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Sample records for current response due

  1. Transient Eddy Current Response Due to a Subsurface Crack in a Conductive Plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Fangwei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Eddy current nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is usually carried out by exciting a time harmonic field using an inductive probe. However, a viable alternative is to use transient eddy current NDE in which a current pulse in a driver coil produces a transient .eld in a conductor that decays at a rate dependent on the conductivity and the permeability of the material and the coil configuration. By using transient eddy current, it is possible to estimate the properties of the conductive medium and to locate and size potential .aws from the measured probe response. The fundamental study described in this dissertation seeks to establish a theoretical understanding of the transient eddy current NDE. Compared with the Fourier transform method, the derived analytical formulations are more convenient when the transient eddy current response within a narrow time range is evaluated. The theoretical analysis provides a valuable tool to study the effect of layer thickness, location of defect, crack opening as well as the optimization of probe design. Analytical expressions have been developed to evaluate the transient response due to eddy currents in a conductive plate based on two asymptotic series. One series converges rapidly for a short time regime and the other for a long time regime and both of them agree with the results calculated by fast Fourier transform over all the times considered. The idea of asymptotic expansion is further applied to determine the induced electromotive force (EMF) in a pick-up coil due to eddy currents in a cylindrical rod. Starting from frequency domain representation, a quasi-static time domain dyadic Green's function for an electric source in a conductive plate has been derived. The resulting expression has three parts; a free space term, multiple image terms and partial reflection terms. The dyadic Green's function serves as the kernel of an electric field integral equation which defines the interaction of an ideal crack with the

  2. Acute respiratory infection due to : current status of diagnostic methods

    OpenAIRE

    Loens, K.; Goossens, H.; Ieven, M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Because of the absence of well-standardized both in-house and FDA-approved commercially available diagnostic tests, the reliable diagnosis of respiratory infection due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae remains difficult. In addition, no formal external quality assessment schemes which would allow to conclude about the performance of M. pneumoniae diagnostic tests exist. In this review, the current state of knowledge of M. pneumoniae-associated respiratory infections in the context ...

  3. Secondary Flows and Sediment Transport due to Wave - Current Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Nabil; Wiegel, Robert

    2015-04-01

    expression, ρs is the seawater mass density, ρ is the river current mass density, a0 is the deep water wave amplitude, g is the acceleration of gravity, Cg is the wave group velocity, L is the deep water wave length, h is the average water depth near the river mouth, C0 is the deep water wave phase velocity, U is the average jet exit velocity and w is the river or the tidal inlet effective width. The values of the above number were found to be in the range between 1.0 and 6.0-8.0 for the examined laboratory and field case studies for non-buoyant jets. Upper bound corresponds to cases of higher wave activity on the coast while the lower bound corresponds to cases of tidal currents with minimum wave activity, Coastal Processes Modifications due to River and Ebb Current Interaction with Opposing Waves: Confirmation of the obtained theoretical expression was obtained by comparison against field data for shoreline variability at river mouths and the formation of accretion shoals and erosion spots at tidal inlets and ocean outfalls in the USA and the Nile delta coastline. The predicted extent of the coast reshaping process, due to shoreline erosion and subsequent accretion, due to the absence of the river Nile current after 1965, east of the Rosetta headland, was determined. The obtained shoreline erosion spatial extent using the above correlation showed that the long term length of coastline recession would be in the neighborhood of 16-20 km east of Rosetta headland (1990-2014). Such results were further confirmed by the recent satellite data (Ghoneim, et al, 2015). The results of the present work were well compared to the data on Fort Pierce Inlet, Florida, where severe erosion is known to exist on both sides of the inlet (Joshi, 1983). The current results are qualitatively in parallel to that obtained recently by the numerical model Delft3D coupled with the wave model SWAN ( Nardin, et al, 2013) on wave- current interaction at river mouths and the formation of mouth bars

  4. Detailed characteristics of intermittent current pulses due to positive corona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yang, E-mail: liuyangwuh520@sina.com; Cui, Xiang; Lu, Tiebing; Wang, Zhenguo; Li, Xuebao; Xiang, Yu; Wang, Xiaobo [State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China)

    2014-08-15

    In order to get detailed characteristics of intermittent current pulses due to positive corona such as the repetition rate of burst-pulse trains, the peak value ratio of the primary pulse to the secondary pulse, the number of pulses per burst, and the interval of the secondary pulses, a systematic study was carried out in a coaxial conductor-cylinder electrode system with the conductor electrode being set with a discharge point. Empirical formulae for the number of pulses per burst and the interval of the secondary pulses are first presented. A theoretical model based on the motion of the space-charge clouds is proposed. Analysis with the model gives explanations to the experimental results and reveals some new insights into the physical mechanism of positive intermittent corona.

  5. Sleep disturbance due to noise: Current issues and future research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Hume

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in carrying out further research to understand and reduce the impact of aircraft noise on airport neighborhood in anticipation of the projected substantial increase in global aviation. Soundscapes provide new analytical methods and a broader, more comprehensive appreciation of the aural environment, which may have a useful role in understanding noise-induced sleep disturbance and annoyance. Current noise metrics like Leq do not provide a common language to report noise environment to residents, which is a key obstacle to effective noise management and acceptance. Non-auditory effects complicate the production of consistent dose-response functions for aircraft noise affecting sleep and annoyance. There are various end-points that can be chosen to assess the degree of sleep disturbance, which has detracted from the clarity of results that has been communicated to wider audiences. The World Health Organization (WHO-Europe has produced Night Noise Guidelines for Europe, which act as a clear guide for airports and planners to work towards. Methodological inadequacies and the need for simpler techniques to record sleep will be considered with the exciting potential to greatly increase cost-effective field data acquisition, which is needed for large scale epidemiological studies

  6. Dynamic Responses of Truss Spar Due to Wave Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.J. Kurian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spar platforms have been used for drilling, production and storage of oil and gas in the offshore deepwater region. The structure is installed at the deepwater locations in the sea and is exposed to continuous action of wind, wave, current and other environmental forces. Wave force constitutes about 70% of the total environmental force and could be considered as the most significant force affecting the dynamic responses needed for the design of these structures. In this study, the dynamic responses of the truss spar due to wave actions including the wave force theories and wave propagation directions are investigated. Numerical simulations are developed to investigate the accuracy of the wave force theories i.e., Morison equation and Diffraction theory, for large structure such as truss spar. The investigation is further expanded to study responses of the truss spar due to variations directions of the wave propagated. The truss spar is modelled as a rigid body with three degrees of freedom restrained by mooring lines. In the simulation, the mass, damping and stiffness matrices are evaluated at every time step. The equations of motion are formulated for the platform dynamic equilibrium and solved by using Newmark Beta method. To compute the wave force for truss spar, which is large compared to the wave length, Diffraction theory was found to be more appropriate. The Morison equation was found applicable only at the high frequency range. Short crested waves resulted in smaller responses in all the motions than that for long crested waves. Hence, it would be appropriate to consider the short crested wave statistics for the optimum design.

  7. Assessment of Nearshore Hazard due to Tsunami-Induced Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynett, P. J.; Ayca, A.; Borrero, J. C.; Eskijian, M.; Miller, K.; Wilson, R. I.

    2014-12-01

    The California Tsunami Program in cooperation with NOAA and FEMA has begun implementing a plan to increase tsunami hazard preparedness and mitigation in maritime communities (both ships and harbor infrastructure) through the development of in-harbor hazard maps, offshore safety zones for boater evacuation, and associated guidance for harbors and marinas before, during and following tsunamis. The hope is that the maritime guidance and associated education program will help save lives and reduce exposure of damage to boats and harbor infrastructure. Findings will be used to develop maps, guidance documents, and consistent policy recommendations for emergency managers and port authorities and provide information critical to real-time decisions required when responding to tsunami alert notifications. The initial goals of the study are to (1) evaluate the effectiveness and sensitivity of existing numerical models for assessing maritime tsunami hazards, (2) find a relationship between current speeds and expected damage levels, (3) evaluate California ports and harbors in terms of tsunami induced hazards by identifying regions that are prone to higher current speeds and damage and to identify regions of relatively lower impact that may be used for evacuation of maritime assets, and (4) determine 'safe depths' for evacuation of vessels from ports and harbors during a tsunami event. We will present details of a new initiative to evaluate the future likelihood of failure for different structural components of a harbor, leading to the identification of high priority areas for mitigation. This presentation will focus on the results from California ports and harbors across the State, and will include feedback we have received from discussions with local harbor masters and port authorities. To help promote accurate and consistent products, the authors are also working through the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program to organize a tsunami current model benchmark workshop.

  8. Changes in thickness of magnetized composites due to current flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarek, S.

    1998-02-01

    The pinch magnitude in monolithic metal conductors and ferromagnetics was estimated in this paper. The conditions for the material were formulated so that the pinch which occurs in it could reach the magnitude useful for applications. The way of production of a special composite with a laminar structure was described. The composite consists of sheets of copper foil separating the layers of the elastic ferromagnet which was made by the dispersion of hard magnetic particles in silicon. Using a measuring system containing a Michelson interferometer, measurements of changes were made in the thickness of the produced composite samples during the electric current flow. The obtained results were discussed.

  9. Response Current from Spin-Vortex-Induced Loop Current System to Feeding Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisaki, Tsubasa; Wakaura, Hikaru; Abou Ghantous, Michel; Koizumi, Hiroyasu

    2017-07-01

    The spin-vortex-induced loop current (SVILC) is a loop current generated around a spin-vortex formed by itinerant electrons. It is generated by a U(1) instanton created by the single-valued requirement of wave functions with respect to the coordinate, and protected by the topological number, "winding number". In a system with SVILCs, a macroscopic persistent current is generated as a collection of SVILCs. In the present work, we consider the situation where external currents are fed in the SVILC system and response currents are measured as spontaneous currents that flow through leads attached to the SVILC system. The response currents from SVILC systems are markedly different from the feeding currents in their directions and magnitude, and depend on the original current pattern of the SVILC system; thus, they may be used in the readout process in the recently proposed SVILC quantum computer, a quantum computer that utilizes SVILCs as qubits. We also consider the use of the response current to detect SVILCs.

  10. Springing Response Due to Directional Wave Field Excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidic-Perunovic, Jelena; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyses the wave-induced high-frequency bending moment response of ships, denoted springing. The aim is to predict measured severe springing responses in a large bulk carrier. It is shown that the most important springing contribution is due to the resultant second order excitation...... in multidirectional sea. The incident pressure field from the second order bidirectional wave field is derived, including the non-linear cross-coupling terms between the two wave systems (e.g. wind driven waves and swell). The resulting effect of the super-harmonic cross-coupling interaction terms on the springing...... response is discussed. An example with opposing waves is given, representing probably the 'worst' case for energy exchange between the wave systems. Theoretical predictions of standard deviation of wave- and springing-induced stress amidships are compared with full-scale measurements for a bulk carrier....

  11. Magnetic Flux Fluctuations Due to Eddy Currents and Thermal Noise in Metallic Disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uzunbajakau, S.; Rijpma, A.P.; Dolfsma, J.; Krooshoop, H.J.G.; Brake, ter H.J.M.; Peters, M.J.; Rogalla, H.

    2003-01-01

    We derive expressions for the magnetic flux in a circular loop due to eddy currents and thermal noise in coaxial metallic disks. The eddy currents are induced by an applied field that changes sinusoidally in time. We give expressions for the eddy current noise when the frequency of the applied field

  12. Magnetic Flux Fluctuations Due to Eddy Currents and Thermal Noise in Metallic Disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uzunbajakau, S.; Rijpma, A.P.; Dolfsma, J.; Krooshoop, Hendrikus J.G.; ter Brake, Hermanus J.M.; Peters, M.J.; Rogalla, Horst

    2003-01-01

    We derive expressions for the magnetic flux in a circular loop due to eddy currents and thermal noise in coaxial metallic disks. The eddy currents are induced by an applied field that changes sinusoidally in time. We give expressions for the eddy current noise when the frequency of the applied field

  13. Do Young and Old Preschoolers Exhibit Response Bias Due to Different Mechanisms? Investigating Children's Response Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okanda, Mako; Itakura, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that younger preschoolers exhibit a yes bias due to underdeveloped cognitive abilities, whereas older preschoolers exhibit a response bias due to other factors. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the response latency to yes-no questions pertaining to familiar and unfamiliar objects in 3- to 6-year-olds. The…

  14. Magnetic Field Due to a Finite Length Current-Carrying Wire Using the Concept of Displacement Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschauer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In undergraduate E&M courses the magnetic field due to a finite length, current-carrying wire can be calculated using the Biot-Savart law. However, to the author's knowledge, no textbook presents the calculation of this field using the Ampere-Maxwell law: ?B [multiplied by] dl = µ[subscript 0] (I + e[subscript 0] dF/dt) [multiplied by] 1

  15. Immune cellular response to HPV: current concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alice Guimarães Gonçalves

    Full Text Available Although cellular immunity is essential for the elimination of human papillomavirus (HPV, the mechanisms involved are still poorly understood. We summarize the main mechanisms involved in cellular immune response to infections caused by HPV. Immunotherapies for HPV-related cancers require the disruption of T-cell response control mechanisms, associated with the stimulation of the Th1 cytokine response.

  16. Loads on a 3D body due to second order waves and a current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skourup, Jesper; Cheung, K. F.; Bingham, Harry B.;

    2000-01-01

    Non-linear loads on a fixed body due to waves and a current are investigated. Potential theory is used to describe the flow, and a three-dimensional (3D) boundary element method (BEM), combined with a time-stepping procedure, is used to solve the problem. The exact free-surface boundary conditions......-order oscillatory forces and for the second-order mean force on a fixed vertical circular cylinder in waves and a current. The second-order oscillatory forces on the body in waves and current are new results, while the remaining force components are verified by comparison with established numerical and analytical...

  17. Bursting and spiking due to additional direct and stochastic currents in neuron models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Zhuo-Qin; Lu Qi-Shao

    2006-01-01

    Neurons at rest can exhibit diverse firing activities patterns in response to various external deterministic and random stimuli, especially additional currents. In this paper, neuronal firing patterns from bursting to spiking, induced by additional direct and stochastic currents, are explored in rest states Corresponding to two values of the parameter VK in the Chay neuron system. Three cases are considered by numerical simulation and fast/slow dynamic analysis, in which only the direct current or the stochastic current exists, or the direct and stochastic currents coexist. Meanwhile, several important bursting patterns in neuronal experiments, such as the period-1 "circle/homoclinic" bursting and the integer multiple "fold/homoclinic" bursting with one spike per burst, as well as the transition from integer multiple bursting to period-1 "circle/homoclinic" bursting and that from stochastic "Hopf/homoclinic" bursting to "Hopf/homoclinic" bursting, are investigated in detail.

  18. Loads on a 3D body due to second order waves and a current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skourup, Jesper; Cheung, K. F.; Bingham, Harry B.

    2000-01-01

    Non-linear loads on a fixed body due to waves and a current are investigated. Potential theory is used to describe the flow, and a three-dimensional (3D) boundary element method (BEM), combined with a time-stepping procedure, is used to solve the problem. The exact free-surface boundary conditions...... are expanded about the still-water level by Taylor series so that the solution is evaluated on a time-invariant geometry. A formulation correct to second order in the wave steepness and to first order in the current speed is used. Numerical results are obtained for the first-order and the second......-order oscillatory forces and for the second-order mean force on a fixed vertical circular cylinder in waves and a current. The second-order oscillatory forces on the body in waves and current are new results, while the remaining force components are verified by comparison with established numerical and analytical...

  19. Image current heating on a metal surface due to charged bunches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xintian E. Lin

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available When charged particles pass through a metal pipe, they are accompanied by an image current on the metal surface. With intense short bunches passing near or even into the metal surface, the peak image current density can be very high. This current may result in substantial temperature rise on the surface, especially in high peak current, multibunch operation. In this paper, we derive an explicit formula for the surface temperature rise due to this previously unrecognized pulsed heating effect and show that this effect dominates the proposed linear coherent light source collimator spoiler and wire scanner heating. Without proper account, it can result in component and instrument failures. The result also applies to optical transition radiation screens, profile screens, wire scanners, exit windows, and targets, which the beam crosses.

  20. Time evolving bed shear stress due the passage of gravity currents estimated with ADVP velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zordan, Jessica; Schleiss, Anton J.; Franca, Mário J.

    2016-04-01

    Density or gravity currents are geophysical flows driven by density gradients between two contacting fluids. The physical trigger mechanism of these phenomena lays in the density differences which may be caused by differences in the temperature, dissolved substances or concentration of suspended sediments. Saline density currents are capable to entrain bed sediments inducing signatures in the bottom of sedimentary basins. Herein, saline density currents are reproduced in laboratory over a movable bed. The experimental channel is of the lock-exchange type, it is 7.5 m long and 0.3 m wide, divided into two sections of comparable volumes by a sliding gate. An upstream reach serves as a head tank for the dense mixture; the current propagates through a downstream reach where the main measurements are made. Downstream of the channel a tank exist to absorb the reflection of the current and thus artifacts due to the limited length of the channel. High performance thermoplastic polyurethane simulating fine sediments forms the movable bed. Measures of 3D instantaneous velocities will be made with the use of the non-intrusive technique of the ADV (Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler). With the velocity measurements, the evolution in time of the channel-bed shear stress due the passage of gravity currents is estimated. This is in turn related to the observed erosion and to such parameters determinant for the dynamics of the current as initial density difference, lock length and channel slope. This work was funded by the ITN-Programme (Marie Curie Actions) of the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN under REA grant agreement n_607394-SEDITRANS.

  1. Shearing Mechanism of Straight Thin Copper Wires at Connecting Terminal due to Lightning Current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Xiao-bo; Takahiro OTSUKA; Toru IWAO; Tsuginori INABA1

    2007-01-01

    When a lightning current is impressed through a copper wire,the copper wire would be melted.A straight thin copper wire with a diameter of 0.1 mm,is melted due to the specific melting Joule heating (j2t)m in an adiabatic condition.However,it has been recognized in the at the connecting terminal by a relatively low impulse current.Electro-magnetic mechanical shearing stress,etc.are discussed in addition to the conventional Joule heating. New broken mechanisms were presumed and proved in the additional experiments.

  2. Evaluation of eddy-current probe signals due to cracks in ferromagnetic parts of fast reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Bowler, John R.

    2017-02-01

    Eddy current testing to evaluate the condition of metallic parts in a sodium cooled fast reactor under standby conditions is challenging due to the presence of liquid sodium at 250 °C. The eddy current test system should be sensitive enough to capture small signal changes and hence an advanced inspection systems is needed. We have developed new hardware and improved numerical models to predict the eddy current probe signal due to cracks in metallic fast reactor parts by using volume integral equation method. The analytical expressions are derived for the quasi-static time-harmonic electromagnetic fields of a circular eddy current coil which interacts with conductive plate. Naturally, the method of moment is used to approximate the integral equation and obtain the discrete approximation of the field in the crack domain. A simple and accurate analytical method for dealing with the hyper-singularity element evaluation is also provided. An accurate controlled experiment is carried out on the ferromagnetic stainless steel plate with precision made notch to obtain reference impedance changes for comparison with the theoretical model predictions. Good agreement between predictions and experiment is obtained.

  3. [The notion of medical responsibility. Current evolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, J

    1998-01-01

    Medical responsibility can be evaluated from a penal or a civil standpoint. In the first case it is referable to common law or other specific provisions, notably those included in the laws voted on July 29 1994. In the second case it is viewed within the contractual relationship, since the physician's obligation is theoretically one of means and not of results. The circumstances under which medical responsibility is questioned have evolved under the influence of three factors affecting the medical art: it is now characterized by techniques that have often become scientific; team practice; an increase in patients' demands. Nonetheless it is most important to maintain a genuine relationship of trust between physician and patient.

  4. Unusual resonances in nanoplasmonic structures due to nonlocal response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raza, Søren; Toscano, Giuseppe; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2011-01-01

    We study the nonlocal response of a confined electron gas within the hydrodynamical Drude model. We address the question as to whether plasmonic nanostructures exhibit nonlocal resonances that have no counterpart in the local-response Drude model. Avoiding the usual quasistatic approximation, we...... find that such resonances do indeed occur, but only above the plasma frequency. Thus the recently found nonlocal resonances at optical frequencies for very small structures, obtained within quasistatic approximation, are unphysical. As a specific example we consider nanosized metallic cylinders...

  5. Response of endlessly long shipping channel due to earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotrasová Kamila

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ground-supported tanks are used to store a variety of liquid. The fluid develops hydrodynamic pressure on walls and bottom of tank during an earthquake. This paper provides theoretical background for specification of impulsive and convective actions of fluid in rectangular endlessly long shopping channel container by using analytical methods. This article contains description of methods for solution of response of vertical containment with fluid on the soil, which is subject to horizontal seismic loads.

  6. Electric Currents and Fields in Middle and Low Atmosphere in Fair-Weather Regions due to Distant Thunderstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velinov, Peter; Velinov, Peter; Tonev, Peter

    The electric currents created by the thunderstorms and the electrified shower clouds over the Earth flow into the global atmospheric electric circuit and are responsible for the formation in fair-weather regions of ionosphere-ground current of about 2 pA per square meter, as well as for the related fair-weather electric field of the order of 100 V/m at sea level. The link of the diurnal variations of the fair-weather electric field with the global thunderstorm activity has been widely studied with connection to the Wilson's hypothesis. To confirm this hypothesis directly, also the fair-weather electric field response to a strong single lightning discharge has being examined. Here we study theoretically the variations of the electric currents and fields in fair-weather regions at different altitudes of the lower and middle atmosphere, which are provoked by distant lightning discharges. The electric field variations can play an important role at higher altitudes (in the upper troposphere and above), where they are much larger and possibly influence the physical and chemical processes. For our goals we realize a globalscale model of the electric fields and currents generated by a lightning discharge, which is based on the Maxwell's equations. The fair-weather electric characteristics are studied by our model depending on the lightning parameters, location and distance. We also examine how variations of the conductivity in the strato/mesosphere due to changes of solar and geomagnetic activity affect the characteristics studied. Another question discussed is whether and how the mesospheric electric response to a remote lightning discharge is influenced by the conductivity anisotropy above 70 km and by the geomagnetic field geometry. The variations of the fairweather electric fields due to a distant lightning at tropospheric heights are also studied with respect to their presumable role in the cloud physics.

  7. Response Analysis Of Payload Fairing Due To Acoustic Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annu Cherian

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During flight missions launch vehicles are subjected to a severe dynamic pressure loading aero-acoustic and structure-borne excitations of various circumstances which can endanger the survivability of the payload and the vehicles electronic equipment and consequently the success of the mission. The purpose of the fairing is to protect the satellite from damage during launch until deployment in space. Both the structural and acoustic loads are significant during the first few minutes of a launch and have the potential to damage the payload. This paper describes the analysis of mechanical structure and the inner acoustic cavity of the payload fairing subjected to acoustic field. The vibro-acoustic behaviour of the fairing is analyzed using Statistical Energy Analysis SEA Model. The software VA One is used for the statistical energy analysis of launch vehicle payload fairing due to acoustic excitation.

  8. Day-to-day variability of midlatitude ionospheric currents due to magnetospheric and lower atmospheric forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Y.; Häusler, K.; Wild, J. A.

    2016-07-01

    As known from previous studies on the solar quiet (Sq) variation of the geomagnetic field, the strength and pattern of ionospheric dynamo currents change significantly from day to day. The present study investigates the relative importance of two sources that contribute to the day-to-day variability of the ionospheric currents at middle and low latitudes. One is high-latitude electric fields that are caused by magnetospheric convection, and the other is atmospheric waves from the lower atmosphere. Global ionospheric current systems, commonly known as Sq current systems, are simulated using the National Center for Atmospheric Research thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model. Simulations are run for 1-30 April 2010 with a constant solar energy input but with various combinations of high-latitude forcing and lower atmospheric forcing. The model well reproduces geomagnetic perturbations on the ground, when both forcings are taken into account. The contribution of high-latitude forcing to the total Sq current intensity (Jtotal) is generally smaller than the contribution of wave forcing from below 30 km, except during active periods (Kp≥4), when Jtotal is enhanced due to the leakage of high-latitude electric fields to lower latitudes. It is found that the penetration electric field drives ionospheric currents at middle and low latitudes not only on the dayside but also on the nightside, which has an appreciable effect on the Dst index. It is also found that quiet time day-to-day variability in Jtotal is dominated by symmetric-mode migrating diurnal and semidiurnal tidal winds at 45-60° latitude at ˜110 km.

  9. Electric Current Filamentation at a Non-potential Magnetic Null-point Due to Pressure Perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelínek, P.; Karlický, M.; Murawski, K.

    2015-10-01

    An increase of electric current densities due to filamentation is an important process in any flare. We show that the pressure perturbation, followed by an entropy wave, triggers such a filamentation in the non-potential magnetic null-point. In the two-dimensional (2D), non-potential magnetic null-point, we generate the entropy wave by a negative or positive pressure pulse that is launched initially. Then, we study its evolution under the influence of the gravity field. We solve the full set of 2D time dependent, ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations numerically, making use of the FLASH code. The negative pulse leads to an entropy wave with a plasma density greater than in the ambient atmosphere and thus this wave falls down in the solar atmosphere, attracted by the gravity force. In the case of the positive pressure pulse, the plasma becomes evacuated and the entropy wave propagates upward. However, in both cases, owing to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, the electric current in a non-potential magnetic null-point is rapidly filamented and at some locations the electric current density is strongly enhanced in comparison to its initial value. Using numerical simulations, we find that entropy waves initiated either by positive or negative pulses result in an increase of electric current densities close to the magnetic null-point and thus the energy accumulated here can be released as nanoflares or even flares.

  10. ELECTRIC CURRENT FILAMENTATION AT A NON-POTENTIAL MAGNETIC NULL-POINT DUE TO PRESSURE PERTURBATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jelínek, P. [University of South Bohemia, Faculty of Science, Institute of Physics and Biophysics, Branišovská 10, CZ-37005 České Budějovice (Czech Republic); Karlický, M. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v. v. i., Astronomical Institute, Fričova 258, CZ-25165 Ondřejov (Czech Republic); Murawski, K., E-mail: pjelinek@prf.jcu.cz [Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, Institute of Physics, Group of Astrophysics, Radziszewskiego 10, PL-20031 Lublin (Poland)

    2015-10-20

    An increase of electric current densities due to filamentation is an important process in any flare. We show that the pressure perturbation, followed by an entropy wave, triggers such a filamentation in the non-potential magnetic null-point. In the two-dimensional (2D), non-potential magnetic null-point, we generate the entropy wave by a negative or positive pressure pulse that is launched initially. Then, we study its evolution under the influence of the gravity field. We solve the full set of 2D time dependent, ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations numerically, making use of the FLASH code. The negative pulse leads to an entropy wave with a plasma density greater than in the ambient atmosphere and thus this wave falls down in the solar atmosphere, attracted by the gravity force. In the case of the positive pressure pulse, the plasma becomes evacuated and the entropy wave propagates upward. However, in both cases, owing to the Rayleigh–Taylor instability, the electric current in a non-potential magnetic null-point is rapidly filamented and at some locations the electric current density is strongly enhanced in comparison to its initial value. Using numerical simulations, we find that entropy waves initiated either by positive or negative pulses result in an increase of electric current densities close to the magnetic null-point and thus the energy accumulated here can be released as nanoflares or even flares.

  11. Static Response of Microbeams due to Capillary and Electrostatic Forces

    KAUST Repository

    Bataineh, Ahmad M.

    2016-03-07

    Micro-sensors or micro-switches usually operate under the effect of electrostatic force and could face some environmental effects like humidity, which may lead to condensation underneath the beams and create strong capillary forces. Those tiny structures are principally made of microbeams that can undergo instabilities under the effect of those created huge capillary forces. In fact, during the fabrication of microbeams, there is an important step to separate the beam from its substrate (wet etching). After this step, the microstructure is dried, which may causes the onset of some droplets of water trapped underneath the beam that could bring about a huge capillary force pulling it toward its substrate. If this force is bigger than the microbeam\\'s restoring force, it will become stuck to the substrate. This paper investigates the instability scenarios of both clamped-clamped (straight and curved) and cantilever (straight and curled) microbeams under the effect of capillary and/or electrostatic forces. The reduced order modeling (ROM) based on the Galerkin procedure is used to solve the nonlinear beam equations. The non-ideal boundaries are modeled by adding springs. The volume of the fluid between the beam and the substrate underneath it is varied and the relation between the volume of the water and the stability of the beam is shown. An analysis for the factors of which should be taken in to consideration in the fabrication processes to overcome the instability due to huge capillary forces is done. Also the size of the electrode for the electrostatic force is varied to show the effect on the micro-switch stability. A variation of the pull-in voltage with some specific beam parameters and with more than one case of electrode size is shown. It is found that capillary forces have a pronounced effect on the stability of microbeams. It is also found that the pull-in length decreases as the electrode size increases. It is also shown that the pull-in voltage decreases

  12. Computational dosimetry for grounded and ungrounded human models due to contact current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kwok Hung; Hattori, Junya; Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa; Taki, Masao

    2013-08-01

    This study presents the computational dosimetry of contact currents for grounded and ungrounded human models. The uncertainty of the quasi-static (QS) approximation of the in situ electric field induced in a grounded/ungrounded human body due to the contact current is first estimated. Different scenarios of cylindrical and anatomical human body models are considered, and the results are compared with the full-wave analysis. In the QS analysis, the induced field in the grounded cylindrical model is calculated by the QS finite-difference time-domain (QS-FDTD) method, and compared with the analytical solution. Because no analytical solution is available for the grounded/ungrounded anatomical human body model, the results of the QS-FDTD method are then compared with those of the conventional FDTD method. The upper frequency limit for the QS approximation in the contact current dosimetry is found to be 3 MHz, with a relative local error of less than 10%. The error increases above this frequency, which can be attributed to the neglect of the displacement current. The QS or conventional FDTD method is used for the dosimetry of induced electric field and/or specific absorption rate (SAR) for a contact current injected into the index finger of a human body model in the frequency range from 10 Hz to 100 MHz. The in situ electric fields or SAR are compared with the basic restrictions in the international guidelines/standards. The maximum electric field or the 99th percentile value of the electric fields appear not only in the fat and muscle tissues of the finger, but also around the wrist, forearm, and the upper arm. Some discrepancies are observed between the basic restrictions for the electric field and SAR and the reference levels for the contact current, especially in the extremities. These discrepancies are shown by an equation that relates the current density, tissue conductivity, and induced electric field in the finger with a cross-sectional area of 1 cm2.

  13. Dissipation in thin superconducting current biased films due to vortex motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulaevskii, Lev N [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the problem of dissipation in thin superconducting films with thickness d on the order of the coherence length {zeta}, and width {omega} much narrower than the Pearl length, {Lambda} >> {omega} >> {zeta}, was discussed as the main cause for the behavior of I-V characteristics observed in thin high-temperature superconducting films. In thin and narrow films or strips with width w >> {zeta} the barrier for phase slips by creation of temporary normal regions across the entire film width is too big, thus phase slips become highly improbable. Instead, we consider a vortex crossing the strip from one edge to the other, perpendicular to the bias current, as the dominant mechanism for generalized phase slips resulting in detectable voltage pulses. We derive the rate of vortex crossings using the general theory of transition rates between metastable states. In mean field theory, the saddle point solution of the rate equation gives the vortex position inside the strip, where the kinetic energy of supercurrents is maximum. However, the free energy barrier derived in such an approach is strongly renormalized by superconducting fluctuations and this effect was not accounted for previously. They drastically reduce the rate of vortex crossings and, consequently, dissipation. We present results for the amplitude and duration of voltage pulses induced by vortex motion and their consequences on I-V characteristics, when heating due to vortex crossings is negligible. We found ohmic behavior at low bias currents, power law behavior at intermediate currents and exponential I-V characteristics at currents close to the critical one. The impact of vortex motion in superconducting strips on the observation of so-called dark counts (voltage pulses) in superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors is discussed.

  14. Leakage Current Degradation Due to Ion Drift and Diffusion in Tantalum and Niobium Oxide Capacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuparowitz Martin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available High temperature and high electric field applications in tantalum and niobium capacitors are limited by the mechanism of ion migration and field crystallization in a tantalum or niobium pentoxide insulating layer. The study of leakage current (DCL variation in time as a result of increasing temperature and electric field might provide information about the physical mechanism of degradation. The experiments were performed on tantalum and niobium oxide capacitors at temperatures of about 125°C and applied voltages ranging up to rated voltages of 35 V and 16 V for tantalum and niobium oxide capacitors, respectively. Homogeneous distribution of oxygen vacancies acting as positive ions within the pentoxide layer was assumed before the experiments. DCL vs. time characteristics at a fixed temperature have several phases. At the beginning of ageing the DCL increases exponentially with time. In this period ions in the insulating layer are being moved in the electric field by drift only. Due to that the concentration of ions near the cathode increases producing a positively charged region near the cathode. The electric field near the cathode increases and the potential barrier between the cathode and insulating layer decreases which results in increasing DCL. However, redistribution of positive ions in the insulator layer leads to creation of a ion concentration gradient which results in a gradual increase of the ion diffusion current in the direction opposite to the ion drift current component. The equilibrium between the two for a given temperature and electric field results in saturation of the leakage current value. DCL vs. time characteristics are described by the exponential stretched law. We found that during the initial part of ageing an exponent n = 1 applies. That corresponds to the ion drift motion only. After long-time application of the electric field at a high temperature the DCL vs. time characteristics are described by the exponential

  15. Modeling Hawaiian ecosystem degradation due to invasive plants under current and future climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorsino, Adam E.; Fortini, Lucas B.; Amidon, Fred A.; Miller, Stephen E.; Jacobi, James D.; Price, Jonathan P.; `Ohukani`ohi`a Gon, Sam; Koob, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Occupation of native ecosystems by invasive plant species alters their structure and/or function. In Hawaii, a subset of introduced plants is regarded as extremely harmful due to competitive ability, ecosystem modification, and biogeochemical habitat degradation. By controlling this subset of highly invasive ecosystem modifiers, conservation managers could significantly reduce native ecosystem degradation. To assess the invasibility of vulnerable native ecosystems, we selected a proxy subset of these invasive plants and developed robust ensemble species distribution models to define their respective potential distributions. The combinations of all species models using both binary and continuous habitat suitability projections resulted in estimates of species richness and diversity that were subsequently used to define an invasibility metric. The invasibility metric was defined from species distribution models with 0.8; True Skill Statistic >0.75) as evaluated per species. Invasibility was further projected onto a 2100 Hawaii regional climate change scenario to assess the change in potential habitat degradation. The distribution defined by the invasibility metric delineates areas of known and potential invasibility under current climate conditions and, when projected into the future, estimates potential reductions in native ecosystem extent due to climate-driven invasive incursion. We have provided the code used to develop these metrics to facilitate their wider use (Code S1). This work will help determine the vulnerability of native-dominated ecosystems to the combined threats of climate change and invasive species, and thus help prioritize ecosystem and species management actions.

  16. Modeling Hawaiian ecosystem degradation due to invasive plants under current and future climates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam E Vorsino

    Full Text Available Occupation of native ecosystems by invasive plant species alters their structure and/or function. In Hawaii, a subset of introduced plants is regarded as extremely harmful due to competitive ability, ecosystem modification, and biogeochemical habitat degradation. By controlling this subset of highly invasive ecosystem modifiers, conservation managers could significantly reduce native ecosystem degradation. To assess the invasibility of vulnerable native ecosystems, we selected a proxy subset of these invasive plants and developed robust ensemble species distribution models to define their respective potential distributions. The combinations of all species models using both binary and continuous habitat suitability projections resulted in estimates of species richness and diversity that were subsequently used to define an invasibility metric. The invasibility metric was defined from species distribution models with 0.8; True Skill Statistic >0.75 as evaluated per species. Invasibility was further projected onto a 2100 Hawaii regional climate change scenario to assess the change in potential habitat degradation. The distribution defined by the invasibility metric delineates areas of known and potential invasibility under current climate conditions and, when projected into the future, estimates potential reductions in native ecosystem extent due to climate-driven invasive incursion. We have provided the code used to develop these metrics to facilitate their wider use (Code S1. This work will help determine the vulnerability of native-dominated ecosystems to the combined threats of climate change and invasive species, and thus help prioritize ecosystem and species management actions.

  17. Neonatal infections due to multi-resistant strains: Epidemiology, current treatment, emerging therapeutic approaches and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzialla, Chryssoula; Borghesi, Alessandro; Pozzi, Margherita; Stronati, Mauro

    2015-12-07

    Severe infections represent the main cause of neonatal mortality accounting for more than one million neonatal deaths worldwide every year. Antibiotics are the most commonly prescribed medications in neonatal intensive care units. The benefits of antibiotic therapy when indicated are clearly enormous, but the continued and widespread use of antibiotics has generated over the years a strong selective pressure on microorganisms, favoring the emergence of resistant strains. Health agencies worldwide are galvanizing attention toward antibiotic resistance in gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Infections in neonatal units due to multidrug and extensively multidrug resistant bacteria are rising and are already seriously challenging antibiotic treatment options. While there is a growing choice of agents against multi-resistant gram-positive bacteria, new options for multi-resistant gram-negative bacteria in the clinical practice have decreased significantly in the last 20 years making the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens challenging mostly in neonates. Treatment options are currently limited and will be some years before any new treatment for neonates become available for clinical use, if ever. The aim of the review is to highlight the current knowledge on antibiotic resistance in the neonatal population, the possible therapeutic choices, and the prevention strategies to adopt in order to reduce the emergency and spread of resistant strains.

  18. Lower-Dark-Current, Higher-Blue-Response CMOS Imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Cunningham, Thomas; Hancock, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Several improved designs for complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated-circuit image detectors have been developed, primarily to reduce dark currents (leakage currents) and secondarily to increase responses to blue light and increase signal-handling capacities, relative to those of prior CMOS imagers. The main conclusion that can be drawn from a study of the causes of dark currents in prior CMOS imagers is that dark currents could be reduced by relocating p/n junctions away from Si/SiO2 interfaces. In addition to reflecting this conclusion, the improved designs include several other features to counteract dark-current mechanisms and enhance performance.

