WorldWideScience

Sample records for current rings experiment

  1. The Heidelberg High Current Injector A Versatile Injector for Storage Ring Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Von Hahn, R; Repnow, R; Schwalm, D; Welsch, C P

    2004-01-01

    The High Current Injector (HCI) was designed and built as a dedicated injector for the Test Storage Ring in Heidelberg to deliver mainly singly charged Li- and Be-ions. After start for routine operation in 1999 the HCI delivered stable beams during the following years for about 50 % of the experiments with very high reliability. Due to the requirements from the experiment the HCI changed during that period from a machine for singly charged positive ions to an injector for a large variety of molecules as well as positively or negatively charged light ions. After successful commissioning of the custom built 18 GHz high power ECR-source at its present test location various modifications and additions were made in preparation of a possible conversion into an injector for highly charged heavy ions as a second phase. This paper gives an overview of the experience gained in the passed 5 years and presents the status of the upgrade of the HCI.

  2. Saturn's Other Ring Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, F. J.

    2014-04-01

    Saturn's main rings orbit the planet within an atmosphere and ionosphere of water, oxygen and hydrogen, produced by meteoritic impacts on and ultraviolet photodesorbtion of the ring particles [Johnson et al., 2006; Luhmann et al., 2006; Tseng et al., 2010]. The neutral atmosphere itself has only been tentatively detected through ultraviolet fluorescents of OH [Hall et al., 1996] while the ionosphere was observed in situ by the Cassini spacecraft shortly after orbital insertion [Coates et al.,2005; Tokar et al. 2005, Waite et al. 2005]. Although the plasma flow velocity of this ionosphere is not well-constrained, but the close association with the rings suggests that its speed would be couppled to the keplarian velocity of the rings themselves. As a result, the motion of the plasma through Saturn's magnetic field would produce an induced voltage, oriented away from the planet outside synchronous orbit and towards the planet inside synchronous orbit. Such a potential could result in currents flowing across the ring plane and closeing along magnetic field lines and through Saturn's ionosphere at latitudes between 36o and 48o. Cassini observations of whistler-mode plasma wave emissions [Xin et al.,2006] centered on synchronous orbit (1.76 Rs, mapping to 41o latitude) have been interpreted as a product of field-aligned electron beams associated with such a current. This presentation will investigate the magnitude of these currents and the resulting Joule heating of the ionosphere. An important constraint is that no auroral ultraviolet emissions have been observed at the relevant latitudes. In contrast, Joule heating could affect infrared emissions from H3+. Variations in H3+ emission associated with Saturn's rings have been reported by O'Donoghue et al., 2013, and interpreted as a result of ring "rain", i.e. precipitating water group species from the rings which alter ionosphereic chemistry and H3+ densities. As noted by O'Donoghue et al., this interpretation may be

  3. Ring current and radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Studies performed during 1983-1986 on the ring current, the injection boundary model, and the radiation belts are discussed. The results of these studies yielded the first observations on the composition and charge state of the ring current throughout the ring-current energy range, and strong observational support for an injection-boundary model accounting for the origins of radiation-belt particles, the ring current, and substorm particles observed at R less than about 7 earth radii. In addition, the results have demonstrated that the detection of energetic neutral atoms generated by charge-exchange interactions between the ring current and the hydrogen geocorona can provide global images of the earth's ring current and its spatial and temporal evolution.

  4. Assessing the role of oxygen on ring current formation and evolution through numerical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, R.; Liemohn, M. W.; Toth, G.; Yu Ganushkina, N.; Daldorff, L. K. S.

    2015-06-01

    We address the effect of ionospheric outflow and magnetospheric ion composition on the physical processes that control the development of the 5 August 2011 magnetic storm. Simulations with the Space Weather Modeling Framework are used to investigate the global dynamics and energization of ions throughout the magnetosphere during storm time, with a focus on the formation and evolution of the ring current. Simulations involving multifluid (with variable H+/O+ ratio in the inner magnetosphere) and single-fluid (with constant H+/O+ ratio in the inner magnetosphere) MHD for the global magnetosphere with inner boundary conditions set either by specifying a constant ion density or by physics-based calculations of the ion fluxes reveal that dynamical changes of the ion composition in the inner magnetosphere alter the total energy density of the magnetosphere, leading to variations in the magnetic field as well as particle drifts throughout the simulated domain. A low oxygen to hydrogen ratio and outflow resulting from a constant ion density boundary produced the most disturbed magnetosphere, leading to a stronger ring current but misses the timing of the storm development. Conversely, including a physics-based solution for the ionospheric outflow to the magnetosphere system leads to a reduction in the cross-polar cap potential (CPCP). The increased presence of oxygen in the inner magnetosphere affects the global magnetospheric structure and dynamics and brings the nightside reconnection point closer to the Earth. The combination of reduced CPCP together with the formation of the reconnection line closer to the Earth yields less adiabatic heating in the magnetotail and reduces the amount of energetic plasma that has access to the inner magnetosphere.

  5. Persistent currents in normal metal rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluhm, Hendrik; Koshnick, Nicholas C; Bert, Julie A; Huber, Martin E; Moler, Kathryn A

    2009-04-03

    The authors have measured the magnetic response of 33 individual cold mesoscopic gold rings, one ring at a time. The response of some sufficiently small rings has a component that is periodic in the flux through the ring and is attributed to a persistent current. Its period is close to h/e, and its sign and amplitude vary between rings. The amplitude distribution agrees well with predictions for the typical h/e current in diffusive rings. The temperature dependence of the amplitude, measured for four rings, is also consistent with theory. These results disagree with previous measurements of three individual metal rings that showed a much larger periodic response than expected. The use of a scanning SQUID microscope enabled in situ measurements of the sensor background. A paramagnetic linear susceptibility and a poorly understood anomaly around a zero field are attributed to defect spins.

  6. Persistent current in small superconducting rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwiete, Georg; Oreg, Yuval

    2009-07-17

    We study theoretically the contribution of fluctuating Cooper pairs to the persistent current in superconducting rings threaded by a magnetic flux. For sufficiently small rings, in which the coherence length xi exceeds the radius R, mean field theory predicts a full reduction of the transition temperature to zero near half-integer flux. We find that nevertheless a very large current is expected to persist in the ring as a consequence of Cooper pair fluctuations that do not condense. For larger rings with R>xi, we calculate analytically the susceptibility in the critical region of strong fluctuations and show that it reflects competition of two interacting complex order parameters.

  7. Ring current proton decay by charge exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P. H.; Hoffman, R. A.; Fritz, T. A.

    1976-01-01

    Explorer 45 (S3-A) measurements were made during the recovery phase of the moderate magnetic storm of February 24, 1972, in which a symmetric ring current had developed and effects due to asymmetric ring current losses could be eliminated. It was found that after the initial rapid decay of the proton flux, which is a consequence of the dissipation of the asymmetric ring current, the equatorially mirroring protons in the energy range 5-30 keV decayed throughout the L value range of 3.5-5.0 at the charge exchange decay rate calculated by Liemohn (1961). After several days of decay, the proton fluxes reached a lower limit where an apparent equilibrium was maintained, between weak particle source mechanisms and the loss mechanisms, until fresh protons were injected into the ring current region during substorms. While other proton loss mechanisms may also be operating, the results indicate that charge exchange is more than sufficient as a particle loss mechanism for the storm time proton ring current decay.

  8. Nuclear Physics Experiments with Ion Storage Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Litvinova, Yu A; Blaum, K; Bosch, F; Brandau, C; Chen, L X; Dillmann, I; Egelhof, P; Geissel, H; Grisenti, R E; Hagmann, S; Heil, M; Heinz, A; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Knöbel, R; Kozhuharov, C; Lestinsky, M; Ma, X W; Nilsson, T; Nolden, F; Ozawa, A; Raabe, R; Reed, M W; Reifarth, R; Sanjari, M S; Schneider, D; Simon, H; Steck, M; Stöhlker, T; Sun, B H; Tu, X L; Uesaka, T; Walker, P M; Wakasugi, M; Weick, H; Winckler, N; Woods, P J; Xu, H S; Yamaguchi, T; Yamaguchi, Y; Zhang, Y H

    2013-01-01

    In the last two decades a number of nuclear structure and astrophysics experiments were performed at heavy-ion storage rings employing unique experimental conditions offered by such machines. Furthermore, building on the experience gained at the two facilities presently in operation, several new storage ring projects were launched worldwide. This contribution is intended to provide a brief review of the fast growing field of nuclear structure and astrophysics research at storage rings.

  9. Formation of the storm-time ring current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Lun; PU Zuyin; ZHOU Xuzhi; FU Suiyan; ZONG Qiugang

    2004-01-01

    An extensive study of ring current injection and intensification of the storm-time symmetric ring current is conducted with three-dimensional (3-D) test particle trajectory calculations (TPTCs) in this paper. TPTCs reveal more accurately the process of ring current injection. The main results are the following: (1) an intense convection electric field can effectively energize and inject plasma sheet particles into ring current region within 1-3 h. (2) Injection ions often follow chaotic trajectories in non-adiabatic regions,which may have implications in storm and ring current physics. (3) The shielding electric field, which arises as a consequence of enhanced convection and co-exists with injection and convection electric field, leads the original open trajectories to change into closed ones, thus may play an important role in the formation of the symmetric ring current.

  10. Aromatic and antiaromatic ring currents in a molecular nanoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeks, Martin D.; Claridge, Timothy D. W.; Anderson, Harry L.

    2016-12-01

    Aromatic and antiaromatic molecules—which have delocalized circuits of [4n + 2] or [4n] electrons, respectively—exhibit ring currents around their perimeters. The direction of the ring current in an aromatic molecule is such as to generate a magnetic field that opposes the external field inside the ring (a ‘diatropic’ current), while the ring current in an antiaromatic molecule flows in the reverse direction (‘paratropic’). Similar persistent currents occur in metal or semiconductor rings, when the phase coherence of the electronic wavefunction is preserved around the ring. Persistent currents in non-molecular rings switch direction as a function of the magnetic flux passing through the ring, so that they can be changed from diatropic (‘aromatic’) to paratropic (‘antiaromatic’) simply by changing the external magnetic field. As in molecular systems, the direction of the persistent current also depends on the number of electrons. The relationship between ring currents in molecular and non-molecular rings is poorly understood, partly because they are studied in different size regimes: the largest aromatic molecules have diameters of about one nanometre, whereas persistent currents are observed in microfabricated rings with diameters of 20-1,000 nanometres. Understanding the connection between aromaticity and quantum-coherence effects in mesoscopic rings provides a motivation for investigating ring currents in molecules of an intermediate size. Here we show, using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and density functional theory, that a six-porphyrin nanoring template complex, with a diameter of 2.4 nanometres, is antiaromatic in its 4+ oxidation state (80 π electrons) and aromatic in its 6+ oxidation state (78 π electrons). The antiaromatic state has a huge paramagnetic susceptibility, despite having no unpaired electrons. This work demonstrates that a global ring current can be promoted in a macrocycle by adjusting its oxidation state

  11. An intensive tree-ring experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sánchez-Salguero, Raúl; Hevia, Andrea; Camarero, J.J.; Treydte, Kerstin; Frank, Dave; Crivellaro, Alan; Domínguez-Delmás, Marta; Hellman, Lena; Kaczka, Ryszard J.; Kaye, Margot; Akhmetzyanov, Linar; Ashiq, Muhammad Waseem; Bhuyan, Upasana; Bondarenko, Olesia; Camisón, Álvaro; Camps, Sien; García, Vicenta Constante; Vaz, Filipe Costa; Gavrila, Ionela G.; Gulbranson, Erik; Huhtamaa, Heli; Janecka, Karolina; Jeffers, Darren; Jochner, Matthias; Koutecký, Tomáš; Lamrani-Alaoui, Mostafa; Lebreton-Anberrée, Julie; Seijo, María Martín; Matulewski, Pawel; Metslaid, Sandra; Miron, Sergiu; Morrisey, Robert; Opdebeeck, Jorgen; Ovchinnikov, Svyatoslav; Peters, Richard; Petritan, Any M.; Popkova, Margarita; Rehorkova, Stepanka; Ariza, María O.R.; Sánchez-Miranda, Ángela; Linden, Van der Marjolein; Vannoppen, Astrid; Volařík, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The European Dendroecologial Fieldweek (EDF) provides an intensive learning experience in tree-ring research that challenges any participant to explore new multidisciplinary dendro-sciences approaches within the context of field and laboratory settings. Here we present the 25th EDF, held in

  12. Morphology of the ring current derived from magnetic field observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Le

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Our examination of the 20 years of magnetospheric magnetic field data from ISEE, AMPTE/CCE and Polar missions has allowed us to quantify how the ring current flows and closes in the magnetosphere at a variety of disturbance levels. Using intercalibrated magnetic field data from the three spacecraft, we are able to construct the statistical magnetic field maps and derive 3-dimensional current density by the simple device of taking the curl of the statistically determined magnetic field. The results show that there are two ring currents, an inner one that flows eastward at ~3 RE and a main westward ring current at ~4–7 RE for all levels of geomagnetic disturbances. In general, the in-situ observations show that the ring current varies as the Dst index decreases, as we would expect it to change. An unexpected result is how asymmetric it is in local time. Some current clearly circles the magnetosphere but much of the energetic plasma stays in the night hemisphere. These energetic particles appear not to be able to readily convect into the dayside magnetosphere. During quiet times, the symmetric and partial ring currents are similar in strength (~0.5MA and the peak of the westward ring current is close to local midnight. It is the partial ring current that exhibits most drastic intensification as the level of disturbances increases. Under the condition of moderate magnetic storms, the total partial ring current reaches ~3MA, whereas the total symmetric ring current is ~1MA. Thus, the partial ring current contributes dominantly to the decrease in the Dst index. As the ring current strengthens the peak of the partial ring current shifts duskward to the pre-midnight sector. The partial ring current is closed by a meridional current system through the ionosphere, mainly the field-aligned current, which maximizes at local times near the dawn and dusk. The closure currents flow in

  13. Transport currents measured in ring samples: test of superconducting weld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, H.; Claus, H.; Chen, L.; Paulikas, A. P.; Veal, B. W.; Olsson, B.; Koshelev, A.; Hull, J.; Crabtree, G. W.

    2001-02-01

    The critical current densities in bulk melt-textured YBa 2Cu 3O x and across superconducting “weld” joints are measured using scanning Hall probe measurements of the trapped magnetic field in ring samples. With this method, critical current densities are obtained without the use of electrical contacts. Large persistent currents are induced in ring samples at 77 K, after cooling in a 3 kG field. These currents can be determined from the magnetic field they produce. At 77 K a supercurrent exceeding 2000 A (about 10 4 A/cm 2) was induced in a 2 cm diameter ring; this current produces a magnetic field exceeding 1.5 kG in the bore of the ring. We demonstrate that when a ring is cut, and the cut is repaired by a superconducting weld, the weld joint can transmit the same high supercurrent as the bulk.

  14. Space Weather Effects Produced by the Ring Current Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganushkina, Natalia; Jaynes, Allison; Liemohn, Michael

    2017-10-01

    One of the definitions of space weather describes it as the time-varying space environment that may be hazardous to technological systems in space and/or on the ground and/or endanger human health or life. The ring current has its contributions to space weather effects, both in terms of particles, ions and electrons, which constitute it, and magnetic and electric fields produced and modified by it at the ground and in space. We address the main aspects of the space weather effects from the ring current starting with brief review of ring current discovery and physical processes and the Dst-index and predictions of the ring current and storm occurrence based on it. Special attention is paid to the effects on satellites produced by the ring current electrons. The ring current is responsible for several processes in the other inner magnetosphere populations, such as the plasmasphere and radiation belts which is also described. Finally, we discuss the ring current influence on the ionosphere and the generation of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC).

  15. Dynamics of the earth's ring current - Theory and observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The development of currents within an arbitrary distribution of particles trapped in the geomagnetic field is described. These currents combine to form the earth's ring current and thus are responsible for the worldwide depressions of surface magnetic field strength during periods of magnetic activity known as magnetic storms. Following a brief review of trapped particle motion in magnetic fields, ring current development is described and presented in terms of basic field and particle distribution parameters. Experimental observations then are presented and discussed within the theoretical framework developed earlier. New results are presented which, in the area of composition and charge state observations, hold high promise in solving many long standing ring current problems. Finally, available experimental results will be used to assess the present understanding as to ring current sources, generation, and dissipation.

  16. Storage ring electric dipole moment experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, William M.; Storage Ring EDM Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Dedicated electric dipole moment (edm) searches have been done only for neutral systems. We discuss in this talk dedicated storage ring proposals for measuring edms of charged particles. The statistical error dominates over the systematic error for the neutron and mercury atom edm searches. Large numbers of particles are available today from modern polarized sources at several accelerators. A proposed proton edm experiment at BNL would improve the present proton edm limit by a factor of 104. A "precursor" deuteron edm experiment has been proposed at COSY, Juelich, Germany. This would be the first measurement of the deuteron edm.

  17. Perimeter ring currents in benzenoids from Pauling bond orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Patrick W; Myrvold, Wendy; Jenkinson, Daniel; Bird, William H

    2016-04-28

    It is shown that the ring currents in perimeter hexagonal rings of Kekulean benzenoids, as estimated within the Randić conjugated-circuit model, can be calculated directly without tedious pairwise comparison of Kekulé structures or Kekulé counting for cycle-deleted subgraphs. Required are only the Pauling bond orders of perimeter bonds and the number of Kekulé structures of the benzenoid, both readily available from the adjacency matrix of the carbon skeleton. This approach provides easy calculation of complete current maps for benzenoids in which every face has at least one bond on the perimeter (as in the example of cata-condensed benzenoids), and allows qualitative evaluation of the main ring-current contributions to (1)H chemical shifts in general benzenoids. A combined Randić-Pauling model for correlation of ring current and bond length through bond order is derived and shown to be consistent with resilience of current under bond alternation.

  18. The Linkage Between the Ionospheric Trough and Ring Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, P. C.; Zheng, Y.; Talaat, E.; Sotirelis, T.; Foster, J. C.; Erickson, P. J.

    2007-05-01

    We present data-model investigations of how the ring current couples to the sub-auroral ionosphere. The ring current pressure distribution during storm and substorms is highly asymetrical and sets up the region 2 current system that closes through the sub-auroral ionosphere. Of particular interest is what happens in the so-called ionospheric trough region, which is a region in the evening ionosphere with extremely low conductance (few tenths of a mho). Observations show strong westward flows in the ionospheric trough (Sub-Auroral Polarization Stream - SAPS) and sometimes highly structured and variable. The Comprehensive Ring Current Model models the ring current by using the bounce averaged Boltzmann equation and allowing the ring current to close through the ionosphere. Our model ionosphere includes dayside and auroral conductance as well as semi-empirical representation of the trough conductance. By using realistic representations of the conductances we seek to explore how the ring current pressure distribution (and therefore the region 2 current system) is linked to the presence of the trough. We use data from the IMAGE satellite, the Millstone Hill and SuperDARN radar facilities.

  19. Recent experiments with ring Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, S.; Kumar, A.; Anderson, N. W.; Campbell, G. K.

    2016-05-01

    Here, we present three recent results of our experiments with ring-shaped 23 Na Bose-Einstein condensates. First, we present results of the effect of temperature on the decay of persistent currents in the presence of a local, stationary perturbation, or weak link. When the weak link rotates, it can drive transitions between quantized persistent current states in the ring, that form hysteresis loops whose size depends strongly on temperature. We find that our data does not fit with a simple model of thermal activation. Second, we present a new method to measure the quantized persistent current state of the ring in a minimally-destructive way. This technique uses phonons as probes of the background flow through the Doppler effect. Finally, we present a set of experiments designed to reproduce the horizon problem in the early universe. Supersonic expansion of the ring creates causally-disconnected regions of BEC whose phase evolves at different rates. When the expansion stops and these regions are allowed to recombine, they form topological excitations. These excitations can be predicted using a simple theory that shows excellent agreement with the data.

  20. Rheology of Rings: Current Status and Future Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Gregory

    Understanding the dynamics of circular or ring-like polymers has been a subject of investigation since the 1980s and is one which remains an area that is not fully understood. Part of the reason for this is the difficulty of making synthetic rings of sufficient size to establish the nature of the entanglement dynamics, if entanglements even exist in these materials. Furthermore, there is now strong evidence that small amounts of linear impurities can impact the dynamics. Hence, one of the major challenges to our understanding of ring dynamics is to make large molecular weight rings of sufficient purity that the dynamics of the rings themselves can be determined. In the present work the current state of understanding of the dynamics of rings is outlined and current work from our group of collaborators to make extremely large circular polymers using Echeverria Coli as a route to make pure rings (circular DNA) in sufficient quantity and size to determine the dynamics of these materials will be shown. First results of ring dynamics in dilute solution are presented and new results on concentrated and entangled solutions will be discussed. Remaining challenges will be elucidated. Partially supported by the John R. Bradford Endowment and the Paul Whitfield Horn Professorship at Texas Tech University.

  1. The impact of exospheric neutral dynamics on ring current decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, R.; Liemohn, M. W.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Gruntman, M.; Bailey, J. J.; Toth, G.

    2015-12-01

    The geocorona plays an important role in the energy budget of the Earth's inner magnetosphere since charge exchange of energetic ions with exospheric neutrals makes the exosphere act as an energy sink for ring current particles. Long-term ring current decay following a magnetic storm is mainly due to these electron transfer reactions, leading to the formation energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) that leave the ring current system on ballistic trajectories. The number of ENAs emitted from a given region of space depends on several factors, such as the energy and species of the energetic ion population in that region and the density of the neutral gas with which the ions undergo charge exchange. However, the density and structure of the exosphere are strongly dependent on changes in atmospheric temperature and density as well as charge exchange with the ions of plasmaspheric origin, which depletes the geocorona (by having a neutral removed from the system). Moreover, the radiation pressure exerted by solar far-ultraviolet photons pushes the geocoronal hydrogen away from the Earth in an anti-sunward direction to form a tail of neutral hydrogen. TWINS ENA images provide a direct measurement of these ENA losses and therefore insight into the dynamics of the ring current decay through interactions with the geocorona. We assess the influence of geocoronal neutrals on ring current formation and decay by analysis of the predicted ENA emissions using 6 different geocoronal models and simulations from the HEIDI ring current model during storm time. Comparison with TWINS ENA images shows that the location of the peak ENA enhancements is highly dependent on the distribution of geocoronal hydrogen density. We show that the neutral dynamics has a strong influence on the time evolution of the ring current populations as well as on the formation of energetic neutral atoms.

  2. Equilibrium currents in a Corbino graphene ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. López

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We address the description of a graphene Corbino disk in the context of a tight binding approach that includes both kinetic and Rashba spin-orbit coupling due to an external out-of-plane electric field. Persistent equilibrium currents are induced by an external magnetic field breaking time reversal symmetry. By direct diagonalization, we compute the spectrum and focus on the dispersion near the K points at the Fermi level. The dispersion keenly reproduces that of a continuum model in spite of the complexity of the boundary conditions. We validate the assumptions of the continuum model in terms of predominant zig-zag boundaries conditions and weak sub-band coupling. The wave functions displaying the lowest transverse modes are obtained, showing the predominance of edge states with charge density at the zig-zag edges. The persistent charge currents, nevertheless, do not follow the traditional argument of current cancellation from levels below the Fermi level, and thus they depart in the tight-binding from those found in the continuum model.

  3. Experiments with vortex rings in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, R. H.; Cibert, B.; Béchet, C.

    2006-09-01

    We report quantitative experimental measurements of the instability of vortex rings generated in air. Vortex rings are created by pushing air through the circular orifice of a cylindrical cavity with a flat piston driven by a loudspeaker. Hot-wire anemometry provides accurate measurements of the velocity profile at all stages of the ring formation including stable and unstable rings. Flow visualization using a laser light sheet shows that the initially undisturbed vortex ring is progressively deformed in the azimuthal direction giving rise to a wavy azimuthal and periodic pattern in the circumference of the ring. The wavy pattern is steady, i.e., it does not rotate or translate during the ring's motion. However as the vortex motion progresses in the axial direction, the displaced portions of the ring are convected away from the initial undisturbed position and the wavy pattern grows with local Reynolds number.

  4. Ring Current Ion Coupling with Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, George V.

    2002-01-01

    A new ring current global model has been developed for the first time that couples the system of two kinetic equations: one equation describes the ring current (RC) ion dynamic, and another equation describes wave evolution of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves (EMIC). The coupled model is able to simulate, for the first time self-consistently calculated RC ion kinetic and evolution of EMIC waves that propagate along geomagnetic field lines and reflect from the ionosphere. Ionospheric properties affect the reflection index through the integral Pedersen and Hall coductivities. The structure and dynamics of the ring current proton precipitating flux regions, intensities of EMIC, global RC energy balance, and some other parameters will be studied in detail for the selected geomagnetic storms. The space whether aspects of RC modelling and comparison with the data will also be discussed.

  5. Oscillatory persistent currents in quantum rings: Semiconductors versus superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devreese, J.T., E-mail: jozef.devreese@ua.ac.b [TFVS, Universiteit Antwerpen, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); COBRA, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Fomin, V.M. [TFVS, Universiteit Antwerpen, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); COBRA, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Dept. of Theoretical Physics, State Univ. of Moldova, MD-2009 Chisinau (Moldova, Republic of); Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, IFW Dresden, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Gladilin, V.N. [TFVS, Universiteit Antwerpen, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Dept. of Theoretical Physics, State Univ. of Moldova, MD-2009 Chisinau (Moldova, Republic of); Tempere, J. [TFVS, Universiteit Antwerpen, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Lyman Laboratory of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Persistent currents are a hallmark of superconductivity in metals. To observe those dissipationless currents in a non-superconducting ring, the circumference of the ring must be short enough so that the phase coherence of the electronic wave functions is preserved around the loop. Recent progress in the fabrication of self-assembled semiconductor quantum rings (SAQRs), which can be filled with only a few (1-2) electrons, has offered the unique possibility to study the magnetic-field-induced oscillations in the persistent current carried by a single electron. In this paper, we discuss similarities and distinctions between the behavior of persistent currents in semiconductor and superconductor samples and give an overview of the recent results for oscillatory persistent currents in SAQRs. Although the real SAQR shape differs strongly from an idealized circular-symmetric open ring structure, the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations of the magnetization survive, as observed in low temperature magnetization measurements on In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As/GaAs SAQRs.

  6. Modeling the Inner Magnetosphere: Radiation Belts, Ring Current, and Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glocer, Alex

    2011-01-01

    The space environment is a complex system defined by regions of differing length scales, characteristic energies, and physical processes. It is often difficult, or impossible, to treat all aspects of the space environment relative to a particular problem with a single model. In our studies, we utilize several models working in tandem to examine this highly interconnected system. The methodology and results will be presented for three focused topics: 1) Rapid radiation belt electron enhancements, 2) Ring current study of Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs), Dst, and plasma composition, and 3) Examination of the outflow of ionospheric ions. In the first study, we use a coupled MHD magnetosphere - kinetic radiation belt model to explain recent Akebono/RDM observations of greater than 2.5 MeV radiation belt electron enhancements occurring on timescales of less than a few hours. In the second study, we present initial results of a ring current study using a newly coupled kinetic ring current model with an MHD magnetosphere model. Results of a dst study for four geomagnetic events are shown. Moreover, direct comparison with TWINS ENA images are used to infer the role that composition plays in the ring current. In the final study, we directly model the transport of plasma from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere. We especially focus on the role of photoelectrons and and wave-particle interactions. The modeling methodology for each of these studies will be detailed along with the results.

  7. Perimeter ring currents in benzenoids from Pauling bond orders

    OpenAIRE

    Fowler, P.W.; Myrvold, W.; Jenkinson, D; Bird, W.H.

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that the ring currents in perimeter hexagonal rings of Kekulean benzenoids, as estimated\\ud within the Randić conjugated-circuit model, can be calculated directly without tedious pairwise\\ud comparison of Kekulé structures or Kekulé counting for cycle-deleted subgraphs. Required are only\\ud the Pauling bond orders of perimeter bonds and the number of Kekulé structures of the benzenoid,\\ud both readily available from the adjacency matrix of the carbon skeleton. This approach provid...

  8. Interdigitated ring electrodes: Theory and experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, Edward O; Pozo-Ayuso, Diego F; Castaño-Alvarez, Mario; Lewis, Grace E M; Dale, Sara E C; Marken, Frank; Compton, Richard G

    2013-01-01

    The oxidation of potassium ferrocyanide, K_4Fe(CN)_6, in aqueous solution under fully supported conditions is carried out at interdigitated band and ring electrode arrays, and compared to theoretical models developed to simulate the processes. Simulated data is found to fit well with experimental results using literature values of diffusion coefficients for Fe(CN)_6^(4-) and Fe(CN)_6^(3-). The theoretical models are used to compare responses from interdigitated band and ring arrays, and the size of ring array required to approximate the response to a linear band array is investigated. An equation is developed for the radius of ring required for a pair of electrodes in a ring array to give a result with 5% of a pair of electrodes in a band array. This equation is found to be independent of the scan rate used over six orders of magnitude.

  9. Neutrino Signals in Electron-Capture Storage-Ring Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avraham Gal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Neutrino signals in electron-capture decays of hydrogen-like parent ions P in storage-ring experiments at GSI are reconsidered, with special emphasis placed on the storage-ring quasi-circular motion of the daughter ions D in two-body decays P → D + ν e . It is argued that, to the extent that daughter ions are detected, these detection rates might exhibit modulations with periods of order seconds, similar to those reported in the GSI storage-ring experiments for two-body decay rates. New dedicated experiments in storage rings, or using traps, could explore these modulations.

  10. Persistent currents in metallic rings containing a quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machura, Lukasz [Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); Silesian Center for Education and Interdisciplinary Research, University of Silesia, 41-500 Chorzów (Poland); Łuczka, Jerzy, E-mail: jerzy.luczka@us.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); Silesian Center for Education and Interdisciplinary Research, University of Silesia, 41-500 Chorzów (Poland)

    2015-08-28

    Currents in metallic rings with a quantum dot are studied in the framework of a Langevin equation for a magnetic flux passing through the ring. Two scenarios are considered: one in which thermal fluctuations of the dissipative part of the current are modeled by classical Johnson–Nyquist noise and one in which quantum character of thermal fluctuations is taken into account in terms of a quantum Smoluchowski equation. The impact of the amplitude and phase of the transmission coefficient of the electron through a quantum dot on current characteristics is analyzed. In tailored parameter regimes, both scenarios can exhibit the transition from para- to diamagnetic response of the current versus external magnetic flux. The type of response is more robust to changes of the amplitude of the transmission coefficient and more sensitive to changes of the phase around some values. - Highlights: • Langevin dynamics of the magnetic flux for classical and quantum Smoluchowski regimes. • Current-flux characteristics vs the amplitude and phase of the transmission coefficient. • Crucial role of the phase of the transmission coefficient. • Contribution to the development of effective control of current in mesoscopic rings.

  11. An integrating current transformer for fast extraction from the HIRFL-CSR main ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun-Xia; Zheng, Jian-Hua; Zhao, Tie-Cheng; Mao, Rui-Shi; Yin, Yan; Yuan, You-Jin; Yang, Jian-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    For any experiment that uses the beam of an accelerator, monitoring the beam intensity is always an important concern. It is particularly useful if one can continuously measure the beam current without disturbing the beam. We report here on test experiments for an Integrating Current Transformer (ICT) used to measure fast extraction beams from the HIRFL-CSR main ring (CSRm). The laboratory tests and beam intensity measurement results are presented in this paper. The influence of the kicker noise is also analyzed.

  12. Protons as the prime contributors to storm time ring current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berko, F. W.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Fritz, T. A.

    1975-01-01

    Following a large sudden commencement on June 17, 1972, a large magnetic storm evolved, with a well-developed main phase and recovery phase. Explorer 45 (S3-A), with its apogee near 16 hours local time in June, measured the equatorial particle populations and magnetic field throughout this period. By use of data obtained during the symmetric recovery phase it is shown that through a series of self-consistent calculations, the measured protons, with energies from 1 to 872 keV, can account for almost all of the observed ring current magnetic effects within the limits of experimental uncertainties. This enables us to set an upper limit to the heavy ion contribution to the storm time ring current of a few percent of the proton contribution.

  13. Persistent Currents in the Double Aharonov-Bohm Ring Connected to Electron Reservoirs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ying; XIAO Jing-Lin

    2007-01-01

    We study persistent currents in the double Aharonov-Bohm ring connected to two electron reservoirs by quantum waveguide theory. It is found that the persistent currents in the double Aharonov-Bohm ring depend on the direction of the current flow from one reservoir to another. When the direction of the current flow reverses, the persistent current in each ring of the double Aharonov-Bohm ring changes. If the two rings are of the same size, the persistent currents in the left and the right rings exchange at the reversal of the current flow direction.

  14. A Safe and Effective Modification of Thomson's Jumping Ring Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waschke, Felix; Strunz, Andreas; Meyn, Jan-Peter

    2012-01-01

    The electrical circuit of the jumping ring experiment based on discharging a capacitor is optimized. The setup is scoop proof at 46 V and yet the ring jumps more than 9 m high. The setup is suitable for both lectures and student laboratory work in higher education. (Contains 1 table, 8 figures and 3 footnotes.)

  15. Modelling of the ring current in Saturn's magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampieri, G.; Dougherty, M.

    2004-02-01

    . The existence of a ring current inside Saturn's magnetosphere was first suggested by smith80 and ness81,ness82, in order to explain various features in the magnetic field observations from the Pioneer 11 and Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft. connerney83 formalized the equatorial current model, based on previous modelling work of Jupiter's current sheet and estimated its parameters from the two Voyager data sets. Here, we investigate the model further, by reconsidering the data from the two Voyager spacecraft, as well as including the Pioneer 11 flyby data set. First, we obtain, in closed form, an analytic expression for the magnetic field produced by the ring current. We then fit the model to the external field, that is the difference between the observed field and the internal magnetic field, considering all the available data. In general, through our global fit we obtain more accurate parameters, compared to previous models. We point out differences between the model's parameters for the three flybys, and also investigate possible deviations from the axial and planar symmetries assumed in the model. We conclude that an accurate modelling of the Saturnian disk current will require taking into account both of the temporal variations related to the condition of the magnetosphere, as well as non-axisymmetric contributions due to local time effects.

  16. Short-Term Forecasting of Radiation Belt and Ring Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Mei-Ching

    2007-01-01

    A computer program implements a mathematical model of the radiation-belt and ring-current plasmas resulting from interactions between the solar wind and the Earth s magnetic field, for the purpose of predicting fluxes of energetic electrons (10 keV to 5 MeV) and protons (10 keV to 1 MeV), which are hazardous to humans and spacecraft. Given solar-wind and interplanetary-magnetic-field data as inputs, the program solves the convection-diffusion equations of plasma distribution functions in the range of 2 to 10 Earth radii. Phenomena represented in the model include particle drifts resulting from the gradient and curvature of the magnetic field; electric fields associated with the rotation of the Earth, convection, and temporal variation of the magnetic field; and losses along particle-drift paths. The model can readily accommodate new magnetic- and electric-field submodels and new information regarding physical processes that drive the radiation-belt and ring-current plasmas. Despite the complexity of the model, the program can be run in real time on ordinary computers. At present, the program can calculate present electron and proton fluxes; after further development, it should be able to predict the fluxes 24 hours in advance

  17. Characterization of a new electrostatic storage ring for photofragmentation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, H. B., E-mail: hbjp@phys.au.dk; Svendsen, A.; Harbo, L. S.; Kiefer, H. V.; Kjeldsen, H.; Lammich, L.; Andersen, L. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Toker, Y. [Departement of Physics, Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan 5290002 (Israel)

    2015-06-15

    We describe the design of and the first commissioning experiments with a newly constructed electrostatic storage ring named SAPHIRA (Storage Ring in Aarhus for PHoton-Ion Reaction Analysis). With an intense beam of Cu{sup −} at 4 keV, the storage ring is characterized in terms of the stored ion beam decay rate, the longitudinal spreading of an injected ion bunch, as well as the direct measurements of the transverse spatial distributions under different conditions of storage. The ion storage stability in SAPHIRA was investigated systematically in a selected region of its electrical configuration space.

  18. Scale Down Experiments for a Stellarator type Magnetostatic Storage Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, N; Meusel, O; Niebuhr, H; Ratzinger, U

    2016-01-01

    The beam transport experiments in toroidal magnets were first described in EPAC08 [1] within the framework of a proposed low energy ion storage ring at Frankfurt University. The experiments with two room temperature 30 degree toroids are needed to design the accumulator ring with closed longitudinal magnetic field levels up to 6-8 T. The test setup aims on developing a ring injection system. The primary beam line for the experiments was installed and successfully commissioned in 2009. A special probe for ion beam detection was installed. This modular technique allows online diagnostics of the ion beam along the beam path. In this paper, we present new results on beam transport experiments and discuss transport and transverse beam injection properties of that system.

  19. Stormtime transport of ring current and radiation belt ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Margaret W.; Schulz, Michael; Lyons, L. R.; Gorney, David J.

    1993-01-01

    This is an investigation of stormtime particle transport that leads to formation of the ring current. Our method is to trace the guiding-center motion of representative ions (having selected first adiabatic invariants mu) in response to model substorm-associated impulses in the convection electric field. We compare our simulation results qualitatively with existing analytically tractable idealizations of particle transport (direct convective access and radial diffusion) in order to assess the limits of validity of these approximations. For mu approximately less than 10 MeV/G (E approximately less than 10 keV at L equivalent to 3) the ion drift period on the final (ring-current) drift shell of interest (L equivalent to 3) exceeds the duration of the main phase of our model storm, and we find that the transport of ions to this drift shell is appropriately idealized as direct convective access, typically from open drift paths. Ion transport to a final closed drift path from an open (plasma-sheet) drift trajectory is possible for those portions of that drift path that lie outside the mean stormtime separatrix between closed and open drift trajectories, For mu approximately 10-25 MeV/G (110 keV approximately less than E approximately less than 280 keV at L equivalent to 3) the drift period at L equivalent to 3 is comparable to the postulated 3-hr duration of the storm, and the mode of transport is transitional between direct convective access and transport that resembles radial diffusion. (This particle population is transitional between the ring current and radiation belt). For mu approximately greater than 25 MeV/G (radiation-belt ions having E approximately greater than 280 keV at L equivalent to 3) the ion drift period is considerably shorter than the main phase of a typical storm, and ions gain access to the ring-current region essentially via radial diffusion. By computing the mean and mean-square cumulative changes in 1/L among (in this case) 12 representative

  20. Relation between the ring current and the tail current during magnetic storms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kalegaev

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the dynamics of the magnetospheric large-scale current systems during storms by using three different magnetospheric magnetic field models: the paraboloid, event-oriented, and Tsyganenko T01 models. We have modelled two storm events, one moderate storm on 25-26 June 1998, when Dst reached -120nT and one intense storm on 21-23 October 1999, when Dst dropped to -250nT. We compare the observed magnetic field from GOES 8, GOES 9, and GOES 10, Polar and Geotail satellites with the magnetic field given by the three models to estimate their reliability. All models demonstrated quite good agreement with observations. Since it is difficult to measure exactly the relative contributions from different current systems to the Dst index, we compute the contributions from ring, tail and magnetopause currents given by the three magnetic field models. We discuss the dependence of the obtained contributions to the Dst index in relation to the methods used in constructing the models. All models show a significant tail current contribution to the Dst index, comparable to the ring current contribution during moderate storms. The ring current becomes the major Dst source during intense storms.

  1. Operational advances in ring current modeling using RAM-SCB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welling, Daniel T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jordanova, Vania K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zaharia, Sorin G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morley, Steven K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-03

    The Ring current Atmosphere interaction Model with Self-Consistently calculated 3D Magnetic field (RAM-SCB) combines a kinetic model of the ring current with a force-balanced model of the magnetospheric magnetic field to create an inner magnetospheric model that is magnetically self consistent. RAM-SCB produces a wealth of outputs that are valuable to space weather applications. For example, the anisotropic particle distribution of the KeV-energy population calculated by the code is key for predicting surface charging on spacecraft. Furthermore, radiation belt codes stand to benefit substantially from RAM-SCB calculated magnetic field values and plasma wave growth rates - both important for determining the evolution of relativistic electron populations. RAM-SCB is undergoing development to bring these benefits to the space weather community. Data-model validation efforts are underway to assess the performance of the system. 'Virtual Satellite' capability has been added to yield satellite-specific particle distribution and magnetic field output. The code's outer boundary is being expanded to 10 Earth Radii to encompass previously neglected geosynchronous orbits and allow the code to be driven completely by either empirical or first-principles based inputs. These advances are culminating towards a new, real-time version of the code, rtRAM-SCB, that can monitor the inner magnetosphere conditions on both a global and spacecraft-specific level. This paper summarizes these new features as well as the benefits they provide the space weather community.

  2. Ring Current Dynamics in Moderate and Strong Storms: Comparative Analysis of TWINS and IMAGE/HENA Data with the Comprehensive Ring Current Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzulukova, N.; Fok, M.-C.; Goldstein, J.; Valek, P.; McComas, D. J.; Brandt, P. C.

    2010-01-01

    We present a comparative study of ring current dynamics during strong and moderate storms. The ring current during the strong storm is studied with IMAGE/HENA data near the solar cycle maximum in 2000. The ring current during the moderate storm is studied using energetic neutral atom (ENA) data from the Two Wide-Angle Imaging Neutral- Atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission during the solar minimum in 2008. For both storms, the local time distributions of ENA emissions show signatures of postmidnight enhancement (PME) during the main phases. To model the ring current and ENA emissions, we use the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM). CRCM results show that the main-phase ring current pressure peaks in the premidnight-dusk sector, while the most intense CRCM-simulated ENA emissions show PME signatures. We analyze two factors to explain this difference: the dependence of charge-exchange cross section on energy and pitch angle distributions of ring current. We find that the IMF By effect (twisting of the convection pattern due to By) is not needed to form the PME. Additionally, the PME is more pronounced for the strong storm, although relative shielding and hence electric field skewing is well developed for both events.

  3. The Magnetic and Shielding Effects of Ring Current on Radiation Belt Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Mei-Ching

    2012-01-01

    The ring current plays many key roles in controlling magnetospheric dynamics. A well-known example is the magnetic depression produced by the ring current, which alters the drift paths of radiation belt electrons and may cause significant electron flux dropout. Little attention is paid to the ring current shielding effect on radiation belt dynamics. A recent simulation study that combines the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) with the Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model has revealed that the ring current-associated shielding field directly and/or indirectly weakens the relativistic electron flux increase during magnetic storms. In this talk, we will discuss how ring current magnetic field and electric shielding moderate the radiation belt enhancement.

  4. Effects of ring current ions on the ULF waves in the inner magnetosphere based on a 5-D drift kinetic ring current model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, K.; Amano, T.; Saito, S.; Kamiya, K.; Miyoshi, Y.; Keika, K.; Matsumoto, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Terrestrial inner magnetosphere is the region where different plasma regimes over a wide range of energy such as the plasmasphere, ring current, and radiation belt coexist. Among them, the ring current carries most of plasma pressure and is thus responsible for deformation of the magnetic field. Since the deformation changes drift paths of charged particles including the ring current ions, it is important to describe this coupling between the ring current and electric/magnetic fields self-consistently. It is known that short-timescale phenomena such as ULF waves and substorm related ion injections from the plasma sheet play important roles in the inner magnetospheric dynamics during magnetic storms. While ULF waves contribute to the radial transport of relativistic electrons to form the radiation belt, the ion injections contribute to excitation of storm-time Pc5 ULF waves as well as to plasma supply to the ring current from the magnetotail. Aiming at a self-consistent description of the coupling between ring current ions and electric/magnetic fields, we have developed a global ring current model (GEMSIS-RC model). The model is a self-consistent and kinetic numerical simulation code solving the five-dimensional collisionless drift-kinetic equation for the ring-current ions coupled with Maxwell equations. Without assuming a force-balanced equilibrium, the GEMSIS-RC model allows the force-imbalance to exist, which generates induced electric field through the polarization current. In this study, we applied the GEMSIS-RC model for simulation of ULF waves in the inner magnetosphere with a focus on the short-timescale phenomena described above. Comparison between runs with/without ring current ions show that the existence of hot ring current ions can deform and amplify the original sinusoidal waveforms. The deformation causes the energy cascade to higher frequency range (Pc4 and Pc3 ranges). The cascade is more pronounced in high plasma beta cases. It is also shown that

  5. Resonant Charge Current in a Rashba Ring Induced by Spin-Dependent Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Zhan-Feng; LI Hong

    2008-01-01

    A one-dimensional ring subject to Rashba spin-orbit coupling is investigated. When it is attached to a lead with spin-dependent chemical potential, there will be charge current in the ring. The charge current response is resonantly maximized when the Fermi energy of the lead is equal to any energy level of the 1D ring. And if two probes are attached to the ring, the electric voltage between them creates sawtooth-like wave, which indicates the direction of the charge current. A ferromagnetic lead can also induce persistent charge current, which can be detected by magnetization intensity measurement.

  6. Current Direct Neutrino Mass Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Drexlin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, we review the status and perspectives of direct neutrino mass experiments, which investigate the kinematics of β-decays of specific isotopes (3H, 187Re, 163Ho to derive model-independent information on the averaged electron (antineutrino mass. After discussing the kinematics of β-decay and the determination of the neutrino mass, we give a brief overview of past neutrino mass measurements (SN1987a-ToF studies, Mainz and Troitsk experiments for 3H, cryobolometers for 187Re. We then describe the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN experiment currently under construction at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, which will use the MAC-E-Filter principle to push the sensitivity down to a value of 200 meV (90% C.L.. To do so, many technological challenges have to be solved related to source intensity and stability, as well as precision energy analysis and low background rate close to the kinematic endpoint of tritium β-decay at 18.6 keV. We then review new approaches such as the MARE, ECHO, and Project8 experiments, which offer the promise to perform an independent measurement of the neutrino mass in the sub-eV region. Altogether, the novel methods developed in direct neutrino mass experiments will provide vital information on the absolute mass scale of neutrinos.

  7. Proceedings of the 1979 workshop on beam current limitations in storage rings, July 16-27, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegrini, C. (ed.)

    1979-01-01

    The Workshop on Beam Current Limitations in Storage Rings was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory from July 16 to 27, 1979. The purpose of this Workshop was to discuss the physical mechanisms limiting the beam current or current density in accelerators or storage rings. Many of these machines are now being built or planned for a variety of applications, such as colliding beam experiments, synchrotron light production, heavy ion beams. This diversity was reflected in the Workshop and in the papers which have been contributed to these Proceedings. The twenty-one papers from the workshop were incorporated individually in the data base. (GHT)

  8. Ring Current-Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves, generated by ion temperature anisotropy in Earth s ring current (RC), is the best known example of wave- particle interaction in the magnetosphere. Also, there is much controversy over the importance of EMIC waves on RC depletion. Under certain conditions, relativistic electrons, with energies 21 MeV, can be removed from the outer radiation belt (RB) by EMIC wave scattering during a magnetic storm. That is why the calculation of EMIC waves must be a very critical part of the space weather studies. The new RC model that we have developed and present for the first time has several new features that we have combine together in a one single model: (a) several lower frequency cold plasma wave modes are taken into account; (b) wave tracing of these wave has been incorporated in the energy EMIC wave equation; (c) no assumptions regarding wave shape spectra have been made; (d) no assumptions regarding the shape of particle distribution have been made to calculate the growth rate; (e) pitch-angle, energy, and mix diffusions are taken into account together for the first time; (f) the exact loss-cone RC analytical solution has been found and coupled with bounce-averaged numerical solution of kinetic equation; (g) the EMIC waves saturation due to their modulation instability and LHW generation are included as an additional factor that contributes to this process; and (h) the hot ions were included in the real part of dielectric permittivity tensor. We compare our theoretical results with the different EMIC waves models as well as RC experimental data.

  9. Current Direct Neutrino Mass Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Drexlin, G; Mertens, S; Weinheimer, C

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution we review the status and perspectives of direct neutrino mass experiments. These experiments investigate the kinematics of $\\beta$-decays of specific isotopes ($^3$H, $^{187}$Re, $^{163}$Ho) to derive model-independent information on the averaged electron (anti-) neutrino mass, which is formed by the incoherent sum of the neutrino mass eigenstates contributing to the electron neutrino. We first review the kinematics of $\\beta$-decay and the determination of the neutrino mass, before giving a brief overview of past neutrino mass measurements (SN1987a-ToF studies, Mainz and Troitsk experiments for $^3$H, cryo-bolometers for $^{187}$Re). We then describe the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment which is currently under construction at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. The large-scale setup will use the MAC-E-Filter principle pioneered earlier to push the sensitivity down to a value of 200 meV(90% C.L.). KATRIN faces many technological challenges that have to be resolved with regar...

  10. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH) of the AMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Barão, F; Alcaraz, J; Arruda, L; Barrau, A; Barreira, G; Belmont, E; Berdugo, J; Brinet, M; Buénerd, M; Casadei, D; Casaus, J; Cortina, E; Delgado, C; Díaz, C; Derome, L; Eraud, L; Garcia-Lopez, R J; Gallin-Martel, L; Giovacchini, F; Gonçalves, P; Lanciotti, E; Laurenti, G; Malinine, A; Maña, C; Marin, J; Martínez, G; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Molla, M; Palomares, C; Panniello, M; Pereira, R; Pimenta, M; Protasov, K; Sánchez, E; Seo, E S; Sevilla, N; Torrento, A; Vargas-Trevino, M; Veziant, O

    2006-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) experiment to be installed on the International Space Station (ISS) will be equipped with a proximity focusing Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector for measuring the electric charge and velocity of the charged cosmic particles. A RICH prototype consisting of 96 photomultiplier units, including a piece of the conical reflector, was built and its performance evaluated with ion beam data. Preliminary results of the in-beam tests performed with ion fragments resulting from collisions of a 158 GeV/c/nuc primary beam of Indium ions (CERN SPS) on a Pb target are reported. The collected data included tests to the final front-end electronics and to different aerogel radiators. Cherenkov rings for a large range of charged nuclei and with reflected photons were observed. The data analysis confirms the design goals. Charge separation up to Fe and velocity resolution of the order of 0.1% for singly charged particles are obtained.

  11. THE POTENTIAL FOR NEUTRINO PHYSICS AT MUON COLLIDERS AND DEDICATED HIGH CURRENT MUON STORAGE RINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BIGI,I.; BOLTON,T.; FORMAGGIO,J.; HARRIS,D.; MORFIN,J.; SPENTZOURIS,P.; YU,J.; KAYSER,B.; KING,B.J.; MCFARLAND,K.; PETROV,A.; SCHELLMAN,H.; VELASCO,M.; SHROCK,R.

    2000-05-11

    Conceptual design studies are underway for both muon colliders and high-current non-colliding muon storage rings that have the potential to become the first true neutrino factories. Muon decays in long straight sections of the storage rings would produce uniquely intense and precisely characterized two-component neutrino beams--muon neutrinos plus electron antineutrinos from negative muon decays and electron neutrinos plus muon antineutrinos from positive muons. This article presents a long-term overview of the prospects for these facilities to greatly extend the capabilities for accelerator-based neutrino physics studies for both high rate and long baseline neutrino experiments. As the first major physics topic, recent experimental results involving neutrino oscillations have motivated a vigorous design effort towards dedicated neutrino factories that would store muon beams of energies 50 GeV or below. These facilities hold the promise of neutrino oscillation experiments with baselines up to intercontinental distances and utilizing well understood beams that contain, for the first time, a substantial component of multi-GeV electron-flavored neutrinos. In deference to the active and fast-moving nature of neutrino oscillation studies, the discussion of long baseline physics at neutrino factories has been limited to a concise general overview of the relevant theory, detector technologies, beam properties, experimental goals and potential physics capabilities. The remainder of the article is devoted to the complementary high rate neutrino experiments that would study neutrino-nucleon and neutrino-electron scattering and would be performed at high performance detectors placed as close as is practical to the neutrino production straight section of muon storage rings in order to exploit beams with transverse dimensions as small as a few tens of centimeters.

  12. The Ring Imaging CHerenkov Detectors of the LHCb Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Perego, Davide Luigi

    2012-01-01

    Particle identification is a fundamental requirement of the LHCb experiment to fulfill its physics programme. Positive hadron identification is performed by two Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detectors. This system covers the full angular acceptance of the experiment and is equipped with three Cherenkov radiators to identify particles in a wide momentum range from1 GeV/ c up to 100 GeV/ c . The Hybrid Photon Detectors (HPDs) located outside the detector acceptance provide the photon detection with 500,000 channels. Specific read–out electronics has been developed to readout and process data from the HPDs including data transmission and power distribution. The operation and performanceoftheRICHsystemare ensuredbythe constant controland monitoringoflowandhighvoltage systems,of thegas qualityandenvironmental parameters,ofthe mirror alignment,and finallyofthe detector safety. The description of the LHCb RICH is given. The experience in operating the detector at the Large Hadron Collider is presented and discusse...

  13. Persistent current and transmission probability in the Aharonov-Bohm ring with an embedded quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Suzhi; Li Ning [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Jin Guojun [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)], E-mail: gjin@nju.edu.cn; Ma Yuqiang [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2008-03-24

    Persistent current and transmission probability in the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) ring with an embedded quantum dot (QD) are studied using the technique of the scattering matrix. For the first time, we find that the persistent current can arise in the absence of magnetic flux in the ring with an embedded QD. The persistent current and the transmission probability are sensitive to the lead-ring coupling and the short-range potential barrier. It is shown that increasing the lead-ring coupling or the short-range potential barrier causes the suppression of the persistent current and the increasing resonance width of the transmission probability. The effect of the potential barrier on the number of the transmission peaks is also investigated. The dependence of the persistent current and the transmission probability on the magnetic flux exhibits a periodic property with period of the flux quantum.

  14. Localized persistent spin currents in defect-free quasiperiodic rings with Aharonov–Casher effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, R.Z.; Chen, C.H.; Cheng, Y.H.; Hsueh, W.J., E-mail: hsuehwj@ntu.edu.tw

    2015-06-26

    We propose strongly localized persistent spin current in one-dimensional defect-free quasiperiodic Thue–Morse rings with Aharonov–Casher effect. The results show that the characteristics of these localized persistent currents depend not only on the radius filling factor, but also on the strength of the spin–orbit interaction. The maximum persistent spin currents in systems always appear in the ring near the middle position of the system array whether or not the Thue–Morse rings array is symmetrical. The magnitude of the persistent currents is proportional to the sharpness of the resonance peak, which is dependent on the bandwidth of the allowed band in the band structure. The maximum persistent spin currents also increase exponentially as the generation order of the system increases. - Highlights: • Strongly localized persistent spin current in quasiperiodic AC rings is proposed. • Localized persistent spin currents are much larger than those produced by traditional mesoscopic rings. • Characteristics of the localized persistent currents depend on the radius filling factor and SOI strength. • The maximum persistent current increases exponentially with the system order. • The magnitude of the persistent currents is related to the sharpness of the resonance.

  15. Role of substorm-associated impulsive electric fields in the ring current development during storms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Ganushkina

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Particles with different energies produce varying contributions to the total ring current energy density as the storm progresses. Ring current energy densities and total ring current energies were obtained using particle data from the Polar CAMMICE/MICS instrument during several storms observed during the years 1996-1998. Four different energy ranges for particles are considered: total (1-200keV, low (1-20keV, medium (20-80keV and high (80-200keV. Evolution of contributions from particles with different energy ranges to the total energy density of the ring current during all storm phases is followed. To model this evolution we trace protons with arbitrary pitch angles numerically in the drift approximation. Tracing is performed in the large-scale and small-scale stationary and time-dependent magnetic and electric field models. Small-scale time-dependent electric field is given by a Gaussian electric field pulse with an azimuthal field component propagating inward with a velocity dependent on radial distance. We model particle inward motion and energization by a series of electric field pulses representing substorm activations during storm events. We demonstrate that such fluctuating fields in the form of localized electromagnetic pulses can effectively energize the plasma sheet particles to higher energies (>80keV and transport them inward to closed drift shells. The contribution from these high energy particles dominates the total ring current energy during storm recovery phase. We analyse the model contributions from particles with different energy ranges to the total energy density of the ring current during all storm phases. By comparing these results with observations we show that the formation of the ring current is a combination of large-scale convection and pulsed inward shift and consequent energization of the ring current particles.

  16. Protons as the prime contributors to the storm time ring current. [measured from Explorer 45

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berko, F. W.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Fritz, T. A.

    1974-01-01

    Following a large magnetic storm (17 June 1972), Explorer 45 measured the equatorial particle populations and magnetic field. Using data obtained during the symmetic recovery phase, it is shown that through a series of self-consistent calculations, the measured protons with energies from 1 to 872 keV, can account for the observed ring current magnetic effects within experimental uncertainities. This enables an upper limit to be set for the heavy ion contribution to the storm time ring current.

  17. A renormalization group study of persistent current in a quasiperiodic ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Paramita [Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Sector-I, Block-AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata-700 064 (India); Maiti, Santanu K., E-mail: santanu.maiti@isical.ac.in [Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, 203 Barrackpore Trunk Road, Kolkata-700 108 (India); Karmakar, S.N. [Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Sector-I, Block-AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata-700 064 (India)

    2014-04-01

    We propose a real-space renormalization group approach for evaluating persistent current in a multi-channel quasiperiodic Fibonacci tight-binding ring based on a Green's function formalism. Unlike the traditional methods, the present scheme provides a powerful tool for the theoretical description of persistent current with a very high degree of accuracy in large periodic and quasiperiodic rings, even in the micron scale range, which emphasizes the merit of this work.

  18. Perspective of the study on the ring current - past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebihara, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The study of the ring current has a long history going back to the early 20th century. The ring current was predicted by Carl Stoermer to explain the equatorward movement of the auroral zone during magnetic storms. In 1917, Adolf Schmidt introduced the concept of the ring current to explain the global decrease of the geomagnetic field. Since then, number of studies have been accomplished in the context of the growth and recovery of magnetic storms. Observations have shown that protons and oxygen ions with energies 1 - 100 keV significantly increase during the storm main phase, which are most likely the major contributor to the storm-time ring current. When the loss of the ions dominates the injection of them, the storm recovery phase takes place. Immediate problems are the origin, transport and loss of the ions. All these relevant processes are essential to understand the growth and decay of the ring current. Derived problems, for example, include the entry of solar wind plasma into the magnetosphere, the outflow of ionospheric ions, generation of the convection electric field, influence of substorm-associated electric field, and pitch angle scattering of ions. Recalling that the ring current is the diamagnetic current, we shall consider the force balance and stress carefully. Generation of field-aligned currents is one of the consequences, which might redistribute the state of the inner magnetosphere including the plasmasphere, the ring current and the radiation belts. The ring current may also have a large influence on the geomagnetically induced current (GIC) on the ground at mid- and low-latitudes. The magnetic storms can be easily identified by looking at magnetograms, but the processes behind the magnetic storms cannot be easily understood because the processes depend on each other. From this sense, we shall pay much attention to the detailed function of each process as well as its role on the overall system. Dealing with the ring current as a complex system

  19. The rings of Saturn: State of current knowledge and some suggestions for future studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzi, J. N.

    1978-01-01

    The state of our current knowledge of the properties of the ring system as a whole, and of the particles individually, is assessed. Attention is primarily devoted to recent results and possibilities for exploration of the ring system by a Saturn orbiter. In particular, the infrared and microwave properties of the ring system are discussed. The behavior of the ring brightness is not well understood in the critical transition spectral region from approximately 100 micrometers to approximately 1 cm. Also, the dynamical behavior of the ring system is discussed. Recent theoretical studies show that ongoing dynamical effects continually affect the ring structure in azimuth (possibly producing the A ring brightness asymmetry) and in the vertical direction. Orbital spacecraft-based studies of the rings will offer several unique advantages and impact important cosmogonical questions. Bistatic radar studies and millimeter-wavelength spectrometer/radiometry will give particle sizes and composition limits needed to resolve the question of the density of the rings, and provide important boundary conditions on the state of Saturn's protoplanetary nebula near the time of planetary formation.

  20. Storm- Time Dynamics of Ring Current Protons: Implications for the Long-Term Energy Budget in the Inner Magnetosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkioulidou, M.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Mitchell, D. G.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2015-12-01

    The ring current energy budget plays a key role in the global electrodynamics of Earth's space environment. Pressure gradients developed in the inner magnetosphere can shield the near-Earth region from solar wind-induced electric fields. The distortion of Earth's magnetic field due to the ring current affects the dynamics of particles contributing both to the ring current and radiation belts. Therefore, understanding the long-term evolution of the inner magnetosphere energy content is essential. We have investigated the evolution of ring current proton pressure (7 - 600 keV) in the inner magnetosphere based on data from the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument aboard Van Allen Probe B throughout the year 2013. We find that although the low-energy component of the protons (governed by convective timescales and is very well correlated with the Dst index, the high-energy component (>100 keV) varies on much longer timescales and shows either no or anti-correlation with the Dst index. Interestingly, the contributions of the high- and low-energy protons to the total energy content are comparable. Our results indicate that the proton dynamics, and as a consequence the total energy budget in the inner magnetosphere (inside geosynchronous orbit), is not strictly controlled by storm-time timescales as those are defined by the Dst index.

  1. Localized persistent spin currents in defect-free quasiperiodic rings with Aharonov-Casher effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, R. Z.; Chen, C. H.; Cheng, Y. H.; Hsueh, W. J.

    2015-06-01

    We propose strongly localized persistent spin current in one-dimensional defect-free quasiperiodic Thue-Morse rings with Aharonov-Casher effect. The results show that the characteristics of these localized persistent currents depend not only on the radius filling factor, but also on the strength of the spin-orbit interaction. The maximum persistent spin currents in systems always appear in the ring near the middle position of the system array whether or not the Thue-Morse rings array is symmetrical. The magnitude of the persistent currents is proportional to the sharpness of the resonance peak, which is dependent on the bandwidth of the allowed band in the band structure. The maximum persistent spin currents also increase exponentially as the generation order of the system increases.

  2. The double electrostatic ion ring experiment: A unique cryogenic electrostatic storage ring for merged ion-beams studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, R. D.; Schmidt, H. T.; Andler, G.; Bjoerkhage, M.; Blom, M.; Braennholm, L.; Baeckstroem, E.; Danared, H.; Das, S.; Haag, N.; Hallden, P.; Hellberg, F.; Holm, A. I. S.; Johansson, H. A. B.; Kaellberg, A.; Kaellersjoe, G.; Larsson, M.; Leontein, S.; Liljeby, L.; Loefgren, P. [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); and others

    2011-06-15

    We describe the design of a novel type of storage device currently under construction at Stockholm University, Sweden, using purely electrostatic focussing and deflection elements, in which ion beams of opposite charges are confined under extreme high vacuum cryogenic conditions in separate ''rings'' and merged over a common straight section. The construction of this double electrostatic ion ring experiment uniquely allows for studies of interactions between cations and anions at low and well-defined internal temperatures and centre-of-mass collision energies down to about 10 K and 10 meV, respectively. Position sensitive multi-hit detector systems have been extensively tested and proven to work in cryogenic environments and these will be used to measure correlations between reaction products in, for example, electron-transfer processes. The technical advantages of using purely electrostatic ion storage devices over magnetic ones are many, but the most relevant are: electrostatic elements which are more compact and easier to construct; remanent fields, hysteresis, and eddy-currents, which are of concern in magnetic devices, are no longer relevant; and electrical fields required to control the orbit of the ions are not only much easier to create and control than the corresponding magnetic fields, they also set no upper mass limit on the ions that can be stored. These technical differences are a boon to new areas of fundamental experimental research, not only in atomic and molecular physics but also in the boundaries of these fields with chemistry and biology. For examples, studies of interactions with internally cold molecular ions will be particular useful for applications in astrophysics, while studies of solvated ionic clusters will be of relevance to aeronomy and biology.

  3. On the role of collective interactions in asymmetric ring current formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Bespalov

    Full Text Available The contribution of resonant wave-particle interactions to the formation and decay of the magnetospheric ring current is analysed in the framework of a self-consistent set of equations which take into account azimuthal plasmasphere asymmetry. It is shown that the cyclotron interaction of westward drifting energetic protons with Alfven waves in the evening-side plasmaspheric bulge region leads to the formation of a ring current asymmetry located near 18:00 MLT. The time-scale of this asymmetry is determined by the proton drift time through the plasmaspheric bulge and is about 1 - 3 h. A symmetrical ring current decays mainly due to charge exchange processes. The theory is compared with known experimental data on ions and waves in the ring current and on low-latitude magnetic disturbances. New low-latitude magnetometer data on the magnetic storm of 24 - 26 July 1986 are also discussed. The model presented explains the observed localization of an asymmetrical ring current loop in the evening sector and the difference in relaxation time-scales of the asymmetry and the Dst index. It also explains measured wave turbulence levels in the evening-side plasmasphere and wave observation statistics.

  4. Development of ring imaging Cherenkov detectors for the LHCb experiment

    CERN Document Server

    John, M J J

    2001-01-01

    This thesis reports on work done as part of the development of the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors of the LHCb experiment. The context of this work is set out in Chapter 1, which includes an overview of the physics of CP violation, followed by a discussion of other experiments that study B physics. LHCb itself is then described, with particular emphasis on its RICH detectors, and the photon detectors to be used therein. The work done by the author to ensure an adequate shielding of the photon detectors in the two RICH detectors from the magnetic fields produced by the LHCb dipole is then presented. A candidate photodetector for the RICH is the Pixel HPD. The author's contribution to the upgrade of the HPD test system to operate at the LHC bunch-crossing rate of 40MHz is the subject of the following section. This system was used to investigate and optimise a method of minimising the threshold distribution of the Pixel HPD's encapsulated readout chip. The final chapter of the thesis concerns the aerogel...

