WorldWideScience

Sample records for current scientific knowledge

  1. Scientific progress: Knowledge versus understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellsén, Finnur

    2016-04-01

    What is scientific progress? On Alexander Bird's epistemic account of scientific progress, an episode in science is progressive precisely when there is more scientific knowledge at the end of the episode than at the beginning. Using Bird's epistemic account as a foil, this paper develops an alternative understanding-based account on which an episode in science is progressive precisely when scientists grasp how to correctly explain or predict more aspects of the world at the end of the episode than at the beginning. This account is shown to be superior to the epistemic account by examining cases in which knowledge and understanding come apart. In these cases, it is argued that scientific progress matches increases in scientific understanding rather than accumulations of knowledge. In addition, considerations having to do with minimalist idealizations, pragmatic virtues, and epistemic value all favor this understanding-based account over its epistemic counterpart.

  2. Overcoming knowledge stickiness in scientific knowledge transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Deborah; Benson, Angela M

    2012-07-01

    This paper explores the transfer and dissemination of knowledge between scientists, the volunteers who collect the knowledge and the communities which learn from it in order to implement change. The role of knowledge "stickiness" in the reduction of knowledge transfer is outlined. The characteristics of the knowledge and the situation combine to develop a range of factors, "stickiness predictors," which can deter knowledge transfer. These stickiness predictors are used to analyse data gathered from three qualitative cases, which were developed from both participant observation and semi-structured interviews studying the interactions between the scientists, volunteers and organisations. A reconsideration of the way that knowledge and knowledge transfer are being conceptualised by scientists is proposed, in order to enable "stickiness" factors to be recognised and managed, thereby increasing the potential for scientific literacy. A move towards a more broadly constituted community of practice is proposed.

  3. Mary’s Scientific Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Malatesti

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Frank Jackson’s knowledge argument (KA aims to prove, by means of a thought experiment concerning the hypothetical scientist Mary, that conscious experiences have non-physical properties, called qualia. Mary has complete scientific knowledge of colours and colour vision without having had any colour experience. The central intuition in the KA is that, by seeing colours, Mary will learn what it is like to have colour experiences. Therefore, her scientific knowledge is incomplete, and conscious experiences have qualia. In this paper I consider an objection to the KA raised by Daniel Dennett. He maintains that the KA is vitiated by Jackson’s account of Mary’s scientific knowledge. While endorsing this criticism, I will defend the plausibility and relevance of the type of strategy involved in the KA by offering an account of Mary’s scientific knowledge. This account involves formulating a reasonable and not immediately false version of the physicalist thesis with regard to colour experiences. Whether this version of the KA is successful against this type of physicalism is not investigated here.

  4. The Evolution of Scientific Knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Siggaard; Ricard, Lykke Margot; Vendelø, Morten Thanning

    The Evolution of Scientific Knowledge aims to reach a unique understanding of science with the help of economic and sociological theories. They use institutional and evolutionary theories and the sociological theories draw from the type of work on social studies of science that have, in recent...

  5. Scientific collaboration and collective knowledge new essays

    CERN Document Server

    Mayo-Wilson, Conor; Weisberg, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Descartes once argued that, with sufficient effort and skill, a single scientist could uncover fundamental truths about our world. Contemporary science proves the limits of this claim. From synthesizing the human genome to predicting the effects of climate change, some current scientific research requires the collaboration of hundreds (if not thousands) of scientists with various specializations. Additionally, the majority of published scientific research is now co-authored, including more than 80% of articles in the natural sciences, meaning small collaborative teams have become the norm in science. This volume is the first to address critical philosophical questions regarding how collective scientific research could be organized differently and how it should be organized. For example, should scientists be required to share knowledge with competing research teams? How can universities and grant-giving institutions promote successful collaborations? When hundreds of researchers contribute to a discovery, how ...

  6. Maximizing scientific knowledge from randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Atar, Dan; Pitt, Bertram

    2010-01-01

    Trialists have an ethical and financial responsibility to plan and conduct clinical trials in a manner that will maximize the scientific knowledge gained from the trial. However, the amount of scientific information generated by randomized clinical trials in cardiovascular medicine is highly...

  7. Creativity, Scientific Practice, and Knowledge Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Marilyn

    2010-01-01

    In this interesting article, Hisham Ghassib (2010) describes the transformation of science from its craft status in a pre-modern era to the major knowledge industry it is today. He then compares the production of scientific knowledge with industrial production, but makes the important distinction between the process of developing scientific…

  8. Maximizing scientific knowledge from randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Atar, Dan; Pitt, Bertram;

    2010-01-01

    Trialists have an ethical and financial responsibility to plan and conduct clinical trials in a manner that will maximize the scientific knowledge gained from the trial. However, the amount of scientific information generated by randomized clinical trials in cardiovascular medicine is highly...... variable. Generation of trial databases and/or biobanks originating in large randomized clinical trials has successfully increased the knowledge obtained from those trials. At the 10th Cardiovascular Trialist Workshop, possibilities and pitfalls in designing and accessing clinical trial databases were......, in particular with respect to collaboration with the trial sponsor and to analytic pitfalls. The advantages of creating screening databases in conjunction with a given clinical trial are described; and finally, the potential for posttrial database studies to become a platform for training young scientists...

  9. Producing scientific knowledge in Africa today

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    This chapter analyses a life-history interview with an African climate change researcher, Mbow, to explore the conditions for scientific knowledge production in Africa. Mbow’s history points to three important and intertwined issues that played out differently through the different phases of his...... life: an inherited or colonial curriculum; universality of knowledge, namely the transfer of methods and theories from the Global North; and the cultural production of African researchers. The chapter shows how the post-colonial school system in Senegal was modelled over the French system and thus how...... difficult it was for Mbow to become independent of the colonial heritage. Through a capacity building programme, Mbow gained the competences necessary to question the transfer of theories and methods from the Global North and become an African emancipated researcher producing knowledge of relevance...

  10. Scientific knowledge dissemination in Danish seed communities of practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tveden-Nyborg, Svend; Misfeldt, Morten; Boelt, Birte

    2012-01-01

    scientific knowledge communication. Theoretically, we consider these actors participants in different communities of practice relating to the production of seeds (Seed-CoP), and we conclude that strong network collaboration is present among Danish seed-CoP effectuated by the valuable work undertaken......Danish agriculture and seed science have a history of successful collaboration spanning more than a hundred years. In this study, we interviewed 26 growers, consultants, and scientists from the Danish seed community focusing on their current knowledge status and on their views on improving......, as only the innovative growers prioritized time allocation for additional knowledge search. To improve scientific knowledge dissemination and interdisciplinary collaboration among Danish seed-CoP we recommend a combination of face-to-face and online communication processes....

  11. Two kinds of knowledge in scientific discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridewell, Will; Langley, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Research on computational models of scientific discovery investigates both the induction of descriptive laws and the construction of explanatory models. Although the work in law discovery centers on knowledge-lean approaches to searching a problem space, research on deeper modeling tasks emphasizes the pivotal role of domain knowledge. As an example, our own research on inductive process modeling uses information about candidate processes to explain why variables change over time. However, our experience with IPM, an artificial intelligence system that implements this approach, suggests that process knowledge is insufficient to avoid consideration of implausible models. To this end, the discovery system needs additional knowledge that constrains the model structures. We report on an extended system, SC-IPM, that uses such information to reduce its search through the space of candidates and to produce models that human scientists find more plausible. We also argue that although people carry out less extensive search than SC-IPM, they rely on the same forms of knowledge--processes and constraints--when constructing explanatory models.

  12. Reply to "Critical assessment of the current state of scientific knowledge, terminology, and research needs concerning the ecological effects of elevated atmospheric nitrogen deposition in China"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Fengxue; Zhang, Yuandong; Huang, Mei; Tao, Bo; Yan, Huimin; Guo, Rui; Li, Jie

    2017-03-01

    In their assessment, Pan et al. (2016) criticize that our estimation of 2.32 g N m-2 yr-1 in 2010 underestimates the total nitrogen (N) deposition amounts by a factor around two by comparing with the estimation of Xu et al. (2015). Our paper entitled "Nitrogen deposition and its effect on carbon storage in Chinese forests during 1981-2010" aims to evaluate the influence of elevated N deposition in China on carbon storage in forest ecosystems by using a process-based model. As limited by observed N deposition dataset availability, we developed a simple algorithm to evaluate the temporal and spatial variations in N deposition based on the relationships among N deposition, precipitation, N fertilizer use, and fuel consumption with reference to the method of Lin et al. (2000). Our results show that the rate of N deposition increased by 0.058 g N m-2 yr-1 between 1981 and 2010. The N deposition rate in 2010 was 2.32 g N m-2 yr-1, and it showed a large spatial variation from 0 to 0.25 g N m-2 yr-1 on the northwestern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau to over 4.5 g N m-2 yr-1 in the southeastern China. We really underestimated the total N deposition in China because we were lack of dry deposition observation dataset in our research. However, we think Pan et al. (2016) overestimated the difference between our estimation and that in Xu et al. (2015). It should be encouraged to discuss the past and current status of N deposition in China based on both observation and simulation. All comments, assessments and suggestions contribute to promote the scientific understanding of N deposition and its influence on ecosystems.

  13. Quality economies as a direction the development of scientific knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shkarina T.Yu.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently, more and more professionals in the field of quality management considering economic aspects of quality, and many economists consider quality as the object of study. However, this direction of development of scientific knowledge economy as the quality is not recognized by many economists. The paper attempts to show the development of this promising research area that has its own history, its theory, tools and methods.

  14. Featured Article: Genotation: Actionable knowledge for the scientific reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahawatte, Panduka; Willis, Ethan; Sakauye, Mark; Jose, Rony; Chen, Hao; Davis, Robert L

    2016-06-01

    We present an article viewer application that allows a scientific reader to easily discover and share knowledge by linking genomics-related concepts to knowledge of disparate biomedical databases. High-throughput data streams generated by technical advancements have contributed to scientific knowledge discovery at an unprecedented rate. Biomedical Informaticists have created a diverse set of databases to store and retrieve the discovered knowledge. The diversity and abundance of such resources present biomedical researchers a challenge with knowledge discovery. These challenges highlight a need for a better informatics solution. We use a text mining algorithm, Genomine, to identify gene symbols from the text of a journal article. The identified symbols are supplemented with information from the GenoDB knowledgebase. Self-updating GenoDB contains information from NCBI Gene, Clinvar, Medgen, dbSNP, KEGG, PharmGKB, Uniprot, and Hugo Gene databases. The journal viewer is a web application accessible via a web browser. The features described herein are accessible on www.genotation.org The Genomine algorithm identifies gene symbols with an accuracy shown by .65 F-Score. GenoDB currently contains information regarding 59,905 gene symbols, 5633 drug-gene relationships, 5981 gene-disease relationships, and 713 pathways. This application provides scientific readers with actionable knowledge related to concepts of a manuscript. The reader will be able to save and share supplements to be visualized in a graphical manner. This provides convenient access to details of complex biological phenomena, enabling biomedical researchers to generate novel hypothesis to further our knowledge in human health. This manuscript presents a novel application that integrates genomic, proteomic, and pharmacogenomic information to supplement content of a biomedical manuscript and enable readers to automatically discover actionable knowledge.

  15. The Knowledge Management Research of Agricultural Scientific Research Institution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Based on the perception of knowledge management from experts specializing in different fields,and experts at home and abroad,the knowledge management of agricultural scientific research institution can build new platform,offer new approach for realization of explicit or tacit knowledge,and promote resilience and innovative ability of scientific research institution.The thesis has introduced functions of knowledge management research of agricultural science.First,it can transform the tacit knowledge into explicit knowledge.Second,it can make all the scientific personnel share knowledge.Third,it is beneficial to the development of prototype system of knowledge management.Fourth,it mainly researches the realization of knowledge management system.Fifth,it can manage the external knowledge via competitive intelligence.Sixth,it can foster talents of knowledge management for agricultural scientific research institution.Seventh,it offers the decision-making service for leaders to manage scientific program.The thesis also discusses the content of knowledge management of agricultural scientific research institution as follows:production and innovation of knowledge;attainment and organizing of knowledge;dissemination and share of knowledge;management of human resources and the construction and management of infrastructure.We have put forward corresponding countermeasures to further reinforce the knowledge management research of agricultural scientific research institution.

  16. Knowledge discovery process for scientific and engineering data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Luis J.; Rudolph, Stephan

    2002-03-01

    Scientists and engineers are often confronted with the problem of modeling the physical laws that govern complex processes and systems. This task may generally be accomplished following traditional modeling procedures. However, when dealing with multivariate problems and/or huge quantities of experimental data, the modeling problem can easily become unmanageable. In such cases, knowledge discovery techniques may help to address this problem. Current knowledge discovery methods however rely mainly on inductive data mining techniques and do not make use of the structural properties of the specific physical context. Hence, they are not yet the ideal process solution for discovering functional models in science and engineering. This paper discusses a knowledge discovery process, which combines deductive and inductive reasoning techniques to find out mathematical models of physical systems. In the supplementary deductive process, the technique of dimensional analysis is used. This allows the incorporation of background knowledge of the involved domain to enrich the general process of knowledge discovery. The background knowledge forms hereby the specific context for a knowledge discovery process for concrete scientific data. As an example, the introduced method is used to find out the expression of the drag force that a viscous fluid exerts on a submersed and uniformly moving solid. The various issues that arise in the development and implementation of such a knowledge discovery system based on the method of dimensional analysis are analyzed and discussed.

  17. Roles of Illustrators in Visual Communication of Scientific Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kana Okawa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Scientific knowledge is the knowledge accumulated by systematic studies and organized by general principles. Visual, verbal, numeric, and other types of representation are used to communicate scientific knowledge. Scientific illustration is the visual representation of objects and concepts in order to record and to convey scientific knowledge(Ford, 1993. There are some discussions on scientific illustrations in history, philosophy and the sociology of science(Burri & Dumit, 2008, but little has been done on the creation of scientific illustrations by illustrators. This study focuses on the creation of scientific illustrations by illustrators. The purpose is to show how illustrators create the visual messages in communications of scientific knowledge. Through analysis of semi-structured interviews with 6 professional illustrators, creators and art directors, it is showed that illustrators select and edit scientific information, add non-scientific information, and organize information into one visual representation of scientific knowledge. The implication of this research will provide a new perspective to multisensory communication of scientific knowledge.

  18. Current knowledge on esophageal atresia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paulo Fernando Martins Pinheiro; Ana Cristina Sim(o)es e Silva; Regina Maria Pereira

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) with or without tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) is the most common congenital anomaly of the esophagus.The improvement of survival observed over the previous two decades is multifactorial and largely attributable to advances in neonatal intensive care,neonatal anesthesia,ventilatory and nutritional support,antibiotics,early surgical intervention,surgical materials and techniques.Indeed,mortality is currently limited to those cases with coexisting severe life-threatening anomalies.The diagnosis of EA is most commonly made during the first 24 h of life but may occur either antenatally or may be delayed.The primary surgical correction for EA and TEF is the best option in the absence of severe malformations.There is no ideal replacement for the esophagus and the optimal surgical treatment for patients with long-gap EA is still controversial.The primary complications during the postoperative period are leak and stenosis of the anastomosis,gastro-esophageal reflux,esophageal dysmotility,fistula recurrence,respiratory disorders and deformities of the thoracic wall.Data regarding long-term outcomes and follow-ups are limited for patients following EA/TEF repair.The determination of the risk factors for the complicated evolution following EA/TEF repair may positively impact long-term prognoses.Much remains to be studied regarding this condition.This manuscript provides a literature review of the current knowledge regarding EA.

  19. Scientific literacy for decisionmaking and the social construction of scientific knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingle, Wade H.; Gaskell, P. James

    Citizens are often required to make decisions about socioscientific issues in a climate characterized by conflict within both the scientific community and the larger society. Central to the process of decisionmaking is a critical examination of the relevant scientific knowledge involved. Individuals capable of performing this task can be considered scientifically literate in a decisionmaking sense. In this article we explore two ways of critically examining scientific knowledge in the context of a current socioscientific dispute: NASA's Galileo Mission to Jupiter. The two approaches we outline, termed the positivist and social constructivist positions, are examined in terms of their inherent views concerning the nature of scientific knowledge, in particular their use of constitutive and contextual values when evaluating knowledge claims. Because the social constructivist position acknowledges the importance of contextual values, it provides citizens with accessible standards for evaluating scientific knowledge claims. The positivist position, on the other hand, relies on constitutive values which we show are normally inaccessible to ordinary citizens. The positivist position, however, is most closely associated with the predominant social issues approach to science-technology-society (STS) education. Implications little consensus about which statements are fact (i.e., will remain stable when challenged) and which opinion, (i.e., will be modified when challenged). All knowledge is potentially unreliable when one is dealing with a socioscientific dispute.The adoption of a social constructivist view of scientific knowledge and its inherent way of evaluating knowledge claims clearly has implications for future approaches to STS education. Although one approach might be to offer a course in the history, philosophy, and sociology of science, this would not be useful without reference to the way in which such knowledge can help students to understand the context of a

  20. Climate change: linking traditional and scientific knowledge

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Riewe, R. R. (Roderick R.); Oakes, Jill E. (Jill Elizabeth)

    2006-01-01

    This book includes papers written by over 50 community experts and scientists addressing theoretical concerns, knowledge transfer, adapting to climate change, implications of changing weather, water...

  1. Current knowledge about sports nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramuková B

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The scientific literature contains an abundance of informationon the nutritional demands of athletes. However, designingthe most suitable sports diet is very difficult.The principal aim of this article is to summarize knowledgeabout sports nutrition, especially the intake of macronutrientsand dietary supplements.

  2. Concept Formation in Scientific Knowledge Discovery from a Constructivist View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wei; Gero, John S.

    The central goal of scientific knowledge discovery is to learn cause-effect relationships among natural phenomena presented as variables and the consequences their interactions. Scientific knowledge is normally expressed as scientific taxonomies and qualitative and quantitative laws [1]. This type of knowledge represents intrinsic regularities of the observed phenomena that can be used to explain and predict behaviors of the phenomena. It is a generalization that is abstracted and externalized from a set of contexts and applicable to a broader scope. Scientific knowledge is a type of third-person knowledge, i.e., knowledge that independent of a specific enquirer. Artificial intelligence approaches, particularly data mining algorithms that are used to identify meaningful patterns from large data sets, are approaches that aim to facilitate the knowledge discovery process [2]. A broad spectrum of algorithms has been developed in addressing classification, associative learning, and clustering problems. However, their linkages to people who use them have not been adequately explored. Issues in relation to supporting the interpretation of the patterns, the application of prior knowledge to the data mining process and addressing user interactions remain challenges for building knowledge discovery tools [3]. As a consequence, scientists rely on their experience to formulate problems, evaluate hypotheses, reason about untraceable factors and derive new problems. This type of knowledge which they have developed during their career is called "first-person" knowledge. The formation of scientific knowledge (third-person knowledge) is highly influenced by the enquirer's first-person knowledge construct, which is a result of his or her interactions with the environment. There have been attempts to craft automatic knowledge discovery tools but these systems are limited in their capabilities to handle the dynamics of personal experience. There are now trends in developing

  3. Curiosity Cloning: Neural Analysis of Scientific Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Daario; Rossini, Luca; Rucinski, Marek; Ampatzis, Christos; Wilkins, Peter; Healy, Graham; Smeaton, Alan; Ashkan, Yazdani; Ebrahimi, Touradj

    2009-09-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) are indicators of brain activity related to cognitive processes. They can be detected from EEG signals and thus constitute an attractive non-invasive option to study cognitive information processing. The P300 wave is probably the most celebrated example of an event-related potential and it is classically studied in connection to the odd-ball paradigm experimental protocol, able to consistently provoke the brain wave. We propose the use of P300 detection to extract the scientific interest in a large set of images and train a computer with machine learning algorithms using the subject's responses to the stimuli as the training data set. As a first step, we here describe a number of experiments designed to relate the P300 brain wave to the cognitive processes related to placing a scientific judgment on a picture and to study the number of images per seconds that can be processed by such a system.

  4. Open access to scientific knowledge and feudalism knowledge: Is there a connection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir M. Moskovkin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of universities and transnational corporations in the circulation of scientific knowledge is considered. If institutions generate, mostly scientific knowledge, trying to facilitate its free circulation, then transnational companies, contrarily, try to remove most significant and cutting-edge scientific knowledge from free circulation and its commercialization and reintroduction into an open, but now commercial, circulation in the TRIPS. However, paradoxical, the open access movement to scientific knowledge, eventually, facilitates feudalism of knowledge. We call this phenomenon the "open access - paradox". Based on the experiments done with Google Scholar and Google Patents, it is shown that universities generates, mostly scientific knowledge (scientific articles, and transnational companies generates, mostly technological knowledge (patents.

  5. Diffusing Scientific Knowledge to Innovative Experts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tveden-Nyborg, Svend; Misfeldt, Morten; Boelt, Birte

    2013-01-01

    . We are looking at how to implement Web2.0 technologies to Danish seed scientists communicating to seed consultants, agricultural advisors, and seed growers, and we are met with the challenge of securing effective knowledge diffusion to the community. Our investigation's focal point is on Rogers...

  6. Scientific knowledge dissemination in Danish seed communities of practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tveden-Nyborg, Svend; Misfeldt, Morten; Boelt, Birte

    2012-01-01

    scientific knowledge communication. Theoretically, we consider these actors participants in different communities of practice relating to the production of seeds (Seed-CoP), and we conclude that strong network collaboration is present among Danish seed-CoP effectuated by the valuable work undertaken...... by the consultants. We discovered a divergence in knowledge dissemination among the growers – an innovative group of growers with a high demand for new scientific knowledge versus a majority of growers content with the level of knowledge provided by the consultants. ‘Time’ was recognized as an important parameter......, as only the innovative growers prioritized time allocation for additional knowledge search. To improve scientific knowledge dissemination and interdisciplinary collaboration among Danish seed-CoP we recommend a combination of face-to-face and online communication processes....

  7. Integrating indigenous and scientific knowledge on soils: recent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    application of conventional scientific methodology to soils investigations (Pawluk ... to consider the character of local knowledge, the advantages of combining the ... The four research sites, two in Katakwi District, Uganda. (Wera and Toroma) ...

  8. Open access to scientific knowledge and feudalism knowledge: Is there a connection?

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir M. Moskovkin

    2011-01-01

    The role of universities and transnational corporations in the circulation of scientific knowledge is considered. If institutions generate, mostly scientific knowledge, trying to facilitate its free circulation, then transnational companies, contrarily, try to remove most significant and cutting-edge scientific knowledge from free circulation and its commercialization and reintroduction into an open, but now commercial, circulation in the TRIPS. However, paradoxical, the open access movement ...

  9. The Notion of Scientific Knowledge in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morante, Silvia; Rossi, Giancarlo

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to reconsider and critically discuss the conceptual foundations of modern biology and bio-sciences in general, and provide an epistemological guideline to help framing the teaching of these disciplines and enhancing the quality of their presentation in High School, Master and Ph.D. courses. After discussing the methodological problems that arise in trying to construct a sensible and useful scientific approach applicable to the study of living systems, we illustrate what are the general requirements that a workable scheme of investigation should meet to comply with the principles of the Galilean method. The amazing success of basic physics, the Galilean science of election, can be traced back to the development of a radically " reductionistic" approach in the interpretation of experiments and a systematic procedure tailored on the paradigm of " falsifiability" aimed at consistently incorporating new information into extended models/theories. The development of bio-sciences seems to fit with neither reductionism (the deeper is the level of description of a biological phenomenon the more difficult looks finding general and simple laws), nor falsifiability (not always experiments provide a yes-or-no answer). Should we conclude that biology is not a science in the Galilean sense? We want to show that this is not so. Rather in the study of living systems, the novel interpretative paradigm of " complexity" has been developed that, without ever conflicting with the basic principles of physics, allows organizing ideas, conceiving new models and understanding the puzzling lack of reproducibility that seems to affect experiments in biology and in other modern areas of investigation. In the delicate task of conveying scientific concepts and principles to students as well as in popularising bio-sciences to a wider audience, it is of the utmost importance for the success of the process of learning to highlight the internal logical consistency of

  10. Scientific publications in XML - towards a global knowledge base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Murray-Rust

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments on the World-Wide Web provide an unparalleled opportunity to revolutionise scientific, technical and medical publication. The technology exists for the scientific world to use primary publication to create a knowledge base, or Semantic Web, with a potential greatly beyond the paper archives and electronic databases of today.

  11. Scientific knowledge dynamics and relatedness in biotech cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschma, Ron; Heimeriks, Gaston; Balland, Pierre-Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of scientific relatedness on knowledge dynamics in biotech at the city level during the period 1989-2008. We assess the extent to which the emergence of new research topics and the disappearance of existing topics in cities are dependent on their degree of scientif

  12. Contribution of Meta-Strategic Knowledge to Scientific Inquiry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-David, Adi; Zohar, Anat

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to explore the effects of Meta-strategic Knowledge (MSK) on scientific inquiry learning. MSK is a subcomponent of metacognition defined as general, explicit knowledge about thinking strategies. Following earlier studies that showed considerable effects of explicit instruction of MSK regarding the strategy of…

  13. The Development of Scientific Knowledge of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobes, Gavin; Martin, Alan E.; Panagiotaki, Georgia

    2005-01-01

    Investigation of children's knowledge of the Earth can reveal much about the origins, content and structure of scientific knowledge, and the processes of conceptual change and development. Vosniadou and Brewer (1992, claim that children construct coherent mental models of a flat, flattened, or hollow Earth based on a framework theory and intuitive…

  14. The epistemic representation: visual production and communication of scientific knowledge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco López Cantos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite its great influence on the History of Science, visual representations have attracted marginal interest until very recently and have often been regarded as a simple aid for mere illustration or scientific demonstration. However, it has been shown that visualization is an integral element of reasoning and a highly effective and common heuristic strategy in the scientific community and that the study of the conditions of visual production and communication are essential in the development of scientific knowledge. In this paper we deal with the nature of the various forms of visual representation of knowledge that have been happening throughout the history of science, taking as its starting point the illustrated monumental works and three-dimensional models that begin to develop within the scientific community around the fifteenth century. The main thesis of this paper is that any scientific visual representations have common elements that allow us to approach them from epistemic nature, heuristic and communicative dimension.

  15. KNOWLEDGE INTEGRITY IN METHODOLOGY OF INTELLECTUAL SCIENTIFIC-RESEARCH SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Koleshko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes a category of knowledge integrity in philosophical and methodological conception of the intellectual technology. Relationship of knowledge integrity and its uncertainty in the methodology of intellectual scientific research is considered in the paper. The paper  reveals a role of purpose uncertainty of intellectual research process in formation of knowledge integrity properties. An analysis of integrity notion functioning has been executed while considering a problem on relationship of general and partial components. The paper shows changes in the given relationship while making transition from value-orientated research process to purpose-orientated scientific investigation. Determination of diffusion, differentiated and integrated knowledge integrity is shown at various stages of intellectual scientific research.

  16. KNOWLEDGE INTEGRITY IN METHODOLOGY OF INTELLECTUAL SCIENTIFIC-RESEARCH SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    V. M. Koleshko; A. V. Gulay; V. A. Gulay

    2010-01-01

    The paper analyzes a category of knowledge integrity in philosophical and methodological conception of the intellectual technology. Relationship of knowledge integrity and its uncertainty in the methodology of intellectual scientific research is considered in the paper. The paper  reveals a role of purpose uncertainty of intellectual research process in formation of knowledge integrity properties. An analysis of integrity notion functioning has been executed while considering a problem on rel...

  17. Current Knowledge on Hepatitis E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Gracia, María Teresa; García, Mario; Suay, Beatriz; Mateos-Lindemann, María Luisa

    2015-06-28

    Although only a single serotype of hepatitis E virus (HEV), the causative agent of hepatitis E, has been identified, there is great genetic variation among the different HEV isolates reported. There are at least four major recognized genotypes of HEV: genotypes 1 and 2 are mainly restricted to humans and linked to epidemic outbreaks in nonindustrialized countries, whereas genotypes 3 and 4 are zoonotic in both developing and industrialized countries. Besides human strains, genotype 3 and 4 strains of HEV have been genetically characterized from swine, sika deer, mongooses, sheep, and rabbits. Currently, there are approximately 11,000 human and animal sequences of HEV available at the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration. HEV is the major cause of waterborne outbreaks of hepatitis in areas of poor sanitation. Additionally, it is responsible for sporadic cases of viral hepatitis in not only endemic but industrialized countries as well. Transmission of HEV occurs predominantly by the fecal-oral route, although parenteral and perinatal routes have been reported. HEV infection develops in most individuals as a self-limiting, acute, icteric hepatitis; with mortality rates around 1%. However, some affected individuals will develop fulminant hepatic failure, a serious condition that is frequently fatal without a liver transplant. This complication is particularly common when the infection occurs in pregnant women, where mortality rates rise dramatically to up to 25%. Among the preventive measures available to avoid HEV infection, two separate subunit vaccines containing recombinant truncated capsid proteins of HEV have been shown to be highly effective in the prevention of disease. One of them, HEV 239, was approved in China, and its commercialization by Innovax began in November 2012 under the name Hecolin(®).

  18. The Digital Road to Scientific Knowledge Diffusion; A Faster, Better Way to Scientific Progress?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojick, D E; Warnick, W L; Carroll, B C; Crowe, J

    2006-06-01

    With the United States federal government spending billions annually for research and development, ways to increase the productivity of that research can have a significant return on investment. The process by which science knowledge is spread is called diffusion. It is therefore important to better understand and measure the benefits of this diffusion of knowledge. In particular, it is important to understand whether advances in Internet searching can speed up the diffusion of scientific knowledge and accelerate scientific progress despite the fact that the vast majority of scientific information resources continue to be held in deep web databases that many search engines cannot fully access. To address the complexity of the search issue, the term global discovery is used for the act of searching across heterogeneous environments and distant communities. This article discusses these issues and describes research being conducted by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI).

  19. Mapping scientific frontiers : the quest for knowledge visualization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyack, Kevin W.

    2003-08-01

    scientists, such as multi-dimensional scaling, advanced dimensional reduction, social network analysis, Pathfinder network scaling, and landscape visualizations. No algorithms are given here; rather, these techniques are described from the point of view of enabling 'visual thinking'. The Generalized Similarity Analysis (GSA) technique used by Chen in his recent published papers is also introduced here. Information and computer science professionals would be wise not to skip through these early chapters. Although principles of gestalt psychology, cartography, thematic maps, and association techniques may be outside their technology comfort zone, or interest, these predecessors lay a groundwork for the 'visual thinking' that is required to create effective visualizations. Indeed, the great challenge in information visualization is to transform the abstract and intangible into something visible, concrete, and meaningful to the user. The second part of the book, covering the final three chapters, extends the mapping metaphor into the realm of scientific discovery through the structuring of literatures in a way that enables us to see scientific frontiers or paradigms. Case studies are used extensively to show the logical progression that has been made in recent years to get us to this point. Homage is paid to giants of the last 20 years including Michel Callon for co-word mapping, Henry Small for document co-citation analysis and specialty narratives (charting a path linking the different sciences), and Kate McCain for author co-citation analysis, whose work has led to the current state-of-the-art. The last two chapters finally answer the question - 'What does a scientific paradigm look like?' The visual answer given is specific to the GSA technique used by Chen, but does satisfy the intent of the book - to introduce a way to visually identify scientific frontiers. A variety of case studies, mostly from Chen's previously published work

  20. Undergraduate honors students' images of science: Nature of scientific work and scientific knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Michael L.

    This exploratory study assessed the influence of an implicit, inquiry-oriented nature of science (NOS) instructional approach undertaken in an interdisciplinary college science course on undergraduate honor students' (UHS) understanding of the aspects of NOS for scientific work and scientific knowledge. In this study, the nature of scientific work concentrated upon the delineation of science from pseudoscience and the value scientists place on reproducibility. The nature of scientific knowledge concentrated upon how UHS view scientific theories and how they believe scientists utilize scientific theories in their research. The 39 UHS who participated in the study were non-science majors enrolled in a Honors College sponsored interdisciplinary science course where the instructors took an implicit NOS instructional approach. An open-ended assessment instrument, the UFO Scenario, was designed for the course and used to assess UHS' images of science at the beginning and end of the semester. The mixed-design study employed both qualitative and quantitative techniques to analyze the open-ended responses. The qualitative techniques of open and axial coding were utilized to find recurring themes within UHS' responses. McNemar's chi-square test for two dependent samples was used to identify whether any statistically significant changes occurred within responses from the beginning to the end of the semester. At the start of the study, the majority of UHS held mixed NOS views, but were able to accurately define what a scientific theory is and explicate how scientists utilize theories within scientific research. Postinstruction assessment indicated that UHS did not make significant gains in their understanding of the nature of scientific work or scientific knowledge and their overall images of science remained static. The results of the present study found implicit NOS instruction even with an extensive inquiry-oriented component was an ineffective approach for modifying UHS

  1. Dismantling the divide between indigenous and scientific knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, A

    1995-01-01

    Metadata only record In the past few years scholarly discussions have characterized indigenous knowledge as a significant resource for development. This article interrogates the concept of indigenous knowledge and the strategies its advocates present to promote development. The article suggests that both the concept of indigenous knowledge and its role in development, are problematic issues as currently conceptualized. To productively engage indigenous knowledge in development, we must go ...

  2. Integrating local and scientific knowledge for environmental management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Christopher M; Fazey, Ioan; Reed, Mark S; Stringer, Lindsay C; Robinson, Guy M; Evely, Anna C

    2010-08-01

    This paper evaluates the processes and mechanisms available for integrating different types of knowledge for environmental management. Following a review of the challenges associated with knowledge integration, we present a series of questions for identifying, engaging, evaluating and applying different knowledges during project design and delivery. These questions are used as a basis to compare three environmental management projects that aimed to integrate knowledge from different sources in the United Kingdom, Solomon Islands and Australia. Comparative results indicate that integrating different types of knowledge is inherently complex - classification of knowledge is arbitrary and knowledge integration perspectives are qualitatively very different. We argue that there is no single optimum approach for integrating local and scientific knowledge and encourage a shift in science from the development of knowledge integration products to the development of problem-focussed, knowledge integration processes. These processes need to be systematic, reflexive and cyclic so that multiple views and multiple methods are considered in relation to an environmental management problem. The results have implications for the way in which researchers and environmental managers undertake and evaluate knowledge integration projects.

  3. Diffusion and utilization of scientific and technological knowledge within state and local governments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, I.; Flanary, P. E.

    1979-01-01

    The state-of-the-art is reviewed concerning current knowledge of processes by which technological innovation and scientific information are disseminated among state and local governments. The effectiveness of various mechanisms, strategies, and approaches by which federal agencies have sought to transfer technology to state, regional, and city governments are assessed. It is concluded that the existing relationships between the state and local governments, and the scientific communities are not adequate.

  4. A VIEW ON THE NATIONAL CAPACITY OF SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE ABSORPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STELIANA SANDU

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the Absorptive Capacity has been approached in numerous theoretical and empirical studies during the last 20 years, covering multiple facets of the relationships between various external sources of knowledge and the capability of a firm, sectors or national economy to identify, assimilate and apply external knowledge in order to increase its economic performance. Absorptive capacity (AC has been extensively analyzed at the firm level, but significantly less consideration has been given to the AC at the national level. National capacity of absorption is definitely much more than the simple aggregation of the individual companies’ capabilities or of the sectoral capacities, due to many systemic complex factors that may add to, or detract from the national AC: the multiplication and propagation effects, access facilities the stock of national and international knowledge, various synergetic mechanisms, knowledge spillovers etc. Based on the literature available, the authors attempted to design a system of indicators to quantify the relative scientific knowledge absorption capacity of different European countries compared with the EU average and the EU leader. Further on, these indicators will be aggregated, providing a fundament for comparative weighted estimations of the national absorptive capacities for scientific knowledge across EU.

  5. Inventing Scientific Discourse: Dimensions of Rhetorical Knowledge in Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, Ann Madeline

    Rhetorical studies of science have emphasized the textual products of scientific activity. In this dissertation, I depart from such traditional analyses of scientific texts and present, instead, a socio-rhetorical analysis of the activities of three physicists presenting their work on the computer simulation of biological molecules to physicists, biologists, and chemists. My analysis focuses, not on a single rhetorical artifact (e.g., the scientific journal article), but on the whole rhetorical process by which the physicists sought to position their work for long-term acceptance. My inquiry was prompted by two questions: "How do scientific artifacts attain public space?" and "How does publicity get achieved and worked out in science?". The findings of my research correct as well as elaborate theoretical assumptions about the rhetorical process as it occurs in science. I argue that scientific persuasion does not occur solely through a text, but that the acceptance of scientific ideas depends on an ongoing social process through which scientists publicize and position their work for long-term acceptance. A central component of this process is audience. Contrary to Perelman and Olbrechts-Tyteca's suggestion that scientific audiences are nonrhetorical entities determined by the larger institution (1969), the physicists' concerns suggest that scientists consciously select their audiences as well as the most suitable forums for reaching those audiences. Further, the physicists' frequent interactions with members of their audiences suggest that audience, more generally, is an internal construct acquired through external means. Scientists acquire knowledge through ongoing social involvement occurring throughout their professional lifetimes. The findings of my research also suggest that scientists use audience knowledge to aid the development and presentation of ideas. Such links between audience and rhetorical invention suggest that rhetoric functions epistemically to aid

  6. Mapping scientific frontiers the quest for knowledge visualization

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Chaomei

    2013-01-01

    In its revised edition, this book examines the history and current developments in knowledge visualization from an interdisciplinary perspective, from theories of invisible colleges and competing paradigms to practical applications of visualization techniques.

  7. Loyalty Programmes : Current Knowledge and Research Directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorotic, Matilda; Bijmolt, Tammo H. A.; Verhoef, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Loyalty programmes (LPs) have increased in number and popularity, but their effects on customer behaviour remain equivocal, due to a lack of understanding of the drivers of LP effectiveness and insufficient generalizable conclusions across prior studies. This paper synthesizes current knowledge pert

  8. Loyalty Programmes : Current Knowledge and Research Directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorotic, Matilda; Bijmolt, Tammo H. A.; Verhoef, Peter C.

    Loyalty programmes (LPs) have increased in number and popularity, but their effects on customer behaviour remain equivocal, due to a lack of understanding of the drivers of LP effectiveness and insufficient generalizable conclusions across prior studies. This paper synthesizes current knowledge

  9. Loyalty Programmes : Current Knowledge and Research Directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorotic, Matilda; Bijmolt, Tammo H. A.; Verhoef, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Loyalty programmes (LPs) have increased in number and popularity, but their effects on customer behaviour remain equivocal, due to a lack of understanding of the drivers of LP effectiveness and insufficient generalizable conclusions across prior studies. This paper synthesizes current knowledge pert

  10. Construction of scientific knowledge in motor learning: history and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Márcio Oliveira

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims to inquire the construction of scientific knowledge in the motor learning area. A necessary historical retrospective on this study field considers the epistemology of Francis Bacon, Karl Popper, Paul Feyerabend and Thomas Kuhn. Bacon and Popper’s conceptions show to be inadequate to explain the scientific progress of motor learning. Feyerabend’s ideas are also inadequate as they lack coherency, even though in some aspects they are adequate. The Kuhnian approach, however, seems more satisfactory, particularly with regard to the notion of “crisis of paradigm” between the ecological approach and the information-processing approach. A critique is offered from human and social sciences perspective. This leads us to reflect on the possible growth of a new paradigm and consider scientific practice as a social practice.

  11. Resistances to Scientific Knowledge Production of Comparative Measurements of Dropout and Completion in European Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlhed, Carina

    2017-01-01

    The article is a critical sociological analysis of current transnational practices on creating comparable measurements of dropout and completion in higher education and the consequences for the conditions of scientific knowledge production on the topic. The analysis revolves around questions of epistemological, methodological and symbolic types…

  12. From Data to Knowledge to Discoveries: Artificial Intelligence and Scientific Workflows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Gil

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific computing has entered a new era of scale and sharing with the arrival of cyberinfrastructure facilities for computational experimentation. A key emerging concept is scientific workflows, which provide a declarative representation of complex scientific applications that can be automatically managed and executed in distributed shared resources. In the coming decades, computational experimentation will push the boundaries of current cyberinfrastructure in terms of inter-disciplinary scope and integrative models of scientific phenomena under study. This paper argues that knowledge-rich workflow environments will provide necessary capabilities for that vision by assisting scientists to validate and vet complex analysis processes and by automating important aspects of scientific exploration and discovery.

  13. Reflections on Peter Slezak and the 'Sociology of Scientific Knowledge`

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchting, W. A.

    The paper examines central parts of the first of two papers in this journal by Peter Slezak criticising sociology of scientific knowledge and also considers, independently, some of the main philosophical issues raised by the sociologists of science, in particular David Bloor. The general conclusion is that each account alludes to different and crucial aspects of the nature of knowledge without, severally or jointly, being able to theorise them adequately. The appendix contains epistemological theses central to a more adequate theory of scientific knowledge.... our Histories of six Thousand Moons make no Mention of any other, than the two great Empires of Lilliput and Blefuscu. Which mighty Powers have ... been engaged in a most obstinate War for six and thirty Moons past. It began upon the following Occasion. It is allowed on all Hands, that the primitive Way of breaking Eggs before we eat them, was upon the larger End: But ... the Emperor [of Lilliput] ... published an Edict, commanding all his Subjects, upon great Penalties, to break the smaller End of their Eggs. The People so resented this Law, that ... there have been six Rebellions raised on that Account ... These civil Commotions were constantly fomented by the Monarchs of Blefuscu ... It is computed, that eleven Thousand have, at several Times, suffered Death, rather than break Eggs at the smaller End. Many hundred large Volumes have published upon this Controversy ...

  14. Using Bibliographic Knowledge for Ranking in Scientific Publication Databases

    CERN Document Server

    Vesely, Martin; Le Meur, Jean-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Document ranking for scientific publications involves a variety of specialized resources (e.g. author or citation indexes) that are usually difficult to use within standard general purpose search engines that usually operate on large-scale heterogeneous document collections for which the required specialized resources are not always available for all the documents present in the collections. Integrating such resources into specialized information retrieval engines is therefore important to cope with community-specific user expectations that strongly influence the perception of relevance within the considered community. In this perspective, this paper extends the notion of ranking with various methods exploiting different types of bibliographic knowledge that represent a crucial resource for measuring the relevance of scientific publications. In our work, we experimentally evaluated the adequacy of two such ranking methods (one based on freshness, i.e. the publication date, and the other on a novel index, the ...

  15. Self-presentation of sociology in scientific knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Mamedov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers some methodological foundations of social cognition, socio-cultural and theoretical foundations of social science; defines a clear position in the sociology of science, criticizes the positivist’s approach to the analysis of the methods of sociology; epistemologically analyze such theoretical constructs, which formed the basis of modern sociological knowledge. The article posits the importance of theoretical knowledge in sociology and its philosophical and methodological foundations. Author explains the integrity of the science of sociology, it differs from simple empiricism. Here we describe the theory of Comte and Spencer, the theory of the scientific revolution Koyre, Kuhn’s theory of sciense paradigm and influence of these theories on the development of sociology (and their limitations. The author examines the methodological principles of postpositivism in the social sciences and social cognition in general and describes fenomenology and essential theories.

  16. Knowledge apartheid in disaster risk management discourse: Is marrying indigenous and scientific knowledge the missing link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukundi Mutasa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous knowledge (IK is a key component of disaster risk management (DRM and development planning, yet it is often overlooked, with practitioners preferring to use scientific knowledge. Critics of IK have termed it archaic, primitive, a constraint to development and inferior to scientific knowledge, which has contributed to its widespread marginalisation. However, smallholder farmers in rural Zimbabwe have utilised IK for generations, especially in predicting rainfall patterns and managing drought conditions, showing that IK can be a useful tool in DRM. This article presents findings from research on drought vulnerability and coping conducted in Zimbabwe’s Buhera and Chikomba districts in 2009, particularly relating to utilisation of IK in smallholder farming communities, and argues that unless IK is documented and preserved, its marginalisation will persist. The research followed a mixed-methods approach whereby both quantitative and qualitative data were collected and analysed. Whilst smallholder respondents were randomly selected for household surveys, snowball sampling was employed for key informant interviews. Respondents indicated that they utilised some indigenous rainfall pattern predictions gained from observing and interpreting plant and animal behaviour. Some cultural practices that were critical to development and utilisation of certain IK were also threatened with extinction. The article argues for ’marrying’ IK and scientific knowledge, in the hope that the two will offset each other’s weaknesses, resulting in some kind of hybrid knowledge that will be critical for promoting sustainable agricultural production in Zimbabwe. However, this is not for disregard the challenges associated with knowledge hybridisation, as these two types of knowledge are grounded on differing foundations.

  17. Scientific Knowledge and Technology, Animal Experimentation, and Pharmaceutical Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinter, Lewis B; DeGeorge, Joseph J

    2016-12-01

    Human discovery of pharmacologically active substances is arguably the oldest of the biomedical sciences with origins >3500 years ago. Since ancient times, four major transformations have dramatically impacted pharmaceutical development, each driven by advances in scientific knowledge, technology, and/or regulation: (1) anesthesia, analgesia, and antisepsis; (2) medicinal chemistry; (3) regulatory toxicology; and (4) targeted drug discovery. Animal experimentation in pharmaceutical development is a modern phenomenon dating from the 20th century and enabling several of the four transformations. While each transformation resulted in more effective and/or safer pharmaceuticals, overall attrition, cycle time, cost, numbers of animals used, and low probability of success for new products remain concerns, and pharmaceutical development remains a very high risk business proposition. In this manuscript we review pharmaceutical development since ancient times, describe its coevolution with animal experimentation, and attempt to predict the characteristics of future transformations.

  18. LINGUISTIC DETERMINISM, CUMULATIVE EVOLUTION AND DEVELOPMENT OF SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhoverkhov A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to examine how language and its historically inherited content and structure allows accumulating knowledge and determines the development of the individuals, culture and science. The article shows the theoretical drawbacks of modern "pragmatic turn" in which language is depicted only as a derivate of natural, cultural and cognitive systems. Instead, it is stated that language, in addition to all of the above, have to be considered also as a relatively independent basis and one of the causes that determine individual and social development. For that reason, the study examines the system nature of language, thought and culture, their environmental and social "embeddiness", a close relationship with other sign systems and with various forms of social activities. From that point, theoretical reduction of multiple relations and varying causes in complex ecological and social systems only to bilateral relations of language-thought, language-culture are revised. Particular attention is paid to the role of language in the accumulation and systematization of scientific knowledge and the transmission of cultural traditions. In that context, language is seen as part of the non-genetic inheritance systems, "social a priori" that determines the content and creates conditions for cumulative social evolution. Therefore, it is maintained that the comprehensive studies of language and its significance for culture and science have to embrace within a systems approach both the linguistic and pragmatic "turns"

  19. Human bocavirus: Current knowledge and future challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guido, Marcello; Tumolo, Maria Rosaria; Verri, Tiziano; Romano, Alessandro; Serio, Francesca; De Giorgi, Mattia; De Donno, Antonella; Bagordo, Francesco; Zizza, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a parvovirus isolated about a decade ago and found worldwide in both respiratory samples, mainly from early life and children of 6-24 mo of age with acute respiratory infection, and in stool samples, from patients with gastroenteritis. Since then, other viruses related to the first HBoV isolate (HBoV1), namely HBoV2, HBoV3 and HBoV4, have been detected principally in human faeces. HBoVs are small non-enveloped single-stranded DNA viruses of about 5300 nucleotides, consisting of three open reading frames encoding the first two the non-structural protein 1 (NS1) and nuclear phosphoprotein (NP1) and the third the viral capsid proteins 1 and 2 (VP1 and VP2). HBoV pathogenicity remains to be fully clarified mainly due to the lack of animal models for the difficulties in replicating the virus in in vitro cell cultures, and the fact that HBoV infection is frequently accompanied by at least another viral and/or bacterial respiratory and/or gastroenteric pathogen infection. Current diagnostic methods to support HBoV detection include polymerase chain reaction, real-time PCR, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and enzyme immunoassay using recombinant VP2 or virus-like particle capsid proteins, although sequence-independent amplification techniques combined with next-generation sequencing platforms promise rapid and simultaneous detection of the pathogens in the future. This review presents the current knowledge on HBoV genotypes with emphasis on taxonomy, phylogenetic relationship and genomic analysis, biology, epidemiology, pathogenesis and diagnostic methods. The emerging discussion on HBoVs as true pathogen or innocent bystander is also emphasized.

  20. Current trends on knowledge-based systems

    CERN Document Server

    Valencia-García, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    This book presents innovative and high-quality research on the implementation of conceptual frameworks, strategies, techniques, methodologies, informatics platforms and models for developing advanced knowledge-based systems and their application in different fields, including Agriculture, Education, Automotive, Electrical Industry, Business Services, Food Manufacturing, Energy Services, Medicine and others. Knowledge-based technologies employ artificial intelligence methods to heuristically address problems that cannot be solved by means of formal techniques. These technologies draw on standard and novel approaches from various disciplines within Computer Science, including Knowledge Engineering, Natural Language Processing, Decision Support Systems, Artificial Intelligence, Databases, Software Engineering, etc. As a combination of different fields of Artificial Intelligence, the area of Knowledge-Based Systems applies knowledge representation, case-based reasoning, neural networks, Semantic Web and TICs used...

  1. Current knowledge, gaps and challenges in the Southern European Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanassiou, Evangelos

    2015-04-01

    New knowledge advances our current understanding on the selection and application of the appropriate tools for assessing the state of the marine environment in the Southern European Seas (SES). Diminishing the lack of knowledge is a prerequisite for sound policy decisions. Although gaps and knowledge are fewer today, the health of marine and coastal ecosystems in the SES is under pressure and shows, in places, some signs of deterioration and declining quality. Overall, there is a lack of data accessibility and long time series in the SES, while in many cases poorly constrained processes cannot really support knowledge-based policy making (e.g. ecosystem functioning, climate change, fisheries management, etc.). New knowledge has to be produced and excellence must be promoted to support sustainable economic growth. At the same time, existing and new capacities have to be upgraded and increased in order to support sustainable convergence between SES countries. There are several gaps that have been identified and processes that have been poorly understood in the SES, mainly from research projects that have been working at basin level. The main research priorities that have been identified from the SeasERA Project for both, the Mediterranean and the Black Sea include: the climate change and its impacts, the hydrological cycle, the ventilation and the inter-basin coupling, the marine biodiversity and the provision of goods and services, the marine protected areas, the deep sea ecosystems, the biological invasions, the marine pollution and the ocean and human health, the renewable energy, the maritime transport, the fisheries and aquaculture activities and the biotechnology and the exploitation of marine resources for industrial application. More important, however, is the fact that the economic, the social and the scientific and the environmental challenges must be collectively tackled. They should have prioritisation and clear objectives as well as data sharing for

  2. Animal experimentation and scientific knowledge: a thought style?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thales de Astrogildo e Tréz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Animal experimentation, besides a research method extensively applied in the production of scientific knowledge, is also considered essential to science and with undeniable historical relevance in advances in human health. In this survey, a questionnaire was applied to a group of researchers involved with research based on non-animal models (n =18, and to another group involved with research based on animal models (n =18. The data analysis was grounded in Ludwik Fleck (1896 -1961 epistemological assumptions. The results suggested that there are at least two thought styles operating in consonance on the same research problem (advances in human health conditions with significantly different conceptions not only concerning the research practices involved, but also the historical conceptions related to the role of animal experimentation.A experimentação animal, além de método amplamente aplicado na produção do conhecimento científico, é considerada como essencial à ciência e com valor histórico inegável no progresso das condições de saúde humana. Neste levantamento, um questionário foi aplicado a um grupo de pesquisadores com trabalhos baseados em modelos não-animais (n =18 e a outro grupo com trabalhos baseados em modelos animais (n =18. A análise de dados se baseou nos pressupostos epitemológicos de Ludwik Fleck (1896-1961. Os dados sugerem que existem pelo menos dois estilos de pensamento operando em consonância sobre o mesmo problema de pesquisa (avanços nas condições de saúde humana, com concepções significativamente diferentes sobre as práticas de pesquisa envolvidas, assim como as concepções históricas relacionadas ao papel da experimentação animal.

  3. The Relationship between Scientific Knowledge and Behaviour: An HIV/AIDS Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnguni, Lindelani; Abrie, Mia; Ebersohn, Liesel

    2016-01-01

    Debates on the role of scientific knowledge to affect behaviour are continuing. The theory of planned behaviour suggests that behaviour is influenced by attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control and not by knowledge. However, a large body of knowledge argues that increased HIV/AIDS-related knowledge leads to the adoption of…

  4. The Relationship between Scientific Knowledge and Behaviour: An HIV/AIDS Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnguni, Lindelani; Abrie, Mia; Ebersohn, Liesel

    2016-01-01

    Debates on the role of scientific knowledge to affect behaviour are continuing. The theory of planned behaviour suggests that behaviour is influenced by attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control and not by knowledge. However, a large body of knowledge argues that increased HIV/AIDS-related knowledge leads to the adoption of…

  5. The Acquisition of Scientific Knowledge via Critical Thinking: A Philosophical Approach to Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talavera, Isidoro

    2016-01-01

    There is a gap between the facts learned in a science course and the higher-cognitive skills of analysis and evaluation necessary for students to secure scientific knowledge and scientific habits of mind. Teaching science is not just about how we do science (i.e., focusing on just "accumulating undigested facts and scientific definitions and…

  6. The Impact of Changing Scientific Knowledge on Science Education in the United States Since 1850

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giorno, Bette J.

    1969-01-01

    Presents the findings and conclusions of research study into the impact of changing scientific knowledge on the content and methodology of science education during the period 1850-1954. The results showed that changing scientific knowledge had a greater and more direct influence on educational psychology and philosophy than on the science…

  7. Intestinal microbiota transplant - current state of knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszczyszyn, Jarosław Jerzy; Radomski, Marek; Leszczyszyn, Anna Maria

    2016-01-01

    Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has induced a lot scientific interest and hopes for the last couple of years. FMT has been approved as a treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis. Highly sophisticated molecular DNA identification methods have been used to assess the healthy human microbiome as well as its disturbances in several diseases. The metabolic and immunologic functions of the microbiome have become more clear and understandable. A lot of pathological changes, such as production of short-chain fatty acids or components of the inflammatory cascade, caused by changes in microbiome diversity, variability and richness have been observed among patients suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases, irritable bowel syndrome, type 2 diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis. The published clinical results are encouraging, but still there is huge demand for FMT controlled clinical trials.

  8. A new knowledge discovery method for scientific and technologic database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new algorithm for the knowledge discovery based on statistic induction logic is proposed, and the validity of the method is verified by examples. The method is suitable for a large range of knowledge discovery applications in the studying of causal relation, uncertainty knowledge acquisition and principal factors analyzing. The language field description of the state space makes the algorithm robust in the adaptation with easier understandable results, which are isomotopy with natural language in the topologic space.

  9. [Hypnosis and pain: current and perspective knowledge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioy, Antoine

    2012-06-27

    After further controversies, the definition of hypnosis is to be at the same time a modified state of consciousness and a particular intersubjective relation between a practitioner and his patient. In a synthetic way, we can say that mechanisms of hypnosis on acute pain are now well known, and its efficiency is particularly proved in the pain provoked by the care. On the other hand, the knowledge concerning the action of the hypnosis on chronic pain is much more complex to understand. If the hypnosis allows connoting differently pain and to decrease its implication in patient's life, otherWise the long-term reorganizations of hypnosis on chronic pain are still for the study. In practice, the field which his particularly in development is the analogical processes of the speech, because they are particularly present in pain medicine, and easy to use in hypnotic method.

  10. SEMI SCIENTIFIC ATTITUDES THROUGH PROCESS REPORTING ON KNOWLEDGE PRODUCTION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tollestrup, Christian

    2010-01-01

    process can emphasize the knowledge production aspects of the process. By making the reflections and evaluation more explicit and accessible this provide a platform for the student to relate to the type of knowledge produced by various activities and methods making theory of science very tangible...

  11. Scientific Knowledge Suppresses but Does Not Supplant Earlier Intuitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtulman, Andrew; Valcarcel, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    When students learn scientific theories that conflict with their earlier, naive theories, what happens to the earlier theories? Are they overwritten or merely suppressed? We investigated this question by devising and implementing a novel speeded-reasoning task. Adults with many years of science education verified two types of statements as quickly…

  12. Metaphor, Multiplicative Meaning and the Semiotic Construction of Scientific Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Owyong, Yuet See Monica

    2011-01-01

    Scientific discourse is characterized by multi-semiotic construction and the resultant semantic expansions. To date, there remains a lack of analytical methods to explicate the multiplicative nature of meaning. Drawing on the theories of systemic functional linguistics, this article examines the meaning-making processes across language and…

  13. Sleep bruxism: Current knowledge and contemporary management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Adrian U; Chua, Ai Ping

    2016-01-01

    Bruxism is defined as the repetitive jaw muscle activity characterized by the clenching or grinding of teeth. It can be categorized into awake and sleep bruxism (SB). Frequent SB occurs in about 13% of adults. The exact etiology of SB is still unknown and probably multifactorial in nature. Current literature suggests that SB is regulated centrally (pathophysiological and psychosocial factors) and not peripherally (morphological factors). Cited consequences of SB include temporomandibular disorders, headaches, tooth wear/fracture, implant, and other restoration failure. Chairside recognition of SB involves the use of subjective reports, clinical examinations, and trial oral splints. Definitive diagnosis of SB can only be achieved using electrophysiological tools. Pharmacological, psychological, and dental strategies had been employed to manage SB. There is at present, no effective treatment that "cures" or "stops" SB permanently. Management is usually directed toward tooth/restoration protection, reduction of bruxism activity, and pain relief.