  19. Effectiveness of Working Memory Training among Subjects Currently on Sick Leave Due to Complex Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasvik, Julie K.; Woodhouse, Astrid; Stiles, Tore C.; Jacobsen, Henrik B.; Landmark, Tormod; Glette, Mari; Borchgrevink, Petter C.; Landrø, Nils I.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The current study examined if adaptive working memory training (Cogmed QM) has the potential to improve inhibitory control, working memory capacity, and perceptions of memory functioning in a group of patients currently on sick leave due to symptoms of pain, insomnia, fatigue, depression and anxiety. Participants who were referred to a vocational rehabilitation center volunteered to take part in the study. Methods: Participants were randomly assigned to either a training condition (N = 25) or a control condition (N = 29). Participants in the training condition received working memory training in addition to the clinical intervention offered as part of the rehabilitation program, while participants in the control condition received treatment as usual i.e., the rehabilitation program only. Inhibitory control was measured by The Stop Signal Task, working memory was assessed by the Spatial Working Memory Test, while perceptions of memory functioning were assessed by The Everyday Memory Questionnaire-Revised. Results: Participants in the training group showed a significant improvement on the post-tests of inhibitory control when compared with the comparison group (p = 0.025). The groups did not differ on the post-tests of working memory. Both groups reported less memory problems at post-testing, but there was no sizeable difference between the two groups. Conclusions: Results indicate that working memory training does not improve general working memory capacity per se. Nor does it seem to give any added effects in terms of targeting and improving self-perceived memory functioning. Results do, however, provide evidence to suggest that inhibitory control is accessible and susceptible to modification by adaptive working memory training. PMID:28111555

  20. Individualized treatment with transcranial direct current stimulation in patients with chronic nonfluent aphasia due to stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka eShah

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available While evidence suggests that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS may facilitate language recovery in chronic post-stroke aphasia, individual variability in patient response to different patterns of stimulation remains largely unexplored. We sought to characterize this variability among chronic aphasic individuals, and to explore whether repeated stimulation with an individualized optimal montage could lead to persistent reduction of aphasia severity. In a two-phase study, we first stimulated patients with 4 active montages (left hemispheric anode or cathode; right hemispheric anode or cathode and one sham montage (Phase 1. We examined changes in picture naming ability to address 1 variability in response to different montages among our patients, and 2 whether individual patients responded optimally to at least one montage. During Phase 2, subjects who responded in Phase 1 were randomized to receive either real-tDCS or to receive sham stimulation (10 days; patients who were randomized to receive sham stimulation first were then crossed over to receive real-tDCS (10 days. In both phases, 2mA tDCS was administered for 20 minutes per real-tDCS sessions and patients performed a picture naming task during stimulation. Patients’ language ability was re-tested after 2-weeks and 2-months following real and sham tDCS in Phase 2.In Phase 1, despite considerable individual variability, the greatest average improvement was observed after left-cathodal stimulation. Seven out of 12 subjects responded optimally to at least 1 montage as demonstrated by transient improvement in picture-naming. In Phase 2, aphasia severity improved at 2-weeks and 2-months following real-tDCS but not sham.Despite individual variability with respect to optimal tDCS approach, certain montages result in consistent transient improvement in persons with chronic post-stroke aphasia. This preliminary study supports the notion that individualized tDCS treatment may enhance

  1. Dementia due to cerebral small vessel damage: Current ideas on its pathogenesis and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Damulin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ever-increasing attention now focusses on dementia caused by small vessel damage when considering cerebrovascular disease leading to cognitive impairments (CIs. Stroke is one of the most important risk factors (RFs of vascular CI, including vascular dementia. Experienced stroke increases thrice the risk of dementia. Diffuse changes in the cerebral white matter (leukoaraiosis due to fluctuating blood pressure (BP and cerebral small vessel damage in most cases play an important role in the genesis of vascular CIs. Executive dysfunctions frequently concurrent with delayed psychomotor speed are the leading clinical manifestations of subcortical vascular dementia. Severe memory impairments are nottypical for subcortical dementia, its early stages in particular. The basis for the pathogenesis of CIs is the dissociation phenomenon that disrupts connections between the frontal lobes and subcortical structures and other cerebral cortical areas. Inadequate hypertension correction at a middle age is responsible for more than one fourth of cases of dementia developing in the elderly. The detection and further elimination of vascular RFs can reduce the risk of developing dementia in elderly and senile patients. Correction of elevated BP in the middle-aged is regarded as an effective method to prevent dementia in the future, but no premium is placed upon antihypertensive therapy in the elderly to lower elevated BP that is an inherent characteristic of this category of patients. Medications affecting RFs and those improving cerebral metabolism and bloodflow, including nicergoline are widely used to treat PD.

  2. Analytical Expressions for Harmonic Distortion at Low Frequencies due to Device Mismatch in CMOS Current Mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Erik

    1999-01-01

    One of the origins of harmonic distortion in current mirrors is the inevitable mismatch between the mirror transistors. In this brief we examine both single current mirrors and complementary class AB current mirrors and develop analytical expressions for the mismatch induced harmonic distortion. ...

  3. Current responsivity of semiconductor superlattice THz-photon detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ignatov, Anatoly A.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1999-01-01

    The current responsivity of a semiconductor superlattice THz-photon detector is calculated using an equivalent circuit model which takes into account the finite matching efficiency between a detector antenna and the superlattice in the presence of parasitic losses. Calculations performed for curr......The current responsivity of a semiconductor superlattice THz-photon detector is calculated using an equivalent circuit model which takes into account the finite matching efficiency between a detector antenna and the superlattice in the presence of parasitic losses. Calculations performed...... for currently available superlattice diodes show that both the magnitudes and the roll-off frequencies of the responsivity are strongly influenced by an excitation of hybrid plasma-Bloch oscillations which are found to be eigenmodes of the system in the THz-frequency band. The expected room temperature values...

  4. Using silver nanoparticle to enhance current response of biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiangling; Meng, Xianwei; Chen, Dong; Tang, Fangqiong; Jiao, Jun

    2005-09-15

    In this paper, we present a simple procedure to increase the sensitivity of a glucose biosensor. The feasibility of an amperometric glucose biosensor based on immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOx) in silver (Ag) sol was investigated for the first time. GOx was simply mixed with Ag nanoparticles and cross-linked with a polyvinyl butyral (PVB) medium by glutaraldehyde. Then a platinum electrode was coated with the mixed solution. The effects of the amount of the Ag particles used, with respect to the current response for enzyme electrodes, were studied. A set of experimental results indicate that the current response for the enzyme electrode containing hydrophobic Ag sol increased from 0.531 to 31.17 microA in the solution of 10 mmol/L beta-D glucose. The time reaching the steady-state current response reduced from 60 to 20s, three times less than those without Ag particles involved.

  5. Nonlinear response of superconductors to alternating fields and currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Jason [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1997-10-08

    This report discusses the following topics on superconductivity: nonlinearities in hard superconductors such as surface impedance of a type II superconductimg half space and harmonic generation and intermodulation due to alternating transport currents; and nonlinearities in superconducting weak links such as harmonic generation by a long Josephson Junction in a superconducting slab.

  6. Asymmetric current-phase relation due to spin-orbit interaction in semiconductor nanowire Josephson junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Tomohiro; Eto, Mikio [Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Nazarov, Yuli V. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft, The Netherlands (Netherlands)

    2013-12-04

    We theoretically study the current-phase relation in semiconductor nanowire Josephson junction in the presence of spin-orbit interaction. In the nanowire, the impurity scattering with strong SO interaction is taken into account using the random matrix theory. In the absence of magnetic field, the Josephson current I and phase difference φ between the superconductors satisfy the relation of I(φ) = –I(–φ). In the presence of magnetic field along the nanowire, the interplay between the SO interaction and Zeeman effect breaks the current-phase relation of I(φ) = –I(–φ). In this case, we show that the critical current depends on the current direction, which qualitatively agrees with recent experimental findings.

  7. Morphological changes at Godavari delta region due to waves, currents and the associated physical processes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sastry, J.S.; Vethamony, P.; Swamy, G.N.

    the speed of 200 cm/sec. The morphological changes due to the effect of river discharge during various seasons and the development of Godavari sand spit off Kakinada and its influence to delta modification are detailed....

  8. Resistive wall heating due to image current on the beam chamber for a superconducting undulator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. H. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS))

    2012-03-27

    The image-current heating on the resistive beam chamber of a superconducting undulator (SCU) was calculated based on the normal and anomalous skin effects. Using the bulk resistivity of copper for the beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated for the residual resistivity ratios (RRRs) of unity at room temperature to 100 K at a cryogenic temperature as the reference. Then, using the resistivity of the specific aluminum alloy 6053-T5, which will be used for the SCU beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated. An electron beam stored in a storage ring induces an image current on the inner conducting wall, mainly within a skin depth, of the beam chamber. The image current, with opposite charge to the electron beam, travels along the chamber wall in the same direction as the electron beam. The average current in the storage ring consists of a number of bunches. When the pattern of the bunched beam is repeated according to the rf frequency, the beam current may be expressed in terms of a Fourier series. The time structure of the image current is assumed to be the same as that of the beam current. For a given resistivity of the chamber inner wall, the application ofthe normal or anomalous skin effect will depend on the harmonic numbers of the Fourier series of the beam current and the temperature of the chamber. For a round beam chamber with a ratius r, much larger than the beam size, one can assume that the image current density as well as the density square, may be uniform around the perimeter 2{pi}r. For the SCU beam chamber, which has a relatively narrow vertical gap compared to the width, the effective perimeter was estimated since the heat load should be proportional to the inverse of the perimeter.

  9. Resistive wall heating due to image current on the beam chamber for a superconducting undulator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. H. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS))

    2012-03-27

    The image-current heating on the resistive beam chamber of a superconducting undulator (SCU) was calculated based on the normal and anomalous skin effects. Using the bulk resistivity of copper for the beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated for the residual resistivity ratios (RRRs) of unity at room temperature to 100 K at a cryogenic temperature as the reference. Then, using the resistivity of the specific aluminum alloy 6053-T5, which will be used for the SCU beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated. An electron beam stored in a storage ring induces an image current on the inner conducting wall, mainly within a skin depth, of the beam chamber. The image current, with opposite charge to the electron beam, travels along the chamber wall in the same direction as the electron beam. The average current in the storage ring consists of a number of bunches. When the pattern of the bunched beam is repeated according to the rf frequency, the beam current may be expressed in terms of a Fourier series. The time structure of the image current is assumed to be the same as that of the beam current. For a given resistivity of the chamber inner wall, the application ofthe normal or anomalous skin effect will depend on the harmonic numbers of the Fourier series of the beam current and the temperature of the chamber. For a round beam chamber with a ratius r, much larger than the beam size, one can assume that the image current density as well as the density square, may be uniform around the perimeter 2{pi}r. For the SCU beam chamber, which has a relatively narrow vertical gap compared to the width, the effective perimeter was estimated since the heat load should be proportional to the inverse of the perimeter.

  10. Current Reversal Due to Coupling Between Asymmetrical Driving Force and Ratchet Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Transport of a Brownian particle moving in a periodic potential is investigated in the presence of an asymmetric unbiased external force. The asymmetry of the external force and the asymmetry of the potential are the two ways of inducing a net current. It is found that the competition of the spatial asymmetry of potential with the temporal asymmetry of the external force leads to the phenomena like current reversal. The competition between the two opposite driving factors is a necessary but not a sufficient condition for current reversals.

  11. Reduced Southern Hemispheric circulation response to quadrupled CO2 due to stratospheric ozone feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodo, Gabriel; Polvani, Lorenzo M.

    2017-01-01

    Due to computational constraints, interactive stratospheric ozone chemistry is commonly neglected in most climate models participating in intercomparison projects. The impact of this simplification on the modeled response to external forcings remains unexplored. In this work, we examine the importance of including interactive stratospheric ozone chemistry on the Southern Hemispheric circulation response to an abrupt quadrupling of CO2. We find that including interactive ozone significantly reduces (by 20%) the response of the midlatitude jet to CO2, even though it does not alter the surface temperature response. The reduction of the tropospheric circulation response is due to CO2 induced ozone changes and their effects on the meridional temperature gradient near the tropopause. Our findings suggest that neglecting this stratospheric ozone feedback results in an overestimate of the circulation response to increased CO2. This has important implications for climate projections of the Southern Hemispheric circulation response to CO2.

  12. Limitations Of The Current State Space Modelling Approach In Multistage Machining Processes Due To Operation Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellán-Nebot, J. V.; Liu, J.; Romero, F.

    2009-11-01

    The State Space modelling approach has been recently proposed as an engineering-driven technique for part quality prediction in Multistage Machining Processes (MMP). Current State Space models incorporate fixture and datum variations in the multi-stage variation propagation, without explicitly considering common operation variations such as machine-tool thermal distortions, cutting-tool wear, cutting-tool deflections, etc. This paper shows the limitations of the current State Space model through an experimental case study where the effect of the spindle thermal expansion, cutting-tool flank wear and locator errors are introduced. The paper also discusses the extension of the current State Space model to include operation variations and its potential benefits.

  13. Polarization retention loss in PbTiO3 ferroelectric films due to leakage currents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morelli, A.; Venkatesan, Sriram; Palasantzas, G.; Kooi, B. J.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between retention loss in single crystal PbTiO3 ferroelectric thin films and leakage currents is demonstrated by piezoresponse and conductive atomic force microscopy measurements. It was found that the polarization reversal in the absence of an electric field followed a stretched ex

  14. Damping of an ion acoustic surface wave due to surface currents

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, H J

    1999-01-01

    The well-known linear dispersion relation for an ion acoustic surface wave has been obtained by including the linear surface current density J sub z parallel to the interface and by neglecting the linear surface current density J sub x perpendicular to the interface. The neglect of J sub x is questionable although it leads to the popular boundary condition that the tangential electric field is continuous. In this work, linear dispersion relation for an ion acoustic surface wave is worked out by including both components of the linear current density J . When that is done, the ion acoustic wave turns out to be heavily damped. If the electron mass is taken to be zero (electrons are Bolzmann-distributed), the perpendicular component of the surface current density vanishes, and we have the well-known ion acoustic surface wave eigenmode. We conclude that an ion acoustic surface wave propagates as an eigenmode only when its phase velocity is much smaller than the electron thermal velocity.

  15. Current-Controlled Negative Differential Resistance Due to Joule Heating In Tio2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratkovsky, A. M.; Alexandrov, A. S.; Savel'Ev, S. E.; Strukov, D. B.; Williams, R. S.

    2012-02-01

    We show that Joule heating causes current-controlled negative differential resistance (CC-NDR) in TiO2 memristive systems by constructing an analytical model of the current-voltage characteristics based on polaronic transport for Ohm's law and Newton's law of cooling and fitting this model to experimental data. This threshold switching is he ``soft breakdown'' observed during electroforming in TiO2 and other transition-metal oxide based memristors, as well as a precursor to ``ON'' or ``SET'' switching of unipolar memristors from their high to their low resistance states. The shape of the V-I curves is a sensitive indicator of the nature of the polaronic conduction, which apparently follows an adiabatic regime [1]. [4pt] [1] A.S. Alexandrov, A.M.Bratkovsky, B.Bridle, S.E.Savel'ev, D. Strukov, and R.S.Williams, Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, xxx (2011).

  16. Neuropathic Pain due to Small Fiber Neuropathy in Aging: Current Management and Future Prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Brouwer, Brigitte A.; de Greef, Bianca T. A.; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G. J.; Geerts, Margot; van Kleef, Maarten; Merkies, Ingemar S. J.; Faber, Catharina G.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, the diagnosis small fiber neuropathy (SFN) has gained recognition worldwide. Patients often suffer from severe neuropathic pain that may be difficult to treat. A substantial subset of patients with SFN is aged 65 years or older, and these patients often exhibit comorbidities and usage of multiple drugs, making neuropathic pain treatment more challenging. In this review, we highlight relevant pathophysiological aspects and discuss currently used therapeutic strategies f...

  17. Excessive magnetic field flux density distribution from overhead isolated powerline conductors due to neutral line current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzer, Moshe

    2013-06-01

    Overhead isolated powerline conductors (hereinafter: "OIPLC") are the most compact form for distributing low voltage currents. From the known physics of magnetic field emission from 3-phase power lines, it is expected that excellent symmetry of the 120° shifted phase currents and where compact configuration of the 3-phase+neutral line exist, the phase current vectorial summation of the magnetic field flux density (MFFD) is expected to be extremely low. However, despite this estimation, an unexpectedly very high MFFD was found in at least three towns in Israel. This paper explains the reasons leading to high MFFD emissions from compact OIPLC and the proper technique to fix it. Analysis and measurement results had led to the failure hypothsis of neutral line poor connection design and poor grounding design of the HV-LV utility transformers. The paper elaborates on the low MFFD exposure level setup by the Israeli Environmental Protection Office which adopted a rather conservative precaution principal exposure level (2 mG averaged over 24 h).

  18. 3D reconnection due to oblique modes: a simulation of Harris current sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lapenta

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulations in three dimensions of a Harris current sheet with mass ratio, mi/me = 180, and current sheet thickness, pi/L = 0.5, suggest the existence of a linearly unstable oblique mode, which is independent from either the drift-kink or the tearing instability. The new oblique mode causes reconnection independently from the tearing mode. During the initial linear stage, the system is unstable to the tearing mode and the drift kink mode, with growth rates that are accurately described by existing linear theories. How-ever, oblique modes are also linearly unstable, but with smaller growth rates than either the tearing or the drift-kink mode. The non-linear stage is first reached by the drift-kink mode, which alters the initial equilibrium and leads to a change in the growth rates of the tearing and oblique modes. In the non-linear stage, the resulting changes in magnetic topology are incompatible with a pure tearing mode. The oblique mode is shown to introduce a helical structure into the magnetic field lines.

  19. Growth instability due to lattice-induced topological currents in limited-mobility epitaxial growth models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjanaput, Wittawat; Limkumnerd, Surachate; Chatraphorn, Patcha

    2010-10-01

    The energetically driven Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier had been generally accepted as the primary cause of the growth instability in the form of quasiregular moundlike structures observed on the surface of thin film grown via molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) technique. Recently the second mechanism of mound formation was proposed in terms of a topologically induced flux of particles originating from the line tension of the step edges which form the contour lines around a mound. Through large-scale simulations of MBE growth on a variety of crystalline lattice planes using limited-mobility, solid-on-solid models introduced by Wolf-Villain and Das Sarma-Tamborenea in 2+1 dimensions, we show that there exists a topological uphill particle current with strong dependence on specific lattice crystalline structure. Without any energetically induced barriers, our simulations produce spectacular mounds very similar, in some cases, to what have been observed in many recent MBE experiments. On a lattice where these currents cease to exist, the surface appears to be scale invariant, statistically rough as predicted by the conventional continuum growth equation.

  20. Suppressing local hot spots due to eddy currents in magnetic coil systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhen; Shojinaga, Aaron; Wu, Yong; Shvartsman, Shmaryu; Eagan, Timothy; Chmielewski, Thomas; Brown, Robert

    2011-03-01

    A particular goal in magnetic field applications is to avoid eddy current heating in coils and shields. It is important, in MRI, for example, to avoid hot spots near the patient to be imaged as well as in the vicinity of soldering joints. We develop effective analytical formulas for the eddy current behavior of sources close to surrounding conductors, we verify these via numerical simulations, and we make successful comparisons to corresponding experimental temperature distributions. Optimized patterns of incisions made in the conductors are discovered for addressing particularly troublesome heating locations. The criteria include the need to minimize the number and length of the cuts. Theory and experiment are in agreement on the efficacy of this method for reducing steady-state temperatures. An example of results in the practical design of commercial coils and shields is that a single cut parallel to the long edge of rectangular conductors reduces the temperatures much more than making multiple cuts parallel to the short edge. Supported by Ohio Third Frontier Program

  1. Current Pharmacological Treatment for Male LUTS due to BPH: Dutasteride or Finasteride?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirozzi, Luisella; Sountoulides, Petros; Castellan, Pietro; Presicce, Fabrizio; Lombardo, Riccardo; Romero, Marilena; De Nunzio, Cosimo; Tubaro, Andrea; Schips, Luigi; Cindolo, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a potentially progressive disease which is commonly associated with bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and might result in complications, such as acute urinary retention and BPH-related surgery. In the current medical therapy scenario for LUTS attributed to BPH, only one class of drugs, 5-α reductase inhibitors (5ARIs), has been found to be effective in reducing the risk of disease progression. The two 5ARIs that are currently available include finasteride and dutasteride. These two drugs have different pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Greater suppression of dehydrotestosterone is achieved by dutasteride (>90% dutasteride vs 70% finasteride) which theoretically should correlate with greater efficacy in alleviating urinary symptoms. Unfortunately, this hypothesis has not yet been clinically demonstrated. The pertinent literature is scarce and heterogeneous and produces low scientific levels of evidence. The present review article aims to evaluate the comparative head-to-head studies in order to evaluate if the hypothetical clinical differences between dutasteride and finasteride do exist. Pharmacological treatment with either drug results in similar symptom improvements; however dutasteride seems to have a better profile in reducing the risk of prostate surgery and acute urinary retention (AUR). More studies are necessary to better evaluate both the clinical and pharmacoeconomic profile of the two 5ARIs.

  2. Cardiovascular responses induced by obstructive apnea are enhanced in hypertensive rats due to enhanced chemoreceptor responsivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana M M Angheben

    Full Text Available Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR, like patients with sleep apnea, have hypertension, increased sympathetic activity, and increased chemoreceptor drive. We investigated the role of carotid chemoreceptors in cardiovascular responses induced by obstructive apnea in awake SHR. A tracheal balloon and vascular cannulas were implanted, and a week later, apneas of 15 s each were induced. The effects of apnea were more pronounced in SHR than in control rats (Wistar Kyoto; WKY. Blood pressure increased by 57±3 mmHg during apnea in SHR and by 28±3 mmHg in WKY (p<0.05, n = 14/13. The respiratory effort increased by 53±6 mmHg in SHR and by 34±5 mmHg in WKY. The heart rate fell by 209±19 bpm in SHR and by 155±16 bpm in WKY. The carotid chemoreceptors were then inactivated by the ligation of the carotid body artery, and apneas were induced two days later. The inactivation of chemoreceptors reduced the responses to apnea and abolished the difference between SHR and controls. The apnea-induced hypertension was 11±4 mmHg in SHR and 8±4 mmHg in WKY. The respiratory effort was 15±2 mmHg in SHR and 15±2 mmHg in WKY. The heart rate fell 63±18 bpm in SHR and 52±14 bpm in WKY. Similarly, when the chemoreceptors were unloaded by the administration of 100% oxygen, the responses to apnea were reduced. In conclusion, arterial chemoreceptors contribute to the responses induced by apnea in both strains, but they are more important in SHR and account for the exaggerated responses of this strain to apnea.

  3. Expression Changes of Early Response Genes in Lung Due to High Volume Ventilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yuelan; YAO Shanglong; XIONG Ping

    2005-01-01

    Summary: The expression changes of early response genes due to ventilation with high volume in adult rats in vivo were observed. Forty SD male rats were randomly divided into control and 30, 60, 90 and 120 min ventilation groups, respectively (n=8 in each group). The animals were ventilated with tidal volume of 42 ml/kg and a PEEP level of 0 cmH2O at a rate of 40 breaths per minute in room air with a ventilator was given to the small animals. The expression of Egr-1, C-jun and IL-1β mRNA and proteins was detected by RT-PCR and immunohistochemical technique, respectively. The pathological changes in lung tissues were examined by HE staining. The results indicated that the expression of Egr-1, C-jun and IL-1β mRNA was detectable at 30th min after overventilation, but there was no significant difference in comparison with that in control group until overventilation for 60 min. However, at 90 and 120 min there was a significent increase as compared with 30 min or control group (P<0.05). The expression of Egr-1, C-jun and IL-1β deteced by immunohistochemical assay also showed a similar tendency of the gradual increase. In the 120 min ventilation group, the expression intensity of Egr-1, C-jun and IL-1β proteins in lung cells was the strongest and the nuclear translocation was increased markedly in comparison with any other groups (P<0.05). HE staining suggested that the degree of lung injury was aggravated gradually with the ventialtion going on and had a similar tendency to the expression of these early response genes and proteins. The current data suggested that overventilation activated and upregulated the expression of early response genes and the expression of these genes may be taken as the early signal to predict the onset and degree of lung injury. These results may demonstrated partially that the expression of early response genes induced by the mechanical stretch is associated with biochamic lung injury.

  4. Are there novel resonances in nanoplasmonic structures due to nonlocal response?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wubs, Martijn; Raza, Søren; Toscano, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    In tiny metallic nanostructures, quantum confinement and nonlocal response change the collective plasmonic behaviour with resulting important consequences for e.g. field-enhancement and extinction cross sections. Here we report on nonlocal resonances in the hydrodynamical Drude model for plasmonic...... nanostructures that have no counterpart in the local-response Drude model. Even though there are no additional resonances in the visible due to nonlocal response, plasmonic field enhancements are affected by nonlocal response. We present both analytical results for simple geometries and our numerical...

  5. MHD Flow with Hall Current and Ion-Slip Effects due to a Stretching Porous Disk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiza M. N. El-Fayez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A partially ionized fluid is driven by a stretching disk, in the presence of a magnetic field that is strong enough to produce significant hall current and ion-slip effects. The limiting behavior of the flow is studied, as the magnetic field strength grows indefinitely. The flow variables are properly scaled, and uniformly valid asymptotic expansions of the velocity components are obtained. The leading order approximations show sinusoidal behavior that is decaying exponentially, as we move away from the disk surface. The two-term expansions of the radial and azimuthal surface shear stress components, as well as the far field inflow speed, compare well with the corresponding finite difference solutions, even at moderate magnetic fields. The effect of mass transfer (suction or injection through the disk is also considered.

  6. Aberrations due to solenoid focusing of a multiply charged high-current ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Grégoire, G; Lisi, N; Schnuriger, J C; Scrivens, R; Tambini, J

    2000-01-01

    At the output of a laser ion source, a high current of highly charged ions with a large range of charge states is available. The focusing of such a beam by magnetic elements causes a nonlinear space-charge field to develop which can induce large aberrations and emittance growth in the beam. Simulation of the beam from the CERN laser ion source will be presented for an ideal magnetic and electrostatic system using a radially symmetric model. In addition, the three dimensional software KOBRA3 is used for the simulation of the solenoid line. The results of these simulations will be compared with experiments performed on the CERN laser ion source with solenoids (resulting in a hollow beam) and a series of gridded electrostatic lenses. (5 refs).

  7. Prevention of gastrointestinal bleeding due to stress ulceration: a review of current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkington, K B; Wagstaff, M J D; Greenwood, J E

    2012-03-01

    Our objective was to audit our current stress ulcer prophylaxis protocol (routine prescription of ranitidine and early enteral feeding) by identifying whether routine prescription of histamine-2 receptor antagonists or proton pump inhibitors as prophylaxis against stress-related mucosal disease and subsequent upper gastrointestinal bleeding is supported in the literature. We also aimed to ascertain what literature evidence supports the role of early enteral feeding as an adjunctive prophylactic therapy, as well as to search for burn-patient specific evidence, since burn patients are at high risk for developing this condition, with the aim of changing our practice. PubMed and Cochrane databases were searched for relevant articles, yielding seven randomised controlled trials comparing histamine-2 receptor antagonists and proton pump inhibitors in the prevention of upper gastrointestinal bleeding associated with stress-related mucosal disease and three separate meta-analyses. Despite level 1 clinical evidence, no significant difference in efficacy between histamine-2 receptor antagonists and proton pump inhibitor treatment groups was demonstrated. No significant difference was demonstrated in the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia between the two drugs given in this indication. However, enteral feeding was found to be safe and effective in preventing clinically significant upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients able to tolerate feeds demonstrated no additional benefit with concomitant pharmacological prophylactic therapy. Since all burn patients at the Royal Adelaide Hospital are fed from very early in their admission, the literature suggests that we, like our intensive care unit colleagues, should abolish our reliance on pharmacological prophylaxis, the routine prescription of which is not supported by the evidence.

  8. Dynamic response of jetting and cementing bucket platform to wave and current loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Hu; Wang Deyu

    2006-01-01

    The jetting and cementing bucket platform (JCBP) is a new type offshore oil-drilling platform. This paper aims to establish an analysis method for calculating the dynamic response of this platform. Based on the theory of elastic half space, the dynamic stiffness and damping of the platform's foundation were obtained and attached to the end of the platform's main jackets as a boundary condition. Then using finite element method (FEM), the dynamic response of the platform due to wave and current loading was calculated. Furthermore, the whole platform's finite element model was established and the dynamic response of the platform was calculated. The numerical results demonstrate that the present method by the usage of elastic half space theory and FEM is simple and it is reliable and efficient to calculate dynamic behavior of the platform in response to wave and current loading.

  9. Electro-thermal injuries due to high-current accidents with special regard to the skeletal muscles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rausch, M.

    1982-02-25

    Seven patients suffering from high-current accidents with different degrees of severity are reported on. Damages to the striped musculature are preferentially considered. When the function of the cellular membrane is affected by an electric current, the Na/sup +//K/sup +/ mechanism collapses due to an increase of membrane permeability for calcium. Depolarisation, development of contractures, changes of the fibrillar structures and decay of the stripes or swelling of the Q (A) substance were found to indicate damage. A particular effect of electrothermal muscle damages is the affection of other organs, e.g. of the kidneys, provoked by an increased chromoprotein production and a higher output of myoglobin and hemoglobin. Since in case of an accident due to electric current affecting the musculature, more acid substances enter the vascular system, an acute renal damage provoked by an alkalinisation of the urine, shall be treated by drugs. In most cases, an anuria, occurring several days after deep burn of musculature, is a so-called constipational anuria, if it is not an anuria induced by a decrease of blood pressure or by shock. The therapy of wounds due to electrical burning depends on the size of the affected skin area and down to which depth the tissue is burnt. Particular attention must be paid to the affection of bones being situated in the depth of wounds due to burning. In the last part of the study possible reconstructive and ensuing rehabilitation measures are indicated.

  10. PECULIARITIES OF CURRENT DOSE ASSESSMENT FOR CHILDREN LIVING IN THE TERRITORIES RADIOACTIVELY CONTAMINATED DUE TO THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Gromov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article outlines peculiarities of current dose assessment for the children living in the territories radioactively contaminated due to the Chernobyl accident. The results of annual exposure dose assessment for the children of various age groups and adult population of three subject territories of the Russian Federation referred to the zones of radioactive contamination are presented. A comparison of obtained estimations is done.

  11. Reversal of alcohol-induced effects on response control due to changes in proprioceptive information processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Mückschel, Moritz; Beste, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Recent research has drawn interest to the effects of binge drinking on response selection. However, choosing an appropriate response is a complex endeavor that usually requires us to process and integrate several streams of information. One of them is proprioceptive information about the position of limbs. As to now, it has however remained elusive how binge drinking affects the processing of proprioceptive information during response selection and control in healthy individuals. We investigated this question using neurophysiological (EEG) techniques in a response selection task, where we manipulated proprioceptive information. The results show a reversal of alcohol-induced effects on response control due to changes in proprioceptive information processing. The most likely explanation for this finding is that proprioceptive information does not seem to be properly integrated in response selection processes during acute alcohol intoxication as found in binge drinking. The neurophysiological data suggest that processes related to the preparation and execution of the motor response, but not upstream processes related to conflict monitoring and spatial attentional orienting, underlie these binge drinking-dependent modulations. Taken together, the results show that even high doses of alcohol have very specific effects within the cascade of neurophysiological processes underlying response control and the integration of proprioceptive information during this process. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  12. Current Debates in Corporate Social Responsibility: An Agenda for Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Crowther

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR has a particular prominence at this point in time, featuring heavily in the discourses of both academe and business. The understanding of what is meant by CSR continues to evolve as a consensus is reached. Nevertheless some important debates continue – or are commencing – which need to be resolved. It is the purpose of this paper to highlight these as some of the current debates within the CSR community – and hence form a significant part of an agenda for research in the area. Specifically we focus upon three key areas for the management of business, namely setting standards for reporting, identifying and implementing sustainable practice, and the management of risk.

  13. Perception and annoyance due to wind turbine noise--a dose-response relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Eja; Waye, Kerstin Persson

    2004-12-01

    Installed global wind power increased by 26% during 2003, with U.S and Europe accounting for 90% of the cumulative capacity. Little is known about wind turbines' impact on people living in their vicinity. The aims of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of annoyance due to wind turbine noise and to study dose-response relationships. Interrelationships between noise annoyance and sound characteristics, as well as the influence of subjective variables such as attitude and noise sensitivity, were also assessed. A cross-sectional study was performed in Sweden in 2000. Responses were obtained through questionnaires (n = 351; response rate 68.4%), and doses were calculated as A-weighted sound pressure levels for each respondent. A statistically significant dose-response relationship was found, showing higher proportion of people reporting perception and annoyance than expected from the present dose-response relationships for transportation noise. The unexpected high proportion of annoyance could be due to visual interference, influencing noise annoyance, as well as the presence of intrusive sound characteristics. The respondents' attitude to the visual impact of wind turbines on the landscape scenery was found to influence noise annoyance.

  14. Comparison between responses of reinforced and unreinforced embankments due to road widening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xiao-ming; WANG Hao

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work is to compare the responses of geosynthetically-reinforced embankment and unreinforced embankment due to road widening by using the centrifuge model tests and a two-dimensional (2D) finite element (FE) model. The measured and calculated responses of the embankment and foundation exposed to road widening include the settlement, horizontal displacement, pore water pressure, and shear stresses. It is found that the road widening changed the transverse slope of the original pavement surface resulting from the nonuniform settlements. The maximum horizontal movement is found to be located at the shoulder of the original embankment. Although the difference is small, it is clearly seen that the geosynthetic reinforcement reduces the nonuniform settlements and horizontal movements due to road widening. Thus the reinforcement reduces the potential of pavement cracking and increases the stability of the embankment on soft ground in road widening.

  15. The responses of the thermosphere due to a geomagnetic storm: A MHD model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.; Chang, S.

    1972-01-01

    A magnetohydrodynamics theory was used to study the dynamic response of the neutral atmosphere to a geomagnetic storm. A full set of magnetohydrodynamic equations appropriate for the present problem is derived and their various orders of approximation are discussed in some detail. In order to demonstrate the usefulness of this theoretical model, the May 1967 geomagnetic storm data were used in the resulting set of nonlinear, time dependent, partial differential magnetohydrodynamic equations to calculate variations of the thermosphere due to the storm. The numerical results are presented for wind speeds, electric field strength, and amount of joule heating at a constant altitude for the data recorded. Data show that the strongest thermospheric responses are at the polar region becoming weaker in the equatorial region. This may lead to the speculation that a thermospheric wave is generated in the polar region due to the geomagnetic storm which propagates towards the equator.

  16. Current trends in gamma radiation detection for radiological emergency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Guss, Paul; Maurer, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies. In recent years, since the establishment of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office by the Department of Homeland Security, a tremendous amount of progress has been made in detection materials (scintillators, semiconductors), imaging techniques (Compton imaging, use of active masking and hybrid imaging), data acquisition systems with digital signal processing, field programmable gate arrays and embedded isotopic analysis software (viz. gamma detector response and analysis software [GADRAS]1), fast template matching, and data fusion (merging radiological data with geo-referenced maps, digital imagery to provide better situational awareness). In this stride to progress, a significant amount of inter-disciplinary research and development has taken place-techniques and spin-offs from medical science (such as x-ray radiography and tomography), materials engineering (systematic planned studies on scintillators to optimize several qualities of a good scintillator, nanoparticle applications, quantum dots, and photonic crystals, just to name a few). No trend analysis of radiation detection systems would be complete without mentioning the unprecedented strategic position taken by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime transportation-the so-called second line of defense.

  17. Transient response of microbial communities in a water well field to application of an impressed current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medihala, P G; Lawrence, J R; Swerhone, G D W; Korber, D R

    2013-02-01

    Deterioration of water wells due to clogging and corrosion over time is a common problem where solutions may be costly and ineffective. Pilot studies have suggested that impressed current or cathodic protection may be used to reduce microbially-induced declines in water well performance. Two water wells in an alluvial aquifer close to the North Saskatchewan River were selected to study the response of subsurface microbial communities to the application of an impressed current as an anti-fouling technology. The treated well was exposed to an impressed current while the untreated well was used as a reference site. Biofilms grown on in situ coupons under the influence of the impressed current were significantly (p anti-fouling technology but actually promoted both microbial growth and physical clogging in this aquifer.

  18. Response of Mycorrhizal Diversity to Current Climatic Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen E. Williams

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Form and function of mycorrhizas as well as tracing the presence of the mycorrhizal fungi through the geological time scale are herein first addressed. Then mycorrhizas and plant fitness, succession, mycorrhizas and ecosystem function, and mycorrhizal resiliency are introduced. From this, four hypotheses are drawn: (1 mycorrhizal diversity evolved in response to changes in Global Climate Change (GCC environmental drivers, (2 mycorrhizal diversity will be modified by present changes in GCC environmental drivers, (3 mycorrhizal changes in response to ecological drivers of GCC will in turn modify plant, community, and ecosystem responses to the same, and (4 Mycorrhizas will continue to evolve in response to present and future changes in GCC factors. The drivers of climate change examined here are: CO2 enrichment, temperature rise, altered precipitation, increased N-deposition, habitat fragmentation, and biotic invasion increase. These impact the soil-rhizosphere, plant and fungal physiology and/or ecosystem(s directly and indirectly. Direct effects include changes in resource availability and change in distribution of mycorrhizas. Indirect effects include changes in below ground allocation of C to roots and changes in plant species distribution. GCC ecological drivers have been partitioned into four putative time frames: (1 Immediate (1–2 years impacts, associated with ecosystem fragmentation and habitat loss realized through loss of plant-hosts and disturbance of the soil; (2 Short-term (3–10 year impacts, resultant of biotic invasions of exotic mycorrhizal fungi, plants and pests, diseases and other abiotic perturbations; (3 Intermediate-term (11–20 year impacts, of cumulative and additive effects of increased N (and S deposition, soil acidification and other pollutants; and (4 Long-term (21–50+ year impacts, where increased temperatures and CO2 will destabilize global rainfall patterns, soil properties and plant ecosystem resilience. Due

  19. Transient simulation and analysis of current collapse due to trapping effects in AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周幸叶; 冯志红; 王元刚; 顾国栋; 宋旭波; 蔡树军

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, two-dimensional (2D) transient simulations of an AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) are carried out and analyzed to investigate the current collapse due to trapping effects. The coupling effect of the trapping and thermal effects are taken into account in our simulation. The turn-on pulse gate-lag transient responses with different quiescent biases are obtained, and the pulsed current–voltage (I–V ) curves are extracted from the transients. The experi-mental results of both gate-lag transient current and pulsed I–V curves are reproduced by the simulation, and the current collapse due to the trapping effect is explained from the view of physics based on the simulation results. In addition, the results show that bulk acceptor traps can influence the gate-lag transient characteristics of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs besides surface traps and that the thermal effect can accelerate the emission of captured electrons for traps. Pulse transient simu-lation is meaningful in analyzing the mechanism of dynamic current collapse, and the work in this paper will benefit the reliability study and model development of GaN-based devices.

  20. Determination of corrosion rate of reinforcement with a modulated guard ring electrode; analysis of errors due to lateral current distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojtas, H

    2004-07-01

    The main source of errors in measuring the corrosion rate of rebars on site is a non-uniform current distribution between the small counter electrode (CE) on the concrete surface and the large rebar network. Guard ring electrodes (GEs) are used in an attempt to confine the excitation current within a defined area. In order to better understand the functioning of modulated guard ring electrode and to assess its effectiveness in eliminating errors due to lateral spread of current signal from the small CE, measurements of the polarisation resistance performed on a concrete beam have been numerically simulated. Effect of parameters such as rebar corrosion activity, concrete resistivity, concrete cover depth and size of the corroding area on errors in the estimation of polarisation resistance of a single rebar has been examined. The results indicate that modulated GE arrangement fails to confine the lateral spread of the CE current within a constant area. Using the constant diameter of confinement for the calculation of corrosion rate may lead to serious errors when test conditions change. When high corrosion activity of rebar and/or local corrosion occur, the use of the modulated GE confinement may lead to significant underestimation of the corrosion rate.

  1. Responses of atmospheric electric field and air-earth current to variations of conductivity profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, M.; Ogawa, T.