  5. The current progress of the ALICE Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Braem, André; Davenport, M; Mauro, A D; Franco, A; Gallas, A; Hoedlmoser, H; Martinengo, P; Nappi, E; Paic, G; Piuz, François; Peskov, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the last two modules (out of seven) of the ALICE High Momentum Particle Identification detector (HMPID) were assembled and tested. The full detector, after a pre-commissioning phase, has been installed in the experimental area, inside the ALICE solenoid, at the end of September 2006. In this paper we review the status of the ALICE/HMPID project and we present a summary of the series production of the CsI photo-cathodes. We describe the key features of the production procedure which ensures high quality photo-cathodes as well as the results of the quality assessment performed by means of a specially developed 2D scanner system able to produce a detailed map of the CsI photo-current over the entire photo-cathode surface. Finally we present our recent R&D efforts toward the development of a novel generation of imaging Cherenkov detectors with the aim to identify, in heavy ions collisions, hadrons up to 30 GeV/c.

  6. Ring imaging Cherenkov detector of PHENIX experiment at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Akiba, Y; Burward-Hoy, J; Chappell, R; Crook, D; Ebisu, K; Emery, M S; Ferriera, J; Frawley, A D; Hamagaki, H; Hara, H; Hayano, R S; Hemmick, T K; Hibino, M; Hutter, R; Kennedy, M; Kikuchi, J; Matsumoto, T; Moscone, C G; Nagasaka, Y; Nishimura, S; Oyama, K; Sakaguchi, T; Salomone, S; Shigaki, K; Tanaka, Y; Walker, J W; Wintenberg, A L; Young, G R

    1999-01-01

    The RICH detector of the PHENIX experiment at RHIC is currently under construction. Its main function is to identity electron tracks in a very high particle density, about 1000 charged particles per unit rapidity, expected in the most violent collisions at RHIC. The design and construction status of the detector and its expected performance are described.

  7. Persistent current of relativistic electrons on a Dirac ring in presence of impurities

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Sumit

    2014-08-01

    We study the behaviour of persistent current of relativistic electrons on a one dimensional ring in presence of attractive/repulsive scattering potentials. In particular, we investigate the persistent current in accordance with the strength as well as the number of the scattering potential. We find that in presence of single scatterer the persistent current becomes smaller in magnitude than the scattering free scenario. This behaviour is similar to the non-relativistic case. Even for a very strong scattering potential, finite amount of persistent current remains for a relativistic ring. In presence of multiple scatterer we observe that the persistent current is maximum when the scatterers are placed uniformly compared to the current averaged over random configurations. However if we increase the number of scatterers, we find that the random averaged current increases with the number of scatterers. The latter behaviour is in contrast to the non-relativistic case. © 2014 EDP Sciences, SIF, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  8. Persistent spin currents in a triple-terminal quantum ring with three arms*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Du Jian; Wang Suxin; Pan Jianghong; Duan Xiuzhi

    2011-01-01

    A new model of a triple-terminal quantum ring with three arms is proposed. We develop an equivalent method for reducing the triple-terminal quantum ring to the double-terminal quantum ring and calculate the persistent spin currents in this model. The results indicate that the persistent spin currents show behavior of nonperiodic and unequal amplitude oscillation with increasing semiconductor ring size when the total magnetic flux is zero.However, when the total magnetic flux is non-zero, the persistent spin currents make periodic equal amplitude oscillations with increasing AB magnetic flux intensity. At the same time, the two kinds of spin state persistent spin currents have the same frequency and amplitude but the inverse phase. In addition, the Rashba spin-orbit interaction affects the phase and the phase difference of the persistent spin currents. The average persistent spin currents relate to the arm length and the terminal position as well as the distribution of the magnetic flux in each arm. Furthermore,our results indicate that the AB magnetic flux has different influences on the two kinds of spin state electrons.

  9. Giant Persistent Current in a Mesoscopic Ring with Parallel-Coupled Double Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiong-Wen; WU Shao-Quan; WANG Peng; SUN Wei-Li

    2004-01-01

    @@ We theoretically study the properties of the ground state of the parallel-coupled double quantum dots embedded in a mesoscopic ring in the Kondo regime by means of the two-impurity Anderson Hamiltonian. The Hamiltonian is solved by means of the slave-boson mean-field theory. Our results show that in this system, the persistent current depends sensitively on both the parity of this system and the size of the ring. Two dots can be coupled coherently, which is reflected in the giant current peak in the strong coupling regime. This system might be a candidate for future device applications.

  10. Azimuthally asymmetric ring current as a function of Dst and solar wind conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Ostapenko

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on magnetic data, spatial distribution of the westward ring current flowing at |z|<3 RE has been found under five levels of Dst, five levels of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF z component, and five levels of the solar wind dynamic pressure Psw. The maximum of the current is located near midnight at distances 5 to 7 RE. The magnitude of the nightside and dayside parts of the westward current at distances from 4 to 9 RE can be approximated as Inight=1.75-0.041 Dst, Inoon=0.22-0.013 Dst, where the current is in MA. The relation of the nightside current to the solar wind parameters can be expressed as Inight=1.45-0.20 Bs IMF + 0.32 Psw, where BsIMF is the IMF southward component. The dayside ring current poorly correlates with the solar wind parameters.

  11. Commissioning and Early Operation Experience of the NSLS-II Storage Ring RF System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, F.; Rose, J.; Cupolo, J.; Dilgen, T.; Rose, B.; Gash, W.; Ravindranath, V.; Yeddulla, M.; Papu, J.; Davila, P.; Holub, B.; Tagger, J.; Sikora, R.; Ramirez, G.; Kulpin, J.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a 3 GeV electron X-ray user facility commissioned in 2014. The storage ring RF system, essential for replenishing energy loss per turn of the electrons, consists of digital low level RF controllers, 310 kW CW klystron transmitters, CESR-B type superconducting cavities, as well as a supporting cryogenic system. Here we will report on RF commissioning and early operation experience of the system for beam current up to 200mA.

  12. Noise-Assisted Currents in a Cylinder-Like Set of Mesoscopic Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dajka, J.; Kostur, M.; Luczka, J.; Szopa, M.; Zipper, E.

    2003-07-01

    We study magnetic fluxes and currents in a set of mesoscopic rings which form a cylinder. We investigate the noiseless system as well as the influence of equilibrium and non-equilibrium fluctuations on the properties of selfsustaining currents. Thermal equilibrium Nyquist noise does not destroy selfsustaining currents up to temperatures of the same order as the critical temperature for selfsustaining currents. For temperatures below the critical temperature, randomness in the distribution of parity of the coherent electrons can lead to disappearing of selfsustaining currents and inducing new metastable states. For temperatures above the critical temperature, it causes a creation of new metastable states with non-zero currents.

  13. Persistent Spin and Charge Currents in Open Conducting Ring Subjected to Rashba Spin-Orbit Coupling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xi-Sua; XIONG Shi-Jie

    2008-01-01

    We investigate persistent charge and spin currents of a one-dimensional ring with Rashba spin-orbit coupling and connected asymmetrically to two external leads spanned with angle (φ)0.Because of the asymmetry of the structure and the spin-reflection,the persistent charge and spin currents can be induced.The magnification of persistent currents can be obtained when tuning the energy of incident electron to the sharp zero and sharp resonance of transmission depending on the Aharonov-Casher (AC) phase due to the spin-orbit coupling and the angle spanned by two leads (φ)0.The general dependence of the charge and spin persistent currents on these parameters is obtained.This suggests a possible method of controlling the magnitude and direction of persistent currents by tuning the AC phase and (φ)0,without the electromagnetic flux though the ring.

  14. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, H. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Armstrong, F.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); von Przewoski, B. [Indiana Univ. Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, IN (United States)] [and others

    1994-08-01

    This report contains summaries of 568 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1988 are excluded. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, INS (Tokyo), ITEP (Moscow), IUCF (Bloomington), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  15. Current experiments in particle physics, 1996

    CERN Document Server

    Lawrence Berkeley Nat. Laboratory. Berkeley; Lehár, F; Klioukhine, V I; Ryabov, Yu; Bilak, S V; Illarionova, N S; Khachaturov, B A; Strokovsky, E A; Hoffman, C M; Kettle, P R; Olin, A; Armstrong, F E

    1996-01-01

    Contains more than 1,800 experiments in elementary particle physics from the Experience database. Search and browse by author; title; experiment number or prefix; institution; date approved, started or completed; accelerator or detector; polarization, reaction, final state or particle; or by papers produced. Maintained at SLAC for the Particle Data Group. Supplies the information for Current Experiments in Particle Physics (LBL-91). Print version updated every second year.

  16. Current experiments in elementary particle physics, 1989

    CERN Document Server

    Lawrence Berkeley Nat. Laboratory. Berkeley; Armstrong, F E; Trippe, T G; Yost, G P; Oyanagi, Y; Dodder, D C; Ryabov, Yu G; Slabospitsky, S R; Frosch, R; Olin, A; Lehar, F; Klumov, I A; Ivanov, I I

    1989-01-01

    Contains more than 1,800 experiments in elementary particle physics from the Experience database. Search and browse by author; title; experiment number or prefix; institution; date approved, started or completed; accelerator or detector; polarization, reaction, final state or particle; or by papers produced. Maintained at SLAC for the Particle Data Group. Supplies the information for Current Experiments in Particle Physics (LBL-91). Print version updated every second year.

  17. Concurrent operational modes and enhanced current sensitivity in heterostructure of magnetoelectric ring and piezoelectric transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengyao; Ming Leung, Chung; Kuang, Wei; Wing Or, Siu; Ho, S. L.

    2013-05-01

    A heterostructure possessing two concurrent operational modes: current sensing (CS) mode and current transduction (CT) mode and an enhanced current sensitivity associated with the CT mode is proposed by combining a magnetoelectric ring (MER) with a piezoelectric transformer (PET). The MER is a ring-shaped magnetoelectric laminate having an axially polarized Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 (PZT) piezoelectric ceramic ring sandwiched between two circumferentially magnetized, inter-magnetically biased Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.92 (Terfenol-D) short-fiber/NdFeB magnet/epoxy three-phase magnetostrictive composite rings, while the PET is a Rosen-type PZT piezoelectric ceramic transformer. The current sensitivity (SI) and magnetoelectric voltage coefficient (αV) of the heterostructure in the two operational modes are evaluated theoretically and experimentally. The CS mode provides a large SI of ˜10 mV/A over a flat frequency range of 10 Hz-40 kHz with a high resonance SI of 157 mV/A at 62 kHz. The CT mode gives a 6.4-times enhancement in resonance SI, reaching 1000 mV/A at 62 kHz, as a result of the amplified vortex magnetoelectric effect caused by the vortex magnetoelectric effect in the MER, the matching of the resonance frequencies between the MER and the PET, and the resonance voltage step-up effect in the PET.

  18. Global, Energy-Dependent Ring Current Response During Two Large Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, J.; Angelopoulos, V.; Burch, J. L.; De Pascuale, S.; Fuselier, S. A.; Genestreti, K. J.; Kurth, W. S.; LLera, K.; McComas, D. J.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Valek, P. W.

    2015-12-01

    Two recent large (~200 nT) geomagnetic storms occurred during 17--18 March 2015 and 22--23 June 2015. The global, energy-dependent ring current response to these two extreme events is investigated using both global imaging and multi-point in situ observations. Energetic neutral atom (ENA) imaging by the Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission provides a global view of ring current ions. Local measurements are provided by two multi-spacecraft missions. The two Van Allen Probes measure in situ plasma (including ion composition) and fields at ring current and plasmaspheric L values. The recently launched Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) comprises four spacecraft that have just begun to measure particles (including ion composition) and fields at outer magnetospheric L-values. We analyze the timing and energetics of the stormtime evolution of ring current ions, both trapped and precipitating, using TWINS ENA images and in situ data by the Van Allen Probes and MMS.

  19. Comparison of Ring Current and Radiation Belt Responses during Transient Solar Wind Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, T. L.; Roeder, J. L.; Lemon, C.; Fennell, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    The analysis of radiation belt dynamics provides insight into the physical mechanisms of trapping, energization, and loss of energetic particles in the magnetosphere. It is well known that the storm-time ring current response to solar wind drivers changes the magnetic field in the inner magnetosphere, which modifies radiation belt particle trajectories as well as the magnetopause and geomagnetic cutoff locations. What is not well known is the detailed space-time structure of solar wind transient features that drive the dynamics of the ring-current and radiation belt response. We compare observed responses of the ring current and radiation belts during two geomagnetic storms of similar intensity on 15 November 2012 and 29 June 2013. Using the self-consistent ring current model RCM-Equilibrium (RCM-E), which ensures a force-balanced ring-current response at each time step, we generate a simulated ring current in response to the changing conditions as the storm evolves on a timescale of hours. Observations of the plasma sheet particles, fields, and solar wind parameters are used to specify the dynamic boundary conditions as the storm evolves. This allows more realistic magnetospheric field and plasma dynamics during solar wind transients than can be obtained from existing empirical models. Using a spatial mapping algorithm developed by Mulligan et al., (2012) we create two-dimensional contour maps of the solar wind bulk plasma parameters using ACE, Wind, Geotail, and THEMIS data to quantitatively follow upstream spatial variations in the radial and azimuthal dimensions driving the storm. We perform a comparison of how the structure and impact angle of the solar wind transients affect the intensity and duration of energization of the ring current and radiation belt at various energies. We also investigate how the varying geomagnetic conditions determined by the solar wind affect dominant loss mechanisms such as magnetopause shadowing. Comparison of energetic particle

  20. On the lack of ring-current aromaticity of (heteroatom) [N]radialenes and their dianions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Domene, C.; Fowler, P.W.; Jenneskens, L.W.; Steiner, E.

    2007-01-01

    Current-density maps, calculated at the ab initio RHF//6-31G**/ CTOCD-DZ level, show no significant π ring current in planar equilateral geometries ofneutral and dianionic [N]radialenes, oxocarbons and thiocarbons CNYNq- (Y=CH2, O, S; N=4, 5, 6; q=0 (1a-12 a), 2 (1b-12b)). Only the N=3 deltate diani

  1. An upper ocean current jet and internal waves in a Gulf Stream warm core ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, T. M.; Stalcup, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    On June 22, 1982, the R/V Endeavor, while participating in a multi-ship study of a warm core ring 82B, encountered a strong front in the core of the ring. The vessel was headed on a radial section outward from ring center while a CTD was repeatedly raised and lowered between 10 and 300 m. Current profiles in the upper 100 m were obtained continuously with a Doppler acoustic profiling system. Above the shallow 45 m seasonal thermocline, a current jet of 4 km width was encountered having a central core of relatively light water and a maximum current of 1.1 m/s. This jet was both highly nonlinear and totally unexpected. A high frequency packet of directional internal waves was acoustically observed in the seasonal thermocline at the outer edge of the jet. Vertical velocities were large enough (6 cm/s) as to be directly observable in the Doppler returns. The waves were propagating from the northeast, parallel to the ship track, and orthogonal to the jet toward the center of the warm core ring. While a nonlinear, centrifugal term was required for the force balance of the jet, the high-frequency internal wave packet could be explained with linear, gravest-mode wave dynamics.

  2. Analysis of the wake field effects in the PEP-II storage rings with extremely high currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novokhatski, A., E-mail: novo@slac.stanford.edu; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.

    2014-01-21

    We present the history and analysis of different wake field effects throughout the operational life of the PEP-II SLAC B-factory. Although the impedance of the high and low energy rings is small, the intense high-current beams generated a lot of power. The effects from these wake fields are: heating and damage of vacuum beam chamber elements like RF seals, vacuum valves, shielded bellows, BPM buttons and ceramic tiles; vacuum spikes, vacuum instabilities and high detector background; and beam longitudinal and transverse instabilities. We also discuss the methods used to eliminate these effects. Results of this analysis and the PEP-II experience may be very useful in the design of new storage rings and light sources.

  3. Analysis of the wake field effects in the PEP-II storage rings with extremely high currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novokhatski, A.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.

    2014-01-01

    We present the history and analysis of different wake field effects throughout the operational life of the PEP-II SLAC B-factory. Although the impedance of the high and low energy rings is small, the intense high-current beams generated a lot of power. The effects from these wake fields are: heating and damage of vacuum beam chamber elements like RF seals, vacuum valves, shielded bellows, BPM buttons and ceramic tiles; vacuum spikes, vacuum instabilities and high detector background; and beam longitudinal and transverse instabilities. We also discuss the methods used to eliminate these effects. Results of this analysis and the PEP-II experience may be very useful in the design of new storage rings and light sources.

  4. Current Experiments in Particle Physics (September 1996)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, H.; Lehar, F.; Klyukhin, V.I.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Bilak, S.V.; Illarionova, N.S.; Khachaturov, B.A.; Strokovsky, E.A.; Hoffman, C.M.; Kettle, P.-R.; Olin, A.; Armstrong, F.E.

    1996-09-01

    This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. This report contains full summaries of 180 approved current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. The focus of the report is on selected experiments which directly contribute to our better understanding of elementary particles and their properties such as masses, widths or lifetimes, and branching fractions.

  5. Energy transfer, orbital angular momentum, and discrete current in a double-ring fiber array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexeyev, C. N.; Volyar, A. V. [Taurida National V.I. Vernadsky University, Vernadsky Prospekt, 4, Simferopol, 95007, Crimea (Ukraine); Yavorsky, M. A. [Taurida National V.I. Vernadsky University, Vernadsky Prospekt, 4, Simferopol, 95007, Crimea (Ukraine); Universite Bordeaux and CNRS, LOMA, UMR 5798, FR-33400 Talence (France)

    2011-12-15

    We study energy transfer and orbital angular momentum of supermodes in a double-ring array of evanescently coupled monomode optical fibers. The structure of supermodes and the spectra of their propagation constants are obtained. The geometrical parameters of the array, at which the energy is mostly confined within the layers, are determined. The developed method for finding the supermodes of concentric arrays is generalized for the case of multiring arrays. The orbital angular momentum carried by a supermode of a double-ring array is calculated. The discrete lattice current is introduced. It is shown that the sum of discrete currents over the array is a conserved quantity. The connection of the total discrete current with orbital angular momentum of discrete optical vortices is made.

  6. Induced fermionic charge and current densities in two-dimensional rings

    CERN Document Server

    Bellucci, S; Grigoryan, A Kh

    2016-01-01

    For a massive quantum fermionic field, we investigate the vacuum expectation values (VEVs) of the charge and current densities induced by an external magnetic flux in a two-dimensional circular ring. Both the irreducible representations of the Clifford algebra are considered. On the ring edges the bag (infinite mass) boundary conditions are imposed for the field operator. This leads to the Casimir type effect on the vacuum characteristics. The radial current vanishes. The charge and the azimuthal current are decomposed into the boundary-free and boundary-induced contributions. Both these contributions are odd periodic functions of the magnetic flux with the period equal to the flux quantum. An important feature that distinguishes the VEVs of the charge and current densities from the VEV of the energy density, is their finiteness on the ring edges. The current density is equal to the charge density for the outer edge and has the opposite sign on the inner edge. The VEVs are peaked near the inner edge and, as f...

  7. Writing with ring currents: selectively hydrogenated polycyclic aromatics as finite models of graphene and graphane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Patrick W; Gibson, Christopher M; Bean, David E

    2014-03-01

    Alternating partial hydrogenation of the interior region of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon gives a finite model system representing systems on the pathway from graphene to the graphane modification of the graphene sheet. Calculations at the DFT and coupled Hartree-Fock levels confirm that sp(2) cycles of bare carbon centres isolated by selective hydrogenation retain the essentially planar geometry and electron delocalization of the annulene that they mimic. Delocalization is diagnosed by the presence of ring currents, as detected by ipsocentric calculation and visualization of the current density induced in the π system by a perpendicular external magnetic field. These induced 'ring' currents have essentially the same sense, strength and orbital origin as in the free hydrocarbon. Subjected to the important experimental proviso of the need for atomic-scale control of hydrogenation, this finding predicts the possibility of writing single, multiple and concentric diatropic and/or paratropic ring currents on the graphene/graphane sheet. The implication is that pathways for free flow of ballistic current can be modelled in the same way.

  8. New Results from Experiments at the HERA Storage Ring and from ARGUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, D.

    1994-10-01

    Recent results from the ep storage ring HERA and from the e+e- storage ring DORIS II are discussed. Special emphasis is given to the specific layout of the detectors and to the progress in calorimetry achieved in the last few years. The impact of the ARGUS experiment on B- and π-physics is discussed.

  9. Analysis of the magnetically induced current density of molecules consisting of annelated aromatic and antiaromatic hydrocarbon rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundholm, Dage; Berger, Raphael J F; Fliegl, Heike

    2016-06-21

    Magnetically induced current susceptibilities and current pathways have been calculated for molecules consisting of two pentalene groups annelated with a benzene (1) or naphthalene (2) moiety. Current strength susceptibilities have been obtained by numerically integrating separately the diatropic and paratropic contributions to the current flow passing planes through chosen bonds of the molecules. The current density calculations provide novel and unambiguous current pathways for the unusual molecules with annelated aromatic and antiaromatic hydrocarbon moieties. The calculations show that the benzene and naphthalene moieties annelated with two pentalene units as in molecules 1 and 2, respectively, are unexpectedly antiaromatic sustaining only a local paratropic ring current around the ring, whereas a weak diatropic current flows around the C-H moiety of the benzene ring. For 1 and 2, the individual five-membered rings of the pentalenes are antiaromatic and a slightly weaker semilocal paratropic current flows around the two pentalene rings. Molecules 1 and 2 do not sustain any net global ring current. The naphthalene moiety of the molecule consisting of a naphthalene annelated with two pentalene units (3) does not sustain any strong ring current that is typical for naphthalene. Instead, half of the diatropic current passing the naphthalene moiety forms a zig-zag pattern along the C-C bonds of the naphthalene moiety that are not shared with the pentalene moieties and one third of the current continues around the whole molecule partially cancelling the very strong paratropic semilocal ring current of the pentalenes. For molecule 3, the pentalene moieties and the individual five-membered rings of the pentalenes are more antiaromatic than for 1 and 2. The calculated current patterns elucidate why the compounds with formally [4n + 2] π-electrons have unusual aromatic properties violating the Hückel π-electron count rule. The current density calculations also provide

  10. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revised

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, H. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, B. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Dodder, D.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Klyukhin, V.I.; Ryabov, Yu.G. [Inst. for High Energy Physics, Serpukhov (Russian Federation); Illarionova, N.S. [Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lehar, F. [CEN Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Oyanagi, Y. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Sciences; Olin, A. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Frosch, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)

    1992-06-01

    This report contains summaries of 584 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1986 are excluded. Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, SSCL, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  11. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Oyanagi, Y. (Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan)); Dodder, D.C. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Ryabov, Yu.G.; Slabospitsky, S.R. (Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol' zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Serpukhov (USSR). Inst. Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij); Frosch, R. (Swiss Inst. for Nuclear Research, Villigen (Switzerla

    1989-09-01

    This report contains summaries of 736 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1982 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PSI/SIN, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground experiments. Also given are instructions for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized.

  12. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E., Oyanagi, Y.; Dodder, D.C.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Frosch, R.; Olin, A.; Lehar, F.; Moskalev, A.N.; Barkov, B.P.

    1987-03-01

    This report contains summaries of 720 recent and current experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1980 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, KEK, LAMPF, Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute, Saclay, Serpukhov, SIN, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also experiments on proton decay. Instructions are given for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized.

  13. Current Experiments in Particle Physics. 1996 Edition.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, Hrvoje

    2003-06-27

    This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  14. State-of-Art Empirical Modeling of Ring Current Plasma Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, C.; Ma, Q.; Wang, C. P.; Bortnik, J.; Thorne, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    The plasma pressure in the inner magnetosphere plays a key role in plasma dynamics by changing magnetic field configurations and generating the ring current. In this study, we present our preliminary results of empirically constructing 2D equatorial ring current pressure and pressure anisotropy spatial distributions controlled by Dst based on measurements from two particle instruments (HOPE and RBSPICE) onboard Van Allen Probes. We first obtain the equatorial plasma perpendicular and parallel pressures for different species including H+, He+, O+ and e- from 20 eV to ~1 MeV, and investigate their relative contributions to the total plasma pressure and pressure anisotropy. We then establish empirical equatorial pressure models within ~ 6 RE using a state-of-art machine learning technique, Support Vector Regression Machine (SVRM). The pressure models predict equatorial perpendicular and parallel plasma thermal pressures (for each species and for total pressures) and pressure anisotropy at any given r, MLT, Bz/Br (equivalent Z distance), and Dst within applicable ranges. We are currently validating our model predictions and investigating how the ring current pressure distributions and the associated pressure gradients vary with Dst index.

  15. Control of Josephson current by Aharonov-Casher phase in a Rashba ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Borunda, M. F.; Liu, Xiong-Jun; Sinova, Jairo

    2009-11-01

    We study the interference effect induced by the Aharonov-Casher phase on the Josephson current through a semiconducting ring attached to superconducting leads. Using a one-dimensional model that incorporates spin-orbit coupling in the semiconducting ring, we calculate the Andreev levels analytically and numerically, and predict oscillations of the Josephson current due to the AC phase. This result is valid from the point-contact limit to the long channel-length case, as defined by the ratio of the junction length and the BCS healing length. We show in the long channel-length limit that the impurity scattering has no effect on the oscillation of the Josephson current, in contrast to the case of conductivity oscillations in a spin-orbit-coupled ring system attached to normal leads where impurity scattering reduces the amplitude of oscillations. Our results suggest a scheme to measure the AC phase with, in principle, higher sensitivity. In addition, this effect allows for control of the Josephson current through the gate-voltage-tuned AC phase.

  16. The persistent current in an Aharonov-Bohm ring with a side-coupled quantum dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Bo; Wu Shao-Quan; Sun Wei-Li; Zhou Xiao-Lin

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the persistent current in a mesoscopic ring with a side-coupled quantum dot. The problems are probed by using the one-impurity Anderson Hamiltonian and are treated with the slave boson mean field theory. It is shown that the persistent current in this system has the spin fluctuations, and the charge transfers between the two subsystems are suppressed in the limit of △/TKo < 1. The minimum value of the persistent current for ζK/L = 5 of the odd parity system provides an opportunity to detect the Kondo screening cloud.

  17. Evolution of Ring Current Protons Induced by Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Fu-Liang; TIAN Tian; CHEN Liang-Xu; SU Zhen-Peng; ZHENG Hui-Nan

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of the phase space density (PSD) of ring current protons induced by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves at the location L=3.5, calculate the diffusion coefficients in pitch angle and momentum, and solve the standard two-dimensional Fokker-Planck diffusion equation. The pitch angle diffusion coefficient is found to be larger than the momentum diffusion coefficient by a factor of about 10~3 or above at lower pitch angles. We show that EMIC waves can produce efficient pitch angle scattering of energetic (~100 keV) protons, yielding a rapid decrement in PSD, typically by a factor of ~10 within a few hours, consistent with observational data. This result further supports previous findings that wave-particle interaction is responsible for the rapid ring current decay.

  18. Effects of Magnetic Flux Circulation on Radiation Belt and Ring Current Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, E. J.; Fok, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    The orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) determines the location of the dayside merging line and the magnetic flux circulation patterns. Magnetic flux circulation determines the amount of energy which enters the magnetosphere and ionosphere. We use the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) code to simulate both idealized and real solar wind cases. We use several satellites to validate the LFM simulation results for the real solar wind case studies. With these cases, we examine the magnetic flux circulation under differing IMF orientations. We also use the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) and Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model to examine the inner magnetospheric response to the orientation of the IMF. We will present the different magnetic flux circulation patterns and the resulting effects on the radiation belt and ring current population.

  19. Second-Order Resonant Interaction of Ring Current Protons with Whistler-Mode Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Fu-Liang; CHEN Liang-Xu; HE Hui-Yong; ZHOU Qing-Hua

    2008-01-01

    We present a study on the second-order resonant interaction between the ring current protons with Whistler-mode waves propagating near the quasi electrostatic limit following the previous second-order resonant theory.The diffusion coefficients are proportional to the electric field amplitude E,much greater than those for the regular first-order resonance.which are proportional to the electric field amplitudes square E2.Numerical calculations for the pitch angle scattering are performed for typical energies of protons Ek=50ke V and 100ke V at locations L=2 and L=3.5.The timescale for the loss process of protons by the Whistler waves is found to approach one hour,comparable to that by the EMIC waves,suggesting that Whistler waves may also contribute significantly to the ring current decay under appropriate conditions.

  20. Latitudinal shift and tilt of the ring current during magnetic storms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Bo; XU WenYao; CHEN GengXiong; DU AiMin; WU YingYan; LIU XiaoCan

    2009-01-01

    The equatorial ring current (ERC) theory suggested that the distribution of global disturbed horizontal geomagnetic field only depends on the cosine of station's latitude. However, we always observe a lar-ger △H at higher latitude stations than lower ones, implying that the ERC could tilt or/and shift with respect to the equatorial plane during intense storms. In this paper, we analyze 11 intense magnetic storms from 2000 to 2004, and introduce two configurational factors to characterize the topology of storm time ring current. The results show that ERC has occasionally deviated off equatorial plane with both tilt angle δ≈13°-25°and latitude shift δ≈0°-21.8°. The ground disturbed field distribution should be improved as △Hk = △H,maxCOS(φk-δ), which agree well with the geomagnetic observations.

  1. Opportunities for detecting ring currents using the attoclock set-up

    CERN Document Server

    Kaushal, Jivesh; Smirnova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Strong field ionization by circularly polarized laser fields from initial states with internal orbital momentum has interesting propensity rule: electrons counter-rotating with respect to the laser field can be liberated more easily than co-rotating electrons [Barth and Smirnova PRA 84, 063415, 2011}]. Here we show that application of few-cycle IR pulses allows one to use this propensity rule to detect ring currents associated with such quantum states, by observing angular shifts of the ejected electrons. Such shifts present the main observable of the attoclock method. We use time-dependent Analytical $R$-Matrix (A$R$M) theory to show that the attoclock measured angular shifts of an electron originating from two counter-rotating orbitals ($p^{+}$ and $p^{-}$) are noticeably different. Our work opens new opportunities for detecting ring currents excited in atoms and molecules, using the attoclock set-up.

  2. Ion transport and loss in the earth's quiet ring current. I - Data and standard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, R. B.; Hamilton, D. C.

    1993-01-01

    A study of the transport and loss of ions in the earth's quiet time ring current, in which the standard radial diffusion model developed for the high-energy radiation belt particles is compared with the measurements of the lower-energy ring current ions, is presented. The data set provides ionic composition information in an energy range that includes the bulk of the ring current energy density, 1-300 keV/e. Protons are found to dominate the quiet time energy density at all altitudes, peaking near L of about 4 at 60 keV/cu cm, with much smaller contributions from O(+) (1-10 percent), He(+) (1-5 percent), and He(2+) (less than 1 percent). A minimization procedure is used to fit the amplitudes of the standard electric radial diffusion coefficient, yielding 5.8 x 10 exp -11 R(E-squared)/s. Fluctuation ionospheric electric fields are suggested as the source of the additional diffusion detected.

  3. Ion transport and loss in the earth's quiet ring current. I - Data and standard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, R. B.; Hamilton, D. C.

    1993-01-01

    A study of the transport and loss of ions in the earth's quiet time ring current, in which the standard radial diffusion model developed for the high-energy radiation belt particles is compared with the measurements of the lower-energy ring current ions, is presented. The data set provides ionic composition information in an energy range that includes the bulk of the ring current energy density, 1-300 keV/e. Protons are found to dominate the quiet time energy density at all altitudes, peaking near L of about 4 at 60 keV/cu cm, with much smaller contributions from O(+) (1-10 percent), He(+) (1-5 percent), and He(2+) (less than 1 percent). A minimization procedure is used to fit the amplitudes of the standard electric radial diffusion coefficient, yielding 5.8 x 10 exp -11 R(E-squared)/s. Fluctuation ionospheric electric fields are suggested as the source of the additional diffusion detected.

  4. Geomagnetic storms, the Dst ring-current myth and lognormal distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, W.H.

    1996-01-01

    The definition of geomagnetic storms dates back to the turn of the century when researchers recognized the unique shape of the H-component field change upon averaging storms recorded at low latitude observatories. A generally accepted modeling of the storm field sources as a magnetospheric ring current was settled about 30 years ago at the start of space exploration and the discovery of the Van Allen belt of particles encircling the Earth. The Dst global 'ring-current' index of geomagnetic disturbances, formulated in that period, is still taken to be the definitive representation for geomagnetic storms. Dst indices, or data from many world observatories processed in a fashion paralleling the index, are used widely by researchers relying on the assumption of such a magnetospheric current-ring depiction. Recent in situ measurements by satellites passing through the ring-current region and computations with disturbed magnetosphere models show that the Dst storm is not solely a main-phase to decay-phase, growth to disintegration, of a massive current encircling the Earth. Although a ring current certainly exists during a storm, there are many other field contributions at the middle-and low-latitude observatories that are summed to show the 'storm' characteristic behavior in Dst at these observatories. One characteristic of the storm field form at middle and low latitudes is that Dst exhibits a lognormal distribution shape when plotted as the hourly value amplitude in each time range. Such distributions, common in nature, arise when there are many contributors to a measurement or when the measurement is a result of a connected series of statistical processes. The amplitude-time displays of Dst are thought to occur because the many time-series processes that are added to form Dst all have their own characteristic distribution in time. By transforming the Dst time display into the equivalent normal distribution, it is shown that a storm recovery can be predicted with

  5. COMPILATION OF CURRENT HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohl, C.G.; Kelly, R.L.; Armstrong, F.E.; Horne, C.P.; Hutchinson, M.S.; Rittenberg, A.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P.; Addis, L.; Ward, C.E.W.; Baggett, N.; Goldschmidt-Clermong, Y.; Joos, P.; Gelfand, N.; Oyanagi, Y.; Grudtsin, S.N.; Ryabov, Yu.G.

    1981-05-01

    This is the fourth edition of our compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about April 1981, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1977. We emphasize that only approved experiments are included.

  6. Analysis of the contributions of ring current and electric field effects to the chemical shifts of RNA bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahakyan, Aleksandr B; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2013-02-21

    Ring current and electric field effects can considerably influence NMR chemical shifts in biomolecules. Understanding such effects is particularly important for the development of accurate mappings between chemical shifts and the structures of nucleic acids. In this work, we first analyzed the Pople and the Haigh-Mallion models in terms of their ability to describe nitrogen base conjugated ring effects. We then created a database (DiBaseRNA) of three-dimensional arrangements of RNA base pairs from X-ray structures, calculated the corresponding chemical shifts via a hybrid density functional theory approach and used the results to parametrize the ring current and electric field effects in RNA bases. Next, we studied the coupling of the electric field and ring current effects for different inter-ring arrangements found in RNA bases using linear model fitting, with joint electric field and ring current, as well as only electric field and only ring current approximations. Taken together, our results provide a characterization of the interdependence of ring current and electric field geometric factors, which is shown to be especially important for the chemical shifts of non-hydrogen atoms in RNA bases.

  7. Universal cumulants of the current in diffusive systems on a ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appert-Rolland, C.; Derrida, B.; Lecomte, V.; van Wijland, F.

    2008-08-01

    We calculate exactly the first cumulants of the integrated current and of the activity (which is the total number of changes of configurations) of the symmetric simple exclusion process on a ring with periodic boundary conditions. Our results indicate that for large system sizes the large deviation functions of the current and of the activity take a universal scaling form, with the same scaling function for both quantities. This scaling function can be understood either by an analysis of Bethe ansatz equations or in terms of a theory based on fluctuating hydrodynamics or on the macroscopic fluctuation theory of Bertini, De Sole, Gabrielli, Jona-Lasinio, and Landim.

  8. Laboratory Experiments of Rip Current Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, R.; Coco, G.; Lomonaco, P.; Dalrymple, R. A.; Alvarez, A.; Gonzalez, M.; Medina, R.

    2014-12-01

    The hypothesis of rip current generation from purely hydrodynamic processes is here investigated through laboratory experiments. The experiments have been performed at the Cantabria Coastal and Ocean Basin (CCOB) with a segmented wavemaker consisting of 64 waveboards. The basin measures 25m in the cross-shore and 32m in the alongshore direction and the water depth at the wavemaker is 1m. A concrete plane sloping (1:5) beach has been built in the opposite side of the wave machine, its toe is 15m from the waveboards. Reflective lateral walls covered the full length of the basin. The set of instruments consists of 33 wave gauges deployed along two longshore and two cross-shore transects, 7 acoustic Doppler velocimeters and 15 run-up wires. Furthermore a set of two cameras has been synchronized with the data acquisition system. Two types of experiments have been performed to specifically study the generation of rip currents under wave group forcing. First, similarly to the experiments of Fowler and Dalrymple (Proc. 22nd Int. Conf. Coast. Eng.,1990), two intersecting wave trains with opposite directions have been imposed. They give rise to the formation of a non-migrating rip current system with a wavelength that depends on wave frequency and direction. Second, single wave trains with alongshore periodic amplitude attenuation have been imposed. Although the attenuation has been set such that the incident wave field has the same envelope as in the first type of experiments, the rip current system differs due to diffraction and interference processes. The results for different wave conditions (maximum incident wave height from 0.2m to 0.4m, wave period from 1.4s to 2s) will be presented and the intensity of the rip currents will be compared to the alongshore variation in wave set-up. This research is part of the ANIMO project funded by the Spanish Government under contract BIA2012-36822.

  9. A single particle detector for electron-ion collision experiments in the Cryogenic Storage Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spruck, Kaija; Mueller, Alfred; Schippers, Stefan [Institut fuer Atom- und Molekuelphysik, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen (Germany); Krantz, Claude; Becker, Arno; Vogel, Stephen; Wolf, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Novotny, Oldrich [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, New York (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The study of ion chemistry in the interstellar medium requires, among others, knowledge about cross sections for the recombination of atomic and molecular ions with low temperature (∝10 K) electrons. Especially the database on singly charged atomic ions relevant to the chemistry of molecular clouds is incomplete in this respect. The electrostatic Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR), currently being commissioned at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, will allow experiments with atomic, molecular and cluster ions at beam energies up to 300 keV per unit charge in a cryogenic extremely high vacuum (XHV) environment. Collisions of stored atomic ions with electrons provided by an electron cooler will lead to reaction products with charge states that differ from those of the parent particles. The detection of these products will be carried out behind a bending deflector of the storage ring by a high-efficiency movable single-particle detector, based on a secondary electron converter backed by heatable microchannel plates. The designs of the mechanical actuator and the detector are compatible with the cryogenic operating conditions at 10 K and a bakeout temperature of up to 530 K.

  10. First storage of ion beams in the Double Electrostatic Ion-Ring Experiment: DESIREE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, H. T.; Thomas, R. D.; Gatchell, M.; Rosen, S.; Reinhed, P.; Loefgren, P.; Braennholm, L.; Blom, M.; Bjoerkhage, M.; Baeckstroem, E.; Alexander, J. D.; Leontein, S.; Zettergren, H.; Liljeby, L.; Kaellberg, A.; Simonsson, A.; Hellberg, F.; Mannervik, S.; Larsson, M.; Geppert, W. D. [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); and others

    2013-05-15

    We report on the first storage of ion beams in the Double ElectroStatic Ion Ring ExpEriment, DESIREE, at Stockholm University. We have produced beams of atomic carbon anions and small carbon anion molecules (C{sub n}{sup -}, n= 1, 2, 3, 4) in a sputter ion source. The ion beams were accelerated to 10 keV kinetic energy and stored in an electrostatic ion storage ring enclosed in a vacuum chamber at 13 K. For 10 keV C{sub 2}{sup -} molecular anions we measure the residual-gas limited beam storage lifetime to be 448 s {+-} 18 s with two independent detector systems. Using the measured storage lifetimes we estimate that the residual gas pressure is in the 10{sup -14} mbar range. When high current ion beams are injected, the number of stored particles does not follow a single exponential decay law as would be expected for stored particles lost solely due to electron detachment in collision with the residual-gas. Instead, we observe a faster initial decay rate, which we ascribe to the effect of the space charge of the ion beam on the storage capacity.

  11. Lower Current Large Deviations for Zero-Range Processes on a Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chleboun, Paul; Grosskinsky, Stefan; Pizzoferrato, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    We study lower large deviations for the current of totally asymmetric zero-range processes on a ring with concave current-density relation. We use an approach by Jensen and Varadhan which has previously been applied to exclusion processes, to realize current fluctuations by travelling wave density profiles corresponding to non-entropic weak solutions of the hyperbolic scaling limit of the process. We further establish a dynamic transition, where large deviations of the current below a certain value are no longer typically attained by non-entropic weak solutions, but by condensed profiles, where a non-zero fraction of all the particles accumulates on a single fixed lattice site. This leads to a general characterization of the rate function, which is illustrated by providing detailed results for four generic examples of jump rates, including constant rates, decreasing rates, unbounded sublinear rates and asymptotically linear rates. Our results on the dynamic transition are supported by numerical simulations using a cloning algorithm.

  12. Otto Rank: beginnings, endings, and current experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novey, R

    1983-01-01

    I have traced the theories of Otto Rank as they appeared in his major technical writings. Against this background, I have discussed references to Rank in past and contemporary psychoanalytic literature. This paper describes three important contributions of Rank--his birth trauma theory, leading to his theory of the birth of the self; his emphasis on present experience (forerunner of the current "here-and-now" theory); and his writings about the creative potential of the termination process.

  13. A novel eddy current damper: theory and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahimi, Babak; Khamesee, Mir Behrad [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Golnaraghi, Farid, E-mail: khamesee@mecheng1.uwaterloo.c [Mechatronic Systems Engineering, Simon Fraser University, Surrey, British Columbia, V3T 0A3 (Canada)

    2009-04-07

    A novel eddy current damper is developed and its damping characteristics are studied analytically and experimentally. The proposed eddy current damper consists of a conductor as an outer tube, and an array of axially magnetized ring-shaped permanent magnets separated by iron pole pieces as a mover. The relative movement of the magnets and the conductor causes the conductor to undergo motional eddy currents. Since the eddy currents produce a repulsive force that is proportional to the velocity of the conductor, the moving magnet and the conductor behave as a viscous damper. The eddy current generation causes the vibration to dissipate through the Joule heating generated in the conductor part. An accurate, analytical model of the system is obtained by applying electromagnetic theory to estimate the damping properties of the proposed eddy current damper. A prototype eddy current damper is fabricated, and experiments are carried out to verify the accuracy of the theoretical model. The experimental test bed consists of a one-degree-of-freedom vibration isolation system and is used for the frequency and transient time response analysis of the system. The eddy current damper model has a 0.1 m s{sup -2} (4.8%) RMS error in the estimation of the mass acceleration. A damping coefficient as high as 53 Ns m{sup -1} is achievable with the fabricated prototype. This novel eddy current damper is an oil-free, inexpensive damper that is applicable in various vibration isolation systems such as precision machinery, micro-mechanical suspension systems and structure vibration isolation.

  14. Evolution of the magnetospheric storm-ring current with a constant time delay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cluadegonzalez, A.L.; Gonzalez, W.D.; Detman, T.R.; Joselyn, J.A. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Using the energy balance equation for the ring current during magnetic storms, a theoretical study of the response of this current is done, for the case of a constant time decay tau. The input energy function for the balance equation is assumed to be described by a simple time variation during the injection time, such that an analytical response can be obtained. The model is used for 5 of the 10 intense storms in the interval August 1978-December 1979, for which the ISEE-3 interplanetary data are available. The energy input function for these 5 events (those with less data gaps) is assumed to be one of both, the azimuthal interplanetary electric field or the Akasofu`s coupling function. These input functions are approximated by one of the simple mentioned input functions and the solution obtained from the energy balance equation, for different values of tau, is compared to the actual evolution of the ring current (derived from the geomagnetic index Dst). The sets of input functions and tau values that better reproduce the observed storm evolution are adopted as the best approximation. As a conclusion, it is found that the more appropriate values of tau are longer than those determined in previous studies, especially for the case of more intense storms.

  15. Current-dependent spectral blueshift in a three-dimensional photonic-quantum-ring laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Sung-Jae; Bae, Joongwoo; Minogin, Vladimir G; Kwon, O'Dae

    2006-03-10

    The emission spectra of photonic-quantum-ring lasers can be explained by a three-dimensional Rayleigh-Fabry-Perot cavity resonance model. The proposed model for the emission spectral peaks fits well with the observed blueshift of the emission spectrum envelope as a function of the view angle. Furthermore, we observe that the emission spectra with the high-order mode index showed blueshift behaviors as functions of the injection current, whereas those with the low-order mode index showed redshift behaviors. These phenomena might result in lowering the effective refractive index by the carrier inhomogeneity in the active disk.

  16. Modelling of the ring current in Saturn's magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Giampieri

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The existence of a ring current inside Saturn's magnetosphere was first suggested by Smith et al. (1980 and Ness et al. (1981, 1982, in order to explain various features in the magnetic field observations from the Pioneer 11 and Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft. Connerney et al. (1983 formalized the equatorial current model, based on previous modelling work of Jupiter's current sheet and estimated its parameters from the two Voyager data sets. Here, we investigate the model further, by reconsidering the data from the two Voyager spacecraft, as well as including the Pioneer 11 flyby data set.

    First, we obtain, in closed form, an analytic expression for the magnetic field produced by the ring current. We then fit the model to the external field, that is the difference between the observed field and the internal magnetic field, considering all the available data. In general, through our global fit we obtain more accurate parameters, compared to previous models. We point out differences between the model's parameters for the three flybys, and also investigate possible deviations from the axial and planar symmetries assumed in the model. We conclude that an accurate modelling of the Saturnian disk current will require taking into account both of the temporal variations related to the condition of the magnetosphere, as well as non-axisymmetric contributions due to local time effects.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (current systems; planetary magnetospheres; plasma sheet

  17. The Current Status of the WARP Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szelc, A. M.; Benetti, P.; Calligarich, E.; Calaprice, F.; Cambiaghi, M.; Carbonara, F.; Cavanna, F.; Cocco, A. G.; Dipompeo, F.; Ferrari, N.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Grandi, L.; Mangano, G.; Montanari, C.; Palamara, O.; Pandola, L.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G. L.; Roncadelli, M.; Rossella, M.; Rubbia, C.; Santorelli, R.; Vignoli, C.; Zhao, Y.

    2006-07-01

    The WARP detector is a new idea in Dark Matter detection using liquid noble gases, specifically argon. We believe that argon is the medium best suited to detect nuclear recoils coming from interactions with the so called WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles). The detection technique, using two different discrimination methods, is capable of an identification power as high as one event in 108. During the second half of the year 2006 the next, 100 liter, detector will be constructed with an active veto shield to further suppress the background, while currently a 2.3 liter prototype, installed in the Gran Sasso Laboratory (Italy), has been taking data since May 2004. The small version of the detector is able to not only provide insight on the operation of a two-phase liquid argon chamber but is also able to provide physics results competitive with the current leading edge experiments.

  18. Ring current Atmosphere interactions Model with Self-Consistent Magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-09-09

    The Ring current Atmosphere interactions Model with Self-Consistent magnetic field (B) is a unique code that combines a kinetic model of ring current plasma with a three dimensional force-balanced model of the terrestrial magnetic field. The kinetic portion, RAM, solves the kinetic equation to yield the bounce-averaged distribution function as a function of azimuth, radial distance, energy and pitch angle for three ion species (H+, He+, and O+) and, optionally, electrons. The domain is a circle in the Solar-Magnetic (SM) equatorial plane with a radial span of 2 to 6.5 RE. It has an energy range of approximately 100 eV to 500 KeV. The 3-D force balanced magnetic field model, SCB, balances the JxB force with the divergence of the general pressure tensor to calculate the magnetic field configuration within its domain. The domain ranges from near the Earth’s surface, where the field is assumed dipolar, to the shell created by field lines passing through the SM equatorial plane at a radial distance of 6.5 RE. The two codes work in tandem, with RAM providing anisotropic pressure to SCB and SCB returning the self-consistent magnetic field through which RAM plasma is advected.

  19. The inconsistency between proton charge exchange and the observed ring current decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, L. R.; Evans, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    The equatorial pitch-angle distributions of ring-current ions observed during a storm recovery phase at L values between 3 and 4 are compared with the pitch-angle distributions predicted by proton charge exchange with neutral hydrogen. Large disagreements are found, and three alternative explanations are explored. (1) A strong proton source acts to mask the effects of charge exchange. It is believed that the required strong continual source with a unique pitch-angle and energy dependence is unrealistic at these low L values. (2) Presently accepted neutral hydrogen density models have densities well over an order of magnitude too large for a storm recovery phase. No evidence is known to support the required large errors in the densities. (3) The ring current at particle energies not exceeding 50 keV was dominated by some ion species other than protons during the storm recovery phase. Such ions must have much longer lifetimes for charge exchange with hydrogen than do protons. This alternative is strongly favored, with He(+) being an attractive candidate.

  20. Energy transfer between energetic ring current H(+) and O(+) by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Richard M.; Horne, Richard B.

    1994-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the frequency range below the helium gyrofrequency can be excited in the equatorial region of the outer magnetosphere by cyclotron resonant instability with anisotropic ring current H(+) ions. As the unducted waves propagate to higher latitudes, the wave normal should become highly inclined to the ambient magnetic field. Under such conditions, wave energy can be absorbed by cyclotron resonant interactions with ambient O(+), leading to ion heating perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. Resonant wave absorption peaks in the vicinity of the bi-ion frequency and the second harmonic of the O(+) gyrofrequrency. This absorption should mainly occur at latitudes between 10 deg and 30 deg along auroral field lines (L is greater than or equal to 7) in the postnoon sector. The concomitant ion heating perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field can contribute to the isotropization and geomagnetic trapping of collapsed O(+) ion conics (or beams) that originate from a low-altitude ionospheric source region. During geomagnetic storms when the O(+) content of the magnetosphere is significantly enhanced, the absorption of EMIC waves should become more efficient, and it may contribute to the observed acceleration of O(+) ions of ionospheric origin up to ring current energies.

  1. Performance of high-resolution position-sensitive detectors developed for storage-ring decay experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, T., E-mail: yamaguti@phy.saitama-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Suzaki, F. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Izumikawa, T. [RI Center, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8510 (Japan); Miyazawa, S. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Morimoto, K. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Suzuki, T. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Tokanai, F. [Department of Physics, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Furuki, H.; Ichihashi, N.; Ichikawa, C. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Kitagawa, A. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kuboki, T. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Momota, S. [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kochi University of Technology, Kochi 782-8502 (Japan); Nagae, D. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Nagashima, M.; Nakamura, Y. [Department of Physics, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Nishikiori, R.; Niwa, T. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Ohtsubo, T. [Department of Physics, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Ozawa, A. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); and others

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Position-sensitive detectors were developed for storage-ring decay spectroscopy. • Fiber scintillation and silicon strip detectors were tested with heavy ion beams. • A new fiber scintillation detector showed an excellent position resolution. • Position and energy detection by silicon strip detectors enable full identification. -- Abstract: As next generation spectroscopic tools, heavy-ion cooler storage rings will be a unique application of highly charged RI beam experiments. Decay spectroscopy of highly charged rare isotopes provides us important information relevant to the stellar conditions, such as for the s- and r-process nucleosynthesis. In-ring decay products of highly charged RI will be momentum-analyzed and reach a position-sensitive detector set-up located outside of the storage orbit. To realize such in-ring decay experiments, we have developed and tested two types of high-resolution position-sensitive detectors: silicon strips and scintillating fibers. The beam test experiments resulted in excellent position resolutions for both detectors, which will be available for future storage-ring experiments.

  2. Current evolution and plasma density space distribution in the reflex discharge with ring cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samokhin, A. A.; Liziakin, G. D.; Gavrikov, A. V.; Usmanov, R. A.; Smirnov, V. P.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper the numerical model of direct current gas discharge in drift-diffusion approximation is considered. For two-component plasma the processes of the gas discharge development in the reflex geometry with ring cathodes at a helium pressure of 35 mTorr are studied. We investigate the influence of: (a) the boundary conditions on the dielectric, (b) the electron temperature and (c) the coefficient of the secondary ion-electron emission on the I-U curve of the discharge. In a magnetic field of 50 Gauss the impact of the discharge voltage U = 300-700 V on the evolutionary process of the discharge is examined. The effect of diffusion on maintaining steady state discharge is researched. The parameters of the existence of a high-current (tens of μA) and low voltage (tens of mA) discharge modes are defined.

  3. Electron-phonon interaction effect on persistent current in a one-dimensional quantum ring by using a simple model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidi, Mahboubeh; Faizabadi, Edris

    2015-09-01

    We use a simple model to study the electron-phonon interaction influences on persistent current in a one-dimensional quantum ring enclosed by a magnetic flux. With increasing the temperature, persistent current amplitude is reduced, especially in a quantum ring with two ions per primitive cell (diatomic ring) because of the participation of optical phonons. Furthermore, the periodicity of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations changes to Φ0 / 2 (Φ0 is magnetic flux quantum). In a diatomic ring, by increasing the difference between left and right nearest-neighbor hopping integrals at zero temperature, persistent current variations show a transition from metallic to insulator against distinctive behavior at nonzero temperature.

  4. Microgravity experiments on the collisional behavior of Saturnian ring particles

    CERN Document Server

    Heißelmann, Daniel; Fraser, Helen J; Wolling, Kristin; 10.1016/j.icarus.2009.08.009

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present results of two novel experimental methods to investigate the collisional behavior of individual macroscopic icy bodies. The experiments reported here were conducted in the microgravity environments of parabolic flights and the Bremen drop tower facility. Using a cryogenic parabolic-flight setup, we were able to capture 41 near-central collisions of 1.5-cm-sized ice spheres at relative velocities between 6 and $22 \\mathrm{cm s^{-1}}$. The analysis of the image sequences provides a uniform distribution of coefficients of restitution with a mean value of $\\overline{\\varepsilon} = 0.45$ and values ranging from $\\varepsilon = 0.06$ to 0.84. Additionally, we designed a prototype drop tower experiment for collisions within an ensemble of up to one hundred cm-sized projectiles and performed the first experiments with solid glass beads. We were able to statistically analyze the development of the kinetic energy of the entire system, which can be well explained by assuming a granular `fluid' fo...

  5. Cosmic AntiParticle Ring Imaging Cerenkov Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %RE2A \\\\ \\\\ %title \\\\ \\\\The CAPRICE experiment studies antimatter and light nuclei in the cosmic rays as well as muons in the atmosphere. The experiment is performed with the spectrometer shown in the figure which is lifted by a balloon to an altitude of 35-40 km. At this altitude less than half a percent of the atmosphere is above the 2 ton spectrometer which makes it possible to study the cosmic ray flux without too much background from atmospherically produced particles. The spectrometer includes time-of-flight scintillators, a gaseous RICH counter, a drift chamber tracker and a silicon electromagnetic calorimeter. The important feature of the spectrometer is to discriminate between different particles.\\\\ \\\\ The experiment aims at measuring the flux of the antiparticles (antiprotons and positrons) above about 5 GeV and relate the fluxes to models including exotic production of antiparticles like dark matter supersymmetric particles. The flux of muons is measured during descent of the balloon through the at...

  6. The storm-time ring current: a statistical analysis at two widely separated low-latitude stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Francia

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a statistical analysis of the geomagnetic field variations during the storm main phase at two low-latitude stations, separated by several hours in magnetic local time, in order to investigate the asymmetry and longitudinal extent of the storm-time ring current. The results show evidence for an asymmetric current which typically extends from evening to noon and, during moderate solar wind electric field conditions, up to the early morning, confirming the important role of the magnetospheric convection in the ring current energization. We also analyzed a possible relationship between the local current intensity during the storm main phase and the substorm activity observed at different time delays τ with respect to the storm onset. The results show a significant anticorrelation for τ =-1h, indicating that if the substorm activity is high just before the storm, a weaker ring current develops.

  7. Persistent current and Drude weight of one-dimensional interacting fermions on imperfect ring from current lattice density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akande, Akinlolu; Sanvito, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    We perform a numerical study of interacting one-dimensional Hubbard rings with a single impurity potential and pierced by a magnetic flux. Our calculations are carried out at the level of current lattice density functional theory (CLDFT) for the Hubbard model and compared to known results obtained in the thermodynamical limit from the Bethe ansatz. In particular, we investigate the effects of disorder and Coulomb interaction on the persistent current (PC) and the Drude weight. It is found that CLDFT is able to accurately describe qualitative and quantitative features of these ground state properties in the presence of disorder and electronic interaction. When the impurity potential is switched off, the CLDFT approach describes well the velocity of the Luttinger liquid excitations as a function of both interaction strength and electron filling. Then, when the impurity scattering potential is finite, we find the PC to vanish as {{L}-{{α\\text{B}}-1}} for large L and independent on the strength of the scattering potential, in good agreement with Luttinger liquid theory.

  8. Energy content of stormtime ring current from phase space mapping simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Margaret W.; Schulz, Michael; Lyons, Larry R.

    1993-01-01

    We perform a phase space mapping study to estimate the enhancement in energy content that results from stormtime particle transport in the equatorial magnetosphere. Our pre-storm phase space distribution is based on a steady-state transport model. Using results from guiding-center simulations of ion transport during model storms having main phases of 3 hr, 6 hr, and 12 hr, we map phase space distributions of ring current protons from the pre-storm distribution in accordance with Liouville's theorem. We find that transport can account for the entire ten to twenty-fold increase in magnetospheric particle energy content typical of a major storm if a realistic stormtime enhancement of the phase space density f is imposed at the nightside tail plasma sheet (represented by an enhancement of f at the neutral line in our model).

  9. Shaping of cluster-jet beams for storage ring experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hergemoeller, Ann-Katrin; Grieser, Silke; Koehler, Esperanza; Taeschner, Alexander; Ortjohann, Hans-Werner; Bonaventura, Daniel; Khoukaz, Alfons [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    2013-07-01

    With a cluster-jet target high and constant densities at the interaction point can be achieved and adjusted continuously during operation. At the University of Muenster the prototype of the cluster-jet target for the PANDA experiment was built up in PANDA geometry and set successfully into operation. Due to observed structures within the cluster beam, a tilting system was installed, allowing for an adjustment of the nozzle system relative to the experimental setup. With this installation target densities of more than 2 x 10{sup 15} atoms/cm{sup 2} were achieved at 2.1 m behind the nozzle. By the use of special shaped skimmers it is possible to determine the size and shape of the cluster beam at the later scattering chamber. Beside the absolutely target density also a low residual gas background at the interaction region is of high interest. Thus the identification of an optimized skimmer geometry will be of high relevance for the experimental conditions at PANDA. From measured cluster beam profiles it is possible to calculate both the expected areal density at the interaction point as well as the gas background. The results of target beam properties with a shaped cluster beam by slit collimators are presented and discussed.

  10. Studies on cluster beam shapes for storage ring experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hergemoeller, Ann-Katrin; Koehler, Esperanza; Taeschner, Alexander; Ortjohann, Hans-Werner; Bonaventura, Daniel; Khoukaz, Alfons [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    One of the two planned internal targets for the PANDA experiment at the accelerator center FAIR will be a cluster-jet target. With this type of target high and constant densities at the interaction point can be achieved and adjusted continuously during operation. At the University of Muenster the prototype of this cluster-jet target was built up in PANDA geometry and set successfully into operation. With this installation hydrogen target densities of 1.5 x 10{sup 15} atoms/cm{sup 2} were achieved at 2 m behind the cluster source. By the use of special shaped skimmers it is possible to determine the size and shape of the cluster beam at the later scattering chamber. Since parallel to the absolute target density also a low residual gas background at the interaction region is of high interest, the identification of an optimized skimmer geometry will be of high relevance for the experimental conditions at PANDA. From measured cluster beam profiles it is possible to calculate both the expected areal density at the interaction point as well as the gas background. First results of beam properties with a shaped cluster beam by slit collimators are presented and discussed.

  11. Comparisons of Simulated and Observed Stormtime Magnetic Intensities and Ion Plasma Parameters in the Ring Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M. W.; Guild, T. B.; Lemon, C.; Roeder, J. L.; Le, G.; Schulz, M.

    2009-12-01

    Recent progress in ring current and plasma sheet modeling has shown the importance of a self-consistent treatment of particle transport and magnetic and electric fields in the inner magnetosphere. Models with and without self-consistency can lead to significantly different magnitudes and spatial distributions of plasma pressure and magnetic intensity during disturbed times. In this study we compare simulated and observed stormtime magnetic intensities (GOES and Polar/MFE) and ion densities (LANL/MPA and Polar/CAMMICE) to test how well self-consistent simulations can simultaneously reproduce these quantities. We simulate the ring current and plasma sheet for conditions corresponding to the 11 August 2000 storm using the self-consistent Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium (RCM-E) [Lemon et al., JGR, 2004] with a constant magnetopause location. Using the empirical IMF-dependent model of Tsyganenko and Mukai [JGR, 2003], we specify the plasma sheet pressure and density at 10 RE as the plasma boundary location in the RCM-E. The simulated ion densities at different magnetic local times agree fairly well with those from the re-analysis model of LANL/MPA densities of O’Brien and Lemon [Space Weather, 2007]. We compare the simulated magnetic intensity with the magnetic intensity measured by magnetometers on the GOES satellites at geosynchronous altitude (6.6 RE) and on the Polar satellite. Agreement between the simulated and observed magnetic intensities tends to agree better on the nightside than on the dayside in the inner magnetosphere. In particular, the model cannot account for observed drops in the dayside magnetic intensity during decreases in the solar wind pressure. We will modify the RCM-E to include a time-varying magnetopause location to simulate compressions and expansions associated with variations in the solar wind pressure. We investigate whether this will lead to improved agreement between the simulated and model magnetic intensities.

  12. A storage ring experiment to detect a proton electric dipole moment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastassopoulos, V. [Department of Physics, University of Patras, 26500 Rio-Patras, Greece; Andrianov, S. [Faculty of Applied Mathematics and Control Processes, Saint-Petersburg State University, Saint-Petersburg, Russia; Baartman, R. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T2A3, Canada; Baessler, S. [Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904, USA; Bai, M. [Institut für Kernphysik and JARA-Fame, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich, Germany; Benante, J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Berz, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, USA; Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Bowcock, T. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom; Brown, K. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Casey, B. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510, USA; Conte, M. [Physics Department and INFN Section of Genoa, 16146 Genoa, Italy; Crnkovic, J. D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; D’Imperio, N. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Fanourakis, G. [Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics NCSR Demokritos, GR-15310 Aghia Paraskevi Athens, Greece; Fedotov, A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Fierlinger, P. [Technical University München, Physikdepartment and Excellence-Cluster “Universe,” Garching, Germany; Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Gaisser, M. O. [Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 34141, South Korea; Giomataris, Y. [CEA/Saclay, DAPNIA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, France; Grosse-Perdekamp, M. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA; Guidoboni, G. [University of Ferrara, INFN of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy; Hacıömeroğlu, S. [Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 34141, South Korea; Hoffstaetter, G. [Laboratory for Elementary-Particle Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA; Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Incagli, M. [Physics Department, University and INFN Pisa, Pisa, Italy; Ivanov, A. [Faculty of Applied Mathematics and Control Processes, Saint-Petersburg State University, Saint-Petersburg, Russia; Kawall, D. [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003, USA; Kim, Y. I. [Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 34141, South Korea; King, B. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom; Koop, I. A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russia; Lazarus, D. M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Lebedev, V. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510, USA; Lee, M. J. [Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 34141, South Korea; Lee, S. [Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 34141, South Korea; Lee, Y. H. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 34141, South Korea; Lehrach, A. [Institut für Kernphysik and JARA-Fame, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich, Germany; RWTH Aachen University and JARA-Fame, III. Physikalisches Institut B, Physikzentrum, 52056 Aachen, Germany; Lenisa, P. [University of Ferrara, INFN of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy; Levi Sandri, P. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, I-00044 Frascati, Rome, Italy; Luccio, A. U. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Lyapin, A. [Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey, United Kingdom; MacKay, W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA; Maier, R. [Institut für Kernphysik and JARA-Fame, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich, Germany

    2016-11-01

    A new experiment is described to detect a permanent electric dipole moment of the proton with a sensitivity of $10^{-29}e\\cdot$cm by using polarized "magic" momentum $0.7$~GeV/c protons in an all-electric storage ring. Systematic errors relevant to the experiment are discussed and techniques to address them are presented. The measurement is sensitive to new physics beyond the Standard Model at the scale of 3000~TeV.

  13. A Storage Ring Experiment to Detect a Proton Electric Dipole Moment

    CERN Document Server

    Anastassopoulos, V; Baartman, R; Bai, M; Baessler, S; Benante, J; Berz, M; Blaskiewicz, M; Bowcock, T; Brown, K; Casey, B; Conte, M; Crnkovic, J; Fanourakis, G; Fedotov, A; Fierlinger, P; Fischer, W; Gaisser, M O; Giomataris, Y; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Guidoboni, G; Haciomeroglu, S; Hoffstaetter, G; Huang, H; Incagli, M; Ivanov, A; Kawall, D; Khazin, B; Kim, Y I; King, B; Koop, I A; Larsen, R; Lazarus, D M; Lebedev, V; Lee, M J; Lee, S; Lee, Y H; Lehrach, A; Lenisa, P; Sandri, P Levi; Luccio, A U; Lyapin, A; MacKay, W; Maier, R; Makino, K; Malitsky, N; Marciano, W J; Meng, W; Meot, F; Metodiev, E M; Miceli, L; Moricciani, D; Morse, W M; Nagaitsev, S; Nayak, S K; Orlov, Y F; Ozben, C S; Park, S T; Pesce, A; Pile, P; Polychronakos, V; Podobedov, B; Pretz, J; Ptitsyn, V; Ramberg, E; Raparia, D; Rathmann, F; Rescia, S; Roser, T; Sayed, H Kamal; Semertzidis, Y K; Senichev, Y; Sidorin, A; Silenko, A; Simos, N; Stahl, A; Stephenson, E J; Stroeher, H; Syphers, M J; Talman, J; Talman, R M; Tishchenko, V; Touramanis, C; Tsoupas, N; Venanzoni, G; Vetter, K; Vlassis, S; Won, E; Zavattini, G; Zelenski, A; Zioutas, K

    2015-01-01

    A new experiment is described to detect a permanent electric dipole moment of the proton with a sensitivity of $10^{-29}e\\cdot$cm by using polarized "magic" momentum $0.7$~GeV/c protons in an all-electric storage ring. Systematic errors relevant to the experiment are discussed and techniques to address them are presented. The measurement is sensitive to new physics beyond the Standard Model at the scale of 3000~TeV.