  14. Sleep bruxism: Current knowledge and contemporary management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian U.J. Yap

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bruxism is defined as the repetitive jaw muscle activity characterized by the clenching or grinding of teeth. It can be categorized into awake and sleep bruxism (SB. Frequent SB occurs in about 13% of adults. The exact etiology of SB is still unknown and probably multifactorial in nature. Current literature suggests that SB is regulated centrally (pathophysiological and psychosocial factors and not peripherally (morphological factors. Cited consequences of SB include temporomandibular disorders, headaches, tooth wear/fracture, implant, and other restoration failure. Chairside recognition of SB involves the use of subjective reports, clinical examinations, and trial oral splints. Definitive diagnosis of SB can only be achieved using electrophysiological tools. Pharmacological, psychological, and dental strategies had been employed to manage SB. There is at present, no effective treatment that “cures” or “stops” SB permanently. Management is usually directed toward tooth/restoration protection, reduction of bruxism activity, and pain relief.

  15. Sleep bruxism: Current knowledge and contemporary management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Adrian U.; Chua, Ai Ping

    2016-01-01

    Bruxism is defined as the repetitive jaw muscle activity characterized by the clenching or grinding of teeth. It can be categorized into awake and sleep bruxism (SB). Frequent SB occurs in about 13% of adults. The exact etiology of SB is still unknown and probably multifactorial in nature. Current literature suggests that SB is regulated centrally (pathophysiological and psychosocial factors) and not peripherally (morphological factors). Cited consequences of SB include temporomandibular disorders, headaches, tooth wear/fracture, implant, and other restoration failure. Chairside recognition of SB involves the use of subjective reports, clinical examinations, and trial oral splints. Definitive diagnosis of SB can only be achieved using electrophysiological tools. Pharmacological, psychological, and dental strategies had been employed to manage SB. There is at present, no effective treatment that “cures” or “stops” SB permanently. Management is usually directed toward tooth/restoration protection, reduction of bruxism activity, and pain relief. PMID:27656052

  16. Global forces and local currents in Argentina's science policy crossroads: restricted access or open knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horacio Javier Etchichury

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the tensions between two competing approaches to scientific policy in Argentina. The traditional vision favors autonomous research. The neoliberal conception fosters the link between science and markets. In the past few years, a neodevelopmentalist current also tries to stress relevance of scientific research. Finally, the article describes how the Open Access movement has entered the debate. The World Bank intervention and the human rights dimension of the question are discussed in depth. The article introduces the notion of open knowledge as a guiding criterion to design a human-rights based scientific policy.

  17. Holistic scientifically artistic paradigm of education in society of knowledges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олена Миколаївна Отич

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Human-center measuring of society education are required by claims of new holistic educational paradigm, which becomes the source of conceptual ideas on providing integral influence of education on intellectual and emotional and sensual spheres of personality with the purpose of its harmonious general and professional development, forming of integral worldview which consists of scientific and artistic worldviews, each of which is valuable

  18. Community intelligence in knowledge curation: an application to managing scientific nomenclature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Dai

    Full Text Available Harnessing community intelligence in knowledge curation bears significant promise in dealing with communication and education in the flood of scientific knowledge. As knowledge is accumulated at ever-faster rates, scientific nomenclature, a particular kind of knowledge, is concurrently generated in all kinds of fields. Since nomenclature is a system of terms used to name things in a particular discipline, accurate translation of scientific nomenclature in different languages is of critical importance, not only for communications and collaborations with English-speaking people, but also for knowledge dissemination among people in the non-English-speaking world, particularly young students and researchers. However, it lacks of accuracy and standardization when translating scientific nomenclature from English to other languages, especially for those languages that do not belong to the same language family as English. To address this issue, here we propose for the first time the application of community intelligence in scientific nomenclature management, namely, harnessing collective intelligence for translation of scientific nomenclature from English to other languages. As community intelligence applied to knowledge curation is primarily aided by wiki and Chinese is the native language for about one-fifth of the world's population, we put the proposed application into practice, by developing a wiki-based English-to-Chinese Scientific Nomenclature Dictionary (ESND; http://esnd.big.ac.cn. ESND is a wiki-based, publicly editable and open-content platform, exploiting the whole power of the scientific community in collectively and collaboratively managing scientific nomenclature. Based on community curation, ESND is capable of achieving accurate, standard, and comprehensive scientific nomenclature, demonstrating a valuable application of community intelligence in knowledge curation.

  19. Scientific knowledge acquisition as a representational change process

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Most of science education research throughout many years, and the teaching models resulting fro this research, has been devoted, without much success, to promote the so-called conceptual change. In this paper students' alternative knowledge is interpreted as embodied implicit representations and it is argued that conceptual change must be interpreted as representational change.

  20. Scientific knowledge acquisition as a representational change process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ignacio Pozo

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Most of science education research throughout many years, and the teaching models resulting fro this research, has been devoted, without much success, to promote the so-called conceptual change. In this paper students' alternative knowledge is interpreted as embodied implicit representations and it is argued that conceptual change must be interpreted as representational change.

  1. Discovering Communicable Scientific Knowledge from Spatio-Temporal Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabacher, Mark; Langley, Pat; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes how we used regression rules to improve upon a result previously published in the Earth science literature. In such a scientific application of machine learning, it is crucially important for the learned models to be understandable and communicable. We recount how we selected a learning algorithm to maximize communicability, and then describe two visualization techniques that we developed to aid in understanding the model by exploiting the spatial nature of the data. We also report how evaluating the learned models across time let us discover an error in the data.

  2. FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ACROSS EUROPE 15. SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE BASE AND DIFFERENCES IN QUALITY

    OpenAIRE

    Acosta, Manuel; Coronado, Daniel; FERRANDIZ, Esther; LEON, Dolores; Moreno, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    This paper contributes with some insights into scientific knowledge base in food industry at the regional level in Europe 15. We argue that science production by universities is not enough to create a scientific knowledge base. An additional requirement is counting on some standards of quality for being useful to firms. We explore this line of inquiry by first examining the regional distribution of food science across Europe and its relationship with the production of technology in the Europe...

  3. Framing of scientific knowledge as a new category of health care research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador-Carulla, Luis; Fernandez, Ana; Madden, Rosamond; Lukersmith, Sue; Colagiuri, Ruth; Torkfar, Ghazal; Sturmberg, Joachim

    2014-12-01

    The new area of health system research requires a revision of the taxonomy of scientific knowledge that may facilitate a better understanding and representation of complex health phenomena in research discovery, corroboration and implementation. A position paper by an expert group following and iterative approach. 'Scientific evidence' should be differentiated from 'elicited knowledge' of experts and users, and this latter typology should be described beyond the traditional qualitative framework. Within this context 'framing of scientific knowledge' (FSK) is defined as a group of studies of prior expert knowledge specifically aimed at generating formal scientific frames. To be distinguished from other unstructured frames, FSK must be explicit, standardized, based on the available evidence, agreed by a group of experts and subdued to the principles of commensurability, transparency for corroboration and transferability that characterize scientific research. A preliminary typology of scientific framing studies is presented. This typology includes, among others, health declarations, position papers, expert-based clinical guides, conceptual maps, classifications, expert-driven health atlases and expert-driven studies of costs and burden of illness. This grouping of expert-based studies constitutes a different kind of scientific knowledge and should be clearly differentiated from 'evidence' gathered from experimental and observational studies in health system research. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Social psychology of education as a branch of scientific knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М.Е. Sachkova

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the emergence of a new scientific field – social psychology of education. Most of the key phenomena that contemporary social psychology examines, cannot influence training and education success of an individual. Therefore, in addition to traditional general psychological, psycho-pedagogic, developmental, psychophysical and other approaches solving the problems of the education system; the possibility is considered of increasing the efficiency of the educational process by means of a rapidly growing social psychology. The prospects of this approach is evidenced by the results of numerous Russian and international research, including those performed in Moscow State University of Psychology and Education. The article discusses ways to develop the concept of the social psychology of education, approaches to the definition of its subject, goals and objectives, as well as new methods of the discipline. The possibilities of further use of the potential of social psychology are analyzed to address the efficiency of the educational process and the full personal development of students.

  5. Specialization and Complementarities of Knowledge in Scientific Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkærsig, Lars

    2011-01-01

    be beneficial has gained influence, arguing that exposure to variety and task diversification improves learning beyond that of specialization. Branching out has proved to be beneficial to the individual, where engaging in diverse, but related tasks have shown to increase performance to a higher degree than...... specialization. The purpose of this thesis is to contribute to our understanding of the effects of specialization of the individual through an exploration of how the performance of the individual are affected by the balance between specialization and diversification of knowledge. In addition, the thesis explores...... the interplay between individual and group levels in an effort to illuminate how the degree of specialization of the individual finds application in different group compositions....

  6. Coupling visualization and data analysis for knowledge discovery from multi-dimensional scientific data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rübel, Oliver; Ahern, Sean; Bethel, E Wes; Biggin, Mark D; Childs, Hank; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Depace, Angela; Eisen, Michael B; Fowlkes, Charless C; Geddes, Cameron G R; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Huang, Min-Yu; Keränen, Soile V E; Knowles, David W; Hendriks, Cris L Luengo; Malik, Jitendra; Meredith, Jeremy; Messmer, Peter; Prabhat; Ushizima, Daniela; Weber, Gunther H; Wu, Kesheng

    2010-05-01

    Knowledge discovery from large and complex scientific data is a challenging task. With the ability to measure and simulate more processes at increasingly finer spatial and temporal scales, the growing number of data dimensions and data objects presents tremendous challenges for effective data analysis and data exploration methods and tools. The combination and close integration of methods from scientific visualization, information visualization, automated data analysis, and other enabling technologies -such as efficient data management- supports knowledge discovery from multi-dimensional scientific data. This paper surveys two distinct applications in developmental biology and accelerator physics, illustrating the effectiveness of the described approach.

  7. Coupling Visualization and Data Analysis for Knowledge Discovery from Multi-dimensional Scientific Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubel, Oliver; Ahern, Sean; Bethel, E. Wes; Biggin, Mark D.; Childs, Hank; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; DePace, Angela; Eisen, Michael B.; Fowlkes, Charless C.; Geddes, Cameron G. R.; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Huang, Min-Yu; Keranen, Soile V. E.; Knowles, David W.; Hendriks, Chris L. Luengo; Malik, Jitendra; Meredith, Jeremy; Messmer, Peter; Prabhat,; Ushizima, Daniela; Weber, Gunther H.; Wu, Kesheng

    2010-06-08

    Knowledge discovery from large and complex scientific data is a challenging task. With the ability to measure and simulate more processes at increasingly finer spatial and temporal scales, the growing number of data dimensions and data objects presents tremendous challenges for effective data analysis and data exploration methods and tools. The combination and close integration of methods from scientific visualization, information visualization, automated data analysis, and other enabling technologies"such as efficient data management" supports knowledge discovery from multi-dimensional scientific data. This paper surveys two distinct applications in developmental biology and accelerator physics, illustrating the effectiveness of the described approach.

  8. Coupling visualization and data analysis for knowledge discovery from multi-dimensional scientific data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rübel, Oliver; Ahern, Sean; Bethel, E. Wes; Biggin, Mark D.; Childs, Hank; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; DePace, Angela; Eisen, Michael B.; Fowlkes, Charless C.; Geddes, Cameron G. R.; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Huang, Min-Yu; Keränen, Soile V. E.; Knowles, David W.; Hendriks, Cris L. Luengo; Malik, Jitendra; Meredith, Jeremy; Messmer, Peter; Prabhat; Ushizima, Daniela; Weber, Gunther H.; Wu, Kesheng

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge discovery from large and complex scientific data is a challenging task. With the ability to measure and simulate more processes at increasingly finer spatial and temporal scales, the growing number of data dimensions and data objects presents tremendous challenges for effective data analysis and data exploration methods and tools. The combination and close integration of methods from scientific visualization, information visualization, automated data analysis, and other enabling technologies —such as efficient data management— supports knowledge discovery from multi-dimensional scientific data. This paper surveys two distinct applications in developmental biology and accelerator physics, illustrating the effectiveness of the described approach. PMID:23762211

  9. USING SCIENTIFIC PAPERS TO STIMULATE THE STUDY OF BIOCHEMISTRY AND THE UNDERSTANDING OF SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE CONSTRUCTION: THE RESEARCH ON ADRENOLEUKODYSTROPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Gagianone

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD is characterized by mutations in very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA peroxisome transporter, leading to VLCFA accumulation in myelin sheath. In the 70’s and 80’s it was hypothesized that X-ALD is caused by enzymatic deficits in FA-coenzyme A connection, VLCFA degradation or FA elongation. The latter enabled Lorenzo’s oil (LO treatment, which became famous by the homonym movie. The apparent initial therapy effectiveness lead to LO administration in many patients, although with biochemical knowledge progress its relevance has been questioned.Objectives Our aim was to discuss X-ALD researches in “Lipids Metabolism” classes during 2014 Biochemistry courses to Biology and Biomedicine undergraduate students at Fluminense Federal University to illustrate how scientific knowledge is constructed.Materials and MethodsIn order to contrast the recent scientific advances with the information spread to society through “Lorenzo’s Oil”, the movie in edited version was presented to students followed by a questionnaire with Likert scale to evaluate the perception of scientific knowledge exposed by the movie. Afterwards, a Guided Study containing a brief history and discursive questions based upon a paper (Wiesingner et.al, J. Biol. Chem. 288:19269, 2013 was applied in class.Results and DiscussionFrom 58 students who filled in the questionnaire,72,4% considered the movie shows that X-ALD biochemical knowledge has been achieved. This notion was confirmed since 84,5% agreed LO is an effective alternative treatment if X-ALD is early detected. The same percentage agreed that based on the movie the biochemical deficiency relies on an enzyme involved in VLCFA degradation. Although the movie transmits the idea that the cure has been found, 67,2% believed X-ALD biochemical mechanisms are not fully comprehended. ConclusionsThe Guided Study/movie application was very effective because allowed the

  10. Everyday knowledge and scientific knowledge in the interpretation of matter properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Sagrario Gutiérrez Julián

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study about students’ representations of matter properties. It shows how in order to explain matter discontinuity and intrinsic motion of particles the students frequently use alternative conceptions instead of scientific theories. These conceptions give local consistency centered on the macroscopic perception of matter, while scientific theories give global consistency.

  11. Searching for Synergy: Integrating Traditional and Scientific Ecological Knowledge in Environmental Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmerer, Robin Wall

    2012-01-01

    Scientific ecological knowledge (SEK) is a powerful discipline for diagnosing and analyzing environmental degradation, but has been far less successful in devising sustainable solutions which lie at the intersection of nature and culture. Traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) of indigenous and local peoples is rich in prescriptions for the…

  12. The Acquisition of Scientific Knowledge: Analysis and Representation of Student Conceptions Concerning Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, Mariana G.

    Problems concerning conceptual change from existing knowledge (accumulated from everyday experiences or earlier teaching) to new scientific knowledge concerning natural phenomena are fundamentally the same for Western and non-Western students. However, difficulties experienced by non-Western students are magnified by factors such as their cultural…

  13. Searching for Synergy: Integrating Traditional and Scientific Ecological Knowledge in Environmental Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmerer, Robin Wall

    2012-01-01

    Scientific ecological knowledge (SEK) is a powerful discipline for diagnosing and analyzing environmental degradation, but has been far less successful in devising sustainable solutions which lie at the intersection of nature and culture. Traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) of indigenous and local peoples is rich in prescriptions for the…

  14. The Philosophy of Modern Scientific Knowledge: the Language of Synergy and the Synergy of Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Kiyashchenko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The issue of the formation of present-day scientific knowledge is viewed in the paper through the prism of language. Language is seen here not merely as an external form vis-a-vis the content of scientific knowledge, but rather as the mode of emergence and existence of scientific knowledge as a certain reality (Shverev 2001: 509,  the one that evolves as a result of cognitive and communicative practices in transdisciplinary studies. The mutual influence of the language of synergy and the synergy of language leads to a new unity of scientific experience and gives rise to the philosophy of transdisciplinarity (Киященко 2006: 17. 

  15. Teachers' scientific knowledge, teaching practice, and students' learning activities: Cases of three elementary classroom teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Shinho

    The purposes of this dissertation study are to better understand what specific types of scientific knowledge and practice three elementary teachers exhibit, and to examine how they use their scientific knowledge in their classroom teaching practice to provide students' opportunities to learn science when teaching condensation in the context of a unit on the water cycle. By comparing and contrasting three cases of elementary classroom teaching, this study discusses what kinds of scientific knowledge and practice are fundamental for teaching elementary science for scientific understanding. The data include structured interviews (content, pre- and post- observation, and stimulated recall), videotaped classroom observations, and collections of teachers' and students' written artifacts. Data were collected prior to, during, and after the three teachers taught condensation to fifth grade students. The data were analyzed in three contexts: interviews, teaching practices, and students' classroom activities. This made it possible to clarify which characteristics of teacher's scientific knowledge influenced which aspects of their teaching practice. Data analysis shows that teachers' scientific knowledge were closely associated with their teaching practice and students' classroom activities. Two characteristics of the teachers' scientific reasoning emerged as especially important. The first concerned how teachers connected observations of condensation with patterns in those observations (e.g., condensation occurs when warm moist air cools) and with explanations for those patterns (e.g., condensation is water vapor that changes to liquid water). Two teachers were careful to connect observations with patterns in their own thinking and in their classroom teaching. One of those teachers also connected the observations and patterns to scientific explanations. In contrast, the third teacher focused on listing scientific terms with little elaboration with specific observations and

  16. Social justice pedagogies and scientific knowledge: Remaking citizenship in the non-science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, Jane L.

    This dissertation contributes to efforts to rethink the meanings of democracy, scientific literacy, and non-scientist citizenship in the United States. Beginning with questions that emerged from action research and exploring the socio-political forces that shape educational practices, it shows why non-science educators who teach for social justice must first recognize formal science education as a primary site of training for (future) non-scientist citizens and then prepare to intervene in the dominant model of scientifically literate citizenship offered by formal science education. This model of citizenship defines (and limits) appropriate behavior for non-scientist citizens as acquiescing to the authority of science and the state by actively demarcating science from non-science, experts from non-experts, and the rational from the irrational. To question scientific authority is to be scientifically illiterate. This vision of 'acquiescent democracy' seeks to end challenges to the authority of science and the state by ensuring that scientific knowledge is privileged in all personal and public decision-making practices, producing a situation in which it becomes natural for non-scientist citizens to enroll scientific knowledge to naturalize oppression within our schools and society. It suggests that feminist and equity-oriented science educators, by themselves, are unable or unwilling to challenge certain assumptions in the dominant model of scientifically literate citizenship. Therefore, it is the responsibility of non-science educators who teach for social justice to articulate oppositional models of non-scientist citizenship and democracy in their classrooms and to challenge the naturalized authority of scientific knowledge in all aspects of our lives. It demonstrates how research in the field of Science & Technology Studies can serve as one resource in our efforts to intervene in the dominant model of scientifically literate citizenship and to support a model of

  17. Teaching the Scientific Method Using Current News Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Laura K.; Mahan, Carolyn G.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a short (less than 50 minutes) activity using news articles from sources such as "Science Daily" to teach students the steps of the scientific method and the difference between primary and secondary literature sources. The flexibility in choosing news articles to examine allowed us to tailor the activity to the specific interests of…

  18. New York scientific a culture of inquiry, knowledge, and learning

    CERN Document Server

    Hargittai, Istvan

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces the reader to the visible memorabilia of science and scientists in all the five boroughs of New York City—statues, busts, plaques, buildings, and other artifacts. In addition, it extends to some scientists and institutions currently operating in the city. New York is a world center of commerce, finance, communications, transportation, and culture, and it is also a world center in science. It is home to worldrenowned universities and research laboratories, a museum of natural history and other museums related to science, a science academy, historical societies, botanical gardens and zoos, libraries, and a hall of science as well as a large number of world-renowned scientists. The eight chapters of the book cover the following areas. 1 Explorers and Naturalists; 2 Scientists and Innovators; 3 Learning: A sampler of high schools and some of their famous graduates; 4 Aiming Higher in Education: Colleges of City University and New York University; 5 City of Medicine: Biomedical research, tea...

  19. Current Levels of Salt Knowledge: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani Sarmugam

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available High salt intake increases the risk of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Given the role of knowledge as a determinant of food intake, this paper aims to review the current levels of salt knowledge and the association between salt knowledge and dietary salt intake and salt-related dietary practices in the general population. Twenty two studies were included in the review. In general, the studies showed consumers were able to identify the health risks associated with high salt intake. However, knowledge of recommended daily intakes, understanding of the relationships between salt and sodium and foods that contribute most salt to the diet were poor. Four of the five studies which examined the relationships between salt knowledge and salt-related dietary practices reported significant associations. Two important gaps in the current literature were identified. First, there is a need for a robustly validated tool to examine salt knowledge and its impact on salt intake. Second, a comprehensive salt knowledge assessment should include assessment of procedural, as well as declarative, knowledge.

  20. Geographical imbalances and divides in the scientific production of climate change knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasgaard, Maya; Dalsgaard, Bo; Maruyama, Pietro K.

    2015-01-01

    Studies on scientific production of climate change knowledge show a geographical bias against the developing and more vulnerable regions of the world. If there is limited knowledge exchange between regions, this may deepen global knowledge divides and, thus, potentially hamper adaptive capacities....... Consequently, there is a need to further understand this bias, and, particularly, link it with the exchange of knowledge across borders. We use a world-wide geographical distribution of author affiliations in > 15,000 scientific climate change publications to show that (1) research production mainly takes...... place in richer, institutionally well-developed countries with cooler climates and high climate footprints, and (2) the network of author affiliations is structured into distinct modules of countries with strong common research interests, but with little knowledge exchange between modules. These modules...

  1. On the growth of scientific knowledge: yeast biology as a case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xionglei He

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The tempo and mode of human knowledge expansion is an enduring yet poorly understood topic. Through a temporal network analysis of three decades of discoveries of protein interactions and genetic interactions in baker's yeast, we show that the growth of scientific knowledge is exponential over time and that important subjects tend to be studied earlier. However, expansions of different domains of knowledge are highly heterogeneous and episodic such that the temporal turnover of knowledge hubs is much greater than expected by chance. Familiar subjects are preferentially studied over new subjects, leading to a reduced pace of innovation. While research is increasingly done in teams, the number of discoveries per researcher is greater in smaller teams. These findings reveal collective human behaviors in scientific research and help design better strategies in future knowledge exploration.

  2. Do large-scale assessments measure students' ability to integrate scientific knowledge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee-Sun

    2010-03-01

    Large-scale assessments are used as means to diagnose the current status of student achievement in science and compare students across schools, states, and countries. For efficiency, multiple-choice items and dichotomously-scored open-ended items are pervasively used in large-scale assessments such as Trends in International Math and Science Study (TIMSS). This study investigated how well these items measure secondary school students' ability to integrate scientific knowledge. This study collected responses of 8400 students to 116 multiple-choice and 84 open-ended items and applied an Item Response Theory analysis based on the Rasch Partial Credit Model. Results indicate that most multiple-choice items and dichotomously-scored open-ended items can be used to determine whether students have normative ideas about science topics, but cannot measure whether students integrate multiple pieces of relevant science ideas. Only when the scoring rubric is redesigned to capture subtle nuances of student open-ended responses, open-ended items become a valid and reliable tool to assess students' knowledge integration ability.

  3. E-book for Knowledge Management in Scientific Research Conducted in the Medical Sciences Graduate Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oramis Sosa Palacios

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The training of students enrolled in the Medical Sciences graduate program (residents includes research activities such as research projects, the final paper of the specialty, scientific events and scientific publications. Knowledge gaps in residents lead to problems seen in both the poor quality of the research project and the final paper of the specialty and in the lack of autonomy to make decisions, affecting their overall training. An electronic book aimed at residents was created for knowledge management in scientific research. The first version was designed using the Crheasoft 2.0 program. It consists of: presentation, start modules, list of topics and complementary information. It comprises condensed knowledge on: research management, research methodology, statistics, information management, computer science, linguistics and language. This e-book contributes to the execution of research activities and promotes learning independence.

  4. A case study of evaluating informatics impact on diffusion of scientific knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Susan B

    2008-11-06

    This case study poster uses a newly developed framework to evaluate an informatics effort in its public health context. The electronic clearance system being evaluated provides the potential for increasing the speed and quality of scientific diffusion of knowledge, and thus translation of research into practice. A graphical logic model and tabular results of the evaluation are presented. Public health history suggests potential benefits of more timely and coordinated diffusion of scientific information.

  5. Examining elementary teachers' knowledge and instruction of scientific explanations for fostering children's explanations in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebke, Heidi Lynn

    This study employed an embedded mixed methods multi-case study design (Creswell, 2014) with six early childhood (grades K-2) teachers to examine a) what changes occurred to their subject matter knowledge (SMK) and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) for teaching scientific explanations while participating in a professional development program, b) how they planned for and implemented scientific explanation instruction within a teacher developed unit on properties of matter, and c) what affordances their instruction of scientific explanations had on fostering their students' abilities to generate explanations in science. Several quantitative and qualitative measures were collected and analyzed in accordance to this studies conceptual framework, which consisted of ten instructional practices teachers should consider assimilating or accommodating into their knowledge base (i.e., SMK & PCK) for teaching scientific explanations. Results of this study indicate there was little to no positive change in the teachers' substantive and syntactic SMK. However, all six teachers did make significant changes to all five components of their PCK for teaching explanations in science. While planning for scientific explanation instruction, all six teachers' contributed some ideas for how to incorporate seven of the ten instructional practices for scientific explanations within the properties of matter unit they co-developed. When enacting the unit, the six teachers' employed seven to nine of the instructional practices to varying levels of effectiveness, as measured by researcher developed rubrics. Given the six teachers' scientific explanation instruction, many students did show improvement in their ability to formulate a scientific explanation, particularly their ability to provide multiple pieces of evidence. Implications for professional developers, teacher educators, researchers, policy makers, and elementary teachers regarding how to prepare teachers for and support students

  6. Contrasting Scientific Knowledge with Knowledge from the Lifeworld: The Dialogic Inclusion Contract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padros, Maria; Garcia, Rocio; de Mello, Roseli; Molina, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    The Dialogic Inclusion Contract (DIC) consists in an agreement between the scientific community and social agents to define successful actions aimed at overcoming social exclusion in highly underprivileged areas. Taking the case of a Spanish neighborhood that is generating important transformations, this article explores the process of defining…

  7. Contrasting Scientific Knowledge with Knowledge from the Lifeworld: The Dialogic Inclusion Contract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padros, Maria; Garcia, Rocio; de Mello, Roseli; Molina, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    The Dialogic Inclusion Contract (DIC) consists in an agreement between the scientific community and social agents to define successful actions aimed at overcoming social exclusion in highly underprivileged areas. Taking the case of a Spanish neighborhood that is generating important transformations, this article explores the process of defining…

  8. The gap in scientific knowledge and role of science communication in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jeong-Heon; Kim, Sei-Hill; Kang, Myung-Hyun; Shim, Jae Chul; Ma, Dong Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Using data from a national survey of South Koreans, this study explores the role of science communication in enhancing three different forms of scientific knowledge ( factual, procedural, and subjective). We first assess learning effects, looking at the extent to which citizens learn science from different channels of communication (interpersonal discussions, traditional newspapers, television, online newspapers, and social media). We then look into the knowledge gap hypothesis, investigating how different communication channels can either widen or narrow the gap in knowledge between social classes. Television was found to function as a "knowledge leveler," narrowing the gap between highly and less educated South Koreans. The role of online newspapers in science learning is pronounced in our research. Reading newspapers online indicated a positive relationship to all three measures of knowledge. Contrary to the knowledge-leveling effect of television viewing, reading online newspapers was found to increase, rather than decrease, the gap in knowledge. Implications of our findings are discussed in detail.

  9. Mobile knowledge and the media: The movement of scientific information in the context of environmental controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocking, Stephen

    2012-08-01

    This paper examines the role of the news media in transnational flows of knowledge. Its focus is on salmon aquaculture, an industry operating in Europe, Canada, and elsewhere. To examine the movement of knowledge from Europe to Canada, a sample of 323 news stories mentioning European aquaculture was drawn from 1261 stories about aquaculture published in Canadian newspapers between 1982 and 2007. Their analysis demonstrates the role of the media in selectively moving and shaping scientific knowledge. This role has been influenced by numerous factors, including journalistic norms, source strategies, and the assertion of trust, relevance and scientific credibility. This analysis corrects the common assumption in the internet era that information flows freely: new technology has not obviated the role of social factors. The media's role in the movement of knowledge also has implications for the geography of science, and for the status of science as a situated practice.

  10. Marine aerosol production: a review of the current knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Dowd, C.D.; Leeuw, G. de

    2007-01-01

    The current knowledge in primary and secondary marine aerosol formation is reviewed. For primary marine aerosol source functions, recent source functions have demonstrated a significant flux of submicrometre particles down to radii of 20 nm. Moreover, the source functions derived from different tech

  11. Diuretics in pediatrics: Current knowledge and future prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M.J. van der Vorst (Maria); M. Kist (Manfred); A.J. van der Heijden (Bert); J. Burggraaf (Jacobus)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThis review summarizes current knowledge on the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and clinical application of the most commonly used diuretics in children. Diuretics are frequently prescribed drugs in children. Their main indication is to reduce fluid overload in acute an

  12. Current knowledge and attitudes: Russian olive biology, ecology and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharlene E. Sing; Kevin J. Delaney

    2016-01-01

    The primary goals of a two-day Russian olive symposium held in February 2014 were to disseminate current knowledge and identify data gaps regarding Russian olive biology and ecology, distributions, integrated management, and to ascertain the feasibility and acceptance of a proposed program for classical biological control of Russian olive. The symposium was...

  13. Scientific and Cultural Knowledge in Intercultural Science Education: Student Perceptions of Common Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondwe, Mzamose; Longnecker, Nancy

    2015-02-01

    There is no consensus in the science education research community on the meanings and representations of western science and indigenous knowledge or the relationships between them. How students interpret these relationships and their perceptions of any connections has rarely been studied. This study reports student perceptions of the meaning and relationship between scientific and cultural knowledge. Personal meaning maps adapted for small groups were conducted in seven culturally diverse schools, school years 7-9 (with students aged 12-15 years) ( n = 190), with six schools in Western Australia and one school in Malawi, Africa. Of the six Australian school groups, two comprised Australian Aboriginal students in an after-school homework programme and the other four schools had a multicultural mix of students. Students in this study identified connections between scientific and cultural knowledge and constructed connections from particular thematic areas—mainly factual content knowledge as opposed to ideas related to values, attitudes, beliefs and identity. Australian Aboriginal students made fewer connections between the two knowledge domains than Malawian students whose previous science teacher had made explicit connections in her science class. Examples from Aboriginal culture were the most dominant illustrations of cultural knowledge in Australian schools, even in school groups with students from other cultures. In light of our findings, we discuss the construction of common ground between scientific knowledge and cultural knowledge and the role of teachers as cultural brokers and travel agents. We conclude with recommendations on creating learning environments that embrace different cultural knowledges and that promote explicit and enquiring discussions of values, attitudes, beliefs and identity associated with both knowledge domains.

  14. Current Scientific Evidence for a Polarized Cardiovascular Endurance Training Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydren, Jay R; Cohen, Bruce S

    2015-12-01

    Recent publications have provided new scientific evidence for a modern aerobic or cardiovascular endurance exercise prescription that optimizes the periodization cycle and maximizes potential endurance performance gains in highly trained individuals. The traditional threshold, high volume, and high-intensity training models have displayed limited improvement in actual race pace in (highly) trained individuals while frequently resulting in overreaching or overtraining (physical injury and psychological burnout). A review of evidence for replacing these models with the proven polarized training model seems warranted. This review provides a short history of the training models, summarizes 5 key studies, and provides example training programs for both the pre- and in-season periods. A polarized training program is characterized by an undulating nonlinear periodization model with nearly all the training time spent at a "light" (≤13) and "very hard" (≥17) pace with very limited time at "hard" (14-16) or race pace (6-20 Rating of Perceived Exertion [RPE] scale). To accomplish this, the polarization training model has specific high-intensity workouts separated by one or more long slow distance workouts, with the exercise intensity remaining below ventilatory threshold (VT) 1 and/or blood lactate of less than 2 mM (A.K.A. below race pace). Effect sizes for increasing aerobic endurance performance for the polarized training model are consistently superior to that of the threshold training model. Performing a polarized training program may be best accomplished by: going easy on long slow distance workouts, avoiding "race pace" and getting after it during interval workouts.

  15. Pedagogical Link-Making: A Fundamental Aspect of Teaching and Learning Scientific Conceptual Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Phil; Mortimer, Eduardo; Ametller, Jaume

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction to the concept of pedagogical link-making in the context of teaching and learning scientific conceptual knowledge. Pedagogical link-making is concerned with the ways in which teachers and students make connections between ideas in the ongoing meaning-making interactions of classroom teaching and learning. First…

  16. Meta-Sticks: Having Children Consider the Source of Knowledge Promotes Scientific Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Mason

    2016-01-01

    Many elementary science teachers understand that the best way to enhance reasoning and thinking skills in their students is to have them engage in scientific negotiation. They know that teaching is not the simple transmission of information but a complex act that requires teachers to apply knowledge from multiple sources, including student…

  17. From Comparison Between Scientists to Gaining Cultural Scientific Knowledge. Leonardo and Galileo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galili, Igal

    2016-03-01

    Physics textbooks often present items of disciplinary knowledge in a sequential order of topics of the theory under instruction. Such presentation is usually univocal, that is, isolated from alternative claims and contributions regarding the subject matter in the pertinent scientific discourse. We argue that comparing and contrasting the contributions of scientists addressing similar or the same subject could not only enrich the picture of scientific enterprise, but also possess a special appealing power promoting genuine understanding of the concept considered. This approach draws on the historical tradition from Plutarch in distant past and Koyré in the recent history and philosophy of science. It gains a new support in the discipline-culture structuring of the physics curriculum, seeking cultural content knowledge (CCK) of the subject matter. Here, we address two prominent individuals of Italian Renaissance, Leonardo and Galileo, in their dealing with issues relevant for introductory science courses. Although both figures addressed similar subjects of scientific content, their products were essentially different. Considering this difference is educationally valuable, illustrating the meaning of what students presently learn in the content knowledge of mechanics, optics and astronomy, as well as the nature of science and scientific knowledge.

  18. Influence of Gender and Knowledge on Secondary School Students' Scientific Creativity Skills in Nakuru District, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okere, Mark I. O.; Ndeke, Grace C. W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of gender and knowledge on scientific creativity among form three biology students (third year in secondary school cycle) in Nakuru district in Kenya. The cross- sectional survey research was employed. A sample of eight schools with a total of 363 students was selected from the population…

  19. Comparison of Pre-Service Teachers' Metaphors Regarding the Concept of "Scientific Knowledge"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinoglu, Orhan; Eren, Canan Dilek

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research was to analyze pre-service teachers' perceptions of the concept "scientific knowledge" through metaphors. Phenomenology, one of qualitative research designs, was used in the study. A total of 189 pre-service teachers, including 158 females and 31 males, studying at different departments in the education faculty…

  20. "The architecture of access to scientific knowledge: just how badly we have messed this up"

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    In this talk, Professor Lessig will review the evolution of access to scientific scholarship, and evaluate the success of this system of access against a background norm of universal access.While copyright battles involving artists has gotten most of the public's attention, the real battle should be over access to knowledge, not culture. That battle we are losing.

  1. From Comparison between Scientists to Gaining Cultural Scientific Knowledge: Leonardo and Galileo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galili, Igal

    2016-01-01

    Physics textbooks often present items of disciplinary knowledge in a sequential order of topics of the theory under instruction. Such presentation is usually univocal, that is, isolated from alternative claims and contributions regarding the subject matter in the pertinent scientific discourse. We argue that comparing and contrasting the…

  2. The path- and place-dependent nature of scientific knowledge production in biotech 1986-2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heimeriks, G.J.; Boschma, R.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the worldwide spatial evolution of scientific knowledge production in biotechnology in the period 1986–2008. We employ new methodology that identifies new key topics in biotech on the basis of frequent use of title worlds in major biotech journals as an indication of new cognitiv

  3. The path- and place-dependent nature of scientific knowledge production in biotech 1986-2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heimeriks, Gaston; Boschma, Ron

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the worldwide spatial evolution of scientific knowledge production in biotechnology in the period 1986-2008. We employ new methodology that identifies new key topics in biotech on the basis of frequent use of title worlds in major biotech journals as an indication of new cognitiv

  4. New ways of scientific publishing and accessing human knowledge inspired by transdisciplinary approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Gebeshuber, I C

    2010-01-01

    Inspired by interdisciplinary work touching biology and microtribology, the authors propose a new, dynamic way of publishing research results, the establishment of a tree of knowledge and the localisation of scientific articles on this tree. 'Technomimetics' is proposed as a new method of knowledge management in science and technology: it shall help find and organise information in an era of over-information. Such ways of presenting and managing research results would be accessible by people with different kinds of backgrounds and levels of education, and allow for full use of the ever- increasing number of scientific and technical publications. This approach would dramatically change and revolutionize the way we are doing science, and contribute to overcoming the three gaps between the world of ideas, inventors, innovators and investors as introduced by Gebeshuber, Gruber and Drack in 2009 for accelerated scientific and technological breakthroughs to improve the human condition. Inspiration for the developme...

  5. Conceptual knowledge representation: A cross-section of current research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Timothy T; Wolmetz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    How is conceptual knowledge encoded in the brain? This special issue of Cognitive Neuropsychology takes stock of current efforts to answer this question through a variety of methods and perspectives. Across this work, three questions recur, each fundamental to knowledge representation in the mind and brain. First, what are the elements of conceptual representation? Second, to what extent are conceptual representations embodied in sensory and motor systems? Third, how are conceptual representations shaped by context, especially linguistic context? In this introductory article we provide relevant background on these themes and introduce how they are addressed by our contributing authors.

  6. Elementary school students’ perceptions about nature of scientific knowledge and some pseudoscientific ideas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behiye Bezir Akçay

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In early childhood, people develop some beliefs that can affect the whole lives. Developing pseudoscientific beliefs can cause differences on child’s nature of scientific knowledge. Giving importance on prevent gaining pseudoscientific knowledge may help qualified lifelong learning abilities. In this study, it was aimed to investigate the elementary school students’ nature of scientific knowledge and views about some common pseudoscientific ideas. Also some variables’ impacts on data collection tool scores were searched, too. The study was conducted on 2014-2015 educational year with 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th grade elementary school students. In the study, Nature of Scientific Knowledge Scale (NSKS and eight statements were used to collect data. The aim of these eight statements was to figure out students’ pseudoscientific ideas about evolution and nature of science. SPSS 20.00 programme was used to analyze data. It was found that girls’ total scale scores were found higher than boys’ total scores.  Girls’ amoral, parsimonious, testable and unified sub-dimension scores were also found higher than boys’ scores. 7th grade students showed higher total scale scores than the other grade students. Also, it was seen that 7th grade students have more sophisticated knowledge about evolution than the nature of science features. At the end of the study the findings were discussed according to literature and some suggestions were given.

  7. Open Knowledge Maps: Creating a Visual Interface to the World’s Scientific Knowledge Based on Natural Language Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kraker

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of Open Knowledge Maps is to create a visual interface to the world’s scientific knowledge. The base for this visual interface consists of so-called knowledge maps, which enable the exploration of existing knowledge and the discovery of new knowledge. Our open source knowledge mapping software applies a mixture of summarization techniques and similarity measures on article metadata, which are iteratively chained together. After processing, the representation is saved in a database for use in a web visualization. In the future, we want to create a space for collective knowledge mapping that brings together individuals and communities involved in exploration and discovery. We want to enable people to guide each other in their discovery by collaboratively annotating and modifying the automatically created maps. Das Ziel von Open Knowledge Map ist es, ein visuelles Interface zum wissenschaftlichen Wissen der Welt bereitzustellen. Die Basis für die dieses Interface sind sogenannte “knowledge maps”, zu deutsch Wissenslandkarten. Wissenslandkarten ermöglichen die Exploration bestehenden Wissens und die Entdeckung neuen Wissens. Unsere Open Source Software wendet für die Erstellung der Wissenslandkarten eine Reihe von Text Mining Verfahren iterativ auf die Metadaten wissenschaftlicher Artikel an. Die daraus resultierende Repräsentation wird in einer Datenbank für die Anzeige in einer Web-Visualisierung abgespeichert. In Zukunft wollen wir einen Raum für das kollektive Erstellen von Wissenslandkarten schaffen, der die Personen und Communities, welche sich mit der Exploration und Entdeckung wissenschaftlichen Wissens beschäftigen, zusammenbringt. Wir wollen es den NutzerInnen ermöglichen, einander in der Literatursuche durch kollaboratives Annotieren und Modifizieren von automatisch erstellten Wissenslandkarten zu unterstützen.

  8. The Dynamics of Exchanges and References among Scientific Texts, and the Autopoiesis of Discursive Knowledge

    CERN Document Server

    Lucio-Arias, Diana

    2009-01-01

    Discursive knowledge emerges as codification in flows of communication. The flows of communication are constrained and enabled by networks of communications as their historical manifestations at each moment of time. New publications modify the existing networks by changing the distributions of attributes and relations in document sets, while the networks are self-referentially updated along trajectories. Codification operates reflexively: the network structures are reconstructed from the perspective of hindsight. Codification along different axes differentiates discursive knowledge into specialties. These intellectual control structures are constructed bottom-up, but feed top-down back upon the production of new knowledge. However, the forward dynamics of diffusion in the development of the communication networks along trajectories differs from the feedback mechanisms of control. Analysis of the development of scientific communication in terms of evolving scientific literatures provides us with a model which ...

  9. Learning of Content Knowledge and Development of Scientific Reasoning Ability: A Cross Culture Comparison

    CERN Document Server

    Bao, Lei; Cai, Tianfang; Wang, Jing; Yang, Lijia; Cui, Lili; Han, Jing; Ding, Lin; Luo, Ying

    2008-01-01

    Student content knowledge and general reasoning abilities are two important areas in education practice and research. However, there hasn't been much work in physics education that clearly documents the possible interactions between content learning and the development of general reasoning abilities. In this paper, we report one study of a systematic research to investigate the possible interactions between students' learning of physics content knowledge and the development of general scientific reasoning abilities. Specifically, this study seeks to answer the research question of whether and to what extent content learning may affect the development of general reasoning abilities. College entrance testing data of freshman college students in both USA and China were collected using three standardized tests, FCI, BEMA, and Lawson's Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning (Lawson Test). The results suggest that years of rigorous training of physics knowledge in middle and high schools have made significant impac...

  10. Scientific Research Collaboration and Knowledge Communication%科研合作与知识交流

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵蓉英; 温芳芳

    2011-01-01

    Through discussing the definition of scientific research collaboration, the motivations of scientific research collaboration, the relationship between scientific research collaboration and co-authorship, the relationship between scientific research collaboration and knowledge communication, the paper proposes 7 characteristic of scientific research collaboration and summarize it' s definition and 5 collaborative motivations, as well as analyzes the advantages and shortcomings in collaboration research through co-authorship meth- od. The difference and linkage between scientific research collaboration and knowledge communication are also pointed. The paper intends to improve the understanding of basic concepts and theories about scientific research collaboration and make up the shortcomings of theory research in the field of scientific research collaboration.%探讨科研合作的定义、科研合作的动机、科研合作与合著的关系、科研合作与知识交流的关系等4个方面的问题。指出科研合作的七大特征,提出其定义,归纳其5类主要合作动机,辩证地分析利用合著论文研究科研合作的优势和不足以及科研合作与知识交流的区别和联系,以期能够增进对科研合作基本概念和基础理论的认识和理解,弥补科研合作领域在基础理论研究方面的不足。

  11. THE CONCEPT OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF AUDIT AS AN INDEPENDENT FORM OF SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safonova M. F.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the problem of development of audit activities as a practical view, and the concept of evolution as science. We have summarized the reasons for appearance and existence of audit, which are the following: separation of powers between the management and the owners of economic subjects; there is not confidence from the external interested users to information about the safety of financial statements; it is necessary to obtain the assurance of economic safety as additional factor of stability. There is a detailed interpretation of definition the "audit", considering the current economic realities, from the position of the sphere of scientific knowledge and from the position of practical activities in the part of verification reports by the independent experts and as an element of economic safety of the company and the country. The trend of market development for audit services was defined and aimed for its consolidation. The perspective of development does not connect with the classic audit of accounting reporting, but it connects with development forecasts for the company. The audit should "look into the future" of each client, which must be recorded in an audit report for improving the quality. The author offers a new paradigm of broad understanding of the audit as a form of independent monitoring, which allows to develop and to realize the concept of auditing business that meets the needs of modern society

  12. The Effects of Video Feedback Coaching for Teachers on Scientific Knowledge of Primary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vondel, Sabine; Steenbeek, Henderien; van Dijk, Marijn; van Geert, Paul

    2017-04-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating the effects of a video feedback coaching intervention for upper-grade primary school teachers on students' cognitive gains in scientific knowledge. This teaching intervention was designed with the use of inquiry-based learning principles for teachers, such as the empirical cycle and the posing of thought-provoking questions. The intervention was put into practice in 10 upper-grade classrooms. The trajectory comprised four lessons, complemented with two premeasures and two postmeasures. The control condition consisted of 11 upper-grade teachers and their students. The success of the intervention was tested using an established standardized achievement test and situated measures. In this way, by means of premeasure and postmeasure questionnaires and video data, an assessment could be made of the change in students' scientific knowledge before, during, and after the intervention. In this study, we primarily focused on the dynamics of students' real-time expressions of scientific knowledge in the classroom. Important indicators of the effect of the intervention were found. Through focusing on the number of explanations and predictions, a significant increase could be seen in the proportion of students' utterances displaying scientific understanding in the intervention condition. In addition, students in the intervention condition more often reasoned on higher complexity levels than students in the control condition. No effect was found for students' scientific knowledge as measured with a standardized achievement test. Implications for future studies are stressed, as well as the importance of enriching the evaluation of intervention studies by focusing on dynamics in the classroom.

  13. The Time Is Now: Attention Increases to Transgender Health in the United States but Scientific Knowledge Gaps Remain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCarthy, Sarah; Reisner, Sari L; Nunn, Amy; Perez-Brumer, Amaya; Operario, Don

    2015-12-01

    Attention to transgender health has dramatically increased in the U.S. Scientific knowledge gaps in empirical research, however, remain and act as barriers to achieving transgender-related health equity. We conducted a search using PubMed and PsycINFO to identify gaps in empirical, peer-reviewed publications related to adult transgender health in the U.S. between 1981 and 2013. We synthesized these findings and commented on opportunities for improving health research. Reducing health disparities and advancing transgender-related health equity requires greater investment in research that addresses current gaps to more comprehensively respond to the diverse health needs of transgender people.

  14. A study of primary science teachers' ability to restructure knowledge in scientific texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh-Yeo, Wan Inn

    The ability of elementary science teachers to restructure knowledge in an unfamiliar scientific text is investigated in this study. Science in schools is said to be characterized by an extensive reliance on textbooks with little evidence of inquiry on the part of students and teachers. The successful implementation of any inquiry science program can only be achieved if teachers can access knowledge in resources such as scientific books and journals which they are able to read critically, and translate and transform that knowledge. Participants were twelve high school graduates undertaking a teacher training course in Singapore. Recalls, problem solving, and ConSAT maps were used as a measure of readers' textbase representation, situational representation and cognitive structures respectively. The target text rewritten for a colleague and for 6sp{th} graders were used as a measure of readers' ability to restructure knowledge. Qualitative and quantitative analyses have shown a difference between able and less able readers on these measures. Able readers recalled more key concepts than less able readers and used the global text structure. Problem solutions of able readers were based on the principles of fermentation with immediate recognition of the variable and its implied consequences and likely solution. The more coherent textbase and situational representations of able readers is reflected in the ConSAT maps of such readers which approximated 44.45% of the criterion map in contrast to less than 25% for less able readers. Not surprisingly, able readers demonstrated to some degree, an ability to restructure knowledge while less able readers did not. Based on the findings of the study the investigator challenges the assumption about reading proficiency of trainee teachers and suggests attention should be paid to literacy requirements and practices. If teachers are unable to restructure knowledge in scientific texts, it is highly unlikely that they would be able to

  15. Scientific reasoning during adolescence: The influence of instruction in science knowledge and reasoning strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, M. C.; Clement, C.; Pulos, S.; Sullivan, P.

    The mechanism linking instruction in scientific topics and instruction in logical reasoning strategies is not well understood. This study assesses the role of science topic instruction combined with logical reasoning strategy instruction in teaching adolescent students about blood pressure problems. Logical reasoning instruction for this study emphasizes the controlling-variables strategy. Science topic instruction emphasizes variables affecting blood pressure. Subjects receiving logical reasoning instruction link their knowledge of blood pressure variables to their knowledge of controlling variables more effectively than those receiving science topic instruction alone - their specific responses show how they attempt to integrate their understanding.Received: 15 April 1988

  16. [Causes of death and the relation between scientific and popular knowledge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdiguero Gil, E

    1993-01-01

    "The framework of this contribution is the nexus between scientific and popular knowledge, and their importance assessing diagnostical expressions when studying death causes in times prior to the setting of a standard for the definition of illness. By means of a particular example, the expression teething, we shall show some nuances concerning the loanwords and equivalences between popular and academic knowledge, and their deep, if sometimes hidden, influence upon the diagnostical expressions informing us about the death causes as shown in the records of life and death statistics." The geographical focus is on Spain. (SUMMARY IN ENG AND FRE) excerpt

  17. Making expert knowledge through the image: connections between antiquarian and early modern scientific illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Stephanie

    2014-03-01

    This essay examines drawings of antiquities in the context of the history of early modern scientific illustration. The role of illustrations in the establishment of archaeology as a discipline is assessed, and the emergence of a graphic style for representing artifacts is shown to be closely connected to the development of scientific illustration in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. The essay argues that the production of conventionalized drawings of antiquities during this period represents a fundamental shift in the approach to ancient material culture, signifying the recognition of objects as evidence. As has been demonstrated in other scientific fields, the creation of a visual system for recording objects was central to the acceptance of artifacts as "data" that could be organized into groups, classified as types, and analyzed to gain knowledge of the past.

  18. Influencing public policies: Two (very good) reasons to look toward scientific knowledge in public policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, François; Bellefleur, Olivier

    2014-07-11

    The healthy public policy movement rests on the belief that a range of public policies should be at least partly informed by evidence demonstrating the positive effects of these policies on population health, health inequalities and their determinants. In order to address certain difficulties that the movement faces, knowledge produced in various scientific disciplines regarding public policies may provide some valuable guidance. In this short commentary, we examine how knowledge from the scientific disciplines investigating public policies makes it possible to address two difficulties in the development of healthy public policies: 1) adequately anticipating the effects of public policies, and 2) assessing the political viability of the policies being promoted. Since urban traffic policies are of interest to most of the other contributors to this supplement, we use examples from this field to illustrate some of our points.

  19. Dynamical interplay between the dissemination of scientific knowledge and rumor spreading in emergency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Liang'an; Song, Naixiang

    2016-11-01

    Rumor is an important form of social interaction and its spreading has a significant impact on human lives. Accounting to rumors' spread, we present a way of analysis on interaction between two processes, and a frame about the dissemination of scientific knowledge in order to prevent rumor transition. Based on this analysis, a 4D dynamic model is established and numerical simulations are performed. Mathematical analysis of the system with regard to boundedness of solutions, local and global stability of the feasible equilibria and persistence of the system are presented. When the rate of scientific knowledge dissemination reaches a critical value, it can be concluded that the strictly positive interior equilibria undergoes Hopf-bifurcation. The rumor spreading rate also plays an important role on the dynamic behavior of our system, which can be showed from our simulation results that lower rumor spreading rate drives the rumormongers to extinction.

  20. Challenges of linking scientific knowledge to river basin management policy: AquaTerra as a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slob, A.; Rijnveld, M.

    2007-01-01

    The EU Project AquaTerra generates knowledge about the river-soil-sediment-groundwater system and delivers scientific information of value for river basin management. In this article, the use and ignorance of scientific knowledge in decision making is explored by a theoretical review. We elaborate o

  1. On the production and use of scientific knowledge about ocean sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter M. Haugan [University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway). Geophysical Institute

    2003-07-01

    Planned small scale ocean experiments designed to learn about the possibilities and limitations of direct ocean storage of CO{sub 2} have recently met with sufficient opposition to be stopped at the highest political level in Norway. In this case, sentiments and appeals to irrational feelings were decisive. Obligations through previous permits and commitments, freedom of research, and hard scientific facts were less important. The production of scientific knowledge was interrupted and may be set back for a long time because scientists and their institutions will prefer to work on other problems with less interference and disturbances. Some environmental organizations see the value and importance of science as a basis for decision-making. However, this case shows that some strong environmental organizations still focus on selected compartments of the earth system separately, act based on non-scientific evidence, and appeal to irrationality. Global environmental problems facing mankind are complicated and interconnected. In order to solve them in a fair way, it is suggested that there is a need for a clean separation between the production of knowledge by scientists and the use of the knowledge in informed decisions by the public through democratically elected politicians and intergovernmental mechanisms. A higher public respect for unbiased and 'value-free' natural science and improved communication between scientists and stakeholders is required. It is proposed that already existing mechanisms and organizations may be used to promote consensus building and guide environmental impact assessments in the case of ocean sequestration. 5 refs.

  2. Integrating scientific and local knowledge to inform risk-based management approaches for climate adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan P. Kettle

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Risk-based management approaches to climate adaptation depend on the assessment of potential threats, and their causes, vulnerabilities, and impacts. The refinement of these approaches relies heavily on detailed local knowledge of places and priorities, such as infrastructure, governance structures, and socio-economic conditions, as well as scientific understanding of climate projections and trends. Developing processes that integrate local and scientific knowledge will enhance the value of risk-based management approaches, facilitate group learning and planning processes, and support the capacity of communities to prepare for change. This study uses the Vulnerability, Consequences, and Adaptation Planning Scenarios (VCAPS process, a form of analytic-deliberative dialogue, and the conceptual frameworks of hazard management and climate vulnerability, to integrate scientific and local knowledge. We worked with local government staff in an urbanized barrier island community (Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina to consider climate risks, impacts, and adaptation challenges associated with sea level rise and wastewater and stormwater management. The findings discuss how the process increases understanding of town officials’ views of risks and climate change impacts to barrier islands, the management actions being considered to address of the multiple impacts of concern, and the local tradeoffs and challenges in adaptation planning. We also comment on group learning and specific adaptation tasks, strategies, and needs identified.

  3. Azelaic acid in dermatological treatment – current state of knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radomir Reszke

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Azelaic acid (AZA is a naturally occurring substance produced by Malassezia furfur which exerts various effects on the skin. Azelaic acid has antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, keratolytic, comedolytic, sebostatic and tyrosinase-inhibiting properties. Topical application of AZA as 20% cream or 15% gel is a well-established therapeutic method in various common dermatoses, mainly acne vulgaris, rosacea and disorders associated with hyperpigmentation. Azelaic acid is used as a component of chemical peels as well. The paper summarizes the most relevant issues concerning AZA application in dermatological treatment based on current knowledge.

  4. A pervasive denigration of natural history misconstrues how biodiversity inventories and taxonomy underpin scientific knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotterill, Fenton P D; Foissner, Wilhelm

    2010-01-01

    Embracing comparative biology, natural history encompasses those sciences that discover, decipher and classify unique (idiographic) details of landscapes, and extinct and extant biodiversity. Intrinsic to these multifarious roles in expanding and consolidating research and knowledge, natural history endows keystone support to the veracity of law-like (nomothetic) generalizations in science. What science knows about the natural world is governed by an inherent function of idiographic discovery; characteristic of natural history, this relationship is exemplified wherever an idiographic discovery overturns established wisdom. This nature of natural history explicates why inventories are of such epistemological importance. Unfortunately, a Denigration of Natural History weakens contemporary science from within. It expresses in the prevalent, pervasive failure to appreciate this pivotal role of idiographic research: a widespread disrespect for how natural history undergirds scientific knowledge. Symptoms of this Denigration of Natural History present in negative impacts on scientific research and knowledge. One symptom is the failure to appreciate and support the inventory and monitoring of biodiversity. Another resides in failures of scientiometrics to quantify how taxonomic publications sustain and improve knowledge. Their relevance in contemporary science characteristically persists and grows; so the temporal eminence of these idiographic publications extends over decades. This is because they propagate a succession of derived scientific statements, findings and/or conclusions - inherently shorter-lived, nomothetic publications. Widespread neglect of natural science collections is equally pernicious, allied with disregard for epistemological functions of specimens, whose preservation maintains the veracity of knowledge. Last, but not least, the decline in taxonomic expertise weakens research capacity; there are insufficient skills to study organismal diversity in all

  5. Nausea: current knowledge of mechanisms, measurement and clinical impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenward, Hannah; Pelligand, Ludovic; Savary-Bataille, Karine; Elliott, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Nausea is a subjective sensation, which often acts as a signal that emesis is imminent. It is a widespread problem that occurs as a clinical sign of disease or as an adverse effect of a drug therapy or surgical procedure. The mechanisms of nausea are complex and the neural pathways are currently poorly understood. This review summarises the current knowledge of nausea mechanisms, the available animal models for nausea research and the anti-nausea properties of commercially available anti-emetic drugs. The review also presents subjective assessment and scoring of nausea. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of nausea might reveal potential clinically useful biomarkers for objective measurement of nausea in species of veterinary interest.