    1984-05-01

    A global circuit model is constructed to study responses of air-earth current and electric field to a variation of atmospheric electrical conductivity profile. The model includes the orography and the global distribution of thunderstorm generators. The conductivity varies with latitude and exponentially with altitude. The thunderstorm cloud is assumed to be a current generator with a positive source at the top and a negative one at the bottom. The UT diurnal variations of the global current and the ionospheric potential are evaluated considering the local-time dependence of thunderstorm activity. The global distribution of the electric field and the air-earth current are affected by the orography and latitudinal effects. Assuming a variation of conductivity profile, responses of atmospheric electrical parameters are investigated. The nonuniform decrement of the conductivity with altitude increases both the electric field and the air-earth current. The result suggests a possibility that the increment of the electric field and the air-earth current after a solar flare may be caused by this scheme, due to Forbush decrease.

  2. Accelerated inactivation of the L-type calcium current due to a mutation in CACNB2b underlies Brugada syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordeiro, Jonathan M; Marieb, Mark; Pfeiffer, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated an association between mutations in CACNA1c or CACNB2b and Brugada syndrome (BrS). Previously described mutations all caused a loss of function secondary to a reduction of peak calcium current (I(Ca)). We describe a novel CACNB2b mutation associated with Br...... revealed brief episodes of very rapid ventricular tachycardia. He was also diagnosed with vasovagal syncope. Genomic DNA was isolated from lymphocytes. All exons and intron borders of 15 ion channel genes were amplified and sequenced. The only mutation uncovered was a missense mutation (T11I) in CACNB2b...... that the faster current decay results in a loss-of-function responsible for the Brugada phenotype...

  3. Epidemics: Lessons from the past and current patterns of response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Paul

    2008-09-01

    Hippocrates gave the term 'epidemic' its medical meaning. From antiquity to modern times, the meaning of the word epidemic has continued to evolve. Over the centuries, researchers have reached an understanding of the varying aspects of epidemics and have tried to combat them. The role played by travel, trade, and human exchanges in the propagation of epidemic infectious diseases has been understood. In 1948, the World Health Organization was created and given the task of advancing ways of combating epidemics. An early warning system to combat epidemics has been implemented by the WHO. The Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network (GOARN) is collaboration between existing institutions and networks that pool their human and technical resources to fight outbreaks. Avian influenza constitutes currently the most deadly epidemic threat, with fears that it could rapidly reach pandemic proportions and put several thousands of lives in jeopardy. Thanks to the WHO's support, most of the world's countries have mobilised and implemented an 'Action Plan for Pandemic Influenza'. As a result, most outbreaks of the H5N1 avian flu virus have so far been speedily contained. Cases of dengue virus introduction in countries possessing every circumstance required for its epidemic spread provide another example pertinent to the prevention of epidemics caused by vector-borne pathogens.

  4. Prolonged Action Potential and After depolarizations Are Not due to Changes in Potassium Currents in NOS3 Knockout Ventricular Myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Honglan; Bonilla, Ingrid M; Huang, Xin; He, Quanhua; Kohr, Mark J; Carnes, Cynthia A; Ziolo, Mark T

    2012-01-01

    Ventricular myocytes deficient in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3(-/-)) exhibit prolonged action potential (AP) duration and enhanced spontaneous activity (early and delayed afterdepolarizations) during β-adrenergic (β-AR) stimulation. Studies have shown that nitric oxide is able to regulate various K(+) channels. Our objective was to examine if NOS3(-/-) myocytes had altered K(+) currents. APs, transient outward (I(to)), sustained (I(Ksus)), and inward rectifier (I(K1)) K(+) currents were measured in NOS3(-/-) and wild-type (WT) myocytes. During β-AR stimulation, AP duration (measured as 90% repolarization-APD(90)) was prolonged in NOS3(-/-) compared to WT myocytes. Nevertheless, we did not observe differences in I(to), I(Ksus), or I(K1) between WT and NOS3(-/-) myocytes. Our previous work showed that NOS3(-/-) myocytes had a greater Ca(2+) influx via L-type Ca(2+) channels with β-AR stimulation. Thus, we measured β-AR-stimulated SR Ca(2+) load and found a greater increase in NOS3(-/-) versus WT myocytes. Hence, our data suggest that the prolonged AP in NOS3(-/-) myocytes is not due to changes in I(to), I(Ksus), or I(K1). Furthermore, the increase in spontaneous activity in NOS3(-/-) myocytes may be due to a greater increase in SR Ca(2+) load. This may have important implications for heart failure patients, where arrhythmias are increased and NOS3 expression is decreased.

  5. Tinea capitis and tinea corporis with a severe inflammatory response due to Trichophyton tonsurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hryncewicz-Gwóźdź, Anita; Beck-Jendroschek, Vera; Brasch, Jochen; Kalinowska, Katarzyna; Jagielski, Tomasz

    2011-10-01

    Trichophyton tonsurans is an anthropophilic dermatophyte, with a worldwide distribution, although its prevalence varies considerably between different geographical regions. Whereas in North America infections due to this fungus are exceptionally common, on the European continent they appear relatively seldom. Although T. tonsurans is primarily associated with tinea capitis, it can also be the cause of tinea corporis and tinea unguium. The course of infection is usually only mildly symptomatic. We describe here two cases of urease-positive T. tonsurans infections with atypically extensive cutaneous lesions and severe inflammatory responses. .

  6. Bias Errors due to Leakage Effects When Estimating Frequency Response Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Josefsson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Frequency response functions are often utilized to characterize a system's dynamic response. For a wide range of engineering applications, it is desirable to determine frequency response functions for a system under stochastic excitation. In practice, the measurement data is contaminated by noise and some form of averaging is needed in order to obtain a consistent estimator. With Welch's method, the discrete Fourier transform is used and the data is segmented into smaller blocks so that averaging can be performed when estimating the spectrum. However, this segmentation introduces leakage effects. As a result, the estimated frequency response function suffers from both systematic (bias and random errors due to leakage. In this paper the bias error in the H1 and H2-estimate is studied and a new method is proposed to derive an approximate expression for the relative bias error at the resonance frequency with different window functions. The method is based on using a sum of real exponentials to describe the window's deterministic autocorrelation function. Simple expressions are derived for a rectangular window and a Hanning window. The theoretical expressions are verified with numerical simulations and a very good agreement is found between the results from the proposed bias expressions and the empirical results.

  7. Pivotal response treatment for autism spectrum disorder: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei J

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Jiedi Lei, Pamela Ventola Yale Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA Abstract: Pivotal response treatment (PRT is an evidence-based behavioral intervention based on applied behavior analysis principles aimed to improve social communication skills in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. PRT adopts a more naturalistic approach and focuses on using a number of strategies to help increase children’s motivation during intervention. Since its conceptualization, PRT has received much empirical support for eliciting therapeutic gains in greater use of functional social communication skills in individuals with ASD. Building upon the empirical evidence supporting PRT, recent advancements have increasingly turned to using interdisciplinary research integrating neuroimaging techniques and behavioral measures to help identify objective biomarkers of treatment, which have two primary purposes. First, neuroimaging results can help characterize how PRT may elicit change, and facilitate partitioning of the heterogeneous profiles of neural mechanisms underlying similar profile of behavioral changes observed over PRT. Second, neuroimaging provides an objective means to both map and track how biomarkers may serve as reliable and sensitive predictors of responder profiles to PRT, assisting clinicians to identify who will most likely benefit from PRT. Together, a better understanding of both mechanisms of change and predictors of responder profile will help PRT to serve as a more precise and targeted intervention for individuals with ASD, thus moving towards the goal of precision medicine and improving quality of care. This review focuses on the recent emerging neuroimaging evidences supporting PRT, offering current perspectives on the importance of interdisciplinary research to help clinicians better understand how PRT works and predict who will respond to PRT. Keywords: PRT, ASD, biomarkers, neuroimaging

  8. Current human immunodeficiency virus epidemic and its response in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Lai-Yi

    2012-01-01

    The first patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) was identified in 1985; since then, as of October 31, 2010, a total accumulative number of 370 000 patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS have been reported. The estimated number of patients living with HIV (PLHIV) in China was 740 000 in 2009. Although China is still a low-HIV prevalence region (rate of 0.057%), the epidemic has spread more widely from the high-risk groups to the general population. This paper covers five topics of importance, i.e., current trends of the HIV epidemic; HIV-1 subtype diversity; emergence of HIV drug resistance (HIVDR); the country's response to the disease; and future challenges and additional actions needed. This paper emphasizes sexual transmission as the predominant route of transmission and it being spread more frequently among men who have sex with men; the epidemic being concentrated over particular areas in China. We also discuss the fact that diverse HIV-1 subtypes have been found throughout the entire country and that recombinant subtypes became predominant. We also explore other topics such as the possibility of HIVDR, including primary and secondary resistance, with the use of free highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART); the integrated strategy of HIVDR surveillance and individual clinical HIVDR testing as a new attempt in China. For many years both policy-makers and professionals (including non-governmental organizations) have expressed strong commitment to prevention, control, and care of HIV/sexual transmission infection (STI), promoted the research and conducted different actions to slow the rising trend of the HIV epidemics. Although China is facing many challenges, its citizens need to be persistent on continuing the campaign of the State Council titled "Information of Strengthening Work on Prevention and Control of AIDS".

  9. Response of Ag Thick Film Microstripline due to Superstrate Strontium Substituted Bismuth Manganites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.N. Mathad

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to describe the use of strontium-substituted bismuth manganites bulk ceramic superstrate on Ag thick film microstripline, to modify its response and measure complex permittivity as a function of strontium. Bismuth strontium manganites (Bi1 − xSrxMnO3 have been synthesized by solid state sintering technique. The perturbation obtained in the transmittance and reflectance of thick film microstripline due to the Bi1 − xSrxMnO3 (0.20  x  0.50 overlay has been used to obtain the permittivity at microwave frequencies in X and Ku band range. Due to the overlay of Bismuth strontium manganites (BSM pellets a substantial increase in the effective dielectric constant was observed in X band more compared to Ku band. The in-touch overlay method provides ease loading and unloading. The perturbation obtained in the transmittance and reflectance of thick film microstripline due to the bismuth strontium manganites overlay has been used to obtain the permittivity.

  10. Prolonged Action Potential and After depolarizations Are Not due to Changes in Potassium Currents in NOS3 Knockout Ventricular Myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honglan Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ventricular myocytes deficient in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3−/− exhibit prolonged action potential (AP duration and enhanced spontaneous activity (early and delayed afterdepolarizations during β-adrenergic (β-AR stimulation. Studies have shown that nitric oxide is able to regulate various K+ channels. Our objective was to examine if NOS3-/- myocytes had altered K+ currents. APs, transient outward (to, sustained (Ksus, and inward rectifier (K1 K+ currents were measured in NOS3-/- and wild-type (WT myocytes. During β-AR stimulation, AP duration (measured as 90% repolarization-APD90 was prolonged in NOS3−/− compared to WT myocytes. Nevertheless, we did not observe differences in to, Ksus, or K1 between WT and NOS3−/− myocytes. Our previous work showed that NOS3−/− myocytes had a greater Ca2+ influx via L-type Ca2+ channels with β-AR stimulation. Thus, we measured β-AR-stimulated SR Ca2+ load and found a greater increase in NOS3−/− versus WT myocytes. Hence, our data suggest that the prolonged AP in NOS3−/− myocytes is not due to changes in to, Ksus, or K1. Furthermore, the increase in spontaneous activity in NOS3−/− myocytes may be due to a greater increase in SR Ca2+ load. This may have important implications for heart failure patients, where arrhythmias are increased and NOS3 expression is decreased.

  11. Radiative Forcing and Climate Response Due to Black Carbon in Snow and Ice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhili; ZHANG Hua; SHEN Xueshun

    2011-01-01

    The radiative forcing and climate response due to black carbon (BC) in snow and/or ice were investigated by integrating observed effects of BC on snow/ice albedo into an atmospheric general circulation model (BCC_AGCM2.0.1) developed by the National Climate Center (NCC) of the China Meteorological Administration (CMA).The results show that the global annual mean surface radiative forcing due to BC in snow/ice is +0.042 W m-2,with maximum forcing found over the Tibetan Plateau and regional mean forcing exceeding +2.8 W m-2.The global annual mean surface temperature increased 0.071℃ due to BC in snow/ice.Positive surface radiative forcing was clearly shown in winter and spring and increased the surface temperature of snow/ice in the Northern Hemisphere.The surface temperatures of snow-covered areas of Eurasia and North America in winter (spring) increased by 0.83℃ (0.6℃) and 0.83℃ (0.46℃),respectively.Snowmelt rates also increased greatly,leading to earlier snowmelt and peak runoff times.With the rise of surface temperatures in the Arctic,more water vapor could be released into the atmosphere,allowing easier cloud formation,which could lead to higher thermal emittance in the Arctic. However,the total cloud forcing could decrease due to increasing cloud cover,which will offset some of the positive feedback mechanism of the clouds.

  12. Structural and acoustic response due to excitation from ship stern: overview and suggestions for future research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUA Hongxing

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Several decades after the development of acoustic stealth technology for ships, there remains an urgent necessity to reduce low frequency structural and acoustic response due to excitation from the stern. This paper reviews research into the coupled vibration and acoustic problems of the sterns of vessels. Attention is especially paid to three key aspects: the characteristics of propeller forces, the vibration-acoustic signatures of coupled propeller-shaft-hull systems, and vibration/noise controls. Therefore, the mapping relationships of vibration noise from the stern excitation and propeller-shaft-hull system is obtained, and the control approaches for low frequency vibration noise is presented. Thereafter, several suggestions are made for further research work in the testing technology of the unsteady force of propellers, the structural vibration induced by the stern bearing friction and the vibration control of propeller-shaft systems in the future.

  13. Nonlinear Site Response Due to Large Ground Acceleration: Observation and Computer Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, S.; Furumura, T.; Sasatani, T.

    2009-12-01

    We studied nonlinear site response due to large ground acceleration during the 2003 off-Miyagi Earthquake (Mw7.0) in Japan by means of horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio analysis of S-wave motion. The results were then confirmed by finite-difference method (FDM) simulation of nonlinear seismic wave propagation. A nonlinear site response is often observed at soft sediment sites, and even at hard bedrock sites which are covered by thin soil layers. Nonlinear site response can be induced by strong ground motion whose peak ground acceleration (PGA) exceeds about 100 cm/s/s, and seriously affects the amplification of high frequency ground motion and PGA. Noguchi and Sasatani (2008) developed an efficient technique for quantitative evaluation of nonlinear site response using the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio of S-wave (S-H/V) derived from strong ground motion records, based on Wen et al. (2006). We applied this technique to perform a detailed analysis of the properties of nonlinear site response based on a large amount of data recorded at 132 K-NET and KiK-net strong motion stations in Northern Japan during the off-Miyagi Earthquake. We succeeded in demonstrating a relationship between ground motion level, nonlinear site response and surface soil characteristics. For example, the seismic data recorded at KiK-net IWTH26 showed obvious characteristics of nonlinear site response when the PGA exceeded 100 cm/s/s. As the ground motion level increased, the dominant peak of S-H/V shifted to lower frequency, the high frequency level of S-H/V dropped, and PGA amplification decreased. On the other hand, the records at MYGH03 seemed not to be affected by nonlinear site response even for high ground motion levels in which PGA exceeds 800 cm/s/s. The characteristics of such nonlinear site amplification can be modeled by evaluating Murnaghan constants (e.g. McCall, 1994), which are the third-order elastic constants. In order to explain the observed characteristics of

  14. Analysis of nonexponential transient response due to a constant-phase element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuveln, F.H. van (Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, Petten (Netherlands))

    1994-12-01

    To characterize electrical losses of fuel cells or batteries, impedance spectroscopy (IS) or current interruption (CI) can be used. Analysis and parameter determination of impedance data is widely used. The system under study is usually represented by an equivalent circuit from which the system parameters can be determined. However, the analysis of current-interruption data is often carried out with too simple circuits, e.g., using pure exponential behavior, because analysis in the time domain (CI) is often much more awkward than analysis in the frequency domain (IS). A comparative study has been carried out on the analysis of a relatively ideal electrical circuit, containing a pure capacitor, and a more realistic circuit where the capacitor is replaced by a constant-phase element. Equations describing the response in the frequency and time domain are presented. Emphasis input upon the analysis of circuits containing a constant-phase element because impedance measurements clearly indicate the presence of such an element in many types of experiments, and because there is only limited literature available describing the behavior in the time domain.

  15. Analysis of non-exponential transient response due to a constant phase element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Heuveln, F.H.

    1994-08-01

    To characterize electrical losses of fuel cells or batteries, impedance spectroscopy (IS) or current interruption (CI) can be used. Analysis and parameter determination of impedance data is widely used. The system under study is usually represented by an equivalent circuit from which the system parameters can be determined. However, the analysis of current interruption data is often carried out with too simple circuits, e.g., using pure exponential behavior, because analysis in the time domain (CI) is often much more awkward then analysis in the frequency domain (IS). A comparative study has been carried out on the analysis of a relatively ideal electrical circuit, containing a pure capacitor, and a more realistic circuit where the capacitor is replaced by a constant phase element. Equations describing the response in the frequency and time domain are presented. Emphasis is put upon the analysis of circuits containing a constant phase element, because impedance measurements clearly indicate the presence of such an element in many types of experiments, and because there is only limited literature available describing the behavior in the time domain. 6 figs., 11 refs.

  16. Increased persistent sodium current due to decreased PI3K signaling contributes to QT prolongation in the diabetic heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhongju; Jiang, Ya-Ping; Wu, Chia-Yen C; Ballou, Lisa M; Liu, Shengnan; Carpenter, Eileen S; Rosen, Michael R; Cohen, Ira S; Lin, Richard Z

    2013-12-01

    Diabetes is an independent risk factor for sudden cardiac death and ventricular arrhythmia complications of acute coronary syndrome. Prolongation of the QT interval on the electrocardiogram is also a risk factor for arrhythmias and sudden death, and the increased prevalence of QT prolongation is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular death in diabetic patients. The pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for this lethal complication are poorly understood. Diabetes is associated with a reduction in phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling, which regulates the action potential duration (APD) of individual myocytes and thus the QT interval by altering multiple ion currents, including the persistent sodium current INaP. Here, we report a mechanism for diabetes-induced QT prolongation that involves an increase in INaP caused by defective PI3K signaling. Cardiac myocytes of mice with type 1 or type 2 diabetes exhibited an increase in APD that was reversed by expression of constitutively active PI3K or intracellular infusion of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3), the second messenger produced by PI3K. The diabetic myocytes also showed an increase in INaP that was reversed by activated PI3K or PIP3. The increases in APD and INaP in myocytes translated into QT interval prolongation for both types of diabetic mice. The long QT interval of type 1 diabetic hearts was shortened by insulin treatment ex vivo, and this effect was blocked by a PI3K inhibitor. Treatment of both types of diabetic mouse hearts with an INaP blocker also shortened the QT interval. These results indicate that downregulation of cardiac PI3K signaling in diabetes prolongs the QT interval at least in part by causing an increase in INaP. This mechanism may explain why the diabetic population has an increased risk of life-threatening arrhythmias.

  17. CURRENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR COMBINATION TREATMENT OF LOWER URINARY TRACT SYMPTOMS DUE TO BENIGN PROSTATIC HYPERPLASIA IN MEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Kasyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH are widely presented, particularly among elderly men. It was commonly accepted that LUTS are directly or indirectly connected with the prostate. Recent studies have shown that mild andsevere forms of LUTS may have a different etiology, such as, bladder related problems: overactive bladder (OAB/detrusor overactivity or, conversely, an underactive bladder due to compromised contractions of the detrusor. There are three main groups of LUTS: storage symptoms, voiding symptoms and post-micturition symptoms. Patients with LUTS/BPH who are not sufficiently respond to monotherapy with alpha-blockers should receive additional treatment with M‑anticholinergics in accordance with the European urological guidelines. Current studies show that up to 65% of patients with LUTS/BPH with symptoms of urgency and frequency do not have sufficient reduction of symptoms after 3 months of treatment with alphablocker as monotherapy. Until recently, alpha-blockers and M‑anticholinergic medications were prescribed in combination therapy as a two separate pills. Vesomni is a combination of antimuscarinic drug solifenacin 6 mg with α1‑blocker tamsulosin OCAS 0.4 mg in one tablet. It is developed to relieve storage (urgency and frequency and voiding symptoms in men with LUTS/BPH. Solifenacin suppresses the overactivity of the detrusor and reduces storage symptoms. Tamsulosin OCAS relaxes smooth muscle of the prostate, prostatic urethra and bladder neck, and eliminates most voiding symptoms and, to a lesser extent, storage symptoms.

  18. Individualized treatment with transcranial direct current stimulation in patients with chronic non-fluent aphasia due to stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah-Basak, Priyanka P; Norise, Catherine; Garcia, Gabriella; Torres, Jose; Faseyitan, Olufunsho; Hamilton, Roy H

    2015-01-01

    While evidence suggests that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may facilitate language recovery in chronic post-stroke aphasia, individual variability in patient response to different patterns of stimulation remains largely unexplored. We sought to characterize this variability among chronic aphasic individuals, and to explore whether repeated stimulation with an individualized optimal montage could lead to persistent reduction of aphasia severity. In a two-phase study, we first stimulated patients with four active montages (left hemispheric anode or cathode; right hemispheric anode or cathode) and one sham montage (Phase 1). We examined changes in picture naming ability to address (1) variability in response to different montages among our patients, and (2) whether individual patients responded optimally to at least one montage. During Phase 2, subjects who responded in Phase 1 were randomized to receive either real-tDCS or to receive sham stimulation (10 days); patients who were randomized to receive sham stimulation first were then crossed over to receive real-tDCS (10 days). In both phases, 2 mA tDCS was administered for 20 min per real-tDCS sessions and patients performed a picture naming task during stimulation. Patients' language ability was re-tested after 2-weeks and 2-months following real and sham tDCS in Phase 2. In Phase 1, despite considerable individual variability, the greatest average improvement was observed after left-cathodal stimulation. Seven out of 12 subjects responded optimally to at least one montage as demonstrated by transient improvement in picture-naming. In Phase 2, aphasia severity improved at 2-weeks and 2-months following real-tDCS but not sham. Despite individual variability with respect to optimal tDCS approach, certain montages result in consistent transient improvement in persons with chronic post-stroke aphasia. This preliminary study supports the notion that individualized tDCS treatment may enhance aphasia

  19. Cellular immune responses to ESAT-6 discriminate between patients with pulmonary disease due to Mycobacterium avium complex and those with pulmonary disease due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lein, A D; von Reyn, C F; Ravn, P;

    1999-01-01

    ESAT-6 (for 6-kDa early secreted antigenic target) is a secreted antigen found almost exclusively in organisms of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. We compared in vitro gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) responses by peripheral blood mononuclear cells to this antigen in patients with pulmonary...... disease due to either Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) or Mycobacterium tuberculosis with those in healthy, skin test-negative, control subjects. Significant IFN-gamma responses to ESAT-6 were detected in 16 (59%) of 27 M. tuberculosis pulmonary disease patients, 0 (0%) of 8 MAC disease patients, and 0...... (0%) of 8 controls. Significant IFN-gamma responses to M. tuberculosis purified protein derivative were detected in 23 (85%) of 27 M. tuberculosis disease patients, 2 (25%) of 8 MAC disease patients, and 5 (63%) of 8 healthy controls. M. avium sensitin was recognized in 24 (89%) of 27 M. tuberculosis...

  20. Intense ventilation of the Black Sea pycnocline due to vertical turbulent exchange in the Rim Current area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovskii, Alexander G.; Zatsepin, Andrey G.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents new observational data, which indicate that deep ventilation events in the aerobic zone extending across the upper part of the permanent pycnocline may occur sporadically in the Rim Current area, even during relatively warm seasons, when the seasonal thermocline is still notable. The strongest observed event of this type occurred on November 2014 off the continental shelf break near Gelendzhik Bay. Vertical profiles of dissolved oxygen were accurately measured using an SBE 52-MP Conductivity, Temperature, Depth (CTD) probe equipped with a fast-response SBE 43F oxygen sensor mounted on a moored Aqualog automatic mobile profiler. The analysis of the profiling data from October 6 through December 16, 2014, from depths between 35 m and 215 m revealed an anomaly on November 6-7. The dissolved oxygen exceeded the background levels by more than 0.2 ml/l (8.9 μM) at the 14.9-15.7 kg/m3 isopycnals in the pycnocline and reached approximately 1 ml/l (44.66 μM) for short periods. The peak absolute value of the dissolved oxygen reached an exceptionally high value of approximately 0.3 ml/l (13.4 μM) at the 15.9 kg/m3 isopycnal. The ventilation event increased the temperature by 0.2 °C at depths of 120-160 m. The simultaneous observations of both the thermohaline stratification and the ocean currents suggest that the ventilation event was associated with the sinking of pycnocline waters in the near-bottom Ekman layer along the continental slope and intense vertical turbulent exchange in the Rim Current area near the continental slope. The ventilation of the pycnocline when the overlaying upper ocean is stably stratified sharply differs from the convection reaching the Cold Intermediate Layer during extensive cooling of the sea surface. Indications of such ventilation events were also found in the Aqualog mooring data archive from 2012.

  1. pH-Responsive carriers for oral drug delivery: challenges and opportunities of current platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Yao, WenDong; Rao, YueFeng; Lu, XiaoYang; Gao, JianQing

    2017-11-01

    Oral administration is a desirable alternative of parenteral administration due to the convenience and increased compliance to patients, especially for chronic diseases that require frequent administration. The oral drug delivery is a dynamic research field despite the numerous challenges limiting their effective delivery, such as enzyme degradation, hydrolysis and low permeability of intestinal epithelium in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. pH-Responsive carriers offer excellent potential as oral therapeutic systems due to enhancing the stability of drug delivery in stomach and achieving controlled release in intestines. This review provides a wide perspective on current status of pH-responsive oral drug delivery systems prepared mainly with organic polymers or inorganic materials, including the strategies used to overcome GI barriers, the challenges in their development and future prospects, with focus on technology trends to improve the bioavailability of orally delivered drugs, the mechanisms of drug release from pH-responsive oral formulations, and their application for drug delivery, such as protein and peptide therapeutics, vaccination, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and bacterial infections.

  2. Corticosterone responses and personality in birds: Individual variation and the ability to cope with environmental changes due to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockrem, John F

    2013-09-01

    Birds can respond to an internal or external stimulus with activation of the HPA axis and secretion of corticosterone. There is considerable individual variation in corticosterone responses, and individual responses can be very different from the mean response for a group of birds. Corticosterone responses and behavioural responses to environmental stimuli are determined by individual characteristics called personality. It is proposed that birds with low corticosterone responses and proactive personalities are likely to be more successful (have greater fitness) in constant or predictable conditions, whilst birds with reactive personalities and high corticosterone responses will be more successful in changing or unpredictable conditions. The relationship between corticosterone responses and fitness thus depends on the prevailing environmental conditions, so birds with either low or high corticosterone responses can have the greatest fitness and be most successful, but in different situations. It is also proposed that birds with reactive personalities and high corticosterone responses will be better able to cope with environmental changes due to climate change than birds with proactive personalities and relatively low corticosterone responses. Phenotypic plasticity in corticosterone responses can be quantified using a reaction norm approach, and reaction norms can be used to determine the degree of plasticity in corticosterone responses of individual birds, and mean levels of plasticity in responses of species of birds. Individual corticosterone responses and personality, and reaction norms for corticosterone responses, can in future be used to predict the ability of birds to cope with environmental changes due to climate change.

  3. Structural and acoustic responses of a submarine hull due to propeller forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Sascha; Kinns, Roger; Kessissoglou, Nicole

    2009-08-01

    The low frequency structural and acoustic responses of a simplified axisymmetric submarine model to fluctuating propeller forces along the submarine axis are investigated. The forces arise from a hydrodynamic mechanism and are transmitted from the propeller to the submarine hull through both the shaft and the fluid. Numerical models have been developed to simulate the strongly coupled structure-fluid interaction of a submerged vessel in the frequency domain. The structure is modelled using the finite element method, so that more complex features such as ring-stiffeners, bulkheads and the propulsion system can be taken into account. A simple, passive vibration attenuation system known as a resonance changer is included in the model of the propeller/shafting system. The surrounding fluid is modelled using the boundary element method. The influence and importance of model parameters such as structural stiffness and fluid loading effects are investigated. Due to the fluctuating propeller forces, the hull is excited by axial structural forces transmitted through the propeller/shafting system as well as by acoustic dipoles, where the dipoles are correlated to the structural forces in strength and direction. The acoustic dipole at the propeller also radiates sound directly to the far field of the surrounding fluid. It is demonstrated that the performance of the RC is negatively influenced at frequencies above the fundamental axial resonance of the hull by the effect of forces transmitted through the fluid. Another problem arises due to increased axial movement of the propeller, when the RC is optimised to minimise excitation of the hull via the propeller shaft. This results in an additional sound field that excites the submarine hull in a similar manner to the fluid forces that arise directly from the hydrodynamic mechanism.

  4. [Lower lymphocyte response in severe cases of acute bronchiolitis due to respiratory syncytial virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Fernández, José Miguel; Moreno-Pérez, David; Antúnez-Fernández, Cristina; Milano-Manso, Guillermo; Cordón-Martínez, Ana María; Urda-Cardona, Antonio

    2017-08-14

    Acute bronchiolitis (AB) of the infant has a serious outcome in 6-16% of the hospital admitted cases. Its pathogenesis and evolution is related to the response of the T lymphocytes. The objective of the present study is to determine if the lower systemic lymphocytic response is related to a worse outcome of AB in hospitalised infants. Retrospective observational-analytical study of cases-controls nested in a cohort of patients admitted due to RSV-AB between the period from October 2010 to March 2015. Those with a full blood count in the first 48hours of respiratory distress were included. Infants with underlying disease, bacterial superinfection, and premature infants <32 weeks of gestation were excluded. The main dichotomous variable was PICU admission. Other variables were: gender, age, post-menstrual age, gestational and post-natal tobacco exposure, admission month, type of lactation, and days of onset of respiratory distress. Lymphocyte counts were categorised by quartiles. Bivariate analysis was performed with the main variable and then by logistic regression to analyse confounding factors. The study included 252 infants, of whom 6.6% (17) required PICU admission. The difference in mean±SD of lymphocytes for patients admitted to and not admitted to PICU was 4,044±1755 and 5,035±1786, respectively (Student-t test, P<.05). An association was found between PICU admission and lymphocyte count <3700/ml (Chi-squared, P=.019; OR: 3.2) and it was found to be maintained in the logistic regression, regardless of age and all other studied factors (Wald 4.191 P=.041, OR: 3.8). A relationship was found between lymphocytosis <3700/ml in the first days of respiratory distress and a worse outcome in previously healthy infants <12 months and gestational age greater than 32 weeks with RSV-AB. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  5. Responses of the Brans-Dicke field due to gravitational collapses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Dong-il; Yeom, Dong-han, E-mail: enotsae@gmail.co, E-mail: innocent@muon.kaist.ac.k [Department of Physics, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-21

    We study responses of the Brans-Dicke field due to gravitational collapses of scalar field pulses using numerical simulations. Double-null formalism is employed to implement the numerical simulations. If we supply a scalar field pulse, it will asymptotically form a black hole via dynamical interactions of the Brans-Dicke field. Hence, we can observe the responses of the Brans-Dicke field by two different regions. First, we observe the late time behaviors after the gravitational collapse, which include formations of a singularity and an apparent horizon. Second, we observe the fully dynamical behaviors during the gravitational collapse and view the energy-momentum tensor components. For the late time behaviors, if the Brans-Dicke coupling is greater (or smaller) than -1.5, the Brans-Dicke field decreases (or increases) during the gravitational collapse. Since the Brans-Dicke field should be relaxed to the asymptotic value with the elapse of time, the final apparent horizon becomes time-like (or space-like). For the dynamical behaviors, we observed the energy-momentum tensors around {omega} {approx} -1.5. If the Brans-Dicke coupling is greater than -1.5, the T{sub uu} component can be negative at the outside of the black hole. This can allow an instantaneous inflating region during the gravitational collapse. If the Brans-Dicke coupling is less than -1.5, the oscillation of the T{sub vv} component allows the apparent horizon to shrink. This allows a combination that violates weak cosmic censorship. Finally, we discuss the implications of the violation of the null energy condition and weak cosmic censorship.

  6. Immense Magnetic Response of Exciplex Light Emission due to Correlated Spin-Charge Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifei; Sahin-Tiras, Kevser; Harmon, Nicholas J.; Wohlgenannt, Markus; Flatté, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    As carriers slowly move through a disordered energy landscape in organic semiconductors, tiny spatial variations in spin dynamics relieve spin blocking at transport bottlenecks or in the electron-hole recombination process that produces light. Large room-temperature magnetic-field effects (MFEs) ensue in the conductivity and luminescence. Sources of variable spin dynamics generate much larger MFEs if their spatial structure is correlated on the nanoscale with the energetic sites governing conductivity or luminescence such as in coevaporated organic blends within which the electron resides on one molecule and the hole on the other (an exciplex). Here, we show that exciplex recombination in blends exhibiting thermally activated delayed fluorescence produces MFEs in excess of 60% at room temperature. In addition, effects greater than 4000% can be achieved by tuning the device's current-voltage response curve by device conditioning. Both of these immense MFEs are the largest reported values for their device type at room temperature. Our theory traces this MFE and its unusual temperature dependence to changes in spin mixing between triplet exciplexes and light-emitting singlet exciplexes. In contrast, spin mixing of excitons is energetically suppressed, and thus spin mixing produces comparatively weaker MFEs in materials emitting light from excitons by affecting the precursor pairs. Demonstration of immense MFEs in common organic blends provides a flexible and inexpensive pathway towards magnetic functionality and field sensitivity in current organic devices without patterning the constituent materials on the nanoscale. Magnetic fields increase the power efficiency of unconditioned devices by 30% at room temperature, also showing that magnetic fields may increase the efficiency of the thermally activated delayed fluorescence process.

  7. Experimental response of Salix cuttings to different flow regimes due to human activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorla, Lorenzo; Signarbieux, Constant; Turberg, Pascal; Buttler, Alexandre; Perona, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    Hydropower production and other human activities change the natural flow regime of rivers, in turn impacting the riparian environment. The main challenge in order to define eco-sustainable flows is to quantify the effects in terms of geomorphology and ecosystem adaptation. We present 2-years controlled experiments to investigate riparian vegetation (Salix Viminalis) response to forced water table changing dynamics, from one water regime to another, in a temperate region (Switzerland). Three synthetic flow regimes have been simulated and applied to three batteries of Salix cuttings growing outdoor within plastic pots, each about 1 meter tall. In 2012 one treatment simulated a minimal flow policy for small run-of-river hydropower plants, which drastically impacts the low and the medium-low components of the hydrograph, but not the extremes. In 2013 we confirmed and completed some of 2012 results, by reproducing typical hydropeaking effects due to dam management and focusing on daily water table variations and offsets. For both the seasons, after an initial period where all pots undergone the same oscillations in order to uniform the plants initial conditions, the experiment started, and the water dynamic was changed. Cuttings transitory response dynamics has been quantified by continuous sap flow and water potential measurements, and by regularly collecting growth parameters, as well as leaves photosynthesis, fluorescence, and pictures of each plant. At the end of the experiment, all cuttings were carefully removed and the both above and below ground biomass analyzed in detail. Particularly, the 3D root structure was obtained by High Resolution Computer Tomography. Our analyses revealed a clear dependence between roots distribution and water regime reflecting the need for adaptation, in agreement with field observations of Pasquale et al. (2012). In particular, an initial strong difference in terms of stress and growth performances was then followed by a later

  8. Host response to nontuberculous mycobacterial infections of current clinical importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, Ian M; Ordway, Diane J

    2014-09-01

    The nontuberculous mycobacteria are a large group of acid-fast bacteria that are very widely distributed in the environment. While Mycobacterium avium was once regarded as innocuous, its high frequency as a cause of disseminated disease in HIV-positive individuals illustrated its potential as a pathogen. Much more recently, there is growing evidence that the incidence of M. avium and related nontuberculous species is increasing in immunocompetent individuals. The same has been observed for M. abscessus infections, which are very difficult to treat; accordingly, this review focuses primarily on these two important pathogens. Like the host response to M. tuberculosis infections, the host response to these infections is of the TH1 type but there are some subtle and as-yet-unexplained differences.

  9. Social Responsability, Depolitisation and the Current Civil Service in Yugoslavia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zelijko SEVIC

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at the broad theoretical issues of social responsibility vis-a-vis depolitisation in Contemporary Civil Service Systems. A clear distinction has been established between the existing models of Public Administration from a politicoadministrative perspective. The paper argues for larger involvement of non-governmental organisations (NGOs in the national policy-making process, and for the promotion of civil education amongst citizens. It also argues for more appropriate and socially responsible Public Administration, capable of meeting the increasing demand from citizens and a modern society. Finally, different theoretical ideas developed in the first part of the paper are applied to the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia's Civil Service(s in a case study.

  10. Response of ENSO amplitude to global warming in CESM large ensemble: uncertainty due to internal variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao-Tong; Hui, Chang; Yeh, Sang-Wook

    2017-08-01

    El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the dominant mode of variability in the coupled ocean-atmospheric system. Future projections of ENSO change under global warming are highly uncertain among models. In this study, the effect of internal variability on ENSO amplitude change in future climate projections is investigated based on a 40-member ensemble from the Community Earth System Model Large Ensemble (CESM-LE) project. A large uncertainty is identified among ensemble members due to internal variability. The inter-member diversity is associated with a zonal dipole pattern of sea surface temperature (SST) change in the mean along the equator, which is similar to the second empirical orthogonal function (EOF) mode of tropical Pacific decadal variability (TPDV) in the unforced control simulation. The uncertainty in CESM-LE is comparable in magnitude to that among models of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5), suggesting the contribution of internal variability to the intermodel uncertainty in ENSO amplitude change. However, the causations between changes in ENSO amplitude and the mean state are distinct between CESM-LE and CMIP5 ensemble. The CESM-LE results indicate that a large ensemble of 15 members is needed to separate the relative contributions to ENSO amplitude change over the twenty-first century between forced response and internal variability.

  11. Giant piezoelectric response in piezoelectric/dielectric superlattices due to flexoelectric effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Wu, Huaping; Wang, Jie

    2016-11-01

    Flexoelectricity describes the linear response of electrical polarization to a strain gradient, which can be used to enhance the piezoelectric effect of piezoelectric material or realize the piezoelectric effect in nonpiezoelectric materials. Here, we demonstrate from thermodynamics theory that a giant piezoelectric effect exists in piezoelectric/dielectric superlattices due to flexoelectric effect. The apparent piezoelectric coefficient is calculated from the closed-form of analytical expression of the polarization distribution in the piezoelectric/dielectric superlattice subjected to a normal stress, in which the flexoelectric effect is included. It is found that there exists a strong nonlinear coupling between the flexoelectric and piezoelectric effects, which significantly enhances the apparent piezoelectric coefficient in the piezoelectric/dielectric superlattice. For a specific thickness ratio of the piezoelectric and dielectric layers, the enhanced apparent piezoelectric coefficient in the superlattice is ten times larger than that of its pure piezoelectric counterpart. The present work suggests an effective way to obtain giant apparent piezoelectric effect in piezoelectric/dielectric superlattices through flexoelectric effect.

  12. Changes of contractile responses due to simulated weightlessness in rat soleus muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkhammari, A.; Noireaud, J.; Léoty, C.

