of specific topics. Thus, the Merapi Interactive project intends to provide an engaging and comprehensive interactive book that should interest kids, adults, as well as Earth Sciences undergraduates and academics. Merapi Interactive is scheduled for delivery in mid-2016.

  19. STUDY OF CURRENT APPROACHES FOR WEB PUBLISHING OF OPEN SCIENTIFIC DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Mouromtsev

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Study. The subject of study of this work is closely related to the development of tools and technologies for Internet publishing of open data in machine-readable formats with regard to data of universities, educational and research organizations and scientific laboratories. We analyze the trends in the publishing formats most commonly used including not only popular formats such as pdf, csv, excel, but also the Semantic Web formats such as RDF. The paper describes the way of scientific data publication in semantic formats on the example of import and convertation of the information from University database. Methods. We describe the methods of publication for scientific open data in the network consisting of a set of transformations of the original data sets to the final semantic representation. These transformation steps include data upload from a relational database, data mapping on the ontological model (schema and the generation of a set of RDF-triples corresponding to the initial database fragment. A description is given to the popular open data publishing systems, such as CKAN, VIVO, and others. OpenLink Virtuoso system is selected as the primary storage and data publication. The description of RDF data model is used as a way of presenting open data of ITMO University. Main Results. The authors have described the methods of scientific open data publication and identified their shortcomings. To demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method of university open data publication, a software prototype has been developed available online at: http://lod.ifmo.ru/. The example of the system usage is also given. Practical Relevance. Implementation of the proposed approach will improve significantly the effect of the publication of university open data and make it available for third-party applications, such as applications for information retrieval about educational activities and research results, analysis of scientific activities in

  20. [The history of Mindfulness put to the test of current scientific data: unresolved questions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trousselard, M; Steiler, D; Claverie, D; Canini, F

    2014-12-01

    The first part of this paper describes the long history of the concept of Mindfulness. Contrary to the belief that Mindfulness only has Buddhist and Hindu origins, it is also rooted in Jewish, Islamic and Christian religions. Furthermore, western philosophers have described a mindful path to become more aware of thoughts, feelings, and bodily sensations. Mindfulness can be considered as a universal human ability embodied to foster clear thinking and open-heartedness. As such, this form of being requires no particular religious or cultural belief system. The current acceptance of what a mindful path is, refers to a psychological quality that involves bringing one's complete attention to present experience on a moment-to-moment basis, in a particular way: in the present moment, and nonjudgmentally. Although such a definition is well accepted in France, the French translation for Mindfulness is not easy to use: being conscious and being aware are translated with the same French word. The French language fails to clearly separate the dimensional attributes of a mindful subject from the ways for developing mindfulness through formal meditation practice. In line with this conception, stability and assessments of Mindfulness mainly were examined. How this disposition allows the development of concentration, attention and acceptance moment by moment in a nonjudgmental way is described in the second part. Particular attention is paid to its positive effects in several aspects of mental and physical health. In particular, positive effects on the ability to cope with stress are described from a physiological point of view. Third, this article intends to present neurobiological aspects currently proposed to explain the benefits of Mindfulness meditation. Modifications of cerebral networks and neurobiological functioning are described in relation to expertise in meditation practice. The hypothesis of the role of meditation on neuroplasticity is also discussed. Furthermore, the

  1. Current State of Terminology in Lithuania: Scientific Research, Management and Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albina Auksoriūtė

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Current State of Terminology in Lithuania: Scientific Research, Management and Education The article discusses the current state of terminology in Lithuania, presents terminological research carried out in the last five years, analyses ways of Lithuanian terminology management, and briefly overviews terminological education and teaching in Lithuania. Lithuanian terminological research is mostly carried out at the Institute of the Lithuanian Language and at universities and other research institutes. The largest part of terminological research is carried out at the Centre of Terminology of the Institute of the Lithuanian Language, which researches Lithuanian terminology and terminography, analyses the use of Lithuanian terminology in different fields. Three ways of terminology management are discussed: terminography, creation of term banks and databases and standardisation of terms. The number of term dictionaries published in Lithuania is rather considerable – over 600. The most productive period for publishing term dictionaries is from 1990 up to date. Between 1990–2013 more than 420 term dictionaries and special encyclopaedias were published. The main and most important terminology database in Lithuania is the Term Bank of the Republic of Lithuania (lt Lietuvos Respublikos terminų bankas, further – LTB, initiated in 2004. This bank is created as a common information system of state institutions administered by the State Commission of the Lithuanian Language (further – Language Commission. There are more than 237,000 term entries in LTB. The article discusses two more terminology databases containing Lithuanian terminology sources – IATE and EUROTERMBANK. The Lithuanian Standards Board, in addition to other work, prepares Lithuanian standards of terms and offers these terms to the Language Commission for evaluation. Since 2000, the Lithuanian Standards Board has been creating a database of standardised terms which currently contains

  2. Understanding patterns of use and scientific opportunities in the emerging global microbial commons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkshoorn, Lenie; De Vos, Paul; Dedeurwaerdere, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Rapidly growing global networking has induced and supported an increased interest in the life sciences in such general issues as health, climate change, food security and biodiversity. Therefore, the need to address and share research data and materials in a systematic way emerged almost simultaneously. This movement has been described as the so-called global research commons. Also in microbiology, where the sharing of microbiological materials is a key issue, microbial commons is attracting attention. Microbiology is currently facing great challenges with the advances of high throughput screening and next-generation whole genome sequencing. Furthermore, the exploration and use of microorganisms in agriculture and food production are increasing so as to safeguard global food and feed production. Further to several meetings on the subject, a special issue of Research in Microbiology is dedicated to Microbial Research Commons with a series of reviews elaborating its major pay-offs and needs in basic and applied microbiology. This paper gives an introduction to these articles covering a range of topics. These include the role of public culture collections and biological resource centers and legal aspects in the exchange of materials, microbial classification, an internet-based platform for data-sharing, applications in agriculture and food production, and challenges in metagenomics and extremophile research. (c) 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Just Do It? The Effect of a Science Apprenticeship Program on High School Students' Understanding of the Nature of Science and Scientific Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Randy L.; Blair, Lesley M.; Lederman, Norman G.; Crawford, Barbara A.

    Science educators often assume and expect that students who are actively engaged in scientific inquiry should develop more accurate understandings of science and the construction of scientific knowledge. However, this assumption, while intuitive, has not been validated. This paper reports on a study that sought to determine the impact of an 8-week…

  4. Just Do It? Impact of a Science Apprenticeship Program on High School Students' Understandings of the Nature of Science and Scientific Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Randy L.; Blair, Lesley M.; Crawford, Barbara A.; Lederman, Norman G.

    2003-01-01

    Explicates the impact of an 8-week science apprenticeship program on a group of high-ability secondary students' understanding of the nature of science and scientific inquiry. Reports that although most students did appear to gain knowledge about the process of scientific inquiry, their conceptions about key aspects of the nature of science…

  5. Fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) phenomena in reactor safety. Current understanding and future research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speis, T.P. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States); Basu, S.

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives an account of the current understanding of fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) phenomena in the context of reactor safety. With increased emphasis on accident management and with emerging in-vessel core melt retention strategies for advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs, recent interest in FCI has broadened to include an evaluation of potential threats to the integrity of reactor vessel lower head and ex-vessel structural support, as well as the role of FCI in debris quenching and coolability. The current understanding of FCI with regard to these issues is discussed, and future research needs to address the issues from a risk perspective are identified. (author)

  6. Mundane science use in a practice theoretical perspective: Different understandings of the relations between citizen-consumers and public communication initiatives build on scientific claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkier, Bente

    2015-08-13

    Public communication initiatives play a part in placing complicated scientific claims in citizen-consumers' everyday contexts. Lay reactions to scientific claims framed in public communication, and attempts to engage citizens, have been important subjects of discussion in the literatures of public understanding and public engagement with science. Many of the public communication initiatives, however, address lay people as consumers rather than citizens. This creates specific challenges for understanding public engagement with science and scientific citizenship. The article compares five different understandings of the relations between citizen-consumers and public issue communication involving science, where the first four types are widely represented in the Public Understanding of Science discussions. The fifth understanding is a practice theoretical perspective. The article suggests how the public understanding of and engagement in science literature can benefit from including a practice theoretical approach to research about mundane science use and public engagement.

  7. Exploring learners' beliefs about science reading and scientific epistemic beliefs, and their relations with science text understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang-Ying; Chang, Cheng-Chieh; Chen, Li-Ling; Chen, Yi-Chun

    2016-07-01

    The main purpose of this study was to explore learners' beliefs about science reading and scientific epistemic beliefs, and how these beliefs were associating with their understanding of science texts. About 400 10th graders were involved in the development and validation of the Beliefs about Science Reading Inventory (BSRI). To find the effects of reader beliefs and epistemic beliefs, a new group of 65 10th grade students whose reader and epistemic beliefs were assessed by the newly developed BSRI and an existing SEB questionnaire were invited to take part in a science reading task. Students' text understanding in terms of concept gain and text interpretations was collected and analyzed. By the correlation analysis, it was found that when students had stronger beliefs about meaning construction based on personal goals and experiences (i.e. transaction beliefs), they produced more thematic and critical interpretations of the content of the test article. The regression analysis suggested that students SEBs could predict concept gain as a result of reading. Moreover, among all beliefs examined in the study, transaction beliefs stood out as the best predictor of overall science-text understanding.

  8. Medical ozone is now ready for a scientific challenge: current status and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregorio Martinez-Sanchez

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present review is to clarify some of the basic mechanisms underlying ozone therapy. Indeed, after its empiric use started at the beginning of the last century, science is now ready to give a chance to the more and more medical doctors working in this field. Unfortunately, the lack of a full recognition by the health authorities and some ostracism against it is, up to date, the major obstacle for its full medical acceptance. Anyway, in the last years and thanks to the contributions of several scientists, most of the mechanisms characterizing the bio-humoral activity of ozone have been scientifically outlined. The built up of randomized clinical studies is going on slowly despite the lack of funds and the difficulties bound mainly to the huge variability of the ozone action. The thousand and thousand medical doctors involved in the use of ozone as emerging therapy, must be fully educated about the properties of this gas in the aim to counteract scientifically the criticisms of colleagues devoted to other field of medicine and not expert of the ozone pharmacological properties. Is for this reason that we encourage all the professionals to deeply increase the knowledge related to the scientific data produced and published on the international literatures in the field of the ozone therapy. For the future we suggest the use of ozone not in alternative but as a complement of the most appropriate pharmacological treatments also in the aim to reduce some side effects derived from a chronic drug use. The lack of a well-defined binding site for the ozone molecule could suggest the introduction of virtual receptors for the supposed biological activity of ozone acting mostly throughout second messengers pathways. [J Exp Integr Med 2012; 2(3.000: 193-196

  9. Risk factors for venous thrombosis - current understanding from an epidemiological point of view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lijfering, Willem M.; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Cannegieter, Suzanne C.

    2010-01-01

    P>Epidemiological research throughout the last 50 years has provided the long list of risk factors for venous thrombosis that are known today. Although this has advanced our current understanding about the aetiology of thrombosis, it does not give us all the answers: many people have several of thes

  10. An Official American Thoracic Society Research Statement: Current Understanding and Future Research Needs in Tobacco Control and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Frank T; Carlsen, Kai-Hakon; Folan, Patricia; Latzka, Karen; Munzer, Alfred; Neptune, Enid; Pakhale, Smita; Sachs, David P L; Samet, Jonathan; Upson, Dona; White, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    Since the mid-20th century, the scientific community has substantially improved its understanding of the worldwide tobacco epidemic. Although significant progress has been made, the sheer enormity and scope of the global problem put it on track to take a billion lives this century. Curbing the epidemic will require maximizing the impact of proven tools as well as the development of new, breakthrough methods to help interrupt the spread of nicotine addiction and reduce the downstream morbidity. Members of the Tobacco Action Committee of the American Thoracic Society queried bibliographic databases, including Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Collaborative, to identify primary sources and reviews relevant to the epidemic. Exploded search terms were used to identify evidence, including tobacco, addiction, smoking, cigarettes, nicotine, and smoking cessation. Evidence was consolidated into three thematic areas: (1) determinants of risk, (2) maternal-fetal exposure, and (3) current tobacco users. Expert panel consensus regarding current gaps in understanding and recommendations for future research priorities was generated through iterative discussion. Although much has been accomplished, significant gaps in understanding remain. Implementation often lags well behind insight. This report identifies a number of investigative opportunities for significantly reducing the toll of tobacco use, including: (1) the need for novel, nonlinear models of population-based disease control; (2) refinement of "real-world" models of clinical intervention in trial design; and (3) understanding of mechanisms by which intrauterine smoke exposure may lead to persistent, tobacco-related chronic disease. In the coming era of tobacco research, pooled talent from multiple disciplines will be required to further illuminate the complex social, environmental and biological codeterminants of tobacco dependence.

  11. The origin of the warped heliospheric current sheet. Scientific technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, J.M.; Scherrer, P.H.; Hoeksema, J.T.

    1980-03-01

    The warped heliospheric current sheet in early 1976 is calculated from the observed photospheric magnetic field using a potential field method. Comparisons with measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field polarity in early 1976 obtained at several locations in the heliosphere at Helios I, Helios II, Pioneer XI and Earth show a rather detailed agreement between the computed current sheet and the observations. It appears that the large-scale structure of the warped heliospheric current sheet is determined by the structure of the photospheric magnetic field, and that 'ballerina skirt' effects may add small-scale ripples.

  12. Concussions: What a neurosurgeon should know about current scientific evidence and management strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Matthew T.; Wilson, Jonathan L.; Hsu, Wesley; Powers, Alexander K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: There has been a tremendous amount of interest focused on the topic of concussions over the past few decades. Neurosurgeons are frequently consulted to manage patients with mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) that have radiographic evidence of cerebral injury. These injuries share significant overlap with concussions, injuries that typically do not reveal radiographic evidence of structural injury, in the realms of epidemiology, pathophysiology, outcomes, and management. Further, neurosurgeons often manage patients with extracranial injuries that have concomitant concussions. In these cases, neurosurgeons are often the only “concussion experts” that patients encounter. Results: The literature has been reviewed and data have been synthesized on the topic including sections on historical background, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnostic advances, clinical sequelae, and treatment suggestions, with neurosurgeons as the intended target audience. Conclusions: Neurosurgeons should have a fundamental knowledge of the scientific evidence that has developed regarding concussions and be prepared to guide patients with treatment plans. PMID:22439107

  13. Pharmacological and analytical aspects of withaferin A:A concise report of current scientific literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kanika Patel; Ravi B Singh; Dinesh K Patel

    2013-01-01

    Withaferin A is an important phytoconstituents of Withania somnifera (W. Somnifera) belonging to the category of withanolides, that are a group of naturally occurring C28-steroidal lactone triterpenoids. Withaferin A has been used in the traditional and indigenous system of medicine for the treatment of various disorders. In view of its unique therapeutic potential, it has gained much attention in the modern science. In the couple of the years, Withaferin A has been scientifically validated for different pharmacological activities including anti-cancer, adaptogenic, anti-stress, anti-convulsant, immunomodulatory, neurological, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor, cardioprotective, and neuroprotective activities. Pharmacological and analytical aspects of Withaferin A were highlighted in the present article. From the literature review it was found that Withaferin A has a very impressive pharmacological profile especially against cancer and could be useful for the development of the new drug in the future for the treatment of cancer and other metabolic disorders.

  14. Geomorphic and vegetation processes of the Willamette River floodplain, Oregon: current understanding and unanswered science questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallick, J. Rose; Jones, Krista L.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Keith, Mackenzie K.; Hulse, David; Gregory, Stanley V.

    2013-01-01

    are now largely stable in response to flow regulation and revetment construction. The upper Willamette and North Santiam Rivers retain some dynamic characteristics, and provide the greatest diversity of aquatic and riparian habitats under the current flow and sediment regime. The McKenzie River has some areas that are more dynamic, whereas other sections are stable due to geology or revetments. Historical reductions in channel dynamism also have implications for ongoing and future recruitment and succession of floodplain forests. For instance, the succession of native plants like black cottonwood is currently limited by (1) fewer low-elevation gravel bars for stand initiation; (2) altered streamflow during seed release, germination, and stand initiation; (3) competition from introduced plant species; and (4) frequent erosion of young vegetation in some locations because scouring flows are concentrated within a narrow channel corridor. Despite past alterations, the Willamette River Basin has many of the physical and ecological building blocks necessary for highly functioning rivers. Management strategies, including environmental flow programs, river and floodplain restoration, revetment modifications, and reclamation of gravel mines, are underway to mitigate some historical changes. However, there are some substantial gaps in the scientific understanding of the modern Willamette basin that is needed to efficiently integrate these blocks and to establish realistic objectives for future conditions. Unanswered questions include: 1. What is the distribution and diversity of landforms and habitats along the Willamette River and its tributaries?

  15. [The representation of scientific publications of RAMS in WEB of science: evaluation of current indicators and prospects of their increasing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starodubtsev, V I; Kuznetsov, S L; Kurakova, N G; Tsvetkova, L A

    2012-01-01

    The contribution scientific publications of Russian Academy of Medical Sciences (RAMS) in the national publication stream, indexed by Web of Science over the past thirty years, was estimated. The indicators of publication activity that are necessary for the institutions of RAMS to achieve in short-term period the conformity with bibliometric indicators, established by Presidential Decree of May 7, 2012 (to increase the share of Russian publications in Web of Science to 2.44% in 2015) were calculated. It is shown that the current structure of global science, where publications in medicine make up for approximately one third of scientific publications in the world, set for RAMS scientists particularly difficult task: to double in three years the number of publications in Web of Sci. In the article are proposed the priorities and the necessary steps to fulfill this task.

  16. Physiology of Penile Erection-A Brief History of the Scientific Understanding up till the Eighties of the 20th Century

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Driel, Mels F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Understanding the physiology of penile erection is important for all who work in the field of sexual medicine. Aim. The aim of this study was to highlight and analyze historical aspects of the scientific understanding of penile erection. Methods. (i) Review of the chapters on the physi

  17. Physiology of Penile Erection-A Brief History of the Scientific Understanding up till the Eighties of the 20th Century

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Driel, Mels F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Understanding the physiology of penile erection is important for all who work in the field of sexual medicine. Aim. The aim of this study was to highlight and analyze historical aspects of the scientific understanding of penile erection. Methods. (i) Review of the chapters on the

  18. Creating healthy work in small enterprises - from understanding to action:Summary of current knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen, legg; Ian S., laird; Olsen, Kirsten Bendix; Hasle, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Although much is known about small and medium enterprises (SMEs), our current knowledge and understanding of occupational health and safety (OHS) and the work environment in SMEs is limited. Far less is known about how SMEs put our knowledge of OSH into action. In short, how do we create healthy work and healthy lives as well as ‘healthy business' in SMEs? The present paper, which also acts as an editorial for this special issue, addresses these questions by providing a summary of current kno...

  19. Pharmacologically screened aphrodisiac plant-A review of current scientific literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patel DK; Kumar R; Prasad SK; Hemalatha S

    2011-01-01

    Substances which are used to treat sexual dysfunction or to improve sexual behavior and satisfaction in humans and animals are called ‘aphrodisiac’. Uses of plant material to treat sexual disorder is a long back history in the different system of medicine and it was practiced by different type of vaidyas and traditional healer in almost all the countries in the world, like China, India, Egypt, Rome and Greek. Even though there was an unavailability of the scientific data, these substances have been used as aphrodisiac. During the historic times Lytta vesicatoria,Tribulus terrestris, Ptychopetalum olacoides, Crocus sativus, Bufo marinus, Myristica fragrans, Theobroma cocao and other plants have been investigated for its aphrodisiac activity by in vivo and in vitro model. Even though the study showed positive response to a particular substance, there is always a need to run the clinical trial before administering the tested drug in human being. The present review article summarizes the plant material which has been tested for its aphrodisiac activity in different experimental model (in vitro, in vivo on animal models, or in human clinical trials) and comply its claim in the different system of medicine. A brief overview about the data of percentage study in the last eighteen years duration on aphrodisiac activity of plant material was done on the basis of the CAB abstract database.

  20. Manifesto for the current understanding and management of traumatic brain injury-induced hypopituitarism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanriverdi, F; Agha, A; Aimaretti, G

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI)-induced hypopituitarism remains a relevant medical problem, because it may affect a significant proportion of the population. In the last decade important studies have been published investigating pituitary dysfunction after TBI. Recently, a group of experts gathered...... and revisited the topic of TBI-induced hypopituitarism. During the 2-day meeting, the main issues of this topic were presented and discussed, and current understanding and management of TBI-induced hypopituitarism are summarized here....

  1. Manifesto for the current understanding and management of traumatic brain injury-induced hypopituitarism.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tanriverdi, F

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI)-induced hypopituitarism remains a relevant medical problem, because it may affect a significant proportion of the population. In the last decade important studies have been published investigating pituitary dysfunction after TBI. Recently, a group of experts gathered and revisited the topic of TBI-induced hypopituitarism. During the 2-day meeting, the main issues of this topic were presented and discussed, and current understanding and management of TBI-induced hypopituitarism are summarized here.

  2. Current understanding of the formation and adaptation of metabolic systems based on network theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, Kazuhiro

    2012-07-12

    Formation and adaptation of metabolic networks has been a long-standing question in biology. With recent developments in biotechnology and bioinformatics, the understanding of metabolism is progressively becoming clearer from a network perspective. This review introduces the comprehensive metabolic world that has been revealed by a wide range of data analyses and theoretical studies; in particular, it illustrates the role of evolutionary events, such as gene duplication and horizontal gene transfer, and environmental factors, such as nutrient availability and growth conditions, in evolution of the metabolic network. Furthermore, the mathematical models for the formation and adaptation of metabolic networks have also been described, according to the current understanding from a perspective of metabolic networks. These recent findings are helpful in not only understanding the formation of metabolic networks and their adaptation, but also metabolic engineering.

  3. A comunidade científica, o Estado e as universidades, no atual estágio de desenvolvimento científico tecnológico Scientific community, State and universities in the current stage of scientific technological development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelangelo Giotto Santoro Trigueiro

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho discute a relação entre a comunidade científica, o Estado e a universidade no contexto atual do desenvolvimento científico-tecnológico. Enfatiza a dimensão política das transformações recentes, sobretudo no tocante aos sistemas decisórios, contrapondo momento mais verticalizado com cenário mais democratizado, e as conseqüências das transformações políticas contemporâneas, na sociedade brasileira. Procura analisar as mútuas correlações entre o Estado, as universidades e as comunidades científicas, a partir do entendimento da especificidade de cada um destes atores na condução do desenvolvimento científico-tecnológico nacional. A esse respeito, é analisado todo um conjunto de ações que se coadunam com o novo modo de produção do conhecimento, buscando destacar a natureza controversa e polêmica da inserção do Estado e o caráter conservador da comunidade científica, bem como a resistência da universidade na proposição de novas linhas de atuação no enfrentamento dos desafios trazidos pela ciência e tecnologias contemporâneas.This article discusses the relationship between scientific community, the State and university in the current circumstances of scientific-technological development. It stresses the political dimension of recent changes, specially regarding decision systems, comparing a more vertical moment and a more democratic scenario and the consequences of contemporary political changes in Brazilian society. It examines mutual relations between the State, universities and the scientific community, based on the understanding of each of those actors' specificities in advancing national scientific-technological development. A whole set of actions is examined in accordance with knowledge's new mode of production in order to highlight the controversial nature of the State and the conservative character of the scientific community as well as the resistance of the university in proposing new lines

  4. The spirituality of human consciousness: a Catholic evaluation of some current neuro-scientific interpretations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGoldrick, Terence A

    2012-09-01

    Catholic theology's traditional understanding of the spiritual nature of the human person begins with the idea of a rational soul and human mind that is made manifest in free will--the spiritual experience of the act of consciousness and cause of all human arts. The rationale for this religion-based idea of personhood is key to understanding ethical dilemmas posed by modern research that applies a more empirical methodology in its interpretations about the cause of human consciousness. Applications of these beliefs about the body/soul composite to the theory of evolution and to discoveries in neuroscience, paleoanthropology, as well as to recent animal intelligence studies, can be interpreted from this religious and philosophical perspective, which argues for the human soul as the unifying cause of the person's unique abilities. Free will and consciousness are at the nexus of the mutual influence of body and soul upon one another in the traditional Catholic view, that argues for a spiritual dimension to personality that is on a par with the physical metabolic processes at play. Therapies that affect consciousness are ethically problematic, because of their implications for free will and human dignity. Studies of resilience, as an example, argue for the greater, albeit limited, role of the soul's conscious choices in healing as opposed to metabolic or physical changes to the brain alone.

  5. A historical study to understand students’ current difficulties about RMS values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khantine-Langlois, Françoise; Munier, Valérie

    2016-07-01

    Several studies show that students experience more and more difficulties managing the measurements of electrical values in alternating current and that they have trouble making links between theory and practice. They find it difficult to give meaning to root mean square (RMS; or effective) values, which are not understood as average values and are confused with instantaneous values. This shows that students do not clearly differentiate variable and direct currents. In this paper we try, with a historical study and a study of teaching the concept of RMS values, to understand students’ difficulties with this concept. In the first part we present an epistemological analysis of the concept of RMS values, showing that it is multifaceted and can be approached from different points of view. In the second part we analyse the evolution of French secondary school curricula and textbooks from the explicit introduction of variable currents to today, questioning the links between the evolution of the curricula and the evolution of the place of science and technology in our societies. We point out that the evolution of the curricula is linked to the social context and to the connections between science, technology and society, and also to the relationship with mathematics curricula. We show that alternating current is introduced earlier in the curriculum but has gradually lost all phenomenological description. This study allows us to better understand students’ difficulties and to discuss some implications for teaching.

  6. History of the current understanding and management of tethered spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi-Abbasi, Sam; Mapstone, Timothy B; Archer, Jacob B; Wilson, Christopher; Theodore, Nicholas; Spetzler, Robert F; Preul, Mark C

    2016-07-01

    An understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of tethered cord syndrome (TCS) and modern management strategies have only developed within the past few decades. Current understanding of this entity first began with the understanding and management of spina bifida; this later led to the gradual recognition of spina bifida occulta and the symptoms associated with tethering of the filum terminale. In the 17th century, Dutch anatomists provided the first descriptions and initiated surgical management efforts for spina bifida. In the 19th century, the term "spina bifida occulta" was coined and various presentations of spinal dysraphism were appreciated. The association of urinary, cutaneous, and skeletal abnormalities with spinal dysraphism was recognized in the 20th century. Early in the 20th century, some physicians began to suspect that traction on the conus medullaris caused myelodysplasia-related symptoms and that prophylactic surgical management could prevent the occurrence of clinical manifestations. It was not, however, until later in the 20th century that the term "tethered spinal cord" and the modern management of TCS were introduced. This gradual advancement in understanding at a time before the development of modern imaging modalities illustrates how, over the centuries, anatomists, pathologists, neurologists, and surgeons used clinical examination, a high level of suspicion, and interest in the subtle and overt clinical appearances of spinal dysraphism and TCS to advance understanding of pathophysiology, clinical appearance, and treatment of this entity. With the availability of modern imaging, spinal dysraphism can now be diagnosed and treated as early as the intrauterine stage.

  7. Deep brain stimulation for Parkinson disease in Australia: current scientific and clinical status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poortvliet, P C; Silburn, P A; Coyne, T J; Chenery, H J

    2015-02-01

    There is currently no cure for Parkinson disease (PD). Disease management is directed primarily at motor symptom relief, but the impact of non-motor symptoms associated with PD should not be underestimated. Medical and surgical treatment options aim to increase functional independence and quality of life. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has proven to be a safe, effective and cost-efficient surgical treatment option. In 2009, the Australian referral guidelines, developed to provide a synopsis of DBS therapy for PD, were introduced, and since then novel findings have been reported regarding the timing of intervention, target selection and symptom management. Our aim is to provide an update of DBS for PD in Australia. Intervention at earlier stages of the disease can potentially improve quality of life over a longer period with greater possibilities for meaningful social and professional contributions. For less responsive motor symptoms (e.g. freezing of gait, postural instability), the pedunculopontine nucleus has emerged as a promising new surgical target. Traditional PD treatment is focused on improvement of motor symptoms, but the disorder is also characterised by non-motor symptoms, often undiagnosed or undisclosed, that have the potential to impact quality of life to a greater extent than motor symptoms. It is essential to identify and routinely monitor for non-motor symptoms as they can emerge at all stages of the disease or can result from treatment. Many of these current advances require long-term monitoring of treatment outcomes to improve future clinical practice, refine patient selection and ensure best patient outcomes.

  8. Understanding vegetation response to climate variability from space: the scientific objectives, the approach and the concept of the SPECTRA Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menenti, M.

    2002-06-01

    The response of vegetation to climate variability is a major scientific question. The monitoring of the carbon stock in terrestrial environments, as well as the improved understanding of the surface-atmosphere interactions controlling the exchange of matter, energy and momentum, is of immediate interest for an improved assessment of the various components of the global carbon cycle. Studies of the Earth System processes at the global scale rely on models that require an advanced understanding and proper characterization of processes at smaller scales. The goal of the SPECTRA mission is to improve the description of those processes by means of better constraints on and parameterizations of the associated models. Many vegetation properties are related to features of reflectance spectra in the region 400 nm - 2500 nm. Detailed observations of spectral reflectance reveal subtle features related to biochemical components of leaves such as chlorophyll and water. The architecture of vegetation canopies determines complex changes of observed reflectance spectra with view and illumination angle. Quantitative analysis of reflectance spectra requires, therefore, an accurate characterization of the anisotropy of reflected radiance. This can be achieved with nearly simultaneous observations at different view angles. Exchange of energy between the biosphere and the atmosphere is an important mechanism determining the response of vegetation to climate variability. This requires measurements of the component temperature of foliage and soil. The prime objective of SPECTRA is to determine the amount, assess the conditions and understand the response of terrestrial vegetation to climate variability and its role in the coupled cycles of energy, water and carbon. The amount and state of vegetation will be determined by the combination of observed vegetation properties and data assimilation. Specifically, the mission will characterize the amount and state of vegetation with observations

  9. Understanding vegetation response to climate variability from space the scientific objectives, the approach and the concept of the Spectra Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menenti, M.; Rast, M.; Baret, F.; Hurk, B.; Knorr, W.; Mauser, W.; Miller, J.; Schaepman, M.; Schimel, D.; Verstraete, M.

    The response of vegetation to climate variability is a major scientific question. The monitoring of the carbon stock in terrestrial environments, as well as the improved understanding of the surface-atmosphere interactions controlling the exchange of matter, energy and momentum, is of immediate interest for an improved assessment of the various components of the global carbon cycle. Studies of the Earth System processes at the global scale rely on models that require an advanced understanding and proper characterization of processes at smaller scales. The goal of the SPECTRA mission is to improve the description of those processes by means of better constraints on and parameterizations of the associated models. Many vegetation properties are related to features of reflectance spectra in the region 400 nm - 2500 nm. Detailed observations of spectral reflectance reveal subtle features related to biochemical components of leaves such as chlorophyll and water. The architecture of vegetation canopies determines complex changes of observed reflectance spectra with view and illumination angle. Quantitative analysis of reflectance spectra requires, therefore, an accurate characterization of the anisotropy of reflected radiance. This can be achieved with nearly - simultaneous observations at different view angles. Exchange of energy between the biosphere and the atmosphere is an important mechanism determining the response of vegetation to climate variability. This requires measurements of the component t mperature ofe foliage and soil. The prime objective of SPECTRA is to determine the amount, assess the conditions and understand the response of terrestrial vegetation to climate variability and its role in the coupled cycles of energy, water and carbon. The amount and state of vegetation will be determined by the combination of observed vegetation properties and data assimilation. Specifically, the mission will characterize the amount and state of vegetation with

  10. Understanding Vegetation Response To Climate Variability From Space: The Scientific Objectives< The Approach and The Concept of The Spectra Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menenti, M.; Rast, M.; Baret, F.; Mauser, W.; Miller, J.; Schaepman, M.; Schimel, D.; Verstraete, M.

    The response of vegetation to climate variability is a major scientific question. The monitoring of the carbon stock in terrestrial environments, as well as the improved understanding of the surface-atmosphere interactions controlling the exchange of mat- ter, energy and momentum, is of immediate interest for an improved assessment of the various components of the global carbon cycle. Studies of the Earth System processes at the global scale rely on models that require an advanced understanding and proper characterization of processes at smaller scales. The goal of the SPECTRA mission is to improve the description of those processes by means of better constraints on and parameterizations of the associated models. Many vegetation properties are related to features of reflectance spectra in the region 400 nm U 2500 nm. Detailed observa- tions of spectral reflectance reveal subtle features related to biochemical components of leaves such as chlorophyll and water. The architecture of vegetation canopies de- termines complex changes of observed reflectance spectra with view and illumination angle. Quantitative analysis of reflectance spectra requires, therefore, an accurate char- acterization of the anisotropy of reflected radiance. This can be achieved with nearly U simultaneous observations at different view angles. Exchange of energy between the biosphere and the atmosphere is an important mechanism determining the response of vegetation to climate variability. This requires measurements of the component tem- perature of foliage and soil. The prime objective of SPECTRA is to determine the amount, assess the conditions and understand the response of terrestrial vegetation to climate variability and its role in the coupled cycles of energy, water and carbon. The amount and state of vegetation will be determined by the combination of observed vegetation properties and data assimilation. Specifically, the mission will character- ize the amount and state of vegetation

  11. Aides logicielles à la lecture de textes documentaires scientifiques Evaluating a software to help students to understand scientific text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Marin

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Une série de recherches a permis de mettre au point un logiciel hypertexte d'aide à la compréhension des textes scientifiques et d'évaluer l'effet de deux types de notes (les unes fondées sur la "base de texte" les autres sur le "modèle de situation", sur support papier et sur écran, dans des situations de lecture "pour s'entraîner" et dans des situations où la lecture est liée à l'élaboration et à la résolution d'un problème scientifique. Les résultats mettent en évidence une aide plus importante à la construction d'une représentation cohérente de la situation évoquée par le texte dans la présentation hypertextuelle, en particulier lorsque le lecteur bénéficie de notes centrées sur le modèle de situation, c'est-à-dire lui fournissant de manière explicite et explicitement reliées aux informations du texte des connaissances permettant d'en combler les "trous sémantiques".A series of studies have allowed to elaborate a hypertext computer system that helps students to understand scientific texts and to evaluate the effect of two kinds of explanatory notes. The first ones are based on the "text base", the other ones are based on the "situation model". They are presented on a sheet of paper and on a computer screen in different situations where reading aims at training and where reading is in order to create and solve a scientific problem. The results show that the hypertext presentation helps the students to build a more coherent representation of the situation evoked by the text. This particularly happens when the reader gets explanatory notes in connection with the "situation model" that provides him clear knowledge in connection with the information of the text, that allows him to fill in the "semantic blanks" of the text.

  12. Current use of medical eponyms – a need for global uniformity in scientific publications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arora Nalini

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although eponyms are widely used in medicine, they arbitrarily alternate between the possessive and nonpossessive forms. As very little is known regarding extent and distribution of this variation, the present study was planned to assess current use of eponymous term taking "Down syndrome" and "Down's syndrome" as an example. Methods This study was carried out in two phases – first phase in 1998 and second phase in 2008. In the first phase, we manually searched the terms "Down syndrome" and "Down's syndrome" in the indexes of 70 medical books, and 46 medical journals. In second phase, we performed PubMed search with both the terms, followed by text-word search for the same. Results In the first phase, there was an overall tilt towards possessive form – 62(53.4% "Down's syndrome" versus 54(46.6% "Down syndrome." However, the American publications preferred the nonpossesive form when compared with their European counterpart (40/50 versus 14/66; P Conclusion Inconsistency in the use of medical eponyms remains a major problem in literature search. Because of linguistic simplicity and technical advantages, the nonpossessive form should be used uniformly worldwide.

  13. Current understanding of iberiotoxin-resistant BK channels in the nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Bin eWang; Jaffe, David B.; Robert eBrenner

    2014-01-01

    While most large-conductance, calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channels (BK or Maxi-K type) are blocked by the scorpion venom iberiotoxin, the so-called type II subtype has the property of toxin resistance. This property is uniquely mediated by channel assembly with one member of the BK accessory β subunit family, the neuron-enriched β4 subunit. This review will focus on current understanding of iberiotoxin-resistant, β4-containing BK channel properties and their function in the CNS. ...

  14. CANCER IMMUNOLOGY AND IMMUNOTHERAPY – UNDERSTANDING AND ADAPTATION THE CURRENT EVIDENCE TO OPTIMIZE PATIENT THERAPY OUTCOMES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlin Savov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this publication includes the try to act as intermediary to the readers, which should be able to understand: - The description of the cancer immunotherapy mechanisms in the context of current therapy decisions for the treatment of cancer - The including criteria for those patients with cancer who could be appropriate candidates for immunotherapy - And to optimize patient outcomes by using best practices to manage the adverse events associated with immunotherapy treatment More than 15 promising immunotherapy approaches being tested in clinical trials with appropriate patients and colleagues for enrollment and peer-to-peer education purposes, respectively.

  15. Microstructural understanding and critical current optimization of advanced high field superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonney, L.A.; Willis, T.C.; Larbalestier, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    It is of great importance to improve critical current density, J[sub c] in A15 superconductors for high field magnet applications. Most current work to improve J[sub c] in A15 wires concentrates on increasing the overall J[sub c] by increasing the fraction of superconducting phase in the wire, by improving the uniformity of the superconductor cross section along the length of the wire and by adjusting the strainstate of the A15 layer. The goal of the A15 work in this group was to investigate the intrinsic J[sub c] of the A15 layer itself. To do this, a better understanding of factors controlling the intrinsic J[sub c]of the Nb[sub 3]Sn was pursued.

  16. How Do You Like Your Science, Wet or Dry? How Two Lab Experiences Influence Student Understanding of Science Concepts and Perceptions of Authentic Scientific Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Maureen; Knuth, Randy; Van Horne, Katie; Shouse, Andrew W.; Levias, Sheldon

    2017-01-01

    This study examines how two kinds of authentic research experiences related to smoking behavior--genotyping human DNA (wet lab) and using a database to test hypotheses about factors that affect smoking behavior (dry lab)--influence students' perceptions and understanding of scientific research and related science concepts. The study used pre and…

  17. An Inquiry-Based Practical for a Large, Foundation-Level Undergraduate Laboratory that Enhances Student Understanding of Basic Cellular Concepts and Scientific Experimental Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugarcic, A.; Zimbardi, K.; Macaranas, J.; Thorn, P.

    2012-01-01

    Student-centered education involving research experiences or inquiry have been shown to help undergraduate students understand, and become excited about, the process of scientific investigation. These benefits are particularly important for students in the early stages of their degree (Report and Kenny,…

  18. Relationship between Added Sugars Consumption and Chronic Disease Risk Factors: Current Understanding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M. Rippe

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Added sugars are a controversial and hotly debated topic. Consumption of added sugars has been implicated in increased risk of a variety of chronic diseases including obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD as well as cognitive decline and even some cancers. Support for these putative associations has been challenged, however, on a variety of fronts. The purpose of the current review is to summarize high impact evidence including systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and randomized controlled trials (RCTs, in an attempt to provide an overview of current evidence related to added sugars and health considerations. This paper is an extension of a symposium held at the Experimental Biology 2015 conference entitled “Sweeteners and Health: Current Understandings, Controversies, Recent Research Findings and Directions for Future Research”. We conclude based on high quality evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCT, systematic reviews and meta-analyses of cohort studies that singling out added sugars as unique culprits for metabolically based diseases such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease appears inconsistent with modern, high quality evidence and is very unlikely to yield health benefits. While it is prudent to consume added sugars in moderation, the reduction of these components of the diet without other reductions of caloric sources seems unlikely to achieve any meaningful benefit.

  19. Relationship between Added Sugars Consumption and Chronic Disease Risk Factors: Current Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippe, James M.; Angelopoulos, Theodore J.