  6. [In the light of current knowledge right ventricle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taçoy, Gülten; Cengel, Atiye

    2014-09-01

    There are important differences between left and right ventricle. Due to anatomical location and structural features, in daily clinical practice the right ventricle cannot be assessed easily as the left ventricle. Therefore, the right ventricle has remained in the background of the left ventricle. Recent clinical studies and advanced imaging modalities have demonstrated that right ventricle is decisive for survival particularly in patients with congenital heart disease, pulmonary hypertension and heart failure. Therefore, the detailed evaluation of the right ventricle has become necessary in current clinical practice. For this reason, in our review we aimed to examine the embryological development, anatomical structure, physiological, metabolic characteristics, responses to different pathological conditions, effects on arrhythmias, causes of failure and imaging modalities of the right ventricle in light of the current knowledge's.

  7. How scientific experiments are designed: Problem solving in a knowledge-rich, error-rich environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Lisa M.

    While theory formation and the relation between theory and data has been investigated in many studies of scientific reasoning, researchers have focused less attention on reasoning about experimental design, even though the experimental design process makes up a large part of real-world scientists' reasoning. The goal of this thesis was to provide a cognitive account of the scientific experimental design process by analyzing experimental design as problem-solving behavior (Newell & Simon, 1972). Three specific issues were addressed: the effect of potential error on experimental design strategies, the role of prior knowledge in experimental design, and the effect of characteristics of the space of alternate hypotheses on alternate hypothesis testing. A two-pronged in vivo/in vitro research methodology was employed, in which transcripts of real-world scientific laboratory meetings were analyzed as well as undergraduate science and non-science majors' design of biology experiments in the psychology laboratory. It was found that scientists use a specific strategy to deal with the possibility of error in experimental findings: they include "known" control conditions in their experimental designs both to determine whether error is occurring and to identify sources of error. The known controls strategy had not been reported in earlier studies with science-like tasks, in which participants' responses to error had consisted of replicating experiments and discounting results. With respect to prior knowledge: scientists and undergraduate students drew on several types of knowledge when designing experiments, including theoretical knowledge, domain-specific knowledge of experimental techniques, and domain-general knowledge of experimental design strategies. Finally, undergraduate science students generated and tested alternates to their favored hypotheses when the space of alternate hypotheses was constrained and searchable. This result may help explain findings of confirmation

  8. Current state of knowledge about nutritional care of pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Barretto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy involves a significant anabolic activity that leads to increased nutritional needs relative to the preconception period. This paper aims to review the current understanding of the energy needs of macro and micronutrients during pregnancy as well as guidelines to address common gastrointestinal disorders during pregnancy, the issue of pica and anthropometric assessment to ensure an optimum weight gain. With the exception of iron, most of the nutrients needed by the pregnancy can be provided by a complete and balanced diet. Currently the scientific evidence shows that routine supplementation with iron and folic acid during pregnancy is a practice that prevents iron deficiency anemia, neural tube disorders and preterm births. Intermittent iron supplementation can also be an appropriated intervention. If the diet does not guarantee and adequate support, iodine, vitamin B12 and vitamin D supplements should also be necessaries. The anthropometric assessment by the pattern of weight gain should be present at each prenatal care visit to prevent maternal and fetal complications. In situations where the mother’s weight cannot be assessed, arm muscle circumference is possible to make an overall assessment as it correlates with maternal weight gain alternative. Measurements of biceps, triceps and subscapular skinfolds are another alternative that is useful to evaluate the fatty deposits and their location, in a complementary way to gain weight.

  9. Current knowledge of the aetiology of human tubal ectopic pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, J.L.V.; Dey, S.K.; Critchley, H.O.D.; Horne, A.W.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND An ectopic pregnancy is a pregnancy which occurs outside of the uterine cavity, and over 98% implant in the Fallopian tube. Tubal ectopic pregnancy remains the most common cause of maternal mortality in the first trimester of pregnancy. The epidemiological risk factors for tubal ectopic pregnancy are well established and include: tubal damage as a result of surgery or infection (particularly Chlamydia trachomatis), smoking and in vitro fertilization. This review appraises the data to date researching the aetiology of tubal ectopic pregnancy. METHODS Scientific literature was searched for studies investigating the underlying aetiology of tubal ectopic pregnancy. RESULTS Existing data addressing the underlying cause of tubal ectopic pregnancy are mostly descriptive. There are currently few good animal models of tubal ectopic pregnancy. There are limited data explaining the link between risk factors and tubal implantation. CONCLUSIONS Current evidence supports the hypothesis that tubal ectopic pregnancy is caused by a combination of retention of the embryo within the Fallopian tube due to impaired embryo-tubal transport and alterations in the tubal environment allowing early implantation to occur. Future studies are needed that address the functional consequences of infection and smoking on Fallopian tube physiology. A greater understanding of the aetiology of tubal ectopic pregnancy is critical for the development of improved preventative measures, the advancement of diagnostic screening methods and the development of novel treatments. PMID:20071358

  10. The importance of knowledge on the evaluation criteria in university scientific research projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Toma

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Scientific research is part of any university mission, at least of big universities, as it represents the complementary element required by the learning process. A learning process based on engendering knowledge is much more valuable and competitive than a learning process which is reduced to a mere transfer of knowledge from the teacher to the students. The important universities consider that “the development of scientific research as a fundamental competence is essential for survival in a more and more competitive environment on global level and that is why, research should be part of the university mission”1. This study aims to highlight how important it is for the university members to be aware of the evaluation criteria for the research projects they undertake. For this purpose, I have interviewed a number of 55 persons, project managers and team members in the projects from the “Research for Excellency” program and the National Plan of Research, Development and Innovation PN II 2007 – 2013. Out of the evaluation criteria for research, the most important ones were considered to be the scientific quality of the project and the quality of the human resources involved in the project.

  11. The Microcosm of Scientific Knowledge: Sceintists are Talking but Mostly to Each Other

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleski, J.; Ibaraki, M.

    2005-12-01

    There is no question that scientists are communicating en masse. But with publication in journals as the main form of communication of research results, modern scientific communication methods are contributing to a major chasm of knowledge between the scientific community and the mainstream public. While publication in a scientific journal is an effective means to communicate results to the scientific community, it is an ineffective means to communicate to the general public that turns to mainstream news media to learn about scientific discoveries. With little effort made to communicate beyond the borders of journals, an alarmingly small number of papers ever are reported on in mainstream publications. During the target years of 1990-1992 and 1998-2000 there were over 5,300 accredited scientific journals in print. However, in those same years, less than 0.0005% of the papers published in those journals gained any attention from mainstream news media and mainstream audiences. This begs the question, that as scientists, is it sufficient to publish results in highly technical formats with only scientists as the intended audience? Or, has this trend lead to a great disparity between the knowledgeable elite and the general population? The recent catastrophe encountered in the United States Gulf Coast after Hurricane Katrina is a striking example of published scientific research failing to reach the general public. Hundreds of papers were published during the years 1980-2005 discussing the topic of the potential threat of hurricanes to the gulf coast, yet many citizens of the area were unaware of the severity of a possible storm and subsequent flooding. In the target years researched, none of the papers published on this topic was reported on in mainstream news media, severely restricting the audience. While the intended audiences of the papers went beyond the general public, information in the hands of the people who inhabit the area would have directly by action and

  12. Enhancing innovation between scientific and indigenous knowledge: pioneer NGOs in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laplante Julie

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Until recently, little attention has been paid to local innovation capacity as well as management practices and institutions developed by communities and other local actors based on their traditional knowledge. This paper doesn't focus on the results of scientific research into innovation systems, but rather on how local communities, in a network of supportive partnerships, draw knowledge for others, combine it with their own knowledge and then innovate in their local practices. Innovation, as discussed in this article, is the capacity of local stakeholders to play an active role in innovative knowledge creation in order to enhance local health practices and further environmental conservation. In this article, the innovative processes through which this capacity is created and reinforced will be defined as a process of "ethnomedicine capacity". Methods The field study undertaken by the first author took place in India, in the State of Tamil Nadu, over a period of four months in 2007. The data was collected through individual interviews and focus groups and was complemented by participant observations. Results The research highlights the innovation capacity related to ethnomedical knowledge. As seen, the integration of local and scientific knowledge is crucial to ensure the practices anchor themselves in daily practices. The networks created are clearly instrumental to enhancing the innovation capacity that allows the creation, dissemination and utilization of 'traditional' knowledge. However, these networks have evolved in very different forms and have become entities that can fit into global networks. The ways in which the social capital is enhanced at the village and network levels are thus important to understand how traditional knowledge can be used as an instrument for development and innovation. Conclusion The case study analyzed highlights examples of innovation systems in a developmental context. They demonstrate that

  13. Does Anyone Really Know Anything? An Exploration of Constructivist Meaning and Identity in the Tension between Scientific and Religious Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Lisa J.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper I discuss the tension created by religion and science in one student's understanding of knowledge and truth by exploring two questions: "How do individuals accommodate their religious beliefs with their understanding of science?" and "How does religious knowledge interact with scientific knowledge to construct meaning?" A…

  14. The epistemology of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery: a scientific evaluation of the knowledge base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Steve; Harvey, Richard J; Burton, Martin J

    2007-10-01

    There are nearly a quarter of a million ENT publications listed in MEDLINE alone and the knowledge within our field continues to accumulate at an increasing rate. Many factors influence publication and the production and dissemination of new knowledge. But the direction of research effort does not always reflect clinical need. A variety of external factors are implicated including-but certainly not limited to-funding, corporate interest and market forces, the political climate, tenacity and resourcefulness of special interest groups, and even fashion. Little detailed information on the current state of knowledge within otolaryngology has been available.

  15. Scientific Knowledge Mobilization: Co-evolution of Data Products and Designated Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen S. Baker

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Digital data are accumulating rapidly, yet issues relating to data production remain unexamined. Data sharing efforts in particular are nascent, disunited and incomplete. We investigate the development of data products tailored for diverse communities with differing knowledge bases. We explore not the technical aspects of how, why, or where data are made available, but rather the socio-scientific aspects influencing what data products are created and made available for use. These products differ from compact data summaries often published in journals. We report on development by a national data center of two data collections describing the changing polar environment. One collection characterizes sea ice products derived from satellite remote sensing data and development unfolds over three decades. The second collection characterizes the Greenland Ice Sheet melt where development of an initial collection of data products over a period of several months was informed by insights gained from earlier experience. In documenting the generation of these two collections, a data product development cycle supported by a data product team is identified as key to mobilizing scientific knowledge. The collections reveal a co-evolution of data products and designated communities where community interest may be triggered by events such as environmental disturbance and new modes of communication. These examples of data product development in practice illustrate knowledge mobilization in the earth sciences; the collections create a bridge between data producers and a growing number of audiences interested in making evidence-based decisions.

  16. Cyanobactins from Cyanobacteria: Current Genetic and Chemical State of Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Martins

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are considered to be one of the most promising sources of new, natural products. Apart from non-ribosomal peptides and polyketides, ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs are one of the leading groups of bioactive compounds produced by cyanobacteria. Among these, cyanobactins have sparked attention due to their interesting bioactivities and for their potential to be prospective candidates in the development of drugs. It is assumed that the primary source of cyanobactins is cyanobacteria, although these compounds have also been isolated from marine animals such as ascidians, sponges and mollusks. The aim of this review is to update the current knowledge of cyanobactins, recognized as being produced by cyanobacteria, and to emphasize their genetic clusters and chemical structures as well as their bioactivities, ecological roles and biotechnological potential.

  17. Cyanobactins from Cyanobacteria: Current Genetic and Chemical State of Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Joana; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2015-11-13

    Cyanobacteria are considered to be one of the most promising sources of new, natural products. Apart from non-ribosomal peptides and polyketides, ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are one of the leading groups of bioactive compounds produced by cyanobacteria. Among these, cyanobactins have sparked attention due to their interesting bioactivities and for their potential to be prospective candidates in the development of drugs. It is assumed that the primary source of cyanobactins is cyanobacteria, although these compounds have also been isolated from marine animals such as ascidians, sponges and mollusks. The aim of this review is to update the current knowledge of cyanobactins, recognized as being produced by cyanobacteria, and to emphasize their genetic clusters and chemical structures as well as their bioactivities, ecological roles and biotechnological potential.

  18. The physiological ecology of vascular epiphytes: current knowledge, open questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotz, G; Hietz, P

    2001-11-01

    The current knowledge of the physiological ecology of vascular epiphytes is reviewed here with an emphasis on the most recent literature. It is argued that by far the most relevant abiotic constraint for growth and vegetative function of vascular epiphytes is water shortage, while other factors such as nutrient availability or irradiation, are generally of inferior importance. However, it is shown that the present understanding of epiphyte biology is still highly biased, both taxonomically and ecologically, and it is concluded that any generalizations are still preliminary. Future studies should include a much wider range of taxa and growing sites within the canopy to reach a better understanding how abiotic factors are limiting epiphyte growth and survival which, in turn, should affect epiphyte community composition. Finally, a more integrative approach to epiphyte biology is encouraged: physiological investigations should be balanced by studies of other possible constraints, for example, substrate instability, dispersal limitation, competition or herbivory.

  19. How I know that it is true? Students’ intuitive epistemologies about scientific knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isidro Pecharromán

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the intuitive epistemologies of university students from two perspectives: their beliefs concerning the nature of knowledge and their beliefs concerning how that knowledge is achieved. We confronted students with a questionnaire in which they had to choose, in a Likert scale, between different epistemological options and afterward we asked them to justify the epistemological positions they had assumed. Results showed that students were epistemologically more sophisticated when they had to select a position than when they had to justify it. Concretely, they choose mainly constructivist beliefs but their justifications were closer to objectivistic positions, showing a kind of “naïve realism” as the epistemological belief from which most students implicitly approach science learning. In fact, our data confirmed that the less instructed students were also the more realists. We compare these results with the data obtained with the same students in two other knowledge domains –moral and social knowledge- in which this trend towards “naïve realism” appears to be less strong. The paper concludes exploring the cognitive and cultural foundations of this intuitive objectivism with regard to the epistemological nature and the acquisition of scientific knowledge, as well as the teaching strategies that should be used in order to improve the complexity of epistemological beliefs in secondary and university students.

  20. Impact of the Knowledge Society in the University and in Scientific Communication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duart, Josep M.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades as a result of the introduction and intensive use of technologies for information and knowledge in general, from the internet in particular, the university is living in a process of complete transformation that affects it´s academic and organizational structures as well as the conception of educational methodology. The ICTs have demonstrated a need to establish coherent institutional strategies in their use and application along with the possibility to expand the sphere of institutional action in regards massive access to higher education. All of this shows an existing change from a model of education based on the transmission of knowledge, that was rather limited and under restricted access, to another that should fundamentally facilitate the competence to learn from people that live in the world in constant change, with open access to information and knowledge. In addition, all of this implies a transformation in the dynamics of communication and diffusion of scientific knowledge, that is now converted into something open and accessible which is subject to an analysis of knowledge social networks.

  1. Facts, theories and ideologies: Viola Klein and Sociology of Scientific Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eulalia Pérez Sedeño

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Several studies on history, philosophy and sociology of science have demonstrated that science is not autonomous and value-neutral and its selfless search of truth is an ideal theoretical myth far from the real practice of science, which is an aggregate of social practices. Viola Klein was a pioneer in studying science using the same instruments and categories utilized in any other social practice. The aim of this work is to highlight her contributions to Sociology of Scientific Knowledge at a moment when this discipline was, at the most, incipient.

  2. A VIEWPOINT ON THE CURRENT STATE OF KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT INSTRUMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    ANDREEA PAULA DUMITRU

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge management is seeking solutions to harmonize the objectives of organizations of the human group, which need to rationalize, to provide policy makers and to implement. This article aims to provide readers with an introduction to knowledge management basic definitions, theories and concepts such as types of knowledge, the differences between data, information and knowledge, etc, are given. But, why we need a knowledge management ? This article justified the need for companies to focus...

  3. Brown carbon in the cryosphere: Current knowledge and perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Ming Wu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the light-absorbing organic carbon, i.e., brown carbon (BrC, has received an increasing attention, because they could significantly absorb the solar radiation in the range of short wavelengths rather than the purely scattering effect. BrC is ubiquitous in the troposphere. It could undergo long range transport within the atmospheric circulation. After the deposition on the surface of snow or ice in the cryospheric region, as the major light absorbing impurities with black carbon and dust, BrC could reduce the snow albedo and accelerate the glacier melting. In this context, this paper summarized the current knowledge of BrC (in aerosols and snow in the cryospheric regions including the Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpines. Although some works have been conducted in those region, the current dataset on the optical properties of BrC like Absorption Ångström Exponent (AAE and Mass Absorption Efficiency (MAE is still limited, which hampers stimulating an accurate evaluation of its climate effects. Especially in the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau, where very limited information concerning BrC is available. Considering biomass burning as a dominant source of BrC, a large amount of emissions from biomass burning in South Asia could reach the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau, where the climate effect of BrC merits more investigation in the future.

  4. Knowledge-Based Parallel Performance Technology for Scientific Application Competitiveness Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malony, Allen D; Shende, Sameer

    2011-08-15

    The primary goal of the University of Oregon's DOE "œcompetitiveness" project was to create performance technology that embodies and supports knowledge of performance data, analysis, and diagnosis in parallel performance problem solving. The target of our development activities was the TAU Performance System and the technology accomplishments reported in this and prior reports have all been incorporated in the TAU open software distribution. In addition, the project has been committed to maintaining strong interactions with the DOE SciDAC Performance Engineering Research Institute (PERI) and Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS). This collaboration has proved valuable for translation of our knowledge-based performance techniques to parallel application development and performance engineering practice. Our outreach has also extended to the DOE Advanced CompuTational Software (ACTS) collection and project. Throughout the project we have participated in the PERI and TASCS meetings, as well as the ACTS annual workshops.

  5. Evaluating Scientific Research Knowledge and Attitude among Medical Representative in Jordan: A Cross-sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukattash, Tareq; Alattar, Meys; Farha, Rana Abu; Alsous, Mervat; Jarab, Anan; El-Hajii, Feras; Mukattash, Ibrahim L

    2017-08-28

    Pharmaceutical companies provide a broad range of different mandatory trainings to their medical representatives to keep the business running, however research related training has often been neglected by these companies. Thus, this study was developed to assess the amount of scientific research knowledge and interest among pharmacy medical representatives in Jordan. A cross sectional study was conducted in Jordan in 2016. During the study period, a questionnaire was administered to 250 medical representatives working in pharmaceutical companies to evaluate their scientific research knowledge and attitudes. The majority of medical representatives had positive attitudes towards clinical trials and research communication and believe that it will increase the value of their work, but a considerable number of medical representatives did not detail clinical trials on every visit and found difficulty in answering clinical trials and research related questions asked by health care professionals. Most of the medical representatives did not have a complete understanding of some basic research terminologies. Medical representatives working in multinational companies seemed to have a significantly better understanding of research and terminologies compared to local companies (P-value= 0.000). Also Medical representatives with higher educational degrees seemed to have significantly better understanding of basic research terminologies (P-value= 0.023). The majority of medical representatives had positive attitudes towards clinical trials and research communication and found that it will increase the value of their work, but still there is a gap in their frequency of detailing. Thus, local pharmaceutical companies need to invest more in research and clinical trials knowledge kind of training. Also, universities need to include research related courses and subject in their bachelors' program curriculum in order to make pharmacists equipped in terms of research knowledge

  6. Study on Dynamic Evolution and the Structure of Transnational Scientific Collaborative Network——Taking Knowledge Management as an Example

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xu Yuchan; Liang Qihua; Zhang Chunyang

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose/significance] This paper aims to understand the evolution characteristics and the structure of transnational scientific collaborative network of knowledge management, and find the shortage and advantage of China. [Method/process...

  7. A VIEWPOINT ON THE CURRENT STATE OF KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT INSTRUMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDREEA PAULA DUMITRU

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge management is seeking solutions to harmonize the objectives of organizations of the human group, which need to rationalize, to provide policy makers and to implement. This article aims to provide readers with an introduction to knowledge management basic definitions, theories and concepts such as types of knowledge, the differences between data, information and knowledge, etc, are given. But, why we need a knowledge management ? This article justified the need for companies to focus management efforts on their intangible elements and provides the five enabling conditions for knowledge creation.

  8. Karl Mannheim and the sociology of scientific knowledge : Toward a new agenda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pels, D

    1996-01-01

    In previous decades, a regrettable divorce has arisen between two currents of theorizing and research about knowledge and science: the Mannheimian and Wittgensteinian traditions. The radical impulse of the new social studies of science in the early 1970s was initiated not by followers of Mannheim, b

  9. Professional development in scientifically based reading instruction: teacher knowledge and reading outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podhajski, Blanche; Mather, Nancy; Nathan, Jane; Sammons, Janice

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the literature and presents data from a study that examined the effects of professional development in scientifically based reading instruction on teacher knowledge and student reading outcomes. The experimental group consisted of four first- and second-grade teachers and their students (n = 33). Three control teachers and their students (n = 14), from a community of significantly higher socioeconomic demographics, were also followed. Experimental teachers participated in a 35-hour course on instruction of phonemic awareness, phonics, and fluency and were coached by professional mentors for a year. Although teacher knowledge in the experimental group was initially lower than that of the controls, their scores surpassed the controls on the posttest. First-grade experimental students' growth exceeded the controls in letter name fluency, phonemic segmentation, nonsense word fluency, and oral reading. Second-grade experimental students exceeded controls in phonemic segmentation. Although the teacher sample was small, findings suggest that teachers can improve their knowledge concerning explicit reading instruction and that this new knowledge may contribute to student growth in reading.

  10. Cardiovascular pharmacogenomics; state of current knowledge and implementation in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabi, Payman; Dubé, Marie-Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Pharmacogenomics (PGx) is the science that examines how an individual's genetic make-up affects the safety and efficacy of therapeutic drugs. PGx of response to cardiovascular (CV) medications is of the most successfully translated branches of PGx into the clinical workout. However, the clinical implementation of PGx of CV drugs is yet far beyond the growth of our understanding of the role of genetics in drug therapy. A considerable amount of efforts have been devoted by the regulatory agents like the food and drug administration (FDA) as well as the expert-based networks such as the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) to overcome the existing barriers. This has been done, at least in part, for some of the most widely prescribed CV drugs, including clopidogrel, warfarin and simvastatin for which the PGx knowledge have been satisfactorily robust to provoke the CPIC to issue the guidelines for these drugs and the FDA to update the drugs' labeling, both strongly recommended the use of genotype-guided dosing for these medications, provided that the genetic data are available. For other drugs, however, studies have produced contradictory results and further large and well-designed clinical trials are required to expand and confirm the clinical utility of their PGx data. This review paper presents the current state of knowledge in the field of PGx of CV medications and describes the facilities assisting to the translation of PGx data into the clinical practice. Afterward, the existing body of PGx literature of the most-commonly used CV medications is comprehensively discussed.

  11. Identifying Sources of Scientific Knowledge: classifying non-source items in the WoS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calero-Medina, C.M.

    2016-07-01

    The sources of scientific knowledge can be tracked using the references in scientific publications. For instance, the publications from the scientific journals covered by the Web of Science database (WoS) contain references to publications for which an indexed source record exist in the WoS (source items) or to references for which an indexed source record does not exist in the WoS (non-source items). The classification of the non-source items is the main objective of the work in progress presented here. Some other scholars have classified and identified non-source items with different purposes (e.g. Butler & Visser (2006); Liseé, Larivière & Archambault (2008); Nerderhof, van Leeuwen & van Raan (2010); Hicks & Wang (2013); Boyack & Klavans (2014)). But these studies are focused in specific source types, fields or set of papers. The work presented here is much broader in terms of the number of publications, source types and fields. (Author)

  12. Co-Producing Accessible Climate Knowledge: Case Study of a Scientific Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourqui, M.; Charriere, M. K. M.; Bolduc, C.

    2016-12-01

    This talk presents the process of and the lessons learned from a scientific challenge where climate scientists re-framed their research for the general public in interaction with members of the general public. This challenge was organized by Climanosco in the context of its launch in the fall 2015 and is due to end in September 2016. It led to the publication of 11 articles from scientific authors spanning 7 countries and engaged the participation of 24 members of the general public. The process of interaction between scientists and members of the general public took place along an extended peer-review process which included on-line community discussions and non-scientific review reports. Details of this interaction, as perceived by the participants and evaluated by a survey, will be discussed in this talk. On the longer term this co-production of accessible climate knowledge, which represents the main goal of the non-profit association Climanosco, is meant to serve as a reliable, research-based source, the decision makers but also the journalists, teachers and communities around the world.

  13. Controlled human malaria infection trials: How tandems of trust and control construct scientific knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijker, Else M; Sauerwein, Robert W; Bijker, Wiebe E

    2016-02-01

    Controlled human malaria infections are clinical trials in which healthy volunteers are deliberately infected with malaria under controlled conditions. Controlled human malaria infections are complex clinical trials: many different groups and institutions are involved, and several complex technologies are required to function together. This functioning together of technologies, people, and institutions is under special pressure because of potential risks to the volunteers. In this article, the authors use controlled human malaria infections as a strategic research site to study the use of control, the role of trust, and the interactions between trust and control in the construction of scientific knowledge. The authors argue that tandems of trust and control play a central role in the successful execution of clinical trials and the construction of scientific knowledge. More specifically, two aspects of tandems of trust and control will be highlighted: tandems are sites where trust and control coproduce each other, and tandems link the personal, the technical, and the institutional domains. Understanding tandems of trust and control results in setting some agendas for both clinical trial research and science and technology studies.

  14. The cultivation of esteem and retrieval of scientific knowledge in physician networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menchik, Daniel A; Meltzer, David O

    2010-06-01

    This article evaluates how physicians draw upon scientific and other forms of knowledge in different professional communities. We argue that because physicians will draw upon clinical research findings to improve their reputation with colleagues, and because the terms for accruing esteem in an academic hospital may differ depending on the dominant task structure of the organization, the form of knowledge that is valued by a physician will vary with his or her hospital's level of prestige. We use social network and multivariate analyses to test this theory in six U.S. hospitals with varying levels of prestige. We find that in lower-prestige hospitals, physicians can improve their reputation by reading a relatively broad range of scientific journals, whereas in higher-prestige hospitals, esteem is allocated to those with a more elite medical school pedigree. Statistically significant differences also exist between hospitals in terms of whether work with patients is valued, with physicians who engage in more clinical activity in the highest-ranked hospitals receiving less esteem from their colleagues. We finish by discussing how the functioning of higher- and lower-prestige hospitals is interconnected in ways that sustain both the development of innovations and their widespread adoption.

  15. Integrating scientific knowledge into large-scale restoration programs: the CALFED Bay-Delta Program experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, K.A.; Short, A.

    2009-01-01

    Integrating science into resource management activities is a goal of the CALFED Bay-Delta Program, a multi-agency effort to address water supply reliability, ecological condition, drinking water quality, and levees in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of northern California. Under CALFED, many different strategies were used to integrate science, including interaction between the research and management communities, public dialogues about scientific work, and peer review. This paper explores ways science was (and was not) integrated into CALFED's management actions and decision systems through three narratives describing different patterns of scientific integration and application in CALFED. Though a collaborative process and certain organizational conditions may be necessary for developing new understandings of the system of interest, we find that those factors are not sufficient for translating that knowledge into management actions and decision systems. We suggest that the application of knowledge may be facilitated or hindered by (1) differences in the objectives, approaches, and cultures of scientists operating in the research community and those operating in the management community and (2) other factors external to the collaborative process and organization.

  16. Scientific Evidence as Content Knowledge: A Replication Study with English and Turkish Pre-Service Primary Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Ros; Sahin-Pekmez, Esin

    2012-01-01

    Pre-service teachers around the world need to develop their content knowledge of scientific evidence to meet the requirements of recent school curriculum developments which prepare pupils to be scientifically literate. This research reports a replication study in Turkey of an intervention originally carried out with pre-service primary teachers in…

  17. Current expertise location by exploiting the dynamics of knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Nozicka

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Systems for expertise location are either very expensive in terms of the costs of maintenance or they tend to become obsolete or incomplete during the time. This article presents a new approach to knowledge mapping/expertise location allowing reducing the costs of knowledge mapping by maintaining the accuracy of the knowledge map. The efficiency of the knowledge map is achieved by introducing the knowledge estimation measures analysing the dynamics of knowledge of company employees and their textual results of work. Finding an expert with most up-to date knowledge is supported by focusing publishing history analysis. The efficiency of proposed measures within various timeframes of publishing history is evaluated by evaluation method introduced within the article. The evaluation took place in the environment of a middle-sized software company allowing seeing directly a practical usability of the expertise location technique. The results form various implications deployment of knowledge map within the company.

  18. Microorganisms in Fermented Apple Beverages: Current Knowledge and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousin, Fabien J; Le Guellec, Rozenn; Schlusselhuber, Margot; Dalmasso, Marion; Laplace, Jean-Marie; Cretenet, Marina

    2017-07-25

    Production of fermented apple beverages is spread all around the world with specificities in each country. 'French ciders' refer to fermented apple juice mainly produced in the northwest of France and often associated with short periods of consumption. Research articles on this kind of product are scarce compared to wine, especially on phenomena associated with microbial activities. The wine fermentation microbiome and its dynamics, organoleptic improvement for healthy and pleasant products and development of starters are now widely studied. Even if both beverages seem close in terms of microbiome and process (with both alcoholic and malolactic fermentations), the inherent properties of the raw materials and different production and environmental parameters make research on the specificities of apple fermentation beverages worthwhile. This review summarizes current knowledge on the cider microbial ecosystem, associated activities and the influence of process parameters. In addition, available data on cider quality and safety is reviewed. Finally, we focus on the future role of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts in the development of even better or new beverages made from apples.

  19. Phocine Distemper Virus: Current Knowledge and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pádraig J. Duignan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Phocine distemper virus (PDV was first recognized in 1988 following a massive epidemic in harbor and grey seals in north-western Europe. Since then, the epidemiology of infection in North Atlantic and Arctic pinnipeds has been investigated. In the western North Atlantic endemic infection in harp and grey seals predates the European epidemic, with relatively small, localized mortality events occurring primarily in harbor seals. By contrast, PDV seems not to have become established in European harbor seals following the 1988 epidemic and a second event of similar magnitude and extent occurred in 2002. PDV is a distinct species within the Morbillivirus genus with minor sequence variation between outbreaks over time. There is now mounting evidence of PDV-like viruses in the North Pacific/Western Arctic with serological and molecular evidence of infection in pinnipeds and sea otters. However, despite the absence of associated mortality in the region, there is concern that the virus may infect the large Pacific harbor seal and northern elephant seal populations or the endangered Hawaiian monk seals. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on PDV with particular focus on developments in diagnostics, pathogenesis, immune response, vaccine development, phylogenetics and modeling over the past 20 years.

  20. Phocine distemper virus: current knowledge and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duignan, Pádraig J; Van Bressem, Marie-Françoise; Baker, Jason D; Barbieri, Michelle; Colegrove, Kathleen M; De Guise, Sylvain; de Swart, Rik L; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Dobson, Andrew; Duprex, W Paul; Early, Greg; Fauquier, Deborah; Goldstein, Tracey; Goodman, Simon J; Grenfell, Bryan; Groch, Kátia R; Gulland, Frances; Hall, Ailsa; Jensen, Brenda A; Lamy, Karina; Matassa, Keith; Mazzariol, Sandro; Morris, Sinead E; Nielsen, Ole; Rotstein, David; Rowles, Teresa K; Saliki, Jeremy T; Siebert, Ursula; Waltzek, Thomas; Wellehan, James F X

    2014-12-22

    Phocine distemper virus (PDV) was first recognized in 1988 following a massive epidemic in harbor and grey seals in north-western Europe. Since then, the epidemiology of infection in North Atlantic and Arctic pinnipeds has been investigated. In the western North Atlantic endemic infection in harp and grey seals predates the European epidemic, with relatively small, localized mortality events occurring primarily in harbor seals. By contrast, PDV seems not to have become established in European harbor seals following the 1988 epidemic and a second event of similar magnitude and extent occurred in 2002. PDV is a distinct species within the Morbillivirus genus with minor sequence variation between outbreaks over time. There is now mounting evidence of PDV-like viruses in the North Pacific/Western Arctic with serological and molecular evidence of infection in pinnipeds and sea otters. However, despite the absence of associated mortality in the region, there is concern that the virus may infect the large Pacific harbor seal and northern elephant seal populations or the endangered Hawaiian monk seals. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on PDV with particular focus on developments in diagnostics, pathogenesis, immune response, vaccine development, phylogenetics and modeling over the past 20 years.

  1. Phocine Distemper Virus: Current Knowledge and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duignan, Pádraig J.; Van Bressem, Marie-Françoise; Baker, Jason D.; Barbieri, Michelle; Colegrove, Kathleen M.; De Guise, Sylvain; de Swart, Rik L.; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Dobson, Andrew; Duprex, W. Paul; Early, Greg; Fauquier, Deborah; Goldstein, Tracey; Goodman, Simon J.; Grenfell, Bryan; Groch, Kátia R.; Gulland, Frances; Hall, Ailsa; Jensen, Brenda A.; Lamy, Karina; Matassa, Keith; Mazzariol, Sandro; Morris, Sinead E.; Nielsen, Ole; Rotstein, David; Rowles, Teresa K.; Saliki, Jeremy T.; Siebert, Ursula; Waltzek, Thomas; Wellehan, James F.X.

    2014-01-01

    Phocine distemper virus (PDV) was first recognized in 1988 following a massive epidemic in harbor and grey seals in north-western Europe. Since then, the epidemiology of infection in North Atlantic and Arctic pinnipeds has been investigated. In the western North Atlantic endemic infection in harp and grey seals predates the European epidemic, with relatively small, localized mortality events occurring primarily in harbor seals. By contrast, PDV seems not to have become established in European harbor seals following the 1988 epidemic and a second event of similar magnitude and extent occurred in 2002. PDV is a distinct species within the Morbillivirus genus with minor sequence variation between outbreaks over time. There is now mounting evidence of PDV-like viruses in the North Pacific/Western Arctic with serological and molecular evidence of infection in pinnipeds and sea otters. However, despite the absence of associated mortality in the region, there is concern that the virus may infect the large Pacific harbor seal and northern elephant seal populations or the endangered Hawaiian monk seals. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on PDV with particular focus on developments in diagnostics, pathogenesis, immune response, vaccine development, phylogenetics and modeling over the past 20 years. PMID:25533658

  2. Current status of knowledge on public-speaking anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pull, Charles B

    2012-01-01

    This review examines the current knowledge on public-speaking anxiety, that is, the fear of speaking in front of others. This article summarizes the findings from previous review articles and describes new research findings on basic science aspects, prevalence rates, classification, and treatment that have been published between August 2008 and August 2011. Recent findings highlight the major aspects of psychological and physiological reactivity to public speaking in individuals who are afraid to speak in front of others, confirm high prevalence rates of the disorder, contribute to identifying the disorder as a possibly distinct subtype of social anxiety disorder (SAD), and give support to the efficacy of treatment programs using virtual reality exposure and Internet-based self-help. Public-speaking anxiety is a highly prevalent disorder, leading to excessive psychological and physiological reactivity. It is present in a majority of individuals with SAD and there is substantial evidence that it may be a distinct subtype of SAD. It is amenable to treatment including, in particular, new technologies such as exposure to virtual environments and the use of cognitive-behavioral self-help programs delivered on the Internet.

  3. Current Approaches Regarding the Knowledge Management Impact on SMEs Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionela Carmen RIZEA (PIRNEA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Managing knowledge is a critical capability for small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs to master because it helps them leverage their most critical resource. Organizational knowledge is the most salient resource at the disposal of SMEs in terms of availability, access, and depth. Successful SMEs are those who can leverage their knowledge in an effective and efficient manner, so as to make up for deficiencies in traditional resources, like land, labor, and capital. The purpose of this article is to identify the knowledge management impact on SMEs performance and to compare knowledge management in SMEs with knowledge management in large companies. The research discovered that SMEs do not manage knowledge the same way as larger organizations.

  4. Carrying on the scientific knowledge in major scientific achievements%重大科技成果科学知识传承研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张克菊

    2013-01-01

    After the concept of carrying on the scientific knowledge was analyzed from the double properties of scientific knowledge, the main contents and methods of carrying on the scientific knowledge in major scientific achievements were stressed according to the enlightenments of biological evolution in order enrich the theories and methodologies and lay the foundation for further studying the development rules of major scientific achievements .%从科学知识的双重属性出发,对科学知识传承的概念进行了辨析。结合生物进化对重大科技成果科学知识传承研究的启示,重点探讨了重大科技成果科学知识传承研究的主要内容、方法,以期丰富已有重大科技成果的理论和方法论研究内容,为进一步探索重大科技成果的发展规律打下基础。

  5. Hazards mapping using local and scientific knowledge. A case in rural Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, B.; Bocco, G.

    2016-12-01

    Natural hazards in rural areas in developing countries usually affect poor peasants and their infrastructure. This poses a problem of social vulnerability that coupled to the risk may cause severe hazards. Research oriented to prevention and adaptation is crucial. Other studies have proved that local knowledge and peasant's perception on hazards is a valuable tool to tackle prevention and mitigation. In the valley of Huahua river, at the Pacific coast of Mexico, landslides have directly affected rural roads hampering communication between villages. In addition some of their deposits have changed the morphology of river channels, resulting in flooding and avalanches threatening rural life and assets. At least 21 landslides are still active in the area. In this research the leading questions are: how do people perceive landslides hazard? What is the knowledge possessed by villagers facing such hazards? Could scientific and local knowledge be coupled in a hybrid format to formulate an adequate hazards map? The investigation used ethnographic techniques (participant observation, semi-structured and structured interviews, and participatory mapping) and multivariate statistical approaches based on empirical data. We will present the preliminary results, based principally on interview data and a first hazard zoning of the lower valley of the Huahua River. Our results suggest that the approach can be used in this and similar areas in developing countries.

  6. 46 CFR 11.713 - Requirements for maintaining current knowledge of waters to be navigated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for maintaining current knowledge of waters... § 11.713 Requirements for maintaining current knowledge of waters to be navigated. (a) If a first class... current knowledge of the route. Persons using this method of re-familiarization shall certify,...

  7. Prophylaxis and therapeutic potential of ozone in buiatrics: Current knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Đuričić, Dražen; Valpotić, Hrvoje; Samardžija, Marko

    2015-08-01

    Ozone therapy has been in use since 1896 in the USA. As a highly reactive molecule, ozone may inactivate bacteria, viruses, fungi, yeasts and protozoans, stimulate the oxygen metabolism of tissue, treat diseases, activate the immune system, and exhibit strong analgesic activity. More recently, ozone has been used in veterinary medicine, particularly in buiatrics, but still insufficiently. Medical ozone therapy has shown effectiveness as an alternative to the use of antibiotics, which are restricted to clinical use and have been withdrawn from non-clinical use as in-feed growth promoters in animal production. This review is an overview of current knowledge regarding the preventive and therapeutic effects of ozone in ruminants for the treatment of puerperal diseases and improvement in their fertility. In particular, ozone preparations have been tested in the treatment of reproductive tract lesions, urovagina and pneumomovagina, metritis, endometritis, fetal membrane retention and mastitis, as well as in the functional restoration of endometrium in dairy cows and goats. In addition, the preventive use of the intrauterine application of ozone has been assessed in order to evaluate its effectiveness in improving reproductive efficiency in dairy cows. No adverse effects were observed in cows and goats treated with ozone preparations. Moreover, there is a lot of evidence indicating the advantages of ozone preparation therapy in comparison to the application of antibiotics. However, there are certain limitations on ozone use in veterinary medicine and buiatrics, such as inactivity against intracellular microbes and selective activity against the same bacterial species, as well as the induction of tissue inflammation through inappropriate application of the preparation.

  8. The contribution of the European Society for Soil Conservation (ESSC) to scientific knowledge, education and sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazzi, Carmelo; Fullen, Michael A.; Costantini, Edoardo A. C.; Theocharopoulos, Sid; Rickson, Jane; Kasparinskis, Raimonds; Lo Papa, Giuseppe; Peres, Guenola; Sholten, Thomas; Kertész, Adam; Vasenev, Ivan; Dumitru, Mihail; Cornelis, Wim; Rubio, José L.

    2017-04-01

    Soil is an integral component of the global environmental system that supports the quality and diversity of terrestrial life on Earth. Therefore, it is vital to consider the processes and impacts of soil degradation on society, especially on the provision of environmental goods and services, including food security and climate change mitigation and adaptation. Scientific societies devoted to Soil Science play significant roles in promoting soil security by advancing scientific knowledge, education and environmental sustainability. The European Society for Soil Conservation (ESSC) was founded in Ghent (Belgium) on 4 November 1988 by a group of 23 researchers from several European countries. It is an interdisciplinary, non-political association with over 500 members in 56 countries. The ESSC produces and distributes a hardcopy Newsletter twice a year and maintains both a website and Facebook page: http://www.soilconservation.eu/ https://www.facebook.com/European-Society-for-Soil-Conservation-ESSC-100528363448094/ The ESSC aims to: • Support research on soil degradation, soil protection and soil and water conservation. • Provide a network for the exchange of knowledge about soil degradation processes and soil conservation research and practises. • Produce publications on major issues relating to soil degradation and soil and water conservation. • Advise regulators and policy-makers on soil issues, especially soil degradation, protection and conservation. The ESSC held its First International Congress in Silsoe (UK) in 1992. Further International Congresses were held in Munich (1996), Valencia (2000), Budapest (2004), Palermo (2007), Thessaloniki (2011) and Moscow (2015). The Eighth International Congress will be held in Lleida (Spain) in June 2017: http://www.consowalleida2017.com/ Interspersed between these international congresses, the ESSC organizes annual international conferences on specific topics. These include Imola, Italy (Biogeochemical Processes at

  9. CRITERIA OF TRUTHFULNESS AND THE SCIENTIFIC QUALITY IN POST-MODERN KNOWLEDGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Mukha

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the criteria of truth in post-modern philosophy, taking into account the ways it is defined in both the classical and non-classical traditions. Specific to post-modern philosophy is the absence of a universal language of narration and the traditional methods in which knowledge is recognized as legitimate. Basing himself on these concepts, the author examines the problem of the ideal of scientific quality and the transformations this idea has undergone in contemporary philosophy. Truth is understood basically through two means which govern our relation to truth: the will to truth and the concern for truth. These also appear as defining factors of truth in various types of post-modern philosophy: social-operative, social-political, and aesthetic

  10. THE METHODOLOGICAL UNIT OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH IN TERMS OF CONCEPTUALISATION OF PEDAGOGICAL KNOWLEDGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfia F. Zakirova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The contents and structure of the methodological unit ofscientific research on educational problems are defined. The present study is the continuation of methodological articles cycle appealed to support the work of newcomer researchers.Methods. The requirements to research justification are disclosed; logicstylistic and language features of the argument while designing the methodological unit are described from the standpoint of complete, panoramic and hermeneutic approaches.Results and scientific novelty. The characteristic of research hypotheses types and the functions realized by them is given. The scientific hypothesis is presented as the instrument of trans-level conceptualization of pedagogical knowledge. The author’s interpretation of a «through» stage-by-stage hypothesis-generating as process of a meaning-making and theoretical organization of research object is offered. Dual character of the hypothesis-generating is presented; it integrates logic-gnoseological and valuable-conceptual, rational and intuitively figurative principles. Typical mistakes in formation of the methodological research unit are analysed. The directions of a multiangle reflection implementation in the course of research activity are designated.Practical significance. The recommendations proposed in the study can by used by teachers-researchers, students, undergraduates, graduate students and doctoral candidates mastering practical methodology of scientific and pedagogical search; and also the materials are designed for research supervisors motivated to increase efficiency and tutorial activity content.

  11. Summary of knowledge gaps related to quality and efficacy of current influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleiderer, Michael; Trouvin, Jean-Hugues; Brasseur, Daniel; Gränstrom, Marta; Shivji, Ragini; Mura, Manuela; Cavaleri, Marco

    2014-07-31

    Influenza viruses are a public health threat, as they are pathogenic, highly transmissible and prone to genetic changes. For decades vaccination strategies have been based on trivalent inactivated vaccines, which are regulated by specific guidelines. The progress in scientific knowledge and the lessons learned from the A(H1N1)2009 pandemic have highlighted further the need to improve current guidelines, including the immunogenicity criteria set by the CHMP in 1997, and to promote the discussion on the shortcomings encountered, e.g. the evaluation of vaccine efficacy in the paediatric and elderly populations, the measurement of the naivety of a population, the impact of prior immunity on subsequent vaccinations, and the technical issues with the serological assays for detection of immunity and immunogenicity. The authors attempted to summarise and tackle key gaps in the existing evidence concerning quality and efficacy of influenza vaccines, aiming at favouring a common understanding and a coordinated approach across stakeholders.

  12. Obstacles and solutions to the generation and dissemination of scientific knowledge in poor countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Nordstrom

    2012-10-01

    and middle-income countries are still opinion-based.Alas this is also all too often the case in the US and Western Europe. For example, little policy has developed in response to the growing threat from climate change to the health and the environment. The process from the discovery of scientific knowledge to its effects on human behavior is usually long and unpredictable. Current epidemiology training focuses on epidemiologic methods, with little attention on how the science of epidemiology is translated into effective health policy (Brownson, 1998, page 377. Actually, research findings always have some degree of uncertainty, and policy choices depend on many social, cultural, and economic factors, including people’s opinions and beliefs. Fortunately, expert guidance is available on ways to communicate research findings to the public and policymakers that increase the chance that good science will result in good public health (Nelson, 2011; Remington, et al., 2011; Brownson, et al., 2011. A somewhat contrary view is that researchers are not responsible for the translation of their findings into public policy and should enter the political fray cautiously (Rothman & Poole, 1985.5.The golden standard of studies generating such evidence is randomized controlled trials.Bonita et al (2006, page 95 distinguish between various study designs by ranking their ability to provide evidence for causality between an exposure and a disease: “strong” for randomized controlled trials, “moderate” for cohort and case-control studies, and “weak” for cross-sectional and ecological studies. However, Steven N Goodman of Stanford University and Gerald J Dal Pan of the US Food and Drug Administration, speakers at the 2012 American College of Epidemiology Annual Meeting, indicated that the traditional hierarchy of scientific evidence may be too simple. They argued that experiments have more limits than generally appreciated, and evidence from observational studies can also be

  13. The History of Liquid Ear Acupuncture and the Current Scientific State of the Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litscher, Daniela; Litscher, Gerhard

    2016-06-01

    This short review article presents a current overview of existing publications and scientific results regarding liquid (ear) acupuncture. The injection of liquids into defined acupuncture points of the ear is not a method commonly used in the Western world. The term liquid acupuncture has different definitions, which makes understanding each definition and differentiating one from the other difficult. General terms like pharmacopuncture, homeosiniatry, and liquid acupuncture, which all describe the method of injecting different kinds of drugs into a defined body acupuncture point, are used. This article presents the history of liquid acupuncture, as well as the current scientific state of the art, from the point of view of two European researchers. Some articles are discussed and a few practical examples are presented.

  14. From Medieval Philosophy to the Virtual Library: a descriptive framework for scientific knowledge and documentation as basis for document retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Morrissey

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the conceptual basis of document retrieval systems for the Virtual Library in science and technology. It does so through analysing some cognitive models for scientific knowledge, drawing on philosophy, sociology and linguistics. It is important to consider improvements in search/ retrieval functionalities for scientific documents because knowledge creation and transfer are integral to the functioning of scientific communities, and on a larger scale, science and technology are central to the knowledge economy. This paper proposes four new and innovative understandings. Firstly, it is proposed that formal scientific communication constitutes the documentation and dissemination of concepts, and that conceptualism is a useful philosophical basis for study. Second, it is proposed that the scientific document is a dyadic con-struct, being both the physical manifestation as an encoded medium, and also being the associated knowledge, or intangible ideation, that is carried within the document. Third, it is shown that major philosophers of science divide science into three main activities, dealing with data, derived or inferred laws, and the axioms or the paradigm. Fourth, it is demonstrated that the data, information and conceptual frameworks carried by a scientific document, as different levels of signification or semiotic systems, can each be characterised in ways assisting in search and retrieval functionalities for the Virtual Library.

  15. Current Efforts in European Projects to Facilitate the Sharing of Scientific Observation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredel, Henning; Rieke, Matthes; Maso, Joan; Jirka, Simon; Stasch, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    This presentation is intended to provide an overview of currently ongoing efforts in European projects to facilitate and promote the interoperable sharing of scientific observation data. This will be illustrated through two examples: a prototypical portal developed in the ConnectinGEO project for matching available (in-situ) data sources to the needs of users and a joint activity of several research projects to harmonise the usage of the OGC Sensor Web Enablement standards for providing access to marine observation data. ENEON is an activity initiated by the European ConnectinGEO project to coordinate in-situ Earth observation networks with the aim to harmonise the access to observations, improve discoverability, and identify/close gaps in European earth observation data resources. In this context, ENEON commons has been developed as a supporting Web portal for facilitating discovery, access, re-use and creation of knowledge about observations, networks, and related activities (e.g. projects). The portal is based on developments resulting from the European WaterInnEU project and has been extended to cover the requirements for handling knowledge about in-situ earth observation networks. A first prototype of the portal was completed in January 2017 which offers functionality for interactive discussion, information exchange and querying information about data delivered by different observation networks. Within this presentation, we will introduce the presented prototype and initiate a discussion about potential future work directions. The second example concerns the harmonisation of data exchange in the marine domain. There are many organisation who operate ocean observatories or data archives. In recent years, the application of the OGC Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) technology has become more and more popular to increase the interoperability between marine observation networks. However, as the SWE standards were intentionally designed in a domain independent manner

  16. Linking environmental risk assessment and communication: An experiment in co-evolving scientific and social knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffy, E.A.; Booth, N.L.

    2008-01-01

    Dissemination of information to decision-makers and enhanced methods of public participation are often put forward as antidotes to a perceived disconnect between risk assessment and risk communication in the public domain. However, mechanisms that support both the provision of routine, timely and relevant technical knowledge to the public and meaningful opportunities for public participation in the evaluation and management of risk are few. We argue for the need to re-conceptualise the institutional context in which risk research and communication occur as one in which scientific knowledge and public understanding are co-evolutionary instead of independent or sequential. Here, we report on an experiment to promote coevolution of environmental risk assessment and risk communication through the instrumental use of a web-based platform that dynamically links expert and public discourses through common information sources, linked scenario evaluations, and opportunities for iterative dialogue. On the basis of technical feasibility, research value and public communication capacity, we conclude that there is potential for further refinement of the methodologies presented here. Copyright ?? 2008 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

  17. Investigating Knowledge and Sources of Scientific Information of University Students and Lifelong Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; Impey, Chris; Romine, James; Nieberding, Megan

    2015-08-01

    Using 25 years of data, we have been conducting a long-term study of undergraduate students’ science literacy. Based on questions developed for the National Science Board’s survey of the US public, we have gathered data from students enrolled in astronomy courses to help us understand their basic science knowledge as well as attitudes towards and beliefs about science. Science literacy of students in this study has remained relatively unchanged over a quarter of a century. Additionally, students’ beliefs and attitudes were associated with their overall knowledge in science. Less predictive were their self-reported majors, year in school, and number of college science courses taken. Students in this study consistently outperformed the general public surveyed by the NSB.Three years ago we broadened to our study to include an investigation of where students get their information about science and what sources they believe are the most and least reliable for that information. This past year, we have collected parallel data from lifelong learners from around the globe enrolled in a Massively Open Online Course (MOOC) in astronomy, 70% of this audience lives outside the US and represent 170 countries. We will present results of these new studies of almost 700 undergraduate students and over 2500 lifelong learners. Overall, the lifelong learners possess a greater interest in science and better knowledge in science despite less overall college science course experience. Using online sources of scientific information were prevalent for both traditional college students and lifelong learners, although there were distinct differences between how different groups of learners perceived the reliability of online information. We will discuss the implications of teaching science in both traditional in-person college classes and in online learning environments as sources of scientific information and information literacy.This material is based upon work supported by the

  18. Knowledge engineering tools for reasoning with scientific observations and interpretations: a neural connectivity use case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bota Mihail

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We address the goal of curating observations from published experiments in a generalizable form; reasoning over these observations to generate interpretations and then querying this interpreted knowledge to supply the supporting evidence. We present web-application software as part of the 'BioScholar' project (R01-GM083871 that fully instantiates this process for a well-defined domain: using tract-tracing experiments to study the neural connectivity of the rat brain. Results The main contribution of this work is to provide the first instantiation of a knowledge representation for experimental observations called 'Knowledge Engineering from Experimental Design' (KEfED based on experimental variables and their interdependencies. The software has three parts: (a the KEfED model editor - a design editor for creating KEfED models by drawing a flow diagram of an experimental protocol; (b the KEfED data interface - a spreadsheet-like tool that permits users to enter experimental data pertaining to a specific model; (c a 'neural connection matrix' interface that presents neural connectivity as a table of ordinal connection strengths representing the interpretations of tract-tracing data. This tool also allows the user to view experimental evidence pertaining to a specific connection. BioScholar is built in Flex 3.5. It uses Persevere (a noSQL database as a flexible data store and PowerLoom® (a mature First Order Logic reasoning system to execute queries using spatial reasoning over the BAMS neuroanatomical ontology. Conclusions We first introduce the KEfED approach as a general approach and describe its possible role as a way of introducing structured reasoning into models of argumentation within new models of scientific publication. We then describe the design and implementation of our example application: the BioScholar software. This is presented as a possible biocuration interface and supplementary reasoning toolkit for a larger

  19. Intestinal microbiota transplant – current state of knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has induced a lot scientific interest and hopes for the last couple of years. FMT has been approved as a treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis. Highly sophisticated molecular DNA identification methods have been used to assess the healthy human microbiome as well as its disturbances in several diseases. The metabolic and immunologic functions of the microbiome have become more clear and understandable. A lot of pathological changes, such ...

  20. A decade of human genome project conclusion: Scientific diffusion about our genome knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Fernanda; Góes, Andréa

    2016-05-06

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) was initiated in 1990 and completed in 2003. It aimed to sequence the whole human genome. Although it represented an advance in understanding the human genome and its complexity, many questions remained unanswered. Other projects were launched in order to unravel the mysteries of our genome, including the ENCyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE). This review aims to analyze the evolution of scientific knowledge related to both the HGP and ENCODE projects. Data were retrieved from scientific articles published in 1990-2014, a period comprising the development and the 10 years following the HGP completion. The fact that only 20,000 genes are protein and RNA-coding is one of the most striking HGP results. A new concept about the organization of genome arose. The ENCODE project was initiated in 2003 and targeted to map the functional elements of the human genome. This project revealed that the human genome is pervasively transcribed. Therefore, it was determined that a large part of the non-protein coding regions are functional. Finally, a more sophisticated view of chromatin structure emerged. The mechanistic functioning of the genome has been redrafted, revealing a much more complex picture. Besides, a gene-centric conception of the organism has to be reviewed. A number of criticisms have emerged against the ENCODE project approaches, raising the question of whether non-conserved but biochemically active regions are truly functional. Thus, HGP and ENCODE projects accomplished a great map of the human genome, but the data generated still requires further in depth analysis. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44:215-223, 2016.

  1. A new method of CCD dark current correction via extracting the dark information from scientific images

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Bin; Hu, Yi; Liu, Qiang; Wang, Lifan; Wei, Peng

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a new method to correct dark current at relatively high temperatures for Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) images when dark frames cannot be obtained on the telescope. For images taken with the Antarctic Survey Telescopes (AST3) in 2012, due to the low cooling efficiency, the median CCD temperature was -46$^\\circ$C, resulting in a high dark current level of about 3$e^-$/pix/sec, even comparable to the sky brightness (10$e^-$/pix/sec). If not corrected, the nonuniformity of the dark current could even overweight the photon noise of the sky background. However, dark frames could not be obtained during the observing season because the camera was operated in frame-transfer mode without a shutter, and the telescope was unattended in winter. Here we present an alternative, but simple and effective method to derive the dark current frame from the scientific images. Then we can scale this dark frame to the temperature at which the scientific images were taken, and apply the dark frame corrections to the s...

  2. Knowledge visualization currents from text to art to culture

    CERN Document Server

    Marchese, Francis T

    2012-01-01

    Presents the state of the art in visualization research and development Highlights research developing at key intersections with other disciplines and its applicability to addressing complex real-world problems Discusses how visualization researchers are addressing complex issues of representation in knowledge, art, and culture

  3. Knowledge first, critique later: why it is a mistake for science education to encourage junior students to discuss, challenge and debate scientific knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2010-02-01

    In UK educational circles it has long been regarded as a platitude that a good scientific education at school and undergraduate level should aim to teach critical thinking and encourage students to challenge mainstream science, debate scientific issues and express their personal opinions. However, I believe that this strategy is usually mistaken, and that such educational strategies probably do more harm than good. For most students, at most levels, for most of the time; science education should be focused on the inculcation of established knowledge. This is for the simple reason that critique is educationally-counterproductive and scientifically-worthless unless or until underpinned by adequate knowledge and competence. Instead, for the early years of science teaching, the basic assumption ought to be that the student is there to learn science; not to confront science. The basic attitude being taught should be one of humility before the science being studied.

  4. Synthesis of current knowledge on post-fire seeding for soil stabilization and invasive species control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyers, Jan L.; Pyke, David A.; Wirth, Troy

    2015-01-01

    The General Accounting Office has identified a need for better information on the effectiveness of post-fire emergency stabilization and rehabilitation methods used by the U.S. Forest Service and Department of Interior (DOI) agencies. Since reviews were published on treatment effectiveness in the early 2000s, treatment choices have changed and increased monitoring has been done. Greater use of native species has added substantially to burned area emergency response (BAER) treatment costs, for example, but quantitative data on this treatment were scarce in earlier reviews. We synthesized current information on the effectiveness of post-fire seeding for both soil stabilization and for prevention of the spread of invasive species in rangelands. We reviewed published literature (peer-reviewed and “gray”) and agency monitoring reports, as well as compiled and analyzed quantitative data in agency files. Products of this review include a web-accessible database of monitoring reports and published information, a scientific journal paper summarizing findings of scientific studies, an annotated bibliography of peer-reviewed papers, a summary report published as a General Technical Report that will be available online (in progress), and presentations to scientific meetings and BAER/ESR team training sessions and workshops. By combining results from studies done by Forest Service and DOI agency personnel with research studies published since the initial reviews, we presented a comprehensive synthesis of seeding effectiveness knowledge that complements the review of other hillslope treatments published by other researchers. This information will help federal land managers make more cost-effective decisions on post-fire stabilization and rehabilitation treatments.