  14. A storage ring experiment to detect a proton electric dipole moment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastassopoulos, V; Andrianov, S; Baartman, R; Baessler, S; Bai, M; Benante, J; Berz, M; Blaskiewicz, M; Bowcock, T; Brown, K; Casey, B; Conte, M; Crnkovic, J D; D'Imperio, N; Fanourakis, G; Fedotov, A; Fierlinger, P; Fischer, W; Gaisser, M O; Giomataris, Y; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Guidoboni, G; Hacıömeroğlu, S; Hoffstaetter, G; Huang, H; Incagli, M; Ivanov, A; Kawall, D; Kim, Y I; King, B; Koop, I A; Lazarus, D M; Lebedev, V; Lee, M J; Lee, S; Lee, Y H; Lehrach, A; Lenisa, P; Levi Sandri, P; Luccio, A U; Lyapin, A; MacKay, W; Maier, R; Makino, K; Malitsky, N; Marciano, W J; Meng, W; Meot, F; Metodiev, E M; Miceli, L; Moricciani, D; Morse, W M; Nagaitsev, S; Nayak, S K; Orlov, Y F; Ozben, C S; Park, S T; Pesce, A; Petrakou, E; Pile, P; Podobedov, B; Polychronakos, V; Pretz, J; Ptitsyn, V; Ramberg, E; Raparia, D; Rathmann, F; Rescia, S; Roser, T; Kamal Sayed, H; Semertzidis, Y K; Senichev, Y; Sidorin, A; Silenko, A; Simos, N; Stahl, A; Stephenson, E J; Ströher, H; Syphers, M J; Talman, J; Talman, R M; Tishchenko, V; Touramanis, C; Tsoupas, N; Venanzoni, G; Vetter, K; Vlassis, S; Won, E; Zavattini, G; Zelenski, A; Zioutas, K

    2016-11-01

    A new experiment is described to detect a permanent electric dipole moment of the proton with a sensitivity of 10(-29) e ⋅ cm by using polarized "magic" momentum 0.7 GeV/c protons in an all-electric storage ring. Systematic errors relevant to the experiment are discussed and techniques to address them are presented. The measurement is sensitive to new physics beyond the standard model at the scale of 3000 TeV.

  15. INTEGRATION POLICY TOWARDS IMMIGRANTS: CURRENT EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadiia Bureiko

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the contemporary world the intensity of the immigration movements is constantly increasing. Countries which experience great immigrant flows are facing numerous problems which should be solved. The article studies the current immigration flows in EU countries, the United States of America and Canada and presents three main models of integration policy towards immigrants – political assimilation, functional integration and multicultural model. Separate models are distinguished for the Muslims’ integration. The author examines the peculiarities of every model and examines the conclusions provided by the Migrant Integration Policy Index (MIPEX concerning the situation of the immigrants’ integration in 31 countries in 2011. Among all the policy indicators the first that are defined are as follows: political participation, education, labour market mobility and anti-discrimination. The situation with immigrants’ integration in Ukraine is also studied as it is gaining a great attention of the authorities and the public. The measures and practical steps done regarding this situation in Ukraine in recent years are analyzed using the information offered by the State Migration Service of Ukraine.

  16. Experiments with Coler magnetic current apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, T.

    Experiments with a replica of the famous Coler "Magnetstromapparat" (magnetic current apparatus) were conducted. The replica was built at the same institute at the Technical University of Berlin where the original was tested by Prof. Kloss in 1925. The details of the setup will be presented in this paper. The investigation of the Coler device was done with modern methods. The output was measured with a digital multi meter (DMM) and a digital storage oscilloscope (DSO). The results of the measurements will be presented. Did Coler convert vacuum fluctuations via magnetic, electric and acoustic resonance into electricity? There is a strong connection between magnetism and quantum field radiation energy. The magnetic moment of the electron is in part an energy exchange with the radiation field. The energy output of the Coler apparatus is measured. Furthermore the dynamics of the ferromagnetic magnets that Coler reported as the working principle of his device was investigated with magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and the spectroscopy mode of an atomic force microscope (AFM). The magnetic and acoustic resonance was investigated with magnetic force microscopy (MFM). The connection between ZPE and magnetism will be discussed as well as the perspective of using magnetic systems as a means to convert vacuum fluctuations into usable electricity.

  17. Intergrain and intragrain currents in bulk melt-grown YBa2Cu3O7-δ rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surzhenko, A. B.; Zeisberger, M.; Habisreuther, T.; Gawalek, W.; Uspenskaya, L. S.

    2003-08-01

    A simple contactless method suitable for discerning between the intergrain (circular) current, which flows in the thin superconducting ring, and the intragrain current, which does not cross the weakest link, has been proposed. At first, we show that the intergrain current may directly be estimated from the magnetic flux density B(±z0) measured by the Hall sensor positioned in the special points ±z0 above or below the ring center. The experimental and numerical techniques to determine the value z0 are discussed. Being very promising for the characterization of a current flowing across the joints in welded YBaCuO rings (its dependences on the temperature and external magnetic field as well as the time dissipation), the approach has been applied to study the corresponding properties of the intragrain and intergrain currents flowing across the a-twisted grain boundaries which are frequent in bulk melt-textured (MT) YBaCuO samples. We present experimental data related to the flux penetration inside a bore of MT YBaCuO rings both in the nonmagnetized, virgin state, and during the field reversal. The shielding properties and their dependence on external magnetic fields are also studied. Besides, we consider flux creep effects and their influence on the current redistribution during a dwell.

  18. Stormtime ring current and radiation belt ion transport: Simulations and interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Larry R.; Gorney, David J.; Chen, Margaret W.; Schulz, Michael

    1995-01-01

    We use a dynamical guiding-center model to investigate the stormtime transport of ring current and radiation-belt ions. We trace the motion of representative ions' guiding centers in response to model substorm-associated impulses in the convection electric field for a range of ion energies. Our simple magnetospheric model allows us to compare our numerical results quantitatively with analytical descriptions of particle transport, (e.g., with the quasilinear theory of radial diffusion). We find that 10-145-keV ions gain access to L approximately 3, where they can form the stormtime ring current, mainly from outside the (trapping) region in which particles execute closed drift paths. Conversely, the transport of higher-energy ions (approximately greater than 145 keV at L approximately 3) turns out to resemble radial diffusion. The quasilinear diffusion coefficient calculated for our model storm does not vary smoothly with particle energy, since our impulses occur at specific (although randomly determined) times. Despite the spectral irregularity, quasilinear theory provides a surprisingly accurate description of the transport process for approximately greater than 145-keV ions, even for the case of an individual storm. For 4 different realizations of our model storm, the geometric mean discrepancies between diffusion coefficients D(sup sim, sub LL) obtained from the simulations and the quasilinear diffusion coefficient D(sup ql, sub LL) amount to factors of 2.3, 2.3, 1.5, and 3.0, respectively. We have found that these discrepancies between D(sup sim, sub LL) and D(sup ql, sub LL) can be reduced slightly by invoking drift-resonance broadening to smooth out the sharp minima and maxima in D(sup ql, sub LL). The mean of the remaining discrepancies between D(sup sim, sub LL) and D(sup ql, sub LL) for the 4 different storms then amount to factors of 1.9, 2.1, 1.5, and 2.7, respectively. We find even better agreement when we reduce the impulse amplitudes systematically in

  19. Energy-dependent evolution of the ring current during the magnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temporin, Ayako; Ebihara, Yusuke; Fritz, Theodore A.

    The ring current is known to mainly consist of two components of ions; one having energy from keV to tens of keV (low-energy), and the other having energy from 100keV to several hundreds keV(high-energy) in the quiet time. According to the past observations, the low-energy component increases during the storm main phase, and decreases during the storm recovery phase. However, the behavior of the high-energy component and the relationship between the two components are less known. For the purpose of understanding the behavior of the ring current in detail, we use data from the ion mass spectrometer called MICS and the magnetometer called MFE aboard the Polar satellite. We focus on the differential flux of protons with 31-80keV (as a proxy of the low-energy component) and those with 125-173keV (as a proxy of the high-energy component) at a pitch angle of 90 degrees when the Polar satellite crossed the magnetic equatorial plane. Pre-storm condition (t1), intense phase of magnetic storm (t2), and decline phase (t3) are identified based on the Dst index. We selected 27 subsets from January 1997 to March 2000 and from April 2001 to April 2002. We obtained the following major results. (1) In the low-energy component, the proton flux tends to increase during the intense phase, and decrease during the decline phase with an exception in the pre-noon sector. (2) In the high-energy component, the proton flux tends to be stationary during the intense phase. During the decline phase, the flux tends to increase, and occasionally, exceeds that in the pre-storm condition. (3) The magnetic field tends to decrease during the intense phase, and increase during the decline phase. The anti-correlation between the low-energy component and the magnetic field may indicate a diamagnetic response. The weak correlation between the high-energy component and the magnetic field during the decline phase may indicate an adiabatic variation of high-energy component. It is suggested that the high

  20. An auroral westward flow channel (AWFC and its relationship to field-aligned current, ring current, and plasmapause location determined using multiple spacecraft observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Parkinson

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available An auroral westward flow channel (AWFC is a latitudinally narrow channel of unstable F-region plasma with intense westward drift in the dusk-to-midnight sector ionosphere. AWFCs tend to overlap the equatorward edge of the auroral oval, and their life cycle is often synchronised to that of substorms: they commence close to substorm expansion phase onset, intensify during the expansion phase, and then decay during the recovery phase. Here we define for the first time the relationship between an AWFC, large-scale field-aligned current (FAC, the ring current, and plasmapause location. The Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER, a Southern Hemisphere HF SuperDARN radar, observed a jet-like AWFC during ~08:35 to 13:28 UT on 7 April 2001. The initiation of the AWFC was preceded by a band of equatorward expanding ionospheric scatter (BEES which conveyed an intense poleward electric field through the inner plasma sheet. Unlike previous AWFCs, this event was not associated with a distinct substorm surge; rather it occurred during an interval of persistent, moderate magnetic activity characterised by AL~−200 nT. The four Cluster spacecraft had perigees within the dusk sector plasmasphere, and their trajectories were magnetically conjugate to the radar observations. The Waves of High frequency and Sounder for Probing Electron density by Relaxation (WHISPER instruments on board Cluster were used to identify the plasmapause location. The Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE EUV experiment also provided global-scale observations of the plasmapause. The Cluster fluxgate magnetometers (FGM provided successive measurements specifying the relative location of the ring current and filamentary plasma sheet current. An analysis of Iridium spacecraft magnetometer measurements provided estimates of large-scale ionospheric FAC in relation to the AWFC evolution. Peak flows in the AWFC were located close to the peak of a Region 2

  1. Magnetic field structure of Saturn's dayside magnetosphere and its mapping to the ionosphere: Results from ring current modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunce, E. J.; Arridge, C. S.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2008-02-01

    Ring current modeling in Saturn's magnetosphere using Pioneer-11, Voyager, and Cassini data has shown that the size and strength of the current system grows with the extension of the magnetosphere, governed by the solar wind dynamic pressure. Here we show that the consequent middle magnetosphere field is quasi-dipolar in form when the magnetosphere is strongly compressed, but extends into a magnetodisc when it is strongly expanded. We also show that the region occupied by the modeled ring current corresponds to an essentially fixed shell of field lines that expands and contracts with the size of the system, thus mapping to an almost fixed co-latitude range in Saturn's ionosphere, between ~14° and ~20° in the northern hemisphere, and ~16° and ~22° in the southern hemisphere. The median dayside UV auroral oval is found to map from near the poleward edge of the modeled ring current toward the boundary of open field lines at smaller co-latitudes. In the equatorial plane this corresponds to a layer ~2-5 Saturn radius wide (depending on magnetosphere size), extending from near the outer edge of the ring current to the vicinity of the magnetopause.

  2. Collision of a loop current anticyclonic ring against the continental shelf slope of the western Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, VíCtor M. V.; Vidal, Francisco V.; PéRez-Molero, José M.

    1992-02-01

    A Loop Current anticyclonic ring ˜330 km in diameter and extending to a depth of >1500 m was observed to collide in January of 1984 against the continental shelf slope of the western Gulf of Mexico between 21.5° and 23°N. The collision occurred precisely at the time we conducted our Argos 84-1 hydrographic cruise in the western gulf (26°00' to 19°20'N) aboard the R/V Justo Sierra. The Caribbean Subtropical Underwater (SUW) was used as a tracer to identify the Loop Current anticyclonic ring within the western gulf. The collision was identified from temperature and salinity distributions and from the dynamic topography distribution relative to 500 m. The ring's collision zone was identified by the presence of a horizontal baroclinic flow divergence, to the east of Tamiahua, that divides the surface circulation into northward and southward baroclinic currents parallel to the western gulf's continental shelf break, with speeds of 85 and 32 cm s-1, respectively. Horizontal divergence and vertical convergence (ring asymmetries) resulted at the focus of the anticyclonic ring's collision and originated the alongshore self advection and northward translation of the colliding anticyclone. Upon colliding the anticyclonic ring shed approximately one third of its volume (˜2 × 104 km3), mass, and transferred angular momentum to the south flanking water mass, thus generating a cyclonic ring to the south of the collision zone. The observed alongshelf southward current results from mass conservation and volume continuity requirements associated with the anticyclonic ring's volume shedding and most probably constitutes the colliding ring's potential vorticity conservation mechanism. The weakening of the anticyclonic ring's relative vorticity due to the collision is most likely made up by gain of vorticity from lateral shear in the northward and southward current jets parallel to the continental shelf break. The core of both the anticyclonic and cyclonic rings had typical SUW

  3. The Nonlinear Coupling of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron and Lower Hybrid Waves in the Ring Current Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.

    2004-01-01

    The excitation of lower hybrid waves (LHWs) is a widely discussed mechanism of interaction between plasma species in space, and is one of the unresolved questions of magnetospheric multi-ion plasmas. In this paper we present the morphology, dynamics, and level of LHW activity generated by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves during the May 2-7, 1998 storm period on the global scale. The LHWs were calculated based on a newly developed self-consistent model (Khazanov et. al., 2002, 2003) that couples the system of two kinetic equations: one equation describes the ring current (RC) ion dynamic, and another equation describes the evolution of EMIC waves. It is found that the LHWs are excited by helium ions due to their mass dependent drift in the electric field of EMIC waves. The level of LHW activity is calculated assuming that the induced scattering process is the main saturation mechanism for these waves. The calculated LHWs electric fields are consistent with the observational data.

  4. Self-Consistent Ring Current/Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Gallagher, D. L.

    2006-01-01

    The self-consistent treatment of the RC ion dynamics and EMIC waves, which are thought to exert important influences on the ion dynamical evolution, is an important missing element in our understanding of the storm-and recovery-time ring current evolution. For example, the EMlC waves cause the RC decay on a time scale of about one hour or less during the main phase of storms. The oblique EMIC waves damp due to Landau resonance with the thermal plasmaspheric electrons, and subsequent transport of the dissipating wave energy into the ionosphere below causes an ionosphere temperature enhancement. Under certain conditions, relativistic electrons, with energies 21 MeV, can be removed from the outer radiation belt by EMIC wave scattering during a magnetic storm. That is why the modeling of EMIC waves is critical and timely issue in magnetospheric physics. This study will generalize the self-consistent theoretical description of RC ions and EMIC waves that has been developed by Khazanov et al. [2002, 2003] and include the heavy ions and propagation effects of EMIC waves in the global dynamic of self-consistent RC - EMIC waves coupling. The results of our newly developed model that will be presented at the meeting, focusing mainly on the dynamic of EMIC waves and comparison of these results with the previous global RC modeling studies devoted to EMIC waves formation. We also discuss RC ion precipitations and wave induced thermal electron fluxes into the ionosphere.

  5. Finite-size effects in a metallic multichannel ring with Kondo impurity: Persistent currents and magnetoresistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zvyagin, A.A. [B. I. Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering of the National Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, 47, Lenin Avenue, 310164, Kharkov (Ukraine); Schlottmann, P. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 (United States)

    1996-12-01

    We consider a spin-1/2 impurity interacting with conduction electrons in two different orbital channels via an isotropic spin exchange. The exchange is the same for both channels, but a crystalline field breaks the symmetry between the orbital channels. This corresponds to a splitting of the conduction electron {Gamma}{sub 8} into two doublets in the quadrupolar Kondo effect, or to the electron-assisted tunneling of an atom in a double-well potential in an external magnetic field. Another possible realization could be a quantum dot coupled to two equal rings of the same length subject to an electrostatic potential difference. We consider the Bethe ansatz equations for this model and derive the tower structure of the finite-size corrections to the ground-state energy. These results are used to discuss the Aharonov-Bohm-Casher interference pattern in the persistent charge and spin currents, and the magnetoresistivity due to the scattering of electrons off the impurity. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  6. Understanding the Dynamical Evolution of the Earth Radiation Belt and Ring Current Coupled System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shprits, Yuri; Usanova, Maria; Kellerman, Adam; Drozdov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Modeling and understanding the ring current and radiation belt-coupled system has been a grand challenge since the beginning of the space age. In this study we show long-term simulations with a 3D Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code of modeling the radiation belts with boundary conditions derived from observations around geosynchronous orbit. Simulations can reproduce long term variations of the electron radiation belt fluxes and show the importance of local acceleration, radial diffusion, loss to the atmosphere and loss to the magnetopause. We also present 4D VERB simulations that include convective transport, radial diffusion, pitch angle scattering and local acceleration. VERB simulations show that the lower energy inward transport is dominated by the convection and higher energy transport is dominated by the diffusive radial transport. We also show that at energies of 100s of keV, a number of processes work simultaneously, including convective transport, radial diffusion, local acceleration, loss to the loss cone and loss to the magnetopause. The results of the simulation of the March 2013 storm are compared with Van Allen Probes observations.

  7. Controllable Persistent Atom Current of Bose-Einstein Condensates in an Optical Lattice Ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Gong-Ping; LIANG Jiu-Qing

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the macroscopic quantum state of Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices is studied by solving the periodic Gross-Pitaevskii equation in one-dimensional geometry. It is shown that an exact solution seen to be a travelling wave of excited macroscopic quantum states resultes in a persistent atom current, which can be controlled by adjusting of the barrier height of the optical periodic potential. A critical condition to generate the travelling wave is demonstrated and we moreover propose a practical experiment to realize the persistent atom current in a toroidal atom waveguide.

  8. Electrostatic ring as the central machine of the Frankfurt Ion Storage Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. Welsch

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available A small electrostatic storage ring is the central machine of the Frankfurt Ion Storage Experiments (FIRE which will be built at the new Stern-Gerlach Center of Frankfurt University. As a true multiuser, multipurpose facility with ion energies up to 50 keV, it will allow new methods to analyze complex many-particle systems from atoms to very large biomolecules. With envisaged storage times of some seconds and beam emittances in the order of a few mm mrad, measurements with up to 6 orders of magnitude better resolutions as compared to single-pass experiments become possible. In comparison to earlier designs, the ring lattice was modified in many details: Problems in earlier designs were related to, e.g., the detection of light particles and highly charged ions with different charge states. Therefore, the deflectors were redesigned completely, allowing a more flexible positioning of the diagnostics. Here, after an introduction to the concept of electrostatic machines, an overview of the planned FIRE is given and the ring lattice and elements are described in detail.

  9. 绝经后取环的临床体会%Clinical experience of contraceptive ring taking post-menopause

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯永青

    2015-01-01

    目的:总结绝经期后妇女取环的临床经验。方法:回顾性分析绝经期后妇女取环的临床资料。结果:绝经期越长,困难取环率越高。结论:妇女绝经后应及时取环,未及时取环应做好困难取环的准备。%Objective:To summarize the clinical experience of contraceptive ring taking post-menopause.Methods:The clinical data of women post-menopause accepting contraceptive ring taking was analyzed retrospectively.Results:The longer the menopause,the higher the difficult rate of contraceptive ring taking.Conclusions:The postmenopausal women should take contraceptive ring timely,who fails to take contraceptive ring timely should be prepared for the difficult contraceptive ring taking.

  10. Saturn's Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzi, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The rings are changing before our eyes; structure varies on all timescales and unexpected things have been discovered. Many questions have been answered, but some answers remain elusive (see Cuzzi et al 2010 for a review). Here we highlight the major ring science progress over the mission to date, and describe new observations planned for Cassini's final three years. Ring Composition and particle sizes: The rings are nearly all water ice with no other ices - so why are they reddish? The C Ring and Cassini Division are "dirtier" than the more massive B and A Rings, as shown by near-IR and, recently, microwave observations. Particle sizes, from stellar and radio occultations, vary from place to place. Ring structure, micro and macro: numerous spiral density waves and ubiquitous "self-gravity wakes" reveal processes which fostered planet formation in the solar system and elsewhere. However, big puzzles remain regarding the main ring divisions, the C Ring plateau structures, and the B Ring irregular structure. Moonlets, inside and out, seen and unseen: Two gaps contain sizeable moonlets, but more gaps seem to contain none; even smaller embedded "propeller" objects wander, systematically or randomly, through the A ring. Rubble pile ringmoons just outside the rings may escaped from the rings, and the recently discovered "Peggy" may be trying this as we watch. Impact bombardment of the rings: Comet fragments set the rings to rippling on century-timescales, and boulders crash through hourly; meanwhile, the constant hail of infalling Kuiper belt material has a lower mass flux than previously thought. Origin and Age of the Rings: The ring mass and bombardment play key roles. The ring mass is well known everywhere but in the B Ring (where most of it is). New models suggest how tidal breakup of evolving moons may have formed massive ancient rings, of which the current ring is just a shadow. During its last three years, the Cassini tour profile will allow entirely new

  11. Global Simulations of the March 17, 2013 Storm: Importance of Boundary Conditions in Reproducing Ring Current Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y.; Jordanova, V.; Larsen, B.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Welling, D. T.; Skoug, R. M.; Kletzing, C.

    2013-12-01

    As modeling capabilities become increasingly available for the study of inner magnetospheric dynamics, the models' boundary conditions remain a crucial controlling factor in reproducing observations. In this study, we use the kinetic Ring current-Atmosphere Interaction Model (RAM) two-way coupled with the global MHD model BATS-R-US to study the evolution of the ring current and its feedback to the ionospheric electrodynamics during the March 17, 2013 storm. The MHD code solves fluid quantities and provides the inner magnetosphere code with plasma sheet plasma, which is the primary source for the development of the ring current. In this study, we examine the effect of different boundary conditions in specifying the plasma sheet plasma source on reproducing observations of the inner magnetospheric/subauroral region, such as in-situ observations (e.g., flux, magnetic fields, and electric fields) from Van Allen Probes (RBSP), field-aligned currents from AMPERE, and global convection maps from SuperDARN. These different boundary settings include a Maxwellian distribution assumption with MHD single-fluid temperature and density, a Kappa distribution assumption with MHD single-fluid temperature and density, and a bi-Maxwellian distribution with anisotropic pressures passed from the MHD code. Results indicate that a Kappa distribution at the boundary of RAM leads to a better ring current flux prediction than that with a Maxwellian distribution assumption, as well as a more realistic spatial distribution of ion anisotropy, which is important in driving electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. The anisotropic pressure coupling between the kinetic code and the MHD code with a bi-Maxwellian function significantly improves the agreement with observations, especially the Dst index prediction.

  12. Design and fabrication of nano-ring MRAM demo devices based on spin-polarized current driving

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Nano-ring-type magnetic tunnel junctions(NR-MTJ)were nano-fabricated.The tunneling magnetoresistance(TMR)versus current(Ⅰ)loops of the NR-MTJs for a spin-polarized current switching were measured and the TMR ratio of around 20%~50% with a Al-O barrier at room temperature were observed.The critical value of switching current for the free Co_(60)Fe_(20)B_(20) layer between parallel and anti-parallel magnetization states is smaller than 650μA.The NR-MTJs arrays were also integrated above the transistors in ...

  13. Coherent π-electron dynamics of (P)-2,2'-biphenol induced by ultrashort linearly polarized UV pulses: angular momentum and ring current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineo, H; Lin, S H; Fujimura, Y

    2013-02-21

    The results of a theoretical investigation of coherent π-electron dynamics for nonplanar (P)-2,2'-biphenol induced by ultrashort linearly polarized UV pulses are presented. Expressions for the time-dependent coherent angular momentum and ring current are derived by using the density matrix method. The time dependence of these coherences is determined by the off-diagonal density matrix element, which can be obtained by solving the coupled equations of motion of the electronic-state density matrix. Dephasing effects on coherent angular momentum and ring current are taken into account within the Markov approximation. The magnitudes of the electronic angular momentum and current are expressed as the sum of expectation values of the corresponding operators in the two phenol rings (L and R rings). Here, L (R) denotes the phenol ring in the left (right)-hand side of (P)-2,2'-biphenol. We define the bond current between the nearest neighbor carbon atoms Ci and Cj as an electric current through a half plane perpendicular to the Ci-Cj bond. The bond current can be expressed in terms of the inter-atomic bond current. The inter-atomic bond current (bond current) depends on the position of the half plane on the bond and has the maximum value at the center. The coherent ring current in each ring is defined by averaging over the bond currents. Since (P)-2,2'-biphenol is nonplanar, the resultant angular momentum is not one-dimensional. Simulations of the time-dependent coherent angular momentum and ring current of (P)-2,2'-biphenol excited by ultrashort linearly polarized UV pulses are carried out using the molecular parameters obtained by the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) method. Oscillatory behaviors in the time-dependent angular momentum (ring current), which can be called angular momentum (ring current) quantum beats, are classified by the symmetry of the coherent state, symmetric or antisymmetric. The bond current of the bridge bond linking the L and R

  14. A Long-term Ring Current Measure Created by Using the VMO MANGO Service Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargatze, L. F.; King, T. A.

    2008-12-01

    A set of computational routines called MANGO (Magnetogram Analysis for the Network of Geomagnetic Observatories) is utilized to calculate a new measure of magnetic storm activity for the years 1932 to the near present. The MANGO routines are part of an effort to enhance data services available to users of the Heliophysics VxOs, specifically for the Virtual Magnetospheric Observatory (VMO). The community can utilize MANGO to derive value-added data products and images suitable for publication via the VMO web site. MANGO routines will be demonstrated through their application to study magnetic storms, a field of research that began in 1828 when von Humboldt launched an investigation of observations taken simultaneously from magnetic field stations spread around the Earth. The defining signature of magnetic storms is a worldwide decrease of the horizontal component of the magnetic field caused by fluctuations in the strength of the ring current. In the 1940's, Bartel pushed for deriving an index to measure the strength of magnetic storms. Progress intensified during the International Geophysical Year leading to the definition of the Dst index. The definitive Dst index is calculated at WDC-C2 for Geomagnetism in Kyoto by using a derivation scheme certified by Division V of IAGA. The Dst index time series spans the years 1957 to present with a cadence equal to 1-hr. The new data set we will present is a magnetic storm measure that is similar to the Dst index though it is calculated by using MANGO and a method that differs slightly from the official scheme. The MANGO data service package is based on a set of IDL routines that decompose ground magnetic field observations to isolate secular, diurnal, and disturbance variations of the magnetic field station-by-station. Each MANGO subroutine has been written in modular fashion to allow "plug and play"- style flexibility and each has been designed to account for failure modes and noisy data so that the programs will run to

  15. Percutaneous vertebroplasty: Current concepts and local experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Hwan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available With the aging population in our country, symptomatic osteoporotic compression fractures are increasingly common. Osteolytic compression fractures from spinal metastasis are also becoming more frequently seen because of the longer life expectancy from improvements in chemotherapy. Percutaneous vertebroplasty with PMMA has been shown to be an efficient procedure to treat pain due to these fractures. It is a minimally invasive procedure performed under local anesthesia and sedation. Injection of PMMA provides immediate stability when it hardens, and permits the patient to ambulate without pain. Appropriate patient selection is the key to clinical success. However, this procedure must be treated with respect, and has to be performed by physicians with the necessary training. Otherwise, increased pain, paralysis, and even death may occur from this seemingly innocuous procedure. In this article, I will deal with the background issues of osteoporotic and osteolytic vertebral compression fractures, patient selection, surgical technique, complications, and review of current literature on vertebroplasty. Key areas of development in this field include the use of kyphoplasty, defining the role of prophylactic augmentation, and improvements in biomaterials.

  16. The effect of guard ring on leakage current and spectroscopic performance of TlBr planar detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargar, Alireza; Kim, Hadong; Cirignano, Leonard; Shah, Kanai

    2014-09-01

    Four thallium bromide planar detectors were fabricated from materials grown at RMD Inc. The TlBr samples were prepared to investigate the effect of guard ring on device gamma-ray spectroscopy performance, and to investigate the leakage current through surface and bulk. The devices' active area in planar configuration were 4.4 × 4.4 × 1.0 mm3. In this report, the detector fabrication process is described and the resulting energy spectra are discussed. It is shown that the guard ring improves device spectroscopic performance by shielding the sensing electrode from the surface leakage current, and by making the electric filed more uniform in the active region of the device.

  17. Generation of geometrical phases and persistent spin currents in 1-dimensional rings by Lorentz-violating terms

    CERN Document Server

    Casana, R; Mouchrek-Santos, V E; Silva, Edilberto O

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated that Lorentz-violating terms stemming from the fermion sector of the SME are able to generate geometrical phases on the wave function of electrons confined in 1-dimensional rings, as well as persistent spin currents, in the total absence of electromagnetic fields. We have explicitly evaluated the eigenenergies and eigenspinors of the electrons modified by the Lorentz-violating terms, using them to calculate the dynamic and the Aharonov-Anandan phases in the sequel. The total phase presents a pattern very similar to the Aharonov-Casher phase accumulated by electrons in rings under the action of the Rashba interaction. Finally, the persistent spin current were carried out and used to impose upper bounds on the Lorentz-violating parameters.

  18. Generation of geometrical phases and persistent spin currents in 1-dimensional rings by Lorentz-violating terms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Casana

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We have demonstrated that Lorentz-violating terms stemming from the fermion sector of the SME are able to generate geometrical phases on the wave function of electrons confined in 1-dimensional rings, as well as persistent spin currents, in the total absence of electromagnetic fields. We have explicitly evaluated the eigenenergies and eigenspinors of the electrons modified by the Lorentz-violating terms, using them to calculate the dynamic and the Aharonov–Anandan phases in the sequel. The total phase presents a pattern very similar to the Aharonov–Casher phase accumulated by electrons in rings under the action of the Rashba interaction. Finally, the persistent spin current were carried out and used to impose upper bounds on the Lorentz-violating parameters.

  19. Generation of geometrical phases and persistent spin currents in 1-dimensional rings by Lorentz-violating terms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casana, R.; Ferreira, M.M., E-mail: manojr.ufma@gmail.com; Mouchrek-Santos, V.E.; Silva, Edilberto O.

    2015-06-30

    We have demonstrated that Lorentz-violating terms stemming from the fermion sector of the SME are able to generate geometrical phases on the wave function of electrons confined in 1-dimensional rings, as well as persistent spin currents, in the total absence of electromagnetic fields. We have explicitly evaluated the eigenenergies and eigenspinors of the electrons modified by the Lorentz-violating terms, using them to calculate the dynamic and the Aharonov–Anandan phases in the sequel. The total phase presents a pattern very similar to the Aharonov–Casher phase accumulated by electrons in rings under the action of the Rashba interaction. Finally, the persistent spin current were carried out and used to impose upper bounds on the Lorentz-violating parameters.

  20. Generation of geometrical phases and persistent spin currents in 1-dimensional rings by Lorentz-violating terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casana, R.; Ferreira, M. M.; Mouchrek-Santos, V. E.; Silva, Edilberto O.

    2015-06-01

    We have demonstrated that Lorentz-violating terms stemming from the fermion sector of the SME are able to generate geometrical phases on the wave function of electrons confined in 1-dimensional rings, as well as persistent spin currents, in the total absence of electromagnetic fields. We have explicitly evaluated the eigenenergies and eigenspinors of the electrons modified by the Lorentz-violating terms, using them to calculate the dynamic and the Aharonov-Anandan phases in the sequel. The total phase presents a pattern very similar to the Aharonov-Casher phase accumulated by electrons in rings under the action of the Rashba interaction. Finally, the persistent spin current were carried out and used to impose upper bounds on the Lorentz-violating parameters.

  1. Current experiences in applied underground coal gasification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Justyn

    2010-05-01

    The world is experiencing greater stress on its ability to mine and exploit energy resources such as coal, through traditional mining methods. The resources available by extraction from traditional mining methods will have a finite time and quantity. In addition, the high quality coals available are becoming more difficult to find substantially increasing exploration costs. Subsequently, new methods of extraction are being considered to improve the ability to unlock the energy from deep coals and improve the efficiency of the exploitation of the resources while also considering the mitigation of global warming. Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) is a leading commercial technology that is able to maximize the exploitation of the deep coal through extraction of the coal as a syngas (CO and H2) in situ. The syngas is then brought to the surface and efficiently utilized in any of combined cycle power generation, liquid hydrocarbon transport fuel production, fertilizer production or polymer production. Commercial UCG has been successfully operating for more than 50 years at the Yerostigaz facility in Angren, Uzbekistan. Yerostigaz is the only remaining UCG site in the former Soviet Union. Linc Energy currently owns 91.6% of this facility. UCG produces a high quality synthetic gas (syngas), containing carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane. UCG produced syngas can be economically used for a variety of purposes, including: the production of liquid fuels when combined with Gas to Liquids (GTL) technology power generation in gas turbine combined cycle power stations a feedstock for different petrochemical processes, for example producing chemicals or other gases such as hydrogen, methane, ammonia, methanol and dimethyl ether Linc Energy has proven the combined use of UCG to Gas to Liquids (GTL) technologies. UCG to GTL technologies have the ability to provide energy alternatives to address increasing global demand for energy products. With these technologies, Linc Energy is

  2. A short review of our current understanding of the development of ring faults during collapse caldera formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelina eGeyer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The term collapse caldera refers to those volcanic depressions resulting from the sinking of the chamber roof due to the rapid withdrawal of magma during the course of an eruption. During the last three decades, collapse caldera dynamics has been the focus of attention of numerous, theoretical, numerical and experimental studies. Nonetheless, even if there is a tendency to go for a general and comprehensive caldera dynamics model, some key aspects remain unclear, controversial or completely unsolved. This is the case of ring fault nucleation points and propagation and dip direction. Since direct information on calderas’ deeper structure comes mainly from partially eroded calderas or few witnessed collapses, ring faults layout at depth remains still uncertain. This has generated a strong debate over the detailed internal fault and fracture configuration of a caldera collapse and, in more detail, how ring faults initiate and propagate. We offer here a very short description of the main results obtained by those analogue and theoretical/mathematical models applied to the study of collapse caldera formation. We place special attention on those observations related to the nucleation and propagation of the collapse-controlling ring faults. This summary is relevant to understand the current state-of-the-art of this topic and it should be taken under consideration in future works dealing with collapse caldera dynamics.

  3. (1) H NMR Spectra. Part 28: Proton chemical shifts and couplings in three-membered rings. A ring current model for cyclopropane and a novel dihedral angle dependence for (3) J(HH) couplings involving the epoxy proton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Raymond J; Leonard, Paul; Tormena, Cláudio F

    2012-04-01

    The (1) H chemical shifts of selected three-membered ring compounds in CDCl(3) solvent were obtained. This allowed the determination of the substituent chemical shifts of the substituents in the three-membered rings and the long-range effect of these rings on the distant protons. The substituent chemical shifts of common substituents in the cyclopropane ring differ considerably from the same substituents in acyclic fragments and in cyclohexane and were modelled in terms of a three-bond (γ)-effect. For long-range protons (more than three bonds removed), the substituent effects of the cyclopropane ring were analysed in terms of the cyclopropane magnetic anisotropy and steric effect. The cyclopropane magnetic anisotropy (ring current) shift was modelled by (a) a single equivalent dipole perpendicular to and at the centre of the cyclopropane ring and (b) by three identical equivalent dipoles perpendicular to the ring placed at each carbon atom. Model (b) gave a more accurate description of the (1) H chemical shifts and was the selected model. After parameterization, the overall root mean square error for the dataset of 289 entries was 0.068 ppm. The anisotropic effects are significant for the cyclopropane protons (ca 1 ppm) but decrease rapidly with distance. The heterocyclic rings of oxirane, thiirane and aziridine do not possess a ring current. (3) J(HH) couplings of the epoxy ring proton with side-chain protons were obtained and shown to be dependent on both the H-C-C-H and H-C-C-O orientations. Both density functional theory calculations and a simple Karplus-type equation gave general agreement with the observed couplings (root mean square error 0.5 Hz over a 10-Hz range).

  4. Quantum dynamics of bosons in a two-ring ladder: Dynamical algebra, vortexlike excitations, and currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richaud, Andrea; Penna, Vittorio

    2017-07-01

    We study the quantum dynamics of the Bose-Hubbard model on a ladder formed by two rings coupled by the tunneling effect. By implementing the Bogoliubov approximation scheme, we prove that, despite the presence of the inter-ring coupling term, the Hamiltonian decouples in many independent sub-Hamiltonians Ĥk associated with momentum-mode pairs ±k . Each sub-Hamiltonian Ĥk is then shown to be part of a specific dynamical algebra. The properties of the latter allow us to perform the diagonalization process, to find the energy spectrum and the conserved quantities of the model, and to derive the time evolution of important physical observables. We then apply this solution scheme to the simplest possible closed ladder, the double trimer. After observing that the excitations of the system are weakly populated vortices, we explore the corresponding dynamics by varying the initial conditions and the model parameters. Finally, we show that the inter-ring tunneling determines a spectral collapse when approaching the border of the dynamical-stability region.

  5. Are Ring Current Ions Lost in Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Wave Dispersion Relation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are widely observed in the inner and outer magnetosphere, at geostationary orbit, at high latitudes along the plasmapause, and at the ionospheric altitudes. Interaction of the Ring Current (RC) ions and EMIC waves causes ion scattering into the loss cone and leads to decay of the RC, especially during the main phase of storms when the RC decay times of about one hour or less are observed. The oblique EMIC waves damp due to Landau resonance with the thermal plasmaspheric electrons, and subsequent transport of the dissipating wave energy into the ionosphere below causes an ionosphere temperature enhancement. Induced scattering of these waves by the plasmaspheric thermal ions leads to ion temperature enhancement, and forms a so-called hot zone near the plasmapause where the temperature of core plasma ions can reach tens of thousands of degrees. Relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt also interact well with the EMIC waves, and during the main and/or recovery phases of the storms these electrons can easily be scattered into the loss cone over a time scale from several hours to a day. The plasma density distribution in the magnetosphere and the ion content play a critical role in EMIC wave generation and propagation, but the wave dispersion relation in the known RC-EMIC wave interaction models is assumed to be determined by the thermal plasma distribution only. In these models, the modification of the EMIC wave dispersion relation caused by the RC ions is not taken into account, and the RC ions are only treated as a source of free energy in order to generate EMIC waves. At the same time, the RC ions can dominate the thermal magnetospheric content in the night MLT sector at great L shells during the main and/or recovery storm phase. In this study, using our self-consistent RC-EMIC wave model [Khazanov et al., 2006], we simulate the May 1998 storm in order to quantify the global EMIC wave redistribution caused by

  6. Effect of Ring Current Ions on Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Wave Dispersion Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are widely observed in the inner and outer magnetosphere, at geostationary orbit, at high latitudes along the plasmapause, and at the ionospheric altitudes. Interaction of the Ring Current (RC) ions and EMIC waves causes ion scattering into the loss cone and leads to decay of the RC, especially during the main phase of storms when the RC decay times of about one hour or less are observed. The oblique EMIC waves damp due to Landau resonance with the thermal plasmaspheric electrons, and subsequent transport of the dissipating wave energy into the ionosphere below causes an ionosphere temperature enhancement. Induced scattering of these waves by the plasmaspheric thermal ions leads to ion temperature enhancement, and forms a so-called hot zone near the plasmapause where the temperature of core plasma ions can reach tens of thousands of degrees. Relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt also interact well with the EMIC waves, and during the main and/or recovery phases of the storms these electrons can easily be scattered into the loss cone over a time scale from several hours to a day. The plasma density distribution in the magnetosphere and the ion content play a critical role in EMIC wave generation and propagation, but the wave dispersion relation in the known RC-EMIC wave interaction models is assumed to be determined by the thermal plasma distribution only. In these models, the modification of the EMIC wave dispersion relation caused by the RC ions is not taken into account, and the RC ions are only treated as a source of free energy in order to generate EMIC waves. At the same time, the RC ions can dominate the thermal magnetospheric content in the night MLT sector at great L shells during the main and/or recovery storm phase. In this study, using our self-consistent RC-EMIC wave model [Khazanov et al., 2006], we simulate the May 1998 storm in order to quantify the global EMIC wave redistribution caused by

  7. Design, fabrication and characterization of multi-guard-ring furnished p+n-n+ silicon strip detectors for future HEP experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalwani, Kavita; Jain, Geetika; Dalal, Ranjeet; Ranjan, Kirti; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh

    2016-07-01

    Si detectors, in various configurations (strips and pixels), have been playing a key role in High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments due to their excellent vertexing and high precision tracking information. In future HEP experiments like upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment (CMS) at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN and the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC), the Si tracking detectors will be operated in a very harsh radiation environment, which leads to both surface and bulk damage in Si detectors which in turn changes their electrical properties, i.e. change in the full depletion voltage, increase in the leakage current and decrease in the charge collection efficiency. In order to achieve the long term durability of Si-detectors in future HEP experiments, it is required to operate these detectors at very high reverse biases, beyond the full depletion voltage, thus requiring higher detector breakdown voltage. Delhi University (DU) is involved in the design, fabrication and characterization of multi-guard-ring furnished ac-coupled, single sided, p+n-n+ Si strip detectors for future HEP experiments. The design has been optimized using a two-dimensional numerical device simulation program (TCAD-Silvaco). The Si strip detectors are fabricated with eight-layers mask process using the planar fabrication technology by Bharat Electronic Lab (BEL), India. Further an electrical characterization set-up is established at DU to ensure the quality performance of fabricated Si strip detectors and test structures. In this work measurement results on non irradiated Si Strip detectors and test structures with multi-guard-rings using Current Voltage (IV) and Capacitance Voltage (CV) characterization set-ups are discussed. The effect of various design parameters, for example guard-ring spacing, number of guard-rings and metal overhang on breakdown voltage of test structures have been studied.

  8. Determination of corrosion rate of reinforcement with a modulated guard ring electrode; analysis of errors due to lateral current distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojtas, H

    2004-07-01

    The main source of errors in measuring the corrosion rate of rebars on site is a non-uniform current distribution between the small counter electrode (CE) on the concrete surface and the large rebar network. Guard ring electrodes (GEs) are used in an attempt to confine the excitation current within a defined area. In order to better understand the functioning of modulated guard ring electrode and to assess its effectiveness in eliminating errors due to lateral spread of current signal from the small CE, measurements of the polarisation resistance performed on a concrete beam have been numerically simulated. Effect of parameters such as rebar corrosion activity, concrete resistivity, concrete cover depth and size of the corroding area on errors in the estimation of polarisation resistance of a single rebar has been examined. The results indicate that modulated GE arrangement fails to confine the lateral spread of the CE current within a constant area. Using the constant diameter of confinement for the calculation of corrosion rate may lead to serious errors when test conditions change. When high corrosion activity of rebar and/or local corrosion occur, the use of the modulated GE confinement may lead to significant underestimation of the corrosion rate.

  9. Current experiments in elementary particle physics, 1976-87

    CERN Document Server

    Lawrence Berkeley Nat. Laboratory. Berkeley

    Contains more than 1,800 experiments in elementary particle physics from the Experience database. Search and browse by author; title; experiment number or prefix; institution; date approved, started or completed; accelerator or detector; polarization, reaction, final state or particle; or by papers produced. Maintained at SLAC for the Particle Data Group. Supplies the information for Current Experiments in Particle Physics (LBL-91). Print version updated every second year.

  10. Photon Detectors for the Ring Imaging Cherenkov Counters of the LHCb Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Plackett, R W R

    2006-01-01

    This thesis reports on the author’s contribution to the development of the Ring Imaging Cherenkov(RICH) detectors in the LHCb experiment due to take data at the CERN Large Hadron Collider in 2007. The first chapter summarises the physics to be explored by the LHCb experiment; measurements of CP violating asymmetries and a study of rare B decay modes. A brief overview of other experiments studying B-physics is presented. The experiment itself is then described, focussing on the RICH system used for particle identification, with particular emphasis on the photondetectors. The thesis then reports on the work done by the author on the design of the RICH1 Magnetic Shield, that allows the photon detectors to operate in the fringe field of the LHCb dipole magnet, while fulfilling the conflicting requirement to provide additional magnetic bending power to aid the LHCb charged particle trigger. The design of all of the many sections of the shield are described in depth and the results of finite element simulations p...

  11. Photon Detectors for the Ring Imaging Cherenkov Counters of the LHCb Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Plackett, R W R

    2006-01-01

    This thesis reports on the author’s contribution to the development of the Ring Imaging Cherenkov(RICH) detectors in the LHCb experiment due to take data at the CERN Large Hadron Collider in 2007. The first chapter summarises the physics to be explored by the LHCb experiment; measurements of CP violating asymmetries and a study of rare B decay modes. A brief overview of other experiments studying B-physics is presented. The experiment itself is then described, focussing on the RICH system used for particle identification, with particular emphasis on the photondetectors. The thesis then reports on the work done by the author on the design of the RICH1 Magnetic Shield, that allows the photon detectors to operate in the fringe field of the LHCb dipole magnet, while fulfilling the conflicting requirement to provide additional magnetic bending power to aid the LHCb charged particle trigger. The design of all of the many sections of the shield are described in depth and the results of finite element simulations p...

  12. The trigger system for the external target experiment in the HIRFL cooling storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Zhao, Lei; Liu, Jin-Xin; Lu, Yi-Ming; Liu, Shu-Bin; An, Qi

    2016-08-01

    A trigger system was designed for the external target experiment in the Cooling Storage Ring (CSR) of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). Considering that different detectors are scattered over a large area, the trigger system is designed based on a master-slave structure and fiber-based serial data transmission technique. The trigger logic is organized in hierarchies, and flexible reconfiguration of the trigger function is achieved based on command register access or overall field-programmable gate array (FPGA) logic on-line reconfiguration controlled by remote computers. We also conducted tests to confirm the function of the trigger electronics, and the results indicate that this trigger system works well. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11079003), the Knowledge Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (KJCX2-YW-N27), and the CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP).

  13. Testing the necessity of transient spikes in the drivers for creating a storm-time ring current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Ilie, R.; Ridley, A. J.; Kozyra, J. U.; Thomsen, M. F.; Borovsky, J. E.

    2007-12-01

    The role of transient spikes in upstream solar wind parameters and near-Earth plasma sheet parameters is investigated through a series of numerical simulations. During magnetic storms, the near-Earth plasma sheet density (as observed at geosynchronous altitude) is often enhanced relative to its normal, quiescent level. In addition to a baseline increase of the density of up to a few per cubic centimeter lasting several hours, there are usually short-lived (a few to tens of minutes) increases on top of this (up to double the baseline). In addition, the solar wind parameters also often have numerous short-lived spikes and fluctuations within it. The question then arises of the relative contribution of these transient spikes in the drivers to the storm-time ring current intensity. To address this issue, a series of simulations are conducted using the Hot Electron and Ion Drift Integrator (HEIDI) model (formerly the Michigan version of RAM). Various running averages of the upstream solar wind conditions and geosynchronous orbit nightside boundary conditions are used to drive HEIDI. It is found that the spikes are simply adding a linear contribution to the ring current intensity over the baseline (averaged) input levels, and that any nonlinear influences occur beyond the HEIDI simulation domain (i.e., at high latitudes or in the tail). That is, the spikes do not last long enough to develop nonlinear influences on the ring current's total energy content. The HEIDI results are compared against global magnetospheric modeling results using averaged input parameters into the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF), which show a nonlinear response to transient spikes.

  14. Circulating current in 1D Hubbard rings with long-range hopping: Comparison between exact diagonalization method and mean-field approach

    OpenAIRE

    Saha, Madhumita; Maiti, Santanu K.

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between Hubbard interaction, long-range hopping and disorder on persistent current in a mesoscopic one-dimensional conducting ring threaded by a magnetic flux $\\phi$ is analyzed in detail. Two different methods, exact numerical diagonalization and Hartree-Fock mean field theory, are used to obtain numerical results from the many-body Hamiltonian. The current in a disordered ring gets enhanced as a result of electronic correlation and it becomes more significant when contribution...

  15. Transport of Spin-Polarized Current Through a Mesoscopic Ring with Two Leads Induced by Aharonov-Bohm and Aharonov-Casher Phases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Ying-Fang; ZHANG Yong-Ping; LIANG Jiu-Qing

    2004-01-01

    @@ We study the transport of spin-polarized current induced by the Aharonov-Bohm and Aharonov-Casher phases in a mesoscopic ring with two leads in the presence of a cylindrically symmetric electric field and the magnetic flux at the centre of the same ring. An exact solution for the quantum transport is obtained. It is shown that the transport spin-polarized current and its polarizability can be controlled by the electric field and the magnetic flux as well.

  16. Current experiments in particle physics - particle data group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, H. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Lehar, F. [Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Kettle, P.R. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  17. Testing a new automated single ring infiltrometer for Beerkan infiltration experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Prima, Simone; Lassabatère, Laurent; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael; Bagarello, Vincenzo; Iovino, Massimo

    2015-04-01

    The Beerkan method along with BEST algorithms is an alternative technique to conventional laboratory or field measurements for rapid and low-cost estimation of soil hydraulic properties. The Beerkan method is simple to conduct but requires an operator to pour known volumes of water through the ring and can be time-consuming. To alleviate this need, a new cheap infiltrometer equipped with a data acquisition system, allowing automation of Beerkan infiltration experiments, was recently designed and is presented in a companion paper. Yet, it has never been tested against a wide range of experimental conditions (soils, initial water saturation, etc.). In this paper, we tested the automated infiltrometer with the aim to validate its applicability to the Beerkan infiltration experiment under several experimental circumstances. In addition, we assessed the accuracy of BEST methods on the data obtained with the infiltrometer for the estimation of saturated soil hydraulic conductivity and sorptivity. For this purpose, we used both analytically generated and real experimental data. The analytically generated data simulate infiltration experiments carried out with the infiltrometer on five contrasting soils from UNSODA database and different initial water contents. The total volume of water to be infiltrated and the volume increments are fixed by the infiltrometer characteristics. Then, inverse analysis of the analytically generated data was performed using the three available BEST algorithms to derive saturated soil hydraulic conductivity and sorptivity that were compared to the reference values. The results of the analytical assessment showed that the infiltrometer along with BEST methods could lead to accurate estimates in most cases thus validating the design of the studied infiltrometer and its combination with BEST algorithms. Some soils (mostly loam) and some hydric conditions (high initial water contents) may lead to misestimate soil properties or failure of BEST

  18. π-Electron ring-currents and bond-currents in [10,5]-Coronene and related structures conforming to the 'Annulene-Within-an-Annulene' model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickens, T K; Mallion, R B

    2013-06-01

    A series of hypothetical conjugated structures is defined; the series is called the p-Coronenes and the first four members of it are shown to respect the 'Annulene-Within-an-Annulene' (AWA) model when tested by means of Hückel-London-Pople-McWeeny (HLPM) π-electron ring-current and bond-current calculations. The first member of this series, 5-Coronene, is also a member of the regular [r,s]-Coronene series, where it is known as [10,5]-Coronene. It is shown that, as p is varied (with p always odd, and with p > 3) through the values 5, 7, 9, 11, etc., the resulting structures alternate between a '[4n + 2]-Annulene-Within-a-[4m]-Annulene' (if (p- 1) is divisible by 4) and a '[4n]-Annulene-Within-a-[4m + 2]-Annulene' (if (p- 1) is not divisible by 4). It is therefore claimed that the p-Coronenes constitute an ideal series for testing the AWA model. It is also remarked that each member of the p-Coronene series has only four Kekulé structures, and that the 'spokes' or 'transverse' bonds connecting the central [p(p- 3)]-membered ring to the outer [p(p- 1)]-membered periphery always have a Pauling bond-order of zero, ensuring that the outer and inner rings are 'decoupled'; such bonds also bear zero bond-current, by symmetry. It is argued that the former property of these transverse bonds, rather than the latter, determines that the p-Coronenes obey the AWA rule-which is in fact an exception, rather than a 'rule'per se. The paper concludes by explicitly stating our philosophy that a conceptually simple model depending on no subjective (or any other) parameters whatsoever can give intuitive chemical insight for certain systems equal to that available from far-more complex methods such as ab initio calculations-what Coulson once famously called 'primitive patterns of understanding'.

  19. Is C-50 a superaromat? Evidence from electronic structure and ring current calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matias, Ana Sanz; Havenith, Remco W. A.; Alcami, Manuel; Ceulemans, Arnout

    2016-01-01

    The fullerene-50 is a 'magic number' cage according to the 2(N + 1)(2) rule. For the three lowest isomers of C-50 with trigonal and pentagonal symmetries, we calculate the sphericity index, the spherical parentage of the occupied p-orbitals, and the current density in an applied magnetic field. The

  20. Interaction of ring current and radiation belt protons with ducted plasmaspheric hiss. 2. Time evolution of the distribution function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Rasmussen, C. E.; Miller, R. H.; Villalon, E.

    1995-11-01

    The evolution of the bounce-averaged ring current/radiation belt proton distribution is simulated during resonant interactions with ducted plasmaspheric hiss. The plasmaspheric hiss is assumed to be generated by ring current electrons and to be damped by the energetic protons. Thus energy is transferred between energetic electrons and protons using the plasmaspheric hiss as a mediary. The problem is not solved self-consistently. During the simulation period, interactions with ring current electrons (not represented in the model) are assumed to maintain the wave amplitudes in the presence of damping by the energetic protons, allowing the wave spectrum to be held fixed. Diffusion coefficients in pitch angle, cross pitch angle/energy, and energy were previously calculated by Kozyra et al. (1994) and are adopted for the present study. The simulation treats the energy range, E>=80 keV, within which the wave diffusion operates on a shorter timescale than other proton loss processes (i.e., Coulomb drag and charge exchange). These other loss processes are not included in the simulation. An interesting result of the simulation is that energy diffusion maximizes at moderate pitch angles near the edge of the atmospheric loss cone. Over the simulation period, diffusion in energy creates an order of magnitude enhancement in the bounce-averaged proton distribution function at moderate pitch angles. The loss cone is nearly empty because scattering of particles at small pitch angles is weak. The bounce-averaged flux distribution, mapped to ionospheric heights, results in elevated locally mirroring proton fluxes. OGO 5 observed order of magnitude enhancements in locally mirroring energetic protons at altitudes between 350 and 1300 km and invariant latitudes between 50° and 60° (Lundblad and Soraas, 1978). The proton distributions were highly anisotropic in pitch angle with nearly empty loss cones. The similarity between the observed distributions and those resulting from this

  1. Dynamics of Ring Current and Electric Fields in the Inner Magnetosphere During Disturbed Periods: CRCM-BATS-R-US Coupled Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzulukova, N.; Fok, M.-C.; Pulkkinen, A.; Kuznetsova, M.; Moore, T. E.; Glocer, A.; Brandt, P. C.; Toth, G.; Rastaetter, L.

    2010-01-01

    We present simulation results from a one-way coupled global MHD model (Block-Adaptive-Tree Solar-Wind Roe-Type Upwind Scheme, BATS-R-US) and kinetic ring current models (Comprehensive Ring Current Model, CRCM, and Fok Ring Current, FokRC). The BATS-R-US provides the CRCM/FokRC with magnetic field information and plasma density/temperature at the polar CRCM/FokRC boundary. The CRCM uses an electric potential from the BATS-R-US ionospheric solver at the polar CRCM boundary in order to calculate the electric field pattern consistent with the CRCM pressure distribution. The FokRC electric field potential is taken from BATS-R-US ionospheric solver everywhere in the modeled region, and the effect of Region II currents is neglected. We show that for an idealized case with southward-northward-southward Bz IMF turning, CRCM-BATS-R-US reproduces well known features of inner magnetosphere electrodynamics: strong/weak convection under the southward/northward Bz; electric field shielding/overshielding/penetration effects; an injection during the substorm development; Subauroral Ion Drift or Polarization Jet (SAID/PJ) signature in the dusk sector. Furthermore, we find for the idealized case that SAID/PJ forms during the substorm growth phase, and that substorm injection has its own structure of field-aligned currents which resembles a substorm current wedge. For an actual event (12 August 2000 storm), we calculate ENA emissions and compare with Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration/High Energy Neutral Atom data. The CRCM-BATS-R-US reproduces both the global morphology of ring current and the fine structure of ring current injection. The FokRC-BATS-R-US shows the effect of a realistic description of Region II currents in ring current-MHD coupled models.

  2. Study of Mn dissolution from LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel electrodes using rotating ring-disk collection experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li-Fang; Ou, Chin-Ching; Striebel, Kathryn A.; Chen, Jenn-Shing

    2003-07-01

    The goal of this research was to measure Mn dissolution from a thin porous spinel LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} electrode by rotating ring-disk collection experiments. The amount of Mn dissolution from the spinel LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} electrode under various conditions was detected by potential step chronoamperometry. The concentration of dissolved Mn was found to increase with increasing cycle numbers and elevated temperature. The dissolved Mn was not dependent on disk rotation speed, which indicated that the Mn dissolution from the disk was under reaction control. The in situ monitoring of Mn dissolution from the spinel was carried out under various conditions. The ring currents exhibited maxima corresponding to the end-of-charge (EOC) and end-of-discharge (EOD), with the largest peak at EOC. The results suggest that the dissolution of Mn from spinel LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} occurs during charge/discharge cycling, especially in a charged state (at >4.1 V) and in a discharged state (at <3.1 V). The largest peak at EOC demonstrated that Mn dissolution took place mainly at the top of charge. At elevated temperatures, the ring cathodic currents were larger due to the increase of Mn dissolution rate.

  3. Characterizing the DIII-D divertor conditions during the tungsten ring experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, J. L.; Watkins, J. G.; Wang, H. Q.; Nygren, R. E.; McLean, A.; Makowski, M.; Unterberg, E.; Thomas, D. M.; Guo, H. Y.; Guterl, J.; Buchenauer, B.

    2016-10-01

    Tungsten (W) is the leading divertor material in tokamaks, but the core W impurity fraction must be kept below 5 ×10-5 in a reactor. The DIII-D tokamak, having all graphite PFCs, has done a series of experiments with two W-coated molybdenum rings in the lower divertor to track W migration after plasma exposure. We characterize the divertor plasma conditions at the DIII-D target plate in L- and ELMing H-mode, and ELM suppressed plasmas. We will present data from an array of Langmuir probes in the divertor and divertor Thomson-scattering. We also compare the heat flux from fast thermocouples (7.5 mm below the surface of the metal tile inserts) and IRTV heat flux profiles from graphite tiles. The plasma conditions will be used to benchmark ERO modeling to aid in understanding the migration of sputtered W onto other plasma facing surfaces and will be compared to post exposure W distribution measured on the graphite tiles. Supported by US DOE under DE-AC04-94AL85000, DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-AC05-000R22725, and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Systematic investigations on high intense cluster-jet beams for storage ring experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, Esperanza; Hergemoeller, Ann-Katrin; Taeschner, Alexander; Ortjohann, Hans-Werner; Bonaventura, Daniel; Khoukaz, Alfons [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    A high-density cluster-jet target will be one of two planned internal target stations for the PANDA experiment at the antiproton accelerator and storage ring HESR/FAIR. For the investigation of elementary anti pN interactions hydrogen and deuterium are of highest interest as used target material. Cluster-jet targets allow high and constant target densities at the interaction point, i.e. 2 m behind the nozzle, with the possibility of a continuous variation during operation. At the University of Muenster a cluster-jet target prototype was designed, built up and set succesfully into operation. The system is installed in complete PANDA geometry, so that the observed cluster beam characteristics can be directly transferred to the later situation at PANDA. Recent optical investigations on the cluster beam directly behind the nozzle resulted in the observation of distinct density structures when the target is operated at highest densities. The development and installation of a special nozzle tilting system allows for the extraction of these high-intense core beams, leading to a significant improvement of the target density. The performance and achieved densities of cluster beams are presented.

  5. Towards an RF-Wien-filter for EDM experiments in storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mey, Sebastian; Gebel, Ralf [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany); Collaboration: JEDI-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The JEDI Collaboration (Juelich Electric Dipole Moment (EDM) Investigations) is developing tools for the measurement of permanent EDMs of charged, light hadrons in storage rings. While the standard model prediction for the EDM gives unobservably small magnitudes, a non-vanishing EDM can lead to a tiny build-up of vertical polarization in a beforehand horizontally polarized beam. This requires a spin tune modulation by an RF Wien-Filter *. In the course of 2014, a prototype RF ExB-Dipole has been successfully commissioned and tested. To determine the characteristics of the device, the force of a radial magnetic field is canceled out by a vertical electric one to achieve a net Lorentz-Force compensation. In this configuration, it directly rotates the particles' polarization vector. We were able to verify that the device can be used to continuously flip the vertical polarization of a 970 MeV/c deuteron beam without exciting any coherent beam oscillations. For a first EDM Experiment, the RF ExB-Dipole in Wien-Filter mode is going to be rotated by 90 {sup circle} around the beam axis and will be used for systematic investigations of sources for false EDM signals.

  6. Spin tune investigations for the storage ring EDM experiment at COSY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekmenev, Stanislav [III. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Collaboration: JEDI-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    An experimental method which is aimed to find a permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a charged particle was proposed by JEDI (Juelich Electric Dipole moment Investigations) collaboration [1]. EDMs can be observed by their small influence on spin motion. The only possible way to perform a direct measurement is to use a storage ring. For this purpose, it was decided to carry out the first precursor experiment at the Cooler Synchrotron (COSY). Since the EDM of a particle violates CP invariance it is expected to be tiny, treatment of all various sources of systematic errors should be done with a great level of precision. A recent achievement of the JEDI collaboration is the determination of the spin tune with a precision of 10{sup -10} in a single accelerator cycle. In parallel with that achievement a new spin tracking code was developed. It is planned to use the spin tune measurement to benchmark the simulation code. In the last data taking period, spin motion changes were generated by steerers and solenoids. Comparison of simulation results with data collected will be discussed.

  7. The field line topology of a uniform magnetic field superposed on the field of a distributed ring current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chance, M.S. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.); Greene, J.M.; Jensen, T.H. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA (USA))

    1991-07-01

    A magnetic field line topology with nulls, generated by superimposing a uniform magnetic field onto the field from a distributed ring current, is analyzed. This simple model is amenable to substantial analytical progress and also facilitates the visualization of the three dimensional field geometry. Four nulls are seen to exist and representative field lines and tubes of flux found by numerical integration are presented. An infinite number of topologically distinct flux bundles is found. A convenient mapping is defined which proves very useful in distinguishing between and following the paths of the different tubes of flux as they traverse through the null system. The complexities already present in this simple but nontrivial configuration serve to emphasize the difficulties in analyzing more complicated geometries, but the intuition gained from this study proves beneficial in those cases. One such example is the application to a model of plasmoid formations in the earth's magnetotail. 7 refs., 19 figs.

  8. Self-Consistent Model of Magnetospheric Electric Field, Ring Current, Plasmasphere, and Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves: Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Khazanov, G. V.; Liemohn, M. W.; Fok, M.-C.; Ridley, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Further development of our self-consistent model of interacting ring current (RC) ions and electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves is presented. This model incorporates large scale magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and treats self-consistently not only EMIC waves and RC ions, but also the magnetospheric electric field, RC, and plasmasphere. Initial simulations indicate that the region beyond geostationary orbit should be included in the simulation of the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. Additionally, a self-consistent description, based on first principles, of the ionospheric conductance is required. These initial simulations further show that in order to model the EMIC wave distribution and wave spectral properties accurately, the plasmasphere should also be simulated self-consistently, since its fine structure requires as much care as that of the RC. Finally, an effect of the finite time needed to reestablish a new potential pattern throughout the ionosphere and to communicate between the ionosphere and the equatorial magnetosphere cannot be ignored.

  9. Relativistic electron's butterfly pitch angle distribution modulated by localized background magnetic field perturbation driven by hot ring current ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ying; Chen, Lunjin; Xie, Lun; Fu, Suiyan; Xia, Zhiyang; Pu, Zuyin

    2017-05-01

    Dayside modulated relativistic electron's butterfly pitch angle distributions (PADs) from ˜200 keV to 2.6 MeV were observed by Van Allen Probe B at L = 5.3 on 15 November 2013. They were associated with localized magnetic dip driven by hot ring current ion (60-100 keV proton and 60-200 keV helium and oxygen) injections. We reproduce the electron's butterfly PADs at satellite's location using test particle simulation. The simulation results illustrate that a negative radial flux gradient contributes primarily to the formation of the modulated electron's butterfly PADs through inward transport due to the inductive electric field, while deceleration due to the inductive electric field and pitch angle change also makes in part contribution. We suggest that localized magnetic field perturbation, which is a frequent phenomenon in the magnetosphere during magnetic disturbances, is of great importance for creating electron's butterfly PADs in the Earth's radiation belts.

  10. Current ramps in tokamaks: from present experiments to ITER scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imbeaux, F.; Citrin, J.; Hobirk, J.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Kochl, F.; Leonov, V. M.; Miyamoto, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Parail, V.; Pereverzev, G.; Polevoi, A.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Basiuk, V.; Budny, R.; Casper, T.; Fereira, J.; Fukuyama, A.; Garcia, J.; Gribov, Y. V.; Hayashi, N.; Honda, M.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Jackson, G.; Kavin, A. A.; Kessel, C. E.; Khayrutdinov, R. R.; Labate, C.; Litaudon, X.; Lomas, P. J.; Lonnroth, J.; Luce, T.; Lukash, V. E.; Mattei, M.; Mikkelsen, D.; Nunes, I.; Peysson, Y.; Politzer, P.; Schneider, M.; Sips, G.; Tardini, G.; Wolfe, S. M.; Zhogolev, V. E.