    2016-01-01

    Added sugars are a controversial and hotly debated topic. Consumption of added sugars has been implicated in increased risk of a variety of chronic diseases including obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) as well as cognitive decline and even some cancers. Support for these putative associations has been challenged, however, on a variety of fronts. The purpose of the current review is to summarize high impact evidence including systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and randomized controlled trials (RCTs), in an attempt to provide an overview of current evidence related to added sugars and health considerations. This paper is an extension of a symposium held at the Experimental Biology 2015 conference entitled “Sweeteners and Health: Current Understandings, Controversies, Recent Research Findings and Directions for Future Research”. We conclude based on high quality evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCT), systematic reviews and meta-analyses of cohort studies that singling out added sugars as unique culprits for metabolically based diseases such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease appears inconsistent with modern, high quality evidence and is very unlikely to yield health benefits. While it is prudent to consume added sugars in moderation, the reduction of these components of the diet without other reductions of caloric sources seems unlikely to achieve any meaningful benefit. PMID:27827899

  20. Socio-Scientific Decision Making in the Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siribunnam, Siripun; Nuangchalerm, Prasart; Jansawang, Natchanok

    2014-01-01

    The learning ability of students in science is improved by socio-scientific decision-making, an important activity that improves a student's scientific literacy, conceptual understanding, scientific inquiry, attitudes, and social values. The socio-scientific issues must be discussed during science classroom activities in the current state of 21st…

  1. Comprehensive Phenotyping in Multiple Sclerosis: Discovery Based Proteomics and the Current Understanding of Putative Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin C. O’Connor

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is no single test for multiple sclerosis (MS. Diagnosis is confirmed through clinical evaluation, abnormalities revealed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF chemistry. The early and accurate diagnosis of the disease, monitoring of progression, and gauging of therapeutic intervention are important but elusive elements of patient care. Moreover, a deeper understanding of the disease pathology is needed, including discovery of accurate biomarkers for MS. Herein we review putative biomarkers of MS relating to neurodegeneration and contributions to neuropathology, with particular focus on autoimmunity. In addition, novel assessments of biomarkers not driven by hypotheses are discussed, featuring our application of advanced proteomics and metabolomics for comprehensive phenotyping of CSF and blood. This strategy allows comparison of component expression levels in CSF and serum between MS and control groups. Examination of these preliminary data suggests that several CSF proteins in MS are differentially expressed, and thus, represent putative biomarkers deserving of further evaluation.

  2. Cell and molecular biology of intervertebral disc degeneration: current understanding and implications for potential therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S Z; Rui, Y F; Lu, J; Wang, C

    2014-10-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is a chronic, complex process associated with low back pain; mechanisms of its occurrence have not yet been fully elucidated. Its process is not only accompanied by morphological changes, but also by systematic changes in its histological and biochemical properties. Many cellular and molecular mechanisms have been reported to be related with IDD and to reverse degenerative trends, abnormal conditions of the living cells and altered cell phenotypes would need to be restored. Promising biological therapeutic strategies still rely on injection of active substances, gene therapy and cell transplantation. With advanced study of tissue engineering protocols based on cell therapy, combined use of seeding cells, bio-active substances and bio-compatible materials, are promising for IDD regeneration. Recently reported progenitor cells within discs themselves also hold prospects for future IDD studies. This article describes the background of IDD, current understanding and implications of potential therapeutic strategies.

  3. The current understanding of trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC): a focused review on pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Stefano; Spiezia, Luca; Campello, Elena; Simioni, Paolo

    2017-05-05

    The emergency management of acute severe bleeding in trauma patients has changed significantly in recent years. In particular, greater attention is now being devoted to a prompt assessment of coagulation alterations, which allows for immediate haemostatic resuscitation procedures when necessary. The importance of an early trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC) diagnosis has led physicians to increase the efforts to better understand the pathophysiological alterations observed in the haemostatic system after traumatic injuries. As yet, the knowledge of TIC is not exhaustive, and further studies are needed. The aim of this review is to gather all the currently available data and information in an attempt to gain a better understanding of TIC. A comprehensive literature search was performed using MEDLINE database. The bibliographies of relevant articles were screened for additional publications. In major traumas, coagulopathic bleeding stems from a complex interplay among haemostatic and inflammatory systems, and is characterized by a multifactorial dysfunction. In the abundance of biochemical and pathophysiological changes occurring after trauma, it is possible to discern endogenously induced primary predisposing conditions and exogenously induced secondary predisposing conditions. TIC remains one of the most diagnostically and therapeutically challenging condition.

  4. Crucial knowledge gaps in current understanding of climate change impacts on coral reef fishes

    KAUST Repository

    Wilson, S. K.

    2010-02-26

    Expert opinion was canvassed to identify crucial knowledge gaps in current understanding of climate change impacts on coral reef fishes. Scientists that had published three or more papers on the effects of climate and environmental factors on reef fishes were invited to submit five questions that, if addressed, would improve our understanding of climate change effects on coral reef fishes. Thirty-three scientists provided 155 questions, and 32 scientists scored these questions in terms of: (i) identifying a knowledge gap, (ii) achievability, (iii) applicability to a broad spectrum of species and reef habitats, and (iv) priority. Forty-two per cent of the questions related to habitat associations and community dynamics of fish, reflecting the established effects and immediate concern relating to climate-induced coral loss and habitat degradation. However, there were also questions on fish demographics, physiology, behaviour and management, all of which could be potentially affected by climate change. Irrespective of their individual expertise and background, scientists scored questions from different topics similarly, suggesting limited bias and recognition of a need for greater interdisciplinary and collaborative research. Presented here are the 53 highest-scoring unique questions. These questions should act as a guide for future research, providing a basis for better assessment and management of climate change impacts on coral reefs and associated fish communities.

  5. Crucial knowledge gaps in current understanding of climate change impacts on coral reef fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, S K; Adjeroud, M; Bellwood, D R; Berumen, M L; Booth, D; Bozec, Y-Marie; Chabanet, P; Cheal, A; Cinner, J; Depczynski, M; Feary, D A; Gagliano, M; Graham, N A J; Halford, A R; Halpern, B S; Harborne, A R; Hoey, A S; Holbrook, S J; Jones, G P; Kulbiki, M; Letourneur, Y; De Loma, T L; McClanahan, T; McCormick, M I; Meekan, M G; Mumby, P J; Munday, P L; Ohman, M C; Pratchett, M S; Riegl, B; Sano, M; Schmitt, R J; Syms, C

    2010-03-15

    Expert opinion was canvassed to identify crucial knowledge gaps in current understanding of climate change impacts on coral reef fishes. Scientists that had published three or more papers on the effects of climate and environmental factors on reef fishes were invited to submit five questions that, if addressed, would improve our understanding of climate change effects on coral reef fishes. Thirty-three scientists provided 155 questions, and 32 scientists scored these questions in terms of: (i) identifying a knowledge gap, (ii) achievability, (iii) applicability to a broad spectrum of species and reef habitats, and (iv) priority. Forty-two per cent of the questions related to habitat associations and community dynamics of fish, reflecting the established effects and immediate concern relating to climate-induced coral loss and habitat degradation. However, there were also questions on fish demographics, physiology, behaviour and management, all of which could be potentially affected by climate change. Irrespective of their individual expertise and background, scientists scored questions from different topics similarly, suggesting limited bias and recognition of a need for greater interdisciplinary and collaborative research. Presented here are the 53 highest-scoring unique questions. These questions should act as a guide for future research, providing a basis for better assessment and management of climate change impacts on coral reefs and associated fish communities.

  6. Emergency nurses' current practices and understanding of family presence during CPR.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Madden, Eilis

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: To examine emergency nurses\\' current practices and understanding of family presence during CPR in the emergency department, Cork University Hospital, Republic of Ireland. METHOD: A quantitative descriptive design was used in the study. A questionnaire developed by ENA was distributed to emergency nurses working in a level I trauma emergency department at Cork University Hospital. The total sample number was 90, including all emergency nurses with at least 6 months\\' emergency nursing experience. RESULTS: Emergency nurses often took families to the bedside during resuscitation efforts (58.9%) or would do so if the opportunity arose (17.8%). A high percentage (74.4%) of respondents would prefer a written policy allowing the option of family presence during CPR. The most significant barrier to family witnessed resuscitation (FWR) was conflicts occurring within the emergency team. The most significant facilitator to FWR was a greater understanding of health care professionals on the benefits of FWR to patients and families, indicating the need for educational development. CONCLUSION: The findings of the study and previously published studies indicate the need for development of written polices and guidelines on the practice to meet the needs of patients, families, and staff by providing consistent, safe, and caring practices for all involved in the resuscitation process. Recommendations of the study include the development of a written policy and an educational programme on the safe implementation and practices of FWR.

  7. Current gaps in understanding and predicting space weather: An operations perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtagh, W. J.

    2016-12-01

    The NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC), one of the nine National Weather Service (NWS) National Centers for Environmental Prediction, is the Nation's official source for space weather alerts and warnings. Space weather effects the technology that forms the backbone of global economic vitality and national security, including satellite and airline operations, communications networks, and the electric power grid. Many of SWPC's over 48,000 subscribers rely on space weather forecasts for critical decision making. But extraordinary gaps still exist in our ability to meet customer needs for accurate and timely space weather forecasts and warnings. The 2015 National Space Weather Strategy recognizes that it is imperative that we improve the fundamental understanding of space weather and increase the accuracy, reliability, and timeliness of space-weather observations and forecasts in support of the growing demands. In this talk we provide a broad perspective of the key challenges that currently limit the forecaster's ability to better understand and predict space weather. We also examine the impact of these limitations on the end-user community.

  8. Current understanding of iberiotoxin-resistant BK channels in the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Jaffe, David B; Brenner, Robert

    2014-01-01

    While most large-conductance, calcium-, and voltage-activated potassium channels (BK or Maxi-K type) are blocked by the scorpion venom iberiotoxin, the so-called "type II" subtype has the property of toxin resistance. This property is uniquely mediated by channel assembly with one member of the BK accessory β subunit family, the neuron-enriched β4 subunit. This review will focus on current understanding of iberiotoxin-resistant, β4-containing BK channel properties and their function in the CNS. Studies have shown that β4 dramatically promotes BK channel opening by shifting voltage sensor activation to more negative voltage ranges, but also slows activation to timescales that theoretically preclude BK ability to shape action potentials (APs). In addition, β4 membrane trafficking is regulated through an endoplasmic retention signal and palmitoylation. More recently, the challenge has been to understand the functional role of the iberiotoxin-resistant BK subtype utilizing computational modeling of neurons and neurophysiological approaches. Utilizing iberiotoxin-resistance as a footprint for these channels, they have been identified in dentate gyrus granule neurons and in purkinje neurons of the cerebellum. In these neurons, the role of these channels is largely consistent with slow-gated channels that reduce excitability either through an interspike conductance, such as in purkinje neurons, or by replacing fast-gating BK channels that otherwise facilitate high frequency AP firing, such as in dentate gyrus neurons. They are also observed in presynaptic mossy fiber terminals of the dentate gyrus and posterior pituitary terminals. More recent studies suggest that β4 subunits may also be expressed in some neurons lacking iberiotoxin-resistant BK channels, such as in CA3 hippocampus neurons. Ongoing research using novel, specific blockers and agonists of BK/β4, and β4 knockout mice, will continue to move the field forward in understanding the function of these

  9. Current understanding of iberiotoxin-resistant BK channels in the nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin eWang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available While most large-conductance, calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channels (BK or Maxi-K type are blocked by the scorpion venom iberiotoxin, the so-called type II subtype has the property of toxin resistance. This property is uniquely mediated by channel assembly with one member of the BK accessory β subunit family, the neuron-enriched β4 subunit. This review will focus on current understanding of iberiotoxin-resistant, β4-containing BK channel properties and their function in the CNS. Studies have shown that β4 dramatically promotes BK channel opening by shifting voltage sensor activation to more negative voltage ranges, but also slows activation to timescales that theoretically preclude BK ability to shape action potentials (APs. In addition, β4 membrane trafficking is regulated through an endoplasmic retention signal and palmitoylation. More recently, the challenge has been to understand the functional role of the iberiotoxin-resistant BK subtype utilizing computational modeling of neurons and neurophysiological approaches. Utilizing iberiotoxin-resistance as a footprint for these channels, they have been identified in dentate gyrus granule neurons and in purkinje neurons of the cerebellum. In these neurons, the role of these channels is largely consistent with slow-gated channels that reduce excitability either through an interspike conductance, such as in purkinje neurons, or by replacing fast-gating BK channels that otherwise facilitate high frequency AP firing, such as in dentate gyrus neurons. They are also observed in presynaptic mossy fiber terminals of the dentate gyrus and posterior pituitary terminals. More recent studies suggest that β4 subunits may also be expressed in some neurons lacking iberiotoxin-resistant BK channels, such as in CA3 hippocampus neurons. Ongoing research using novel, specific blockers and agonists of BK/β4, and β4 knockout mice, will continue to move the field forward in understanding the

  10. Transcription Factors and Plants Response to Drought Stress: Current Understanding and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Rohit; Wani, Shabir H.; Singh, Balwant; Bohra, Abhishek; Dar, Zahoor A.; Lone, Ajaz A.; Pareek, Ashwani; Singla-Pareek, Sneh L.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing vulnerability of plants to a variety of stresses such as drought, salt and extreme temperatures poses a global threat to sustained growth and productivity of major crops. Of these stresses, drought represents a considerable threat to plant growth and development. In view of this, developing staple food cultivars with improved drought tolerance emerges as the most sustainable solution toward improving crop productivity in a scenario of climate change. In parallel, unraveling the genetic architecture and the targeted identification of molecular networks using modern “OMICS” analyses, that can underpin drought tolerance mechanisms, is urgently required. Importantly, integrated studies intending to elucidate complex mechanisms can bridge the gap existing in our current knowledge about drought stress tolerance in plants. It is now well established that drought tolerance is regulated by several genes, including transcription factors (TFs) that enable plants to withstand unfavorable conditions, and these remain potential genomic candidates for their wide application in crop breeding. These TFs represent the key molecular switches orchestrating the regulation of plant developmental processes in response to a variety of stresses. The current review aims to offer a deeper understanding of TFs engaged in regulating plant’s response under drought stress and to devise potential strategies to improve plant tolerance against drought. PMID:27471513

  11. Transcription factors and plant response to drought stress: Current understanding and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Joshi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Increasing vulnerability of plants to a variety of stresses such as drought, salt and extreme temperatures poses a global threat to sustained growth and productivity of major crops. Of these stresses, drought represents a considerable threat to plant growth and development. In view of this, developing staple food cultivars with improved drought tolerance emerges as the most sustainable solution towards improving crop productivity in a scenario of climate change. In parallel, unraveling the genetic architecture and the targeted identification of molecular networks using modern OMICS analyses, that can underpin drought tolerance mechanisms, is urgently required. Importantly, integrated studies intending to elucidate complex mechanisms can bridge the gap existing in our current knowledge about drought stress tolerance in plants. It is now well established that drought tolerance is regulated by several genes, including transcription factors (TFs that enable plants to withstand unfavorable conditions, and these remain potential genomic candidates for their wide application in crop breeding. These TFs represent the key molecular switches orchestrating the regulation of plant developmental processes in response to a variety of stresses. The current review aims to offer a deeper understanding of TFs engaged in regulating plant’s response under drought stress and to devise potential strategies to improve plant tolerance against drought.

  12. Current multiple sclerosis treatments have improved our understanding of MS autoimmune pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roland; Sospedra, Mireia; Rosito, Maria; Engelhardt, Britta

    2016-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) in young adults. When MS is not treated, it leads to irreversible and severe disability. The etiology of MS and its pathogenesis are not fully understood. The recent discovery that MS-associated genetic variants code for molecules related to the function of specific immune cell subsets is consistent with the concept of MS as a prototypic, T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease targeting the CNS. While the therapeutic efficacy of the currently available immunomodulatory therapies further strengthen this concept, differences observed in responses to MS treatment as well as additional clinical and imaging observations have also shown that the autoimmune pathogenesis underlying MS is much more complex than previously thought. There is therefore an unmet need for continued detailed phenotypic and functional analysis of disease-relevant adaptive immune cells and tissues directly derived from MS patients to unravel the immune etiology of MS in its entire complexity. In this review, we will discuss the currently available MS treatment options and approved drugs, including how they have contributed to the understanding of the immune pathology of this autoimmune disease.

  13. Current progress on understanding the impact of mercury on human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Eunhee; Basu, Niladri; Bose-O'Reilly, Stephan; Dórea, José G; McSorley, Emeir; Sakamoto, Mineshi; Chan, Hing Man

    2017-01-01

    Mercury pollution and its impacts on human health is of global concern. The authors of this paper were members of the Plenary Panel on Human Health in the 12th International Conference on Mercury as a Global Pollutant held in Korea in June 2015. The Panel was asked by the conference organizers to address two questions: what is the current understanding of the impacts of mercury exposure on human health and what information is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of the Minamata Convention in lowering exposure and preventing adverse effects. The authors conducted a critical review of the literature published since January 2012 and discussed the current state-of-knowledge in the following areas: environmental exposure and/or risk assessment; kinetics and biomonitoring; effects on children development; effects on adult general populations; effects on artisanal and small-scale gold miners (ASGM); effects on dental workers; risk of ethylmercury in thimerosal-containing vaccines; interactions with nutrients; genetic determinants and; risk communication and management. Knowledge gaps in each area were identified and recommendations for future research were made. The Panel concluded that more knowledge synthesis efforts are needed to translate the research results into management tools for health professionals and policy makers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Exploring How Research Experiences for Teachers Changes Their Understandings of the Nature of Science and Scientific Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, Sanlyn R.

    2014-01-01

    The nature of science is a prevalent theme across United States national science education standards and frameworks as well as other documents that guide formal and informal science education reform. To support teachers in engaging their students in authentic scientific practices and reformed teaching strategies, research experiences for teachers…

  15. Scientific Research Activity of Students Pre-Service Teachers of Sciences at University: The Aspects of Understanding, Situation and Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamanauskas, Vincentas; Augiene, Dalia

    2017-01-01

    The development of student abilities of scientific research activity (SRA) in the process of studies appears as a highly important area. In the course of studies, students not only increase their general competencies, acquire professional abilities and skills but also learn to conduct research. This does not mean that all students will build their…

  16. Does Attainment of Piaget's Formal Operational Level of Cognitive Development Predict Student Understanding of Scientific Models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahti, Richard Dennis, II.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of scientific models and their uses is a concept that has become a key benchmark in many of the science standards of the past 30 years, including the proposed Next Generation Science Standards. Knowledge of models is linked to other important nature of science concepts such as theory change which are also rising in prominence in newer…

  17. Preschool Pathways to Science (PrePS[TM]): Facilitating Scientific Ways of Thinking, Talking, Doing, and Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Rochel; Brenneman, Kimberly; Macdonald, Gay; Roman, Moises

    2009-01-01

    To ensure they're meeting state early learning guidelines for science, preschool educators need fun, age-appropriate, and research-based ways to teach young children about scientific concepts. The basis for the PBS KIDS show "Sid the Science Kid," this teaching resource helps children ages 3-5 investigate their everyday world and develop the…

  18. Detection of Explanation Obstacles in Scientific Texts: The Effect of an Understanding Task vs. an Experiment Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Júlia; Otero, José; Vaz-Rebelo, Piedade; Sanjosé, Vicente; Caldeira, Helena

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse the effect of tasks on the detection of explanation obstacles when secondary school students read scientific texts. Students were instructed to read short passages under different task conditions, and to ask questions if necessary. Obstacle detection was operationalised in terms of the type of questions asked by…

  19. Deepening Our Understanding of Academic Inbreeding Effects on Research Information Exchange and Scientific Output: New Insights for Academic Based Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, Hugo

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of academic inbreeding in relation to academic research, and proposes a new conceptual framework for its analysis. We find that mobility (or lack of) at the early research career stage is decisive in influencing academic behaviors and scientific productivity. Less mobile academics have more inward oriented…

  20. Polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE: Review of observations and current understanding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rapp

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE are very strong radar echoes primarily studied in the VHF wavelength range from altitudes close to the polar summer mesopause. Radar waves are scattered at irregularities in the radar refractive index which at mesopause altitudes is effectively determined by the electron number density. For efficient scatter, the electron number density must reveal structures at the radar half wavelength (Bragg condition for monostatic radars; ~3 m for typical VHF radars. The question how such small scale electron number density structures are created in the mesopause region has been a longstanding open scientific question for almost 30 years. This paper reviews experimental and theoretical milestones on the way to an advanced understanding of PMSE. Based on new experimental results from in situ observations with sounding rockets, ground based observations with radars and lidars, numerical simulations with microphysical models of the life cycle of mesospheric aerosol particles, and theoretical considerations regarding the diffusivity of electrons in the ice loaded complex plasma of the mesopause region, a consistent explanation for the generation of these radar echoes has been developed. The main idea is that mesospheric neutral air turbulence in combination with a significantly reduced electron diffusivity due to the presence of heavy charged ice aerosol particles (radii ~5–50 nm leads to the creation of structures at spatial scales significantly smaller than the inner scale of the neutral gas turbulent velocity field itself. Importantly, owing to their very low diffusivity, the plasma structures acquire a very long lifetime, i.e., 10 min to hours in the presence of particles with radii between 10 and 50 nm. This leads to a temporal decoupling of active neutral air turbulence and the existence of small scale plasma structures and PMSE and thus readily explains observations proving the absence of neutral air turbulence at

  1. Key scientific challenges in current rechargeable non-aqueous Li-O2 batteries: experiment and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Mahesh Datt; Geaney, Hugh; Nolan, Michael; O'Dwyer, Colm

    2014-06-28

    Rechargeable Li-air (henceforth referred to as Li-O2) batteries provide theoretical capacities that are ten times higher than that of current Li-ion batteries, which could enable the driving range of an electric vehicle to be comparable to that of gasoline vehicles. These high energy densities in Li-O2 batteries result from the atypical battery architecture which consists of an air (O2) cathode and a pure lithium metal anode. However, hurdles to their widespread use abound with issues at the cathode (relating to electrocatalysis and cathode decomposition), lithium metal anode (high reactivity towards moisture) and due to electrolyte decomposition. This review focuses on the key scientific challenges in the development of rechargeable non-aqueous Li-O2 batteries from both experimental and theoretical findings. This dual approach allows insight into future research directions to be provided and highlights the importance of combining theoretical and experimental approaches in the optimization of Li-O2 battery systems.

  2. Current ecological understanding of fungal-like pathogens of fish: what lies beneath?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolphe Elie Gozlan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite increasingly sophisticated microbiological techniques, and long after the first discovery of microbes, basic knowledge is still lacking to fully appreciate the ecological importance of microbial parasites in fish. This is likely due to the nature of their habitats as many species of fish suffer from living beneath turbid water away from easy recording. However, fishes represent key ecosystem services for millions of people around the world and the absence of a functional ecological understanding of viruses, prokaryotes, and small eukaryotes in the maintenance of fish populations and of their diversity represents an inherent barrier to aquatic conservation and food security. Among recent emerging infectious diseases responsible for severe population declines in plant and animal taxa, fungal and fungal-like microbes have emerged as significant contributors. Here, we review the current knowledge gaps of fungal and fungal-like parasites and pathogens in fish and put them into an ecological perspective with direct implications for the monitoring of fungal fish pathogens in the wild, their phylogeography as well as their associated ecological impact on fish populations. With increasing fish movement around the world for farming, releases into the wild for sport fishing and human-driven habitat changes, it is expected, along with improved environmental monitoring of fungal and fungal-like infections, that the full extent of the impact of these pathogens on wild fish populations will soon emerge as a major threat to freshwater biodiversity.

  3. Current understanding of the bi-directional relationship of major depression with inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messay Berhane

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Consistent evidence links major depression and its affective components to negative health outcomes. Although the pathways of these effects are likely complex and multifactorial, recent evidence suggests that innate inflammatory processes may play a role. An overview of current literature suggests that pathways between negative moods and inflammation are bi-directional. Indeed, negative moods activate peripheral physiologic mechanisms that result in an up regulation of systemic levels of inflammation. Conversely, peripheral inflammatory mediators signal the brain to affect behavioral, affective and cognitive changes that are consistent with symptoms of major depressive disorder. It is likely that these pathways are part of a complex feedback loop that involves the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems and plays a role in the modulation of peripheral inflammatory responses to central and peripheral stimuli, in central responses to peripheral immune activation and in the maintenance of homeostatic balance. Further research is warranted to fully understand the role of central processes in this feedback loop, which likely contributes to the pathophysiology of mental and physical health.

  4. Understanding the current state of infection preventionists through competency, role, and activity self-assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalp, Ericka L; Marx, James F; Davis, James

    2017-06-01

    The Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC) MegaSurvey, administered in 2015, was completed by approximately 4,079 APIC members. The survey sought to gain a better understanding the current state of 4 components of infection prevention practice: demographic characteristics, compensation, organizational structure, and practice and competency. The data for this analysis come from the APIC MegaSurvey Practice and Competency domain. Descriptive statistics and χ(2) analyses were conducted to examine differences in infection preventionist (IP) competency, roles, and activity self-assessments. The majority of IPs self-assessed their competency as Proficient compared with Novice or Expert for each of the 8 IP core competency activities. Forty percent of IPs self-rated their competency as Expert in the Preventing/Controlling the Transmission of Infectious Agents/HAIs component. IPs reported Novice competency in Employee/Occupational Health (29%); Cleaning, Sterilization, Disinfection, and Asepsis (23%); and Education and Research categories (22%). Differences in self-rated competency among IPs by discipline type (public health, nurse, and laboratory) were identified. Differences in self-rated competency were identified for each of the 8 IP core competency activities. IPs report using various resource types to gain competency. Future research is needed to identify opportunities to increase competency levels in the weakest-rated competency activities. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Review: Animal model and the current understanding of molecule dynamics of adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, C F; Duarte, M S; Guimarães, S E F; Verardo, L L; Wei, S; Du, M; Jiang, Z; Bergen, W G; Hausman, G J; Fernyhough-Culver, M; Albrecht, E; Dodson, M V

    2016-06-01

    Among several potential animal models that can be used for adipogenic studies, Wagyu cattle is the one that presents unique molecular mechanisms underlying the deposit of substantial amounts of intramuscular fat. As such, this review is focused on current knowledge of such mechanisms related to adipose tissue deposition using Wagyu cattle as model. So abundant is the lipid accumulation in the skeletal muscles of these animals that in many cases, the muscle cross-sectional area appears more white (adipose tissue) than red (muscle fibers). This enhanced marbling accumulation is morphologically similar to that seen in numerous skeletal muscle dysfunctions, disease states and myopathies; this might indicate cross-similar mechanisms between such dysfunctions and fat deposition in Wagyu breed. Animal models can be used not only for a better understanding of fat deposition in livestock, but also as models to an increased comprehension on molecular mechanisms behind human conditions. This revision underlies some of the complex molecular processes of fat deposition in animals.

  6. Effect of Current Electricity Simulation Supported Learning on the Conceptual Understanding of Elementary and Secondary Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, David Devraj; Thomas, P. V.; Morris, John D.; Tobias, Karen M.; Baker, Mary; Jermanovich, Trudy

    2011-04-01

    This study examined the impact of computer simulation and supported science learning on a teacher's understanding and conceptual knowledge of current electricity. Pre/Post tests were used to measure the teachers' concept attainment. Overall, there was a significant and large knowledge difference effect from Pre to Post test. Two interesting interactions were observed during the data analysis. The first was the difference between Elementary and Secondary teachers. Both groups had significant gains, with large effect sizes, but the Elementary teachers (Pre-Mean = 3.70, Post-Mean = 7.51) started lower and ended higher exhibiting a significantly larger gain than the Secondary teachers (Pre-Mean = 4.96, Post-Mean = 6.71). The second interaction was the impact of gender. Both groups showed significant gains, with large effect sizes, but females (Pre-Mean = 3.90, Post-Mean = 7.21) gained significantly more than males (Pre-Mean = 5.13, Post-Mean = 7.01). These results confirm that computer simulation supported science learning can have a positive effect on concept attainment in teachers.

  7. Understanding the Dynamical Evolution of the Earth Radiation Belt and Ring Current Coupled System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shprits, Yuri; Usanova, Maria; Kellerman, Adam; Drozdov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Modeling and understanding the ring current and radiation belt-coupled system has been a grand challenge since the beginning of the space age. In this study we show long-term simulations with a 3D Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code of modeling the radiation belts with boundary conditions derived from observations around geosynchronous orbit. Simulations can reproduce long term variations of the electron radiation belt fluxes and show the importance of local acceleration, radial diffusion, loss to the atmosphere and loss to the magnetopause. We also present 4D VERB simulations that include convective transport, radial diffusion, pitch angle scattering and local acceleration. VERB simulations show that the lower energy inward transport is dominated by the convection and higher energy transport is dominated by the diffusive radial transport. We also show that at energies of 100s of keV, a number of processes work simultaneously, including convective transport, radial diffusion, local acceleration, loss to the loss cone and loss to the magnetopause. The results of the simulation of the March 2013 storm are compared with Van Allen Probes observations.

  8. Current Understanding and Remaining Challenges in Modeling Long-Term Degradation of Borosilicate Nuclear Waste Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ryan, Joseph V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gin, Stephane [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SECM, Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Inagaki, Yaohiro [Dept. of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoda (Japan)

    2013-12-01

    Chemical durability is not a single material property that can be uniquely measured. Instead it is the response to a host of coupled material and environmental processes whose rates are estimated by a combination of theory, experiment, and modeling. High-level nuclear waste (HLW) glass is perhaps the most studied of any material yet there remain significant technical gaps regarding their chemical durability. The phenomena affecting the long-term performance of HLW glasses in their disposal environment include surface reactions, transport properties to and from the reacting glass surface, and ion exchange between the solid glass and the surrounding solution and alteration products. The rates of these processes are strongly influenced and are coupled through the solution chemistry, which is in turn influenced by the reacting glass and also by reaction with the near-field materials and precipitation of alteration products. Therefore, those processes must be understood sufficiently well to estimate or bound the performance of HLW glass in its disposal environment over geologic time-scales. This article summarizes the current state of understanding of surface reactions, transport properties, and ion exchange along with the near-field materials and alteration products influences on solution chemistry and glass reaction rates. Also summarized are the remaining technical gaps along with recommended approaches to fill those technical gaps.

  9. Danger Signals and Graft-versus-host Disease: Current Understanding and Future Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toubai, Tomomi; Mathewson, Nathan D.; Magenau, John; Reddy, Pavan

    2016-01-01

    Graft-versus-host response after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT) represents one of the most intense inflammatory responses observed in humans. Host conditioning facilitates engraftment of donor cells, but the tissue injury caused from it primes the critical first steps in the development of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Tissue injuries release pro-inflammatory cytokines (such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) through widespread stimulation of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) by the release of danger stimuli, such as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). DAMPs and PAMPs function as potent stimulators for host and donor-derived antigen presenting cells (APCs) that in turn activate and amplify the responses of alloreactive donor T cells. Emerging data also point towards a role for suppression of DAMP induced inflammation by the APCs and donor T cells in mitigating GVHD severity. In this review, we summarize the current understanding on the role of danger stimuli, such as the DAMPs and PAMPs, in GVHD. PMID:27965667

  10. Current ecological understanding of fungal-like pathogens of fish: what lies beneath?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozlan, Rodolphe E; Marshall, Wyth L; Lilje, Osu; Jessop, Casey N; Gleason, Frank H; Andreou, Demetra

    2014-01-01

    Despite increasingly sophisticated microbiological techniques, and long after the first discovery of microbes, basic knowledge is still lacking to fully appreciate the ecological importance of microbial parasites in fish. This is likely due to the nature of their habitats as many species of fish suffer from living beneath turbid water away from easy recording. However, fishes represent key ecosystem services for millions of people around the world and the absence of a functional ecological understanding of viruses, prokaryotes, and small eukaryotes in the maintenance of fish populations and of their diversity represents an inherent barrier to aquatic conservation and food security. Among recent emerging infectious diseases responsible for severe population declines in plant and animal taxa, fungal and fungal-like microbes have emerged as significant contributors. Here, we review the current knowledge gaps of fungal and fungal-like parasites and pathogens in fish and put them into an ecological perspective with direct implications for the monitoring of fungal fish pathogens in the wild, their phylogeography as well as their associated ecological impact on fish populations. With increasing fish movement around the world for farming, releases into the wild for sport fishing and human-driven habitat changes, it is expected, along with improved environmental monitoring of fungal and fungal-like infections, that the full extent of the impact of these pathogens on wild fish populations will soon emerge as a major threat to freshwater biodiversity.

  11. History of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament)--Current Academic Understandings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, Brant; Smith, Fred

    The lessons in the teacher's guide about the Bible's Old Testament are based on historic and scientific scholarship and, to avoid a sectarian point of view, focus on the factual data generated by academic research. The lessons are based on what is known about the nature of oral tradition, recent archaeological findings, and the academic biblical…

  12. Theoretical study of the source-drain current and gate leakage current to understand the graphene field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Cui; Liu, Hongmei; Ni, Wenbin; Gao, Nengyue; Zhao, Jianwei; Zhang, Haoli

    2011-02-28

    We designed acene molecules attached to two semi-infinite metallic electrodes to explore the source-drain current of graphene and the gate leakage current of the gate dielectric material in the field-effect transistors (FETs) device using the first-principles density functional theory combined with the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism. In the acene-based molecular junctions, we modify the connection position of the thiol group at one side, forming different electron transport routes. The electron transport routes besides the shortest one are defined as the cross channels. The simulation results indicate that electron transport through the cross channels is as efficient as that through the shortest one, since the conductance is weakly dependent on the distance. Thus, it is possible to connect the graphene with multiple leads, leading the graphene as a channel utilized in the graphene-based FETs in the mesoscopic system. When the conjugation of the cross channel is blocked, the junction conductance decreases dramatically. The differential conductance of the BA-1 is nearly 7 (54.57 μS) times as large as that of the BA-4 (7.35 μS) at zero bias. Therefore, the blocked graphene can be employed as the gate dielectric material in the top-gated graphene FET device, since the leakage current is small. The graphene-based field-effect transistors fabricated with a single layer of graphene as the channel and the blocked graphene as the gate dielectric material represent one way to overcome the problem of miniaturization which faces the new generation of transistors.

  13. Toward an Understanding of the Environmental and Public Health Impacts of Unconventional Natural Gas Development: A Categorical Assessment of the Peer-Reviewed Scientific Literature, 2009-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Jake; Shonkoff, Seth B C

    2016-01-01

    The body of science evaluating the potential impacts of unconventional natural gas development (UNGD) has grown significantly in recent years, although many data gaps remain. Still, a broad empirical understanding of the impacts is beginning to emerge amidst a swell of research. The present categorical assessment provides an overview of the peer-reviewed scientific literature from 2009-2015 as it relates to the potential impacts of UNGD on public health, water quality, and air quality. We have categorized all available original research during this time period in an attempt to understand the weight and direction of the scientific literature. Our results indicate that at least 685 papers have been published in peer-reviewed scientific journals that are relevant to assessing the impacts of UNGD. 84% of public health studies contain findings that indicate public health hazards, elevated risks, or adverse health outcomes; 69% of water quality studies contain findings that indicate potential, positive association, or actual incidence of water contamination; and 87% of air quality studies contain findings that indicate elevated air pollutant emissions and/or atmospheric concentrations. This paper demonstrates that the weight of the findings in the scientific literature indicates hazards and elevated risks to human health as well as possible adverse health outcomes associated with UNGD. There are limitations to this type of assessment and it is only intended to provide a snapshot of the scientific knowledge based on the available literature. However, this work can be used to identify themes that lie in or across studies, to prioritize future research, and to provide an empirical foundation for policy decisions.

  14. Historical and cultural aspects of the pineal gland: comparison between the theories provided by Spiritism in the 1940s and the current scientific evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchetti, Giancarlo; Daher, Jorge C; Iandoli, Decio; Gonçalves, Juliane P B; Lucchetti, Alessandra L G

    2013-01-01

    Significance has been attached to the pineal gland in numerous different cultures and beliefs. One religion that has advanced the role of the pineal gland is Spiritism. The objective of the present study was to compile information on the pineal gland drawing on the books of Francisco Cândido Xavier written through psychography and to carry out a critical analysis of their scientific bases by comparing against evidence in the current scientific literature. A systematic search using the terms "pineal gland" and "epiphysis" was conducted of 12 works allegedly dictated by the spirit "André Luiz". All information on the pineal having potential correlation with the field of medicine and current studies was included. Specialists in the area were recruited to compile the information and draw parallels with the scientific literature. The themes related to the pineal gland were: mental health, reproductive function, endocrinology, relationship with physical activity, spiritual connection, criticism of the theory that the organ exerts no function, and description of a hormone secreted by the gland (reference alluding to melatonin, isolated 13 years later). The historical background for each theme was outlined, together with the theories present in the Spiritist books and in the relevant scientific literature. The present article provides an analysis of the knowledge the scientific community can acquire from the history of humanity and from science itself. The process of formulating hypotheses and scientific theories can benefit by drawing on the cultural aspects of civilization, taking into account so-called non-traditional reports and theories.

  15. A three-phase model proposal for the evolution of scientific communication: from first print periodicals to current electronic communication system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Bertin

    Full Text Available Scientific communication has undergone deep transformations, since the emergence of Internet. Aiming to provide further thought on the evolution of scientific communication, this paper features a historical overview of the scientific communication advances over the last twenty years through a three-phase model for the evolution of the electronic journal and the preprints services, and presents Brazilian contemporary panorama for scientific communication. The three-phase model presented in this work is an adaptation of that one proposed by Tenopir et al. (2003 to describe the patterns of journal use by scientists since 1990. The early evolutionary phase followed the emergence of the first digital journals and the creation of repositories in the Web for publishing preliminary versions of scientific literature on the author’s initiative; by that time, most academics reproved electronic publishing initiatives. From 1996 and forward, in the consolidation phase, electronic journals were commonly identical to their print counterparts; the acceptance of the electronic format began to increase, and preprint services got underway in several disciplines. The advanced evolutionary phase started with the world discussion on open access to scientific information. The comparison of the current electronic journal with that viewed by enthusiasts in the first years of the 1990s shows that some aspects still remain to be improved in electronic formal and informal communication, towards effective dissemination of scientific information.

  16. Analysis on the Current State of Performance Appraisal for Scientific Workers in Agricultural Sci-entific Institute%农业科研机构科研人员绩效考核现状分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔怡; 武晓亮; 蔚承祥; 苏波; 马刚

    2014-01-01

    绩效考核工作是现代人力资源管理工作中的一项重要内容[1]。文章主要阐述了农业科研机构科研人员绩效考核的现状,分析了现行农业科研人员绩效考核工作中存在的问题,以期为建立科学合理的农业科研人员绩效考核体系提供参考。%Performance appraisal is an important part of human resource management. In order to provide reference to build a more scientific performance appraisal system of agricultural scientific workers, in this article, we elaborated the state, and analyzed the problems of the current performance appraisal of agricul-tural scientific workers.

  17. From the False Prophet Perc eption to the Negative Prophet I mage: A Critical Approach on Using Of Scientific Informations For Understanding And Interpreting The Hadiths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman ORUÇHAN

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Quran exemplifies the Prophet Moham mad for all Muslims. Therefore, his words and behaviors has a great importance in the eyes of Muslims. These are must be understood and explicated correctly. Correct understanding and explication of Hadiths are largely depends on correct understanding of h is personality and his historical mission. A methodology to understanding and explication the hadith, if used correctly, it is possible to reach accurate conclusions. Otherwise, the bad and the wrong conclusions w e re reached. One of them is to create a neg ative image about the Prophet. In this paper, misperceives that was done during the use of scientific data in explication and understanding the Hadith and that it caused the nega tive image of the Prophet was examined. During the research, the explic ations on the Hadi ths that science interest w e re considered. These hadiths wer e selected by the sampling method. For the determination of comments on the Hadiths, some of the Hadith commentary books, some internet sites and other books that contains some com menta ries on the Hadiths wer e examined. In the paper, the faulty and incorrect approaches on explication and understanding the Hadith w ere determined, categorized and evoluated. On the reasons of the false prophet perception was focused. The scholiast’s mistak es on explication and understanding the Hadith who was espouse this perception and erroneous mistakes that they made intentionally and the negative image of the Prophet that created with this was displayed. In the final section, the results obtained in the research wer e presented. Also, some proposals for prevention the errors and mistakes about understanding and explication the Hadith usin g scientific informations wer e presented.