    1994-08-01

    Some contractile and electrophysiological properties of muscle fibers isolated from the slow-twitch soleus (SOL) and fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of rats were compared with those measured in SOL muscles from suspended rats. In suspendede SOL (21 days of tail-suspension) membrane potential (Em), intracellular sodium activity (aiNa) and the slope of the relationship between Em and log [K]o were typical of fast-twitch muscles. The relation between the maximal amplitude of K-contractures vs Em was steeper for control SOL than for EDL and suspended SOL muscles. After suspension, in SOL muscles the contractile threshold and the inactivation curves for K-contractures were shifted to more positive Em. Repriming of K-contractures was unaffected by suspencion. The exposure of isolated fibers to perchlorate (ClO4-)-containing (6-40 mM) solutions resulted ina similar concentration-dependent shift to more negative Em of activation curves for EDL and suspended SOL muscles. On exposure to a Na-free TEA solution, SOL from control and suspended rats, in contrast to EDL muscles, generated slow contractile responses. Suspended SOL showed a reduced sensitivity to the contracture-producing effect of caffeine compared to control muscles. These results suggested that the modification observed due to suspension could be encounted by changes in the characteristics of muscle fibers from slow to fast-twitch type.

  13. Visual context due to speech-reading suppresses the auditory response to acoustic interruptions in speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Jyoti; Pitt, Mark A; Shahin, Antoine J

    2014-01-01

    Speech reading enhances auditory perception in noise. One means by which this perceptual facilitation comes about is through information from visual networks reinforcing the encoding of the congruent speech signal by ignoring interfering acoustic signals. We tested this hypothesis neurophysiologically by acquiring EEG while individuals listened to words with a fixed portion of each word replaced by white noise. Congruent (meaningful) or incongruent (reversed frames) mouth movements accompanied the words. Individuals judged whether they heard the words as continuous (illusion) or interrupted (illusion failure) through the noise. We hypothesized that congruent, as opposed to incongruent, mouth movements should further enhance illusory perception by suppressing the auditory cortex's response to interruption onsets and offsets. Indeed, we found that the N1 auditory evoked potential (AEP) to noise onsets and offsets was reduced when individuals experienced the illusion during congruent, but not incongruent, audiovisual streams. This N1 inhibitory effect was most prominent at noise offsets, suggesting that visual influences on auditory perception are instigated to a greater extent during noisy periods. These findings suggest that visual context due to speech-reading disengages (inhibits) neural processes associated with interfering sounds (e.g., noisy interruptions) during speech perception.

  14. Monitoring and modeling shoreline response due to shoreface nourishment on a high-energy coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, P. L.; Erikson, Li H.; Hansen, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    Shoreface nourishment can be an efficient technique to feed sediment into the littoral zone without the order of magnitude cost increase incurred by directly nourishing the beach. An erosion hot spot at Ocean Beach in San Francisco, California, USA, threatens valuable public infrastructure as well as safe recreational use of the beach. In an effort to reduce the erosion at this location, a new beneficial reuse plan was implemented in May 2005 for the sediment dredged annually from the main shipping channel at the mouth of San Francisco Bay. From 2005 to 2007, approximately 230,000 m of sand was placed annually at depths between 9 and 14 m, in a location where strong tidal currents and open-ocean waves could potentially feed sediment onto the section of beach experiencing critical erosion. The evolution of the disposal mound and adjacent beach were monitored with 12 multibeam bathymetric surveys, and over 40 high-resolution beach topographic surveys. In addition, sediment transport processes were investigated using sediment grab samples, acoustic Doppler profilers, and two separate models: a cross-shore profile model (UNIBEST-TC) and a coastal area model (Delft3D). The results of the monitoring and modeling demonstrate that the disposal mound may be effective in dissipating wave energy striking this vulnerable stretch of coast with negligible shadowing effects, but a positive shoreline response can only be achieved by placing the sediment in water depths less than 5 m. 

  15. Canine rangeliosis due to Rangelia vitalii: from first report in Brazil in 1910 to current day - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, Raqueli T; Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Loretti, Alexandre P; Mazzanti, Cinthia M; Lopes, Sonia T A

    2014-09-01

    Canine rangeliosis (popular names: "nambi-uvú", i.e. ``bleeding ears''; "peste de sangue", i.e. ``bleeding plague''; and "febre amarela dos cães", i.e. ``yellow fever of dogs'') is a tick-borne haemolytic and haemorrhagic disease caused by the protozoan parasite Rangelia vitalii which infects erythrocytes, leukocytes, and endothelial cells of blood capillaries. Rangelia vitalii was first reported as a novel piroplasm of dogs in 1910 in Brazil, a discovery that was met with skepticism at that time. Canine rangeliosis has been diagnosed in domestic dogs not only in Brazil but also in other South American countries (Argentina and Uruguay). Rangelia vitalii infection has also been found incidentally in Brazil in wild dogs (Cerdocyon thous, the crab-eating fox). Despite the fact that researchers in the early 1900s suggested that R. vitalii was a hitherto unidentified piroplasm that would be transmitted by the tick Amblyomma aureolatum, it was not until 2012 that these hypotheses were actually confirmed by PCR and transmission studies. Molecular studies have shown that R. vitalii is related to the Babesia sensu strictu clade, but genetically different from other morphologically similar species of Babesia that infect dogs. Another difference between Babesia spp. and R. vitalii is the ability of R. vitalii to invade endothelial cells, erythrocytes, and leukocytes. Experimental infection in dogs has successfully reproduced the clinical picture and pathology of the natural disease. In this article, epidemiology, clinical signs, laboratory findings, pathogenetic mechanisms including oxidative stress and immune response, necropsy findings, microscopic lesions, diagnosis, and treatment of canine rangeliosis are reviewed. What is currently known about this protozoal disease since its first report over a century ago is presented herein.

  16. Study of toroidal current penetration during current ramp in JIPP T-IIU with fast response Zeeman polarimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuramoto, H.; Hiraki, N. [Kyushu Inst. of Tech., Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan); Toi, K. [and others

    1997-01-01

    The toroidal current penetration is studied in current ramp experiments of the JIPP T-IIU tokamak. The poloidal magnetic field profile in the peripheral region of a plasma (0.5 {<=} {rho} {<=} 1.0) has been measured directly with a newly developed fast response Zeeman polarimeter. The experimental results indicate that an obvious skin effect of toroidal current density is clearly observed during both the current ramp-up and ramp-down experiments. The experimentally obtained toroidal current density profiles are well described by the profiles calculated on the assumption of the neoclassical electrical conductivity. Quasi-linear {Delta}`-analysis of tearing modes for the measured current density profile is consistent with time behaviour of coherent MHD modes such as m=4/n=1 or m=3/n=1 (m: poloidal mode number, n: toroidal mode number) often observed during the current ramp-up phase. The effect of these MHD modes on current penetration during the current ramp-up discharges is studied. (author)

  17. Run-up on a structure due to second-order waves and current in a numerical wave tank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchmann, Bjarne; Skourup, Jesper; Cheung, Kwok Fai

    1998-01-01

    A numerical wave tank is considered in which the interaction between waves, current and a structure is simulated by a 3D boundary element model in the time domain. Through a Taylor series expansion and a perturbation procedure the model is formulated to second order in wave steepness and to first...... order in current speed. The boundary-value problem is separated into a known incident wave field and an unknown scattered wave field, the latter being absorbed at the radiation boundaries using active wave absorption. The present paper focuses on the wave run-up on a structure in waves and current....... For the simulations a bottom mounted vertical circular cylinder is chosen. The numerical results show good agreement with previous analytical and numerical solutions for second-order wave diffraction without a current and first-order wave diffraction with a collinear current. The inclusion of a current...

  18. Waveguide-integrated black phosphorus photodetector with high responsivity and low dark current

    CERN Document Server

    Youngblood, Nathan; Koester, Steven J; Li, Mo

    2014-01-01

    Layered two-dimensional materials have shown novel optoelectronic properties and are well suited to be integrated in planar photonic circuits. For example, graphene has been utilized as a wideband photodetector. However, because it lacks a band gap, graphene photodetectors suffer from extremely high dark current8. In contrast, few-layer black phosphorous, the latest addition to the family of 2D materials, is well-suited for photodetector applications due to its narrow but finite energy gap. Here, we demonstrate a gated multilayer black phosphorus photodetector integrated in a silicon photonic waveguide operating in the near-infrared telecom band. In a significant advantage over graphene devices, black phosphorus photodetectors can operate under a bias with very low dark current and attain intrinsic responsivity up to 125 mA/W and 657 mA/W in 11.5nm and 100 nm thick devices, respectively. The photocurrent is dominated by the photovoltaic effect with a high response bandwidth exceeding 3 GHz.

  19. Waveguide-integrated black phosphorus photodetector with high responsivity and low dark current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngblood, Nathan; Chen, Che; Koester, Steven J.; Li, Mo

    2015-04-01

    Layered two-dimensional materials have demonstrated novel optoelectronic properties and are well suited for integration in planar photonic circuits. Graphene, for example, has been utilized for wideband photodetection. However, because graphene lacks a bandgap, graphene photodetectors suffer from very high dark current. In contrast, layered black phosphorous, the latest addition to the family of two-dimensional materials, is ideal for photodetector applications due to its narrow but finite bandgap. Here, we demonstrate a gated multilayer black phosphorus photodetector integrated on a silicon photonic waveguide operating in the near-infrared telecom band. In a significant advantage over graphene devices, black phosphorus photodetectors can operate under bias with very low dark current and attain an intrinsic responsivity up to 135 mA W-1 and 657 mA W-1 in 11.5-nm- and 100-nm-thick devices, respectively, at room temperature. The photocurrent is dominated by the photovoltaic effect with a high response bandwidth exceeding 3 GHz.

  20. Review of current neutron detection systems for emergency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Guss, Paul; Kruschwitz, Craig

    2014-09-01

    Neutron detectors are used in a myriad of applications—from safeguarding special nuclear materials (SNM) to determining lattice spacing in soft materials. The transformational changes taking place in neutron detection and imaging techniques in the last few years are largely being driven by the global shortage of helium-3 (3He). This article reviews the status of neutron sensors used specifically for SNM detection in radiological emergency response. These neutron detectors must be highly efficient, be rugged, have fast electronics to measure neutron multiplicity, and be capable of measuring direction of the neutron sources and possibly image them with high spatial resolution. Neutron detection is an indirect physical process: neutrons react with nuclei in materials to initiate the release of one or more charged particles that produce electric signals that can be processed by the detection system. Therefore, neutron detection requires conversion materials as active elements of the detection system; these materials may include boron-10 (10B), lithium-6 (6Li), and gadollinium-157 (157Gd), to name a few, but the number of materials available for neutron detection is limited. However, in recent years, pulse-shape-discriminating plastic scintillators, scintillators made of helium-4 (4He) under high pressure, pillar and trench semiconductor diodes, and exotic semiconductor neutron detectors made from uranium oxide and other materials have widely expanded the parameter space in neutron detection methodology. In this article we will pay special attention to semiconductor-based neutron sensors. Modern microfabricated nanotubes covered inside with neutron converter materials and with very high aspect ratios for better charge transport will be discussed.

  1. Transient Response of Organo-Metal-Halide Solar Cells Analyzed by Time-Resolved Current-Voltage Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Greyson Christoforo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The determination of the power conversion efficiency of solar cells based on organo-metal-halides is subject to an ongoing debate. As solar cell devices may exhibit very slow transient response, current-voltage scans in different directions may not be congruent, which is an effect often referred to as hysteresis. We here discuss time-resolved current-voltage measurements as a means to evaluate appropriate delay times (voltage settling times to be used in current-voltage measurements of solar cells. Furthermore, this method allows the analysis of transient current response to extract time constants that can be used to compare characteristic differences between devices of varying architecture types, selective contacts and changes in devices due to storage or degradation conditions.

  2. Induced Currents in a Rat's Brain due a Radio Frequency Fields: Numerical Simulation with a Pixel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, R.; Garcia, R. D.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2008-08-01

    The increasing use of high fields in Magnetic Resonance Systems poses new challenges for their operation within safety limits. At high frequencies, electromagnetic fields induce current densities that may damage the organs to be imaged. These eddy currents are transformed in heat via the Joule's effect causing possible severe damage in tissues and organs. The electric field effects in a rat's brain were studied from numerically computed induced currents using a pixel-based model. Numerical simulations were calculated solving the Maxwell's equations with a Finite Element Method for a circular-shaped coil and the pixel model of a rat's brain. Simulations of the electric field were computed and graphically displayed as bi-dimensional transversal images. Profiles of current density as a function of position for four different frequencies were computed from the simulations. An increment of the induced currents can be appreciates at the surface of the brain, and it vanished towards the centre.

  3. Study of the impact of board orientation on radiated emissions due to common-mode currents on attached cables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten; Hubing, Todd H.; Jensen, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Common-mode current on attached cables is a typical source for radiated emission. Several models have been made for conversion of the intended differential signal to unwanted common-mode current on cables. In this paper we refine a method for identifying the radiation sources arising from a long...... microstrip. This method is used to show that the radiated emission from a PCB with attached cable(s) caused by a long trace depends on whether the trace is facing up or down with different result for voltage and current sources....

  4. Path transition of the western boundary current with a gap due to mesoscale eddies: a 1.5-layer, wind-driven experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡珀; 侯一筠

    2010-01-01

    Using a 1.5 layer nonlinear shallow-water reduced-gravity model, we executed numerical simulations to investigate the possibility of a western boundary current (WBC) path transition due to mesoscale eddies based on the background of the Kuroshio intrusion into the South China Sea (SCS) from the Luzon Strait. Because the WBC existed different current states with respect to different wind stress control parameters, we chose three steady WBC states (loop current, eddy shedding and leaping) as the background fl...

  5. MRI detection of weak magnetic fields due to an extended current dipole in a conducting sphere: a model for direct detection of neuronal currents in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konn, Daniel; Gowland, Penny; Bowtell, Richard

    2003-07-01

    To investigate the feasibility of direct MR detection of neuronal activity in the brain, neuronal current flow was modeled as an extended current dipole located in a conducting sphere. The spatially varying magnetic field induced within the sphere by such a dipole was calculated, including its form close to and within the current source. The predicted field variation was experimentally verified by measurements of the variation in phase of the MR signal in a sphere containing a model dipole. The effects of the calculated magnetic field distributions on the phase and magnitude of the signal in MR images were explored. The minimum detectable dipole strength under normal experimental conditions was calculated to be about 4.5 nAm, which is similar in magnitude to dipole strengths from evoked neuronal activity, and is an order of magnitude smaller than dipole strengths expected from spontaneous activity. This minimum detectable dipole strength increases with increasing spatial extent of the primary current distribution. In the experimental work, the effects of a field of [1.1 +/- 0.5] x 10(-10) T strength were detected, corresponding to the maximum net field caused by a dipole of 6.3 nAm strength with a spatial extent of 3 x 3 x 2 mm(3). Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Risk of Crew Adverse Health Event Due to Altered Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian; Kunz, Hawley; Sams, Clarence F.

    2015-01-01

    Determining the effect of space travel on the human immune system has proven to be extremely challenging. Limited opportunities for in-flight studies, varying mission durations, technical and logistical obstacles, small subject numbers, and a broad range of potential assays have contributed to this problem. Additionally, the inherent complexity of the immune system, with its vast array of cell populations, sub-populations, diverse regulatory molecules, and broad interactions with other physiological systems, makes determining precise variables to measure very difficult. There is also the challenge of determining the clinical significance of any observed immune alterations. Will such a change lead to disease, or is it a transient subclinical observation related to short-term stress? The effect of this problem may be observed by scanning publications associated with immunity and spaceflight, which began to appear during the 1970s. Although individually they are each valid studies, the comprehensive literature to date suffers from widely varying sampling methods and assay techniques, low subject counts, and sometimes a disparate focus on narrow aspects of immunity. The most clinically relevant data are derived from in-flight human studies, which have demonstrated altered cell-mediated immunity and reactivation of latent herpes viruses. Much more data are available from post-flight testing of humans, with clear evidence of altered cytokine production patterns, altered leukocyte distribution, continued latent viral reactivation, and evidence of dramatically altered virus-specific immunity. It is unknown if post-flight assessments relate to the in-flight condition or are a response to landing stress and readaptation. In-flight culture of cells has clearly demonstrated that immune cells are gravity-sensitive and display altered functional characteristics. It is unknown if these data are related to in vivo immune cell function or are an artifact of microgravity culture

  7. Kinetics deformation of current-voltage characteristics of the varistor oxide structures due to overcharging of the localized states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonkoshkur A. S.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged exposure of zinc oxide varistors to the electrical load leads to current-voltage characteristics (CVC deformation, which is associated with a change in the height and width of the intergranular barriers, which are main structural element of the varistors. Polarization phenomena in zinc oxide ceramics are studied in a number of works, but those are mainly limited to the study of the physics of the CVC deformation process and to determining the parameters of localized electronic states involved in this process. This paper presents the results on the simulation of the deformation of pulse CVC of a separate intergranular potential barrier at transient polarization/depolarization, associated with recharging of surface electronic states (SES, which cause this barrier. It is found that at high density of SES their degree of electron filling is small and the effect of DC voltage leads to a shift of pulse current-voltage characteristics into the region of small currents. Conversely, the low density SES are almost completely filled with electrons, and after crystallite polarization CVC is shifted to high currents. Experimental studies have confirmed the possibility of applying the discovered laws to ceramic varistor structures. The proposed model allows interpreting the «anomalous» effects (such as increase in the classification voltage and reduction of active losses power observed during the varistors accelerated aging test.

  8. Seismic response of soft deposits due to landslide: The Mission Peak, California, landslide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, Stephen; Leeds, Alena L.; Jibson, Randall W.

    2017-01-01

    The seismic response of active and intermittently active landslides is an important issue to resolve to determine if such landslides present an elevated hazard in future earthquakes. To study the response of landslide deposits, seismographs were placed on the Mission Peak landslide in the eastern San Francisco Bay region for a period of one year. Numerous local and near‐regional earthquakes were recorded that reveal a complexity of seismic response phenomena using the horizontal‐to‐vertical spectral ratio method. At lower frequencies, a clear spectral peak is observed at 0.5 Hz common to all four stations in the array and is attributed to a surface topographic effect. At higher frequencies, other spectral peaks occur that are interpreted in terms of local deposits and structures. Site amplification from the standard reference site method shows the minimum amplification with a factor of 2, comparing a site on and off the landslide. A site located on relatively homogeneous deposits of loose soils shows a clear spectral peak associated with the thickness of the deposit. Another site on a talus‐filled graben near the headscarp shows possible 2D or 3D effects from subsurface topography or scattering within and between buried sandstone blocks. A third site on a massive partially detached block below the crown of the headscarp shows indications of resonance caused by the reverberation of shear waves within the block. The varied seismic response of different parts of this complex landslide is consistent with other studies which found that, although landslide response is commonly enhanced in the downslope direction of landslide movement, such a response does not occur uniformly or consistently. When it does occur, enhanced site response parallel to the direction of landslide movement would contribute to landslide reactivation during significant earthquakes.

  9. Electrical Detection of Charge-Current-Induced Spin Polarization Due to Spin-Momentum Locking in Bi2Se3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    magnetic field, the measured spin voltage mirrors the hysteresis loop of the contact. When the contact magnetization is rotated in-plane 908 so that... measurements , as described in the Supplementary Section ‘Ferromagnetic contacts’. The Fe contacts exhibited square magnetization versus applied field...Fig. 3a,b, and for this current direction closely resembles the magnetic hysteresis loop of the Fe detector contact itself. The detector voltage often

  10. Analyzing the pupil response due to increased cognitive demand: an independent component analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jainta, S; Baccino, T

    2010-07-01

    Pupillometry is used to indicate the relative extent of processing demands within or between tasks; however, this analysis is complicated by the fact that the pupil also responds to low-level aspects of visual input. First, we attempted to identify "principal" components that contribute to the pupil response by computing a principal component analysis (PCA) and second, to reveal "hidden" sources within the pupil response by calculating an independent component analysis (ICA). Pupil response data were collected while subjects read, added or multiplied numbers. A set of 3 factors/components were identified as resembling the individual pupil responses, but only one ICA component changed in concordance to the cognitive demand. This component alone accounted for about 50% of the variance of the pupil response during the most demanding task, i.e. the multiplication task. The highest impact of this factor was observed for 2000 to 300ms after task onset. Even though we did not attempt to answer the question of the functional background of the components 1 and 3, we speculated that component 2 might reflect the effort a subject engages to perform a task with greater difficulty.

  11. Semantic interference in language production is due to graded similarity, not response relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristei, Sabrina; Rahman, Rasha Abdel

    2013-11-01

    There is an ongoing debate on the question whether semantic interference effects in language production reflect competitive processes at the level of lexical selection or whether they reflect a post-lexical bottleneck, occupied in particular by response-relevant distractor words. To disentangle item-inherent categorical relatedness and task-related response relevance effects, we combined the picture-word interference task with the conditional naming paradigm in an orthogonal design, varying categorical relatedness and task-related response relevance independent of each other. Participants were instructed to name only objects that are typically seen in or on the water (e.g. canoe) and refrain from naming objects that are typically located outside the water (e.g. bike), and vice versa. Semantic relatedness and the response relevance of superimposed distractor words were manipulated orthogonally. The pattern of results revealed no evidence for response relevance as a major source of semantic interference effects in the PWI paradigm. In contrast, our data demonstrate that semantic similarity beyond categorical relations is critical for interference effects to be observed. Together, these findings provide support for the assumption that lexical selection is competitive and that semantic interference effects in the PWI paradigm reflect this competition.

  12. The effect of tibia element on the tibia response due to impact loading

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pandelani, T

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Lower leg injury risk is commonly assessed using lower limb surrogates. The HIII and the THOR-Lx has been shown to have low biofidelity due to their geometry and material properties. A new surrogate (the MIL-Lx) was developed to address these issues...

  13. Minamata disease: catastrophic poisoning due to a failed public health response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Toshihide; Yorifuji, Takashi; Takao, Soshi; Miyai, Masaya; Babazono, Akira

    2009-04-01

    We present the history of Minamata disease in a chronological order from the public health point of view. Because the appropriate public health response - to investigate and control the outbreak - as set out in the Food Sanitation Act was not conducted, no one knew how many became ill following the outbreak. Exposure could not be stopped. In our discussion, we offer two reasons as to why the Japanese public health agencies did not apply the Act: social circumstances in the 1950s and 1960s that placed emphasis on industrial development, and the Japanese medical community's lack of knowledge about the Act. The history of Minamata disease shows us the consequences when public health responses are not implemented. Minamata disease should be an invaluable lesson for future public health responses.

  14. Stochastic and Chaotic Sub- and Superharmonic Response of Shallow Cables due to Chord Elongations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Sichani, Mahdi Teimouri

    2011-01-01

    to enhance chaotic behavior. Based on Monte Carlo simulation on a reduced non-linear two-degree-of freedom system the indicated effects have been investigated for stochastic subharmonic resonance of order 2:1, and stochastic superharmonic resonances of orders 1:2 and 2:3. By analyzing the responses for two......The paper deals with the non-linear response of shallow cables driven by stochastically varying chord elongations caused by random vibrations of the supported structure. The chord elongation introduces parametric excitation in the linear stiffness terms of the modal coordinate equations, which...... are responsible for significant internal subharmonic and superharmonic resonances. Under harmonically varying support motions coupled ordered or chaotic in-plane and out-of-plane subharmonic and superharmonic periodic motions may take place. If the harmonically varying chord elongation is replaced by a zero...

  15. Acceleration response spectrum for prediction of structural vibration due to individual bouncing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Lei; Racic, Vitomir; Lou, Jiayue

    2016-08-01

    This study is designed to develop an acceleration response spectrum that can be used in vibration serviceability assessment of civil engineering structures, such as floors and grandstands those are dynamically excited by individual bouncing. The spectrum is derived from numerical simulations and statistical analysis of acceleration responses of a single degree of freedom system with variable natural frequency and damping under a large number of experimentally measured individual bouncing loads. Its mathematical representation is fit for fast yet reliable application in design practice and is comprised of three equations that describe three distinct frequency regions observed in the actual data: the first resonant plateau (2-3.5 Hz), the second resonant plateau (4-7 Hz) and a descension region (7-15 Hz). Finally, this paper verifies the proposed response spectrum approach to predict structural vibration by direct comparison against numerical simulations and experimental results.

  16. Modified field enhancement and extinction by plasmonic nanowire dimers due to nonlocal response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toscano, Giuseppe; Raza, Søren; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2012-01-01

    We study the effect of nonlocal optical response on the optical properties of metallic nanowires, by numerically implementing the hydrodynamical Drude model for arbitrary nanowire geometries. We first demonstrate the accuracy of our frequency-domain finite-element implementation by benchmarking...... in the usual local-response description. For the same geometry at a fixed frequency, the field enhancement and cross section can also be significantly more enhanced in the nonlocal-response model....... it in a wide frequency range against analytical results for the extinction cross section of a cylindrical plasmonic nanowire. Our main results concern more complex geometries, namely cylindrical and bow-tie nanowire dimers that can strongly enhance optical fields. For both types of dimers we find that nonlocal...

  17. Numerical Simulation of Seabed Response and Liquefaction due to Non-linear Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jin-feng; ZHANG Qing-he; HAN Tao; QIN Chong-ren

    2005-01-01

    Based on Biot's consolidation theory, a two-dimensional model for computation of the seabed response to waves is presented with the finite element method. Numerical results for different wave conditions are obtained, and the effects of wave non-linearity on the wave-induced seabed response are examined. Moreover, the wave-induced momentary liquefaction in uniform and inhomogeneous seabeds is investigated. It is shown that the wave non-linearity affects the distribution of the wave-induced pore pressure and effective stresses, while the influence of wave non-linearity on the seabed liquefaction potential is not so significant.

  18. Principal component analysis of Birkeland currents determined by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, S. E.; Carter, J. A.; Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Principal component analysis is performed on Birkeland or field-aligned current (FAC) measurements from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment. Principal component analysis (PCA) identifies the patterns in the FACs that respond coherently to different aspects of geomagnetic activity. The regions 1 and 2 current system is shown to be the most reproducible feature of the currents, followed by cusp currents associated with magnetic tension forces on newly reconnected field lines. The cusp currents are strongly modulated by season, indicating that their strength is regulated by the ionospheric conductance at the foot of the field lines. PCA does not identify a pattern that is clearly characteristic of a substorm current wedge. Rather, a superposed epoch analysis of the currents associated with substorms demonstrates that there is not a single mode of response, but a complicated and subtle mixture of different patterns.

  19. Principle Component Analysis of Birkeland Currents Determined by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, S. E.; Carter, J. A.; Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Principle Component Analysis is performed on northern and southern hemisphere Birkeland or field-aligned current (FAC) measurements from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE). PCA identifies the patterns in the FACs that respond coherently to different aspects of geomagnetic activity. The region 1 and 2 current system is shown to be the most reproducible feature of the currents, followed by cusp currents associated with magnetic tension forces on newly-reconnected field lines. The cusp currents are strongly modulated by season, indicating that their strength is regulated by the ionospheric conductance at the foot of the field lines. PCA does not identify a pattern that is clearly characteristic of a substorm current wedge. Rather, a superposed epoch analysis of the currents associated with substorms demonstrates that there is not a single mode of response, but a complicated and subtle mixture of different patterns. Other interhemispheric differences are discussed.

  20. Principal component analysis of Birkeland currents determined by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Milan, S E; Korth, H; Anderson, B J

    2016-01-01

    Principal component analysis is performed on Birkeland or field-aligned current (FAC) measurements from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment. Principal component analysis (PCA) identifies the patterns in the FACs that respond coherently to different aspects of geomagnetic activity. The regions 1 and 2 current system is shown to be the most reproducible feature of the currents, followed by cusp currents associated with magnetic tension forces on newly reconnected field lines. The cusp currents are strongly modulated by season, indicating that their strength is regulated by the ionospheric conductance at the foot of the field lines. PCA does not identify a pattern that is clearly characteristic of a substorm current wedge. Rather, a superposed epoch analysis of the currents associated with substorms demonstrates that there is not a single mode of response, but a complicated and subtle mixture of different patterns.

  1. Stochastic and Chaotic Sub- and Superharmonic Response of Shallow Cables due to Chord Elongations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Sichani, Mahdi Teimouri

    2011-01-01

    to enhance chaotic behavior. Based on Monte Carlo simulation on a reduced non-linear two-degree-of freedom system the indicated effects have been investigated for stochastic subharmonic resonance of order 2:1, and stochastic superharmonic resonances of orders 1:2 and 2:3. By analyzing the responses for two...

  2. CargoVibes: human response to vibration due to freight rail traffic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waddington, D.; Woodcock, J.; Smith, M.G.; Janssen, S.A.; Persson Waye, K.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present an overview of the research concerning human response to vibration conducted in the EU FP7 CargoVibes project. The European Union-funded project CargoVibes involved 10 partners from 8 nations and ran from April 2011 to April 2014. The project was concerned with ra

  3. CargoVibes: human response to vibration due to freight rail traffic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waddington, D.; Woodcock, J.; Smith, M.G.; Janssen, S.A.; Persson Waye, K.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present an overview of the research concerning human response to vibration conducted in the EU FP7 CargoVibes project. The European Union-funded project CargoVibes involved 10 partners from 8 nations and ran from April 2011 to April 2014. The project was concerned with

  4. 4 acute nicotine induced pressor response is in part due to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    aortic baro-receptors to produce its sustained presser response, an effect ... increases in heart rate in both normal and in nicotine treated rats but the increases shows no ... heart rate in most animals and in human subjects ... vasoconstriction similar to various cardiovascular ... exercise Mudge et al., 1976; Brown et al., 1984;.

  5. Modified field enhancement and extinction by plasmonic nanowire dimers due to nonlocal response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano, Giuseppe; Raza, Søren; Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Mortensen, N Asger; Wubs, Martijn

    2012-02-13

    We study the effect of nonlocal optical response on the optical properties of metallic nanowires, by numerically implementing the hydrodynamical Drude model for arbitrary nanowire geometries. We first demonstrate the accuracy of our frequency-domain finite-element implementation by benchmarking it in a wide frequency range against analytical results for the extinction cross section of a cylindrical plasmonic nanowire. Our main results concern more complex geometries, namely cylindrical and bow-tie nanowire dimers that can strongly enhance optical fields. For both types of dimers we find that nonlocal response can strongly affect both the field enhancement in between the dimers and their respective extinction cross sections. In particular, we give examples of blueshifted maximal field enhancements near hybridized plasmonic dimer resonances that are still large but nearly two times smaller than in the usual local-response description. For the same geometry at a fixed frequency, the field enhancement and cross section can also be significantly more enhanced in the nonlocal-response model.

  6. Comparison of Measurement And Modeling Of Current Profile Changes Due To Neutral Bean Ion Redistribution During TAE Avalanches in NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darrow, Douglas

    2013-07-09

    Brief "avalanches" of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs) are observed in NSTX plasmas with several different n numbers simultaneously present. These affect the neutral beam ion distribution as evidenced by a concurrent drop in the neutron rate and, sometimes, beam ion loss. Guiding center orbit modeling has shown that the modes can transiently render portions of the beam ion phase space stochastic. The resulting redistribution of beam ions can also create a broader beam-driven current profile and produce other changes in the beam ion distribution function

  7. Response of orthotropic micropolar elastic medium due to time harmonic source

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajneesh Kumar; Suman Choudhary

    2004-02-01

    The present paper is concerned with the plane strain problem in homogeneous micropolar orthotropic elastic solids. The disturbance due to time harmonic concentrated source is investigated by employing eigen-value approach. The integral transforms have been inverted by using a numerical technique to obtain the component of displacement, force stress and couple stress in the physical domain. The results of these quantities are given and illustrated graphically.

  8. Response of the global climate to changes in atmospheric chemical composition due to fossil fuel burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, S.; Cess, R. D.; Hogan, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Recent modeling of atmospheric chemical processes (Logan et al, 1978; Hameed et al, 1979) suggests that tropospheric ozone and methane might significantly increase in the future as the result of increasing anthropogenic emissions of CO, NO(x), and CH4 due to fossil fuel burning. Since O3 and CH4 are both greenhouse gases, increases in their concentrations could augment global warming due to larger future amounts of atmospheric CO2. To test the possible climatic impact of changes in tropospheric chemical composition, a zonal energy-balance climate model has been combined with a vertically averaged tropospheric chemical model. The latter model includes all relevant chemical reactions which affect species derived from H2O, O2, CH4, and NO(x). The climate model correspondingly incorporates changes in the infrared heating of the surface-troposphere system resulting from chemically induced changes in tropospheric ozone and methane. This coupled climate-chemical model indicates that global climate is sensitive to changes in emissions of CO, NO(x) and CH4, and that future increases in these emissions could augment global warming due to increasing atmospheric CO2.

  9. Response of the global climate to changes in atmospheric chemical composition due to fossil fuel burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, S.; Cess, R. D.; Hogan, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Recent modeling of atmospheric chemical processes (Logan et al, 1978; Hameed et al, 1979) suggests that tropospheric ozone and methane might significantly increase in the future as the result of increasing anthropogenic emissions of CO, NO(x), and CH4 due to fossil fuel burning. Since O3 and CH4 are both greenhouse gases, increases in their concentrations could augment global warming due to larger future amounts of atmospheric CO2. To test the possible climatic impact of changes in tropospheric chemical composition, a zonal energy-balance climate model has been combined with a vertically averaged tropospheric chemical model. The latter model includes all relevant chemical reactions which affect species derived from H2O, O2, CH4, and NO(x). The climate model correspondingly incorporates changes in the infrared heating of the surface-troposphere system resulting from chemically induced changes in tropospheric ozone and methane. This coupled climate-chemical model indicates that global climate is sensitive to changes in emissions of CO, NO(x) and CH4, and that future increases in these emissions could augment global warming due to increasing atmospheric CO2.

  10. Electrical detection of charge-current-induced spin polarization due to spin-momentum locking in Bi2Se3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C H; van 't Erve, O M J; Robinson, J T; Liu, Y; Li, L; Jonker, B T

    2014-03-01

    Topological insulators exhibit metallic surface states populated by massless Dirac fermions with spin-momentum locking, where the carrier spin lies in-plane, locked at right angles to the carrier momentum. Here, we show that a charge current produces a net spin polarization via spin-momentum locking in Bi2Se3 films, and this polarization is directly manifested as a voltage on a ferromagnetic contact. This voltage is proportional to the projection of the spin polarization onto the contact magnetization, is determined by the direction and magnitude of the charge current, scales inversely with Bi2Se3 film thickness, and its sign is that expected from spin-momentum locking rather than Rashba effects. Similar data are obtained for two different ferromagnetic contacts, demonstrating that these behaviours are independent of the details of the ferromagnetic contact. These results demonstrate direct electrical access to the topological insulators' surface-state spin system and enable utilization of its remarkable properties for future technological applications.

  11. Antipodal Magnetic Anomalies on the Moon, Contributions from Impact Induced Currents Due to Positive Holes and Flexoelectric Phenomina and Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletetschka, G.; Freund, F.; Wasilewski, P. J.; Mikula, V.; Kohout, Tomas

    2005-01-01

    Large impacts on the Moon generate large pressure pulses that penetrate the whole body. Several of these large impacts may have generated antipodal structure with anomalous magnetic intensity.These regions can be more than a thousand km across, with fields of the order of tens to hundreds of nT. This is the case of Orientale, Imbrium, Serenitatis, Crisium, and Nectaris impact basins. The production of large-scale magnetic fields and associated crustal magnetization due to lunar basin-forming impacts was hypothesized to have an origin in fields external to the impact plasma cloud that are produced by the magnetohydrodynamic interaction of the cloud with ambient magnetic fields and plasmas. During the period of compressed antipodal field amplification, seismic compressional waves from the impact converge at the antipode resulting in transient shock pressures that reach 2 GPa (20 kbar). This can produce conditions for shock magnetic acquisition of the crust antipodal to impact basins.

  12. Enhanced specific antibody response to bovine serum albumin in pigeons due to L-carnitine supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, G P; Mast, J; Goddeeris, B M; Cox, E; Hesta, M; De Wilde, R O

    2000-09-01

    1. Thirty adult female pigeons (Columba livia domestica) were randomly divided into 3 equal groups; the 1st and 2nd groups were immunised with bovine serum albumin (BSA) at 0 and 20 d, the 2nd group also received 1 g L-carnitine per litre of drinking water from -5 to 25 d post-immunisation (dpi) and the 3rd group, a control group, received neither treatment. 2. Body weights and serum samples were taken at 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 dpi. 3. Both BSA-specific IgG and IgM responses were enhanced by about 10% by L-carnitine supplementation. 4. L-carnitine supplemented pigeons showed a higher water consumption. Body weight loss during the onset of the immune response showed a slight tendency to be counteracted by L-carnitine supplementation. 5. The impact of L-carnitine on resistance and resilience to an immunological challenge is discussed.

  13. Plasma-induced magnetic responses during nonlinear dynamics of magnetic islands due to resonant magnetic perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Seiya, E-mail: n-seiya@kobe-kosen.ac.jp [Kobe City College of Technology, Kobe, Hyogo 651-2194 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) produce magnetic islands in toroidal plasmas. Self-healing (annihilation) of RMP-induced magnetic islands has been observed in helical systems, where a possible mechanism of the self-healing is shielding of RMP penetration by plasma flows, which is well known in tokamaks. Thus, fundamental physics of RMP shielding is commonly investigated in both tokamaks and helical systems. In order to check this mechanism, detailed informations of magnetic island phases are necessary. In experiments, measurement of radial magnetic responses is relatively easy. In this study, based on a theoretical model of rotating magnetic islands, behavior of radial magnetic fields during the self-healing is investigated. It is confirmed that flips of radial magnetic fields are typically observed during the self-healing. Such behavior of radial magnetic responses is also observed in LHD experiments.

  14. DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF PLATES DUE TO MOVING VEHICLES USING FINITE STRIP METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程远胜; 张佑啟; 区达光

    2002-01-01

    Dynamic response of beam-like structures to moving vehicles has been extensive-ly studied. However, the study on dynamic response of plates to moving vehicles has so farreceived but scant attention. A plate-vehicle strip for simulating the interaction between arectangular plate and moving vehicles was described. For the portion of strips that are in di-rect contact with the moving vehicles, the plate-vehicle strips were employed. Conventionalplate finite strips were used to model the portion of strips that are not directly under the ac-tion of moving vehicles. In the analysis, each moving vehicle is idealized as a one-foot dy-namic system with the unsprung mass and sprund mass interconnected by a spring and adashpot. The numerical results obtained from the proposed method agree well with availableresults.

  15. Voltammetric current oscillations due to general and pitting corrosion of tantalum: Implications for electrochemical-mechanical planarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulyma, Christopher M. [Department of Physics, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699-5820 (United States); Roy, Dipankar, E-mail: samoy@clarkson.ed [Department of Physics, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699-5820 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Anodic corrosion of Ta is examined for potential applications in electrochemical-mechanical planarization (ECMP) of diffusion barriers. This strategy involves electro-oxidation of Ta in the presence of NO{sub 3}{sup -} (or Br{sup -}) to form mechanically weak surface-oxide films, followed by mechanical removal of the latter. The voltammetric currents exhibit oscillatory behaviour with frequencies that are signature attributes of localised pitting by Br{sup -} or general surface corrosion by NO{sub 3}{sup -}. SEM, voltammetry, and impedance spectroscopy are used to probe these corrosion mechanisms. Apart from their relevance for ECMP, the results also address certain fundamental aspects of pitting and general corrosion of valve metals.