  5. Birds of Pernambuco: Current state of ornithological knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmar Beserra de Farias

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of the present state of ornithological knowledge is required for the guidance of researchers in their future investigations. This work provides a survey of literature describing the development of ornithological research in the state. Between 1880 and 2008, many lists were organized, which contributed towards the systematization of the knowledge about Pernambuco’s birds. Out if the 535 species recorded, 49 are found in marine environments or wetlands, 450 occur in the Atlantic Rainforest, and 270 reside in the semi-arid Caatinga. We suggest that studies on the birds of the Caatinga are most important and should be prioritized at present, in addition to effective actions for the conservation of endemic species and of species under risk of extinction.

  6. Current and future trends in metagenomics : Development of knowledge bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Hiroshi; Yamada, Takuji; Kurokawa, Ken

    Microbes are essential for every part of life on Earth. Numerous microbes inhabit the biosphere, many of which are uncharacterized or uncultivable. They form a complex microbial community that deeply affects against surrounding environments. Metagenome analysis provides a radically new way of examining such complex microbial community without isolation or cultivation of individual bacterial community members. In this article, we present a brief discussion about a metagenomics and the development of knowledge bases, and also discuss about the future trends in metagenomics.

  7. Methane hydrates in nature - Current knowledge and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated effort, the United States Congress enacted the Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000. At the same time, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry in Japan launched a research program to develop plans for a methane hydrate exploratory drilling project in the Nankai Trough. India, China, the Republic of Korea, and other nations also have established large methane hydrate research and development programs. Government-funded scientific research drilling expeditions and production test studies have provided a wealth of information on the occurrence of methane hydrates in nature. Numerous studies have shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world may exceed the volume of known organic carbon sources. However, methane hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge, and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of methane hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various methane hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural methane hydrates, (5) analyzing the methane hydrate role as a geohazard, (6) establishing the means to detect and characterize methane hydrate accumulations using geologic and geophysical data, and (7) establishing the thermodynamic phase equilibrium properties of methane hydrates as a function of temperature, pressure, and gas composition. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership (COL) combined their efforts in 2012 to assess the contributions that scientific drilling has made and could continue to make to advance

  8. THE KNOWLEDGE SOCIETY AND THE INFORMATION SOCIETY. THE CURRENT SITUATION IN ROMANIA

    OpenAIRE

    STELIAC Nela; POP Ciprian-Viorel; Diana-Aderina MOISUC

    2012-01-01

    Currently, human societies are experiencing a new type of economy: the knowledge economy which is founded on a knowledge society. The main driver of social and economic growth is knowledge itself. The new economy requires a rethinking of the production theory in that traditional factors change into secondary factors, while knowledge becomes the main, essential, production factor. An information society is a prerequisite stage towards a knowledge society; hence it needs to be implemented first...

  9. Bridging the Gap between Scientific and Indigenous knowledge to Better Understand Social Impacts of Changing Rainfall Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, A. H.; Joachim, L.; Zhu, X.; Hammer, C.; Harris, M.; Griggs, D.

    2011-12-01

    The Murray-Darling Basin incorporates Australia's three longest rivers and is important for an agricultural industry worth more than $9 billion per annum, a rich biodiversity of habitat and species, and the very life of its traditional owners. The complex and sometimes enigmatic relationships between modes of variability and Australian regional rainfall distribution means that reliable projections of future water availability remain highly uncertain. Persistent drought, with associated heat stress and high fire danger, and episodic flooding rains present further challenges. Indeed, recent extremes likely herald a tipping point for the communities and ecosystems that rely on the river system. The Barmah-Millewa region in the Murray-Darling Basin is the heart of Yorta Yorta Traditional Tribal Lands. The Yorta Yorta continue to assert their inherent rights to country and have shown through oral, documentary and material evidence, that their social, spiritual, economic and cultural links with country have never been broken. Current water policy and practice, highly contested community consultation processes, cross-border governance issues and a changing social landscape create in this region a microcosm for understanding the complex demands of economic, environmental and cultural security along the Murray-Darling Basin as the climate changes. New approaches to bridging the gap between scientific and Indigenous epistemologies have emerged in recent years, including for example ecosystem-based adaptation (Vignola et al. 2009) and the analysis of cultural water flows (Weir 2010). The potential for innovation using these approaches has informed a study that investigates how the deep knowledge of country of the Yorta Yorta people can be combined with state of the art climate science to develop a better understanding of the competing demands on water resources in the Barmah-Millewa region now and in the future. An important dimension of this collaborative work with the Yorta

  10. Combining social policy and scientific knowledge with stakeholder participation can benefit on salted grassland production in Northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Deli; Yang, Zhiming; Wang, Ling; Sun, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Soil salinization is a serious environmental problem across the Eurasian steppes, where millions people have been living for at least five thousand years and will still depend on it in the near future. During the last several decades, ecologists and grassland scientists have done much research on rational grassland utilization avoiding land degradation and reduction in ecological services. Meanwhile, the central and local governments took some attempts of agricultural policy and ecological subsidy to mitigate large scale land salinization in Northeast China. Fortunately, more and more farmers and stakeholders begin to adopt rational grassland management with the guidance of scientists and the help of local governments. However, up to date, there is still a gap between farmers, scientists and governments, which often negatively affect grassland production and remission of soil salinization in these areas. We conducted a case study on sustainable grassland production adapted to steppe salinization funded by EC project from 2011 to 2013. Our goal is trying to establish a mode of adaptive grassland management integrating previous scientific knowledge (grazing and seeding), current agricultural policies (ecological subsidy) and stakeholders' participation or performance. The study showed that: A. Despite of some grassland utilization techniques available for stakeholders (regulating stocking rate and seeding in pastures, or planting high quality forages), they tended to take the simplest action to enhance animal production and prevent grassland salinization; B. Compared to educating or training stakeholders, demonstration of grazing management is the most effective mean for knowledge dissemination or technology transfer; C. Ecological subsidy is absolutely welcome to the local people, and technology transfer became easier when combined with ecological subsidy; D. There was a contrasting effect in grassland production and land degradation mitigation for experimental farm

  11. A Systematic Review of Athletes’ and Coaches’ Nutrition Knowledge and Reflections on the Quality of Current Nutrition Knowledge Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trakman, Gina L.; Forsyth, Adrienne; Devlin, Brooke L.; Belski, Regina

    2016-01-01

    Context: Nutrition knowledge can influence dietary choices and impact on athletic performance. Valid and reliable measures are needed to assess the nutrition knowledge of athletes and coaches. Objectives: (1) To systematically review the published literature on nutrition knowledge of adult athletes and coaches and (2) to assess the quality of measures used to assess nutrition knowledge. Data Sources: MEDLINE, CINAHL, SPORTDiscuss, Web of Science, and SCOPUS. Study Selection: 36 studies that provided a quantitative measure of nutrition knowledge and described the measurement tool that was used were included. Data extraction: Participant description, questionnaire description, results (mean correct and responses to individual items), study quality, and questionnaire quality. Data synthesis: All studies were of neutral quality. Tools used to measure knowledge did not consider health literacy, were outdated with regards to consensus recommendations, and lacked appropriate and adequate validation. The current status of nutrition knowledge in athletes and coaches is difficult to ascertain. Gaps in knowledge also remain unclear, but it is likely that energy density, the need for supplementation, and the role of protein are frequently misunderstood. Conclusions: Previous reports of nutrition knowledge need to be interpreted with caution. A new, universal, up-to-date, validated measure of general and sports nutrition knowledge is required to allow for assessment of nutrition knowledge. PMID:27649242

  12. A Systematic Review of Athletes’ and Coaches’ Nutrition Knowledge and Reflections on the Quality of Current Nutrition Knowledge Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina L. Trakman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Context: Nutrition knowledge can influence dietary choices and impact on athletic performance. Valid and reliable measures are needed to assess the nutrition knowledge of athletes and coaches. Objectives: (1 To systematically review the published literature on nutrition knowledge of adult athletes and coaches and (2 to assess the quality of measures used to assess nutrition knowledge. Data Sources: MEDLINE, CINAHL, SPORTDiscuss, Web of Science, and SCOPUS. Study Selection: 36 studies that provided a quantitative measure of nutrition knowledge and described the measurement tool that was used were included. Data extraction: Participant description, questionnaire description, results (mean correct and responses to individual items, study quality, and questionnaire quality. Data synthesis: All studies were of neutral quality. Tools used to measure knowledge did not consider health literacy, were outdated with regards to consensus recommendations, and lacked appropriate and adequate validation. The current status of nutrition knowledge in athletes and coaches is difficult to ascertain. Gaps in knowledge also remain unclear, but it is likely that energy density, the need for supplementation, and the role of protein are frequently misunderstood. Conclusions: Previous reports of nutrition knowledge need to be interpreted with caution. A new, universal, up-to-date, validated measure of general and sports nutrition knowledge is required to allow for assessment of nutrition knowledge.

  13. Gaps in scientific knowledge about the carcinogenic potential of asphalt/bitumen fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Paul A

    2007-01-01

    Despite a relatively large body of published research, the potential carcinogenicity of asphalt/bitumen fumes is still a vexing question. Various uncertainties and gaps in scientific knowledge need to be addressed. These include uncertainties in chemistry, animal studies, and human studies. The chemistry of asphalt/bitumen fumes is complex and varies according to the source of the crude oil and the application parameters. The epidemiological studies, while showing weak evidence of lung cancer, are inconsistent and many confounding factors have not been addressed. Studies of animal exposure are also inconsistent regarding laboratory and field-generated fumes. There is a need for further human studies that address potential confounding factors such as smoking, diet, coal tar, and diesel exposures. Animal inhalation studies need to be conducted with asphalt/bitumen fumes that are chemically representative of roofing and paving fumes. Underlying all of this is the need for continued characterization of fumes so their use in animal and field studies can be properly assessed. Nonetheless, uncertainties such as these should not preclude appropriate public health actions to protect workers in the even that asphalt fumes are found to be a carcinogenic hazard.

  14. Intestinal microbiota transplant – current state of knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radomski, Marek; Leszczyszyn, Anna Maria

    2016-01-01

    Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has induced a lot scientific interest and hopes for the last couple of years. FMT has been approved as a treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis. Highly sophisticated molecular DNA identification methods have been used to assess the healthy human microbiome as well as its disturbances in several diseases. The metabolic and immunologic functions of the microbiome have become more clear and understandable. A lot of pathological changes, such as production of short-chain fatty acids or components of the inflammatory cascade, caused by changes in microbiome diversity, variability and richness have been observed among patients suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases, irritable bowel syndrome, type 2 diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis. The published clinical results are encouraging, but still there is huge demand for FMT controlled clinical trials. PMID:27407273

  15. Historical and cultural aspects of the pineal gland: comparison between the theories provided by Spiritism in the 1940s and the current scientific evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchetti, Giancarlo; Daher, Jorge C; Iandoli, Decio; Gonçalves, Juliane P B; Lucchetti, Alessandra L G

    2013-01-01

    Significance has been attached to the pineal gland in numerous different cultures and beliefs. One religion that has advanced the role of the pineal gland is Spiritism. The objective of the present study was to compile information on the pineal gland drawing on the books of Francisco Cândido Xavier written through psychography and to carry out a critical analysis of their scientific bases by comparing against evidence in the current scientific literature. A systematic search using the terms "pineal gland" and "epiphysis" was conducted of 12 works allegedly dictated by the spirit "André Luiz". All information on the pineal having potential correlation with the field of medicine and current studies was included. Specialists in the area were recruited to compile the information and draw parallels with the scientific literature. The themes related to the pineal gland were: mental health, reproductive function, endocrinology, relationship with physical activity, spiritual connection, criticism of the theory that the organ exerts no function, and description of a hormone secreted by the gland (reference alluding to melatonin, isolated 13 years later). The historical background for each theme was outlined, together with the theories present in the Spiritist books and in the relevant scientific literature. The present article provides an analysis of the knowledge the scientific community can acquire from the history of humanity and from science itself. The process of formulating hypotheses and scientific theories can benefit by drawing on the cultural aspects of civilization, taking into account so-called non-traditional reports and theories.

  16. [Current state of the scientific activity of the Aachen group concerning number processing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlfs-Domínguez, P

    The research group from Willmes and colleagues is one of the most advanced research groups in cognitive neuroscience. The use and nature of the numeric magnitude representation constitutes one of the study objects of the mentioned research group. This mental representation provokes a great controversy among the members of the scientific community studying number processing and arithmetic. As a consequence, there are several different theoretical models concerning number processing. In this work, we have reviewed some of the scientific studies realized by the Aachen group concerning number processing, with the aim to expound the current state of its activity. In the works from Willmes and colleagues, we can notice a logic sequence, regarding the formulation of work hypothesis. The course of evolution of their activity starts studying number processing and arithmetic on German listener population and continues with a progressive integration of the German deaf population into their work. There is, as well, an emergent trend in this group to research number processing at the classroom. This means to examine the underlying mental representations in the education field. The information included in the studies analyzed here, leads to several scientific questions which need to be researched in future studies, and questions and complements what has been supported by other research groups.

  17. Cancer Treatment-Related Cardiotoxicity: Understanding the Current State of Knowledge and Developing Future Research Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer Treatment-Related Cardiotoxicity: Understanding the Current State of Knowledge and Developing Future Research Priorities, a 2013 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  18. Concussions: What a neurosurgeon should know about current scientific evidence and management strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Matthew T.; Wilson, Jonathan L.; Hsu, Wesley; Powers, Alexander K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: There has been a tremendous amount of interest focused on the topic of concussions over the past few decades. Neurosurgeons are frequently consulted to manage patients with mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) that have radiographic evidence of cerebral injury. These injuries share significant overlap with concussions, injuries that typically do not reveal radiographic evidence of structural injury, in the realms of epidemiology, pathophysiology, outcomes, and management. Further, neurosurgeons often manage patients with extracranial injuries that have concomitant concussions. In these cases, neurosurgeons are often the only “concussion experts” that patients encounter. Results: The literature has been reviewed and data have been synthesized on the topic including sections on historical background, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnostic advances, clinical sequelae, and treatment suggestions, with neurosurgeons as the intended target audience. Conclusions: Neurosurgeons should have a fundamental knowledge of the scientific evidence that has developed regarding concussions and be prepared to guide patients with treatment plans. PMID:22439107

  19. Medical ozone is now ready for a scientific challenge: current status and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregorio Martinez-Sanchez

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present review is to clarify some of the basic mechanisms underlying ozone therapy. Indeed, after its empiric use started at the beginning of the last century, science is now ready to give a chance to the more and more medical doctors working in this field. Unfortunately, the lack of a full recognition by the health authorities and some ostracism against it is, up to date, the major obstacle for its full medical acceptance. Anyway, in the last years and thanks to the contributions of several scientists, most of the mechanisms characterizing the bio-humoral activity of ozone have been scientifically outlined. The built up of randomized clinical studies is going on slowly despite the lack of funds and the difficulties bound mainly to the huge variability of the ozone action. The thousand and thousand medical doctors involved in the use of ozone as emerging therapy, must be fully educated about the properties of this gas in the aim to counteract scientifically the criticisms of colleagues devoted to other field of medicine and not expert of the ozone pharmacological properties. Is for this reason that we encourage all the professionals to deeply increase the knowledge related to the scientific data produced and published on the international literatures in the field of the ozone therapy. For the future we suggest the use of ozone not in alternative but as a complement of the most appropriate pharmacological treatments also in the aim to reduce some side effects derived from a chronic drug use. The lack of a well-defined binding site for the ozone molecule could suggest the introduction of virtual receptors for the supposed biological activity of ozone acting mostly throughout second messengers pathways. [J Exp Integr Med 2012; 2(3.000: 193-196

  20. The Effect of Project-Based History and Nature of Science Practices on the Change of Nature of Scientific Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çibik, Ayse Sert

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the change of pre-service science teachers' views about the nature of scientific knowledge through Project-Based History and Nature of Science training and Conventional Method. The sample of the study consists of two groups of 3rd grade undergraduate students attending teacher preparation program of science…

  1. How Historical Experiments Can Improve Scientific Knowledge and Science Education: The Cases of Boiling Water and Electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hasok

    2011-01-01

    I advance some novel arguments for the use of historical experiments in science education. After distinguishing three different types of historical experiments and their general purposes, I define "complementary experiments", which can recover lost scientific knowledge and extend what has been recovered. Complementary experiments can help science…

  2. How Historical Experiments Can Improve Scientific Knowledge and Science Education: The Cases of Boiling Water and Electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hasok

    2011-01-01

    I advance some novel arguments for the use of historical experiments in science education. After distinguishing three different types of historical experiments and their general purposes, I define "complementary experiments", which can recover lost scientific knowledge and extend what has been recovered. Complementary experiments can help science…

  3. Subglacial Lake Whillans microbial biogeochemistry: a synthesis of current knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikucki, J A; Lee, P A; Ghosh, D; Purcell, A M; Mitchell, A C; Mankoff, K D; Fisher, A T; Tulaczyk, S; Carter, S; Siegfried, M R; Fricker, H A; Hodson, T; Coenen, J; Powell, R; Scherer, R; Vick-Majors, T; Achberger, A A; Christner, B C; Tranter, M

    2016-01-28

    Liquid water occurs below glaciers and ice sheets globally, enabling the existence of an array of aquatic microbial ecosystems. In Antarctica, large subglacial lakes are present beneath hundreds to thousands of metres of ice, and scientific interest in exploring these environments has escalated over the past decade. After years of planning, the first team of scientists and engineers cleanly accessed and retrieved pristine samples from a West Antarctic subglacial lake ecosystem in January 2013. This paper reviews the findings to date on Subglacial Lake Whillans and presents new supporting data on the carbon and energy metabolism of resident microbes. The analysis of water and sediments from the lake revealed a diverse microbial community composed of bacteria and archaea that are close relatives of species known to use reduced N, S or Fe and CH4 as energy sources. The water chemistry of Subglacial Lake Whillans was dominated by weathering products from silicate minerals with a minor influence from seawater. Contributions to water chemistry from microbial sulfide oxidation and carbonation reactions were supported by genomic data. Collectively, these results provide unequivocal evidence that subglacial environments in this region of West Antarctica host active microbial ecosystems that participate in subglacial biogeochemical cycling.

  4. Immunotherapies Targeting Fish Mucosal Immunity - Current Knowledge and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshio, Shunsuke

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, studies on the mucosal immunity in fish species have shown much progress. Although there are some organs such as skin, gills, and gut are directly associated with the mucosal immunity of fish species, this mini review emphasizes the general knowledge on the role and production figures of skin mucus and factors affecting the secretion of skin mucus of fish species. As the skin mucus of fish species is the first defense line for protection against invading microorganisms such as pathogens (bacteria, virus), parasites, etc., the information for understanding the roles of the skin mucus is very important. Furthermore, the information in the review will shed light on the development of high quality aquafeeds for the sustainable aquaculture field as well.

  5. Climate change and respiratory health: current evidence and knowledge gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaro, Tim K; Knowlton, Kim; Balmes, John R

    2013-08-01

    Climate change is a key driver of the accelerating environmental change affecting populations around the world. Many of these changes and our response to them can affect respiratory health. This is an expert opinion review of recent peer-reviewed literature, focused on more recent medical journals and climate-health relevant modeling results from non-biomedical journals pertaining to climate interactions with air pollution. Global health impacts in low resource countries and migration precipitated by environmental change are addressed. The major findings are of respiratory health effects related to heat, air pollution, shifts in infectious diseases and allergens, flooding, water, food security and migration. The review concludes with knowledge gaps and research need that will support the evidence-base required to address the challenges ahead.

  6. CURRENT SCENARIO: KNOWLEDGE OF BASIC LIFE SUPPORT IN MEDICAL COLLEGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmita Chaudhary

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A workshop has been conducted on basic skill of Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR among doctors and nursing staff in medical college. Theoretical aspect was explained through power point presentation whereas practical aspect was demonstrated through skill station. The results were analyzed by using an answer key prepared from BLS manual of American Heart Association (AHA. Out of 117 participants only three participants secured 80-90% marks in pretest whereas rest of secured less than 50% marks .Post workshop assessment was done with same question papers showed 70% candidates securing more than 80%. Hence BLS workshop is essential to improve knowledge and skill of CPR. [National J of Med Res 2011; 1(2.000: 80-82

  7. Arrhythmogenic KCNE gene variants: current knowledge and future challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn M Crump

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are twenty-five known inherited cardiac arrhythmia susceptibility genes, all of which encode either ion channel pore-forming subunits or proteins that regulate aspects of ion channel biology such as function, trafficking and localization. The human KCNE gene family comprises five potassium channel regulatory subunits, sequence variants in each of which are associated with cardiac arrhythmias. KCNE gene products exhibit promiscuous partnering and in some cases ubiquitous expression, hampering efforts to unequivocally correlate each gene to specific native potassium currents. Likewise, deducing the molecular etiology of cardiac arrhythmias in individuals harboring rare KCNE gene variants, or more common KCNE polymorphisms, can be challenging. In this review we provide an update on putative arrhythmia-causing KCNE gene variants, and discuss current thinking and future challenges in the study of molecular mechanisms of KCNE-associated cardiac rhythm disturbances.

  8. Compatibility and complementarity of indigenous and scientific knowl-edge of wild plants in the highlands of southwest Saudi Arabia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.K.Hegazy; A.A.Alatar; J.Thomas; M.Faisal; A.H.Alfarhan; K.Krzywinski

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a survey of wild plants commonly used by local inhabitants in the highlands of southwest Saudi Arabia. Based upon literature review, direct observation of local inhabitants, and question-naire interviews, 36 plant species were assessed and given scores ac-cording to their use. The gaps between scientific and indigenous knowl-edge on the use of plants were estimated using a“compatibility ratio”. The score values were estimated based on seven different use categories of ecosystem services, including food, forage, medicine, wood, beekeeping, research, and education. Additional structural categories include source of materials, shade, hedges, ornamental plantings, and soil stabilization. There are discrepancies between indigenous knowledge (IK) and scien-tific knowledge (SK) but in most cases, SK of the species supports the IK and plant users preference. The results also provide information that challenges assumptions about the consistency of IK with SK. Our study highlights the importance of understanding the cultural context and uses of wild plants. Biodiversity-based knowledge holds promise for contrib-uting to sustainable use of wild plant resources and related traditions. The success of such endeavours depends on the compatibility and comple-mentarity of indigenous and scientific knowledge.

  9. The National Center for Biomedical Ontology: Advancing Biomedicinethrough Structured Organization of Scientific Knowledge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Daniel L.; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Mungall, Chris J.; Misra,Sima; Westerfield, Monte; Ashburner, Michael; Sim, Ida; Chute,Christopher G.; Solbrig, Harold; Storey, Margaret-Anne; Smith, Barry; Day-Richter, John; Noy, Natalya F.; Musen, Mark A.

    2006-01-23

    The National Center for Biomedical Ontology (http://bioontology.org) is a consortium that comprises leading informaticians, biologists, clinicians, and ontologists funded by the NIH Roadmap to develop innovative technology and methods that allow scientists to record, manage, and disseminate biomedical information and knowledge in machine-processable form. The goals of the Center are: (1) to help unify the divergent and isolated efforts in ontology development by promoting high quality open-source, standards-based tools to create, manage, and use ontologies, (2) to create new software tools so that scientists can use ontologies to annotate and analyze biomedical data, (3) to provide a national resource for the ongoing evaluation, integration, and evolution of biomedical ontologies and associated tools and theories in the context of driving biomedical projects (DBPs), and (4) to disseminate the tools and resources of the Center and to identify, evaluate, and communicate best practices of ontology development to the biomedical community. The Center is working toward these objectives by providing tools to develop ontologies and to annotate experimental data, and by developing resources to integrate and relate existing ontologies as well as by creating repositories of biomedical data that are annotated using those ontologies. The Center is providing training workshops in ontology design, development, and usage, and is also pursuing research in ontology evaluation, quality, and use of ontologies to promote scientific discovery. Through the research activities within the Center, collaborations with the DBPs, and interactions with the biomedical community, our goal is to help scientists to work more effectively in the e-science paradigm, enhancing experiment design, experiment execution, data analysis, information synthesis, hypothesis generation and testing, and understand human disease.

  10. From "sit and listen" to "shake it out yourself": Helping urban middle school students to bridge personal knowledge to scientific knowledge through a collaborative environmental justice curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeh, Shamu Fenyvesi

    Science education and environmental education are not meeting the needs of marginalized communities such as urban, minority, and poor communities (Seller, 2001; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA], 1996). There exists an equity gap characterized by the racial and socioeconomic disparities in: levels of participation in scientific and environmental careers and environmental organizations (Lewis & James, 1995; Sheppard, 1995), access to appropriate environmental education programs (U.S. EPA, 1996), exposure to environmental toxins (Bullard, 1993), access to environmental amenities and legal protections (Bullard, 1993), and in grades and standardized test scores in K-12 science (Jencks & Phillips, 1998; Johnston & Viadero, 2000). Researchers point to the cultural divide between home and school culture as one of the reasons for the equity gap in science education (Barton, 2003; Delpit, 1995; Seiler, 2001). This study is designed to address the equity gap by helping students connect personal/cultural knowledge to scientific knowledge. A collaborative action research study was conducted in 8th-grade science classrooms of low-income African American and Latino students. The participating teacher and the researcher developed, enacted and evaluated a curriculum that elicited students' personal and cultural knowledge in the investigation of local community issues. Using qualitative methods, data were collected through student and teacher interviews, observation, and written documents. Data were analyzed to answer questions on student participation and learning, bridging between personal and scientific knowledge, and student empowerment. The most compelling themes from the data were described as parts of three stories: tensions between the empire of school and the small student nation, bridging between the two nations, and students gaining empowerment. This study found that the bridging the curriculum intended was successful in that many students brought personal

  11. Current knowledge on diabetic retinopathy from humandonor tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jessica H Eisma; Jennifer E Dulle; Patrice E Fort

    2015-01-01

    According to the American Diabetes Association, diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death, and diabetic retinopathy the leading cause of blindness in working age adults in the United States in 2010. Diabetes is characterized by hyperglycemia associated with either hypoinsulinemia or insulin resistance, and over time, this chronic metabolic condition may lead to various complications including kidney failure, heart attacks,and retinal degeneration. In order to better understandthe molecular basis of this disease and its complications,animal models have been the primary approach usedto investigate the effects of diabetes on various tissuesor cell types of the body, including the retina. However,inherent to these animal models are critical limitationsthat make the insight gained from these modelschallenging to apply to the human pathology. Thesedifficulties in translating the knowledge obtained fromanimal studies have led a growing number of researchgroups to explore the diabetes complications, especiallydiabetic retinopathy, on tissues from human donors.This review summarizes the data collected from diabeticpatients at various stages of diabetic retinopathy andclassifies the data based upon their relevance to themain aspects of diabetic retinopathy: retinal vasculaturedysfunction, inflammation, and neurodegeneration. Thisreview discusses the importance of those studies todiscriminate and establish the relevance of the findingsobtained from animal models but also the limitations ofsuch approaches.

  12. Vitamin K metabolism: current knowledge and future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Card, David J; Gorska, Renata; Cutler, Jacky; Harrington, Dominic J

    2014-08-01

    Vitamin K is an essential fat-soluble micronutrient that is required for the post-translational γ-carboxylation of specific glutamic acid residues in hepatic and extra-hepatic proteins involved in blood coagulation and preventing cartilage and vasculature calcification. In humans, sources of vitamin K are derived from plants as phylloquinone and bacteria as the menaquinones. Menadione is a synthetic product used as a pharmaceutical but also represents an intermediate in the tissue-specific conversion of vitamin K to menaquinone-4, which preferentially resides in tissues such as brain. Research into vitamin K metabolism is essential for the understanding of vitamin K biology in health and disease. Progress in this area, driven by knowledge of vitamin K and the availability of markers of vitamin K status, has already proved beneficial in many areas of medicine and further opportunities present themselves. Areas of interest discussed in this review include prophylactic administration of vitamin K1 in term and preterm neonates, interactions between vitamins K and E, the industrial conversion of vitamin K to dihydro-vitamin K in foods, tissue-specific conversion of vitamin K to menaquinone-4, the biological activity of the five and seven carbon metabolites of vitamin K and circadian variations.

  13. Hybrid regimes of knowledge? Challenges for constructing scientific evidence in the context of the GMO-debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böschen, Stefan

    2009-07-01

    Over the last two decades, there has been a remarkable shift of attention to the scientific and political fundamentals of the precautionary principle. The application of this principle has become a main strategy of coping with the different forms and problems related to non-knowledge. Thus, societies are increasingly confronted with the challenging and hitherto unresolved problem of political and technological decision-making under conditions of diverging framings of non-knowledge. At present, there seems to be no generally accepted scientific or institutional approach. This is why the fundamental question of how different scientific actors define and construct evidence is not answered yet. Hence, this paper is based on the consideration that the conflicts in risk policy concerning genetically modified organisms (GMO) depend on the unresolved conflicts about the diverging scientific strategies and structures of evidence-making between the epistemic cultures involved. Thus, this study investigates two questions: (1) do the epistemic strategies of evidence-making differ systematically with the scientific actors involved in the GMO-debate? (2) What consequences emerge considering institutionalized procedures of decision-making? This article is based on a secondary analysis of findings and perspectives reported in the literature and on the methods of qualitative social empirical research, i.e., interviews with experts. A total number of 34 interviews were conducted to explore the different strategies of handling non-knowledge and constructing evidence. Actors from science, administration, business and NGOs were interviewed. In this way, typical epistemic cultures can be described. An epistemic culture is the constellation of methodological strategies, theoretical assumptions and practical-experimental settings which define in every speciality the ways how we know what we know. There are two main results. Firstly, it was worked out that the epistemic cultures involved

  14. The Effect of the "Weekly Reader" on Children's Knowledge of Current Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Carolyn Huie; Hofstetter, C. Richard; Lapp, Diane; Flood, James

    2000-01-01

    Studied the effects of reading the "Weekly Reader" on children's knowledge of current events. Results from 2,331 urban and suburban elementary school students, aged 8 to 12, show increased knowledge of current events among younger children who used the "Weekly Reader," but the effect was less in grades 4 through 6. (SLD)

  15. Prediction of severe acute pancreatitis: Current knowledge and novel insights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Georgios I Papachristou

    2008-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common and potentially lethal acute inflammatory process with a highly variable clinical course. It is still unclear why some patients progress to organ failure and others do not. Physicians, ability to predict which patients will develop severe disease is limited. Routine clinical and laboratory data and multi-factorial clinical scores measured on admission and during the first 48 h of hospitalization are currently the standards of care used to estimate the magnitude of the inflammatory response to injury. Current literature highlights several common environmental, metabolic and genetic factors that increase the risk of AP development and subsequent adverse sequelae. Several cytokines have been found to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of AP by driving the subsequent inflammatory response, to include tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), Interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (HCP-1). Large, prospective studies are still needed to address these questions by identifying AP risk factors and serum biomarkers of severe disease.

  16. STR allele sequence variation: Current knowledge and future issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettings, Katherine Butler; Aponte, Rachel A; Vallone, Peter M; Butler, John M

    2015-09-01

    This article reviews what is currently known about short tandem repeat (STR) allelic sequence variation in and around the twenty-four loci most commonly used throughout the world to perform forensic DNA investigations. These STR loci include D1S1656, TPOX, D2S441, D2S1338, D3S1358, FGA, CSF1PO, D5S818, SE33, D6S1043, D7S820, D8S1179, D10S1248, TH01, vWA, D12S391, D13S317, Penta E, D16S539, D18S51, D19S433, D21S11, Penta D, and D22S1045. All known reported variant alleles are compiled along with genomic information available from GenBank, dbSNP, and the 1000 Genomes Project. Supplementary files are included which provide annotated reference sequences for each STR locus, characterize genomic variation around the STR repeat region, and compare alleles present in currently available STR kit allelic ladders. Looking to the future, STR allele nomenclature options are discussed as they relate to next generation sequencing efforts underway.

  17. Anterior point of reference: Current knowledge and perspectives in prosthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prince Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The opening and closing mandibular axis is not a purely theoretical postulation, but an absolutely demonstrable biomechanical entity. It is very crucial to accurately record and transfer to articulators for the purpose of maxillofacial rehabilitation. Following the Face bow record and transfer of the mandibular axis to an anatomic articulator, we can then mount the casts so that they open and close on the articulator in the same fashion as the patient′s jaws. For this reason one of the fixed factors presented by the patient is taken into the consideration, which if properly considered, can be of inestimable value in all phases of dental treatment. This paper has sought to review the current concepts and practical implications regarding anterior point of reference in prosthodontics.

  18. Police peer support programs: current knowledge and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauwiler, Peggy; Barocas, Briana; Mills, Linda G

    2008-01-01

    This review examines the current empirical research and literature on peer assistance programs, peer support, and peer-facilitated interventions for police officers. A literature search was conducted to identify studies on police, peer support, and peer assistance programs. Studies were examined in terms of the following criteria: description of data collection methods, findings, study limitations, implications for police, workplace assistance, and peer support. Articles on peer support in the aftermath of the September 11, 2001, World Trade Center rescue and recovery efforts were also reviewed. The research studies reviewed in this article do not evaluate peer program effectiveness from the perspective of those officers receiving peer services. To better serve this invaluable population, efforts must be made to incorporate their views. Information is also needed on the effectiveness of peer assistance programs and peer-driven crisis intervention models. Finally, research is needed that specifically examines the effectiveness of programs that utilize trained peers in partnership with professional mental health practitioners.

  19. Cyberbullying Prevention and Intervention Efforts: Current Knowledge and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espelage, Dorothy L; Hong, Jun Sung

    2017-06-01

    Bullying is a serious public health concern that is associated with significant negative mental, social, and physical outcomes. Technological advances have increased adolescents' use of social media, and online communication platforms have exposed adolescents to another mode of bullying- cyberbullying. Prevention and intervention materials, from websites and tip sheets to classroom curriculum, have been developed to help youth, parents, and teachers address cyberbullying. While youth and parents are willing to disclose their experiences with bullying to their health care providers, these disclosures need to be taken seriously and handled in a caring manner. Health care providers need to include questions about bullying on intake forms to encourage these disclosures. The aim of this article is to examine the current status of cyberbullying prevention and intervention. Research support for several school-based intervention programs is summarised. Recommendations for future research are provided.

  20. Are iron oxide nanoparticles safe? Current knowledge and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Fernández-Bertólez, Natalia; Kiliç, Gözde; Costa, Carla; Costa, Solange; Fraga, Sonia; Bessa, Maria Joao; Pásaro, Eduardo; Teixeira, João Paulo; Laffon, Blanca

    2016-12-01

    Due to their unique physicochemical properties, including superparamagnetism, iron oxide nanoparticles (ION) have a number of interesting applications, especially in the biomedical field, that make them one of the most fascinating nanomaterials. They are used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, in targeted drug delivery, and for induced hyperthermia cancer treatments. Together with these valuable uses, concerns regarding the onset of unexpected adverse health effects following exposure have been also raised. Nevertheless, despite the numerous ION purposes being explored, currently available information on their potential toxicity is still scarce and controversial data have been reported. Although ION have traditionally been considered as biocompatible - mainly on the basis of viability tests results - influence of nanoparticle surface coating, size, or dose, and of other experimental factors such as treatment time or cell type, has been demonstrated to be important for ION in vitro toxicity manifestation. In vivo studies have shown distribution of ION to different tissues and organs, including brain after passing the blood-brain barrier; nevertheless results from acute toxicity, genotoxicity, immunotoxicity, neurotoxicity and reproductive toxicity investigations in different animal models do not provide a clear overview on ION safety yet, and epidemiological studies are almost inexistent. Much work has still to be done to fully understand how these nanomaterials interact with cellular systems and what, if any, potential adverse health consequences can derive from ION exposure.

  1. Pain in Neurodegenerative Disease: Current Knowledge and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina de Tommaso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are going to increase as the life expectancy is getting longer. The management of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD and other dementias, Parkinson’s disease (PD and PD related disorders, motor neuron diseases (MND, Huntington’s disease (HD, spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA, and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, is mainly addressed to motor and cognitive impairment, with special care to vital functions as breathing and feeding. Many of these patients complain of painful symptoms though their origin is variable, and their presence is frequently not considered in the treatment guidelines, leaving their management to the decision of the clinicians alone. However, studies focusing on pain frequency in such disorders suggest a high prevalence of pain in selected populations from 38 to 75% in AD, 40% to 86% in PD, and 19 to 85% in MND. The methods of pain assessment vary between studies so the type of pain has been rarely reported. However, a prevalent nonneuropathic origin of pain emerged for MND and PD. In AD, no data on pain features are available. No controlled therapeutic trials and guidelines are currently available. Given the relevance of pain in neurodegenerative disorders, the comprehensive understanding of mechanisms and predisposing factors, the application and validation of specific scales, and new specific therapeutic trials are needed.

  2. Oxytocin and Socioemotional Aging─Current Knowledge and Future Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie C. Ebner

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The oxytocin (OT system is involved in various aspects of social cognition and prosocial behavior. Specifically, OT has been examined in the context of social memory, emotion recognition, cooperation, trust, empathy, and bonding, and─though evidence is somewhat mixed─intranasal OT appears to benefit aspects of socioemotional functioning. However, most of the extant data on aging and OT is from animal research and human OT research has focused largely on young adults. As such, though we know that various socioemotional capacities change with age, we know little about whether age-related changes in the OT system may underlie age-related differences in socioemotional functioning. In this review, we take a genetic-neuro-behavioral approach and evaluate current evidence on age-related changes in the OT system as well as the putative effects of these alterations on age-related socioemotional functioning. Looking forward, we identify informational gaps and propose an Age-Related Genetic, Neurobiological, Sociobehavioral Model of Oxytocin (AGeNeS-OT model which may structure and inform investigations into aging-related genetic, neural, and sociocognitive processes related to OT. As an exemplar of the use of the model, we report exploratory data suggesting differences in socioemotional processing associated with genetic variation in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR in samples of young and older adults. Information gained from this arena has translational potential in depression, social stress, and anxiety─all of which have high relevance in aging─and may contribute to reducing social isolation and improving well-being of individuals across the lifespan.

  3. Scientific controversies on biological knowledge construction: investigating a continued formation course for teachers with respect for human biological evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Erdmann Bulla

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The research here presented has as central theme the human biological evolution, its scientific controversies and the continued formation of science and biology teachers. We evaluate the development of a teaching sequence on the topic, emphasizing the scientific controversy regarding the supposed fossil hominid Ardipithecus ramidus (“Ardi” in a continued formation course for teachers of science and biology of basic public network Cascavel-PR and region. The empirical work involved collecting data from the responses provided by teachers to an initial questionnaire and a final. The analysis and data discussion has highlighted the importance of scientific controversy for the development of scientific knowledge and the urgency to insert the contents of human evolution in subjects on the initial formation of courses in licentiate of Biological Sciences. It is necessary also to offer continued formation courses to include such content for teachers already inserted in schools. We conclude that teaching biology and science using scientific controversies may be in satisfactory teaching tool to introduce the history and nature of science, since scientific activity is permeated by conflicts.

  4. The Nature of What Teachers Know: Exploring Teacher Knowledge through Novel Scientific Metaphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jill Voorhies

    2009-01-01

    This essay explores the nature of what teachers know by examining trends in teacher knowledge research, specifically the use of conventional metaphors to describe teacher knowledge. Contending that conventional metaphors fail to acknowledge the complex and multidimensional nature of teacher knowledge, the author argues that novel metaphors should…

  5. Transmission routes of African swine fever virus to domestic pigs: current knowledge and future research directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinat, Claire; Gogin, Andrey; Blome, Sandra; Keil, Guenther; Pollin, Reiko; Pfeiffer, Dirk U; Dixon, Linda

    2016-03-12

    African swine fever (ASF) is a major threat to the pig industry in Europe. Since 2007, ASF outbreaks have been ongoing in the Caucasus, Eastern Europe and the Baltic countries, causing severe economic losses for many pig farmers and pork producers. In addition, the number of ASF cases in wild boar populations has dramatically increased over the past few years. Evidence supports direct contact with infectious domestic pigs and wild boars, and consumption of contaminated feed, as the main transmission routes of ASF virus (ASFV) to domestic pigs. However, significant knowledge gaps highlight the urgent need for research to investigate the dynamics of indirect transmission via the environment, the minimal infective doses for contaminated feed ingestion, the probability of effective contacts between infectious wild boars and domestic pigs, the potential for recovered animals to become carriers and a reservoir for transmission, the potential virus persistence within wild boar populations and the influence of human behaviour for the spread of ASFV. This will provide an improved scientific basis to optimise current interventions and develop new tools and strategies to reduce the risk of ASFV transmission to domestic pigs.

  6. Diagnosis and management of chronic pancreatitis: current knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammann, Rudolf W

    2006-03-18

    This paper reviews the current literature on chronic pancreatitis (CP). Despite marked progress in diagnostic tools, predominately imaging methods, no consensus has been reached on the nomenclature of CP, ie diagnosis, classification, staging, pathomechanisms of pain and its optimal treatment. A major problem is that no single reliable diagnostic test exists for early-stage CP except histopathology (rarely available). This stage is characterised typically by recurrent acute pancreatitis +/- necrosis (eg pseudocysts). Acute pancreatitis is a well-defined condition caused in 80% of cases by gallstones or alcohol abuse. Alcoholic pancreatitis, in contrast to biliary pancreatitis, progresses to CP in the majority of patients. However, a definite CP-diagnosis is often delayed because progressive dysfunction and/or calcification, the clinical markers of CP, develop on average 5 years from disease onset. The progression rate is variable and depends on several factors eg aetiology, smoking, continued alcohol abuse. Repeated function testing eg by the faecal elastase test, is the best alternative for histology to monitor progression (or non-progression) of suspected (probable) to definite CP. The pathomechanism of pain in CP is multifactorial and data from different series are hardly comparable mainly because insufficient data of the various variables ie diagnosis, classification, staging of CP, pain pattern and presumptive pain cause, are provided. Pain in CP is rarely intractable except in the presence of cancer, opiate addiction or extra-pancreatic pain causes. Local complications like pseudocysts or obstructive cholestasis are the most common causes of severe persistent pain which can be relieved promptly by an appropriate drainage procedure. Notably, partial to complete pain relief is a common feature in 50-80% of patients with late-stage CP irrespective of surgery and about 50% of CP-patients never need surgery (or endoscopic intervention). The spontaneous "burn

  7. Database, Knowledge and Scientific Networks : The visibility in the Information Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Cereser Pezzella

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to analyze the protection provided personal data, voluntarely given by people and collected in files without their consent, an affront to their confidentiality, confidentiality and privacy rights, affecting the right of personality, also fail to materialize the right to privacy in the Information Society. The Information Society, backed the rule of knowledge, creation, circulation and encumbrance information, is embodied in the current form of promotion of personal interrelationships, and the targeting of economic, political, legal and social, causing significant changes in daily life. Indeed, in the information society, the person is primarily represented by information, therefore known for data, numbers, shopping routines and spending, in the form of text, images, sounds and recorded data. This new perception of the individual, as an informational being, shall claim the protection of privacy, especially because it is a fundamental right of first magnitude, recognized as personality right, unavailability of characters, intransferable, inalienable and imprescriptible. The research was mainly based literature, using the national and international doctrine pondering the various branches of legal science, beyond the historical perspective - key to better understanding the complexity in the contemporary context.

  8. SCIENTIFIC PRODUCTION AND KNOWLEDGE NETWORKS: SECOND GENERATION OF THE DOCTORATE IN SCIENCES ADMINISTRATIVE UNIVERSITY OF WEST CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de los Ángeles Cervantes-Rosas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The present research work analyses the scientific production generated by the students of the second generation of the doctorate in Administrative Sciences from the Universidad de Occidente, which is located in the national program's quality postgraduates of Conacyt and fundamental objective is to generate human resources to solve the problem through research. We analysed the records of 18 student, collecting information regarding the scientific production and knowledge networks. Results show that the 73.8% of the generated output is in papers in national and international congresses, whose principal authors are PhD students. In the 28.4% of production are the co-authors are the same companions by which it can be concluded that knowledge to the interior of the PhD networks generated.

  9. The Acquisition of Scientific Knowledge: The Influence of Methods of Questioning and Analysis on the Interpretation of Children's Conceptions of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frede, Valerie; Nobes, Gavin; Frappart, Soren; Panagiotaki, Georgia; Troadec, Bertrand; Martin, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Studies of children's knowledge of the Earth have led to very different conclusions: some appear to show that children construct their own, non-scientific "theories" (mental models) of the flat, hollow or dual Earth. Others indicate that many young children have some understanding of the spherical (scientific) Earth, and that their knowledge lacks…

  10. Excellence in the knowledge-based economy: from scientific to research excellence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads P.; Bloch, Carter Walter; Young, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, the European Union (EU) unveiled its new ‘Composite Indicator for Scientific and Technological Research Excellence’. This is not an isolated occurrence; policy-based interest in excellence is growing all over the world. The heightened focus on excellence and, in particular, attempts....... This change is evidenced by the ‘Composite Indicator for Scientific and Technological Research Excellence’, its rationale and its components....

  11. Understanding the validity of data : a knowledge-based network underlying research expertise in scientific disciplines.

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This article considers what might be taught to meet a widely held curriculum aim of students being able to understand research in a discipline. Expertise, which may appear as a ‘chain of practice’, is widely held to be underpinned by networks of understanding. Scientific research expertise is considered from this perspective. Within scientific disciplines, how research is conducted to solve different problems varies with concomitant effects on the validity of the data and the strengths of the...

  12. The communication of scientific knowledge in society : the role of the media

    CERN Document Server

    Göpfert, W

    1999-01-01

    In that view the jobe of science journalism is not only to translate scientific speech into everyday language... Why should the media report on science-and how? Increasingly scientific influence is regarded as risky or even dangerous, be informed about these kinds of science. And where science itself is under scrutiny, media have to provide arguments and room or time for discussion. for example nuclear power or genetic engineering. Societies have to decide on such issues and therefore people have to

  13. A day of immersive physiology experiments increases knowledge and excitement towards physiology and scientific careers in Native American students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Bryan K; Schiller, Alicia M; Zucker, Irving H; Eager, Eric A; Bronner, Liliana P; Godfrey, Maurice

    2017-03-01

    Underserved minority groups are disproportionately absent from the pursuit of careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. One such underserved population, Native Americans, are particularly underrepresented in STEM fields. Although recent advocacy and outreach designed toward increasing minority involvement in health care-related occupations have been mostly successful, little is known about the efficacy of outreach programs in increasing minority enthusiasm toward careers in traditional scientific professions. Furthermore, very little is known about outreach among Native American schools toward increasing involvement in STEM. We collaborated with tribal middle and high schools in South Dakota and Nebraska through a National Institutes of Health Science Education Partnership Award to hold a day-long physiology, activity-based event to increase both understanding of physiology and enthusiasm to scientific careers. We recruited volunteer biomedical scientists and trainees from the University of Nebraska Medical Center, Nebraska Wesleyan University, and University of South Dakota. To evaluate the effectiveness of the day of activities, 224 of the ~275-300 participating students completed both a pre- and postevent evaluation assessment. We observed increases in both students self-perceived knowledge of physiology and enthusiasm toward scientific career opportunities after the day of outreach activities. We conclude that activity-based learning opportunities in underserved populations are effective in increasing both knowledge of science and interest in scientific careers.

  14. A Systemic View of the Learning and Differentiation of Scientific Concepts: The Case of Electric Current and Voltage Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koponen, Ismo T.; Kokkonen, Tommi

    2014-01-01

    In learning conceptual knowledge in physics, a common problem is the incompleteness of a learning process, where students' personal, often undifferentiated concepts take on more scientific and differentiated form. With regard to such concept learning and differentiation, this study proposes a systemic view in which concepts are considered as…

  15. ACADEMIC PARTNERSHIP AND GENERATION OF SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE: THE CASE OF THE INTERNATIONAL NETWORK OF RESEARCHERS ON COMPETITIVENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Guadalupe Vargas Hernández

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper has the objective to demonstrate the contributions achieved by the International Network of Researchers in Competitiveness (INRCO in academic collaboration and scientific knowledge generation. Part of the assumption sustaining that economic globalization processes, information and communication technologies revolution lead to the increasing environmental complexity and uncertainty of a knowledge society. One answer is the study and analysis of competitiveness considered as the strategy to achieve higher levels of economic growth and socio-cultural development in all micro, meso and macro levels. The method used is the analytic-deductive based on the evidence of related data with the activity and results in publications of the International Network of Researchers in Competitiveness. Consequently, it has been adapted certain speculative notions in a theoretical analysis exploring the social dynamics of the scientific activities. It is concluded that the management of the researchers’ dynamic network is capable to generate, apply and recycle the critical knowledge and the assets of academic and scientific talent through a dynamic combination of resources that have a position inside the formal e informal borders and between these borders of participant academics and institutions.

  16. Challenges of scientific knowledge visualization in publication productivity of the university academic staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabanova Natalia N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It has recently been shown that a person, an author particularly, faces the challenges of visualization in the cognitive process. The aim of this study is to consider the forms of thinking process and the changes happened in education process and in scientific activity. It was noted that the challenges connected with information perceiving during the work with the text occur in the process of creating academic papers as well. We conclude that the topical field of visualization covers not only the educative process assuming information transfer from person to person (model “teacher-student”, but the process of scientific activity. Applying the methods of visualization in publication activity is the factor for effective communication in social and cultural space that provides the opportunity for academic society to recognize results. We offer possible ways to promote scientific papers via online resources such as scientific social networks and tools of media corporations. The scientific social network ResearchGate and Thomson Reuters media corporation product as an online tool “Researcher ID” placed at the bibliographic database Web of Science TM Core Collection are used as the examples. We state that information technology allows authors to promote the results of their studies around the world.

  17. Lexical knowledge sources for cartography and GIS - development, current status and outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Wolf Günther

    2016-12-01

    Lexical knowledge sources are indispensable for research, education and general information. The transition of the reference works to the digital world has been a gradual one. This paper discusses the basic principles and structure of knowledge presentation, as well as user access and knowledge acquisition with specific consideration of contributions in German. The ideal reference works of the future should be interactive, optimally adapted to the user, reliable, current and quotable.

  18. Cultural distance between peoples’ worldview and scientific knowledge in the area of public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raza Gauhar

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present paper is an attempt to measure the public understanding of science in the area of health and hygiene and test the efficacy of “cultural distance model”. A pre-tested open-ended questionnaire was used for administering cross-sectional surveys at a religio-cultural festival in India. 3484 individuals were interviewed and responses were coded and entered to construct computer database. The data was used for determining the cultural distance of five scientific concepts from the quotidian life of the target population. In developing countries, the formal system of modern education operates as a strong determinant in shaping cultural structures of thoughts prevalent among the citizens. There exists a cultural distance between the scientific structure of configuring natural occurrences and peoples’ complexity of thoughts. The distance varies significantly across the concepts that were subjected to the inspection and is a function of the nature of scientific information.

  19. The communication of scientific knowledge in society.The role of the media

    CERN Document Server

    Göpfert, W

    1999-01-01

    Why should the media report on science - and how? Increasingly scientific influence is regarded as risky or even dangerous, for example nuclear power or genetic engineering. Societies have to decide on such issues and therefore people have to be informed about these kinds of science. And where science itself is under scrutiny, media have to provide arguments and room or time for discussion. In that view the job of science journalism is not only to translate scientific speech into everyday language - as science journalism is often regarded. Science journalism also has to consider the context the man in the street is interested in. These are two different goals science reporting has to address. And it is necessary to distinguish between the two levels of serving readers interests. Science journalists should orient themselves on journalistic rules, not scientific needs. And scientists should know that journalists are not the translators of scientists. The arising conflicts between scientists and Journalists will...

  20. Negotiating Curriculum Change in the French University: The Case of "Regionalising" Social Scientific Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrou, Sophia

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on the curricular change in French universities that has taken place over the last two decades and especially since the implementation of the "LMD Reform" in 2002. Curricula tend to become "regionalised-knowledge" courses, by regrouping disciplinary knowledge and looking forward to economic and social needs.…

  1. Using web-based technology to deliver scientific knowledge: the Southern Forest Encyclopedia Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John M. Pye; H. Michael Rauscher; Deborah K. Kennard; Patricia A. Flebbe; J. Bryan Jordin; William G. Hubbard; Cynthia Fowler; James. Ward

    2007-01-01

    Forest science, like any science, is a continuous process of discovering new knowledge, reevaluating existing knowledge, and revising our theories and management practices in light of these changes. The forest science community has not yet found the solution to the problem of getting continuously changing science efficiently and effectively into the hands of those who...

  2. World Cities of Scientific Knowledge: Systems, Networks and Potential Dynamics. An Analysis Based on Bibliometric Indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, Christian Wichmann; Schwarz, Annette Winkel; Find, Søren

    2010-01-01

    This paper is based on identification of the pattern of the upper level of the world city network of knowledge as published in a series of earlier papers. It is our aim to update the findings and relate to the general world city discussion. The structure of the world cities of knowledge network h...

  3. Breast-feeding: Current knowledge, attitudes and practices of paediatricians and obstetricians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Videlefsky

    1996-05-01

    Full Text Available Doctors, as part of the healthcare team, can have a significant impact on the successful initiation and maintenance of breastfeeding. There is a need for ongoing education and intervention programmes to update current knowledge on breastfeeding management.

  4. Connections between experience, beliefs, scientific knowledge, and self-evaluated expertise among investigators of child sexual abuse in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnilä-Tuohimaa, Katarina; Santtila, Pekka; Sainio, Mikael; Niemi, Pekka; Sandnabba, Kenneth

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether clinicians investigating child sexual abuse (CSA) rely more on scientific knowledge or on clinical experience when evaluating their own expertise. Another goal was to check what kind of pre-trial beliefs the clinicians had. The connections between these different factors were investigated. A questionnaire covering items concerning demographic data, experience, knowledge about CSA, self-evaluated expertise and beliefs about CSA was given to 126 social workers, 60 child psychiatrists and 134 psychologists. The results showed that the clinicians relied more on their clinical experience than on scientific knowledge when evaluating their expertise as investigators of CSA. Furthermore, social workers possessed stronger attitudes in favor of children than the other groups, while child psychiatrists had more negative attitudes towards the criminal justice system. Male participants had less strong beliefs than did the female participants. The findings indicate that the education of CSA investigators should focus more on theoretical knowledge and decision-making processes as well as the role of pre-trial beliefs.

  5. Knowledges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berling, Trine Villumsen

    2012-01-01

    and reflectivism. Bourdieu, on the contrary, lets the challenge to the theory/reality distinction spill over into a challenge to the theory/practice distinction by thrusting the scientist in the foreground as not just a factor (discourse/genre) but as an actor. In this way, studies of IR need to include a focus......Scientific knowledge in international relations has generally focused on an epistemological distinction between rationalism and reflectivism over the last 25 years. This chapter argues that this distinction has created a double distinction between theory/reality and theory/practice, which works...... as a ghost distinction structuring IR research. While reflectivist studies have emphasised the impossibility of detached, objective knowledge production through a dissolution of the theory/reality distinction, the theory/practice distinction has been left largely untouched by both rationalism...

  6. Excellence in the Knowledge-Based Economy: From Scientific to Research Excellence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Mads P.; Bloch, Carter; Young, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, the European Union (EU) unveiled its new "Composite Indicator for Scientific and Technological Research Excellence." This is not an isolated occurrence; policy-based interest in excellence is growing all over the world. The heightened focus on excellence and, in particular, attempts to define it through quantitative indicators…

  7. On scaling of scientific knowledge production in U.S. metropolitan areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nomaler, Önder; Frenken, Koen|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/207145253; Heimeriks, Gaston|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/291061664

    2014-01-01

    Using data on all scientific publications from the Scopus database, we find a superlinear scaling effect for U.S. metropolitan areas as indicated by the increase of per capita publication output with city size. We also find that the variance of residuals is much higher for mid-sized cities (100,000

  8. Knowledge as a Common Good: The Societal Relevance of Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouter, Lex M.

    2010-01-01

    Universities are, to a large extent, publicly funded. It is reasonable to expect that society should benefit as a result. This means that scientific research should at least have a potential societal impact. Universities and individual researchers should therefore give serious thought to the societal relevance of their research activities and…

  9. Knowledge as a Common Good: The Societal Relevance of Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouter, Lex M.

    2010-01-01

    Universities are, to a large extent, publicly funded. It is reasonable to expect that society should benefit as a result. This means that scientific research should at least have a potential societal impact. Universities and individual researchers should therefore give serious thought to the societal relevance of their research activities and…

  10. Attitude, Certainty and Allusions to Common Knowledge in Scientific Research Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsantoni, Dimitra

    2004-01-01

    Acceptance of claims made in scientific research articles depends on the "stance" authors take and their resources for "appraisal" (Martin and White, http://www.grammatics.com/appraisal). "Stance" has been defined as "the ways authors project themselves into their texts to communicate their relationship to subject matter and the readers",…

  11. Systematizing Scientific Knowledge in Sustainable Tourism, Poverty Reduction and Nature Conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tassone, V.C.

    2008-01-01

    The state of the art of tourism research, second chapter. A detailed maping by Tassone of the development of research in the field of tourism, nature conservation and poverty reduction. She provides an indication of the direction of past scientific research work in this field.