  18. Kindergarten students’ levels of understanding some science concepts and scientific inquiry processes according to demographic variables (the sampling of Kilis Province in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nail İlhan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to identify the kindergarten students’ levels of understanding some science concepts (LUSSC and scientific inquiry processes (SIP and compare their LUSSC and SIP in terms of some demographic variables. Also, another purpose of this study is to identify the predictive power of those demographic variables over the kindergarten students’ LUSSC and SIP. This study was conducted according to quantitative research design. The study group consisted of 335 kindergarten students from 20 different rural and urban schools. In the study, the scale for “Turkish Kindergarten Students’ Understandings of Scientific Concepts and Scientific Inquiry Processes” was used. According to some variables (such as mother’s education level and family structure, there was a statistically significant difference between students’ mean scores for LUSSC and between students’ mean scores for SIP. Within the scope of this study, it was found that among the predictor variables (age, family’s income level, and number of brother/sister were significant predictors for LUSSC, and number of brother/sister was a significant predictor for SIP.

  19. How Do You Like Your Science, Wet or Dry? How Two Lab Experiences Influence Student Understanding of Science Concepts and Perceptions of Authentic Scientific Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Maureen; Knuth, Randy; Van Horne, Katie; Shouse, Andrew W.; Levias, Sheldon

    2017-01-01

    This study examines how two kinds of authentic research experiences related to smoking behavior—genotyping human DNA (wet lab) and using a database to test hypotheses about factors that affect smoking behavior (dry lab)—influence students’ perceptions and understanding of scientific research and related science concepts. The study used pre and post surveys and a focus group protocol to compare students who conducted the research experiences in one of two sequences: genotyping before database and database before genotyping. Students rated the genotyping experiment to be more like real science than the database experiment, in spite of the fact that they associated more scientific tasks with the database experience than genotyping. Independent of the order of completing the labs, students showed gains in their understanding of science concepts after completion of the two experiences. There was little change in students’ attitudes toward science pre to post, as measured by the Scientific Attitude Inventory II. However, on the basis of their responses during focus groups, students developed more sophisticated views about the practices and nature of science after they had completed both research experiences, independent of the order in which they experienced them. PMID:28572181

  20. New Understanding of Hubble Space Telescope Gyro Current Increase Led to a Method to Save a Failing Gyro Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A.

    2017-01-01

    Throughout the history of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) program, gyro current increases have been observed to occur, often times leading to gyro failure. The explanation was that debris from the surfaces of the gas bearings, with only 1.27 micron clearance, resulted in rotor restriction, which increased friction, torque, and current. However, the rotor restriction theory never could account for the fact that a restart of the gyro would restore the current back to nominal. An effort was made to understand this puzzling gyro behavior after two HST gyros exhibited increased current within the same week in November 2015. A review board was created to resolve these anomalies and generate operational procedures to potentially extend gyro life. A new understanding of gyro current behavior led to implementation of a method that could potentially save a failing gyro.

  1. Using Memes and Memetic Processes to Explain Social and Conceptual Influences on Student Understanding about Complex Socio-Scientific Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Susan

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated seventh grade learners' decision making about genetic engineering concepts and applications. A social network analyses supported by technology tracked changes in student understanding with a focus on social and conceptual influences. Results indicated that several social and conceptual mechanisms potentially affected how…

  2. Using Memes and Memetic Processes to Explain Social and Conceptual Influences on Student Understanding about Complex Socio-Scientific Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Susan

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated seventh grade learners' decision making about genetic engineering concepts and applications. A social network analyses supported by technology tracked changes in student understanding with a focus on social and conceptual influences. Results indicated that several social and conceptual mechanisms potentially affected how…

  3. Parathyroid Carcinoma: Current Understanding and New Insights into Gene Expression and Intraoperative Parathyroid Hormone Kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelgadir Adam, Mohamed; Untch, Brian R.; Olson, John A.

    2010-01-01

    This review summarizes the current knowledge on parathyroid carcinoma and describes new information on parathyroid carcinoma gene expression and operative management using intraoperative parathyroid hormone monitoring.

  4. Current status of pediatric kidney transplantation in China: data analysis of Chinese Scientific Registry of Kidney Transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Longshan; Zhang Huanxi; Fu Qian; Chen Liping; Sun Chuanhou; Xiong Yunyi; Shi Bingyi

    2014-01-01

    Background Kidney transplantation (KTx) is the primary therapy for children with renal failure.Unlike KTx in adult patients,it is commonly agreed that pediatric KTx in China is far behind that of America.There has been no systematic analysis of Chinese pediatric KTx reported.This study aimed to demonstrate the current status of pediatric KTx in China.Methods Registry data of pediatric KTx (1983-2012) from Chinese Scientific Registry of Kidney Transplantation (CSRKT) were retrospectively analyzed.Results There were 851 pediatric KTx from 102 transplant units.The recipients were (15.4±2.5) years of age,93.9% of who were over 10 years old.Chronic glomerulonephritis and pyelonephritis accounted for 75.6% of recognized primary diseases.Allografts were from deceased donors (72.2%) or living donation (27.7%).The patient survival for 1,3,5,and 10 years was 96.9%,94.2%,92.3%,and 92.3% and the graft survival was 94.6%,91.4%,86.3%,and 79.2%,respectively.The majority of post-transplant complications were acute rejection and infections.Annual transplant reached the peak in 2008 (n=114),and decreased sharply in 2006 (n=41) and 2010 (n=57).The percentage of pediatric KTx in total KTx was highest in 2007 (1.95%) and decreased to trough level in 2010 (1.0%).Living donation increased by 32.5-folds from 2004 to 2008 and then decreased by 86.6% till 2010.The percentage of living donation in pediatric or total KTx dynamically changed in a similar manner,while living donation ratio in pediatric KTx was much higher.Conclusions Kidney transplant can provide long-term benefits to pediatric recipients.Rejection and infections are worthy of concern during follow-up.Pediatric kidney transplant in China is very much lagging behind that in developed countries.Living donation played an important role in its development in the past decades.New strategies for implementation are encouraged to increase the priority of uremic children in organ allocation so as to

  5. Current status of pediatric kidney transplantation in China: data analysis of Chinese Scientific Registry of Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Longshan; Zhang, Huanxi; Fu, Qian; Chen, Liping; Sun, Chuanhou; Xiong, Yunyi; Shi, Bingyi; Wang, Changxi

    2014-01-01

    Kidney transplantation (KTx) is the primary therapy for children with renal failure. Unlike KTx in adult patients, it is commonly agreed that pediatric KTx in China is far behind that of America. There has been no systematic analysis of Chinese pediatric KTx reported. This study aimed to demonstrate the current status of pediatric KTx in China. Registry data of pediatric KTx (1983-2012) from Chinese Scientific Registry of Kidney Transplantation (CSRKT) were retrospectively analyzed. There were 851 pediatric KTx from 102 transplant units. The recipients were (15.4±2.5) years of age, 93.9% of who were over 10 years old. Chronic glomerulonephritis and pyelonephritis accounted for 75.6% of recognized primary diseases. Allografts were from deceased donors (72.2%) or living donation (27.7%). The patient survival for 1, 3, 5, and 10 years was 96.9%, 94.2%, 92.3%, and 92.3% and the graft survival was 94.6%, 91.4%, 86.3%, and 79.2%, respectively. The majority of post-transplant complications were acute rejection and infections. Annual transplant reached the peak in 2008 (n = 114), and decreased sharply in 2006 (n = 41) and 2010 (n = 57). The percentage of pediatric KTx in total KTx was highest in 2007 (1.95%) and decreased to trough level in 2010 (1.0%). Living donation increased by 32.5-folds from 2004 to 2008 and then decreased by 86.6% till 2010. The percentage of living donation in pediatric or total KTx dynamically changed in a similar manner, while living donation ratio in pediatric KTx was much higher. Kidney transplant can provide long-term benefits to pediatric recipients. Rejection and infections are worthy of concern during follow-up. Pediatric kidney transplant in China is very much lagging behind that in developed countries. Living donation played an important role in its development in the past decades. New strategies for implementation are encouraged to increase the priority of uremic children in organ allocation so as to promote its progress in China.

  6. A new symbol-and-GIS based detailed geomorphological mapping system: Renewal of a scientific discipline for understanding landscape development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gustavvson, M.; Kolstrup, E.; Seijmonsbergen, A.C.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract This paper presents a comprehensive and flexible new geomorphological combination legend that expands the possibilities of current geomorphological mapping concepts. The new legend is presented here at scale of 1:10,000 and it combines symbols for hydrography, morphometry/morphography,

  7. [Evaluation of scientific production in different subareas of Public Health: limits of the current model and contributions to the debate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriart, Jorge Alberto Bernstein; Deslandes, Suely Ferreira; Martin, Denise; Camargo Jr, Kenneth Rochel de; Carvalho, Marilia Sá; Coeli, Cláudia Medina

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to discuss the limits of the quantitative evaluation model for scientific production in Public Health. An analysis of the scientific production of professors from the various subareas of Public Health was performed for 2010-2012. Distributions of the mean annual score for professors were compared according to subareas. The study estimated the likelihood that 60% of the professors in the graduate studies programs scored P50 (Very Good) or higher in their area. Professors of Epidemiology showed a significantly higher median annual score. Graduate studies programs whose faculty included at least 60% of Epidemiology professors and fewer than 10% from the subarea Social and Human Sciences in Health were significantly more likely to achieve a "Very Good" classification. The observed inequalities in scientific production between different subareas of Public Health point to the need to rethink their evaluation in order to avoid reproducing iniquities that have harmful consequences for the field's diversity.

  8. Caustic-based approach to understanding bunching dynamics and current spike formation in particle bunches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, T. K.; Paganin, D. M.; Dowd, R. T.

    2016-10-01

    Current modulations, current spikes, and current horns, are observed in a range of accelerator physics applications including strong bunch compression in Free Electron Lasers and linear colliders, trains of microbunching for terahertz radiation, microbunching instability and many others. This paper considers the fundamental mechanism that drives intense current modulations in dispersive regions, beyond the common explanation of nonlinear and higher-order effects. Under certain conditions, neighboring electron trajectories merge to form caustics, and often result in characteristic current spikes. Caustic lines and surfaces are regions of maximum electron density, and are witnessed in accelerator physics as folds in phase space of accelerated bunches. We identify the caustic phenomenon resulting in cusplike current profiles and derive an expression which describes the conditions needed for particle-bunch caustic formation in dispersive regions. The caustic expression not only reveals the conditions necessary for caustics to form but also where in longitudinal space the caustics will form. Particle-tracking simulations are used to verify these findings. We discuss the broader implications of this work including how to utilize the caustic expression for manipulation of the longitudinal phase space to achieve a desired current profile shape.

  9. Current understanding of the molecular basis of chloroquine-resistance in Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang H

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chloroquine (CQ is the most successful antimalarial drug ever discovered. Unfortunately, parasites resistant to the drug eventually emerged after its large scale use and are now widespread. Although great progress in our understanding of the mechanisms of CQ action and CQ resistance (CQR has been achieved over the past two decades, including the identification of the molecules responsible for CQR (e.g., Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistant transporter, PfCRT many questions remain unanswered. Here we highlight recent advances in our understanding of the genetics and molecular mechanisms of CQR, with particular emphasis on the role of genes such as pfcrt and pfmdr1 in the resistance to CQ and other drugs. New drug development and applications will undoubtedly benefit from a better understanding of CQR, eventually leading to more effective malaria control measures.

  10. The current understanding of the treatment chronic non-bacterial prostatitis with inflammatory component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Yu. Vinnik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A literature review is dedicated to one of the most urgent problems of modern andrology – the treatment of chronic non-bacterial prostatitis (CP with inflammatory component. Over the past decades, despite numerous methods of prevention and treatment offered by the Russian and foreign urologists, the incidence of CP has been steadily progressing. Treatment of patients with CP should be comprehensive and be sure to include the effects on all the links in the pathogenesis of the disease. It is different depending on the age of the patient and the presence and nature of CP manifestations, including changes in mental status, especially disease progression, stage and phase inflammatory activity in the prostate, the degree of involvement in the disease process nearby organs, immune status and other factors. The proposed scientific review covers the basic techniques of therapeutic effect on patients with CP. Given in article data allows a more rational approach to the treatment of these patients.

  11. A Systemic View of the Learning and Differentiation of Scientific Concepts: The Case of Electric Current and Voltage Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koponen, Ismo T.; Kokkonen, Tommi

    2014-01-01

    In learning conceptual knowledge in physics, a common problem is the incompleteness of a learning process, where students' personal, often undifferentiated concepts take on more scientific and differentiated form. With regard to such concept learning and differentiation, this study proposes a systemic view in which concepts are considered as…

  12. Current understanding of microplastics in the environment: Occurrence, fate, risks, and what we should do.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jinping; Wang, Jundong; Cai, Liqi

    2017-05-01

    Microplastics pollution has been documented in the global environment, including at sea, in freshwater and in atmospheric fallout. Ingestion of microplastics by multiple kinds of organisms has been reported and has received increasing attention, because microplastics not only act as a source of toxic chemicals but also a sink for toxic chemicals. To better understand the great concerns about microplastics and associated toxic chemicals potential exposed to the organisms ingesting the debris, we should know more about the occurrence, fate, and risks of microplastics in the environment. What we should do depends on this better understanding. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:476-482. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  13. An inquiry-based practical for a large, foundation-level undergraduate laboratory that enhances student understanding of basic cellular concepts and scientific experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugarcic, A; Zimbardi, K; Macaranas, J; Thorn, P

    2012-01-01

    Student-centered education involving research experiences or inquiry have been shown to help undergraduate students understand, and become excited about, the process of scientific investigation. These benefits are particularly important for students in the early stages of their degree (Report and Kenny, http://naplesccsunysbedu/Pres/boyernsf/1998). However, embedding such experiences into the curriculum is particularly difficult when dealing with early stage students, who are in larger cohorts and often lack the background content knowledge necessary to engage with primary research literature and research level methods and equipment. We report here the design, delivery, assessment, and subsequent student learning outcomes of a 4-week practical module for 120 students at the beginning of their second year of university, which successfully engages students in designing cell culture experiments and in understanding the molecular processes and machinery involved in the basic cellular process of macropinocytosis. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The "Current" Commander: Understanding and Effecting Change in Civilian Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-30

    that can help provide a framework for comprehension and understanding. Leading People Peter Northouse , in Leadership Theory and Practice ... Leadership : Theory and Practice (Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc., 2003). 152. 11 Ibid., 148. 12 John P. Kotter, Leading Change (Boston...successful leadership and management within hierarchical military organizations. Their practiced and practical experiences using these techniques have

  15. Current as the Key Concept of Taiwanese Students' Understandings of Electric Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Hsing; Chen, Hsueh-Yu; Chou, Ching-Yang; Lain, Kuen-Der

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the results of a nationwide survey of Taiwanese high schools students' understandings about electric circuits. The study involved two stratified random samples consisting of 7,145 students in Grades 8 and 9, and 2,857 students in Grade 11, accounting for about 2.3% of the total enrolment in the corresponding…

  16. Trying to Get Ahead of the Curve: Raising and Understanding Current Themes in New Literacies Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilber, Dana

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses the following questions: What impact does using the theoretical framework of new literacies have on understanding language, literacy, and learning practices today as technologies are constantly being developed and used? What is the state of research in this area? What are some new directions the field might take in order to…

  17. Haunted by the ghost in the machine. Commentary on "The spirituality of human consciousness: a Catholic evaluation of some current neuro-scientific interpretations".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James B

    2012-09-01

    Metaphysical and epistemological dualism informs much contemporary discussion of the relationships of science and religion, in particular in relation to the neurosciences and the religious understanding of the human person. This dualism is a foundational artifact of modern culture; however, contemporary scientific research and historical theological scholarship encourage a more holistic view wherein human personhood is most fittingly understood as an emergent phenomenon of, but not simply reducible to, evolutionary and developmental neurobiology.

  18. Ten years' venturing in ZnO nanostructures: from discovery to scientific understanding and to technology applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Lin WANG

    2009-01-01

    Zinc oxide is a unique material that exhibits semiconducting,piezoelectric and pyroelectric multiple properties.Nanostructures of ZnO are equally important as carbon nanotubes and silicon nanowires (NWs) for nanotechnology,and have great potential applications in nano-electronics,optoelectronics,sensors,field emission,light emitting diodes,photocatalysis,nanogenerators,and nanopiezotronics.Ever since the discovery of nanobelts (NBs) in 2001 by my group,a world wide research in ZnO has been kicked off.This review introduces my group's experience in venturing the discovery,understanding and applications of ZnO NWs and NBs.The aim is to introduce the progress made in my research in the last 10 years in accompany to the huge social advances and economic development taking place in China in the last 10 years.

  19. Reply to "Critical assessment of the current state of scientific knowledge, terminology, and research needs concerning the ecological effects of elevated atmospheric nitrogen deposition in China"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Fengxue; Zhang, Yuandong; Huang, Mei; Tao, Bo; Yan, Huimin; Guo, Rui; Li, Jie

    2017-03-01

    In their assessment, Pan et al. (2016) criticize that our estimation of 2.32 g N m-2 yr-1 in 2010 underestimates the total nitrogen (N) deposition amounts by a factor around two by comparing with the estimation of Xu et al. (2015). Our paper entitled "Nitrogen deposition and its effect on carbon storage in Chinese forests during 1981-2010" aims to evaluate the influence of elevated N deposition in China on carbon storage in forest ecosystems by using a process-based model. As limited by observed N deposition dataset availability, we developed a simple algorithm to evaluate the temporal and spatial variations in N deposition based on the relationships among N deposition, precipitation, N fertilizer use, and fuel consumption with reference to the method of Lin et al. (2000). Our results show that the rate of N deposition increased by 0.058 g N m-2 yr-1 between 1981 and 2010. The N deposition rate in 2010 was 2.32 g N m-2 yr-1, and it showed a large spatial variation from 0 to 0.25 g N m-2 yr-1 on the northwestern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau to over 4.5 g N m-2 yr-1 in the southeastern China. We really underestimated the total N deposition in China because we were lack of dry deposition observation dataset in our research. However, we think Pan et al. (2016) overestimated the difference between our estimation and that in Xu et al. (2015). It should be encouraged to discuss the past and current status of N deposition in China based on both observation and simulation. All comments, assessments and suggestions contribute to promote the scientific understanding of N deposition and its influence on ecosystems.

  20. Air pollution toxicology--a brief review of the role of the science in shaping the current understanding of air pollution health risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanek, Lindsay Wichers; Brown, James S; Stanek, John; Gift, Jeff; Costa, Daniel L

    2011-03-01

    Human and animal toxicology has had a profound impact on our historical and current understanding of air pollution health effects. Early animal toxicological studies of air pollution had distinctively military or workplace themes. With the discovery that ambient air pollution episodes led to excess illness and death, there became an emergence of toxicological studies that focused on industrial air pollution encountered by the general public. Not only did the pollutants investigated evolve from ambient mixtures to individual pollutants but also the endpoints and outcomes evaluated became more sophisticated, resulting in our present state of the science. Currently, a large toxicological database exists for the effects of particulate matter and ozone, and we provide a focused review of some of the major contributions to the biological understanding for these two "criteria" air pollutants. A limited discussion of the toxicological advancements in the scientific knowledge of two hazardous air pollutants, formaldehyde and phosgene, is also included. Moving forward, the future challenge of air pollution toxicology lies in the health assessment of complex mixtures and their interactions, given the projected impacts of climate change and altered emissions on ambient conditions. In the coming years, the toxicologist will need to be flexible and forward thinking in order to dissect the complexity of the biological system itself, as well as that of air pollution in all its varied forms.

  1. Greek Primary School Teachers' Understanding of Current Environmental Issues: An Exploration of Their Environmental Knowledge and Images of Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michail, Sirmo; Stamou, Anastasia G.; Stamou, George P.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the Greek primary school teachers' understanding of three current environmental issues (acid rain, the ozone layer depletion, and the greenhouse effect) as well as the emerging images of nature were examined. The study revealed that teachers held several environmental knowledge gaps and misconceptions about the three phenomena.…

  2. Greek Primary School Teachers' Understanding of Current Environmental Issues: An Exploration of Their Environmental Knowledge and Images of Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michail, Sirmo; Stamou, Anastasia G.; Stamou, George P.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the Greek primary school teachers' understanding of three current environmental issues (acid rain, the ozone layer depletion, and the greenhouse effect) as well as the emerging images of nature were examined. The study revealed that teachers held several environmental knowledge gaps and misconceptions about the three phenomena.…

  3. Multiculturalism in current tourism: Can tourism and travelling help to improve tolerance and understanding?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefová Alena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on one of the most important issues of the beginning of the 21st century, which is unprecedented move of people. This political, sociological, geographical and psycho-linguistics phenomenon needs qualitatively new approaches in meeting races, cultures, religions, customs and habits. What are the possibilities of cohabitation of people in these new political, cultural and economic conditions? The way can be intercultural exchange characterised by mutual respect and the will to understand otherness and other values.

  4. Human factors implications of vehicle automation: Current understanding and future directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merat, N.; de Waard, Dick

    2014-01-01

    Advances in vehicle-based technology are currently progressing at an ever- increasing rate and innovations in this area are no longer restricted to Original Equipment Manufacturers or the automotive industry, with service providers such as Google and a number of research institutes in Europe and Nor

  5. Understanding the catalyst-free transformation of amorphous carbon into graphene by current-induced annealing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barreiro, A.; Börrnert, F.; Avdoshenko, S.M.; Rellinghaus, B.; Cunibert, G.; Rümmeli, M.H.; Vandersypen, L.M.K.

    2013-01-01

    We shed light on the catalyst-free growth of graphene from amorphous carbon (a–C) by current induced annealing by witnessing the mechanism both with in-situ transmission electron microscopy and with molecular dynamics simulations. Both in experiment and in simulation, we observe that small a–C clust

  6. Specification of laboratory animal use in scientific articles: current low detail in the journals' instructions for authors and some proposals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, V

    2005-09-01

    The scientific article communicates results of research to other investigators; therefore, it must contain a complete description of the experiment to help other researchers when designing their future investigations. However, poorly detailed data on laboratory animal use is given in published articles. Despite the well-known and important contribution of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) to standardize scientific writing and submission of manuscripts to biomedical journals, no specific instructions on the reporting of animal use are given in the ICMJE Uniform Requirements and, therefore, most journals do not detail this to the authors. Individual efforts from groups like the Working Committee for the Biological Characterizations of Laboratory Animals, the Boyd Group, or the Committee on Publication Ethics are commendable. These contributions should be incorporated into the ICMJE Uniform Requirements and, later, into the Instructions for Authors of peer-reviewed journals. This would be the only efficient way to instruct authors on how to report laboratory animal use in their submitted manuscripts. The present article relates some proposals for helping authors when reporting animal use in scientific articles. These proposals are not only based on previous guidelines for animal specifications, but also on Instructions for Authors from journals specialized in Laboratory Animal Science. These proposals are classified into major and minor issues, and they are located in the corresponding parts of the article, as defined by the Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion (IMRAD) method. (c) 2005 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

  7. Current Status and Future Prospects of Clinical Psychology: Toward a Scientifically Principled Approach to Mental and Behavioral Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Timothy B; McFall, Richard M; Shoham, Varda

    2008-11-01

    The escalating costs of health care and other recent trends have made health care decisions of great societal import, with decision-making responsibility often being transferred from practitioners to health economists, health plans, and insurers. Health care decision making increasingly is guided by evidence that a treatment is efficacious, effective-disseminable, cost-effective, and scientifically plausible. Under these conditions of heightened cost concerns and institutional-economic decision making, psychologists are losing the opportunity to play a leadership role in mental and behavioral health care: Other types of practitioners are providing an increasing proportion of delivered treatment, and the use of psychiatric medication has increased dramatically relative to the provision of psychological interventions. Research has shown that numerous psychological interventions are efficacious, effective, and cost-effective. However, these interventions are used infrequently with patients who would benefit from them, in part because clinical psychologists have not made a convincing case for the use of these interventions (e.g., by supplying the data that decision makers need to support implementation of such interventions) and because clinical psychologists do not themselves use these interventions even when given the opportunity to do so. Clinical psychologists' failure to achieve a more significant impact on clinical and public health may be traced to their deep ambivalence about the role of science and their lack of adequate science training, which leads them to value personal clinical experience over research evidence, use assessment practices that have dubious psychometric support, and not use the interventions for which there is the strongest evidence of efficacy. Clinical psychology resembles medicine at a point in its history when practitioners were operating in a largely prescientific manner. Prior to the scientific reform of medicine in the early 1900s

  8. Gold deposits in metamorphic belts: Overview of current understanding, outstanding problems, future research, and exploration significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, D.I.; Goldfarb, R.J.; Robert, F.; Hart, C.J.R.

    2003-01-01

    Metamorphic belts are complex regions where accretion or collision has added to, or thickened, continental crust. Gold-rich deposits can be formed at all stages of orogen evolution, so that evolving metamorphic belts contain diverse gold deposit types that may be juxtaposed or overprint each other. This partly explains the high level of controversy on the origin of some deposit types, particularly those formed or overprinted/remobilized during the major compressional orogeny that shaped the final geometry of the hosting metamorphic belts. These include gold-dominated orogenic and intrusion-related deposits, but also particularly controversial gold deposits with atypical metal associations. There are a number of outstanding problems for all types of gold deposits in metamorphc belts. These include the following: (1) definitive classifications, (2) unequivocal recognition of fluid and metal sources, (3) understanding of fluid migration and focusing at all scales, (4) resolution of the precise role of granitoid magmatism, (5) precise gold-depositional mechanisms, particularly those producing high gold grades, and (6) understanding of the release of CO2-rich fluids from subducting slabs and subcreted oceanic crust and granitoid magmas at different crustal levels. Research needs to be better coordinated and more integrated, such that detailed fluid-inclusion, trace-element, and isotopic studies of both gold deposits and potential source rocks, using cutting-edge technology, are embedded in a firm geological framework at terrane to deposit scales. Ultimately, four-dimensional models need to be developed, involving high-quality, three-dimensional geological data combined with integrated chemical and fluid-flow modeling, to understand the total history of the hydrothermal systems involved. Such research, particularly that which can predict superior targets visible in data sets available to exploration companies before discovery, has obvious spin-offs for global- to deposit

  9. Current Understanding on Aflatoxin Biosynthesis and Future Perspective in Reducing Aflatoxin Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiujiang

    2012-01-01

    Traditional molecular techniques have been used in research in discovering the genes and enzymes that are involved in aflatoxin formation and genetic regulation. We cloned most, if not all, of the aflatoxin pathway genes. A consensus gene cluster for aflatoxin biosynthesis was discovered in 2005. The factors that affect aflatoxin formation have been studied. In this report, the author summarized the current status of research progress and future possibilities that may be used for solving aflatoxin contamination. PMID:23202305

  10. Current Understanding on Aflatoxin Biosynthesis and Future Perspective in Reducing Aflatoxin Contamination

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Traditional molecular techniques have been used in research in discovering the genes and enzymes that are involved in aflatoxin formation and genetic regulation. We cloned most, if not all, of the aflatoxin pathway genes. A consensus gene cluster for aflatoxin biosynthesis was discovered in 2005. The factors that affect aflatoxin formation have been studied. In this report, the author summarized the current status of research progress and future possibilities that may be used for solving afla...

  11. Caring for Machado-Joseph Disease: current understanding and how to help patients

    OpenAIRE

    D’Abreu, Anelyssa; França, Marcondes C.; Paulson, Henry L.; Lopes-Cendes,Iscia

    2009-01-01

    Machado-Joseph disease or spinocerebellar ataxia 3 (MJD/SCA3) is a clinically heterogeneous, neurodegenerative disorder characterized by varying degrees of ataxia, ophthalmoplegia, peripheral neuropathy, pyramidal dysfunction and movement disorder. MJD/SCA3 is caused by a CAG repeat expansion mutation in the protein coding region of the ATXN3 gene located at chromosome 14q32.1. Current hypotheses regarding pathogenesis favor the view that mutated ataxin-3, with its polyglutamine expansion, is...

  12. Current understandings and perspectives on non-cancer health effects of benzene: A global concern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahadar, Haji [International Campus, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center and Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mostafalou, Sara [Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center and Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollahi, Mohammad, E-mail: Mohammad.Abdollahi@UToronto.Ca [Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center and Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Objective: Benzene, as a volatile organic compound, is known as one of the main air pollutants in the environment. The aim of this review is to summarize all available evidences on non-cancerous health effects of benzene providing an overview of possible association of exposure to benzene with human chronic diseases, specially, in those regions of the world where benzene concentration is being poorly monitored. Methodology: A bibliographic search of scientific databases including PubMed, Google Scholar, and Scirus was conducted with key words of “benzene toxic health effects”, “environmental volatile organic compounds”, “diabetes mellitus and environmental pollutants”, “breast cancer and environmental pollution”, “prevalence of lung cancer”, and “diabetes prevalence”. More than 300 peer reviewed papers were examined. Experimental and epidemiologic studies reporting health effects of benzene and volatile organic compounds were included in the study. Results: Epidemiologic and experimental studies suggest that benzene exposure can lead to numerous non-cancerous health effects associated with functional aberration of vital systems in the body like reproductive, immune, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, and respiratory. Conclusion: Chronic diseases have become a health burden of global dimension with special emphasis in regions with poor monitoring over contents of benzene in petrochemicals. Benzene is a well known carcinogen of blood and its components, but the concern of benzene exposure is more than carcinogenicity of blood components and should be evaluated in both epidemiologic and experimental studies. Aspect of interactions and mechanism of toxicity in relation to human general health problems especially endocrine disturbances with particular reference to diabetes, breast and lung cancers should be followed up. - Highlights: • Benzene is a volatile organic compound and established blood carcinogen. • Exposure to benzene needs to be

  13. Current Understanding of Molecular Pathology and Treatment of Cardiomyopathy in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirsa L. E. van Westering

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a genetic muscle disorder caused by mutations in the Dmd gene resulting in the loss of the protein dystrophin. Patients do not only experience skeletal muscle degeneration, but also develop severe cardiomyopathy by their second decade, one of the main causes of death. The absence of dystrophin in the heart renders cardiomyocytes more sensitive to stretch-induced damage. Moreover, it pathologically alters intracellular calcium (Ca2+ concentration, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS localization and mitochondrial function and leads to inflammation and necrosis, all contributing to the development of cardiomyopathy. Current therapies only treat symptoms and therefore the need for targeting the genetic defect is immense. Several preclinical therapies are undergoing development, including utrophin up-regulation, stop codon read-through therapy, viral gene therapy, cell-based therapy and exon skipping. Some of these therapies are undergoing clinical trials, but these have predominantly focused on skeletal muscle correction. However, improving skeletal muscle function without addressing cardiac aspects of the disease may aggravate cardiomyopathy and therefore it is essential that preclinical and clinical focus include improving heart function. This review consolidates what is known regarding molecular pathology of the DMD heart, specifically focusing on intracellular Ca2+, nNOS and mitochondrial dysregulation. It briefly discusses the current treatment options and then elaborates on the preclinical therapeutic approaches currently under development to restore dystrophin thereby improving pathology, with a focus on the heart.

  14. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: an update on the current understanding [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Addington

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy is a common side effect of selected chemotherapeutic agents. Previous work has suggested that patients often under report the symptoms of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and physicians fail to recognize the presence of such symptoms in a timely fashion. The precise pathophysiology that underlies chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, in both the acute and the chronic phase, remains complex and appears to be medication specific. Recent work has begun to demonstrate and further clarify potential pathophysiological processes that predispose and, ultimately, lead to the development of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. There is increasing evidence that the pathway to neuropathy varies with each agent. With a clearer understanding of how these agents affect the peripheral nervous system, more targeted treatments can be developed in order to optimize treatment and prevent long-term side effects.

  15. Current understanding of the neurobiology and longitudinal course of geriatric depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisenbach, Sara L; Kumar, Anand

    2014-09-01

    Late life depression is a complex disease associated with a number of contributing neurobiological factors, including cerebrovascular disease, neurodegeneration, and inflammation, which also contribute to its longitudinal prognosis and course. These factors create a context in which the brain is more vulnerable to the impact of stress, and thus, to depression. At the same time, some individuals are protected from late life depression and its consequences, even in the face of neurobiological vulnerability, through benefitting from one or more attributes associated with resilience, including social support, engagement in physical and cognitive activities, and brain reserve. Enhanced understanding of how neurobiological and environmental factors interact in predicting vulnerability and resilience is needed to predict onset and course of depression in late life and develop more effective interventions.

  16. Field—Scale Contaminant Transport Through Soils: Current Understanding and Open Questions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGJIABAO; K.ROTH

    1999-01-01

    Agro-chemical transport processes at different scales are discussed and relevant opening question are identified by literature review to make some suggestions concerning the improvement of research methods for filed scale solute transport by aid of evaluation of existing models,and examining transport behaviors of solute in vadose zones on different scales.The results indicate that present research progess and understanding on field scale solute transport have not yet been enough to guarantee the use of our models for the management of field soulte movement.Much more research work needs to be done,particularly,in aspects of high resolution of spatial structures relevant to the hydraulic and transport properties,explicit numerical simulation of actual structure on field scale and field measurement corroborated with model development.

  17. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: an update on the current understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addington, James; Freimer, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy is a common side effect of selected chemotherapeutic agents. Previous work has suggested that patients often under report the symptoms of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and physicians fail to recognize the presence of such symptoms in a timely fashion. The precise pathophysiology that underlies chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, in both the acute and the chronic phase, remains complex and appears to be medication specific. Recent work has begun to demonstrate and further clarify potential pathophysiological processes that predispose and, ultimately, lead to the development of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. There is increasing evidence that the pathway to neuropathy varies with each agent. With a clearer understanding of how these agents affect the peripheral nervous system, more targeted treatments can be developed in order to optimize treatment and prevent long-term side effects.

  18. Therapeutic Mechanisms of Lithium in Bipolar Disorder: Recent Advances and Current Understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhi, Gin S; Outhred, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Lithium is the most effective and well established treatment for bipolar disorder, and it has a broad array of effects within cellular pathways. However, the specific processes through which therapeutic effects occur and are maintained in bipolar disorder remain unclear. This paper provides a timely update to an authoritative review of pertinent findings that was published in CNS Drugs in 2013. A literature search was conducted using the Scopus database, and was limited by year (from 2012). There has been a resurgence of interest in lithium therapy mechanisms, perhaps driven by technical advancements in recent years that permit the examination of cellular mechanisms underpinning the effects of lithium-along with the reuptake of lithium in clinical practice. Recent research has further cemented glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) inhibition as a key mechanism, and the inter-associations between GSK3β-mediated neuroprotective, anti-oxidative and neurotransmission mechanisms have been further elucidated. In addition to highly illustrative cellular research, studies examining higher-order biological systems, such as circadian rhythms, as well as employing innovative animal and human models, have increased our understanding of how lithium-induced changes at the cellular level possibly translate to changes at behavioural and clinical levels. Neural circuitry research is yet to identify clear mechanisms of change in bipolar disorder in response to treatment with lithium, but important structural findings have demonstrated links to the modulation of cellular mechanisms, and peripheral marker and pharmacogenetic studies are showing promising findings that will likely inform the exploration for predictors of lithium treatment response. With a deeper understanding of lithium's therapeutic mechanisms-from the cellular to clinical levels of investigation-comes the opportunity to develop predictive models of lithium treatment response and identify novel drug targets, and

  19. Current understanding of TRPM7 pharmacology and drug development for stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christine You Jin BAE; Hong-shuo SUN

    2013-01-01

    The initial excitement and counties efforts to find a pharmacological agent that disrupts the excitotoxic pathway of ischemic neuronal death have only led to disappointing clinical trials.Currently,a thrombolytic agent called recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) is the only pharmacological treatment available for patients with acute ischemic stroke in most countries.Even though its efficacy has been confirmed repeatedly,rt-PA is considerably underused due to reasons including a short therapeutic window and repeated complications associated with its use.A search for alternative mechanisms that may operate dependently or independently with the well-established excitotoxic mechanism has led researchers to the discovery of newly described non-glutamate mechanisms.Among the latter,transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) is one of the important nonglutamate mechanisms in stroke,which has been evaluated in both in-vitro and in-vivo.In this review,we will discuss the current state of pharmacological treatments of ischemic stroke and provide evidence that TRPM7 is a promising therapeutic target of stroke.

  20. Understanding the current status and exploring the potential for distance education in public health in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kavya; George, Sunil; Zodpey, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    Continuing education of health care providers plays an important role in producing a health work force that is efficient and effective. In India public health education has primarily relied on conventional methods of training. However, such methods have limitations in equipping the health workforce of a vast and varied country like India. This paper analyzes the current status of distance education in public health and lists the various courses that are presently available in India through the distance education mode. Presently 25 institutions in India are offering 69 courses in various domains of public health through distance education. The providers of these programs comprised both government and private educational institutions. This paper also points out the role and importance of various stakeholders in the design and delivery of distance education programs in public health and raises key areas that need attention in the governance of such programs. It urges the use of digital technology in the delivery of distance education programs and points out how distance education that is designed and delivered using the latest technology could address the current gap in training human resources for health in India.

  1. New Understanding of Hubble Space Telescope Gyro Current Increase Led to a Method to Save a Failing Gyro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A.

    2017-01-01

    Throughout the history of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) program, gyro current increases have been observed to occur, oftentimes leading to gyro failure. The explanation was that debris from the surfaces of the gas bearings, with only 50 millionths on an inch clearance, resulted in rotor restriction, which increased friction, torque, and current. However, the rotor restriction theory never could account for the fact that a restart of the gyro would restore the current back to nominal. An effort was made to understand this puzzling gyro behavior after two HST gyros exhibited increased current within the same week in November 2015. A review board was created to resolve these anomalies and generate operational procedures to potentially extend gyro life.

  2. Current state of musculoskeletal ultrasound training and implementation in Europe: results of a survey of experts and scientific societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naredo, Esperanza; D'Agostino, Maria A; Conaghan, Philip G

    2010-01-01

    To document the current state of musculoskeletal US (MSUS) training and extent of implementation among rheumatologists in the member countries of EULAR.......To document the current state of musculoskeletal US (MSUS) training and extent of implementation among rheumatologists in the member countries of EULAR....

  3. The Hyaluronic Acid Fillers: Current Understanding of the Tissue Device Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Jacqueline J; Sidle, Douglas M

    2015-11-01

    The article is a detailed update regarding cosmetic injectable fillers, specifically focusing on hyaluronic acid fillers. Hyaluronic acid-injectable fillers are used extensively for soft tissue volumizing and contouring. Many different hyaluronic acid-injectable fillers are available on the market and differ in terms of hyaluronic acid concentration, particle size, cross-linking density, requisite needle size, duration, stiffness, hydration, presence of lidocaine, type of cross-linking technology, and cost. Hyaluronic acid is a natural component of many soft tissues, is identical across species minimizing immunogenicity has been linked to wound healing and skin regeneration, and is currently actively being studied for tissue engineering purposes. The biomechanical and biochemical effects of HA on the local microenvironment of the injected site are key to its success as a soft tissue filler. Knowledge of the tissue-device interface will help guide the facial practitioner and lead to optimal outcomes for patients.