    2011-01-01

    In order to prepare adequate current ramp-up and ramp-down scenarios for ITER, present experiments from various tokamaks have been analysed by means of integrated modelling in view of determining relevant heat transport models for these operation phases. A set of empirical heat transport models for

  11. Enhanced Lower Hybrid Current Drive Experiments on HT-7 Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Effective Lower Hybrid Current Driving (LHCD) and improved confinement exper-iments in higher plasma parameters (Ip > 200 kA, ne> 2×1013 cm-3, Te ≥ 1 keⅤ) havebeen curried out in optimized LH wave spectrum and plasma parameters in HT-7 supercon-ducting tokamak. The dependence of current driving efficiency on LH power spectrum, plasmadensity ne and toroidal magnetic field BT has been obtained under optimal conditions. A goodCD efficiency was obtained at higher plasma current and higher electron density. The improve-ment of the energy confinement time is accompanied with the increase in line averaged electrondensity, and in ion and electron temperatures. The highest current driving efficiency reachedηCD = IpneR/PRF ≈ 1.05 × 1019 Am-2/W. Wave-plasma coupling was sustained in a good stateand the reflective coefficient was less than 5%. The experiments have also demonstrated the abilityof LH wave in the start-up and ramp-up of the plasma current. The measurement of the temporaldistribution of plasma parameter shows that lower hybrid leads to a broader profile in plasmaparameter. The LH power deposition profile and the plasma current density profile were modeledwith a 2D Fokker-Planck code corresponding to the evolution process of the hard x-ray detectorarray.

  12. Effects of geometry and linearly polarized cavity photons on charge and spin currents in a quantum ring with spin-orbit interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Thorsten; Tang, Chi-Shung; Manolescu, Andrei; Gudmundsson, Vidar

    2014-05-01

    We calculate the persistent charge and spin polarization current inside a finite-width quantum ring of realistic geometry as a function of the strength of the Rashba or Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction. The time evolution in the transient regime of the two-dimensional (2D) quantum ring connected to electrically biased semi-infinite leads is governed by a time-convolutionless non-Markovian generalized master equation. The electrons are correlated via Coulomb interaction. In addition, the ring is embedded in a photon cavity with a single mode of linearly polarized photon field, which is polarized either perpendicular or parallel to the charge transport direction. To analyze carefully the physical effects, we compare to the analytical results of the toy model of a one-dimensional (1D) ring of non-interacting electrons with spin-orbit coupling. We find a pronounced charge current dip associated with many-electron level crossings at the Aharonov-Casher phase ΔΦ = π, which can be disguised by linearly polarized light. Qualitative agreement is found for the spin polarization currents of the 1D and 2D ring. Quantitatively, however, the spin polarization currents are weaker in the more realistic 2D ring, especially for weak spin-orbit interaction, but can be considerably enhanced with the aid of a linearly polarized electromagnetic field. Specific spin polarization current symmetries relating the Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction case to the Rashba one are found to hold for the 2D ring, which is embedded in the photon cavity.

  13. NanoRocks: A Long-Term Microgravity Experiment to Stydy Planet Formation and Planetary Ring Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisset, J.; Colwell, J. E.; Dove, A.; Maukonen, D.; Brown, N.; Lai, K.; Hoover, B.

    2015-12-01

    We report on the results of the NanoRocks experiment on the International Space Station (ISS), which simulates collisions that occur in protoplanetary disks and planetary ring systems. A critical stage of the process of early planet formation is the growth of solid bodies from mm-sized chondrules and aggregates to km-sized planetesimals. To characterize the collision behavior of dust in protoplanetary conditions, experimental data is required, working hand in hand with models and numerical simulations. In addition, the collisional evolution of planetary rings takes place in the same collisional regime. The objective of the NanoRocks experiment is to study low-energy collisions of mm-sized particles of different shapes and materials. An aluminum tray (~8x8x2cm) divided into eight sample cells holding different types of particles gets shaken every 60 s providing particles with initial velocities of a few cm/s. In September 2014, NanoRocks reached ISS and 220 video files, each covering one shaking cycle, have already been downloaded from Station. The data analysis is focused on the dynamical evolution of the multi-particle systems and on the formation of cluster. We track the particles down to mean relative velocities less than 1 mm/s where we observe cluster formation. The mean velocity evolution after each shaking event allows for a determination of the mean coefficient of restitution for each particle set. These values can be used as input into protoplanetary disk and planetary rings simulations. In addition, the cluster analysis allows for a determination of the mean final cluster size and the average particle velocity of clustering onset. The size and shape of these particle clumps is crucial to understand the first stages of planet formation inside protoplanetary disks as well as many a feature of Saturn's rings. We report on the results from the ensemble of these collision experiments and discuss applications to planetesimal formation and planetary ring

  14. An Imposed Dynamo Current Drive Experiment: Demonstration of Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarboe, Thomas; Hansen, Chris; Hossack, Aaron; Marklin, George; Morgan, Kyle; Nelson, Brian; Sutherland, Derek; Victor, Brian

    2014-10-01

    An experiment for studying and developing the efficient sustainment of a spheromak with sufficient confinement (current-drive power heats the plasma to its stability β-limit) and in the keV temperature range is discussed. A high- β spheromak sustained by imposed dynamo current drive (IDCD) is justified because: previous transient experiments showed sufficient confinement in the keV range with no external toroidal field coil; recent results on HIT-SI show sustainment with sufficient confinement at low temperature; the potential of IDCD of solving other fusion issues; a very attractive reactor concept; and the general need for efficient current drive in magnetic fusion. The design of a 0.55 m minor radius machine with the required density control, wall loading, and neutral shielding for a 2 s pulse is presented. Peak temperatures of 1 keV and toroidal currents of 1.35 MA and 16% wall-normalized plasma beta are envisioned. The experiment is large enough to address the key issues yet small enough for rapid modification and for extended MHD modeling of startup and code validation.

  15. Compilation of current high-energy-physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohl, C.G.; Kelly, R.L.; Armstrong, F.E.

    1980-04-01

    This is the third edition of a compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and ten participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Rutherford (RHEL), Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about January 1980, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1976.

  16. Status and Current Sensitivity of the CELESTE Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    De Naurois, Mathieu

    2000-01-01

    The CELESTE experiment uses the heliostats of an old solar farm in the French Pyrenees to detect gamma ray air showers by the atmospheric Cerenkov technique. CELESTE has been operating since November 1999 with an array of 40 heliostats fully instrumented with 1GHz flash ADCs. Significant advances have been made in the detector simulations and in the data analysis techniques. We report here on results from recent observations of the Crab nebula above an energy threshold of 50GeV. The results and simulations illustrate the current sensitivity of the experiment.

  17. PERSISTENT CURRENT IN A ONE-DIMENSIONALMESOSCOPIC RING WITH ELECTRON-PHONONINTERACTION IN THE LATTICE MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Tong-zhong(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Ibrahim S R. Application of random time domain analysis to dynamic flight measurements [J]. Shock and Vibration Bulletin, 1979, 49(2): 165~170.[2]Pappa R S, Juang J N. Some experiences with the eigensystem realization algorithm [A]. Proceeding of the 6th IMAC[C]. Orlando, FL, USA, 1988.[3]Kramer C, Desmet C A M, Peeters B. Comparison of ambient and forced vibration testing of civil engineering structures [A]. 17th IMAC[C]. Kissimmee, FL, USA, 1999. 1030~1034.[4]Hoen C, Moan T, Remseth S. System identification of structures exposed to environmental loads [A]. Proceedings of EURODYN'93, the 2nd European Conference on Structural Dynamics [C]. Trondheim, Norway, 1993. 835~844.[5]James G H, Carne T G, Edmunds R S. Stars missile-modal analysis of first flight data using the natural excitation technique, NExT [A]. 12th IMAC [C]. Honolulu, HI, USA, 1994.[6]Hermans I. In-flight modal testing and analysis of a helicopter [A]. 17th IMAC [C]. Florida, 1999. 80~89.[7]Hermans L. Modal testing and analysis of a car under operational conditions [A]. 16th IMAC [C]. Florida, 1998. 1000~1006.[8]James G H, Garne T G. The natural excitation technique (NExT) for modal parameter extraction from ambient operating structure [J]. The International J of Analytical and Experimental Modal Analysis, 1995, 10(4): 260~277.[9]傅志方.振动模态分析与参数辨识[M].北京:机械工业出版社,1989.[10]周概容.概率论与数理统计.北京:高等教育出版社,1984.[11]宁德成.信号与系统.西安:西北工业大学出版社,1996.[12]葛照强.矩阵理论及其在工程技术中的应用.西安:陕西科学技术出版社,1991.[13]Chiang Dar-Yun, Cheng Ming-Si. Modal parameter identification from ambient response [J]. AIAA Journal, 1999, 37(4): 513~515.

  18. Current profile modification experiments in EXTRAP T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconello, M.; Malmberg, J.-A.; Spizzo, G.; Chapman, B. E.; Gravestjin, R. M.; Franz, P.; Piovesan, P.; Martin, P.; Drake, J. R.

    2004-01-01

    Pulsed poloidal current drive (PPCD) experiments have been conducted in the resistive shell EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch experiment. During the current profile modification phase, the fluctuation level of the m = 1 internally resonant tearing modes decreases, and the velocity of these modes increases. The m = 0 modes are not affected during PPCD, although termination occurs with a burst in the m = 0 amplitude. The PPCD phase is characterized by an increase in the central electron temperature (up to 380 eV) and in the soft x-ray signal. Spectroscopic observations confirm an increase in the central electron temperature. During PPCD, the plasma poloidal beta increases to 14%, and the estimated energy confinement time doubles, reaching 380 µs. The reduction in the fluctuation level and the corresponding increase in the energy confinement time are qualitatively consistent with a reduction in parallel transport along stochastic magnetic field lines.

  19. Current status of the LHCf experiment and future plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamura T.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Large Hadron Collider forward (= LHCf experiment has successfully finished the first phase of data taking at LHC √s = 0.9 and 7 TeV proton-proton collisions in 2010. As current status, we concentrate on analyzing the obtained data. As the first result, the energy spectra of photon measured by LHCf during = 7 TeV p-p collision has been published recently. Also the study of the upgraded version of LHCf detector for future = 14TeV run scenario is developed with the GSO scintillator. Another possible plan of p-A(nuclear collision in LHC is also studied. In this paper, as the current status of the experiment, analyses, and works for foreseen detector upgrade are summarized.

  20. Current status of the MiniBooNE experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Heather L.; /Los Alamos

    2004-11-01

    MiniBooNE is an experiment designed to refute or confirm the LSND {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} oscillation result. MiniBooNE will look for oscillations of {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} in a closed-box appearance analysis. MiniBooNE began collecting data in 2002, and is expected to continue data taking through 2005. Current MiniBooNE results are presented.

  1. Beam current transformer (BCT) for experiment WA1/2

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1978-01-01

    In experiment WA1/2, a 400 GeV proton beam from the SPS was directed at a target, downstream of which a hadron line selected, in several narrow momentum bands, a beam of either pi+ and K+ or pi- and K-. These neutrino-parent particles, before entering a 292 m long decay tunnel, passed through a set of 2 BCTs of a design seen here. They measured the hadron intensity (10^10 to 10^11 particles/pulse) with a precision of the order of 1%. There were 2 of them, for enhanced precision and confidence. After the discovery of neutral currents in the Gargamelle-experiment, WA1/2 was the first follow-up, high-precision experiment (Z.Phys.C35, 443-452, 1987 and Z.Phys.C45, 361-379, 1990). See also 7706516X.

  2. Ion optics and beam dynamics optimization at the HESR storage ring for the SPARC experiments with highly charged heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalenko, Oleksandr

    2015-06-24

    The High-Energy Storage Ring (HESR) is a part of an upcoming International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt. A key part of a scientific program, along with antiproton physics, will be physics with highly-charged heavy ions. Phase-space cooled beams together with fixed internal target will provide an excellent environment for storage ring experiments at the HESR for the SPARC collaboration. Until recently, however, the existing ion optical lattice for the HESR was designed only for the experiments with antiproton beams. The thesis presents a new ion optical mode developed specifically for the operation of the HESR with highly charged heavy ions. The presence of the errors, such as beam momentum spread, magnetic field impurities or magnets misalignments, leads to disruption of beam dynamics: exciting of resonant motion and loss of beam stability. Within the paper, these effects are investigated with the help of numerical codes for particle accelerator design and simulation MAD-X and MIRKO. A number of correction techniques are applied to minimize the nonlinear impact on the beam dynamics and improve the experimental conditions. The application of the analytical and numerical tools is demonstrated in the experiment with uranium U{sup 90+} beam at the existing storage ring ESR, GSI.

  3. Surveying rip current survivors: preliminary insights into the experiences of being caught in rip currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdzewski, D.; Shaw, W.; Dominey-Howes, D.; Brander, R.; Walton, T.; Gero, A.; Sherker, S.; Goff, J.; Edwick, B.

    2012-04-01

    This paper begins a process of addressing a significant gap in knowledge about people's responses to being caught in rip currents. While rip currents are the primary hazard facing recreational ocean swimmers in Australia, debate exists about the best advice to give swimmers caught in rip currents. Such surf rescue advice - on what to do and how to respond when caught in a rip - relies on empirical evidence. However, at present, knowledge about swimmers reactions and responses to rip currents is limited. This gap is a considerable barrier to providing effective advice to beach goers and to understanding how this advice is utilised (or not) when actually caught in the rip current. This paper reports the findings of a pilot study that focussed on garnering a better understanding of swimmers' experiences when caught in rip currents. A large scale questionnaire survey instrument generated data about rip current survivors' demographics, knowledge of beach safety and their reactions and responses when caught in a rip current. A mix of online and paper surveys produced a total of 671 completed surveys. Respondents were predominantly an informed group in terms of rip current knowledge, beach experience and had a high self-rated swimming ability. Preliminary insights from the survey show that most respondents recalled a "swim across the rip/parallel to the beach" message when caught in the rip and most escaped unassisted by acting on this message. However, while nearly a quarter of respondents recalled a message of "not to panic", short answer responses revealed that the onset of panic inhibited some respondents from recalling or enacting any other type of beach safety message when caught in the rip current. Results also showed that despite the research sample being younger, competent and frequent ocean swimmers, they were more likely to swim at unpatrolled beaches and outside of the red and yellow safety flags. Moreover, they were still caught in a rip current and they

  4. Surveying rip current survivors: preliminary insights into the experiences of being caught in rip currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Drozdzewski

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper begins a process of addressing a significant gap in knowledge about people's responses to being caught in rip currents. While rip currents are the primary hazard facing recreational ocean swimmers in Australia, debate exists about the best advice to give swimmers caught in rip currents. Such surf rescue advice – on what to do and how to respond when caught in a rip – relies on empirical evidence. However, at present, knowledge about swimmers reactions and responses to rip currents is limited. This gap is a considerable barrier to providing effective advice to beach goers and to understanding how this advice is utilised (or not when actually caught in the rip current.

    This paper reports the findings of a pilot study that focussed on garnering a better understanding of swimmers' experiences when caught in rip currents. A large scale questionnaire survey instrument generated data about rip current survivors' demographics, knowledge of beach safety and their reactions and responses when caught in a rip current. A mix of online and paper surveys produced a total of 671 completed surveys. Respondents were predominantly an informed group in terms of rip current knowledge, beach experience and had a high self-rated swimming ability. Preliminary insights from the survey show that most respondents recalled a "swim across the rip/parallel to the beach" message when caught in the rip and most escaped unassisted by acting on this message. However, while nearly a quarter of respondents recalled a message of "not to panic", short answer responses revealed that the onset of panic inhibited some respondents from recalling or enacting any other type of beach safety message when caught in the rip current. Results also showed that despite the research sample being younger, competent and frequent ocean swimmers, they were more likely to swim at unpatrolled beaches and outside of the red and yellow safety flags. Moreover, they were still

  5. Preparation and Current Situation of Proton-ICCHIBAN-2 Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchihori, Yukio; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Kitamura, H.; Kodaira, S.; Benton, Eric; Hajek, Michael; Berger, Thomas; Jadrnickova, Iva; Ploc, Ondrej

    The ICCHIBAN (Inter Comparison for Cosmicrays with Heavy Ion Beams at NIRS) working group has organized and performed various ICCHIBAN runs for active and passive radiation detectors at HIMAC, NIRS, Japan, Loma Linda and Brookhaven, USA and CERN, Switzer-land since the start of the ICCHIBAN project in the year 2002. One of the main focus points of this project is to understand the response of the applied detector systems (either active or passive) for personal and area dosimetry in space environment to a simulated sub-set of the space radiation environment, focusing on the heavy ion response. This is of special importance for the further intercomparison of space radiation data gathered by various international in-stitutes and universities for space radiation experiments as MATROSHKA, DOSIS, DOBIES, BRADOS, MATROSHKA-R etc. The ICCHIBAN experiments have created a big database of response data, especially for all the different passive radiation detectors and detector materials (Thermoluminescence (TLD) and Optical Luminescence (OSL)) over the last 7 years, resulting in a better understanding of how and why we still have differences in the measurement results from common space experiments -as the Space ICCHIBAN 2 experiment. One of the reasons why for the differences in the TLD/OSL results is the lack of intercomparison and response data for low LET particles up to around 10 keV/m, especially protons. Due to the fact, that the main contribution to absorbed dose in low earth orbit is due to protons, the ICCHIBAN working group has started the set-up of a Proton ICCHIBAN intercomparison experiment at NIRS. The Proton ICCHIBAN run has been performed at the cyclotron at NIRS, Chiba in February 2010. 15 institutes from 12 countries sent or brought their dosimeters and exposed them to 40 and 70 MeV proton beams with the same doses and exposure conditions. In this paper, the experiment procedures and current situation of the intercomparision experiments will be shown.

  6. Highly optimized tunable Er3+-doped single longitudinal mode fiber ring laser, experiment and model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Christian; Sejka, Milan

    1993-01-01

    A continuous wave (CW) tunable diode-pumped Er3+-doped fiber ring laser, pumped by diode laser at wavelengths around 1480 nm, is discussed. Wavelength tuning range of 42 nm, maximum slope efficiency of 48% and output power of 14.4 mW have been achieved. Single longitudinal mode lasing...

  7. Modern Ives-Stilwell Experiments At Storage Rings: Large Boosts Meet High Precision

    CERN Document Server

    Gwinner, G; Geppert, C; Huber, G; Karpuk, S; Krieger, A; Nörtershäuser, W; Novotny, C; Kühl, T; Sanchez, R; Stöhlker, T; Bing, D; Schwalm, D; Wolf, A; Hänsch, T W; Reinhardt, S; Saathoff, G

    2013-01-01

    We give a brief overview of time dilation tests using high-resolution laser spectroscopy at heavy-ion storage rings. We reflect on the various methods used to eliminate the first-order Doppler effect and on the pitfalls encountered, and comment on possible extensions at future facilities providing relativistic heavy ion beams at $\\gamma \\gg 1$.

  8. Folded Fabry-Perot quasi-optical ring resonator diplexer Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, H. M.; Chiou, A. E. T.

    1983-01-01

    Performance of folded Fabry-Perot quasi-optical ring resonator diplexers with different geometries of reflecting surfaces is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Design of optimum surface geometry for minimum diffraction, together with the figure of merit indicating improvement in performance, are given.

  9. Interaction of ring current and radiation belt protons with ducted plasmaspheric hiss. 1: Diffusion coefficients and timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Rasmussen, C. E.; Miller, R. H.; Lyons, L. R.

    1994-01-01

    Protons that are convected into the inner magnetosphere in response to enhanced magnetic activity can resonate with ducted plasmaspheric hiss in the outer plasmasphere via an anomalous Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance. Plasmaspheric hiss is a right-hand-polarized electromagnetic emission that is observed to fill the plasmasphere on a routine basis. When plasmaspheric hiss is confined within field-aligned ducts or guided along density gradients, wave normal angles remain largely below 45 deg. This allows resonant interactions with ions at typical ring current and radiation belt energies to take place. Such field-aligned ducts have been observed both within the plasmasphere and in regions outside of the plasmasphere. Wave intensities are estimated using statistical information from studies of detached plasma regions. Diffusion coefficients are presented for a range of L shells and proton energies for a fixed wave distribution. Harmonic resonances in the range N = +/-100 are considered in order to include interactions between hiss at 100 Hz to 2 kHz frequencies, and protons in the energy range between approximately 10 keV and 1000 keV. Diffusion timescales are estimated to be of the order of tens of days and comparable to or shorter than lifetimes for Coulomb decay and charge exchange losses over most of the energy and spatial ranges of interest.

  10. Penetration Depths of Energetic Electrons and Ions into the Inner Magnetosphere and Their Contributions to the Ring Current Energy Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinlin; Zhao, Hong; Baker, Daniel; Claudepierre, Seth; Fennell, Joe; Blake, J. Bernard; Larsen, Brian; Skoug, Ruth; Funsten, Herbert; Friedel, Reiner; Reeves, Geoff; Spence, Harlan; Mitchell, Donald; Lanzerotti, Louis

    2016-04-01

    Deep injections of energetic electrons and ions into the inner magnetosphere occur frequently, but the depths of the injections strongly depend on the species and energies. Electrons with energies of 10s to 100s of keV are injected into the inner belt (Linner belt but lost quickly. Ions with higher energies have much longer lifetime but cannot be injected as deep. For similar energies (100s of keV), Oxygen are injected a little deeper than Hydrogen and also decayed faster. Those results are obtained based on the measurements from the Van Allen Probes mission. The underline physics mechanisms responsible for these observations are still not clear. The relative contributions of these energetic particles to the ring current energy content have been calculated. Electrons contribute much less than the ions (~10%) with <35 keV electrons dominating the electron energy content during the main phases of a storm. The enhancement of electron energy content during a storm can get to ~30% of that of ions, indicating a more dynamic feature of the electrons.

  11. Early experience of the compression anastomosis ring (CARTM 27) in left-sided colon resection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jung-Yeon Lee; Jin-Hee Woo; Hong-Jo Choi; Ki-Jae Park; Young-Hoon Roh; Ki-Han Kim; Hak-Yoon Lee

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate clinical validity of the compression anastomosis ring (CAR(tm) 27) anastomosis in left-sided colonic resection. METHODS: A non-randomized prospective data col-lection was performed for patients undergoing an elective left-sided colon resection, followed by an anastomosis using the CAR(tm) 27 between November 2009 and January 2011. Eligibility criteria of the use of the CAR(tm) 27 were anastomoses between the colon and at or above the intraperitoneal rectum. The pri-mary short-term clinical endpoint, rate of anastomotic leakage, and other clinical outcomes, including intra- and postoperative complications, length of operation time and hospital stay, and the ring elimination time were evaluated.RESULTS: A total of 79 patients (male, 43; median age, 64 years) underwent an elective left-sided co-lon resection, followed by an anastomosis using the CAR(tm) 27. Colectomy was performed laparoscopically in 70 patients, in whom two patients converted to open procedure (2.9%). There was no surgical mortality. As an intraoperative complication, total disruption of the anastomosis occurred by premature enforced tension on the proximal segment of the anastomosis in one pa-tient. The ring was removed and another new CAR(tm) 27 anastomosis was constructed. One patient with sigmoid colon cancer showed postoperative anastomotic leak-age after 6 d postoperatively and temporary diverting il-eostomy was performed. Exact date of expulsion of the ring could not be recorded because most patients were not aware that the ring had been expelled. No patients manifested clinical symptoms of anastomotic stricture.CONCLUSION: Short-term evaluation of the CAR(tm) 27 anastomosis in elective left colectomy suggested it to be a safe and efficacious alternative to the standard hand-sewn or stapling technique.

  12. Vascular rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, Carl L; Mongé, Michael C; Popescu, Andrada R; Eltayeb, Osama M; Rastatter, Jeffrey C; Rigsby, Cynthia K

    2016-06-01

    The term vascular ring refers to congenital vascular anomalies of the aortic arch system that compress the esophagus and trachea, causing symptoms related to those two structures. The most common vascular rings are double aortic arch and right aortic arch with left ligamentum. Pulmonary artery sling is rare and these patients need to be carefully evaluated for frequently associated tracheal stenosis. Another cause of tracheal compression occurring only in infants is the innominate artery compression syndrome. In the current era, the diagnosis of a vascular ring is best established by CT imaging that can accurately delineate the anatomy of the vascular ring and associated tracheal pathology. For patients with a right aortic arch there recently has been an increased recognition of a structure called a Kommerell diverticulum which may require resection and transfer of the left subclavian artery to the left carotid artery. A very rare vascular ring is the circumflex aorta that is now treated with the aortic uncrossing operation. Patients with vascular rings should all have an echocardiogram because of the incidence of associated congenital heart disease. We also recommend bronchoscopy to assess for additional tracheal pathology and provide an assessment of the degree of tracheomalacia and bronchomalacia. The outcomes of surgical intervention are excellent and most patients have complete resolution of symptoms over a period of time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Compilation of current high energy physics experiments - Sept. 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Addis, L.; Odian, A.; Row, G. M.; Ward, C. E. W.; Wanderer, P.; Armenteros, R.; Joos, P.; Groves, T. H.; Oyanagi, Y.; Arnison, G. T. J.; Antipov, Yu; Barinov, N.

    1978-09-01

    This compilation of current high-energy physics experiments is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and the nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), KEK, Rutherford (RHEL), Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. Nominally, the compilation includes summaries of all high-energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about June 1978, and had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1975. The experimental summaries are supplemented with three indexes to the compilation, several vocabulary lists giving names or abbreviations used, and a short summary of the beams at each of the laboratories (except Rutherford). The summaries themselves are included on microfiche. (RWR)

  14. Maximizing the DUNE early physics output with current experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Monojit; Goswami, Srubabati [Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad (India); Raut, Sushant K. [Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad (India); School of Engineering Sciences, KTH Royal Institute of Technology-AlbaNova University Center, Department of Theoretical Physics, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-03-15

    The deep underground neutrino experiment (DUNE) is a proposed next generation superbeam experiment at Fermilab. Its aims include measuring the unknown neutrino oscillation parameters - the neutrino mass hierarchy, the octant of the mixing angle θ{sub 23}, and the CP-violating phase δ{sub CP}. The current and upcoming experiments T2K, NOνA, and ICAL rate at IN will also be collecting data for the same measurements. In this paper, we explore the sensitivity reach of DUNE in combination with these other experiments. We evaluate the least exposure required by DUNE to determine the above three unknown parameters with reasonable confidence.We find that for each case, the inclusion of data from T2K, NOνA, and ICAL rate at IN help to achieve the same sensitivity with a reduced exposure from DUNE thereby helping to economize the configuration. Further, we quantify the effect of the proposed near detector on systematic errors and study the consequent improvement in sensitivity. We also examine the role played by the second oscillation cycle in furthering the physics reach of DUNE. Finally, we present an optimization study of the neutrino-antineutrino running of DUNE. (orig.)

  15. Primary signet ring cell carcinoma of the appendix: A rare case report and our 18-year experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoon Ho Ko; Young Seon Hong; Chan-Kwon Jung; Soon Nam Oh; Tae Hee Kim; Hye Sung Won; Jin Hyoung Kang; Hyung Jin Kim; Won Kyung Kang; Seong Taek Oh

    2008-01-01

    Primary adenocarcinoma of the appendix is a rare malignancy that constitutes < 0.5% of all gastrointestinal neoplasms.Moreover,primary signet ring cell carcinoma of the appendix is an exceedingly rare entity.We have encountered 15 cases of primary appendiceal cancer among 3389 patients who underwent appendectomy over the past 18 years.In the present report,we describe a rare case of primary signet ring cell carcinoma of the appendix with ovarian metastases and unresectable peritoneal dissemination occurring in a 67-year-old female patient.She underwent appendectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with a laparoscopy procedure.She then received palliative systemic chemotherapy with 12 cycles of oxaliplatin,5-flurorouracil,and leucovorin (FOLFOX-4).The patient currently is well without progression of disease 12 mo after beginning chemotherapy.

  16. Unsteady magnetic reconnection in laboratory experiments with current sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Anna

    2009-11-01

    According to present notion, unsteady magnetic reconnection in current sheets (CS) is basic to dramatic natural phenomena: solar and stellar flares, substorms in the Earth and other planetary magnetospheres, as well as to disruptive instabilities in tokamak plasmas. We present a review of laboratory experiments studying evolution of CS formed in 3D and 2D magnetic configurations with an X line, in the CS-3D device. Usually CS exists during an extended period in a metastable stage, without essential changes of its structure and parameters. Under certain conditions this stage may be suddenly interrupted by unsteady phase of magnetic reconnection, which manifests itself in a rapid change of the magnetic field topology, current redistribution, excitation of pulsed electric fields, and other dynamic effects. The unsteady phase results in effective conversion of magnetic energy into the energy of plasma and accelerated particles, and may finally bring about the CS disruption. In the context of the solar flares, a metastable CS is associated with a pre-flare situation, while CS disruption -- with the flare itself. The physical mechanisms triggering the unsteady magnetic reconnection in the laboratory produced current sheets are discussed. Supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project # 09-02-00971).

  17. Topological rings

    CERN Document Server

    Warner, S

    1993-01-01

    This text brings the reader to the frontiers of current research in topological rings. The exercises illustrate many results and theorems while a comprehensive bibliography is also included. The book is aimed at those readers acquainted with some very basic point-set topology and algebra, as normally presented in semester courses at the beginning graduate level or even at the advanced undergraduate level. Familiarity with Hausdorff, metric, compact and locally compact spaces and basic properties of continuous functions, also with groups, rings, fields, vector spaces and modules, and with Zorn''s Lemma, is also expected.

  18. The role of convection in the buildup of the ring current pressure during the 17 March 2013 storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menz, A. M.; Kistler, L. M.; Mouikis, C. G.; Spence, H. E.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Larsen, B. A.; Mitchell, D. G.; Gkioulidou, M.

    2017-01-01

    On 17 March 2013, the Van Allen Probes measured the H+ and O+ fluxes of the ring current during a large geomagnetic storm. Detailed examination of the pressure buildup during the storm shows large differences in the pressure measured by the two spacecraft, with measurements separated by only an hour, and large differences in the pressure measured at different local times. In addition, while the H+ and O+ pressure contributions are about equal during the main phase in the near-Earth plasma sheet outside L = 5.5, the O+ pressure dominates at lower L values. We test whether adiabatic convective transport from the near-Earth plasma sheet (L > 5.5) to the inner magnetosphere can explain these observations by comparing the observed inner magnetospheric distributions with the source distribution at constant magnetic moment, mu. We find that adiabatic convection can account for the enhanced pressure observed during the storm. Using a Weimer 1996 electric field we model the drift trajectories to show that the key features can be explained by variation in the near-Earth plasma sheet population and particle access that changes with energy and L shell. Finally, we show that the dominance of O+ at low L shells is due partly to a near-Earth plasma sheet that is preferentially enhanced in O+ at lower energies (5-10 keV) and partly due to the time dependence in the source combined with longer drift times to low L shells. No source of O+ inside L = 5.5 is required to explain the observations at low L shells.

  19. World Encircling Tectonic Vortex Street - Geostreams Revisited: The Southern Ring Current EM Plasma-Tectonic Coupling in the Western Pacific Rim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leybourne, Bruce; Smoot, Christian; Longhinos, Biju

    2014-05-01

    Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) coupling to south polar magnetic ring currents transfers induction energy to the Southern Geostream ringing Antarctica and underlying its encircling mid-ocean ridge structure. Magnetic reconnection between the southward interplanetary magnetic field and the magnetic field of the earth is the primary energy transfer mechanism between the solar wind and the magnetosphere. Induced telluric currents focused within joule spikes along Geostreams heat the southern Pacific. Alignment of the Australian Antarctic Discordance to other tectonic vortexes along the Western Pacific Rim, provide electrical connections to Earths core that modulate global telluric currents. The Banda Sea Triple Junction, a mantle vortex north of Australia, and the Lake Baikal Continental Rift vortex in the northern hemisphere modulate atmospheric Jetstream patterns gravitationally linked to internal density oscillations induced by these telluric currents. These telluric currents are driven by solar magnetic power, rotation and orbital dynamics. A solar rotation 40 day power spectrum in polarity controls north-south migration of earthquakes along the Western Pacific Rim and manifest as the Madden Julian Oscillation a well-documented climate cycle. Solar plasma turbulence cycles related to Hale flares trigger El Nino Southern Oscillations (ENSO's), while solar magnetic field strength frequencies dominate global warming and cooling trends indexed to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. These Pacific climate anomalies are solar-electro-tectonically modulated via coupling to tropical geostream vortex streets. Particularly the section along the Central Pacific Megatrend connecting the Banda Sea Triple Junction (up welling mantle vortex) north of Australia with the Easter Island & Juan Fernandez twin rotating micro-plates (twin down welling mantle vortexes) along the East Pacific Rise modulating ENSO. Solar eruptions also enhance the equatorial ring current located

  20. Experiments on the Synchronization of an Ultrafast Cr LiSAF Laser with the ELETTRA Storage Ring and FEL Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Ferianis, Mario; De Ninno, G; Diviacco, Bruno; Trovò, Mauro

    2004-01-01

    The techniques for synchronizing ultrafast lasers to external radio frequency reference sources are well established and characterized in the literature. However, data lack on the minimum light-to-light jitter which can be achieved in different synchrotron operation modes when an external laser is locked to the storage ring master clock. Here we present first results for the synchronization of an ultrafast Cr:LiSAF laser with electromagnetic radiation coming from the Elettra storage ring in four bunch and multi-bunch mode. In addition, data on the synchronization of the same laser with the Elettra FEL pulses, both in free running and Q-switching regime, are reported. In our experiments, laser-to-RF locking was continuously monitored using a built-in phase detection. The laser light to storage ring light locking was characterized by simultaneous acquisition of two/three pulse trains by a streak camera. In addition, pulse jitter was determined by processing of the signal of fast photodiodes monitoring the diffe...

  1. Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenly, John, B.

    2005-07-31

    This Final Technical Report presents the results of the program, Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion, which was carried out under Department of Energy funding during the period August, 1993 to January, 2005. The central objective of the program was to study the properties of field-reversed configurations formed by ion rings. In order to reach this objective, our experimental program, called the Field-reversed Ion Ring Experiment, FIREX, undertook to develop an efficient, economical technology for the production of field-reversed ion rings. A field-reversed configuration (FRC) in which the azimuthal (field-reversing) current is carried by ions with gyro-radius comparable to the magnetic separatrix radius is called a field-reversed ion ring. A background plasma is required for charge neutralization of the ring, and this plasma will be confined within the ring's closed magnetic flux. Ion rings have long been of interest as the basis of compact magnetic fusion reactors, as the basis for a high-power accelerator for an inertial fusion driver, and for other applications of high power ion beams or plasmas of high energy density. Specifically, the FIREX program was intended to address the longstanding question of the contribution of large-orbit ions to the observed stability of experimental FRCs to the MHD tilt mode. Typical experimental FRCs with s {approx} 2-4, where s is the ratio of separatrix radius to ion gyro-radius, have been stable to tilting, but desired values for a fusion reactor, s > 20, should be unstable. The FIREX ring would consist of a plasma with large s for the background ions, but with s {approx} 1 for the ring ions. By varying the proportions of these two populations, the minimum proportion of large-orbit ions necessary for stability could be determined. The incorporation of large-orbit ions, perhaps by neutral-beam injection, into an FRC has been advanced for the purpose of stabilizing, heating, controlling angular momentum, and aiding the formation

  2. Experience with current multiaxial diagnostic systems: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastrup, Marianne

    2002-01-01

    It is difficult to capture the complexity of the psychiatric condition with a single diagnostic category, and a multiaxial approach provides a more comprehensive picture of the current disorder. The WPA section on classification has developed a multiaxial schema based on the ICD-10 family of classifications. Four axes are proposed. Axis I: on clinical disorders; axis II: on disabilities; axis III: on contextual factors, and axis IV: on quality of life. Even though the multiaxial approach has been widely taught and surveys report on its international acceptability, daily use by clinicians of the 'non-diagnostic' axes have till now been limited, despite expressed interest by the very same clinicians. The multiaxial formulation is still developing and transcultural experiences need to be gained.

  3. Mechanical behaviour of granular materials used in analogue modelling: insights from grain characterisation, ring-shear tests and analogue experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panien, Marion; Schreurs, Guido; Pfiffner, Adrian

    2006-09-01

    The mechanical behaviour of several dry granular materials is investigated through ring-shear tests, grain characterisation, and simple analogue experiments analysed by X-ray computed tomography. An improved knowledge of granular materials is essential to determine their suitability as analogues for upper crustal rocks in experimental models and to compare analogue and numerical experiments. The ring-shear tests show that the granular materials have an elastic/frictional plastic behaviour with strain-hardening preceding failure at peak strength, followed by strain softening until a dynamic-stable value is reached. This is similar to the behaviour exhibited by experimentally deformed rocks. The physical characteristics of the grains determine the amount of diffuse deformation before failure, the percentage of strain softening and act on the thickness of the shear zones before broadening. Initial shear zone width in extensional and contractional experiments is between 11 and 16 times the mean grain size. The angle of internal friction defining one of the mechanical properties of granular materials and thus fault dip is not only related to physical characteristics of the grains and to the handling technique used (e.g. sieving or pouring), but also to the overburden and to the experimental setup used.

  4. Investigating the Impacts of Previous and Current Learning Experiences on Student Teachers' Teaching Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ögeyik, Muhlise Cosgun

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the impacts of the previous and current learning experiences of the student teachers on their microteaching practices. The study pursued threefold research goals: to diagnose the microteaching stance, to treat it, and to explore and evaluate the progress. The participants were 24 undergraduate third year student teachers…

  5. New Titan Saltation Threshold Experiments: Investigating Current and Past Climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, N.; Burr, D. M.; Marshall, J.; Smith, J. K.; Emery, J. P.; Horst, S. M.; Nield, E.; Yu, X.

    2015-12-01

    Titan exhibits aeolian sand dunes that cover ~20% of its surface, attesting to significant sediment transport by the wind. Recent experiments in the Titan Wind Tunnel (TWT) at NASA Ames Research Center [1,2] found that the threshold friction speed needed to detach Titanian "sand" is about 50% higher than previous estimates based on theory alone [3], a result that might be explained by the low ratio of particle to fluid density on the body [1]. Following the successful completion of the initial Titan threshold tests, we are conducting new experiments that expand the pressure range above and below current Titan values. The basic experimental techniques are described in [1], with minor updates to the instrumentation as described in [2]. To reproduce the kinematic viscosity and particle friction Reynolds number equivalent to that expected for Titan's nitrogen atmosphere at 1.4 bars and 94 K requires that TWT be pressurized to 12.5 bars for air at 293K. In addition to running experiments at this pressure to reproduce previous results [1] and investigate low density (high density ratio) materials, TWT pressures of 3 and 8 bars are in the experimental matrix to understand threshold under past Titan conditions when the atmospheric pressure may have been lower [4]. Higher pressures, at 15 and 20 bars in TWT, are also being run to understand the putative effects of low density ratio conditions. Our experimental matrix for this follow-on work uses some of the same materials as previously used, including walnut shells, basalt, quartz, glass spheres, and various low density materials to better simulate the gravity-equivalent weight of Titan sand. For these experiments, the TWT is now equipped with a new high pressure Tavis transducer with sufficient sensitivity to measure freestream speeds of less than 0.5 m s-1 at 12.5 bars. New techniques include video documentation of the experiments. We are also investigating methods of measuring humidity of the wind tunnel environment and

  6. The SNO+ experiment. Current status and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozza, Valentina [Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Zellescher Weg 19, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    SNO+ is a large liquid scintillator based experiment that reuses the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory detector. The detector, located 2 km underground in a mine near Sudbury, Canada, consists of a 12 m diameter acrylic vessel which will be filled with 780 tonnes of liquid scintillator. The main physics goal of SNO+ is to search for the neutrinoless double-beta (0νββ) decay of {sup 130}Te. During the double-beta phase, the liquid scintillator will be initially loaded with 0.3-0.5% natural tellurium. In 5 years of data taking, SNO+ expects to reach a sensitivity on the effective Majorana neutrino mass of 55-133 meV, just above the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy region. Recently, the possibility to deploy up to 10 times more natural tellurium has been investigated, by which SNO+ could explore deep into the parameter space for the inverted hierarchy in the near future. Designed as a general purpose neutrino experiment, SNO+ can additionally measure the reactor antineutrino oscillations, geo-neutrinos in a geologically-interesting location, watch supernova neutrinos and measure low-energy solar neutrinos. A first commissioning phase with the detector filled with water will begin soon. The scintillator phase is expected to start after few months of water data taking. The 0νββ decay phase is foreseen for the 2017. In this talk the current status and the broad physics program of SNO+ will be presented.

  7. High current transport experiment for heavy ion inertial fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. R. Prost

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The High Current Experiment at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is part of the U.S. program to explore heavy-ion beam transport at a scale representative of the low-energy end of an induction linac driver for fusion energy production. The primary mission of this experiment is to investigate aperture fill factors acceptable for the transport of space-charge-dominated heavy-ion beams at high intensity (line charge density ∼0.2  μC/m over long pulse durations (4  μs in alternating gradient focusing lattices of electrostatic or magnetic quadrupoles. This experiment is testing transport issues resulting from nonlinear space-charge effects and collective modes, beam centroid alignment and steering, envelope matching, image charges and focusing field nonlinearities, halo, and electron and gas cloud effects. We present the results for a coasting 1 MeV K^{+} ion beam transported through ten electrostatic quadrupoles. The measurements cover two different fill factor studies (60% and 80% of the clear aperture radius for which the transverse phase space of the beam was characterized in detail, along with beam energy measurements and the first halo measurements. Electrostatic quadrupole transport at high beam fill factor (≈80% is achieved with acceptable emittance growth and beam loss, even though the initial beam distribution is not ideal (but the emittance is low nor in thermal equilibrium. We achieved good envelope control, and rematching may only be needed every ten lattice periods (at 80% fill factor in a longer lattice of similar design. We also show that understanding and controlling the time dependence of the envelope parameters is critical to achieving high fill factors, notably because of the injector and matching section dynamics.

  8. The high current transport experiment for heavy ion inertial fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prost, L.R.; Baca, D.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J.W.; Leitner, M.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Cohen, R.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Morse, E.

    2004-05-01

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is part of the US program to explore heavy-ion beam transport at a scale representative of the low-energy end of an induction linac driver for fusion energy production. The primary mission of this experiment is to investigate aperture fill factors acceptable for the transport of space-charge-dominated heavy-ion beams at high intensity (line charge density {approx} 0.2 {micro}C/m) over long pulse durations (4 {micro}s) in alternating gradient focusing lattices of electrostatic or magnetic quadrupoles. This experiment is testing transport issues resulting from nonlinear space-charge effects and collective modes, beam centroid alignment and steering, envelope matching, image charges and focusing field nonlinearities, halo and, electron and gas cloud effects. We present the results for a coasting 1 MeV K{sup +} ion beam transported through ten electrostatic quadrupoles. The measurements cover two different fill factor studies (60% and 80% of the clear aperture radius) for which the transverse phase-space of the beam was characterized in detail, along with beam energy measurements and the first halo measurements. Electrostatic quadrupole transport at high beam fill factor ({approx}80%) is achieved with acceptable emittance growth and beam loss, even though the initial beam distribution is not ideal (but the emittance is low) nor in thermal equilibrium. We achieved good envelope control, and rematching may only be needed every ten lattice periods (at 80% fill factor) in a longer lattice of similar design. We also show that understanding and controlling the time dependence of the envelope parameters is critical to achieving high fill factors, notably because of the injector and matching section dynamics.

  9. Measurement of Ring Strain Using Butanols: A Physical Chemistry Lab Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William R.; Davidson, Ada S.; Ball, David W.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, a bomb calorimeter experiment and subsequent calculations aimed at determining the strain energy of the cyclobutane backbone are described. Students use several butanol isomers instead of the parent hydrocarbons, and they manipulate liquids instead of gases, which makes the experiment much easier to perform. Experiments show that…

  10. The current status of orbital experiments for UHECR studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panasyuk, M. I.; Casolino, M.; Garipov, G. K.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Gorodetzky, P.; Khrenov, B. A.; Klimov, P. A.; Morozenko, V. S.; Sakaki, N.; Saprykin, O. A.; Sharakin, S. A.; Takizawa, Y.; Tkachev, L. G.; Yashin, I. V.; Zotov, M. Yu

    2015-08-01

    Two types of orbital detectors of extreme energy cosmic rays are being developed nowadays: (i) TUS and KLYPVE with reflecting optical systems (mirrors) and (ii) JEM-EUSO with high- transmittance Fresnel lenses. They will cover much larger areas than existing ground-based arrays and almost uniformly monitor the celestial sphere. The TUS detector is the pioneering mission developed in SINP MSU in cooperation with several Russian and foreign institutions. It has relatively small field of view (±4.5°), which corresponds to a ground area of 6.4 • 103 km2. The telescope consists of a Fresnel-type mirror-concentrator (∼ 2 m2) and a photo receiver (a matrix of 16 x 16 photomultiplier tubes). It is to be deployed on the Lomonosov satellite, and is currently at the final stage of preflight tests. Recently, SINP MSU began the KLYPVE project to be installed on board of the Russian segment of the ISS. The optical system of this detector contains a larger primary mirror (10 m2), which allows decreasing the energy threshold. The total effective field of view will be at least ±14° to exceed the annual exposure of the existing ground-based experiments. Several configurations of the detector are being currently considered. Finally, JEM-EUSO is a wide field of view (±30°) detector. The optics is composed of two curved double-sided Fresnel lenses with 2.65 m external diameter, a precision diffractive middle lens and a pupil. The ultraviolet photons are focused onto the focal surface, which consists of nearly 5000 multi-anode photomultipliers. It is developed by a large international collaboration. All three orbital detectors have multi-purpose character due to continuous monitoring of various atmospheric phenomena. The present status of development of the TUS and KLYPVE missions is reported, and a brief comparison of the projects with JEM-EUSO is given.

  11. Recent experience with inductive insert at the proton storage ring (PSR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, K.-Y (Kal Y.); Griffin, J. E. (James E.); Wildman, D.; Popovic, M. (Mihai); Browman, A. A. (Andrew A.); Fitzgerald, D. H. (Daniel H.); Macek, R. J. (Robert J.); Plum, M. A. (Michael A.); Spickermann, T. J. (Thomas J.)

    2001-01-01

    In a Fermilab-Los Alamos collaboration, inductances constructed of ferrite cores sufficient to cancel a large fraction of the space charge potential-well distortion were installed in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) as one means of raising the threshold for the two-stream e-p instability. When operating at higher intensities and with sufficient inductance added for full space-charge compensation, an unacceptable longitudinal self-bunching, microwavelike, instability was encountered. Heating the cores to N 130 C proved to be an effective cure, and was found to be a means for tuning the inductance over a limited but useful range. The heated inductors were an essential ingredient in achieving a record accumulation of 9.7 pC/pulse. An engineered version of the inductors is now installed for routine operation of the PSR. A summary of the inductor characteristics, theory of operation, experimental results, and interpretation will be presented.

  12. Two-photon exchange contribution in elastic electron-proton scattering, experiment at the VEPP-3 storage ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolenko D.M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a precise measurement of the ratio of the (e+ p to (e− p elastic scattering cross sections. This comparison is sensitive to the effect of two-photon exchange contributions which may be the cause for inconsistent extractions of the proton form factors obtained using different methods. The experiment was performed at storage ring VEPP–3, Novosibirsk at energies of positron/electron beams of 1.0 and 1.6 GeV with electron/positron scattering angles θ = 65÷105° for the first case and 15÷25° and 55÷75° for the second case. Details of the experiment and the preliminary results are presented.

  13. Effects of the ring current and plasmasphere on ULF waves in the inner magnetosphere based on the GEMSIS-RC model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, K.; Amano, T.; saito, S.; Miyoshi, Y.; Matsumoto, Y.; Umeda, T.; Miyashita, Y.; Ebihara, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Acceleration mechanisms of electrons to cause drastic variation of the Earth's outer radiation belt is one of outstanding issues of the geospace researches. While the radial diffusion of the electrons driven by ULF waves has been considered as one of the candidate mechanisms, efficiency of the mechanism under realistic ULF characteristics and distribution is far from understood. GEMSIS (Geospace Environment Modeling System for Integrated Studies) of STEL, Nagoya University, is the observation-based modeling project for understanding energy and mass transportation from the Sun to the Earth in the geospace environment. Aiming at understanding the dynamics of the inner magnetosphere during the geospace storms, the GEMSIS-Magnetosphere working team has developed a new physics-based model for the global dynamics of the ring current (GEMSIS-RC model). The GEMSIS-RC model is a self-consistent and kinetic numerical simulation code solving the five-dimensional collisionless drift-kinetic equation for the ring-current ions in the inner-magnetosphere coupled with Maxwell equations. We applied the GEMSIS-RC model for simulation of global distribution of ULF waves to test its capability of describing fast time scale phenomena like SCs and ULF waves. Two cases of background profile, i.e., cases without/with plasmapause in the simulation domain, are compared. The result shows that existence of plasmapause strengthens ULFs outside the plasmapause and widens the MLT region where the E_r (toroidal) component is excited from initially-given E_phi (poloidal) component. Comparison between runs with/without ring current ions show that the existence of hot ring current ions can deform and amplify the original sinusoidal waveforms. The deformation causes the energy cascade to higher frequency range (Pc4 and Pc3 ranges). The cascade is more pronounced in the high beta case. Combination with GEMSIS-RB model reproduced rapid radial transport by the drift resonance for ions with drift period

  14. 3-flavor oscillations with current and future reactor experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear reactors have been a crucial tool for our understanding of neutrinos. The disappearance of electron antineutrinos emitted by nuclear reactors has firmly established that neutrino flavor oscillates, and that neutrinos consequently have mass. The current generation of precision measurements rely on some of the world's most intense reactor facilities to demonstrate that the electron antineutrino mixes with the third antineutrino mass eigenstate (v3-). Accurate measurements of antineutrino energies robustly determine the tiny difference between the masses-squared of the v3- state and the two more closely-spaced v1- and v2- states. These results have given us a much clearer picture of neutrino mass and mixing, yet at the same time open major questions about how to account for these small but non-zero masses in or beyond the Standard Model. These observations have also opened the door for a new generation of experiments which aim to measure the ordering of neutrino masses and search for potential violation of CP symmetry by neutrinos. I will provide a brief overview of this exciting field. Work supported under DOE OHEP DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  15. Current advances in synchrotron radiation instrumentation for MX experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, Robin L.; Juanhuix, Jordi; Fuchs, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Following pioneering work 40 years ago, synchrotron beamlines dedicated to macromolecular crystallography (MX) have improved in almost every aspect as instrumentation has evolved. Beam sizes and crystal dimensions are now on the single micron scale while data can be collected from proteins with molecular weights over 10 MDa and from crystals with unit cell dimensions over 1000 Å. Furthermore it is possible to collect a complete data set in seconds, and obtain the resulting structure in minutes. The impact of MX synchrotron beamlines and their evolution is reflected in their scientific output, and MX is now the method of choice for a variety of aims from ligand binding to structure determination of membrane proteins, viruses and ribosomes, resulting in a much deeper understanding of the machinery of life. A main driving force of beamline evolution have been advances in almost every aspect of the instrumentation comprising a synchrotron beamline. In this review we aim to provide an overview of the current status of instrumentation at modern MX experiments. The most critical optical components are discussed, as are aspects of endstation design, sample delivery, visualisation and positioning, the sample environment, beam shaping, detectors and data acquisition and processing.

  16. Current profile control experiments in EXTRAP T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsell, P.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J.; Franz, P.; Malmberg, J. A.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Spizzo, G.

    2002-11-01

    EXTRAP T2R is a high aspect ratio (R=1.24 m, a = 0.183 m) reversed-field pinch device, characterised by a double, thin shell system. The simultaneous presence of many m=1, |n| > 11 tearing modes is responsible for a magnetic field turbulence, which is believed to produce the rather high energy and particle transport that is observed in this type of magnetic configuration. In this paper first results from current profile control experiments (PPCD) in a thin shell device are shown. When an edge poloidal electric field is transiently applied, an increase of the electron temperature and of the electron density is seen, which is consistent with an increase of the thermal content of the plasma. At the same time, the soft x-ray emission, measured with a newly installed miniaturised camera, shows a peaking of the profile in the core. Furthermore, the amplitudes of the m=1 tearing modes are reduced and and the rotation velocities increase during PPCD, which is also consistent with a reduction of magnetic turbulence and a heating of the plasma

  17. Nuclear aspects of neutrino energy reconstruction in current oscillation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, Tina; Buss, Oliver; Mosel, Ulrich [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen (Germany); Alvarez-Ruso, Luis [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Universidad de Valencia - CSIC (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    There is an extensive experimental effort aiming at a precise determination of neutrino oscillation parameters. A critical quantity is the neutrino energy which can not be measured directly but has to be reconstructed from observables. A good knowledge of neutrino-nucleus interactions is thus necessary to minimize the systematic uncertainties in neutrino fluxes, backgrounds and detector responses. A reliable reconstruction has to account for in-medium modifications. We find that in particular final-state interactions inside the target nucleus modify considerably the distributions through rescattering, charge-exchange and absorption. These effects can be simulated with our coupled channel GiBUU transport model where the neutrino first interacts with a bound nucleon producing secondary particles which are then transported out of the nucleus. We consider, besides Fermi motion and Pauli blocking, full in-medium kinematics, mean-field potentials and in-medium spectral functions. In this contribution, we compare the reconstructed quantities obtained within our model to the ones obtained by the current experiments like MiniBooNE, which mostly rely on simple two-body kinematics. We then discuss how these uncertainties influence not only the cross section measurements but also the oscillation results.

  18. Meaning-making matters in product design: users' sensory perceptions and experience evaluations of long-acting vaginal gels and intravaginal rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Rochelle K; van den Berg, Jacob J; Vargas, Sara E; Senocak, Natali; Shaw, Julia G; Buckheit, Robert W; Smith, Kelley Alison; Guthrie, Kate Morrow

    2015-12-01

    Users' sensory perceptions and experiences of intravaginal products can inform acceptability and adherence. Focusing on the meanings women derive from formulation/device characteristics facilitates developers' design iterations toward optimizing user experience. We investigated how users of long-acting gels and intravaginal rings (IVRs) impute meaning to characteristics that may affect future product use. Focus groups were conducted with contraceptive IVR and vaginal lubricant users. Current perceptibility science and historical theory on the cultural acceptability of fertility regulating methods informed the analysis. A total of 21 IVR users and 29 lubricant users attended focus groups in which they manipulated products in their hands and discussed reactions to product characteristics. Participants used prior product experiences and sensory perceptions of prototype manipulations to inform meanings about product properties and performance for pregnancy, disease prevention, comfort, and perceived efficacy. The meanings derived from product characteristics depended on why the product would be used; a characteristic deemed problematic in one risk context may be considered preferable in another. Intravaginal product users create narratives that ascribe influence or causality to product characteristics. These meanings, whether correct or incorrect biologically, will shape vaginal product acceptability, use, and effectiveness. Long-acting and sustained-release drug delivery systems will be part of the multipurpose prevention continuum. Developers must consider how sensory experiences and culturally salient assumptions shape the meanings users make of product design characteristics. Those meanings will ultimately impact use and effectiveness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The theoretical basis of correct measurement for the diameters of dake rings in the experiment of Newton’s rings%牛顿环实验中正确测量暗环直径的理论依据

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马良财

    2012-01-01

      针对在“用牛顿环测透镜的曲率半径”实验中暗环条纹直径正确测量的问题,通过光学理论分析得出应选取暗环两侧的条纹外边缘之间距作为暗环直径的结论。%  In this paper, the optical theory of measurement for the diameters of dake rings in the experiment of Newton’s rings is analyzed, and the conclusion of the diameter of dake ring is a distance between outer edges of its two sides is also presented.

  20. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector of the AMS experiment: test beam results with a prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Arruda, Luísa; Goncalves, Patrícia; Pereira, Rui

    2008-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) to be installed on the International Space Station (ISS) will be equipped with a proximity Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector for measuring the velocity and electric charge of the charged cosmic particles. This detector will contribute to the high level of redundancy required for AMS as well as to the rejection of albedo particles. Charge separation up to iron and a velocity resolution of the order of 0.1% for singly charged particles are expected. A RICH protoptype consisting of a detection matrix with 96 photomultiplier units, a segment of a conical mirror and samples of the radiator materials was built and its performance was evaluated. Results from the last test beam performed with ion fragments resulting from the collision of a 158 GeV/c/nucleon primary beam of indium ions (CERN SPS) on a lead target are reported. The large amount of collected data allowed to test and characterize different aerogel samples and the sodium fluoride radiator. In addition, the reflec...

  1. The Contribution of the Nearest-Neighborhood Interaction to the Persistent Current in a Mesoscopic Ring Studied by a New Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Guang-Ping; LI Hua-Zhong; MA Zhong-Shui

    2001-01-01

    We propose an effective description of the interaction between the nearest-neighboring particles in a continuum theory. The contributions of the electron-electron interaction to the persistent current in 1D strongly correlating mesoscopic rings with or without impurities are analyzed. It is shown that the nearest-neighborhood int eraction gives significant contributions to the current and correlation functions. The enhance of the theoretical value of current magnitude is observed at finite temperature in the presence of the impurity scattering. The statistical property of the persistent current over random impurity distribution is also discussed. It is found that the exponential law of the persistent current for a non-interacting system will remain in an interacting one, as long as the interactions between nonnearest-neighborhoods are excluded.

  2. Current experiments in elementary-particle physics - March 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Rittenberg, A.

    1983-03-01

    Microfiche are included which contain summaries of 479 experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments are included at the following laboratories: Brookhaven (BNL); CERN; CESR; DESY; Fermilab (FNAL); Institute for Nuclear Studies (INS); KEK; LAMPF; Serpukhov (SERP); SIN; SLAC; and TRIUMF. Also, summaries of proton decay experiments are included. A list of experiments and titles is included; and a beam-target-momentum index and a spokesperson index are given. Properties of beams at the facilities are tabulated. (WHK)

  3. Circulating current in 1D Hubbard rings with long-range hopping: Comparison between exact diagonalization method and mean-field approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Madhumita; Maiti, Santanu K.

    2016-10-01

    The interplay between Hubbard interaction, long-range hopping and disorder on persistent current in a mesoscopic one-dimensional conducting ring threaded by a magnetic flux ϕ is analyzed in detail. Two different methods, exact numerical diagonalization and Hartree-Fock mean field theory, are used to obtain numerical results from the many-body Hamiltonian. The current in a disordered ring gets enhanced as a result of electronic correlation and it becomes more significant when contributions from higher order hoppings, even if they are too small compared to nearest-neighbor hopping, are taken into account. Certainly this can be an interesting observation in the era of long-standing controversy between theoretical and experimental results of persistent current amplitudes. Along with these we also find half-flux quantum periodic current for some typical electron fillings and kink-like structures at different magnetic fluxes apart from ϕ = 0 and ±ϕ0 / 2. The scaling behavior of current is also discussed for the sake of completeness of our present analysis.

  4. Persistent currents in mesoscopic graphene rings with armchair edges%扶手椅型石墨烯介观环中的持续电流∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代楠; 邓文基

    2015-01-01

    Based on the tight-binding model, the energy spectrum and persistent currents of mesoscopic graphene rings with armchair edges are studied analytically and numerically. Characters of the persistent currents changing with Aharonov-Bohm (A-B) magnetic flux in rings in different geometry are investigated in datail. The periodicity and special symmetry of energy spectrum and persistent currents changing with the magnetic flux are revealed. It is demonstrated that the persistent currents are determined by the geometric structures of the rings;the quantum states with small eigen-energies may carry much larger currents than those quantum states with eigen-energies far away from zero.%在紧束缚近似下,解析求解了扶手椅型边界石墨烯介观环的能量本征值问题,计算和讨论了不同大小尺寸的介观环中持续电流随Aharonov-Bohm (A-B)磁通的变化,并证明了能级和持续电流关于磁通变化的周期性和特殊对称性。研究表明,持续电流显著地依赖于介观环的几何结构;零能量附近的能级可以承载较大的持续电流,而远离零能量的其他能级对持续电流的贡献很小。

  5. Bounds on higher-order Lorentz-violating photon sector coefficients from an asymmetric optical ring resonator experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Stephen R; Baynes, Fred N; Tobar, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Optical resonators provide a powerful tool for testing aspects of Lorentz invariance. Here, we present a reanalysis of an experiment where a path asymmetry was created in an optical ring resonator by introducing a dielectric prism in one arm. The frequency difference of the two fundamental counter-propagating modes was then recorded as the apparatus was orientation-modulated in the laboratory. By assuming that the minimal Standard-Model Extension coefficients vanish we are able to place bounds on higher-order parity-odd Lorentz-violating coefficients of the Standard-Model Extension. The results presented in this work set the first constraints on two previously unbounded linear combinations of d=8 parity-odd nonbirefringent nondispersive coefficients of the photon sector.

  6. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revision 1-85

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Rittenberg, A.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P.; Oyanagi, Y.; Dodder, D.C.; Grudtsin, S.N.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Frosch, R.

    1985-01-01

    This report contains summaries of 551 approved experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1 January 1980 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, KEK, LAMPF, Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute, Saclay, Serpukhov, SIN, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also experiments on proton decay. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized. Instructions are given for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  7. Damping of unwanted turbulence in wave–current experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markus, D.; Jakobsen, Morten Møller; Bletzinger, K.-U.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory testing of structures placed in combined wave–current flows is a valuable source of information for the fulfillment of offshore engineering related tasks and the development of ocean energy devices. In recirculating wave–current flumes, one of the problems encountered during...... such experimental studies is the occurrence of undesirable current induced velocity fluctuations. These fluctuations often result in significant disturbances of the generated wave profiles. In this paper, a physical flow filter is introduced that significantly reduces fluctuations in the current profile while...... permitting wave passage. This is achieved by passing the wave–current flow through a setup of perforated net tubes that allows for both horizontal and vertical flow motions. An in depth investigation of the properties of different filter configurations is presented, focusing on the reduction of turbulence...

  8. Current drive experiments in the Helicity Injected Torus - II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamp, W. T.; Redd, A. J.; Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; O'Neill, R. G.; Raman, R.; Sieck, P. E.; Smith, R. J.; Mueller, D.

    2006-10-01

    The HIT-II spherical torus (ST) device has demonstrated four toroidal plasma current drive configurations to form and sustain a tokamak: 1) inductive (ohmic) current drive, 2) coaxial helicity injection (CHI) current drive, 3) CHI initiated plasmas with ohmic sustainment (CHI+OH), and 4) ohmically initiated plasmas with CHI edge current drive (OH+ECD). CHI discharges with a sufficiently high ratio of injector current to toroidal field current form a closed flux core, and amplify the injector poloidal flux through magnetic reconnection. CHI+OH plasmas are more robust than unassisted ohmic discharges, with a wider operating space and more efficient use of the transformer Volt-seconds. Finally, edge CHI can enhance the plasma current of an ohmic discharge without significantly degrading the quality of the discharge. Results will be presented for each HIT-II operating regime, including empirical performance scalings, applicable parametric operating spaces, and requirements to produce these discharges. Thomson scattering measurements and EFIT simulations are used to evaluate confinement in several representative plasmas. Finally, we outline extensions to the HIT-II CHI studies that could be performed with NSTX, SUNIST, or other ST devices.

  9. Quantitative two-dimensional measurement of oil-film thickness by laser-induced fluorescence in a piston-ring model experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigger, Stefan; Füßer, Hans-Jürgen; Fuhrmann, Daniel; Schulz, Christof; Kaiser, Sebastian A

    2016-01-10

    This paper describes advances in using laser-induced fluorescence of dyes for imaging the thickness of oil films in a rotating ring tribometer with optical access, an experiment representing a sliding piston ring in an internal combustion engine. A method for quantitative imaging of the oil-film thickness is developed that overcomes the main challenge, the accurate calibration of the detected fluorescence signal for film thicknesses in the micrometer range. The influence of the background material and its surface roughness is examined, and a method for flat-field correction is introduced. Experiments in the tribometer show that the method yields quantitative, physically plausible results, visualizing features with submicrometer thickness.

  10. Vascular ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... Vascular ring is rare. It accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition ...

  11. Wave-current interaction, experiments with controlled uniform shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Bruno; Touboul, Julien; Rey, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Vertically varying currents have a non negligible impact on the propagation of waves. Even though the analytical aspect of the interaction between wave and sheared current is being an active subject of research, experimental data remain rare. Here, the effects of a uniformly shear were investigated in the 10 m long by 0.3 m wide wave flume of the Université de Toulon, France. The main difficulty of the study was to produce several conditions of current with constant shear (du/dz = cst) that would persist along the channel. This was achieved by using curved wire screens upstream the channel (Dunn and Tavoularis, 2007). The geometry and properties of the screens were adjusted to deflect the streamline towards the channel bed or the free surface in order to change the velocity profile. The study focused on regular wave propagating against the current for several wave frequencies and amplitudes. Properties of the free surface and flow velocity are discussed for current with positive and negative shear in order to quantify the influence of the current on the waves. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The DGA (Direction Générale de l'Armement, France) is acknowledged for its financial support through the ANR grant N° ANR-13-ASTR-0007.