  12. Preface: conservation of european ponds-current knowledge and future needs

    OpenAIRE

    Miracle, Rosa; Oertli, Beat; Céréghino, Régis; Hull, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    Ponds are common elements of the landscape with an important role in the global processes of biosphere and biodiversity preservation. Recent research indicates that ecological characteristics of ponds are different from other inland water systems, but scientific knowledge is still insufficient and poor compared to lakes and rivers. Therefore, whilst indicators and conservation tools have been developed for most aquatic systems, there is also a gap between existing basic information on pond ec...

  13. Fascia--Current knowledge and future directions in physiatry: narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Evan H; Findley, Thomas W

    2014-01-01

    Fascia can be considered part of the connective tissues that permeates the human body. However, in medical training its definition is not clear, and even among specialists its role is not completely understood. Physiatrists have a unique opportunity to add to the growing scientific and clinical knowledge about fascia, particularly about how this connective tissue network may apply clinically to musculoskeletal disorders. In this narrative review, the structure and function of fascia is discussed from the perspective of physiatry.

  14. The role of scientific knowledge in shaping public attitudes to GM technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mielby, Henrik Ole; Sandøe, Peter; Lassen, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    sample of the Danish population (n = 2000) was presented with questionnaires. The respondent’s knowledge was measured by a number of textbook questions on biology. The results indicated that knowledge increases the likelihood that a person will have differentiated opinions on medical and agricultural...... applications, but decreases the likelihood that he or she will differentiate between cisgenic and transgenic cereals. We discuss the implication that knowledge makes people more likely to base their acceptance on judgements of risks and benefits, rather than on judgements of naturalness. The article concludes...

  15. Pharmaceutical residues in environmental waters and wastewater: current state of knowledge and future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatta-Kassinos, Despo; Meric, Sureyya; Nikolaou, Anastasia

    2011-01-01

    Pollution from pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment is now recognized as an environmental concern in many countries. This has led to the creation of an extensive area of research, including among others: their chemical identification and quantification; elucidation of transformation pathways when present in wastewater-treatment plants or in environmental matrices; assessment of their potential biological effects; and development and application of advanced treatment processes for their removal and/or mineralization. Pharmaceuticals are a unique category of pollutants, because of their special characteristics, and their behavior and fate cannot be simulated with other chemical organic contaminants. Over the last decade the scientific community has embraced research in this specific field and the outcome has been immense. This was facilitated by advances in chromatographic techniques and relevant biological assays. Despite this, a number of unanswered questions exist and still there is much room for development and work towards a more solid understanding of the actual consequences of the release of pharmaceuticals in the environment. This review tries to present part of the knowledge that is currently available with regard to the occurrence of pharmaceutical residues in aquatic matrices, the progress made during the last several years on identification of such compounds down to trace levels, and of new, previously unidentified, pharmaceuticals such as illicit drugs, metabolites, and photo-products. It also tries to discuss the main recent findings in respect of the capacity of various treatment technologies to remove these contaminants and to highlight some of the adverse effects that may be related to their ubiquitous existence. Finally, socioeconomic measures that may be able to hinder the introduction of such compounds into the environment are briefly discussed.

  16. Summary of the ACAT Round Table Discussion: Open-source, knowledge sharing and scientific collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Carminati, Federico; Riemann, Tord

    2014-01-01

    Round table discussions are in the tradition of ACAT. This year's plenary round table discussion was devoted to questions related to the use of scientific software in High Energy Physics and beyond. The 90 minutes of discussion were lively, and quite a lot of diverse opinions were spelled out. Although the discussion was, in part, controversial, the participants agreed unanimously on several basic issues in software sharing: (i) The importance of having various licensing models in academic research; (ii) The basic value of proper recognition and attribution of intellectual property, including scientific software; (iii) The user respect for the conditions of use, including licence statements, as formulated by the author. The need of a similar discussion on the issues of data sharing was emphasized and it was recommended to cover this subject at the conference round table discussion of next ACAT. In this contribution, we summarise selected topics that were covered in the introductory talks and in the following ...

  17. Knowledge Development and Scientific Status in Consumer-Behavior Research: A Social Exchange Perspective.

    OpenAIRE

    Zinkhan, George M; Roth, Martin S; Saxton, Mary Jane

    1992-01-01

    The communication patterns (1977 through 1988) between the JOURNAL OF CONSUMER RESEARCH (JCR) and other related disciplines are examined from a social exchange perspective. As one way of assessing scientific status, we completed a citation analysis to consider both the journals that JCR authors cite and the journals that cite JCR. The results reveal that JCR performs an important bridging function between the psychology and marketing literatures. However, JCR has had considerably less impact ...

  18. Knowledge Development and Scientific Status in Consumer-Behavior Research: A Social Exchange Perspective.

    OpenAIRE

    Zinkhan, George M; Martin S Roth; Saxton, Mary Jane

    1992-01-01

    The communication patterns (1977 through 1988) between the JOURNAL OF CONSUMER RESEARCH (JCR) and other related disciplines are examined from a social exchange perspective. As one way of assessing scientific status, we completed a citation analysis to consider both the journals that JCR authors cite and the journals that cite JCR. The results reveal that JCR performs an important bridging function between the psychology and marketing literatures. However, JCR has had considerably less impact ...

  19. Knowledge gaps in scientific literature on maternal mortality: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-González, Diana; Carrasco-Portiño, Mercedes; Ruiz, Maria Teresa

    2006-11-01

    Issues related to maternal mortality have generated a lot of empirical and theoretical information. However, despite the amount of work published on the topic, maternal mortality continues to occur at high rates and solutions to the problem are still not clear. Scientific research on maternal mortality is focused mainly on clinical factors. However, this approach may not be the most useful if we are to understand the problem of maternal mortality as a whole and appreciate the importance of economical, political and social macrostructural factors. In this paper, we report the number of scientific studies published between 2000 and 2004 about the main causes of maternal death, as identified by WHO, and compare the proportion of papers on each cause with the corresponding burden of each cause. Secondly, we systematically review the characteristics and quality of the papers on the macrostructural determinants of maternal mortality. In view of their burden, obstructed labour, unsafe abortion and haemorrhage are proportionally underrepresented in the scientific literature. In our review, most studies analysed were cross-sectional, and were carried out by developed countries without the participation of researchers in the developing countries where maternal mortality was studied. The main macrostructural factors mentioned were socioeconomic variables. Overall, there is a lack of published information about the cultural and political determinants of maternal mortality. We believe that a high-quality scientific approach must be taken in studies of maternal mortality in order to obtain robust comparative data and that study design should be improved to allow causality between macrostructural determinants and maternal mortality to be shown.

  20. Structures and dynamics of scientific knowledge networks:An empirical analysis based on a co-word network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Xiaoguang; JIANG; Tingting; LI; Xiaoyu

    2010-01-01

    Co-word networks are constructed with author-provided keywords in academic publications and their relations of co-occurrence.As special form of scientific knowledge networks,they represent the cognitive structure of scientific literature.This paper analyzes the complex structure of a co-word network based on 8,190 author-provided keywords extracted from 3,651 papers in five Chinese core journals in the field of management science.Small-world and scale-free phenomena are found in this network.A large-scale co-word network graph,which consists of one major giant component and many small isolated components,has been generated with the GUESS software.The dynamic growth of keywords and keyword co-occurrence relationships are described with four new informetrics measures.The results indicate that existing concepts always serve as the intellectual base of new ideas as represented by keywords.

  1. [Evidence-Based Knowledge Translation: From Scientific Evidence to Clinical Nursing Practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kee-Hsin; Kao, Ching-Chiu; Chen, Chiehfeng

    2016-12-01

    In 1992, Gordon Guyatt coined the term "evidence-based medicine", which has since attracted worldwide attention. In 2007, the Institute of Medicine's Roundtable on Evidence-Based Medicine set the goal that 90% of clinical decisions would be supported by accurate, timely, and up-to-date clinical information and would reflect the best available evidence by 2020. However, the chasm between knowing and doing remains palpable. In 2000, the Canadian Institute of Health Research applied the term "knowledge translation" to describe the bridge that is necessary to cross the gap between research knowledge and clinical practice. The present paper outlines the conceptual framework, barriers, and promotion strategies for evidence-based knowledge translation and shares clinical experience related to overcoming the seven layers of leakage (aware, accepted, applicable, able, acted on, agreed, and adhered to). We hope that this paper can enhance the public well-being and strengthen the future health care system.

  2. World Cities of Scientific Knowledge: Systems, Networks and Potential Dynamics. An Analysis Based on Bibliometric Indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, Christian Wichmann; Schwarz, Annette Winkel; Find, Søren

    2010-01-01

    This paper is based on identification of the pattern of the upper level of the world city network of knowledge as published in a series of papers.It is our aim to update the findings and relate to the general world city discussion. The structure of the world cities of knowledge network has changed...... over the last decade in favour of south east Asian and south European cities and in disfavour of the traditional centres of North America and north-western Europe. The analysis is based on bibliometric data on the world’s 100 largest cities measured in terms of research output. Then level of co...

  3. The relationship between chiropractor required and current level of business knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciolfi, Michael Anthony; Kasen, Patsy Anne

    2017-01-01

    Chiropractors frequently practice within health care systems requiring the business acumen of an entrepreneur. However, some chiropractors do not know the relationship between the level of business knowledge required for practice success and their current level of business knowledge. The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine the relationship between chiropractors' perceived level of business knowledge required and their perceived level of current business knowledge. Two hundred and seventy-four participants completed an online survey (Health Care Training and Education Needs Survey) which included eight key business items. Participants rated the level of perceived business knowledge required (Part I) and their current perceived level of knowledge (Part II) for the same eight items. Data was collected from November 27, 2013 to December 18, 2013. Data were analyzed using Spearman's ranked correlation to determine the statistically significant relationships for the perceived level of knowledge required and the perceived current level of knowledge for each of the paired eight items from Parts I and II of the survey. Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Tests were performed to determine the statistical difference between the paired items. The results of Spearman's correlation testing indicated a statistically significant (p ethical, (e) managerial decisions, and (f) operations. Wilcoxon Signed Ranks testing indicated a significant difference for three paired items: strategic management; marketing and; legal and ethical. The results suggest that relationships exist for the majority of business items (6 of 8) however a statistically difference was demonstrated in only three of the paired business items. The implications of this study for social change include the potential to improve chiropractors' business knowledge and skills, enable practice success, enhance health services delivery and positively influence the profession as a viable career.

  4. Survival in extreme environments – on the current knowledge of adaptations in tardigrades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møbjerg, Nadja; Halberg, Kenneth Agerlin; Jørgensen, Aslak

    2011-01-01

    of the tardigrades and highlight species that are currently used as models for physiological and molecular investigations. Tardigrades are uniquely adapted to a range of environmental extremes. Cryptobiosis, currently referred to as a reversible ametabolic state induced by e.g. desiccation, is common especially...... to below )20 C, presumably relying on efficient DNA repair mechanisms and osmoregulation. This review summarizes the current knowledge on adaptations found among tardigrades, and presents new data on tardigrade cell numbers and osmoregulation....

  5. The recursive universe cosmic complexity and the limits of scientific knowledge

    CERN Document Server

    Poundstone, WIlliam

    2013-01-01

    This fascinating popular science journey explores key concepts in information theory in terms of Conway's ""Game of Life"" program. The author explains the application of natural law to a random system and demonstrates the necessity of limits. Other topics include the limits of knowledge, paradox of complexity, Maxwell's demon, Big Bang theory, and much more. 1985 edition.

  6. The dynamics of exchanges and references among scientific texts, and the autopoiesis of discursive knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucio-Arias, D.; Leydesdorff, L.

    2009-01-01

    Discursive knowledge emerges as codification in flows of communication. The flows of communication are constrained and enabled by networks of communications as their historical manifestations at each moment of time. New publications modify the existing networks by changing the distributions of attri

  7. Alcohol: A Description and Comparison of Recent Scientific vs. Public Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckalew, L. W.

    1979-01-01

    After noting recent research on the nature, effects, and consequences of alcohol use/abuse, this article describes the results of a survey of high school and college students on that issue. Implications of the low overall knowledge level; specific informational deficits; and age, sex, and racial variables are discussed. (SJL)

  8. Using hyperdocuments to manage scientific knowledge: the prototype Encyclopedia of Southern Appalachian Forest Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah K. Kennard; H. Michael Rauscher; Patricia A. Flebbe; Daniel L. Schmoldt; William G. Hubbard; J. Bryan Jordin; William Milnor

    2005-01-01

    Despite the overwhelming body of research available on the ecology and management of Southern Appalachian forests, a gap exists between what scientists know and what the management community is able to apply on the ground. Most research knowledge still resides in highly technical, narrowly focused research publications housed in libraries. The internet, combined with...

  9. Environmental Education: From the Perspective of Scientific Knowledge for Constructivist Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giron, Graciela; Vasquez-Martinez, Claudio-Rafael; López, Juan Sánchez; Bañuelos, Antonio Ayón

    2012-01-01

    Environmental education is not merely a modern form for the didactics of natural science, but is, on the contrary, an educational process that integrates ecological knowledge, philosophy, politics, economics and sociology, among others. This is because its purpose is to change the relationships of production, social structures of economics and…

  10. Scientific and Cultural Knowledge in Intercultural Science Education: Student Perceptions of Common Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondwe, Mzamose; Longnecker, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    There is no consensus in the science education research community on the meanings and representations of western science and indigenous knowledge or the relationships between them. How students interpret these relationships and their perceptions of any connections has rarely been studied. This study reports student perceptions of the meaning and…

  11. Divine action in the framework of scientific knowledge: From quantum theory to divine action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lameter, Christoph

    During the Enlightenment, many theologians gave up the claim that God could act in the universe because the world was envisioned to be completely describable and governed by scientific laws. Surprisingly the development of quantum theory has resulted in the discovery of limits to causality, the universe is no longer conceived to be a closed system and therefore an account of divine action compatible with scientific theories might be possible now. First, the concept of divine intervention as envisioned in the nineteenth century is investigated and then a survey of the development of quantum theory is provided. The disputed character of the interpretation of quantum theory and of the measurement problem noted. It is suggested that the controversy continues because the straightforward acceptance of quantum theory---as already suggested by von Neumann in 1932---would imply a connection between mind and matter and question the notion of an objective, observer independent universe. It is shown using the literature on quantum theory that other solutions to the measurement problem are questionable on scientific grounds alone. Henry Stapp's recent rearticulation of von Neumann's arguments integrating them with Heisenberg's thinking is then selected as a potential basis for a theory of divine action. Existing theories of divine action are investigated starting with William James's idea of an indeterministic universe and ending with the contemporary approaches by Robert Russell and Nancey Murphy. Contemporary proposals are based on the notion of quantum events. A search is made for a scientific basis for quantum events but it is found that none of the interpretations of quantum theory would be compatible with the proposed idea of quantum events. Finally, a new theory of divine action is proposed understanding divine action as a holistic act, analogous to personal agency, through quantum determination. The universe is creating potentialities that are then collapsed by

  12. The sacrifice of knowledge: vain debates in the social scientific study of religion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramp, Joseph M

    2013-03-01

    Since its inception, the social scientific study of religion has been a battleground for scholars advocating for the advantages of one sort of methodology over against the other. I argue that these debates have more to do with the personalities of the researchers rather than any kind of justifiable proof that one method is better than another. I argue that the process by which scholars quarrel over methods is a sign of stagnation or regression in the academy; I draw broad implications for the health of the discipline of religious studies.

  13. Open exchange of scientific knowledge and European copyright: The case of biodiversity information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willi Egloff

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. The 7th Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development is helping the European to prepare for an integrative system for intelligent management of biodiversity knowledge. The infrastructure that is envisaged and that will be further developed within the Programme “Horizon 2020” aims to provide open and free access to taxonomic information to anyone with a requirement for biodiversity data, without the need for individual consent of other persons or institutions. Open and free access to information will foster the re-use and improve the quality of data, will accelerate research, and will promote new types of research. Progress towards the goal of free and open access to content is hampered by numerous technical, economic, sociological, legal, and other factors. The present article addresses barriers to the open exchange of biodiversity knowledge that arise from European laws, in particular European legislation on copyright and database protection rights.We present a legal point of view as to what will be needed to bring distributed information together and facilitate its re-use by data mining, integration into semantic knowledge systems, and similar techniques. We address exceptions and limitations of copyright or database protection within Europe, and we point to the importance of data use agreements. We illustrate how exceptions and limitations have been transformed into national legislations within some European states to create inconsistencies that impede access to biodiversity information.Conclusions. The legal situation within the EU is unsatisfactory because there are inconsistencies among states that hamper the deployment of an open biodiversity knowledge management system. Scientists within the EU who work with copyright protected works or with protected databases have to be aware of regulations that vary from country to country. This is a major stumbling block to international collaboration and is an

  14. Open exchange of scientific knowledge and European copyright: The case of biodiversity information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egloff, Willi; Patterson, David J; Agosti, Donat; Hagedorn, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Background. The 7(th) Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development is helping the European Union to prepare for an integrative system for intelligent management of biodiversity knowledge. The infrastructure that is envisaged and that will be further developed within the Programme "Horizon 2020" aims to provide open and free access to taxonomic information to anyone with a requirement for biodiversity data, without the need for individual consent of other persons or institutions. Open and free access to information will foster the re-use and improve the quality of data, will accelerate research, and will promote new types of research. Progress towards the goal of free and open access to content is hampered by numerous technical, economic, sociological, legal, and other factors. The present article addresses barriers to the open exchange of biodiversity knowledge that arise from European laws, in particular European legislation on copyright and database protection rights. We present a legal point of view as to what will be needed to bring distributed information together and facilitate its re-use by data mining, integration into semantic knowledge systems, and similar techniques. We address exceptions and limitations of copyright or database protection within Europe, and we point to the importance of data use agreements. We illustrate how exceptions and limitations have been transformed into national legislations within some European states to create inconsistencies that impede access to biodiversity information. Conclusions. The legal situation within the EU is unsatisfactory because there are inconsistencies among states that hamper the deployment of an open biodiversity knowledge management system. Scientists within the EU who work with copyright protected works or with protected databases have to be aware of regulations that vary from country to country. This is a major stumbling block to international collaboration and is an impediment to the

  15. [TOPICS-MDS: a versatile resource for generating scientific and social knowledge for elderly care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brink, Danielle; Lutomski, Jennifer E; Qin, Li; den Elzen, Wendy P J; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M; Krabbe, Paul F M; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Muntinga, Maaike; Moll van Charante, Eric P; Bleijenberg, Nienke; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G M; Melis, René J F

    2015-04-01

    Developed as part of the National Care for the Elderly Programme (NPO), TOPICS-MDS is a uniform, national database on the health and wellbeing of the older persons and caregivers who participated in NPO-funded projects. TOPICS-MDS Consortium has gained extensive experience in constructing a standardized questionnaire to collect relevant health care data on quality of life, health services utilization, and informal care use. A proactive approach has been undertaken not only to ensure the standardization and validation of instruments but also the infrastructure for external data requests. Efforts have been made to promote scientifically and socially responsible use of TOPICS-MDS; data has been available for secondary use since early 2014. Through this data sharing initiative, researchers can explore health issues in a broader framework which may have not been possible within individual NPO projects; this broader framework is highly relevant for influencing health policy. In this article, we provide an overview of the development and on-going progress of TOPICS-MDS. We further describe how information derived from TOPICS-MDS can be applied to facilitate future scientific innovations and public health initiatives to improve care for frail older persons and their caregivers.

  16. Geoethical implications in the L'Aquila case: scientific knowledge and communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Capua, Giuseppe

    2013-04-01

    On October 22nd 2012, three and a half years after the earthquake that destroyed the city of L'Aquila (central Italy), killing more than 300 people and wounding about 1,500, a landmark judgment for the scientific research established the condemnation of six members of the Major Risks Committee of the Italian Government and a researcher of INGV (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia), called to provide information about the evolution of the seismic sequence. The judge held that these Geoscientists were negligent during the meeting of 31st March 2009, convened to discuss the scientific aspects of the seismic risk of this area, affected by a long seismic sequence, also in the light of repeated warnings about the imminence of a strong earthquake, on the base of measurements of radon gas by an Italian independent technician, transmitted to the population by mass-media. Without going into the legal aspects of the criminal proceedings, this judgment strikes for the hardness of the condemnation to be paid by the scientists (six years of imprisonment, perpetual disqualification from public office and legal disqualification during the execution of the penalty, compensation for victims up to several hundred thousands of Euros). Some of them are scientists known worldwide for their proven skills, professionalism and experience. In conclusion, these scientists were found guilty of having contributed to the death of many people, because they have not communicated in an appropriate manner all available information on the seismic hazard and vulnerability of the area of L'Aquila. This judgment represents a watershed in the way of looking at the social role of geoscientists in the defense against natural hazards and their responsibility towards the people. But, in what does this responsibility consist of? It consists of the commitment to conduct an updated and reliable scientific research, which provides for a detailed analysis of the epistemic uncertainty for a more

  17. Tiger Beetles' (Coleoptera: Carabidae, Cicindelinae) pupal stage: current state of knowledge and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roza, André S; Mermudes, José R M

    2017-01-26

    The tiger beetles (Carabidae: Cicindelinae) include about 2,822 species and 120 genera around the world. They are one of the most widely studied families of Coleoptera. However, the knowledge about their immature stages is incipient and usually restricted to the larval stages. Pupal characteristics have been among the most ignored aspects of tiger beetle biology. Here we compile and update the current knowledge of tiger beetle pupae.

  18. Online Scientific Dissemination of Knowledge Blended with Face-to-Face Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tveden-Nyborg, Svend

    2013-01-01

    is experienced differently throughout a society due to fast and slow adopters. Blending online learning with face-to-face experience will strengthen the learning curve among the targeted users and ensure a faster dissemination of knowledge and thus learning to the entire community....... between the seed scientists, seed consultants, and the seed growers, and the requirements for a knowledge website for learning new seed science. This paper describes the specification requirements set for the required website including taxonomized hierarchical meta-tagging, RSS, legal matters, together...... with limitations and potentials. However, selecting online communication media as a dissemination tool for a community comes with a challenge – among other things it risks creating a learning divide between fast and slow learners. According to the theoretical framework “Diffusion of Innovation”[1] innovation...

  19. Online Scientific Dissemination of Knowledge Blended with Face-to-Face Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tveden-Nyborg, Svend

    2013-01-01

    is experienced differently throughout a society due to fast and slow adopters. Blending online learning with face-to-face experience will strengthen the learning curve among the targeted users and ensure a faster dissemination of knowledge and thus learning to the entire community....... between the seed scientists, seed consultants, and the seed growers, and the requirements for a knowledge website for learning new seed science. This paper describes the specification requirements set for the required website including taxonomized hierarchical meta-tagging, RSS, legal matters, together...... with limitations and potentials. However, selecting online communication media as a dissemination tool for a community comes with a challenge – among other things it risks creating a learning divide between fast and slow learners. According to the theoretical framework “Diffusion of Innovation”[1] innovation...

  20. FROM FACTORIES TO SHOPS: DECONSTRUCTION OF SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE WITHOUT A CLIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Braga Rodrigues

    2009-09-01

    Some arguments have been advanced in this paper that has a bearing upon re-definition of which kind of knowledge will be the focus of universities. With new technology, firms and universities are increasingly devoting to the task of changing tacit knowledge into a concrete and distinct product. It is argued that some factors such as globalization, the increasing salience of the market in organizational decisions have promoted commodification of knowledge even in universities. While globalization has worshipped innovation as the solution to upgrade the level of development of a given nation, this has also subverted the social importance of science in innovative processes. Because of the demise of basic science and the increasing external pressures universities, from now on, will tend to pay more attention to solution of problems that are assumed to impact on a country’s relative  position in competitiveness ranks. Thus the market, the State, TNCs or industry, those institutions that have been empowered by new-liberalism will have a stronger voice in defining the worth of research subjects rather than it will be a matter of academics’ own discretion or choice.

  1. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 57; US Scientific and Technical Information Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1996-01-01

    In fiscal year 1994, the United States government spent about $68 billion for science and technology. Although there is general agreement among policy makers that the results of this expenditure can be used to enhance technological innovation and improve economic competitiveness, there is no coherent scientific and technical information (STI) policy. The absence of a cohesive policy and STI policy framework means that the transfer and utilization of STI goes uncoordinated. This chapter examines the U.S. government's role in funding science and technology, reviews Federal STI activities and involvement in the transfer and use of STI resulting from federally-funded science and technology, presents issues surrounding the use of federally-funded STI, and offers recommendations for improving the transfer and use of STI.

  2. The Acquisition of Scientific Knowledge: The Influence of Methods of Questioning and Analysis on the Interpretation of Children's Conceptions of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frede, Valerie; Nobes, Gavin; Frappart, Soren; Panagiotaki, Georgia; Troadec, Bertrand; Martin, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Studies of children's knowledge of the Earth have led to very different conclusions: some appear to show that children construct their own, non-scientific "theories" (mental models) of the flat, hollow or dual Earth. Others indicate that many young children have some understanding of the spherical (scientific) Earth, and that their…

  3. Private Science and Public Knowledge: The Committee for the Scientific Investigation of the Claims of the Paranormal and its Use of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinch, T. J.; Collins, H. M.

    1984-01-01

    Shows the part played by formal/informal literatures in the social construction of scientific knowledge, analyzing the work of the "Committee for the Scientific Investigation of the Claims of the Paranormal" (which critically investigates fringe-sciences). Indicates that popular literature can deconstruct facts while scientific…

  4. Creating healthy work in small enterprises - from understanding to action:Summary of current knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen, legg; Ian S., laird; Olsen, Kirsten Bendix; Hasle, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Although much is known about small and medium enterprises (SMEs), our current knowledge and understanding of occupational health and safety (OHS) and the work environment in SMEs is limited. Far less is known about how SMEs put our knowledge of OSH into action. In short, how do we create healthy work and healthy lives as well as ‘healthy business' in SMEs? The present paper, which also acts as an editorial for this special issue, addresses these questions by providing a summary of current kno...

  5. Poverty and health disparities for American Indian and Alaska Native children: current knowledge and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarche, Michelle; Spicer, Paul

    2008-01-01

    This report explores the current state of knowledge regarding inequalities and their effect on American Indian and Alaska Native children, underscoring gaps in our current knowledge and the opportunities for early intervention to begin to address persistent challenges in young American Indian and Alaska Native children's development. This overview documents demographic, social, health, and health care disparities as they affect American Indian and Alaska Native children, the persistent cultural strengths that must form the basis for any conscientious intervention effort, and the exciting possibilities for early childhood interventions.

  6. Scientifically Based Research in Quantitative Literacy: Guidelines for Building a Knowledge Base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L. Scheaffer

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Research in quantitative literacy (QL is in its infancy, so now is the time to begin a regimen for healthy growth into adulthood. As a new discipline still defining itself, QL has the opportunity to build a sound infrastructure for accumulating a solid body of interconnected research that will serve the discipline well in years to come. To that end, much can be learned from recent studies of the weaknesses of mathematics education research and recommendations on how to overcome them. Mathematics education lacks a strong research foundation, one that is scientific, cumulative, interconnected, and intertwined with teaching practice. These weaknesses can be alleviated by following a model built around five key components of a high-quality research program: generating ideas, framing those ideas in a research setting, examining the research questions in small studies, generalizing the results in larger and more refined studies, and extending the results over time and location. Single research projects having only one or two of these components should link to others so that a viable research program that is interconnected and cumulative can be identified and effectively used to improve both teaching practice and future research. Detailed reporting guidelines for each component of the model are outlined in the following sections.

  7. [Handbook for the preparation of evidence-based documents. Tools derived from scientific knowledge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrión-Camacho, M R; Martínez-Brocca, M A; Paneque-Sánchez-Toscano, I; Valencia-Martín, R; Palomino-García, A; Muñoz-Durán, C; Tamayo-López, M J; González-Eiris-Delgado, C; Otero-Candelera, R; Ortega-Ruiz, F; Sobrino-Márquez, J M; Jiménez-García-Bóveda, R; Fernández-Quero, M; Campos-Pareja, A M

    2013-01-01

    This handbook is intended to be an accessible, easy-to-consult guide to help professionals produce or adapt Evidence-Based Documents. Such documents will help standardize both clinical practice and decision-making, the quality always being monitored in such a way that established references are complied with. Evidence-Based Health Care Committee, a member of "Virgen del Rocío" University Hospital quality structure, proposed the preparation of a handbook to produce Evidence-Based Documents including: a description of products, characteristics, qualities, uses, methodology of production, and application scope of every one of them. The handbook consists of seven Evidence-Based tools, one chapter on critical analysis methodology of scientific literature, one chapter with internet resources, and some appendices with different assessment tools. This Handbook provides general practitioners with a great opportunity to improve quality and as a guideline to standardize clinical healthcare, and managers with a strategy to promote and encourage the development of documents in an effort to reduce clinical practice variability, as well as giving patients the opportunity of taking part in planning their own care. Copyright © 2011 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Earthquake ethics through scientific knowledge, historical memory and societal awareness: the experience of direct internet information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rubeis, Valerio; Sbarra, Paola; Sebaste, Beppe; Tosi, Patrizia

    2013-04-01

    The experience of collection of data on earthquake effects and diffusion of information to people, carried on through the site "haisentitoilterremoto.it" (didyoufeelit) managed by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), has evidenced a constantly growing interest by Italian citizens. Started in 2007, the site has collected more than 520,000 compiled intensity questionnaires, producing intensity maps of almost 6,000 earthquakes. One of the most peculiar feature of this experience is constituted by a bi-directional information exchange. Every person can record observed effects of the earthquake and, at the same time, look at the generated maps. Seismologists, on the other side, can find each earthquake described in real time through its effects on the whole territory. In this way people, giving punctual information, receive global information from the community, mediated and interpreted by seismological knowledge. The relationship amongst seismologists, mass media and civil society is, thus, deep and rich. The presence of almost 20,000 permanent subscribers distributed on the whole Italian territory, alerted in case of earthquake, has reinforced the participation: the subscriber is constantly informed by the seismologists, through e-mail, about events occurred in his-her area, even if with very small magnitude. The "alert" service provides the possibility to remember that earthquakes are a phenomenon continuously present, on the other hand it shows that high magnitude events are very rare. This kind of information is helpful as it is fully complementary to that one given by media. We analyze the effects of our activity on society and mass media. The knowledge of seismic phenomena is present in each person, having roots on fear, idea of death and destruction, often with the deep belief of very rare occurrence. This position feeds refusal and repression. When a strong earthquake occurs, surprise immediately changes into shock and desperation. A

  9. Taking stock of current societal, political and academic stakeholders in the Canadian healthcare knowledge translation agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott-Findlay Shannon

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past 15 years, knowledge translation in healthcare has emerged as a multifaceted and complex agenda. Theoretical and polemical discussions, the development of a science to study and measure the effects of translating research evidence into healthcare, and the role of key stakeholders including academe, healthcare decision-makers, the public, and government funding bodies have brought scholarly, organizational, social, and political dimensions to the agenda. Objective This paper discusses the current knowledge translation agenda in Canadian healthcare and how elements in this agenda shape the discovery and translation of health knowledge. Discussion The current knowledge translation agenda in Canadian healthcare involves the influence of values, priorities, and people; stakes which greatly shape the discovery of research knowledge and how it is or is not instituted in healthcare delivery. As this agenda continues to take shape and direction, ensuring that it is accountable for its influences is essential and should be at the forefront of concern to the Canadian public and healthcare community. This transparency will allow for scrutiny, debate, and improvements in health knowledge discovery and health services delivery.

  10. Influence of Constructivist Professional Development on Chemistry Content Knowledge and Scientific Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khourey-Bowers, Claudia; Fenk, Christopher

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between teachers’ ( N = 69) participation in constructivist chemistry professional development (PD) and enhancement of content (CK) and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) (representational thinking and conceptual change strategies) and self-efficacy (PSTE). Quantitative measures assessed CK, PCK, and PSTE. Document analysis focused on PCK. Elementary teachers gained CK, PCK, PSTE, and designed lessons to advance thinking from macroscopic to abstract models. Middle/secondary teachers gained PSTE, PCK, and introduced macroscopic models to develop understanding of previously taught abstract models. All implemented representational thinking and conceptual change strategies. Results suggest that: (1) constructivist PD meets the needs of teachers of varying CK, and (2) instruction should connect representational models with alternative conceptions, integrating radical and social constructivism.

  11. Geometric knowledge and scientific rigor of digital photography: the case of nodal photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Carpiceci

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the past the formation of the photographic image was almost exclusively delegated to a process of shooting, developing and printing or projecting. Today the picture has so many possibilities that it is difficult to delineate a clear and focused operative boundary. In digital photography, every step offers the opportunity of transformation. However the multiple possibilities offered by digital photography implya required knowledge of all those activities in which the automatisms can prevent user from the realization processes control. As emblem of general cognitive problem, we analyze a significant application field that we define “nodal photography”. It is based on a technique produced from the development of electronics and computer, and that encompasses many aspects of technological innovation we are experiencing.

  12. STUDY OF CURRENT APPROACHES FOR WEB PUBLISHING OF OPEN SCIENTIFIC DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Mouromtsev

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Study. The subject of study of this work is closely related to the development of tools and technologies for Internet publishing of open data in machine-readable formats with regard to data of universities, educational and research organizations and scientific laboratories. We analyze the trends in the publishing formats most commonly used including not only popular formats such as pdf, csv, excel, but also the Semantic Web formats such as RDF. The paper describes the way of scientific data publication in semantic formats on the example of import and convertation of the information from University database. Methods. We describe the methods of publication for scientific open data in the network consisting of a set of transformations of the original data sets to the final semantic representation. These transformation steps include data upload from a relational database, data mapping on the ontological model (schema and the generation of a set of RDF-triples corresponding to the initial database fragment. A description is given to the popular open data publishing systems, such as CKAN, VIVO, and others. OpenLink Virtuoso system is selected as the primary storage and data publication. The description of RDF data model is used as a way of presenting open data of ITMO University. Main Results. The authors have described the methods of scientific open data publication and identified their shortcomings. To demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method of university open data publication, a software prototype has been developed available online at: http://lod.ifmo.ru/. The example of the system usage is also given. Practical Relevance. Implementation of the proposed approach will improve significantly the effect of the publication of university open data and make it available for third-party applications, such as applications for information retrieval about educational activities and research results, analysis of scientific activities in

  13. The personal is scientific: Women, gender, and the production of sexological knowledge in Germany and Austria, 1900-1931.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Kirsten

    2015-08-01

    This article addresses the roles women and gender played in the production of sexological knowledge in the early 20th century, particularly in German-speaking Europe. Although existing scholarship focuses almost exclusively on the work of "founding fathers" such as Richard von Krafft-Ebing and Magnus Hirschfeld, women in fact made important contributions to the field. Based on analysis of texts written between 1900 and 1931, this article shows how women were able to successfully mobilize their gender as a privileged form of "situated knowledge," and thereby assert their authority over and superior insights into certain subject areas, namely, female sexualities and sexual difference. At the same time, however, this article also highlights the constraints upon women's gendered standpoint. It shows that women's sexological writing was not just informed by their gender but also by their class and race. Moreover, because gender threatened to cast their work as insufficiently objective and scientific, women cleaved to sexology's rules of evidence and argumentation, and adopted the field's ideological trappings in order to participate in discursive contestations over sexual truths. By interrogating gender, this article introduces much-needed nuance into existing understandings of sexology, and reframes sexology itself as a site wherein new sexual subjectivities were imagined, articulated, and debated. However, it also raises fundamental questions about women sexologists' capacity to create knowledge about women and female sexualities that was truer, more correct, and more authentic than that produced by men.

  14. Encouraging Civic Knowledge and Engagement: Exploring Current Events through a Psychological Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Camp, Debbie; Baugh, Stacey-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Engagement with political, social, and civil issues is a fundamental component of an educated population, but civic knowledge and engagement are decreasing among adolescents and young adults. A Psychology in Current Events class sought to increase this engagement and key skills such as critical thinking. A one-group pretest-posttest…

  15. Current state of knowledge on aetiology, diagnosis, management, and therapy of myocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caforio, Alida L P; Pankuweit, Sabine; Arbustini, Eloisa

    2013-01-01

    In this position statement of the ESC Working Group on Myocardial and Pericardial Diseases an expert consensus group reviews the current knowledge on clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of myocarditis, and proposes new diagnostic criteria for clinically suspected myocarditis and its di...

  16. 科学知识网络的演化模型%Evolvement model for scientific knowledge networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马费成; 刘向

    2013-01-01

    针对科学知识网络的演化规律及动力问题,建立了科学知识网络的演化模型.模型构建了基于局域世界的增长网络,通过引入跨领域交叉连接、度择优连接和时间优先连接三种连接机制以反映科学知识的集聚和交叉、继承和发展的关系.其中跨领域交叉既形成一定集聚拓扑结构又满足学科知识交叉引用的要求,度择优机制保证对经典科学理论的继承,时间优先机制则促使对最新知识的吸收和发展.数理分析和实验模拟表明度择优的作用是全局性的,而时间优先连接机制的作用是局部的,模型的拓扑特征与实际统计具有较好的一致性.%For the study of evolvement and dynamics of scientific knowledge, an evolvement model of scientific knowledge networks was constructed. By considered of the independent and crossing connection among different subjects, the model introduced three kinds of attachment strategies: local-world crossing attachment, preferential attachment of indegree, preferential attachment of time. Preferential attachment of in-degree could represent the inhabitation of classical scientific theories; preferential attachment of time showed the promotion of absorbing new knowledge, local-world crossing attachment presented topology of clustering character and satisfies the demand of inter-filed permeating. The simulation shows that the effect is global of the indegree preferential attachment and partial of the time-preferential attachment.

  17. The Relationship of Science Knowledge, Attitude and Decision Making on Socio-Scientific Issues: The Case Study of Students' Debates on a Nuclear Power Plant in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jho, Hunkoog; Yoon, Hye-Gyoung; Kim, Mijung

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of students' understanding of science knowledge, attitude and decision making on socio-scientific issues (SSI), especially on the issues of nuclear energy in Korea. SSI-focused instructions were developed to encourage students to understand and reflect on knowledge, attitude and…

  18. How the Elderly Can Use Scientific Knowledge to Solve Problems While Designing Toys: A Retrospective Analysis of the Design of a Working UFO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-Yung; Hong, Jon-Chao; Hwang, Ming-Yueh; Wong, Wan-Tzu

    2013-01-01

    The venerable aphorism "an old dog cannot learn new tricks" implies that the elderly rarely learn anything new--in particular, scientific knowledge. On the basis of "learning by doing," the present study emphasized knowledge application (KA) as elderly subjects collaborated on the design of a toy flying saucer (UFO). Three…

  19. How the Elderly Can Use Scientific Knowledge to Solve Problems While Designing Toys: A Retrospective Analysis of the Design of a Working UFO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-Yung; Hong, Jon-Chao; Hwang, Ming-Yueh; Wong, Wan-Tzu

    2013-01-01

    The venerable aphorism "an old dog cannot learn new tricks" implies that the elderly rarely learn anything new--in particular, scientific knowledge. On the basis of "learning by doing," the present study emphasized knowledge application (KA) as elderly subjects collaborated on the design of a toy flying saucer (UFO). Three…

  20. Current State of Terminology in Lithuania: Scientific Research, Management and Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albina Auksoriūtė

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Current State of Terminology in Lithuania: Scientific Research, Management and Education The article discusses the current state of terminology in Lithuania, presents terminological research carried out in the last five years, analyses ways of Lithuanian terminology management, and briefly overviews terminological education and teaching in Lithuania. Lithuanian terminological research is mostly carried out at the Institute of the Lithuanian Language and at universities and other research institutes. The largest part of terminological research is carried out at the Centre of Terminology of the Institute of the Lithuanian Language, which researches Lithuanian terminology and terminography, analyses the use of Lithuanian terminology in different fields. Three ways of terminology management are discussed: terminography, creation of term banks and databases and standardisation of terms. The number of term dictionaries published in Lithuania is rather considerable – over 600. The most productive period for publishing term dictionaries is from 1990 up to date. Between 1990–2013 more than 420 term dictionaries and special encyclopaedias were published. The main and most important terminology database in Lithuania is the Term Bank of the Republic of Lithuania (lt Lietuvos Respublikos terminų bankas, further – LTB, initiated in 2004. This bank is created as a common information system of state institutions administered by the State Commission of the Lithuanian Language (further – Language Commission. There are more than 237,000 term entries in LTB. The article discusses two more terminology databases containing Lithuanian terminology sources – IATE and EUROTERMBANK. The Lithuanian Standards Board, in addition to other work, prepares Lithuanian standards of terms and offers these terms to the Language Commission for evaluation. Since 2000, the Lithuanian Standards Board has been creating a database of standardised terms which currently contains

  1. The contribution of action research in the construction of scientific knowledge in Brazilian Production Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Gibertoni

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The main subject of this article is the action research and it has as general objective to describe the construction of knowledge in this field from the uses that Brazilian Production Engineering makes of it, aiming to recognize its contributions, potentials and limits. To achieve this goal, a literature review was carried out for a subsequent contrast with the national academic researches that use action research and show its uses. Identified these similarities, a documentary research was carried out in academic papers published in the National Meeting of Production Engineering (ENEGEP – from 1996 to 2010. The content analysis was the strategy used for data analysis and NVivo® software was used for its treatment. As a conclusion of the research, it can be stated that the use of action research in the Brazilian Production Engineering distances itself from epistemic precepts associated with it. The results of the action are more highlighted than the reflection on the mechanisms that produced it

  2. Improving medical students' knowledge of genetic disease: a review of current and emerging pedagogical practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolyniak MJ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Michael J Wolyniak,1 Lynne T Bemis,2 Amy J Prunuske2 1Department of Biology, Hampden-Sydney College, Hampden-Sydney, VA, 2Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth, MN, USA Abstract: Genetics is an essential subject to be mastered by health professional students of all types. However, technological advances in genomics and recent pedagogical research have changed the way in which many medical training programs teach genetics to their students. These advances favor a more experience-based education focused primarily on developing student's critical thinking skills. In this review, we examine the current state of genetics education at both the preclinical and clinical levels and the ways in which medical and pedagogical research have guided reforms to current and emerging teaching practices in genetics. We discover exciting trends taking place in which genetics is integrated with other scientific disciplines both horizontally and vertically across medical curricula to emphasize training in scientific critical thinking skills among students via the evaluation of clinical evidence and consultation of online databases. These trends will produce future health professionals with the skills and confidence necessary to embrace the new tools of medical practice that have emerged from scientific advances in genetics, genomics, and bioinformatics. Keywords: genetics education, medical genetics, pedagogical practice, active learning, problem-based learning

  3. Developing genomic knowledge bases and databases to support clinical management: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huser, Vojtech; Sincan, Murat; Cimino, James J

    2014-01-01

    Personalized medicine, the ability to tailor diagnostic and treatment decisions for individual patients, is seen as the evolution of modern medicine. We characterize here the informatics resources available today or envisioned in the near future that can support clinical interpretation of genomic test results. We assume a clinical sequencing scenario (germline whole-exome sequencing) in which a clinical specialist, such as an endocrinologist, needs to tailor patient management decisions within his or her specialty (targeted findings) but relies on a genetic counselor to interpret off-target incidental findings. We characterize the genomic input data and list various types of knowledge bases that provide genomic knowledge for generating clinical decision support. We highlight the need for patient-level databases with detailed lifelong phenotype content in addition to genotype data and provide a list of recommendations for personalized medicine knowledge bases and databases. We conclude that no single knowledge base can currently support all aspects of personalized recommendations and that consolidation of several current resources into larger, more dynamic and collaborative knowledge bases may offer a future path forward.

  4. When Scientific Knowledge, Daily Life Experience, Epistemological and Social Considerations Intersect: Students' Argumentation in Group Discussions on a Socio-scientific Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albe, Virginie

    2008-01-01

    Socio-scientific issues in class have been proposed in an effort to democratise science in society. A micro-ethnographic approach has been used to explore how students elaborate arguments on a socio-scientific controversy in the context of small group discussions. Several processes of group argumentation have been identified. Students’ arguments were elaborated from scientific data, common ideas and epistemological and strategic considerations. Students’ social interactions influenced the patterns of argumentation elaborated within the group discussions. Implications of this study for the teaching of socio-scientific issues in class are discussed.

  5. Febrile Seizures and Febrile Seizure Syndromes: An Updated Overview of Old and Current Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khair, Abdulhafeez M; Elmagrabi, Dalal

    2015-01-01

    Febrile seizures are the most common paroxysmal episode during childhood, affecting up to one in 10 children. They are a major cause of emergency facility visits and a source of family distress and anxiety. Their etiology and pathophysiological pathways are being understood better over time; however, there is still more to learn. Genetic predisposition is thought to be a major contributor. Febrile seizures have been historically classified as benign; however, many emerging febrile seizure syndromes behave differently. The way in which human knowledge has evolved over the years in regard to febrile seizures has not been dealt with in depth in the current literature, up to our current knowledge. This review serves as a documentary of how scientists have explored febrile seizures, elaborating on the journey of knowledge as far as etiology, clinical features, approach, and treatment strategies are concerned. Although this review cannot cover all clinical aspects related to febrile seizures at the textbook level, we believe it can function as a quick summary of the past and current sources of knowledge for all varieties of febrile seizure types and syndromes.

  6. BIBLIOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF SCIENTIFIC PRODUCTION OF KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT AVAILABLE IN SCIELO DATA BASIS IN THE PERIOD OF 1990 TO 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelina Maria de Oliveira Licório

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to characterize the scientific production on "knowledge management", published in Scielo database, from 1999 to 2012, through bibliometric analysis. The methodological procedures, in the first phase, uses predominantly quantitative, descriptive and documentary research, and in a second, a qualitative approach. Considering some limits, it has reached 63 publications, being 3 abstracts of thesis, 1 editorial and 59 articles defined as research sample. The criteria for the analysis are identification of periodic, the years of highest incidence, the number of authors per publication and their scientific production, authors' affiliation, philosophical conception and adopted research strategy. The results point to a methodological inconsistency in the drafting of the articles and a small number of published articles. A high incidence of only one publication per author is observed, showing that the production is more a result of specific work in graduate programs than the reflection and continued studies of the topic. Among other things, we have concluded that the researchers need to invest more in the field in order to expand it.

  7. Galictis cuja (Mammalia: an update of current knowledge and geographic distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela A. Poo-Muñoz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The lesser grison (Galictis cuja is one of the least-known mustelids in the Neotropics, despite its broad range across South America. This study aimed to explore current knowledge of the distribution of the species to identify gaps in knowledge and anticipate its full geographic distribution. Eighty-nine articles have mentioned G. cuja since 1969, but only 13 focused on the species. We generated a detailed model of the species' potential distribution that validated previous maps, but with improved detail, supporting previous southernmost records, and providing a means of identifying priority sites for conservation and management of the species.

  8. When Scientific Knowledge, Daily Life Experience, Epistemological and Social Considerations Intersect: Students' Argumentation in Group Discussions on a Socio-Scientific Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albe, Virginie

    2008-01-01

    Socio-scientific issues in class have been proposed in an effort to democratise science in society. A micro-ethnographic approach has been used to explore how students elaborate arguments on a socio-scientific controversy in the context of small group discussions. Several processes of group argumentation have been identified. Students' arguments…

  9. Key tasks in healthcare marketing: assessing importance and current level of knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennett, Pamela A; Henson, Steve W; Crow, Stephen M; Hartman, Sandra J

    2005-01-01

    When examining the healthcare industry, the need for continuing education in internal functions (i.e., HR management) has been documented. However, equally important to success in the healthcare industry are external functions such as marketing. In an expansion of research on internally focused functions, we report findings from an exploratory study designed to examine the perceptions of executives about managerial skill needs in the externally focused area of marketing. Specifically, we examine eight key tasks in marketing and ask executives to rate the level of knowledge required for each and then to assess current, or actual, levels of knowledge in the field. Findings suggest that pricing strategy, product strategy, and segmentation and targeting were the tasks that require the most knowledge for healthcare marketers, and that they do, in fact, perceive various gaps in all of the areas examined. Implications and suggestions for future research are provided.

  10. Measuring currents in submarine canyons: technological and scientific progress in the past 30 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    The development and application of acoustic and optical technologies and of accurate positioning systems in the past 30 years have opened new frontiers in the submarine canyon research communities. This paper reviews several key advancements in both technology and science in the field of currents in submarine canyons since the1979 publication of Currents in Submarine Canyons and Other Sea Valleys by Francis Shepard and colleagues. Precise placements of high-resolution, high-frequency instruments have not only allowed researchers to collect new data that are essential for advancing and generalizing theories governing the canyon currents, but have also revealed new natural phenomena that challenge the understandings of the theorists and experimenters in their predictions of submarine canyon flow fields. Baroclinic motions at tidal frequencies, found to be intensified both up canyon and toward the canyon floor, dominate the flow field and control the sediment transport processes in submarine canyons. Turbidity currents are found to frequently occur in active submarine canyons such as Monterey Canyon. These turbidity currents have maximum speeds of nearly 200 cm/s, much smaller than the speeds of turbidity currents in geological time, but still very destructive. In addition to traditional Eulerian measurements, Lagrangian flow data are essential in quantifying water and sediment transport in submarine canyons. A concerted experiment with multiple monitoring stations along the canyon axis and on nearby shelves is required to characterize the storm-trigger mechanism for turbidity currents.

  11. A comunidade científica, o Estado e as universidades, no atual estágio de desenvolvimento científico tecnológico Scientific community, State and universities in the current stage of scientific technological development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelangelo Giotto Santoro Trigueiro

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho discute a relação entre a comunidade científica, o Estado e a universidade no contexto atual do desenvolvimento científico-tecnológico. Enfatiza a dimensão política das transformações recentes, sobretudo no tocante aos sistemas decisórios, contrapondo momento mais verticalizado com cenário mais democratizado, e as conseqüências das transformações políticas contemporâneas, na sociedade brasileira. Procura analisar as mútuas correlações entre o Estado, as universidades e as comunidades científicas, a partir do entendimento da especificidade de cada um destes atores na condução do desenvolvimento científico-tecnológico nacional. A esse respeito, é analisado todo um conjunto de ações que se coadunam com o novo modo de produção do conhecimento, buscando destacar a natureza controversa e polêmica da inserção do Estado e o caráter conservador da comunidade científica, bem como a resistência da universidade na proposição de novas linhas de atuação no enfrentamento dos desafios trazidos pela ciência e tecnologias contemporâneas.This article discusses the relationship between scientific community, the State and university in the current circumstances of scientific-technological development. It stresses the political dimension of recent changes, specially regarding decision systems, comparing a more vertical moment and a more democratic scenario and the consequences of contemporary political changes in Brazilian society. It examines mutual relations between the State, universities and the scientific community, based on the understanding of each of those actors' specificities in advancing national scientific-technological development. A whole set of actions is examined in accordance with knowledge's new mode of production in order to highlight the controversial nature of the State and the conservative character of the scientific community as well as the resistance of the university in proposing new lines

  12. The origin of the warped heliospheric current sheet. Scientific technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, J.M.; Scherrer, P.H.; Hoeksema, J.T.

    1980-03-01

    The warped heliospheric current sheet in early 1976 is calculated from the observed photospheric magnetic field using a potential field method. Comparisons with measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field polarity in early 1976 obtained at several locations in the heliosphere at Helios I, Helios II, Pioneer XI and Earth show a rather detailed agreement between the computed current sheet and the observations. It appears that the large-scale structure of the warped heliospheric current sheet is determined by the structure of the photospheric magnetic field, and that 'ballerina skirt' effects may add small-scale ripples.

  13. Integrating Indigenous Traditional, Local and Scientific Knowledge for Improved Management, Policy and Decision-Making in Reindeer Husbandry in the Russian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Nancy G.; Yurchak, Boris; Turi, Johan Mathis; Mathiesen, Svein D.; Aissi-Wespi, Rita L.

    2004-01-01

    As scientists and policy-makers from both indigenous and non-indigenous communities begin to build closer partnerships to address common sustainability issues such as the health impacts of climate change and anthropogenic activities, it becomes increasingly important to create shared information management systems which integrate all relevant factors for optimal information sharing and decision-making. This paper describes a new GIs-based system being designed to bring local and indigenous traditional knowledge together with scientific data and information, remote sensing, and information technologies to address health-related environment, weather, climate, pollution and land use change issues for improved decision/policy-making for reindeer husbandry. The system is building an easily-accessible archive of relevant current and historical, traditional, local and remotely-sensed and other data and observations for shared analysis, measuring, and monitoring parameters of interest. Protection of indigenous culturally sensitive information will be respected through appropriate data protocols. A mechanism which enables easy information sharing among all participants, which is real time and geo-referenced and which allows interconnectivity with remote sites is also being designed into the system for maximum communication among partners. A preliminary version of our system will be described for a Russian reindeer test site, which will include a combination of indigenous knowledge about local conditions and issues, remote sensing and ground-based data on such parameters as the vegetation state and distribution, snow cover, temperature, ice condition, and infrastructure.

  14. Integrating Indigenous Traditional, Local and Scientific Knowledge for Improved Management, Policy and Decision-Making in Reindeer Husbandry in the Russian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Nancy G.; Yurchak, Boris; Turi, Johan Mathis; Mathiesen, Svein D.; Aissi-Wespi, Rita L.

    2004-01-01

    As scientists and policy-makers from both indigenous and non-indigenous communities begin to build closer partnerships to address common sustainability issues such as the health impacts of climate change and anthropogenic activities, it becomes increasingly important to create shared information management systems which integrate all relevant factors for optimal information sharing and decision-making. This paper describes a new GIs-based system being designed to bring local and indigenous traditional knowledge together with scientific data and information, remote sensing, and information technologies to address health-related environment, weather, climate, pollution and land use change issues for improved decision/policy-making for reindeer husbandry. The system is building an easily-accessible archive of relevant current and historical, traditional, local and remotely-sensed and other data and observations for shared analysis, measuring, and monitoring parameters of interest. Protection of indigenous culturally sensitive information will be respected through appropriate data protocols. A mechanism which enables easy information sharing among all participants, which is real time and geo-referenced and which allows interconnectivity with remote sites is also being designed into the system for maximum communication among partners. A preliminary version of our system will be described for a Russian reindeer test site, which will include a combination of indigenous knowledge about local conditions and issues, remote sensing and ground-based data on such parameters as the vegetation state and distribution, snow cover, temperature, ice condition, and infrastructure.

  15. Current knowledge on helicobacter pylori infection in end stage renal disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khedmat Hossein

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric infection with Helicobacter Pylori in end-stage renal disease patients is of rele-vance because of its potential impact on the quality of life as well as morbidity and mortality of patients. Existed data on the issue are controversial, and we attempt in this article to evaluate the available data to approach extended perception of the current knowledge on the epidemiology, relevance, and optimum therapeutic strategies.

  16. Mycobacterium bovis infection in the lion (Panthera leo): Current knowledge, conundrums and research challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljoen, Ignatius M; van Helden, Paul D; Millar, Robert P

    2015-06-12

    Mycobacterium bovis has global public-health and socio-economic significance and can infect a wide range of species including the lion (Panthera leo) resulting in tuberculosis. Lions are classified as vulnerable under the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species and have experienced a 30% population decline in the past two decades. However, no attempt has been made to collate and critically evaluate the available knowledge of M. bovis infections in lions and potential effects on population. In this review we set out to redress this. Arguments suggesting that ingestion of infected prey animals are the main route of infection for lions have not been scientifically proven and research is needed into other possible sources and routes of infection. The paucity of knowledge on host susceptibility, transmission directions and therefore host status, manifestation of pathology, and epidemiology of the disease in lions also needs to be addressed. Advances have been made in diagnosing the presence of M. bovis in lions. However, these diagnostic tests are unable to differentiate between exposure, presence of infection, or stage of disease. Furthermore, there are contradictory reports on the effects of M. bovis on lion populations with more data needed on disease dynamics versus the lion population's reproductive dynamics. Knowledge on disease effects on the lion reproduction and how additional stressors such as drought or co-morbidities may interact with tuberculosis is also lacking. Filling these knowledge gaps will contribute to the understanding of mycobacterial infections and disease in captive and wild lions and assist in lion conservation endeavours. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Pharmacological and analytical aspects of withaferin A:A concise report of current scientific literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kanika Patel; Ravi B Singh; Dinesh K Patel

    2013-01-01

    Withaferin A is an important phytoconstituents of Withania somnifera (W. Somnifera) belonging to the category of withanolides, that are a group of naturally occurring C28-steroidal lactone triterpenoids. Withaferin A has been used in the traditional and indigenous system of medicine for the treatment of various disorders. In view of its unique therapeutic potential, it has gained much attention in the modern science. In the couple of the years, Withaferin A has been scientifically validated for different pharmacological activities including anti-cancer, adaptogenic, anti-stress, anti-convulsant, immunomodulatory, neurological, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor, cardioprotective, and neuroprotective activities. Pharmacological and analytical aspects of Withaferin A were highlighted in the present article. From the literature review it was found that Withaferin A has a very impressive pharmacological profile especially against cancer and could be useful for the development of the new drug in the future for the treatment of cancer and other metabolic disorders.

  18. [The representation of scientific publications of RAMS in WEB of science: evaluation of current indicators and prospects of their increasing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starodubtsev, V I; Kuznetsov, S L; Kurakova, N G; Tsvetkova, L A

    2012-01-01

    The contribution scientific publications of Russian Academy of Medical Sciences (RAMS) in the national publication stream, indexed by Web of Science over the past thirty years, was estimated. The indicators of publication activity that are necessary for the institutions of RAMS to achieve in short-term period the conformity with bibliometric indicators, established by Presidential Decree of May 7, 2012 (to increase the share of Russian publications in Web of Science to 2.44% in 2015) were calculated. It is shown that the current structure of global science, where publications in medicine make up for approximately one third of scientific publications in the world, set for RAMS scientists particularly difficult task: to double in three years the number of publications in Web of Sci. In the article are proposed the priorities and the necessary steps to fulfill this task.