  4. Current understanding of the driving mechanisms for spatiotemporal variations of atmospheric speciated mercury: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Huiting; Cheng, Irene; Zhang, Leiming

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric mercury (Hg) is a global pollutant and thought to be the main source of mercury in oceanic and remote terrestrial systems, where it becomes methylated and bioavailable; hence, atmospheric mercury pollution has global consequences for both human and ecosystem health. Understanding of spatial and temporal variations of atmospheric speciated mercury can advance our knowledge of mercury cycling in various environments. This review summarized spatiotemporal variations of total gaseous mercury or gaseous elemental mercury (TGM/GEM), gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM), and particulate-bound mercury (PBM) in various environments including oceans, continents, high elevation, the free troposphere, and low to high latitudes. In the marine boundary layer (MBL), the oxidation of GEM was generally thought to drive the diurnal and seasonal variations of TGM/GEM and GOM in most oceanic regions, leading to lower GEM and higher GOM from noon to afternoon and higher GEM during winter and higher GOM during spring-summer. At continental sites, the driving mechanisms of TGM/GEM diurnal patterns included surface and local emissions, boundary layer dynamics, GEM oxidation, and for high-elevation sites mountain-valley winds, while oxidation of GEM and entrainment of free tropospheric air appeared to control the diurnal patterns of GOM. No pronounced diurnal variation was found for Tekran measured PBM at MBL and continental sites. Seasonal variations in TGM/GEM at continental sites were attributed to increased winter combustion and summertime surface emissions, and monsoons in Asia, while those in GOM were controlled by GEM oxidation, free tropospheric transport, anthropogenic emissions, and wet deposition. Increased PBM at continental sites during winter was primarily due to local/regional coal and wood combustion emissions. Long-term TGM measurements from the MBL and continental sites indicated an overall declining trend. Limited measurements suggested TGM/GEM increasing from the

  5. Intra-household allocation of food and health care: current findings and understandings--introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, E

    1997-06-01

    This work offers an anthropological analysis of intra-household processes underlying gender- and age-specific differences in individual nutritional and health care allocations and outcomes in particular cultures. Based on recent ethnographic studies in India, Nepal, Madagascar, Mexico, and Peru, correspondences are analyzed between local cultural ("emic") and scientist-policy maker practitioner ("etic") understandings of nutrition, health, and human development, and the relative "values" of females, males, and children of different ages. The data and analyses clarify specific epidemiological and demographic findings on age and gender bias in nutrition and health and highlight the multiple cultural, economic, and biological factors that contribute to gender- or age-based discrimination or neglect. Recent advances in nutrition policy have argued for a broader concept of nutritional security, one that incorporates both food quantity and quality, and of nutrition as "food, health and care" (International Conference on Nutrition, World Declaration and Plan of Action for Nutrition, FAO/WHO, Rome, 1992). These ethnographic findings; lend strong support for such broader nutrition concepts and associated nutrition policies. The studies also suggest ways in which anthropological questions, methods, and data and community-based research can help predict or identify the nutritionally vulnerable within households and help other social and medical scientists design more effective interventions.

  6. Actuarial senescence in a long-lived orchid challenges our current understanding of ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgren, Johan Petter; Colchero, Fernando; Jones, Owen R; Øien, Dag-Inge; Moen, Asbjørn; Sletvold, Nina

    2016-11-16

    The dominant evolutionary theory of actuarial senescence-an increase in death rate with advancing age-is based on the concept of a germ cell line that is separated from the somatic cells early in life. However, such a separation is not clear in all organisms. This has been suggested to explain the paucity of evidence for actuarial senescence in plants. We used a 32 year study of Dactylorhiza lapponica that replaces its organs each growing season, to test whether individuals of this tuberous orchid senesce. We performed a Bayesian survival trajectory analysis accounting for reproductive investment, for individuals under two types of land use, in two climatic regions. The mortality trajectory was best approximated by a Weibull model, showing clear actuarial senescence. Rates of senescence in this model declined with advancing age, but were slightly higher in mown plots and in the more benign climatic region. At older ages, senescence was evident only when accounting for a positive effect of reproductive investment on mortality. Our results demonstrate actuarial senescence as well as a survival-reproduction trade-off in plants, and indicate that environmental context may influence senescence rates. This knowledge is crucial for understanding the evolution of demographic senescence and for models of plant population dynamics.

  7. Changing currents: a strategy for understanding and predicting the changing ocean circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryden, Harry L; Robinson, Carol; Griffiths, Gwyn

    2012-12-13

    Within the context of UK marine science, we project a strategy for ocean circulation research over the next 20 years. We recommend a focus on three types of research: (i) sustained observations of the varying and evolving ocean circulation, (ii) careful analysis and interpretation of the observed climate changes for comparison with climate model projections, and (iii) the design and execution of focused field experiments to understand ocean processes that are not resolved in coupled climate models so as to be able to embed these processes realistically in the models. Within UK-sustained observations, we emphasize smart, cost-effective design of the observational network to extract maximum information from limited field resources. We encourage the incorporation of new sensors and new energy sources within the operational environment of UK-sustained observational programmes to bridge the gap that normally separates laboratory prototype from operational instrument. For interpreting the climate-change records obtained through a variety of national and international sustained observational programmes, creative and dedicated UK scientists should lead efforts to extract the meaningful signals and patterns of climate change and to interpret them so as to project future changes. For the process studies, individual scientists will need to work together in team environments to combine observational and process modelling results into effective improvements in the coupled climate models that will lead to more accurate climate predictions.

  8. Understanding the Neuro-ophthalmology of Head Trauma: A Review of the Current Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samra, Khawla Abu

    2014-01-01

    Head trauma is a major medical, social, economic, national, and public health priority issue in the United States. In severe head trauma, the overwhelming clinical manifestations are so compelling that damage to the visual system is most likely to be ignored. Both the afferent and efferent visual systems are susceptible to injury after head trauma, and physicians should be aware of the visual system and perform a thorough neuro-ophthalmic evaluation in patients presenting with head trauma.Most of the data available on neuro-ophthalmic complications of head trauma including cortical blindness, Horner's syndrome, traumatic internuclear ophthalmoplegia, and ocular motor palsy, comes from case reports highlighting the need for future studies to better understand these complications.This review summarizes some of the most important neuro-ophthalmic complications of head trauma including cortical blindness, Horner's syndrome, traumatic internuclear ophthalmoplegia, and ocular motor palsy. Search of the peer-reviewed literature was conducted using MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Library, Global Health, and MD Consult.

  9. Current understanding of dystrophin-related muscular dystrophy and therapeutic challenges ahead

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Guang-qian; XIE Hui-qi; ZHANG Su-zhen; YANG Zhi-ming

    2006-01-01

    Objective To review the recent research progress in dystrophin-related muscular dystrophy includes X-linked hereditary Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD).Data sources Information included in this article was identified by searches of PUBMED and other online resources using the key terms DMD, dystrophin, mutations, animal models, pathophysiology, gene expression, stem cells, gene therapy, cell therapy, and pharmacological.Study selection Mainly original milestone articles and timely reviews written by major pioneer investigators of the field were selected.Results The key issues related to the genetic basis and pathophysiological factors of the diseases were critically addressed. The availabilities and advantages of various animal models for the diseases were described. Major molecular and cellular therapeutic approaches were also discussed, many of which have indeed exhibited some success in pre-clinical studies but at the same time encountered a number of technical hurdles, including the efficient and systemic delivery of a functional gene and myogenic precursor/stem cells to repair genetic defects.Conclusions Further understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms at molecular levels and regenerative properites of myogenic precursor/stem cells will promote the development of multiple therapeutic strategies. The combined use of multiple strategies may represent the major challenge as well as the greatest hope for the therapy of these diseases in coming years.

  10. Mini-review: Current Understanding of the Correlation of Lignin Structure with Biomass Recalcitrance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mi; Pu, Yunqiao; Ragauskas, Arthur

    2016-11-01

    Lignin, a complex aromatic polymer in terrestrial plants, contributes significantly to biomass recalcitrance to microbial and/or enzymatic deconstruction. To reduce biomass recalcitrance, substantial endeavors have been exerted on pretreatment and lignin engineering in the past few decades. Lignin removal and/or alteration of lignin structure have been shown to result in reduced biomass recalcitrance with improved cell wall digestibility. While high lignin content is usually a barrier to a cost-efficient application of bioresource to biofuels, the direct correlation of lignin structure and its concomitant properties with biomass remains unclear due to the complexity of cell wall and lignin structure. Advancement in application of biorefinery to production of biofuels, chemicals, and biomaterials necessitates a fundamental understanding of the relationship of lignin structure and biomass recalcitrance. In this mini-review, we focus on recent investigations on the influence of lignin chemical properties on bioprocessability— pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass. Specifically, lignin-enzyme interaction and the effects of lignin compositional units, hydroxycinnamates, and lignin functional groups on biomass recalcitrance have been highlighted, which will be useful not only in addressing biomass recalcitrance but also in deploying renewable lignocelluloses efficiently.

  11. Current Understanding of the Role of Complement in IgA Nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, Nicolas; Wyatt, Robert J.; Julian, Bruce A.; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Gharavi, Ali; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique

    2015-01-01

    Complement activation has a role in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy, an autoimmune disease mediated by pathogenic immune complexes consisting of galactose-deficient IgA1 bound by antiglycan antibodies. Of three complement-activation pathways, the alternative and lectin pathways are involved in IgA nephropathy. IgA1 can activate both pathways in vitro, and pathway components are present in the mesangial immunodeposits, including properdin and factor H in the alternative pathway and mannan-binding lectin, mannan–binding lectin–associated serine proteases 1 and 2, and C4d in the lectin pathway. Genome–wide association studies identified deletion of complement factor H–related genes 1 and 3 as protective against the disease. Because the corresponding gene products compete with factor H in the regulation of the alternative pathway, it has been hypothesized that the absence of these genes could lead to more potent inhibition of complement by factor H. Complement activation can take place directly on IgA1–containing immune complexes in circulation and/or after their deposition in the mesangium. Notably, complement factors and their fragments may serve as biomarkers of IgA nephropathy in serum, urine, or renal tissue. A better understanding of the role of complement in IgA nephropathy may provide potential targets and rationale for development of complement-targeting therapy of the disease. PMID:25694468

  12. Capsaicin: Current Understanding of Its Mechanisms and Therapy of Pain and Other Pre-Clinical and Clinical Uses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Fattori

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we discuss the importance of capsaicin to the current understanding of neuronal modulation of pain and explore the mechanisms of capsaicin-induced pain. We will focus on the analgesic effects of capsaicin and its clinical applicability in treating pain. Furthermore, we will draw attention to the rationale for other clinical therapeutic uses and implications of capsaicin in diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular conditions, cancer, airway diseases, itch, gastric, and urological disorders.

  13. The Solar Wind: Our Current Understanding and How We Got Here

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Joseph V. Hollweg

    2008-03-01

    In the original theory for the solar wind, the electron pressure gradient was the principal accelerating force. This was soon recognized to be insufficient to drive the high-speed streams. Subsequently, the discovery of Alfvén waves in the solar wind led to a long series of models in which wave pressure provided additional acceleration, but these wave-driven models ultimately failed to explain the rapid acceleration of the fast wind close to the Sun. An alternate viewwas that the pressure of hot protons close to the Sun could explain the rapid acceleration, with the proton heating coming from the cyclotron resonance. SOHO has provided remarkable data which have verified some of the predictions of this view, and given impetus to ongoing studies of the ion-cyclotron resonance in the fast wind. After a historical review, we discuss the basic ideas behind current research, emphasizing the importance of particle kinetics. We conclude with some guesses as to how work might proceed in the future.

  14. Studying the start of the Maunder Minimum to understand the current situation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhäuser, Ralph; Neuhäuser, Dagmar L.

    2016-04-01

    To investigate whether we now enter a Maunder-like grand minimum, we have to compare the current situation with the time around the start of the Maunder minimum. Sunspot observations in the 1610s are of particular importance and relevance, because they are shortly before the start of the Maunder Grand Minimum. While the Maunder Minimum it is usually dated from 1645 to 1715, Vaquero & Trigo (2015) argue that what they call the "Extended Maunder Minimum" would have started in 1618 during or around a Schwabe cycle minimum around that time. We have therefore studied the sunspot record of that time in detail. Hoyt & Schatten (1998) compiled for all known telescopic observers a list of their observations; recent solar activity studies for the past four centuries are based on their compilation. In addition to 12 observers listed by Hoyt & Schatten (1998) for the 1610s, we list six more observers with datable spot observations. Furthermore, while Hoyt & Schatten (1998) argue that Simon Marius would have observed from mid 1617 to the end of 1618 almost every day, but would have never seen a spot, we can show with the original reports by Marius that he observed from Aug 1611 to spring 1619 with a lot of sunspot detections. Similar, while Hoyt & Schatten (1998) argue that Giovanni Riccioli would have observed on almost every day in 1618, but would have never seen a spot, he did not report any own observations at all that year, but quoted Argoli for that there were no spots during the periods with comets in 1618. The data base by Hoyt & Schatten (1998) has several more errors in the 1610s, as we show also for the observations by Harriot, Scheiner, Malapert, Saxonius, and Tarde. We also compare drawings from Jungius with the observations by Harriot, Galilei, and Marius. In contrast to what is specified in Hoyt & Schatten (1998), after Harriot, the two Fabricius (father and son), Scheiner and Cysat, Marius and Schmidnerus are among the earliest datable telescopic sunspot

  15. Current understanding of the mechanism of action of the antiepileptic drug lacosamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogawski, Michael A; Tofighy, Azita; White, H Steve; Matagne, Alain; Wolff, Christian

    2015-02-01

    The antiepileptic drug lacosamide [(R)-2-acetamido-N-benzyl-3-methoxypropanamide], a chiral functionalized amino acid, was originally identified by virtue of activity in the mouse and rat maximal electroshock (MES) test. Attention was drawn to lacosamide because of its high oral potency and stereoselectivity. Lacosamide is also active in the 6 Hz seizure model but inactive against clonic seizures in rodents induced by subcutaneous pentylenetetrazol, bicuculline and picrotoxin. It is also ineffective in genetic models of absence epilepsy. At doses greater than those required to confer protection in the MES test, lacosamide inhibits behavioral and electrographic seizures in hippocampal kindled rats. It also effectively terminates seizures in the rat perforant path stimulation status epilepticus model when administered early after the onset of seizures. Lacosamide does not exhibit antiepileptogenic effects in kindling or post-status epilepticus models. The profile of lacosamide in animal seizure and epilepsy models is similar to that of sodium channel blocking antiepileptic drugs, such as phenytoin and carbamazepine. However, unlike these agents, lacosamide does not affect sustained repetitive firing (SRF) on a time scale of hundreds of milliseconds or affect fast inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels; however, it terminates SRF on a time scale of seconds by an apparent effect on sodium channel slow inactivation. Lacosamide shifts the slow inactivation curve to more hyperpolarized potentials and enhances the maximal fraction of channels that are in the slow inactivated state. Currently, lacosamide is the only known antiepileptic drug in clinical practice that exerts its anticonvulsant activity predominantly by selectively enhancing slow sodium channel inactivation.

  16. Understanding Gully Formation and Seasonal Flows on Recent and Current Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulick, Virginia C.; Glines, Natalie

    2016-10-01

    The discoveries of gullies and seasonal slope flows (RSL) have re-ignited the debate over various channel, valley, and gully formation mechanisms on Mars. The controversy over whether liquid water was involved with gully formation, harkens back to the mid-1970s to early 2000s, where catastrophic flooding, surface runnoff and ground-water sapping processes were strongly debated along with other mechanisms as the primary processes responsible for channel and valley formation on Mars. However, over the past decade, the value of multiple working hypotheses has again become apparent, this time in understanding the formation of Martian gullies and Recurring Slope Lineae. Various mechanisms put forth to explain these landforms include liquid H2O/ice erosion, CO2 ice/frost sublimation, CO2 ice block sliding, water and brine flows, salt deliquescence, and dry granular flows, among others.We carried out detailed morphologic/morphometric studies of gullies in various environmental settings on Mars to evaluate the potential formation processes. Using HiRISE images and DTMs, we mapped and generated detailed longitudinal and cross-sectional profiles of gully systems and estimated volumes for both the gullies and their debris aprons. Several gullies form highly integrated patterns similar to fluvial systems. Additionally, RSL are often found either in the tributaries of these integrated systems or in adjacent regions, implying that RSL may play a role in initiating gully formation or mark the last vestiges of water activity in these locations. We also find that the more highly integrated gullies have volumes significantly larger than their aprons, suggesting that the missing volumes (~40-60% or more) were likely the volatiles involved in gully formation. Additionally, THEMIS and TES surface temperatures of these integrated gully sites, many of which also contain RSL, are at or above freezing seasonally suggesting that the volatile component may be consistent with H2O although CO2

  17. Vaccinations in migrants and refugees: a challenge for European health systems. A systematic review of current scientific evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mipatrini, Daniele; Stefanelli, Paola; Severoni, Santino; Rezza, Giovanni

    2017-03-01

    The decline of immunization rates in countries of origin of migrants and refugees, along with risky conditions during the journey to Europe, may threaten migrants' health. We performed a systematic review of the scientific literature in order to assess the frequency of vaccine preventable diseases, and vaccination coverage among migrants and refugees in Europe. To this end, Medline and Cochrane databases were considered. After the screening and the selection process, 58 papers were included in the review. We focused on the following vaccine-preventable diseases: hepatitis B, measles, rubella, mumps, tetanus, poliomyelitis, pertussis, diphtheria, meningitis, and varicella. The results were presented as a qualitative synthesis. In summary, several studies highlighted that migrants and refugees have lower immunization rates compared to European-born individuals. Firstly, this is due to low vaccination coverage in the country of origin. Then, several problems may limit migrants' access to vaccination in Europe: (i) migrants are used to move around the continent, and many vaccines require multiple doses at regular times; (ii) information on the immunization status of migrants is often lacking; (iii) hosting countries face severe economic crises; (iv) migrants often refuse registration with medical authorities for fear of legal consequences and (v) the lack of coordination among public health authorities of neighboring countries may determine either duplications or lack of vaccine administration. Possible strategies to overcome these problems include tailoring immunization services on the specific needs of the target population, developing strong communication campaigns, developing vaccination registers, and promoting collaboration among public health authorities of European Countries.

  18. Current Scientific Impact of Ss Cyril and Methodius University of Skopje, Republic of Macedonia in the Scopus Database (1960-2014)

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to analyze current scientific impact of Ss Cyril and Methodius University of Skopje, Republic of Macedonia in the Scopus Database (1960-2014). Material and Methods: Affiliation search of the Scopus database was performed on November 23, 2014 in order to identify published papers from the Ss Cyril and Methodius University of Skopje (UC&M), Republic of Macedonia. A total number of 3960 articles (3055 articles from UC&M, 861 articles from Faculty of Medicine, U...

  19. Effects of learning-style environmental and tactal/kinesthetic preferences on the understanding of scientific terms and attitude test scores of fifth-grade students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Angela Tirino

    This investigator analyzed the effects of learning-style environmental and tactual/kinesthetic preferences on the understanding of scientific terms and attitude test scores of fifth-grade students. To identify individual preferences, the Learning-Styles Inventory (Dunn, Dunn & Price, 1996) was administered to students who attended a suburban elementary school. Forty-six general education students were given instruction through the gradual establishment of an environmentally- and perceptually-responsive learning-style classroom. Instructional units were divided into three phases of two weeks each. The units of scientific terms were instructed for varied learning-style preferences and were gradually introduced during these instructional phases: Phase 1: Electricity was taught with traditional teaching methods; Phase 2: The Source of Energy was taught with accommodations for sound, light, temperature, design elements; Phase 3: Pollution was taught with accommodations for tactual/kinesthetic modalities. Pre and Post-tests, were administered in each of the three phases to determine scientific term gains. A repeated measures ANOVA and General Linear Model were employed to compare mean gains from phase to phase. Post-hoc comparisons were performed using the Bonferroni method and similar procedures were conducted on the Semantic Differential Scales (Pizzo, 1981). Correlations of relative gain scores during each phase were assessed by means of Pearson-product-moment correlations. Differences in the strengths of correlated correlations were evaluated by means of t-tests for related correlation coefficients. Significant gains were found when students were instructed employing incremental learning-styles strategies. To determine attitudinal changes toward science terms, the Semantic Differential Scale (Pizzo, 1981) was administered three times throughout this study: after Phase 1, traditional teaching; Phases 2 and 3, after learning-styles intervention. Statistically higher

  20. Current Public Knowledge Pertaining to Traumatic Brain Injury: Influence of Demographic Factors, Social Trends, and Sport Concussion Experience on the Understanding of Traumatic Brain Injury Sequelae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Zachary C; Van Patten, Ryan; Lace, John

    2017-03-01

    The current study aimed to assess current broad traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related knowledge in the general public, as well as understanding regarding specific TBI-related conditions including post-concussive syndrome (PCS) and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Data were collected from 307 domestic and 73 international individuals via online researcher-developed survey instrumentation utilizing the Amazon Mechanical Turk marketplace, a recently developed website that allows for a streamlined process of survey-based participant recruitment and data collection. Participants completed background demographics questions, a 31-item true/false questionnaire pertaining to TBI-related knowledge, and an inquiry related to willingness to allow (future) child(ren) to participate in several popular U.S. sports. The overall accuracy rate of our U.S. sample was 61%. No accuracy differences were present for gender or geographic region (p's > .05). Participants who self-reported a prior concussion diagnosis, who reported receiving formal concussion training, and who endorsed participation in collegiate, semi-professional, or professional athletic competition, all exhibited lower accuracy rates than the respective comparison groups (p's < .001). Finally, individual item analysis revealed the presence of significant misconceptions pertaining to PCS and CTE. Misconceptions regarding TBI remain highly prevalent within the general public and may be explained, to some extent, by inefficiencies in current TBI-education practices. Moreover, misconceptions regarding PCS and CTE are also prevalent and likely reflect inconsistencies in the scientific literature, coupled with misleading media reports. To combat these trends, greater emphasis must be placed on construct definition within the field and streamlined, efficient communication with the general public.

  1. How Do We Understand Children’s Restlessness? A Critique of the Biopsychosocial Model and ADHD as the Dominating Perspective in Current Understanding and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Helle-Valle

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available How is children’s restlessness understood and handled by surrounding adults? Two approaches are outlined in this article: one is the biomedical and later the biopsychosocial model, the other is a tradition that can be traced back to Foucault’s concept of historical ontology. The biopsychosocial model and ADHD is currently the dominating perspective when it comes to describing, understanding and treating restlessness in children. In this tradition, a focus on pathology and biology places the root of the problem within the child and positions the surrounding adults as neutral observers and helpers. By contrast, historical ontology opens up to questions about the neutrality and validity of a biopsychosocial approach by pointing to our active role as subjects in creating ideas of truth about children, in judging their behaviour and in “helping” them. Rather than claiming that one approach is better than the other, it can be useful to regard the two traditions as providing different levels of analysis and be aware of the possibilities and limitations pertaining to these.

  2. Purposeful and targeted use of scientists to support in-service teachers' understandings and teaching of scientific inquiry and nature of science

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kevin

    Efforts have been made to enhance teachers' understanding and teaching of NOS and/or SI by immersing teachers into the field and lab work of scientists through intensive summer institutes. Results have been mixed and the samples have been small. This may be due to several factors: implicit strategies to learn and teach about NOS and/or SI (Schwartz, Lederman, & Crawford, 2004), experiences lasting as little as two weeks (Morrison, Raab, & Ingram, 2009), lack of teacher availability during the school year or summer, intimidation of subject matter or scientists, etc. The challenge remains to see if scientist-teacher collaborations are a meaningful and effective way to enhance teachers' understandings and instruction of NOS and SI. Learning about scientists and their culture while experiencing explicit instruction of NOS has demonstrated improved understandings of NOS (Bianchini & Colburn, 2000). However, Morrison, Raab, and Ingram (2009) identify that there is still a shortage of literature available addressing how teachers' view of NOS and SI may be impacted through interactions with scientists when not involved in authentic research. To this author's knowledge, there is no research available that investigates teachers' instruction of NOS and SI while in the same condition. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships of in-service teachers' views of scientists, their understandings of NOS and SI, their view of teaching NOS and SI while engaged in a professional development experience that provided participants with a sustained immersion into the culture, beliefs and knowledge of scientists while in a NOS and SI course. Teachers showed substantial changes (pretest to posttest) on all seven aspects of NOS. And, as with NOS, teachers showed substantial improvement on all four aspects of SI investigated. The results of this investigation suggest an approach to teaching nature of science and scientific inquiry that may be an effective, lasting and

  3. Recent scientific advances in leiomyoma (uterine fibroids research facilitates better understanding and management [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/54a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darlene K. Taylor

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Uterine leiomyomas (fibroids are the most prevalent medical problem of the female reproductive tract, but there are few non-surgical treatment options. Although many advances in the understanding of the molecular components of these tumors have occurred over the past five years, an effective pharmaceutical approach remains elusive. Further, there is currently no clinical method to distinguish a benign uterine leiomyoma from a malignant leiomyosarcoma prior to treatment, a pressing need given concerns about the use of the power morcellator for minimally invasive surgery. This paper reviews current studies regarding the molecular biology of uterine fibroids, discusses non-surgical approaches and suggests new cutting-edge therapeutic and diagnostic approaches.

  4. Design of an Experimental Contemporary Physics Course which Develops the Full Experience of Scientific Research and Highlights Current Faculty Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarrison-Rice, Jan M.; Jaeger, Herbert; Eid, Khalid F.

    2013-03-01

    From background literature searches and reading, to conducting experiments, to presenting results and writing a journal manuscript, Miami University has revised its second-year Experimental Contemporary Physics Course, Phy293, to follow a basic research model. We examined research that faculty were conducting and chose experiments which were strongly related to understanding the ongoing research in the Department, while being based in fundamental quantum mechanics and recent 21st century physics. Experiments often had common instrumentation and data analysis techniques which allowed for grouping them into 3 basic categories: 1) Spectroscopy of gases and solids, 2) Characterization of contemporary samples, and 3) Quantized systems in electronic, magnetic and nuclear physics. These experiments also supported our secondary goal of preparing students to enter our research laboratories. At Miami, we generally have between 25-35 second year students, so the laboratory course must be managed to maintain groups of 2-3 for the best student learning outcomes. We will report on course logistics, the grouping of experiments, and methods for assessing students' learning. Having run the revised, full experimental format of Phy293 a 3rd time, we feel confident stating that this course demonstrates to students ``how physics research in the 21st century is actually conducted!''

  5. The emergence of international food safety standards and guidelines: understanding the current landscape through a historical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsingh, Brigit

    2014-07-01

    Following the Second World War, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) teamed up to construct an International Codex Alimentarius (or 'food code') which emerged in 1963. The Codex Committee on Food Hygiene (CCFH) was charged with the task of developing microbial hygiene standards, although it found itself embroiled in debate with the WHO over the nature these standards should take. The WHO was increasingly relying upon the input of biometricians and especially the International Commission on Microbial Specifications for Foods (ICMSF) which had developed statistical sampling plans for determining the microbial counts in the final end products. The CCFH, however, was initially more focused on a qualitative approach which looked at the entire food production system and developed codes of practice as well as more descriptive end-product specifications which the WHO argued were 'not scientifically correct'. Drawing upon historical archival material (correspondence and reports) from the WHO and FAO, this article examines this debate over microbial hygiene standards and suggests that there are many lessons from history which could shed light upon current debates and efforts in international food safety management systems and approaches.

  6. Critical assessment of the current understanding/ knowledge of the framework of the Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries in the Mediterranean and Black Seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Sartor

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A critical review was carried out involving experts from 17 countries, to identify, summarize and evaluate the current understanding related to the Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries management (EAF in the Mediterranean and Black Seas. The existing information available at country level, coming from research and monitoring projects and other types of activities, was explored. The evaluation was done following a standardized protocol and using simple semi-quantitative methods. The results highlighted an overall low-medium degree of fulfilment of the requirements of the EAF, with some differences related to the different issues considered. The highest scores were reported for the knowledge related to fleet structure/ behaviour and species/habitat distribution, whereas the lowest scores were reported for modelling, and socio-economic and management issues. Although only semi-quantitative, these results provided an initial picture at a broad regional level on the state of knowledge with a view to a proper implementation of the EAF in the Mediterranean and Black Seas, and identified gaps in scientific knowledge that should be covered.

  7. Understanding Readers' Differing Understandings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucer, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    This research examines the characteristics of reader understandings that vary from those stated in the text. Eighty-seven fourth graders orally read complex academic literary and scientific texts, followed by probed retellings. Retold ideas not directly supported by, or reflective of, the texts were identified. These differing understandings…

  8. Current understanding of the processes underlying the triggering of and energy loss associated with type I ELMs

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, A; Dunne, M; Huijsmans, G; Pamela, S; Becoulet, M; Harrison, J R; Hillesheim, J; Roach, C; Saarelma, S

    2013-01-01

    The type I ELMy H-mode is the baseline operating scenario for ITER. While it is known that the type I ELM ultimately results from the peeling-ballooning instability, there is growing experimental evidence that a mode grows up before the ELM crash that may modify the edge plasma, which then leads to the ELM event due to the peeling-ballooning mode. The triggered mode results in the release of a large number of particles and energy from the core plasma but the precise mechanism by which these losses occur is still not fully understood and hence makes predictions for future devices uncertain. Our current understanding of the processes that trigger type I ELMs and the size of the resultant energy loss are reviewed and compared to experimental data and ideas for further development are discussed.

  9. A review of the scientific literature related to the adverse impact of physical restraint: gaining a clearer understanding of the physiological factors involved in cases of restraint-related death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Richard; Stirling, Chris; Pandyan, Anand D

    2012-07-01

    Deaths occurring during and/or in close proximity to physical restraint have been attributed to positional asphyxia, a conclusion primarily based on opinion and reviews of case studies. This review sought to identify the current scientific evidence available in regard to the aetiology of adverse events or death occurring during or in close proximity to physical restraint. A systematic search of electronic databases (SPORTDiscus, AMED, CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO) for papers published in English, between 1980 and 2011, using keywords that related to restraint, restraint position and cardiovascular function resulted in 11 experimental papers being found for review. The term positional asphyxia as a mechanism for sudden death is poorly understood. The literature shows that restraint position has the ability to impede life-maintaining physiological functions, but that the imposed impediment is not uniform across all restraint positions/techniques. Further research is required to ascertain the risks posed by struggling during restraint for more prolonged periods of time and in different positions using varied techniques of restraint. This research should seek to and rank known or future risk factors of adverse events occurring during restraint, seeking to understand the interactions and if present the cumulative effect of these risk factors. Finally, future research should focus on populations other than apparently healthy male adults.

  10. Current Understandings of the Research-Practice Gap From the Viewpoint of Complementary Medicine Academics: A Mixed-Method Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Matthew J; Tucker, Basil

    Research plays an important role in advancing health and healthcare. However, much research evidence is not reflected in contemporary complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practice. Understanding and addressing the reasons for this research-practice gap may have positive implications for quality of care. To shed light on the gap between research and CAM practice. Descriptive cross-sectional, mixed-method study. A total of 126 senior CAM academics across Australasia, Europe, UK, and North America. Participants completed a 30-item online survey and a semi-structured interview; both of which explored the research-practice gap in CAM. A total of 43 (34%) academics completed the survey, with 29 (67%) respondents undergoing an interview. There was general agreement among respondents that CAM research should be informed by practice, and practice informed by research; however, most agreed that this did not reflect the current situation. Translational issues were perceived to be the primary reason for the research-practice gap in CAM. Suggested strategies for closing the gap focussed mostly around improving CAM student/practitioner education and training, and researcher-practitioner engagement and collaboration. Study findings point toward the presence of a research-practice gap in CAM, with several factors likely to be instrumental in sustaining this gap. Attention now needs to focus on understanding the views of CAM clinicians on this issue. Insights gained from this research will help inform the development of a multi-modal strategy that will effectively target the barriers to change in order to bring CAM research and practice closer together. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Microplastics in freshwater and terrestrial environments: Evaluating the current understanding to identify the knowledge gaps and future research priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Alice A; Walton, Alexander; Spurgeon, David J; Lahive, Elma; Svendsen, Claus

    2017-05-15

    Plastic debris is an environmentally persistent and complex contaminant of increasing concern. Understanding the sources, abundance and composition of microplastics present in the environment is a huge challenge due to the fact that hundreds of millions of tonnes of plastic material is manufactured for societal use annually, some of which is released to the environment. The majority of microplastics research to date has focussed on the marine environment. Although freshwater and terrestrial environments are recognised as origins and transport pathways of plastics to the oceans, there is still a comparative lack of knowledge about these environmental compartments. It is highly likely that microplastics will accumulate within continental environments, especially in areas of high anthropogenic influence such as agricultural or urban areas. This review critically evaluates the current literature on the presence, behaviour and fate of microplastics in freshwater and terrestrial environments and, where appropriate, also draws on relevant studies from other fields including nanotechnology, agriculture and waste management. Furthermore, we evaluate the relevant biological and chemical information from the substantial body of marine microplastic literature, determining the applicability and comparability of this data to freshwater and terrestrial systems. With the evidence presented, the authors have set out the current state of the knowledge, and identified the key gaps. These include the volume and composition of microplastics entering the environment, behaviour and fate of microplastics under a variety of environmental conditions and how characteristics of microplastics influence their toxicity. Given the technical challenges surrounding microplastics research, it is especially important that future studies develop standardised techniques to allow for comparability of data. The identification of these research needs will help inform the design of future studies, to

  12. A short review of our current understanding of the development of ring faults during collapse caldera formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelina eGeyer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The term collapse caldera refers to those volcanic depressions resulting from the sinking of the chamber roof due to the rapid withdrawal of magma during the course of an eruption. During the last three decades, collapse caldera dynamics has been the focus of attention of numerous, theoretical, numerical and experimental studies. Nonetheless, even if there is a tendency to go for a general and comprehensive caldera dynamics model, some key aspects remain unclear, controversial or completely unsolved. This is the case of ring fault nucleation points and propagation and dip direction. Since direct information on calderas’ deeper structure comes mainly from partially eroded calderas or few witnessed collapses, ring faults layout at depth remains still uncertain. This has generated a strong debate over the detailed internal fault and fracture configuration of a caldera collapse and, in more detail, how ring faults initiate and propagate. We offer here a very short description of the main results obtained by those analogue and theoretical/mathematical models applied to the study of collapse caldera formation. We place special attention on those observations related to the nucleation and propagation of the collapse-controlling ring faults. This summary is relevant to understand the current state-of-the-art of this topic and it should be taken under consideration in future works dealing with collapse caldera dynamics.

  13. It Ain't (Just) the Heat, It's the Humanity: Increasing Public Understanding of Scientific Consensus and Its Role in Climate Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, P.; Cook, J.; Nuccitelli, D.

    2014-12-01

    An overwhelming scientific consensus exists on the issue of anthropogenic climate change. Unfortunately, public perception of expert agreement remains low- only around 1 in 10 Americans correctly estimates the actual level of consensus on the topic. Moreover, several recent studies have demonstrated the pivotal role that perceived consensus plays in the public's acceptance of key scientific facts about environmental problems, as well as their willingness to support policy to address them. This "consensus gap", between the high level of scientific agreement vs. the public's perception of it, has led to calls for increased consensus messaging. However this call has been challenged by a number of different groups: climate "skeptics" in denial about the existence and validity of the consensus; some social science researchers and journalists who believe that such messages will be ineffective or counterproductive; and even some scientists and science advocates who downplay the value of consensus in science generally. All of these concerns can be addressed by effectively communicating the role of consensus within science to the public, as well as the conditions under which consensus is likely to be correct. Here, we demonstrate that the scientific consensus on anthropogenic climate change satisfies these conditions, and discuss past examples of purported consensus that failed or succeeded to satisfy them as well. We conclude by discussing the way in which scientific consensus is interpreted by the public, and how consensus messaging can improve climate literacy.

  14. Current Understanding of HSP90 as a Novel Therapeutic Target: An Emerging Approach for the Treatment of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Absarul; Alam, Qamre; Alam, Mohammad Zubair; Azhar, Esam I; Sait, Khalid Hussain Wali; Anfinan, Nisrin; Mushtaq, Gohar; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Rasool, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Heat Shock Protein 90 (HSP90) is a ubiquitous molecular chaperone that is considered to be the most abundantly expressed protein in various human cancers such as breast, lung, colon, prostate, leukemia and skin. The master regulator, HSP90 plays a pivotal role in the conformational stabilization, maturation and activity of its various labile oncogenic client proteins such as p53, ErbB2, Bcr-Abl, Akt, Her-2, Cdk4, Cdk6, Raf-1 and v-Src in altered cells. Hence, making a guaranteed attempt to inhibit such a master regulator for cancer therapy appears to be a potential approach for combinatorial inhibition of numerous oncogenic signaling pathways simultaneously. Considerable efforts are being under way to develop novel molecular targets and its inhibitors that may block key signaling pathways involved in the process of tumorigenesis and metastasis. In this regards, HSP90 has acquired immense interest as a potent anticancer drug-target due to its key functional link with multiple signaling pathways involved in the process of cell proliferation and cell survival. Notably, geldanamycin and its derivatives (17-AAG, 17-DMAG) have shown quite encouraging results in inhibiting HSP90 function in several cancers and currently almost 17 drug candidates known to be target HSP90 are being under clinical trials either as single agents or combinatorial therapy. Hence, this review is an attempt to get new insight into novel drug target therapy by focusing on recent advances made in understanding HSP90 chaperone structure-function relationships, identification of new HSP90 client proteins and, more importantly, on the advancements of HSP90 targeted therapy based on various existing and emerging classical inhibitors.

  15. Developing a Critical Dialog for Educational Technology: Understanding the Nature of Technology and the Legacy of Scientific Management in Our Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizelle, Thomas Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the legacy of scientific management and the dominance of one-dimensional thinking in the field of educational technology. Through this analysis, I demonstrate that the ways practitioners and policymakers frame educational technology, assess its effectiveness, and make judgments about its potential, often exclude…

  16. Developing a Critical Dialog for Educational Technology: Understanding the Nature of Technology and the Legacy of Scientific Management in Our Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizelle, Thomas Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the legacy of scientific management and the dominance of one-dimensional thinking in the field of educational technology. Through this analysis, I demonstrate that the ways practitioners and policymakers frame educational technology, assess its effectiveness, and make judgments about its potential, often exclude…

  17. Scientific publication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getulio Teixeira Batista

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The necessary work for developing a scientific publication is sometimes underestimated and requires the effective participation of many players to obtain a result in good standard. Initially it depends upon the determination of the authors that decide to write the scientific article. Scientific writing is a very challenging and time consuming task, but at the same time essential for any scientist. A published scientific article is unquestionably one of the main indicators of scientific production, especially if published in a qualified scientific journal with highly qualified editorial committee and strict peer review procedure. By looking at evaluation criteria for scientific production of the several Thematic Scientific Committees of the Brazilian Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq it becomes clear publications in scientific journals that has certified quality is the most important item in the evaluation of a scientist production.

  18. Science and Scientificity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zong-Liang Xu; Xin Zhang

    2005-01-01

    @@ A question about science We are now living in a scientific era, in which the theory and practice of science have penetrated into all aspects of society and science is often a hot topic.However, what on earth is science? This question is largely neglected by many people, even researchers focusing on scientific studies may not have a very clear understanding of it.

  19. 全球环境与卫生的关联性:科学认知的深化%The linkage of global environment and health:Deepening of the scientific understanding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志芳; 陈婧嫣; 张海滨

    2015-01-01

    本文基于历史和环境视角分析了全球环境与卫生之间关联性的科学认知的变化。环境问题对人类健康的影响越来越受到国际社会的关注和重视,现有科学研究已充分证明,环境问题与人类健康风险之间存在明显的因果关系,环境问题是导致人类各种疾病的重大因素之一;从全球层面对环境问题的健康影响进行量化研究是当前相关研究的重点、亮点和难点,目前国际上在研究方法和具体结论上都存在许多分歧,但定量研究方兴未艾;如何将现有的科学认知与全球层面的政策制定与实施有机结合起来是摆在全球环境与卫生治理面前的一大课题。%This paper introduces and analyzes the changes of scientific understanding in the linkage of global envi-ronment and health from historical and environment perspective, emphasizing on the fact that:the environmental issue im-pacts on human health are attracting an increased attention and emphasis from the international community;the existing re-search has fully proved a clear causal relationship between environmental issues which constitute one of the major factors that lead to a variety of human diseases and human health risks;the environmental issues effects on health quantified at the global level are the highlights and difficulties in the related research, differences in the current research methods and con-clusions exist internationally, but quantitative research is popular; the integration perspective of the existing scientific knowledge and global policy is a huge challenge placed in front of the global environment and health governance.