  12. Current Status and Future Prospects of the SNO+ Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Arushanova, E; Asahi, S; Askins, M; Auty, D J; Back, A R; Barnard, Z; Barros, N; Beier, E W; Bialek, A; Biller, S D; Blucher, E; Bonventre, R; Braid, D; Caden, E; Caravaca, J; Carvalho, J; Cavalli, L; Chauhan, D; Chen, M; Chkvorets, O; Clark, K; Cleveland, B; Coulter, I T; Cressy, D; Dai, X; Darrach, C; Davis-Purcell, B; Deen, R; Depatie, M M; Descamps, F; Di Lodovico, F; Duhaime, N; Duncan, F; Dunger, J; Falk, E; Fatemighomi, N; Ford, R; Gorel, P; Grant, C; Grullon, S; Guillian, E; Hallin, A L; Hallman, D; Hans, S; Hartnell, J; Harvey, P; Hedayatipour, M; Heintzelman, W J; Helmer, R L; Howe, M; Hreljac, B; Hu, J; Iida, T; Jackson, C M; Jelley, N A; Jillings, C; Jones, C; Jones, P G; Kamdin, K; Kaptanoglu, T; Kaspar, J; Keener, P; Khaghani, P; Kippenbrock, L; Klein, J R; Knapik, R; Kofron, J N; Kormos, L L; Korte, S; Kraus, C; Krauss, C B; Labe, K; Lam, I; Lan, C; Land, B J; Langrock, S; LaTorre, A; Lawson, I; Lefeuvre, G M; Leming, E J; Lidgard, J; Liu, X; Liu, Y; Lozza, V; Maguire, S; Maio, A; Majumdar, K; Manecki, S; Maneira, J; Marzec, E; Mastbaum, A; McCauley, N; McDonald, A B; McMillan, J E; Mekarski, P; Miller, C; Mony, E; Mottram, M J; Novikov, V; O'Keeffe, H M; O'Sullivan, E; Gann, G D Orebi; Parnell, M J; Peeters, S J M; Pershing, T; Petriw, Z; Prior, G; Prouty, J C; Quirk, S; Reichold, A; Robertson, A; Rose, J; Rosero, R; Rost, P M; Rumleskie, J; Schumaker, M A; Schwendener, M H; Scislowski, D; Secrest, J; Seddighin, M; Segui, L; Seibert, S; Shantz, T; Shokair, T M; Sibley, L; Sinclair, J R; Singh, K; Skensved, P; Sonley, T; Stainforth, R; Strait, M; Stringer, M I; Svoboda, R; Soerensen, A; Tatar, J; Tian, L; Tolich, N; Tseng, J; Tseung, H W C; Van Berg, R; Virtue, C; von Krosigk, B; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E; Walker, J M G; Walker, M; Wasalski, O; Waterfield, J; White, R F; Wilkerson, J F; Wilson, J R; Winchester, T J; Wright, A; Yeh, M; Zhao, T; Zuber, K

    2015-01-01

    SNO+ is a large liquid scintillator-based experiment located 2km underground at SNOLAB, Sudbury, Canada. It reuses the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory detector, consisting of a 12m diameter acrylic vessel which will be filled with about 780 tonnes of ultra-pure liquid scintillator. Designed as a multi-purpose neutrino experiment, the primary goal of SNO+ is a search for the neutrinoless double-beta decay (0$\

  13. Conditioning of BPM pickup signals for operations of the Duke storage ring with a wide range of single-bunch current

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Xu; Sen-Lin, Huang; Wu, W Z; Hao, H; Wang, P; Wu, Y K

    2013-01-01

    The Duke storage ring is a dedicated driver for the storage ring based oscillator free-electron lasers (FELs), and the High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIGS). It is operated with a beam current ranging from about 1 mA to 100 mA per bunch for various operations and accelerator physics studies. High performance operations of the FEL and gamma-ray source require a stable electron beam orbit, which has been realized by the global orbit feedback system. As a critical part of the orbit feedback system, the electron beam position monitors (BPMs) are required to be able to precisely measure the electron beam orbit in a wide range of the single-bunch current. However, the high peak voltage of the BPM pickups associated with high single-bunch current degrades the performance of the BPM electronics, and can potentially damage the BPM electronics. A signal conditioning method using low pass filters is developed to reduce the peak voltage to protect the BPM electronics, and to make the BPMs capable of working with a wide ...

  14. How Different are the Ring Current Compositions and Strengths of the 20 November, 2003 and the 24 August, 2005 Geomagnetic Storms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, P. C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Ohtani, S.

    2006-05-01

    The 20 November, 2003 and the 24 August, 2005 geomagnetic storms were both driven by an interplantery magnetic field (IMF) down to approximately -60 nT. Although, the minimum SYM-H (or Dst)depression on ground reached about -500 nT for the 20 November, 2003 storm, but not even -200 nT for the 24 August, 2005 storm. There can be several reasons for this outstanding difference: the meaning of the SYMH index and the relative tail-current contribution; the duration of the southward IMF was relatively short (~1 h) for the 24 August, 2005 storm. Did this imply less time for substorms to inject fresh plasma (especially O+) into the ring current?; Cold and dense plasmasheet. We discuss the composition and intensity of the global ring current during these two storms, by using energetic neutral atom (ENA) data from the Medium- and High Energy Neutral Atom (MENA and HENA) imagers onboard the IMAGE satellite. While at first glance the strength of the ENA images in the 10-200 keV hydrogen and oxygen are comparable for the two storms, we investigate indications that the <10 keV hydrogen data is slightly enhanced for the 20 November, 2003 storm. We will re analyze the HENA images (H and O) in more detail to retrieve the parent ion intensity and investigate the effect of substorms.

  15. Simulation of Phase-Change Random Access Memory with Ring-Type Contactor for Low Reset Current by Finite Element Modelling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Yue-Feng; LING Yun; SONG Zhi-Tang; FENG Song-Lin

    2008-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element models for phase change random access memory (PCRAM) is established to simulate thermal and electrical behaviours during RESET operation. The RESET behaviours of the conventional structure (CS) and the ring-type contact in bottom electrode (RIB) are compared with each other. The simulation results indicate that the RIB cell has advantages of high heat efficiency for melting phase change material in cell,reduction of contact area and lower RESET current with maintaining good resistance contrast. The RESET current decreases from 1.26mA to 1.2mA and the heat consumption in GST material during programming increases from 12% to 37% in RIB structure. Thus the RIB structure PCRAM cell is suitable for future device with high heat efficiency and smaller RESET current.

  16. A note on the ring current in Saturn’s magnetosphere: Comparison of magnetic data obtained during the Pioneer-11 and Voyager-1 and -2 fly-bys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. Bunce

    Full Text Available We examine the residual (measured minus internal magnetic field vectors observed in Saturn’s magnetosphere during the Pioneer-11 fly-by in 1979, and compare them with those observed during the Voyager-1 and -2 fly-bys in 1980 and 1981. We show for the first time that a ring current system was present within the magnetosphere during the Pioneer-11 encounter, which was qualitatively similar to those present during the Voyager fly-bys. The analysis also shows, however, that the ring current was located closer to the planet during the Pioneer-11 encounter than during the comparable Voyager-1 fly-by, reflecting the more com-pressed nature of the magnetosphere at the time. The residual field vectors have been fit using an adaptation of the current system proposed for Jupiter by Connerney et al. (1981a. A model that provides a reasonably good fit to the Pioneer-11 Saturn data extends radially between 6.5 and 12.5 RS (compared with a noon-sector magnetopause distance of 17 RS, has a north-south extent of 4 RS, and carries a total current of 9.6 MA. A corresponding model that provides a qualitatively similar fit to the Voyager data, determined previously by Connerney et al. (1983, extends radially between 8 and 15.5 RS (compared with a noon-sector magnetopause distance for Voyager-1 of 23–24 RS, has a north-south extent of 6 RS, and carries a total current of 11.5 MA.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (current systems, magnetospheric configuration and dynamics, planetary magnetospheres

  17. Derivation of dynamo current drive in a closed-current volume and stable current sustainment in the HIT-SI experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossack, A. C.; Sutherland, D. A.; Jarboe, T. R.

    2017-02-01

    A derivation is given showing that the current inside a closed-current volume can be sustained against resistive dissipation by appropriately phased magnetic perturbations. Imposed-dynamo current drive theory is used to predict the toroidal current evolution in the helicity injected torus with steady inductive helicity injection (HIT-SI) experiment as a function of magnetic fluctuations at the edge. Analysis of magnetic fields from a HIT-SI discharge shows that the injector-imposed fluctuations are sufficient to sustain the measured toroidal current without instabilities whereas the small, plasma-generated magnetic fluctuations are not sufficiently large to sustain the current.

  18. Nobel Chemistry in the Laboratory: Synthesis of a Ruthenium Catalyst for Ring-Closing Olefin Metathesis--An Experiment for the Advanced Inorganic or Organic Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, George E.

    2007-01-01

    An experiment for the upper-level undergraduate laboratory is described in which students synthesize a ruthenium olefin metathesis catalyst, then use the catalyst to carry out the ring-closing metathesis of diethyl diallylmalonate. The olefin metathesis reaction was the subject of the 2005 Nobel Prize in chemistry. The catalyst chosen for this…

  19. Ring blowers. Ring blower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahara, Y.; Okamura, T.; Takahashi, M. (Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-06-10

    Features, structures and several products of ring blowers were outlined. The ring blower is featured by its medium characteristics because it is higher in air pressure than a turboblower and larger in airflow than a vane blower, and it is applicable flexibly to not only air blasting but various industrial fields such as suction transfer. As several products corresponding to various fields, the followings were outlined: the low noise type with optimum shapes of inlet, outlet and casing cover for reducing noises by 10 dB or more, the heat resistant, water-tight and explosion-proof types suitable for severe environmental conditions, the multi-voltage type for every country served at different voltages, the high air pressure type with two pressure rise stages, and the large airflow type with a wide impeller. In addition, as special use products, the glass fiber reinforced unsatulated polyester ring blower for respiration apparatus, and the variable speed blushless DC motor-driven one for medical beds were outlined. 2 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Lower Hybrid Current Drive Experiments in Alcator C-Mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.R. Wilson, S. Bernabei, P. Bonoli, A. Hubbard, R. Parker, A. Schmidt, G. Wallace, J. Wright, and the Alcator C-Mod Team

    2007-10-09

    A Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) system has been installed on the Alcator C-MOD tokamak at MIT. Twelve klystrons at 4.6 GHz feed a 4x22 waveguide array. This system was designed for maximum flexibility in the launched parallel wave-number spectrum. This flexibility allows tailoring of the lower hybrid deposition under a variety of plasma conditions. Power levels up to 900 kW have been injected into the tokomak. The parallel wave number has been varied over a wide range, n|| ~ 1.6–4. Driven currents have been inferred from magnetic measurements by extrapolating to zero loop voltage and by direct comparison to Fisch-Karney theory, yielding an efficiency of n20IR/P ~ 0.3. Modeling using the CQL3D code supports these efficiencies. Sawtooth oscillations vanish, accompanied with peaking of the electron temperature (Te0 rises from 2.8 to 3.8 keV). Central q is inferred to rise above unity from the collapse of the sawtooth inversion radius, indicating off-axis cd as expected. Measurements of non-thermal x-ray and electron cyclotron emission confirm the presence of a significant fast electron population that varies with phase and plasma density. The x-ray emission is observed to be radialy broader than that predicted by simple ray tracing codes. Possible explanations for this broader emission include fast electron diffusion or broader deposition than simple ray tracing predictions (perhaps due to diffractive effects).

  1. Current Status and Future Prospects of the SNO+ Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Andringa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available SNO+ is a large liquid scintillator-based experiment located 2 km underground at SNOLAB, Sudbury, Canada. It reuses the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory detector, consisting of a 12 m diameter acrylic vessel which will be filled with about 780 tonnes of ultra-pure liquid scintillator. Designed as a multipurpose neutrino experiment, the primary goal of SNO+ is a search for the neutrinoless double-beta decay (0νββ of 130Te. In Phase I, the detector will be loaded with 0.3% natural tellurium, corresponding to nearly 800 kg of 130Te, with an expected effective Majorana neutrino mass sensitivity in the region of 55–133 meV, just above the inverted mass hierarchy. Recently, the possibility of deploying up to ten times more natural tellurium has been investigated, which would enable SNO+ to achieve sensitivity deep into the parameter space for the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy in the future. Additionally, SNO+ aims to measure reactor antineutrino oscillations, low energy solar neutrinos, and geoneutrinos, to be sensitive to supernova neutrinos, and to search for exotic physics. A first phase with the detector filled with water will begin soon, with the scintillator phase expected to start after a few months of water data taking. The 0νββ Phase I is foreseen for 2017.

  2. Therapeutic drug monitoring for imatinib: Current status and Indian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Brijesh; Gota, Vikram; Menon, Hari; Sengar, Manju; Nair, Reena; Patial, Pankaj; Banavali, S D

    2013-07-01

    Imatinib is the current gold standard for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Recent pharmacokinetic studies have shown considerable variability in trough concentrations of imatinib due to variations in its metabolism, poor compliance, or drug-drug interactions and highlighted its impact on clinical response. A trough level close to 1000 ng/mL, appears to be correlated with better cytogenetic and molecular responses. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM) for imatinib may provide useful added information on efficacy, safety and compliance than clinical assessment alone and help in clinical decision making. It may be particularly helpful in patients with suboptimal response to treatment or treatment failure, severe or rare adverse events, possible drug interactions, or suspected nonadherence. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm relationship between imatinib plasma concentrations with response, and to define effective plasma concentrations in different patient populations.

  3. The Smart Ring Experience in l’Aquila (Italy: Integrating Smart Mobility Public Services with Air Quality Indexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Gabriella Villani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the “City Dynamics and Smart Environment” activities of the Smart Ring project, a model for the smart city, based on the integration of sustainable urban transport services and environmental monitoring over a 4–5-km circular path, the “Smart Ring”, around the historical center of l’Aquila (Italy. We describe our pilot experience performed during an experimental on-demand public service electric bus, “SmartBus”, which was equipped with a multi-parametric air quality low-cost gas electrochemical sensor platform, “NASUS IV”. For five days (28–29 August 2014 and 1–3 September 2014, the sensor platform was installed inside the SmartBus and measured air quality gas compounds (nitrogen dioxide, carbon oxide, sulfur dioxide, hydrogen sulfide during the service. Data were collected and analyzed on the bases of an air quality index, which provided qualitative insights on the air status potentially experienced by the users. The results obtained are in agreement with the synoptic meteorological conditions, the urban background air quality reference measurements and the potential traffic flow variations. Furthermore, they indicated that the air quality status was influenced by the gas component NO 2 , followed by H 2 S, SO 2 and CO. We discuss the features of our campaign, and we highlight the potential, limitations and key factors to consider for future project designs.

  4. EBT ring physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uckan, N.A. (ed.)

    1980-04-01

    This workshop attempted to evaluate the status of the current experimental and theoretical understanding of hot electron ring properties. The dominant physical processes that influence ring formation, scaling, and their optimal behavior are also studied. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the 27 included papers. (MOW)

  5. Alternative donor transplants for severe aplastic anemia: current experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacigalupo, Andrea; Sica, Simona

    2016-04-01

    Patients with acquired severe aplastic anemia (SAA), who lack a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) identical sibling donor (SIB), have two therapeutic options: immunosuppressive therapy with anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) and cyclosporine (CsA), or a transplant from an alternative donor. In these patients, the current guidelines of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) call for a course of ATG + CsA first and transplantation in case of no response. The alternative donor source can be an unrelated donor (UD), a cord blood (CB) unit, or a family mismatched member, in most instances genetically HLA haplo-mismatched (HAPLO). In the present review, we will discuss recent results of transplants from matched UD and SIB donors, with significantly improved outcome, especially with UD in the past decade. We will also be looking at CB transplants, and the problems of limited stem cell dose. Finally HAPLO grafts have been explored in patients lacking or having rejected an unrelated or CB graft: early results seem encouraging, though the procedure should still be considered experimental.

  6. The current status of orbital experiments for UHECR studies

    CERN Document Server

    Panasyuk, M I; Garipov, G K; Ebisuzaki, T; Gorodetzky, P; Khrenov, B A; Klimov, P A; Morozenko, V S; Sakaki, N; Saprykin, O A; Sharakin, S A; Takizawa, Y; Tkachev, L G; Yashin, I V; Zotov, M Yu

    2015-01-01

    Two types of orbital detectors of extreme energy cosmic rays are being developed nowadays: (i) TUS and KLYPVE with reflecting optical systems (mirrors) and (ii) JEM-EUSO with high-transmittance Fresnel lenses. They will cover much larger areas than existing ground-based arrays and almost uniformly monitor the celestial sphere. The TUS detector is the pioneering mission developed in SINP MSU in cooperation with several Russian and foreign institutions. It has relatively small field of view (+/-4.5 deg), which corresponds to a ground area of 6.4x10^3 sq.km. The telescope consists of a Fresnel-type mirror-concentrator (~2 sq.m) and a photo receiver (a matrix of 16x16 photomultiplier tubes). It is to be deployed on the Lomonosov satellite, and is currently at the final stage of preflight tests. Recently, SINP MSU began the KLYPVE project to be installed on board of the Russian segment of the ISS. The optical system of this detector contains a larger primary mirror (10 sq.m), which allows decreasing the energy thr...

  7. Current experience with computed tomographic cystography and blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deck, A J; Shaves, S; Talner, L; Porter, J R

    2001-12-01

    We present our experience with computed tomographic (CT) cystography for the diagnosis of bladder rupture in patients with blunt abdominal and pelvic trauma and compare the results of CT cystography to operative exploration. We identified all blunt trauma patients diagnosed with bladder rupture from January 1992 to September 1998. We also reviewed the radiology computerized information system (RIS) for all CT cystograms performed for the evaluation of blunt trauma during the same time period. The medical records and pertinent radiographs of the patients with bladder rupture who underwent CT cystography as part of their admission evaluation were reviewed. Operative findings were compared to radiographic findings. Altogether, 316 patients had CT cystograms as part of an initial evaluation for blunt trauma. Of these patients, 44 had an ultimate diagnosis of bladder rupture; 42 patients had CT cystograms indicating bladder rupture. A total of 28 patients underwent formal bladder exploration; 23 (82%) had operative findings that exactly (i.e., presence and type of rupture) matched the CT cystogram interpretation. The overall sensitivity and specificity of CT cystography for detection of bladder rupture were 95% and 100%, respectively. For intraperitoneal rupture, the sensitivity and specificity were 78% and 99%, respectively. CT cystography provides an expedient evaluation for bladder rupture caused by blunt trauma and has an accuracy comparable to that reported for plain film cystography. We recommend CT cystography over plain film cystography for patients undergoing CT evaluation for other blunt trauma-related injuries.

  8. LOCAL BUDGETS UNDER CURRENT DECENTRALIZATION: UKRAINE AND FOREIGN EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Cheberyako

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the major trends and issues of development of local budgets in Ukraine. A study of the essence of fiscal decentralization as one of the components of the management, aimed at reducing the dependence of local governments from the central government with regard to foreign experience. Particular attention is paid to local budgets under decentralization of own and delegated financial powers. The theoretical principles of fiscal decentralization and its proven impact on the socio-economic development. Studied the European countries model of local budgets. The features of formation of revenues of local budgets under decentralization. The role in shaping tax revenues of local budgets in foreign countries and Ukraine. The analysis of state policy of financial support for regional development in Ukraine. The structure of tax revenue in the context of changes in the budget and tax legislation in a decentralized tax powers. Systematized features of fiscal decentralization in Ukraine. Problems and grounded main ways of optimizing the formation of local budgets in a decentralized tax powers. Formed selection of areas targeted as ways to increase economic and financial independence of regions of Ukraine.

  9. A Loop Current experiment: Field and remote measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Peter; Lugo-Fernández, Alexis; Sheinbaum, Julio

    2016-12-01

    An overview of a new comprehensive observational study of the Loop Current (LC) in the eastern Gulf of Mexico that encompassed full-depth and near-bottom moorings, pressure-equipped inverted echo sounders (PIES) and remote sensing is presented. The study array was designed to encompass the LC from the Campeche Bank to the west Florida escarpment. This overview centers about principal findings as they pertain to mesoscale dynamics. Two companion papers provide in-depth analyses. Three LC anticyclonic eddy separation events were observed with good 3D spatial coverage over the 2½ year extent of the field study; the three separations exhibited similar processes after the LC had extended into the eastern Gulf. Large scale (∼300 km wavelength, 40-60 day periods) southward propagating meanders developed on the eastern side of the LC over deep (∼3000 m) water that were the result of baroclinic instability between the upper layer meandering jet and lower layer cyclones and anticyclones. The lower layer was only highly energetic during relatively short (∼2-3 months) intervals just prior to or during eddy detachments because of baroclinic instability. The steepening of the meanders lead to a pinch-off of LC eddies. The deep lower-layer eddies, constrained by the closed topography of the southeastern Gulf, propagated westward across the detachment zone and appear to assist in achieving separation. Small scale (∼50-100 km, periods ∼10 days) frontal eddies, observed on the western side of the LC along the Campeche Bank slope, decay over the deep water of the northern part of an extended LC, and have little influence on lower layer eddies, the east side meanders and the eddy detachment processes.

  10. Program experience with micronutrient powders and current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rah, Jee Hyun; dePee, Saskia; Kraemer, Klaus; Steiger, Georg; Bloem, Martin W; Spiegel, Paul; Wilkinson, Caroline; Bilukha, Oleg

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of micronutrient powders (MNP) in the treatment of anemia in moderately anemic children aged 6-24 mo has been clearly demonstrated. The evidence of the effectiveness of MNP in large-scale programs, however, is scarce. This article describes the program experience and findings of large-scale MNP distribution in refugee camps and in an emergency context in Bangladesh, Nepal, and Kenya. The MNP contained 15-16 micronutrients as per the WHO/World Food Programme/UNICEF joint statement, whereas the iron content was reduced to 2.5 mg from NaFeEDTA in a malaria-endemic area in Kenya. Hundreds of thousands of children aged 6-59 mo and pregnant and lactating women were targeted to consume MNP either daily or every other day over an extended period of time. Extensive social marketing campaigns were undertaken to promote regular use of the product. A number of studies were embedded in the programs to assess the impact of MNP on the nutritional status of target beneficiaries. Some improvements in anemia prevalence estimates were observed in particular subgroups, but other results did not show significant improvements. A significant decrease in the prevalence of stunting was observed in Nepal and Kenya but not in Bangladesh. Diarrhea episodes decreased significantly among children receiving MNP in Nepal. A key challenge is to ensure high MNP acceptance and adherence among beneficiaries. Investigation of non-nutritional causes of anemia is warranted in settings with high compliance but no improvement in hemoglobin status. Further investigation into the most appropriate manner to use MNP in malaria endemic settings is warranted.

  11. Serratia Infections: from Military Experiments to Current Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlen, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Serratia species, in particular Serratia marcescens, are significant human pathogens. S. marcescens has a long and interesting taxonomic, medical experimentation, military experimentation, and human clinical infection history. The organisms in this genus, particularly S. marcescens, were long thought to be nonpathogenic. Because S. marcescens was thought to be a nonpathogen and is usually red pigmented, the U.S. military conducted experiments that attempted to ascertain the spread of this organism released over large areas. In the process, members of both the public and the military were exposed to S. marcescens, and this was uncovered by the press in the 1970s, leading to U.S. congressional hearings. S. marcescens was found to be a certain human pathogen by the mid-1960s. S. marcescens and S. liquefaciens have been isolated as causative agents of numerous outbreaks and opportunistic infections, and the association of these organisms with point sources such as medical devices and various solutions given to hospitalized patients is striking. Serratia species appear to be common environmental organisms, and this helps to explain the large number of nosocomial infections due to these bacteria. Since many nosocomial infections are caused by multiply antibiotic-resistant strains of S. marcescens, this increases the danger to hospitalized patients, and hospital personnel should be vigilant in preventing nosocomial outbreaks due to this organism. S. marcescens, and probably other species in the genus, carries several antibiotic resistance determinants and is also capable of acquiring resistance genes. S. marcescens and S. liquefaciens are usually identified well in the clinical laboratory, but the other species are rare enough that laboratory technologists may not recognize them. 16S rRNA gene sequencing may enable better identification of some of the less common Serratia species. PMID:21976608

  12. Characteristics of ring current protons and oxygen ions during the 7 January 2015 and 17 March 2015 storms: Van Allen Probes/RBSPICE observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keika, K.; Seki, K.; Nose, M.; Machida, S.; Miyoshi, Y.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Mitchell, D. G.; Gkioulidou, M.; Gerrard, A. J.; Manweiler, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate enhancements and losses of energetic (~50-~500 keV) protons and oxygen ions during two intense storms on January 7 and March 17 in 2015. We use proton and oxygen ion data from RBSPICE onboard Van Allen Probes. During the January 7 storm (Dstmin = -99 nT), Van Allen Probes explored the inner magnetosphere on the night side, with both spacecraft located around midnight at apogee. Their orbits were in opposite phase. RBSPICE data are available from both spacecraft during the rapid recovery of the storm. We analyze energy spectra of both species to identify whether the ring current is symmetric or not, and determine the dominant loss process. During the March 17 storm (Dstmin = -223 nT), Van Allen Probes traveled in the pre-midnight sector during the outbound paths and around midnight during the inbound path. The orbits of the two spacecraft were in opposite phase. The Dst index during the storm showed a two-step decrease with the first minimum at 9 UT and the second at 22 UT. Enhancements of ring current ions began at RBSPICE-B at ~7 UT, and RBSPICE-A entered the ring current region at ~9 UT. The RBSPICE data show penetration of energetic protons (μ~0.1 keV/nT) down to L~4 during the first storm development. Protons penetrated more deeply (as low as L~3) during the second enhancement. The protons, which we confirmed made a dominant contribution to energy density at L = 3-4, are more enhanced in flux around the storm maximum. The flux of 200-400 keV oxygen ions was enhanced and localized around midnight near the end of the first storm development. Oxygen ion enhancements during the second development were seen in a wide range of MLT (pre-midnight to midnight). We examine the evolution of ion energy spectra to identify whether each phase of the multi-step storm development was due to deep penetration of transport/injections, density enhancements, or/and non-adiabatic acceleration of protons and oxygen ions.

  13. Current experience with renal transplantation across the ABO barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, P W; Helling, T S; Shield, C F; Beck, M; Bryan, C F

    1992-11-01

    Solid organ transplantation has traditionally been governed by the rules of blood group compatibility. Thus, it has been demonstrated that crossing the ABO blood group barrier generally results in hyperacute rejection. However, the A2 subtype of the blood group A is a weaker antigen. Under certain circumstances, organs from donors with blood group A2 can be transplanted across the ABO blood group barrier into recipients of O or B blood type. Since 1986, 33 patients including 24 blood group O and 9 blood group B patients received A2 (30) or A2B (3) donor kidneys. Both cadaver donor (31) and living-related grafts (2) have been undertaken. The mean follow-up since transplantation for the 21 patients with functioning grafts is 36 months, with a 67.2% current graft survival. Immunosuppression for these transplants consisted of azathioprine, prednisone, and cyclosporine, often in combination with prophylactic OKT3 or antilymphocyte globulin as protocol dictated. Special immunosuppressive protocols such as splenectomy or plasmapheresis were not used. The serum of the potential recipient was analyzed for immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin M (IgM) forms of antibody against A1 and A2 red blood cells. There is a strong correlation between a low (less than or equal to 1:8) anti-A1 IgG titer and both early and long-term graft function. Recipients with an IgG titer greater than 1:8 in the pretransplant serum had a much higher incidence of early graft failure. We no longer recommend transplantation of A2 kidneys into O or B recipients with a pretransplant titer of greater than 1:8 but found that recipients with low titers have graft function rates essentially equal to those of ABO-compatible patients. Patients with blood group B have, over time, lower anti-A IgG titers than do blood group O patients. In addition, the graft survival among blood group B patients is 89% compared with 58% among group O recipients. This may be due to the generally low titers found in blood

  14. [Evoked potentials in intracranial operations: current status and our experiences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, H E; Hess, W; Pohlen, G; Marggraf, G; Rimpel, J

    1987-03-01

    Intraoperative neuromonitoring, especially evoked potential monitoring, has gained interest in recent years for both the anesthesiologist evaluating cerebral function and the neurosurgeon wishing to avoid neuronal lesions during intracranial operations. Before evoked potential monitoring can be introduced as a routine method of intraoperative management, experience with this method particularly in intensive care units, is imperative. We recorded evoked potentials with the Compact Four (Nicolet) and Basis 8000 (Schwarzer Picker International) computer systems. Preoperative derivations should be done with the same apparatus used intraoperatively and parameters of peri- and intraoperative derivations should not be changed. The patient's head must be fixed in a Mayfield clamp in order to avoid artefacts during trepanation. The possible artefacts due to apparatus, patient, or anesthesia are summarized in the tables. The derivations of evoked potentials should be supervised by a person who is not involved in the anesthesia or the surgical procedure; this condition may change in the future with full automatization of the recording technique and alarms. Good communication between surgeon, anesthesiologist, and neurophysiological assistant is a prerequisite. The modality is chosen in accordance with the affected neuronal system: visual-evoked potential (VEP) monitoring in the management of processes affecting the visual pathway, brain stem auditory-(BAER) and somatosensory-evoked potential (SSEP) monitoring in lesions affecting these pathways, in particular space-occupying lesions of the posterior fossa. VEP monitoring may be useful, but we observed alterations of the responses without changes in the level of anesthesia or manipulation of the visual pathways. In space-occupying processes of the cerebellopontine angle, BAER could not be developed in nearly all cases because the large underlying tumor had caused the disappearance of waves II-V. In these cases SSEP monitoring

  15. Commentary on accessing 3-D currents in space: Experiences from Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, M. W.; Haaland, S.; Escoubet, P. C.; Dong, X.-C.

    2016-08-01

    The curlometer was introduced to estimate the electric current density from four-point measurements in space; anticipating the realization of the four spacecraft Cluster mission which began full science operations in February 2001. The method uses Ampère's law to estimate current from the magnetic field measurements, suitable for the high-conductivity plasma of the magnetosphere and surrounding regions. The accuracy of the method is limited by the spatial separation knowledge, accuracy of the magnetic field measurement, and the relative scale size of the current structures sampled but nevertheless has proven to be robust and reliable in many regions of the magnetosphere. The method has been applied successfully and has been a key element, in studies of the magnetopause currents; the magnetotail current sheet; and the ring current, as well as allowing other current structures such as flux tubes and field aligned currents to be determined. The method is also applicable to situations where less than four spacecraft are closely grouped or where special assumptions (particularly stationarity) can be made. In view of the new four-point observations of the MMS mission taking place now, which cover a dramatically different spatial regime, we comment on the performance, adaptability, and lessons learnt from the curlometer technique. We emphasize the adaptability of the method, in particular, to the new sampling regime offered by the MMS mission; thereby offering a tool to address open questions on small-scale current structures.

  16. The Nonlinear Coupling of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron and Lower Hybrid Waves in the Ring Current Region: The Magnetic Storm May 1-7 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Krivorutsky, E.; Gamayunov, K.; Avanov, L.

    2003-01-01

    The excitation of lower hybrid waves (LHWs) is a widely discussed mechanism of interaction between plasma species in space, and is one of the unresolved questions of magnetospheric multi-ion plasmas. In this paper we present the morphology, dynamics, and level of LHW activity generated by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves during the May 2-7, 1998 storm period on the global scale. The LHWs were calculated based on our newly developed self-consistent model that couples the system of two kinetic equations: one equation describes the ring current (RC) ion dynamic, and another equation describes the evolution of EMIC waves. It is found that the LHWs are excited by helium ions due to their mass dependent drift in the electric field of EMIC waves. The level of LHW activity is calculated assuming that the induced scattering process is the main saturation mechanism for these waves. The calculated LHWs electric fields are consistent with the observational data.

  17. Vortex rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhmetov, D.G. [Lavrentiev Institute of Hydrodynamics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-01

    This book presents a comprehensive coverage of the wide field of vortex rings. The book presents the results of systematic experimental investigations, theoretical foundation, as well as the practical applications of vortex rings, such as the extinction of fires at gushing gas and oil wells. All the basic properties of vortex rings as well as their hydrodynamic structures are presented. Special attention is paid to the formation and motion of turbulent vortex rings. (orig.)

  18. Non-Commutative Ring Theory

    CERN Document Server

    López-Permouth, Sergio

    1990-01-01

    The papers of this volume share as a common goal the structure and classi- fication of noncommutative rings and their modules, and deal with topics of current research including: localization, serial rings, perfect endomorphism rings, quantum groups, Morita contexts, generalizations of injectivitiy, and Cartan matrices.

  19. Ring theory

    CERN Document Server

    Rowen, Louis H

    1991-01-01

    This is an abridged edition of the author's previous two-volume work, Ring Theory, which concentrates on essential material for a general ring theory course while ommitting much of the material intended for ring theory specialists. It has been praised by reviewers:**""As a textbook for graduate students, Ring Theory joins the best....The experts will find several attractive and pleasant features in Ring Theory. The most noteworthy is the inclusion, usually in supplements and appendices, of many useful constructions which are hard to locate outside of the original sources....The audience of non

  20. Ring closure in actin polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Supurna; Chattopadhyay, Sebanti

    2017-03-01

    We present an analysis for the ring closure probability of semiflexible polymers within the pure bend Worm Like Chain (WLC) model. The ring closure probability predicted from our analysis can be tested against fluorescent actin cyclization experiments. We also discuss the effect of ring closure on bend angle fluctuations in actin polymers.

  1. Postoperative outcome after oesophagectomy for cancer: Nutritional status is the missing ring in the current prognostic scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, B; Scarpa, M; Cavallin, F; Cagol, M; Alfieri, R; Saadeh, L; Ancona, E; Castoro, C

    2015-06-01

    Several prognostic scores were designed in order to estimate the risk of postoperative adverse events. None of them includes a component directly associated to the nutritional status. The aims of the study were the evaluation of performance of risk-adjusted models for early outcomes after oesophagectomy and to develop a score for severe complication prediction with special consideration regarding nutritional status. A comparison of POSSUM and Charlson score and their derivates, ASA, Lagarde score and nutritional index (PNI) was performed on 167 patients undergoing oesophagectomy for cancer. A logistic regression model was also estimated to obtain a new prognostic score for severe morbidity prediction. Overall morbidity was 35.3% (59 cases), severe complications (grade III-V of Clavien-Dindo classification) occurred in 20 cases. Discrimination was poor for all the scores. Multivariable analysis identified pulse, connective tissue disease, PNI and potassium as independent predictors of severe morbidity. This model showed good discrimination and calibration. Internal validation using standard bootstrapping techniques confirmed the good performance. Nutrition could be an independent risk factor for major complications and a nutritional status coefficient could be included in current prognostic scores to improve risk estimation of major postoperative complications after oesophagectomy for cancer. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. GPU-based low-level trigger system for the standalone reconstruction of the ring-shaped hit patterns in the RICH Cherenkov detector of NA62 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammendola, R.; Biagioni, A.; Chiozzi, S.; Cretaro, P.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Di Lorenzo, S.; Fantechi, R.; Fiorini, M.; Frezza, O.; Gianoli, A.; Lamanna, G.; Lo Cicero, F.; Lonardo, A.; Martinelli, M.; Neri, I.; Paolucci, P. S.; Pastorelli, E.; Piandani, R.; Piccini, M.; Pontisso, L.; Rossetti, D.; Simula, F.; Sozzi, M.; Vicini, P.

    2017-03-01

    This project aims to exploit the parallel computing power of a commercial Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) to implement fast pattern matching in the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector for the level 0 (L0) trigger of the NA62 experiment. In this approach, the ring-fitting algorithm is seedless, being fed with raw RICH data, with no previous information on the ring position from other detectors. Moreover, since the L0 trigger is provided with a more elaborated information than a simple multiplicity number, it results in a higher selection power. Two methods have been studied in order to reduce the data transfer latency from the readout boards of the detector to the GPU, i.e., the use of a dedicated NIC device driver with very low latency and a direct data transfer protocol from a custom FPGA-based NIC to the GPU. The performance of the system, developed through the FPGA approach, for multi-ring Cherenkov online reconstruction obtained during the NA62 physics runs is presented.

  3. Laboratory experiments on current flow between stationary and moving electrodes in magnetoplasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, Reiner L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed in order to investigate the basic physics of current flow between tethered electrodes in magnetoplasmas. The major findings are summarized. The experiments are performed in an effectively very large laboratory plasma in which not only the nonlinear current collection is addressed but also the propagation and spread of currents, the formation of current wings by moving electrodes, the current closure, and radiation from transmission lines. The laboratory plasma consists of a pulsed dc discharge whose Maxwellian afterglow provides a quiescent, current-free uniform background plasma. Electrodes consisting of collectors and electron emitters are inserted into the plasma and a pulsed voltage is applied between two floating electrodes via insulated transmission lines. Besides the applied current in the wire, the total current density in the plasma is obtained from space and time resolved magnetic probe measurements via Maxwell's law. Langmuir probes yield the plasma parameters.

  4. How pattern formation in ring networks of excitatory and inhibitoryspiking neurons depends on the input current regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit eKriener

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pattern formation, i.e., the generation of an inhomogeneous spatial activity distribution in a dynamical system with translation invariant structure, is a well-studied phenomenon in neuronal network dynamics,specifically in neural field models. These are population models to describe the spatio-temporal dynamics of large groups of neurons in terms of macroscopic variables such as population firing rates. Though neural field models are often deduced from and equipped with biophysically meaningfulproperties, a direct mapping to simulations of individual spiking neuron populations is rarely considered. Neurons have a distinct identity defined by their action on their postsynaptic targets. In its simplest form they act either excitatorily or inhibitorily.When the distribution of neuron identities is assumed to be periodic, pattern formation can be observed, given the coupling strength is supercritical, i.e., larger than a critical weight. We find that this critical weight is strongly dependent on the characteristics of the neuronal input, i.e., depends on whether neurons are mean- orfluctuation driven, and different limits in linearizing the full non-linear system apply in order to assess stability.In particular, if neurons are mean-driven, the linearization has a very simple form and becomesindependent of both the fixed point firing rate and the variance of the input current, while in the very strongly fluctuation-driven regime the fixed point rate, as well as the input mean and variance areimportant parameters in the determination of the critical weight.We demonstrate that interestingly even in ``intermediate'' regimes, when the system is technically fluctuation-driven, the simple linearization neglecting the variance of the input can yield the better prediction of the critical couplingstrength. We moreover analyze the effects of structural randomness by rewiring individualsynapses or redistributing weights, as well as coarse-graining on pattern

  5. Computer controlled performance mapping of thermionic converters: effect of collector, guard-ring potential imbalances on the observed collector current-density, voltage characteristics and limited range performance map of an etched-rhenium, niobium planar converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manista, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of collector, guard-ring potential imbalance on the observed collector-current-density J, collector-to-emitter voltage V characteristic was evaluated in a planar, fixed-space, guard-ringed thermionic converter. The J,V characteristic was swept in a period of 15 msec by a variable load. A computerized data acquisition system recorded test parameters. The results indicate minimal distortion of the J,V curve in the power output quadrant for the nominal guard-ring circuit configuration. Considerable distortion, along with a lowering of the ignited-mode striking voltage, was observed for the configuration with the emitter shorted to the guard ring. A limited-range performance map of an etched-rhenium, niobium, planar converter was obtained by using an improved computer program for the data acquisition system.

  6. The Experiment of Modulated Toroidal Current on HT-7 and HT-6M Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The Experiments of Modulated Toroidal Current were done on the HT-6M tokamakand HT-7 superconducting tokamak. The toroidal current was modulated by programming theOhmic heating field. Modulation of the plasma current has been used successfully to suppressMHD activity in discharges near the density limit where large MHD m = 2 tearing modes weresuppressed by sufficiently large plasma current oscillations. The improved Ohmic confinementphase was observed during modulating toroidal current (MTC) on the Hefei Tokamak-6M (HT-6M) and Hefei superconducting Tokamak-7 (HT-7). A toroidal frequency-modulated current,induced by a modulated loop voltage, was added on the plasma equilibrium current. The ratio ofA.C. amplitude of plasma current to the main plasma current △Ip/Ip is about 12% ~ 30%. Thedifferent formats of the frequency-modulated toroidal current were compared.

  7. Planetary Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Tiscareno, Matthew S

    2011-01-01

    Planetary rings are the only nearby astrophysical disks, and the only disks that have been investigated by spacecraft. Although there are significant differences between rings and other disks, chiefly the large planet/ring mass ratio that greatly enhances the flatness of rings (aspect ratios as small as 1e-7), understanding of disks in general can be enhanced by understanding the dynamical processes observed at close-range and in real-time in planetary rings. We review the known ring systems of the four giant planets, as well as the prospects for ring systems yet to be discovered. We then review planetary rings by type. The main rings of Saturn comprise our system's only dense broad disk and host many phenomena of general application to disks including spiral waves, gap formation, self-gravity wakes, viscous overstability and normal modes, impact clouds, and orbital evolution of embedded moons. Dense narrow rings are the primary natural laboratory for understanding shepherding and self-stability. Narrow dusty...

  8. Storage-ring ionization and recombination experiments with multiply charged ions relevant to astrophysical and fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Schippers, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Past and ongoing research activities at the Heidelberg heavy-ion storage-ring TSR are reviewed which aim at providing accurate absolute rate coefficients and cross sections of atomic collision processes for applications in astrophysics and magnetically confined fusion. In particular, dielectronic recombination and electron impact ionization of iron ions are discussed as well as dielectronic recombination of tungsten ions.

  9. Neptune's ring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porco, C. C.; Nicholson, P. D.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Lissauer, J. J.; Esposito, L. W.

    The authors review the current state of knowledge regarding the structure, particle properties, kinematics, dynamics, origin, and evolution of the Neptune rings derived from Earth-based and Voyager data. Neptune has a diverse system of five continuous rings - 2 broad (Galle and Lassell) and 3 narrow (Adams, Le Verrier, and Arago) - plus a narrow discontinuous ring sharing the orbit of one of its ring-region satellites, Galatea. The outermost Adams ring contains the only arcs observed so far in Voyager images. The five arcs vary in angular extent from ≡1° to ≡10°, and exhibit internal azimuthal structure with typical spatial scales of ≡0.5°. All five lie within ≡40° of longitude. Dust is present throughout the Neptune system and measureable quantities of it were detected over Neptune's north pole. The Adams ring (including the arcs) and the Le Verrier ring contain a significant fraction of dust. The Neptune ring particles are probably red, and may consist of ice "dirtied" with silicates and/or some carbon-bearing material. A kinematic model for the arcs derived from Voyager data, the arcs' physical characteristics, and their orbital geometry and phasing are all roughly in accord with single-satellite arc shepherding by Galatea, though the presence of small kilometer-sized bodies embedded either within the arcs or placed at their Lagrange points may explain some inconsistencies with this model.

  10. Net current measurements and secondary electron emission characteristics of the Voyager plasma science experiment and their impact on data interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcnutt, Ralph L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Voyager Plasma Science (PLS) instrument is capable of returning integral (DC) current measurements, similar in some respects to measurements made with a Langmuir probe or a retarding potential analyzer, although there are significant differences. The integral measurements were made during a calibration sequence in the solar wind, during Cruise Science Maneuvers, and within the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn by Voyager 1. After the failure of the PLS experiment following the Saturn encounter, that instrument was placed in the DC return mode returning possibly usable data from early 1981 through early 1985. The DC return measurements are difficult to interpret and are above threshold values only for relatively large fluxes; the determination of the measured current level is dependent on the operating temperature of the preamplifiers which further complicates the interpretation. Nevertheless, these measurements can be used to determine the efficiency of the suppressor grid at preventing the loss of secondary electrons off the collector plate. Some DC return measurements have been invaluable in aiding in the interpretation of some electron plasma measurements not previously understood. It is found that electron spectra can be significantly modified by the presence of second generation secondary electrons produced by either first generation secondaries or photoelectrons on the support ring of the negative high voltage modulator grid within the instrument housing.

  11. Ring autosomes: some unexpected findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caba, L; Rusu, C; Plăiaşu; Gug, G; Grămescu, M; Bujoran, C; Ochiană, D; Voloşciuc, M; Popescu, R; Braha, E; Pânzaru, M; Butnariu, L; Sireteanu, A; Covic, M; Gorduza, Ev

    2012-12-01

    Ring chromosomes are rare entities, usually associated with phenotypic abnormalities in correlation with the loss of genetic material. There are various breakpoints and sometimes there is a dynamic mosaicism that is reflected in clinical features. Most of the ring chromosomes are de novo occurrences. Our study reflects the experience of three Romanian cytogenetic laboratories in the field of ring chromosomes. We present six cases with ring chromosomes involving chromosomes 5, 13, 18, and 21. All ring chromosomes were identified after birth in children with plurimalformative syndromes. The ring chromosome was present in mosaic form in three cases, and this feature reflects the ring's instability. In case of ring chromosome 5, we report a possible association with oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum.

  12. Heavy ion storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuch, R.

    1987-01-01

    A brief overview of synchrotron storage rings for heavy ions, which are presently under construction in different accelerator laboratories is given. Ions ranging from protons up to uranium ions at MeV/nucleon energies will be injected into these rings using multiturn injection from the accelerators available or being built in these laboratories. After injection, it is planned to cool the phase space distribution of the ions by merging them with cold electron beams or laser beams, or by using stochastic cooling. Some atomic physics experiments planned for these rings are presented.

  13. A Measurement of Coherent Neutral Pion Production in Neutrino Neutral Current Interactions in NOMAD experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kullenberg, C T

    2009-01-01

    We present a study of exclusive neutral pion production in neutrino-nucleus Neutral Current interactions using data from the NOMAD experiment at the CERN SPS. The data correspond to $1.44 \\times 10^6$ muon-neutrino Charged Current interactions in the energy range $2.5 \\leq E_{\

  14. Frequency translation of light waves by propagation around an optical ring circuit containing a frequency shifter: I. Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, K; Horiguchi, T; Koyamada, Y

    1993-11-20

    A technique for the external frequency translation of light waves is reported. The technique permits the stepwise sweeping of an optical frequency over a wide range with high linearity with respect to time. The frequency translator is composed of an optical pulse modulator and an optical ring circuit containing an acousto-optic frequency shifter and an optical amplifier. The pulse launched into the ring circuit undergoes a constant frequency shift for each circulation around the circuit and the frequency can be translated to a considerable degree from that of the original input pulse. We report a stepwise frequency translation over approximately 68 GHz for a 1.5-µm light wave with a strictly constant frequency-sweep rate and an approximately constant intensity.

  15. Fast electron dynamics in lower hybrid current drive experiment on HT-7 tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Yue-Jiang; Kuang Gang-Li; Li Jian-Gang; HT-7 Team; Wan Bao-Nian; Chen Zhong-Yong; Hu Li-Qun; Lin Shi-Yao; Ruan Huai-Lin; Qian Jin-Ping; Zhen Xiang-Jun; Ding Bo-Jiang

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic behaviour of fast electron in lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) experiments is a crucial issue in the sense of enhancing plasma performance. A new hard x-ray diagnostic system on HT-7 allows the investigation of the lower hybrid wave dynamics. The behaviour of fast electron is studied in several kinds of LHCD experiments, including long pulse discharges, high performance discharges and counter-LHCD experiments.

  16. Modeling a Rotating Partial Ring Current in the Saturn's Magnetosphere as a Source of B-field Periodicities: A Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyganenko, N. A.; Brandt, P. C.; Khurana, K. K.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2010-12-01

    periodically injected energetic (>2 keV) particles that form a partial ring current (PRC) co-rotating with the planet. Plasma pressures inferred from the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) (2 keV) will be used to compute the currents and their associated magnetic field perturbations. The distribution of the "hot" (>2 keV)plasma pressure is derived from Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) images, obtained by the Ion Neutral Camera (INCA) and in-situ spectral measurements.

  17. Planetary Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1994-01-01

    Just over two decades ago, Jim Pollack made a critical contribution to our understanding of planetary ring particle properties, and resolved a major apparent paradox between radar reflection and radio emission observations. At the time, particle properties were about all there were to study about planetary rings, and the fundamental questions were, why is Saturn the only planet with rings, how big are the particles, and what are they made of? Since then, we have received an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems into the complex webs of structure that we now know them to display. Insights gained from studies of these giant dynamical analogs have carried over into improved understanding of the formation of the planets themselves from particle disks, a subject very close to Jim's heart. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is ark emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system

  18. Design and experiment of 4H-SiC JBS diodes achieving a near-theoretical breakdown voltage with non-uniform floating limiting rings terminal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hao; Song, Qingwen; Tang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yimeng; Zhang, Yimen; Zhang, Yuming

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a 4H-SiC Junction Barrier Schottky diode (JBS) with non-uniform floating limiting rings (FLRs) has been investigated and fabricated using n type 4H-SiC epitaxial layer with thickness of 31 μm and doping concentration of 3.3 × 1015 cm-3. According to the simulated results, the key parameters of a FLRs design to achieve a high voltage are the minimum space between two adjacent doped rings, spacing growth step and number of rings. The experimental results also show a great agreement with simulated results. Meanwhile, a near-ideal breakdown voltage of 3.7 kV was achieved, which yield around 95% of the parallel-plane breakdown voltage. The forward characteristics show that the fabricated JBS diodes have a forward current density of 210 A/cm2 at 3 V and a specific on-resistance (Rsp-on) of 7.58 mΩ cm2. Different FLRs parameters have no effect on the forward device performance.

  19. Principal component analysis of Birkeland currents determined by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, S. E.; Carter, J. A.; Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Principal component analysis is performed on Birkeland or field-aligned current (FAC) measurements from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment. Principal component analysis (PCA) identifies the patterns in the FACs that respond coherently to different aspects of geomagnetic activity. The regions 1 and 2 current system is shown to be the most reproducible feature of the currents, followed by cusp currents associated with magnetic tension forces on newly reconnected field lines. The cusp currents are strongly modulated by season, indicating that their strength is regulated by the ionospheric conductance at the foot of the field lines. PCA does not identify a pattern that is clearly characteristic of a substorm current wedge. Rather, a superposed epoch analysis of the currents associated with substorms demonstrates that there is not a single mode of response, but a complicated and subtle mixture of different patterns.

  20. Principle Component Analysis of Birkeland Currents Determined by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, S. E.; Carter, J. A.; Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Principle Component Analysis is performed on northern and southern hemisphere Birkeland or field-aligned current (FAC) measurements from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE). PCA identifies the patterns in the FACs that respond coherently to different aspects of geomagnetic activity. The region 1 and 2 current system is shown to be the most reproducible feature of the currents, followed by cusp currents associated with magnetic tension forces on newly-reconnected field lines. The cusp currents are strongly modulated by season, indicating that their strength is regulated by the ionospheric conductance at the foot of the field lines. PCA does not identify a pattern that is clearly characteristic of a substorm current wedge. Rather, a superposed epoch analysis of the currents associated with substorms demonstrates that there is not a single mode of response, but a complicated and subtle mixture of different patterns. Other interhemispheric differences are discussed.

  1. Principal component analysis of Birkeland currents determined by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Milan, S E; Korth, H; Anderson, B J

    2016-01-01

    Principal component analysis is performed on Birkeland or field-aligned current (FAC) measurements from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment. Principal component analysis (PCA) identifies the patterns in the FACs that respond coherently to different aspects of geomagnetic activity. The regions 1 and 2 current system is shown to be the most reproducible feature of the currents, followed by cusp currents associated with magnetic tension forces on newly reconnected field lines. The cusp currents are strongly modulated by season, indicating that their strength is regulated by the ionospheric conductance at the foot of the field lines. PCA does not identify a pattern that is clearly characteristic of a substorm current wedge. Rather, a superposed epoch analysis of the currents associated with substorms demonstrates that there is not a single mode of response, but a complicated and subtle mixture of different patterns.

  2. Theory and experiments on RF plasma heating, current drive and profile control in TORE SUPRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the main experimental and theoretical achievements related to the study of RF heating and non-inductive current drive and particularly phenomena related to the current density profile control and the potentiality of producing stationary enhanced performance regimes: description of the Lower Hybrid (LH) and Ion Cyclotron Resonant Frequency (ICRF) systems; long pulse coupling performance of the RF systems; observation of the transition to the so-called ``stationary LHEP regime`` in which the (flat) central current density and (peaked) electron temperature profiles are fully decoupled; experiments on ICRF sawtooth stabilization with the combined effect of LHCD modifying the current density profile; diffusion of fast electrons generated by LH waves; ramp-up experiments in which the LH power provided a significant part of the resistive poloidal flux and flux consumption scaling; theory of spectral wave diffusion and multipass absorption; fast wave current drive modelling with the Alcyon full wave code; a reflector LH antenna concept. 18 figs., 48 refs.

  3. Characteristics of persistent spin current components in a quasi-periodic Fibonacci ring with spin-orbit interactions: Prediction of spin-orbit coupling and on-site energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Moumita; Maiti, Santanu K.

    2016-12-01

    In the present work we investigate the behavior of all three components of persistent spin current in a quasi-periodic Fibonacci ring subjected to Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions. Analogous to persistent charge current in a conducting ring where electrons gain a Berry phase in presence of magnetic flux, spin Berry phase is associated during the motion of electrons in presence of a spin-orbit field which is responsible for the generation of spin current. The interplay between two spin-orbit fields along with quasi-periodic Fibonacci sequence on persistent spin current is described elaborately, and from our analysis, we can estimate the strength of any one of two spin-orbit couplings together with on-site energy, provided the other is known.

  4. Polydispersed Gravity Currents Along a V-Shaped Valley: Experiments and Box Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriaux, C. A. M. D.; Besson, C. K.

    2014-12-01

    Turbidity currents, which occur at the continental margins and transport sediments along submarines canyons are particulate gravity currents made of poorly sorted particles. In such currents, the flow is to a large extent controlled by the grain size distribution of the particles at the source. Here we present the combined results of a box model and lock-exchange experiments of particulate gravity currents at small volumetric concentrations of particles (Tecnologia (FCT, Portugal) under Project Pest-OE/CTE /LA0019/2013-2014.

  5. An experiment of dynamical behaviours in an erbium-doped fibre-ring laser with loss modulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yue; Feng Xue; Zhang Wei; Liu Xiao-Ming

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports a systematic experimental investigation on the dynamics in the low-frequency region in an erbium-doped fibre-ring laser with loss modulation.A rich variety of bifurcation is analyzed through the bifurcation diagram and structured with the concept of the winding numbers.The coexistence of multiple attractors and the crisis that appear in the saddle-node bifurcations,and an interesting structure of bifurcation which is similar to the bifurcations in high-frequency range,have been observed.

  6. SUPRAMITRAL RING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh G

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Supra mitral ring is a rare cause for congenital mitral valve obstr uction. The reported incidence of supramitral ring is 0.2-0.4% in general population and 8% in patients with congenital mitral valve disease. The condition is characterized by an abnormal ridge of connective tissue often circumferential in shape ,on the atrial side of the mitral valve encroaching on the orifice of the mitral valve. It may adhere to the leaflets of the valve and restrict their movements. Although a supramitral ring may be rarely nonobstructive, it often results in mitral valve inflow obstruction.

  7. Modified Newton's rings: II

    CERN Document Server

    Chaitanya, T Sai; Krishna, V Sai; Anandh, B Shankar; Umesh, K S

    2010-01-01

    In an earlier work (Shankar kumar Jha, A Vyas, O S K S Sastri, Rajkumar Jain & K S Umesh, 'Determination of wavelength of laser light using Modified Newton's rings setup', Physics Education, vol. 22, no.3, 195-202(2005)) reported by our group, a version of Newton's rings experiment called Modified Newton's rings was proposed. The present work is an extension of this work. Here, a general formula for wavelength has been derived, applicable for a plane of observation at any distance. A relation between the focal length and the radius curvature is also derived for a plano-convex lens which is essentially used as a concave mirror. Tracker, a video analysis software, freely downloadable from the net, is employed to analyze the fringes captured using a CCD camera. Two beams which give rise to interference fringes in conventional Newton's rings and in the present setup are clearly distinguished.

  8. Determinantal rings

    CERN Document Server

    Bruns, Winfried

    1988-01-01

    Determinantal rings and varieties have been a central topic of commutative algebra and algebraic geometry. Their study has attracted many prominent researchers and has motivated the creation of theories which may now be considered part of general commutative ring theory. The book gives a first coherent treatment of the structure of determinantal rings. The main approach is via the theory of algebras with straightening law. This approach suggest (and is simplified by) the simultaneous treatment of the Schubert subvarieties of Grassmannian. Other methods have not been neglected, however. Principal radical systems are discussed in detail, and one section is devoted to each of invariant and representation theory. While the book is primarily a research monograph, it serves also as a reference source and the reader requires only the basics of commutative algebra together with some supplementary material found in the appendix. The text may be useful for seminars following a course in commutative ring theory since a ...

  9. Cave Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    hypothesis, that cave rings are formed in the same manner as coffee rings[3], that is, due to the enhanced deposition at the edges of sessile drops ...ring’ is the deposit formed when a sessile drop of a solution containing dissolved particles, such as coffee or salt, dries. This was investigated by...who expanded on Deegan et al.[3] to find an exact form for the evaporation flux over a sessile drop . It turns out that solving 179 for the flux is

  10. Magnetization of two coupled rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avishai, Y [Department of Physics and Ilse Katz Center for Nanotechnology, Ben Gurion University, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Luck, J M [Institut de Physique Theorique, IPhT, CEA Saclay, and URA 2306, CNRS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)], E-mail: yshai@bgu.ac.il, E-mail: jean-marc.luck@cea.fr

    2009-05-01

    We investigate the persistent currents and magnetization of a mesoscopic system consisting of two clean metallic rings sharing a single contact point in a magnetic field. Many novel features with respect to the single-ring geometry are underlined, including the explicit dependence of wavefunctions on the Aharonov-Bohm fluxes, the complex pattern of two-fold and three-fold degeneracies, the key role of length and flux commensurability, and in the case of commensurate ring lengths the occurrence of idle levels which do not carry any current. Spin-orbit interactions, induced by the electric fields of charged wires threading the rings, give rise to a peculiar version of the Aharonov-Casher effect where, unlike for a single ring, spin is not conserved. Remarkably enough, this can only be realized when the Aharonov-Bohm fluxes in both rings are neither integer nor half-integer multiples of the flux quantum.

  11. The charged current neutrino cross section for solar neutrinos, and background to \\BBz\\ experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Ejiri, H

    2013-01-01

    Solar neutrinos can interact with the source isotope in neutrinoless double beta decay experiments through charged current and neutral current interactions. The charged-current product nucleus will then beta decay with a Q-value larger than the double beta decay Q-value. As a result, this process can populate the region of interest and be a background to the double beta decay signal. In this paper we estimate the solar neutrino capture rates on three commonly used double beta decay isotopes, \

  12. Wave Scattering by Double Slotted Barriers in A Steady Current: Experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The adoption of slotted breakwaters can be an ideal option in the protection of very large near-shore floating structures that may extend offshore to a considerable water depth. In this paper, we experimently investigated the behaviour of wave transmission and reflection coefficients of double slotted barriers in the presence of a steady opposing current. The experimental results show that opposing currents have only minor effects on wave reflection, but can significantly reduce the wave transmission through double slotted barriers. The experimental results suggest that coastal currents should be taken into consideration for an economical design of slotted breakwaters.

  13. VISAR Unfold Analysis of Load Current in MagLIF Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Mark; McBride, Ryan; Martin, Matthew

    2013-10-01

    An accurate prediction of the load current is essential in the performance of MagLIF experiments on the Z-Machine at Sandia. At present, the most accurate diagnostic for measuring load current on the Z-machine is the well-established VISAR technique. The VISAR diagnostic measures the velocity of a thin aluminum foil placed near the load, which is subject to the magnetic pressure produced by the load current, using a laser interferometer. The load current unfold analysis is highly nonlinear due to the equation of state/conductivity models, along with the MHD equations governing the foil. Nevertheless, an accurate load current unfold from the VISAR measurement is possible using an MHD code, in conjunction with an optimization algorithm. We will review the VISAR unfold analysis, and show recent current unfolds of MagLIF experiments in comparison to load current measurements using B-dot probes. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. Harmonic Analysis of Currents and Voltages Obtained in the Result of Computational Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Novash

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a methodology for execution of a harmonic analysis of current and voltage numerical values obtained in the result of a computational experiment and saved in an external data file. The harmonic analysis has been carried out in the Mathcad mathematical packet environment.

  15. Rings dominate western Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal L., Francisco V.; Vidal L., Victor M. V.; Molero, José María Pérez

    Surface and deep circulation of the central and western Gulf of Mexico is controlled by interactions of rings of water pinched from the gulf's Loop Current. The discovery was made by Mexican oceanographers who are preparing a full-color, 8-volume oceanographic atlas of the gulf.Anticyclonic warm-core rings pinch off the Loop Current at a rate of about one to two per year, the scientists of the Grupo de Estudios Oceanográficos of the Instituto de Investigaciones Eléctricas (GEO-IIE) found. The rings migrate west until they collide with the continental shelf break of the western gulf, almost always between 22° and 23°N latitude. On their westward travel they transfer angular momentum and vorticity to the surrounding water, generating cyclonic circulations and vortex pairs that completely dominate the entire surface and deep circulation of the central and western gulf.

  16. Analytical Calculation of the Eddy Current Loss of Turbine Generator Retaining Ring%汽轮发电机转子护环涡流损耗的解析计算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丹; 张树波; 刘庆河

    2013-01-01

    The eddy current distribution and eddy current loss of turbine generator retaining ring are analysed by analytical method in this paper. The common formula to calculate the eddy current loss is obtained.%  本文用解析法分析了汽轮发电机转子护环涡流分布及其涡流损耗,得出了计算汽轮发电机转子护环涡流损耗的一般公式。

  17. OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE WITH FAST FIBER-OPTIC BEAM LOSS MONITORS FOR THE ADVANCED PHOTON SOURCE STORAGE RING SUPERCONDUCTING UNDULATORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooling, J.; Harkay, K.; Sajaev, V.; Shang, H.

    2017-06-25

    Fast fiber-optic (FFO) beam loss monitors (BLMs) installed with the first two superconducting undulators (SCUs) in the Advanced Photon Source storage ring have proven to be a useful diagnostic for measuring deposited charge (energy) during rapid beam loss events. The first set of FFOBLMs were installed outside the cryostat of the short SCU, a 0.33-m long device, above and below the beam centerline. The second set are mounted with the first 1.1-mlong SCU within the cryostat, on the outboard and inboard sides of the vacuum chamber. The next 1.1-m-long SCU is scheduled to replace the short SCU later in 2016 and will be fitted with FFOBLMs in a manner similar to original 1.1-m device. The FFOBLMs were employed to set timing and voltage for the abort kicker (AK) system. The AK helps to prevent quenching of the SCUs during beam dumps [1] by directing the beam away from the SC magnet windings. The AK is triggered by the Machine Protection System (MPS). In cases when the AK fails to prevent quenching, the FFOBLMs show that losses often begin before detection by the MPS.

  18. Experiments on the magnetic coupling in a small scale counter rotating marine current turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, I. C.; Lee, N. J.; Wata, J.; Hyun, B. S.; Lee, Y. H.

    2016-05-01

    Modern economies are dependent on energy consumption to ensure growth or sustainable development. Renewable energy sources provide a source of energy that can provide energy security and is renewable. Tidal energy is more predictable than other sources or renewable energy like the sun or wind. Horizontal axis marine current turbines are currently the most advanced and commercially feasible option for tidal current convertors. A dual rotor turbine is theoretically able to produce more power than a single rotor turbine at the same fluid velocity. Previous experiments for a counter rotating dual rotor horizontal axis marine current turbine used a mechanical oil seal coupling that caused mechanical losses when water entered through small gaps at the shaft. A new magnetic coupling assembly eliminates the need for a shaft to connect physically with the internal mechanisms and is water tight. This reduces mechanical losses in the system and the effect on the dual rotor performance is presented in this paper.

  19. Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, J.; Bird, L.

    2012-11-01

    Currently, 29 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico have instituted a renewable portfolio standard (RPS). An RPS sets a minimum threshold for how much renewable energy must be generated in a given year. Each state policy is unique, varying in percentage targets, timetables, and eligible resources. This paper examines state experience with implementing renewable portfolio standards that include energy efficiency, thermal resources, and non-renewable energy and explores compliance experience, costs, and how states evaluate, measure, and verify energy efficiency and convert thermal energy. It aims to gain insights from the experience of states for possible federal clean energy policy as well as to share experience and lessons for state RPS implementation.

  20. Development and construction of low-cracking high-performance concrete (LC-HPC) bridge decks: Free shrinkage tests, restrained ring tests, construction experience, and crack survey results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jiqiu

    2011-12-01

    The development, construction, and evaluation of low-cracking high-performance concrete (LC-HPC) bridge decks are described based on laboratory test results and experiences gained during the construction of 13 LC-HPC bridge decks in Kansas, along with another deck bid under the LC-HPC specifications but for which the owner did not enforce the specification. This study is divided into four parts covering (1) an evaluation of the free shrinkage properties of LC-HPC candidate mixtures, (2) an investigation of the relationship between the evaporable water content in the cement paste and the free shrinkage of concrete, (3) a study of the restrained shrinkage performance of concrete using restrained ring tests, and (4) a description of the construction and preliminary evaluation of LC-HPC and control bridge decks constructed in Kansas. The first portion of the study involves evaluating the effects of the duration of curing, fly ash, and a shrinkage reducing admixture (SRA) on the free-shrinkage characteristics of concrete mixtures. The results indicate that an increase of curing period reduces free shrinkage. With 7 days of curing, concretes containing fly ash as a partial replacement for cement exhibit higher free shrinkage than concretes with 100% portland cement. When the curing period is increased to 14, 28, and 56 days, the adverse effect of adding fly ash on free shrinkage is minimized and finally reversed. The addition of an SRA significantly reduces free shrinkage for both the 100% portland cement mixture and the mixture containing fly ash. The second portion of the study investigates the relationship between the evaporable water content in the cement paste and the free shrinkage of concrete. A linear relationship between free shrinkage and evaporable water content in the cement paste is observed. For a given mixture, specimens cured for a longer period contain less evaporable water and exhibit lower free shrinkage and less weight loss in the free shrinkage

  1. Director of Nursing Current Job Tenure and Past Experience and Quality of Care in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Melanie R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Directors of nursing (DON) are central to quality of care in nursing homes (NH) because of their role in coordinating and overseeing nursing care. Research is needed to test the association between DON characteristics and quality using large, representative samples of NHs and global measures of quality. One such measure is the quality measure (QM) rating from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ Five-Star Quality Rating, which aggregates 10 individual QMs into a single rating. Purpose This study examined whether DON current job tenure or past experience (1) differed across levels of the QM rating, (2) was associated with QM ratings, and (3) was associated with any of the individual 10 QM scores that comprise QM ratings. Methodology Data for a nationally representative sample of 1,174 NHs were obtained from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey, publicly-reported QMs, and an Area Resource File. Wald tests were used to test differences in mean DON current job tenure and past experience across levels of the QM rating. Multinomial logistic and Poisson regression analyses were used to examine the association between DON current job tenure and past experience and QM ratings and QM scores, respectively, controlling for selected market and organizational characteristics. Findings NHs with longer DON current job tenure tended to have higher QM ratings. Longer DON current job tenure was associated with higher QM ratings and lower QM scores for several individual QMs, suggesting higher quality. DON past experience did not differ across levels of the QM rating and was neither associated with QM ratings or QM scores. Practice Implications This study highlights the need for owners and administrators to support DONs as they either transition into the role of the DON for the first time or learn to effectively fulfill their role in a new NH. PMID:21712721

  2. Why Are Ring Galaxies Interesting?

    CERN Document Server

    Higdon, James L

    2010-01-01

    Compared with ordinary spirals, the ISM in ring galaxies experiences markedly different physical conditions and evolution. As a result, ring galaxies provide interesting perspectives on the triggering/quenching of large scale star formation and the destructive effects of massive stars on molecular cloud complexes. We use high resolution radio, sub-millimeter, infrared, and optical data to investigate the role of gravitational stability in star formation regulation, factors influencing the ISM's molecular fraction, and evidence of peculiar star formation laws and efficiencies in two highly evolved ring galaxies: Cartwheel and the Lindsay-Shapley ring.