  19. The IUR Forum: Worldwide Harmonisation of Networks to Support Integration of Scientific Knowledge and Consensus Development in Radioecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bréchignac, F; Alexakhin, R; Bollhöfer, A; Frogg, K E; Hardeman, F; Higley, K; Hinton, T G; Kapustka, L A; Kuhne, W; Leonard, K; Masson, O; Nanba, K; Smith, G; Smith, K; Strand, P; Vandenhove, H; Yankovich, T; Yoshida, S

    2017-04-01

    During the past decades, many specialised networks have formed to meet specific radioecological objectives, whether regional or sectorial (purpose-oriented). Regional networks deal with an array of radioecological issues related to their territories. Examples include the South Pacific network of radioecologists, and the European network of excellence in radioecology. The latter is now part of the European platform for radiation protection. Sectorial networks are more problem-oriented, often with wider international representativeness, but restricted to one specific issue, (e.g. radioactive waste, low-level atmospheric contamination, modelling). All such networks, while often working in relative isolation, contribute to a flow of scientific information which, through United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR's) efforts of synthesis, feeds into the radiation protection frameworks of protecting humans and the environment. The IUR has therefore prompted a co-construction process aimed at improving worldwide harmonisation of radioecology networks. An initiative based on an initial set of 15 networks, now called the IUR FORUM, was launched in June 2014. The IUR Forum agreed to build a framework for improved coordination of scientific knowledge, integration and consensus development relative to environmental radioactivity. Three objectives have been collectively assigned to the IUR FORUM: (1) coordination, (2) global integration and construction of consensus and (3) maintenance of expertise. One particular achievement of the FORUM was an improved description and common understanding of the respective roles and functions of the various networks within the overall scene of radioecology R&D. It clarifies how the various networks assembled within the IUR FORUM interface with UNSCEAR and other international regulatory bodies (IAEA, ICRP), and how consensus on the assessment of risk is constructed. All these agencies interact with regional

  20. Current Status and Future Prospects of Clinical Psychology: Toward a Scientifically Principled Approach to Mental and Behavioral Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Timothy B; McFall, Richard M; Shoham, Varda

    2008-11-01

    , physicians typically shared the attitudes of many of today's clinical psychologists, such as valuing personal experience over scientific research. Medicine was reformed, in large part, by a principled effort by the American Medical Association to increase the science base of medical school education. Substantial evidence shows that many clinical psychology doctoral training programs, especially PsyD and for-profit programs, do not uphold high standards for graduate admission, have high student-faculty ratios, deemphasize science in their training, and produce students who fail to apply or generate scientific knowledge. A promising strategy for improving the quality and clinical and public health impact of clinical psychology is through a new accreditation system that demands high-quality science training as a central feature of doctoral training in clinical psychology. Just as strengthening training standards in medicine markedly enhanced the quality of health care, improved training standards in clinical psychology will enhance health and mental health care. Such a system will (a) allow the public and employers to identify scientifically trained psychologists; (b) stigmatize ascientific training programs and practitioners; (c) produce aspirational effects, thereby enhancing training quality generally; and (d) help accredited programs improve their training in the application and generation of science. These effects should enhance the generation, application, and dissemination of experimentally supported interventions, thereby improving clinical and public health. Experimentally based treatments not only are highly effective but also are cost-effective relative to other interventions; therefore, they could help control spiraling health care costs. The new Psychological Clinical Science Accreditation System (PCSAS) is intended to accredit clinical psychology training programs that offer high-quality science-centered education and training, producing graduates who are

  1. The ecotoxicity of graphene family materials: current status, knowledge gaps and future needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrzębska, Agnieszka Maria; Olszyna, Andrzej Roman

    2015-01-01

    Recently, graphene family materials (GFMs) have been introduced among all fields of science and still get numerous attention. Also, the applicability of these materials in many areas makes them very attractive. GFMs have attracted both academic and industrial interest as they can produce a dramatic improvement in materials properties at very low filler content. The aim of this review is to identify, summarize, and present the first available information on the influence of GFMs on soil and water environment as well as identify the knowledge gaps and indicate the directions for the next generation of the original scientific investigations. The paper also presents our first preliminary impact assessment and potential pathways of GFMs distribution in the environment. We used as an example the reduced graphene oxide/Al2O3 nanocomposite (RGO/Al2O3) that has been previously designed and synthesized by us. Authors believe that further work should focus on improvement of characterization methodology applicable for ecotoxicity analyses and possible interactions between GFMs and different living ecosystems. Consequently, the potential impact of graphene and its derivatives on environmental health is a matter of academic interest. However, potential hazards sufficient for risk assessment and concerned with GFMs usage in consumer products first need to be investigated and identified. Further research should focus on gathering knowledge on GFMs properties for life cycle analyses, which still poses a great challenge for scientists.

  2. Pharmacologically screened aphrodisiac plant-A review of current scientific literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patel DK; Kumar R; Prasad SK; Hemalatha S

    2011-01-01

    Substances which are used to treat sexual dysfunction or to improve sexual behavior and satisfaction in humans and animals are called ‘aphrodisiac’. Uses of plant material to treat sexual disorder is a long back history in the different system of medicine and it was practiced by different type of vaidyas and traditional healer in almost all the countries in the world, like China, India, Egypt, Rome and Greek. Even though there was an unavailability of the scientific data, these substances have been used as aphrodisiac. During the historic times Lytta vesicatoria,Tribulus terrestris, Ptychopetalum olacoides, Crocus sativus, Bufo marinus, Myristica fragrans, Theobroma cocao and other plants have been investigated for its aphrodisiac activity by in vivo and in vitro model. Even though the study showed positive response to a particular substance, there is always a need to run the clinical trial before administering the tested drug in human being. The present review article summarizes the plant material which has been tested for its aphrodisiac activity in different experimental model (in vitro, in vivo on animal models, or in human clinical trials) and comply its claim in the different system of medicine. A brief overview about the data of percentage study in the last eighteen years duration on aphrodisiac activity of plant material was done on the basis of the CAB abstract database.

  3. Sensory perception in cetaceans: Part I – Current knowledge about dolphin senses as a representative species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothee eKremers

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A large part of the literature on sensory perception and behavior in dolphins is devoted to its well-developed vocal and echolocation abilities. In this review, we aim to augment current knowledge by examining the literature on dolphins’ entire Merkwelt (which refers to everything a subject perceives, creating a crucial part of the subject’s Umwelt. We will show that despite extensive knowledge on audition, aspects such as context relatedness, the social function of vocalizations or socio-sexual recognition, remain poorly understood. Therefore, we propose areas for further lines of investigation. Recent studies have shown that the sensory world of dolphins might well be much more diverse than initially thought. Indeed, although underwater and aerial visual systems differ in dolphins, they have both been shown to be important. Much debated electro- and magnetoreception appear to be functional senses according to recent studies. Finally, another neglected area is chemoreception. We will summarize neuroanatomical and physiological data on olfaction and taste, as well as corresponding behavioral evidence. Taken together, we will identify a number of technical and conceptual reasons for why chemosensory data appear contradictory, which is much debated in the literature. In summary, this article aims to provide both an overview of the current knowledge on dolphin perception, but also offer a basis for further discussion and potential new lines of research.

  4. Assessment of knowledge and awareness among radiology personnel regarding current computed tomography technology and radiation dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, M. K. A.; Hashim, S.; Bradley, D. A.; Bahruddin, N. A.; Ang, W. C.; Salehhon, N.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the level of knowledge and awareness among 120 radiology personnel working in 7 public hospitals in Johor, Malaysia, concerning Computed Tomography (CT) technology and radiation doses based on a set of questionnaires. Subjects were divided into two groups (Medical profession (Med, n=32) and Allied health profession (AH, n=88). The questionnaires are addressed: (1) demographic data (2) relative radiation dose and (3) knowledge of current CT technology. One-third of respondents from both groups were able to estimate relative radiation dose for routine CT examinations. 68% of the allied health profession personnel knew of the Malaysia regulations entitled ‘Basic Safety Standard (BSS) 2010’, although notably 80% of them had previously attended a radiation protection course. No significant difference (p < 0.05) in mean scores of CT technology knowledge detected between the two groups, with the medical professions producing a mean score of (26.7 ± 2.7) and the allied health professions a mean score of (25.2 ± 4.3). This study points to considerable variation among the respondents concerning their understanding of knowledge and awareness of risks of radiation and CT optimization techniques.

  5. Knowledge and institutional requirements to promote land degradation neutrality in drylands - An analysis of the outcomes of the 3rd UNCCD scientific conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar-Schuster, Mariam; Safriel, Uriel; Abraham, Elena; de Vente, Joris; Essahli, Wafa; Escadafal, Richard; Stringer, Lindsay

    2015-04-01

    Achieving land degradation neutrality (LDN) through sustainable land management (SLM) targets the maintenance or restoration of the productivity of land, and therefore has to include decision-makers, knowledge generators and knowledge holders at the different relevant geographic scales. In order to enhance the implementation of the Convention, the Conference of the Parties (COP) of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification therefore decided that each future session of its Committee on Science and Technology (CST) would be organized in a predominantly scientific and technical conference-style format. This contribution will outline the major outcomes of UNCCD's 3rd scientific conference that will be held in Cancún, Mexico, from 9 to 12 March 2015, on addressing desertification, land degradation and drought issues (DLDD) for poverty reduction and sustainable development. The conference follows an exceptional new round table conference format that will allow the various stakeholders to discuss scientific as well as the contribution of traditional knowledge and practices in combating land degradation. This format should provide two-way communication and enable deeper insight into the availability and contribution of all forms of knowledge for achieving LDN through the assessment of: • the vulnerability of lands to DLDD and climate change and the adaptive capacities of socio-ecosystems; • best examples of adapted, knowledge-based practices and technologies; • monitoring and assessment methods to evaluate the effectiveness of adaptation practices and technologies. The outcomes of UNCCD's 3rd scientific conference will serve as a basis for discussing: • contributions of science to diagnose the status of land; • research gaps that need to be addressed to achieve LDN for poverty reduction; • additional institutional requirements to optimally bridge knowledge generation, knowledge maintenance and knowledge implementation at the science

  6. Intervention strategies to reduce the risk of zoonotic infection with avian influenza viruses: scientific basis, challenges and knowledge gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Leslie D

    2013-09-01

    A range of measures has been recommended and used for the control and prevention of avian influenza. These measures are based on the assessment of local epidemiological situations, field observations and other scientific information. Other non-technical factors are (or in some cases should be) taken into account when developing and recommending control measures. The precise effects under field conditions of most individual interventions applied to control and prevent avian influenza have not been established or subjected to critical review, often because a number of measures are applied simultaneously without controls. In most cases, the combination of measures used results in control or elimination of the virus although there are some countries where this has not been the case. In others, especially those with low poultry density, it is not clear whether the link between the adoption of a set of measures and the subsequent control of the disease is causative. This article discusses the various measures recommended, with particular emphasis on stamping out and vaccination, examines how these measures assist in preventing zoonotic infections with avian influenza viruses and explores gaps in knowledge regarding their effectiveness.

  7. Reviews and Practice of College Students Regarding Access to Scientific Knowledge: A Case Study in Two Spanish Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Sáez López

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the concepts, attitudes, and practices of 327 pedagogy students from two major Spanish universities related to the process of finding academic information utilizing open access. A training program has been developed through an innovation project (PIMCD to address the problem of the lack of university training designed to enable students to access reliable sources of scientific knowledge. A mixed questionnaire with a pretest-posttest design, applying a descriptive analysis, a factor analysis, and a Wilcoxon test was administered to students. The results show that it is essential to provide information and training to encourage university students to learn how to find and manage rigorous and reliable sources of information. While searching for academic information, Spanish students tend to focus on the use of Google and, to a lesser extent, Google Scholar. Although there are no significant limitations of access to Spanish language articles, students’ attitudes remain very positive towards the concept of open access. In short, in accordance with the study results, the promotion of educational activities relating to the search for and selection of information and the use of reliable and rigorous academic content is highly recommended in the university context.

  8. Ecology of Urban Bees: A Review of Current Knowledge and Directions for Future Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon W. Frankie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban bee ecology is an emerging field that holds promise for advancing knowledge of bee community dynamics and promoting bee conservation. Published studies of bee communities in urban and suburban habitats are fewer than those documenting bees in agricultural and wildland settings. As land lost to urbanization is predicted to increase in coming years the necessity of studying urban bee populations is growing. We reviewed 59 publications on urban bee ecology with the following goals, to assess current knowledge, to highlight areas in need of further research, and to suggest applications of study findings to bee conservation. Identified trends in urban areas included the following, negative correlation between bee species richness and urban development, increase in abundance of cavity-nesters in urban habitats, and scarcity of floral specialists. Future directions for studying urban bee ecology include incorporation of landscape-scale assessments, conducting manipulative experiments and actively designing urban bee habitats.

  9. The Effect of Active Learning Based Science Camp Activities on Primary School Students' Opinions towards Scientific Knowledge and Scientific Process Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydede Yalçin, Meryem Nur

    2016-01-01

    It is important for people to be able to judge the nature while actually living in it to gain the scientific perspective which is an important skill nowadays. Within this importance, the general purpose of this study is to examine the effect of active learning based science camp activities on sixth, seventh and eighth grade students' opinions…

  10. Atmospheric transport and deposition of pesticides: An assessment of current knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pul, W.A.J. van; Bidleman, T.F.; Brorström-Lunden, E.

    1999-01-01

    there is a shortage of measurement data to evaluate the deposition and reemission processes. It was concluded that the mechanisms of transport and dispersion of pesticides can be described similarly to those for other air pollution components and these mechanisms are rather well-known. Large uncertainties are present......The current knowledge on atmospheric transport and deposition of pesticides is reviewed and discussed by a working group of experts during the Workshop on Fate of pesticides in the atmosphere; implications for risk assessment, held in Driebergen, the Netherlands, 22-24 April, 1998. In general...

  11. Comparative ecophysiology of active zoobenthic filter feeding, essence of current knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riisgård, H. U.; Larsen, P. S.

    2000-12-01

    The present contribution gives an overview of current knowledge of a comprehensive and steadily growing research field. The first section deals with water pumping and particle retention mechanisms in ciliary and muscular filter feeders. The second section examines the biological filter pumps in order to assess adaptation to the environment. Filter-feeding benthic invertebrates have evolved filter pumps to solve common basic problems. This has led to a large degree of similarity between otherwise distant standing species, which makes comparative studies interesting and important. The present review of zoobenthic filter feeding aims at accentuating such recognition.

  12. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy - historical report in comparison with the current knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowska, Agnieszka; Korwin, Magdalena; Bartnik, Ewa; Tońska, Katarzyna

    2015-01-15

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a genetic, maternally inherited disease caused by point mutations in the mitochondrial genome. LHON patients present with sudden, painless and usually bilateral loss of vision caused by optic nerve atrophy. The first clinical description of the disease was made by Theodor Leber, a German ophthalmologist, in 1871. Here we present his thorough notes about members of four families and their pedigrees. We also provide insights into the current knowledge about LHON pathology, genetics and treatment in comparison with Leber's findings.

  13. Deep brain stimulation for Parkinson disease in Australia: current scientific and clinical status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poortvliet, P C; Silburn, P A; Coyne, T J; Chenery, H J

    2015-02-01

    There is currently no cure for Parkinson disease (PD). Disease management is directed primarily at motor symptom relief, but the impact of non-motor symptoms associated with PD should not be underestimated. Medical and surgical treatment options aim to increase functional independence and quality of life. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has proven to be a safe, effective and cost-efficient surgical treatment option. In 2009, the Australian referral guidelines, developed to provide a synopsis of DBS therapy for PD, were introduced, and since then novel findings have been reported regarding the timing of intervention, target selection and symptom management. Our aim is to provide an update of DBS for PD in Australia. Intervention at earlier stages of the disease can potentially improve quality of life over a longer period with greater possibilities for meaningful social and professional contributions. For less responsive motor symptoms (e.g. freezing of gait, postural instability), the pedunculopontine nucleus has emerged as a promising new surgical target. Traditional PD treatment is focused on improvement of motor symptoms, but the disorder is also characterised by non-motor symptoms, often undiagnosed or undisclosed, that have the potential to impact quality of life to a greater extent than motor symptoms. It is essential to identify and routinely monitor for non-motor symptoms as they can emerge at all stages of the disease or can result from treatment. Many of these current advances require long-term monitoring of treatment outcomes to improve future clinical practice, refine patient selection and ensure best patient outcomes.

  14. Secondary School Congress on Environment and Sustainable Development (CEMADS): an efficient tool to improve student knowledge on scientific research and communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarque, Pilar; García-Paz, Maria; Olivares, Conchi; Fernández-Boán, Isabel

    2013-04-01

    Secondary school students in Spain commonly show little knowledge on the way science is produced and diffused. To familiarize students with the scientific method and scientific communication, we have simulated a scientific congress on Earth Sciences at the secondary school level. Since 2002, the congress takes place yearly and it is attended by teachers and students from high schools of our hometown and beyond. Since its onset, the project follows several phases: (i) In the first phase (First Call), 14- to 18-year-old students are invited to register by means of brochures containing basic information on the congress (terms, conditions and main topics). (ii) Teachers from each participating school explain students the basis of scientific posters and oral presentations and encourage them to participate in the congress. (iii) Students prepare presentations describing the results of small scientific experiments carried out for this purpose and present them to the local organizing committee. (iv) The committee then reviews all presentations and select the best ones for public exposition. (v) In the final phase, the congress takes place. It includes registration, opening ceremony attended by educational authorities, plenary conference delivered by an outstanding local scientist, coffee break, oral presentations and closing ceremony. The project lasts for one day. It has been attended by an average of 250 students and teachers from 4 schools, and has been widely reported in the local media. Post-congress evaluation shows that the project is highly motivating for students and it improves student knowledge on scientific research and communication.

  15. The growth of knowledge and the importance and benefits of scientific information supply. [Paper presented at the IRRD Information and Documentation Seminar, Prague, 2-4 July 1997].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornstra, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Up to late medieval times growth of science was limited and knowledge transfer oral or handwritten. The manufacturing of paper and the invention of printing and its further mechanisation enabled the explosive growth of scientific information from the Renaissance onward. In its turn it enabled by mec

  16. Pre-Service Teachers' Opinions about the Course on Scientific Research Methods and the Levels of Knowledge and Skills They Gained in This Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Cemal

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether the pre-service teachers taking the Scientific Research Methods course attained basic research knowledge and skills. In addition, the impact of the process, which is followed while implementing the course, on the students' anxiety and attitude during the course is examined. Moreover, the study…

  17. The growth of knowledge and the importance and benefits of scientific information supply. [Paper presented at the IRRD Information and Documentation Seminar, Prague, 2-4 July 1997].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornstra, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Up to late medieval times growth of science was limited and knowledge transfer oral or handwritten. The manufacturing of paper and the invention of printing and its further mechanisation enabled the explosive growth of scientific information from the Renaissance onward. In its turn it enabled by

  18. Knowledge Orientations of Prospective Early Childhood Teachers: A Study of Students' Scientific versus Subjective Orientations in Teacher Education Courses in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischo, Christoph; Wahl, Stefan; Strohmer, Janina; Hendler, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Recent changes in the system of early childhood teacher education in Germany raise the question of whether different academic levels of early childhood teacher education lead to different beliefs and orientations. In this study, prospective early childhood teachers' orientations to scientific knowledge and to research were explored. A…

  19. Students' Knowledge of Nuclear Science and Its Connection with Civic Scientific Literacy in Two European Contexts: The Case of Newspaper Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaparlis, Georgios; Hartzavalos, Sotiris; Nakiboglu, Canan

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear science has uses and applications that are relevant and crucial for world peace and sustainable development, so knowledge of its basic concepts and topics should constitute an integral part of civic scientific literacy. We have used two newspaper articles that deal with uses of nuclear science that are directly relevant to life, society,…

  20. 基于Wiki的高校科研知识社群的共享模式研究%Research on the Knowledge Sharing Mode of University Scientific Research Knowledge Community Based on Wiki

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟克吟

    2015-01-01

    With the help of the communication and sharing mechanism of university scientific research knowledge community, the collegial scientific researcher’s implicit knowledge can be made explicit ,and it also can promote knowledge sharing, innovation and value-added. In view of the functional requirements of the knowledge sharing platform, the system uses the prominent wiki engine MediaWiki to build a knowledge sharing platform for university scientific research knowledge community. For forming a perfect community knowledge sharing mode it establishes an incentive mechanism to inspire college teachers' interest and builds some function-al modules such as the module for mining the community knowledge resources in order to integrate academic re-source, the module of the platform of scientific research projects and an academic frontier forum.%利用高校科研知识社群的交流和分享机制,将高校科研人员的隐性知识外显化,促进高校知识的共享、创新与增值。针对知识共享平台的系统功能需求,选用较为著名的Wiki引擎MediaWiki构建高校科研知识社群共享平台,建立激励机制以激发高校教师的参与积极性,分析和挖掘社群知识资源,通过整合学术资源库、设立科研专题支撑平台、学术前沿讨论区等功能模块,以完善社群知识共享模式。

  1. Impact of nanoparticles on DNA repair processes: current knowledge and working hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriere, Marie; Sauvaigo, Sylvie; Douki, Thierry; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-01

    The potential health effects of exposure to nanomaterials (NMs) is currently heavily studied. Among the most often reported impact is DNA damage, also termed genotoxicity. While several reviews relate the DNA damage induced by NMs and the techniques that can be used to prove such effects, the question of impact of NMs on DNA repair processes has never been specifically reviewed. The present review article proposes to fill this gap of knowledge by critically describing the DNA repair processes that could be affected by nanoparticle (NP) exposure, then by reporting the current state of the art on effects of NPs on DNA repair, at the level of protein function, gene induction and post-transcriptional modifications, and taking into account the advantages and limitations of the different experimental approaches. Since little is known about this impact, working hypothesis for the future are then proposed.

  2. [The history of Mindfulness put to the test of current scientific data: unresolved questions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trousselard, M; Steiler, D; Claverie, D; Canini, F

    2014-12-01

    The first part of this paper describes the long history of the concept of Mindfulness. Contrary to the belief that Mindfulness only has Buddhist and Hindu origins, it is also rooted in Jewish, Islamic and Christian religions. Furthermore, western philosophers have described a mindful path to become more aware of thoughts, feelings, and bodily sensations. Mindfulness can be considered as a universal human ability embodied to foster clear thinking and open-heartedness. As such, this form of being requires no particular religious or cultural belief system. The current acceptance of what a mindful path is, refers to a psychological quality that involves bringing one's complete attention to present experience on a moment-to-moment basis, in a particular way: in the present moment, and nonjudgmentally. Although such a definition is well accepted in France, the French translation for Mindfulness is not easy to use: being conscious and being aware are translated with the same French word. The French language fails to clearly separate the dimensional attributes of a mindful subject from the ways for developing mindfulness through formal meditation practice. In line with this conception, stability and assessments of Mindfulness mainly were examined. How this disposition allows the development of concentration, attention and acceptance moment by moment in a nonjudgmental way is described in the second part. Particular attention is paid to its positive effects in several aspects of mental and physical health. In particular, positive effects on the ability to cope with stress are described from a physiological point of view. Third, this article intends to present neurobiological aspects currently proposed to explain the benefits of Mindfulness meditation. Modifications of cerebral networks and neurobiological functioning are described in relation to expertise in meditation practice. The hypothesis of the role of meditation on neuroplasticity is also discussed. Furthermore, the

  3. Adequacy of Physicians Knowledge Level of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation to Current Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümmu Kocalar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study is to test the level of information on CPR and suitability to current application of the phsicians practicing in hospital ANEAH. Material and Method: The form of a test of 20 questions fort his purpose has been prepared in accordance with the 2010 AHA-ERC CPR guidelines. This form distributed to volunteer physicians to fill in. A total of 173 physicians agreed to participate in he study. The results were analyzed statistically and tried to determine the factors affecting the level of information. Results:According to the results of the study physicians gender, age and the total duration of physicians and medical asistance doesn%u2019t affect the level of information. The number of CPR within 1 month positively affect the level of knowledge. The number of theoretical and practical training in medical school, have taken the positive impact the level of knowledge of physicians. The training period after graduation, significantly increased the level of physicians information. The order of these training sessions with the asistant courses, congress, seminars and lessions on the sempozims are effective. Discussion: CPR trainig programs for physicians should be standardized, updated and expanded. Recurent in-service trainig should be provided to increase phsicians knowledge on skills.

  4. Current use of medical eponyms – a need for global uniformity in scientific publications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arora Nalini

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although eponyms are widely used in medicine, they arbitrarily alternate between the possessive and nonpossessive forms. As very little is known regarding extent and distribution of this variation, the present study was planned to assess current use of eponymous term taking "Down syndrome" and "Down's syndrome" as an example. Methods This study was carried out in two phases – first phase in 1998 and second phase in 2008. In the first phase, we manually searched the terms "Down syndrome" and "Down's syndrome" in the indexes of 70 medical books, and 46 medical journals. In second phase, we performed PubMed search with both the terms, followed by text-word search for the same. Results In the first phase, there was an overall tilt towards possessive form – 62(53.4% "Down's syndrome" versus 54(46.6% "Down syndrome." However, the American publications preferred the nonpossesive form when compared with their European counterpart (40/50 versus 14/66; P Conclusion Inconsistency in the use of medical eponyms remains a major problem in literature search. Because of linguistic simplicity and technical advantages, the nonpossessive form should be used uniformly worldwide.

  5. The Immunology of Neuromyelitis Optica—Current Knowledge, Clinical Implications, Controversies and Future Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasiak-Zatonska, Michalina; Kalinowska-Lyszczarz, Alicja; Michalak, Slawomir; Kozubski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune, demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) with typical clinical manifestations of optic neuritis and acute transverse myelitis attacks. Previously believed to be a variant of multiple sclerosis (MS), it is now considered an independent disorder which needs to be differentiated from MS. The discovery of autoantibodies against aquaporin-4 (AQP4-IgGs) changed our understanding of NMO immunopathogenesis and revolutionized the diagnostic process. AQP4-IgG is currently regarded as a specific biomarker of NMO and NMO spectrum disorders (NMOsd) and a key factor in its pathogenesis. Nevertheless, AQP4-IgG seronegativity in 10%–25% of NMO patients suggests that there are several other factors involved in NMO immunopathogenesis, i.e., autoantibodies against aquaporin-1 (AQP1-Abs) and antibodies against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-IgGs). This manuscript reviews current knowledge about NMO immunopathogenesis, pointing out the controversial issues and showing potential directions for future research. Further efforts should be made to broaden our knowledge of NMO immunology which could have important implications for clinical practice, including the use of potential novel biomarkers to facilitate an early and accurate diagnosis, and modern treatment strategies improving long-term outcome of NMO patients. PMID:26950113

  6. The Immunology of Neuromyelitis Optica-Current Knowledge, Clinical Implications, Controversies and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasiak-Zatonska, Michalina; Kalinowska-Lyszczarz, Alicja; Michalak, Slawomir; Kozubski, Wojciech

    2016-03-02

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune, demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) with typical clinical manifestations of optic neuritis and acute transverse myelitis attacks. Previously believed to be a variant of multiple sclerosis (MS), it is now considered an independent disorder which needs to be differentiated from MS. The discovery of autoantibodies against aquaporin-4 (AQP4-IgGs) changed our understanding of NMO immunopathogenesis and revolutionized the diagnostic process. AQP4-IgG is currently regarded as a specific biomarker of NMO and NMO spectrum disorders (NMOsd) and a key factor in its pathogenesis. Nevertheless, AQP4-IgG seronegativity in 10%-25% of NMO patients suggests that there are several other factors involved in NMO immunopathogenesis, i.e., autoantibodies against aquaporin-1 (AQP1-Abs) and antibodies against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-IgGs). This manuscript reviews current knowledge about NMO immunopathogenesis, pointing out the controversial issues and showing potential directions for future research. Further efforts should be made to broaden our knowledge of NMO immunology which could have important implications for clinical practice, including the use of potential novel biomarkers to facilitate an early and accurate diagnosis, and modern treatment strategies improving long-term outcome of NMO patients.

  7. The Immunology of Neuromyelitis Optica—Current Knowledge, Clinical Implications, Controversies and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalina Jasiak-Zatonska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica (NMO is an autoimmune, demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS with typical clinical manifestations of optic neuritis and acute transverse myelitis attacks. Previously believed to be a variant of multiple sclerosis (MS, it is now considered an independent disorder which needs to be differentiated from MS. The discovery of autoantibodies against aquaporin-4 (AQP4-IgGs changed our understanding of NMO immunopathogenesis and revolutionized the diagnostic process. AQP4-IgG is currently regarded as a specific biomarker of NMO and NMO spectrum disorders (NMOsd and a key factor in its pathogenesis. Nevertheless, AQP4-IgG seronegativity in 10%–25% of NMO patients suggests that there are several other factors involved in NMO immunopathogenesis, i.e., autoantibodies against aquaporin-1 (AQP1-Abs and antibodies against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-IgGs. This manuscript reviews current knowledge about NMO immunopathogenesis, pointing out the controversial issues and showing potential directions for future research. Further efforts should be made to broaden our knowledge of NMO immunology which could have important implications for clinical practice, including the use of potential novel biomarkers to facilitate an early and accurate diagnosis, and modern treatment strategies improving long-term outcome of NMO patients.

  8. Current knowledge on the genetics of autism and propositions for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeron, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a heterogeneous group of neuropsychiatric disorders characterized by problems in social communication, as well as by the presence of restricted interests, stereotyped and repetitive behaviours. In the last 40years, genetic studies have provided crucial information on the causes of ASD and its diversity. In this article, I will first review the current knowledge on the genetics of ASD and then suggest three propositions to foster research in this field. Twin and familial studies estimated the heritability of ASD to be 50%. While most of the inherited part of ASD is captured by common variants, our current knowledge on the genetics of ASD comes almost exclusively from the identification of highly penetrant de novo mutations through candidate gene or whole exome/genome sequencing studies. Approximately 10% of patients with ASD, especially those with intellectual disability, are carriers of de novo copy-number (CNV) or single nucleotide variants (SNV) affecting clinically relevant genes for ASD. Given the function of these genes, it was hypothesized that abnormal synaptic plasticity and failure of neuronal/synaptic homeostasis could increase the risk of ASD. In addition to these discoveries, three propositions coming from institutions, researchers and/or communities of patients and families can be made to foster research on ASD: (i) to use more dimensional and quantitative data than diagnostic categories; (ii) to increase data sharing and research on genetic and brain diversity in human populations; (iii) to involve patients and relatives as participants for research. Hopefully, this knowledge will lead to a better diagnosis, care and integration of individuals with ASD.

  9. Stem cells for liver tissue repair:Current knowledge and perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells from extra- or intrahepatic sources have been recently characterized and their usefulness for the generation of hepatocyte-like lineages has been demonstrated.Therefore,they are being increasingly considered for future applications in liver cell therapy.In that field,liver cell transplantation is currently regarded as a possible alternative to whole organ transplantation,while stem cells possess theoretical advantages on hepatocytes as they display higher in vitro culture performances and could be used in autologous transplant procedures.However,the current research on the hepatic fate of stem cells is still facing difficulties to demonstrate the acquisition of a full mature hepatocyte phenotype,both in vitro and in vivo.Furthermore,the lack of obvious demonstration of in vivo hepatocyte-like cell functionality remains associated to low repopulation rates obtained after current transplantation procedures.The present review focuses on the current knowledge of the stern cell potential for liver therapy.We discuss the characteristics of the principal cell candidates and the methods to demonstrate their hepatic potential in vitro and in vivo.We finally address the question of the future clinical applications of stem cells for liver tissue repair and the technical aspects that remain to be investigated.

  10. NATURAL-SCIENCE EDUCATION: SCIENTIFIC AND RELIGIOUS KNOWLEDGE CORRELATION IN THE VIEW OF A SYMMETRY PRINCIPLE. PART I. THE CONTENT OF A SYMMETRY PRINCIPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly L. Gapontsev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to disclose the content of a symmetry principle; to show system hierarchy of its forms, developed in the course of evolution of scientific knowledge, a society and development of individual consciousness of the person. Methods. Based on the analysis of existing scientific sources, comparison, synthesis and generalisation of its content, the role of symmetry was found out in the course of historical formation of scientific disciplines, arrangement of an empirical set of the facts and its subsequent registration in the form of strict deductive systems. Results. It is proved that the concept «a symmetry principle» (V. I. Vernadsky was the first to coin this concept into the circulation objectifies now the highest level of scientific knowledge. Following E. Vigner’s works, it is said that set of forms of symmetry determines structure of scientific knowledge. On the one hand, these forms have got a deep empirical basis and a close connection with figurative perception of the validity; on the other – they have strict mathematical definitions and generate particular principles of symmetry of Mathematics and Physics based on axiomatic constructions of exact disciplines. Stages of formation and development of a number of scientific disciplines such as Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and Biology are compared; the peculiarities and common features of its evolution are designated. Invariants and corresponding symmetries in formation of individual consciousness of the person are allocated. Scientific novelty. Developing V. I. Vernadsky’s idea, as he used only the short characteristic of a general scientific principle of symmetry, the authors of the present study consider symmetry forms in various branches of knowledge as particular displays of the given principle. Based on the principle of symmetry as a set of symmetry forms, this principle allows the authors to take a fresh look at the decision of methodological

  11. Historical first descriptions of Cajal-Retzius cells: from pioneer studies to current knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa eGil

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Santiago Ramón y Cajal developed a great body of scientific research during the last decade of 19th century, mainly between 1888 and 1892, when he published more than 30 manuscripts. The neuronal theory, the structure of dendrites and spines, and fine microscopic descriptions of numerous neural circuits are among these studies. In addition, numerous cell types (neuronal and glial were described by Ramón y Cajal during this time using this ‘reazione nera’ or Golgi method. Among these neurons were the special cells of the molecular layer of the neocortex. These cells were also termed Cajal cells or Retzius cells by other colleagues. Today these cells are known as Cajal-Retzius cells. From the earliest description, several biological aspects of these fascinating cells have been analyzed (e.g., cell morphology, physiological properties, origin and cellular fate, putative function during cortical development, etc. In this review we will summarize in a temporal basis the emerging knowledge concerning this cell population with specific attention the pioneer studies of Santiago Ramón y Cajal.

  12. Current knowledge of environmental exposure in children during the sensitive developmental periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlroth, Norma Helena; Castelo Branco, Christina Wyss

    This study aims to identify the scientific evidence on the risks and effects of exposure to environmental contaminants in children during sensitive developmental periods. The search was performed in the Bireme database, using the terms: children's health, environmental exposure, health vulnerability, toxicity pathways and developmental disabilities in the LILACS, MEDLINE and SciELO systems. Children differ from adults in their unique physiological and behavioral characteristics and the potential exposure to risks caused by several threats in the environment. Exposure to toxic agents is analyzed through toxicokinetic processes in the several systems and organs during the sensitive phases of child development. The caused effects are reflected in the increased prevalence of congenital malformations, diarrhea, asthma, cancer, endocrine and neurological disorders, among others, with negative impacts throughout adult life. To identify the causes and understand the mechanisms involved in the genesis of these diseases is a challenge for science, as there is still a lack of knowledge on children's susceptibility to many environmental contaminants. Prevention policies and more research on child environmental health, improving the recording and surveillance of environmental risks to children's health, should be an ongoing priority in the public health field. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Status of scientific knowledge, recovery progress, and future research directions for the Gulf Sturgeon, Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi Vladykov, 1955

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulak, Kenneth J.; Parauka, F; Slack, W. Todd; Ruth, T; Randall, Michael; Luke, K; Mette, M. F; Price, M. E

    2016-01-01

    The Gulf Sturgeon, Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi, is an anadromous species of Acipenseridae and native to North America. It currently inhabits and spawns in the upper reaches of seven natal rivers along the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico from the Suwannee River, Florida, to the Pearl River, Louisiana, during spring to autumn. Next to the Alligator Gar (Atractosteus spatula), the Gulf Sturgeon is currently the largest fish species occurring in U.S. Gulf Coast rivers, attaining a length of 2.35 m and weights exceeding 135 kg, but historically attained a substantially larger size. Historically, the spawning populations existed in additional rivers from which the species has been wholly or nearly extirpated, such as the Mobile and Ochlockonee rivers, and possibly the Rio Grande River. Most Gulf Sturgeon populations were decimated by unrestricted commercial fishing between 1895–1910. Subsequently most populations remained unrecovered or extirpated due to continued harvest until the 1970s–1980s, and the construction of dams blocking access to ancestral upriver spawning grounds. Late 20th Century harvest bans and net bans enacted by the several Gulf Coast states have stabilized several populations and enabled the Suwannee River population to rebound substantially and naturally. Hatchery supplementation has not been necessary in this regard to date. Sturgeon are resilient and adaptable fishes with a geological history of 150 million years. Research undertaken since the 1970s has addressed many aspects of Gulf Sturgeon life history, reproduction, migration, population biology, habitat requirements, and other aspects of species biology. However, many knowledge gaps remain, prominently including the life history of early developmental stages in the first year of life. Natural population recovery is evident for the Suwannee River population, but seems promising as well for at least four other populations. The Pascagoula and Pearl River populations face a challenging

  14. Knowledge Gaps in Cardiovascular Care of Older Adults: A Scientific Statement from the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and American Geriatrics Society: Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Michael W; Chyun, Deborah A; Skolnick, Adam H; Alexander, Karen P; Forman, Daniel E; Kitzman, Dalane W; Maurer, Mathew S; McClurken, James B; Resnick, Barbara M; Shen, Win K; Tirschwell, David L

    2016-11-01

    The incidence and prevalence of most cardiovascular disorders increase with age, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death and major disability in adults aged 75 and older. Despite the effect of CVD on quality of life, morbidity, and mortality in older adults, individuals aged 75 and older have been markedly underrepresented in most major cardiovascular trials, and virtually all trials have excluded older adults with complex comorbidities, significant physical or cognitive disabilities, frailty, or residence in nursing homes and assisted living facilities. As a result, current guidelines are unable to provide evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of older adults typical of those encountered in routine clinical practice. The objectives of this scientific statement are to summarize current guideline recommendations as they apply to older adults, identify critical gaps in knowledge that preclude informed evidence-based decision-making, and recommend future research to close existing knowledge gaps. To achieve these objectives, a detailed review was conducted of current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) and American Stroke Association (ASA) guidelines to identify content and recommendations that explicitly targeted older adults. A pervasive lack of evidence to guide clinical decision-making in older adults with CVD was found, as well as a paucity of data on the effect of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions on outcomes that are particularly important to older adults, such as quality of life, physical function, and maintenance of independence. Accordingly, there is a critical need for a multitude of large population-based studies and clinical trials that include a broad spectrum of older adults representative of those seen in clinical practice and that incorporate relevant outcomes important to older adults in the study design. The results of these studies will provide the foundation for

  15. Knowledge Gaps in Cardiovascular Care of the Older Adult Population: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and American Geriatrics Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Michael W; Chyun, Deborah A; Skolnick, Adam H; Alexander, Karen P; Forman, Daniel E; Kitzman, Dalane W; Maurer, Mathew S; McClurken, James B; Resnick, Barbara M; Shen, Win K; Tirschwell, David L

    2016-05-24

    The incidence and prevalence of most cardiovascular disorders increase with age, and cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and major disability in adults ≥75 years of age; however, despite the large impact of cardiovascular disease on quality of life, morbidity, and mortality in older adults, patients aged ≥75 years have been markedly underrepresented in most major cardiovascular trials, and virtually all trials have excluded older patients with complex comorbidities, significant physical or cognitive disabilities, frailty, or residence in a nursing home or assisted living facility. As a result, current guidelines are unable to provide evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of older patients typical of those encountered in routine clinical practice. The objectives of this scientific statement are to summarize current guideline recommendations as they apply to older adults, identify critical gaps in knowledge that preclude informed evidence-based decision making, and recommend future research to close existing knowledge gaps. To achieve these objectives, we conducted a detailed review of current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association and American Stroke Association guidelines to identify content and recommendations that explicitly targeted older patients. We found that there is a pervasive lack of evidence to guide clinical decision making in older patients with cardiovascular disease, as well as a paucity of data on the impact of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions on key outcomes that are particularly important to older patients, such as quality of life, physical function, and maintenance of independence. Accordingly, there is a critical need for a multitude of large population-based studies and clinical trials that include a broad spectrum of older patients representative of those seen in clinical practice and that incorporate relevant outcomes important to older patients in the study design. The

  16. Knowledge Gaps in Cardiovascular Care of the Older Adult Population: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and American Geriatrics Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Michael W; Chyun, Deborah A; Skolnick, Adam H; Alexander, Karen P; Forman, Daniel E; Kitzman, Dalane W; Maurer, Mathew S; McClurken, James B; Resnick, Barbara M; Shen, Win K; Tirschwell, David L

    2016-05-24

    The incidence and prevalence of most cardiovascular disorders increase with age, and cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and major disability in adults ≥75 years of age; however, despite the large impact of cardiovascular disease on quality of life, morbidity, and mortality in older adults, patients aged ≥75 years have been markedly underrepresented in most major cardiovascular trials, and virtually all trials have excluded older patients with complex comorbidities, significant physical or cognitive disabilities, frailty, or residence in a nursing home or assisted living facility. As a result, current guidelines are unable to provide evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of older patients typical of those encountered in routine clinical practice. The objectives of this scientific statement are to summarize current guideline recommendations as they apply to older adults, identify critical gaps in knowledge that preclude informed evidence-based decision making, and recommend future research to close existing knowledge gaps. To achieve these objectives, we conducted a detailed review of current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association and American Stroke Association guidelines to identify content and recommendations that explicitly targeted older patients. We found that there is a pervasive lack of evidence to guide clinical decision making in older patients with cardiovascular disease, as well as a paucity of data on the impact of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions on key outcomes that are particularly important to older patients, such as quality of life, physical function, and maintenance of independence. Accordingly, there is a critical need for a multitude of large population-based studies and clinical trials that include a broad spectrum of older patients representative of those seen in clinical practice and that incorporate relevant outcomes important to older patients in the study design. The

  17. Survival in extreme environments - on the current knowledge of adaptations in tardigrades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møbjerg, N; Halberg, K A; Jørgensen, A; Persson, D; Bjørn, M; Ramløv, H; Kristensen, R M

    2011-07-01

    Tardigrades are microscopic animals found worldwide in aquatic as well as terrestrial ecosystems. They belong to the invertebrate superclade Ecdysozoa, as do the two major invertebrate model organisms: Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. We present a brief description of the tardigrades and highlight species that are currently used as models for physiological and molecular investigations. Tardigrades are uniquely adapted to a range of environmental extremes. Cryptobiosis, currently referred to as a reversible ametabolic state induced by e.g. desiccation, is common especially among limno-terrestrial species. It has been shown that the entry and exit of cryptobiosis may involve synthesis of bioprotectants in the form of selective carbohydrates and proteins as well as high levels of antioxidant enzymes and other free radical scavengers. However, at present a general scheme of mechanisms explaining this phenomenon is lacking. Importantly, recent research has shown that tardigrades even in their active states may be extremely tolerant to environmental stress, handling extreme levels of ionizing radiation, large fluctuation in external salinity and avoiding freezing by supercooling to below -20 °C, presumably relying on efficient DNA repair mechanisms and osmoregulation. This review summarizes the current knowledge on adaptations found among tardigrades, and presents new data on tardigrade cell numbers and osmoregulation.

  18. Invasive Carassius Carp in Georgia: Current state of knowledge and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bella JAPOSHVILI, Levan MUMLADZE, Fahrettin KÜÇÜK

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In Georgia, crucian carp Carassius carassius (Linnaeus, 1758 was known from only one locality after Kesslers record (1877–1878 with no new findings until 1985. Since then C. carassius rapidly and simultaneously invaded almost all water bodies of Georgia. In 2004, it was for the first time noted that this invasive Carassius sp. could not be a C. Carassius, but was a form of Carassius gibelio (Bloch, 1792. However no further data is available about this invasive species in Georgia. The aim of the present study was to investigate taxonomic status of Carassius sp. in Georgia using mtDNA phylogenetic analyses and morphometric study of truss network system. Genetic analysis revealed that invasive Carassius sp. is closely related to the C. gibelio from Turkey and other countries. In contrast, morphometrically Carassius sp. from Georgia can be easily differentiated from those of Turkey indicating high intraspecific variability. This is the first time discussion on the current knowledge of the present distribution of invasive carp in Georgia with identifying current problems and future research directions needed [Current Zoology 59 (6: 732–739, 2013].

  19. How the Contents of a Bachelor's Degree Final Project of Engineering Evolve towards Innovative Scientific Knowledge: Keys to Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Cristina; Guinea, Ana; Callau, Sara; Bengoa, Christophe; Basco, Josep; Gavaldà, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    The Bachelor's Degree Final Project (BDFP) of our school aims to develop a real constructive project, enhance cooperative teamwork and increase productivity of students. We present a real case study, related with engineering and scientific innovation results obtained by BDFP, which has led to an innovative scientific study presented at the 7th…

  20. ['I'm worthless' and other forms of self-criticism: Current knowledge and therapeutic interventions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, Pauline; Kramer, Ueli

    2015-01-01

    Self-criticism is considered as a harsh or punitive evaluation of the self. It is omnipresent in culture, in daily life as well as in psychotherapy. Self-criticism can lead to question oneself but can also open new perspectives and guide us. However, it can become excessive, rigid, and might turn out to be deleterious. This present article focuses on the concept of self-criticism in clinical psychology and psychotherapy and aims to review current knowledge about this topic. First, its definition and the reasons for its development in individuals will be presented. Second, a description of the links between self-criticism and psychopathology will be made, in particular regarding depression. Finally, the third part of this article will be dedicated to the therapeutic interventions that can reduce self-criticism.

  1. Chemical and molecular factors in irritable bowel syndrome: current knowledge, challenges, and unanswered questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Michael; Oduyebo, Ibironke; Halawi, Houssam

    2016-11-01

    Several chemical and molecular factors in the intestine are reported to be altered and to have a potentially significant role in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), particularly in IBS with diarrhea. These include bile acids; short-chain fatty acids; mucosal barrier proteins; mast cell products such as histamine, proteases, and tryptase; enteroendocrine cell products; and mucosal mRNAs, proteins, and microRNAs. This article reviews the current knowledge and unanswered questions in the pathobiology of the chemical and molecular factors in IBS. Evidence continues to point to significant roles in pathogenesis of these chemical and molecular mechanisms, which may therefore constitute potential targets for future research and therapy. However, it is still necessary to address the interaction between these factors in the gut and to appraise how they may influence hypervigilance in the central nervous system in patients with IBS. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Physiological Reactivity to Psychological Stress in Human Pregnancy: Current Knowledge and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular and neuroendocrine reactivity to acute stress are important predictors of health outcomes in non-pregnant populations. Greater magnitude and duration of physiological responses have been associated with increased risk of hypertensive disorders and diabetes, greater susceptibility to infectious illnesses, suppression of cell-mediated immunity as well as risk for depression and anxiety disorders. Stress reactivity during pregnancy has unique implications for maternal health, birth outcomes, and fetal development. However, as compared to the larger literature, our understanding of the predictors and consequences of exaggerated stress reactivity in pregnancy is limited. This paper reviews the current state of this literature with an emphasis on gaps in knowledge and future directions. PMID:22800930

  3. The enigmatic role of RUNX1 in female-related cancers - current knowledge & future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggio, Alessandra I; Blyth, Karen

    2017-08-01

    Historically associated with the aetiology of human leukaemia, the runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1) gene has in recent years reared its head in an assortment of epithelial cancers. This review discusses the state-of-the-art knowledge of the enigmatic role played by RUNX1 in female-related cancers of the breast, the uterus and the ovary. The weight of evidence accumulated so far is indicative of a very context-dependent role, as either an oncogene or a tumour suppressor. This is corroborated by high-throughput sequencing endeavours which report different genetic alterations affecting the gene, including amplification, deep deletion and mutations. Herein, we attempt to dissect that contextual role by firstly giving an overview of what is currently known about RUNX1 function in these specific tumour types, and secondly by delving into connections between this transcription factor and the physiology of these female tissues. In doing so, RUNX1 emerges not only as a gene involved in female sex development but also as a crucial mediator of female hormone signalling. In view of RUNX1 now being listed as a driver gene, we believe that greater knowledge of the mechanisms underlying its functional dualism in epithelial cancers is worthy of further investigation. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  4. Crucial knowledge gaps in current understanding of climate change impacts on coral reef fishes

    KAUST Repository

    Wilson, S. K.

    2010-02-26

    Expert opinion was canvassed to identify crucial knowledge gaps in current understanding of climate change impacts on coral reef fishes. Scientists that had published three or more papers on the effects of climate and environmental factors on reef fishes were invited to submit five questions that, if addressed, would improve our understanding of climate change effects on coral reef fishes. Thirty-three scientists provided 155 questions, and 32 scientists scored these questions in terms of: (i) identifying a knowledge gap, (ii) achievability, (iii) applicability to a broad spectrum of species and reef habitats, and (iv) priority. Forty-two per cent of the questions related to habitat associations and community dynamics of fish, reflecting the established effects and immediate concern relating to climate-induced coral loss and habitat degradation. However, there were also questions on fish demographics, physiology, behaviour and management, all of which could be potentially affected by climate change. Irrespective of their individual expertise and background, scientists scored questions from different topics similarly, suggesting limited bias and recognition of a need for greater interdisciplinary and collaborative research. Presented here are the 53 highest-scoring unique questions. These questions should act as a guide for future research, providing a basis for better assessment and management of climate change impacts on coral reefs and associated fish communities.

  5. Crucial knowledge gaps in current understanding of climate change impacts on coral reef fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, S K; Adjeroud, M; Bellwood, D R; Berumen, M L; Booth, D; Bozec, Y-Marie; Chabanet, P; Cheal, A; Cinner, J; Depczynski, M; Feary, D A; Gagliano, M; Graham, N A J; Halford, A R; Halpern, B S; Harborne, A R; Hoey, A S; Holbrook, S J; Jones, G P; Kulbiki, M; Letourneur, Y; De Loma, T L; McClanahan, T; McCormick, M I; Meekan, M G; Mumby, P J; Munday, P L; Ohman, M C; Pratchett, M S; Riegl, B; Sano, M; Schmitt, R J; Syms, C

    2010-03-15

    Expert opinion was canvassed to identify crucial knowledge gaps in current understanding of climate change impacts on coral reef fishes. Scientists that had published three or more papers on the effects of climate and environmental factors on reef fishes were invited to submit five questions that, if addressed, would improve our understanding of climate change effects on coral reef fishes. Thirty-three scientists provided 155 questions, and 32 scientists scored these questions in terms of: (i) identifying a knowledge gap, (ii) achievability, (iii) applicability to a broad spectrum of species and reef habitats, and (iv) priority. Forty-two per cent of the questions related to habitat associations and community dynamics of fish, reflecting the established effects and immediate concern relating to climate-induced coral loss and habitat degradation. However, there were also questions on fish demographics, physiology, behaviour and management, all of which could be potentially affected by climate change. Irrespective of their individual expertise and background, scientists scored questions from different topics similarly, suggesting limited bias and recognition of a need for greater interdisciplinary and collaborative research. Presented here are the 53 highest-scoring unique questions. These questions should act as a guide for future research, providing a basis for better assessment and management of climate change impacts on coral reefs and associated fish communities.

  6. Current knowledge on the photoneuroendocrine regulation of reproduction in temperate fish species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migaud, H; Davie, A; Taylor, J F

    2010-01-01

    Seasonality is an important adaptive trait in temperate fish species as it entrains or regulates most physiological events such as reproductive cycle, growth profile, locomotor activity and key life-stage transitions. Photoperiod is undoubtedly one of the most predictable environmental signals that can be used by most living organisms including fishes in temperate areas. This said, however, understanding of how such a simple signal can dictate the time of gonadal recruitment and spawning, for example, is a complex task. Over the past few decades, many scientists attempted to unravel the roots of photoperiodic signalling in teleosts by investigating the role of melatonin in reproduction, but without great success. In fact, the hormone melatonin is recognized as the biological time-keeping hormone in fishes mainly due to the fact that it reflects the seasonal variation in daylength across the whole animal kingdom rather than the existence of direct evidences of its role in the entrainment of reproduction in fishes. Recently, however, some new studies clearly suggested that melatonin interacts with the reproductive cascade at a number of key steps such as through the dopaminergic system in the brain or the synchronization of the final oocyte maturation in the gonad. Interestingly, in the past few years, additional pathways have become apparent in the search for a fish photoneuroendocrine system including the clock-gene network and kisspeptin signalling and although research on these topics are still in their infancy, it is moving at great pace. This review thus aims to bring together the current knowledge on the photic control of reproduction mainly focusing on seasonal temperate fish species and shape the current working hypotheses supported by recent findings obtained in teleosts or based on knowledge gathered in mammalian and avian species. Four of the main potential regulatory systems (light perception, melatonin, clock genes and kisspeptin) in fish reproduction

  7. Directions of scientific literature in knowledge management from the perspective of their relationships with innovation, information and technology management

    OpenAIRE

    Ligia Maria Moura Madeira; Thais Elaine Vick; Marcelo Seido Nagano

    2013-01-01

    Given the establishment of new journals as a way to fill in gaps and further studies in the area of Knowledge Management and the impact Knowledge Management has had for two decades as a tool for competitive advantage, the aim of the study was to point out tendencies and discuss academic production in Knowledge Management over the years. As the focus of discussion, the article analyzes the relationship of Knowledge Management between Innovation Management, Technology Management and Information...

  8. Conhecimento científico, seu ensino e aprendizagem: atualidade do construtivismo Scientific knowledge, its teaching and learning: constructivism present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Regina Pessôa Campello Queiroz

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo parte de uma ilustração acerca da etimologia da palavra construtivismo - semear coletivamente para, em seguida, reunir sementes a serem disponibilizadas aos alunos durante os cursos formação de professores de Física. Entre elas estão argumentos a favor de uma versão sustentável para o Construtivismo, reconhecendo críticas, de origem epistemológica, psicológica ou mesmo pedagógica, a aspectos particulares de versões que têm circulado entre pesquisadores da área de pesquisa em educação em ciências nos últimos anos. Com o compromisso de não nos limitarmos às críticas e diante da complexidade dos sistemas educacionais nos quais o debate sobre o Construtivismo é travado, sua versão pedagógica proposta neste trabalho integra uma visão de realidade mais próxima à aceitável pela comunidade de pesquisadores e professores de Física e ao valioso trabalho de criação de conhecimento científico na escola, que a comunidade de pesquisadores em ensino de Física vem realizando há mais de duas décadas no Brasil.The present article comes from an illustration of the etymology of the word constructivism - to sow together - and then gather the seeds that will be put at the pupils disposal throughout the courses for the development of Physics teachers. Among them there are arguments in favor of a sustainable version of Constructivism, recognizing the critics of epistemological, psychological or even pedagogical origin, to a few aspects of versions that have been circulated by researchers of education in science, in the last years. With the commitment of not being limited to criticism and in light of the complexity of educational systems about which the debate about Constructivism takes place, the pedagogical version proposed in this work integrates a vision of reality closer to that acceptable by the community of researchers and professors of Physics. There is valuable work in constructivist teaching of scientific

  9. ANDRILL: INVOLVING TEACHERS IN FIELD RESEARCH ENHANCES THE TRANSFER OF SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE TO CLASSROOMS AND TO OTHER EDUCATORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattadori, M.; Huffman, L. T.; Trummel, B.

    2009-12-01

    For most educators, the end of a field research experience is truly the beginning. From the knowledge gained and the excitement of living and working in a harsh environment like Antarctica, ARISE (ANDRILL Research Immersion for Science Educators) participants create enhanced learning experiences and resources for their students and for the professional development of other teachers. ANDRILL (Antarctic geological DRILLing) is an multi-national and interdisciplinary research project involving Italy, Germany , New Zealand, and USA. The core concept of its Education and Public Outreach Program is to embed educators as integral members on the science research teams, allowing them to participate in every phase of the mission. Their primary goal is to develop effective and innovative educational approaches for the communication of the scientific and technical aspects of the drilling program. ANDRILL has developed an exemplary teacher research experience model that differs from most by supporting a collaborative team of international educators rather than just one teacher. During the first two years of drilling projects, 2006 and 2007, ANDRILL took 16 educators from 4 countries to Antarctica. From those experiences, a growing collaborative network of polar science educators is nurtured, many valuable resources and examples of professional development have been created, and lessons have been learned and evaluated for future teacher research immersion experiences. An Italian ARISE participant and ANDRILL’s Education and Outreach Coordinator will present how ARISE has been at the core of developing transformational programs and resources in both countries including: [1] Flexhibit, a digital series of climate change materials designed for informal and formal learning environments that have been translated into Italian, German, French, Arabic, Spanish, and New Zealand English, (2) C2S2: Climate Change Student Summits, which provide professional development and resources for

  10. What Is the Current Level of Asthma Knowledge in Elementary, Middle, and High School Teachers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    This study examined teacher asthma knowledge based on three areas including (a) the level of teacher asthma knowledge in the Maury County Public School System, (b) the level of teacher asthma knowledge based on five demographic factors, and (c) the level of teacher asthma knowledge in the Maury County Public School System compared with teacher…

  11. Current knowledge on tumour induction by computed tomography should be carefully used

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candela-Juan, Cristian [La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Radioprotection Department, Valencia (Spain); Montoro, Alegria; Villaescusa, Juan Ignacio [La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Radioprotection Department, Valencia (Spain); IIS La Fe, Biomedical Imaging Research Group GIBI230, Valencia (Spain); Ruiz-Martinez, Enrique; Marti-Bonmati, Luis [IIS La Fe, Biomedical Imaging Research Group GIBI230, Valencia (Spain); La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Valencia (Spain)

    2014-03-15

    Risks associated to ionising radiation from medical imaging techniques have focused the attention of the medical society and general population. This risk is aimed to determine the probability that a tumour is induced as a result of a computed tomography (CT) examination since it makes nowadays the biggest contribution to the collective dose. Several models of cancer induction have been reported in the literature, with diametrically different implications. This article reviews those models, focusing on the ones used by the scientific community to estimate CT detriments. Current estimates of the probability that a CT examination induces cancer are reported, highlighting its low magnitude (near the background level) and large sources of uncertainty. From this objective review, it is concluded that epidemiological data with more accurate dosimetric estimates are needed. Prediction of the number of tumours that will be induced in population exposed to ionising radiation should be avoided or, if given, it should be accompanied by a realistic evaluation of its uncertainty and of the advantages of CTs. Otherwise they may have a negative impact in both the medical community and the patients. Reducing doses even more is not justified if that compromises clinical image quality in a necessary investigation. (orig.)