  20. Current Situations of Competitive Scientific Research Projects for Agri-scientific Research Institutions: A Case Study of Tropical Crops Genetic Resources Institute of Chinese Academy of Tropical Agricultural Sciences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiyan; LUO; Qingqun; YAO; Lizhen; CHEN; Yu; ZHENG

    2015-01-01

    This paper collected and arranged competitive scientific research projects undertaken by Tropical Crops Genetic Resources Institute of Chinese Academy of Tropical Agricultural Sciences in 2003-2014. Through statistical analysis on quantity of projects,funded amount,age of person responsible,professional title of person responsible,academic degree of person responsible,research object,it discussed relevant characteristics and rules. Finally,it came up with pertinent measures and recommendations,in the hope of providing services for decision-making and scientific and technological management.

  1. Collaboration in scientific practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagenknecht, Susann

    2014-01-01

    scientists engage in relations of mutual epistemic dependence. To deepen philosophy’s understanding of scientific practice in its diversity, a distinction should be made between opaque and translucent epistemic dependence. While opaque epistemic dependence involves asymmetries in expertise, translucent...

  2. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Program Cancer Reporting Fellowships Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Events Cancer Currents ... Media Contacts Multicultural Media Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Cancer Currents Blog ...

  3. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reporting Fellowships Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Events Cancer Currents Blog All ... Multicultural Media Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Cancer Currents Blog About NCI ...

  4. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Events Cancer Currents Blog All Press Releases 2017 ... Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Cancer Currents Blog About NCI NCI Overview History ...

  5. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Events Cancer Currents Blog All Press Releases 2017 ... Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Cancer Currents Blog About NCI NCI Overview History ...

  6. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Events Cancer Currents Blog All Press Releases ... Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Cancer Currents Blog About NCI NCI Overview ...

  7. Current Scientific Impact of Ss Cyril and Methodius University of Skopje, Republic of Macedonia in the Scopus Database (1960-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiroski, Mirko

    2015-03-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze current scientific impact of Ss Cyril and Methodius University of Skopje, Republic of Macedonia in the Scopus Database (1960-2014). Affiliation search of the Scopus database was performed on November 23, 2014 in order to identify published papers from the Ss Cyril and Methodius University of Skopje (UC&M), Republic of Macedonia. A total number of 3960 articles (3055 articles from UC&M, 861 articles from Faculty of Medicine, UC&M, and 144 articles from Faculty of Pharmacy, UC&M) were selected for analysis (1960-2014). SCImago Journal Rank (SJR), Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) and h-index were calculated from the Scopus database. The number of published papers was sharply increased with maximum of 379 papers in 2012 year. The largest number of papers has been published in Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences, Journal of Molecular Structure, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Acta Pharmecutica, and Macedonian Journal of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. The biggest SJR and SNIP has journal Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation. First three places of the top ten authors belong to Dimirovski GM, Gavrilovska L, and Gusev M. Top three places based on Scopus h-index (total number of published papers) belong to Kocarev L, Stafilov T, and Polenakovic M. The majority of papers originate from UC&M, but significant numbers of papers are affiliated to Faculty of Medicine, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Institute of Chemistry as members of UC&M, as well as Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts. Articles are the most dominant type of documents followed by conference papers, and review articles. Medicine is the most represented subject. Officials of the Ss Cyril and Methodius University of Skopje should undertake more effective and proactive policies for journal publishers and their Editorial Boards in order to include more journals from UC&M in the Scopus database.

  8. Current Scientific Impact of Ss Cyril and Methodius University of Skopje, Republic of Macedonia in the Scopus Database (1960-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Spiroski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to analyze current scientific impact of Ss Cyril and Methodius University of Skopje, Republic of Macedonia in the Scopus Database (1960-2014. Material and Methods: Affiliation search of the Scopus database was performed on November 23, 2014 in order to identify published papers from the Ss Cyril and Methodius University of Skopje (UC&M, Republic of Macedonia. A total number of 3960 articles (3055 articles from UC&M, 861 articles from Faculty of Medicine, UC&M, and 144 articles from Faculty of Pharmacy, UC&M were selected for analysis (1960-2014. SCImago Journal Rank (SJR, Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP and h-index were calculated from the Scopus database. Results: The number of published papers was sharply increased with maximum of 379 papers in 2012 year. The largest number of papers has been published in Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences, Journal of Molecular Structure, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Acta Pharmecutica, and Macedonian Journal of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. The biggest SJR and SNIP has journal Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation. First three places of the top ten authors belong to Dimirovski GM, Gavrilovska L, and Gusev M. Top three places based on Scopus h-index (total number of published papers belong to Kocarev L, Stafilov T, and Polenakovic M. The majority of papers originate from UC&M, but significant numbers of papers are affiliated to Faculty of Medicine, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Institute of Chemistry as a members of UC&M, as well as Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts. Articles are the most dominant type of documents followed by conference papers, and review articles. Medicine is the most represented subject. Conclusion: Officials of the Ss Cyril and Methodius University of Skopje should undertake more effective and proactive policies for journal publishers and their Editorial Boards in order to include more journals from UC&M in the Scopus database.

  9. Science Teachers and Scientific Argumentation: Trends in Views and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Victor; Blanchard, Margaret R.

    2012-01-01

    Current research indicates that student engagement in scientific argumentation can foster a better understanding of the concepts and the processes of science. Yet opportunities for students to participate in authentic argumentation inside the science classroom are rare. There also is little known about science teachers' understandings of…

  10. Network effects on scientific collaborations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahadat Uddin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The analysis of co-authorship network aims at exploring the impact of network structure on the outcome of scientific collaborations and research publications. However, little is known about what network properties are associated with authors who have increased number of joint publications and are being cited highly. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Measures of social network analysis, for example network centrality and tie strength, have been utilized extensively in current co-authorship literature to explore different behavioural patterns of co-authorship networks. Using three SNA measures (i.e., degree centrality, closeness centrality and betweenness centrality, we explore scientific collaboration networks to understand factors influencing performance (i.e., citation count and formation (tie strength between authors of such networks. A citation count is the number of times an article is cited by other articles. We use co-authorship dataset of the research field of 'steel structure' for the year 2005 to 2009. To measure the strength of scientific collaboration between two authors, we consider the number of articles co-authored by them. In this study, we examine how citation count of a scientific publication is influenced by different centrality measures of its co-author(s in a co-authorship network. We further analyze the impact of the network positions of authors on the strength of their scientific collaborations. We use both correlation and regression methods for data analysis leading to statistical validation. We identify that citation count of a research article is positively correlated with the degree centrality and betweenness centrality values of its co-author(s. Also, we reveal that degree centrality and betweenness centrality values of authors in a co-authorship network are positively correlated with the strength of their scientific collaborations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Authors' network positions in co

  11. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force's current understanding of idiopathic epilepsy of genetic or suspected genetic origin in purebred dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hülsmeyer, Velia-Isabel; Fischer, Andrea; Mandigers, Paul J. J.;

    2015-01-01

    Canine idiopathic epilepsy is a common neurological disease affecting both purebred and crossbred dogs. Various breed-specific cohort, epidemiological and genetic studies have been conducted to date, which all improved our knowledge and general understanding of canine idiopathic epilepsy, and in ...

  12. How Secondary History Teachers Use and Think about Museums: Current Practices and Untapped Promise for Promoting Historical Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Alan S.; Levine, Thomas H.; Grenier, Robin S.

    2012-01-01

    Museums have great potential to help secondary students develop a deep understanding of the past; however, we know little about what history teachers actually do or want to accomplish when they utilize museums. In this study, the authors draw on questionnaire and interview data from 94 secondary history teachers in Connecticut in an effort to…

  13. Beyond usage: understanding the use of electronic journals on the basis of information activity analysis. Electronic journals, Use studies, Information activity, Scientific communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annaïg Mahé

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, which reports the second part of a two-part study of the use of electronic journals by researchers in two French research institutions, we attempt to explain the integration of the use of electronic journals in the scientists' information habits, going beyond usage analysis. First, we describe how the development of electronic journals use follows a three-phase innovation process - research-development, first uses, and technical acculturation. Then, we attempt to find more significant explanatory factors, and emphasis is placed on the wider context of information activity. Three main information activity types are outlined - marginal, parallel, and integrated. Each of these types corresponds to a particular attitude towards scientific information and to different levels of electronic journal use.

  14. Reframing science communication: How the use of metaphor, rhetoric, and other tools of persuasion can strengthen the public understanding of science (without weakening the integrity of the scientific process)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderberg, Jeanne

    This paper is about "truthiness", its resulting impact on the public understanding of science (and subsequently science policy), and why scientists need to learn how to navigate truthiness in order to ensure that the scientific body of knowledge is both preserved and shared. In order to contend with truthiness, scientists must understand and acknowledge how people receive and process information, how they form their reactions and opinions about it, and how they can be manipulated by various agencies and players to feel and think in certain ways. In order to accomplish these objectives, scientists must also understand various aspects of culture, language, psychology, neuroscience, and communication. Most importantly, scientists must recognize their own humanity, and learn how to accept and work with their own human boundaries. Truth can indeed be beauty. And, there is absolutely nothing unscientific about creating beauty in order to demonstrate and explain truth.

  15. Interactive effects of air pollution and climate change on forest ecosystems in the United States: current understanding and future scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzej Bytnerowicz; Mark Fenn; Steven McNulty; Fengming Yuan; Afshin Pourmokhtarian; Charles Driscoll; Tom Meixner

    2013-01-01

    A review of the current status of air pollution and climate change (CC) in the United States from a perspective of their impacts on forest ecosystems is provided. Ambient ozone (O3) and nitrogen (N) deposition have important and widespread ecological impacts in U.S. forests. Effects of sulphurous (S) air pollutants and other trace pollutants have...

  16. Historical and Current Understanding of Core Stability%核心稳定性研究历史与现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李立; Andy Walhelm

    2011-01-01

    Core stability is a term frequently used in many fields including health and medical areas. The definitions of core stability in different scientific documents are not the same. Through the analysis of the position of core, the definition of stability in core stability and the composition of core stability, the article tries to define the position of core in human body, discuss the connotion of stability in core stability and analyze the biomechanical principles of core stability.%核心稳定性是一个广泛应用于包括健康和医学领域在内的多领域的常见术语,科学文献中有关核心稳定性定义的表述各不相同。通过对“核心”的位置、核心稳定性中的稳定性的定义、核心稳定性的构成的分析,确定人体“核心”的位置,探讨“核心稳定性”中的“稳定性”的内涵,分析核心稳定性的生物力学原理。

  17. Guidelines for the Design and Conduct of Clinical Studies in Knee Articular Cartilage Repair: International Cartilage Repair Society Recommendations Based on Current Scientific Evidence and Standards of Clinical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mithoefer, Kai; Saris, Daniel B F; Farr, Jack; Kon, Elizaveta; Zaslav, Kenneth; Cole, Brian J; Ranstam, Jonas; Yao, Jian; Shive, Matthew; Levine, David; Dalemans, Wilfried; Brittberg, Mats

    2011-04-01

    To summarize current clinical research practice and develop methodological standards for objective scientific evaluation of knee cartilage repair procedures and products. A comprehensive literature review was performed of high-level original studies providing information relevant for the design of clinical studies on articular cartilage repair in the knee. Analysis of cartilage repair publications and synopses of ongoing trials were used to identify important criteria for the design, reporting, and interpretation of studies in this field. Current literature reflects the methodological limitations of the scientific evidence available for articular cartilage repair. However, clinical trial databases of ongoing trials document a trend suggesting improved study designs and clinical evaluation methodology. Based on the current scientific information and standards of clinical care, detailed methodological recommendations were developed for the statistical study design, patient recruitment, control group considerations, study endpoint definition, documentation of results, use of validated patient-reported outcome instruments, and inclusion and exclusion criteria for the design and conduct of scientifically sound cartilage repair study protocols. A consensus statement among the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) and contributing authors experienced in clinical trial design and implementation was achieved. High-quality clinical research methodology is critical for the optimal evaluation of current and new cartilage repair technologies. In addition to generally applicable principles for orthopedic study design, specific criteria and considerations apply to cartilage repair studies. Systematic application of these criteria and considerations can facilitate study designs that are scientifically rigorous, ethical, practical, and appropriate for the question(s) being addressed in any given cartilage repair research project.

  18. Partners in Earth System Science: a Field, Laboratory and Classroom Based Professional Development Program for K-12 Teachers Designed to Build Scientific and Pedagogical Understandings of Teaching Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, W.; Lunsford, S.; Diedrick, A.; Crane, C.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the Partners in Earth System Science summer and academic year professional development program for Ohio K-12 teachers is to build their understandings of the scientific observations, methods and resources that scientists use when studying past and present climate change. Participants then use these tools to develop inquiry-based activities to teach their K-12 students how the scientific method and data are used to understand the effects of global climate change. The summer portion of the program takes teachers from throughout Ohio to the Duke University Marine Laboratory in Beaufort, North Carolina. There they engage in a physical and biological exploration of the modern and ancient ocean. For example, they collect samples of sediment and test water samples collected from modern coastal environments and connect their findings with evidence of the fauna living in those environments. Then, using observations from the geological record of the Eocene through Pleistocene sediments exposed in eastern North Carolina and inferences from observations made from the modern ocean they seek to answer scientifically testable questions regarding the physical and biological characteristics of the ocean during Cenozoic climate change events. During the academic year participants connect with each other and project faculty online to support the development of inquiry based science activities for their K-12 students. These activities focus on how evidence and observations such as outcrop extent, sediment type and biological assemblages can be used to infer past climates. The activities are taught in participant's classrooms and discussed with other participants in an online discussion space. Assessment of both teachers and K-12 students document significant positive changes in science knowledge, their confidence in being able to do science and a clearer understanding of how oceans are impacted by global climate change.

  19. 大洋性柔鱼类资源开发现状及可持续利用的科学问题%Current exploitation and some scientific issues in the sustainable utilization of Ommastrephidae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈新军; 陆化杰; 刘必林; 田思泉

    2012-01-01

    大洋性柔鱼类是重要的渔业资源,商业性开发的种类主要有太平洋褶柔鱼、柔鱼、阿根廷滑柔鱼、茎柔鱼和双柔鱼等。据统计,1992-2010年柔鱼类产量占世界头足类的比重稳定在51.15%~62.19%,平均达到55.40%。对重要柔鱼种类的资源现状及开发状况进行系统分析,根据大洋性柔鱼类生命周期短、生长快等特点,提出了4项需研究的问题,即:(1)全面了解大洋性柔鱼类的生态地位和作用;(2)全面掌握环境包括全球气候变化对大洋性柔鱼类资源补充量的影响;(3)深入研究大洋性柔鱼类短生命周期资源评估模式;(4)发展基于生态系统的大洋性柔鱼类资源管理方法。%The oceanic Ommastrephidae is an important cephalopod resource.The main species which have been exploited at the large-scale commercial development included Todarodes pacificus,Illex argentinus,Dosidicus gigas,Nototodarus sloani and Symplectoteuthis oualaniensis.According to the data statistics during 1992 to 2010,the Ommastrephidae production accounted for 51.15%-62.19% of cephalopods in the world,with an average of 55.40%.In this paper,the current exploitation and resources conditions of Todarodes pacificus,Illex argentinus,Dosidicus gigas and other squids are described in details.Meanwhile,according to the biological characteristics of short life cycle and fast growth,four major scientific issues which are to be resolved have been put forward.The four scientific issues are:(1) a completely comprehensive understanding of the ecological status and role of Ommastrephidae;(2) fully mastering the effect of environment including global climate change on the recruitment of Ommastrephidae;(3) further study of assessment model for Ommastrephidae based on the short life cycle;and(4) developing the ecosystem-based resource management approaches for Ommastrephidae.

  20. Using Freire's Participatory Educational Method to Understand the Experience of Living With Chronic Illness in the Current Age of Globalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo Plazas, Maria del Pilar; Cameron, Brenda L

    2015-06-01

    Many approaches and efforts have been used to better understand chronic diseases worldwide. Yet, little is known about the meaning of living with chronic illness under the pressures of globalization and neoliberal ideologies. Through Freire's participatory educational method, this article presents an innovative approach to understanding the multiple dimensions of living with chronic illness. In this way, we hope to use an innovative approach to address the impact of globalization on the daily life of chronically ill people and thus expand to the body of knowledge on nursing. This article uses Freire's participatory educational method to understand the multiple dimensions of living with chronic illness. This qualitative study follows an interpretive inquiry approach and uses a critical hermeneutic phenomenological method and critical research methodologies. Five participants were recruited for this participatory educational activity. Data collection methods included digitally recorded semistructured individual interviews and a Freire's participatory educational method session. Data analysis included a thematic analysis. Participants reported lacking adequate access to healthcare services because of insurance policies; a general perception that they were an unwanted burden on the healthcare system; and a general lack of government support, advocacy, and political interest. This research activity assisted participants to gain a new critical perspective about the condition of others with chronic diseases and thus provided an enlightening opportunity to learn about the illnesses and experiences of others and to realize that others experienced the same oppression from the healthcare system. Participants became agents of change within their own families and communities. Chronic diseases cause many economic and social consequences in their victims. These findings urge us to move from merely acknowledging the difficulties of people who live with chronic illness in an age of

  1. The current state of Contract Law in Australia and why it is important for rural managers to understand it

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Tony

    2011-01-01

    Farmers are business managers and as such they must understand the law or they are likely to fall foul of it. This especially applies to contract law, with which they deal constantly. Contract law is made up of the common law – as the courts have decided it – and statute law- as the state and federal parliaments have enacted statutes which modify the common law. The most important and most recent of the latter is the new Australian Consumer Law.

  2. Calcium window currents, periodic forcing, and chaos: Understanding single neuron response with a discontinuous one-dimensional map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudanski, J.; Sumner, C.; Coombes, S.

    2010-07-01

    Thalamocortical (TC) neurones are known to express the low-voltage activated, inactivating Ca2+ current IT . The triggering of this current underlies the generation of low threshold Ca2+ potentials that may evoke single or bursts of action potentials. Moreover, this current can contribute to an intrinsic slow (dynamics for the gating variables in the model of IT . This model can be analyzed in closed form and is shown to support an unstable set of periodic orbits. Trajectories are repelled from these organizing centers until they reach the threshold for firing. By determining the condition for a grazing bifurcation (at the border between a spiking and nonspiking event) we show how knowledge of the unstable periodic orbits (existence and stability) can be combined with the grazing condition to determine an effective one-dimensional map that captures the essentials of the chaotic behavior. This map is discontinuous and has strong similarities with the universal limit mapping in grazing bifurcations derived in the context of impacting mechanical systems [A. B. Nordmark, Phys. Rev. E 55, 266 (1997)10.1103/PhysRevE.55.266].

  3. Current concepts on burn wound conversion-A review of recent advances in understanding the secondary progressions of burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salibian, Ara A; Rosario, Angelica Tan Del; Severo, Lucio De Almeida Moura; Nguyen, Long; Banyard, Derek A; Toranto, Jason D; Evans, Gregory R D; Widgerow, Alan D

    2016-08-01

    Burn wound conversion describes the process by which superficial partial thickness burns convert into deeper burns necessitating surgical intervention. Fully understanding and thus controlling this phenomenon continues to defy burn surgeons. However, potentially guiding burn wound progression so as to obviate the need for surgery while still bringing about healing with limited scarring is the major unmet challenge. Comprehending the pathophysiologic background contributing to deeper progression of these burns is an essential prerequisite to planning any intervention. In this study, a review of articles examining burn wound progression over the last five years was conducted to analyze trends in recent burn progression research, determine changes in understanding of the pathogenesis of burn conversion, and subsequently examine the direction for future research in developing therapies. The majority of recent research focuses on applying therapies from other disease processes to common underlying pathogenic mechanisms in burn conversion. While ischemia, inflammation, and free oxygen radicals continue to demonstrate a critical role in secondary necrosis, novel mechanisms such as autophagy have also been shown to contribute affect significantly burn progression significantly. Further research will have to determine whether multiple mechanisms should be targeted when developing clinical therapies.

  4. Building a shared understanding of the skills and competences in order to respond to the current global technical challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friesel, Anna; Ward, Anthony; Welzer, Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    A pan-European team, including the representatives from 45 European universities, is working on an EU supported project to firstly explore and then provide models for ways in which Higher Education Institutions of Europe in the Electrical and Information Engineering disciplines can respond...... to current challenges. This paper presents the objectives and actual results of the EU supported project which runs from October 2012 to November 2015, named SALEIE - Strategic Alignment of Electrical and Information Engineering in European Higher Education Institutions. We describe in this paper...

  5. Scientific Understanding of the Connotation of Ecological Consciousness%科学理解生态自觉的内涵

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪顺成

    2014-01-01

    Ecological consciousness refers to the scientific and rational orientation relationship between man and nature, and make it consciously out to legislative, institutional development, daily life, event, achieved between man and man, man and society, man and himself based on harmonious development between human and nature in harmony. Eco-consciousness is predicated on ecological theory of self-innovation and eco-consciousness of the establishment; Basis of eco-consciousness is consciousness of ecological laws, regulations, and systems development and implementation; Eco-conscious in everyday life is the core of consciousness of ecological practices; Eco-conscious ultimate value to be achieved between man and man, man and society, man and himself based on harmony between man and nature in harmony.%生态自觉是指人们科学理性地定位人与自然的关系,并使其自觉地外化到立法、制度制定、日常生产生活等活动中,实现人与人、人与社会、人与自身和谐基础之上的人与自然的和谐发展。生态自觉的前提是生态理论的自觉创新和生态意识的自觉建立;生态自觉的基础是生态法律、法规、制度的自觉制定及执行;生态自觉的核心是日常生产生活中自觉的生态实践;生态自觉的终极价值指向是实现人与人、人与社会、人与自身和谐基础之上的人与自然的和谐。

  6. Lamont-Doherty's Secondary School Field Research Program: Using Goal-Oriented Applied Research as a Means of Building Comprehensive and Integrated Scientific Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostick, B. C.; Newton, R.; Vincent, S.; Peteet, D. M.; Sambrotto, R.; Schlosser, P.; Corbett, E.

    2015-12-01

    Conventional instruction in science often proceeds from the general to the specific and from text to action. Fundamental terminologies, concepts, and ideas that are often abstract are taught first and only after such introductory processes can a student engage in research. Many students struggle to find relevance when presented information without context specific to their own experiences. This challenge is exacerbated for students whose social circles do not include adults who can validate scientific learning from their own experiences. Lamont-Doherty's Secondary School Field Research Program inverts the standard paradigm and places small groups of students in research projects where they begin by performing manageable tasks on complex applied research projects. These tasks are supplemented with informal mentoring and relevant articles (~1 per week). Quantitative metrics suggest the approach is highly successful—most participants report a dramatic increase in their enthusiasm for science, 100% attend college, and approximately 50% declare majors in science or technology. We use one project, the construction of a microbial battery, to illustrate this novel model of science learning and argue that it should be considered a best practice for project-based science education. The goal of this project was to build a rechargeable battery for a mobile phone based on a geochemical cycle, to generate and store electricity. The students, mostly from ethnic groups under-represented in the STEM fields, combined concepts and laboratory methods from biology, chemistry and physics to isolate photosynthetic bacteria from a natural salt marsh, and made an in situ device capable of powering a light bulb. The younger participants had been exposed to neither high school chemistry nor physics at the start of the project, yet they were able to use the project as a platform to deepen their science knowledge and their desire for increased participation in formal science education.

  7. Cannabinoids therapeutic use: what is our current understanding following the introduction of THC, THC:CBD oromucosal spray and others?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccarrone, Mauro; Maldonado, Rafael; Casas, Miguel; Henze, Thomas; Centonze, Diego

    2017-04-01

    The complexity of the endocannabinoid (eCB) system is becoming better understood and new drivers of eCB signaling are emerging. Modulation of the activities of the eCB system can be therapeutic in a number of diseases. Research into the eCB system has been paralleled by the development of agents that interact with cannabinoid receptors. In this regard it should be remembered that herbal cannabis contains a myriad of active ingredients, and the individual cannabinoids have quite distinct biological activities requiring independent studies. Areas covered: This article reviews the most important current data involving the eCB system in relation to human diseases, to reflect the present (based mainly on the most used prescription cannabinoid medicine, THC/CBD oromucosal spray) and potential future uses of cannabinoid-based therapy. Expert commentary: From the different therapeutic possibilities, THC/CBD oromucosal spray has been in clinical use for approximately five years in numerous countries world-wide for the management of multiple sclerosis (MS)-related moderate to severe resistant spasticity. Clinical trials have confirmed its efficacy and tolerability. Other diseases in which different cannabinoids are currently being investigated include various pain states, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and epilepsy. The continued characterization of individual cannabinoids in different diseases remains important.

  8. Simultaneous visualization of oxygen partial pressure, current density, and water droplets in serpentine fuel cell during power generation for understanding reaction distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanohashi, Kazuhiro; Suga, Takeo; Uchida, Makoto; Ueda, Toshihide; Nagumo, Yuzo; Inukai, Junji; Nishide, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masahiro

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the reaction distributions inside a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) is essential for the higher performance and durability. We have developed a new see-through cell and visualized the distributions of oxygen partial pressure and current density inside a running PEFC at the temperature of 40 and 80 °C and the relative humidity of 53%. The oxygen utilization was changed from 0% to 80% by changing the current density. At higher oxygen utilizations, the current density was higher and therefore the water generation. Generated water droplets in the flow channel were also visualized, allowing for the simultaneous visualization of the distribution of the oxygen partial pressure, current density, and water droplets. By combining the observations of all three parameters, the reactions inside a membrane-electrode assembly were discussed.

  9. Scientific news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1994-01-01

    The Rijksherbarium/Hortus Botanicus acquired funds through NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research) to participate in a 7-year interdisciplinary cooperative programme of Indonesian and Dutch scientific institutions aiming at research in Irian Jaya, Cenderawasih province (the Bird’s Hea

  10. Understanding Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Deepika; Shelby, Blake; Mattingly, Christine

    2016-01-01

    "Energy" is a term often used in everyday language. Even young children associate energy with the food they eat, feeling tired after playing soccer, or when asked to turn the lights off to save light energy. However, they may not have the scientific conceptual understanding of energy at this age. Teaching energy and matter could be…

  11. 科学知识的社会学阐释--拉图尔行动者网络理论的解读%Sociological Interpretation of Scientific Knowledge:understanding Latour's network theory of the doer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈新辉

    2015-01-01

    拉图尔认为科学知识社会学反对和解构科学社会学,用“社会”的一极代替“自然”的一极,两者都只注重了科学事实的解释。拉图尔运用人类学方法研究科学家们在实验室的行为和行动,行动者网络理论更是实验室研究成果的提升和超越。深入阐释和理解行动者网络理论有助于我们全面了解拉图尔的学术思想,把握当代科学知识社会学的发展趋势。%Latour thinks that the sociology of scientific knowledge goes against and deconstructs the scientific sociolo-gy,with the pole of "society"to replace the pole of "nature",both focusing only on the interpretation of scientific facts.By utilizing the method of anthropological research of the behaviour and actions of the scientists in the laborato-ry,and the network theory of the doer,Latour has achieved the ascension and transcendence of the results of laborato-ry research.The interpretation and understanding of the network theory of the doer in depth,will be conducive to a comprehensive grasp of Latour's academic ideas,and to mastering the development trend of the contemporary sociolo-gy of scientific knowledge.

  12. A Study of the Abundance and 13C/12C Ratio of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide to Advance the Scientific Understanding of Terrestrial Processes Regulating the Global Carbon Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen C. Piper

    2005-10-15

    The primary goal of our research program, consistent with the goals of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and funded by the terrestrial carbon processes (TCP) program of DOE, has been to improve understanding of changes in the distribution and cycling of carbon among the active land, ocean and atmosphere reservoirs, with particular emphasis on terrestrial ecosystems. Our approach is to systematically measure atmospheric CO2 to produce time series data essential to reveal temporal and spatial patterns. Additional measurements of the 13C/12C isotopic ratio of CO2 provide a basis for distinguishing organic and inorganic processes. To pursue the significance of these patterns further, our research also involved interpretations of the observations by models, measurements of inorganic carbon in sea water, and of CO2 in air near growing land plants.

  13. Biocompatibility of ionic liquids towards protein stability: A comprehensive overview on the current understanding and their implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Awanish; Bisht, Meena; Venkatesu, Pannuru

    2017-03-01

    Over the past years since the discovery of ionic liquids (ILs), there is an increased demand to consider ILs as novel biocompatible co-solvents for proteins. Due to their tunable physical properties ILs can adjust themselves in any required experimental conditions starting from protein extraction to enzyme catalysis at elevated temperature. In recent years, large numbers of ILs have been synthesized and their effect on protein stability has been illustrated. With the rapid growth in various kinds of ILs, our understanding of protein stability in ILs has substantially increased. It is not necessary that a particular IL that is biocompatible to a protein will behave same for the other. Therefore, it is extremely essential to collect the literature dealing with the direct involvement of ILs in protein folding/unfolding studies under the same roof. This review focuses the tremendous accomplishments achieved in recent years in the field of protein stability in ILs. We hope that this would also help to set a stage where we can identify, explore and compare the mechanistic behavior of protein folding/unfolding in ILs. This review will surely bring a new boost in protein folding studies from the chemical biology perspective.

  14. Guar gum and similar soluble fibers in the regulation of cholesterol metabolism: Current understandings and future research priorities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd C Rideout

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Todd C Rideout1, Scott V Harding1, Peter JH Jones1, Ming Z Fan21Richardson Centre for Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; 2Centre for Nutrition Modeling, Department of Animal and Poultry Science, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: The hypocholesterolemic effects associated with soluble fiber consumption are clear from animal model and human clinical investigations. Moreover, the modulation of whole-body cholesterol metabolism in response to dietary fiber consumption, including intestinal cholesterol absorption and fecal sterol and bile acid loss, has been the subject of many published reports. However, our understanding of how dietary fibers regulate molecular events at the gene/protein level and alter cellular cholesterol metabolism is limited. The modern emphasis on molecular nutrition and rapid progress in ‘high-dimensional’ biological techniques will permit further explorations of the role of genetic polymorphisms in determining the variable interindividual responses to soluble fibers. Furthermore, with traditional molecular biology tools and the application of ‘omic’ technology, specific insight into how fibers modulate the expression of genes and proteins that regulate intestinal cholesterol absorption and alter hepatic sterol balance will be gained. Detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanisms by which soluble fibers reduce plasma cholesterol concentrations is paramount to developing novel fiber-based “cocktails” that target specific metabolic pathways to gain maximal cholesterol reductions.Keywords: dietary fiber, cholesterol, bile acids, gene, protein

  15. Current Gaps in the Understanding of the Subcellular Distribution of Exogenous and Endogenous Protein TorsinA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harata, N Charles

    2014-01-01

    An in-frame deletion leading to the loss of a single glutamic acid residue in the protein torsinA (ΔE-torsinA) results in an inherited movement disorder, DYT1 dystonia. This autosomal dominant disease affects the function of the brain without causing neurodegeneration, by a mechanism that remains unknown. We evaluated the literature regarding the subcellular localization of torsinA. Efforts to elucidate the pathophysiological basis of DYT1 dystonia have relied partly on examining the subcellular distribution of the wild-type and mutated proteins. A typical approach is to introduce the human torsinA gene (TOR1A) into host cells and overexpress the protein therein. In both neurons and non-neuronal cells, exogenous wild-type torsinA introduced in this manner has been found to localize mainly to the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas exogenous ΔE-torsinA is predominantly in the nuclear envelope or cytoplasmic inclusions. Although these outcomes are relatively consistent, findings for the localization of endogenous torsinA have been variable, leaving its physiological distribution a matter of debate. As patients' cells do not overexpress torsinA proteins, it is important to understand why the reported distributions of the endogenous proteins are inconsistent. We propose that careful optimization of experimental methods will be critical in addressing the causes of the differences among the distributions of endogenous (non-overexpressed) vs. exogenously introduced (overexpressed) proteins.

  16. Airborne, Balloon-borne and ground network measurements of aerosol BC over Indian region: Current understanding and possible implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Vijayakumar S.; Krishna Moorthy, K.; Babu, Suresh, S.; Manoj, M. R.; Gogoi, Mukunda

    2012-07-01

    Though the role of BC aerosols in direct and indirect aerosol climate forcing is now well accepted and being extensively investigated, there is a large knowledge gap on its vertical distribution. Large amounts of BC, if present above and within the clouds, could significantly modify the atmospheric heating due to aerosol absorption. In the back drop of some of the recent measurements of strong BC layers in the middle and upper troposphere and even in the stratosphere, the knowledge of vertical distribution of BC becomes all the more relevant, especially over the tropics, with significant solar heating, cloud cover and BC hotspots. With a view to addressing this issue from comprehensive measurements over Indian region, extensive measurements using aircrafts, balloons, and a large network of ground-based observatories have been made as a part of the Regional Aerosol Warming Experiment (RAWEX). These measurements were examined in the light of simulations made using the regional climate model (RegCM of ICTP) to understand the ability and biases of climate models. While the aircraft measurements revealed presence of strong BC layers above the atmospheric boundary layer, within which the BC concentration often exceeded those near the surface. These layers were more elevated and strong along the eastern coast and over Bay of Bengal, rather than on the west. The RegCM simulations were found to underestimate the BC concentrations, especially during the daytime probably owing to inadequate representation of ABL dynamics. The details would be presented and implications would be discussed

  17. Current Understanding of Cu-Exchanged Chabazite Molecular Sieves for Use as Commercial Diesel Engine DeNOx Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Feng; Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2013-11-03

    Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with ammonia using metal-exchanged molecular sieves with a chabazite (CHA) structure has recently been commercialized on diesel vehicles. One of the commercialized catalysts, i.e., Cu-SSZ-13, has received much attention for both practical and fundamental studies. For the latter, the particularly well-defined structure of this zeolite is allowing long-standing issues of the catalytically active site for SCR in metal-exchanged zeolites to be addressed. In this review, recent progress is summarized with a focus on two areas. First, the technical significance of Cu-SSZ-13 as compared to other Cu-ion exchanged zeolites (e.g., Cu-ZSM-5 and Cu-beta) is highlighted. Specifically, the much enhanced hydrothermal stability for Cu-SSZ-13 compared to other zeolite catalysts is addressed via performance measurements and catalyst characterization using several techniques. The enhanced stability of Cu-SSZ-13 is rationalized in terms of the unique small pore structure of this zeolite catalyst. Second, the fundamentals of the catalytically active center; i.e., the chemical nature and locations within the SSZ-13 framework are presented with an emphasis on understanding structure-function relationships. For the SCR reaction, traditional kinetic studies are complicated by intra-particle diffusion limitations. However, a major side reaction, nonselective ammonia oxidation by oxygen, does not suffer from mass-transfer limitations at relatively low temperatures due to significantly lower reaction rates. This allows structure-function relationships that are rather well understood in terms of Cu ion locations and redox properties. Finally, some aspects of the SCR reaction mechanism are addressed on the basis of in-situ spectroscopic studies.

  18. Toward Understanding the Role of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor in the Immune System: Current Progress and Future Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Hanieh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The immune system is regulated by distinct signaling pathways that control the development and function of the immune cells. Accumulating evidence suggest that ligation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr, an environmentally responsive transcription factor, results in multiple cross talks that are capable of modulating these pathways and their downstream responsive genes. Most of the immune cells respond to such modulation, and many inflammatory response-related genes contain multiple xenobiotic-responsive elements (XREs boxes upstream. Active research efforts have investigated the physiological role of Ahr in inflammation and autoimmunity using different animal models. Recently formed paradigm has shown that activation of Ahr by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD or 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM prompts the differentiation of CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs and inhibits T helper (Th-17 suggesting that Ahr is an innovative therapeutic strategy for autoimmune inflammation. These promising findings generate a basis for future clinical practices in humans. This review addresses the current knowledge on the role of Ahr in different immune cell compartments, with a particular focus on inflammation and autoimmunity.

  19. Current Understanding on the Role of Standard and Immunoproteasomes in Inflammatory/Immunological Pathways of Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Bellavista

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin-proteasome system is the major intracellular molecular machinery for protein degradation and maintenance of protein homeostasis in most human cells. As ubiquitin-proteasome system plays a critical role in the regulation of the immune system, it might also influence the development and progression of multiple sclerosis (MS. Both ex vivo analyses and animal models suggest that activity and composition of ubiquitin-proteasome system are altered in MS. Proteasome isoforms endowed of immunosubunits may affect the functionality of different cell types such as CD8+ and CD4+ T cells and B cells as well as neurons during MS development. Furthermore, the study of proteasome-related biomarkers, such as proteasome antibodies and circulating proteasomes, may represent a field of interest in MS. Proteasome inhibitors are already used as treatment for cancer and the recent development of inhibitors selective for immunoproteasome subunits may soon represent novel therapeutic approaches to the different forms of MS. In this review we describe the current knowledge on the potential role of proteasomes in MS and discuss the pro et contra of possible therapies for MS targeting proteasome isoforms.

  20. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Outreach Program Cancer Reporting Fellowships Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Events Cancer ... Resources Media Contacts Multicultural Media Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Cancer Currents ...

  1. Shaping a Scientific Self

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrade-Molina, Melissa; Valero, Paola

    In this paper we illustrate how a truth circulates within social discourse. We examine a particular truth reproduced within science, that is: through the understanding of Euclid’s axioms and postulates a person will gain the access to all human knowledge. We deploy a discourse analysis that helps...... us to understand how a truth is reproduced, circulating among diverse fields of human knowledge. Also it will show why we accept and reproduce a particular discourse. Finally, we state Euclidean geometry as a truth that circulates in scientific discourse and performs a scientific self. We unfold...

  2. Analytical approaches to support current understanding of exposure, uptake and distributions of engineered nanoparticles by aquatic and terrestrial organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Carolin; Powell, Kate; Crossley, Alison; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Kille, Peter; Morgan, A John; Read, Daniel; Tyne, William; Lahive, Elma; Svendsen, Claus; Spurgeon, David J

    2015-03-01

    Initiatives to support the sustainable development of the nanotechnology sector have led to rapid growth in research on the environmental fate, hazards and risk of engineered nanoparticles (ENP). As the field has matured over the last 10 years, a detailed picture of the best methods to track potential forms of exposure, their uptake routes and best methods to identify and track internal fate and distributions following assimilation into organisms has begun to emerge. Here we summarise the current state of the field, focussing particularly on metal and metal oxide ENPs. Studies to date have shown that ENPs undergo a range of physical and chemical transformations in the environment to the extent that exposures to pristine well dispersed materials will occur only rarely in nature. Methods to track assimilation and internal distributions must, therefore, be capable of detecting these modified forms. The uptake mechanisms involved in ENP assimilation may include a range of trans-cellular trafficking and distribution pathways, which can be followed by passage to intracellular compartments. To trace toxicokinetics and distributions, analytical and imaging approaches are available to determine rates, states and forms. When used hierarchically, these tools can map ENP distributions to specific target organs, cell types and organelles, such as endosomes, caveolae and lysosomes and assess speciation states. The first decade of ENP ecotoxicology research, thus, points to an emerging paradigm where exposure is to transformed materials transported into tissues and cells via passive and active pathways within which they can be assimilated and therein identified using a tiered analytical and imaging approach.

  3. Cerebellar Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (ctDCS): A Novel Approach to Understanding Cerebellar Function in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Giuliana; Argyropoulos, Georgios P; Bastian, Amy; Cortes, Mar; Davis, Nicholas J; Edwards, Dylan J; Ferrucci, Roberta; Fregni, Felipe; Galea, Joseph M; Hamada, Masahi; Manto, Mario; Miall, R Chris; Morales-Quezada, Leon; Pope, Paul A; Priori, Alberto; Rothwell, John; Tomlinson, S Paul; Celnik, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    The cerebellum is critical for both motor and cognitive control. Dysfunction of the cerebellum is a component of multiple neurological disorders. In recent years, interventions have been developed that aim to excite or inhibit the activity and function of the human cerebellum. Transcranial direct current stimulation of the cerebellum (ctDCS) promises to be a powerful tool for the modulation of cerebellar excitability. This technique has gained popularity in recent years as it can be used to investigate human cerebellar function, is easily delivered, is well tolerated, and has not shown serious adverse effects. Importantly, the ability of ctDCS to modify behavior makes it an interesting approach with a potential therapeutic role for neurological patients. Through both electrical and non-electrical effects (vascular, metabolic) ctDCS is thought to modify the activity of the cerebellum and alter the output from cerebellar nuclei. Physiological studies have shown a polarity-specific effect on the modulation of cerebellar-motor cortex connectivity, likely via cerebellar-thalamocortical pathways. Modeling studies that have assessed commonly used electrode montages have shown that the ctDCS-generated electric field reaches the human cerebellum with little diffusion to neighboring structures. The posterior and inferior parts of the cerebellum (i.e., lobules VI-VIII) seem particularly susceptible to modulation by ctDCS. Numerous studies have shown to date that ctDCS can modulate motor learning, and affect cognitive and emotional processes. Importantly, this intervention has a good safety profile; similar to when applied over cerebral areas. Thus, investigations have begun exploring ctDCS as a viable intervention for patients with neurological conditions.