  16. NONLINEAR DYNAMICS RESPONSE OF CASING PIPE UNDER COMBINED WAVE-CURRENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG You-gang; GU Jia-yang; ZUO Jian-li; MIN Jian-qin

    2005-01-01

    The vortex-induced nonlinear vibration of casing pipes in the deep water was studied considering the loads of current and combined wave-current. The vortex-induced vibration equation of a casing pipe was set up considering the beam mode and Morison's nonlinear fluid loads as well as the vortex-excited loads. The approach of calculating vortex-excited nonlinear vibration by Galerkin's method was proposed. The natural vibration frequencies and modes were obtained, and the response including primary resonance induced by current and the composite resonance under combined wave-current for the 170 m long casing pipe in the 160 m depth of water were investigated. The results show that the dynamics response of casing pipe obviously increases, and the complicated response behaviors of casing pipe are described under combined wave-current.

  17. Reversal by EGTA of the enhanced secretory responsiveness of mast cells due to treatment with ouabain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Torben; Knudsen, T; Bertelsen, Niels Haldor

    1990-01-01

    The effect of EGTA on the enhancement by ouabain of compound 48/80-induced secretion from mast cells was compared with the effect on the Na(+)-K+ pump activity. The time-dependent secretory enhancement by ouabain was blocked by addition of EGTA to the cell suspension concomitantly with the addition...... of ouabain, and EGTA caused a large increase in the pump activity. Addition of 10 microM EGTA to ouabain-treated cells stopped but did not reverse the enhancement. The experiments show that the effect of ouabain was due to changes in a calcium pool utilized in compound 48/80-induced secretion following...

  18. Quadriparesis due to Gitelman′s syndrome diagnosed with thiazide diuretic test response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumanto Mukhopadhyay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gitelman′s syndrome is characterized by hypocalciuria, severe hypomagnesemia, and prominent muscular involvements such as fatigue, weakness, cramps, and tetany. It is due to mutations in the thiazide sensitive NaCl co-transporter in the distal convoluted tubule. The administration of thiazide diuretics may induce a subnormal increase of urinary Cl− excretion in patients with Gitelman′s syndrome, consistent with the hypothesis that less than normal Cl− is reabsorbed by the thiazide-inhibitable transporter in Gitelman′s syndrome. Thus, we report a case of Gitelman′s syndrome presenting with quadriparesis diagnosed by using thiazide clearance test.

  19. Researching corporate social responsibility in the Middle East - the current state and future directions

    OpenAIRE

    Taposh, Roy; Ahmed, Al-Abdin; Nicholson, John

    2017-01-01

    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has the potential to yield economic and social value in the Middle East (ME), especially given the current high environmental flux in the region. Although much scholarly has been paid to CSR issues, a key question remains about how to operate responsibly in the ME, particularly since institutional environments and stakeholders’ needs vary across ME states. The purpose of this paper is to provide a systematic review of the current state of CSR in the ME. W...

  20. Is transcranial direct current stimulation a potential method for improving response inhibition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yong Hyun; Kwon, Jung Won

    2013-04-15

    Inhibitory control of movement in motor learning requires the ability to suppress an inappropriate action, a skill needed to stop a planned or ongoing motor response in response to changes in a variety of environments. This study used a stop-signal task to determine whether transcranial direct-current stimulation over the pre-supplementary motor area alters the reaction time in motor inhibition. Forty healthy subjects were recruited for this study and were randomly assigned to either the transcranial direct-current stimulation condition or a sham-transcranial direct-current stimulation condition. All subjects consecutively performed the stop-signal task before, during, and after the delivery of anodal transcranial direct-current stimulation over the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-transcranial direct-current stimulation phase, transcranial direct-current stimulation phase, and post-transcranial direct-current stimulation phase). Compared to the sham condition, there were significant reductions in the stop-signal processing times during and after transcranial direct-current stimulation, and change times were significantly greater in the transcranial direct-current stimulation condition. There was no significant change in go processing-times during or after transcranial direct-current stimulation in either condition. Anodal transcranial direct-current stimulation was feasibly coupled to an interactive improvement in inhibitory control. This coupling led to a decrease in the stop-signal process time required for the appropriate responses between motor execution and inhibition. However, there was no transcranial direct-current stimulation effect on the no-signal reaction time during the stop-signal task. Transcranial direct-current stimulation can adjust certain behaviors, and it could be a useful clinical intervention for patients who have difficulties with response inhibition.

  1. Is transcranial direct current stimulation a potential method for improving response inhibition?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Hyun Kwon; Jung Won Kwon

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitory control of movement in motor learning requires the ability to suppress an inappropriate action, a skill needed to stop a planned or ongoing motor response in response to changes in a variety of environments. This study used a stop-signal task to determine whether transcranial direct-current stimulation over the pre-supplementary motor area alters the reaction time in motor inhibition. Forty healthy subjects were recruited for this study and were randomly assigned to either the transcranial direct-current stimulation condition or a sham-transcranial direct-current stimulation condition. All subjects consecutively performed the stop-signal task before, during, and after the delivery of anodal transcranial direct-current stimulation over the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-transcranial direct-current stimulation phase, transcranial direct-current stimulation phase, and post-transcranial direct-current stimulation phase). Compared to the sham condition, there were significant reductions in the stop-signal processing times during and after transcranial direct-current stimulation, and change times were significantly greater in the transcranial direct-current stimulation condition. There was no significant change in go processing-times during or after transcranial direct-current stimulation in either condition. Anodal transcranial direct-current stimulation was feasibly coupled to an interactive improvement in inhibitory control. This coupling led to a decrease in the stop-signal process time required for the appropriate responses between motor execution and inhibition. However, there was no transcranial direct-current stimulation effect on the no-signal reaction time during the stop-signal task. Transcranial direct-current stimulation can adjust certain behaviors, and it could be a useful clinical intervention for patients who have difficulties with response inhibition.

  2. Analysis of Current Pulses in HeLa-Cell Permeabilization Due to High Voltage DC Corona Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetty, Nevendra K; Chonco, Louis; Ijumba, Nelson M; Chetty, Leon; Govender, Thavendran; Parboosing, Raveen; Davidson, Innocent E

    2016-09-01

    Corona discharges are commonly utilized for numerous practical applications, including bio-technological ones. The corona induced transfer of normally impermeant molecules into the interior of biological cells has recently been successfully demonstrated. The exact nature of the interaction of the corona discharge with a cell membrane is still unknown, however, previous studies have suggested that it is either the electric fields produced by ions or the chemical interaction of the reactive species that result in the disruption of the cell membrane. This disruption of the cell membrane allows molecules to permeate into the cell. Corona discharge current constitutes a series of pulses, and it is during these pulses that the ions and reactive species are produced. It stands to reason, therefore, that the nature of these corona pulses would have an influence on the level of cell permeabilization and cell destruction. In this investigation, an analysis of the width, rise-time, characteristic frequencies, magnitude, and repetition rate of the nanosecond pulses was carried out in order to establish the relationship between these factors and the levels of cell membrane permeabilization and cell destruction. Results obtained are presented and discussed.

  3. Time-dependent current-density-functional theory for the metallic response of solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romaniello, P; de Boeij, PL

    2005-01-01

    We extend the formulation of time-dependent current-density-functional theory for the linear response properties of dielectric and semi-metallic solids [Kootstra , J. Chem. Phys. 112, 6517 (2000)] to treat metals as well. To achieve this, the Kohn-Sham response functions have to include both interba

  4. Time-dependent current-density-functional theory for the metallic response of solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romaniello, P; de Boeij, PL

    We extend the formulation of time-dependent current-density-functional theory for the linear response properties of dielectric and semi-metallic solids [Kootstra , J. Chem. Phys. 112, 6517 (2000)] to treat metals as well. To achieve this, the Kohn-Sham response functions have to include both

  5. A COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF ISOFLURANE VS HALOTHANE TO ATTENUATE HAEMODYNAMIC RESPONSE DUE TO CO 2 PNEUMOPERI- TONEUM DURING LAPAROSCOPIC CHOLECYSTECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chavi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a relatively new sur gical procedure which is enjoying ever increasing popularit y and presenting new anesthetic challenges. Volatile anesthetics play an important ro le in the management of haemodynamic changes due to CO2 pneumoperitoneum during laparoscopi c surgeries. The aim of the study is to evaluate Isoflurane Vs Halothane as an adjunct t o obtund haemodynamic response due to CO2 pneumoperitoneum. MATERIALS & METHODS: 50 patients aged 20-60 yrs of either sex belonging to ASA grade I & II scheduled for electiv e laparoscopic cholecystectomy admitted in MLB Medical College, Jhansi were randomly divided i nto two group. Group I – O 2 : N 2 O + Inhalational agent (Isoflurane 1.5-2% Group II – O 2 : N 2 O + Inhalational agent (Halothane 1.5-2% RESULTS : Hypertensive response due to CO 2 pneumoperitoneum was well suppressed by Isoflurane (1.5-2% {Group-I} which maintained pulse rate at a relatively higher side than halothane, (1.5-2%{Group II} decreased mean arteria l pressure more significantly than halothane without any difference in arterial oxygen saturation (SPO 2 and end tidal CO 2 concentration (E T CO 2 . CONCLUSION : This can be concluded from the study that Isoflur ane (Group-I more effectively attenuated the haemodyna mic response due to CO 2 pneumoperitoneum during laparoscopic cholecystectomy as compared to Halothane (Group-II under balanced anesthetic technique.

  6. Exposure-response relationships for annoyance due to freight and passenger railway vibration exposure in residential environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Calum; Woodcock, James; Sica, Gennaro; Peris, Eulalia; Moorhouse, Andrew T; Waddington, David C

    2014-01-01

    In this work, exposure-response relationships for annoyance due to freight and passenger railway vibration exposure in residential environments are developed, so as to better understand the differences in human response to these two sources of environmental vibration. Data for this research come from a field study comprising interviews with respondents and measurements of their vibration exposure (N = 752). A logistic regression model is able to accurately classify 96% of these measured railway vibration signals as freight or passenger based on two signal properties that quantify the duration and low frequency content of each signal. Exposure-response relationships are then determined using ordinal probit modeling with fixed thresholds. The results indicate that people are able to distinguish between freight and passenger railway vibration, and that the annoyance response due to freight railway vibration is significantly higher than that due to passenger railway vibration, even for equal levels of exposure. In terms of a community tolerance level, the population studied is 15 dB (re 10(-6) m s(-2)) more tolerant to passenger railway vibration than freight railway vibration. These results have implications for the expansion of freight traffic on rail, or for policies to promote passenger railway.

  7. Early pathogenesis and inflammatory response in experimental bovine mastitis due to Streptococcus uberis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, L.H.; Aalbæk, B.; Røntved, C.M.

    2003-01-01

    A generally similar clinical response was observed in six lactating Holstein-Friesian cows after intramammary inoculation with approximately 107 colony-forming units of Streptococcus uberis. Increased concentrations of serum amyloid A (SAA) were measured in both milk and serum taken 6 and 11 h...... after inoculation, respectively. In contrast, increased concentrations of haptoglobin were detected after 10 h of infection, in milk only. In the blood, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TFN-alpha) was detected (0.503 ng/ml) in only one animal, at the time of euthanasia (10 h after infection). Interferon...... and neutrophils) and within the lumen of ducts and alveoli. Lesions developed progressively in an ascending manner and became widespread throughout the mammary gland in less than 8 h. The parallel development of inflammation and increased concentrations of SAA and haptoglobin in milk points to these acute phase...

  8. Individual Differences and State-Dependent Responses in Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Tzu-Yu; Juan, Chi-Hung; Tseng, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been extensively used to examine whether neural activities can be selectively increased or decreased with manipulations of current polarity. Recently, the field has reevaluated the traditional anodal-increase and cathodal-decrease assumption due to the growing number of mixed findings that report the effects of the opposite directions. Therefore, the directionality of tDCS polarities and how it affects each individual still remain unclear. In this study, we used a visual working memory (VWM) paradigm and systematically manipulated tDCS polarities, types of different independent baseline measures, and task difficulty to investigate how these factors interact to determine the outcome effect of tDCS. We observed that only low-performers, as defined by their no-tDCS corsi block tapping (CBT) performance, persistently showed a decrement in VWM performance after anodal stimulation, whereas no tDCS effect was found when participants were divided by their performance in digit span. In addition, only the optimal level of task difficulty revealed any significant tDCS effect. All these findings were consistent across different blocks, suggesting that the tDCS effect was stable across a short period of time. Lastly, there was a high degree of intra-individual consistency in one's responsiveness to tDCS, namely that participants who showed positive or negative effect to anodal stimulation are also more likely to show the same direction of effects for cathodal stimulation. Together, these findings imply that tDCS effect is interactive and state dependent: task difficulty and consistent individual differences modulate one's responsiveness to tDCS, while researchers' choices of independent behavioral baseline measures can also critically affect how the effect of tDCS is evaluated. These factors together are likely the key contributors to the wide range of "noises" in tDCS effects between individuals, between stimulation protocols

  9. Ordinary mode reflectometry. Modification of the scattering and cut-off responses due to the shape of localized density fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanack, C.; Boucher, I.; Heuraux, S.; Leclert, G. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 54 - Nancy (France). Lab. de Physique du Solide; Clairet, F.; Zou, X.L. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee

    1996-01-01

    Ordinary wave reflectometry in a plasma containing a localized density perturbation is studied with a 1-D model. The phase response is studied as a function of the wavenumber and position of the perturbation. It is shown that it strongly depends upon the perturbation shape and size. For a small perturbation wavenumber, the response is due to the oscillation of the cut-off layer. For larger wavenumbers, two regimes are found: for a broad perturbation, the phase response is an image of the perturbation itself; for a narrow perturbation, it is rather an image of the Fourier transform. For tokamak plasmas it turns out that, for the fluctuation spectra usually observed, the phase response comes primarily from those fluctuations that are localized at the cut-off. Results of a 2-D numerical model show that geometry effects are negligible for the scattering by radial fluctuations. (author). 18 refs.

  10. Reporting a Remarkable Visual Illusion Due to Temporal Lobe Epilepsy and an Unusual Response to Lamotrigine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Visual illusions and hallucinations may accompany a wide variety of disorders with many various etiologies; therefore, they are nonspecific phenomena. In a partial seizure, a localized hyper synchronous neuronal discharge evolving into a partial seizure affecting a particular cortical region or cerebral subsystem can give rise to psychotic symptoms like visual hallucination. This case study introduces a patient with metamorphopsia, a rare visual illusion, that was treated with lamotrigine. Case Presentation This case study introduces a 34-year-old man with a history of falling. After a while, his seizures became accompanied with aura and, during the attack, he saw people and objects as bloody. He was asymptomatic between the attacks, with no visceral feeling and with dysphoric mood and borderline IQ. He was resistant to various treatments. After 6 months administration of lamotrigine, he has not had any seizure attacks and the psychotic symptoms have improved. Conclusions The psychotic symptoms due to temporal lobe epilepsy can be resolved with lamotrigine administration.

  11. A modeling study of effective radiative forcing and climate response due to increased methane concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Xie

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An atmospheric general circulation model BCC_AGCM2.0 and observation data from ARIS were used to calculate the effective radiative forcing (ERF due to increased methane concentration since pre-industrial times and its impacts on climate. The ERF of methane from 1750 to 2011 was 0.46 W m−2 by taking it as a well-mixed greenhouse gas, and the inhomogeneity of methane increased its ERF by about 0.02 W m−2. The change of methane concentration since pre-industrial led to an increase of 0.31 °C in global mean surface air temperature and 0.02 mm d−1 in global mean precipitation. The warming was prominent over the middle and high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere (with a maximum increase exceeding 1.4 °C. The precipitation notably increased (maximum increase of 1.8 mm d−1 over the ocean between 10°N and 20°N and significantly decreased (maximum decrease >–0.6 mm d−1 between 10°S and 10°N. These changes caused a northward movement of precipitation cell in the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ. Cloud cover significantly increased (by approximately 4% in the high latitudes in both hemispheres, and sharply decreased (by approximately 3% in tropical areas.

  12. [Responsibility due to medication errors in France: a study based on SHAM insurance data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theissen, A; Orban, J-C; Fuz, F; Guerin, J-P; Flavin, P; Albertini, S; Maricic, S; Saquet, D; Niccolai, P

    2015-03-01

    The safe medication practices at the hospital constitute a major public health problem. Drug supply chain is a complex process, potentially source of errors and damages for the patient. SHAM insurances are the biggest French provider of medical liability insurances and a relevant source of data on the health care complications. The main objective of the study was to analyze the type and cause of medication errors declared to SHAM and having led to a conviction by a court. We did a retrospective study on insurance claims provided by SHAM insurances with a medication error and leading to a condemnation over a 6-year period (between 2005 and 2010). Thirty-one cases were analysed, 21 for scheduled activity and 10 for emergency activity. Consequences of claims were mostly serious (12 deaths, 14 serious complications, 5 simple complications). The types of medication errors were a drug monitoring error (11 cases), an administration error (5 cases), an overdose (6 cases), an allergy (4 cases), a contraindication (3 cases) and an omission (2 cases). Intravenous route of administration was involved in 19 of 31 cases (61%). The causes identified by the court expert were an error related to service organization (11), an error related to medical practice (11) or nursing practice (13). Only one claim was due to the hospital pharmacy. The claim related to drug supply chain is infrequent but potentially serious. These data should help strengthen quality approach in risk management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Experimental Structural Dynamic Response of Plate Specimens Due to Sonic Loads in a Progressive Wave Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Juan F.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to assess the repeatability of experiments at NASA Langley's Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA) facility and to use these experiments to validate numerical models. Experiments show that power spectral density (PSD) curves were repeatable except at the resonant frequencies, which tended to vary between 5 Hz to 15 Hz. Results show that the thinner specimen had more variability in the resonant frequency location than the thicker sample, especially for modes higher than the first mode in the frequency range. Root Mean Square (RMS) tended to be more repeatable. The RMS behaved linearly through the SPL range of 135 to 153 dB. Standard Deviations (STDs) of the results tended to be relatively low constant up to about 147 dB. The RMS results were more repeatable than the PDS results. The STD results were less than 10% of the RMS results for both the 0.125 in (0.318 cm) and 0.062 in (0.1588 cm) thick plate. The STD of the PSD results were around 20% to 100% of the mean PSD results for non-resonant and resonant frequencies, respectively, for the 0.125 in (0.318 cm) thicker plate and between 25% to 125% of the mean PSD results, for nonresonant and resonant frequencies, respectively, for the thinner plate.

  14. Retrieving the impulse response of the Earth due to random electromagnetic forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsalsadati, S.; Weiss, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    The subject presented here focuses on the adoption of recently-developed ideas in the field of passive seismic interferometry (also known as “passive Green’s function estimation”) to electromagnetics. A derivation is presented of exact magnetic field Green’s function in an arbitrary, heterogeneous conductive medium subject to random, ambient, uncorrelated noise sources. Our approach for extracting Green’s function uses the correlation of time series of parallel magnetic field components at two independent locations. As in similarly-derived Green’s function of electric field where the volume distribution of noise sources must be spatially correlated with the heterogeneous conductivity distribution, Green’s function for magnetic field requires noise sources to be spatially correlated with the volume distribution of magnetic permeability. For shallow-Earth investigations in cluttered and culturally-overprinted areas where conductivity dominates the EM response, rather than permeability, this restriction on the correlation of sources is approximately satisfied. Hence, in the low-frequency limit, magnetic Green’s functions derived here may, themselves, be useful for passive electromagnetic subsurface imaging. The attraction of such an approach is clear: sources of noise, whose effects previously required heuristic filtering to isolate the Earth signal from a known source, could now be embraced in their full complexity, and furthermore, exploited for improved subsurface resolution. Details of the derivation will be presented, along with preliminary 3D modeling results.

  15. Physiological responses of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L. plants due to different copper concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Copstein Cuchiara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available At low concentrations, Cu is considered as an essential micronutrient for plants and as a constituent and activator of several enzymes. However, when in excess, Cu can negatively affect plant growth and metabolism. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate physiological responses of sweet potato plants at different Cu concentrations by measuring morphological parameters, antioxidant metabolism, stomatal characteristics, and mineral profile. For this purpose, sweet potato plants were grown hydroponically in complete nutrient solution for six days. Then, the plants were transferred to solutions containing different Cu concentrations, 0.041 (control, 0.082, and 0.164 mM, and maintained for nine days. The main effect of increased Cu concentration was observed in the roots. The sweet potato plants grown in 0.082 mM Cu solution showed increased activity of antioxidant enzymes and no changes in growth parameters. However, at a concentration of 0.164 mM, Cu was transported from the roots to the shoots. This concentration altered morpho-anatomical characteristics and activated the antioxidant system because of the stress generated by excess Cu. On the basis of the results, it can be concluded that the sweet potato plants were able to tolerate Cu toxicity until 0.082 mM.

  16. Evaluation of the tapered PMMA fiber sensor response due to the ionic interaction within electrolytic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batumalay, M.; Rahman, H. A.; Kam, W.; Ong, Y. S.; Ahmad, F.; Zakaria, R.; Harun, S. W.; Ahmad, H.

    2014-01-01

    A tapered plastic multimode fiber (PMMA) optical sensor is proposed and demonstrated for continuous monitoring of solutions based on different concentration of sodium chloride and glucose in deionized water The tapered PMMA fiber was fabricated using an etching method involving deionized water and acetone to achieve a waist diameter and length of 0.45 mm and 10 mm, respectively, and was used to investigate the effect of straight, U-shape, and knot shape against concentration for both sodium chloride and glucose. The results show that there is a strong dependence of the electrolytic and non-electrolytic nature of the chemical solutions on the sensor output. It is found that the sensitivity of the sodium chloride concentration sensor with the straight tapered fiber probe was 0.0023 mV/%, which was better than the other probe arrangements of U-shape and knot. Meanwhile, the glucose sensor performs with the highest sensitivity of 0.0026 mV/wt % with the knot-shaped tapered fiber probe. In addition, a tapered PMMA probe which was coated by silver film was fabricated and demonstrated using calcium hypochlorite (G70) solution. The working mechanism of such a device is based on the observed increment in the transmission of the sensor that is immersed in solutions of higher concentration. As the concentration varies from 0 ppm to 6 ppm, the output voltage of the sensor increases linearly from 3.61 mV to 4.28 mV with a sensitivity of 0.1154 mV/ppm and a linearity of more than 99.47%. The silver film coating increases the sensitivity of the proposed sensor due to the effective cladding refractive index, which increases with the coating and thus allows more light to be transmitted from the tapered fiber.

  17. Temperature increase due to Joule heating in a nanostructured MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction over a wide current-pulse range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Boram; Lim, Sang Ho

    2011-07-01

    The temperature increase due to Joule heating in a nanopillar of a magnetic tunnel junction sandwiched by top and bottom electrodes was calculated by the finite element method. The results for the critical condition for the current-induced magnetization switching measured over a wide current-pulse range were taken from the literature. At long pulse widths, the temperature increase was solely dependent on the magnitude of the critical current density. However, no saturation in the temperature increase occurred for short pulse widths. In this case, the temperature increase additionally depended on the pulse width, so that a broad maximum occurred in the pulse width (or the critical current density) dependence of the temperature increase. The original results for the critical condition were corrected by accounting for the temperature increase and these corrected results, together with the Slonczewski equation, were used to extract an accurate value for the thermal stability factor.

  18. Bioinformatics analysis of potential essential genes that response to the high intraocular pressure on astrocyte due to glaucoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang; Yang; Jing-Zhu; Duan; Yu; Di; Dong-Mei; Gui; Dian-Wen; Gao

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the gene expression response and predict the network in cell due to pressure effects on optic nerve injury of glaucoma.METHODS: We used glaucoma related microarray data in public database [Gene Expression Omnibus(GEO)] to explore the potential gene expression changes as well as correspondent biological process alterations due to increased pressure in astrocytes during glaucoma development.RESULTS: A total of six genes were identified to be related with pressure increasing. Through the annotation and network analysis, we found these genes might be involved in cell morphological remodeling, angiogenesis,mismatch repair.CONCLUSION: Increasing pressure in glaucoma on astrocytes might cause gene expression alterations,which might induce some cellular responses changes.

  19. Relocation due to Climate Change: Mapping the Divergent Responses of the Governments of Tuvalu and Kiribati

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, K. E.; Hemstock, S.; Smith, R.; Holland, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change will continue to impact Pacific Island livelihoods in diverse and complex ways. At the 2009 Copenhagen Conference of Parties to discuss the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, Pacific governments argued for the need to limit warming to 1.5°C. A growing body of literature demonstrates that warming beyond this 2°C threshold is likely and will result in numerous negative impacts on socio-ecological systems across the world, particularly for low-lying coastal communities (Parry et al, 2009; Smith et al, 2009). These communities will need to manage, if possible,a series of interconnected impacts, such as declining freshwater and food security and diminishing land availability, as a result of sea level rise and increasing extreme weather events (Adger and Barnett, 2009). Discussions concerning climate change as a trigger for relocation for low-lying Pacific nations have been contentious, and are fuelled by emotion and varying degrees of sensitivity. As Hayward-Jones (2010: 2) lamented: 'What is at stake over the next decade is not a sinking island but the very viability of life on this fragile atoll state. The land mass of Tuvalu will still exist in 2020 but it may be unable to support the population'. While this debate has historical roots, and indeed the phenomenon of relocation due to localised environmental degradation is not something new in the Pacific, it remains a significant contemporary issue. Scholars have argued that a 'successful mix of strategies' is required to develop culturally-appropriate solutions to this concern about the need for low-lying coastal communities in the Pacific to relocate (Bedford and Bedford, 2010: 93). As such, this paper assesses how the national governments of two low-lying nations in the Pacific - Tuvalu and Kiribati - are mapping out very different long-term strategies to respond to climate change impacts and concerns about the possibility of relocation. The governments of Tuvalu and Kiribati

  20. Linear Response of Field-Aligned Currents to the Interplanetary Electric Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weimer, D. R.; R. Edwards, T.; Olsen, Nils

    2017-01-01

    Many studies that have shown that the ionospheric, polar cap electric potentials (PCEP) exhibit a “saturation” behavior in response to the level of the driving by the solar wind. As the magnitude of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and electric field (IEF) increase, the PCEP response...... of the field-aligned currents (FAC) with the solar wind/magnetosphere/ionosphere system has a role. As the FAC are more difficult to measure, their behavior in response to the level of the IEF has not been investigated as thoroughly. In order to resolve the question of whether or not the FAC also exhibit...... saturation, we have processed the magnetic field measurements from the Ørsted, CHAMP, and Swarm missions, spanning more than a decade. As the amount of current in each region needs to be known, a new technique is used to separate and sum the current by region, widely known as R0, R1, and R2. These totals...

  1. Path transition of the western boundary current with a gap due to mesoscale eddies: a 1.5-layer, wind-driven experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Po; Hou, Yijun

    2010-03-01

    Using a 1.5 layer nonlinear shallow-water reduced-gravity model, we executed numerical simulations to investigate the possibility of a western boundary current (WBC) path transition due to mesoscale eddies based on the background of the Kuroshio intrusion into the South China Sea (SCS) from the Luzon Strait. Because the WBC existed different current states with respect to different wind stress control parameters, we chose three steady WBC states (loop current, eddy shedding and leaping) as the background flow field and simulated the path transition of the WBC due to mesoscale eddies. Our simulations indicated that either an anticyclonic or cyclonic eddy can lead to path transition of the WBC with different modes. The simulation results also show that the mesoscale eddies can lead to path transition of the WBC from loop and eddy shedding state to leaping state because of the hysteresis effect. The leaping state is relatively stable compared with the mesoscale eddies. Moreover, an anticyclonic eddy is more effective in producing the WBC path transition for the path transition than a cyclonic eddy. Our results may help to explain some phenomena observed regarding the path transition of the Kuroshio due to the mesoscale eddies at the Luzon Strait.

  2. Tilt-shift eddy current probe impact on information value of response signal

    OpenAIRE

    Chudacik Vladimir; Smetana Milan

    2016-01-01

    This article deals with the possibility for increasing of the informational value of a response signal using tilt-shift eddy current probe. Numerical simulations based on the FEM method using the OPERA 3D software as well as gained experimental results are presented. The simulated cracks are evaluated at the selected eddy current probe tilts and shifts with respect to conductive plate to obtain additional data needed for its evaluation and localization. Obtained simulation results are compare...

  3. Is transcranial direct current stimulation a potential method for improving response inhibition?☆

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Yong Hyun; Kwon, Jung Won

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitory control of movement in motor learning requires the ability to suppress an inappropriate action, a skill needed to stop a planned or ongoing motor response in response to changes in a variety of environments. This study used a stop-signal task to determine whether transcranial direct-current stimulation over the pre-supplementary motor area alters the reaction time in motor inhibition. Forty healthy subjects were recruited for this study and were randomly assigned to either the tran...

  4. Climate Response due to Black Carbon Aerosols and Black-Carbon-induced SST Effects in MIROC5.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y.; Nakajima, T.; Goto, D.

    2014-12-01

    This study used the Models for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate, MIROC5.0, one member of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5), to investigate the effects of black carbon (BC) aerosols on atmospheric circulations and climate including intricate feedback mechanism. The simulations with and without BC were conducted and the difference between these two runs is the corresponding response due to BC. Both atmosphere-ocean coupled general circulation model simulation (CGCM with full ocean) and the fixed SST runs (AGCM with prescribed sea surface temperature and sea ice temperature) were used to study the effects from ocean boundary conditions. The regional effects due to BC may be much larger than models have assumed (Andreae and Ramanathan, 2013; Bond et al., 2013). There are many studies used simplified mixed-layer ocean under prescribed surface heat flux to estimate the climate effect of BC (Kim et al., 2014), however these ocean-atmosphere coupled processes act on seasonal and annual time scales more real than non-ocean-atmosphere coupled models. Our results showed that the comprehensively sea-air interaction amplified the heating effect of black carbon aerosols; the presence of BC affected climate not only at local source areas but also at remote regions due to changes on energy transport processes and atmospheric circulations; we also discussed how the feedback of SST induced by BC affected on the distribution and magnitudes of climate response such as temperature, precipitation and cloud coverage between CGCM and AGCM runs.

  5. An Approach for the Response of Buildings Subjected to Impact Load after Soft-Story Failure due to Earthquake Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Migda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The soft-story failure is one of the most typical types of damage observed in buildings during earthquakes. The failure of an intermediate soft story of a structure results in large impact loading acting on the lower floors due to the fall of the upper stories. The aim of the present paper is to study the behavior of the structural members exposed to such extreme load conditions occurring under ground motion excitation. Special attention is paid to investigate the influence of the degradation of horizontal stiffness of columns on the response of the building during earthquake. The results of the study show that the stiffness degradation of building columns, due to impact caused by the fall of the upper stories, may have a considerable influence on the structural response. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that the time of impact plays a substantial role in the overall behavior of the building suffering from the soft-story failure. It has been shown that the structural response may be increased significantly if impact takes place when the building is in the range of its peak deformations during the earthquake, especially when the structure is just approaching the extreme position.

  6. Load kick-back effects due to activation of demand response in view of distribution grid operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Xue; Sossan, Fabrizio; Bindner, Henrik W.

    2014-01-01

    There are increasing potentials to utilize the flexibilities from demand side resource (DSR) units. They can provide grid operation services by shifting or curtailing their energy consumption. The service provision can be achieved by aggregating a large quantity of DSR units in the network....... The paper has shown how aggregated consumption dynamics introduce new peaks in the system due to the synchronous behaviors of a portfolio of homogeneous DSRs, which is instructed by the flexibility management system. This dynamic effect is recognized as load kick-back effect. The impact of load kick......-back effects onto the distribution grid is analysed in this paper by establishing scenarios based on the estimation of DSR penetration levels from the system operator. The results indicate some risks that the activation of demand response may create critical peaks in the local grid due to kick-back effects....

  7. Evaluation of the risk to underground mine personnel due to the rockmass response to continuous mining operations.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Aswegen, G

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Final Project Report Evaluation of the risk to underground mine personnel due to the rockmass response to continuous mining operations G van Aswegen Research agency : ISS International Limited Project number : GAP 610 Project duration : January...th 18th 19th 20th 21st 22nd 23rd 24th Hour of Day 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 Average Daily Frequency Average Number of Personnel ....11 Figure 3.2. Personnel in Stopes and Event Frequency >1.0 for Time of Day Distributions for 11...

  8. Forget the Desk Job: Current Roles and Responsibilities in Entry-Level Reference Job Advertisements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detmering, Robert; Sproles, Claudene

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the evolving roles and responsibilities of entry-level academic reference positions, as stated in recent job advertisements posted on the American Library Association's JobLIST Web site and other sources. Findings from a content analysis of these advertisements indicate that current entry-level reference positions in academic…

  9. Forget the Desk Job: Current Roles and Responsibilities in Entry-Level Reference Job Advertisements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detmering, Robert; Sproles, Claudene

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the evolving roles and responsibilities of entry-level academic reference positions, as stated in recent job advertisements posted on the American Library Association's JobLIST Web site and other sources. Findings from a content analysis of these advertisements indicate that current entry-level reference positions in academic…

  10. Effective Strategies for Diagnosis of Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) due to Bacterial Infection in Surgical Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubljar, David; Skvarc, Miha

    2015-01-01

    Surgery associated with trauma and soft tissue injuries after surgery significantly activates the systemic immune response. If an infection after surgery occurs, the response is even stronger. Due to spontaneous activation of immune response and elevated biomarkers for sepsis and cytokines, posttraumatic complications such as new-coming postoperative infections are difficult to diagnose. Sepsis as systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) rapidly progresses through severe sepsis to septic shock and organ failure, and with no applied antibiotic treatment, the disease often ends at death of the patients. In the treatment of non-surgery patients, the biomarkers like white cell blood count, C-reactive protein (CRP) or procalcitonin (PCT) proved to be useful in sepsis recognition. However, diagnostics after surgeries are more complicated and these biomarkers are not ideal. The solution is a sepsis biomarker, which would have high sensitivity and specificity, that can improve diagnostic accuracy of sepsis, should also be measured easily by the patients, and should not be too expensive. We think more sensitive and specific biomarkers such as presepsin (sCD14-ST) or CD64 index on neutrophils could be useful. A diagnosis of sepsis should be based on clinical signs, and clinicians should use biomarker that is not only most sensitive and specific but also is cost effective. Furthermore, confirmation of the bacterial or fungal infection with blood cultures or with the use of broad range polymerase chain reaction (PCR), when culturing is impossible, should be performed.

  11. Self-reported sleep disturbances due to railway noise: exposure-response relationships for nighttime equivalent and maximum noise levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasvang, Gunn Marit; Moum, Torbjorn; Engdahl, Bo

    2008-07-01

    The objective of the present survey was to study self-reported sleep disturbances due to railway noise with respect to nighttime equivalent noise level (L(p,A,eq,night)) and maximum noise level (L(p,A,max)). A sample of 1349 people in and around Oslo in Norway exposed to railway noise was studied in a cross-sectional survey to obtain data on sleep disturbances, sleep problems due to noise, and personal characteristics including noise sensitivity. Individual noise exposure levels were determined outside of the bedroom facade, the most-exposed facade, and inside the respondents' bedrooms. The exposure-response relationships were analyzed by using logistic regression models, controlling for possible modifying factors including the number of noise events (train pass-by frequency). L(p,A,eq,night) and L(p,A,max) were significantly correlated, and the proportion of reported noise-induced sleep problems increased as both L(p,A,eq,night) and L(p,A,max) increased. Noise sensitivity, type of bedroom window, and pass-by frequency were significant factors affecting noise-induced sleep disturbances, in addition to the noise exposure level. Because about half of the study population did not use a bedroom at the most-exposed side of the house, the exposure-response curve obtained by using noise levels for the most-exposed facade underestimated noise-induced sleep disturbance for those who actually have their bedroom at the most-exposed facade.

  12. Parametric Identification of a Dynamic Foundation Model of a Rotary Machine Using Response Data Due to Unknown Unbalances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Prells

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of a model of the foundation of a rotary machine has been recently attempted by using the difference between two sets of response data at some of the bearing locations from two consecutive rundowns of the machine, with and without known unbalance weights at certain positions on the two balance discs of each rotor respectively. However, it would be a great advantage to be able to perform the estimation with a single rundown. Due to practical restrictions in performing such tests (accessibility, costs etc., there are cases in which data for only one rundown are available. In this case, the unbalance configuration is unknown and has, therefore, to be estimated, in addition to the unknown foundation model. Due to the special form of the unbalance force, this overall inverse problem can be solved by eliminating the unbalance configuration from the model estimation process. The remaining equation to estimate the foundation model consists of the projection of the response data, where the associated projector depends on the foundation model parameter. First results using the method, applied to a laboratory test rig and to a commercial turbo-generator, are presented.

  13. Comparison of Ring Current and Radiation Belt Responses during Transient Solar Wind Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, T. L.; Roeder, J. L.; Lemon, C.; Fennell, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    The analysis of radiation belt dynamics provides insight into the physical mechanisms of trapping, energization, and loss of energetic particles in the magnetosphere. It is well known that the storm-time ring current response to solar wind drivers changes the magnetic field in the inner magnetosphere, which modifies radiation belt particle trajectories as well as the magnetopause and geomagnetic cutoff locations. What is not well known is the detailed space-time structure of solar wind transient features that drive the dynamics of the ring-current and radiation belt response. We compare observed responses of the ring current and radiation belts during two geomagnetic storms of similar intensity on 15 November 2012 and 29 June 2013. Using the self-consistent ring current model RCM-Equilibrium (RCM-E), which ensures a force-balanced ring-current response at each time step, we generate a simulated ring current in response to the changing conditions as the storm evolves on a timescale of hours. Observations of the plasma sheet particles, fields, and solar wind parameters are used to specify the dynamic boundary conditions as the storm evolves. This allows more realistic magnetospheric field and plasma dynamics during solar wind transients than can be obtained from existing empirical models. Using a spatial mapping algorithm developed by Mulligan et al., (2012) we create two-dimensional contour maps of the solar wind bulk plasma parameters using ACE, Wind, Geotail, and THEMIS data to quantitatively follow upstream spatial variations in the radial and azimuthal dimensions driving the storm. We perform a comparison of how the structure and impact angle of the solar wind transients affect the intensity and duration of energization of the ring current and radiation belt at various energies. We also investigate how the varying geomagnetic conditions determined by the solar wind affect dominant loss mechanisms such as magnetopause shadowing. Comparison of energetic particle

  14. Response of the Kuroshio Current to Eddies in the Luzon Strait

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jie; LUO De-Hai

    2010-01-01

    The impact of eddies on the Kuroshio Current in the Luzon Strait(LS)area is investigated by using the sea surface height anomaly(SSHA)satellite observation data and the sea surface height(SSH)assimilation data.The influence of the eddies on the mean current depends upon the type of eddies and their relative position.The mean current is enhanced(weakened)as the cyclonic(anticyclonic)eddy becomes slightly far from it,whereas it is weakened(enhanced)as the cyclonic(anticyclonic)eddy moves near or within the position of the mean current;this is explained as the eddy-induced meridional velocity and geostrophic flow relationship.The anticyclonic(cyclonic)eddy can increase(decrease)the mean meridional flow due to superimposition of the eddy-induced meridional flow when the eddy is within the region of the mean current.However,when the eddy is slightly far from the mean current region,the anticyclonic(cyclonic)eddy tends to decrease(increase)the zonal gradient of the SSH,which thus results in weakening(strengthening)of the mean current in the LS region.