  3. Sounding Rocket Experiments to Investigate Thermal Electron Heating in the Sq Current Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, T.; Ishisaka, K.; Kumamoto, A.; Yoshikawa, A.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, M.

    2015-12-01

    Sounding rocket observations in the southern part of Japan suggest that the electron temperature profile occasionally exhibits the local increase by several hundred K at 100-110 km altitudes at 1100-1200 LT in winter. Detailed study of the temperature profiles indicates that such an increase is closely related to the existence of Sq current focus, because it becomes more significant when the measurement is made near the center of Sq focus. In order to understand a general feature of this unusual phenomena occurring in the Sq current focus, the sounding rocket experiment was conducted in Uchinoura of Japan. In this experiment, we launched "S-310-37" rocket equipped with a total of eight science instruments at 11:20 JST on January 16, 2007 after being convinced that the Sq current was approaching to the planned rocket trajectory. The geomagnetic activity had been successively quiet on that day so that we can estimate the position of Sq current focus. Our analysis of the obtained data indicates that the electron temperature was certainly increased by about 500-600 K at the altitude of 97-101 km with respect to the background. Strong electron density perturbation was also observed to exist above 97 km altitude, which corresponds to the lower boundary of the high electron temperatures. It is also noticeable that both the electric field and magnetic field data include unusual variation in the same altitude region as the temperature increase was observed, suggesting a possible connection between the thermal electron heating and variation of the electric and/or magnetic field. Thus, the first experiment in 2007 revealed a general feature of such unusual phenomena in the Sq current focus, and thereby our interest to the generation mechanism for increasing the electron temperature was more and more increased. We will conduct the second rocket experiment to investigate such unusual phenomena in the Sq current focus in January 2016. In this experiment, we will try to measure

  4. 三尖瓣成形环在风湿性瓣膜病三尖瓣关闭不全中的应用现状%Current Applications of Tricuspid Forming Ring in Rheumatic Valve Disease-Tricuspid Regurgitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    国欣涛

    2011-01-01

    Tricuspid valve disease is a common heart valve disease, among which tricuspid regurgitation is more common than tricuspid stenosis, especially the functional tricuspid regurgitation.Surgical treatment of tricuspid insufficiency experienced suture annuloplasty to the hard artificial valve ring plasty and the soft artificial valve ring then to the current three-dimensional Edwards MC3 valve ring plasty procedure with constant improvement.Here is mainly to introduce the application of tricuspid forning ring in rheumatic tricuspid valve disease-tricuspid insufficiency.%三尖瓣疾病是一种常见的心脏瓣膜疾病,其中三尖瓣关闭不全较三尖瓣狭窄更为常见,尤其是功能性的三尖瓣关闭不全.三尖瓣关闭不全的外科治疗经历了从缝线成形术到人造硬质瓣环成形术和人造软质瓣环成形术最后改进至目前的三维Edwards MC3瓣环成形术的过程.现主要介绍三尖瓣成形环在风湿性瓣膜病三尖瓣关闭不全中的应用.

  5. A Study of Strange Particles Produced in Neutrino Neutral Current Interactions in the NOMAD Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Naumov, D V; Naumova, E; Popov, B; Astier, Pierre; Autiero, D; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baldo-Ceolin, Massimilla; Banner, M; Bassompierre, G; Benslama, K; Besson, N; Bird, I; Blumenfeld, B; Bobisut, F; Bouchez, J; Boyd, S; Bueno, A G; Bunyatov, S; Camilleri, L L; Cardini, A; Cattaneo, P W; Cavasinni, V; Cervera-Villanueva, A; Challis, R C; Collazuol, G; Conforto, G; Conta, C; Contalbrigo, M; Cousins, R; Daniels, D; Das, R; Degaudenzi, H M; Del Prete, T; De Santo, A; Dignan, T; Di Lella, L; do Couto e Silva, E; Dumarchez, J; Ellis, M; Feldman, G J; Ferrari, R; Ferrère, D; Flaminio, V; Fraternali, M; Gaillard, J M; Gangler, E; Geiser, A; Geppert, D; Gibin, D; Gninenko, S; Godley, A; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; Gosset, J; Gössling, C; Gouanère, M; Grant, A; Graziani, G; Guglielmi, A M; Hagner, C; Hernando, J; Hong, T M; Hubbard, D B; Hurst, P; Hyett, N; Iacopini, E; Joseph, C L; Juget, F R; Kent, N; Kirsanov, M; Klimov, O; Kokkonen, J; Kovzelev, A; Krasnoperov, A V; Lacaprara, S; Lachaud, C; Lakic, B; Lanza, A; La Rotonda, L; Laveder, M; Letessier-Selvon, A A; Lévy, J M; Linssen, Lucie; Ljubicic, A; Long, J; Lupi, A; Lyubushkin, V V; Marchionni, A; Martelli, F; Méchain, X; Mendiburu, J P; Meyer, J P; Mezzetto, Mauro; Mishra, S R; Moorhead, G F; Nédélec, P; Nefedov, Yu A; Nguyen-Mau, C; Orestano, D; Pastore, F; Peak, L S; Pennacchio, E; Pessard, H; Petti, R; Placci, A; Polesello, G; Pollmann, D; Polyarush, A Yu; Poulsen, C; Rebuffi, L; Rico, J; Roda, C; Rubbia, André; Salvatore, F; Schahmaneche, K; Schmidt, B; Schmidt, T; Sconza, A; Sevior, M E; Shih, D; Sillou, D; Soler, F J P; Sozzi, G; Steele, D; Stiegler, U; Stipcevic, M; Stolarczyk, T; Tareb-Reyes, M; Taylor, G N; Tereshchenko, V V; Toropin, A N; Touchard, A M; Tovey, Stuart N; Tran, M T; Tsesmelis, E; Ulrichs, J; Vacavant, L; Valdata-Nappi, M; Valuev, V Yu; Vannucci, François; Varvell, K E; Veltri, M; Vercesi, V; Vidal-Sitjes, G; Vieira, J M; Vinogradova, T G; Weber, F V; Weisse, T; Wilson, F F; Winton, L J; Yabsley, B D; Zaccone, Henri; Zuber, K; Zuccon, P

    2004-01-01

    Results of a detailed study of strange particle production in neutrino neutral current interactions are presented using the data from the NOMAD experiment. Integral yields of neutral strange particles (K0s, Lambda, Lambda-bar) have been measured. Decays of resonances and heavy hyperons with an identified K0s or Lambda in the final state have been analyzed. Clear signals corresponding to K* and Sigma(1385) have been observed. First results on the measurements of the Lambda polarization in neutral current interactions have been obtained.

  6. Study of D*+ production in νμ charged current interactions in the NOMAD experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    NOMAD Collaboration; Astier, P.; Autiero, D.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Banner, M.; Bassompierre, G.; Benslama, K.; Besson, N.; Bird, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bobisut, F.; Bouchez, J.; Boyd, S.; Bueno, A.; Bunyatov, S.; Camilleri, L.; Cardini, A.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cavasinni, V.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Challis, R.; Chukanov, A.; Collazuol, G.; Conforto, G.; Conta, C.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cousins, R.; Daniels, D.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Prete, T.; De Santo, A.; Dignan, T.; Di Lella, L.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Dumarchez, J.; Ellis, M.; Fazio, T.; Feldman, G. J.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrère, D.; Flaminio, V.; Fraternali, M.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Gangler, E.; Geiser, A.; Geppert, D.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Godley, A.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.-J.; Gosset, J.; Gößling, C.; Gouanère, M.; Grant, A.; Graziani, G.; Guglielmi, A.; Hagner, C.; Hernando, J.; Hubbard, D.; Hurst, P.; Hyett, N.; Iacopini, E.; Joseph, C.; Juget, F.; Kent, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Klimov, O.; Kokkonen, J.; Kovzelev, A.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kustov, D.; Kuznetsov, V.; Lacaprara, S.; Lachaud, C.; Lakić, B.; Lanza, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Laveder, M.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Levy, J.-M.; Linssen, L.; Ljubičić, A.; Long, J.; Lupi, A.; Marchionni, A.; Martelli, F.; Méchain, X.; Mendiburu, J.-P.; Meyer, J.-P.; Mezzetto, M.; Mishra, S. R.; Moorhead, G. F.; Naumov, D.; Nédélec, P.; Nefedov, Yu.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Peak, L. S.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Petti, R.; Placci, A.; Polesello, G.; Pollmann, D.; Polyarush, A.; Popov, B.; Poulsen, C.; Rico, J.; Riemann, P.; Roda, C.; Rubbia, A.; Salvatore, F.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, T.; Sevior, M.; Sillou, D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Sozzi, G.; Steele, D.; Stiegler, U.; Stipčević, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Tareb-Reyes, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Tereshchenko, V.; Toropin, A.; Touchard, A.-M.; Tovey, S. N.; Tran, M.-T.; Tsesmelis, E.; Ulrichs, J.; Vacavant, L.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Valuev, V.; Vannucci, F.; Varvell, K. E.; Veltri, M.; Vercesi, V.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Vieira, J.-M.; Vinogradova, T.; Weber, F. V.; Weisse, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Winton, L. J.; Yabsley, B. D.; Zaccone, H.; Zuber, K.; Zuccon, P.

    2002-02-01

    A search was made among νμ charged current events collected in the NOMAD experiment for the reaction: νμ+N-->μ- +D*++hadrons↪D0+π+↪K-+π+. A high purity D*+ sample composed of 35 events was extracted. The D*+ yield in νμ charged current interactions was measured to be /T=(0.79+/-0.17(stat.)+/-0.10(syst.))%. The mean fraction of the hadronic jet energy taken by the D*+ is /0.67+/-0.02(stat.)+/-0.02(syst.). The distributions of the fragmentation variables /z, PT2 and xF for D*+ are also presented.

  7. A study of strange particles produced in neutrino neutral current interactions in the NOMAD experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, D.; Chukanov, A.; Naumova, E.; Popov, B.; Astier, P.; Autiero, D.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Banner, M.; Bassompierre, G.; Benslama, K.; Besson, N.; Bird, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bobisut, F.; Bouchez, J.; Boyd, S.; Bueno, A.; Bunyatov, S.; Camilleri, L.; Cardini, A.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cavasinni, V.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Challis, R.; Collazuol, G.; Conforto, G.; Conta, C.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cousins, R.; Daniels, D.; Das, R.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Prete, T.; de Santo, A.; Dignan, T.; di Lella, L.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Dumarchez, J.; Ellis, M.; Feldman, G. J.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrère, D.; Flaminio, V.; Fraternali, M.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Gangler, E.; Geiser, A.; Geppert, D.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Godley, A.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.-J.; Gosset, J.; Gößling, C.; Gouanère, M.; Grant, A.; Graziani, G.; Guglielmi, A.; Hagner, C.; Hernando, J.; Hong, T. M.; Hubbard, D.; Hurst, P.; Hyett, N.; Iacopini, E.; Joseph, C.; Juget, F.; Kent, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Klimov, O.; Kokkonen, J.; Kovzelev, A.; Krasnoperov, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Lachaud, C.; Lakić, B.; Lanza, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Laveder, M.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Levy, J.-M.; Linssen, L.; Ljubičić, A.; Long, J.; Lupi, A.; Lyubushkin, V.; Marchionni, A.; Martelli, F.; Méchain, X.; Mendiburu, J.-P.; Meyer, J.-P.; Mezzetto, M.; Mishra, S. R.; Moorhead, G. F.; Nédélec, P.; Nefedov, Yu.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Peak, L. S.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Petti, R.; Placci, A.; Polesello, G.; Pollmann, D.; Polyarush, A.; Poulsen, C.; Rebuffi, L.; Rico, J.; Riemann, P.; Roda, C.; Rubbia, A.; Salvatore, F.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, T.; Sconza, A.; Sevior, M.; Shih, D.; Sillou, D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Sozzi, G.; Steele, D.; Stiegler, U.; Stipčević, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Tareb-Reyes, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Tereshchenko, V.; Toropin, A.; Touchard, A.-M.; Tovey, S. N.; Tran, M.-T.; Tsesmelis, E.; Ulrichs, J.; Vacavant, L.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Valuev, V.; Vannucci, F.; Varvell, K. E.; Veltri, M.; Vercesi, V.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Vieira, J.-M.; Vinogradova, T.; Weber, F. V.; Weisse, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Winton, L. J.; Yabsley, B. D.; Zaccone, H.; Zuber, K.; Zuccon, P.; NOMAD Collaboration

    2004-11-01

    Results of a detailed study of strange particle production in neutrino neutral current interactions are presented using the data from the NOMAD experiment. Integral yields of neutral strange particles ( Ks0, Λ, Λ¯) have been measured. Decays of resonances and heavy hyperons with an identified Ks0 or Λ in the final state have been analyzed. Clear signals corresponding to K and Σ(1385 have been observed. First results on the measurements of the Λ polarization in neutral current interactions have been obtained.

  8. Ring interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Malykin, Grigorii B; Zhurov, Alexei

    2013-01-01

    This monograph is devoted to the creation of a comprehensive formalism for quantitative description of polarized modes' linear interaction in modern single-mode optic fibers. The theory of random connections between polarized modes, developed in the monograph, allows calculations of the zero shift deviations for a fiber ring interferometer. The monograph addresses also the

  9. A season in Saturn's rings: Cycling, recycling and ring history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, L. W.; Meinke, B. K.; Albers, N.; Sremcevic, M.

    2012-04-01

    Cassini experiments have watched Saturn's ring system evolve before our eyes. Images and occultations show changes and transient events. The rings are a dynamic and complex geophysical system, incompletely modeled as a single-phase fluid. Key Cassini observations: High resolution images show straw, propellers, embedded moonlets, and F ring objects. Multiple UVIS, RSS and VIMS occutlations indicate multimodal ringlet and edge structure, including free and forced modes along with stochastic perturbations that are most likely caused by nearby mass concentrations. Vertical excursions are evident at ring edges and in other perturbed regions. The rings are occasionally hit by meteorites that leave a signature that may last centuries; meteoritic dust pollutes the rings. Temperature, reflectance and transmission spectra are influenced by the dynamical state of the ring particles. Saturn's Equinox 2009: Oblique lighting exposed vertical structure and embedded objects. The rings were the coldest ever. Images inspired new occultation and spectral analysis that show abundant structure in the perturbed regions. The rings are more variable and complex than we had expected prior to this seasonal viewing geometry. Sub-kilometer structure in power spectral analysis: Wavelet analysis shows features in the strongest density waves and at the shepherded outer edge of the B ring. Edges are variable as shown by multiple occultations and occultations of double stars. F ring kittens: 25 features seen in the first 102 occultations show a weak correlation with Prometheus location. We interpret these features as temporary aggregations. Simulation results indicate that accretion must be enhanced to match the kittens' size distribution. Images show that Prometheus triggers the formation of transient objects. Propellers and ghosts: Occulations and images provide evidence for small moonlets in the A, B and C rings. These indicate accretion occurs inside the classical Roche limit. Implications

  10. The eRHIC Ring-Ring Collider Design

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Fuhua; Beebe-Wang, Joanne; Deshpande, Abhay A; Farkhondeh, Manouchehr; Franklin, Wilbur; Graves, William; Litvinenko, Vladimir N; MacKay, William W; Milner, Richard; Montag, Christoph; Ozaki, Satoshi; Parker, Brett; Peggs, Steve; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Tepikian, Steven; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tschalär, C; Wang, Dong; Zolfaghari, Abbasali; Zwart, Townsend; van der Laan, Jan

    2005-01-01

    The eRHIC ring-ring collider is the main design option of the future lepton-ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. We report the revisions of the ring-ring collider design features to the baseline design presented in the eRHIC Zeroth Design Report (ZDR). These revisions have been made during the past year. They include changes of the interaction region which are required from the modifications in the design of the main detector. They also include changes in the lepton storage ring for high current operations as a result of better understandings of beam-beam interaction effects. The updated collider luminosity and beam parameters also take into account a more accurate picture of current and future operational aspects of RHIC.

  11. Optimization of current waveform tailoring for magnetically driven isentropic compression experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisman, E. M.; Reisman, D. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Stygar, W. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Haill, T. A.; Davis, J.-P.; Brown, J. L.; Seagle, C. T.; Spielman, R. B.

    2016-06-01

    The Thor pulsed power generator is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The design consists of up to 288 decoupled and transit time isolated capacitor-switch units, called "bricks," that can be individually triggered to achieve a high degree of pulse tailoring for magnetically driven isentropic compression experiments (ICE) [D. B. Reisman et al., Phys. Rev. Spec. Top.-Accel. Beams 18, 090401 (2015)]. The connecting transmission lines are impedance matched to the bricks, allowing the capacitor energy to be efficiently delivered to an ICE strip-line load with peak pressures of over 100 GPa. Thor will drive experiments to explore equation of state, material strength, and phase transition properties of a wide variety of materials. We present an optimization process for producing tailored current pulses, a requirement for many material studies, on the Thor generator. This technique, which is unique to the novel "current-adder" architecture used by Thor, entirely avoids the iterative use of complex circuit models to converge to the desired electrical pulse. We begin with magnetohydrodynamic simulations for a given material to determine its time dependent pressure and thus the desired strip-line load current and voltage. Because the bricks are connected to a central power flow section through transit-time isolated coaxial cables of constant impedance, the brick forward-going pulses are independent of each other. We observe that the desired equivalent forward-going current driving the pulse must be equal to the sum of the individual brick forward-going currents. We find a set of optimal brick delay times by requiring that the L2 norm of the difference between the brick-sum current and the desired forward-going current be a minimum. We describe the optimization procedure for the Thor design and show results for various materials of interest.

  12. Dentists' leadership-related educational experiences, attitudes, and past and current behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichman, L Susan; Taichman, Russell S; Inglehart, Marita R

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess practicing dentists' perceptions of their leadership-related educational experiences during predoctoral education and after graduation, to investigate if these perceptions differed as a function of the respondents' graduation year and gender, and to explore the relationships between educational experiences and the respondents' understanding/perceptions of leadership, leadership-related attitudes, self-perceived effectiveness, and past and current leadership- related behavior. Of the 3,000 general dentist members of the American Dental Association who were invited to participate, 593 returned the survey for a response rate of 20 percent. Between 37 and 65 percent of the respondents indicated that their predoctoral dental education had not prepared them well on a series of factors related to being leaders in their practice, community, state, or at the national level. However, 33 to 77 percent of these dentists responded that educational experiences after graduation prepared them well for different types of leadership activities. Overall, respondents rated their predoctoral experiences significantly less positively than their experiences after graduation for each content area. The more recently the respondents had graduated, the higher they rated their leadership-related educational experiences. The better their educational experiences, the more important the respondents evaluated leadership activities in their practice, organized dentistry, and research/teaching, the more important they assessed leadership to be, and the more effective they evaluated themselves to be as leaders. The perceived quality of the respondents' predoctoral education was not correlated with their past and current leadership activities. The results of this study may suggest that improving leadership training during predoctoral education could positively affect future dentists' attitudes about leadership and ratings of their own effectiveness as leaders.

  13. Ohmic Radio-Frequency Synergy Current Drive and Transformer Recharging Experiments in the HT-7 Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhong-Yong; WAN Bao-Nian; SHI Yue-Jiang; HU Li-Qun; XU Han-Dong

    2005-01-01

    @@ Lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) experiments for investigating the interaction between lower hybrid (LH) wave and residual dc electric field were performed in extensive plasma parameter ranges in the HT-7 superconducting tokamak. The experimental results are well fitted to the Karney-Fisch theory on the efficiency of LH waves energy converted to poloidal magnetic field energy. The fraction of absorbed LH power is about 0.75 for the HT-7 machine, and the upshift of the LH-wave parallel refraction index during LHCD experiments have been derived by the optimizing fitting parameters. The LH wave is also used for the transformer recharging when the plasma current is maintained unchanged. The highest efficiency about 7% has been achieved in HT-7 machine.

  14. SPEAR-1: An experiment to measure current collection in the ionosphere by high voltage biased conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitt, W. John; Myers, Neil B.; Roberts, Jon A.; Thompson, D. C.

    1990-01-01

    An experiment is described in which a high electrical potential difference, up to 45 kV, was applied between deployed conducting spheres and a sounding rocket in the ionosphere. Measurements were made of the applied voltage and the resulting currents for each of 24 applications of different high potentials. In addition, diagnostic measurements of optical emissions in the vicinity of the spheres, energetic particle flow to the sounding rocket, dc electric field and wave data were made. The ambient plasma and neutral environments were measured by a Langmuir probe and a cold cathode neutral ionization gauge, respectively. The payload is described and examples of the measured current and voltage characteristics are presented. The characteristics of the measured currents are discussed in terms of the diagnostic measurements and the in-situ measurements of the vehicle environment. In general, it was found that the currents observed were at a level typical of magnetically limited currents from the ionospheric plasma for potentials less than 12 kV, and slightly higher for larger potentials. However, due to the failure to expose the plasma contactor, the vehicle sheath modified the sphere sheaths and made comparisons with the analytic models of Langmuir-Blodgett and Parker-Murphy less meaningful. Examples of localized enhancements of ambient gas density resulting from the operation of the attitude control system thrusters (cold nitrogen) were obtained. Current measurements and optical data indicated localized discharges due to enhanced gas density that reduced the vehicle-ionosphere impedance.

  15. Lower hybrid current drive experiments on Alcator C-Mod: Comparison with theory and simulationa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonoli, P. T.; Ko, J.; Parker, R.; Schmidt, A. E.; Wallace, G.; Wright, J. C.; Fiore, C. L.; Hubbard, A. E.; Irby, J.; Marmar, E.; Porkolab, M.; Terry, D.; Wolfe, S. M.; Wukitch, S. J.; Alcator C-Mod Team; Wilson, J. R.; Scott, S.; Valeo, E.; Phillips, C. K.; Harvey, R. W.

    2008-05-01

    Lower hybrid (LH) current drive experiments have been carried out on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak [I. H. Hutchinson et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994)] using a radio-frequency system at 4.6GHz. Up to 900kW of LH power has been coupled and driven LH currents have been inferred from magnetic measurements by extrapolating to zero loop voltage, yielding an efficiency of neILHR0/PLH≈2.5±0.2×1019(A/W/m2). We have simulated the LH current drive in these discharges using the combined ray tracing/three-dimensional (r,v⊥,v∥) Fokker-Planck code GENRAY-CQL3D (R. W. Harvey and M. McCoy, in Proceedings of the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Simulation and Modeling of Thermonuclear Plasmas, Montreal, Canada, 1992) and found similar current drive efficiencies. The simulated profiles of current density from CQL3D, including both ohmic plus LH drive have been found to be in good agreement with the measured current density from a motional Stark effect diagnostic. Measurements of nonthermal x-ray emission confirm the presence of a significant fast electron population and the three-dimensional (r,v⊥,v∥) electron distribution function from CQL3D has been used in a synthetic diagnostic code to simulate the measured hard x-ray data.

  16. On SAP-rings

    OpenAIRE

    Zhixiang, Wu

    2006-01-01

    The rings whose simple right modules are absolutely pure are called right $SAP$-rings. We give a new characterization of right $SAP$ rings, right $V$ rings, and von Neumann regular rings. We also obtain a new decomposition theory of right selfinjective von Neumann regular rings. The relationships between $SAP$-rings, $V$-rings, and von Neumann regular rings are explored. Some recent results obtained by Faith are generalized and the results of Wu-Xia are strengthened.

  17. Adult Sexual Experiences as a Mediator Between Child Abuse and Current Secretory Immunoglobulin A Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Jonathan C; Scarpa, Angela; Kim-Spoon, Jungmeen; Coe, Christopher L

    2016-03-01

    The current study investigated whether a history of child abuse is a predictor of adult immune status, with unwanted adult sexual experiences as a proximal mediator. Participants included 89 young adult women (M(age) = 19.24) who were classified as having experienced no child abuse, child physical abuse, or child sexual abuse, based upon self-reported victimization history before 14 years of age. Participants also reported on unwanted sexual experiences in young adulthood and provided four saliva samples, which were collected over two consecutive days to determine secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA). Age and negative life events were considered as covariates. The results indicated that adult sexual victimization partially mediated the relationship between child abuse (physical and sexual) and sIgA. Specifically, child abuse experiences predicted more adult sexual victimization experiences, which in turn predicted lower sIgA levels. These findings support long-term health effects of victimization, and suggest that the influence of child abuse on sIgA may be perpetuated through adult victimization. Prevention efforts should aim to empower child maltreatment survivors with skills to prevent adult re-victimization. By thwarting future unwanted sexual experiences in adulthood, individuals will be better protected from the health impairments associated with early abuse experiences. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Potential scour for marine current turbines based on experience of offshore wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L.; Lam, W. H.; Shamsuddin, A. H.

    2013-06-01

    The oceans have tremendous untapped natural resources. These sources are capable to make significant contribution to our future energy demands. Marine current energy offers sustainable and renewable alternative to conventional sources. Survival problems of Marine Current Turbines (MCTs) need to be addressed due to the harsh marine environment. The analogous researches in wind turbine have been conducted. Some of the results and knowledge are transferable to marine current energy industry. There still exist some gaps in the state of knowledge. Scour around marine structures have been well recognised as an engineering issue as scour is likely to cause structural instability. This paper aims to review different types of foundation of MCTs and potential scour and scour protection around these foundations based on the experience of offshore wind turbine farm.

  19. Evolution of Wave Energy Deposition Profile in HT-7 Lower Hybrid Current Drive Experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方瑜德; 石跃江; 匡光力; 刘岳修; 沈慰慈; 丁伯江

    2001-01-01

    Lower hybrid waves (LHWs) with a selected n‖ spectrum have been used to control the energy deposition profiles, and then the wave driven current profiles effectively in tokamak discharges. In our lower hybrid current drive experiment in the HT-7 tokamak, it was found that the set-up of the wave energy deposition profile is a graduation process. In the beginning phase of the wave injection duration, the waves (with different n‖ spectra)deposit almost all their energy in the central region of the plasma column, even if their n‖ are very different. Up to around one hundred milliseconds, the wave energy deposition profiles can only take their corresponding shapes according to the n‖ spectra of LHWs. It also shown that this evolution process is affected obviously by the LHW driven current profile, which has been formed early.

  20. Empirical compensation function for eddy current effects in pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X X; Macdonald, P M

    1995-05-01

    An empirical compensation function for the correction of eddy current effects in the Stejskal-Tanner pulsed-gradient spin-echo (PGSE) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments has been established. Eddy currents may arise as a result of the application of sharp and strong gradient pulses and may cause severe distortion of the NMR signals. In this method, the length of one gradient pulse is altered to compensate for the eddy current effects. The compensation is considered to be ideal when the position and the phase of the spin-echo maximum obtained from an aqueous solution of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is the same in the presence and absence of a gradient pulse in the PGSE pulse sequence. We first characterized the functional dependence of the length of the required compensation on the three principal variables in the PGSE experiment: the gradient strength, the duration of the gradient pulse, and the interval between the two gradient pulses. Subsequently, we derived a model which successfully describes the general relationship between these variables and the size of the induced eddy current. The parameters extracted from fitting the model to the experimental compensation data may be used to predict the correct compensation for any combination of the three principal variables.

  1. Effects of neutral gas release on current collection during the CHARGE-2 rocket experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, B. E.; Banks, P. M.; Neubert, T.; Williamson, P. R.; Myers, Neil B.; Raitt, W. John; Sasaki, S.

    1990-01-01

    Observations of current collection enhancements due to cold nitrogen gas control jet emissions from a highly charged rocket payload in the ionosphere are reported. These observations were made during the second cooperative high altitude rocket gun experiment (CHARGE-2) which was an electrically tethered mother/daughter payload system. The current collection enhancement was observed at the daughter payload located 100 to 400 m away from the mother which was firing an energetic electron beam. The authors interpret these results in terms of an electrical discharge forming in close proximity to the daughter during the short periods of gas emission. The results indicate that it is possible to enhance the electron current collection capability of positively charged vehicles by means of deliberate neutral gas releases into an otherwise undisturbed space plasma. These results can also be compared with recent laboratory observations of hollow cathode plasma contactors operating in the ignited mode. Experimental observations of current collection enhancements due to cold nitrogen gas control jet emissions from a highly charged, isolated daughter payload in the nighttime ionosphere were made. These observations were derived from the second cooperative high altitude rocket gun experiment (CHARGE-2) which was an electrically tethered mother-daughter payload system. The rocket flew from White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) in December, 1985. The rocket achieved an altitude of 261 km and carried a 1 keV electron beam emitting up to 48 mA of current (Myers, et al., 1989a). The mother payload, carried the electron beam source, while the daughter acted as a remote current collection and observation platform and reached a distance of 426 m away from the main payload. Gas emissions at the daughter were due to periodic thruster jet firings to maintain separation velocity between the two payloads.

  2. Characterization of the plasma current quench during disruptions in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhardt, S.P., Menard, J.E., and the NSTX Research Team

    2008-12-17

    A detailed analysis of the plasma current quench in the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M.Ono, et al Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] is presented. The fastest current quenches are fit better by a linear waveform than an exponential one. Area-normalized current quench times down to .4 msec/m2 have been observed, compared to the minimum of 1.7 msec/m2 recommendation based on conventional aspect ratio tokamaks; as noted in previous ITPA studies, the difference can be explained by the reduced self-inductance at low aspect ratio and high-elongation. The maximum instantaneous dIp/dt is often many times larger than the mean quench rate, and the plasma current before the disruption is often substantially less than the flat-top value. The poloidal field time-derivative during the disruption, which is directly responsible for driving eddy currents, has been recorded at various locations around the vessel. The Ip quench rate, plasma motion, and magnetic geometry all play important roles in determining the rate of poloidal field change.

  3. Modeling, Simulation, and Experiment of Switched Reluctance Ocean Current Generator System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents nonlinear simulation model of switched reluctance (SR ocean current generator system on MATLAB/SIMULINK with describing the structure of generator system. The developed model is made up of main model, rotor position calculation module, controller module, gate module, power converter module, phase windings module, flux-linkage module, torque module, and power calculation module. The magnetization curves obtained by two-dimensional finite-element electromagnetic field calculation and the conjugated magnetic energy graphics obtained from the three-dimensional graphics of flux linkage are stored in the “Lookup Table” modules on MATLAB/SIMULINK. The hardware of the developed three-phase 12/8 structure SR ocean current generator system prototype with the experimental platform is presented. The simulation of the prototype is performed by the developed models, and the experiments have been carried out under the same condition with different output power, turn-off angle, and rotor speed. The simulated phase current waveforms agree well with the tested phase current waveforms experimentally. The simulated output voltage curves agree well with the tested output voltage curves experimentally. It is shown that the developed nonlinear simulation model of the three-phase 12/8 structure SR ocean current generator system is valid.

  4. Profile of currently employed European Food Scientists and Technologists: Education, experience and skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Flynn

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The food & drink (F&D sector in Europe ranks low in innovation and the European F&D industry has been losing importance in the global market. The food professionals, i.e., food scientists and technologists (FSTs, may not be meeting the varied demands of the sector. Here, we identify education, experience and skills of current FSTs and compare  geographic regions and employment areas. Between 2009 and 2012, 287 questionnaires representing over 4000 FSTs were collected from employers in 16 countries. Analyses showed that more than 80% of FSTs have a university degree; but only in Industry in the Central European region are most degrees in food science/technology. More than half of FSTs, and almost 60% in the South, have less than 10 years’ experience. The most common FST job title is Quality Manager, but with several variations based on region and employment area. Among skills, the most common is Communicating; found in over 90% of FSTs in all regions and employment areas. Food Safety is the most common of the food sector-specific skills, present in more than 75% of FSTs, yet there are differences in food sector skills based on employment area. Overall, these data suggest similarities among currently employed food professionals throughout Europe; they are young and highly educated, but also differences, especially in their food sector-specific skills. An understanding of the current FST should contribute to the improvement of FST training and thus benefit the European food sector.

  5. Effort of lower hybrid current drive experiments toward to H-mode in EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, B. J.; Li, M. H.; Liu, F. K.; Shan, J. F.; Li, Y. C.; Wang, M.; Liu, L.; Zhao, L. M.; Yang, Y.; Wu, Z. G.; Feng, J. Q.; Hu, H. C.; Jia, H.; Cheng, M.; Zang, Q.; Lyu, B.; Duan, Y. M.; Lin, S. Y.; Wu, J. H.; Hillairet, J.; Ekedahl, A.; Peysson, Y.; Goniche, M.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Cesario, R.; Amicucci, L.; Shen, B.; Gong, X. Z.; Xu, G. S.; Zhao, H. L.; Hu, L. Q.; Li, J. G.; Wan, B. N.; EAST Team

    2017-02-01

    Lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) is an effective tool to achieve high confinement (H-mode) plasma in EAST. To utilize LHCD for accessing H-mode plasma, efforts have been made to improve LHW (lower hybrid wave)-plasma coupling and current drive capability at high density. Improved LHW-plasma coupling by means of local gas puffing and gas puffing from the electron side is routinely used during EAST operation with LHCD. High density experiments suggest that low recycling and high LH frequency are preferred for LHCD experiments at high density, consistent with previous results in other machines. The effect of LHCD on the current profile in EAST demonstrates that it is possible to control the plasma profile by optimizing the LHW spectrum. Repeatable H-mode plasma was obtained by LHCD and the maximum density during H-mode with the combination of 2.45 GHz and 4.6 GHz LH waves was up to 4.5  ×  1019 m-3.

  6. Electron Neutrino Charged-Current Quasielastic Scattering in the MINERvA Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Wolcott, J

    2016-01-01

    The electron-neutrino charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) cross section on nuclei is an important input parameter for electron neutrino appearance oscillation experiments. Current experiments typically begin with the muon neutrino cross section and apply theoretical corrections to obtain a prediction for the electron neutrino cross section. However, at present no experimental verification of the estimates for this channel at an energy scale appropriate to such experiments exists. We present the cross sections for a CCQE-like process determined using the MINERvA detector, which are the first measurements of any exclusive reaction in few-GeV electron neutrino interactions. The result is given as differential cross-sections vs. the electron energy, electron angle, and square of the four-momentum transferred to the nucleus, $Q^{2}$. We also compute the ratio to a muon neutrino cross-section in $Q^{2}$ from MINERvA. We find satisfactory agreement between these measurements and the predictions of the GENIE generato...

  7. Electron neutrino charged-current quasielastic scattering in the MINERvA experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Wolcott, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    The electron-neutrino charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) cross section on nuclei is an important input parameter to appearance-type neutrino oscillation experiments. Current experiments typically work from the muon neutrino cross section and apply corrections from theoretical arguments to obtain a prediction for the electron neutrino cross section, but to date there has been no experimental verification of the estimates for this channel at an energy scale appropriate to such experiments. We present the first measurement of an exclusive reaction in few-GeV electron neutrino interactions, namely, the cross section for a CCQE-like process, made using the MINERvA detector. The result is given as differential cross-sections vs. the electron energy, electron angle, and square of the four-momentum transferred to the nucleus, $Q^2$. We also compute the ratio to a muon neutrino cross-section in $Q^2$ from MINERvA. We find satisfactory agreement between this measurement and the predictions of the GENIE generator.

  8. Electron Neutrino Charged-Current Quasielastic Scattering in the MINERvA Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolcott, J. [Tufts U.

    2015-12-31

    The electron-neutrino charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) cross section on nuclei is an important input parameter for electron neutrino appearance oscillation experiments. Current experiments typically begin with the muon neutrino cross section and apply theoretical corrections to obtain a prediction for the electron neutrino cross section. However, at present no experimental verification of the estimates for this channel at an energy scale appropriate to such experiments exists. We present the cross sections for a CCQE-like process determined using the MINERvA detector, which are the first measurements of any exclusive reaction in few-GeV electron neutrino interactions. The result is given as differential cross-sections vs. the electron energy, electron angle, and square of the four-momentum transferred to the nucleus, $Q^{2}$. We also compute the ratio to a muon neutrino cross-section in $Q^{2}$ from MINERvA. We find satisfactory agreement between these measurements and the predictions of the GENIE generator. We furthermore report on a photon-like background unpredicted by the generator which we interpret as neutral-coherent diffractive scattering from hydrogen.

  9. Electron Neutrino Charged-Current Quasielastic Scattering in the MINERvA Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolcott, Jeremy [Rochester U.

    2015-10-28

    The electron-neutrino charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) cross section on nuclei is an important input parameter to appearance-type neutrino oscillation experiments. Current experiments typically work from the muon neutrino cross section and apply corrections from theoretical arguments to obtain a prediction for the electron neutrino cross section, but to date there has been no experimental verification of the estimates for this channel at an energy scale appropriate to such experiments. We present the first measurement of an exclusive reaction in few-GeV electron neutrino interactions, namely, the cross section for a CCQE-like process, made using the MINERvA detector. The result is given as differential cross-sections vs. the electron energy, electron angle, and square of the four-momentum transferred to the nucleus, $Q^2$. We also compute the ratio to a muon neutrino cross-section in $Q^2$ from MINERvA. We find satisfactory agreement between this measurement and the predictions of the GENIE generator.

  10. Recombination of W18+ ions with electrons: Absolute rate coefficients from a storage-ring experiment and from theoretical calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Spruck, K; Krantz, C; Novotný, O; Becker, A; Bernhardt, D; Grieser, M; Hahn, M; Repnow, R; Savin, D W; Wolf, A; Müller, A; Schippers, S

    2014-01-01

    We present new experimentally measured and theoretically calculated rate coefficients for the electron-ion recombination of W$^{18+}$([Kr] $4d^{10}$ $4f^{10}$) forming W$^{17+}$. At low electron-ion collision energies, the merged-beam rate coefficient is dominated by strong, mutually overlapping, recombination resonances. In the temperature range where the fractional abundance of W$^{18+}$ is expected to peak in a fusion plasma, the experimentally derived Maxwellian recombination rate coefficient is 5 to 10 times larger than that which is currently recommended for plasma modeling. The complexity of the atomic structure of the open-$4f$-system under study makes the theoretical calculations extremely demanding. Nevertheless, the results of new Breit-Wigner partitioned dielectronic recombination calculations agree reasonably well with the experimental findings. This also gives confidence in the ability of the theory to generate sufficiently accurate atomic data for the plasma modeling of other complex ions.

  11. Analysis and experiment of eddy current loss in Homopolar magnetic bearings with laminated rotor cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinji, Sun; Dong, Chen

    2013-08-01

    This paper analyses the eddy current loss in Homopolar magnetic bearings with laminated rotor cores produced by the high speed rotation in order to reduce the power loss for the aerospace applications. The analytical model of rotational power loss is proposed in Homopolar magnetic bearings with laminated rotor cores considering the magnetic circuit difference between Homopolar and Heteropolar magnetic bearings. Therefore, the eddy current power loss can be calculated accurately using the analytical model by magnetic field solutions according to the distribution of magnetic fields around the pole surface and boundary conditions at the surface of the rotor cores. The measurement method of rotational power loss in Homopolar magnetic bearing is proposed, and the results of the theoretical analysis are verified by experiments in the prototype MSCMG. The experimental results show the correctness of calculation results.

  12. The current status of "Troitsk nu-mass" experiment in search for sterile neutrino

    CERN Document Server

    Abdurashitov, D N; Berlev, A I; Chernov, V G; Geraskin, E V; Golubev, A A; Koroteev, G A; Likhovid, N A; Lokhov, A A; Markin, A I; Nozik, A A; Pantuev, V S; Parfenov, V I; Skasyrskaya, A K; Titov, N A; Tkachev, I I; Tkachov, F V; Zadorozhny, S V

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new experiment to search for a sterile neutrino in a few keV mass range at the "Troitsk nu-mass" facility. The expected signature corresponds to a kink in the electron energy spectrum in tritium beta-decay. The new goal compared to our previous experiment will be precision spectrum measurements well below end point. The experimental installation consists of a windowless gaseous tritium source and a high resolution electromagnetic spectrometer. We estimate that the current bounds on the sterile neutrino mixing parameter can be improved by an order of magnitude in the mass range under 5 keV without major upgrade of the existing equipment. Upgrades of calibration, data acquisition and high voltage systems will allow to improve the bounds by another order of magnitude.

  13. Exploring reconnection, current sheets, and dissipation in a laboratory MHD turbulence experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX) can serve as a testbed for studying MHD turbulence in a controllable laboratory setting, and in particular, explore the phenomena of reconnection, current sheets and dissipation in MHD turbulence. Plasma with turbulently fluctuating magnetic and velocity fields can be generated using a plasma gun source and launched into a flux-conserving cylindrical tunnel. No background magnetic field is applied so internal fields are allowed to evolve dynamically. Point measurements of magnetic and velocity fluctuations yield broadband power-law spectra with a steepening breakpoint indicative of the onset of a dissipation scale. The frequency range at which this steepening occurs can be correlated to the ion inertial scale of the plasma, a length which is characteristic of the size of current sheets in MHD plasmas and suggests a connection to dissipation. Observation of non-Gaussian intermittent jumps in magnetic field magnitude and angle along with measurements of ion temperature bursts suggests the presence of current sheets embedded within the turbulent plasma, and possibly even active reconnection sites. Additionally, structure function analysis coupled with appeals to fractal scaling models support the hypothesis that current sheets are associated with dissipation in this system.

  14. Charged-current quasielastic scattering of muon antineutrino and neutrino in the MINERvA experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ankowski, Artur M

    2015-01-01

    One of the largest sources of systematic uncertainties in ongoing neutrino-oscillation measurements is the description of nuclear effects. Its considerable reduction is expected thanks to the dedicated studies of (anti)neutrino-nucleus interactions in the MINERvA experiment. In this article, the calculations within the spectral function approach are compared to the charged-current quasielastic cross sections reported from MINERvA. The obtained results show that the effect of final-state interactions on the (anti)muon kinematics plays pivotal role in reproducing the experimental data.

  15. Measurement of the /Λ polarization in νμ charged current interactions in the NOMAD experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astier, P.; Autiero, D.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Banner, M.; Bassompierre, G.; Benslama, K.; Besson, N.; Bird, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bobisut, F.; Bouchez, J.; Boyd, S.; Bueno, A.; Bunyatov, S.; Camilleri, L.; Cardini, A.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cavasinni, V.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Chukanov, A.; Collazuol, G.; Conforto, G.; Conta, C.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cousins, R.; Daniels, D.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Prete, T.; de Santo, A.; Dignan, T.; di Lella, L.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Dumarchez, J.; Ellis, M.; Fazio, T.; Feldman, G. J.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrère, D.; Flaminio, V.; Fraternali, M.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Gangler, E.; Geiser, A.; Geppert, D.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Godley, A.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.-J.; Gosset, J.; Gößling, C.; Gouanère, M.; Grant, A.; Graziani, G.; Guglielmi, A.; Hagner, C.; Hernando, J.; Hubbard, D.; Hurst, P.; Hyett, N.; Iacopini, E.; Joseph, C.; Juget, F.; Kirsanov, M.; Klimov, O.; Kokkonen, J.; Kovzelev, A.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kustov, D.; Kuznetsov, V.; Lacaprara, S.; Lachaud, C.; Lakić, B.; Lanza, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Laveder, M.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Levy, J.-M.; Linssen, L.; Ljubičić, A.; Long, J.; Lupi, A.; Marchionni, A.; Martelli, F.; Méchain, X.; Mendiburu, J.-P.; Meyer, J.-P.; Mezzetto, M.; Mishra, S. R.; Moorhead, G. F.; Naumov, D.; Nédélec, P.; Nefedov, Yu.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Peak, L. S.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Petti, R.; Placci, A.; Polesello, G.; Pollmann, D.; Polyarush, A.; Popov, B.; Poulsen, C.; Rathouit, P.; Rico, J.; Riemann, P.; Roda, C.; Rubbia, A.; Salvatore, F.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, T.; Sevior, M.; Sillou, D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Sozzi, G.; Steele, D.; Stiegler, U.; Stipčević, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Tareb-Reyes, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Tereshchenko, V.; Toropin, A.; Touchard, A.-M.; Tovey, S. N.; Tran, M.-T.; Tsesmelis, E.; Ulrichs, J.; Vacavant, L.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Valuev, V.; Vannucci, F.; Varvell, K. E.; Veltri, M.; Vercesi, V.; Vieira, J.-M.; Vinogradova, T.; Weber, F. V.; Weisse, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Winton, L. J.; Yabsley, B. D.; Zaccone, H.; Zuber, K.; Zuccon, P.; NOMAD Collaboration

    2000-11-01

    The Λ polarization in ν μ charged current interactions has been measured in the NOMAD experiment. The event sample (8087 reconstructed Λ 's) is more than an order of magnitude larger than that of previous bubble chamber experiments, while the quality of event reconstruction is comparable. We observe negative polarization along the W -boson direction which is enhanced in the target fragmentation region: P x(x F0)=-0.09±0.06 (stat)±0.03 (sys) . These results provide a test of different models describing the nucleon spin composition and the spin transfer mechanisms. A significant transverse polarization (in the direction orthogonal to the Λ production plane) has been observed for the first time in a neutrino experiment: P y=-0.22±0.03 (stat)±0.01 (sys) . The dependence of the absolute value of P y on the Λ transverse momentum with respect to the hadronic jet direction is in qualitative agreement with the results from unpolarized hadron-hadron experiments.

  16. The orthopedic damage control in pelvic ring fractures:when and why-a multicenter experience of 10 years' treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gabriele Falzarano; Antonio Medici; Serafino Carta; Pedrag Grubor; Mattia Fortina; Luigi Meccariello; Paolo Ferrata

    2014-01-01

    Objectives:To report our experience of regional referral center for the pelvis.Methods:We treated526 pelvic fractures fromJanuary2004 toDecember2014 in three regional reference centers for pelvic trauma.Men were480 and women were46 and ages ranged from16 to93 years old.Car(65%) and farm(20%) crashes were the most frequent causes of pelvis fractures.Injury severity scores ranged from9.0 to75.0, with a mean of37.5.A defined algorithm for fracture management has been in place and employed to assure adequate resuscitation and fracture care. Results:There were24 deaths in total(4.56%).Sixty three(11.98%) patients underwent angio-embolization for control of bleeding(12 deaths).The average amount of blood transfused was 8.3IU.Hospital lengths of stay ranged between1-35 days.Among the502 alive patients,55.98% were able to be discharged at home while the remaining44.02% being transferred to various rehabilitation facilities or extended care facilities.Conclusions:The goal of initial management is to restore vital indicators, urinary excretion function and protect the patient from infectious complications.An emergency decisional algorithm helps manage hemodynamic instability.Initial bone and ligament procedures should reduce displacement and make it possible for the patient to wait until his condition is stable enough for definitive surgical fixation.

  17. Comparative Analysis of the Current Status, Own Body Perception and Positive Experience From Diagnosed Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zornitza Ganeva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Comparative analysis of the current status, own body perception and positive experience within a period of up to 1 year from diagnosing ofwomen with breast cancer (N = 41; mean age 35.25 in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd stages of the disease progress, of Bulgarian origin, was made.Reliability and validity of the scales were described. They were analysed with respect to: 1 medical characteristics (partial or total surgery,surgical removal of lymph nodes, presence or absence of metastases in them, 2 classical therapies (chemotherapy, radiation therapy andhormonal therapy administered or not and 3 application or not of alternative therapies (herbal medicine, physical load, administration ofmassage, lymph drainage, use of nutritional supplements, observance of diet. The results showed that the more therapies the personssurveyed were undergone the more unsatisfactory they assessed their current general status. The bigger the size of the surgery performedto remove the tumour the more positive idea of their own bodies they had. The more time after the surgical treatment passed the more thepositive experience accumulated from the oncologic diagnosis grew.

  18. Origami rings

    CERN Document Server

    Buhler, Joe; de Launey, Warwick; Graham, Ron

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by a question in origami, we consider sets of points in the complex plane constructed in the following way. Let $L_\\alpha(p)$ be the line in the complex plane through $p$ with angle $\\alpha$ (with respect to the real axis). Given a fixed collection $U$ of angles, let $\\RU$ be the points that can be obtained by starting with $0$ and $1$, and then recursively adding intersection points of the form $L_\\alpha(p) \\cap L_\\beta(q)$, where $p, q$ have been constructed already, and $\\alpha, \\beta$ are distinct angles in $U$. Our main result is that if $U$ is a group with at least three elements, then $\\RU$ is a subring of the complex plane, i.e., it is closed under complex addition and multiplication. This enables us to answer a specific question about origami folds: if $n \\ge 3$ and the allowable angles are the $n$ equally spaced angles $k\\pi/n$, $0 \\le k < n$, then $\\RU$ is the ring $\\Z[\\zeta_n]$ if $n$ is prime, and the ring $\\Z[1/n,\\zeta_{n}]$ if $n$ is not prime, where $\\zeta_n := \\exp(2\\pi i/n)$ is ...

  19. TSR: A Storage Ring for HIE-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, P A; Blaum, K; Grieser, M; Davinson, T; Woods, P J; Flanagan, K; Freeman, S J; Lazarus, I H; Litvinov, Yu A; Raabe, R; Siesling, E; Wenander, F

    2016-01-01

    It is planned to install the heavy-ion, low-energy ring TSR, currently at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, at the HIE-ISOLDE facility in CERN, Geneva. Such a facility will provide a capability for experiments with stored, cooled secondary beams that is rich and varied, spanning from studies of nuclear ground-state properties and reaction studies of astrophysical relevance, to investigations with highly-charged ions and pure isomeric beams. In addition to experiments performed using beams recirculating within the ring, the cooled beams can be extracted and exploited by external spectrometers for high-precision measurements. The capabilities of the ring facility as well as some physics cases will be presented, together with a brief report on the status of the project.

  20. TSR: A storage and cooling ring for HIE-ISOLDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, P.A. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Blaum, K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Davinson, T. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Flanagan, K.; Freeman, S.J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Grieser, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Lazarus, I.H. [S.T.F.C. Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Litvinov, Yu.A. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Lotay, G. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Page, R.D. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Raabe, R. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Siesling, E.; Wenander, F. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Woods, P.J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-01

    It is planned to install the heavy-ion, low-energy ring TSR, currently at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, at the HIE-ISOLDE facility in CERN, Geneva. Such a facility will provide a capability for experiments with stored, cooled secondary beams that is rich and varied, spanning from studies of nuclear ground-state properties and reaction studies of astrophysical relevance, to investigations with highly-charged ions and pure isomeric beams. In addition to experiments performed using beams recirculating within the ring, the cooled beams can be extracted and exploited by external spectrometers for high-precision measurements. The capabilities of the ring facility as well as some physics cases will be presented, together with a brief report on the status of the project.

  1. LINAC 3 experiment: This experiment is used to study some scenarios of the future LEIR (low-energy ion ring) vacuum design.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Photo 1 316LN stainless steel sheet 0.7 m thick sheet metal, with water-jet cut holes; before (sheet metal) and after rolling (tube). Photo 2 316LN stainless steel tube with water-jet cut holes. Photo 3 Inner tube is fitted with NEG (non-evaporable getter) strips, creating a kind of total NEG pump. Photo 4 Inner tube is fitted with NEG (non-evaporable getter) strips, creating a kind of total NEG pump. Photo 5 Same tubes but compiled on top of each other. Photo 6 The stack of tubes is put into a vacuum chamber that will be used in the LINAC 3 experiment during summer 2002 (lead-ion beam will be used for this experiment). The holes allow all-round pumping, i.e. close to the vacuum chamber walls.

  2. An objective reference system for studying rings in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelão, Guilherme P.; Irber, Luiz C.; Villas Boas, Ana B. M.

    2013-12-01

    Rings are marine vortices with a scale of hundreds of kilometers that can last for months, whose associated transport and mixing play an important role in the ocean dynamics. Such features are traditionally treated as a geostrophic flow, but since the centrifugal acceleration is not negligible in the inner core, the cyclo-geostrophic balance is a better approximation for the rings. In the present work, we describe a novel objective technique to identify the ring center, which is used as the origin of a convenient framework to handle rings under the cyclo-geostrophic balance. Furthermore, we correct the velocity field by the translation to isolate the swirl movement, a procedure ignored by other methodologies. We show that the lack of such correction would lead to an error of 30 km on the center definition of a ship surveyed North Brazil Current Ring with 160 km of radius. Another distinct characteristic of our approach is the flexibility in the spatio-temporal structure of the data, because it allows for ungridded data, an important ability for in situ observations. That also enables the use of a hybrid dataset composed from different instruments. The error on the Monte Carlo experiments to identify the center of the propagating ring is less than 10 km, and depends on the level of noise, sampling strategy, and strength of the ring, among other factors. This technique was fully implemented in PyRings, an open Python library with a collection of procedures to handle oceanic rings and mesoscale eddies in general.

  3. Broadband sidebands generated by parametric instability in lower hybrid current drive experiments on EAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amicucci, L., E-mail: luca.amicucci@enea.it; Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.; Giovannozzi, E.; Tuccillo, A. A. [EUROfusion-ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Unità Fusione, Frascati (Italy); Ding, B. J.; Li, M. H. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2015-12-10

    Modern research on nuclear fusion energy, based on the tokamak concept, has strong need of tools for actively driving non-inductive current especially at the periphery of plasma column, where tools available so far have poor efficiency. This is essential for solving one of the most critical problems for thermonuclear reactor, consisting in how to achieve the figure of fusion gain in the context of sufficient stability. The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) effect has the potential capability of driving current at large radii of reactor plasma with high efficiency [1]. Experiments recently carried out on EAST showed that a strong activity of LH sideband waves (from the RF probe spectra), accompanied by weak core penetration of the coupled LH power, is present when operating at relatively high plasma densities. Previous theoretical results, confirmed by experiments on FTU, showed that the LH sideband phenomenon is produced by parametric instability (PI), which are mitigated by higher plasma edge temperatures. This condition is thus useful for enabling the LH power propagation when operating with profiles having high plasma densities even at the edge. In the present work, we show new PI modeling of EAST plasmas data, obtained in condition of higher plasma edge temperature due to chamber lithisation. The obtained trend of the PI frequencies and growth rates is consistent with data of RF probe spectra, available in different regimes of lithisated and not lithisated vessel. Moreover, these spectra are interpreted as PI effect occurring at the periphery of plasma column, however in the low field side where the LH power is coupled.

  4. Broadband sidebands generated by parametric instability in lower hybrid current drive experiments on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amicucci, L.; Ding, B. J.; Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.; Giovannozzi, E.; Li, M. H.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Modern research on nuclear fusion energy, based on the tokamak concept, has strong need of tools for actively driving non-inductive current especially at the periphery of plasma column, where tools available so far have poor efficiency. This is essential for solving one of the most critical problems for thermonuclear reactor, consisting in how to achieve the figure of fusion gain in the context of sufficient stability. The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) effect has the potential capability of driving current at large radii of reactor plasma with high efficiency [1]. Experiments recently carried out on EAST showed that a strong activity of LH sideband waves (from the RF probe spectra), accompanied by weak core penetration of the coupled LH power, is present when operating at relatively high plasma densities. Previous theoretical results, confirmed by experiments on FTU, showed that the LH sideband phenomenon is produced by parametric instability (PI), which are mitigated by higher plasma edge temperatures. This condition is thus useful for enabling the LH power propagation when operating with profiles having high plasma densities even at the edge. In the present work, we show new PI modeling of EAST plasmas data, obtained in condition of higher plasma edge temperature due to chamber lithisation. The obtained trend of the PI frequencies and growth rates is consistent with data of RF probe spectra, available in different regimes of lithisated and not lithisated vessel. Moreover, these spectra are interpreted as PI effect occurring at the periphery of plasma column, however in the low field side where the LH power is coupled.

  5. A measurement of coherent neutral pion production in neutrino neutral current interactions in the NOMAD experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullenberg, C. T.; Mishra, S. R.; Seaton, M. B.; Kim, J. J.; Tian, X. C.; Scott, A. M.; Kirsanov, M.; Petti, R.; Alekhin, S.; Astier, P.; Autiero, D.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Banner, M.; Bassompierre, G.; Benslama, K.; Besson, N.; Bird, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bobisut, F.; Bouchez, J.; Boyd, S.; Bueno, A.; Bunyatov, S.; Camilleri, L.; Cardini, A.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cavasinni, V.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Challis, R.; Chukanov, A.; Collazuol, G.; Conforto, G.; Conta, C.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cousins, R.; Degaudenzi, H.; De Santo, A.; Del Prete, T.; Di Lella, L.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Dumarchez, J.; Ellis, M.; Feldman, G. J.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrère, D.; Flaminio, V.; Fraternali, M.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Gangler, E.; Geiser, A.; Geppert, D.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Godley, A.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.-J.; Gosset, J.; Gößling, C.; Gouanère, M.; Grant, A.; Graziani, G.; Guglielmi, A.; Hagner, C.; Hernando, J.; Hurst, P.; Hyett, N.; Iacopini, E.; Joseph, C.; Juget, F.; Kent, N.; Klimov, O.; Kokkonen, J.; Kovzelev, A.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kulagin, S.; Lacaprara, S.; Lachaud, C.; Lakić, B.; Lanza, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Laveder, M.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Levy, J.-M.; Ling, J.; Linssen, L.; Ljubičić, A.; Long, J.; Lupi, A.; Lyubushkin, V.; Marchionni, A.; Martelli, F.; Méchain, X.; Mendiburu, J.-P.; Meyer, J.-P.; Mezzetto, M.; Moorhead, G. F.; Naumov, D.; Nédélec, P.; Nefedov, Yu.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Peak, L. S.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Placci, A.; Polesello, G.; Pollmann, D.; Polyarush, A.; Poulsen, C.; Popov, B.; Rebuffi, L.; Rico, J.; Riemann, P.; Roda, C.; Rubbia, A.; Salvatore, F.; Samoylov, O.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, T.; Sconza, A.; Sevior, M.; Sillou, D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Sozzi, G.; Steele, D.; Stiegler, U.; Stipčević, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Tareb-Reyes, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Tereshchenko, V.; Toropin, A.; Touchard, A.-M.; Tovey, S. N.; Tran, M.-T.; Tsesmelis, E.; Ulrichs, J.; Vacavant, L.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Valuev, V.; Vannucci, F.; Varvell, K. E.; Veltri, M.; Vercesi, V.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Vieira, J.-M.; Vinogradova, T.; Weber, F. V.; Weisse, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Winton, L. J.; Wu, Q.; Yabsley, B. D.; Zaccone, H.; Zuber, K.; Zuccon, P.

    2009-11-01

    We present a study of exclusive neutral pion production in neutrino-nucleus Neutral Current interactions using data from the NOMAD experiment at the CERN SPS. The data correspond to 1.44 ×106 muon-neutrino Charged Current interactions in the energy range 2.5 ⩽Eν ⩽ 300 GeV. Neutrino events with only one visible π0 in the final state are expected to result from two Neutral Current processes: coherent π0 production, ν + A → ν + A +π0 and single π0 production in neutrino-nucleon scattering. The signature of coherent π0 production is an emergent π0 almost collinear with the incident neutrino while π0's produced in neutrino-nucleon deep inelastic scattering have larger transverse momenta. In this analysis all relevant backgrounds to the coherent π0 production signal are measured using data themselves. Having determined the backgrounds, and using the Rein-Sehgal model for the coherent π0 production to compute the detection efficiency, we obtain 4630 ± 522 (stat) ± 426 (syst) corrected coherent-π0 events with Eπ0 ⩾ 0.5 GeV. We measure σ (νA → νAπ0) = [ 72.6 ± 8.1 (stat) ± 6.9 (syst) ] ×10-40 cm2 /nucleus. This is the most precise measurement of the coherent π0 production to date.

  6. Simulations and experiments of intense ion beam current density compression in space and timea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefkow, A. B.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Anders, A.; Coleman, J. E.; Leitner, M.; Lidia, S. M.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.; Yu, S. S.; Welch, D. R.

    2009-05-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory has achieved 60-fold longitudinal pulse compression of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) [P. K. Roy et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 234801 (2005)]. To focus a space-charge-dominated charge bunch to sufficiently high intensities for ion-beam-heated warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy studies, simultaneous transverse and longitudinal compression to a coincident focal plane is required. Optimizing the compression under the appropriate constraints can deliver higher intensity per unit length of accelerator to the target, thereby facilitating the creation of more compact and cost-effective ion beam drivers. The experiments utilized a drift region filled with high-density plasma in order to neutralize the space charge and current of an ˜300 keV K+ beam and have separately achieved transverse and longitudinal focusing to a radius 2 MeV) ion beam user-facility for warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy-relevant target physics experiments.

  7. Exploring the sensitivity of current and future experiments to $\\theta_{\\odot}$

    CERN Document Server

    Bandyopadhyay, A; Goswami, S; Bandyopadhyay, Abhijit; Choubey, Sandhya; Goswami, Srubabati

    2003-01-01

    The first results from the KamLAND experiment in conjunction with the global solar neutrino data has demonstrated striking ability to constrain the $\\Delta m^2_\\odot$ ($\\Delta m^2_{21}$) very precisely. However the allowed range of $\\theta_{\\odot}$ ($\\theta_{12}$) did not change much with the inclusion of the KamLAND results. In this paper we probe if future data from KamLAND can increase the accuracy of the allowed range in $\\theta_{\\odot}$ and conclude that even after 3 kton-year of statistics, KamLAND may find it hard to improve the bounds on the mixing angle obtained from the current solar neutrino data. We discuss the $\\theta_{12}$ sensitivity of the survival probabilities in matter (vacuum) as is relevant for the solar (KamLAND) experiments. We find that the presence of matter effects in the survival probabilities for $^8B$ neutrinos give the solar neutrino experiments SK and SNO an edge over KamLAND, as far as $\\theta_{12}$ sensitivity is concerned, particularly near maximal mixing. Among solar neutrin...

  8. Current characteristics associated with hereditary angioedema attacks and treatment: the home infusion based patient experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachdjian, Raffi; Banerji, Aleena; Guyer, Autumn; Morphew, Tricia

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a current perspective on the characteristics of hereditary angioedema (HAE) attacks and treatment as captured by a home infusion service. Retrospective data on 158 HAE patients who were enrolled in this acute treatment program were analyzed for factors surrounding an attack. The majority of patients had a high level of disease severity at baseline (88%), with a higher than expected likelihood of having a positive family history (87.8%). The most likely times for patients to call for home treatment were just before and during working hours (6:00 A.M.-5:00 P.M.). Eighty-three percent had more than one alternate mode of medication. Factors associated with a severe attack included an overall severe rating of HAE attacks in the previous year, an abdominal attack alone or a combination of peripheral and abdominal attacks versus a peripheral attack alone, and the use of two doses rather than one for treatment of the current attack. Average time to relief onset was 43.5 minutes. One dose of ecallantide was sufficient to treat the majority of attacks, and a second dose was needed in 23.6% of patients experiencing a severe attack. However, patients who reported both a severe attack rating during the previous year and experiencing only a peripheral current attack were more likely to experience a severe current attack. Acute treatment paradigms for HAE remain diverse. Understanding factors driving these decisions could help alleviate the overall burden of this disease and help overcome some of the challenges faced by the patients and their caretakers and improve their quality of life. Enhanced capture and analysis of prodromal factors in future studies should help us further alleviate the burden of this disease.

  9. High current, 0.5-MA, fast, 100-ns, linear transformer driver experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Mazarakis

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The linear transformer driver (LTD is a new method for constructing high current, high-voltage pulsed accelerators. The salient feature of the approach is switching and inductively adding the pulses at low voltage straight out of the capacitors through low inductance transfer and soft iron core isolation. Sandia National Laboratories are actively pursuing the development of a new class of accelerator based on the LTD technology. Presently, the high current LTD experimental research is concentrated on two aspects: first, to study the repetition rate capabilities, reliability, reproducibility of the output pulses, switch prefires, jitter, electrical power and energy efficiency, and lifetime measurements of the cavity active components; second, to study how a multicavity linear array performs in a voltage adder configuration relative to current transmission, energy and power addition, and wall plug to output pulse electrical efficiency. Here we report the repetition rate and lifetime studies performed in the Sandia High Current LTD Laboratory. We first utilized the prototype ∼0.4-MA, LTD I cavity which could be reliably operated up to ±90-kV capacitor charging. Later we obtained an improved 0.5-MA, LTD II version that can be operated at ±100  kV maximum charging voltage. The experimental results presented here were obtained with both cavities and pertain to evaluating the maximum achievable repetition rate and LTD cavity performance. The voltage adder experiments with a series of double sized cavities (1 MA, ±100  kV will be reported in future publications.

  10. Lower Hybrid Current Drive Experiments on Alcator C-Mod: Comparison with Theory and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonoli, Paul

    2007-11-01

    Recently, lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) experiments have been carried out on Alcator C-Mod using an RF system consisting of 12 klystrons at 4.6 GHz, feeding a 4 x 22 waveguide array. Up to 900 kW of LH power has been coupled in the range1.6 PLH 0.3 [1]. We have simulated the LH current drive in these discharges using the combined ray tracing / 3D (r, v, v//) Fokker Planck code GENRAY -- CQL3D [2] and found similar current drive efficiencies. Measurements of nonthermal x-ray emission and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) confirm the presence of a significant fast electron population that varies with waveguide phasing and plasma density. Studies are currently underway to investigate the role of fast electron diffusion and full-wave effects such as diffractional broadening in determining the spatial and velocity space structure of the nonthermal electrons. The 3D (r, v, v//) electron distribution function from CQL3D has been used in synthetic diagnostic codes to simulate the measured hard x-ray and ECE emissions. Fast electron diffusion times have been inferred from x-ray data by employing a radial diffusion operator in CQL3D and determining the fast electron diffusivities that are required to reproduce the experimentally observed profiles of hard x-ray emission. Finally, we have been performing full-wave LH field simulations using the massively parallel TORIC --LH solver [3] in order to assess spatial and spectral broadening of the incident wave front that can result from diffraction and wave focusing effects. [1] R. Parker, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 51, 20 (2006). [2] R.W. Harvey and M. McCoy, ``The CQL3D Fokker Planck Code,'' Proc. IAEA Tech. Comm. Meeting on Simulation and Modeling of Thermonuclear Plasmas, Montreal, Canada, 1992. [3] J. C. Wright et al., Nucl. Fusion 45, 1411 (2005).