  4. Food webs of the Delta, Suisun Bay and Suisun Marsh: an update on current understanding and possibilities for management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Larry R.; Kimmerer, Wim J.; Conrad, Louise; Lesmeister, Sarah; Mueller-Solger, Anke

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews and highlights recent research findings on foodweb processes since an earlier review by Kimmerer et al. (2008). We conduct this review within a conceptual framework of the Delta-Suisun food web, which includes both temporal and spatial components. The temporal component is based on knowledge that the landscape has changed markedly from historical conditions. The spatial component of our framework acknowledges that the food web is not spatially static; it varies regionally and across habitat types within regions. The review highlights the idea of a changing baseline with respect to foodweb function. New research also indicates that interactions between habitat-specific food webs vary across the current landscape. For example, based on early work in the South Delta, the food web associated with submerged aquatic vegetation was thought to provide little support to species of concern; however, data from other regions of the estuary suggest that this conceptual model may not apply across the entire region. Habitat restoration has been proposed as a method of re-establishing historic foodweb processes to support species of concern. Benefits are likely for species that directly access such restored habitats, but are less clear for pelagic species. Several topics require attention to further improve the knowledge of food webs needed to support effective management, including: 1) synthesis of factors responsible for low pelagic biomass; 2) monitoring and research on effects of harmful algal blooms; 3) broadening the scope of long-term monitoring; 4) determining benefits of tidal wetland restoration to species of concern, including evaluations of interactions of habitat-specific food webs; and 5) interdisciplinary analysis and synthesis. The only certainty is that food webs will continue to change in response to the changes in the physical environment and new species invasions.

  5. The water vapour continuum in near-infrared windows - Current understanding and prospects for its inclusion in spectroscopic databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shine, Keith P.; Campargue, Alain; Mondelain, Didier; McPheat, Robert A.; Ptashnik, Igor V.; Weidmann, Damien

    2016-09-01

    Spectroscopic catalogues, such as GEISA and HITRAN, do not yet include information on the water vapour continuum that pervades visible, infrared and microwave spectral regions. This is partly because, in some spectral regions, there are rather few laboratory measurements in conditions close to those in the Earth's atmosphere; hence understanding of the characteristics of the continuum absorption is still emerging. This is particularly so in the near-infrared and visible, where there has been renewed interest and activity in recent years. In this paper we present a critical review focusing on recent laboratory measurements in two near-infrared window regions (centred on 4700 and 6300 cm-1) and include reference to the window centred on 2600 cm-1 where more measurements have been reported. The rather few available measurements, have used Fourier transform spectroscopy (FTS), cavity ring down spectroscopy, optical-feedback - cavity enhanced laser spectroscopy and, in very narrow regions, calorimetric interferometry. These systems have different advantages and disadvantages. Fourier Transform Spectroscopy can measure the continuum across both these and neighbouring windows; by contrast, the cavity laser techniques are limited to fewer wavenumbers, but have a much higher inherent sensitivity. The available results present a diverse view of the characteristics of continuum absorption, with differences in continuum strength exceeding a factor of 10 in the cores of these windows. In individual windows, the temperature dependence of the water vapour self-continuum differs significantly in the few sets of measurements that allow an analysis. The available data also indicate that the temperature dependence differs significantly between different near-infrared windows. These pioneering measurements provide an impetus for further measurements. Improvements and/or extensions in existing techniques would aid progress to a full characterisation of the continuum - as an example, we

  6. Conceptions of end users in current smart grid research and opportunities for further social scientific research on users in smart grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Ege

    there have been no attempts to handle it. This paper suggests that classifying the research contributions according to the roles they assign to users and the theoretical concepts they employ to represent users can help in evaluating the validity of their claims, uncovering possibilities for synthesis...... of existing knowledge and seeing new possibilities for social scientific research where knowledge gaps appear. Different user representations and user roles are found through a content analysis of project related documents from a selection of European and North American smart grid projects. It is argued...

  7. On the Current Situation and Countermeasures of Uni-versity Students' Scientific Research Ability in Regular Undergraduate Universities%普通本科院校大学生科研能力现状及对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵靖伟; 何小杨

    2015-01-01

    随着社会对人才的需求不断提高,用人单位选人的标准除了学生学习成绩之外,越来越注重考察学生的实践能力和科研能力。培养大学生科研能力不仅成为市场的迫切需求,更是我国高校教育改革的一项重要目标。因此,本文在对学生科研能力的现状、问题进行调查与分析的基础上,进一步探讨培养大学生科研能力的对策。%With the continuous raise of social demands for talents, in addition to students' academic performance, employers pay more attention to students' practical ability and scientific research ability. The cultivation of university students' scientific research ability has become not only an urgent demand of the market, but also an important objective of China's university education re-form. Therefore, based on investigating and analyzing the current situation and problems of students' scientific research ability, this paper further explores countermeasures of cultivating university students' scientific research ability.

  8. Designing scientific applications on GPUs

    CERN Document Server

    Couturier, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    Many of today's complex scientific applications now require a vast amount of computational power. General purpose graphics processing units (GPGPUs) enable researchers in a variety of fields to benefit from the computational power of all the cores available inside graphics cards.Understand the Benefits of Using GPUs for Many Scientific ApplicationsDesigning Scientific Applications on GPUs shows you how to use GPUs for applications in diverse scientific fields, from physics and mathematics to computer science. The book explains the methods necessary for designing or porting your scientific appl

  9. 我校体育教师科研现状分析与研究%Analysis and Research on the Current Situation of Physi-cal Education Teachers' Scientific Research in Our School

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐红琴

    2013-01-01

      选取我校13位专业教师的科研论文为研究对象,采用数据调查法、数理统计法及文献资料法等研究方法对我校体育教师科研现状进行分析研究,提出提高我校体育教师科研能力的有效途径。%In this article, 13 professional teachers' research pa-pers in our school were selected as the research object, we use research methods such as data survey method, mathematical statistics method and the literature method to research and ana-lyze the current situation of scientific research from the physical education teachers in our school, put forward the effective ways to improve our school physical education teachers' scientific re-search ability.

  10. Understanding the Current International Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Andrew, “Taking Preferences Seriously: A Liberal Theory of International Politics,” International Organization, Vol. 51, No. 4, Autumn 1997, pp...296. Snyder, Quddus Z., “Integrating Rising Powers: Liberal Systemic Theory and the Mechanism of Cooperation,” Review of International Studies, Vol. 39...institutions, bilateral and regional security organizations, and liberal political norms; these ordering mechanisms are often collectively referred to as

  11. Scientific communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Kobylarek

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article tackles the problem of models of communication in science. The formal division of communication processes into oral and written does not resolve the problem of attitude. The author defines successful communication as a win-win game, based on the respect and equality of the partners, regardless of their position in the world of science. The core characteristics of the process of scientific communication are indicated , such as openness, fairness, support, and creation. The task of creating the right atmosphere for science communication belongs to moderators, who should not allow privilege and differentiation of position to affect scientific communication processes.

  12. Understanding collaborative studies through interoperable workflow provenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altintas, I.; Anand, M.K.; Crawl, D.; Bowers, S.; Belloum, A.; Missier, P.; Ludäscher, B.; Goble, C.A.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2010-01-01

    The provenance of a data product contains information about how the product was derived, and is crucial for enabling scientists to easily understand, reproduce, and verify scientific results. Currently, most provenance models are designed to capture the provenance related to a single run, and mostly

  13. 临床护理和护理科研中Meta分析法应用现状的文献分析%Current application of meta-analysis in clinical nursing and nursing scientific research in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常婷; 赵婷; 陶学梅; 潘凌蕴

    2013-01-01

    目的 对近10年Meta分析法在国内护理临床和科研中的应用现状进行研究.方法 采用计算机检索和手工检索相结合的方法,检索2003年1月至2013年1月万方数据资源系统、中国知网(CNKI)、中文科技期刊数据库(VIP)、中文生物医学期刊数据库(CMCC)收录的国内所有涉及护理临床和科研应用的Meta分析文章,2位评估者独立提取数据,应用OQAQ量表进行质量评价.结果 纳入21篇合格文献,其中专科护理实践16篇,护理教育5篇.纳入文献中,资料检索和缺乏研究真实性评价是主要缺陷.结论 应用Meta分析可以汇总同类护理研究的不同研究结果,目前许多护理领域Meta分析的应用仍是空白,护理工作可以应用这种分析方法提高护理学科研水平.%Objective To understand current application of meta-analysis in clinical nursing and nursing scientific research in China in recent ten years.Methods The literature which concerned application of meta-analysis in clinical nursing and nursing scientific research in China in recent ten years,and was published in January 2003 through January 2013,were retrieved from Wanfang Database,CNKI,VIP,CMCC manually or through computer aided methods.Two researchers extracted data independently and assessed the quality of the included literature with the Oxman-Guyatt Overview Quality Assessment Questionnaire (OQAQ).Results Twenty-one papers met the inclusion and exclusion criteria,with 16 papers concerning specialized advanced nursing practice,the others concerning nursing education.The major defects of the included literature dwelled in inadequate literature searches and absence of validity assessment of studies.Conclusion Meta-analysis could gather different findings from the same kind of nursing research.At present,the application of meta-analysis in many nursing areas is still blank in China.Nursing staff could make use of this analytical method to improve the level of nurse research.

  14. Current Scientific and Regulatory Approaches for Development of Orally Inhaled and Nasal Drug Products: Overview of the IPAC-RS/University of Florida Orlando Inhalation Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochhaus, Guenther; Davis-Cutting, Craig; Oliver, Martin; Lee, Sau L; Lyapustina, Svetlana

    2015-09-01

    This article summarizes discussions at the March 2014 conference organized by the University of Florida (UF) and International Pharmaceutical Aerosol Consortium on Regulation and Science (IPAC-RS), entitled "Orlando Inhalation Conference: Approaches in International Regulation." The special focus of the conference was on global scientific and regulatory issues associated with the testing and demonstration of equivalence for the registration of orally inhaled drug products (OIDPs) in the United States, Europe, Brazil, China, and India. The scope included all types of OIDPs throughout their lifecycle, e.g., innovator/brand-name products, generics, modifications due to lifecycle management, device changes, etc. Details were presented for the U.S. "weight of evidence approach" for registration of generic products (which includes demonstration of in vitro and in vivo equivalence, as well as quantitative and qualitative sameness, and device similarity). The European "stepwise" approach was elucidated, and the thinking of regulatory agencies in the major emerging markets was clarified. The conference also highlighted a number of areas that would benefit from further research and discussion, especially around patient/device interface and human factor studies, statistical methods and criteria for demonstrating equivalence, the relative roles of in vivo and in vitro tests, and appropriate designs and metrics for in vivo studies of inhaled drugs.

  15. A Scientific Understanding of Keystroke Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    proceedings: IEEE Xplore, ACM Digital Library, SpringerLink , and ScienceDirect; the last is a search tool that includes books and journals published by... SpringerLink 2 25 3 - - - 30 Other Sources 15 5 - 5 2 2 29 Total 43 115 3 5 2 2 170 Table 2.1: Breakdown of the number of sources found in survey. The...Neuropsychological Tests: Administration, Norms, and Commentary. Oxford University Press, New York, 2nd edition, 1998. SpringerLink . SpringerLink , 2011. http

  16. Mastering scientific computing with R

    CERN Document Server

    Gerrard, Paul

    2015-01-01

    If you want to learn how to quantitatively answer scientific questions for practical purposes using the powerful R language and the open source R tool ecosystem, this book is ideal for you. It is ideally suited for scientists who understand scientific concepts, know a little R, and want to be able to start applying R to be able to answer empirical scientific questions. Some R exposure is helpful, but not compulsory.

  17. Understanding Secondary Flows in Rivers Using a Combination of Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Measurements and a Finite Volume solution to the Navier-Stokes Equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtak-Cole, E.

    2016-12-01

    Hydraulic processes in rivers are central to issues of river ecosystem health, contaminant transport, and essential to understanding meander dynamics. In particular, large scale secondary flows are often cited as being the driving force behind river bend shape and migration. We seek to understand the fundamental flow patterns in rivers by augmenting field-collected bathymetry and velocity data with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. This approach has successfully been applied to flume studies, but rarely used in a natural setting. Here, complex geometries, lack of data, large woody debris, riprap, and biased measurements all present difficulties. Velocity and bathymetry data were collected over multiple consecutive days on a reach of the Minnesota river in Belle Plaine with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). Time averaging and interpolation of velocity vectors along transects reveal coarse scale secondary flow patterns, including an outer bank cell. A mesh was created from bathymetry data for use with the openFOAM C++ library. A hydraulics study is conducted by solving the Navier-Stokes equations with a slip condition free-surface and large eddy simulation turbulence model. Results are compared to field-measured data, and areas affected by downed trees and riprap are identified. We show that modelling at the coarse scale can provide useful information for understanding river hydraulics and predicting sediment transport over large domains.

  18. Understanding Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Understanding Alzheimer's Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents For ... and brain scans. No treatment so far stops Alzheimer's. However, for some in the disease's early and ...

  19. Scientific/Techical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Chris Leighton, Neutron Scattering Society of American; Mr. J. Ardie (Butch) Dillen, MRS Director of Finance and Administration

    2012-11-07

    The ACNS provides a focal point for the North American neutron user community, strengthening ties within this diverse group, and promoting neutron research in related disciplines. The conference thus serves a dual role as both a national user meeting and a scientific meeting. As a venue for scientific exchange, the ACNS showcases recent results and provides a forum for scientific discussion of neutron-enabled research in fields as diverse as hard and soft condensed matter, liquids, biology, magnetism, engineering materials, chemical spectroscopy, crystal structure, elementary excitations, fundamental physics, and development of neutron instrumentation. This is achieved through a combination of invited oral presentations, contributed oral presentations, and poster sessions. Adequate opportunity for spontaneous discussion and collaboration is also built into the ACNS program in order to foster free exchange of new scientific ideas and the potential for use of powerful neutron scattering methods beyond the current realms of application. The sixth American Conference on Neutron Scattering (ACNS 2012) provided essential information on the breadth and depth of current neutron-related research worldwide. A strong program of plenary, invited and contributed talks showcased recent scientific results in neutron science in a wide range of fields, including soft and hard condensed matter, biology, chemistry, energy and engineering applications, and neutron physics.

  20. Current scientific evidence for integrated community case management (iCCM in Africa: Findings from the iCCM Evidence Symposium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Diaz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In March 2014, over 400 individuals from 35 countries in sub-Saharan Africa and 59 international partner organizations gathered in Accra, Ghana for an integrated Community Case Management (iCCM Evidence Review Symposium. The objective was 2-fold: first, to review the current state of the art of iCCM implementation and second, to assist African countries to integrate lessons learned and best practices presented during the symposium into their programmes. Based on the findings from the symposium this supplement includes a comprehensive set of articles that provide the latest evidence for improving iCCM programs and ways to better monitor and evaluate such programs

  1. Scientific media education in the classroom and beyond: a research agenda for the next decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Grace; Norris, Stephen P.

    2016-03-01

    Scientific media education is the ability to draw on a knowledge of the media and science, in order to choose, understand, evaluate, and respond to representations of science across diverse media genres. We begin this manuscript by reviewing research that shows scientific media education is one of the most important content areas that could be taught in and out of the science classroom. We then set out to identify a research agenda that will help make scientific media education a key content area in both formal and informal science learning environments. In particular, we identified research avenues that will allow us to better understand: (1) limitations in current practices of scientific media education; (2) what scientific media education should look like in the future; and (3) ways we might overcome barriers to implementing a new and improved scientific media education.

  2. Scientific Crossbreeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidtfeldt, Rolf

    This thesis presents an alternative approach to the analysis of interdisciplinarity. One of the basic reasons for developing an alternative method for evaluation of interdisciplinary activities is that epistemic issues are insufficiently dealt with in the existing literature on the topic. To deve......This thesis presents an alternative approach to the analysis of interdisciplinarity. One of the basic reasons for developing an alternative method for evaluation of interdisciplinary activities is that epistemic issues are insufficiently dealt with in the existing literature on the topic....... To develop a more adequate way of capturing what is at stake in interdisciplinarity, I suggest drawing inspiration from the contemporary philosophical literature on scientific representation. The development of a representation based approach to the analysis of interdisciplinarity, and the discussion...... of the concept of “scientific discipline” and disciplinary difference. This chapter provides reasons to assume that conventional scientific taxonomies do not provide a good basis for analysing epistemic aspects of interdisciplinary science. On this background it is argued that the concept of “approaches...

  3. 变化中的地球所面临的挑战:全球变化的科学理解(英文)%CHALLENGES OF A CHANGING EARTH:TOWARDS A SCIENTIFIC UNDERSTANDING OF GLOBAL CHANGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    简要介绍了变化中的地球所面临的挑战,并在描述地球系统科学近年来所取得成就的基础上给出了全球变化的科学理解.同时也简要介绍了世界正在面临的主要环境问题;描述了气候系统研究所达成的共识、面临的挑战及所取得的研究进展;并从大气、海洋和陆地间的CO2交换、转换、不确定性等方面阐述了碳循环;然后,简单描述了全球水循环研究进展;最后,展望了在变化的地球中生存所要面临的挑战与机遇.%This paper introduces the challenges of a changing Earth and gives a scientific understanding of global change basing on the description of scientific accomplishment about the Earth System. Firstly, the significant environmental problems the world facing are introduced briefly. Secondly, the consensus, challenge, and advancement of climate system research are described. Thirdly, the carbon cycle is elaborated from its transition, uncertainty, and CO2 exchange among atmosphere, ocean, and land. Fourthly, global hydrological cycle is displayed. Lastly, the challenges and opportunities of living with a changing Earth are expected.

  4. Bringing Kids into the Scientific Review Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, Sabine; Knight, Robert T

    2017-01-04

    Frontiers for Young Minds puts kids in charge of scientific publications by having them control the review process. This provides kids the ability to shape the way science is taught and to better understand the scientific method.

  5. Scientific evidence for health effects attributed to the consumption of probiotics and prebiotics: an update for current perspectives and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Rafael Chacon Ruiz; Bedani, Raquel; Saad, Susana Marta Isay

    2015-12-28

    Probiotics and prebiotics, mainly commercialised as food ingredients and also as supplements, are considered highly profitable niche markets. However, in recent years, the food industry has suffered from a series of health claim restrictions on probiotics and prebiotics in many parts of the world, including those made by the European Food Safety Authority. Therefore, we reviewed the core benefits of probiotic and prebiotic consumption on health. A number of studies have examined the prevention and/or management of intestinal infections, respiratory tract infections, CVD, osteoporosis, urogenital infections, cavities, periodontal disease and halitosis, allergic reactions, inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome and Helicobacter pylori gastric infections. In fact, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms involved in human microbiota and immune system modulation by probiotics and prebiotics relies on continuous efforts to establish suitable biomarkers of health and diseases risk factors for the design of clinical trials required for health claim approval. In spite of the promising results, the performance of large, long-term, well-planned, well-aligned clinical studies is crucial to provide more reliability and a more solid basis for the outcomes achieved and to support the potential use of probiotics and prebiotics in clinical practice.

  6. Women scientists' scientific and spiritual ways of knowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffington, Angela Cunningham

    While science education aims for literacy regarding scientific knowledge and the work of scientists, the separation of scientific knowing from other knowing may misrepresent the knowing of scientists. The majority of science educators K-university are women. Many of these women are spiritual and integrate their scientific and spiritual ways of knowing. Understanding spiritual women of science would inform science education and serve to advance the scientific reason and spirituality debate. Using interviews and grounded theory, this study explores scientific and spiritual ways of knowing in six women of science who hold strong spiritual commitments and portray science to non-scientists. From various lived experiences, each woman comes to know through a Passive knowing of exposure and attendance, an Engaged knowing of choice, commitment and action, an Mindful/Inner knowing of prayer and meaning, a Relational knowing with others, and an Integrated lifeworld knowing where scientific knowing, spiritual knowing, and other ways of knowing are integrated. Consequences of separating ways of knowing are discussed, as are connections to current research, implications to science education, and ideas for future research. Understanding women scientists' scientific/ spiritual ways of knowing may aid science educators in linking academic science to the life-worlds of students.

  7. Scientific Realism versus Antirealism in Science Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungbae Park

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Scientific realists believe both what a scientific theory says about observables and unobservables. In contrast, scientific antirealists believe what a scientific theory says about observables, but not about unobservables. I argue that scientific realism is a more useful doctrine than scientific antirealism in science classrooms. If science teachers are antirealists, they are caught in Moore’s paradox when they help their students grasp the content of a scientific theory, and when they explain a phenomenon in terms of a scientific theory. Teachers ask questions to their students to check whether they have grasped the content of a scientific theory. If the students are antirealists, they are also caught in Moore’s paradox when they respond positively to their teachers’ questions, and when they explain a phenomenon in terms of a scientific theory. Finally, neither teachers nor students can understand phenomena in terms of scientific theories, if they are antirealists.

  8. Etiquette in scientific publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Vinod

    2013-10-01

    Publishing a scientific article in a journal with a high impact factor and a good reputation is considered prestigious among one's peer group and an essential achievement for career progression. In the drive to get their work published, researchers can forget, either intentionally or unintentionally, the ethics that should be followed in scientific publishing. In an environment where "publish or perish" rules the day, some authors might be tempted to bend or break rules. This special article is intended to raise awareness among orthodontic journal editors, authors, and readers about the types of scientific misconduct in the current publishing scenario and to provide insight into the ways these misconducts are managed by the Committee of Publishing Ethics. Case studies are presented, and various plagiarism detection software programs used by publishing companies are briefly described.

  9. Understanding of the Current Long-term Care Policy in China%理解我国现阶段的长期照护政策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    房莉杰

    2015-01-01

    以全面了解目前中国的长期照护政策,从制度发展的角度理解其处境、问题及未来趋势为研究目的,回顾了主要相关文献、政府政策文件,并对全国统计数据进行了对比。研究表明:我国进入21世纪以来,长期照护产生和发展背景是需求迅速增加,且原有服务能力不足,因此我国长期照护政策是从服务机构“能力建设”起步。发展至今,一方面服务数量增加、内容丰富、形成多元提供的格局;另一方面,很多服务需求仍没有得到释放,公平性差,服务机构的持续发展也存在隐患。问题的根源在于空有能力建设,而制度建设不足,尤其是筹资制度。%With the purpose of understanding the current long-term care policy and understanding its position, problems and developing trend with an institutional from the perspective of the transition. This paper reviews the main related papers, the government policy document and compares the national statistical data. Since the entrance of the 21st century, the supply of long-term care needs the rapid development and now it is far from adequate. The construction of the long-term new care system has been started with capacity building ten years ago. Understanding the long-term care policy in current China, on one hand, the institutional care and the community care has both developed fast;but on the other hand, the absence of a stable policy scheme has more and more obstructed the sustainable development of the long-term care.

  10. Scientific Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    As one of the world's largest grain consumers,food security has always been a major concern for the Chinese nation.China must confront the challenge of feeding a fifth of the world's population with less than 9 percent of the planet's arable land.In 2011,China's grain output recorded growth for the eighth successive year,and total production reached an all-time high of 571million tons.In terms of food security,China's goal is to maintain a self-sufficiency rate of above 95 percent.However,an annual net population growth of 7.39 million and the effective decline of the area of farmland in the country,as a result of urbanization,make achieving such selfsufficiency a serious challenge.Given the heavy burden placed on Chinese agriculture,constantly raising productivity by relying on scientific and technological progress has become a priority for China's agricultural sector.The Ministry of Agriculture,for example,has worked to raise China's annual grain yield per-unit area by 1 percent,on average,over the past decade.Last year,the contributory rate of scientific and technological development to China's agriculture reached 52 percent,surpassing the contribution made by land,labor and other production factors for the first time in history.

  11. Current Situation of Published SCI Paper in Traditional Chinese Medicine Scientific Research in Stitutes%我国中医药科研单位发表SCI论文现状分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘学俊; 陈玉龙

    2012-01-01

    目的:分析我国中医药科研机构发表SCI论文情况.方法:利用ISI Web of Knowledge数据库进行了检索,从学科类别、文献类别、研究机构、发表年份、出版物、引文等方面进行了分析.结果:我国中医药科研机构发表的SCI论文逐年增多,中药学相关论文数目明显多于中医学相关论文,发表在中国大陆出版的期刊比例较重,论文引用率相对较低.结论:我国中医药科研单位发表的SCI论文数量增长迅速,但仍有发展空间,质量亟待提高,中药与中医相关论文发展呈不平衡态势.%Objective: Analyze the current situation of published SCI paper in traditional Chinese medicine scientific research institutes. Methods:Use the ISI Web of Knowledge database to analyze from the subject category,literature type,research institutions,published year,publications,citations and so on. Results:SCI paper published in the Chinese medicine scientific research institutions increase annually , Chinese medicine related significantly more than traditional Chinese medicine related and more published in the journal published in Chinese mainland with low quoted rate. Conclusion: Published SCI paper in the traditional Chinese medicine scientific research institutes increases rapidly,but still need development and improvement. The development of Chinese medicine and traditional Chinese medicine development related thesis shows imbalance.

  12. Understanding uncertainty

    CERN Document Server

    Lindley, Dennis V

    2013-01-01

    Praise for the First Edition ""...a reference for everyone who is interested in knowing and handling uncertainty.""-Journal of Applied Statistics The critically acclaimed First Edition of Understanding Uncertainty provided a study of uncertainty addressed to scholars in all fields, showing that uncertainty could be measured by probability, and that probability obeyed three basic rules that enabled uncertainty to be handled sensibly in everyday life. These ideas were extended to embrace the scientific method and to show how decisions, containing an uncertain element, could be rationally made.

  13. First-year university Physics students’ knowledge about direct current circuits: probing improvement in understanding as a function of teaching and learning interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Richard; van der Ventel, Brandon; Hanekom, Crischelle

    2017-07-01

    Probing university students’ understanding of direct-current (DC) resistive circuits is still a field of active physics education research. We report here on a study we conducted of this understanding, where the cohort consisted of students in a large-enrollment first-year physics module. This is a non-calculus based physics module for students in the life sciences stream. The study involved 366 students enrolled in the physics (bio) 154 module at Stellenbosch University in 2015. Students’ understanding of DC resistive circuits was probed by means of a standardized test instrument. The instrument comprises 29 multiple choice questions that students have to answer in ~40 min. Students were required to first complete the standardized test at the start of semester (July 2015). For ease of reference we call this test the pre-test. Students answered the pre-test having no university-level formal exposure to DC circuits in theory or practice. The pre-test therefore served to probe students’ school level knowledge of DC circuits. As the semester progressed students were exposed to a practical (E1), lectures, a prescribed textbook, a tutorial and online videos focusing on DC circuits. The E1 practical required students to solve DC circuit problems by means of physically constructing circuits, algebraically using Kirchhoff's Rules and Ohm’s Law, and by means of simulating circuits using the app iCircuit running on iPads (iOS platform). Each E1 practical involved ~50 students in a three hour session. The practical was repeated three afternoons per week over an eight week period. Twenty three iPads were distributed among students on a practical afternoon in order for them to do the circuit simulations in groups (of 4-5 students). At the end of the practical students were again required to do the standardized test on circuits and complete a survey on their experience of the use of the iPad and iCircuit app. For ease of reference we refer to this second test as the

  14. Mathematics for understanding disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bies, R R; Gastonguay, M R; Schwartz, S L

    2008-06-01

    The application of mathematical models to reflect the organization and activity of biological systems can be viewed as a continuum of purpose. The far left of the continuum is solely the prediction of biological parameter values, wherein an understanding of the underlying biological processes is irrelevant to the purpose. At the far right of the continuum are mathematical models, the purposes of which are a precise understanding of those biological processes. No models in present use fall at either end of the continuum. Without question, however, the emphasis in regards to purpose has been on prediction, e.g., clinical trial simulation and empirical disease progression modeling. Clearly the model that ultimately incorporates a universal understanding of biological organization will also precisely predict biological events, giving the continuum the logical form of a tautology. Currently that goal lies at an immeasurable distance. Nonetheless, the motive here is to urge movement in the direction of that goal. The distance traveled toward understanding naturally depends upon the nature of the scientific question posed with respect to comprehending and/or predicting a particular disease process. A move toward mathematical models implies a move away from static empirical modeling and toward models that focus on systems biology, wherein modeling entails the systematic study of the complex pattern of organization inherent in biological systems.

  15. A combined field and numerical approach to understanding dilute pyroclastic density current dynamics and hazard potential: Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Brittany D.; Gravley, Darren M.; Clarke, Amanda B.; Lindsay, Jan M.; Bloomberg, Simon H.; Agustin-Flores, Javier; Németh, Károly

    2014-04-01

    less damage is expected up to the final runout distance of 4 km. For larger eruptions (base surge runout distance 4-6 km), Pdyn of > 35 kPa can be expected up to 2.5 km from source, ensuring complete destruction within this area. Moderate damage to reinforced structures and damage to weaker structures can be expected up to 6 km from source. In both cases hot ash may still cause damage due to igniting flammable materials in the distal-most regions of a base surge. This work illustrates our ability to combine field observations and numerical models to explore the depositional mechanisms, macroscale current dynamics, and potential impact of dilute PDCs. Thus, this approach may serve as a tool to understand the damage potential and extent of previous and potential future eruptions in the AVF.

  16. Memorandum of Understanding between CERN and the Government of New-Zealand concerning the Further Development of Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    New Zealand has a pioneering tradition in experimental fundamental physics that originated with Ernest Rutherford. The country currently has active research programmes in the related areas of astrophysics and theoretical physics. Experimental groups from the Universities of Auckland and Canterbury have recently been accepted into the CMS collaboration. They are planning a contribution to the CMS pixel detector, and have already started simulations of heavy-ion collisions in CMS. They have also expressed interest in the applications of pixel imaging technology to medicine, and in Grid computing. Collaboration with CERN is seen by the New Zealand Government as an important element in its strategy of seeking linkages with international research networks and overcoming the country's relative geographical isolation. The proposed Agreement (which, taking into account specific New Zealand legal constraints, is named « Memorandum of Understanding » instead of, as is usual at CERN,« Co-operation Agreement ») would...

  17. PLAGIARISM IN SCIENTIFIC PUBLISHING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet

    2012-01-01

    scientific research and intellectual honesty of researchers which would be absolutely applicable in all situations and in all research institutions. A special form of plagiarism is self-plagiarism. Scientists need to take into consideration this form of plagiarism, though for now there is an attitude as much as their own words can be used without the word about plagiarism. If the authors cite their own research facilities already stated then they should be put in quote sand cite the source in which it was published. Science should not be exempt from disclosure and sanctioning plagiarism. In the fight against intellectual dishonesty on ethics education in science has a significant place. A general understanding of ethics in scientific research work in all its stages had to be acquired during the undergraduate course and continue to intensify. It is also important ethical aspect of the publishing industry,especially in small and developing economies,because the issuer has an educational role in the development of the scientific community that aspires to relish so. In this paper author describe his experiences in discovering of plagiarism as Editor-in-Chief of three indexed medical journals with presentations of several examples of plagiarism recorded in countries in Southeastern Europe. PMID:23378684

  18. Plagiarism in scientific publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet

    2012-12-01

    scientific research and intellectual honesty of researchers which would be absolutely applicable in all situations and in all research institutions. A special form of plagiarism is self-plagiarism. Scientists need to take into consideration this form of plagiarism, though for now there is an attitude as much as their own words can be used without the word about plagiarism. If the authors cite their own research facilities already stated then they should be put in quote sand cite the source in which it was published. Science should not be exempt from disclosure and sanctioning plagiarism. In the fight against intellectual dishonesty on ethics education in science has a significant place. A general understanding of ethics in scientific research work in all its stages had to be acquired during the undergraduate course and continue to intensify. It is also important ethical aspect of the publishing industry,especially in small and developing economies,because the issuer has an educational role in the development of the scientific community that aspires to relish so. In this paper author describe his experiences in discovering of plagiarism as Editor-in-Chief of three indexed medical journals with presentations of several examples of plagiarism recorded in countries in Southeastern Europe.

  19. Scientific Eschatology

    CERN Document Server

    Noyes, H P; Lindesay, James

    2005-01-01

    The future evolution of the universe suggested by the cosmological model proposed earlier at this meeting by the authors is explored. The fundamental role played by the positive "cosmological constant" is emphasized. Dyson's 1979 paper entitled "Time Without End" is briefly reviewed. His most optimistic scenario requires that the universe be geometrically open and that biology is structural in the sense that the current complexity of human society can be reproduced by scaling up its (quantum mechanical) structure to arbitrary size. If the recently measured "cosmological constant" is indeed a fundamental constant of nature, then Dyson's scenario is, for various reasons, ruled out by the finite (De Sitter) horizon due to exponential expansion of the resulting space. However, the finite temperature of that horizon does open other interesting options. If, as is suggested by the cosmology under consideration, the current exponential expansion of the universe is due to a phase transition which fixes a physical boun...

  20. Scientific Toy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Tensegritoy, inspired by the tensegrity concepts of R. Buckminster Fuller, is an erector set like toy designed to give students an understanding of structural stability. It is used by children, architects, engineers, and teachers. The manufacturer, Tensegrity Systems Corporation, also offers a collapsible point of purchase display which incorporates technology developed for space station trusses described in "NASA Tech Briefs." The tech brief described deployable trusses that can be collapsed into small packages for space shuttle transport, then unfolded in space. As a result, the display occupies a minimum amount of floor space, freight cost savings are substantial and assembly can be completed quickly.

  1. SCIENTIFIC STATUS OF DIDACTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Osmolovskaya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The research is aimed at scientific justification of didactics referred to the social and humanitarian field of knowledge. The author deals with the scientific character criteria (verity, inter-subjectivity, systemacity and validity taking into account different scientific rationality types (classical and nonclassical and identifying post-modernism influence on didactics. Objectives and results of research. Attempts are made to systematize the didactic knowledge and identify its components and structure. Didactic concepts are classified in accordance with its objects: teaching process by the whole, its individual components or educative process aspects that enable to form definite teaching views, studying it from the specific positions. The author singles out holistic-didactic, component and aspect concepts; and specifies the concept of didactic systems and models with its hierarchy. The author highlights the didactic knowledge increment. Apart from traditional empirical theoretical researches, the author’s attention is drawn to the academic pursuit such as a scientific project based on the didactic object specificity of the teaching process which is fully human controlled and realized and doesn’texist without human being. It is shown that basic theoretical ideas of scientific projects are itemized, concretized and enlarged during co-current educative practice, i.e. an adhesion of theory and practice occurs.It is stressed that there are two special directions of didactic development multidimensionality: 1. extension of its semantic field in the context of modern socio-cultural conditions; 2. increase of scientific status related to a conceptual framework improvement, empirically accumulated information arrangement, new hypotheses, theories and concepts’ development. Scientific novelty. The research findings demonstrate well-reasoned statement of the didactics’ scientific status, its particular components and structure

  2. SCIENTIFIC STATUS OF DIDACTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Osmolovskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The research is aimed at scientific justification of didactics referred to the social and humanitarian field of knowledge. The author deals with the scientific character criteria (verity, inter-subjectivity, systemacity and validity taking into account different scientific rationality types (classical and nonclassical and identifying post-modernism influence on didactics. Objectives and results of research. Attempts are made to systematize the didactic knowledge and identify its components and structure. Didactic concepts are classified in accordance with its objects: teaching process by the whole, its individual components or educative process aspects that enable to form definite teaching views, studying it from the specific positions. The author singles out holistic-didactic, component and aspect concepts; and specifies the concept of didactic systems and models with its hierarchy. The author highlights the didactic knowledge increment. Apart from traditional empirical theoretical researches, the author’s attention is drawn to the academic pursuit such as a scientific project based on the didactic object specificity of the teaching process which is fully human controlled and realized and doesn’texist without human being. It is shown that basic theoretical ideas of scientific projects are itemized, concretized and enlarged during co-current educative practice, i.e. an adhesion of theory and practice occurs.It is stressed that there are two special directions of didactic development multidimensionality: 1. extension of its semantic field in the context of modern socio-cultural conditions; 2. increase of scientific status related to a conceptual framework improvement, empirically accumulated information arrangement, new hypotheses, theories and concepts’ development. Scientific novelty. The research findings demonstrate well-reasoned statement of the didactics’ scientific status, its particular components and structure

  3. 78 FR 57159 - Scientific Information Request on Medication Therapy Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Scientific Information Request on Medication... scientific information submissions from the public on medication therapy management Scientific information is being solicited to inform our review of Medication Therapy Management, which is currently...

  4. Promoting Scientific Spirit to Cultivate Scientific Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Scientific culture is an advanced culture that is based on scientific knowledge and supported by the scientific method, with scientific thinking as its core and scientific spirit as its soul. During the process of modernization, it has profound impacts on human society in terms of values, ethics, mode of thinking, lifestyle and code of conduct, offering human civilization an important ideological source, physical foundation, technological tool and effective carrier.

  5. 10 March 2008 - Swedish Minister for Higher Education and Research L. Leijonborg signing the guest book with CERN Chef Scientific Officer J. Engelen, followed by the signature of the Swedish Computing Memorandum of Understanding by the Director General of the Swedish Research Council P. Ömling.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    10 March 2008 - Swedish Minister for Higher Education and Research L. Leijonborg signing the guest book with CERN Chef Scientific Officer J. Engelen, followed by the signature of the Swedish Computing Memorandum of Understanding by the Director General of the Swedish Research Council P. Ömling.

  6. Signature of the WLCG Memorandum of Understanding between Norway and CERN by Ole Henrik Ellestad, Director of the Research Council of Norway and the Chief Scientific Officer J. Engelen with C. Eck, S. Foffano and B. Jacobsen on 13 December 2007.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    Signature of the WLCG Memorandum of Understanding between Norway and CERN by Ole Henrik Ellestad, Director of the Research Council of Norway and the Chief Scientific Officer J. Engelen with C. Eck, S. Foffano and B. Jacobsen on 13 December 2007.

  7. Scientific Opinion on the evaluation of the substances currently on the list in the annex to Commission Directive 96/3/EC as acceptable previous cargoes for edible fats and oils – Part III of III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain (CONTAM

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Shipping of edible fats and oils into Europe is permitted in bulk tanks, in which substances, included in a positive list, had been previously transported. The European Commission requested EFSA to evaluate the list of substances in the Annex to Commission Directive 96/3/EC as acceptable previous cargoes for edible fats and oils, taking into account its review of the Scientific Committee on Food criteria for acceptable previous cargoes and criteria proposed by the Codex Committee for Fats and Oils. This is the third and last scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain (CONTAM Panel on this topic, in which sixteen of these substances or groups of substances have been evaluated. The CONTAM Panel concluded that sodium silicate (water glass solution, iso-octanol, iso-nonanol, iso-decanol, 1,3-propanediol, isobutyl acetate, sec-butyl acetate, tert-butyl acetate, n-butyl acetate, propylene tetramer, paraffin wax, candelilla wax, white mineral oils and glycerol would not be of health concern as previous cargoes. The CONTAM Panel concluded that carnauba wax was not acceptable as a previous cargo because of its insolubility in water and high melting point, which raise concerns regarding the efficiency of tank cleaning. There was insufficient information available on the composition of montan wax for the CONTAM Panel to conclude that it would be of no health concern when used as previous cargo and hence it does not meet the criteria for acceptability as previous cargo. The CONTAM Panel made several recommendations regarding the way in which the substances are described in the Annex to Commission Directive 96/3/EC, to correct inaccuracies and to better reflect current transport practices.