  15. Responsivity Dependent Anodization Current Density of Nanoporous Silicon Based MSM Photodetector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batool Eneaze B. Al-Jumaili

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Achieving a cheap and ultrafast metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM photodetector (PD for very high-speed communications is ever-demanding. We report the influence of anodization current density variation on the response of nanoporous silicon (NPSi based MSM PD with platinum (Pt contact electrodes. Such NPSi samples are grown from n-type Si (100 wafer using photoelectrochemical etching with three different anodization current densities. FESEM images of as-prepared samples revealed the existence of discrete pores with spherical and square-like shapes. XRD pattern displayed the growth of nanocrystals with (311 lattice orientation. The nanocrystallite sizes obtained using Scherrer formula are found to be between 20.8 nm and 28.6 nm. The observed rectifying behavior in the I-V characteristics is ascribed to the Pt/PSi/n-Si Schottky barrier formation, where the barrier height at the Pt/PSi interface is estimated to be 0.69 eV. Furthermore, this Pt/PSi/Pt MSM PD achieved maximum responsivity of 0.17 A/W and quantum efficiency as much as 39.3%. The photoresponse of this NPSi based MSM PD demonstrated excellent repeatability, fast response, and enhanced saturation current with increasing anodization current density.

  16. Evaluation of lung tumor response to therapy: Current and emerging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coche, E

    2016-10-01

    Lung tumor response to therapy may be evaluated in most instances by morphological criteria such as RECIST 1.1 on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, those criteria are limited because they are based on tumoral dimensional changes and do not take into account other morphologic criteria such as density evaluation, functional or metabolic changes that may occur following conventional or targeted chemotherapy. New techniques such as dual-energy CT, PET-CT, MRI including diffusion-weighted MRI has to be considered into the new technical armamentarium for tumor response evaluation. Integration of all informations provided by the different imaging modalities has to be integrated and represents probably the future goal of tumor response evaluation. The aim of the present paper is to review the current and emerging imaging criteria used to evaluate the response of therapy in the field of lung cancer.

  17. Current dependence of the hot-spot response spectrum of superconducting single-photon detectors with different layouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charaev, I.; Semenov, A.; Doerner, S.; Gomard, G.; Ilin, K.; Siegel, M.

    2017-02-01

    We show that avoiding bends in a current-carrying superconducting nanowire enhances the probability for low energy photons to be detected and that this enhancement is entirely due to the increase in the experimentally achievable critical current. We studied nanowires shaped as either meander or spiral. The spirals had different layouts, a double-spiral layout with an S-turn in the middle and a single-spiral layout without such a turn. Nanowires were prepared from films of niobium nitride with a thickness of 5 nm. For specimens with each layout we measured the spectra of the single-photon response in the wavelength range from 400 nm to 1600 nm and defined the cut-off wavelength (λ c) beyond which the response rolls off. The largest and the smallest λ c were found for the single-spiral layout and for the meander, respectively. For all three layouts the relationship between λ c and the relative bias current falls onto a universal curve which has been predicted earlier in the framework of the modified hot-spot model. For the single-spiral layout, the efficiency of photon detection at wavelengths smaller than λ c reaches the expected absorbance of the spiral structure and the timing jitter per unit length of the nanowire has the smallest value.

  18. Utilisation of the magnetic sensor in a smartphone for facile magnetostatics experiment: magnetic field due to electrical current in straight and loop wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septianto, R. D.; Suhendra, D.; Iskandar, F.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the result of a research into the utilisation of a smartphone for the study of magnetostatics on the basis of experiments. The use of such a device gives great measurement result and thus it can replace magnetic sensor tools that are relatively expensive. For the best experimental result, firstly the position of the magnetic sensor in the smartphone has to be considered by way of value mapping of a magnetic field due to permanent magnet. The magnetostatics experiment investigated in this research was the measurement of magnetic field due to electrical currents in two shapes of wire, straight and looped. The current flow, the distance between the observation point and the wire, and the diameter of the loop were the variable parameters investigated to test the smartphone’s capabilities as a measurement tool. To evaluate the experimental results, the measured data were compared with theoretical values that were calculated by using both an analytical and a numerical approach. According to the experiment results, the measured data had good agreement with the results from the analytical and the numerical approach. This means that the use of the magnetic sensor in a smartphone in physics experiments is viable, especially for magnetic field measurement.

  19. Tilt-shift eddy current probe impact on information value of response signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chudacik Vladimir

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the possibility for increasing of the informational value of a response signal using tilt-shift eddy current probe. Numerical simulations based on the FEM method using the OPERA 3D software as well as gained experimental results are presented. The simulated cracks are evaluated at the selected eddy current probe tilts and shifts with respect to conductive plate to obtain additional data needed for its evaluation and localization. Obtained simulation results are compared and discussed with the experimental results.

  20. Magnetic response and critical current properties of mesoscopic-size YBCO superconducting samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisboa-Filho, P N [UNESP - Universidade Estadual Paulista, Grupo de Materiais Avancados, Departamento de Fisica, Bauru (Brazil); Deimling, C V; Ortiz, W A, E-mail: plisboa@fc.unesp.b [Grupo de Supercondutividade e Magnetismo, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos (Brazil)

    2010-01-15

    In this contribution superconducting specimens of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} were synthesized by a modified polymeric precursor method, yielding a ceramic powder with particles of mesoscopic-size. Samples of this powder were then pressed into pellets and sintered under different conditions. The critical current density was analyzed by isothermal AC-susceptibility measurements as a function of the excitation field, as well as with isothermal DC-magnetization runs at different values of the applied field. Relevant features of the magnetic response could be associated to the microstructure of the specimens and, in particular, to the superconducting intra- and intergranular critical current properties.

  1. The Development of Forms of Corporate Social Responsibility in Russia in the Current Economic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Arzumanova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the characteristic features of modern trends in the formation and implementation of corporate social responsibility in Russia in the current economic conditions, which is based on the fact that reasonable economic interests oriented business not only on maximizing profits, but also to improve their own macro - socio-economic, natural, political, through voluntary investment profits in the respective areas.

  2. Plagiarism: A Shared Responsibility of All, Current Situation, and Future Actions in Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthanna, Abdulghani

    2016-01-01

    As combating plagiarism is a shared responsibility of all, this article focuses on presenting the current situation of higher education in Yemen. The critical review of four implementable policy documents and interviews revealed the absence of research ethics code, research misconduct policy, and institutional policies in the country. This led to the presence of several acts of research dishonesty. The article concludes with an initiative for necessary future actions in the nation.

  3. Ionic currents underlying difference in light response between type A and type B photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, K T

    2006-05-01

    In Hermissenda crassicornis, the memory of light associated with turbulence is stored as changes in intrinsic and synaptic currents in both type A and type B photoreceptors. These photoreceptor types exhibit qualitatively different responses to light and current injection, and these differences shape the spatiotemporal firing patterns that control behavior. Thus the objective of the study was to identify the mechanisms underlying these differences. The approach was to develop a type B model that reproduced characteristics of type B photoreceptors recorded in vitro, and then to create a type A model by modifying a select number of ionic currents. Comparison of type A models with characteristics of type A photoreceptors recorded in vitro revealed that type A and type B photoreceptors have five main differences, three that have been characterized experimentally and two that constitute hypotheses to be tested with experiments in the future. The three differences between type A and type B photoreceptors previously characterized include the inward rectifier current, the fast sodium current, and conductance of calcium-dependent and transient potassium channels. Two additional changes were required to produce a type A photoreceptor model. The very fast firing frequency observed during the first second after light onset required a faster time constant of activation of the delayed rectifier. The fast spike adaptation required a fast, noninactivating calcium-dependent potassium current. Because these differences between type A and type B photoreceptors have not been confirmed in comparative experiments, they constitute hypotheses to be tested with future experiments.

  4. A comparison between exposure-response relationships for wind turbine annoyance and annoyance due to other noise sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Sabine A; Vos, Henk; Eisses, Arno R; Pedersen, Eja

    2011-12-01

    Surveys have shown that noise from wind turbines is perceived as annoying by a proportion of residents living in their vicinity, apparently at much lower noise levels than those inducing annoyance due to other environmental sources. The aim of the present study was to derive the exposure-response relationship between wind turbine noise exposure in L(den) and the expected percentage annoyed residents and to compare it to previously established relationships for industrial noise and transportation noise. In addition, the influence of several individual and situational factors was assessed. On the basis of available data from two surveys in Sweden (N=341, N=754) and one survey in the Netherlands (N=725), a relationship was derived for annoyance indoors and for annoyance outdoors at the dwelling. In comparison to other sources of environmental noise, annoyance due to wind turbine noise was found at relatively low noise exposure levels. Furthermore, annoyance was lower among residents who received economical benefit from wind turbines and higher among residents for whom the wind turbine was visible from the dwelling. Age and noise sensitivity had similar effects on annoyance to those found in research on annoyance by other sources.

  5. Atmospheric Wind Relaxations and the Oceanic Response in the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fewings, M. R.; Dorman, C. E.; Washburn, L.; Liu, W.

    2010-12-01

    On the West Coast of North America in summer, episodic relaxation of the upwelling-favorable winds causes warm water to propagate northward from southern to central California, against the prevailing currents [Harms and Winant 1998, Winant et al. 2003, Melton et al. 2009]. Similar wind relaxations are an important characteristic of coastal upwelling ecosystems worldwide. Although these wind relaxations have an important influence on coastal ocean dynamics, no description exists of the regional atmospheric patterns that lead to wind relaxations in southern California, or of the regional ocean response. We use QuikSCAT wind stress, North American Regional Reanalysis atmospheric pressure products, water temperature and velocity from coastal ocean moorings, surface ocean currents from high-frequency radars, and MODIS satellite sea-surface temperature and ocean color images to analyze wind relaxation events and the ocean response. We identify the events based on an empirical index calculated from NDBC buoy winds [Melton et al. 2009]. We describe the regional evolution of the atmosphere from the Gulf of Alaska to Baja California over the few days leading up to wind relaxations, and the coastal ocean temperature, color, and current response off southern and central California. We analyze ~100 wind relaxation events in June-September during the QuikSCAT mission, 1999-2009. Our results indicate south-central California wind relaxations in summer are tied to mid-level atmospheric low-pressure systems that form in the Gulf of Alaska and propagate southeastward over 3-5 days. As the low-pressure systems reach southern California, the atmospheric pressure gradient along the coast weakens, causing the surface wind stress to relax to near zero. The weak wind signal appears first at San Diego and propagates northward. QuikSCAT data indicate the relaxed winds extend over the entire Southern California Bight and up to 200 km offshore of central California. Atmospheric dynamics in

  6. Blunted sympathoinhibitory responses in obesity-related hypertension are due to aberrant central but not peripheral signalling mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    How, Jackie M Y; Wardak, Suhail A; Ameer, Shaik I; Davey, Rachel A; Sartor, Daniela M

    2014-04-01

    The gut hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) acts at subdiaphragmatic vagal afferents to induce renal and splanchnic sympathoinhibition and vasodilatation, via reflex inhibition of a subclass of cardiovascular-controlling neurons in the rostroventrolateral medulla (RVLM). These sympathoinhibitory and vasodilator responses are blunted in obese, hypertensive rats and our aim in the present study was to determine whether this is attributable to (i) altered sensitivity of presympathetic vasomotor RVLM neurons, and (ii) aberrant peripheral or central signalling mechanisms. Using a diet-induced obesity model, male Sprague-Dawley rats exhibited either an obesity-prone (OP) or obesity-resistant (OR) phenotype when placed on a medium high fat diet for 13-15 weeks; control animals were placed on a low fat diet. OP animals had elevated resting arterial pressure compared to OR/control animals (P obesity-related hypertension are due to alterations in RVLM neuronal responses, resulting from aberrant central but not peripheral signalling mechanisms. In obesity, blunted sympathoinhibitory mechanisms may lead to increased regional vascular resistance and contribute to the development of hypertension.

  7. Effect of hall current on MHD flow of a nanofluid with variable properties due to a rotating disk with viscous dissipation and nonlinear thermal radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Wahed, Mohamed; Akl, Mohamed

    2016-09-01

    Analysis of the MHD Nanofluid boundary layer flow over a rotating disk with a constant velocity in the presence of hall current and non-linear thermal radiation has been covered in this work. The variation of viscosity and thermal conductivity of the fluid due to temperature and nanoparticles concentration and size is considered. The problem described by a system of P.D.E that converted to a system of ordinary differential equations by the similarity transformation technique, the obtained system solved analytically using Optimal Homotopy Asymptotic Method (OHAM) with association of mathematica program. The velocity profiles and temperature profiles of the boundary layer over the disk are plotted and investigated in details. Moreover, the surface shear stress, rate of heat transfer explained in details.

  8. Effects due to induced azimuthal eddy currents in a self-exciting Faraday disk homopolar dynamo with a nonlinear series motor. I.. Two special cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hide, Raymond; Moroz, Irene M.

    1999-10-01

    The elucidation of the behaviour of physically realistic self-exciting Faraday-disk dynamos bears inter alia on attempts by theoretical geophysicists to interpret observations of geomagnetic polarity reversals. Hide [The nonlinear differential equations governing a hierarchy of self-exciting coupled Faraday-disk homopolar dynamos, Phys. Earth Planet. Interiors 103 (1997) 281-291; Nonlinear quenching of current fluctuations in a self-exciting homopolar dynamo, Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics 4 (1998) 201-205] has introduced a novel 4-mode set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations to describe such a dynamo in which a nonlinear electric motor is connected in series with the coil. The applied couple, α, driving the disk is steady and the Lorentz couple driving the motor is a quadratic function, x(1-ɛ)+ɛσx 2, of the dynamo-generated current x, with 0≤ɛ≤1. When there are no additional biasing effects due to background magnetic fields etc., the behaviour of the dynamo is determined by eight independent non-negative control parameters. These include ρ, proportional to the resistance of the disk to azimuthal eddy currents, and β, an inverse measure of the moment of inertia of the armature of the motor. When β=0 (the case when the motor is absent and ɛ and σ are redundant) and ρ -1≠0 , the 4-mode dynamo equations reduce to the 3-mode Lorenz equations, which can behave chaotically [E. Knobloch, Chaos in the segmented disc dynamo, Phys. Lett. A 82 (1981) 439-440]. When β≠0 but ρ -1=0 , the 4-mode set of equations reduces to a 3-mode dynamo [R. Hide (1997), see above], which can also behave chaotically when ɛ=0 [R. Hide, A.C. Skeldon, D.J. Acheson, A study of two novel self-exciting single-disk homopolar dynamos: theory, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 452 (1996) 1369-1395] but not when ɛ=1 [R. Hide (1998), see above]. In the latter case, however, all persistent fluctuations are completely quenched [R. Hide (1998), see above]. In this paper we investigate

  9. Individualized model predicts brain current flow during transcranial direct-current stimulation treatment in responsive stroke patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Abhishek; Baker, Julie M; Bikson, Marom; Fridriksson, Julius

    2011-07-01

    Although numerous published reports have demonstrated the beneficial effects of transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) on task performance, fundamental questions remain regarding the optimal electrode configuration on the scalp. Moreover, it is expected that lesioned brain tissue will influence current flow and should therefore be considered (and perhaps leveraged) in the design of individualized tDCS therapies for stroke. The current report demonstrates how different electrode configurations influence the flow of electrical current through brain tissue in a patient who responded positively to a tDCS treatment targeting aphasia. The patient, a 60-year-old man, sustained a left hemisphere ischemic stroke (lesion size = 87.42 mL) 64 months before his participation. In this study, we present results from the first high-resolution (1 mm(3)) model of tDCS in a brain with considerable stroke-related damage; the model was individualized for the patient who received anodal tDCS to his left frontal cortex with the reference cathode electrode placed on his right shoulder. We modeled the resulting brain current flow and also considered three additional reference electrode positions: right mastoid, right orbitofrontal cortex, and a "mirror" configuration with the anode over the undamaged right cortex. Our results demonstrate the profound effect of lesioned tissue on resulting current flow and the ability to modulate current pattern through the brain, including perilesional regions, through electrode montage design. The complexity of brain current flow modulation by detailed normal and pathologic anatomy suggest: (1) That computational models are critical for the rational interpretation and design of individualized tDCS stroke-therapy; and (2) These models must accurately reproduce head anatomy as shown here.

  10. Gyrotropic elastic response of skyrmion crystals to current-induced tensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Hector; Kim, Se Kwon; Tchernyshyov, Oleg; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2017-07-01

    We theoretically study the dynamics of skyrmion crystals in electrically insulating chiral magnets subjected to current-induced spin torques by adjacent metallic layers. We develop an elasticity theory that accounts for the gyrotropic force engendered by the nontrivial topology of the spin texture, tensions at the boundaries due to the exchange of linear and spin angular momentum with the metallic reservoirs, and dissipation in the bulk of the film. A steady translation of the skyrmion crystal is triggered by the current-induced tensions and subsequently sustained by dissipative forces, generating an electromotive force on itinerant spins in the metals. This phenomenon should be revealed as a negative drag in an open two-terminal geometry, or equivalently, as a positive magnetoresistance when the terminals are connected in parallel. We propose nonlocal transport measurements with these salient features as a tool to characterize the phase diagram of insulating chiral magnets.

  11. Frequency dependence of CA3 spike phase response arising from h-current properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melodie eBorel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The phase of firing of hippocampal neurons during theta oscillations encodes spatial information. Moreover, the spike phase response to synaptic inputs in individual cells depends on the expression of the hyperpolarisation-activated mixed cation current (Ih, which differs between CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons. Here, we compared the phase response of these two cell types, as well as their intrinsic membrane properties. We found that both CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons show a voltage sag in response to negative current steps but that this voltage sag is significantly smaller in CA3 cells. Moreover, CA3 pyramidal neurons have less prominent resonance properties compared to CA1 pyramidal neurons. This is consistent with differential expression of Ih by the two cell types. Despite their distinct intrinsic membrane properties, both CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons displayed bidirectional spike phase control by excitatory conductance inputs during theta oscillations. In particular, excitatory inputs delivered at the descending phase of a dynamic clamp-induced membrane potential oscillation delayed the subsequent spike by nearly 50 mrad. The effect was shown to be mediated by Ih and was counteracted by increasing inhibitory conductance driving the membrane potential oscillation. Using our experimental data to feed a computational model, we showed that differences in Ih between CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons could predict frequency-dependent differences in phase response properties between these cell types. We confirmed experimentally such frequency-dependent spike phase control in CA3 neurons. Therefore, a decrease in theta frequency, which is observed in intact animals during novelty, might switch the CA3 spike phase response from unidirectional to bidirectional and thereby promote encoding of the new context.

  12. Acute Respiratory Distress due to Thymoma in a Patient Treated with TK Inhibitor: A Case Report and Review of the Current Treatment Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Zarogoulidis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Thymic malignancies are rare intrathoracic tumors that may be aggressive and difficult to treat in advanced stage. Surgery is the cornerstone of the management of thymomas: it is significant for the definite histopathological diagnosis and staging, and in most cases, it constitutes the first step of the treatment strategy. For patients with primary unresectable thymomas, the multimodal treatment schedule nowadays includes neoadjuvant chemotherapy, extensive surgery, adjuvant radiotherapy, and in some cases, adjuvant chemotherapy. A patient with a history of stage III COPD and an undiagnosed thoracic mass was admitted to the intensive care unit with acute respiratory distress. A radiologic evaluation by CT scan revealed a mass of 13 cm in diameter at the mediastinum. Fine needle aspiration was performed and revealed a thymoma. Due to poor performance status, the patient was not able to undergo surgery. He refused to be treated with neither chemotherapy nor radiotherapy, but due to EGFR overexpression, treatment with TK inhibitor was suggested. Fine needle aspiration biopsy is commonly used to identify metastasis to the mediastinum. However, it is less often employed as a primary diagnostic tool for tumors, particularly thymic neoplasms. The use of targeted therapies for the treatment of thymic malignancies has been described in the literature. Over the past years, significant efforts have been made to dissect the molecular pathways involved in the carcinogenesis of these tumors. Insights have been obtained following anecdotal clinical responses to targeted therapies, and large-scale genomic analyses have been conducted.

  13. Quantification of Hydrological Responses Due to Climate Change and Human Activities over Various Time Scales in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangho Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrological responses are being impacted by both climate change and human activities. In particular, climate change and regional human activities have accelerated significantly during the last three decades in South Korea. The variation in runoff due to the two types of factors should be quantitatively investigated to aid effective water resources’ planning and management. In water resources’ planning, analysis using various time scales is useful where rainfall is unevenly distributed. However, few studies analyzed the impacts of these two factors over different time scales. In this study, hydrologic model-based approach and hydrologic sensitivity were used to separate the relative impacts of these two factors at monthly, seasonal and annual time scales in the Soyang Dam upper basin and the Seom River basin in South Korea. After trend analysis using the Mann–Kendall nonparametric test to identify the causes of gradual change, three techniques, such as the double mass curve method, Pettitt’s test and the BCP (Bayesian change point analysis, were used to detect change points caused by abrupt changes in the collected observed runoff. Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT models calibrated from the natural periods were used to calculate the impacts of human activities. Additionally, six Budyko-based methods were used to verify the results obtained from the hydrological-based approach. The results show that impacts of climate change have been stronger than those of human activities in the Soyang Dam upper basin, while the impacts of human activities have been stronger than those of climate change in the Seom River basin. Additionally, the quantitative characteristics of relative impacts due to these two factors were identified at the monthly, seasonal and annual time scales. Finally, we suggest that the procedure used in this study can be used as a reference for regional water resources’ planning and management.

  14. Morphological response of the saltmarsh habitats of the Guadiana estuary due to flow regulation and sea-level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, D. M. R.; Boski, T.

    2016-12-01

    In the context of rapid sea-level rise in the 21st century, the reduction of fluvial sediment supply due to the regulation of river discharge represents a major challenge for the management of estuarine ecosystems. Therefore, the present study aims to assess the cumulative impacts of the reduction of river discharge and projected sea-level rise on the morphological evolution of the Guadiana estuary during the 21st century. The assessment was based on a set of analytical solutions to simplified equations of tidal wave propagation in shallow waters and empirical knowledge of the system. As methods applied to estimate environmental flows do not take into consideration the fluvial discharge required to maintain saltmarsh habitats and the impact of sea-level rise, simulations were carried out for ten cases in terms of base river flow and sea-level rise so as to understand their sensitivity on the deepening of saltmarsh platforms. Results suggest saltmarsh habitats may not be affected severely in response to lower limit scenarios of sea-level rise and sedimentation. A similar behaviour can be expected even due to the upper limit scenarios until 2050, but with a significant submergence afterwards. In the case of the upper limit scenarios under scrutiny, there was a net erosion of sediment from the estuary. Multiplications of amplitudes of the base flow function by factors 1.5, 2, and 5 result in reduction of the estimated net eroded sediment volume by 25, 40, and 80%, respectively, with respect to the net eroded volume for observed river discharge. The results also indicate that defining the minimum environmental flow as a percentage of dry season flow (as done presently) should be updated to include the full spectrum of natural flows, incorporating temporal variability to better anticipate scenarios of sea-level rise during this century. As permanent submergence of intertidal habitats can be significant after 2050, due to the projected 79 cm rise of sea-level by the year

  15. Global, Energy-Dependent Ring Current Response During Two Large Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, J.; Angelopoulos, V.; Burch, J. L.; De Pascuale, S.; Fuselier, S. A.; Genestreti, K. J.; Kurth, W. S.; LLera, K.; McComas, D. J.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Valek, P. W.

    2015-12-01

    Two recent large (~200 nT) geomagnetic storms occurred during 17--18 March 2015 and 22--23 June 2015. The global, energy-dependent ring current response to these two extreme events is investigated using both global imaging and multi-point in situ observations. Energetic neutral atom (ENA) imaging by the Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission provides a global view of ring current ions. Local measurements are provided by two multi-spacecraft missions. The two Van Allen Probes measure in situ plasma (including ion composition) and fields at ring current and plasmaspheric L values. The recently launched Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) comprises four spacecraft that have just begun to measure particles (including ion composition) and fields at outer magnetospheric L-values. We analyze the timing and energetics of the stormtime evolution of ring current ions, both trapped and precipitating, using TWINS ENA images and in situ data by the Van Allen Probes and MMS.

  16. Breast fibromatosis response to tamoxifen: dynamic MRI findings and review of the current treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Michael J; Yepes, Monica

    2012-03-01

    Breast fibromatosis is a rare entity responsible for 0.2% of all solid breast tumors. It has been associated with scars, pregnancy, implants, and familial adenomatous polyposis. We present an interesting case of breast fibromatosis in a 29 year old woman which encroached upon her saline implant and subsequently filled its cavity once the implant was removed. The patient was put on tamoxifen therapy and at 14 month follow-up there was a significant decrease in the size of the mass. Dynamic MRI images are offered for review and current treatment options are discussed.

  17. Avian mortalities due to transmission line collisions: a review of current estimates and field methods with an emphasis on applications to the Canadian electric network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Rioux

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Birds are vulnerable to collisions with human-made fixed structures. Despite ongoing development and increases in infrastructure, we have few estimates of the magnitude of collision mortality. We reviewed the existing literature on avian mortality associated with transmission lines and derived an initial estimate for Canada. Estimating mortality from collisions with power lines is challenging due to the lack of studies, especially from sites within Canada, and due to uncertainty about the magnitude of detection biases. Detection of bird collisions with transmission lines varies due to habitat type, species size, and scavenging rates. In addition, birds can be crippled by the impact and subsequently die, although crippling rates are poorly known and rarely incorporated into estimates. We used existing data to derive a range of estimates of avian mortality associated with collisions with transmission lines in Canada by incorporating detection, scavenging, and crippling biases. There are 231,966 km of transmission lines across Canada, mostly in the boreal forest. Mortality estimates ranged from 1 million to 229.5 million birds per year, depending on the bias corrections applied. We consider our most realistic estimate, taking into account variation in risk across Canada, to range from 2.5 million to 25.6 million birds killed per year. Data from multiple studies across Canada and the northern U.S. indicate that the most vulnerable bird groups are (1 waterfowl, (2 grebes, (3 shorebirds, and (4 cranes, which is consistent with other studies. Populations of several groups that are vulnerable to collisions are increasing across Canada (e.g., waterfowl, raptors, which suggests that collision mortality, at current levels, is not limiting population growth. However, there may be impacts on other declining species, such as shorebirds and some species at risk, including Alberta's Trumpeter Swans (Cygnus buccinator and western Canada's endangered Whooping

  18. Transcription Factors and Plants Response to Drought Stress: Current Understanding and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Rohit; Wani, Shabir H.; Singh, Balwant; Bohra, Abhishek; Dar, Zahoor A.; Lone, Ajaz A.; Pareek, Ashwani; Singla-Pareek, Sneh L.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing vulnerability of plants to a variety of stresses such as drought, salt and extreme temperatures poses a global threat to sustained growth and productivity of major crops. Of these stresses, drought represents a considerable threat to plant growth and development. In view of this, developing staple food cultivars with improved drought tolerance emerges as the most sustainable solution toward improving crop productivity in a scenario of climate change. In parallel, unraveling the genetic architecture and the targeted identification of molecular networks using modern “OMICS” analyses, that can underpin drought tolerance mechanisms, is urgently required. Importantly, integrated studies intending to elucidate complex mechanisms can bridge the gap existing in our current knowledge about drought stress tolerance in plants. It is now well established that drought tolerance is regulated by several genes, including transcription factors (TFs) that enable plants to withstand unfavorable conditions, and these remain potential genomic candidates for their wide application in crop breeding. These TFs represent the key molecular switches orchestrating the regulation of plant developmental processes in response to a variety of stresses. The current review aims to offer a deeper understanding of TFs engaged in regulating plant’s response under drought stress and to devise potential strategies to improve plant tolerance against drought. PMID:27471513

  19. Fractional Modeling of the AC Large-Signal Frequency Response in Magnetoresistive Current Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Iván Ravelo Arias

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Fractional calculus is considered when derivatives and integrals of non-integer order are applied over a specific function. In the electrical and electronic domain, the transfer function dependence of a fractional filter not only by the filter order n, but additionally, of the fractional order α is an example of a great number of systems where its input-output behavior could be more exactly modeled by a fractional behavior. Following this aim, the present work shows the experimental ac large-signal frequency response of a family of electrical current sensors based in different spintronic conduction mechanisms. Using an ac characterization set-up the sensor transimpedance function  is obtained considering it as the relationship between sensor output voltage and input sensing current,[PLEASE CHECK FORMULA IN THE PDF]. The study has been extended to various magnetoresistance sensors based in different technologies like anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR, giant magnetoresistance (GMR, spin-valve (GMR-SV and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR. The resulting modeling shows two predominant behaviors, the low-pass and the inverse low-pass with fractional index different from the classical integer response. The TMR technology with internal magnetization offers the best dynamic and sensitivity properties opening the way to develop actual industrial applications.

  20. Transcription factors and plant response to drought stress: Current understanding and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Joshi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Increasing vulnerability of plants to a variety of stresses such as drought, salt and extreme temperatures poses a global threat to sustained growth and productivity of major crops. Of these stresses, drought represents a considerable threat to plant growth and development. In view of this, developing staple food cultivars with improved drought tolerance emerges as the most sustainable solution towards improving crop productivity in a scenario of climate change. In parallel, unraveling the genetic architecture and the targeted identification of molecular networks using modern OMICS analyses, that can underpin drought tolerance mechanisms, is urgently required. Importantly, integrated studies intending to elucidate complex mechanisms can bridge the gap existing in our current knowledge about drought stress tolerance in plants. It is now well established that drought tolerance is regulated by several genes, including transcription factors (TFs that enable plants to withstand unfavorable conditions, and these remain potential genomic candidates for their wide application in crop breeding. These TFs represent the key molecular switches orchestrating the regulation of plant developmental processes in response to a variety of stresses. The current review aims to offer a deeper understanding of TFs engaged in regulating plant’s response under drought stress and to devise potential strategies to improve plant tolerance against drought.

  1. Response of plasma facing components in Tokamaks due to intense energy deposition using Particle-In-Cell (PIC) methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genco, Filippo

    Damage to plasma-facing components (PFC) due to various plasma instabilities is still a major concern for the successful development of fusion energy and represents a significant research obstacle in the community. It is of great importance to fully understand the behavior and lifetime expectancy of PFC under both low energy cycles during normal events and highly energetic events as disruptions, Edge-Localized Modes (ELM), Vertical Displacement Events (VDE), and Run-away electron (RE). The consequences of these high energetic dumps with energy fluxes ranging from 10 MJ/m2 up to 200 MJ/m 2 applied in very short periods (0.1 to 5 ms) can be catastrophic both for safety and economic reasons. Those phenomena can cause a) large temperature increase in the target material b) consequent melting, evaporation and erosion losses due to the extremely high heat fluxes c) possible structural damage and permanent degradation of the entire bulk material with probable burnout of the coolant tubes; d) plasma contamination, transport of target material into the chamber far from where it was originally picked. The modeling of off-normal events such as Disruptions and ELMs requires the simultaneous solution of three main problems along time: a) the heat transfer in the plasma facing component b) the interaction of the produced vapor from the surface with the incoming plasma particles c) the transport of the radiation produced in the vapor-plasma cloud. In addition the moving boundaries problem has to be considered and solved at the material surface. Considering the carbon divertor as target, the moving boundaries are two since for the given conditions, carbon doesn't melt: the plasma front and the moving eroded material surface. The current solution methods for this problem use finite differences and moving coordinates system based on the Crank-Nicholson method and Alternating Directions Implicit Method (ADI). Currently Particle-In-Cell (PIC) methods are widely used for solving

  2. On an Increase of Critical Current in High Temperature Superconductors Doped with $^{238}U$ Due to the Production of Nuclear Photofission Fragment Tracks

    CERN Document Server

    Goncharov, I N

    2001-01-01

    The effect of appreciable increasing J_c(B,T) in HTSC (especially at liquid nitrogen temperatures of 62-78 K and magnetic fields of above 0.5 T) due to the production of fast heavy ion tracks, including those of doped U nuclear fission fragments, is known. The tracks are additional effective pinning-centers. The results described in the literature have been obtained for {235}U doped HTSC after reactor thermal neutron irradiations. Disadvantages of such a method are analyzed in this paper, in particular in case of its use for current-carrying Bi-2223/Ag tape, because a very high radioactivity level slowly decreasing in time arises. The author has suggested to use {238}U nuclear photofission in over a giant resonance energy range (E_gamma ~10-20 MeV). The experimental results obtained after tape irradiation with gamma-quanta (E_gamma \\leq 24 MeV), including a time dependence of radioactivity level, are presented. Possibilities of practical realization of this method are discussed.

  3. Human immune system mice: current potential and limitations for translational research on human antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuyyuru, Raja; Patton, John; Manser, Tim

    2011-12-01

    It has recently become possible to generate chimeric mice durably engrafted with many components of the human immune system (HIS mice). We have characterized the maturation and function of the B cell compartment of HIS mice. The antibody response of HIS mice to T cell-dependent B cell antigens is limited, and contributing factors may be the general immaturity of the B cell compartment, infrequent helper T cells selected on human MHC class II antigens, and incomplete reconstitution of secondary lymphoid organs and their microenvironments. In contrast, HIS mice generate protective antibody responses to the bacterium Borrelia hermsii, which acts as a T cell-independent antigen in mice, but do not respond to purified polysaccharide antigens (PPS). We speculate that the anti-B. hermsii response of HIS mice is derived from an abundant B cell subset that may be analogous to B1 B cells in mice. We suggest that failure of HIS mice to respond to PPS is due to the lack of a B cell subset that may originate from adult bone marrow and is highly dependent on human interleukin-7 for development.

  4. A miniaturized Rogowski current transducer with wide bandwidth and fast response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Hao; Shan, Chao; Liu, Keyin; Chen, Feng; Yang, Qing; Yong, Jiale; Hou, Xun

    2016-11-01

    The miniaturization of the 3D Rogowski current transducer down to the micro-scale is essential for device integration and expansion of its application scope, particularly for ‘lab-on-a-chip’ systems. However, fabrication of 3D miniaturized Rogowski coils remains challenging as most relative methods still rely on the 2D micromachining process. In this paper, a miniaturized Rogowski coil current transducer was fabricated using an improved femtosecond laser wet etching technology and a metal microsolidification process, in which a metal alloy with a relatively high melting point was used and a robust but simple packaging structure based on a conical electrode was developed. The results show that the miniaturized Rogowski coil current transducer reveals a response time of less than 1 ns, high sensitivity and good detection capability for high-frequency electrical signals. The miniaturized Rogowski coil can easily be integrated into functional microsystems and will be widely applicable for high-frequency electric signal detection and circuit protection.

  5. Malignant gliomas: current perspectives in diagnosis, treatment, and early response assessment using advanced quantitative imaging methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed R

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Rafay Ahmed,1 Matthew J Oborski,2 Misun Hwang,1 Frank S Lieberman,3 James M Mountz11Department of Radiology, 2Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 3Department of Neurology and Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USAAbstract: Malignant gliomas consist of glioblastomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, anaplastic oligodendrogliomas and anaplastic oligoastrocytomas, and some less common tumors such as anaplastic ependymomas and anaplastic gangliogliomas. Malignant gliomas have high morbidity and mortality. Even with optimal treatment, median survival is only 12–15 months for glioblastomas and 2–5 years for anaplastic gliomas. However, recent advances in imaging and quantitative analysis of image data have led to earlier diagnosis of tumors and tumor response to therapy, providing oncologists with a greater time window for therapy management. In addition, improved understanding of tumor biology, genetics, and resistance mechanisms has enhanced surgical techniques, chemotherapy methods, and radiotherapy administration. After proper diagnosis and institution of appropriate therapy, there is now a vital need for quantitative methods that can sensitively detect malignant glioma response to therapy at early follow-up times, when changes in management of nonresponders can have its greatest effect. Currently, response is largely evaluated by measuring magnetic resonance contrast and size change, but this approach does not take into account the key biologic steps that precede tumor size reduction. Molecular imaging is ideally suited to measuring early response by quantifying cellular metabolism, proliferation, and apoptosis, activities altered early in treatment. We expect that successful integration of quantitative imaging biomarker assessment into the early phase of clinical trials could provide a novel approach for testing new therapies

  6. Tropical forest responses to increasing [CO2]: current knowledge and opportunities for future research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernusak, Lucas [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Winter, Klaus [Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute; Dalling, James [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Holtum, Joseph [James Cook University; Jaramillo, Carlos [Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute; Korner, Christian [University of Basel; Leakey, Andrew D.B. [University of Illinois; Norby, Richard J [ORNL; Poulter, Benjamin [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environement, France; Turner, Benjamin [Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute; Wright, S. Joseph [Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

    2013-01-01

    Elevated atmospheric [CO2] (ca) will undoubtedly affect the metabolism of tropical forests worldwide; however, critical aspects of how tropical forests will respond remain largely unknown. Here we review the current state of knowledge about physiological and ecological responses, with the aim of providing a framework that can help to guide future experimental research. Modelling studies have indicated that elevated ca can potentially stimulate photosynthesis more in the tropics than at higher latitudes, because suppression of photorespiration by elevated ca increases with temperature. However, canopy leaves in tropical forests could also potentially reach a high temperature threshold under elevated ca that will moderate the rise in photosynthesis. Belowground responses, including fine root production, nutrient foraging, and soil organic matter processing, will be especially important to the integrated ecosystem response to elevated CO2. Water-use efficiency will increase as ca rises, potentially impacting upon soil moisture status and nutrient availability. Recruitment may be differentially altered for some functional groups, potentially decreasing ecosystem carbon storage. Whole-forest CO2 enrichment experiments are urgently needed to test predictions of tropical forest functioning under elevated ca. Smaller scale experiments in the understory and in gaps would also be informative, and could provide stepping stones toward stand-scale manipulations.

  7. Optimal Environmental Conditions and Anomalous Ecosystem Responses: Constraining Bottom-up Controls of Phytoplankton Biomass in the California Current System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacox, Michael G.; Hazen, Elliott L.; Bograd, Steven J.

    2016-06-01

    In Eastern Boundary Current systems, wind-driven upwelling drives nutrient-rich water to the ocean surface, making these regions among the most productive on Earth. Regulation of productivity by changing wind and/or nutrient conditions can dramatically impact ecosystem functioning, though the mechanisms are not well understood beyond broad-scale relationships. Here, we explore bottom-up controls during the California Current System (CCS) upwelling season by quantifying the dependence of phytoplankton biomass (as indicated by satellite chlorophyll estimates) on two key environmental parameters: subsurface nitrate concentration and surface wind stress. In general, moderate winds and high nitrate concentrations yield maximal biomass near shore, while offshore biomass is positively correlated with subsurface nitrate concentration. However, due to nonlinear interactions between the influences of wind and nitrate, bottom-up control of phytoplankton cannot be described by either one alone, nor by a combined metric such as nitrate flux. We quantify optimal environmental conditions for phytoplankton, defined as the wind/nitrate space that maximizes chlorophyll concentration, and present a framework for evaluating ecosystem change relative to environmental drivers. The utility of this framework is demonstrated by (i) elucidating anomalous CCS responses in 1998-1999, 2002, and 2005, and (ii) providing a basis for assessing potential biological impacts of projected climate change.