  12. The order Corallinales sensu lato (Rhodophyta in the Iberian Atlantic: current state of knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Lugilde

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A review of the order Corallinales sensu lato in the Atlantic Iberian Peninsula is presented with the aim of assessing its current state of knowledge in comparison with adjacent areas (British Isles-Atlantic France, Macaronesia and Iberian Mediterranean. According to the information compiled from more than 250 publications, herbarium data and manuscripts, we concluded that Atlantic Iberian coralline algae have been poorly studied, which resulted in only 49 species reported. By contrast, Macaronesia is the most species-rich region (91, followed by Spanish Mediterranean (67 and the British Isles-Atlantic France (61. In the Atlantic Iberian Peninsula, 17 species occurred commonly (present in more than 50% of the coastline, particularly those corresponding to the genera Amphiroa, Jania, Lithophyllum, Mesophyllum, and Phymatolithon. Instead, the genera Harveylithon, Hydrolithon, Leptophytum, Lithothamnion, Neogoniolithon and Pneophyllum have been occasionally reported. In the Atlantic Iberian Peninsula and adjacent regions, the epilithic growth-form was dominant, followed by the epiphytic, epizoic and the unattached (maerl/rodoliths; besides, sciaphilous taxa were more abundant than photophilous species. The low intertidal and shallow subtidal harbour a high diversity of coralline algae, as well as semi-exposed coasts or areas affected by currents. The present study confirms that studies on the Atlantic Iberian coralline algae are scarce, and that further research on this group is required.

  13. B-group vitamin production by lactic acid bacteria--current knowledge and potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, J G; Laiño, J E; del Valle, M Juarez; Vannini, V; van Sinderen, D; Taranto, M P; de Valdez, G Font; de Giori, G Savoy; Sesma, F

    2011-12-01

    Although most vitamins are present in a variety of foods, human vitamin deficiencies still occur in many countries, mainly because of malnutrition not only as a result of insufficient food intake but also because of unbalanced diets. Even though most lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are auxotrophic for several vitamins, it is now known that certain strains have the capability to synthesize water-soluble vitamins such as those included in the B-group (folates, riboflavin and vitamin B(12) amongst others). This review article will show the current knowledge of vitamin biosynthesis by LAB and show how the proper selection of starter cultures and probiotic strains could be useful in preventing clinical and subclinical vitamin deficiencies. Here, several examples will be presented where vitamin-producing LAB led to the elaboration of novel fermented foods with increased and bioavailable vitamins. In addition, the use of genetic engineering strategies to increase vitamin production or to create novel vitamin-producing strains will also be discussed. This review will show that the use of vitamin-producing LAB could be a cost-effective alternative to current vitamin fortification programmes and be useful in the elaboration of novel vitamin-enriched products. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Circulation and production of knowledge and scientific practices in southern America in the eighteenth century: an analysis of Materia medica misionera, a manuscript by Pedro Montenegro (1710).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Eliane Cristina Deckmann; Poletto, Roberto

    2012-12-01

    The article analyzes a 1790 manuscript copy of Materia medica misionera, a book written in 1710 by a Jesuit, Pedro Montenegro. Alongside knowledge of a magical or religious nature, and exotic ingredients for the recipes, this work also contains the unmistakable presence of Hippocratic and Galenic conceptions and a growing empiricism, characteristic of the scientific transformations seen in the eighteenth century. The analysis of this work also prompts reflections about the diffusion, circulation and production of pharmacological and medical knowledge in the first half of the eighteenth century within the missions and colleges installed in the area that was the Jesuit Province of Paraguay, southern America.

  15. Outline of Synthesis of Cognitive and Socio-cultural Foundations of Scientific Knowledge Evolution in Research Programs of Western Philosophy of Science

    OpenAIRE

    Kornienko, Anna Anatolievna

    2015-01-01

    The article analyses the development of cognitive sociology of science, in the object field of which connection of cognitive and social structures of science is traced. The role of context in scientific knowledge formation is defined. It is stated that the basis for development of research program of cognitive sociology of science appeared to be reconsideration of the standard concept of science as a complex of gnoseological, epistemological and methodological interpretations of nature and mo...

  16. Outline of Synthesis of Cognitive and Socio-cultural Foundations of Scientific Knowledge Evolution in Research Programs of Western Philosophy of Science

    OpenAIRE

    Kornienko, Anna Anatolievna

    2015-01-01

    The article analyses the development of cognitive sociology of science, in the object field of which connection of cognitive and social structures of science is traced. The role of context in scientific knowledge formation is defined. It is stated that the basis for development of research program of cognitive sociology of science appeared to be reconsideration of the standard concept of science as a complex of gnoseological, epistemological and methodological interpretations of nature and mo...

  17. Sea urchin overgrazing of seagrasses: A review of current knowledge on causes, consequences, and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklöf, J. S.; de la Torre-Castro, M.; Gullström, M.; Uku, J.; Muthiga, N.; Lyimo, T.; Bandeira, S. O.

    2008-09-01

    Sea urchins are one of the most common seagrass macro-grazers in contemporary seagrass systems. Occasionally their grazing rates exceed seagrass growth rates, a phenomenon sometimes referred to as overgrazing. Because of a reported increasing frequency of overgrazing events, concomitant with loss of seagrass-associated ecosystem services, it has been suggested that overgrazing is one of the key threats to tropical and subtropical seagrasses. In light of this, we review the current knowledge on causes, consequences, and management of sea urchin overgrazing of seagrasses. Initially we argue that the definition of overgrazing must include scale and impairment of ecosystem services, since this is the de facto definition used in the literature, and will highlight the potential societal costs of seagrass overgrazing. A review of 16 identified cases suggests that urchin overgrazing is a global phenomenon, ranging from temperate to tropical coastal waters and involving at least 11 seagrass and 7 urchin species. Even though most overgrazing events seem to affect areas of enrichment), top-down (reduced predation control due to e.g. overfishing), "side-in" mechanisms (e.g. changes in water temperature) and natural population fluctuations. Based on recent studies, there seems to be fairly strong support for the top-down and bottom-up hypotheses. However, many potential drivers often co-occur and interact, especially in areas with high anthropogenic pressure, suggesting that multiple disturbances—by simultaneously reducing predation control, increasing urchin recruitment and reducing the resistance of seagrasses—could pave the way for overgrazing. In management, the most common response to overgrazing has been to remove urchins, but limited knowledge of direct and indirect effects makes it difficult to assess the applicability and sustainability of this method. Based on the wide knowledge gaps, which severely limits management, we suggest that future research should focus

  18. Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF: properties and frontier of current knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aas IH Monrad

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF is well known internationally and widely used for scoring the severity of illness in psychiatry. Problems with GAF show a need for its further development (for example validity and reliability problems. The aim of the present study was to identify gaps in current knowledge about properties of GAF that are of interest for further development. Properties of GAF are defined as characteristic traits or attributes that serve to define GAF (or may have a role to define a future updated GAF. Methods A thorough literature search was conducted. Results A number of gaps in knowledge about the properties of GAF were identified: for example, the current GAF has a continuous scale, but is a continuous or categorical scale better? Scoring is not performed by setting a mark directly on a visual scale, but could this improve scoring? Would new anchor points, including key words and examples, improve GAF (anchor points for symptoms, functioning, positive mental health, prognosis, improvement of generic properties, exclusion criteria for scoring in 10-point intervals, and anchor points at the endpoints of the scale? Is a change in the number of anchor points and their distribution over the total scale important? Could better instructions for scoring within 10-point intervals improve scoring? Internationally, both single and dual scales for GAF are used, but what is the advantage of having separate symptom and functioning scales? Symptom (GAF-S and functioning (GAF-F scales should score different dimensions and still be correlated, but what is the best combination of definitions for GAF-S and GAF-F? For GAF with more than two scales there is limited empirical testing, but what is gained or lost by using more than two scales? Conclusions In the history of GAF, its basic properties have undergone limited changes. Problems with GAF may, in part, be due to lack of a research programme testing the effects of

  19. GENESIS SciFlo: Scientific Knowledge Creation on the Grid Using a Semantically-Enabled Dataflow Execution Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, B. D.; Manipon, G.; Tang, B.; Mazzoni, D.; Fetzer, E.; Dobinson, E.; Yunck, T.

    2005-12-01

    The General Earth Science Investigation Suite (GENESIS) project is a NASA-sponsored partnership between the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, academia, and NASA data centers to develop a new suite of Web Services tools to facilitate multi-sensor investigations in Earth System Science. The goal of GENESIS is to enable large-scale, multi-instrument atmospheric science using combined datasets from the AIRS, MODIS, MISR, and GPS sensors. Investigations include cross-comparison of spaceborne climate sensors, cloud spectral analysis, study of upper troposphere-stratosphere water transport, study of the aerosol indirect cloud effect, and global climate model validation. The challenges are to bring together very large datasets, reformat and understand the individual instrument retrievals, co-register or re-grid the retrieved physical parameters, perform computationally-intensive data fusion and data mining operations, and accumulate complex statistics over months to years of data. To meet these challenges, we have developed a Grid computing and dataflow framework, named SciFlo, in which we are deploying a set of versatile and reusable operators for data access, subsetting, registration, mining, fusion, compression, and advanced statistical analysis. SciFlo is a system for Scientific Knowledge Creation on the Grid using a Semantically-Enabled Dataflow Execution Environment. SciFlo leverages Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) Web Services and the Grid Computing standards (WS-* & Globus Alliance toolkits), and enables scientists to do multi-instrument Earth Science by assembling reusable Web Services and native executables into a distributed computing flow (tree of operators). The SciFlo client & server engines optimize the execution of such distributed data flows and allow the user to transparently find and use datasets and operators without worrying about the actual location of the Grid resources. The scientist injects a distributed computation into the Grid by simply filling

  20. The Influence of Subject Knowledge and Second Language Proficiency on the Reading Comprehension of Scientific and Technical Discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tim; Berry, Vivien

    2000-01-01

    Examined the effect of background knowledge and second language proficiency in relation to two sets of specific reading materials. One came from an IELTS reading module related to science and technology; the other was from a highly-specific popular science text. Results showed that both language proficiency and background knowledge predicted…

  1. Targeted Therapy Database (TTD: a model to match patient's molecular profile with current knowledge on cancer biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Mocellin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The efficacy of current anticancer treatments is far from satisfactory and many patients still die of their disease. A general agreement exists on the urgency of developing molecularly targeted therapies, although their implementation in the clinical setting is in its infancy. In fact, despite the wealth of preclinical studies addressing these issues, the difficulty of testing each targeted therapy hypothesis in the clinical arena represents an intrinsic obstacle. As a consequence, we are witnessing a paradoxical situation where most hypotheses about the molecular and cellular biology of cancer remain clinically untested and therefore do not translate into a therapeutic benefit for patients. OBJECTIVE: To present a computational method aimed to comprehensively exploit the scientific knowledge in order to foster the development of personalized cancer treatment by matching the patient's molecular profile with the available evidence on targeted therapy. METHODS: To this aim we focused on melanoma, an increasingly diagnosed malignancy for which the need for novel therapeutic approaches is paradigmatic since no effective treatment is available in the advanced setting. Relevant data were manually extracted from peer-reviewed full-text original articles describing any type of anti-melanoma targeted therapy tested in any type of experimental or clinical model. To this purpose, Medline, Embase, Cancerlit and the Cochrane databases were searched. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: We created a manually annotated database (Targeted Therapy Database, TTD where the relevant data are gathered in a formal representation that can be computationally analyzed. Dedicated algorithms were set up for the identification of the prevalent therapeutic hypotheses based on the available evidence and for ranking treatments based on the molecular profile of individual patients. In this essay we describe the principles and computational algorithms of an original method

  2. Targeted Therapy Database (TTD): A Model to Match Patient's Molecular Profile with Current Knowledge on Cancer Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone; Shrager, Jeff; Scolyer, Richard; Pasquali, Sandro; Verdi, Daunia; Marincola, Francesco M.; Briarava, Marta; Gobbel, Randy; Rossi, Carlo; Nitti, Donato

    2010-01-01

    Background The efficacy of current anticancer treatments is far from satisfactory and many patients still die of their disease. A general agreement exists on the urgency of developing molecularly targeted therapies, although their implementation in the clinical setting is in its infancy. In fact, despite the wealth of preclinical studies addressing these issues, the difficulty of testing each targeted therapy hypothesis in the clinical arena represents an intrinsic obstacle. As a consequence, we are witnessing a paradoxical situation where most hypotheses about the molecular and cellular biology of cancer remain clinically untested and therefore do not translate into a therapeutic benefit for patients. Objective To present a computational method aimed to comprehensively exploit the scientific knowledge in order to foster the development of personalized cancer treatment by matching the patient's molecular profile with the available evidence on targeted therapy. Methods To this aim we focused on melanoma, an increasingly diagnosed malignancy for which the need for novel therapeutic approaches is paradigmatic since no effective treatment is available in the advanced setting. Relevant data were manually extracted from peer-reviewed full-text original articles describing any type of anti-melanoma targeted therapy tested in any type of experimental or clinical model. To this purpose, Medline, Embase, Cancerlit and the Cochrane databases were searched. Results and Conclusions We created a manually annotated database (Targeted Therapy Database, TTD) where the relevant data are gathered in a formal representation that can be computationally analyzed. Dedicated algorithms were set up for the identification of the prevalent therapeutic hypotheses based on the available evidence and for ranking treatments based on the molecular profile of individual patients. In this essay we describe the principles and computational algorithms of an original method developed to fully exploit

  3. Process based inventory of isoprenoid emissions from European forests: model comparisons, current knowledge and uncertainties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Keenan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Large uncertainties exist in our knowledge of regional emissions of non-methane biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC. We address these uncertainties through a two-pronged approach by compiling a state of the art database of the emissions potentials for 80 European forest species, and by a model assessment and inter-comparison, both at the local and regional scale, under present and projected future climatic conditions. We coupled three contrasting isoprenoid models with the ecophysiological forest model GOTILWA+ to explore the interactive effects of climate, vegetation distribution, and productivity, on leaf and ecosystem isoprenoid emissions, and to consider model behaviour in present climate and under projected future climate change conditions. Hourly, daily and annual isoprene emissions as simulated by the models were evaluated against flux measurements. The validation highlighted a general model capacity to capture gross fluxes but inefficiencies in capturing short term variability. A regional inventory of isoprenoid emissions for European forests was created using each of the three modelling approaches. The models agreed on an average European emissions budget of 1.03 TgC a−1 for isoprene and 0.97 TgC a−1 for monoterpenes for the period 1960–1990, which was dominated by a few species with largest aerial coverage. Species contribution to total emissions depended both on species emission potential and geographical distribution. For projected future climate conditions, however, emissions budgets proved highly model dependent, illustrating the current uncertainty associated with isoprenoid emissions responses to potential future conditions. These results suggest that current model estimates of isoprenoid emissions concur well, but future estimates are highly uncertain. We conclude that development of reliable models is highly urgent, but for the time being, future BVOC emission scenario estimates should consider

  4. Whole dairy matrix or single nutrients in assessment of health effects: current evidence and knowledge gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorning, Tanja Kongerslev; Bertram, Hanne Christine; Bonjour, Jean-Philippe; de Groot, Lisette; Dupont, Didier; Feeney, Emma; Ipsen, Richard; Lecerf, Jean Michel; Mackie, Alan; McKinley, Michelle C; Michalski, Marie-Caroline; Rémond, Didier; Risérus, Ulf; Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S; Tholstrup, Tine; Weaver, Connie; Astrup, Arne; Givens, Ian

    2017-04-12

    Foods consist of a large number of different nutrients that are contained in a complex structure. The nature of the food structure and the nutrients therein (i.e., the food matrix) will determine the nutrient digestion and absorption, thereby altering the overall nutritional properties of the food. Thus, the food matrix may exhibit a different relation with health indicators compared to single nutrients studied in isolation. The evidence for a dairy matrix effect was presented and discussed by an expert panel at a closed workshop, and the following consensus was reached: 1) Current evidence does not support a positive association between intake of dairy products and risk of cardiovascular disease (i.e., stroke and coronary heart disease) and type 2 diabetes. In contrast, fermented dairy products, such as cheese and yogurt, generally show inverse associations. 2) Intervention studies have indicated that the metabolic effects of whole dairy may be different than those of single dairy constituents when considering the effects on body weight, cardiometabolic disease risk, and bone health. 3) Different dairy products seem to be distinctly linked to health effects and disease risk markers. 4) Different dairy structures and common processing methods may enhance interactions between nutrients in the dairy matrix, which may modify the metabolic effects of dairy consumption. 5) In conclusion, the nutritional values of dairy products should not be considered equivalent to their nutrient contents but, rather, be considered on the basis of the biofunctionality of the nutrients within dairy food structures. 6) Further research on the health effects of whole dairy foods is warranted alongside the more traditional approach of studying the health effects of single nutrients. Future diet assessments and recommendations should carefully consider the evidence of the effects of whole foods alongside the evidence of the effects of individual nutrients. Current knowledge gaps and

  5. Exploration for the foundation of hospital scientific research management based knowledge community%面向医院科研管理的知识社区构建探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛莲; 鲁鸿; 吴志华

    2015-01-01

    国内医院知识管理的研究与实践处于低水平阶段.本文认为医院科研管理创新应以知识管理为导向,知识社区是医院知识管理实施的核心构件.知识社区打破了医院原有组织的界限,为知识创新提供了新的结构支持.组织模式创新包括构建在医院科研管理业务层次上的知识社区及建立医院知识管理部门.简述了知识社区的构建方法,如知识社区分类、医院知识体系分类,构建面向医院科研管理的知识地图包括职称型知识地图、流程型知识地图和概念型知识地图等.%Currently,research and practice in the of hospital management in China are at low level.This paper agrees that the innovation of hospital research management should be based on scientific knowledge management,knowledge communities is a core component of knowledge management implementation in hospitals.This paper descripts the method that how to buide the knowledge community,for example,the types of knowledge community,hospital knowledge system,and the job title based knowledge map and process-oriented knowledge map.

  6. Patient knowledge, perceptions, and acceptance of generic medicines: a comprehensive review of the current literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alrasheedy AA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Alian A Alrasheedy,1 Mohamed Azmi Hassali,1 Kay Stewart,2 David CM Kong,2 Hisham Aljadhey,3 Mohamed Izham Mohamed Ibrahim,4 Saleh Karamah Al-Tamimi1 1Discipline of Social and Administrative Pharmacy, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia; 2Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 3Medication Safety Research Chair, Clinical Pharmacy Department, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4College of Pharmacy, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar Background: Generic medicines have the same quality, safety, and efficacy as their counterpart original brand medicines. Generic medicines provide the same therapeutic outcomes but at a much cheaper cost, so are promoted in many countries to contain pharmaceutical expenditure and sustain the health care system. Thus, the perspective of patients and medicine consumers as end users of these medicines is an important factor to enhance the use and utilization of generic medicines. The objective of this paper is to review patients’ and consumers’ knowledge, perceptions, acceptance, and views of generic medicines in the current literature. Methods: An extensive literature search was performed in several databases, namely Scopus, PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge, Proquest, and the Wiley online library, to identify relevant studies published in the English literature for the period 1990–2013. Results: A total of 53 studies were included in the review, comprising 24 studies from Europe, ten from North America, six from Asia, five from Australia and New Zealand, five from the Middle East, one from Africa, one from Latin America, and one from the Caribbean region. A large body of literature has reported misconceptions and negative perceptions about generic medicines on the part of patients and medicine consumers. Moreover, although it is reported in almost all countries, the percentage of consumers who had

  7. The iron-sulfur cluster assembly machineries in plants: current knowledge and open questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémy eCouturier

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Many metabolic pathways and cellular processes occurring in most sub-cellular compartments depend on the functioning of iron-sulfur (Fe-S proteins, whose cofactors are assembled through dedicated protein machineries. Recent advances have been made in the knowledge of the functions of individual components through a combination of genetic, biochemical and structural approaches, primarily in prokaryotes and non-plant eukaryotes. Whereas most of the components of these machineries are conserved between kingdoms, their complexity is likely increased in plants owing to the presence of additional assembly proteins and to the existence of expanded families for several assembly proteins. This review focuses on the new actors discovered in the past few years, such as glutaredoxin, BOLA and NEET proteins as well as MIP18, MMS19, TAH18, DRE2 for the cytosolic machinery, which are integrated into a model for the plant Fe-S cluster biogenesis systems. It also discusses a few issues currently subjected to an intense debate such as the role of the mitochondrial frataxin and of glutaredoxins, the functional separation between scaffold, carrier and iron-delivery proteins and the crosstalk existing between different organelles.

  8. Toxicological evaluation of microcystins in aquatic fish species: current knowledge and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavagadhi, Shruti; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    2013-10-15

    Microcystins (MCs) are algal toxins produced intracellularly within the algal cells, and are subsequently released into the aquatic systems. An increase in the frequency and intensity of occurrence of harmful algal blooms has directed the global attention towards the presence of MCs in aquatic systems. The effects of MCs on fish have been verified in a number of studies including histological, biochemical and behavioral effects. The toxicological effects of MCs on different organs of fish are related to the exposure route (intraperitoneal injection, feeding or immersion), the mode of uptake (passive or active transport) as well as biotransformation and bioaccumulation capabilities by different organs. This paper reviews the rapidly expanding literature on the toxicological evaluation of MCs in fish from both field studies and controlled laboratory experimental investigations, integrates the current knowledge available about the mechanisms involved in MC-induced effects on fish, and points out future research directions from a cross-disciplinary perspective. In addition, the need to carry out systematic fish toxicity studies to account for possible interactions between MCs and other environmental pollutants in aquatic systems is discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Epidemiology of leishmaniasis in Ecuador: current status of knowledge -- a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvopina, Manuel; Armijos, Rodrigo X; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa

    2004-11-01

    Although leishmaniasis is regarded as a significant health problem in Ecuador by the Ministry of Health, and the incidence has increased over the last years, an official map on the geographic distribution of disease and sand fly vectors or a control strategy do not exist yet. This article reviews the current situation based on published information to improve our knowledge and understand the epidemiological situation of leishmaniasis in Ecuador in order to help future research and to develop a national control strategy. The disease is endemic in most provinces throughout Pacific coastal region, Amazonian lowlands, and some inter-Andean valleys with a total 21,805 cases reported during 1990-2003. Whereas cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is found throughout Ecuador, mucocutaneous leishmaniasis (MCL) appears to be restricted to the Amazon region; one, parasitologically unconfirmed case of visceral form was reported in 1949. Most human infections are caused by Leishmania (Viannia) spp., which is distributed in the subtropical and tropical lowlands; infections due to L. (Leishmania) spp. are found in the Andean highlands and in the Pacific lowlands as well. The proven vectors are Lutzomyia trapidoi and Lu. ayacuchensis. Canis familiaris, Sciurus vulgaris, Potos flavus, and Tamandua tetradactyla have been found infected with Leishmania spp. It is estimated that around 3000-4500 people may be infected every year, and that 3.1 to 4.5 millions people are estimated to be at risk of contracting leishmaniasis.

  10. The trigemino-cardiac reflex: an update of the current knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Bernhard; Cornelius, Jan F; Prabhakar, Hemanshu; Koerbel, Andrei; Gnanalingham, Kanna; Sandu, Nora; Ottaviani, Giulia; Filis, Andreas; Buchfelder, Michael

    2009-07-01

    The trigemino-cardiac reflex (TCR) is clinically defined as the sudden onset of parasympathetic activity, sympathetic hypotension, apnea, or gastric hypermotility during central or peripheral stimulation of any of the sensory branches of the trigeminal nerve. Clinically, the TCR has been reported to occur during craniofacial surgery, manipulation of the trigeminal nerve/ganglion and during surgery for lesion in the cerebellopontine angle, cavernous sinus, and the pituitary fossa. Apart from the few clinical reports, the physiologic function of this brainstem reflex has not yet been fully explored. The manifestation of the TCR can vary from bradycardia and hypotension to asystole. From the experimental findings, the TCR represents an expression of a central reflex leading to rapid cerebrovascular vasodilatation generated from excitation of oxygen-sensitive neurons in the rostral ventro-lateral medulla oblongata. By this physiologic response, the systemic and cerebral circulations may be adjusted in a way that augments cerebral perfusion. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge about TCR.

  11. A REVIEW OF CURRENT KNOWLEDGE CONCERNING SIZE-DEPENDENT AEROSOL REMOVAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leiming Zhang; Robert Vet

    2006-01-01

    The status of current knowledge on size-dependent aerosol removal by dry and wet processes, including dry deposition and impaction and nucleation scavenging, is reviewed. The largest discrepancies between theoretical estimations and measurement data on dry deposition and below-cloud scavenging are for submicron particles. Early dry deposition models, which developed based on chamber and wind tunnel measurements, tended to underestimate dry deposition velocity (Vd) for submicron particles by around one order of magnitude compared to recent field measurements. Recently developed models are able to predict reasonable Vd values for submicron particles but shift unrealistically the predicted minimum Vd to larger particle sizes. Theoretical studies of impaction scavenging of aerosol particles by falling liquid drops also substantially underestimate the scavenging coefficients for submicron particles. Empirical formulas based on field measurements can serve as an alternative to the theoretical scavenging models. Future development of size-resolved impaction scavenging models needs to include more precipitation properties (e.g., droplet surface area) and to be evaluated by detailed cloud microphysical models and available measurements. Several recently developed nucleation scavenging parameterizations for in-cloud removal of interstitial aerosol give comparable results when evaluated against parcel models; however, they need to be verified once suitable field measurements are available.More theoretical and field studies are also needed in order to better understand the role of organic aerosols in the nucleation scavenging process.

  12. Humpback Dolphins of Western Australia: A Review of Current Knowledge and Recommendations for Future Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanf, Daniella M; Hunt, Tim; Parra, Guido J

    2016-01-01

    Among the many cetacean species that occupy Australian coastal waters, Australian humpback dolphins, Sousa sahulensis, are one of the most vulnerable to extirpation due to human activities. This review summarises the existing knowledge, presently occurring and planned research projects, and current conservation measures for humpback dolphins in Western Australia (WA). Rapid and wide-scale coastal development along the northern WA coastline has occurred despite a lack of baseline data for inshore dolphins and, therefore, without a precautionary approach to their conservation. The distribution, abundance, habitat use, and population structure of humpback dolphins remain poorly understood. Less than 1% of their inferred distribution has so far been studied to understand local population demography. The sparse data available suggest that WA humpback dolphins occur as localised populations in low numbers within a range of inshore habitats, including both clear and turbid coastal waters. Marine protected areas cover a third of their inferred distribution in WA, but the efficacy of these reserves in protecting local cetacean populations is unknown. There is a pressing need for coordination and collaboration among scientists, government agencies, industry bodies, Traditional Owners, and local community groups to fill in the gaps of information on humpback dolphins in WA. The recently developed strategies and sampling guidelines developed by state and federal governments should serve as a best practise standard for collection of data aimed at assessing the conservation status of humpback dolphins in WA and Australia.

  13. Adult-onset autoimmune diabetes: current knowledge and implications for management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzetti, Raffaella; Zampetti, Simona; Maddaloni, Ernesto

    2017-09-08

    Adult-onset autoimmune diabetes is a heterogeneous disease that is characterized by a reduced genetic load, a less intensive autoimmune process and a mild metabolic decompensation at onset compared with young-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The majority of patients with adult-onset autoimmune diabetes do not require insulin treatment for at least 6 months after diagnosis. Such patients are defined as having latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA), which is distinct from classic adult-onset T1DM. The extensive heterogeneity of adult-onset autoimmune diabetes is apparent beyond the distinction between classic adult-onset T1DM and LADA. LADA is characterized by genetic, phenotypic and humoral heterogeneity, encompassing different degrees of insulin resistance and autoimmunity; this heterogeneity is probably a result of different pathological mechanisms, which have implications for treatment. The existence of heterogeneous phenotypes in LADA makes it difficult to establish an a priori treatment algorithm, and therefore, a personalized medicine approach is required. In this Review, we discuss the current understanding and gaps in knowledge regarding the pathophysiology and clinical features of adult-onset autoimmune diabetes and highlight the similarities and differences with classic T1DM and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  14. Sugar transporters in efficient utilization of mixed sugar substrates: current knowledge and outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jojima, Toru; Omumasaba, Crispinus A; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing interest in production of transportation fuels and commodity chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass, most desirably through biological fermentation. Considerable effort has been expended to develop efficient biocatalysts that convert sugars derived from lignocellulose directly to value-added products. Glucose, the building block of cellulose, is the most suitable fermentation substrate for industrial microorganisms such as Escherichia coli, Corynebacterium glutamicum, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Other sugars including xylose, arabinose, mannose, and galactose that comprise hemicellulose are generally less efficient substrates in terms of productivity and yield. Although metabolic engineering including introduction of functional pentose-metabolizing pathways into pentose-incompetent microorganisms has provided steady progress in pentose utilization, further improvements in sugar mixture utilization by microorganisms is necessary. Among a variety of issues on utilization of sugar mixtures by the microorganisms, recent studies have started to reveal the importance of sugar transporters in microbial fermentation performance. In this article, we review current knowledge on diversity and functions of sugar transporters, especially those associated with pentose uptake in microorganisms. Subsequently, we review and discuss recent studies on engineering of sugar transport as a driving force for efficient bioconversion of sugar mixtures derived from lignocellulose.

  15. Role of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in the Nitrogen Uptake of Plants: Current Knowledge and Research Gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Bücking

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi play an essential role for the nutrient uptake of the majority of land plants, including many important crop species. The extraradical mycelium of the fungus takes up nutrients from the soil, transfers these nutrients to the intraradical mycelium within the host root, and exchanges the nutrients against carbon from the host across a specialized plant-fungal interface. The contribution of the AM symbiosis to the phosphate nutrition has long been known, but whether AM fungi contribute similarly to the nitrogen nutrition of their host is still controversially discussed. However, there is a growing body of evidence that demonstrates that AM fungi can actively transfer nitrogen to their host, and that the host plant with its carbon supply stimulates this transport, and that the periarbuscular membrane of the host is able to facilitate the active uptake of nitrogen from the mycorrhizal interface. In this review, our current knowledge about nitrogen transport through the fungal hyphae and across the mycorrhizal interface is summarized, and we discuss the regulation of these pathways and major research gaps.

  16. Influence of Electric, Magnetic, and Electromagnetic Fields on the Circadian System: Current Stage of Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Lewczuk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the side effects of each electrical device work is the electromagnetic field generated near its workplace. All organisms, including humans, are exposed daily to the influence of different types of this field, characterized by various physical parameters. Therefore, it is important to accurately determine the effects of an electromagnetic field on the physiological and pathological processes occurring in cells, tissues, and organs. Numerous epidemiological and experimental data suggest that the extremely low frequency magnetic field generated by electrical transmission lines and electrically powered devices and the high frequencies electromagnetic radiation emitted by electronic devices have a potentially negative impact on the circadian system. On the other hand, several studies have found no influence of these fields on chronobiological parameters. According to the current state of knowledge, some previously proposed hypotheses, including one concerning the key role of melatonin secretion disruption in pathogenesis of electromagnetic field induced diseases, need to be revised. This paper reviews the data on the effect of electric, magnetic, and electromagnetic fields on melatonin and cortisol rhythms—two major markers of the circadian system as well as on sleep. It also provides the basic information about the nature, classification, parameters, and sources of these fields.

  17. The rings of Saturn: State of current knowledge and some suggestions for future studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzi, J. N.

    1978-01-01

    The state of our current knowledge of the properties of the ring system as a whole, and of the particles individually, is assessed. Attention is primarily devoted to recent results and possibilities for exploration of the ring system by a Saturn orbiter. In particular, the infrared and microwave properties of the ring system are discussed. The behavior of the ring brightness is not well understood in the critical transition spectral region from approximately 100 micrometers to approximately 1 cm. Also, the dynamical behavior of the ring system is discussed. Recent theoretical studies show that ongoing dynamical effects continually affect the ring structure in azimuth (possibly producing the A ring brightness asymmetry) and in the vertical direction. Orbital spacecraft-based studies of the rings will offer several unique advantages and impact important cosmogonical questions. Bistatic radar studies and millimeter-wavelength spectrometer/radiometry will give particle sizes and composition limits needed to resolve the question of the density of the rings, and provide important boundary conditions on the state of Saturn's protoplanetary nebula near the time of planetary formation.

  18. Tropical forest responses to increasing [CO2]: current knowledge and opportunities for future research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernusak, Lucas [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Winter, Klaus [Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute; Dalling, James [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Holtum, Joseph [James Cook University; Jaramillo, Carlos [Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute; Korner, Christian [University of Basel; Leakey, Andrew D.B. [University of Illinois; Norby, Richard J [ORNL; Poulter, Benjamin [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environement, France; Turner, Benjamin [Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute; Wright, S. Joseph [Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

    2013-01-01

    Elevated atmospheric [CO2] (ca) will undoubtedly affect the metabolism of tropical forests worldwide; however, critical aspects of how tropical forests will respond remain largely unknown. Here we review the current state of knowledge about physiological and ecological responses, with the aim of providing a framework that can help to guide future experimental research. Modelling studies have indicated that elevated ca can potentially stimulate photosynthesis more in the tropics than at higher latitudes, because suppression of photorespiration by elevated ca increases with temperature. However, canopy leaves in tropical forests could also potentially reach a high temperature threshold under elevated ca that will moderate the rise in photosynthesis. Belowground responses, including fine root production, nutrient foraging, and soil organic matter processing, will be especially important to the integrated ecosystem response to elevated CO2. Water-use efficiency will increase as ca rises, potentially impacting upon soil moisture status and nutrient availability. Recruitment may be differentially altered for some functional groups, potentially decreasing ecosystem carbon storage. Whole-forest CO2 enrichment experiments are urgently needed to test predictions of tropical forest functioning under elevated ca. Smaller scale experiments in the understory and in gaps would also be informative, and could provide stepping stones toward stand-scale manipulations.

  19. Role of lung surfactant in respiratory disease: current knowledge in large animal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christmann, U; Buechner-Maxwell, V A; Witonsky, S G; Hite, R D

    2009-01-01

    Lung surfactant is produced by type II alveolar cells as a mixture of phospholipids, surfactant proteins, and neutral lipids. Surfactant lowers alveolar surface tension and is crucial for the prevention of alveolar collapse. In addition, surfactant contributes to smaller airway patency and improves mucociliary clearance. Surfactant-specific proteins are part of the innate immune defense mechanisms of the lung. Lung surfactant alterations have been described in a number of respiratory diseases. Surfactant deficiency (quantitative deficit of surfactant) in premature animals causes neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. Surfactant dysfunction (qualitative changes in surfactant) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome and asthma. Analysis of surfactant from amniotic fluid allows assessment of fetal lung maturity (FLM) in the human fetus and exogenous surfactant replacement therapy is part of the standard care in premature human infants. In contrast to human medicine, use and success of FLM testing or surfactant replacement therapy remain limited in veterinary medicine. Lung surfactant has been studied in large animal models of human disease. However, only a few reports exist on lung surfactant alterations in naturally occurring respiratory disease in large animals. This article gives a general review on the role of lung surfactant in respiratory disease followed by an overview of our current knowledge on surfactant in large animal veterinary medicine.

  20. Horizontal gene transfer among microorganisms in food: current knowledge and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Franca; Rizzotti, Lucia; Felis, Giovanna E; Torriani, Sandra

    2014-09-01

    The possibility of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) among microorganisms in food matrices has been specifically targeted in a few investigations, though most current knowledge has been obtained indirectly or derived from genome sequence analyses. In this review, we have assembled reported examples of the HGT events that probably occurred in food matrices since the bacterial partners involved are commonly found in association in a food matrix or are specifically adapted to it. Exchanged genes include those encoding for substrate utilization, bacteriocin, exopolysaccharide and biogenic amine (BA) production, immunity to bacteriophages and antibiotic resistance (AR). While the acquisition of new traits involved in substrate utilization led to the natural genetic improvement of the microbial cultures for food production, the acquisition of hazardous traits, e.g., AR, virulence or BA production genes, can give rise to health concerns in otherwise innocuous species. Available evidence suggests that it would be opportune to determine what conditions favour HGT among bacteria in food ecosystems in order to naturally obtain improved starter or adjunct cultures, and also to prevent the propagation of hazardous traits.

  1. Epidemiology of leishmaniasis in Ecuador: current status of knowledge - A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Calvopina

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Although leishmaniasis is regarded as a significant health problem in Ecuador by the Ministry of Health, and the incidence has increased over the last years, an official map on the geographic distribution of disease and sand fly vectors or a control strategy do not exist yet. This article reviews the current situation based on published information to improve our knowledge and understand the epidemiological situation of leishmaniasis in Ecuador in order to help future research and to develop a national control strategy. The disease is endemic in most provinces throughout Pacific coastal region, Amazonian lowlands, and some inter-Andean valleys with a total 21,805 cases reported during 1990-2003. Whereas cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL is found throughout Ecuador, mucocutaneous leishmaniasis (MCL appears to be restricted to the Amazon region; one, parasitologically unconfirmed case of visceral form was reported in 1949. Most human infections are caused by Leishmania (Viannia spp., which is distributed in the subtropical and tropical lowlands; infections due to L. (Leishmania spp. are found in the Andean highlands and in the Pacific lowlands as well. The proven vectors are Lutzomyia trapidoi and Lu. ayacuchensis. Canis familiaris, Sciurus vulgaris, Potos flavus, and Tamandua tetradactyla have been found infected with Leishmania spp. It is estimated that around 3000-4500 people may be infected every year, and that 3.1 to 4.5 millions people are estimated to be at risk of contracting leishmaniasis.

  2. Key scientific challenges in current rechargeable non-aqueous Li-O2 batteries: experiment and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Mahesh Datt; Geaney, Hugh; Nolan, Michael; O'Dwyer, Colm

    2014-06-28

    Rechargeable Li-air (henceforth referred to as Li-O2) batteries provide theoretical capacities that are ten times higher than that of current Li-ion batteries, which could enable the driving range of an electric vehicle to be comparable to that of gasoline vehicles. These high energy densities in Li-O2 batteries result from the atypical battery architecture which consists of an air (O2) cathode and a pure lithium metal anode. However, hurdles to their widespread use abound with issues at the cathode (relating to electrocatalysis and cathode decomposition), lithium metal anode (high reactivity towards moisture) and due to electrolyte decomposition. This review focuses on the key scientific challenges in the development of rechargeable non-aqueous Li-O2 batteries from both experimental and theoretical findings. This dual approach allows insight into future research directions to be provided and highlights the importance of combining theoretical and experimental approaches in the optimization of Li-O2 battery systems.

  3. Directions of scientific literature in knowledge management from the perspective of their relationships with innovation, information and technology management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Maria Moura Madeira

    Full Text Available Given the establishment of new journals as a way to fill in gaps and further studies in the area of Knowledge Management and the impact Knowledge Management has had for two decades as a tool for competitive advantage, the aim of the study was to point out tendencies and discuss academic production in Knowledge Management over the years. As the focus of discussion, the article analyzes the relationship of Knowledge Management between Innovation Management, Technology Management and Information Management. The source material for mapping academic output was ten international journals, which were selected from 2006 to 2012, obtaining an initial sample of 2,900 papers. The systematic search was conducted to identify which relationships are more predominant in the journals selected. Through the analysis of relationships in publications within the time interval established, it was found that the relationship between Knowledge Management and Technology Management appears much more frequently in all publications over the years. The relationship between Knowledge Management and Technology Management decreased significantly in recent years. In contrast, there was an increase in papers discussing Knowledge Management and Innovation Management.

  4. Estado de conocimiento del orden Ephemeroptera en la Patagonia Current knowledge of Patagonian Ephemeroptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Pessacq

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available El conocimiento actual del orden Ephemeroptera en la Patagonia se debe en gran parte a la labor original y compilatoria de M.L. Pescador, W.L. Peters y E. Domínguez, llevada a cabo en la década del 80 del siglo pasado. Se suman a ésta, importantes contribuciones que han conducido a un adecuado conocimiento del grupo en la cordillera norte y centro de la Patagonia, aunque menor en la zona austral de esta región (Santa Cruz y Tierra del Fuego y las áreas de estepa. Merced al trabajo de campo realizado en 80 sitios de muestreo relevados en el marco del "Darwin Initiative Project" en el Parque Nacional Nahuel Huapi, se incluyen aquí nuevos registros para la Argentina (Hapsiphlebia anastomosis Demoulin, la región Andina (Apobaetis Day y la provincia de Río Negro (Chaquihua bullocki (Navás, Andesiops ardua (Lugo-Ortíz & McCafferty, Murphyella needhami Lestage y Dactylophlebia carnulenta Pescador & Peters. Con estos registros, la riqueza de Ephemeroptera de la Patagonia alcanza 43 especies y 24 géneros, de las cuales 33 (en 20 géneros se conocen para la Argentina.The current knowledge of the Patagonian Ephemeroptera is due to the original and compiling work by M.L. Pescador, W.L. Peters and E. Domínguez during last Century's 80´s . Besides, other previous publications exist that contributed to achieve a reasonable knowledge of its taxonomy for the norhtern and central Patagonian Andes, though poor for the southernmost mountain areas (Santa Cruz and Tierra del Fuego provinces and the steppe. From the field work carried in 80 collecting sites during the development of the "Darwin Initiative Project" in the Nahuel Huapi Nacional Park, some species are recorded for the first time in Argentina (Hapsiphlebia anastomosis Demoulin, the Andean region (Apobaetis Day and the province of Río Negro (Chaquihua bullock (Navás, Andesiops ardua (Lugo-Ortíz & McCafferty, Murphyella needhami Lestage, Dactylophlebia carnulenta Pescador & Peters. With

  5. Correlation between scores on integration of scientific knowledge and achievement in a course in educational research methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwuegbuzie, A J

    2001-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlations between students' scores on integrating science knowledge and their conceptual knowledge of educational research concepts, methods, and applications. Participants were 124 graduate students enrolled in several sections of a required introductory course in educational research methods. Students' integration of science knowledge was measured via the Test of Integrated Process Skills II, and performance in the educational research methods class was assessed via midterm and final examinations. Analysis indicated that correlations between scores on the Test of Integrated Process Skills II and achievement in the course on midterm and final examinations were .36 and .42, respectively, suggesting that those who were more able to integrate science knowledge also tended to exhibit higher performance on the examinations.

  6. 知识管理论文著者科学生产率统计分析%Statistical Analysis on Scientific Productivity of Knowledge Management Thesis Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍玉成; 刘小乐; 马捷

    2012-01-01

    This article mainly summarized scientific productivity of thesis authors and researched scientific productivity situation. At the same time, the thesis carried on comparative analysis between the results of the research and Lotka' s law of thesis authors. Through the analysis we can get scientific productivity situation of knowledge management papers and research status of knowledge management subjecto%对论文著者的科学生产率进行简单的概述,以知识管理专题论文为例研究论文著者科学生产率状况,并将研究的结果与论文著者的洛特卡定律进行比较分析,得出知识管理专题论文著者的科学生产率情况,进而得出"知识管理"领域的研究状况。

  7. Building Bridges through Scientific Conferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zierath, Juleen R

    2016-01-01

    Getting together to exchange ideas, forge collaborations, and disseminate knowledge is a long-standing tradition of scientific communities. How conferences are serving the community, what their current challenges are, and what is in store for the future of conferences are the topics covered...

  8. Promoting Scientific Spirit to Cultivate Scientific Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Scientific culture is an advanced culture that is based on scientific knowledge and supported by the scientific method, with scientific thinking as its core and scientific spirit as its soul. During the process of modernization, it has profound impacts on human society in terms of values, ethics, mode of thinking, lifestyle and code of conduct, offering human civilization an important ideological source, physical foundation, technological tool and effective carrier.

  9. Examine the Gaps between Current and Ideal State of Knowledge Management in the Department of Physical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Hasani

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In today's competitive world, knowledge has become the strategic resource in many organizations. Nonaka believes that in today's volatile situation, the only viable source of sustainable competitive advantage is knowledge. Thus, the knowledge management has become a major task for organizations that are looking to take advantage of this valuable asset. In this case the goal of this study is to examine the gaps between current and ideal state of knowledge management in the Department of Physical Education in Iran. Research's method was descriptive-menstruation. Study sample consisted of all employees of the Department of Physical Education of Kurdistan that were 320 members and it was selected by using Morgan table that were 175 members. The reliability of the questionnaire was measured and verified based on Cronbach's Alpha for the knowledge management dimension equals 0/89. Also a questionnaire to be standardized and be normalized in internal research, ensure validity of test. Used statistical methods in current study is use SPSS software and descriptive statistics to describe sex, age, education level and staff's job precedence variables and Kolmogorov – Smirnov test (K-S to verify data to be normal and to verify or reject hypothesis, Paired t-test is been used. Research results showed, there are meaningful differences among knowledge management Dimensions, including Technology infrastructure, organizational culture and organizational structure from the perspective of the Kurdistan's physical education staff in current situation with the ideal situation.

  10. Current knowledge of tooth development: patterning and mineralization of the murine dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catón, Javier; Tucker, Abigail S

    2009-04-01

    The integument forms a number of different types of mineralized element, including dermal denticles, scutes, ganoid scales, elasmoid scales, fin rays and osteoderms found in certain fish, reptiles, amphibians and xenarthran mammals. To this list can be added teeth, which are far more widely represented and studied than any of the other mineralized elements mentioned above, and as such can be thought of as a model mineralized system. In recent years the focus for studies on tooth development has been the mouse, with a wealth of genetic information accrued and the availability of cutting edge techniques. It is the mouse dentition that this review will concentrate on. The development of the tooth will be followed, looking at what controls the shape of the tooth and how signals from the mesenchyme and epithelium interact to lead to formation of a molar or incisor. The number of teeth generated will then be investigated, looking at how tooth germ number can be reduced or increased by apoptosis, fusion of tooth germs, creation of new tooth germs, and the generation of additional teeth from existing tooth germs. The development of mineralized tissue will then be detailed, looking at how the asymmetrical deposition of enamel is controlled in the mouse incisor. The continued importance of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions at these later stages of tooth development will also be discussed. Tooth anomalies and human disorders have been well covered by recent reviews, therefore in this paper we wish to present a classical review of current knowledge of tooth development, fitting together data from a large number of recent research papers to draw general conclusions about tooth development.

  11. Genetic considerations for mollusc production in aquaculture: current state of knowledge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela eAstorga

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available IIn 2012, world mollusk production in aquaculture reached a volume of 15,171,000 tons, representing 23% of total aquaculture production and positioning mollusks as the second most important category of aquaculture products (fishes are the first. Clams and oysters are the mollusk species with the highest production levels, followed in descending order by mussels, scallops and abalones. In view of the increasing importance attached to genetic information on aquaculture, which can help with good maintenance and thus the sustainability of production, the present work offers a review of the state of knowledge on genetic and genomic information about mollusks produced in aquaculture. The analysis was applied to mollusks which are of importance for aquaculture, with emphasis on the 5 species with the highest production levels. According to FAO, these are: Japanese clam Ruditapes philippinarum; Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas; Chilean mussel Mytilus chilensis; Blood clam Anadara granosa and Chinese clam Sinonovacula constricta. To date, the genomes of 5 species of mollusks have been sequenced, only one of which, Crassostrea gigas, coincides with the species with the greatest production in aquaculture. Another important species whose genome has been sequenced is Mytilus galloprovincialis, which is the second most important mussel in aquaculture production, after M. chilensis. Few genetic improvement programs have been reported in comparison with the number reported in fish species. The most commonly investigated species are oysters, with at least 5 genetic improvement programs reported, followed by abalones with 2 programs and mussels with one. The results of this work will establish the current situation with respect to the genetics of mollusks which are of importance for aquaculture production, in order to assist future decisions to ensure the sustainability of these resources.

  12. A three-phase model proposal for the evolution of scientific communication: from first print periodicals to current electronic communication system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Bertin

    Full Text Available Scientific communication has undergone deep transformations, since the emergence of Internet. Aiming to provide further thought on the evolution of scientific communication, this paper features a historical overview of the scientific communication advances over the last twenty years through a three-phase model for the evolution of the electronic journal and the preprints services, and presents Brazilian contemporary panorama for scientific communication. The three-phase model presented in this work is an adaptation of that one proposed by Tenopir et al. (2003 to describe the patterns of journal use by scientists since 1990. The early evolutionary phase followed the emergence of the first digital journals and the creation of repositories in the Web for publishing preliminary versions of scientific literature on the author’s initiative; by that time, most academics reproved electronic publishing initiatives. From 1996 and forward, in the consolidation phase, electronic journals were commonly identical to their print counterparts; the acceptance of the electronic format began to increase, and preprint services got underway in several disciplines. The advanced evolutionary phase started with the world discussion on open access to scientific information. The comparison of the current electronic journal with that viewed by enthusiasts in the first years of the 1990s shows that some aspects still remain to be improved in electronic formal and informal communication, towards effective dissemination of scientific information.

  13. [Public scientific knowledge distribution in health information, communication and information technology indexed in MEDLINE and LILACS databases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Abel Laerte; Tardelli, Adalberto Otranto; Castro, Regina Célia Figueiredo

    2007-01-01

    This study explores the distribution of international, regional and national scientific output in health information and communication, indexed in the MEDLINE and LILACS databases, between 1996 and 2005. A selection of articles was based on the hierarchical structure of Information Science in MeSH vocabulary. Four specific domains were determined: health information, medical informatics, scientific communications on healthcare and healthcare communications. The variables analyzed were: most-covered subjects and journals, author affiliation and publication countries and languages, in both databases. The Information Science category is represented in nearly 5% of MEDLINE and LILACS articles. The four domains under analysis showed a relative annual increase in MEDLINE. The Medical Informatics domain showed the highest number of records in MEDLINE, representing about half of all indexed articles. The importance of Information Science as a whole is more visible in publications from developed countries and the findings indicate the predominance of the United States, with significant growth in scientific output from China and South Korea and, to a lesser extent, Brazil.

  14. As transformações do saber científico ao saber ensinado: o caso do logaritmo The transformation of scientific knowledge into taught knowledge: the case of logarithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saddo Ag Almouloud

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Para ensinar uma noção científica em um dado nível de escolaridade, é necessário que ela seja acessível aos alunos. Portanto, precisa-se transformá-la a partir de um saber de referência que é, em geral, o saber dos especialistas da disciplina (o saber sábio. Neste trabalho, são apresentadas ferramentas teóricas da didática da matemática para estudar as transformações do saber científico em saber ensinado. É tomado como objeto matemático de estudo o "logaritmo". A função logaritmo é uma das noções mais importantes das que integram o currículo do Ensino Médio. Ela tem várias aplicações em diversas áreas de conhecimento tais como: física, química, economia, astronomia, o que justifica sua manutenção nas propostas curriculares de vários países.In order to teach a scientific concept at a given school level, this concept must be accessible to the students; therefore, it must be transformed based on a reference knowledge, which is, in general, the knowledge from the discipline's specialists (scholar knowledge. In this paper, theoretical tools from the didactic of Mathematics are presented to study the transformation of scientific knowledge into taught knowledge. The mathematical object on focus is the "logarithm." The logarithm function is one of the most important concepts in the High School curriculum. It has various applications in a wide range of knowledge areas, such as physics, chemistry, economics, astronomy, justifying its continued inclusion in the curricula proposals of various countries.

  15. Analysis on the Current State of Performance Appraisal for Scientific Workers in Agricultural Sci-entific Institute%农业科研机构科研人员绩效考核现状分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔怡; 武晓亮; 蔚承祥; 苏波; 马刚

    2014-01-01

    绩效考核工作是现代人力资源管理工作中的一项重要内容[1]。文章主要阐述了农业科研机构科研人员绩效考核的现状,分析了现行农业科研人员绩效考核工作中存在的问题,以期为建立科学合理的农业科研人员绩效考核体系提供参考。%Performance appraisal is an important part of human resource management. In order to provide reference to build a more scientific performance appraisal system of agricultural scientific workers, in this article, we elaborated the state, and analyzed the problems of the current performance appraisal of agricul-tural scientific workers.

  16. Conceptions of end users in current smart grid research and opportunities for further social scientific research on users in smart grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Ege

    there have been no attempts to handle it. This paper suggests that classifying the research contributions according to the roles they assign to users and the theoretical concepts they employ to represent users can help in evaluating the validity of their claims, uncovering possibilities for synthesis...... of existing knowledge and seeing new possibilities for social scientific research where knowledge gaps appear. Different user representations and user roles are found through a content analysis of project related documents from a selection of European and North American smart grid projects. It is argued...

  17. THE CURRENT STATE OF KNOWLEDGE IN THE VALUE RELEVANCE RESEARCH FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen- Alexandra BALTARIU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to assess the scientific literature referring to the value relevance of reported accounting information over a twelve year period starting from 2002. The approach of the paper is a theoretical (conceptual one. In order to complete the purpose of the paper we selected as research method the longitudinal qualitative analysis. The qualitative analysis carried out presents a deductive character. Our conclusions regarding the general characteristics of the research field pertaining to the value relevance of reported accounting information are drawn based on the main results and scientific contributions identified in the research field of interest.

  18. SCIENTIFIC STATUS OF DIDACTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Osmolovskaya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The research is aimed at scientific justification of didactics referred to the social and humanitarian field of knowledge. The author deals with the scientific character criteria (verity, inter-subjectivity, systemacity and validity taking into account different scientific rationality types (classical and nonclassical and identifying post-modernism influence on didactics. Objectives and results of research. Attempts are made to systematize the didactic knowledge and identify its components and structure. Didactic concepts are classified in accordance with its objects: teaching process by the whole, its individual components or educative process aspects that enable to form definite teaching views, studying it from the specific positions. The author singles out holistic-didactic, component and aspect concepts; and specifies the concept of didactic systems and models with its hierarchy. The author highlights the didactic knowledge increment. Apart from traditional empirical theoretical researches, the author’s attention is drawn to the academic pursuit such as a scientific project based on the didactic object specificity of the teaching process which is fully human controlled and realized and doesn’texist without human being. It is shown that basic theoretical ideas of scientific projects are itemized, concretized and enlarged during co-current educative practice, i.e. an adhesion of theory and practice occurs.It is stressed that there are two special directions of didactic development multidimensionality: 1. extension of its semantic field in the context of modern socio-cultural conditions; 2. increase of scientific status related to a conceptual framework improvement, empirically accumulated information arrangement, new hypotheses, theories and concepts’ development. Scientific novelty. The research findings demonstrate well-reasoned statement of the didactics’ scientific status, its particular components and structure

  19. SCIENTIFIC STATUS OF DIDACTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Osmolovskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The research is aimed at scientific justification of didactics referred to the social and humanitarian field of knowledge. The author deals with the scientific character criteria (verity, inter-subjectivity, systemacity and validity taking into account different scientific rationality types (classical and nonclassical and identifying post-modernism influence on didactics. Objectives and results of research. Attempts are made to systematize the didactic knowledge and identify its components and structure. Didactic concepts are classified in accordance with its objects: teaching process by the whole, its individual components or educative process aspects that enable to form definite teaching views, studying it from the specific positions. The author singles out holistic-didactic, component and aspect concepts; and specifies the concept of didactic systems and models with its hierarchy. The author highlights the didactic knowledge increment. Apart from traditional empirical theoretical researches, the author’s attention is drawn to the academic pursuit such as a scientific project based on the didactic object specificity of the teaching process which is fully human controlled and realized and doesn’texist without human being. It is shown that basic theoretical ideas of scientific projects are itemized, concretized and enlarged during co-current educative practice, i.e. an adhesion of theory and practice occurs.It is stressed that there are two special directions of didactic development multidimensionality: 1. extension of its semantic field in the context of modern socio-cultural conditions; 2. increase of scientific status related to a conceptual framework improvement, empirically accumulated information arrangement, new hypotheses, theories and concepts’ development. Scientific novelty. The research findings demonstrate well-reasoned statement of the didactics’ scientific status, its particular components and structure

  20. Critical assessment of the current understanding/ knowledge of the framework of the Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries in the Mediterranean and Black Seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Sartor

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A critical review was carried out involving experts from 17 countries, to identify, summarize and evaluate the current understanding related to the Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries management (EAF in the Mediterranean and Black Seas. The existing information available at country level, coming from research and monitoring projects and other types of activities, was explored. The evaluation was done following a standardized protocol and using simple semi-quantitative methods. The results highlighted an overall low-medium degree of fulfilment of the requirements of the EAF, with some differences related to the different issues considered. The highest scores were reported for the knowledge related to fleet structure/ behaviour and species/habitat distribution, whereas the lowest scores were reported for modelling, and socio-economic and management issues. Although only semi-quantitative, these results provided an initial picture at a broad regional level on the state of knowledge with a view to a proper implementation of the EAF in the Mediterranean and Black Seas, and identified gaps in scientific knowledge that should be covered.