  8. Scientific Tourism in Armenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashchyan, Davit

    2016-12-01

    The Scientific Tourism is relatively new direction in the world, however it already has managed to gain great popularity. As it is, it has arisen in 1980s, but its ideological basis comes from the earliest periods of the human history. In Armenia, it is a completely new phenomenon and still not-understandable for many people. At global level, the Scientific Tourism has several definitions: for example, as explains the member of the scientific tourist centre of Zlovlen Mrs. Pichelerova "The essence of the scientific tourism is based on the provision of the educational, cultural and entertainment needs of a group of people of people who are interested in the same thing", which in our opinion is a very comprehensive and discreet definition. We also have our own views on this type of tourism. Our philosophy is that by keeping the total principles, we put the emphasis on the strengthening of science-individual ties. Our main emphasis is on the scientific-experimental tourism. But this does not mean that we do not take steps to other forms of tourism. Studying the global experience and combining it with our resources, we are trying to get a new interdisciplinary science, which will bring together a number of different professionals as well as individuals, and as a result will have a new lore. It is in this way that an astronomer will become an archaeologist, an archaeologist will become an astrophysicist, etc. Speaking on interdisciplinary sciences, it's worth mentioning that in recent years, the role of interdisciplinary sciences at global level every day is being considered more and more important. In these terms, tourism is an excellent platform for the creation of interdisciplinary sciences and, therefore, the preparation of corresponding scholars. Nevertheless, scientific tourism is very important for the revelation, appreciation and promotion of the country's historical-cultural heritage and scientific potential. Let us not forget either that tourism in all its

  9. Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    "Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding" is a 19-minute award-winning short-film about teaching at university and higher-level educational institutions. It is based on the "Constructive Alignment" theory developed by Prof. John Biggs. The film delivers a foundation for understanding what...

  10. Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    "Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding" is a 19-minute award-winning short-film about teaching at university and higher-level educational institutions. It is based on the "Constructive Alignment" theory developed by Prof. John Biggs. The film delivers a foundation for understanding what...

  11. Speech and scientific paper. A rhetorical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Carmona Sandoval

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay attempts to show that the ancient rhetorical theory has explanatory capabilities to understand and learn to write modern texts and to analyze them in order to understand their communication skills, as in the scientific article, one of the most prestigious forms on scientific communication. It starts with the notion of discourse in the field of scientific communication and then address the rhetorical dimension of the paper.

  12. [Communication of scientific fraud].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitoun, Jean-David; Rouquette, Sébastien

    2012-09-01

    There is for a scientific journal several levels of communication depending of the degree of suspicion or certainty of a case of error or fraud. The task is increasingly difficult for journal editors as disclosed cases of fraud are more common and scientific communication on this topic is growing. Biomedical fraud is fairly little reported by the mainstream press and causes of this low interest are not currently well understood. The difficulty of processing this type of news for journalists appears to be one possible reason. The potentially numerous and significant consequences of fraud on health professionals are poorly documented. Though it is likely to cause a feeling of distrust and create controversy, the impact of fraud on the general public is poorly studied and appears multifactorial. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Practical scientific computing

    CERN Document Server

    Muhammad, A

    2011-01-01

    Scientific computing is about developing mathematical models, numerical methods and computer implementations to study and solve real problems in science, engineering, business and even social sciences. Mathematical modelling requires deep understanding of classical numerical methods. This essential guide provides the reader with sufficient foundations in these areas to venture into more advanced texts. The first section of the book presents numEclipse, an open source tool for numerical computing based on the notion of MATLAB®. numEclipse is implemented as a plug-in for Eclipse, a leading integ

  14. Scientific Software Component Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, S.; Dykman, N.; Kumfert, G.; Smolinski, B.

    2000-02-16

    We are developing new software component technology for high-performance parallel scientific computing to address issues of complexity, re-use, and interoperability for laboratory software. Component technology enables cross-project code re-use, reduces software development costs, and provides additional simulation capabilities for massively parallel laboratory application codes. The success of our approach will be measured by its impact on DOE mathematical and scientific software efforts. Thus, we are collaborating closely with library developers and application scientists in the Common Component Architecture forum, the Equation Solver Interface forum, and other DOE mathematical software groups to gather requirements, write and adopt a variety of design specifications, and develop demonstration projects to validate our approach. Numerical simulation is essential to the science mission at the laboratory. However, it is becoming increasingly difficult to manage the complexity of modern simulation software. Computational scientists develop complex, three-dimensional, massively parallel, full-physics simulations that require the integration of diverse software packages written by outside development teams. Currently, the integration of a new software package, such as a new linear solver library, can require several months of effort. Current industry component technologies such as CORBA, JavaBeans, and COM have all been used successfully in the business domain to reduce software development costs and increase software quality. However, these existing industry component infrastructures will not scale to support massively parallel applications in science and engineering. In particular, they do not address issues related to high-performance parallel computing on ASCI-class machines, such as fast in-process connections between components, language interoperability for scientific languages such as Fortran, parallel data redistribution between components, and massively

  15. Current status and future perspectives of electron interactions with molecules, clusters, surfaces, and interfaces [Workshop on Fundamental challenges in electron-driven chemistry; Workshop on Electron-driven processes: Scientific challenges and technological opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Kurt H.; McCurdy, C. William; Orlando, Thomas M.; Rescigno, Thomas N.

    2000-09-01

    This report is based largely on presentations and discussions at two workshops and contributions from workshop participants. The workshop on Fundamental Challenges in Electron-Driven Chemistry was held in Berkeley, October 9-10, 1998, and addressed questions regarding theory, computation, and simulation. The workshop on Electron-Driven Processes: Scientific Challenges and Technological Opportunities was held at Stevens Institute of Technology, March 16-17, 2000, and focused largely on experiments. Electron-molecule and electron-atom collisions initiate and drive almost all the relevant chemical processes associated with radiation chemistry, environmental chemistry, stability of waste repositories, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, plasma processing of materials for microelectronic devices and other applications, and novel light sources for research purposes (e.g. excimer lamps in the extreme ultraviolet) and in everyday lighting applications. The life sciences are a rapidly advancing field where the important role of electron-driven processes is only now beginning to be recognized. Many of the applications of electron-initiated chemical processes require results in the near term. A large-scale, multidisciplinary and collaborative effort should be mounted to solve these problems in a timely way so that their solution will have the needed impact on the urgent questions of understanding the physico-chemical processes initiated and driven by electron interactions.

  16. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 2012 Media Resources Media Contacts Multicultural Media Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Cancer Currents Blog About NCI NCI Overview History Contributing to Cancer Research Leadership Director's Page Previous NCI Directors NCI Organization ...

  17. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 2013 2012 Media Resources Media Contacts Multicultural Media Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Cancer Currents Blog About NCI NCI Overview History Contributing to Cancer Research Leadership Director's Page Previous ...

  18. Scientific Progress in Strategic Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai

    , the RBV represents an "unfinished revolution" as there is still considerable potential to dig deeper in the deep structure of competitive advantage. Keywords: Resource-based view, mechanisms, reductionism, competitive advantage, transaction costs, property rights. JEL Code: L2, M1...... for understanding this. Instead, it is argued that in order to understand why the RBV is an instance of scientific progress, we should begin from the notion that reduction is at the heart of progress in science, and that many scientists implicitly or explicitly hold this view. The RBV is a case of scientific...

  19. Role of Scientific Societies in International Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.

    2007-12-01

    Geophysical research increasingly requires global multidisciplinary approaches. Understanding how deeply interrelated are Earth components and processes, population growth, increased needs of mineral and energy resources, global impact of human activities, and view of our planet as an interconnected system emphasizes the need of international cooperation. International research collaboration has an immense potential and is needed for further development of Earth science research and education. The Union Session is planned to provide a forum for analysis and discussion of the status of research and education of geosciences in developing countries, international collaboration programs and new initiatives for promoting and strengthening scientific cooperation. A theme of particular relevance in the analyses and discussions is the role of scientific societies in international collaboration. Societies organize meetings, publish journals and books and promote cooperation through academic exchange activities. They may further assist communities in developing countries in providing and facilitating access to scientific literature, attendance to international meetings, short and long-term stays and student and young researcher mobility. What else can be done? This is a complex subject and scientific societies may not be seen independently from the many factors involved in research and education. Developing countries present additional challenges resulting from limited economic resources and social and political problems, while urgently requiring improved educational and research programs. Needed are in-depth analyses of infrastructure and human resources, and identification of major problems and needs. What are the major limitations and needs in research and postgraduate education in developing countries? What and how should international collaboration do? What are the roles of individuals, academic institutions, funding agencies, scientific societies? Here we attempt to

  20. Salt, time, and metaphor: examining norms in scientific culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Anna G.

    2017-06-01

    As has been widely discussed, the National Research Council's (NRC) current policy in United States education advocates supporting students toward acquiring skills to engage in scientific practices. NRC policy also suggests that supporting students in the practices of science may require different approaches than what is required for supporting student engagement with scientific content. Further, acquiring skills in scientific practices is not limited to gaining proficiency in utilizing tools that support scientific inquiry: students must also understand how to interpret information generated from such tools. These tools of scientific practices are embedded within scientific culture, which from Sewell's perspective, is comprised of both practice and semiotic code (symbols and meanings). To become scientifically literate students must learn to utilize this code in practice. Author Germà Garcia-Belmonte identified one example of learning to utilize the semiotic code in scientific practice and considers challenges faced by undergraduate physics and engineering students within that context. Garcia-Belmonte observes students struggle to interpret symbols and meaning (the visual display generated) while engaging in practice (utilizing an oscilloscope) and posits that two, culturally bound, competing, linguistic metaphors of time may be the cause. Ultimately, however, the author does not explore beyond hypotheses. Although his theory may be correct, the paper serves as a reminder of the responsibility we have to students. As educators, it is useful and beneficial to make observations and develop theories surrounding why our students struggle. However, in addition to theorizing on why, for example, a particular scientific norm might present challenges for our students, we must remain mindful that challenges may not be uniform and may vary considerably according to students' culture(s). Engaging with students and soliciting specific information regarding the challenges

  1. Salt, time, and metaphor: examining norms in scientific culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Anna G.

    2016-08-01

    As has been widely discussed, the National Research Council's (NRC) current policy in United States education advocates supporting students toward acquiring skills to engage in scientific practices. NRC policy also suggests that supporting students in the practices of science may require different approaches than what is required for supporting student engagement with scientific content. Further, acquiring skills in scientific practices is not limited to gaining proficiency in utilizing tools that support scientific inquiry: students must also understand how to interpret information generated from such tools. These tools of scientific practices are embedded within scientific culture, which from Sewell's perspective, is comprised of both practice and semiotic code (symbols and meanings). To become scientifically literate students must learn to utilize this code in practice. Author Germà Garcia-Belmonte identified one example of learning to utilize the semiotic code in scientific practice and considers challenges faced by undergraduate physics and engineering students within that context. Garcia-Belmonte observes students struggle to interpret symbols and meaning (the visual display generated) while engaging in practice (utilizing an oscilloscope) and posits that two, culturally bound, competing, linguistic metaphors of time may be the cause. Ultimately, however, the author does not explore beyond hypotheses. Although his theory may be correct, the paper serves as a reminder of the responsibility we have to students. As educators, it is useful and beneficial to make observations and develop theories surrounding why our students struggle. However, in addition to theorizing on why, for example, a particular scientific norm might present challenges for our students, we must remain mindful that challenges may not be uniform and may vary considerably according to students' culture(s). Engaging with students and soliciting specific information regarding the challenges

  2. Scientific Research: Commodities or Commons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeir, Koen

    2013-10-01

    Truth is for sale today, some critics claim. The increased commodification of science corrupts it, scientific fraud is rampant and the age-old trust in science is shattered. This cynical view, although gaining in prominence, does not explain very well the surprising motivation and integrity that is still central to the scientific life. Although scientific knowledge becomes more and more treated as a commodity or as a product that is for sale, a central part of academic scientific practice is still organized according to different principles. In this paper, I critically analyze alternative models for understanding the organization of knowledge, such as the idea of the scientific commons and the gift economy of science. After weighing the diverse positive and negative aspects of free market economies of science and gift economies of science, a commons structured as a gift economy seems best suited to preserve and take advantage of the specific character of scientific knowledge. Furthermore, commons and gift economies promote the rich social texture that is important for supporting central norms of science. Some of these basic norms might break down if the gift character of science is lost. To conclude, I consider the possibility and desirability of hybrid economies of academic science, which combine aspects of gift economies and free market economies. The aim of this paper is to gain a better understanding of these deeper structural challenges faced by science policy. Such theoretical reflections should eventually assist us in formulating new policy guidelines.

  3. Scientific ballooning in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, R.; Rinke, E.; Fernandes, J. O.; Villela, T.

    We present an overview of the scientific ballooning activities that took place in Brazil over the past 30 years as well as the current ongoing efforts in the area. We also briefly describe the balloon launching facility that exists at the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (National Institute for Space Research) — INPE. Up to now, over 100 scientific balloon experiments, related to Astrophysics, Aeronomy, and Geophysics were launched from Brazil taking advantage of the country's continental dimensions, a well-defined rain season, and a low population density, which offer excellent conditions for scientific ballooning activities. Balloons with volumes up to 500,000 cubic meters can be launched from INPE's balloon launching base (latitude S 22° 4' 2″; longitude W 044° 58' 41″). The availability of good roads and several inland airports in Brazil provides the necessary structure for safe payload retrieval and its rapid return to the balloon base. There are several airports throughout Brazil that can also be used as balloon launching bases, mainly in the country's Eastern region. Overflights of more than 1,000 kilometers are possible and easily attained. Balloon flights ranging from a few hours to long duration flights can be safely verified. The constant climate monitoring through the use of weather satellites information received at INPE provides the necessary data to determine the necessary conditions for a long duration flight. INPE's Center for Weather Forecast and Climate Studies (CPTEC) provides the necessary weather forecast support for launch and payload retrieval.

  4. Do Pre-Service Science Teachers Have Understanding of the Nature of Science?: Explicit-Reflective Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örnek, Funda; Turkey, Kocaeli

    2014-01-01

    Current approaches in Science Education attempt to enable students to develop an understanding of the nature of science, develop fundamental scientific concepts, and develop the ability to structure, analyze, reason, and communicate effectively. Students pose, solve, and interpret scientific problems, and eventually set goals and regulate their…

  5. Do Pre-Service Science Teachers Have Understanding of the Nature of Science?: Explicit-Reflective Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örnek, Funda; Turkey, Kocaeli

    2014-01-01

    Current approaches in Science Education attempt to enable students to develop an understanding of the nature of science, develop fundamental scientific concepts, and develop the ability to structure, analyze, reason, and communicate effectively. Students pose, solve, and interpret scientific problems, and eventually set goals and regulate their…

  6. Sources of error in the retracted scientific literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadevall, Arturo; Steen, R. Grant; Fang, Ferric C.

    2014-01-01

    Retraction of flawed articles is an important mechanism for correction of the scientific literature. We recently reported that the majority of retractions are associated with scientific misconduct. In the current study, we focused on the subset of retractions for which no misconduct was identified, in order to identify the major causes of error. Analysis of the retraction notices for 423 articles indexed in PubMed revealed that the most common causes of error-related retraction are laboratory errors, analytical errors, and irreproducible results. The most common laboratory errors are contamination and problems relating to molecular biology procedures (e.g., sequencing, cloning). Retractions due to contamination were more common in the past, whereas analytical errors are now increasing in frequency. A number of publications that have not been retracted despite being shown to contain significant errors suggest that barriers to retraction may impede correction of the literature. In particular, few cases of retraction due to cell line contamination were found despite recognition that this problem has affected numerous publications. An understanding of the errors leading to retraction can guide practices to improve laboratory research and the integrity of the scientific literature. Perhaps most important, our analysis has identified major problems in the mechanisms used to rectify the scientific literature and suggests a need for action by the scientific community to adopt protocols that ensure the integrity of the publication process.—Casadevall, A., Steen, R. G., Fang, F. C. Sources of error in the retracted scientific literature. PMID:24928194

  7. The framing of scientific domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam Christensen, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: By using the UNISIST models this article argues for the necessity of domain analysis in order to qualify scientific information seeking. The models better understanding of communication processes in a scientific domain and embraces the point that domains are always both unstable over time...... as according to the agents that are charting them. As such, power in a Foucauldian sense is unavoidable in outlining a domain. Originality/value 1. The UNISIST models are applied to the domain of art history; and 2. the article discusses the instability of a scientific domain as well as, at the same time......, the significance of framing a domain; an implication which is often neglected in scientific information seeking....

  8. The framing of scientific domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam Christensen, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: By using the UNISIST models this article argues for the necessity of domain analysis in order to qualify scientific information seeking. The models better understanding of communication processes in a scientific domain and embraces the point that domains are always both unstable over time...... and changeable according to the specific perspective. This understanding is even more important today as numerous digitally generated information tools as well as collaborative and interdisciplinary research are blurring the domain borders. Nevertheless, researchers navigate “intuitively” in “their” specific...... as according to the agents that are charting them. As such, power in a Foucauldian sense is unavoidable in outlining a domain. Originality/value 1. The UNISIST models are applied to the domain of art history; and 2. the article discusses the instability of a scientific domain as well as, at the same time...

  9. Scientific journal cancellations

    CERN Multimedia

    The Library

    2001-01-01

    Earlier this year the Scientific Information Policy Board (SIPB) requested the Library and the Working Group for Acquisitions to revise the current printed journal collection in order to cancel those titles that are less required. Savings could then be used for the development of other collections and particularly electronic resources needed to support CERN current research activities. A list of proposed cancellations was drawn and posted on the Library web pages: http://library.cern.ch/library_general/cancel.html The SIPB invites every one to check if any of the titles are of importance to their work, in which case you are invited to inform the Library before the 25th of September by sending an e-mail to: eliane.chaney@cern.ch Titles not reconsidered by the users will be cancelled by the end of the year. Thank you, The Library

  10. The Evolution of Scientific Knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Siggaard; Ricard, Lykke Margot; Vendelø, Morten Thanning

    The Evolution of Scientific Knowledge aims to reach a unique understanding of science with the help of economic and sociological theories. They use institutional and evolutionary theories and the sociological theories draw from the type of work on social studies of science that have, in recent...

  11. Recommended approaches to the scientific evaluation of ecotoxicological hazards and risks of endocrine-active substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, Peter; Ankley, Gerald T.; Biever, Ronald C

    2017-01-01

    A SETAC Pellston Workshop(®) "Environmental Hazard and Risk Assessment Approaches for Endocrine-Active Substances (EHRA)" was held in February 2016 in Pensacola, Florida, USA. The primary objective of the workshop was to provide advice, based on current scientific understanding, to regulators and...

  12. The Promissory Future(s) of Education: Rethinking Scientific Literacy in the Era of Biocapitalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Clayton

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates the biopolitical dimensions that have grown out of the union between biocapitalism and current science education reform in the US. Drawing on science and technology study theorists, I utilize the analytics of promissory valuation and salvationary discourses to understand how scientific literacy in the neo-Sputnik era has…

  13. Passages on Brazilian scientific cinema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Jane; da Silva, Cicero Inacio; Suppia, Alfredo; Stalbaum, Brett

    2017-07-01

    The article examines the conditions of production and recognition of scientific cinema in Brazil by comparing three distinct moments and contexts: the first moment takes place in the nineteenth century, and it is related to the contribution of a Brazilian astronomer otherwise little known to Brazilian film scholars, the second addresses Benedito Junqueira Duarte's voluminous mid-twentieth-century filmography, and the third moment documents recent scientific film experiences within ultra high resolution movies transmitted over photonic networks. Future trajectories for aesthetic concerns and practical issues such as the archiving of ultra high definition cinema are usefully informed by these histories of scientific cinema, even as a current generation of multidisciplinary teams including scientists, filmmakers, computer scientists, and network engineers reinvent, rediscover, and necessarily expand the scientific cinema toward concerns of real time collaboration and teaching.

  14. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and smoldering multiple myeloma: a review of the current understanding of epidemiology, biology, risk stratification, and management of myeloma precursor disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Amit; Ghobrial, Irene M

    2013-03-01

    The term monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) was coined in 1978. The recent advances in our knowledge about MGUS and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) have helped us better understand the pathogenesis of myeloma. It seems that myeloma evolves from a precursor state in almost all cases. We do not completely understand the multistep process from the precursor state to myeloma, but studies like whole genome sequencing continue to improve our understanding of this process. The process of transformation may not be linear acquisition of changes, but rather a branched heterogeneous process. Clinical features that are prognostic of rapid transformation have been identified, but no specific molecular markers have been identified. Even with recent advances, multiple myeloma remains an incurable disease in the vast majority, and intervening at the precursor state provides a unique opportunity to alter the natural history of the disease. A limitation is that a vast majority of patients with precursor disease, especially low-risk MGUS, will never progress to myeloma in their lifetime, and treating these patients is not only unnecessary but may be potentially harmful. The challenge is to identify a subset of patients with the precursor state that would definitely progress to myeloma and in whom interventions will have a meaningful impact. As our understanding of the molecular and genetic processes improves, these studies will guide the selection of high-risk patients more appropriately and ultimately direct a tailored management strategy to either delay progression to symptomatic myeloma or even "cure" a person at this premalignant stage.

  15. Scientific and Technical Demand and Current Situations of Cassava Biomass Energy Industry in China%我国木薯生物质能源产业发展现状与科技需求

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦昌联; 卢柳忠; 黎贞崇

    2012-01-01

    Based on the analysis of current situations of cassava biomass energy industry in China and the relative advances in science and technology,the major existed problems in this industry were put forward.Furthermore,scientific and technical demands for further development of cassava biomass energy industry were discussed covering the following aspects:strengthening the research on the culture and the matching cultivation technology of new varieties of high-yield high-starch cassava,launching the development of cassava full-process automated manufacturing equipments,strengthening the research on cassava comprehensive utilization and the development of new cassava products,and strengthening the research on the recycle use of cassava waste and the relative techniques.%在分析我国木薯生物质能源产业现状和科技发展进展的基础上,指出了当前木薯生物质能源产业科技发展存在的主要问题。提出了下一步产业发展的科技需求,重点是加强高产高粉木薯新品种培育和配套栽培技术研究,开展木薯全程机械化系列产品的研发,加强木薯综合利用技术和产品攻关及木薯废弃物的资源化利用技术的研发力度。

  16. Enracinement or the earth, the originary ark, does not move: on the phenomenological (historical and ontogenetic) origin of common and scientific sense and the genetic method of teaching (for) understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2015-06-01

    For many students, the experience with science tends to be alienating and uprooting. In this study, I take up Simone Weil's concepts of enracinement (rooting) and déracinement (uprooting) to theorize the root of this alienation, the confrontation between children's familiarity with the world and unfamiliar/strange scientific conceptions. I build on the works of the phenomenological philosopher Edmund Husserl and the German physics educator Martin Wagenschein (who directly refers to Weil's concepts) to make a case for the rooting function of original/originary experiences and the genetic method to science teaching. The genetic approach allows students to retain their foundational familiarity with the world and their descriptions thereof all the while evolving other (more scientific) ways of explaining natural phenomena.

  17. Plate tectonics: Scientific revolution or scientific program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareschal, Jean-Claude

    In The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Thomas S. Kuhn suggested that science progresses discontinuously: As a scientific theory becomes obsolete, a period of crisis results, at the end of which the old theory is overthrown and replaced by a new, sounder, more complete theory [Kuhn, 1962]. After the scientific community has accepted the new [paradigm,] it undertakes only routine research until a new crisis occurs, usually as a result of an anomalous experiment that accidentally happens to be critical.

  18. Replacing Victoria's Scientific Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwan Morus

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Traditional views of nineteenth century science has viewed it in terms of a largely unproblematic institutional consolidation. More recently, the consensus view of the century as a period of leisurely progress towards scientific professionalization has been decisively broken. In particular the issues of what counted as science at all and what sorts of spaces counted as scientific have been rigorously contested. A variety of new accounts of Victorian science have now emerged, built around new sets of questions concerning science's place in culture and the emergence of new strategies of self-fashioning and legitimation. In this overview I survey promising trends in the cultural history of nineteenth-century science with a view to assessing the possibility of resurrecting a new grand narrative. I suggest in conclusion that the possibility of reconstructing such a big picture as an explicitly political account might be improved by rethinking the category of Victorian science and reorienting our understanding around the French Revolution and its immediate aftermath.

  19. Scientific developments ISFD3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schropp, M.H.I.; Soong, T.W.

    2006-01-01

    Highlights, trends, and consensus from the 63 papers submitted to the Scientific Developments theme of the Third International Symposium on Flood Defence (ISFD) are presented. Realizing that absolute protection against flooding can never be guaranteed, trends in flood management have shifted: (1) from flood protection to flood-risk management, (2) from reinforcing structural protection to lowering flood levels, and (3) to sustainable management through integrated problem solving. Improved understanding of watershed responses, climate changes, applications of GIS and remote-sensing technologies, and advanced analytical tools appeared to be the driving forces for renewing flood-risk management strategies. Technical competence in integrating analytical tools to form the basin wide management systems are demonstrated by several large, transnation models. However, analyses from social-economic-environmental points of view are found lag in general. ?? 2006 Taylor & Francis Group.

  20. Scientific aesthetics: three steps forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Anjan

    2014-11-01

    Leder and Nadal (2014, this issue) examine the current state of scientific aesthetics through the lens of a prescient psychological model proposed 10 years ago. These retrospective points to several future directions of which I touch on three: the nature of aesthetic emotions, the time course of emotions in aesthetic episodes, and the relationship of art and evolution.

  1. Building Bridges through Scientific Conferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zierath, Juleen R

    2016-01-01

    Getting together to exchange ideas, forge collaborations, and disseminate knowledge is a long-standing tradition of scientific communities. How conferences are serving the community, what their current challenges are, and what is in store for the future of conferences are the topics covered...

  2. Compreendendo a aprendizagem da linguagem científica na formação de professores de ciências Understanding the learning about scientific language in the science teachers formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Oliveira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Após a contextualização da reforma curricular das ciências no ensino básico em Portugal, apresenta-se uma proposta de trabalho, no campo da Didática, para os professores de ciências aplicarem em sala de aula, que se pretende inovadora, investigação com base no planeamento - "design-based research (DBR". Com a descrição desta abordagem pretende-se dar resposta a problemas que se colocam a professores e a investigadores, como seja a implementação de práticas de ensino baseadas em resultados da investigação de modo a diminuir o fosso existente entre a investigação educacional e as práticas dos professores. O ensino da linguagem científica, base da literacia e da cultura científica, é aqui tratado nessa perspectiva e integrada na abordagem apresentada. A formação de professores, como resposta ao desafio que estes problemas colocam, constitui-se como campo privilegiado de análise.After the contextualization of the Portuguese curricular basic school science reform, an innovative didactic work proposal was presented to be applied in the classroom by science teachers - "design-based research (DBR". With this approach we intend to solve teachers and researchers problems like the implementation of research-oriented practice and to decrease the gap between educational research and teacher practice. The above-mentioned approach integrates the scientific language teaching, crucial for scientific literacy and scientific culture. The teachers' training, as a challenge to solve those problems is a privileged field for analysis.

  3. Authentic Scientific Inquiry and School Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Scientific literacy goals feature strongly in the rhetoric of most forward-looking science curricula. Many science educators believe that a key means of attaining these goals is through the engagement of students in "authentic scientific inquiry". For students to experience such learning it is critical that teachers understand and appreciate what…

  4. Motor Cortex and Motor Cortical Interhemispheric Communication in Walking After Stroke: The Roles of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Animal Models in Our Current and Future Understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalambous, Charalambos C; Bowden, Mark G; Adkins, DeAnna L

    2016-01-01

    Despite the plethora of human neurophysiological research, the bilateral involvement of the leg motor cortical areas and their interhemispheric interaction during both normal and impaired human walking is poorly understood. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), we have expanded our understanding of the role upper-extremity motor cortical areas play in normal movements and how stroke alters this role, and probed the efficacy of interventions to improve post-stroke arm function. However, similar investigations of the legs have lagged behind, in part, due to the anatomical difficulty in using TMS to stimulate the leg motor cortical areas. Additionally, leg movements are predominately bilaterally controlled and require interlimb coordination that may involve both hemispheres. The sensitive, but invasive, tools used in animal models of locomotion hold great potential for increasing our understanding of the bihemispheric motor cortical control of walking. In this review, we discuss 3 themes associated with the bihemispheric motor cortical control of walking after stroke: (a) what is known about the role of the bihemispheric motor cortical control in healthy and poststroke leg movements, (b) how the neural remodeling of the contralesional hemisphere can affect walking recovery after a stroke, and (c) what is the effect of behavioral rehabilitation training of walking on the neural remodeling of the motor cortical areas bilaterally. For each theme, we discuss how rodent models can enhance the present knowledge on human walking by testing hypotheses that cannot be investigated in humans, and how these findings can then be back-translated into the neurorehabilitation of poststroke walking.

  5. The Scientific Life Of John Bahcall

    CERN Document Server

    Haxton, W C

    2009-01-01

    This article follows the scientific life of John Norris Bahcall, including his tenacious pursuit of the solar neutrino problem, his contributions to our understanding of galaxies, quasars, and their emissions, and his leadership of and advocacy for astronomy and astrophysics.

  6. El neoconstitucionalismo y el nuevo constitucionalismo latinoamericano: ¿dos corrientes llamadas a entenderse? || Neoconstitutionalism And The "New" Latin American Constitutionalism: Two Current Calls To Understand?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Belloso Martin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: Entre las corrientes del neoconstitucionalismo y del nuevo constitucionalismo latinoamericano hay aspectos que las diferencian pero también un sustrato común, lo que permite sostener la posibilidad de un diálogo fructífero entre ambas corrientes. Lo “nuevo” del nuevo constitucionalismo latinoamericano no es lo nuevo del movimiento constitucional de Latinoamérica. Se analizarán los presupuestos, las líneas de análisis y las posiciones doctrinales sobre el nuevo constitucionalismo latinoamericano, a la vez que se destacarán las peculiaridades que lo caracterizan. Se identificarán los rasgos principales que caracterizan a una y otra corriente, tales como la omnipresencia de la Constitución, el protagonismo de los principios y el renovado papel asignado al Poder Judicial.Abstract: Among neoconstitutionalism currents and the new Latin American constitutionalism are aspects that differentiate but also a common substrate, allowing the possibility to hold a fruitful dialogue between the two currents. The main features that characterize and over current, such as the omnipresence of the Constitution, the role of the principles and the new role assigned to the judiciary be identified. The 'new' Latin American constitutionalism is not new constitutional movement in Latin America. Budgets, the lines of analysis and doctrinal positions on the new Latin American constitutionalism is analyzed, as well as the peculiarities that characterize it will be highlighted. Finally, it asks whether there is anything really "new" in the new Latin American constitutionalism.

  7. Understanding aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strehler, B L

    2000-01-01

    Enormous advances in our understanding of human aging have occurred during the last 50 yr. From the late 19th to the mid-20th centuries only four comprehensive and important sources of information were available: 1. August Weismann's book entitled Essays on Heredity and Kindred Biological Problems (the first of these essays dealt with The Duration of Life; 1). Weissmann states (p. 10) "In the first place in regulating the length of life, the advantage to the species, and not to the individual, is alone of any importance. This must be obvious to any one who has once thoroughly thought out the process of natural selection_". 2. A highly systematized second early source of information on aging was the collection of essays edited by Cowdry and published in 1938. This 900+ page volume contains 34 chapters and was appropriately called Problems of Aging. 3. At about the same time Raymond Pearl published his book on aging (2). Pearl believed that aging was the indirect result of cell specialization and that only the germ line was resistant to aging. Unfortunately Pearl died in the late 1930s and is largely remembered now for having been the founding editor of Quarterly Review of Biology while he was at the Johns Hopkins University, this author's alma mater. 4. Alexis Carrel wrote a monumental scientific and philosophical book, Man, the Unknown (3). Carrel believed that he had demonstrated that vertebrate cells could be kept in culture and live indefinitely, a conclusion challenged by others (more on this later).

  8. A review of the irradiation evolution of dispersed oxide nanoparticles in the b.c.c. Fe-Cr system: Current understanding and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharry, Janelle P.; Swenson, Matthew J.; Yano, Kayla H.

    2017-04-01

    Thus far, a number of studies have investigated the irradiation evolution of oxide nanoparticles in b.c.c. Fe-Cr based oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys. But given the inconsistent experimental conditions, results have been widely variable and inconclusive. Crystal structure and chemistry changes differ from experiment to experiment, and the total nanoparticle volume fraction has been observed to both increase and decrease. Furthermore, there has not yet been a comprehensive review of the archival literature. In this paper, we summarize the existing studies on nanoparticle irradiation evolution. We note significant observations with respect to oxide nanoparticle crystallinity, composition, size, and number density. We discuss four possible contributing mechanisms for nanoparticle evolution: ballistic dissolution, Ostwald ripening, irradiation-enhanced diffusion, and homogeneous nucleation. Finally, we propose future directions to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of irradiation effects on oxide nanoparticles in ODS alloys.

  9. Betting on better scientific literacy

    CERN Multimedia

    Daisy Yuhas

    Dmitry Zimin, founder of the Russian philanthropic foundation Dynasty, visited CERN on 23 October. Zimin, who is himself a scientist and businessman, founded Dynasty in order to support scientific education and a greater public understanding of scientific thinking. Zimin met the Bulletin to reflect on the experience and what had interested him about CERN. Zimin, who had read about and researched CERN before his visit, felt prepared for the physics at CERN but was greatly impressed by the collaborative “brainforce.” He observed that “The organization of all of these people is not less important as an achievement than all of the technical achievements, the collider, the experiments.” He was amazed at “how CERN has been able to organize such a grand collaboration of different people from different institutes of countries from all over the world.” At the core of the Dynasty Foundation’s ideals is the dissemination of scientific thought. Zimin ...

  10. Scientist Participation in Education and Public Outreach - Using Web Tools to Communicate the Scientific Process and Engage an Audience in Understanding Planetary Science: Examples with Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Data (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petro, N. E.

    2013-12-01

    Scientists often speak to the public about their science and the current state of understanding of their field. While many talks (including those by this author) typically feature static plots, figures, diagrams, and the odd movie/animation/visualization (when technology allows), it is now possible, using the web to guide an audience through the thought process of how a scientist tackles certain questions. The presentation will highlight examples of web tools that effectively illustrate how datasets are used to address questions of lunar science. Why would a scientist use precious time during a talk to interact with data, in real time? Why not just show the results and move on? Through experience it is evident that illustrating how data is analyzed, even in a simple form, engages an audience, and demonstrates the thought process when interacting with data. While it is clear that scientists are unlikely to use such a tool to conduct science, it illustrates how a member of the public can engage with mission data. An example is discussed below. When discussing the geology of the Moon, there is an enormous volume of data that can be used to explain what we know (or think we know) and how we know it. For example, the QuickMap interface (http://www.actgate.com/home/quickmap.htm) enables interaction with a set of data (images, spectral data, topography, radar data) across the entire Moon (http://target.lroc.asu.edu/q3/). This webtool enables a speaker the opportunity (given adequate web connectivity) to talk about features, such as a crater, and show it from multiple perspectives (e.g., plan view, oblique, topographically exaggerated) in a logical flow. The tool enables illustration of topographic profiles, 3-D perspectives, and data overlays. Now, one might ask why doing this demonstration in real time is valuable, over a set of static slides. In some cases static slides are best, and doing any real time demos is unfeasible. However, guiding an engaged audience through

  11. Scientific Insights for Managing Droughts in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, J. R.; Medellin-Azuara, J.; Howitt, R. E.; MacEwan, D.; Sumner, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Droughts stress water systems and provide important opportunities to learn about vulnerabilities and motivate improvements in water systems. Current and past droughts in California show that this highly-engineered system is highly robust and resilient to droughts, as agriculture and urban water needs are mostly fulfilled and recover quickly following drought. However, environmental systems remain highly vulnerable and have shown less resilience to drought, with each drought bringing additional native species closer to extinction, often with little recovery following the drought. This paper reviews the impacts of California's ongoing 4-year drought and its importance for better understanding its ecological and water supply systems, as well as motivating improvements in water management and scientific work.

  12. Scientific integrity in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lins, Liliane; Carvalho, Fernando Martins

    2014-09-01

    This article focuses on scientific integrity and the identification of predisposing factors to scientific misconduct in Brazil. Brazilian scientific production has increased in the last ten years, but the quality of the articles has decreased. Pressure on researchers and students for increasing scientific production may contribute to scientific misconduct. Cases of misconduct in science have been recently denounced in the country. Brazil has important institutions for controlling ethical and safety aspects of human research, but there is a lack of specific offices to investigate suspected cases of misconduct and policies to deal with scientific dishonesty.

  13. Scientific mobility and development: toward a socioeconomic conceptual framework

    OpenAIRE

    Woolley, Richard; Cañibano, Carolina

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the theoretical discussion of scientific mobility in order to progress understanding of the role it plays in shaping and fostering knowledge transfers, which in turn could benefit the scientific and technological advancement of developing countries. We use Callon's socioeconomics of scientific research (1994, 2002) as the theoretical basis for posing the question: to what extent are the components of scientific knowledge embodied in scientific hum...

  14. Evaluating simplistic methods to understand current distributions and forecast distribution changes under climate change scenarios: An example with coypu (Myocastor coypus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarnevich, Catherine S.; Young, Nicholas E; Sheffels, Trevor R.; Carter, Jacoby; Systma, Mark D.; Talbert, Colin

    2017-01-01

    Invasive species provide a unique opportunity to evaluate factors controlling biogeographic distributions; we can consider introduction success as an experiment testing suitability of environmental conditions. Predicting potential distributions of spreading species is not easy, and forecasting potential distributions with changing climate is even more difficult. Using the globally invasive coypu (Myocastor coypus [Molina, 1782]), we evaluate and compare the utility of a simplistic ecophysiological based model and a correlative model to predict current and future distribution. The ecophysiological model was based on winter temperature relationships with nutria survival. We developed correlative statistical models using the Software for Assisted Habitat Modeling and biologically relevant climate data with a global extent. We applied the ecophysiological based model to several global circulation model (GCM) predictions for mid-century. We used global coypu introduction data to evaluate these models and to explore a hypothesized physiological limitation, finding general agreement with known coypu distribution locally and globally and support for an upper thermal tolerance threshold. Global circulation model based model results showed variability in coypu predicted distribution among GCMs, but had general agreement of increasing suitable area in the USA. Our methods highlighted the dynamic nature of the edges of the coypu distribution due to climate non-equilibrium, and uncertainty associated with forecasting future distributions. Areas deemed suitable habitat, especially those on the edge of the current known range, could be used for early detection of the spread of coypu populations for management purposes. Combining approaches can be beneficial to predicting potential distributions of invasive species now and in the future and in exploring hypotheses of factors controlling distributions.

  15. Evaluating simplistic methods to understand current distributions and forecast distribution changes under climate change scenarios: an example with coypu (Myocastor coypus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine S. Jarnevich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive species provide a unique opportunity to evaluate factors controlling biogeographic distributions; we can consider introduction success as an experiment testing suitability of environmental conditions. Predicting potential distributions of spreading species is not easy, and forecasting potential distributions with changing climate is even more difficult. Using the globally invasive coypu (Myocastor coypus [Molina, 1782], we evaluate and compare the utility of a simplistic ecophysiological based model and a correlative model to predict current and future distribution. The ecophysiological model was based on winter temperature relationships with nutria survival. We developed correlative statistical models using the Software for Assisted Habitat Modeling and biologically relevant climate data with a global extent. We applied the ecophysiological based model to several global circulation model (GCM predictions for mid-century. We used global coypu introduction data to evaluate these models and to explore a hypothesized physiological limitation, finding general agreement with known coypu distribution locally and globally and support for an upper thermal tolerance threshold. Global circulation model based model results showed variability in coypu predicted distribution among GCMs, but had general agreement of increasing suitable area in the USA. Our methods highlighted the dynamic nature of the edges of the coypu distribution due to climate non-equilibrium, and uncertainty associated with forecasting future distributions. Areas deemed suitable habitat, especially those on the edge of the current known range, could be used for early detection of the spread of coypu populations for management purposes. Combining approaches can be beneficial to predicting potential distributions of invasive species now and in the future and in exploring hypotheses of factors controlling distributions.