  8. Optimal Environmental Conditions and Anomalous Ecosystem Responses: Constraining Bottom-up Controls of Phytoplankton Biomass in the California Current System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacox, Michael G; Hazen, Elliott L; Bograd, Steven J

    2016-06-09

    In Eastern Boundary Current systems, wind-driven upwelling drives nutrient-rich water to the ocean surface, making these regions among the most productive on Earth. Regulation of productivity by changing wind and/or nutrient conditions can dramatically impact ecosystem functioning, though the mechanisms are not well understood beyond broad-scale relationships. Here, we explore bottom-up controls during the California Current System (CCS) upwelling season by quantifying the dependence of phytoplankton biomass (as indicated by satellite chlorophyll estimates) on two key environmental parameters: subsurface nitrate concentration and surface wind stress. In general, moderate winds and high nitrate concentrations yield maximal biomass near shore, while offshore biomass is positively correlated with subsurface nitrate concentration. However, due to nonlinear interactions between the influences of wind and nitrate, bottom-up control of phytoplankton cannot be described by either one alone, nor by a combined metric such as nitrate flux. We quantify optimal environmental conditions for phytoplankton, defined as the wind/nitrate space that maximizes chlorophyll concentration, and present a framework for evaluating ecosystem change relative to environmental drivers. The utility of this framework is demonstrated by (i) elucidating anomalous CCS responses in 1998-1999, 2002, and 2005, and (ii) providing a basis for assessing potential biological impacts of projected climate change.

  9. A discrete element model of laser beam induced current (LBIC) due to the lateral photovoltaic effect in open-circuit HgCdTe photodiodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fynn, K.A.; Faraone, L. [Univ. of Western Australia, Nedlands (Australia). Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Bajaj, J. [Rockwell International Science Center, Thousand Oaks, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The non-destructive optical characterization technique of Laser-Beam-Induced-Current (LBIC) imaging has proven useful in qualitatively assessing electrically active defects and localized non-uniformities in HgCdTe materials and devices used for infrared photovoltaic arrays. To further the development of a quantitative working model for LBIC, this paper focuses on the application of the technique to photovoltaic structures that are represented by a discrete element equivalent circuit. For this particular case the LBIC signal arises due to the lateral photovoltaic effect in non-uniformly illuminated open-circuit photodiodes. The outcomes of the model predict all of the experimentally observed geometrical features of the LBIC image and signal. Furthermore, the model indicates that the LBIC signal has an extremely weak dependence on the p-n junction reverse saturation current, and shows a linear dependence with laser power. This latter feature may be useful for non-contact measurement of the quantum efficiency of individual photodiodes within a large two-dimensional focal plane array. The decay of the LBIC signal outside the physical boundary of the p-n junction is of the same form as the roll-off in the short circuit photoresponse and, therefore, can be used to extract the diffusion length of minority carriers. Experimental data are obtained from an arsenic implanted p-on-n junction fabricated on MBE grown Hg{sub 1{minus}x}Cd{sub x}Te material with an x-value of 0.3. The p-on-n diode is shown to be uniform and of high quality with an R{sub o}A product of 1 {times} 10{sup 8} {Omega}{center_dot}cm{sup 2} at 77 K. The validity of the simple model developed in this paper, is confirmed by the excellent agreement with experimental results. Consequently, the LBIC technique is shown to be an appropriate diagnostic tool for non-contact quantitative analysis of semiconductor materials and devices.

  10. Biological responses to current UV-B radiation in Arctic regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian; N. Mikkelsen, Teis; Ro-Poulsen, Helge

    Depletion of the ozone layer and the consequent increase in solar ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) may impact living conditions for arctic plants significantly. In order to evaluate how the prevailing UV-B fluxes affect the heath ecosystem at Zackenberg (74°30'N, 20°30'W) and other high......-arctic regions, manipulation experiments with various set-ups have been performed. Activation of plant defence mechanisms by production of UV-B absorbing compounds was significant in ambient UV-B in comparison to a filter treatment reducing the UV-B radiation. Despite the UV-B screening response, ambient UV...... (mycorrhiza) or in the biomass of microbes in the soil of the root zone. However, the composition of the soil microbial community was different in the soils under ambient and reduced UV radiation after three treatment years. These results provide new insight into the negative impact of current UV-B fluxes...

  11. High-grade glioma management and response assessment—recent advances and current challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M.N.; Sharma, A.M.; Pitz, M.; Loewen, S.K.; Quon, H.; Poulin, A.; Essig, M.

    2016-01-01

    The management of high-grade gliomas (hggs) is complex and ever-evolving. The standard of care for the treatment of hggs consists of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. However, treatment options are influenced by multiple factors such as patient age and performance status, extent of tumour resection, biomarker profile, and tumour histology and grade. Follow-up cranial magnetic resonance imaging (mri) to differentiate treatment response from treatment effect can be challenging and affects clinical decision-making. An assortment of advanced radiologic techniques—including perfusion imaging with dynamic susceptibility contrast mri, dynamic contrast-enhanced mri, diffusion-weighted imaging, proton spectroscopy, mri subtraction imaging, and amino acid radiotracer imaging—can now incorporate novel physiologic data, providing new methods to help characterize tumour progression, pseudoprogression, and pseudoresponse. In the present review, we provide an overview of current treatment options for hgg and summarize recent advances and challenges in imaging technology. PMID:27536188

  12. Variability of hemodynamic responses to acute digitalization in chronic cardiac failure due to cardiomyopathy and coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, K; Selzer, A; Kersh, E S; Karpman, L S; Goldschlager, N

    1975-04-01

    Eight patients with chronic congestive heart failure (four with cardiomyopathy and four with ischemic heart disease) underwent hemodynamic studies during acute administration of digoxin, given intravenously in two 0-5 mg doses 2 hours apart. Observations were made before administration of digitalis (control period) and serially therafter for 4 hours after the first dose. Resting mean cardiac index and pulmonary arterial wedge pressure were as follows: 2.0 liters/min per m2 and 23 mm Hg (control period); 2.1 and 24 (at 1 hour); 2.0 and 23 (at 2 hours); 2.7 and 19 (at 3 hours); and 2.3 and 20 (at 4 hours). Exercise responses of mean cardiac index and pulmonary arterial wedge pressure in five patients were: 3.1 liters/min per m2 and 36 mm Hg (control period); 3.2 and 33 (at 1 hour); 3.2 and 28 (at 2 hours); 3.1 and 27 (at.3 hours); and 3.4 and 31 (at 4 hours). The pulmonary arterial wedge pressure remained elevated during exercise in all cases. Arrhythmias were seen in five patients after administration of 0.5 mg of digoxin. Hemodynamic improvement at 4 hours involving both reduced filling pressure and increased blood flow was observed in only two patients at rest and in one additional patient during exercise. Acute deterioration of cardiac function (elevated pulmonary arterial wedge pressure of decreased cardiac index) occurred 30 minutes after administration of digoxin in four patients, concomitantly with increased systemic resistance. In six patients, a peak hemodynamic effect appeared 1 to 1 1/2 hours after administration of digoxin, with partial or total loss of initial benefit by 2 and 4 hours. In previously performed studies observations have seldom exceeded 1 hour; the results of this 4 hour study suggest that, in patients with cardiomyopathy or coronary artery disease and chronic congestive heart failure, acute digitalization does not necessarily lead to consistent, marked or lasting hemodynamic improvement. Thus, current concepts of the use of digitalis is

  13. Aging Reduces L-Type Calcium Channel Current and the Vasodilatory Response of Small Mesenteric Arteries to Calcium Channel Blockers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarwani, Sulayma A.; Mansour, Fathi; Khan, Abdul Aleem; Al-Lawati, Intisar; Al-Kaabi, Abdulla; Al-Busaidi, Al-Manar; Al-Hadhrami, Safa; Al-Husseini, Isehaq; Al-Siyabi, Sultan; Tanira, Musbah O.

    2016-01-01

    Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are widely used to treat cardiovascular disease (CVD) including hypertension. As aging is an independent risk factor for CVD, the use of CCBs increases with increasing age. Hence, this study was designed to evaluate the effect of aging on the sensitivity of small mesenteric arteries to L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (LTCC) blockers and also to investigate whether there was a concomitant change in calcium current density. Third order mesenteric arteries from male F344 rats, aged 2.5–3 months (young) and 22–26 months (old) were mounted on wire myograph to measure the tension during isometric contraction. Arteries were contracted with 100 mM KCl and were then relaxed in a cumulative concentration-response dependent manner with nifedipine (0.1 nM–1 μM), verapamil (0.1 nM–10 μM), or diltiazem (0.1 nM–10 μM). Relaxation-concentration response curves produced by cumulative concentrations of three different CCBs in arteries of old rats were shifted to the right with statistically significant IC50s. pIC50 ± s.e.m: (8.37 ± 0.06 vs. 8.04 ± 0.05, 7.40 ± 0.07 vs. 6.81 ± 0.04, and 6.58 ± 0.07 vs. 6.34 ± 0.06) in young vs. old. It was observed that the maximal contractions induced by phenylephrine and reversed by sodium nitroprusside were not different between young and old groups. However, Bay K 8644 (1 μM) increased resting tension by 23 ± 4.8% in young arteries and 4.7 ± 1.6% in old arteries. LTCC current density were also significantly lower in old arteries (−2.77 ± 0.45 pA/pF) compared to young arteries (−4.5 ± 0.40 pA/pF); with similar steady-state activation and inactivation curves. Parallel to this reduction, the expression of Cav1.2 protein was reduced by 57 ± 5% in arteries from old rats compared to those from young rats. In conclusion, our results suggest that aging reduces the response of small mesenteric arteries to the vasodilatory effect of the CCBs and this may be due to, at least in part, reduced

  14. Aging Reduces L-type Calcium Channel Current and the Vasodilatory Response of Small Mesenteric Arteries to Calcium Channel Blockers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulayma A Albarwani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Calcium channel blockers are widely used to treat cardiovascular disease (CVD including hypertension. As aging is an independent risk factor for CVD, the use of calcium channel blockers increases with increasing age. Hence, this study was designed to evaluate the effect of aging on the sensitivity of small mesenteric arteries to L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (LTCC blockers and also to investigate whether there was a concomitant change in calcium current density. Third order mesenteric arteries from male F344 rats, aged 2.5 - 3 months (young and 22 - 26 months (old were mounted on wire myograph to measure the tension during isometric contraction. Arteries were contracted with 100 mM KCl and were then relaxed in a cumulative concentration-response dependent manner with nifedipine (0.1nM - 10 µM, verapamil (0.1nM-10 µM or diltiazem (0.1nM - 10µM. Relaxation-concentration response curves produced by cumulative concentrations of three different calcium channel blockers (CCBs in arteries of old rats were shifted to the right with statistically significant IC50s. pEC50 ± s.e.m: (8.37 ± 0.06 vs 8.04 ± 0.05 , 7.40 ± 0.07 vs 6.81 ± 0.04 and 6.58 ± 0.07 vs 6.34 ± 0.06 in young vs old. It was observed that the maximal contractions induced by 100 mM KCl, phenylephrine and reversed by sodium nitroprusside were not different between young and old groups. However, Bay K 8644 increased resting tension by 23±4.8% in young arteries and 4.7±1.6% in old arteries. LTCC current density were also significantly lower in old arteries (-2.77 ± 0.45 pA/pF compared to young arteries (-4.5 ± 0.40 pA/pF; with similar steady-state activation and inactivation curves. Parallel to this reduction, the expression of Cav1.2 protein was reduced by 57 ± 5% in arteries from old rats compared to those from young rats. In conclusion, our results suggest that aging reduces the response of small mesenteric arteries to the vasodilatory effect of the CCBs and this may

  15. Thermal stimulated current response in cupric oxide single crystal thin films over a wide temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kungan; Wu, Shuxiang; Yu, Fengmei; Zhou, Wenqi; Wang, Yunjia; Meng, Meng; Wang, Gaili; Zhang, Yueli; Li, Shuwei

    2017-01-01

    Cupric oxide single crystal thin films (~26 nm) were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectra and in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction show that the thin films are 2  ×  2 reconstructed with an in-plane compression and out-of-plane stretching. A thermal stimulated current measurement indicates that the electric polarization response is shown in the special 2D cupric oxide single crystal thin film over a wide temperature range from 130 K to near-room temperature. We infer that the abnormal electric response involves the changing of phase transition temperature induced by structure distortion, the spin frustration and the magnetic fluctuation effect of a short-range magnetic order, or the combined action of both of the two factors mentioned above. This work suggests a promising clue for finding new room temperature single phase multiferroics or tuning phase transition temperatures.

  16. Reducing aggressive responses to social exclusion using transcranial direct current stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Paolo; Romero Lauro, Leonor J; DeWall, C Nathan; Chester, David S; Bushman, Brad J

    2015-03-01

    A vast body of research showed that social exclusion can trigger aggression. However, the neural mechanisms involved in regulating aggressive responses to social exclusion are still largely unknown. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) modulates the excitability of a target region. Building on studies suggesting that activity in the right ventrolateral pre-frontal cortex (rVLPFC) might aid the regulation or inhibition of social exclusion-related distress, we hypothesized that non-invasive brain polarization through tDCS over the rVLPFC would reduce behavioral aggression following social exclusion. Participants were socially excluded or included while they received tDCS or sham stimulation to the rVLPFC. Next, they received an opportunity to aggress. Excluded participants demonstrated cognitive awareness of their inclusionary status, yet tDCS (but not sham stimulation) reduced their behavioral aggression. Excluded participants who received tDCS stimulation were no more aggressive than included participants. tDCS stimulation did not influence socially included participants' aggression. Our findings provide the first causal test for the role of rVLPFC in modulating aggressive responses to social exclusion. Our findings suggest that modulating activity in a brain area (i.e. the rVLPFC) implicated in self-control and emotion regulation can break the link between social exclusion and aggression.

  17. Observation of ocean current response to 1998 Hurricane Georges in the Gulf of Mexico

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The ocean current response to a hurricane on the shelf-break is examined. The study area is the DeSoto Canyon in the northeast Gulf of Mexico, and the event is the passage of 1998 Hurricane Georges with a maximum wind speed of 49 m/s. The data sets used for analysis consist of the mooring data taken by the Field Program of the DeSoto Canyon Eddy Intrusion Study, and simultaneous winds observed by NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) Moored Buoy 42040. Time-depth ocean current energy density images derived from the observed data show that the ocean currents respond almost immediately to the hurricane with important differences on and offthe shelf. On the shelf, in the shallow water of 100 m, the disturbance penetrates rapidly downward to the bottom and forms two energy peaks, the major peak is located in the mixed layer and the secondary one in the lower layer. The response dissipates quickly after external forcing disappears. Off the shelf, in the deep water, the major disturbance energy seems to be trapped in the mixed layer with a trailing oscillation; although the disturbance signals may still be observed at the depths of 500 and 1 290 m. Vertical dispersion analysis reveals that the near-initial wave packet generated off the shelf consists of two modes. One is a barotropic wave mode characterized by a fast decay rate of velocity amplitude of 0.020 s-1, and the other is baroclinic wave mode characterized by a slow decay rate of 0.006 9 s-1. The band-pass-filtering and empirical function techniques are employed to the frequency analysis. The results indicate that all frequencies shift above the local inertial frequency. On the shelf, the average frequency is 1.04fin the mixed layer, close to the diagnosed frequency of the first baroclinic mode, and the average frequency increases to 1.07fin the thermocline.Off the shelf, all frequencies are a little smaller than the diagnosed frequency of the first mode. The average frequency decreases from 1

  18. Variations in insulin responsiveness in rat fat cells are due to metabolic differences rather than insulin binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Finn Mølgård; Nilsson, Poul; Sonne, Ole

    1983-01-01

    Insulin resistance was studied by comparing insulin response and insulin binding in four groups of rats. Glucose metabolism in isolated fat cells from male Wistar rats weighing 340 g was less responsive to a supramaximal dose of insulin than glucose metabolism in fat cells from rats weighing 200 ...

  19. Top-Down Effect of Direct Current Stimulation on the Nociceptive Response of Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimov, Luiz Fabio; Franciosi, Adriano Cardozo; Campos, Ana Carolina Pinheiro; Brunoni, André Russowsky

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is an emerging, noninvasive technique of neurostimulation for treating pain. However, the mechanisms and pathways involved in its analgesic effects are poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated the effects of direct current stimulation (DCS) on thermal and mechanical nociceptive thresholds and on the activation of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) and the dorsal horn of the spinal cord (DHSC) in rats; these central nervous system areas are associated with pain processing. Male Wistar rats underwent cathodal DCS of the motor cortex and, while still under stimulation, were evaluated using tail-flick and paw pressure nociceptive tests. Sham stimulation and naive rats were used as controls. We used a randomized design; the assays were not blinded to the experimenter. Immunoreactivity of the early growth response gene 1 (Egr-1), which is a marker of neuronal activation, was evaluated in the PAG and DHSC, and enkephalin immunoreactivity was evaluated in the DHSC. DCS did not change the thermal nociceptive threshold; however, it increased the mechanical nociceptive threshold of both hind paws compared with that of controls, characterizing a topographical effect. DCS decreased the Egr-1 labeling in the PAG and DHSC as well as the immunoreactivity of spinal enkephalin. Altogether, the data suggest that DCS disinhibits the midbrain descending analgesic pathway, consequently inhibiting spinal nociceptive neurons and causing an increase in the nociceptive threshold. This study reinforces the idea that the motor cortex participates in the neurocircuitry that is involved in analgesia and further clarifies the mechanisms of action of tDCS in pain treatment. PMID:27071073

  20. HIV-induced immunodeficiency. Relatively preserved phytohemagglutinin as opposed to decreased pokeweed mitogen responses may be due to possibly preserved responses via CD2/phytohemagglutinin pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, B; Jakobsen, K D; Odum, N

    1989-01-01

    We studied the proliferative response of PBL to the mitogens PHA and PWM and Candida albicans Ag in 301 HIV seropositive homosexual men, of whom 55 had AIDS. The responses to PHA were reduced only in the clinically ill HIV seropositive subjects. In contrast, the responses to PWM were profoundly...... and eight controls were chosen for the following studies. Expression of T3, Ti, delta receptors, and CD2 was investigated and showed an increased percentage of CD2 receptors positive cells in HIV seropositive subjects without AIDS. The proliferative responses of PBL to stimulation with PHA, PWM, antibodies...... to CD3, or antibodies to CD2 were investigated and showed significant correlation in controls, whereas in contrast, only the responses to PHA and CD2ab correlated in patients with AIDS. The proliferative responses to CD2ab and CD3ab in controls were larger than the responses to both PHA and PWM...

  1. Surface Modified Multifunctional and Stimuli Responsive Nanoparticles for Drug Targeting: Current Status and Uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siafaka, Panoraia I.; Üstündağ Okur, Neslihan; Karavas, Evangelos; Bikiaris, Dimitrios N.

    2016-01-01

    Nanocarriers, due to their unique features, are of increased interest among researchers working with pharmaceutical formulations. Polymeric nanoparticles and nanocapsules, involving non-toxic biodegradable polymers, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, and inorganic–organic nanomaterials, are among the most used carriers for drugs for a broad spectrum of targeted diseases. In fact, oral, injectable, transdermal-dermal and ocular formulations mainly consist of the aforementioned nanomaterials demonstrating promising characteristics such as long circulation, specific targeting, high drug loading capacity, enhanced intracellular penetration, and so on. Over the last decade, huge advances in the development of novel, safer and less toxic nanocarriers with amended properties have been made. In addition, multifunctional nanocarriers combining chemical substances, vitamins and peptides via coupling chemistry, inorganic particles coated by biocompatible materials seem to play a key role considering that functionalization can enhance characteristics such as biocompatibility, targetability, environmental friendliness, and intracellular penetration while also have limited side effects. This review aims to summarize the “state of the art” of drug delivery carriers in nanosize, paying attention to their surface functionalization with ligands and other small or polymeric compounds so as to upgrade active and passive targeting, different release patterns as well as cell targeting and stimuli responsibility. Lastly, future aspects and potential uses of nanoparticulated drug systems are outlined. PMID:27589733

  2. A comparison between exposure-response relationships for wind turbine annoyance and annoyance due to other noise sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, S.A.; Vos, H.; Eisses, A.R.; Eja Pedersen, E.

    2011-01-01

    Surveys have shown that noise from wind turbines is perceived as annoying by a proportion of residents living in their vicinity, apparently at much lower noise levels than those inducing annoyance due to other environmental sources. The aim of the present study was to derive the exposureresponse

  3. The contribution of interindividual factors to variability of response in transcranial direct current stimulation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia M Li

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been an explosion of research using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS for investigating and modulating human cognitive and motor function in healthy populations. It has also been used in many studies seeking to improve deficits in disease populations. With the slew of studies reporting ‘promising results’ for everything from motor recovery after stroke to boosting memory function, one could be easily seduced by the idea of tDCS being the next panacea for all neurological ills. However, huge variability exists in the reported effects of tDCS, with great variability in the effect sizes and even contradictory results reported. In this review, we consider the interindividual factors that may contribute to this variability. In particular, we discuss the importance of baseline neuronal state and features, anatomy, age and the inherent variability in the injured brain. We additionally consider how interindividual variability affects the results of motor evoked potential (MEP testing with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, which, in turn, can lead to apparent variability in response to tDCS in motor studies.

  4. Stress response of bovine artery and rat brain tissue due to combined translational shear and fixed unconfined compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Lauren

    During trauma resulting from impacts and blast waves, sinusoidal waves permeate the brain and cranial arterial tissue, both non-homogeneous biological tissues with high fluid contents. The experimental shear stress response to sinusoidal translational shear deformation at 1 Hz and 25% strain amplitude and either 0% or 33% compression is compared for rat brain tissue and bovine aortic tissue. Both tissues exhibit Mullins effect in shear. Harmonic wavelet decomposition, a novel application to the mechanical response of these tissues, shows significant 1 Hz and 3 Hz components. The 3 Hz component magnitude in brain tissue, which is much larger than in aortic tissue, may correlate to interstitial fluid induced drag forces that decrease on subsequent cycles perhaps because of damage resulting in easier fluid movement. The fluid may cause the quasiperiodic, viscoelastic behavior of brain tissue. The mechanical response differences under impact may cause shear damage between arterial and brain connections.

  5. Ringing in the pulse response of long and wideband coaxial transmission lines due to group delay dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotzian,G.; de Maria,R.; Caspers, F.; Federmann, S.; Hofle, W.

    2009-05-04

    In particle accelerators coaxial cables are commonly used to transmit wideband beam signals covering many decades of frequencies over long distances. Those transmission lines often have a corrugated outer and/or inner conductor. This particular construction exhibits a significant amount of frequency dependent group delay variation. A comparison of simulations based on theoretical models, numerical simulations and S{sub 21} network analyzer measurements up to 2.5 GHz is presented. It is shown how the non-linear phase response and varying group delay leads to ringing in the pulse response and subsequent distortion of signal s transmitted through such coaxial transmission lines.

  6. Spatial inhomogeneities in the energy response of a tunnel junction detector due to penetration of Abrikosov vortices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grand, le J.B.; Martin, J.; Gross, R.; Hubener, R.P.; Hamster, A.W.; Brons, G.C.S.; Adelerhof, D.J.; Flokstra, J.; Korte, de P.A.J.

    1996-01-01

    For the application of superconductive tunnel junctions (STJs) as high resolution X-ray detectors the homogeneity of the detector response is of utmost importance. In this article it is shown how this homogeneity is degraded by the penetration of Abrikosov vortices (AVs) into the junction electrodes

  7. Defining Clinical Response Criteria and Early Response Criteria for Precision Oncology: Current State-of-the-Art and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Subbiah

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this era of precision oncology, there has been an exponential growth in the armamentarium of genomically targeted therapies and immunotherapies. Evaluating early responses to precision therapy is essential for “go” versus “no go” decisions for these molecularly targeted drugs and agents that arm the immune system. Many different response assessment criteria exist for use in solid tumors and lymphomas. We reviewed the literature using the Medline/PubMed database for keywords “response assessment” and various known response assessment criteria published up to 2016. In this article we review the commonly used response assessment criteria. We present a decision tree to facilitate selection of appropriate criteria. We also suggest methods for standardization of various response assessment criteria. The relevant response assessment criteria were further studied for rational of development, key features, proposed use and acceptance by various entities. We also discuss early response evaluation and provide specific case studies of early response to targeted therapy. With high-throughput, advanced computing programs and digital data-mining it is now possible to acquire vast amount of high quality imaging data opening up a new field of “omics in radiology”—radiomics that complements genomics for personalized medicine. Radiomics is rapidly evolving and is still in the research arena. This cutting-edge technology is poised to move soon to the mainstream clinical arena. Novel agents with new mechanisms of action require advanced molecular imaging as imaging biomarkers. There is an urgent need for development of standardized early response assessment criteria for evaluation of response to precision therapy.

  8. Current impulse response of thin InP p+-i-n+ diodes using full band structure Monte Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, A. H.; Cheang, P. L.

    2007-02-01

    A random response time model to compute the statistics of the avalanche buildup time of double-carrier multiplication in avalanche photodiodes (APDs) using full band structure Monte Carlo (FBMC) method is discussed. The effect of feedback impact ionization process and the dead-space effect on random response time are included in order to simulate the speed of APD. The time response of InP p+-i-n+ diodes with the multiplication region of 0.2μm is presented. Finally, the FBMC model is used to calculate the current impulse response of the thin InP p+-i-n+ diodes with multiplication lengths of 0.05 and 0.2μm using Ramo's theorem [Proc. IRE 27, 584 (1939)]. The simulated current impulse response of the FBMC model is compared to the results simulated from a simple Monte Carlo model.

  9. Extreme oceanographic forcing and coastal response due to the 2015-2016 El Niño.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Patrick L; Hoover, Daniel; Hubbard, David M; Snyder, Alex; Ludka, Bonnie C; Allan, Jonathan; Kaminsky, George M; Ruggiero, Peter; Gallien, Timu W; Gabel, Laura; McCandless, Diana; Weiner, Heather M; Cohn, Nicholas; Anderson, Dylan L; Serafin, Katherine A

    2017-02-14

    The El Niño-Southern Oscillation is the dominant mode of interannual climate variability across the Pacific Ocean basin, with influence on the global climate. The two end members of the cycle, El Niño and La Niña, force anomalous oceanographic conditions and coastal response along the Pacific margin, exposing many heavily populated regions to increased coastal flooding and erosion hazards. However, a quantitative record of coastal impacts is spatially limited and temporally restricted to only the most recent events. Here we report on the oceanographic forcing and coastal response of the 2015-2016 El Niño, one of the strongest of the last 145 years. We show that winter wave energy equalled or exceeded measured historical maxima across the US West Coast, corresponding to anomalously large beach erosion across the region. Shorelines in many areas retreated beyond previously measured landward extremes, particularly along the sediment-starved California coast.

  10. Extreme oceanographic forcing and coastal response due to the 2015–2016 El Niño

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Patrick; Hoover, Daniel J.; Hubbard, David M.; Snyder, Alexander; Ludka, Bonnie C.; Allan, Jonathan; Kaminsky, George M.; Ruggiero,; Gallien, Timu W.; Gabel, Laura; McCandless, Diana; Weiner, Heather M.; Cohn, Nicholas; Anderson, Dylan L.; Serafin, Katherine A.

    2017-01-01

    The El Niño-Southern Oscillation is the dominant mode of interannual climate variability across the Pacific Ocean basin, with influence on the global climate. The two end members of the cycle, El Niño and La Niña, force anomalous oceanographic conditions and coastal response along the Pacific margin, exposing many heavily populated regions to increased coastal flooding and erosion hazards. However, a quantitative record of coastal impacts is spatially limited and temporally restricted to only the most recent events. Here we report on the oceanographic forcing and coastal response of the 2015–2016 El Niño, one of the strongest of the last 145 years. We show that winter wave energy equalled or exceeded measured historical maxima across the US West Coast, corresponding to anomalously large beach erosion across the region. Shorelines in many areas retreated beyond previously measured landward extremes, particularly along the sediment-starved California coast.

  11. Extreme oceanographic forcing and coastal response due to the 2015-2016 El Niño

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Hoover, Daniel; Hubbard, David M.; Snyder, Alex; Ludka, Bonnie C.; Allan, Jonathan; Kaminsky, George M.; Ruggiero, Peter; Gallien, Timu W.; Gabel, Laura; McCandless, Diana; Weiner, Heather M.; Cohn, Nicholas; Anderson, Dylan L.; Serafin, Katherine A.

    2017-02-01

    The El Niño-Southern Oscillation is the dominant mode of interannual climate variability across the Pacific Ocean basin, with influence on the global climate. The two end members of the cycle, El Niño and La Niña, force anomalous oceanographic conditions and coastal response along the Pacific margin, exposing many heavily populated regions to increased coastal flooding and erosion hazards. However, a quantitative record of coastal impacts is spatially limited and temporally restricted to only the most recent events. Here we report on the oceanographic forcing and coastal response of the 2015-2016 El Niño, one of the strongest of the last 145 years. We show that winter wave energy equalled or exceeded measured historical maxima across the US West Coast, corresponding to anomalously large beach erosion across the region. Shorelines in many areas retreated beyond previously measured landward extremes, particularly along the sediment-starved California coast.

  12. Recovery Sleep Reverses Impaired Response Inhibition due to Sleep Restriction: Evidence from a Visual Event Related Potentials Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Jin

    Full Text Available To investigate response inhibition after total sleep deprivation (TSD and the restorative effects of one night of recovery sleep (RS.Fourteen healthy male participants performed a visual Go/NoGo task, and electroencephalogram recordings were conducted at five time points: (1 baseline, (2 after 12 h of TSD, (3 after 24 h of TSD, (4 after 36 h of TSD, and (5 following 8 h of RS. The dynamic changes in response inhibition during TSD and after 8 h of RS were investigated by examining the NoGo-N2 and NoGo-P3 event-related potential components.Compared with baseline, NoGo-P3 amplitudes were decreased, while the NoGo-N2 latency increased along with the awake time prolonged. NoGo anteriorization, which was minimized after 24 h of TSD, progressively decreased with increasing TSD. After 8 h of RS, recoveries of both the NoGo-P3 amplitude and NoGo-N2 latency in the prefrontal cortex were observed compared with the values after 36 h of TSD.TSD induced a dose-dependent functional decline in the response inhibition of NoGo-N2 and NoGo-P3 on prefrontal cortex activation, and 8 h of RS resulted in recovery or maintenance of the response inhibition. However, it was not restored to baseline levels.Participants were chosen male college students only, thus the findings cannot be generalized to older people and women. Additionally, the sample size was small, and, thus, speculations on the meaning of the results of this study should be cautious. The EEG continuous recording should be employed to monitor the decline of alertness following TSD.

  13. Manual responses to visual stimuli: early and late facilitatory effects due to the offset of a peripheral cue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Machado-Pinheiro

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Manual and saccadic reaction times (MRTs and SRTs are reduced when a warning signal precedes the onset of a target. The decreasing on SRTs observed after the offset of a fixation point has been called the gap effect. Different theories have been proposed to explain it. According to some authors, the offset also allows the saccadic system to generate a separate population of SRTs, the express saccades. Nevertheless there is no agreement about the influence of the offset of a peripheral stimulus on MRT. In two experiments we tested the effects of a peripheral visual offset used as preparatory signal on MRTs to a target after variable intervals. We found a reduction on MRT at short (200-300 ms and long (1300-2000 ms intervals after the peripheral offset. MRT distribution shifted toward short latencies, which sometimes formed a separate population. Since MRTs obtained at long intervals were affected by the introduction of catch trials, while MRTs at short intervals were not, we propose that two different mechanisms are involved in the decreasing of MRTs: warning and temporal expectancy. Our data support the hypothesis that the temporal component involved with the preparatory stages for motor responses can be shared by saccadic movements and key press responses, allowing the reduction on motor latencies after the visual offset in the gap paradigm. Our data corroborate the three components model for the gap effect. In our view, the question of the existence or not of a gap effect for manual responses is essentially conceptual.

  14. Giant magnetoresistance due to magnetoelectric currents in Sr{sub 3}Co{sub 2}Fe{sub 24}O{sub 41} hexaferrites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xian [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Center for Microwave Magnetic Materials and Integrated Circuits, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Su, Zhijuan; Sokolov, Alexander; Hu, Bolin; Andalib, Parisa; Chen, Yajie, E-mail: y.chen@neu.edu; Harris, Vincent G. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Center for Microwave Magnetic Materials and Integrated Circuits, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    The giant magnetoresistance and magnetoelectric (ME) effects of Z-type hexaferrite Sr{sub 3}Co{sub 2}Fe{sub 24}O{sub 41} were investigated. The present experiments indicated that an induced magnetoelectric current in a transverse conical spin structure not only presented a nonlinear behavior with magnetic field and electric field but also depended upon a sweep rate of the applied magnetic field. More interestingly, the ME current induced magnetoresistance was measured, yielding a giant room temperature magnetoresistance of 32.2% measured at low magnetic fields (∼125 Oe). These results reveal great potential for emerging applications of multifunctional magnetoelectric ferrite materials.

  15. The placebo response in clinical trials-the current state of play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enck, Paul; Klosterhalfen, Sibylle

    2013-04-01

    While randomized, placebo-controlled double-blinded trials have become the pharmacological standard over the last 60 years, the gain in knowledge of the mechanisms behind the placebo response in recent years has raised substantial concerns about the appropriateness of some of its underlying assumptions. The following questions will be addressed: Is the assumed model of drug and placebo being additive (still) valid? Does the likelihood of receiving active treatment affect the placebo response? What is the size of the placebo response in "active comparator studies"? Minimizing the placebo response/maximizing the drug-placebo difference? How to maximize the placebo response in daily medicine? What is the placebo response with personalized medicines in the future? This and other questions require answers that can only be generated with more experimental studies on the placebo response and with thorough meta- and re-analyses of placebo responses in clinical trials.

  16. Altered cement hydration and subsequently modified porosity, permeability and compressive strength of mortar specimens due to the influence of electrical current

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanto, A.; Koleva, D.A.; Van Breugel, K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the influence of stray current flow on microstructural prop-erties, i.e. pore connectivity and permeability of mortar specimens, and link these to the observed alterations in mechanical properties and cement hydration. Mortar specimens were partly submerged in water and calcium

  17. Altered cement hydration and subsequently modified porosity, permeability and compressive strength of mortar specimens due to the influence of electrical current

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanto, A.; Koleva, D.A.; Van Breugel, K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the influence of stray current flow on microstructural prop-erties, i.e. pore connectivity and permeability of mortar specimens, and link these to the observed alterations in mechanical properties and cement hydration. Mortar specimens were partly submerged in water and calcium

  18. Magnetic field effects on the vestibular system: calculation of the pressure on the cupula due to ionic current-induced Lorentz force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, A.; Glover, P. M.; Li, Y.; Mian, O. S.; Day, B. L.

    2012-07-01

    Large static magnetic fields may be employed in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). At high magnetic field strengths (usually from about 3 T and above) it is possible for humans to perceive a number of effects. One such effect is mild vertigo. Recently, Roberts et al (2011 Current Biology 21 1635-40) proposed a Lorentz-force mechanism resulting from the ionic currents occurring naturally in the endolymph of the vestibular system. In the present work a more detailed calculation of the forces and resulting pressures in the vestibular system is carried out using a numerical model. Firstly, realistic 3D finite element conductivity and fluid maps of the utricle and a single semi-circular canal containing the current sources (dark cells) and sinks (hair cells) of the utricle and ampulla were constructed. Secondly, the electrical current densities in the fluid are calculated. Thirdly, the developed Lorentz force is used directly in the Navier-Stokes equation and the trans-cupular pressure is computed. Since the driving force field is relatively large in comparison with the advective acceleration, we demonstrate that it is possible to perform an approximation in the Navier-Stokes equations that reduces the problem to solving a simpler Poisson equation. This simplification allows rapid and easy calculation for many different directions of applied magnetic field. At 7 T a maximum cupula pressure difference of 1.6 mPa was calculated for the combined ampullar (0.7 µA) and utricular (3.31 µA) distributed current sources, assuming a hair-cell resting current of 100 pA per unit. These pressure values are up to an order of magnitude lower than those proposed by Roberts et al using a simplistic model and calculation, and are in good agreement with the estimated pressure values for nystagmus velocities in caloric experiments. This modeling work supports the hypothesis that the Lorentz force mechanism is a significant contributor to the perception of magnetic field induced vertigo.

  19. Magnetic field effects on the vestibular system: calculation of the pressure on the cupula due to ionic current-induced Lorentz force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, A; Glover, P M; Li, Y; Mian, O S; Day, B L

    2012-07-21

    Large static magnetic fields may be employed in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). At high magnetic field strengths (usually from about 3 T and above) it is possible for humans to perceive a number of effects. One such effect is mild vertigo. Recently, Roberts et al (2011 Current Biology 21 1635-40) proposed a Lorentz-force mechanism resulting from the ionic currents occurring naturally in the endolymph of the vestibular system. In the present work a more detailed calculation of the forces and resulting pressures in the vestibular system is carried out using a numerical model. Firstly, realistic 3D finite element conductivity and fluid maps of the utricle and a single semi-circular canal containing the current sources (dark cells) and sinks (hair cells) of the utricle and ampulla were constructed. Secondly, the electrical current densities in the fluid are calculated. Thirdly, the developed Lorentz force is used directly in the Navier-Stokes equation and the trans-cupular pressure is computed. Since the driving force field is relatively large in comparison with the advective acceleration, we demonstrate that it is possible to perform an approximation in the Navier-Stokes equations that reduces the problem to solving a simpler Poisson equation. This simplification allows rapid and easy calculation for many different directions of applied magnetic field. At 7 T a maximum cupula pressure difference of 1.6 mPa was calculated for the combined ampullar (0.7 µA) and utricular (3.31 µA) distributed current sources, assuming a hair-cell resting current of 100 pA per unit. These pressure values are up to an order of magnitude lower than those proposed by Roberts et al using a simplistic model and calculation, and are in good agreement with the estimated pressure values for nystagmus velocities in caloric experiments. This modeling work supports the hypothesis that the Lorentz force mechanism is a significant contributor to the perception of magnetic field induced vertigo.

  20. Modeling of the saturation current of a fission chamber taking into account the distorsion of electric field due to space charge effects

    CERN Document Server

    Poujade, O; Poujade, Olivier; Lebrun, Alain

    1999-01-01

    Fission chambers were first made fifty years ago for neutron detection. At the moment, the French Atomic Energy Commission \\textsf{(CEA-Cadarache)} is developing a sub-miniature fission chamber technology with a diameter of 1.5 mm working in the current mode (Bign). To be able to measure intense fluxes, it is necessary to adjust the chamber geometry and the gas pressure before testing it under real neutron flux. In the present paper, we describe a theoretical method to foresee the current-voltage characteristics (sensitivity and saturation plateau) of a fission chamber whose geometrical features are given, taking into account the neutron flux to be measured (spectrum and intensity). The proposed theoretical model describes electric field distortion resulting from charge collection effect. A computer code has been developed on this model basis. Its application to 3 kinds of fission chambers indicates excellent agreement between theoretical model and measured characteristics.

  1. Current-driven domain wall motion due to volume spin transfer torque in Co/Ni multilayer systems on Au underlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Kwang-Su; Yang, See-Hun; Thomas, Luc; Parkin, Stuart

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the current-induced domain wall (CIDW) dynamics in perpendicularly magnetized Co/Ni multilayers deposited on Au underlayer, where the conventional spin transfer torque governs the domain wall dynamics, by the Kerr microscope. It is found that the DW angle tilting following Oersted field profile plays an important role in domain wall (DW) motion at high current density J by decreasing DW velocity with the increasing J, while distorting its DW morphology. Also we find that the DW pinning becomes pronounced as the anisotropy decreases by increasing number of Co/Ni repeats. Most remarkably, the DW tilting angle changes its sign by inserting ultrathin Pt layer between Au and Co layer, which suggests that the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and spin Hall effect induces opposite effect in DW tilting. Our findings can be of use for application of CIDW to spintronics with perpendicularly magnetized systems.