  11. Clinical impact of computed tomography-based image-guided brachytherapy for cervix cancer using the tandem-ring applicator - the Addenbrooke's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, L T; Coles, C E; Hart, C; Tait, E

    2009-04-01

    We report our initial 3-year experience of chemoradiotherapy for cervical cancer with computed tomography-based image-guided high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy using the tandem-ring applicator. Twenty-eight patients were treated between February 2005 and December 2007. All patients received initial external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) followed by HDR brachytherapy (planned dose 21 Gy to point A in three fractions over 8 days). For each insertion, a computed tomography scan was obtained with the brachytherapy applicator in situ. The cervix, uterus and organs at risk (OAR) were contoured on the computed tomography images to create an individualised dosimetry plan. The D(90) (the dose delivered to 90% of the tumour target), V(100) (the percentage of tumour target volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose) and the minimum dose in the most exposed 2 cm(3) volume (D(2 cc)) of rectum, bladder and bowel were recorded. The equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions delivered by EBRT and brachytherapy was calculated. The 3-year cancer-specific survival was 81%, with a pelvic control rate of 96%. In 24 patients, a D(90)>or=74 Gy (alpha/beta10) was achieved. The only patient with local recurrence had a D(90) of 63.8 Gy(alpha/beta10). The overall actuarial risk of serious late morbidity was 14%. Seventeen patients had satisfactory OAR doses using the standard loading pattern. Seven patients had modifications to reduce the risk of toxicity, whereas two had modifications to improve the tumour dose. Comparison with a previous cohort of patients treated with chemoradiotherapy and a conventionally planned low dose rate triple source brachytherapy technique showed an improvement in local pelvic control of 20% (P=0.04). The implementation of a computed tomography-based tandem-ring HDR brachytherapy technique in conjunction with individual dose adaptation has resulted in a significant improvement in local control at Addenbrooke's without increasing the risk of serious toxicity, and with little

  12. Reply to "Comment on 'A Self-Consistent Model of the Interacting Ring Current Ions and Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves, Initial Results: Waves and Precipitation Fluxes' and 'Self-Consistent Model of the Magnetospheric Ring Current and Propagating Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves: Waves in Multi-Ion Magnetosphere' by Khazanov et al. et al."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. W.

    2007-01-01

    It is well-known that the effects of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on ring current (RC) ion and radiation belt (RB) electron dynamics strongly depend on such particle/wave characteristics as the phase-space distribution function, frequency, wavenormal angle, wave energy, and the form of wave spectral energy density. The consequence is that accurate modeling of EMIC waves and RC particles requires robust inclusion of the interdependent dynamics of wave growth/damping, wave propagation, and[ particles. Such a self-consistent model is being progressively developed by Khazanov et al. [2002, 2006, 2007]. This model is based on a system of coupled kinetic equations for the RC and EMIC wave power spectral density along with the ray tracing equations. Thome and Home [2007] (hereafter referred to as TH2007) call the Khazanov et al. [2002, 2006] results into question in their Comment. The points in contention can be summarized as follows. TH2007 claim that: (1) "the important damping of waves by thermal heavy ions is completely ignored", and Landau damping during resonant interaction with thermal electrons is not included in our model; (2) EMIC wave damping due to RC O + is not included in our simulation; (3) non-linear processes limiting EMIC wave amplitude are not included in our model; (4) growth of the background fluctuations to a physically significantamplitude"must occur during a single transit of the unstable region" with subsequent damping below bi-ion latitudes,and consequently"the bounce averaged wave kinetic equation employed in the code contains a physically erroneous 'assumption". Our reply will address each of these points as well as other criticisms mentioned in the Comment. TH2007 are focused on two of our papers that are separated by four years. Significant progress in the self-consistent treatment of the RC-EMIC wave system has been achieved during those years. The paper by Khazanov et al. [2006] presents the latest version of our model, and in

  13. Optimization of Superconducting Focusing Quadrupoles for the HighCurrent Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabbi, GianLuca; Gourlay, Steve; Gung, Chen-yu; Hafalia, Ray; Lietzke, Alan; Martovetski, Nicolai; Mattafirri, Sara; Meinke, Rainer; Minervini, Joseph; Schultz, Joel; Seidl, Peter

    2005-09-16

    The Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) program is progressing through a series of physics and technology demonstrations leading to an inertial fusion power plant. The High Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is exploring the physics of intense beams with high line-charge density. Superconducting focusing quadrupoles have been developed for the HCX magnetic transport studies. A baseline design was selected following several pre-series models. Optimization of the baseline design led to the development of a first prototype that achieved a conductor-limited gradient of 132 T/m in a 70 mm bore, without training, with measured field errors at the 0.1% level. Based on these results, the magnet geometry and fabrication procedures were adjusted to improve the field quality. These modifications were implemented in a second prototype. In this paper, the optimized design is presented and comparisons between the design harmonics and magnetic measurements performed on the new prototype are discussed.

  14. Photon emission in neutral current interactions at the T2K experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, E; Hayato, Y; Mahn, K; Nieves, J

    2015-01-01

    We have applied a microscopic model for single photon emission in neutral current interactions on nucleons and nuclei to determine the number and distributions of such events at the Super-Kamiokande detector, for the flux and beam exposure of the T2K experiment in neutrino mode. These reactions represent an irreducible background in electron-(anti)neutrino appearance measurements aimed at a precise measurement of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ and the $CP$ violating phase. We have obtained a total number of photon events that is twice larger than the one from the NEUT event generator (version 5.1.4.2) used in the analysis of T2K data. Detailed comparisons of energy and angular distributions for the $\

  15. Current Experiences with Internet Telepathology and Possible Evolution in the Next Generation of Internet Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Della Mea

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The last five years experience has definitely demonstrated the possible applications of the Internet for telepathology. They may be listed as follows: (a teleconsultation via multimedia e‐mail; (b teleconsultation via web‐based tools; (c distant education by means of World Wide Web; (d virtual microscope management through Web and Java interfaces; (e real‐time consultations through Internet‐based videoconferencing. Such applications have led to the recognition of some important limits of the Internet, when dealing with telemedicine: (i no guarantees on the quality of service (QoS; (ii inadequate security and privacy; (iii for some countries, low bandwidth and thus low responsiveness for real‐time applications. Currently, there are several innovations in the world of the Internet. Different initiatives have been aimed at an amelioration of the Internet protocols, in order to have quality of service, multimedia support, security and other advanced services, together with greater bandwidth.

  16. The Social Lives of Global Policies against Malaria: Conceptual Considerations, Past Experiences, and Current Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckl, Julian

    2017-07-01

    While a casual observer might easily get the impression that global policies against malaria have unanimous support, there are strongly divergent perspectives on malaria control. Analyzing ethnographic and historical material through a political science lens, I foreground the social negotiation of malaria both as an illness experience of affected populations and as a disease problem defined by experts. Taking the interrelationship between problems, solutions, and solution providers as a point of departure, I reconstruct recurrent tensions and social mechanisms that can account for the tendency to downplay conflicts and to produce technical-biomedical solutions that seem to be irresistible. This helps to overcome the perception that current policies have no alternatives and that aiming directly for malaria eradication is the only form of sustainability in times of resistances when "saving the established technical-biomedical solutions" has become a key concern.

  17. The flow structure of pyroclastic density currents: evidence from particle models and large-scale experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellino, Pierfrancesco; Büttner, Ralf; Dioguardi, Fabio; Doronzo, Domenico Maria; La Volpe, Luigi; Mele, Daniela; Sonder, Ingo; Sulpizio, Roberto; Zimanowski, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Pyroclastic flows are ground hugging, hot, gas-particle flows. They represent the most hazardous events of explosive volcanism, one striking example being the famous historical eruption of Pompeii (AD 79) at Vesuvius. Much of our knowledge on the mechanics of pyroclastic flows comes from theoretical models and numerical simulations. Valuable data are also stored in the geological record of past eruptions, i.e. the particles contained in pyroclastic deposits, but they are rarely used for quantifying the destructive potential of pyroclastic flows. In this paper, by means of experiments, we validate a model that is based on data from pyroclastic deposits. It allows the reconstruction of the current's fluid-dynamic behaviour. We show that our model results in likely values of dynamic pressure and particle volumetric concentration, and allows quantifying the hazard potential of pyroclastic flows.

  18. Propagation and deposition mechanisms of dense pyroclastic density currents: insights from analogue laboratory experiments. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, O.; Montserrat, S.; Niño, Y.; Tamburrino, A.

    2010-12-01

    Analogue laboratory experiments on air-particle flows represent a useful tool to investigate the mechanisms of propagation and deposition of dense (or the dense part of) pyroclastic density currents. In this context, we carried out experiments in the dam-break configuration and studied the emplacement processes of analogue biphasic currents generated from the quasi-instantaneous release of fluidized columns of fine (80 µm) particles. The low permeability of the granular material permitted relatively slow diffusion of the initial pore pressure within the flows until they came to halt. Analysis of the flow kinematics and comparison with flows of water in the same apparatus revealed that the air-particle currents propagated in two distinct stages. They behaved as their inertial water counterparts for most their emplacement, as both types of flows had the same morphology and propagated at constant front velocity U~√(2gh), h being the initial height of the granular column. This occurred as long as the height of the collapsing fluidized columns was higher than the that of the resultant flows, thus generating a driving pressure gradient. This fluid-inertial behavior suggested that the pore fluid pressure was high during propagation of the mixture. In order to check this hypothesis, we carried out non invasive measurements of the pore fluid pressure at the base of the air-particle flows and made correlation of the pressure signal with the flow structure from analyses of high speed videos. The flow structure consisted of a sliding head that caused underpressure relative to ambient conditions and whose magnitude correlated with the flow velocity. The flow head was followed by a body that generated overpressure and at the base of which a deposit aggraded at a nearly constant rate. Both the flow head and body were sheared pervasively as the internal velocity increased upwards. The combination of pressure advection from the source and relatively slow pressure diffusion

  19. Cassini microwave observations provide clues to the origin of Saturn's C ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Hayes, A. G.; Janssen, M. A.; Nicholson, P. D.; Cuzzi, J. N.; de Pater, I.; Dunn, D. E.; Estrada, P. R.; Hedman, M. M.

    2017-01-01

    Despite considerable study, Saturn's rings continue to challenge current theories for their provenance. Water ice comprises the bulk of Saturn's rings, yet it is the small fraction of non-icy material that is arguably more valuable in revealing clues about the system's origin and age. Herein, we present new measurements of the non-icy material fraction in Saturn's C ring, determined from microwave radiometry observations acquired by the Cassini spacecraft. Our observations show an exceptionally high brightness at near-zero azimuthal angles, suggesting a high porosity of 70-75% for the C ring particles. Furthermore, our results show that most regions in the C ring contain about 1-2% silicates. These results are consistent with an initially nearly pure-ice ring system that has been continuously contaminated by in-falling micrometeoroids over ∼15-90 million years, using the currently accepted value of the micrometeoroid flux at infinity of ∼4.5 × 10-17g cm-2 s-1, and assuming that the C ring optical depth and surface density has not changed significantly during that time. This absolute time scale is inversely proportional not only to the flux at infinity, but also to the amount of gravitational focusing by Saturn the micrometeoroids experience before encountering the rings. We also find an enhanced abundance of non-icy material concentrated in the middle C ring. When assumed to be mixed volumetrically ("intramixed") with water ice, this enhanced contamination reaches a maximum concentration of 6-11% silicates by volume around a ring radius of 83,000 km, depending on the volume mixing model used. This is significantly higher than the inner and outer C ring. As opposed to an intramixing model, we also consider a silicate-core, icy-mantle model to address the fact that silicates may be present in chunks instead of fine powder in the ring particles. Such a model naturally helps to account for the observed opacity distribution. We propose several models to explain the

  20. High power millimeter wave experiment of ITER relevant electron cyclotron heating and current drive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, K; Kajiwara, K; Oda, Y; Kasugai, A; Kobayashi, N; Sakamoto, K; Doane, J; Olstad, R; Henderson, M

    2011-06-01

    High power, long pulse millimeter (mm) wave experiments of the RF test stand (RFTS) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) were performed. The system consists of a 1 MW/170 GHz gyrotron, a long and short distance transmission line (TL), and an equatorial launcher (EL) mock-up. The RFTS has an ITER-relevant configuration, i.e., consisted by a 1 MW-170 GHz gyrotron, a mm wave TL, and an EL mock-up. The TL is composed of a matching optics unit, evacuated circular corrugated waveguides, 6-miter bends, an in-line waveguide switch, and an isolation valve. The EL-mock-up is fabricated according to the current design of the ITER launcher. The Gaussian-like beam radiation with the steering capability of 20°-40° from the EL mock-up was also successfully proved. The high power, long pulse power transmission test was conducted with the metallic load replaced by the EL mock-up, and the transmission of 1 MW/800 s and 0.5 MW/1000 s was successfully demonstrated with no arcing and no damages. The transmission efficiency of the TL was 96%. The results prove the feasibility of the ITER electron cyclotron heating and current drive system.

  1. Wave-current interaction near the Gulf Stream during the surface wave dynamics experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David W.; Liu, Antony K.; Peng, Chih Y.; Meindl, Eric A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a case study on the wave-current interaction near the local curvature of a Gulf Stream meander. The wave data were obtained from in situ measurements by a pitch-roll discus buoy during the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment (SWADE) conducted off Wallops Island, Virginia, from October 1990 to March 1991. Owing to the advection of the Gulf Stream by the semidiurnal tide, the discus buoy was alternately located outside and inside the Gulf Stream. The directional wave measurements from the buoy show the changes in wave direction, wave energy, and directional spreading when waves encountered the current in the Gulf Stream meanders. A wave refraction model, using the ray-tracing method with an estimated Gulf Stream velocity field and meandering condition, was used to simulate wave refraction patterns and to estimate wave parameters at relative locations corresponding to buoy measurements. The numerical simulation shows that a focusing zone of wave rays was formed near the boundary and behind the crest of a simulated Gulf Stream meander. The focusing of wave rays causes changes in wave direction, increases in wave energy, and decreases in wave directional spreading, which are in good agreement with the results from the buoy measurements.

  2. Overview of HIT-SI3 experiment: Simulations, Diagnostics, and Summary of Current Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penna, James; Jarboe, Thomas; Nelson, Brian; Hossack, Aaron; Sutherland, Derek; Morgan, Kyle; Hansen, Chris; Benedett, Thomas; Everson, Chris; Victor, Brian

    2016-10-01

    The Helicity Injected Torus - Steady Inductive 3(HIT-SI3)experiment forms and maintains spheromaks via Steady Inductive Helicity Injection (SIHI). Three injector units allow for continuous injection of helicity into a copper flux conserver in order to sustain a spheromak. Firing of the injectors with a phase difference allows finite rotation of the plasma to provide a stabilizing effect. Simulations in the MHD code NIMROD and the fluid-model code PSI-TET provide validation and a basis for interpretation of the observed experimental data. Thompson Scattering (TS) and Far Infrared (FIR) Interferometer systems allow temperature and line-averaged density measurements to be taken. An Ion Doppler Spectroscopy (IDS) system allows measurement of the plasma rotation and velocity. HIT-SI3 data has been used for validation of IDCD predictions, in particular the projected impedance of helicity injectors according to the theory. The experimental impedances have been calculated here for the first time for different HIT-SI3 regimes. Such experimental evidence will contribute to the design of future experiments employing IDCD as a current-drive mechanism. Work supported by the D.O.E., Office of Science, Office of Fusion Science.

  3. Circular currents: Experience of time in the songs by Los Planetas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Peris Llorca

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the representation of time in the lyrics of the Spanish indie pop band Los Planetas, from Granada, from their first album Super 8 (1994 to the last one, Una ópera egipcia (2010, which incorporate fl amenco influences into their sound. Here, as suggested by the title of one of the songs, time seems to move in circular currents, always returning to the starting point, while the lyrical subject attempts unsuccessfully to break the temporal cycle, to forget an unhappy love, to overcome the paralyzing presence of memory or to change his life. These attempts, however, oft en are only vain hopes that themselves fade away. The only alternative seems to be an escape to another time, which seems to have no effect on the level of experience. The experience of time in these lyrics is proposed, firstly, as a representation inherent to mass culture, which is itself a temporary break from linearity. It is also linked to the imagery of the generation who were young at the beginning the 90’s (my own, which is the one that experienced in Spain the disappointment of failed change, and which stopped believing that the future would necessarily be better.

  4. Measurement of Drug Craving in Persian Speaking Subjects; a Review on Current Experiences and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoomeh Maarefvand

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug craving is considered as one of the main cores of drug dependency and addiction. Multidimensionality of drug craving, its cultural-bounded features and its intra individual rapidly changing nature makes it difficult to be measured. Nowadays, regarding different psychometric approaches, there are various instruments available for measurement of different aspects of drug craving but mainly for Latin-based languages in North America and European countries. High prevalence and special conditions, and unique subcultures in substance abuse and addiction in many countries, like Iran, make the design of culturally validated instruments for drug craving assessment priority. Materials and Methods: Comprehensive review on drug craving measurement instruments for Persian speaking subjects have been performed by searching in databases (ELSEVIER, Science Direct and Scientific Information Database (SID and investigating of related documents on regional experiences. Results: In this article seven main categories of drug craving instruments have been reviewed focusing on validated versions in Persian language including: self-reports, reinforcement “proxies”, drug self administration, psycho physiological responding, neurobiological responding, cognitive processing and expressive methods. Conclusion: Reviewing on weak and strength points of each instrument group and national and regional experiences shows that designing and validating a new series of ecologically-validated instruments for multidimensional measurement of drug craving in different addiction subcultures should be prioritized to cover current methodological gaps in substance abuse studies in Iran.

  5. Truncation planes from a dilute pyroclastic density current: field data and analogue experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douillet, Guilhem Amin; Gegg, Lukas; Mato, Celia; Kueppers, Ulrich; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-04-01

    Pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) are a catastrophic transport mode of ground hugging gas-particle mixtures associated with explosive volcanic eruptions. The extremely high sedimentation rates and turbulence levels of these particulate density currents can freeze and preserve dynamic phenomena that happen but are not recorded in other sedimentary environments. Several intriguing and unanticipated features have been identified in outcrops and reproduced via analogue experiments, with the potential to change our views on morphodynamics and particle motion. Three types of small-scale (ca. 10 cm) erosion structures were observed on the stoss side of dune bedforms in the field: 1) vertical erosion planes covered with stoss-aggrading, vertical lamination, 2) overturned laminations at the preserved limit of erosion planes and 3) loss of stratification at erosion planes. These features are interpreted to indicate rapidly evolving velocities, undeveloped boundary layers, and a diffuse zone rather than a sharp border defining the flow-bed interface. Most experimental work on particle motion and erosion from the literature has been accomplished under constant conditions and with planar particle beds. Here, in order to reproduce the field observations, short-lived air-jets generated with a compressor-gun were shot into stratified beds of coarse particles (300 μm) of low density (1000 kg/m3). These "eroding jets" were filmed with a high speed camera and the deposits were sectioned after the experiments. The three natural types of erosion characteristics were experimentally generated. Vertical erosion planes are produced by small-scale, relatively sustained jets. Overturned laminations are due to a fluidization-like behavior at the erosion front of short-lived, strong jets, demonstrating that the fluid's velocity profile penetrates into the deposit. Loss of lamination seems related to the nature of erosion onset in packages. Rather than providing simple answers, the dataset

  6. Recalled peer relationship experiences and current levels of self-criticism and self-reassurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopala-Sibley, Daniel C; Zuroff, David C; Leybman, Michelle J; Hope, Nora

    2013-03-01

    Numerous studies have shown that personality factors may increase or decrease individuals' vulnerability to depression, but little research has examined the role of peer relationships in the development of these factors. Accordingly, this study examined the role of recalled parenting and peer experiences in the development of self-criticism and self-reassurance. It was hypothesized that, controlling for recalled parenting behaviours, specific recalled experiences of peer relationships would be related to current levels of specific forms of self-criticism and self-reassurance. Hypotheses were tested using a retrospective design in which participants were asked to recall experiences of parenting and peer relationships during early adolescence. This age was chosen as early adolescence has been shown to be a critical time for the development of vulnerability to depression. A total of 103 female and 97 male young adults completed measures of recalled parenting, overt and relational victimization and prosocial behaviour by peers, and current levels of self-criticism and self-reassurance. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that parents and peers independently contributed to the development of self-criticism and self-reassurance. Specifically, controlling for parental care and control, overt victimization predicted self-hating self-criticism, relational victimization predicted inadequacy self-criticism, and prosocial behaviour predicted self-reassurance. As well, prosocial behaviour buffered the effect of overt victimization on self-reassurance. Findings highlight the importance of peers in the development of personality risk and resiliency factors for depression, and suggest avenues for interventions to prevent the development of depressive vulnerabilities in youth. The nature of a patient's personality vulnerability to depression may be better understood through a consideration of the patient's relationships with their peers as well as with parents during

  7. Rings from Close Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    Weve recently discovered narrow sets of rings around two minor planets orbiting in our solar system. How did these rings form? A new study shows that they could be a result of close encounters between the minor planets and giants like Jupiter or Neptune.Unexpected Ring SystemsPositions of the centaurs in our solar system (green). Giant planets (red), Jupiter trojans (grey), scattered disk objects (tan) and Kuiper belt objects (blue) are also shown. [WilyD]Centaurs are minor planets in our solar system that orbit between Jupiter and Neptune. These bodies of which there are roughly 44,000 with diameters larger than 1 km have dynamically unstable orbits that cross paths with those of one or more giant planets.Recent occultation observations of two centaurs, 10199 Chariklo and 2060 Chiron, revealed that these bodies both host narrow ring systems. Besides our four giant planets, Chariklo and Chiron are the only other bodies in the solar system known to have rings. But how did these rings form?Scientists have proposed several models, implicating collisions, disruption of a primordial satellite, or dusty outgassing. But a team of scientists led by Ryuki Hyodo (Paris Institute of Earth Physics, Kobe University) has recently proposed an alternative scenario: what if the rings were formed from partial disruption of the centaur itself, after it crossed just a little too close to a giant planet?Tidal Forces from a GiantHyodo and collaborators first used past studies of centaur orbits to estimate that roughly 10% of centaurs experience close encounters (passing within a distance of ~2x the planetary radius) with a giant planet during their million-year lifetime. The team then performed a series of simulations of close encounters between a giant planet and a differentiated centaur a body in which the rocky material has sunk to form a dense silicate core, surrounded by an icy mantle.Some snapshots of simulation outcomes (click for a closer look!) for different initial states of

  8. Annual tree rings in Piptadenia gonoacantha (Mart. J.F.Macbr. in a restoration experiment in the Atlantic Forest: potential for dendroecological research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arno Fritz das Neves Brandes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The tree Piptadenia gonoachantha is widely used in forestry and in forest restoration projects, which require methods for evaluating tree growth. Long-term studies are necessary to determine patterns and detect changes in species growth rhythms. Tree ring analysis provides a precise method for determining age and documenting long-term growth trends in tropical tree species. The present study evaluated the periodicity of tree ring formation and radial growth dynamics of P. gonoachantha from a population of known age in the Poço das Antas Biological Reserve. Two radii from six trees were sampled using non-destructive methods. Tree rings were counted and measured to estimate age and to calculate diametric increment. All samples had 16 tree rings, which matched the known plantation age and confirmed the annual formation of rings. The individuals sampled had a mean annual diametric increment of 9.5 mm / year. Results showed a trend towards decreasing growth rate with increasing age. Individuals of P. gonoachantha in Ombrophilous Dense Forest produce annual tree rings, which holds potential for future dendroecological studies.

  9. Current Practices in Global/International Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences: Home/Host Country or Site/Institution Considerations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Naser Z Alsharif; Adnan Dakkuri; Jeanine P Abrons; Dennis Williams; David N Ombengi; HaiAn Zheng; Sara Al-Dahir; Toyin Tofade; Suzanna Gim; Mary Beth O'Connell; Anna Ratka; Emily Dornblaser

    2016-01-01

      International outreach by schools and colleges of pharmacy is increasing. In this paper, we provide current practice guidelines to establish and maintain successful global/international advanced pharmacy practice experiences (G/I APPEs...

  10. Prime rings with PI rings of constants

    CERN Document Server

    Kharchenko, V K; Rodríguez-Romo, S

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that if the ring of constants of a restricted differential Lie algebra with a quasi-Frobenius inner part satisfies a polynomial identity (PI) then the original prime ring has a generalized polynomial identitiy (GPI). If additionally the ring of constants is semiprime then the original ring is PI. The case of a non-quasi-Frobenius inner part is also considered.

  11. A survey on IVIVC/IVIVR development in the pharmaceutical industry - Past experience and current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, M A; Flanagan, T; Brewster, M; Kesisoglou, F; Beato, S; Biewenga, J; Crison, J; Holm, R; Li, R; Mannaert, E; McAllister, M; Mueller-Zsigmondy, M; Muenster, U; Ojala, K; Page, S; Parr, A; Rossenu, S; Timmins, P; Van Peer, A; Vermeulen, A; Langguth, P

    2017-05-01

    The present work aimed to describe the current status of IVIVC/IVIVR development in the pharmaceutical industry, focusing on the use and perception of specific approaches as well as successful and failed case studies. Two questionnaires have been distributed to 13 EFPIA partners of the Oral Biopharmaceutics Tools Initiative and to the Pharmacokinetics Working Party of the European Medicines Agency in order to capture the perspectives and experiences of industry scientists and agency members, respectively. Responses from ten companies and three European Agencies were received between May 21st 2014 and January 19th 2016. The majority of the companies acknowledged the importance of IVIVC/IVIVR throughout the drug development stages and a well-balanced rate of return on investment. However, the IVIVC/IVIVR approach seemed to be underutilized in regulatory submissions. Four of the ten companies stated to have an internal guidance related to IVIVC/IVIVR modelling, whereas three felt that an overall strategy is not necessary. Successful models mainly served to support formulation development and to provide a better mechanistic understanding. There was not yet much experience with safe-space IVIVRs as well as the use of physiologically based modelling in the field of IVIVC. At the same time, the responses from both industry and agencies indicated that there might be a need for a regulatory framework to guide the application of these novel approaches. The relevance of IVIVC/IVIVR for oral IR drug products was recognized by most of the companies. For IR formulations, relationships other than Level A correlation were more common outcomes among the provided case studies, such as multiple Level C correlation or safe-space IVIVR, which could be successfully used for requesting regulatory flexibility. Compared to the responses from industry scientists, there was a trend towards a higher appreciation of the BCS among the regulators, but a less positive attitude towards the utility

  12. Review of Current Experience on Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) and A Recommended Code Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duane Spencer; Kevin McCoy

    2010-02-02

    The purpose of the ASME/DOE Gen IV Task 7 Part I is to review the current experience on various high temperature reactor intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) concepts. There are several different IHX concepts that could be envisioned for HTR/VHTR applications in a range of temperature from 850C to 950C. The concepts that will be primarily discussed herein are: (1) Tubular Helical Coil Heat Exchanger (THCHE); (2) Plate-Stamped Heat Exchanger (PSHE); (3) Plate-Fin Heat Exchanger (PFHE); and (4) Plate-Machined Heat Exchanger (PMHE). The primary coolant of the NGNP is potentially subject to radioactive contamination by the core as well as contamination from the secondary loop fluid. To isolate the radioactivity to minimize radiation doses to personnel, and protect the primary circuit from contamination, intermediate heat exchangers (IHXs) have been proposed as a means for separating the primary circuit of the NGNP (Next Generation Nuclear Plant) or other process heat application from the remainder of the plant. This task will first review the different concepts of IHX that could be envisioned for HTR/VHTR applications in a range of temperature from 850 to 950 C. This will cover shell-and-tube and compact designs (including the platefin concept). The review will then discuss the maturity of the concepts in terms of design, fabricability and component testing (or feedback from experience when applicable). Particular attention will be paid to the feasibility of developing the IHX concepts for the NGNP with operation expected in 2018-2021. This report will also discuss material candidates for IHX applications and will discuss specific issues that will have to be addressed in the context of the HTR design (thermal aging, corrosion, creep, creep-fatigue, etc). Particular attention will be paid to specific issues associated with operation at the upper end of the creep regime.

  13. Radical theory of rings

    CERN Document Server

    Gardner, JW

    2003-01-01

    Radical Theory of Rings distills the most noteworthy present-day theoretical topics, gives a unified account of the classical structure theorems for rings, and deepens understanding of key aspects of ring theory via ring and radical constructions. Assimilating radical theory's evolution in the decades since the last major work on rings and radicals was published, the authors deal with some distinctive features of the radical theory of nonassociative rings, associative rings with involution, and near-rings. Written in clear algebraic terms by globally acknowledged authorities, the presentation

  14. Nuclear Quantum Effects in Water and Aqueous Systems: Experiment, Theory, and Current Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceriotti, Michele; Fang, Wei; Kusalik, Peter G; McKenzie, Ross H; Michaelides, Angelos; Morales, Miguel A; Markland, Thomas E

    2016-07-13

    Nuclear quantum effects influence the structure and dynamics of hydrogen-bonded systems, such as water, which impacts their observed properties with widely varying magnitudes. This review highlights the recent significant developments in the experiment, theory, and simulation of nuclear quantum effects in water. Novel experimental techniques, such as deep inelastic neutron scattering, now provide a detailed view of the role of nuclear quantum effects in water's properties. These have been combined with theoretical developments such as the introduction of the principle of competing quantum effects that allows the subtle interplay of water's quantum effects and their manifestation in experimental observables to be explained. We discuss how this principle has recently been used to explain the apparent dichotomy in water's isotope effects, which can range from very large to almost nonexistent depending on the property and conditions. We then review the latest major developments in simulation algorithms and theory that have enabled the efficient inclusion of nuclear quantum effects in molecular simulations, permitting their combination with on-the-fly evaluation of the potential energy surface using electronic structure theory. Finally, we identify current challenges and future opportunities in this area of research.

  15. Transport approach to the reconstruction of the neutrino kinematics in current oscillation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, Tina; Buss, Oliver; Mosel, Ulrich [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen (Germany); Alvarez-Ruso, Luis [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Universidad de Valencia - CSIC (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    Neutrino oscillation results depend on the neutrino energy - a quantity which can not be measured directly but has to be reconstructed from the hadronic debris coming out of the neutrino-nucleus reaction inside the detector. A reliable reconstruction of the neutrino kinematics and the initial scattering process has to account for in-medium modifications and, in particular, for final state interactions inside the target nucleus. They can, e.g. through intranuclear rescattering, change particle multiplicities and also redistribute their energy. Those effects can be simulated with our fully coupled channel GiBUU transport model where the neutrino first interacts with a bound nucleon producing secondary particles which are then transported out of the nucleus. We use a relativistic formalism that incorporates recent form factor parametrizations, and apply, besides Fermi motion, full in-medium kinematics, mean-field potentials and in-medium spectral functions. In this talk, we compare the reconstructed quantities obtained within our framework to the ones obtained by the current experiments, which, as e.g. MiniBooNE, mostly rely on simple two-body kinematics. We then discuss how these uncertainties influence not only the cross section measurements but also the oscillation results.

  16. End-of-Life Care in Nunavik, Quebec: Inuit Experiences, Current Realities, and Ways Forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordyk, Shawn Renee; Macdonald, Mary Ellen; Brassard, Paul

    2017-06-01

    Increasing longevity for Inuit living in Nunavik, northern Quebec, has resulted in heightened rates of cancers and chronic diseases necessitating complex treatments. Consequently, end-of-life (EOL) care, once the domain of Inuit families and communities, has come to include professionalized healthcare providers with varying degrees of awareness of factors to consider in providing care to Inuit populations. To better understand the factors shaping EOL care in Nunavik to support the development of a sustainable model of care. Using focused ethnography, we conducted participant observations and informal and semistructured interviews with 103 participants (community members, healthcare practitioners, and administrators) across Nunavik and in Montreal, the affiliated tertiary care center. Data domains included the following: care trajectories; patient and family experiences receiving and providing EOL care; local and urban resources and challenges; and ways forward. Sociocultural, historical, and geographic factors shape EOL care in Nunavik, presenting a complex set of challenges for Inuit patients, families, and healthcare providers. A sustainable model of EOL care requires building on shared initiatives, capitalizing on the existing strengths in communities, and attending to the multiple bereavement needs in the region. Building a sustainable model of EOL care requires respectful collaboration among governing structures, healthcare institutions, and community members. It must centrally value local knowledge and initiatives. To ensure Inuit families and patients are supported throughout the dying process, future initiatives must centrally include local stakeholders in both the design and evaluation of any changes to the current healthcare system.

  17. Use of novel proteosome inhibitors as a therapeutic strategy in lymphomas current experience and emerging concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abayomi, Emmanuel Akinola; Sissolak, Gerhard; Jacobs, Peter

    2007-08-01

    Precedent from preclinical experiments coupled with two pivotal phase 2 studies in myeloma has focused attention on a potential role for ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in modulating a number of events that occur commonly in the neoplastic process involving proteins in the regulation of cells cycling, growth and differentiation. This influence is vested in the proteasomes which are large complexes of proteolytic enzymes responsible for degradation of many of these intracellular messengers. Logically interest has centred on molecules having the capacity to influence, by degradation, such molecules and although a number of agents are in development bortezomib is the only one currently in clinical use. Velcade, formerly PS-341, is a novel dipeptide boronic acid capable of reversibly inhibiting the 26S proteasome through a range of activities. The latter are anti-proliferative and proapoptotic with the latter blocking nuclear transcription via NF-kappa B in addition to down regulating adhesion and inhibiting angiogenesis. Additional changes are mediated in protein folding within the endoplasmic reticulum and contribute to cell death. These concepts are given focus by considering their introduction into treatment of lymphoreticular malignancy.

  18. Current Canadian And American Experiences In The Treatment Of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Dolati

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke remains one of the main public health issues worldwide. It is the third leading cause of death in the United States, with more than 200,000 people dying from strokes each year. Approximately 80% of all acute ischemic strokes are due to intracranial artery occlusion, most commonly thromboembolic clot occlusion. Revascularization of occluded territories is the cornerstone of acute ischemic stroke and Thrombolysis for ischemic stroke has been systematically studied in large randomized trials only since the 1990s. To date, thrombolytic therapy for ischemic stroke has been investigated in 21 randomized controlled clinical trials enrolling more than 7,000 patients. The advent of modern imaging and endovascular tools and technologyhas revolutionized treatment of stroke. In this talk, I will review current clinical trials published in The NEJM (ESCAPE, MR Clean, EXTENDED IA, …. regarding superiority of the endovascular treatments, especially, the stent retrievers, over Iv tPA. I will also go over all endovascular techniques used in the endovascular treatment of acute stroke using my Canadian and American experiences.

  19. Current Canadian And American Experiences In The Treatment Of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Dolati

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke remains one of the main public health issues worldwide. It is the third leading cause of death in the United States, with more than 200,000 people dying from strokes each year. Approximately 80% of all acute ischemic strokes are due to intracranial artery occlusion, most commonly thromboembolic clot occlusion. Revascularization of occluded territories is the cornerstone of acute ischemic stroke and Thrombolysis for ischemic stroke has been systematically studied in large randomized trials only since the 1990s. To date, thrombolytic therapy for ischemic stroke has been investigated in 21 randomized controlled clinical trials enrolling more than 7,000 patients. The advent of modern imaging and endovascular tools and technology has revolutionized treatment of stroke. In this talk, I will review current clinical trials published in The NEJM (ESCAPE, MR Clean, EXTENDED IA, …. regarding superiority of the endovascular treatments, especially, the stent retrievers, over Iv tPA. I will also go over all endovascular techniques used in the endovascular treatment of acute stroke using my Canadian and American experiences.

  20. Clinicopathologic features and survival of patients with colorectal mucinous, signet-ring cell or non-mucinous adenocarcinoma:experience at an institution in southern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Wu; WU Sui-jing; HE Yu-long; CAI Shi-rong; ZHANG Chang-hua; ZHANG Xin-hua; ZHAN Wen-hua

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown conflicting results on the relation between clinicopathologic features and prognosis of patients with colorectal mucinous, signet-ring cell, or non-mucinous adenocarcinoma; only few such studies have been performed in China. This retrospective study analyzed data from our department to investigate clinicopathologic characteristics, prognosis and possible correlations of three histologic types -- colorectal mucinous,signet-ring cell, and non-mucinous adenocarcinoma, to clarity the bases for observed differences which may lead to development of targeted therapies Methods Of 2079 patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer between 1994 and 2007, 144 had mucinous, 25 had signet-ring cell, and 1837 had non-mucinous adenocarcinoma. Their clinicopathologic parameters and survival were analyzed using established statistical methodologies.Results Mucinous and signet-ring cell adenocarcinomas were common in younger patients (P <0.001). Location, size and disease stage differed significantly among the three types. Signet-ring cell tumors were more commonly found in the rectum than mucinous and non-mucinous adenocarcinoma (P <0.001). Mucinous and signet-ring cell tumors presented in a later stage in life more often than non-mucinous adenocarcinoma, with lymph node involvement, serosal infiltration, peritoneal dissemination, and adjacent organ invasion (P <0.01). The rate of radical resection, hepatic metastasis and local recurrence did not differ among types (P >0.05). Compared with patients with non-mucinous adenocarcinoma, patients with mucinous and signet-ring cell tumors who underwent potentially curative resections or stage Ⅱ/Ⅲ disease had poorer long-term overall survival. Survival did not differ by type for patients with either stage Ⅰor Ⅳ disease (P >0.05). Conclusions Mucinous and signet-ring cell adenocarcinoma have unique carcinogenesis and similar biologic behavior.Our study confirms that both histologic types

  1. Saturn's Periodic Magnetosphere: The Relation Between Periodic Hot Plasma Injections, a Rotating Partial Ring Current, Global Magnetic Field Distortions, Plasmapause Motion, and Radio Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, P. C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Gurnett, D. A.; Persoon, A. M.; Tsyganenko, N. A.

    2012-04-01

    It has been know for some time that the large-scale energetic particle injections (~3-200 keV) on the nigh side of Saturn observed by Cassini/INCA are closely tracked by the periodic Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR). The resulting energetic particle pressure is comparable to that of the colder plasma and it therefore distorts the global magnetic field significantly as the energetic particle population drifts around Saturn. In this presentation we discuss the important consequences this has for the large-scale dynamics and configuration of the entire inner magnetosphere of Saturn. We begin by reviewing the observational correlations between remote, global INCA observations of energetic particles, magnetic field distortions, and radio emissions. We present examples of how the magnetic field measurements and the INCA observations show direct implications of a rotating 3D electrical current system associated with, not only, the energetic particle pressure, but also with an interhemispheric field-aligned current (FAC) system. Recently, we found an intriguing high correlation also between the periodic motion of the high-latitude plasmapause-like boundary reported by Gurnett et al. [2011] and the energetic particles observed remotely by INCA that are periodically injected on the night side and then drift around Saturn according to their energy. In our preliminary analysis we see a direct correlation in at least 75% of the case with the center of drifting energetic particle distribution [Brandt et al., 2010] and the encounter with the rotating plasmapause-like density boundary [Gurnett et al., 2011]. However, the remaining, low-correlation cases suggest that we do not fully understand the global, 3D current system that produces the periodic perturbations in Saturn's magnetosphere. We will use these observations to constrain the underlying 3D current system and in particular, assess the role of interhemispheric FACs in reproducing the observations.

  2. An Energy Recovery Electron Linac On Ring Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolitsa Merminga; Geoffrey Krafft; Valeri Lebedev; Ilan Ben-Zvi

    2001-09-01

    Electron-proton/ion colliders with center of mass energies between 14 GeV and 100 GeV (protons) or 63 GeV/A (ions) and luminosities at the 10{sup 33} (per nucleon) level have been proposed recently as a means for studying hadronic structure. Electron beam polarization appears to be crucial for many of the experiments. Two accelerator design scenarios have been examined in detail: colliding rings and recirculating linac-on-ring. Although the linac-on-ring scenario is not as well developed as the ring-ring scenario, comparable luminosities appear feasible. The linac-on-ring option presents significant advantages with respect to: (1) spin manipulations; (2) reduction of the synchrotron radiation load in the detectors; (3) a wide range of continuous energy variability. Rf power and beam dump considerations require that the electron linac recover the beam energy. This technology has been demonstrated at Jefferson Lab's IR FEL with cw current up to 5 mA and beam energy up to 50 MeV. Based on extrapolations from actual measurements and calculations, energy recovery is expected to be feasible at higher currents (a few hundred mA) and higher energies (a few GeV) as well. The report begins with a brief overview of Jefferson Lab's experience with energy recovery and summarize its benefits. Luminosity projections for the linac-ring scenario based on fundamental limitations are presented next. The feasibility of an energy recovery electron linac-on-proton ring collider is investigated and four conceptual point designs are shown corresponding to electron to proton energies of: 3 GeV on 15 GeV, 5 GeV on 50 GeV and 10 GeV on 250 GeV, and for gold ions with 100 GeV/A. The last two designs assume that the protons or ions are stored in the existing RHIC accelerator. Accelerator physics issues relevant to proton rings and energy recovery linacs are discussed next and a list of required R and D for the realization of such a design is presented.

  3. Ovarian preservation in children for adenexal pathology, current trends in laparoscopic management and our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preet Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    follow-up ultrasound, who were found to have normal shape, size and blood flow compared to the contra lateral side. Conclusion: We outline our experience from the management of 46 cases of various ovarian pathologies with and without ischemia and found that ovarian torsion with a benign pathology and ischemia is not a contraindication for ovarian preservation, as pointed out in the current literature.

  4. Stirling engine piston ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, Roy B.

    1983-01-01

    A piston ring design for a Stirling engine wherein the contact pressure between the piston and the cylinder is maintained at a uniform level, independent of engine conditions through a balancing of the pressure exerted upon the ring's surface and thereby allowing the contact pressure on the ring to be predetermined through the use of a preloaded expander ring.

  5. Birth Control Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Birth Control Ring KidsHealth > For Teens > Birth Control Ring A A A What's in this article? ... español Anillo vaginal anticonceptivo What Is It? The birth control ring is a soft, flexible, doughnut-shaped ring ...

  6. DYNAMICAL BALANCE STUDY OF RING REDUCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The basic structure of epicyclical gear transmission with inner teeth of single-ring, double-ring, three-ring and four-ring reducer are analyzed. The force analysis model of ring reducer is built. Following this, it is concluded that the present ring reducers have the problem that the inertia force or the inertia moment is lopsided. On the base of analysis and calculation the balanced ring reducer which can realize the balance of inertia force and inertia moment is brought forward, and so is its concrete realizing step. The specimen of the balanced ring reducer is designed and manufactured; the experiment is carried out on the gear transmission test bench. Compared with other ring reducer of the same power, the balanced ring reducer has many advantages, such as low vibration noise, low cost and less production difficulty and less heat. It is the substitute of other ring reducer of the same kind. Therefore, it has important theoretic significance and highly practical engineering value.

  7. Storage rings, internal targets and PEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J.E.

    1986-11-01

    Storage rings with internal targets are described, using PEP as an example. The difference between electrons and heavier particles such as protons, antiprotons, and heavy ions is also discussed because it raises possibilities of bypass insertions for more exotic experiments. PEP is compared to other rings in various contexts to verify the assertion that it is an ideal ring for many fundamental and practical applications that can be carried on simultaneously. (LEW)

  8. Actin Rings of Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwayer, Cornelia; Sikora, Mateusz; Slováková, Jana; Kardos, Roland; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2016-06-20

    Circular or ring-like actin structures play important roles in various developmental and physiological processes. Commonly, these rings are composed of actin filaments and myosin motors (actomyosin) that, upon activation, trigger ring constriction. Actomyosin ring constriction, in turn, has been implicated in key cellular processes ranging from cytokinesis to wound closure. Non-constricting actin ring-like structures also form at cell-cell contacts, where they exert a stabilizing function. Here, we review recent studies on the formation and function of actin ring-like structures in various morphogenetic processes, shedding light on how those different rings have been adapted to fulfill their specific roles.

  9. Alternative loop rings

    CERN Document Server

    Goodaire, EG; Polcino Milies, C

    1996-01-01

    For the past ten years, alternative loop rings have intrigued mathematicians from a wide cross-section of modern algebra. As a consequence, the theory of alternative loop rings has grown tremendously. One of the main developments is the complete characterization of loops which have an alternative but not associative, loop ring. Furthermore, there is a very close relationship between the algebraic structures of loop rings and of group rings over 2-groups. Another major topic of research is the study of the unit loop of the integral loop ring. Here the interaction between loop rings and group ri

  10. Model of myosin node aggregation into a contractile ring: the effect of local alignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojkic, Nikola; Vavylonis, Dimitrios [Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Wu Jianqiu, E-mail: vavylonis@lehigh.edu [Department of Molecular Genetics and Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2011-09-21

    Actomyosin bundles frequently form through aggregation of membrane-bound myosin clusters. One such example is the formation of the contractile ring in fission yeast from a broad band of cortical nodes. Nodes are macromolecular complexes containing several dozens of myosin-II molecules and a few formin dimers. The condensation of a broad band of nodes into the contractile ring has been previously described by a search, capture, pull and release (SCPR) model. In SCPR, a random search process mediated by actin filaments nucleated by formins leads to transient actomyosin connections among nodes that pull one another into a ring. The SCPR model reproduces the transport of nodes over long distances and predicts observed clump-formation instabilities in mutants. However, the model does not generate transient linear elements and meshwork structures as observed in some wild-type and mutant cells during ring assembly. As a minimal model of node alignment, we added short-range aligning forces to the SCPR model representing currently unresolved mechanisms that may involve structural components, cross-linking and bundling proteins. We studied the effect of the local node alignment mechanism on ring formation numerically. We varied the new parameters and found viable rings for a realistic range of values. Morphologically, transient structures that form during ring assembly resemble those observed in experiments with wild-type and cdc25-22 cells. Our work supports a hierarchical process of ring self-organization involving components drawn together from distant parts of the cell followed by progressive stabilization.

  11. Heating and current drive by fast wave in lower hybrid range of frequency on Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun-Ho, E-mail: shkim95@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Seung-Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyunwoo; Lee, Byungje [KwangWoon University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Jong-Gab; Lee, Hyun-Young; Hwang, Yong-Seok [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    An efficient heating and current drive scheme in central or off-axis region is required to realize steady state operation of tokamak fusion reactor. And the fast wave in lower hybrid resonance range of frequency could be a candidate for such an efficient scheme in high density and high temperature plasmas. Its propagation and absorption characteristics including current drive and coupling efficiency are analyzed for Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus and it is shown that it is possible to drive current with considerable current drive efficiency in central region. The RF system for the fast wave experiment including klystron, transmission systems, inter-digital antenna, and RF diagnostics are given as well in this paper.

  12. On JB-Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huanyin CHEN

    2007-01-01

    A ring R is a QB-ring provided that aR + bR = R with a, b ∈ R implies that there exists a y ∈ R such that a+by ∈ R-1q. It is said that a ring R is a JB-ring provided that R/J(R) is a QB-ring, where J(R) is the Jacobson radical of R. In this paper, various necessary and sufficient conditions, under which a ring is a JB-ring, are established. It is proved that JB-rings can be characterized by pseudo-similarity. Furthermore, the author proves that R is a J B-ring iff so is R/J(R)2.

  13. Flyer-Plate-Based Current Diagnostic for Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reneker, Joseph; Gomez, Matthew; Hess, Mark; Jennings, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    Accurate measurements of the current delivered to Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) loads on the Z machine are important for understanding the dynamics of liner implosions. Difficulty acquiring a reliable load current measurement with the standard Z load B-dots has spurred the development of alternative load current diagnostics. Velocimetry of an electromagnetically-accelerated flyer plate can be used to infer the drive current on a flyer surface. A load current diagnostic design is proposed using a cylindrical flyer plate in series with the MagLIF target. Aspects of the flyer plate design were optimized using magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Design and preliminary results will be presented. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. A Phenomenological Approach to Experiences with Technology: Current State, Promise, and Future Directions for Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilesiz, Sebnem

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I conceptualize experiences with technology as an object of study for educational technology research and propose phenomenology as a highly suitable method for studying this construct. I begin by reviewing existing research focusing on the construct of experiences with technology and the approaches utilized for its study. To augment…

  15. How Stereotypes Affect Current Collegiate Female Athletes' Athletic Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Stereotype discrimination affects female athletes' athletic experiences. Studies have been conducted of former collegiate female athletes' perceptions of the lesbian stereotype found that they were discriminated against because of their sport participation. These limit the recalling of thoughts and experience from the female athletes' playing…

  16. Density- and viscosity-stratified gravity currents: Insight from laboratory experiments and implications for submarine flow deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amy, L. A.; Peakall, J.; Talling, P. J.

    2005-08-01

    Vertical stratification of particle concentration is a common if not ubiquitous feature of submarine particulate gravity flows. To investigate the control of stratification on current behaviour, analogue stratified flows were studied using laboratory experiments. Stratified density currents were generated by releasing two-layer glycerol solutions into a tank of water. Flows were sustained for periods of tens of seconds and their velocity and concentration measured. In a set of experiments the strength of the initial density and viscosity stratification was increased by progressively varying the lower-layer concentration, CL. Two types of current were observed indicating two regimes of behaviour. Currents with a faster-moving high-concentration basal region that outran the upper layer were produced if CL < 75%. Above this critical value of CL, currents were formed with a relatively slow, high-concentration base that lagged behind the flow front. The observed transition in behaviour is interpreted to indicate a change from inertia- to viscosity-dominated flow with increasing concentration. The reduction in lower-layer velocity at high concentrations is explained by enhanced drag at low Reynolds numbers. Results show that vertical stratification produces longitudinal stratification in the currents. Furthermore, different vertical and temporal velocity and concentration profiles characterise the observed flow types. Implications for the deposit character of particle-laden currents are discussed and illustrated using examples from ancient turbidite systems.

  17. Seasonal and Interannual Variations of Irminger Ring Formation and Boundary–Interior Heat Exchange in FLAME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, M. F.; Bower, A.S.; Furey, H.H.

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of warm-core anticyclones shed by the Irminger Current offWestGreenland, known asIrminger rings, to the restratification of the upper layers of the Labrador Sea is investigated in the 1/ 128Family of Linked Atlantic Models Experiment (FLAME) model. The model output, covering the 199

  18. On semi ring bornologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, A. N.; Rakhimov, I. S.; Husain, Sh. K. Said

    2016-06-01

    Our main focus in this work is to introduce new structure bornological semi rings. This generalizes the theory of algebraic semi rings from the algebraic setting to the framework of bornological sets. We give basic properties for this new structure. As well as, We study the fundamental construction of bornological semi ring as product, inductive limits and projective limits and their extensions on bornological semi ring. Additionally, we introduce the category of bornological semi rings and study product and pullback (fiber product) in the category of bornological semi rings.

  19. Range-based underwater vehicle localization in the presence of unknown ocean currents: Theory and experiments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bayat, M.; Crasta, N.; Aguiar, A.P.; Pascoal, A.M.

    This paper addresses the problem of range-based autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) localization in the presence of unknown ocean currents. In the setup adopted, the AUV is equipped with an attitude and heading reference system, a depth sensor...

  20. Experiences of Incivility and Ageism in Currently Enrolled RN to BS Nursing Students and Their Intent to Quit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balko, Kimberly A.

    2013-01-01

    Student registered nurses face barriers to successful completion of a bachelor's of science degree program when faced with memories of incivility within their basic nursing program and their current experiences of incivility and ageism in the classroom, as well as in the workplace. This incivility, along with generational differences, adds to the…

  1. Experiences of Incivility and Ageism in Currently Enrolled RN to BS Nursing Students and Their Intent to Quit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balko, Kimberly A.

    2013-01-01

    Student registered nurses face barriers to successful completion of a bachelor's of science degree program when faced with memories of incivility within their basic nursing program and their current experiences of incivility and ageism in the classroom, as well as in the workplace. This incivility, along with generational differences, adds to the…

  2. Pain experiences among a population-based cohort of current, former, and never regular smokers with lung and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Adam; Japuntich, Sandra; Keating, Nancy L; Wallace, Robert; He, Yulei; Streck, Joanna M; Park, Elyse R

    2014-11-15

    Smoking and pain are prevalent and comorbid among patients with cancer. Limited work has compared pain experiences among current, former, and never (regular) smokers with lung and colorectal cancer. We studied pain experiences of patients with lung (n = 2390) and colorectal (n = 2993) cancer participating in the multi-regional Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance study. We examined reports of pain, pain treatment, pain severity, and pain-related interference within each cancer group by smoking status, adjusting for demographic, psychosocial, and cancer characteristics. Among lung cancer patients, current smokers reported pain and receiving pain treatment more often than former smokers. Never smokers did not differ from current and former smokers on endorsement of pain; however, they reported pain treatment less often than their counterparts. Current smokers reported greater pain severity than former smokers after adjusting for other contributing factors; however, no differences were detected between current and never smokers. There were no differences in pain-related interference. Among colorectal cancer patients, current smokers reported pain and pain treatment more often than former and never smokers; however, the latter 2 groups did not differ. Current smokers also reported greater pain severity than never smokers after adjustments; however, no differences were detected between current and former smokers. An identical pattern of findings was observed for pain-related interference. Many smokers with lung and colorectal cancer experience pain following a cancer diagnosis. Future work should assess if comprehensive smoking cessation treatments that address pain can reduce pain and facilitate smoking cessation among patients with cancer. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  3. Application of Taguchi method in optimization of cervical ring cage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Teo, Ee-Chon; Fuss, Franz Konstantin

    2007-01-01

    The Taguchi method is a statistical approach to overcome the limitation of the factorial and fractional factorial experiments by simplifying and standardizing the fractional factorial design. The objective of the current study is to illustrate the procedures and strengths of the Taguchi method in biomechanical analysis by using a case study of a cervical ring cage optimization. A three-dimensional finite element (FE) model of C(5)-C(6) with a generic cervical ring cage inserted was modelled. Taguchi method was applied in the optimization of the cervical ring cage in material property and dimensions for producing the lowest stress on the endplate to reduce the risk of cage subsidence, as in the following steps: (1) establishment of objective function; (2) determination of controllable factors and their levels; (3) identification of uncontrollable factors and test conditions; (4) design of Taguchi crossed array layout; (5) execution of experiments according to trial conditions; (6) analysis of results; (7) determination of optimal run; (8) confirmation of optimum run. The results showed that a cage with larger width, depth and wall thickness can produce the lower von Mises stress under various conditions. The contribution of implant materials is found trivial. The current case study illustrates that the strengths of the Taguchi method lie in (1) consistency in experimental design and analysis; (2) reduction of time and cost of experiments; (3) robustness of performance with removing the noise factors. The Taguchi method will have a great potential application in biomechanical field when factors of the issues are at discrete level.

  4. Laboratory experiments in innovation research: a methodological overview and a review of the current literature

    OpenAIRE

    Brüggemann, Julia; Bizer, Kilian

    2016-01-01

    Innovation research has developed a broad set of methodological approaches in recent decades. In this paper, we propose laboratory experiments as a fruitful methodological addition to the existing methods in innovation research. Therefore, we provide an overview of the existing methods, discuss the advantages and limitations of laboratory experiments, and review experimental studies dealing with different fields of innovation policy, namely intellectual property rights, financial instruments,...

  5. Intrinsic structure in Saturn's rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, N.

    2015-10-01

    Saturn's rings are the most prominent in our Solar system and one example of granular matter in space. Dominated by tides and inelastic collisions the system is highly flattened being almost 300000km wide while only tens of meters thick. Individual particles are composed of primarily water ice and range from microns to few tens of meters in size. Apparent patterns comprise ringlets, gaps, kinematic wakes, propellers, bending waves, and the winding spiral arms of density waves. These large-scale structures are perturbations foremost created by external as well as embedded moons. Observations made by the Cassini spacecraft currently in orbit around Saturn show these structures in unprecedented detail. But high-resolution measurements reveal the presence of small-scale structures throughout the system. These include self-gravity wakes (50-100m), overstable waves (100-300m), subkm structure at the A and B ring edges, "straw" and "ropy" structures (1-3km), and the C ring "ghosts". Most of these had not been anticipated and are found in perturbed regions, driven by resonances with external moons, where the system undergoes periodic phases of compression and relaxation that correlate with the presence of structure. High velocity dispersion and the presence of large clumps imply structure formation on time scales as short as one orbit (about 10 hours). The presence of these intrinsic structures is seemingly the response to varying local conditions such as internal density, optical depth, underlying particle size distribution, granular temperature, and distance from the central planet. Their abundance provides evidence for an active and dynamic ring system where aggregation and fragmentation are ongoing on orbital timescales. Thus a kinetic description of the rings may be more appropriate than the fluid one. I will present Cassini Ultraviolet Spectrometer (UVIS) High Speed Photometer (HSP) occultations, Voyager 1 and 2 Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS), and high

  6. Buoyant Norbury's vortex rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyth, Mark; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Salman, Hayder

    2014-11-01

    Norbury's vortices are a one-parameter family of axisymmetric vortex rings that are exact solutions to the Euler equations. Due to their relative simplicity, they are extensively used to model the behavior of real vortex rings found in experiments and in Nature. In this work, we extend the original formulation of the problem to include buoyancy effects for the case where the fluid that lies within the vortex has a different density to that of the ambient. In this modified formulation, buoyancy effects enter the problem through the baroclinic term of the vorticity equation. This permits an efficient numerical solution of the governing equation of motion in terms of a vortex contour method that tracks the evolution of the boundary of the vortex. Finally, we compare our numerical results with the theoretical analysis of the short-time evolution of a buoyant vortex. Funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through grant DPI2011-28356-C03-02 and by the London Mathematical Society.

  7. The Financial System of the New EU Member States: Experiences and Current Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela ROMAN

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The current financial crisis has had a severe impact on the European financial systems, reinforcing the ongoing discussion about the scale, scope, performance, safety and soundness of the financial system and its institutions. In this context, the purpose of this research is to highlight, using an empirical approach and a quantitative analysis, the vulnerabilities accumulated by the financial systems from the new EU member states (Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Romania during the period before the current global economic crisis broke out and to emphasize the extremely serious consequences of the current crisis on their financial systems, the interaction between the financial sector and the real economy, the measures taken by the authorities in order to avoid the collapse of financial systems, as well as the new challenges aroused for the authorities in the current context. Finally, we argue then that building a safer financialsystem with better crisis management and a compelling solution forburden‐sharing should be the current priority.

  8. An analysis of JET fast-wave heating and current drive experiments directly related to ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, V.P.; Eriksson, L.; Gormezano, C.; Jacquinot, J.; Kaye, A.; Start, D.F.H. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-07-01

    The ITER fast-wave system is required to serve a variety of purposes, in particular, plasma heating to ignition, current profile and burn control and eventually, in conjunction with other schemes, a central non-inductive current drive (CD) for the steady-state operation of ITER. The ICRF heating and current drive data that has been obtained in JET are analyzed in terms of dimensionless parameters, with a view to ascertaining its direct relevance to key ITER requirements. The analysis is then used to identify areas both in physics and technological aspects of ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) and CD that require further experimentation in ITER-relevant devices such as JET to establish the required data base. (authors). 12 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Measuring ac losses in superconducting cables using a resonant circuit:Resonant current experiment (RESCUE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Däumling, Manfred; Olsen, Søren Krüger; Rasmussen, Carsten;

    1998-01-01

    be recorded using, for example, a digital oscilloscope. The amplitude decay of the periodic voltage or current accurately reflects the power loss in the system. It consists of two components-an ohmic purely exponential one (from leads, contacts, etc.), and a nonexponential component originating from......A simple way to obtain true ac losses with a resonant circuit containing a superconductor, using the decay of the circuit current, is described. For the measurement a capacitor is short circuited with a superconducting cable. Energy in the circuit is provided by either charging up the capacitors...... with a certain voltage, or letting a de flow in the superconductor. When the oscillations are started-either by opening a switch in case a de is flowing or by closing a switch to connect the charged capacitors with the superconductor-the current (via a Rogowski coil) or the voltage on the capacitor can...

  10. Calibration of the Neutral Current Detection Array in the SNO experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, G.A. [University of Washington, Seattle, US (United States); Cleveland, B.T. [University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Di Marco, M. [Queen' s University, Kingston (Canada); present address: University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Evans, H.C.; Guillian, E.; Hallin, A.L. [Queen' s University, Kingston (Canada); Huang, M. [University of Texas, Austin (United States); Howard, C. [Queen' s University, Kingston (Canada); Jelley, N.A. [University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Law, J. [University of Guelph, Guelph (Canada); Loach, J.C. [University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley (United States); O' Keeffe, H.M. [University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Kraus, C.; Krauss, C.B. [Queen' s University, Kingston (Canada); McGee, S. [present address: University of Geneva, Geneva, Switserland (Switzerland); Peeters, S.J.M., E-mail: s.peeters1@physics.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Prior, G. [University of Texas, Austin (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley (United States); Rielage, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos (United States); Reitzner, D. [University of Guelph, Guelph (Canada); Skensved, P. [Queen' s University, Kingston (Canada); and others

    2011-12-15

    Since November 25th, 2004, the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory has been taking production data in its third and final phase. For this phase a 'Neutral-Current Detection (NCD) Array', consisting of 36 strings of {sup 3}He proportional counters and 4 strings of {sup 4}He proportional counters, was deployed in SNO's D{sub 2}O volume. It supplements the Cherenkov detector, consisting of 9456 photomultiplier tubes, present in the previous two phases by offering an independent measurement of the solar neutral current rate. The {sup 3}He counters detect neutrons from neutrino-deuteron neutral current interactions in the D{sub 2}O. We describe the calibration of this array.

  11. Experiments on Interaction Between Current-Induced Vibration and Scour of Submarine Pipelines on Sandy Bottom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Zhonghan; LIU Yubiao; LI Qingping; HUANG Qinghua; ZHU Farong

    2000-01-01

    In order to understand the dynamic behavior of submarine pipelines exposed to current and the mechanism of the interaction between current-induced vibration and scour of pipelines on a sandy bottom, an experimental investigation is conducted with a small scale model. A test model which can be testedin the flume is set up by taking into account the typical working conditions of the pipelines and by applying the similarity theory. The interactions between the shape of the scour hole and the behavior of the pipeline as well as the flow patterns of the current are detailed, and the interaction mechanism outlined.The effect of vibration of the pipeline on the development of dynamic scour at different stages is found out. The proposed experimental method and test results provide an effective means for design of marine pipelines against scouring.

  12. Eddy current braking experiment using brake disc from aluminium series of A16061 and A17075

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharom, M. Z.; Nuawi, M. Z.; Priyandoko, G.; Harris, S. M.

    2012-09-01

    The electromagnetic braking using eddy current was studied, focused on two series of aluminium as the brake disc which are A16061 and A17075. This paper presents the comparison for both series in a few varied parameters related to eddy current braking such as air-gap, number of turns and brake disc thickness. Optical tachometer has been used along with PULSE analyzer to capture the speed (rpm) and time (s). The findings shows that the smaller the air-gap, the larger of electromagnet turns and the thicker disc thickness is, will generate higher braking torque to stop the rotational motion of disc brake and give great performance for eddy current braking. Thos parameters that been evaluated also addressed a potential on expanding this knowledge to develop an electromagnetic braking system to replace the conventional braking system.

  13. An Experiment in BEBC to Compare Neutral and Charged Current Neutrino Interactions Induced by $\

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The CERN narrow-band neutrino beam provides a unique possibility to study whether there is a difference between neutrinos resulting from @p-decays and those from K-decays. Since any difference might most strongly appear in strange particle production, BEBC is particularly suited for this study thanks to the efficient strange particle detection it provides.\\\\ \\\\ The experiment consists of two exposures of about 100 K pictures each in BEBC filled with 75\\% Ne-H^2 mixture without TST. The parent energies are most conveniently chosen to be respectively 275 GeV and 75 GeV yielding E(@nK) = E(@n@p) @= 65 GeV as the common energy. This would make the higher energy run parasitic on NB operation of the approved WA1 counter experiment. The lower, approximately coincides with an energy proposed for the Gargamelle experiment WA23.

  14. ROMANIAN PUPILS AT THE SPANISH PRIMARY SCHOOLS: CONTINUITIES AND DISCONTINUITIES BETWEEN FORMER AND CURRENT EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta Ion

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available During the last few years, East-Europeans, predominantly Romanians, have become the second largest cultural minority in Catalonia (Spain. Spanish educational institutions now have students from more than twenty different cultures. This paper focuses on the educational background and the factors which characterize the educational experience of Romanian students prior to attending schools in Spain, and how this affects their experiences into Catalonian primary schools. Twenty seven interviews were undertaken, of Catalonian and Romanian teachers, of experts and parents from the host primary schools where the proportion of Romanian students was highest. Two focus-group sessions were carried out with school teachers from Romania. The analysis shows that there is some consistency between educational practices and values in Romania and the practices and values of the host schools. The ability of children to assimilate into the host school is directly influenced by their previous experience in the schools in their country of origin.

  15. Remote Synchronization Experiments for Quasi-Senith Satellite System Using Current Geostationary Satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Iwata

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The remote synchronization system for the onboard crystal oscillator (RESSOX realizes accurate synchronization between an atomic clock at a ground station and the QZSS onboard crystal oscillator, reduces overall cost and satellite power consumption, as well as onboard weight and volume, and is expected to have a longer lifetime than a system with onboard atomic clocks. Since a QZSS does not yet exist, we have been conducting synchronization experiments using geostationary earth orbit satellites (JCSAT-1B or Intelsat-4 to confirm that RESSOX is an excellent system for timing synchronization. JCSAT-1B, the elevation angle of which is 46.5 degrees at our institute, is little affected by tropospheric delay, whereas Intelsat-4, the elevation angle of which is 7.9 degrees, is significantly affected. The experimental setup and the results of uplink experiments and feedback experiments using mainly Intelsat-4 are presented. The results show that synchronization within 10 ns is realized.