  1. Do the health claims made for Morinda citrifolia (Noni) harmonize with current scientific knowledge and evaluation of its biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Patel, Amit Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Morinda citrifolia, also known as Great Morinda, Indian Mulberry, or Noni, is a plant belonging to the family Rubiaceae. A number of major chemical compounds have been identified in the leaves, roots, and fruits of Noni plant. The fruit juice is in high demand in alternative medicine for different kinds for illnesses such as arthritis, diabetes, high blood pressure, muscle ached and pains, menstrual difficulties, headache, heart diseases, AIDS, gastric ulcer, sprains, mental depression, senility, poor digestion, arteriosclerosis, blood vessel problems, and drug addiction. Several studies have also demonstrated the anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and apoptosis-inducing effect of Noni in various cancers. Based on a toxicological assessment, Noni juice was considered as safe. Though a large number of in vitro, and, to a certain extent, in vivo studies demonstrated a range of potentially beneficial effects, clinical data are essentially lacking. To what extent the findings from experimental pharmacological studies are of potential clinical relevance is not clear at present and this question needs to be explored in detail before an recommendations can be made.

  2. OECD/NEA Data Bank Scientific and Intergral Experiments Databases in Support of Knowledge Preservation and Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. B. Briggs; E. Sartori; J. Gado; A. Hasegawa; P. D& #39; hondt; I. Kodeli; F. J. Mompean; W. Wiesenack; A. Zaetta

    2004-09-01

    The OECD/Nuclear Energy Data Bank was established by its member countries as an institution to allow effective sharing of knowledge and its basic underlying information and data in key areas of nuclear science and technology. The activities as regards preserving and transferring knowledge consist of the: — Acquisition of basic nuclear data, computer codes and experimental system data needed over a wide range of nuclear and radiation applications. — Independent verification and validation of these data using quality assurance methods, adding value through international benchmark exercises, workshops and meetings and by issuing relevant reports with conclusions and recommendations, as well as by organising training courses to ensure their qualified and competent use. — Dissemination of the different products to authorised establishments in member countries and collecting and integrating user feedback. Of particular importance has been the establishment of basic and integral experiments databases and the methodology developed with the aim of knowledge preservation and transfer. Databases established thus far include: — IRPhE – International Reactor Physics Experimental Benchmarks Evaluations, — SINBAD – a radiation shielding experiments database (nuclear reactors, fusion neutronics and accelerators), — IFPE – International Fuel Performance Benchmark Experiments Database, — TDB – The Thermochemical Database Project, — ICSBE – International Nuclear Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluations [1], — CCVM – CSNI Code Validation Matrix of Thermal-hydraulic Codes for LWR LOCA and Transients [2]. This paper will concentrate on knowledge preservation and transfer concepts and methods related to some of the integral experiments and TDB.

  3. A Breach in the Relationship between Correctness and Scientific Conceptual Knowledge for the Meaningful Solving of a Problem about Osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, June T.

    Expert/novice studies of conceptually rich problem solving have demonstrated a relationship between the correctness of a solution and the extent and organization of the solver's conceptual knowledge. This study examines meaningful problem solving and the relationship between the correctness of a solution and the extent of the solver's scientific…

  4. Sexuality and Human Reproduction: A Study of Scientific Knowledge, Behaviours and Beliefs of Portuguese Future Elementary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Luisa; Teixeira, Filomena; Martins, Isabel; Melico-Silvestre, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Sex education in Portugal has become a right and an obligation starting in the first years of school. However, despite being required by legislation, this is not easy to achieve, partly because of weaknesses in the training of teachers, which need to be identified. In this study, data were collected about the knowledge, behaviours and beliefs of…

  5. "It's All Scientific to Me": Focus Group Insights into Why Young People Do Not Apply Safe-Sex Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Alan; Watson, Anne-Frances; Dore, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    Despite rising levels of safe-sex knowledge in Australia, sexually transmitted infection notifications continue to increase. A culture-centred approach suggests it is useful in attempting to reach a target population first to understand their perspective on the issues. Twenty focus groups were conducted with 89 young people between the ages of 14…

  6. Managing player load in professional rugby union: a review of current knowledge and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarrie, Kenneth L; Raftery, Martin; Blackie, Josh; Cook, Christian J; Fuller, Colin W; Gabbett, Tim J; Gray, Andrew J; Gill, Nicholas; Hennessy, Liam; Kemp, Simon; Lambert, Mike; Nichol, Rob; Mellalieu, Stephen D; Piscione, Julien; Stadelmann, Jörg; Tucker, Ross

    2017-03-01

    The loads to which professional rugby players are subjected has been identified as a concern by coaches, players and administrators. In November 2014, World Rugby commissioned an expert group to identify the physical demands and non-physical load issues associated with participation in professional rugby. To describe the current state of knowledge about the loads encountered by professional rugby players and the implications for their physical and mental health. The group defined 'load' as it relates to professional rugby players as the total stressors and demands applied to the players. In the 2013-2014 seasons, 40% of professional players appeared in 20 matches or more, and 5% of players appeared in 30 matches or more. Matches account for ∼5-11% of exposure to rugby-related activities (matches, team and individual training sessions) during professional competitions. The match injury rate is about 27 times higher than that in training. The working group surmised that players entering a new level of play, players with unresolved previous injuries, players who are relatively older and players who are subjected to rapid increases in load are probably at increased risk of injury. A mix of 'objective' and 'subjective' measures in conjunction with effective communication among team staff and between staff and players was held to be the best approach to monitoring and managing player loads. While comprehensive monitoring holds promise for individually addressing player loads, it brings with it ethical and legal responsibilities that rugby organisations need to address to ensure that players' personal information is adequately protected. Administrators, broadcasters, team owners, team staff and the players themselves have important roles in balancing the desire to have the 'best players' on the field with the ongoing health of players. In contrast, the coaching, fitness and medical staff exert significant control over the activities, duration and intensity of training

  7. Skin Wound Healing: An Update on the Current Knowledge and Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorg, Heiko; Tilkorn, Daniel J; Hager, Stephan; Hauser, Jörg; Mirastschijski, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    repair have been delineated in part, many underlying pathophysiological processes are still unknown. The purpose of the following update on skin wound healing is to focus on the different phases and to brief the reader on the current knowledge and new insights. Skin wound healing is a complex process, which is dependent on many cell types and mediators interacting in a highly sophisticated temporal sequence. Although some interactions during the healing process are crucial, redundancy is high and other cells or mediators can adopt functions or signaling without major complications. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Current state of knowledge in microbial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debajyoti Ghosal

    2016-08-01

    PAHs. The main purpose of this review is to provide an overview of current knowledge of bacteria, halophilic archaea, fungi and algae mediated degradation/transformation of PAHs. In addition, factors affecting PAHs degradation in the environment, recent advancement in genetic, genomic, proteomic and metabolomic techniques are also highlighted with an aim to facilitate the development of a new insight into the bioremediation of PAH in the environment.

  9. Current State of Knowledge in Microbial Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs): A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Debajyoti; Ghosh, Shreya; Dutta, Tapan K.; Ahn, Youngho

    2016-01-01

    purpose of this review is to provide an overview of current knowledge of bacteria, halophilic archaea, fungi and algae mediated degradation/transformation of PAHs. In addition, factors affecting PAHs degradation in the environment, recent advancement in genetic, genomic, proteomic and metabolomic techniques are also highlighted with an aim to facilitate the development of a new insight into the bioremediation of PAH in the environment. PMID:27630626

  10. Current State of Knowledge in Microbial Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs): A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Debajyoti; Ghosh, Shreya; Dutta, Tapan K; Ahn, Youngho

    2016-01-01

    purpose of this review is to provide an overview of current knowledge of bacteria, halophilic archaea, fungi and algae mediated degradation/transformation of PAHs. In addition, factors affecting PAHs degradation in the environment, recent advancement in genetic, genomic, proteomic and metabolomic techniques are also highlighted with an aim to facilitate the development of a new insight into the bioremediation of PAH in the environment.

  11. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 9: Information intermediaries and the transfer of aerospace Scientific and Technical Information (STI): A report from the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eveland, J. D.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1991-01-01

    From the NASA/DOD survey data, there can be no way of inferring what strategy for knowledge transfer is best; indeed, given the fact that the respondents were all presumably well qualified professionals, the data tend to call into serious question the idea that any one model might meet the needs of more than a distinct minority of possible users. The evidence to date appears to reinforce the concept that different information environments take many different shapes, and interact with each other and with formal data transmission sources in many different and equally valuable ways. Any overall strategy for improving the effectiveness and efficiency of scientific and technical information sharing must take this divergence into account, and work toward the creation of systems that reinforce true interactive knowledge utilization rather than simply disseminating data.

  12. A review on current knowledge and future prospects of organohalogen contaminants (OHCs) in Asian birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Naeem Akhtar; Malik, Riffat Naseem; Frantz, Adrien; Jaspers, Veerle Leontina Bernard

    2016-01-15

    The release of harmful chemicals in the Asian environment has recently increased dramatically due to rising industrial and agricultural activities. About 60% of the global human population is currently living on the Asian continent and may thus be exposed to a large range of different chemicals. Different classes of organohalogen chemicals have indeed been reported in various environmental compartments from Asia including humans and wildlife, but this issue has received less attention in birds. In this article, we reviewed the available literature on levels of legacy persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and various flame retardants (FRs) in Asian avifauna to analyze the existing pool of knowledge as well as to identify the gaps that should be addressed in future research. Furthermore, we discussed the variation in levels of organohalogens based on differences in regions, trophic level, dietary sources and migratory behaviors of species including distribution patterns in different tissues of birds. Although the mass of published literature is very low and even absent in many important regions of Asia, we deduced from the reported studies that levels of almost all classes of organohalogens (OHCs) including FRs were highest in East Asian countries such as Japan, China and South Korea, except for HCHs that were found at maximum levels in birds of South India. Concentrations (ng/g LW) of different OHCs in Asian birds ranged between

  13. Greek Primary School Teachers' Understanding of Current Environmental Issues: An Exploration of Their Environmental Knowledge and Images of Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michail, Sirmo; Stamou, Anastasia G.; Stamou, George P.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the Greek primary school teachers' understanding of three current environmental issues (acid rain, the ozone layer depletion, and the greenhouse effect) as well as the emerging images of nature were examined. The study revealed that teachers held several environmental knowledge gaps and misconceptions about the three phenomena.…

  14. Investigating Relationships among Pre-Service Science Teachers' Conceptual Knowledge of Electric Current, Motivational Beliefs and Self-Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaltun, Hüseyin; Ates, Salih

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine relationships among pre-service science teachers' conceptual knowledge of electric current, motivational beliefs, and self-regulation. One hundred and twenty-seven students (female = 107, male = 20) enrolled in the science education program of a public university in Ankara participated the study. A concept…

  15. Greek Primary School Teachers' Understanding of Current Environmental Issues: An Exploration of Their Environmental Knowledge and Images of Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michail, Sirmo; Stamou, Anastasia G.; Stamou, George P.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the Greek primary school teachers' understanding of three current environmental issues (acid rain, the ozone layer depletion, and the greenhouse effect) as well as the emerging images of nature were examined. The study revealed that teachers held several environmental knowledge gaps and misconceptions about the three phenomena.…

  16. Investigating Relationships among Pre-Service Science Teachers' Conceptual Knowledge of Electric Current, Motivational Beliefs and Self-Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaltun, Hüseyin; Ates, Salih

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine relationships among pre-service science teachers' conceptual knowledge of electric current, motivational beliefs, and self-regulation. One hundred and twenty-seven students (female = 107, male = 20) enrolled in the science education program of a public university in Ankara participated the study. A concept…

  17. Individual motivation and threat indicators of collaboration readiness in scientific knowledge producing teams: a scoping review and domain analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano R. Lotrecchiano

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper identifies a gap in the team science literature that considers intrapersonal indicators of collaboration as motivations and threats to participating in collaborative knowledge producing teams (KPTs. Through a scoping review process, over 150 resources were consulted to organize 6 domains of motivation and threat to collaboration in KPTs: Resource Acquisition, Advancing Science, Building Relationships, Knowledge Transfer, Recognition and Reward, and Maintenance of Beliefs. Findings show how domains vary in their presentation of depth and diversity of motivation and threat indicators as well as their relationship with each other within and across domains. The findings of 51 indicators resulting from the review provide a psychosocial framework for which to establish a hierarchy of collaborative reasoning for individual engagement in KPTs thus allowing for further research into the mechanism of collaborative engagement. The indicators serve as a preliminary step in establishing a protocol for testing of the psychometric properties of intrapersonal measures of collaboration readiness.

  18. Current status of pediatric kidney transplantation in China: data analysis of Chinese Scientific Registry of Kidney Transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Longshan; Zhang Huanxi; Fu Qian; Chen Liping; Sun Chuanhou; Xiong Yunyi; Shi Bingyi

    2014-01-01

    Background Kidney transplantation (KTx) is the primary therapy for children with renal failure.Unlike KTx in adult patients,it is commonly agreed that pediatric KTx in China is far behind that of America.There has been no systematic analysis of Chinese pediatric KTx reported.This study aimed to demonstrate the current status of pediatric KTx in China.Methods Registry data of pediatric KTx (1983-2012) from Chinese Scientific Registry of Kidney Transplantation (CSRKT) were retrospectively analyzed.Results There were 851 pediatric KTx from 102 transplant units.The recipients were (15.4±2.5) years of age,93.9% of who were over 10 years old.Chronic glomerulonephritis and pyelonephritis accounted for 75.6% of recognized primary diseases.Allografts were from deceased donors (72.2%) or living donation (27.7%).The patient survival for 1,3,5,and 10 years was 96.9%,94.2%,92.3%,and 92.3% and the graft survival was 94.6%,91.4%,86.3%,and 79.2%,respectively.The majority of post-transplant complications were acute rejection and infections.Annual transplant reached the peak in 2008 (n=114),and decreased sharply in 2006 (n=41) and 2010 (n=57).The percentage of pediatric KTx in total KTx was highest in 2007 (1.95%) and decreased to trough level in 2010 (1.0%).Living donation increased by 32.5-folds from 2004 to 2008 and then decreased by 86.6% till 2010.The percentage of living donation in pediatric or total KTx dynamically changed in a similar manner,while living donation ratio in pediatric KTx was much higher.Conclusions Kidney transplant can provide long-term benefits to pediatric recipients.Rejection and infections are worthy of concern during follow-up.Pediatric kidney transplant in China is very much lagging behind that in developed countries.Living donation played an important role in its development in the past decades.New strategies for implementation are encouraged to increase the priority of uremic children in organ allocation so as to

  19. Current status of pediatric kidney transplantation in China: data analysis of Chinese Scientific Registry of Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Longshan; Zhang, Huanxi; Fu, Qian; Chen, Liping; Sun, Chuanhou; Xiong, Yunyi; Shi, Bingyi; Wang, Changxi

    2014-01-01

    Kidney transplantation (KTx) is the primary therapy for children with renal failure. Unlike KTx in adult patients, it is commonly agreed that pediatric KTx in China is far behind that of America. There has been no systematic analysis of Chinese pediatric KTx reported. This study aimed to demonstrate the current status of pediatric KTx in China. Registry data of pediatric KTx (1983-2012) from Chinese Scientific Registry of Kidney Transplantation (CSRKT) were retrospectively analyzed. There were 851 pediatric KTx from 102 transplant units. The recipients were (15.4±2.5) years of age, 93.9% of who were over 10 years old. Chronic glomerulonephritis and pyelonephritis accounted for 75.6% of recognized primary diseases. Allografts were from deceased donors (72.2%) or living donation (27.7%). The patient survival for 1, 3, 5, and 10 years was 96.9%, 94.2%, 92.3%, and 92.3% and the graft survival was 94.6%, 91.4%, 86.3%, and 79.2%, respectively. The majority of post-transplant complications were acute rejection and infections. Annual transplant reached the peak in 2008 (n = 114), and decreased sharply in 2006 (n = 41) and 2010 (n = 57). The percentage of pediatric KTx in total KTx was highest in 2007 (1.95%) and decreased to trough level in 2010 (1.0%). Living donation increased by 32.5-folds from 2004 to 2008 and then decreased by 86.6% till 2010. The percentage of living donation in pediatric or total KTx dynamically changed in a similar manner, while living donation ratio in pediatric KTx was much higher. Kidney transplant can provide long-term benefits to pediatric recipients. Rejection and infections are worthy of concern during follow-up. Pediatric kidney transplant in China is very much lagging behind that in developed countries. Living donation played an important role in its development in the past decades. New strategies for implementation are encouraged to increase the priority of uremic children in organ allocation so as to promote its progress in China.

  20. Content knowledge development in a chemistry teacher preparation program: A current potentials and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widhiyanti, Tuszie; Treagust, David F.; Mocerino, Mauro; Vishnumolakala, Venkat

    2017-08-01

    One of the essential facets in teacher education program is the development of the teachers' content knowledge and it has been suggested by many scholars that the study to analyse the process of content knowledge development in teacher education program is necessary. Regarding this, the aim of this research is to evaluate the existing program of developing pre-service chemistry teachers' content knowledge, especially in the topic about the particulate nature of matter. The curriculum of content knowledge development was analysed using the forms of the curriculum evaluation (Akker, 1998; Goodlad, Klein, and Tye (1979); Treagust, 1987). Within this framework, the curriculum was evaluated in several aspects including the vision and intention of the curriculum as mentioned in the curriculum documents (intended curriculum), the users' interpretation and perception about the curriculum (perceived curriculum), the actual process of curriculum implementation (implemented curriculum), and the outcomes of the curriculum (achieved curriculum). According to the framework used for this study, the research combined qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection and the interpretation including document analysis, classroom observation, interviews, and two-tier diagnostic test. Through this research we examined the coherence among those aspects. The results reveal that although the content knowledge development is explicitly intended in a curriculum, its implementation and lecturers' perceptions give influence in the results as appear in pre-service teachers' achievements. In general, this research provides basic information about the effectiveness of the program including the challenges and the potentials for a reconsideration of the program in the future.

  1. Exchanging knowledge and working together in COST Action TU1208: Short-Term Scientific Missions on Ground Penetrating Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Assuncao, Sonia; De Smedt, Philippe; Giannakis, Iraklis; Matera, Loredana; Pinel, Nicolas; Dimitriadis, Klisthenis; Giannopoulos, Antonios; Sala, Jacopo; Lambot, Sébastien; Trinks, Immo; Marciniak, Marian; Pajewski, Lara

    2015-04-01

    This work aims at presenting the scientific results stemming from six Short-Term Scientific Missions (STSMs) funded by the COST (European COoperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 'Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar' (Action Chair: Lara Pajewski, STSM Manager: Marian Marciniak). STSMs are important means to develop linkages and scientific collaborations between participating institutions involved in a COST Action. Scientists have the possibility to go to an institution abroad, in order to undertake joint research and share techniques/equipment/infrastructures that may not be available in their own institution. STSMs are particularly intended for Early Stage Researchers (ESRs), i.e., young scientists who obtained their PhD since no more than 8 years when they started to be involved in the Action. Duration of a standard STSM can be from 5 to 90 days and the research activities carried out during this short stay shall specifically contribute to the achievement of the scientific objectives of the supporting COST Action. The first STSM was carried out by Lara Pajewski, visiting Antonis Giannopoulos at The University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom). The research activities focused on the electromagnetic modelling of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) responses to complex targets. A set of test scenarios was defined, to be used by research groups participating to Working Group 3 of COST Action TU1208, to test and compare different electromagnetic forward- and inverse-scattering methods; these scenarios were modelled by using the well-known finite-difference time-domain simulator GprMax. New Matlab procedures for the processing and visualization of GprMax output data were developed. During the second STSM, Iraklis Giannakis visited Lara Pajewski at Roma Tre University (Italy). The study was concerned with the numerical modelling of horn antennas for GPR. An air-coupled horn antenna was implemented in GprMax and tested in a realistically

  2. [Evaluation of scientific production in different subareas of Public Health: limits of the current model and contributions to the debate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriart, Jorge Alberto Bernstein; Deslandes, Suely Ferreira; Martin, Denise; Camargo Jr, Kenneth Rochel de; Carvalho, Marilia Sá; Coeli, Cláudia Medina

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to discuss the limits of the quantitative evaluation model for scientific production in Public Health. An analysis of the scientific production of professors from the various subareas of Public Health was performed for 2010-2012. Distributions of the mean annual score for professors were compared according to subareas. The study estimated the likelihood that 60% of the professors in the graduate studies programs scored P50 (Very Good) or higher in their area. Professors of Epidemiology showed a significantly higher median annual score. Graduate studies programs whose faculty included at least 60% of Epidemiology professors and fewer than 10% from the subarea Social and Human Sciences in Health were significantly more likely to achieve a "Very Good" classification. The observed inequalities in scientific production between different subareas of Public Health point to the need to rethink their evaluation in order to avoid reproducing iniquities that have harmful consequences for the field's diversity.

  3. BEYOND ACADEMIC EDUCATION: CONTRIBUTIONS OF THE SCIENTIFIC INITIATION FOR THE PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATION OF STUDENTS FROM THE MANAGEMENT AREA OF KNOWLEDGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Lúcia da Silva Pinto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Scientific Initiation (SI at graduation can be considered an opportunity for students to develop their academic and interpersonal skills, as well as to find professional guidance. The present study aims to analyze how the Scientific Initiation Program contributing to the professional qualification of the students from the Management Program. This is a qualitative and quantitative research, and the data were collected from interviews and questionnaires. The content analysis technique was used for the systematization and interpretation of the data. Among the main results, the profile of the students involved in research consisted of young people with less than 25 years of age, and mostly women from the morning course. It was observed that the search for new knowledge and curriculum improvement are the main motivating factors for joining a Scientific Initiation program. The research also revealed the students evaluation on their research participation and the difficulties they encountered. Thereby, based on the perception of the participants it was possible to conclude that the SI generates positive impact on personal, professional, and academic students of the Management Program in the institution analyzed.

  4. Present scienticism makes scientific knowledge absolute. New prophets speculate on existential fears; Hedendaags scientisme verabsoluteert wetenschappelijke kennis. Nieuwe profeten in opmars speculeren op existentiele angst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Kasteren, J.; Hanekamp, J.

    2007-07-01

    Climate change, particulate matter or poisonous chemicals are all recurring issues that are raised by 'prophets' warning us for the end of times, according to the authors of this study. These prophets base themselves on scientific knowledge according to which burning fossil fuels raises the global temperature and offsets the climate; particulate matter causes tens of thousands of deaths in the Netherlands alone; barely measurable quantities of pesticides and fire retardants affect our reproductive abilities. According to the authors, such opinions are nowadays embraced without any skepticism by politicians and each scientific outpouring must be translated into policy immediately. The authors wonder what has happened to critical reflection as part of the scientific and public discourse. [mk]. [Dutch] Of het nu gaat om klimaatverandering, fijn stof of giftige chemicalien, steeds weer zijn er volgens de auteurs 'profeten' die waarschuwen voor het einde der tijden. Ze beroepen zich daarbij op wetenschappelijke kennis. Op wetenschappelijke gronden zou zijn bewezen dat het verstoken van fossiele brandstoffen de aardse temperatuur opjaagt waardoor het klimaat van slag raakt; dat fijn stof tienduizenden doden veroorzaakt, alleen al in Nederland; en dat nauwelijks meetbare hoeveelheden pesticiden en brandvertragers ons vermogen tot reproductie aantasten. Het lijkt er volgens de auteurs op dat die meningen tegenwoordig zonder enige scepsis worden omarmd door de politiek en dat iedere wetenschappelijke oprisping direct in beleid moet worden vertaald. De auteurs vragen zich af waar de kritische reflectie, als onderdeel van het wetenschappelijke en publieke discours, is gebleven.

  5. Twenty-Year Survey of Scientific Literacy and Attitudes Toward Science - Investigating the Relationship Between Students' Knowledge and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; Antonellis, J.; Impey, C.; CATS

    2010-01-01

    Data from a twenty-year investigation into the science literacy of undergraduates (see Impey et al., this meeting) was used to explore responses to questions, derived from policy driven projects (e.g. NSF Science Indicators). Responses from almost 10,000 undergraduate students enrolled in introductory astronomy courses from 1989 to 2009 have been analyzed based on students’ responses to forced-choice and open-ended science literacy questions as well as Likert scale belief questions about science and technology. Science literacy questions were scored based on work by Miller (1998, 2004). In addition, we developed an extensive emergent coding scheme for the four open-ended science questions. Unique results as well as trends in the student data based on subgroups of codes are presented. Responses to belief questions were categorized, using theoretically derived categories, remodeled and confirmed through factor analysis, into five main categories; belief in life on other planets, faith-based beliefs, belief in unscientific phenomena, general attitude toward science and technology, and ethical considerations. Analysis revealed that demographic information explained less than 10% of the overall variance in students’ forced-answer scientific literacy scores. We present how students’ beliefs in these categories relate to their scientific literacy scores. You can help! Stop by our poster and fill out a new survey that will give us important parallel information to help us continue to analyze our valuable data set. We acknowledge the NSF for funding under Award No. 0715517, a CCLI Phase III Grant for the Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS) Program.

  6. Knowledge Mobilization in Canadian Educational Research: Identifying Current Developments and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snezana Ratkovic

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this special issue of Brock Education: Journal for Educational Research and Practice, we build on the knowledge mobilization (KMb discourses initiated by the Ontario Ministry of Education (MOE, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC, Knowledge Network for Applied Education Research (KNAER, Canadian Society for the Study of Education (CSSE, and School District-University Research Exchange (SURE network. We feature five journal articles and a book review addressing the three main KMb questions: How to assess KMb efforts across educational systems?  To what extent do educators use research to inform their praxis? How to make KMb work?

  7. Malassezia: Estado del conocimiento y perspectivas en su estudio Malassezia: Current knowledge and study perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo E. Giusiano

    2006-03-01

    knowledge of the ecology and epidemiology of this genus. Noteworthy antifungal susceptibility variations have been observed in some species, although there is not a standard method for these yeasts. There are few data about their biochemical characteristics, and the enzymes they produce might be important virulence factors, favouring host tissue invasion. Malassezia has been recognised as a member of the normal human and animal skin. Its implication in pathologic processes, including skin diseases to systemic infections, is the main issue in current investigations in order to determine the real pathogenic role of these yeasts.

  8. A Case Analysis to Increase Awareness of Current USMC Knowledge Management (KM) Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    communities” (p. 63; Virtanen, 2013, p. 119)  Capeda- Carrion (2006) states KM to be “the formalized, integrated approach of managing an enterprise’s...management and intellectual capital research,” Knowledge and Process Management,15(4): 235–246. doi:10.1002/kpm.314 Capeda- Carrion , G. (2006). Competitive

  9. Current Situation and Analysis of Geography Teachers' Active Learning Knowledge and Usage in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, Fikret

    2012-01-01

    In parallel to the developments in the approach to education, the secondary education geography curriculum in Turkey was renewed in 2005. This new programme encourages the use of active learning methods and techniques in the classroom by adopting the idea that students should construct and interpret knowledge by actively participating in the…

  10. Civic Education and Charter Schools: Current Knowledge and Future Research Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudowsky, Naomi; Chudowsky, Victor

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, as schools have shifted more attention to English language arts and mathematics, several groups have made a plea for renewed attention to civic education for all students. One such group is the Spencer Foundation, which promotes research to improve students' civics knowledge and skills and their dispositions for responsible…

  11. Current Knowledge and Training Needs of Certified Rehabilitation Counselors to Work Effectively with Veterans with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frain, Michael; Bishop, Malachy; Tansey, Timothy; Sanchez, Jennifer; Wijngaarde, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Veterans with disabilities have gained national attention in recent years because of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. This study examined certified rehabilitation counselors' (CRCs) knowledge and preparation for working with veterans with disabilities on their rehabilitation. Results indicate that CRCs report low levels of preparation in…

  12. Feed Efficiency: An Assessment of Current Knowledge from a Voluntary Subsample of the Swine Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flohr, Josh R.; Tokach, Mike D.; DeRouchey, Joel M.; Goodband, Robert D.; Dritz, Steve S.; Nelssen, Jim L.; Patience, John F.

    2014-01-01

    A voluntary sample of pork producers and advisers to the swine industry were surveyed about feed efficiency. The questionnaire was designed to accomplish three objectives: (a) determine the level of knowledge related to feed efficiency topics, (b) identify production practices used that influence feed efficiency, and (c) identify information gaps…

  13. Racial/ethnic differences in electronic cigarette knowledge, social norms, and risk perceptions among current and former smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb Hooper, Monica; Kolar, Stephanie K

    2017-04-01

    Psychosocial factors that may affect electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) initiation or maintenance among racial/ethnic minorities are not well-understood. This study examined racial/ethnic differences in e-cigarette knowledge, risk perceptions, and social norms among current and former smokers. Individuals with a tobacco smoking history and an awareness of e-cigarettes (N=285) were recruited from the community from June to August 2014. Telephone-administered surveys assessed demographics, smoking status, and e-cigarette knowledge, risk perceptions, and normative beliefs. Analyses of covariance and multinomial logistic regression tested associations by race/ethnicity. Controlling for sociodemographics and smoking status, White participants scored significantly higher on e-cigarette knowledge, compared to both Hispanics and African Americans/Blacks. Knowledge was lower among African Americans/Blacks compared to Hispanics. Compared to both Whites and Hispanics, African American/Black participants held lower perceptions regarding e-cigarette health risks and were less likely to view e-cigarettes as addictive. Normative beliefs did not differ by race/ethnicity. In conclusion, e-cigarette knowledge, health risk perceptions, and perceived addictiveness differed by race/ethnicity. The variation in e-cigarette knowledge and beliefs among smokers and former smokers has implications for use, and potentially, dual use. Understanding these relationships in unrepresented populations can inform future research and practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. PEASANT AND SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE ON PLANOSOLS AS A SOURCE OF MATERIALS IN THE MAKING OF NON-INDUSTRIAL POTTERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raiana Lira Cabral

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Ethnopedological studies have mainly focused on agricultural land uses and associated practices. Nevertheless, peasant and indigenous populations use soil and land resources for a number of additional purposes, including pottery. In the present study, we describe and analyze folk knowledge related to the use of soils in non-industrial pottery making by peasant potters, in the municipality of Altinho, Pernambuco State, semiarid region at Brazil. Ethnoscientific techniques were used to record local knowledge, with an emphasis on describing the soil materials recognized by the potters, the properties they used to identify those soil materials, and the criteria employed by them to differentiate and relate such materials. The potters recognized three categories of soil materials: “terra” (earth, “barro” (clay and, “piçarro” (soft rock. The multi-layered arrangement of these materials within the soil profiles was similar to the arrangement of the soil horizon described by formal pedologists. “Barro vermelho” (red clay was considered by potters as the principal ceramic resource. The potters followed morphological and utilitarian criteria in distinguishing the different soil materials. Soils from all of these sites were sodium-affected Alfisols and correspond to Typic Albaqualf and Typic Natraqualf in the Soil Taxonomy (Soil Survey Staff, 2010.

  15. The construction of knowledge in dentistry: the scientific production of three Brazilian magazines of 1990 to 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Patrícia Cardoso Amorim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to accomplish an analysis of the thematic approached by three dentistry Brazilian magazines, during the period of 1990 to 2004. We start from the presupposed that these magazines play an important role in the professional formation, for they are dynamic means of divulgation of knowledge and, thus, they are going to influence and guide the thoughts, the reflections and the attitudes, molding the dentistry practice. We have articulated a quantitative approach, studying 2806 articles. The analysis of the empiric material tells us that different thematic and subjects have been published; therefore, some of them have predominated, while others have appeared more discretely. The five thematic that have been more often approached refer to the technical and professionalizing subjects, reaching 52,73% of the publications. Amongst the conclusions, we point out that this research aims to contribute to the understanding of the knowledge construction process, granting reflection and after studies and also working as a parameter to follow the dentistry thinking.

  16. A review on current knowledge and future prospects of organohalogen contaminants (OHCs) in Asian birds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, Naeem Akhtar [Environmental Biology and Ecotoxicology Laboratory, Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Malik, Riffat Naseem, E-mail: r_n_malik2000@yahoo.co.uk [Environmental Biology and Ecotoxicology Laboratory, Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Frantz, Adrien [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UPEC, Paris 7, CNRS, INRA, IRD, Institut d' Ecologie et des Sciences de l' Environnement de Paris, F-75005, Paris (France); Jaspers, Veerle Leontina Bernard [Environmental Toxicology, Department of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway)

    2016-01-15

    The release of harmful chemicals in the Asian environment has recently increased dramatically due to rising industrial and agricultural activities. About 60% of the global human population is currently living on the Asian continent and may thus be exposed to a large range of different chemicals. Different classes of organohalogen chemicals have indeed been reported in various environmental compartments from Asia including humans and wildlife, but this issue has received less attention in birds. In this article, we reviewed the available literature on levels of legacy persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and various flame retardants (FRs) in Asian avifauna to analyze the existing pool of knowledge as well as to identify the gaps that should be addressed in future research. Furthermore, we discussed the variation in levels of organohalogens based on differences in regions, trophic level, dietary sources and migratory behaviors of species including distribution patterns in different tissues of birds. Although the mass of published literature is very low and even absent in many important regions of Asia, we deduced from the reported studies that levels of almost all classes of organohalogens (OHCs) including FRs were highest in East Asian countries such as Japan, China and South Korea, except for HCHs that were found at maximum levels in birds of South India. Concentrations (ng/g LW) of different OHCs in Asian birds ranged between < LOD (limit of detection) to 14,000,000 for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), < LOD to 790,000 for dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDTs), < LOD to 12,000 for hexachlorobenzene (HCB), < LOD to 29,000 for hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), < LOD to 47,000 for chlordanes (CHLs) and < LOD to 4600 for total cyclodienes. Further, ranges (ng/g LW) of 1.1 to 150,000 for Co-PCBs; < LOD to 27 for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs); < LOD to 45 for polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and 0.02 to 73 for PCDD/DFs have been reported in Asian aves

  17. The hazard of Sea Level Rise (SLR) in Greece: from scientific knowledge towards risk awareness of main actors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandoulaki, Miranda; Karymbalis, Efthimios; Yorgos, Melissourgos; Skordili, Sophia; Valkanou, Kanella

    2014-05-01

    A natural hazard that is expected to affect coastal areas in the near future is Sea-Level Rise (SLR) due to climate change. According to recent reports the eustatic sea-level rise caused by global warming will reach approximately 18-59 cm by the year 2100. Potential impacts of future sea-level rise include coastal erosion, frequent and intensified cyclonic activity and associated storm surge flooding that may affect the coastal zones, saltwater intrusion into groundwater aquifers, the inundation of ecologically significant wetlands, and threats to cultural and historical resources, as well as to infrastructure. The identification of sensitive sections of coasts and the assessment of potential impacts of SLR on these is therefore a fundamental, yet initial, step towards their protection. Greece has the most extensive coastline among all Mediterranean countries with most of the socio-economic activities concentrated along the coastal zone. Almost all big urban centres are coastal ones and the same stands for a great part of infrastructure (ports, airports, roads, electricity and telecommunications network etc). As a result, the impacts of a potential rise of the sea level are expected to seriously affect the entire country. The paper examines the vulnerability to SLR of coastal zones in Greece; however its main focus is how knowledge can lead to policy making and the protection of coastal areas. The main actors in respect to protection from SLR in Greece are identified and there is an attempt to pin point how the knowledge is communicated and shared between them. Barriers, bridges and gaps are detected as regards how information and knowledge lead to risk awareness and finally to the implementation of protection policies. A main finding of the paper is that SLR risk is far from becoming a policy priority in Greece, although steps are taken for addressing impacts attributed to SLR such as coastal erosion. In order to address this risk, there are many potential

  18. Geothermal projects funded under the NER 300 programme - current state of development and knowledge gained

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uihlein, Andreas; Salto Saura, Lourdes; Sigfusson, Bergur; Lichtenvort, Kerstin; Gagliardi, Filippo

    2015-04-01

    Introduction The NER 300 programme, managed by the European Commission is one of the largest funding programmes for innovative low-carbon energy demonstration projects. NER 300 is so called because it is funded from the sale of 300 million emission allowances from the new entrants' reserve (NER) set up for the third phase of the EU emissions trading system (ETS). The programme aims to successfully demonstrate environmentally safe carbon capture and storage (CCS) and innovative renewable energy (RES) technologies on a commercial scale with a view to scaling up production of low-carbon technologies in the EU. Consequently, it supports a wide range of CCS and RES technologies (bioenergy, concentrated solar power, photovoltaics, geothermal, wind, ocean, hydropower, and smart grids). Funded projects and the role of geothermal projects for the programme In total, about EUR 2.1 billion have been awarded to 39 projects through the programme's 2 calls for proposals (the first awarded in December 2012, the second in July 2014). The programme has awarded around 70 mEUR funding to 3 geothermal projects in Hungary, Croatia and France (see Annex). The Hungarian geothermal project awarded funding under the first call will enter into operation at the end of 2015 and the rest are expected to start in 2016 (HR) and in 2018 (FR), respectively. Knowledge Sharing Knowledge sharing requirements are built into the legal basis of the programme as a critical tool to lower risks in bridging the transition to large-scale production of innovative renewable energy and CCS deployment. Projects have to submit annually to the European Commission relevant knowledge gained during that year in the implementation of their project. The relevant knowledge is aggregated and disseminated by the European Commission to industry, research, government, NGO and other interest groups and associations in order to provide a better understanding of the practical challenges that arise in the important step of

  19. Geothermal projects funded under the NER 300 programme - current state of development and knowledge gained

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortall, Ruth; Uihlein, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Introduction The NER 300 programme, managed by the European Commission is one of the largest funding programmes for innovative low-carbon energy demonstration projects. NER 300 is so called because it is funded from the sale of 300 million emission allowances from the new entrants' reserve (NER) set up for the third phase of the EU emissions trading system (ETS). The programme aims to successfully demonstrate environmentally safe carbon capture and storage (CCS) and innovative renewable energy (RES) technologies on a commercial scale with a view to scaling up production of low-carbon technologies in the EU. Consequently, it supports a wide range of CCS and RES technologies (bioenergy, concentrated solar power, photovoltaics, geothermal, wind, ocean, hydropower, and smart grids). Funded projects and the role of geothermal projects for the programme In total, about EUR 2.1 billion have been awarded through the programme's 2 calls for proposals (the first awarded in December 2012, the second in July 2014). The programme has awarded around EUR 70 million funding to 3 geothermal projects in Hungary, Croatia and France. The Croatian geothermal project will enter into operation during 2017 the Hungarian in 2018, and the French in 2020. Knowledge Sharing Knowledge sharing requirements are built into the legal basis of the programme as a critical tool to lower risks in bridging the transition to large-scale production of innovative renewable energy and CCS deployment. Projects have to submit annually to the European Commission relevant knowledge gained during that year in the implementation of their project. The relevant knowledge is aggregated and disseminated by the European Commission to industry, research, government, NGO and other interest groups and associations in order to provide a better understanding of the practical challenges that arise in the important step of scaling up technologies and operating them at commercial scale. The knowledge sharing of the NER 300

  20. [Epidemiologic knowledge and current situation of Chagas disease in the state of Jalisco, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Kasten, Felipe; Magallón-Gastélum, Ezequiel; Soto-Gutiérrez, Margarita; Kasten-Monges, Marina; Bosseno, Marie-France; Brenière, Simone Frédérique

    2008-01-01

    Chagas disease in the state of Jalisco, Mexico was described for the first time in 1967; however, knowledge on the disease remains in a slow process. Between 1967 and 2006, the disease was described in its acute and chronic forms. The vector species have been identified, and the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi has been isolated and genetically characterized. Also, the magnitude of the infection in humans has been determined through serological studies of different populations as well as of blood donors. The up-to-dateness of knowledge of the disease in the state of Jalisco, unveils a necessity of increased research on the epidemiology of Chagas disease as well as on clinical studies to assess the health of individuals and the populations.

  1. A survey of current knowledge on sexually transmitted diseases and sexual behaviour in Italian adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Drago; Giulia Ciccarese; Francesca Zangrillo; Giulia Gasparini; Ludovica Cogorno; Silvia Riva; Sanja Javor; Emanuele Cozzani; Francesco Broccolo; Susanna Esposito; Aurora Parodi

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, 500 million people a year acquire a sexually transmitted disease (STD). Adolescents, accounting for 25% of the sexually active population, are the most affected. To analyze sexual behavior among Italian adolescents and their knowledge of STDs, with the goal of preventing their transmission, a questionnaire was administered to 2867 secondary school students (1271 males and 1596 females) aged 14–21 years. For the study, 1492 students were interviewed in Genoa (Northern Italy) and 137...

  2. How Do Clinicians Learn About Knowledge Translation? An Investigation of Current Web-Based Learning Opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Damarell, Raechel A; Tieman, Jennifer J

    2017-01-01

    Background Clinicians are important stakeholders in the translation of well-designed research evidence into clinical practice for optimal patient care. However, the application of knowledge translation (KT) theories and processes may present conceptual and practical challenges for clinicians. Online learning platforms are an effective means of delivering KT education, providing an interactive, time-efficient, and affordable alternative to face-to-face education programs. Objective This study ...

  3. The current status of knowledge of herbal medicine and medicinal plants in Fiche, Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    d’Avigdor, Elizabeth; Wohlmuth, Hans; Asfaw, Zemede; Awas, Tesfaye

    2014-01-01

    Background A majority of Ethiopians rely on traditional medicine as their primary form of health care, yet they are in danger of losing both their knowledge and the plants they have used as medicines for millennia. This study, conducted in the rural town of Fiche in Ethiopia, was undertaken with the support of Southern Cross University (SCU) Australia, Addis Ababa University (AAU) Ethiopia, and the Ethiopian Institute of Biodiversity (EIB), Ethiopia. The aim of this study, which included an e...

  4. Current Challenges for the Knowledge Society. Toward Digital Inclusion in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Migdalia Pineda

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This work makes reference to the subject of the present challenges of the society of the knowledge as far as the profit of the digital inclusion, mainly in Latin America, for which one stops in analyzing the incidence of the technologies of the information and the communication in the construction of the knowledge in the contemporary societies. Also, one approaches the problem of the social innovation in the production of popular contents and knowledge, and of the social inclusion like condition indispensable for an inclusion sustained in the social appropriation of the TIC. Methodologically, the investigation when being cradle in an ampler theoretical study, at the moment in course, titleholder: “Society of the Information, post modernity and culture of masses”, is of documentary and bibliographical character, so that it makes a conceptual analysis of the subjects boarded. Finally some actions and recommendations for the digital inclusion set out, by means of the creation of social networks, the sectors and worked against communities more in the zone.

  5. Current Public Knowledge Pertaining to Traumatic Brain Injury: Influence of Demographic Factors, Social Trends, and Sport Concussion Experience on the Understanding of Traumatic Brain Injury Sequelae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Zachary C; Van Patten, Ryan; Lace, John

    2017-03-01

    The current study aimed to assess current broad traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related knowledge in the general public, as well as understanding regarding specific TBI-related conditions including post-concussive syndrome (PCS) and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Data were collected from 307 domestic and 73 international individuals via online researcher-developed survey instrumentation utilizing the Amazon Mechanical Turk marketplace, a recently developed website that allows for a streamlined process of survey-based participant recruitment and data collection. Participants completed background demographics questions, a 31-item true/false questionnaire pertaining to TBI-related knowledge, and an inquiry related to willingness to allow (future) child(ren) to participate in several popular U.S. sports. The overall accuracy rate of our U.S. sample was 61%. No accuracy differences were present for gender or geographic region (p's > .05). Participants who self-reported a prior concussion diagnosis, who reported receiving formal concussion training, and who endorsed participation in collegiate, semi-professional, or professional athletic competition, all exhibited lower accuracy rates than the respective comparison groups (p's < .001). Finally, individual item analysis revealed the presence of significant misconceptions pertaining to PCS and CTE. Misconceptions regarding TBI remain highly prevalent within the general public and may be explained, to some extent, by inefficiencies in current TBI-education practices. Moreover, misconceptions regarding PCS and CTE are also prevalent and likely reflect inconsistencies in the scientific literature, coupled with misleading media reports. To combat these trends, greater emphasis must be placed on construct definition within the field and streamlined, efficient communication with the general public.

  6. The Relationship of Science Knowledge, Attitude and Decision Making on Socio-Scientific Issues: The Case Study of Students' Debates on a Nuclear Power Plant in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jho, Hunkoog; Yoon, Hye-Gyoung; Kim, Mijung

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of students' understanding of science knowledge, attitude and decision making on socio-scientific issues (SSI), especially on the issues of nuclear energy in Korea. SSI-focused instructions were developed to encourage students to understand and reflect on knowledge, attitude and…

  7. Specification of laboratory animal use in scientific articles: current low detail in the journals' instructions for authors and some proposals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, V

    2005-09-01

    The scientific article communicates results of research to other investigators; therefore, it must contain a complete description of the experiment to help other researchers when designing their future investigations. However, poorly detailed data on laboratory animal use is given in published articles. Despite the well-known and important contribution of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) to standardize scientific writing and submission of manuscripts to biomedical journals, no specific instructions on the reporting of animal use are given in the ICMJE Uniform Requirements and, therefore, most journals do not detail this to the authors. Individual efforts from groups like the Working Committee for the Biological Characterizations of Laboratory Animals, the Boyd Group, or the Committee on Publication Ethics are commendable. These contributions should be incorporated into the ICMJE Uniform Requirements and, later, into the Instructions for Authors of peer-reviewed journals. This would be the only efficient way to instruct authors on how to report laboratory animal use in their submitted manuscripts. The present article relates some proposals for helping authors when reporting animal use in scientific articles. These proposals are not only based on previous guidelines for animal specifications, but also on Instructions for Authors from journals specialized in Laboratory Animal Science. These proposals are classified into major and minor issues, and they are located in the corresponding parts of the article, as defined by the Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion (IMRAD) method. (c) 2005 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

  8. Current knowledge of the South East Asian large branchiopod Crustacea (Anostraca, Notostraca, Laevicaudata, Spinicaudata, Cyclestherida

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    D. Christopher Rogers

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The large branchiopod crustaceans (fairy shrimp, tadpole shrimp and clam shrimp of South East (SE Asia have only recently been examined with scientific vigor. Although more than 70 species have been reported for Asia and Indonesia, only six native taxa and one introduced species are known from SE Asia. The majority of records are from Thailand, with fewer than three records each from Laos, Myanmar, Malaysia, Cambodia, Vietnam, and Singapore. Eleven genera reported from adjacent regions may potentially occur in SE Asia. Spinicaudatan clam shrimp have been collected from Thailand and Cambodia, but have not been identified beyond genus. Four of the five native fairy shrimp species are endemic to SE Asia. The limited distributions of these few taxa suggest that this region has a distinct branchiopod fauna. In addition, we present new species and records of clam shrimp from Thailand. Future survey efforts will undoubtedly reveal additional taxa.

  9. The integration of scientific knowledge on hydrogeomorphological processes in fluvial risk management strategies through the "Freedom space for rivers" concept

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    Massé, Simon; Buffin-Bélanger, Thomas; Biron, Pascale; Ruiz, Julie

    2017-04-01

    Extensive knowledge and tools developed by hydrogeomorphologists led to the development of new approaches for fluvial hazards mapping that recognize the diversity of river systems and consider the temporal morphodynamic adjustments. Hydrogeomorphological mapping can be integrated into a management approach by considering distinct processes with specific regulation and management practices. The Freedom space for rivers (FSR) concept promotes the integration of multiple processes into a single space by combining the flooding and the mobility spaces as well as the riparian wetlands. Flooding spaces are delimited by a combination of methods, calling for the use of LiDAR elevation models and geomorphological observations related to past flood events. Mobility spaces are defined by the analysis of historical river positions and the interpretation of landforms associated with morphodynamics. In the FSR approach, fluvial processes can naturally operate, thus limiting risk for citizens and infrastructure, while providing a series of ecological services and socioeconomic benefits. Many methodological and institutional challenges arise for the applicability of the FSR concept in the management of rivers. To investigate these challenges, working groups bringing together different water stakeholders were created in collaboration with local watershed organizations and municipal authorities in three contrasting river environments in Québec (Canada). Stakeholders' engagement help identify local concerns regarding FSR management, collectively set up implementation strategies and transfer knowledge gained on river dynamics and fluvial hazards. The collaborative research approach aims to better understand challenges and opportunities for FSR management concepts. Farmers' reluctance to limit their interventions and practices along watercourses, a lack of political will at local level, the absence of government incentives to support local FSR actions, and the institutional challenge

  10. A Review on Current Status of Stability and Knowledge on Liquid Electrolyte-Based Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

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    Frédéric Sauvage

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to gather the current background in materials development and provide the reader with an accurate image of today’s knowledge regarding the stability of dye-sensitized solar cells. This contribution highlights the literature from the 1970s to the present day on nanostructured TiO2, dye, Pt counter electrode, and liquid electrolyte for which this review is focused on.

  11. Systematic review of the current status of programs and general knowledge of diagnosis and management of retinoblastoma

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    Marco A. Ramírez-Ortiz

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: There is an immediate need in Mexico to expand primary care providers’ knowledge of Rb and to expand and upgrade current Rb programs to meet the needs of the population adequately. Diagnosis and care of Rb patients in Mexico can also be improved by the establishment of a national Rb registry and a national early detection program, and by increased use of the national treatment protocol.

  12. KNOWLEDGE CYCLE AND STRATEGIC KNOWLEDGE WITHIN COMPANY

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    Ovidiu NICOLESCU

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the knowledge-based economy, a company performs a set of activities focused on knowledge: identifying necessary knowledge, buying knowledge, learning, acquiring knowledge, creating knowledge, storing knowledge, sharing knowledge, using knowledge, protection of knowledge, capitalizing knowledge. As a result, a new function emerge: the knowledge function. In the knowledge-based companies, not every knowledge has the same impact. The analysis of the actual situations in the most developed and highly performing companies - based in knowledge, outlines the occurrence of a new category of knowledge – strategic knowledge. Generating this category of knowledge is a new category of challenge for the scientific system.

  13. How Do Clinicians Learn About Knowledge Translation? An Investigation of Current Web-Based Learning Opportunities.

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    Damarell, Raechel A; Tieman, Jennifer J

    2017-07-13

    Clinicians are important stakeholders in the translation of well-designed research evidence into clinical practice for optimal patient care. However, the application of knowledge translation (KT) theories and processes may present conceptual and practical challenges for clinicians. Online learning platforms are an effective means of delivering KT education, providing an interactive, time-efficient, and affordable alternative to face-to-face education programs. This study investigates the availability and accessibility of online KT learning opportunities for health professionals. It also provides an analysis of the types of resources and associated disciplines retrieved by a range of KT synonyms. We searched a range of bibliographic databases and the Internet (Google advanced option) using 9 KT terms to identify online KT learning resources. To be eligible, resources had to be free, aimed at clinicians, educational in intent, and interactive in design. Each term was searched using two different search engines. The details of the first 100 websites captured per browser (ie, n=200 results per term) were entered into EndNote. Each site was subsequently visited to determine its status as a learning resource. Eligible websites were appraised for quality using the AACODS (Authority, Accuracy, Coverage, Objectivity, Date, Significance) tool. We identified 971 unique websites via our multiple search strategies. Of these, 43 were health-related and educational in intent. Once these sites were evaluated for interactivity, a single website matched our inclusion criteria (Dementia Knowledge Translation Learning Centre). KT is an important but complex system of processes. These processes overlap with knowledge, practice, and improvement processes that go by a range of different names. For clinicians to be informed and competent in KT, they require better access to free learning opportunities. These resources should be designed from the viewpoint of the clinician, presenting KT

  14. HISTORICAL CRITICAL PEDAGOGY AND OBJECTIVE KNOWLEDGE VERSUS THE MULTICULTURALISM AND RELATIVISM CURRENT ACADEMIC DEBATE

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    Julia Malanchen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the existing antagonistic understanding among the authors who discuss curriculum from the multiculturalist perspective and the authors of the Historical-Critical Pedagogy. The aim is to explain the postmodern relativists bases and multiculturalism, which opposes the defense of objective knowledge as central to the organization of a curriculum. Finally we point out what content should integrate an academic, with the objective, human development, human emancipation and social transformation, which allow the human being aim to provide social and consciously so increasingly free and universal.

  15. Implementing interactive decision support: A case for combining cyberinfrastructure, data fusion, and social process to mobilize scientific knowledge in sustainability problems

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    Pierce, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Geosciences are becoming increasingly data intensive, particularly in relation to sustainability problems, which are multi-dimensional, weakly structured and characterized by high levels of uncertainty. In the case of complex resource management problems, the challenge is to extract meaningful information from data and make sense of it. Simultaneously, scientific knowledge alone is insufficient to change practice. Creating tools, and group decision support processes for end users to interact with data are key challenges to transforming science-based information into actionable knowledge. The ENCOMPASS project began as a multi-year case study in the Atacama Desert of Chile to design and implement a knowledge transfer model for energy-water-mining conflicts in the region. ENCOMPASS combines the use of cyberinfrastructure (CI), automated data collection, interactive interfaces for dynamic decision support, and participatory modelling to support social learning. A pilot version of the ENCOMPASS CI uses open source systems and serves as a structure to integrate and store multiple forms of data and knowledge, such as DEM, meteorological, water quality, geomicrobiological, energy demand, and groundwater models. In the case study, informatics and data fusion needs related to scientific uncertainty around deep groundwater flowpaths and energy-water connections. Users may upload data from field sites with handheld devices or desktops. Once uploaded, data assets are accessible for a variety of uses. To address multi-attributed decision problems in the Atacama region a standalone application with touch-enabled interfaces was created to improve real-time interactions with datasets by groups. The tool was used to merge datasets from the ENCOMPASS CI to support exploration among alternatives and build shared understanding among stakeholders. To date, the project has increased technical capacity among stakeholders, resulted in the creation of both for-profit and non

  16. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 26: The relationship between technology policy and scientific and technical information within the US and Japanese aerospace industries

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    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Government technology policy has nurtured the growth of the aerospace industry which is vital to both the U.S. and Japanese economies. Japanese technology policy differs significantly from U.S. technology policy, however, particularly with respect to the production, transfer, and use of scientific and technical information (STI). In this paper, we discuss the unique position of the aerospace industry in the U.S. and Japan, U.S. and Japanese aerospace policy, and the role of STI in the process of aerospace innovation. The information-seeking behaviors of U.S. and Japanese aerospace engineers and scientists are compared. The authors advocate the development of innovation-adoption technology and STI policy goals for U.S. aerospace and the inclusion of an aerospace knowledge diffusion transfer system with an 'active' component for scanning and acquiring foreign aerospace technology and STI.

  17. Microbiology of Wind-eroded Sediments: Current Knowledge and Future Research Directions

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    Wind erosion is a threat to the sustainability and productivity of soils that takes place at local, regional, and global scales. Current estimates of cost of wind erosion have not included the costs associated with the loss of soil biodiversity and reduced ecosystem functions. Microorganisms carrie...

  18. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Perspective on Current Evidence and Clinical Knowledge

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    Ali Habib

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the current published data regarding open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF in relation to minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF. Introduction. MI-TLIF, a modern method for lumbar interbody arthrodesis, has allowed for a minimally invasive method to treat degenerative spinal pathologies. Currently, there is limited literature that compares TLIF directly to MI-TLIF. Thus, we seek to discuss the current literature on these techniques. Methods. Using a PubMed search, we reviewed recent publications of open and MI-TLIF, dating from 2002 to 2012. We discussed these studies and their findings in this paper, focusing on patient-reported outcomes as well as complications. Results. Data found in 14 articles of the literature was analyzed. Using these reports, we found mean follow-up was 20 months. The mean patient study size was 52. Seven of the articles directly compared outcomes of open TLIF with MI-TLIF, such as mean duration of surgery, length of post-operative stay, blood loss, and complications. Conclusion. Although high-class data comparing these two techniques is lacking, the current evidence supports MI-TLIF with outcomes comparable to that of the traditional, open technique. Further prospective, randomized studies will help to further our understanding of this minimally invasive technique.

  19. Biological aspects of dental implant; Current knowledge and perspectives in oral implantology

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    Sukant Sahoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of dental implants became a scientifically accepted treatment modality for the rehabilitation of fully and partially edentulous patients. The evolution of dental implants has completely changed dentistry. Implants can offer a number of benefits, from improved esthetics, to reducing bone loss, to improving denture retention for edentulous patients. Branemark et al., was the first person to examined submerged titanium implants with a machined surface in dogs and later called this procedure as osseointegration, which is now defined as "A direct structural and functional connection between ordered, living bone and the surface of a load-bearing implant." Commercially pure titanium is recognized today as a material of choice, since it is characterized by excellent biological and also good mechanical properties. In this comprehensive review, authors have sought to explore various biological aspects of dental implant as pertinent to clinical procedure so as to provide research foundation for the establishment of suitable strategies that can assist in successful implant therapy.

  20. Surgical templates for dental implant positioning; current knowledge and clinical perspectives

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    Mohammed Zaheer Kola

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental implants have been used in a variety of different forms for many years. Since the mid-20 th century, there has been an increase in interest in the implant process for the replacement of missing teeth. Branemark was one of the initial pioneers who applied scientifically based research techniques to develop an endosseous implant that forms an immobile connection with bone. The need for a dental implant to completely address multiple physical and biological factors imposes tremendous constraints on the surgical and handling protocol. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have serious shortcomings related to their bony union and the fact that their mechanical properties do not match those of bone. However, anatomic limitation and restorative demands encourage the surgeon to gain precision in planning and surgical positioning of dental implants. Ideal placement of the implant facilitates the establishment of favorable forces on the implants and the prosthetic component as well as ensures an aesthetic outcome. Therefore, it is advisable to establish a logical continuity between the planned restoration and the surgical phases, it is essential to use a transfer device that for sure increases the predictability of success. The surgical guide template is fabricated by a dental technician after the presurgical restorative appointments that primarily include determination of occlusal scheme and implant angulations. Here, authors genuinely attempted to review the evolution and clinical applicability of surgical templates used in the placement of dental implants.