  16. Asthma in the elderly: Current understanding and future research needs--a report of a National Institute on Aging (NIA) workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanania, Nicola A; King, Monroe J; Braman, Sidney S; Saltoun, Carol; Wise, Robert A; Enright, Paul; Falsey, Ann R; Mathur, Sameer K; Ramsdell, Joe W; Rogers, Linda; Stempel, David A; Lima, John J; Fish, James E; Wilson, Sandra R; Boyd, Cynthia; Patel, Kushang V; Irvin, Charles G; Yawn, Barbara P; Halm, Ethan A; Wasserman, Stephen I; Sands, Mark F; Ershler, William B; Ledford, Dennis K

    2011-09-01

    Asthma in the elderly is underdiagnosed and undertreated, and there is a paucity of knowledge on the subject. The National Institute on Aging convened this workshop to identify what is known and what gaps in knowledge remain and suggest research directions needed to improve the understanding and care of asthma in the elderly. Asthma presenting at an advanced age often has similar clinical and physiologic consequences as seen with younger patients, but comorbid illnesses and the psychosocial effects of aging might affect the diagnosis, clinical presentation, and care of asthma in this population. At least 2 phenotypes exist among elderly patients with asthma; those with longstanding asthma have more severe airflow limitation and less complete reversibility than those with late-onset asthma. Many challenges exist in the recognition and treatment of asthma in the elderly. Furthermore, the pathophysiologic mechanisms of asthma in the elderly are likely to be different from those seen in young asthmatic patients, and these differences might influence the clinical course and outcomes of asthma in this population.

  17. Case study of quasi-steady reconnection in Saturn's magnetotail, and update on our current understanding of mass transport and loss in Saturn's nightside magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, C. M.; Thomsen, M. F.; Mitchell, D. G.; Sergis, N.; Arridge, C. S.; Felici, M.; Badman, S. V.; Paranicas, C.; Jia, X.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Andriopoulou, M.; Khurana, K. K.; Smith, A. W.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2015-10-01

    We present a case study of an event from August20th (day 232) of 2006, as viewed by magnetic field, plasma, energetic particle and plasma wave sensors (MAG/CAPS/MIMI/RPWS) when the Cassini spacecraft was sampling the region near 32 Rs and 22 hours LT in Saturn's magnetotail. Cassini observed a strong northward-to-southward turning of the magnetic field, which is interpreted as the signature of dipolarization of the field as seen by the spacecraft planetward of the reconnection x-line. This event was accompanied by very rapid (up to ~1500 km s-1) thermal plasma flow toward the planet. At energies above 28 keV, energetic hydrogen and oxygen ion flow bursts were observed to stream planetward from a reconnection site downtail of the spacecraft. Meanwhile a strong field-aligned beam of energetic hydrogen was also observed to stream tailward, likely from an ionospheric source. Saturn Kilometric Radiation emissions were stimulated shortly after the observation of the dipolarization. We discuss the field, plasma, energetic particle and radio observations in the context of the impact this reconnection event had on global magnetospheric dynamics.We also discuss this event in terms of other recent studies of reconnection in Saturn's tail and update on the emerging picture concerning our understanding of how mass is transported and lost within Saturn's magnetosphere.

  18. Getting Healthy Scientifically

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Recently,Zhao Zhixin,a Beijing-based instructor on scientific bodybuilding and public sport,was interviewed by China Youth Daily,sharing his views on how to get healthy scientifically.Edited excerpts follow:

  19. Teaching toward a More Scientifically Literate Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoGiudici, Raymond; Ende, Fred

    2010-01-01

    To teach scientific literacy to eighth graders, the authors created a yearlong project that emphasizes the various components and skills required to be a scientifically literate citizen. This project is broken into four separate components: skeptical thinking (pseudoscience), current-event article analysis, fiction and nonfiction literature, and…

  20. [Scientific concepts in clinical medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogler, G

    2003-11-28

    The understanding of the scientific basis and the theory of knowledge are surprisingly heterogeneous in practical and clinical medicine. It is frequently influenced or based on the philosophical theory of critical rationalism founded by Sir Karl Popper. Because the theory of knowledge and the understanding of scientific truth is the central basis for cautious and good clinical practise it is necessary to discuss both points to avoid unscientific auto-immunisation against critique in a type of medicine that regards herself as science-based. Evidence-based medicine would not be possible without interpretation and explanation of existing data into the individual treatment context. Besides an inductive or deductive logic the historical and situative side-conditions of the gathering of knowledge and of experiments are of central importance for their interpretation and their relevance in clinical practice. This historical and situative context warrants reflection but must also be paid attention to in the reflections on medical ethics.

  1. Extensional scientific realism vs. intensional scientific realism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seungbae

    2016-10-01

    Extensional scientific realism is the view that each believable scientific theory is supported by the unique first-order evidence for it and that if we want to believe that it is true, we should rely on its unique first-order evidence. In contrast, intensional scientific realism is the view that all believable scientific theories have a common feature and that we should rely on it to determine whether a theory is believable or not. Fitzpatrick argues that extensional realism is immune, while intensional realism is not, to the pessimistic induction. I reply that if extensional realism overcomes the pessimistic induction at all, that is because it implicitly relies on the theoretical resource of intensional realism. I also argue that extensional realism, by nature, cannot embed a criterion for distinguishing between believable and unbelievable theories.

  2. Research into the Current Situation of Scientific Research and its Management in Universities%高校科研与科研管理工作现状探微

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢青; 吴卫红

    2011-01-01

    In recent ten years,great achievements have been made in university scientific research and its management in China,but some problems do exist and must be solved as soon as possible.The phenomena of professional-title-oriented scientific research and extrusion academic research have been an object of public denunciation.No doubt,it is unfair to lay stress on management but neglect service and give judgment on scientific research with the same criterion in different levels and types of universities.Therefore,strengthening the function of academic organization,optimizing the model of academic organization,refining evaluation mechanism of scientific research and cultivating the spirit of good faith are the inevitable requirements for improving university scientific research and its management.%近10年来,我国高校科研及科研管理工作取得了不小成就,但也存在一些亟待调整、解决的问题。"职称科研"、"膨化学术"等现象一直为世人所诟病;重管理、轻服务,用同一标准来评判不同层次和类型高校的科研成果自然有失公允。强化高校学术组织职能,调整、优化高校学术组织模式,强化、细化高校科研评价机制,倡导、培养诚信精神,是做好高校科研及科研管理工作的必然要求。

  3. Understanding Ocean Acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This curriculum module is designed for students who are taking high school chemistry. Students should already have some experience with the following: (1) Understanding and reading the pH scale; (2) Knowledge of the carbon cycle; (3) Using scientific notation to express large and small values; and (4) Reading chemical equations. This curriculum…

  4. The Scientific Data Management Center

    OpenAIRE

    Shoshani, Arie

    2006-01-01

    With the increasing volume and complexity of data produced by ultra-scale simulations and high-throughput experiments, understanding the science is largely hampered by the lack of comprehensive, end-to-end data management solutions ranging from initial data acquisition to final analysis and visualization. The Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center is bringing a set of advanced data management technologies to DOE scientists in various application domains including astrophysics, climate, ...

  5. What is scientific misconduct?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    2006-01-01

    Selected examples from history are discussed to illustrate the many difficulties in judging scientific behavior. Scientific misconduct is not an a priori given concept but must first be defined. The definitions of scientific misconduct used in the USA and in Denmark are discussed as examples....

  6. Do Zoo Visitors Need Zoology Knowledge to Understand Conservation Messages? An Exploration of the Public Understanding of Animal Biology and of the Conservation of Biodiversity in a Zoo Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, Tracy; Byrne, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the current knowledge and understanding about animal biology of zoo visitors and investigates whether knowledge of animal biology influences the ability of people to understand how human activity affects biodiversity. Zoos can play a role in the development of scientific literacy in the fields of animal biology and biodiversity…

  7. Understanding the densification process of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O x round wires with overpressure processing and its effect on critical current density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matras, M. R.; Jiang, J.; Larbalestier, D. C.; Hellstrom, E. E.

    2016-10-01

    Overpressure (OP) processing increases the critical current density ({{\\boldsymbol{J}}}{{C}}) of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O x (2212) round wires by shrinking the surrounding Ag matrix around the 2212 filaments, driving them close to full density and greatly increasing the 2212 grain connectivity. Indeed densification is vital for attaining the highest {{\\boldsymbol{J}}}{{C}}. Here, we investigate the time and temperature dependence of the wire densification. We find that the wire diameter decreases by 3.8 ± 0.3% after full heat treatment at 50 atm and 100 atm OP. At 50 atm OP pressure, the filaments start densifying above 700 °C and reach a 3.30 ± 0.07% smaller diameter after 2 h at 820 °C, which is below the melting point of 2212 powder. The densification is homogeneous and does not change the filament shape before melting. The growth of non-superconducting phases is observed at 820 °C, suggesting that time should be minimized at high temperature prior to melting the 2212 powder. Study of an open-ended 2.2 m long wire sample shows that full densification and the high OP {{\\boldsymbol{J}}}{{C}} ({{\\boldsymbol{J}}}{{C}} varies by about 3.1 times over the 2.2 m long wire) is reached about 1 m from the open ends, thus showing that coil-length wires can be protected from leaky seals by adding at least 1 m of sacrificial wire at each end.

  8. Current Views and Perspectives on E-Mental Health: An Exploratory Survey Study for Understanding Public Attitudes Toward Internet-Based Psychotherapy in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apolinário-Hagen, Jennifer; Vehreschild, Viktor; Alkoudmani, Ramez M

    2017-02-23

    Despite the advanced development of evidence-based psychological treatment services, help-seeking persons with mental health problems often fail to receive appropriate professional help. Internet-delivered psychotherapy has thus been suggested as an efficient strategy to overcome barriers to access mental health care on a large scale. However, previous research indicated poor public acceptability as an issue for the dissemination of Internet-delivered therapies. Currently, little is known about the expectations and attitudes toward Internet-delivered therapies in the general population. This is especially the case for countries such as Germany where electronic mental health (e-mental health) treatment services are planned to be implemented in routine care. This pilot study aimed to determine the expectations and attitudes toward Internet-based psychotherapy in the general population in Germany. Furthermore, it aimed to explore the associations between attitudes toward Internet-based therapies and perceived stress. To assess public attitudes toward Internet-based psychotherapy, we conducted both Web-based and paper-and-pencil surveys using a self-developed 14-item questionnaire (Cronbach alpha=.89). Psychological distress was measured by employing a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the 20-item German version of the Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ). In addition, we conducted explorative factor analysis (principal axis factor analysis with promax rotation). Spearman's rank correlations were used to determine the associations between attitudes toward Internet-based therapies and perceived stress. Descriptive analyses revealed that most respondents (N=1558; female: 78.95%, 1230/1558) indicated being not aware of the existence of Internet-delivered therapies (83.46%, 1141/1367). The average age was 32 years (standard deviation, SD 10.9; range 16-76). Through exploratory factor analysis, we identified 3 dimensions of public attitudes toward Internet-based therapies

  9. Scientific Drilling at Lake Tanganyika, Africa: A Transformative Record for Understanding Evolution in Isolation and the Biological History of the African Continent, University of Basel, 6-8 June 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Andrew S.; Salzburger, Walter

    2017-05-01

    We report on the outcomes of a workshop held to discuss evolutionary biology, paleobiology and paleoecology questions that could be addressed by a scientific drilling project at Lake Tanganyika, the largest, deepest and oldest of the African Rift Valley lakes. Lake Tanganyika is of special significance to evolutionary biologists as it harbors one of the most spectacular endemic faunas of any lake on earth, with hundreds of unique species of fish, molluscs, crustaceans and other organisms that have evolved over the lake's long history. Most of these groups of organisms are known from fossils in short cores from the lake, raising the possibility that both body fossil and ancient DNA records might be recovered from long drill cores. The lake's sedimentary record could also provide a record of African terrestrial ecosystem history since the late Miocene. This 3-day workshop brought together biological and geological specialists on the lake and its surroundings to prioritize paleobiological, ecological and microbiological objectives that could ultimately be incorporated into an overall drilling plan for Lake Tanganyika and to consider how biological objectives can effectively be integrated into the paleoclimate and tectonics objectives of a Lake Tanganyika drilling project already considered in prior workshops.

  10. Current Views and Perspectives on E-Mental Health: An Exploratory Survey Study for Understanding Public Attitudes Toward Internet-Based Psychotherapy in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vehreschild, Viktor; Alkoudmani, Ramez M

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite the advanced development of evidence-based psychological treatment services, help-seeking persons with mental health problems often fail to receive appropriate professional help. Internet-delivered psychotherapy has thus been suggested as an efficient strategy to overcome barriers to access mental health care on a large scale. However, previous research indicated poor public acceptability as an issue for the dissemination of Internet-delivered therapies. Currently, little is known about the expectations and attitudes toward Internet-delivered therapies in the general population. This is especially the case for countries such as Germany where electronic mental health (e-mental health) treatment services are planned to be implemented in routine care. Objective This pilot study aimed to determine the expectations and attitudes toward Internet-based psychotherapy in the general population in Germany. Furthermore, it aimed to explore the associations between attitudes toward Internet-based therapies and perceived stress. Methods To assess public attitudes toward Internet-based psychotherapy, we conducted both Web-based and paper-and-pencil surveys using a self-developed 14-item questionnaire (Cronbach alpha=.89). Psychological distress was measured by employing a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the 20-item German version of the Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ). In addition, we conducted explorative factor analysis (principal axis factor analysis with promax rotation). Spearman’s rank correlations were used to determine the associations between attitudes toward Internet-based therapies and perceived stress. Results Descriptive analyses revealed that most respondents (N=1558; female: 78.95%, 1230/1558) indicated being not aware of the existence of Internet-delivered therapies (83.46%, 1141/1367). The average age was 32 years (standard deviation, SD 10.9; range 16-76). Through exploratory factor analysis, we identified 3 dimensions of public

  11. Current situation of scientific research administrator in Primary Hospital and training Countermeasures%浅谈基层医院科研管理人才现状及培养对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘利民; 黄先涛; 王宽垒; 靖超; 翟俊霞

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of the knowledge economy,hospital management of scientific research work is facing new challenges.At present,administrators in charge of scientific research in most primary hospitals of China do not have the systematic training on knowledge and skills involving research management.Thus,training a master business and familiar with the operation of modern hospital science and technology management of high-quality management personnel is urgent needed.As long as Do a good job on training of the management personnel of scientific research in the primary hospital,can enrich the scientific research management team,do good on the management work of sci ence and technology in the hospital,hospital work to be continuous development of science and technology and enhance.%随着知识经济的到来,医院科研管理工作面临新的挑战,科技竞争日显激烈,科技管理的作用也更加显现.当前我国大部分基层医院科研管理人才没有经过系统培训,缺乏专门的管理知识与能力,制约了基层医院科研工作的开展.因此,培养造就精通业务,熟悉运作现代医院科研管理的高素质管理人才刻不容缓.只要搞好基层医院科研管理人才的培养,才能充实科研管理队伍,搞好医院科研管理工作,使医院科技工作得到不断发展与提高.

  12. Scientific dishonesty and good scientific practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, D; Axelsen, N H; Riis, P

    1993-04-01

    Scientific dishonesty has been the subject of much public interest in recent years. Although the problem has had a low profile in Denmark, there is no reason to believe that it is non-existent. Several preconditions known to be important prevail here as well as in other countries, such as pressure to publish and severe competition for research grants and senior academic positions. The Danish Medical Research Council (DMRC) decided to respond to this problem by preparing a report on scientific dishonesty with suggestions to the research institutions on rules for good scientific practice and procedures for investigation of suspected dishonesty. To this end, an investigatory system was suggested. The system should consist of two regional committees and one national committee. They should be headed by high court judges and experienced health sciences researchers as members. The committees will investigate cases reported to them and conclude on whether dishonesty has been established and on whether the scientific work should be retracted. Sanctions shall remain the task of the institutions. Preventive measures comprise open access to and a long storage period for scientific data.

  13. A Scientific Autobiography

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, M. S. N; Caselli, P; Cores to Clusters

    2005-01-01

    Toward the second half of this decade, several major telescope facilities operating in the infrared, sub-millimeter, and millimeter wave bands will become operational. These missions are expected to throw much light on our understanding of the star formation phenomenon, which is one of the primary science goals in these wave bands. This book contains the proceedings of the "Cores to Clusters" workshop held at Centro de Astrofisica da Universidade do Porto. The mission of the workshop was to discuss current and future issues in star formation physics in the light of these Next Generation Telescopes. This book is comprised of a mixture of articles that provide a comprehensive coverage of current topics including both low and high mass star formation. It serves as a practical compendium for graduate students and young researchers working in the field of star formation.

  14. Popularization of science and scientific journalism: possibilities of scientific literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Augusto Barros Façanha

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study evidences the intersection between science education and communication in the perspective of the popularization of sciences based on the evidence produced in a specific column of a large circulation newspaper of the city of Teresina / PI. The discussions were based on the analysis of content carried out in the context of science classes in a school of basic education with elementary students, where journalistic texts were used with diverse themes that involved science and daily life in order to understand the interpretation of texts And the relationship with the context of scientific dissemination and citizenship. The analysis of the content was used and the answers were stratified into categories of conceptual nature and application of the themes. The analyses show that the texts of scientific dissemination have a contribution in relation to the popularization of Sciences, fomentation to the debate in the classroom, didactic increment in the classes of sciences, in spite of their insertion still incipient in the context of science education. However, the results of the research denote the difficulty faced by the students in understanding the text of dissemination in their conceptual comprehension and resolution of daily problems, as well as the distance between the context of the sciences in their theoretical scope and their presentation in everyday situations, Despite this, the texts of divulgation corroborated as an important way of real insertion in the process of scientific literacy and promotion of citizenship.

  15. Developing Scientific Literacy in Non-science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winrich, C.; Holt, S.; Philips, J.; Laprise, S.; Simons, L.

    2004-12-01

    We present a three-tiered interdisciplinary program designed for business students at Babson College. At the foundation level, we introduce fundamental ideas in physical and biological science as they relate to a particular theme. In the intermediate tier, we discuss the technologies that arise from the broad understanding of science developed at the previous level, and their impact on society. In the optional advanced tier, we further explore the relationship between science and society. At all levels, the broader impact of technological and scientific progress is explored through discussion of current events, works of art, and popular culture.

  16. Mythical thinking, scientific discourses and research dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hroar Klempe, Sven

    2011-06-01

    This article focuses on some principles for understanding. By taking Anna Mikulak's article "Mismatches between 'scientific' and 'non-scientific' ways of knowing and their contributions to public understanding of science" (IPBS 2011) as a point of departure, the idea of demarcation criteria for scientific and non-scientific discourses is addressed. Yet this is juxtaposed with mythical thinking, which is supposed to be the most salient trait of non-scientific discourses. The author demonstrates how the most widespread demarcation criterion, the criterion of verification, is self-contradictory, not only when it comes to logic, but also in the achievement of isolating natural sciences from other forms of knowledge. According to Aristotle induction is a rhetorical device and as far as scientific statements are based on inductive inferences, they are relying on humanities, which rhetoric is a part of. Yet induction also has an empirical component by being based on sense-impressions, which is not a part of the rhetoric, but the psychology. Also the myths are understood in a rhetorical (Lévi-Strauss) and a psychological (Cassirer) perspective. Thus it is argued that both scientific and non-scientific discourses can be mythical.

  17. Fostering Scientific Literacy: Establishing Social Relevance via the Grand Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyford, M. E.; Myers, J. D.; Buss, A.

    2010-12-01

    Numerous studies and polls suggest the general public’s understanding of science and scientific literacy remain woefully inadequate despite repeated calls for improvement over the last 150 years. This inability to improve scientific literacy significantly is a complex problem likely driven by a number of factors. However, we argue that past calls and efforts for improving scientific literacy have failed to: 1) articulate a truly meaningful justification for society to foster a scientifically literate public; 2) provide a rationale that motivates individuals of diverse backgrounds to become scientifically literate; 3) consider the impact of personal perspective, e.g. values, beliefs, attitudes, etc., on learning; and 4) offer a relevant and manageable framework in which to define scientific literacy. For instance, past calls for improving scientific literacy, e.g. the U.S. is behind the Soviets in the space race, U.S students rank below country X in math and science, etc., have lacked justification, personal motivation and a comprehensive framework for defining scientific literacy. In these cases, the primary justification for improving science education and scientific literacy was to regain international dominance in the space race or to advance global standing according to test results. These types of calls also articulate short-term goals that are rendered moot once they have been achieved. At the same time, teaching practices have commonly failed to consider the perspectives students bring to the classroom. Many STEM faculty do not address issues of personal perspective through ignorance or the desire to avoid controversial subjects, e g. evolution, climate change. We propose that the ‘grand challenges’ (e.g., energy, climate change, antibacterial resistance, water, etc.) humankind currently faces provides a compelling framework for developing courses and curricula well-suited for improving scientific literacy. A grand challenge paradigm offers four

  18. The effect of scientific evidence on conservation practitioners' management decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jessica C; Dicks, Lynn V; Sutherland, William J

    2015-02-01

    A major justification of environmental management research is that it helps practitioners, yet previous studies show it is rarely used to inform their decisions. We tested whether conservation practitioners focusing on bird management were willing to use a synopsis of relevant scientific literature to inform their management decisions. This allowed us to examine whether the limited use of scientific information in management is due to a lack of access to the scientific literature or whether it is because practitioners are either not interested or unable to incorporate the research into their decisions. In on-line surveys, we asked 92 conservation managers, predominantly from Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom, to provide opinions on 28 management techniques that could be applied to reduce predation on birds. We asked their opinions before and after giving them a summary of the literature about the interventions' effectiveness. We scored the overall effectiveness and certainty of evidence for each intervention through an expert elicitation process-the Delphi method. We used the effectiveness scores to assess the practitioners' level of understanding and awareness of the literature. On average, each survey participant changed their likelihood of using 45.7% of the interventions after reading the synopsis of the evidence. They were more likely to implement effective interventions and avoid ineffective actions, suggesting that their intended future management strategies may be more successful than current practice. More experienced practitioners were less likely to change their management practices than those with less experience, even though they were not more aware of the existing scientific information than less experienced practitioners. The practitioners' willingness to change their management choices when provided with summarized scientific evidence suggests that improved accessibility to scientific information would benefit conservation management

  19. Evaluating a scientific collaboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Whitton, Mary C.; Maglaughlin, Kelly L.

    2003-01-01

    and process of scientific work completed by 20 pairs of participants (upper level undergraduate science students) working face-to-face and remotely. We collected scientific outcomes (graded lab reports) to investigate the quality of scientific work, post-questionnaire data to measure the adoptability......The evaluation of scientific collaboratories has lagged behind their development. Do the capabilities afforded by collaboratories outweigh their disadvantages? To evaluate a scientific collaboratory system, we conducted a repeated-measures controlled experiment that compared the outcomes...... of collaborating remotely. While the data analysis produced null results, considered as a whole, the analysis leads us to conclude there is positive potential for the development and adoption of scientific collaboratory systems....

  20. Exploiting the Use of Social Networking to Facilitate Collaboration in the Scientific Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppock, Edrick G. [Information International Associates, Inc.

    2014-04-07

    The goal of this project was to exploit social networking to facilitate scientific collaboration. The project objective was to research and identify scientific collaboration styles that are best served by social networking applications and to model the most effective social networking applications to substantiate how social networking can support scientific collaboration. To achieve this goal and objective, the project was to develop an understanding of the types of collaborations conducted by scientific researchers, through classification, data analysis and identification of unique collaboration requirements. Another technical objective in support of this goal was to understand the current state of technology in collaboration tools. In order to test hypotheses about which social networking applications effectively support scientific collaboration the project was to create a prototype scientific collaboration system. The ultimate goal for testing the hypotheses and research of the project was to refine the prototype into a functional application that could effectively facilitate and grow collaboration within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research community.

  1. An extended dual search space model of scientific discovery learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joolingen, van Wouter R.; Jong, de Ton

    1997-01-01

    This article describes a theory of scientific discovery learning which is an extension of Klahr and Dunbar''s model of Scientific Discovery as Dual Search (SDDS) model. We present a model capable of describing and understanding scientific discovery learning in complex domains in terms of the SDDS fr

  2. Scientific Literacy: Resurrecting the Phoenix with Thinking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, John C.; O'Donnell, Jacqueline R.; Malone, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Prior research suggests that students' understanding of scientific concepts is pre-determined by their reasoning ability. Other efforts suggest that American students' scientific literacy is in decline. One difficulty Bybee (2009) acknowledges is that there are two divergent philosophical models of scientific literacy. The first describes the…

  3. Acquisition of Scientific Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noland, Lynn [Director, Sponsored Programs

    2014-05-16

    Whitworth University constructed a 63,00 sq. ft. biology and chemistry building which opened in the Fall of 2011. This project provided for new state-of-the-art science instrumentation enabling Whitworth students to develop skills and knowledge that are directly transferable to practical applications thus enhancing Whitworth student's ability to compete and perform in the scientific workforce. Additionally, STEM faculty undertake outreach programs in the area schools, bringing students to our campus to engage in activities with our science students. The ability to work with insturmentation that is current helps to make science exciting for middle school and high school students and gets them thinking about careers in science. 14 items were purchased following the university's purchasing policy, that benefit instruction and research in the departments of biology, chemistry, and health sciences. They are: Cadaver Dissection Tables with Exhaust Chamber and accessories, Research Microscope with DF DIC, Phase and Fluorescence illumination with DP72 Camera, Microscope with Fluorescence, Microcomputer controlled ultracentrifuge, Ultracentrifuge rotor, Variable Temperature steam pressure sterilizer, Alliance APLC System, DNA Speedvac, Gel Cocumentation System, BioPac MP150, Glovebox personal workstation,Lyophilizer, Nano Drop 2000/2000c Spectrophotometer, C02 Incubator.

  4. Scientific and historical archive

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    : International Archives Day, 9 June, is an opportunity to discover a little-known CERN resource. Unlike libraries, archives tend to be hidden away. You can’t browse among the shelves, or borrow files to use in the workplace, but sometimes they contain just the information you need. CERN’s rich heritage has many parts: its scientific data, the black and white photos recently put online by the Library, the audio-visual collection, currently being digitized by the IT department, historic objects in the care of the IR-ECO group, and much more - not least the memory of its people. The CERN Archive exists in the background, supporting other endeavours and preserving our documentary heritage for future generations. About 1000 shelf metres of files filled with letters, notes, reports, rough drafts, memos such as this report, by Miss Steel, are preserved. You can browse more examples on our timeline. It is a place for information on all aspects of CERN’s history. Sometimes documents pro

  5. Current Understanding of Psychosis in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Oluwadamilola O; Fernandez, Hubert H

    2016-10-01

    Psychosis in Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the greatest determinants of nursing home placement and caregiver stress. Traditionally associated with medications with dopaminergic effect, it has now been linked to other medications and other stressors e.g. systemic illnesses. The development of hallucinations in a PD patient can herald the onset of dementia and usually predicts increased mortality risk. Medication reduction in PD psychosis usually reduces the symptoms; however, this comes at the cost of worsening motor function. If gradually decreasing the patient's medications does not resolve the psychosis, the treatment of choice is an atypical antipychotic. Though only clozapine has level A recommendation for this indication, other atypicals like quetiapine continue to get used for this purpose on account of the logistics involved with clozapine use. Cholinesterase inhibitors are also increasingly being used for PD psychosis on account of the association with dementia. The treatment of PD psychosis is an unmet need in PD management and search for suitable agents constitutes an active area of research in PD.

  6. Secondary Amenorrhea among Female Athletes. Current Understandings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasiene, Gwen Hagenbuch

    1983-01-01

    Research pertaining to female athletes' problems with secondary amenorrhea is reviewed. Studies point to stress, weight loss, anorexia nervosa, obesity, arduous athletic training, and age of onset of training as factors which may contribute to this disorder. (PP)

  7. Current understanding of multi-species biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Wu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Direct observation of a wide range of natural microorganisms has revealed the fact that the majority of microbes persist as surface-attached communities surrounded by matrix materials, called biofilms. Biofilms can be formed by a single bacterial strain. However, most natural biofilms are actuall...

  8. Current Understanding of Perfluoroalkyl Acid Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are a family of organic chemicals consisting of a perfluorinated carbon backbone (4-14 carbons in length) and an anionic head group (sulfonate, carboxylate or phosphonate). These compounds have excellent surface-tension reducing properties and hav...

  9. Understanding ionospheric instabilities eludes current approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Atreyee

    2012-07-01

    Ionized gases are heavily concentrated in the ionosphere's F zone, the region between 200 and 500 kilometers in altitude, which is critical for transmitting long-distance radio signals on Earth. However, instabilities in the F region plasma, which can last from seconds to hours and can be spread over centimeters to tens of kilometers, disrupt transmission of radio signals. The plasma instabilities, restricted to the equatorial region following sunset, are called equatorial spread F (ESF). Earth-based instruments perceive ESF events as “twinkling” radio signals. ESF events, first detected in the 1930s, affect the performance and reliability of space-borne and ground-based electronic systems; they can disrupt satellite operations and related communications and navigation systems.

  10. Current understanding of multi-species biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Wu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Direct observation of a wide range of natural microorganisms has revealed the fact that the majority of microbes persist as surface-attached communities surrounded by matrix materials, called biofilms. Biofilms can be formed by a single bacterial strain. However, most natural biofilms are actuall...

  11. Understanding the Limitation of Modern Medicine from the Scientific View of Space and Time%从科学的时空观看现代临床医学的局限性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何权瀛

    2014-01-01

    时空是世间万物存在的载体,也是万物运行的物质基础。在一定意义上讲空间和时间都是无限的。然而,我们所经历的时空又都是有限的。本文从时空的维度论证现代临床医学的局限性和有限性。从时间的维度上看,无论在门诊还是住院期间我们对疾病的认识仅仅看到疾病过程中的中段或极期,而没有观察到疾病的潜伏期或前驱期,更没有观察到疾病的康复期。从空间的维度上看,现代临床医学分科过细使我们无法从整体上完整地理解疾病的全貌和本质,以及各个脏器的结构和功能变化之间的内在联系。%The time and space is the carrier on which all things of creation on the earth exist ,and they are also material base of all things moving .Space and time are both immeasurable ,speaking in a certain sense ,however ,the time and space we have undergone is also limited .The limitation of modern clinical medicine was proved in the paper from the point of the view on time and space . Firstly , from the view of time , our understanding of various disease is only limited on the intermediate phase or extreme stage ,not on the observation the incubation period or prodromal stage of the disease ,even not on the observation of the recovery phase of the disease both in the out-patient department or the inpatient-department . Secondly ,from the view of space ,it has become impossible that we fully understand the complete picture and the essence of the disease as well as the internal relationship between the structure and function of various organs ,because the modern clinical medicine is separated excessively into deferent departments .

  12. Understanding Zika virus pathogenesis: an interview with Catherine Spong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, Catherine Y

    2016-06-06

    A recent outbreak of Zika virus has been linked to fetal abnormalities in pregnant women who have been infected. The scientific community is working toward understanding Zika virus pathogenesis to better manage affected women and children. In an interview with Dr. Catherine Spong, we discuss the aims and challenges of a forthcoming longitudinal study of a cohort of pregnant women in areas of current active Zika virus transmission.

  13. The Current Situation and Reflections of Scientific Re- search Management in Independent Colleges of Beijing City%北京市独立学院科研管理现状及思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马征; 房怀军

    2014-01-01

    根据2014年教育部工作要点和高考模式改革制度,独立学院在高等教育中扮演着越来越重要的角色。为适应教育教学的改革和发展,独立学院必须不断增强自身的科研能力,从学院层面、制度建设、培训体系建立方面打造一支高素质、高水平的科研管理队伍,提高学院的软实力。%According to the key points of the 2014 work of Min-istry of Education and the college entrance examination reform system, independent colleges play an increasingly important role in higher education. In order to meet the reform and development of education and teaching, independent colleges must continu-ously enhance the scientific research ability, and establish a high-quality and high-level scientific research management group from the college level, system construction and training system construction, so as to improve the soft power of colleges.

  14. On (scientific) integrity: conceptual clarification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrão Neves, Maria do Céu

    2017-09-13

    The notion of "integrity" is currently quite common and broadly recognized as complex, mostly due to its recurring and diverse application in various distinct domains such as the physical, psychic or moral, the personal or professional, that of the human being or of the totality of beings. Nevertheless, its adjectivation imprints a specific meaning, as happens in the case of "scientific integrity". This concept has been defined mostly by via negativa, by pointing out what goes against integrity, that is, through the identification of its infringements, which has also not facilitated the elaboration of an overarching and consensual code of scientific integrity. In this context, it is deemed necessary to clarify the notion of "integrity", first etymologically, recovering the original meaning of the term, and then in a specifically conceptual way, through the identification of the various meanings with which the term can be legitimately used, particularly in the domain of scientific research and innovation. These two steps are fundamental and indispensable for a forthcoming attempt at systematizing the requirements of "scientific integrity".

  15. Tie strength distribution in scientific collaboration networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Qing; Ahn, Yong-Yeol

    2014-09-01

    Science is increasingly dominated by teams. Understanding patterns of scientific collaboration and their impacts on the productivity and evolution of disciplines is crucial to understand scientific processes. Electronic bibliography offers a unique opportunity to map and investigate the nature of scientific collaboration. Recent studies have demonstrated a counterintuitive organizational pattern of scientific collaboration networks: densely interconnected local clusters consist of weak ties, whereas strong ties play the role of connecting different clusters. This pattern contrasts itself from many other types of networks where strong ties form communities while weak ties connect different communities. Although there are many models for collaboration networks, no model reproduces this pattern. In this paper, we present an evolution model of collaboration networks, which reproduces many properties of real-world collaboration networks, including the organization of tie strengths, skewed degree and weight distribution, high clustering, and assortative mixing.

  16. Tie Strength Distribution in Scientific Collaboration Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ke, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Science is increasingly dominated by teams. Understanding patterns of scientific collaboration and their impacts on the productivity and evolution of disciplines is crucial to understand scientific processes. Electronic bibliography offers a unique opportunity to map and investigate the nature of scientific collaboration. Recent work have demonstrated a counter-intuitive organizational pattern of scientific collaboration networks: densely interconnected local clusters consist of weak ties, whereas strong ties play the role of connecting different clusters. This pattern contrasts itself from many other types of networks where strong ties form communities while weak ties connect different communities. Although there are many models for collaboration networks, no model reproduces this pattern. In this paper, we present an evolution model of collaboration networks, which reproduces many properties of real-world collaboration networks, including the organization of tie strengths, skewed degree and weight distribut...

  17. Laboratory testing for von Willebrand's disease: an assessment of current diagnostic practice and efficacy by means of a multi-laboratory survey. RCPA Quality Assurance Program (QAP) in Haematology Haemostasis Scientific Advisory Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaloro, E J; Smith, J; Petinos, P; Hertzberg, M; Koutts, J

    1999-10-01

    We report an evaluation of current laboratory practice for the diagnosis of von Willebrand's disease (VWD) by means of a multilaboratory survey. This assessment was undertaken with the RCPA Quality Assurance Program (QAP) in Haematology, which covers a wide geographic area encompassing Australia, New Zealand and Asia. A total of 25 laboratories actively involved in testing for VWD were selected to participate in a sample testing assessment exercise. Samples comprised 10 plasmas: (i) a normal plasma pool (in duplicate), (ii) this pool diluted to 50% (in duplicate), (iii) a normal individual (X1), (iv) severe Type 1 VWD (X1), (v) Type 2B VWD (x2 unrelated donors), (vi) Type 3 VWD (x1), (vii) Type 2A VWD (x1). Laboratories were asked to perform all tests available to them in order to establish a laboratory diagnosis of VWD, and then to comment on the possibility or otherwise of VWD. Overall findings indicated a wide variation in test practice, in the effectiveness of various test procedures in detecting VWD, and in the ability of various composite test panels to identify type 2 VWD subtypes. Firstly, while all laboratories (n = 25) performed tests for FVIII:C activity, von Willebrand factor 'antigen' (VWF:Ag) and a functional VWF assay [using the ristocetin cofactor assay (VWF:RCo; n = 23) and/or the collagen binding assay (VWF:CBA; n = 12)], only three laboratories carried out VWF:Multimer analysis. Secondly, for the three quantitative VWF assays, 10/25 (40%) laboratories performed all three, whereas 15/25 (60%) performed only two [VWF:Ag and VWF:RCo (n = 13); VWF:Ag and VWF:CBA (n = 2)]. Thirdly, a variety of assay methodologies were evident for VWF:Ag [ELISA, electro-immuno diffusion (EID), latex immuno-assay (LIA), and VIDAS assay] and VWF:RCo (platelet agglutination/'aggregometry' and a 'functional VWF:RCo-alternative' ELISA assay). Between method analysis for the quantitative VWF assays showed that the VWF:RCo yielded the greatest degree of inter

  18. Scientific Journal Indexing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getulio Teixeira Batista

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available It is quite impressive the visibility of online publishing compared to offline. Lawrence (2001 computed the percentage increase across 1,494 venues containing at least five offline and five online articles. Results shown an average of 336% more citations to online articles compared to offline articles published in the same venue. If articles published in the same venue are of similar quality, then they concluded that online articles are more highly cited because of their easier access. Thomson Scientific, traditionally concerned with printed journals, announced on November 28, 2005, the launch of Web Citation Index™, the multidisciplinary citation index of scholarly content from institutional and subject-based repositories (http://scientific.thomson. com/press/2005/8298416/. The Web Citation Index from the abstracting and indexing (A&I connects together pre-print articles, institutional repositories and open access (OA journals (Chillingworth, 2005. Basically all research funds are government granted funds, tax payer’s supported and therefore, results should be made freely available to the community. Free online availability facilitates access to research findings, maximizes interaction among research groups, and optimizes efforts and research funds efficiency. Therefore, Ambi-Água is committed to provide free access to its articles. An important aspect of Ambi-Água is the publication and management system of this journal. It uses the Electronic System for Journal Publishing (SEER - http://www.ibict.br/secao.php?cat=SEER. This system was translated and customized by the Brazilian Institute for Science and Technology Information (IBICT based on the software developed by the Public Knowledge Project (Open Journal Systems of the British Columbia University (http://pkp.sfu.ca/ojs/. The big advantage of using this system is that it is compatible with the OAI-PMH protocol for metadata harvesting what greatly promotes published articles

  19. Scientific understanding of avian influenza A H7N9 virus to effectively prevent and control of its infection%科学认识H7N9,有效防控人感染禽流感病毒

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛青

    2013-01-01

    On March 31, 2013, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of China first reported 3 laboratory confirmed cases of human infection with influenza A subtype H7N9 virus, a new avian influenza virus (AIV) in the eastern China. Up to April 15, 2013, a total of 63 cases of laboratory confirmed infection have been reported. Most reported cases have severe respiratory illness, and 14 of them died since February. Scientists of China have found that the influenza A( H7N9) virus was derived from a reassortment of 3 strains of AIV, and substantial mutations have been detected. Compared to seasonal influenza, the susceptibility of human to influenza A(H7N9) virus is low, but some cases are likely to become virus carriers or recessive infection. No person-to-person transmission of the influenza A( H7N9) virus has been found, and the reported cases are not linked to each other. Currently, there is no vaccine or effective treatment available for H7N9 infection, thus, strengthening prevention strategy is critical to avoid being infected. The article aims at discussing the clinic features of the infection of the influenza A( H7N9) virus and recommending some precautionary measures to prevent the infection.

  20. Master in Scientific, Medical and Environmental Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir de Semir

    2009-01-01

    Public communication of sciences is of strategic relevance in the transition from the industrial society to the knowledge society. The Master’s Course in Scientific, Medical and Environmental Communication of Pompeu Fabra University in Barcelona (Spain) responds to this economic, social and cultural need. The result: professionals who clearly understand the key aspects of the transmission of scientific knowledge to society through the different essential communication channels in multiple org...