  16. Groups, rings, modules

    CERN Document Server

    Auslander, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    This classic monograph is geared toward advanced undergraduates and graduate students. The treatment presupposes some familiarity with sets, groups, rings, and vector spaces. The four-part approach begins with examinations of sets and maps, monoids and groups, categories, and rings. The second part explores unique factorization domains, general module theory, semisimple rings and modules, and Artinian rings. Part three's topics include localization and tensor products, principal ideal domains, and applications of fundamental theorem. The fourth and final part covers algebraic field extensions

  17. Analysis of JET LCHD/ICRH synergy experiments in terms of relativistic current drive theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Start, D.F.H.; Baranov, Y.; Brusati, M.; Ekedahl, A.; Froissard, P.; Gormezano, C.; Jacquinot, J.; Paquin, L.; Rimini, F.G. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Cox, M.; Gardner, C.; O`Brien, M.R. [UKAEA Culham Lab., Abingdon (United Kingdom); Di Vita, A. [Ansaldo SpA, Genoa (Italy)

    1994-07-01

    The present analysis shows that the observed efficiency of current drive with synergy between LHCD and ICRH is in good agreement with the relativistic theory of Karney and Fisch for Landau damped waves. The predicted power absorption from the fast wave by the electron tail is within 30% of the measured value. In the presence of significant fast electron diffusion within a slowing down time it would be possible to produce central current drive using multiple ICRF resonances even when the LHCD deposition is at half radius, as in an ITER type device. (authors). 4 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Study on PMT Ringing Signal of The Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment%大亚湾中微子实验光电倍增管输出振铃脉冲的分析研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋文奇; 王铮; 李秋菊; 常劲帆; 严雄波; 魏微; 陆卫国; 吕继方

    2012-01-01

    The Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment is a neutrino - oscillation experiment designed to measure the mixing angle θ13 using anti - neutrinos produced by the reactors of the DayaBay Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) and the Ling Ao NPP. The readout signals of the PMTs which are reacted by the Neutrino need to be accurately measured for the goal of the Daya Bay experiment which needs a measurement of sin22θ13 to 0.01 or better. But ringing was found in the PMT test. It describes the ringing in the readout signals of the PMTs, and analyses the cause of the ringing.%大亚湾反应堆中微子实验是一个研究中微子振荡的实验[1],主要目标是利用核反应堆产生的电子反中微子来测定一个具有重大物理意义的参数一中微子混合角θ13.大亚湾中微子实验的目标是将sin22θ13测量到0.01或更高的精度,为实现对大亚湾中微子信号的准确测量,必须要求光电倍增管输出干净脉冲信号到前端电子学(FEE),但在测试实验中,发现光电倍增管输出脉冲含有振铃.针对振铃进行了详尽分析,找到了振铃产生的根源,也确认了电容在高压下的压电效应.

  19. Birth Control Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Right Sport for You Healthy School Lunch Planner Birth Control Ring KidsHealth > For Teens > Birth Control Ring Print A A A What's in ... español Anillo vaginal anticonceptivo What Is It? The birth control ring is a soft, flexible, doughnut-shaped ...

  20. On Weakly Semicommutative Rings*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN WEI-XING; CUI SHU-YING

    2011-01-01

    A ring R is said to be weakly scmicommutative if for any a, b ∈ R,ab = 0 implies aRb C_ Nil(R), where Nil(R) is the set of all nilpotcnt elements in R.In this note, we clarify the relationship between weakly semicommutative rings and NI-rings by proving that the notion of a weakly semicommutative ring is a proper generalization of NI-rings. We say that a ring R is weakly 2-primal if the set of nilpotent elements in R coincides with its Levitzki radical, and prove that if R is a weakly 2-primal ring which satisfies oα-condition for an endomorphism α of R (that is, ab = 0 (←→) aα(b) = 0 where a, b ∈ R) then the skew polynomial ring R[π; αα]is a weakly 2-primal ring, and that if R is a ring and I is an ideal of R such that I and R/I are both weakly semicommutative then R is weakly semicommutative.Those extend the main results of Liang et al. 2007 (Taiwanese J. Math., 11(5)(2007),1359-1368) considerably. Moreover, several new results about weakly semicommutative rings and NI-rings are included.

  1. Study of multipass regimes in lower hybrid current drive experiments on Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arslanbekov, R.; Litaudon, X.; Peysson, Y.; Hoang, G.T.; Kazarian, F.; Moreau, D. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Shoucri, M.; Shkarofsky, I.P. [Centre Canadien de Fusion Magnetique, Varennes, PQ (Canada); Baranov, Y. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Kupfer, K. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This document presents a study of multipass regimes in Lower Hybrid Current Drive on Tore Supra. A statistical model of the plasma wave propagation based on the Fokker-Planck theory is proposed, together with experimental results performed on Tore Supra. (TEC). 9 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Josephson current in Fe-based superconducting junctions: theory and experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burmistrova, A.V.; Devyatov, I.A.; Golubov, A.; Yada, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Tortello, M.; Gonnelli, R.S.; Stepanov, V.A.; Ding, X.X.; Wen, H.H.; Green, L.H.

    2015-01-01

    We present a theory of the dc Josephson effect in contacts between Fe-based and spin-singlet s-wave superconductors. The method is based on the calculation of temperature Green's function in the junction within the tight-binding model. We calculate the phase dependencies of the Josephson current for

  3. The Current Experiences of Physical Education Teachers at Schools for Blind Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haegele, Justin A.; Lieberman, Lauren J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: It has been well established that children with visual impairments tend to be less physically active and more delayed in motor skills than their sighted peers. As a result, there has been some research focusing on inclusive physical education for these children. However, there is a clear lack of research on the current status of…

  4. The British Colonial Experience in Waziristan and Its Applicability to Current Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    fall 2004, the Paksitani government used the same carrots and sticks that the British government used in the tribal areas from 1849-1947. The...limited and precise. (3) The U.S. and Pakistani cannot employ a cookie cutter solution to the current situation in Waziristan. Due to the complex and

  5. Discrepancies in the Ideal Perceptions and the Current Experiences of Special Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Amanda; Brown, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    The field of special education continues to have lower teacher retention rates compared to general education. As a result, concerns over the quality of special education teachers' professional experiences have risen. Both general and special education teachers have their ideal views of the profession, including ample classroom facilities,…

  6. Nuclear radiation as a probe of chemical bonding: the current interplay between theory and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, M D

    1978-01-01

    After a survey of appropriate theoretical formalisms, recent confrontations of theory and experiment in the areas of neutron scattering, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and positron chemistry are discussed, with major emphasis on the degree to which simple concepts of chemical bonding can be refined by complementary use of the above experimental probes and the powerful techniques of computational quantum chemistry.

  7. Statistical Correlations Between Near-Infrared Luminosities and Ring Sizes in Field Ringed Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wentao

    2008-01-01

    Statistically complete samples of inner-pseudo-, inner-, and outer-ringed galaxies can be extracted from the Catalog of Southern Ringed Galaxies. Redshifts and near-infrared (NIR) photometric data are available for the samples, allowing the derivation of the statistical correlations between the total NIR luminosities (L NIR) and the projected ring major axes in the physical scale (D) for these galaxies. For any of the three types of rings, the correlations are approximately L NIR vprop D 1.2 among the early-type ringed galaxies (the most commonly observed ringed galaxies). The correlations among late-type ringed galaxies appear significantly different. The results contradict the previous suggestion by Kormendy (1979, ApJ, 227, 714), who gave LB vprop D 2 (LB : B-band galaxy luminosity). The relations can be used in future to test theoretical simulations of dynamical structures of ringed galaxies as well as those of ring formation under the framework of cosmological models. Currently the results indicate at most small differences in the relative contributions of disk components to total galaxy masses and in the initial disk velocity dispersions between commonly observed ringed galaxies of similar type. The correlations also suggest a new approach to effectively use ring sizes as tertiary cosmological distance indicators, to help enhance the reliability of the measurement of the Hubble Constant.

  8. MREIT experiments with 200μA injected currents: a feasibility study using two reconstruction algorithms, SMM and Harmonic BZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpinar, V E; Hamamura, M J; Degirmenci, E; Muftuler, L T

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is a technique that produces images of conductivity in tissues and phantoms. In this technique electrical currents are applied to an object and the resulting magnetic flux density is measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the conductivity distribution is reconstructed using these MRI data. Currently the technique is used in research environments, primarily studying phantoms and animals. In order to translate MREIT to clinical applications, strict safety standards need to be established, especially for safe current limits. However, there are currently no standards for safe current limits specific to MREIT. Until such standards are established, human MREIT applications need to conform to existing electrical safety standards in medical instrumentation, such as the IEC601. This protocol limits patient auxiliary currents to 100μA for low frequencies. However, published MREIT studies have utilized currents 10 to 400 times larger than this limit, bringing into question whether the clinical applications of MREIT are attainable under current standards. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of MREIT to accurately reconstruct the relative conductivity of a simple agarose phantom using 200μA total injected current and we tested the performance of two MREIT reconstruction algorithms. These reconstruction algorithms used are the iterative sensitivity matrix method (SMM) by Ider and Birgul in 1998 with Tikhonov regularization and the Harmonic BZ proposed by Oh et al in 2003. The reconstruction techniques were tested at both 200μA and 5mA injected currents to investigate their noise sensitivity at low and high current conditions. It should be noted that 200μA total injected current into a cylindrical phantom generates only 14.7μA current in imaging slice. Similarly, 5mA total injected current results in 367μA in imaging slice. Total acquisition time for 200μA and 5mA experiments were about one

  9. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS AND EXPERIMENT OF UNSTEADY THERMAL FIELDOF ROTOR PLATE FOR EDDY CURRENT RETARDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chengye; HE Ren

    2008-01-01

    The physical model based on heat transfer theory and virtual boundary method for analyzing unsteady thermal field of rotor plate for eddy current retarder used in automobile is established and boundary conditions are also defined. The finite element governing equation is derived by Galerkin method. The time differential item is discrete based on Galerkin format that is stable at any condition. And a new style of varying time step method is used in iteration process. The thermal field on the rotor plate at the radial and axle directions is analyzed and varying temperature at appointed points on two side-surfaces is measured. The testing and analytical data are uniform approximately. Finite element method can be used for estimating thermal field of the rotor plate at initial design stage of eddy current retarder.

  10. POLITICAL POWER IN THE PRISM OF POLITICAL ANALYSIS (EXPERIENCE REVIEW OF CURRENT RESEARCH DIRECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Kuryukin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The broad theoretical material considered relevant areas of the study of political power. Reveals the patterns of occurrence and development of a strictly scientific views on political power as a phenomenon and a social process. Determined the current trends of development of theoreticalunderstanding of political power in relation to the stages of its evolution. The most urgent technological model of exercising political power.

  11. Turbulent boundary layers under irregular waves and currents: Experiments and the equivalent-wave concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing

    2016-04-01

    A full-scale experimental study of turbulent boundary layer flows under irregular waves and currents is conducted with the primary objective to investigate the equivalent-wave concept by Madsen (1994). Irregular oscillatory flows following the bottom-velocity spectrum under realistic surface irregular waves are produced over two fixed rough bottoms in an oscillatory water tunnel, and flow velocities are measured using a Particle Image Velocimetry. The root-mean-square (RMS) value and representative phase lead of wave velocities have vertical variations very similar to those of the first-harmonic velocity of periodic wave boundary layers, e.g., the RMS wave velocity follows a logarithmic distribution controlled by the physical bottom roughness in the very near-bottom region. The RMS wave bottom shear stress and the associated representative phase lead can be accurately predicted using the equivalent-wave approach. The spectra of wave bottom shear stress and boundary layer velocity are found to be proportional to the spectrum of free-stream velocity. Currents in the presence of irregular waves exhibit the classic two-log-profile structure with the lower log-profile controlled by the physical bottom roughness and the upper log-profile controlled by a much larger apparent roughness. Replacing the irregular waves by their equivalent sinusoidal waves virtually makes no difference for the coexisting currents. These observations, together with the excellent agreement between measurements and model predictions, suggest that the equivalent-wave representation adequately characterizes the basic wave-current interaction under irregular waves.

  12. Josephson current in Fe-based superconducting junctions: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmistrova, A. V.; Devyatov, I. A.; Golubov, Alexander A.; Yada, Keiji; Tanaka, Yukio; Tortello, M.; Gonnelli, R. S.; Stepanov, V. A.; Ding, Xiaxin; Wen, Hai-Hu; Greene, L. H.

    2015-06-01

    We present a theory of the dc Josephson effect in contacts between Fe-based and spin-singlet s -wave superconductors. The method is based on the calculation of temperature Green's function in the junction within the tight-binding model. We calculate the phase dependencies of the Josephson current for different orientations of the junction relative to the crystallographic axes of Fe-based superconductor. Further, we consider the dependence of the Josephson current on the thickness of an insulating layer and on temperature. Experimental data for PbIn/Ba 1 -xKx (FeAs) 2 point-contact Josephson junctions are consistent with theoretical predictions for s± symmetry of an order parameter in this material. The proposed method can be further applied to calculations of the dc Josephson current in contacts with other new unconventional multiorbital superconductors, such as Sr2RuO4 and the superconducting topological insulator CuxBi2Se3 .

  13. Current saturation in submicrometer graphene transistors with thin gate dielectric: experiment, simulation, and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shu-Jen; Reddy, Dharmendar; Carpenter, Gary D; Franklin, Aaron D; Jenkins, Keith A

    2012-06-26

    Recently, graphene field-effect transistors (FET) with cutoff frequencies (f(T)) between 100 and 300 GHz have been reported; however, the devices showed very weak drain current saturation, leading to an undesirably high output conductance (g(ds)= dI(ds)/dV(ds)). A crucial figure-of-merit for analog/RF transistors is the intrinsic voltage gain (g(m)/g(ds)) which requires both high g(m) (primary component of f(T)) and low g(ds). Obtaining current saturation has become one of the key challenges in graphene device design. In this work, we study theoretically the influence of the dielectric thickness on the output characteristics of graphene FETs by using a surface-potential-based device model. We also experimentally demonstrate that by employing a very thin gate dielectric (equivalent oxide thickness less than 2 nm), full drain current saturation can be obtained for large-scale chemical vapor deposition graphene FETs with short channels. In addition to showing intrinsic voltage gain (as high as 34) that is comparable to commercial semiconductor FETs with bandgaps, we also demonstrate high frequency AC voltage gain and S21 power gain from s-parameter measurements.

  14. Physics of quantum rings

    CERN Document Server

    Fomin, Vladimir M

    2013-01-01

    This book deals with a new class of materials, quantum rings. Innovative recent advances in experimental and theoretical physics of quantum rings are based on the most advanced state-of-the-art fabrication and characterization techniques as well as theoretical methods. The experimental efforts allow to obtain a new class of semiconductor quantum rings formed by capping self-organized quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Novel optical and magnetic properties of quantum rings are associated with non-trivial topologies at the nanoscale. An adequate characterization of quantum rings is po

  15. Envelopes of Commutative Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rafael PARRA; Manuel SAOR(I)N

    2012-01-01

    Given a significative class F of commutative rings,we study the precise conditions under which a commutative ring R has an F-envelope.A full answer is obtained when.F is the class of fields,semisimple commutative rings or integral domains.When F is the class of Noetherian rings,we give a full answer when the Krull dimension of R is zero and when the envelope is required to be epimorphic.The general problem is reduced to identifying the class of non-Noetherian rings having a monomorphic Noetherian envelope,which we conjecture is the empty class.

  16. RING PROXY SIGNATURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Proxy signatures have been used to enable the transfer of digital signing power within some context and ring signatures can be used to provide the anonymity of a signer. By combining the functionalities of proxy signatures and ring signatures, this paper introduces a new concept, named ring proxy signature, which is a proxy signature generated by an anonymous member from a set of potential signers. The paper also constructs the first concrete ring proxy signature scheme based on the provably secure Schnorr's signatures and two ID-based ring proxy signature schemes. The security analysis is provided as well.

  17. Can current moisture responses predict soil CO2 efflux under altered precipitation regimes? A synthesis of manipulation experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vicca

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a key component of the carbon cycle, soil CO2 efflux (SCE is being increasingly studied to improve our mechanistic understanding of this important carbon flux. Predicting ecosystem responses to climate change often depends on extrapolation of current relationships between ecosystem processes and their climatic drivers to conditions not yet experienced by the ecosystem. This raises the question to what extent these relationships remain unaltered beyond the current climatic window for which observations are available to constrain the relationships. Here, we evaluate whether current responses of SCE to fluctuations in soil temperature and soil water content can be used to predict SCE under altered rainfall patterns. Of the 58 experiments for which we gathered SCE data, 20 were discarded because either too few data were available, or inconsistencies precluded their incorporation in the analyses. The 38 remaining experiments were used to test the hypothesis that a model parameterized with data from the control plots (using soil temperature and water content as predictor variables could adequately predict SCE measured in the manipulated treatment. Only for seven of these 38 experiments, this hypothesis was rejected. Importantly, these were the experiments with the most reliable datasets, i.e., those providing high-frequency measurements of SCE. Accordingly, regression tree analysis demonstrated that measurement frequency was crucial; our hypothesis could be rejected only for experiments with measurement intervals of less than 11 days, and was not rejected for any of the 24 experiments with larger measurement intervals. This highlights the importance of high-frequency measurements when studying effects of altered precipitation on SCE, probably because infrequent measurement schemes have insufficient capacity to detect shifts in the climate-dependencies of SCE. We strongly recommend that future experiments focus more strongly on establishing response

  18. Measurement of the {lambda}-bar polarization in {nu}{sub {mu}} charged current interactions in the NOMAD experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astier, P.; Autiero, D.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Banner, M.; Bassompierre, G.; Besson, N.; Bird, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bobisut, F.; Bouchez, J.; Boyd, S.; Bueno, A.; Bunyatov, S.; Camilleri, L.; Cardini, A.; Cattaneo, P.W.; Cavasinni, V.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Chukanov, A.; Collazuol, G.; Conforto, G.; Conta, C.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cousins, R.; Daniels, D.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Prete, T.; De Santo, A.; Dignan, T.; Di Lella, L.; Couto e Silva, E. do; Dumarchez, J.; Ellis, M.; Fazio, T.; Feldman, G.J.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrere, D.; Flaminio, V.; Fraternali, M.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Gangler, E.; Geiser, A.; Geppert, D.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Godley, A.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.-J.; Gosset, J.; Goessling, C.; Gouanere, M.; Grant, A.; Graziani, G.; Guglielmi, A.; Hagner, C.; Hernando, J.; Hubbard, D.; Hurst, P.; Hyett, N.; Iacopini, E.; Joseph, C.; Juget, F.; Kirsanov, M.; Klimov, O.; Kokkonen, J.; Kovzelev, A.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kustov, D.; Kuznetsov, V.; Lacaprara, S.; Lachaud, C.; Lakic, B.; Lanza, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Laveder, M.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Levy, J.-M.; Linssen, L.; Ljubicic, A.; Long, J.; Lupi, A.; Marchionni, A.; Martelli, F.; Mechain, X.; Mendiburu, J.-P.; Meyer, J.-P.; Mezzetto, M.; Mishra, S.R.; Moorhead, G.F.; Naumov, D.; Nedelec, P.; Nefedov, Yu.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Peak, L.S.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Petti, R.; Placci, A.; Polesello, G.; Pollmann, D.; Polyarush, A.; Popov, B. E-mail: boris.popov@cern.ch; Poulsen, C.; Rico, J.; Riemann, P.; Roda, C.; Rubbia, A.; Salvatore, F.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, T.; Sevior, M.; Sillou, D.; Soler, F.J.P.; Sozzi, G.; Steele, D.; Stiegler, U.; Stipcevic, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Tareb-Reyes, M.; Taylor, G.N.; Tereshchenko, V.; Toropin, A.; Touchard, A.-M.; Tovey, S.N.; Tran, M.-T.; Tsesmelis, E.; Ulrichs, J.; Vacavant, L.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Valuev, V.; Vannucci, F.; Varvell, K.E.; Veltri, M.; Vercesi, V.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Vieira, J.-M.; Vinogradova, T.; Weber, F.V.[and others

    2001-07-02

    We present a measurement of the polarization of {lambda}-bar hyperons produced in {nu}{sub {mu}} charged current interactions. The full data sample from the NOMAD experiment has been analyzed using the same V{sup 0} identification procedure and analysis method reported in a previous paper [NOMAD Collaboration, Nucl. Phys. B 588 (2000) 3] for the case of {lambda} hyperons. The {lambda}-bar polarization has been measured for the first time in a neutrino experiment. The polarization vector is found to be compatible with zero.

  19. Measurement of the Λ¯ polarization in νμ charged current interactions in the NOMAD experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astier, P.; Autiero, D.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Banner, M.; Bassompierre, G.; Besson, N.; Bird, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bobisut, F.; Bouchez, J.; Boyd, S.; Bueno, A.; Bunyatov, S.; Camilleri, L.; Cardini, A.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cavasinni, V.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Chukanov, A.; Collazuol, G.; Conforto, G.; Conta, C.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cousins, R.; Daniels, D.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Prete, T.; de Santo, A.; Dignan, T.; di Lella, L.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Dumarchez, J.; Ellis, M.; Fazio, T.; Feldman, G. J.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrère, D.; Flaminio, V.; Fraternali, M.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Gangler, E.; Geiser, A.; Geppert, D.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Godley, A.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.-J.; Gosset, J.; Gößling, C.; Gouanère, M.; Grant, A.; Graziani, G.; Guglielmi, A.; Hagner, C.; Hernando, J.; Hubbard, D.; Hurst, P.; Hyett, N.; Iacopini, E.; Joseph, C.; Juget, F.; Kirsanov, M.; Klimov, O.; Kokkonen, J.; Kovzelev, A.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kustov, D.; Kuznetsov, V.; Lacaprara, S.; Lachaud, C.; Lakić, B.; Lanza, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Laveder, M.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Levy, J.-M.; Linssen, L.; Ljubičić, A.; Long, J.; Lupi, A.; Marchionni, A.; Martelli, F.; Méchain, X.; Mendiburu, J.-P.; Meyer, J.-P.; Mezzetto, M.; Mishra, S. R.; Moorhead, G. F.; Naumov, D.; Nédélec, P.; Nefedov, Yu.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Peak, L. S.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Petti, R.; Placci, A.; Polesello, G.; Pollmann, D.; Polyarush, A.; Popov, B.; Poulsen, C.; Rico, J.; Riemann, P.; Roda, C.; Rubbia, A.; Salvatore, F.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, T.; Sevior, M.; Sillou, D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Sozzi, G.; Steele, D.; Stiegler, U.; Stipčević, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Tareb-Reyes, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Tereshchenko, V.; Toropin, A.; Touchard, A.-M.; Tovey, S. N.; Tran, M.-T.; Tsesmelis, E.; Ulrichs, J.; Vacavant, L.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Valuev, V.; Vannucci, F.; Varvell, K. E.; Veltri, M.; Vercesi, V.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Vieira, J.-M.; Vinogradova, T.; Weber, F. V.; Weisse, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Winton, L. J.; Yabsley, B. D.; Zaccone, H.; Zuber, K.; Zuccon, P.; NOMAD Collaboration

    We present a measurement of the polarization of Λ¯ hyperons produced in νμ charged current interactions. The full data sample from the NOMAD experiment has been analyzed using the same V0 identification procedure and analysis method reported in a previous paper [NOMAD Collaboration, Nucl. Phys. B 588 (2000) 3] for the case of Λ hyperons. The Λ¯ polarization has been measured for the first time in a neutrino experiment. The polarization vector is found to be compatible with zero.

  20. Saturn's largest ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbiscer, Anne J; Skrutskie, Michael F; Hamilton, Douglas P

    2009-10-22

    Most planetary rings in the Solar System lie within a few radii of their host body, because at these distances gravitational accelerations inhibit satellite formation. The best known exceptions are Jupiter's gossamer rings and Saturn's E ring, broad sheets of dust that extend outward until they fade from view at five to ten planetary radii. Source satellites continuously supply the dust, which is subsequently lost in collisions or by radial transport. Here we report that Saturn has an enormous ring associated with its outer moon Phoebe, extending from at least 128R(S) to 207R(S) (Saturn's radius R(S) is 60,330 km). The ring's vertical thickness of 40R(S) matches the range of vertical motion of Phoebe along its orbit. Dynamical considerations argue that these ring particles span the Saturnian system from the main rings to the edges of interplanetary space. The ring's normal optical depth of approximately 2 x 10(-8) is comparable to that of Jupiter's faintest gossamer ring, although its particle number density is several hundred times smaller. Repeated impacts on Phoebe, from both interplanetary and circumplanetary particle populations, probably keep the ring populated with material. Ring particles smaller than centimetres in size slowly migrate inward and many of them ultimately strike the dark leading face of Iapetus.

  1. Unveiling the physics of the Thomson jumping ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladera, Celso L.; Donoso, Guillermo

    2015-04-01

    We present a new theoretical model and validating experiments that unveil the rich physics behind the flight of the conductive ring in the Thomson experiment—physics that is hard to see because of the rapid motion. The electrodynamics of the flying ring exhibits interesting features, e.g., varying mutual inductance between the ring and the electromagnet. The dependences of the ring electrodynamics upon time and position as the ring travels upward are conveniently separated and determined to obtain a comprehensive view of the ring motion. We introduce a low-cost jumping ring setup that incorporates pickup coils connected in opposition, allowing us to scrutinize the ring electrodynamics and confirm our theoretical model with good accuracy. This work is within the reach of senior students of science or engineering, and it can be implemented either as a teaching laboratory experiment or as an open-ended project.

  2. The contraceptive vaginal ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwardson, Jill; Jamshidi, Roxanne

    2010-03-01

    The contraceptive vaginal ring offers effective contraception that is self-administered, requires less frequent dosing than many other forms of contraception, and provides low doses of hormones. NuvaRing (Organon, Oss, The Netherlands), the only contraceptive vaginal ring approved for use in the United States, contains etonogestrel and ethinyl estradiol. It is inserted into the vagina for 3 weeks, followed by a 1-week ring-free period, and works by inhibiting ovulation. Most women note a beneficial effect on bleeding profiles and are satisfied with NuvaRing. Commonly reported adverse events include vaginitis, leukorrhea, headaches, and device-related events such as discomfort. Serious adverse events are rare. In Chile and Peru, progesterone-only vaginal contraceptive rings are available for nursing women. Studies are ongoing examining new formulations of vaginal contraceptive rings.

  3. New Dust Belts of Uranus: One Ring, Two Ring, Red Ring, Blue Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Pater, I; Hammel, H B; Gibbard, S G; Showalter, M R

    2006-02-02

    We compare near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with HST results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced via impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where non-gravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of sub-micron sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring.

  4. Certain near-rings are rings, II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard E. Bell

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate distributively-generated near-rings R which satisfy one of the following conditions: (i for each x,y∈R, there exist positive integers m, n for which xy=ymxn; (ii for each x,y∈R, there exists a positive integer n such that xy=(yxn. Under appropriate additional hypotheses, we prove that R must be a commutative ring.

  5. Reducing current noise in cryogenic experiments by vacuum-insulated cables

    CERN Document Server

    Mykkänen, E; Kemppinen, A; Krause, C; Drung, D; Nissilä, J; Manninen, A J

    2016-01-01

    We measure the current noise of several cryogenic cables in a pulse tube based dilution refrigerator at frequencies between about 1~mHz and 50~kHz. We show that vibration-induced noise can be efficiently suppressed by using vacuum-insulated cables between room temperature and the 2nd pulse tube stage. A noise peak below 4 fA at the 1.4~Hz operation frequency of the pulse tube, and a white noise density of 0.44 fA/\\sqrt{Hz} in the millihertz range are obtained.

  6. Current Practices in Global/International Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences: Home/Host Country or Site/Institution Considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Alsharif, Naser Z.; Dakkuri, Adnan; Abrons, Jeanine P.; Williams, Dennis; Ombengi, David N.; Zheng, HaiAn; Al-Dahir, Sara; Tofade, Toyin; Gim, Suzanna; O’Connell, Mary Beth; Ratka, Anna; Dornblaser, Emily

    2016-01-01

    International outreach by schools and colleges of pharmacy is increasing. In this paper, we provide current practice guidelines to establish and maintain successful global/international advanced pharmacy practice experiences (G/I APPEs) with specific recommendations for home/host country and host site/institution. The paper is based on a literature review (2000-2014) in databases and Internet searches with specific keywords or terms. Educational documents such as syllabi and memoranda of unde...

  7. Current Practices in Global/International Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences: Home/Host Country or Site/Institution Considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Alsharif, Naser Z.; Dakkuri, Adnan; Abrons, Jeanine P.; Williams, Dennis; Ombengi, David N.; Zheng, HaiAn; Al-Dahir, Sara; Tofade, Toyin; Gim, Suzanna; O’Connell, Mary Beth; Ratka, Anna; Dornblaser, Emily

    2016-01-01

    International outreach by schools and colleges of pharmacy is increasing. In this paper, we provide current practice guidelines to establish and maintain successful global/international advanced pharmacy practice experiences (G/I APPEs) with specific recommendations for home/host country and host site/institution. The paper is based on a literature review (2000-2014) in databases and Internet searches with specific keywords or terms. Educational documents such as syllabi and memoranda of unde...

  8. Improved upper bounds on Kaluza-Klein gravity with current Solar System experiments and observations

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Xue-Mei

    2015-01-01

    As an extension of previous works on classical tests of Kaluza-Klein (KK) gravity and as an attempt to find more stringent constraints on this theory, its effects on physical experiments and astronomical observations conducted in the Solar System are studied. We investigate the gravitational time delay at inferior conjunction caused by KK gravity, and use new Solar System ephemerides and the observation of \\textit{Cassini} to strengthen constraints on KK gravity by up to two orders of magnitude. These improved upper bounds mean that the fifth-dimensional space in the soliton case is a very flat extra dimension in the Solar System, even in the vicinity of the Sun.

  9. Improved upper bounds on Kaluza-Klein gravity with current Solar System experiments and observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Xue-Mei [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Purple Mountain Observatory, Nanjing (China); Xie, Yi [Nanjing University, School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Space Navigation and Position Techniques, Shanghai (China); Nanjing University, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Modern Astronomy and Astrophysics, Nanjing (China)

    2015-11-15

    As an extension of previous works on classical tests of Kaluza-Klein (KK) gravity and as an attempt to find more stringent constraints on this theory, its effects on physical experiments and astronomical observations conducted in the Solar System are studied. We investigate the gravitational time delay at inferior conjunction caused by KK gravity, and use new Solar System ephemerides and the observation of Cassini to strengthen constraints on KK gravity by up to two orders of magnitude. These improved upper bounds mean that the fifth-dimensional space in the soliton case is a very flat extra dimension in the Solar System, even in the vicinity of the Sun. (orig.)

  10. Fiber cavity ring down and gain amplification effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Susana; Magalhães, Regina; Pérez-Herrera, Rosa Ana; Lopez-Amo, Manuel; Marques, M. B.; Frazão, O.

    2016-12-01

    The effect of an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) placed inside the fiber ring of a cavity ring down (CRD) configuration is studied. The limitations and advantages of this configuration are discussed, and the study of the ring-down time as a function of the current applied and gain to the EDFA is also presented. In this case, the power fluctuations in the output signal are strongly dependent on the cavity ring-down time with the EDFA gain.

  11. Numerical experiments on the detailed energy conversion and spectrum studies in a corona current sheet

    CERN Document Server

    Ni, Lei; Mei, Zhixing; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study the energy conversion and spectra in a corona current sheet by 2.5-dimensional MHD numerical simulations. Numerical results show that many Petschek-like fine structures with slow-mode shocks mediated by plasmoid instabilities develop during the magnetic reconnection process. The termination shocks can also be formed above the primary magnetic island and at the head of secondary islands. These shocks play important roles in generating thermal energy in a corona current sheet. For a numerical simulation with initial conditions close to the solar corona environment, the ratio of the generated thermal energy to the total dissipated magnetic energy is around $1/5$ before secondary islands appear. After secondary islands appear, the generated thermal energy starts to increase sharply and this ratio can reach a value about $3/5$. In an environment with a relatively lower plasma density and plasma $\\beta$, the plasma can be heated to a much higher temperature. After secondary islands appear, t...

  12. Operational experience in the use of 18 kA HTS current leads for Edipo

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, S.; Wesche, R.; Bruzzone, P.

    2014-05-01

    In spring 2013, the Edipo facility of CRPP was commissioned. The dipole is powered via two 18 kA HTS current leads, designed and manufactured at CRPP. As part of the Edipo commissioning framework, the operational parameters of the leads were implemented in the control system. The in-situ tests were found to be in good agreement with the tests performed without a background field in 2011. The leads consist of a conduction cooled HTS module, made of AgMgAu/Bi-2223 stacks, and a wire bundle heat exchanger. The heat exchanger is cooled by forced flow helium gas, the inlet temperature of which was measured to vary between 65 K and 85 K. During operation with field, the mass flow rate is a function of current (2.05 g/s per lead at full field, 12.35 T, 17.2 kA). Reduced cooling investigations showed that 0.31 g/s per lead is suitable for overnight standby and 0.2 g/s per lead for longer periods. For detection of and protection against quench in the HTS module, a threshold of 10 mV was found to be appropriate. The heat exchanger has a voltage protection threshold of 120 mV. The temperatures of the heat exchanger, the HTS, and the helium inlet temperature were monitored in order to provide a further layer of protection.

  13. Ion Current Collection Diagnostic for the Triggered Plasma Opening Switch Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, D. P.; Gilmore, M. A.

    2005-10-01

    The novel Triggered Plasma Opening Switch (TPOS) is a unique device that exploits the high conductivity and low mass properties of plasma. The TPOS's objective is to take the initial ˜.8 MA (˜250 ns rise time) storage inductor current and deliver ˜.5 MA at ˜2.5 MV (˜10ns rise time) to a load of ˜5-10 φ. Study of the TPOS characteristics is in progress via an Ion Current Collection Diagnostic (ICCD). The ICCD has been designed, fabricated, tested, and is in use on the TPOS in order to explore the main switch opening profile. The ICCD utilizes 12 charge collectors (biased faraday cups) that are positioned perpendicularly to the main switch stage in order to collect radially traveling ions emitted from the plasma surface via the Child-Langmuir law. Magnetostatic simulations with self consistent space charge emitting surfaces of the main switch using the Trak static 2D finite element code have been conducted as well. Finally, ICCD experimental data have been recorded, and hopefully these data will provide evidence that support both theory and simulation.

  14. Operational Experience and Consolidations for the Current Lead Control Valves of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Perin, A; Pirotte, O; Krieger, B; Widmer, A

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider superconducting magnets are powered by more than 1400 gas cooled current leads ranging from 120 A to 13000 A. The gas flow required by the leads is controlled by solenoid proportional valves with dimensions from DN 1.8 mm to DN 10 mm. During the first months of operation, signs of premature wear were found in the active parts of the valves. This created major problems for the functioning of the current leads threatening the availability of the LHC. Following the detection of the problems, a series of measures were implemented to keep the LHC running, to launch a development program to solve the premature wear problem and to prepare for a global consolidation of the gas flow control system. This article describes first the difficulties encountered and the measures taken to ensure a continuous operation of the LHC during the first year of operation. The development of new friction free valves is then presented along with the consolidation program and the test equipment developed to val...

  15. Current Practices in Global/International Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences: Preceptor and Student Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornblaser, Emily K; Ratka, Anna; Gleason, Shaun E; Ombengi, David N; Tofade, Toyin; Wigle, Patricia R; Zapantis, Antonia; Ryan, Melody; Connor, Sharon; Jonkman, Lauren J; Ochs, Leslie; Jungnickel, Paul W; Abrons, Jeanine P; Alsharif, Naser Z

    2016-04-25

    The objective of this article is to describe the key areas of consideration for global/international advanced pharmacy practice experience (G/I APPE) preceptors, students and learning objectives. At the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP), the GPE SIG prepared and presented an initial report on the G/IAPPE initiatives. Round table discussions were conducted at the 2014 AACP Annual Meeting to document GPE SIG member input on key areas in the report. Literature search of PubMed, Google Scholar and EMBASE with keywords was conducted to expand this report. In this paper, considerations related to preceptors and students and learning outcomes are described. Preceptors for G/I APPEs may vary based on the learning outcomes of the experience. Student learning outcomes for G/I APPEs may vary based on the type of experiential site. Recommendations and future directions for development of G/IAPPEs are presented. Development of a successful G/I APPE requires significant planning and consideration of appropriate qualifications for preceptors and students.

  16. Three-Axis Magnetic Field Measurements in the TCSU RMF Current Drive Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velas, K. M.; Milroy, R. D.

    2011-10-01

    A 3-axis probe was installed on TCSU shortly before its shutdown. The probe has 90 windings that simultaneously measure Br, Bθ, and Bz at 30 radial positions and is fully translatable. Positioning the probe at multiple axial positions and taking multiple repeatable shots allows for a full r-z map of the magnetic field. Initially, data has been processed with a 10 kHz low pass filter to capture the steady field. Higher frequency content has more shot-to-shot variability; it is difficult to map this axially. Plans include using a band pass filter to isolate the RMF frequency, which is consistent between shots. It is anticipated that the RMF field, in conjunction with the steady field, will yield a map of the full 3D rotating field structure. The 3- axis probe measurements are used to calculate the end-shorting torque, which opposes the RMF torque. Data from even- and odd-parity experiments will be compared. The NIMROD code has been adapted to simulate the TCSU experiment using boundary conditions adjusted to match both even- and odd-parity experimental conditions. A comparison of the n = 0 components of the calculated fields to the 3- axis probe measurements shows agreement in the magnetic field structure of the FRC as well as in the jet region.

  17. On Exchange QB∞-Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huanyin Chen

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new class of rings, the QB∞-rings. We investigate necessary and sufficient conditions under which an exchange ring is a QB∞-ring. The modules over an exchange QB∞-ring are studied. Also, we prove that every regular square matrix over an exchange QB∞-ring admits a diagonal reduction by pseudo-invertible matrices.

  18. Neutrosophic LA-Semigroup Rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumtaz Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrosophic LA-semigroup is a midway structure between a neutrosophic groupoid and a commutative neutrosophic semigroup. Rings are the old concept in algebraic structures. We combine the neutrosophic LA-semigroup and ring together to form the notion of neutrosophic LA-semigroup ring. Neutrosophic LAsemigroup ring is defined analogously to neutrosophic group ring and neutrosophic semigroup ring.

  19. Measurement of the {lambda} polarization in {nu}{sub {mu}} charged current interactions in the NOMAD experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astier, P.; Autiero, D.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Banner, M.; Bassompierre, G.; Benslama, K.; Besson, N.; Bird, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bobisut, F.; Bouchez, J.; Boyd, S.; Bueno, A.; Bunyatov, S.; Camilleri, L.; Cardini, A.; Cattaneo, P.W.; Cavasinni, V.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Chukanov, A.; Collazuol, G.; Conforto, G.; Conta, C.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cousins, R.; Daniels, D.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Prete, T.; De Santo, A.; Dignan, T.; Di Lella, L. E-mail: luigi.di.lella@cern.ch; Couto e Silva, E. do; Dumarchez, J.; Ellis, M.; Fazio, T.; Feldman, G.J.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrere, D.; Flaminio, V.; Fraternali, M.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Gangler, E.; Geiser, A.; Geppert, D.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Godley, A.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.-J.; Gosset, J.; Goessling, C.; Gouanere, M.; Grant, A.; Graziani, G.; Guglielmi, A.; Hagner, C.; Hernando, J.; Hubbard, D.; Hurst, P.; Hyett, N.; Iacopini, E.; Joseph, C.; Juget, F.; Kirsanov, M.; Klimov, O.; Kokkonen, J.; Kovzelev, A.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kustov, D.; Kuznetsov, V.; Lacaprara, S.; Lachaud, C.; Lakic, B.; Lanza, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Laveder, M.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Levy, J.-M.; Linssen, L.; Ljubicic, A.; Long, J.; Lupi, A.; Marchionni, A.; Martelli, F.; Mechain, X.; Mendiburu, J.-P.; Meyer, J.-P.; Mezzetto, M.; Mishra, S.R.; Moorhead, G.F.; Naumov, D.; Nedelec, P.; Nefedov, Yu.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Peak, L.S.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Petti, R.; Placci, A.; Polesello, G.; Pollmann, D.; Polyarush, A.; Popov, B.; Poulsen, C.; Rathouit, P.; Rico, J.; Riemann, P.; Roda, C.; Rubbia, A.; Salvatore, F.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, T.; Sevior, M.; Sillou, D.; Soler, F.J.P.; Sozzi, G.; Steele, D.; Stiegler, U.; Stipcevic, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Tareb-Reyes, M.; Taylor, G.N.; Tereshchenko, V.; Toropin, A.; Touchard, A.-M.; Tovey, S.N.; Tran, M.-T.; Tsesmelis, E.; Ulrichs, J.; Vacavant, L.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Valuev, V.; Vannucci, F.; Varvell, K.E.; Veltri, M.; Vercesi, V.; Vieira, J.-M.; Vinogradova, T.[and others

    2000-11-06

    The {lambda} polarization in {nu}{sub {mu}} charged current interactions has been measured in the NOMAD experiment. The event sample (8087 reconstructed {lambda} 's) is more than an order of magnitude larger than that of previous bubble chamber experiments, while the quality of event reconstruction is comparable. We observe negative polarization along the W -boson direction which is enhanced in the target fragmentation region: P{sub x}(x{sub F}<0)=-0.21{+-}0.04(stat){+-}0.02(sys) . In the current fragmentation region we find P{sub x}(x{sub F}>0)=-0.09{+-}0.06(stat){+-}0.03(sys) . These results provide a test of different models describing the nucleon spin composition and the spin transfer mechanisms. A significant transverse polarization (in the direction orthogonal to the {lambda} production plane) has been observed for the first time in a neutrino experiment: P{sub y}=-0.22{+-}0.03(stat){+-}0.01(sys) . The dependence of the absolute value of P{sub y} on the {lambda} transverse momentum with respect to the hadronic jet direction is in qualitative agreement with the results from unpolarized hadron-hadron experiments.

  20. The Loop Current Dynamics Experiment (2009-2011) in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo-Fernández, Alexis

    2016-12-01

    The Environmental Studies Program of the US Department of the Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) has sponsored oceanographic research in the Gulf of Mexico for over 40 years. Since 1998, BOEM and its predecessor agencies funded several oceanographic studies on the Gulf's continental slope and beyond. These investigations were aimed at discovering and understanding the physical process driving the circulation and improving numerical models' forecasting skills. One common finding in many of those studies was the ubiquitous influence that the Loop Current (LC) and its associated eddies have on the Gulf's circulation. The LC dominance of the upper layer circulation has been well established by previous studies. Many of these studies suggested that the LC is a source of deep energy below the main thermocline. Yet, despite its acknowledged importance to the Gulf circulation, there had been few observational studies of the LC itself particularly in the main eddy shedding regime.

  1. A coarse-grained DNA model for the prediction of current signals in DNA translocation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weik, Florian; Kesselheim, Stefan; Holm, Christian

    2016-11-01

    We present an implicit solvent coarse-grained double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) model confined to an infinite cylindrical pore that reproduces the experimentally observed current modulations of a KaCl solution at various concentrations. Our model extends previous coarse-grained and mean-field approaches by incorporating a position dependent friction term on the ions, which Kesselheim et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 018101 (2014)] identified as an essential ingredient to correctly reproduce the experimental data of Smeets et al. [Nano Lett. 6, 89 (2006)]. Our approach reduces the computational effort by orders of magnitude compared with all-atom simulations and serves as a promising starting point for modeling the entire translocation process of dsDNA. We achieve a consistent description of the system's electrokinetics by using explicitly parameterized ions, a friction term between the DNA beads and the ions, and a lattice-Boltzmann model for the solvent.

  2. Translational Science Project Team Managers: Qualitative Insights and Implications from Current and Previous Postdoctoral Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, Kevin C; Dann, Sara M; Finnerty, Celeste C; Kotarba, Joseph A

    2014-07-01

    The development of leadership and project management skills is increasingly important to the evolution of translational science and team-based endeavors. Team science is dependent upon individuals at various stages in their careers, inclusive of postdocs. Data from case histories, as well as from interviews with current and former postdocs, and those supervising postdocs, indicate six essential tasks required of project managers in multidisciplinary translational teams, along with eight skill-related themes critical to their success. To optimize the opportunities available and to ensure sequential development of team project management skills, a life cycle model for the development of translational team skills is proposed, ranging from graduate trainees, postdocs, assistant professors, and finally to mature scientists. Specific goals, challenges and project management roles and tasks are recommended for each stage for the life cycle.

  3. Phage therapy--history from Twort and d'Herelle through Soviet experience to current approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanishvili, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Felix d'Herelle proposed the use of bacteriophages for the therapy of human and animal bacterial infections at the beginning of the 20th century. This approach, however, was not widely accepted in the West. After the emergence of antibiotics in 1940s, phage research was diverted to a more fundamental level. At the same time, phage therapy was widely practiced in the Soviet Union due to collaboration of Felix d'Herelle with his Georgian colleagues. The majority of the articles dedicated to this subject are from the 1930s and 1940s. The old Soviet literature indicates that phage therapy was used extensively to treat a wide range of bacterial infections in the areas of dermatology (Beridze, 1938), ophthalmology (Rodigina, 1938), urology (Tsulukidze, 1938), stomatology (Ruchko and Tretyak, 1936), pediatrics (Alexandrova et al., 1935; Lurie, 1938), otolaryngology (Ermolieva, 1939), and surgery (Tsulukidze, 1940, 1941). These articles were published in Russian and thus were not readily available to Western scientists. The Western skepticism toward phage therapy itself was again followed by renewed interest and reappraisal, mainly due to the emergence of drug-resistant bacteria. Often the experiments described in the old Soviet articles were not designed properly: the use of placebos and the coding of preparations were absent from most of the studies, number of patients in the experimental and control groups was unequal or missing, sometimes no control groups were used at all, or patients treated previously unsuccessfully with antibiotics were employed as an experimental group and as control. The results obtained and the efficiency of phage prophylaxis were estimated by comparing with results obtained in previous years. In most publications, phage titers and descriptions of methods used for evaluation of the results are not specified. Nevertheless, past experience indicates some effectiveness of phage therapy and prophylaxis. Therefore, these clinical results should not

  4. Accelerator physics measurements at the damping ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivkin, L.; Delahaye, J. P.; Wille, K.; Allen, M. A.; Bane, K.; Fieguth, T.; Hofmann, A.; Button, A.; Lee, M.; Linebarger, W.

    1985-05-01

    Besides the optics measurements described elsewhere, machine experiments were done at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) damping ring to determine some of its parameters. The synchrotron radiation energy loss which gives the damping rates was measured by observing the RF-voltage dependence of the synchronous phase angle. The emittance was obtained from the synchrotron light monitor, scraper measurements and by extracting the beam through a doublet and measuring its size for different quadrupole settings. Current dependent effects such as parasitic mode losses, head tail instabilities, synchrotron and betatron frequency shifts were measured to estimate the impedance. RF-cavity beam loading and its compensation were also studied and ion collection was investigated. All results agree reasonably well with expectations and indicate no limitations to the design performance.

  5. Vortex rings impinging on permeable boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujal-Colilles, Anna; Dalziel, Stuart B.; Bateman, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Experiments with vortex rings impinging permeable and solid boundaries are presented in order to investigate the influence of permeability. Utilizing Particle Image Velocimetry, we compared the behaviour of a vortex ring impinging four different reticulated foams (with permeability k ˜ 26 - 85 × 10-8 m2) and a solid boundary. Results show how permeability affects the stretching phenomena of the vortex ring and the formation and evolution of the secondary vortex ring with opposite sign. Moreover, permeability also affects the macroscopic no-slip boundary condition found on the solid boundary, turning it into an apparent slip boundary condition for the most permeable boundary. The apparent slip-boundary condition and the flux exchange between the ambient fluid and the foam are jointly responsible for both the modified formation of the secondary vortex and changes on the vortex ring diameter increase.

  6. Space experiment BTN-NEUTRON on INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION - CURRENT STATUS and future stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakov, V. I.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Laygushin, V. I.; Litvak, M. L.; Malakhov, A. V.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Pronin, M. A.; Vostrukhin, A. A.; Sanin, A. B.

    2009-04-01

    Space experiment BTN (Board Telescope of Neutrons) was suggested in 1997 for the Russian segment of International Space Station. The first stage of this experiment was started in February 2007 with instrumentation BTN-M1, which contain two separate units: 1) the electronics unit for commanding and data handling, which is installed inside the Station; 2) the detector unit, which is installed at the outer surface of Russian Service Module "Zvezda". The total mass of this instrument without cables is about 15 kg and total power consumption is about 18 Watts. Detector unit of BTN-M1 has the set of four neutron detectors: three proportional counters of epithermal neutrons with 3He covered by cadmium shields and polyethylene moderators with different thickness and stylbene scintillator for fast neutrons at the energy range 0.4 Mev - 10 Mev. There are three sources of neutrons in the near-Earth space. Permanent flux of neutrons is produced due to interaction of energetic particles of galactic and solar cosmic rays with the upper atmosphere of the Earth ("natural neutrons") and with the body of the spacecraft ("technogenic neutrons"). The third transient sources of neutrons are active regions of the Sun, which may sporadically emit energetic neutrons during strong flares. Some of these particles have sufficiently high energy to neutrons cover the distance to the Earth before decay Data from BTN-M1 after 2 years of space operations is sufficient for preliminary estimation of neutron component of radiation environment in the near-Earth space. BTN-M1 detector unit is equal to the Russian instrument HEND, which also operates now onboard NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter since May 2001. Simultaneous measurements of neutron radiation on orbits around Mars and Earth give the unique opportunity to compare neutron radiation environment around two planets. The technogenic component of neutron background may be estimated by analysis of data for different stages of flight. After evaluation

  7. A Study of Storage Ring Requirements for an Explosive Detection System Using NRA Method

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Tai-Sen

    2005-01-01

    The technical feasibility of an explosives detection system based on the nuclear resonance absorption (NRA) of gamma rays in nitrogen-rich materials was demonstrated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 1993 by using an RFQ proton accelerator and a tomographic imaging prototype.* The study is being continued recently to examine deployment of such an active interrogation system in realistic scenarios. The approach is to use a cyclotron and electron-cooling-equipped storage rings(s) to provide the high quality and high current proton beam needed in a practical application. In this work, we investigate the storage ring requirements for a variant of the airport luggage inspection system considered in the earlier LANL experiments. Estimations are carried out based on the required inspection throughput, the gamma ray yield, the proton beam emittance growth due to scattering with the photon-production target, beam current limit in the storage ring, and the electron cooling rate. Studies using scaling and reas...

  8. Mass transfer in thin films under counter-current gas: experiments and numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucquiaud, Mathieu; Lavalle, Gianluca; Schmidt, Patrick; Ausner, Ilja; Wehrli, Marc; O Naraigh, Lennon; Valluri, Prashant

    2016-11-01

    Mass transfer in liquid-gas stratified flows is strongly affected by the waviness of the interface. For reactive flows, the chemical reactions occurring at the liquid-gas interface also influence the mass transfer rate. This is encountered in several technological applications, such as absorption units for carbon capture. We investigate the absorption rate of carbon dioxide in a liquid solution. The experimental set-up consists of a vertical channel where a falling film is sheared by a counter-current gas flow. We measure the absorption occurring at different flow conditions, by changing the liquid solution, the liquid flow rate and the gas composition. With the aim to support the experimental results with numerical simulations, we implement in our level-set flow solver a novel module for mass transfer taking into account a variant of the ghost-fluid formalism. We firstly validate the pure mass transfer case with and without hydrodynamics by comparing the species concentration in the bulk flow to the analytical solution. In a final stage, we analyse the absorption rate in reactive flows, and try to reproduce the experimental results by means of numerical simulations to explore the active role of the waves at the interface.

  9. The value of postmortem experience in undergraduate medical education: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamber AR

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Andrew R Bamber,1 Thelma A Quince2 1UCL Institute of Child Health, London, UK; 2Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Primary Care Unit, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, UK Abstract: The autopsy has traditionally been used as a tool in undergraduate medical education, but recent decades have seen a sharp decline in their use for teaching. This study reviewed the current status of the autopsy as a teaching tool by means of systematic review of the medical literature, and a questionnaire study involving UK medical schools. Teachers and students are in agreement that autopsy-based teaching has many potential benefits, including a deeper knowledge of basic clinical sciences, medical fallibility, end of life issues, audit and the “hidden curriculum”. The reasons underlying the decline in teaching are complex, but include the decreasing autopsy rate, increasing demands on teachers' time, and confusion regarding the law in some jurisdictions. Maximal use of autopsies for teaching may be achieved by involvement of anatomical pathology technologists and trainee pathologists in teaching, the development of alternative teaching methods using the principles of the autopsy, and clarification of the law. Students gain most benefit from repeated attendance at autopsies, being taught by enthusiastic teachers, when they have been effectively prepared for the esthetic of dissection and the mortuary environment. Keywords: medical education, autopsy, postmortem 

  10. Liposomal Drug Product Development and Quality: Current US Experience and Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Mamta; Lee, Sau L; Tyner, Katherine M

    2017-02-03

    Research in the area of liposomes has grown substantially in the past few decades. Liposomes are lipid bilayer structures that can incorporate drug substances to modify the drug's pharmacokinetic profile thereby improving drug delivery. The agency has received over 400 liposomal drug product submissions (excluding combination therapies), and there are currently eight approved liposomal drug products on the US market. In order to identify the pain points in development and manufacturing of liposomal drug products, a retrospective analysis was performed from a quality perspective on submissions for new and generic liposomal drug products. General analysis on liposomal drug product submissions was also performed. Results indicated that 96% of the submissions were Investigational New Drug (IND) applications, 3% were New Drug Applications (NDAs), and the remaining 1% was Abbreviated New Drug Applications (ANDAs). Doxorubicin hydrochloride was the most commonly used drug substance incorporated into the liposomes (31%). The majority of the liposomal products were administered via intravenous route (84%) with cancer (various types) being the most common indication (63%). From a quality perspective, major challenges during the development of liposomal drug products included identification and (appropriate) characterization of critical quality attributes of liposomal drug products and suitable control strategies during product development. By focusing on these areas, a faster and more efficient development of liposomal drug products may be achieved. Additionally, in this way, the drug review process for such products can be streamlined.

  11. Dependence of a rabbit's reaction on the frequency of repetition of an impulse and current exposition in experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koklin А.Е.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Now electroshock devices are used as a civilian weapon for self-defense and as a non-lethal weapon in the police. Therefore, medical-biological safety testing of electroshock devices should be carried out. Development of hygienic regulations is relevant as well. The aim of our work is the study of the biological effects of pulsed current depending on the pulse frequency, pulse amplitude and exposure. Material and methods. We compared the biological effects with varying frequency of the current pulse (50, 400, and 600 Hz with varying exposure (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 s.. Average pulse power in all cases was equal, and the pulse energy was different. Experiments were performed on rabbits. Biological effects of stun device were evaluated by clinical lesions, as well as electrophysiological parameters: ECG and electro-pneumogram. Results. Response was observed only in the current period (0.25 s, 0.5 s or 1 s was disorientation, convulsing, dyspnea. The degree of severity of the reaction was determined by a combination of pulse repetition frequency and exposure. Immediately after switching off the current noted vocalization, decreased heart rate and breathing. Heart rate and respiration in 5 minutes back to the normal values. Conclusions. In the results of the research has got a comparative classification organism's response (based on a points system as well as the characteristic of the biological response of the individual systems of the body on the parameters of the current pulse.

  12. Constraints on new physics in the electroweak bosonic sector from current data and future experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Hagiwara, K; Szalapski, R

    1995-01-01

    Extensions of the Standard Model which involve a new scale, \\Lambda, may, for energies sufficiently small compared to this new scale, be expressed in terms of operators with energy dimension greater than four. The coefficients of just four SU(2)\\timesU(1)-gauge-inva riant energy-dimension-six operators are sufficient to parameterize the contributions of new physics in the electroweak bosonic sector to electroweak precision measurements. In this letter we update constraints on the coefficients of these four operators due to recent precision measurements of electroweak observables. We further demonstrate how such constraints may be improved by experiments at TRISTAN, LEP2 and at a future linear e^+e^- collider. The relationship of these operators to the oblique parameters S, T and U is examined. Two of the operators contribute to a non-standard running of the electroweak charge form-factors \\overline{\\alpha}(q^2), \\overline{s}^2(q^2), \\overline{g}_Z^2(q^2) and \\overline{g}_W^2(q^2); in the special case where th...

  13. Visualizing the impact of art: An update and comparison of current psychological models of art experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew ePelowski

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has witnessed a renaissance of empirical and psychological approaches to art study, especially regarding cognitive models of art processing experience. This new emphasis on modeling has often become the basis for our theoretical understanding of human interaction with art. Models also often define areas of focus and hypotheses for new empirical research, and are increasingly important for connecting psychological theory to discussions of the brain. However, models are often made by different researchers, with quite different emphases or visual styles. Inputs and psychological outcomes may be differently considered, or can be under-reported with regards to key functional components. Thus, we may lose the major theoretical improvements and ability for comparison that can be had with models. To begin addressing this, this paper presents a theoretical assessment, comparison, and new articulation of a selection of key contemporary cognitive or information-processing-based approaches detailing the mechanisms underlying the viewing of art. We review six major models in contemporary psychological aesthetics. We in turn present redesigns of these models using a unified visual form, in some cases making additions or creating new models where none had previously existed. We also frame these approaches in respect to their targeted outputs (e.g., emotion, appraisal, physiological reaction and their strengths within a more general framework of early, intermediate and later processing stages. This is used as a basis for general comparison and discussion of implications and future directions for modeling, and for theoretically understanding our engagement with visual art.

  14. [Regulatory Program for Medical Devices in Cuba: experiences and current challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Dulce María Martínez; Rodríguez, Yadira Álvarez; Valdés, Yamila Cedeño; Ribas, Silvia Delgado

    2016-05-01

    Regulatory control of medical devices in Cuba is conducted through a system based on the Regulatory Program for Medical Devices as a way to ensure the safety, efficacy, and effectiveness of these technologies, which are in use by the National Health System. This program was launched in 1992, when the Regulations for State Evaluation and Registration of Medical Devices were approved. Its successive stages and the merging of regulatory activities for drugs and medical equipment have meant progress toward stronger, more transparent strategies and greater control of industry and the National Health System. Throughout its course the Cuban program has met with challenges and difficulties that it has addressed by drawing on its own experiences. During the new period, the greatest challenges revolve around ensuring that regulatory systems incorporate scientific evaluation, risk levels, maximum rigor through the use of technical standards, and the implementation of international recommendations, together with the application of the ISO 13485 certification scheme, enhanced market monitoring, and classification of medical devices in accordance with their relevance to the country's national health policies. From the regional standpoint, the greatest challenge lies in working toward regulatory convergence. The Collaborating Centre for the Regulation of Health Technologies will support the proposed regulatory strategy and established regional priorities, in particular in connection with the implementation of actions involving medical devices.

  15. Current Status of 3-Dimensional Speckle Tracking Echocardiography: A Review from Our Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizu, Tomko; Aonuma, Kazutaka

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac function analysis is the main focus of echocardiography. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) has been the clinical standard, however, LVEF is not enough to investigate myocardial function. For the last decade, speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) has been the novel clinical tool for regional and global myocardial function analysis. However, 2-dimensional imaging methods have limitations in assessing 3-dimensional (3D) cardiac motion. In contrast, 3D echocardiography also has been widely used, in particular, to measure LV volume measurements and assess valvular diseases. Joining the technology bandwagon, 3D-STE was introduced in 2008. Experimental studies and clinical investigations revealed the reliability and feasibility of 3D-STE-derived data. In addition, 3D-STE provides a novel deformation parameter, area change ratio, which have the potential for more accurate assessment of overall and regional myocardial function. In this review, we introduced the features of the methodology, validation, and clinical application of 3D-STE based on our experiences for 7 years. PMID:25031794

  16. [Drug supply chain safety in hospitals: current data and experience of the Grenoble university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedouch, P; Baudrant, M; Detavernier, M; Rey, C; Brudieu, E; Foroni, L; Allenet, B; Calop, J

    2009-01-01

    Drug supply chain safety has become a priority for public health which implies a collective process. This process associates all health professionals including the pharmacist who plays a major role. The objective of this present paper is to describe the several approaches proven effective in the reduction of drug-related problem in hospital, illustrated by the Grenoble University Hospital experience. The pharmacist gets involved first in the general strategy of hospital drug supply chain, second by his direct implication in clinical activities. The general strategy of drug supply chain combines risk management, coordination of the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee, selection and purchase of drugs and organisation of drug supply chain. Computer management of drug supply chain is a major evolution. Nominative drug delivering has to be a prior objective and its implementation modalities have to be defined: centralized or decentralized in wards, manual or automated. Also, new technologies allow the automation of overall drug distribution from central pharmacy and the implementation of automated drug dispensing systems into wards. The development of centralised drug preparation allows a safe compounding of high risk drugs, like cytotoxic drugs. The pharmacist should develop his clinical activities with patients and other health care professionals in order to optimise clinical decisions (medication review, drug order analysis) and patients follow-up (therapeutic monitoring, patient education, discharge consultation).

  17. TeV/m Nano-Accelerator: Current Status of CNT-Channeling Acceleration Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Young Min [Northern Illinois U.; Lumpkin, Alex H. [Fermilab; Thangaraj, Jayakar Charles [Fermilab; Thurman-Keup, Randy Michael [Fermilab; Shiltsev, Vladimir D. [Fermilab

    2014-09-17

    Crystal channeling technology has offered various opportunities in the accelerator community with a viability of ultrahigh gradient (TV/m) acceleration for future HEP collider. The major challenge of channeling acceleration is that ultimate acceleration gradients might require a high power driver in the hard x-ray regime (~ 40 keV). This x-ray energy exceeds those for x-rays as of today, although x-ray lasers can efficiently excite solid plasma and accelerate particles inside a crystal channel. Moreover, only disposable crystal accelerators are possible at such high externally excited fields which would exceed the ionization thresholds destroying the atomic structure, so acceleration will take place only in a short time before full dissociation of the lattice. Carbon-based nanostructures have great potential with a wide range of flexibility and superior physical strength, which can be applied to channeling acceleration. This paper presents a beam- driven channeling acceleration concept with CNTs and discusses feasible experiments with the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) in Fermilab.

  18. CBD-enriched medical cannabis for intractable pediatric epilepsy: The current Israeli experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzadok, Michal; Uliel-Siboni, Shimrit; Linder, Ilan; Kramer, Uri; Epstein, Orna; Menascu, Shay; Nissenkorn, Andrea; Yosef, Omer Bar; Hyman, Eli; Granot, Dorit; Dor, Michael; Lerman-Sagie, Tali; Ben-Zeev, Bruria

    2016-02-01

    To describe the experience of five Israeli pediatric epilepsy clinics treating children and adolescents diagnosed as having intractable epilepsy with a regimen of medical cannabis oil. A retrospective study describing the effect of cannabidiol (CBD)-enriched medical cannabis on children with epilepsy. The cohort included 74 patients (age range 1-18 years) with intractable epilepsy resistant to >7 antiepileptic drugs. Forty-nine (66%) also failed a ketogenic diet, vagal nerve stimulator implantation, or both. They all started medical cannabis oil treatment between 2-11/2014 and were treated for at least 3 months (average 6 months). The selected formula contained CBD and tetrahydrocannabinol at a ratio of 20:1 dissolved in olive oil. The CBD dose ranged from 1 to 20mg/kg/d. Seizure frequency was assessed by parental report during clinical visits. CBD treatment yielded a significant positive effect on seizure load. Most of the children (66/74, 89%) reported reduction in seizure frequency: 13 (18%) reported 75-100% reduction, 25 (34%) reported 50-75% reduction, 9 (12%) reported 25-50% reduction, and 19 (26%) reported epilepsy in a population of children and adolescents are highly promising. Further prospective, well-designed clinical trials using enriched CBD medical cannabis are warranted. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Kaiser Permanente Northern California: current experiences with internet, mobile, and video technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Robert

    2014-02-01

    The US health care system has been slow to adopt Internet, mobile, and video technologies, which have the capability to engage patients in their own care, increase patients' access to providers, and possibly improve the quality of care while reducing costs. Nevertheless, there are some pockets of progress, including Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC). In 2008 KPNC implemented an inpatient and ambulatory care electronic health record system for its 3.4 million members and developed a suite of patient-friendly Internet, mobile, and video tools. KPNC has achieved many successes. For example, the number of virtual "visits" grew from 4.1 million in 2008 to an estimated 10.5 million in 2013. This article describes KPNC's experience with Internet, mobile, and video technologies and the obstacles faced by other health care providers interested in embracing them. The obstacles include the predominant fee-for-service payment model, which does not reimburse for virtual visits; the considerable investment needed to deploy these technologies; and physician buy-in.

  20. Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitors in B-cell lymphoma: current experience and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, T; Dreyling, M

    2017-08-01

    The Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) is a central hub in the B cell receptor (BCR) pathway and strongly influences B cell maturation, differentiation and proliferation. Not surprisingly, BTK plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of various B cell lymphomas. Inhibitors of BTK have broadened our therapeutic options in several B cell lymphomas and already are an integral element in the treatment of Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and Waldenström's marcoglobulinemia. Several second generation BTK inhibitors are in clinical development and might further improve tolerability and efficacy of therapy in advanced stage CLL and MCL. Areas covered: This review illustrates the mechanism of action of BTK inhibitors and provides a comprehensive summary of key clinical trials in the development of BTK inhibitors. Characteristics of second generation BTK-inhibitors are described. Expert opinion: With accumulation of clinical experience after drug approval, longer patient follow-up and larger numbers of treated patients, future development will focus on the identification of intelligent treatment combinations. Individual selection of patients with distinct biologically properties might guide treatment decisions. While BTK inhibitors are moving to earlier treatment lines, the incorporation of these drugs into a comprehensive therapeutic strategy is still difficult to date.