  2. Downfall of the current antibody correlates of influenza vaccine response in yearly vaccinated subjects: Toward qualitative rather than quantitative assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagigi, Alberto; Cotugno, Nicola; Rinaldi, Stefano; Santilli, Veronica; Rossi, Paolo; Palma, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    Response to seasonal influenza vaccination is currently evaluated by antibody correlates that estimate vaccine seroconversion as well as immune protection. These correlates rely on the general dogmas surrounding seasonal influenza vaccination; that is, that vaccine-induced antibodies would exclusively generate immunity to influenza vaccine strains and that protective immunity would wane before the next season. Here, we summarize recently reported data on immunity to seasonal influenza in healthy individuals and rediscuss results on yearly vaccinated pediatric immunocompromised patients that together highlight the need for revision of the current correlates of vaccine response to shift from quantitative to qualitative measurements.

  3. Magnetic field response of NaCl:Eu crystal plasticity due to spin-dependent Eu2+ aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgunov, R. B.; Buchachenko, A. L.

    2010-07-01

    Magnetic field impulse (7 T amplitude 10 ms duration) was found to affect microhardness of NaCl:Eu crystals at room temperature. Dimers (pairs of Eu2+ paramagnetic ions) were shown to be responsible for the crystal softening induced by magnetic field. Theoretical treatment of the magnetoplastic effect based on the spin dependence of processes resulting in transformation of the dimers in crystals is developed and applied to the description of the long-term magnetic memory. Activation energies of the dimer formation, E1=0.23±0.04eV and decomposition, E2=0.33±0.06eV were extracted from thermoactivation analysis of magnetic field controlled Eu2+ aggregation in 77-473 K temperature range.

  4. Charge inversion, water splitting, and vortex suppression due to DNA sorption on ion-selective membranes and their ion-current signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slouka, Zdenek; Senapati, Satyajyoti; Yan, Yu; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2013-07-02

    The physisorption of negatively charged single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) of different lengths onto the surface of anion-exchange membranes is sensitively shown to alter the anion flux through the membrane. At low surface concentrations, the physisorbed DNAs act to suppress an electroconvection vortex instability that drives the anion flux into the membrane and hence reduce the overlimiting current through the membrane. Beyond a critical surface concentration, determined by the total number of phosphate charges on the DNA, the DNA layer becomes a cation-selective membrane, and the combined bipolar membrane has a lower net ion flux, at low voltages, than the original membrane as a result of ion depletion at the junction between the cation- (DNA) and anion-selective membranes. However, beyond a critical voltage that is dependent on the ssDNA coverage, water splitting occurs at the junction to produce a larger overlimiting current than that of the original membrane. These two large opposite effects of polyelectrolyte counterion sorption onto membrane surfaces may be used to eliminate limiting current constraints of ion-selective membranes for liquid fuel cells, dialysis, and desalination as well as to suggest a new low-cost membrane surface assay that can detect and quantify the number of large biomolecules captured by probes functionalized on the membrane surface.

  5. Genetic interactions due to constitutive and inducible gene regulation mediated by the unfolded protein response in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Shen

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The unfolded protein response (UPR is an adaptive signaling pathway utilized to sense and alleviate the stress of protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. In mammals, the UPR is mediated through three proximal sensors PERK/PEK, IRE1, and ATF6. PERK/PEK is a protein kinase that phosphorylates the alpha subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 to inhibit protein synthesis. Activation of IRE1 induces splicing of XBP1 mRNA to produce a potent transcription factor. ATF6 is a transmembrane transcription factor that is activated by cleavage upon ER stress. We show that in Caenorhabditis elegans, deletion of either ire-1 or xbp-1 is synthetically lethal with deletion of either atf-6 or pek-1, both producing a developmental arrest at larval stage 2. Therefore, in C. elegans, atf-6 acts synergistically with pek-1 to complement the developmental requirement for ire-1 and xbp-1. Microarray analysis identified inducible UPR (i-UPR genes, as well as numerous constitutive UPR (c-UPR genes that require the ER stress transducers during normal development. Although ire-1 and xbp-1 together regulate transcription of most i-UPR genes, they are each required for expression of nonoverlapping sets of c-UPR genes, suggesting that they have distinct functions. Intriguingly, C. elegans atf-6 regulates few i-UPR genes following ER stress, but is required for the expression of many c-UPR genes, indicating its importance during development and homeostasis. In contrast, pek-1 is required for induction of approximately 23% of i-UPR genes but is dispensable for the c-UPR. As pek-1 and atf-6 mainly act through sets of nonoverlapping targets that are different from ire-1 and xbp-1 targets, at least two coordinated responses are required to alleviate ER stress by distinct mechanisms. Finally, our array study identified the liver-specific transcription factor CREBh as a novel UPR gene conserved during metazoan evolution.

  6. Genetic Interactions Due to Constitutive and Inducible Gene Regulation Mediated by the Unfolded Protein Response in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The unfolded protein response (UPR is an adaptive signaling pathway utilized to sense and alleviate the stress of protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. In mammals, the UPR is mediated through three proximal sensors PERK/PEK, IRE1, and ATF6. PERK/PEK is a protein kinase that phosphorylates the alpha subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 to inhibit protein synthesis. Activation of IRE1 induces splicing of XBP1 mRNA to produce a potent transcription factor. ATF6 is a transmembrane transcription factor that is activated by cleavage upon ER stress. We show that in Caenorhabditis elegans, deletion of either ire-1 or xbp-1 is synthetically lethal with deletion of either atf-6 or pek-1, both producing a developmental arrest at larval stage 2. Therefore, in C. elegans, atf-6 acts synergistically with pek-1 to complement the developmental requirement for ire-1 and xbp-1. Microarray analysis identified inducible UPR (i-UPR genes, as well as numerous constitutive UPR (c-UPR genes that require the ER stress transducers during normal development. Although ire-1 and xbp-1 together regulate transcription of most i-UPR genes, they are each required for expression of nonoverlapping sets of c-UPR genes, suggesting that they have distinct functions. Intriguingly, C. elegans atf-6 regulates few i-UPR genes following ER stress, but is required for the expression of many c-UPR genes, indicating its importance during development and homeostasis. In contrast, pek-1 is required for induction of approximately 23% of i-UPR genes but is dispensable for the c-UPR. As pek-1 and atf-6 mainly act through sets of nonoverlapping targets that are different from ire-1 and xbp-1 targets, at least two coordinated responses are required to alleviate ER stress by distinct mechanisms. Finally, our array study identified the liver-specific transcription factor CREBh as a novel UPR gene conserved during metazoan evolution.

  7. Response of the waterlouse Asellus aquaticus to multiple stressors : effects of current velocity and mineral substratum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, E.T.H.M.; Camu, J.M.; Beijer, J.A.J.; Scheffer, M.; Gardeniers, J.J.P.

    2002-01-01

    Experiments were performed to study the individual and combined effects of current velocity and substratum composition on the waterlouse Asellus aquaticus (L.). Both factors affected growth, mortality, behavior, and food consumption of A. aquaticus. Short-term effects of increasing current velocity

  8. Dose response relationship of disturbed migration of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum due to X-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darmanto, W.; Inouye, Minoru; Hayasaka, Shizu; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Aolad, H.; Murata, Yoshiharu [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. of Environmental Medicine

    1998-10-01

    Pregnant rats were exposed to 2.0, 2.25 or 2.5 Gy X-irradiation on gestation day 21. Pups were sacrificed 12 hr after exposure, and on postnatal day 5 (P5), P7 and P9. Their cerebella were observed immunohistochemically using anti-inositol 1,4,5 triphosphate (IP3) receptor antibody to identify Purkinje cells. These cells were disturbed to migrate and remained in the internal granular layer and white matter of the cerebellum. They had short dendrites, and some showed an abnormal direction of dendrites in rats exposed to 2.25 or 2.5 Gy. Alignment of Purkinje cells was also disturbed when examined either on P5, P7 or P9 especially by doses of 2.25 and 2.5 Gy. There was a relationship between X-ray doses and the number of cells piling up in the Purkinje cell layer of the cerebellum. The dose-response relationship with the number of ectopic Purkinje cells was noted in the anterior lobes of the cerebellum. (author)

  9. A vermal Purkinje cell simple spike population response encodes the changes in eye movement kinematics due to smooth pursuit adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryadeep eDash

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Smooth pursuit adaptation (SPA is an example of cerebellum-dependent motor learning that depends on the integrity of the oculomotor vermis (OMV. In an attempt to unveil the neuronal basis of the role of the OMV in SPA, we recorded Purkinje cells simple spikes (PC SS of trained monkeys. Individual PC SS exhibited specific changes of their discharge patterns during the course of SPA. However, these individual changes did not provide a reliable explanation of the behavioural changes. On the other hand, the population response of PC SS perfectly reflected the changes resulting from adaptation. Population vector was calculated using all cells recorded independent of their location. A population code conveying the behavioural changes is in full accordance with the anatomical convergence of PC axons on target neurons in the cerebellar nuclei. Its computational advantage is the ease with which it can be adjusted to the needs of the behavior by changing the contribution of individual PC SS based on error feedback.

  10. Blubber cortisol: a potential tool for assessing stress response in free-ranging dolphins without effects due to sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellar, Nicholas M; Catelani, Krista N; Robbins, Michelle N; Trego, Marisa L; Allen, Camryn D; Danil, Kerri; Chivers, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    When paired with dart biopsying, quantifying cortisol in blubber tissue may provide an index of relative stress levels (i.e., activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis) in free-ranging cetacean populations while minimizing the effects of the act of sampling. To validate this approach, cortisol was extracted from blubber samples collected from beach-stranded and bycaught short-beaked common dolphins using a modified blubber steroid isolation technique and measured via commercially available enzyme immunoassays. The measurements exhibited appropriate quality characteristics when analyzed via a bootstraped stepwise parallelism analysis (observed/expected = 1.03, 95%CI: 99.6 - 1.08) and showed no evidence of matrix interference with increasing sample size across typical biopsy tissue masses (75-150 mg; r(2) = 0.012, p = 0.78, slope = 0.022 ng(cortisol deviation)/ul(tissue extract added)). The relationships between blubber cortisol and eight potential cofactors namely, 1) fatality type (e.g., stranded or bycaught), 2) specimen condition (state of decomposition), 3) total body length, 4) sex, 5) sexual maturity state, 6) pregnancy status, 7) lactation state, and 8) adrenal mass, were assessed using a Bayesian generalized linear model averaging technique. Fatality type was the only factor correlated with blubber cortisol, and the magnitude of the effect size was substantial: beach-stranded individuals had on average 6.1-fold higher cortisol levels than those of bycaught individuals. Because of the difference in conditions surrounding these two fatality types, we interpret this relationship as evidence that blubber cortisol is indicative of stress response. We found no evidence of seasonal variation or a relationship between cortisol and the remaining cofactors.

  11. Complex hydrologic changes in frequency-magnitude response due to shifting agricultural practices in the Midwestern U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takbiri, Z.; Czuba, J. A.; Foufoula-Georgiou, E.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrologic change is occurring in many basins throughout the Midwestern U.S. not only in the mean annual streamflow but across a spectrum of magnitudes and frequencies. Disentangling the causative mechanisms responsible for these changes such as anthropogenic factors, e.g., artificial drainage to increase agricultural productivity, and climatic shifts in precipitation patterns is important for planning effective mitigation strategies. We have begun unraveling these changes in a human impacted agricultural landscape in the Midwestern U.S., specifically two subbasins of the Minnesota River Basin in Minnesota: the Redwood and Whetstone River Basins, where there has been a shift in agriculture from small grains to soybeans. This shift occurred at different times for each basin (1976 and 1991, respectively) and when soy covered about 20% of the basin area an apparent shift in the hydrologic regime also occurred as evidence by visual inspection of the hydrographs. Precisely quantifying the nature of this hydrologic regime shift however is a challenge and this work adds in this direction. Using Copulas and the joint probability distribution of daily precipitation and streamflow, we quantified a significantly higher dependence between precipitation and streamflow increments in the mid-quantiles (0.1-0.6; attributed to the artificial drainage to the stream rather than the slower infiltration and subsurface runoff) and no significant change for high quantiles (because for extreme storms the artificially fast drainage does not differ much hydrologically from the naturally fast overland flow). We further performed a multi-scale analysis of streamflow increments via wavelets to quantify the changes in the magnitude and frequency of the rising and falling limbs of hydrographs, confirming the above findings. Since precipitation changes were confirmed not to be significant, it is suggested that streamflow changes are largely driven by a change in land use and not climate in these

  12. Blubber cortisol: a potential tool for assessing stress response in free-ranging dolphins without effects due to sampling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas M Kellar

    Full Text Available When paired with dart biopsying, quantifying cortisol in blubber tissue may provide an index of relative stress levels (i.e., activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis in free-ranging cetacean populations while minimizing the effects of the act of sampling. To validate this approach, cortisol was extracted from blubber samples collected from beach-stranded and bycaught short-beaked common dolphins using a modified blubber steroid isolation technique and measured via commercially available enzyme immunoassays. The measurements exhibited appropriate quality characteristics when analyzed via a bootstraped stepwise parallelism analysis (observed/expected = 1.03, 95%CI: 99.6 - 1.08 and showed no evidence of matrix interference with increasing sample size across typical biopsy tissue masses (75-150 mg; r(2 = 0.012, p = 0.78, slope = 0.022 ng(cortisol deviation/ul(tissue extract added. The relationships between blubber cortisol and eight potential cofactors namely, 1 fatality type (e.g., stranded or bycaught, 2 specimen condition (state of decomposition, 3 total body length, 4 sex, 5 sexual maturity state, 6 pregnancy status, 7 lactation state, and 8 adrenal mass, were assessed using a Bayesian generalized linear model averaging technique. Fatality type was the only factor correlated with blubber cortisol, and the magnitude of the effect size was substantial: beach-stranded individuals had on average 6.1-fold higher cortisol levels than those of bycaught individuals. Because of the difference in conditions surrounding these two fatality types, we interpret this relationship as evidence that blubber cortisol is indicative of stress response. We found no evidence of seasonal variation or a relationship between cortisol and the remaining cofactors.

  13. Extended producer responsibility for packaging waste in South Africa: Current approaches and lessons learned

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nahman, Anton

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Extended producer responsibility (EPR) is a policy concept aimed at extending producers’ responsibility for their products to the post-consumer stage of their products’ life cycle. One of the outcomes of an effective EPR programme is to move waste...

  14. Transient Response of Arc Temperature and Iron Vapor Concentration Affected by Current Frequency with Iron Vapor in Pulsed Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Tatsuro; Maeda, Yoshifumi; Yamamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru

    2016-10-01

    TIG arc welding is chemically a joining technology with melting the metallic material and it can be high quality. However, this welding should not be used in high current to prevent cathode melting. Thus, the heat transfer is poor. Therefore, the deep penetration cannot be obtained and the weld defect sometimes occurs. The pulsed arc welding has been used for the improvement of this defect. The pulsed arc welding can control the heat flux to anode. The convention and driving force in the weld pool are caused by the arc. Therefore, it is important to grasp the distribution of arc temperature. The metal vapor generate from the anode in welding. In addition, the pulsed current increased or decreased periodically. Therefore, the arc is affected by such as a current value and current frequency, the current rate of increment and the metal vapor. In this paper, the transient response of arc temperature and the iron vapor concentration affected by the current frequency with iron vapor in pulsed arc was elucidated by the EMTF (ElectroMagnetic Thermal Fluid) simulation. As a result, the arc temperature and the iron vapor were transient response as the current frequency increase. Thus, the temperature and the electrical conductivity decreased. Therefore, the electrical field increased in order to maintain the current continuity. The current density and electromagnetic force increased at the axial center. In addition, the electronic flow component of the heat flux increased at the axial center because the current density increased. However, the heat conduction component of the heat flux decreased.

  15. Can current moisture responses predict soil CO2 efflux under altered precipitation regimes? A synthesis of manipulation experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vicca, S.; Bahn, M.; Estiarte, M.

    2014-01-01

    As a key component of the carbon cycle, soil CO2 efflux (SCE) is being increasingly studied to improve our mechanistic understanding of this important carbon flux. Predicting ecosystem responses to climate change often depends on extrapolation of current relationships between ecosystem processes ...

  16. Membrane voltage differently affects mIPSCs and current responses recorded from somatic excised patches in rat hippocampal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Maria; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2006-01-30

    Recent analysis of current responses to exogenous GABA applications recorded from excised patches indicated that membrane voltage affected the GABAA receptor gating mainly by altering desensitization and binding [M. Pytel, K. Mercik, J.W. Mozrzymas, Membrane voltage modulates the GABAA receptor gating in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, Neuropharmacology, in press]. In order investigate the impact of such voltage effect on GABAA receptors in conditions of synaptic transmission, mIPSCs and current responses to rapid GABA applications were recorded from the same culture of rat hippocampal neurons. We found that I-V relationship for mIPSCs amplitudes showed a clear outward rectification while for current responses an inward rectification was seen, except for very low GABA concentrations. A clear shift in amplitude cumulative distributions indicated that outward rectification resulted from the voltage effect on the majority of mIPSCs. Moreover, the decaying phase of mIPSCs was clearly slowed down at positive voltages and this effect was represented by a shift in cumulative distributions of weighted decaying time constants. In contrast, deactivation of current responses was only slightly affected by membrane depolarization. These data indicate that the mechanisms whereby the membrane voltage modulates synaptic and extrasynaptic receptors are qualitatively different but the mechanism underlying this difference is not clear.

  17. Can current moisture responses predict soil CO2 efflux under altered precipitation regimes? A synthesis of manipulation experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vicca, S.; Bahn, M.; Estiarte, M.;

    2014-01-01

    As a key component of the carbon cycle, soil CO2 efflux (SCE) is being increasingly studied to improve our mechanistic understanding of this important carbon flux. Predicting ecosystem responses to climate change often depends on extrapolation of current relationships between ecosystem processes ...

  18. Can current moisture responses predict soil CO2 efflux under altered precipitation regimes? A synthesis of manipulation experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vicca, S.; Bahn, M.; Estiarte, M.; van Loon, E.E.; Vargas, R.; Alberti, G.; Ambus, P.; Arlain, M.A.; Beier, C.; Bentley, L.P.; Borken, W.; Buchmann, N.; Collins, S.L.; De Dato, G.; Dukes, J.S.; Escolar, C.; Fay, P.; Guidolotti, G.; Hanson, P.J.; Kahmen, A.; Kröel-Dulay, G.; Ladreiter-Knauss, T.; Larsen, K.S.; Lellei-Kovacs, E.; Lebrija-Trejos, E.; Maestre, F.T.; Marhan, S.; Marshall, M.; Meir, P.; Miao, Y.; Muhr, J.; Niklaus, P.A.; Ogaya, R.; Peñuelas, J.; Poll, C.; Rustad, L.E.; Savage, K.; Schindlbacher, A.; Schmidt, I.K.; Smith, A.R.; Scotta, E.D.; Suseela, V.; Tietema, A.; Van Gestel, N.; Van Straaten, O.; Wan, S.; Weber, U.; Janssens, I.A.

    2014-01-01

    As a key component of the carbon cycle, soil CO2 efflux (SCE) is being increasingly studied to improve our mechanistic understanding of this important carbon flux. Predicting ecosystem responses to climate change often depends on extrapolation of current relationships between ecosystem processes and

  19. Cultured hippocampal neurons from trisomy 16 mouse, a model for Down's syndrome, have an abnormal action potential due to a reduced inward sodium current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdzicki, Z; Coan, E; Rapoport, S I

    1993-02-26

    Mouse trisomy 16 is an animal model for Down's syndrome (human trisomy 21). The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to compare passive and active electrical properties of trisomy 16 and diploid mouse 16 fetal hippocampal neurons maintained in culture for 2-5 weeks. There was no significant difference in any mean passive property, including resting potential, membrane resistance, capacitance and time constant. However, in trisomic neurons, the action potential had a 20% significantly slower rising phase and a 20% significantly smaller inward sodium current and inward sodium conductance than did control neurons. The outward conductance was not altered. The ratio of maximum inward conductance to maximum outward conductance was 30% less in the trisomy 16 cells. These results indicate that trisomy 16 hippocampal neurons have abnormal active electrical properties, most likely reflecting reduced sodium channel membrane density. Such subtle differences may influence elaboration of the hippocampus during development.

  20. Coupled atmosphere-mixed layer ocean response to ocean heat flux convergence along the Kuroshio current extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Young-Oh [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Physical Oceanography Department, Woods Hole, MA (United States); Deser, Clara [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Cassou, Christophe [CNRS-CERFACS, Toulouse (France)

    2011-06-15

    The winter response of the coupled atmosphere-ocean mixed layer system to anomalous geostrophic ocean heat flux convergence in the Kuroshio Extension is investigated by means of experiments with an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to an entraining ocean mixed layer model in the extra-tropics. The direct response consists of positive SST anomalies along the Kuroshio Extension and a baroclinic (low-level trough and upper-level ridge) circulation anomaly over the North Pacific. The low-level component of this atmospheric circulation response is weaker in the case without coupling to an extratropical ocean mixed layer, especially in late winter. The inclusion of an interactive mixed layer in the tropics modifies the direct coupled atmospheric response due to a northward displacement of the Pacific Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone which drives an equivalent barotropic anomalous ridge over the North Pacific. Although the tropically driven component of the North Pacific atmospheric circulation response is comparable to the direct response in terms of sea level pressure amplitude, it is less important in terms of wind stress curl amplitude due to the mitigating effect of the relatively broad spatial scale of the tropically forced atmospheric teleconnection. (orig.)

  1. Massive Rock Detachments from the Continental slope of the Balsas River Submarine Delta that occur due to Instability of Sediments which Produce Turbidity Currents and Tsunamis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval-Ochoa, J.; Aguayo-Camargo, J.

    2007-05-01

    During the NOAA oceanographic delivery cruise of the US R/V "Roger Revelle" to the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California in San Diego, California USA, in July 1996; a well calibrated bathymetric equipment, the SeaBeam* 2012, was tested. Good resolutions in data allowed bathymetric mapping to visualize the sea floor relief. Detailed colorful chartographic images showed a portion of the continental slope between the Balsas River Delta and the Middle America Trench and between the Balsas Canyon and La Necesidad Canyon. The surveyed area covered more than 3 000 square kilometers. After the delivery cruise, one of the goals was to measure and analyze the Morphobathymetry of the uneven lower portion of the Balsas River Submarine Delta. So far some of the findings with the morphometric analyses consist of several isolated slump scars that each comprise more than 12 cubic kilometers in volume and a multiple slump scar with an evident steep hollow about 200 cubic kilometers absent of rock. These volumes of rock apparently underwent a remobilization from the slope during the Late Quaternary. The rock detachments occured in relatively small portions but in instantaneous massive displacements because of their instability as well as other identified factors in the region. Over time more and more authors have accepted that coastal cuts or submarine slump scars have been left by sudden movements of rock and fluids. The phenomena that occur in the region in general, are accompanied on one side by potential and kinetic energies like falling bodies, flows and gravity waves, and on the other side, by mass transfer of rock and fluid mobilization like turbidity currents, accumulations, sea wave surges or tsunamis. In some cases the phenomena is produced by another natural triggering forces or by an earthquake. We propose that events like these, i.e. massive detachments and their products such as accumulations, turbidity currents and depositional debrites

  2. Surficial Sedimentary Diatoms in Okinawa Trough and Its Response to Kuroshio Current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan Dongzhao; Fang Qi; Liao Lianzhao

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the relative contents of dominant diatom species and the distributive characteristics of tropical pelagic species and diatom assemblages, and also discusses the relations between the relative content of tropical pelagic species and Kuroshio Current and between the distribution of diatom assemblages and material sources. The results show that the limit of>20% relative content of tropical pelagic species is basically consistent with the demarcation of Kuroshio Current, and that the distributions of dominant diatom species and diatom assemblages reserve the records of their closer relations to material sources.

  3. Responses of action potential and K+ currents to temperature acclimation in fish hearts: phylogeny or thermal preferences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverinen, Jaakko; Vornanen, Matti

    2009-01-01

    Electrical activity of the heart is assumed to be one of the key factors that set thermal tolerance limits for ectothermic vertebrates. Therefore, we hypothesized that in thermal acclimation--the duration of cardiac action potential and the repolarizing K+ currents that regulate action potential duration (APD)--the rapid component of the delayed rectifier K+ current (I(Kr)) and the inward rectifier K+ current (I(K1)) are more plastic in eurythermal than in stenothermal fish species. The hypothesis was tested in six freshwater teleosts representing four different fish orders (Cadiformes, Cypriniformes, Perciformes, Salmoniformes) acclimated at +4 degrees C (cold acclimation) or +18 degrees C (warm acclimation). In cold acclimation, a compensatory shortening of APD occurred in all species regardless of thermal tolerances, life styles, or phylogenies of the fish, suggesting that this response is a common characteristic of the teleost heart. The strength of the response did not, however, obey simple eurythermy-stenothermy gradation but differed among the phylogenetic groups. Salmoniformes fish showed the greatest acclimation capacity of cardiac electrical activity, whereas the weakest response appeared in the perch (Perciformes) heart. The underlying ionic mechanisms were also partly phylogeny dependent. Modification of the I(Kr) current was al- most ubiquitously involved in acclimation response of fish cardiac myocytes to temperature, while the ability to change the I(K1) current under chronic thermal stress was absent or showed inverse compensation in Salmoniformes species. Thus, in Salmoniformes fish, the thermal plasticity of APD is strongly based on I(Kr), while other fish groups rely on both I(Kr) and I(K1).

  4. Biological responses to current UV-B radiation in Arctic regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian; N. Mikkelsen, Teis; Ro-Poulsen, Helge

    -B was demonstrated to decrease photosynthesis and shift carbon allocation from shoots to roots. Moreover, ambient UV-B increased plant stress with detrimental effects on electron processing in the photosynthetic apparatus. Plant responses did not lead to clear changes in the amount of fungal root symbionts...... on high-arctic vegetation. They supplement previous investigations from the Arctic focussing on other variables like growth etc., which have reported no or minor plant responses to UV-B, and clearly indicates that UV-B radiation is an important factor affecting plant life at high-arctic Zackenberg...

  5. Extreme precipitation and temperature responses to circulation patterns in current climate: statistical approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Photiadou, C.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is likely to influence the frequency of extreme extremes - temperature, precipitation and hydrological extremes, which implies increasing risks for flood and drought events in Europe. In current climate, European countries were often not sufficiently prepared to deal with the great so

  6. Higher Education in Kenya: An Assessment of Current Responses to the Imperative of Widening Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odhiambo, George

    2016-01-01

    Higher education is a key factor in a nation's effort to develop a highly skilled workforce for competing in the global economy. In this paper, current trends in accessibility, equity, participation and financing of higher education in Kenya are examined. The paper explores the challenges which need to be confronted and discusses the way forward…

  7. Biological responses to current UV-B radiation in Arctic regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian; N. Mikkelsen, Teis; Ro-Poulsen, Helge

    (mycorrhiza) or in the biomass of microbes in the soil of the root zone. However, the composition of the soil microbial community was different in the soils under ambient and reduced UV radiation after three treatment years. These results provide new insight into the negative impact of current UV-B fluxes...

  8. Frequency Response Analysis of Current Controllers for Selective Harmonic Compensation in Active Power Filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lascu, C.; Asiminoaei, L.; Boldea, I.;

    2009-01-01

    This paper compares four current control structures for selective harmonic compensation in active power filters. All controllers under scrutiny perform the harmonic compensation by using arrays of resonant controllers, one for the fundamental and one for each harmonic of interest, in order to ach...

  9. [Current distribution of Schisandra chinensis in China and its predicted responses to climate change].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Li-Le; Zhang, Hai-Ying; Qin, Ling; Yan, Bo-Qian

    2012-09-01

    With integration of literature data, specimens records, and field surveys, the current distribution map of Schisandra chinensis in China was drawn, and, based on this map and considering 21 environmental factors, the future distribution of S. chinensis in China in the 2050s and 2080s under the IPCC A2 and A1B climate change scenarios was predicted by using Maxent software. Currently, the S. chinensis in China occurred in 15 provinces, involving 151 counties, and its distribution area decreased with decreasing latitude and longitude. The main distribution area included Heilongjiang, Liaoning, Inner Mongolia, and Jilin. The potential distribution area of S. chinensis in China was 145.12 x 10(4) km2, 48.6% of which were the favorable habitat area, mainly distributed in Changbai Mountains, Xiaoxing'anling Mountains, Daxing'anling Mountains, and the regions between Hebei and Liaoning provinces. The most favorable habitat area only accounted for 0.3%, and was mainly in the Kuandian Manchu Autonomous County, Benxi Manchu Autonomous County, and Huanren Manchu Autonomous County of Liaoning Province, the Antu County and Helong County of Jilin Province, and the Yakeshi City of Inner Mongolia. Under the two climate change scenarios, the potential future distribution area of S. chinensis in China would have a gradual decrease, and the decrement would be larger under A2 than under A1B scenario. By 2050, the distribution area of the S. chinensis under A1B and A2 scenarios would be moderately decreased to 84.0% and 81.5% of the current distribution area, respectively; by 2080, the distribution of S. chinensis under A2 scenario would be dramatically decreased to only 0.5% of the current range, and that under A1B scenario would be decreased to 1/2 of the current range.

  10. Early response to sibutramine in patients not meeting current label criteria: preliminary analysis of SCOUT lead-in period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caterson, Ian; Coutinho, Walmir; Finer, Nick;

    2010-01-01

    The Sibutramine Cardiovascular Outcomes (SCOUT) trial protocol defines a patient population predominantly outside current European Union label criteria. This article explores responses to sibutramine during the 6-week, single-blind, lead-in period between patients who conformed to the label......-in period. Initial responses were assessed post hoc in label conformers and nonconformers. Of that 8.1% patients met label criteria; 91.9%, the majority with cardiovascular disease and/or blood pressure >145/90 mm Hg, were nonconformers. Conformers and nonconformers had similar reductions in body weight...

  11. Dosimetric response for crystalline and nanostructured aluminium oxide to a high-current pulse electron beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, S V; Kortov, V S

    2014-11-01

    The main thermoluminescent (TL) and dosimetric properties of the detectors based on anion-defective crystalline and nanostructured aluminium oxide after exposure to a high-current pulse electron beam are studied. TL peaks associated with deep-trapping centres are registered. It is shown that the use of deep-trap TL at 200-600°С allows registering absorbed doses up to 750 kGy for single-crystalline detectors and those up to 6 kGy for nanostructured ones. A wide range of the doses registered, high reproducibility of the TL signal and low fading contribute to a possibility of using single-crystalline and nanostructured aluminium oxide for the dosimetry of high-current pulse electron beams.

  12. Transcranial direct current stimulation in patients with Alzheimer’s disease: Challenges and responses

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Hong; Tabarak, Serik; Yu, Jing; Lei, Xu

    2015-01-01

    The use of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) as a noninvasive therapeutic approach for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has gained increasing attention. Research regarding the utility of tDCS in AD is inconsistent. In this study, we reviewed the importance of individual diversity among AD patients, starting from the uninformative mean results. We also demonstrated variation among AD patients. Highly educated patients seem to benefit more; education also seems to modulate baseline measure...

  13. Investigations on the electrical current-voltage response in protein light receptors

    CERN Document Server

    Alfinito, E; Reggiani, L

    2014-01-01

    We report a theoretical/computational approach for modeling the current-voltage characteristics of sensing proteins. The modeling is applied to a couple of transmembrane proteins, bacteriorhodopsin and proteorhodopsin, sensitive to visible light and promising biomaterials for the development of a new generation of photo-transducers. The agreement between theory and experiments sheds new light on the microscopic interpretation of charge transfer in proteins and biological materials in general.

  14. A fast transient response low dropout regulator with current control methodology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Zhuo; Guo Yang; Duan Zhikui; Xie Lunguo; Chen Jihua; Yu Jinshan

    2011-01-01

    A transient performance optimized CCL-LDO regulator is proposed.In the CCL-LDO,the control method of the charge pump phase-locked loop is adopted.A current control loop has the feedback signal and reference current to be compared,and then a loop filter generates the gate voltage of the power MOSFET by integrating the error current.The CCL-LDO has the optimized damping coefficient and natural resonant frequency,while its output voltage can be sub-1-V and is not restricted by the reference voltage.With a 1μF decoupling capacitor,the experimental results based on a 0.13 μm CMOS process show that the output voltage is 1.0 V; when the workload changes from 100 μA to 100 mA transiently,the stable dropout is 4.25 mV,the settling time is 8.2 μs and the undershoot is 5.11 mV; when the workload changes from 1 00 mA to 100 μA transiently,the stable dropout is 4.25 mV,the settling time is 23.3 μs and the overshoot is 6.21 mV.The PSRR value is more than -95 dB.Most of the attributes of the CCL-LDO are improved rapidly with a FOM value of 0.0097.

  15. Genetic and physiological bases for phenological responses to current and predicted climates

    OpenAIRE

    Wilczek, A. M.; Burghardt, L. T.; Cobb, A. R.; Cooper, M D; Welch, S. M.; Schmitt, J

    2010-01-01

    We are now reaching the stage at which specific genetic factors with known physiological effects can be tied directly and quantitatively to variation in phenology. With such a mechanistic understanding, scientists can better predict phenological responses to novel seasonal climates. Using the widespread model species Arabidopsis thaliana, we explore how variation in different genetic pathways can be linked to phenology and life-history variation across geographical regions and seasons. We sho...

  16. Osteoblastic differentiation and stress response of human mesenchymal stem cells exposed to alternating current electric fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaplan David L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electric fields are integral to many biological events, from maintaining cellular homeostasis to embryonic development to healing. The application of electric fields offers substantial therapeutic potential, while optimal dosing regimens and the underlying mechanisms responsible for the positive clinical impact are poorly understood. Methods The purpose of this study was to track the differentiation profile and stress response of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs undergoing osteogenic differentiation during exposure to a 20 mV/cm, 60 kHz electric field. Morphological and biochemical changes were imaged using endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF and quantitatively assessed through eccentricity calculations and extraction of the redox ratio from NADH, FAD and lipofuscin contributions. Real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR were used to track osteogenic differentiation markers, namely alkaline phosphatase (ALP and collagen type 1 (col1, and stress response markers, such as heat shock protein 27 (hsp27 and heat shock protein 70 (hsp70. Comparisons of collagen deposition between the stimulated hMSCs and controls were examined through second harmonic generation (SHG imaging. Results Quantitative differences in cell morphology, as described through an eccentricity ratio, were found on days 2 and days 5 (p Conclusions Electrical stimulation is a useful tool to improve hMSC osteogenic differentiation, while heat shock proteins may reveal underlying mechanisms, and optical non-invasive imaging may be used to monitor the induced morphological and biochemical changes.

  17. The Acute Inflammatory Response in Trauma / Hemorrhage and Traumatic Brain Injury: Current State and Emerging Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Vodovotz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic injury/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS elicits an acute inflammatory response that may result in death. Inflammation describes a coordinated series of molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and systemic responses that drive the pathology of various diseases including T/HS and traumatic brain injury (TBI. Inflammation is a finely tuned, dynamic, highly-regulated process that is not inherentlydetrimental, but rather required for immune surveillance, optimal post-injury tissue repair, and regeneration. The inflammatory response is driven by cytokines and chemokines and is partiallypropagated by damaged tissue-derived products (Damage-associated Molecular Patterns; DAMP’s.DAMPs perpetuate inflammation through the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, but may also inhibit anti-inflammatory cytokines. Various animal models of T/HS in mice, rats, pigs, dogs, and nonhumanprimates have been utilized in an attempt to move from bench to bedside. Novel approaches, including those from the field of systems biology, may yield therapeutic breakthroughs in T/HS andTBI in the near future.

  18. Behavioral Responses Of Fish To A Current-Based Hydrokinetic Turbine Under Mutlipe Operational Conditions: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grippo, Mark A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Shen, Haixue [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Zydlewski, Gayle [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Rao, Shivanesh [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Goodwin, Andy [United States Army Engineer R & D Center, Vicksburg, MI (United States)

    2017-02-01

    There is significant interest in the interaction of aquatic organisms with current-based marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies. Determining the potential impacts of MHK devices on fish behavior is critical to addressing the environmental concerns that could act as barriers to the permitting and deployment of MHK devices. To address these concerns, we use field monitoring and fish behavior models to characterize the behavioral responses of fish to MHK turbines and infer potential stimuli that may have elicited the observed behavioral changes.

  19. Effects of an NMDA antagonist on the auditory mismatch negativity response to transcranial direct current stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impey, Danielle; de la Salle, Sara; Baddeley, Ashley; Knott, Verner

    2016-09-13

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive form of brain stimulation which uses a weak constant current to alter cortical excitability and activity temporarily. tDCS-induced increases in neuronal excitability and performance improvements have been observed following anodal stimulation of brain regions associated with visual and motor functions, but relatively little research has been conducted with respect to auditory processing. Recently, pilot study results indicate that anodal tDCS can increase auditory deviance detection, whereas cathodal tDCS decreases auditory processing, as measured by a brain-based event-related potential (ERP), mismatch negativity (MMN). As evidence has shown that tDCS lasting effects may be dependent on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity, the current study investigated the use of dextromethorphan (DMO), an NMDA antagonist, to assess possible modulation of tDCS's effects on both MMN and working memory performance. The study, conducted in 12 healthy volunteers, involved four laboratory test sessions within a randomised, placebo and sham-controlled crossover design that compared pre- and post-anodal tDCS over the auditory cortex (2 mA for 20 minutes to excite cortical activity temporarily and locally) and sham stimulation (i.e. device is turned off) during both DMO (50 mL) and placebo administration. Anodal tDCS increased MMN amplitudes with placebo administration. Significant increases were not seen with sham stimulation or with anodal stimulation during DMO administration. With sham stimulation (i.e. no stimulation), DMO decreased MMN amplitudes. Findings from this study contribute to the understanding of underlying neurobiological mechanisms mediating tDCS sensory and memory improvements.

  20. Integration of PET/CT in Current Diagnostic and Response Evaluation Methods in Patients with Tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezmen, Oelem; Goekcek, Atila; Tatci, Ebru; Biner, Inci; Akkalyoncu, Behiye [Atatuerk Chest Diseases and Thoracic Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkmenistan)

    2014-03-15

    Tuberculosis is a systemic disease that still affects many people. While pleural involvement is frequently observed in extrapulmonary tuberculosis, multiple skeletal system and articular involvements are quite rare. FDG PET imaging could be a promising diagnostic and treatment monitoring method, especially in complicated cases and if the other methods are inadequate. In this case study, we report a patient who was admitted with suspected malignancy and then diagnosed with tuberculosis pleuritis, lymphadenitis, spondylodiscitis, and sacroiliitis with specific symptoms; the response to anti-tuberculosis therapy was shown using FDG PET/CT.

  1. Frequency-dependent reduction of voltage-gated sodium current modulates retinal ganglion cell response rate to electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, David; Morley, John W.; Suaning, Gregg J.; Lovell, Nigel H.

    2011-10-01

    The ability to elicit visual percepts through electrical stimulation of the retina has prompted numerous investigations examining the feasibility of restoring sight to the blind with retinal implants. The therapeutic efficacy of these devices will be strongly influenced by their ability to elicit neural responses that approximate those of normal vision. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) can fire spikes at frequencies greater than 200 Hz when driven by light. However, several studies using isolated retinas have found a decline in RGC spiking response rate when these cells were stimulated at greater than 50 Hz. It is possible that the mechanism responsible for this decline also contributes to the frequency-dependent 'fading' of electrically evoked percepts recently reported in human patients. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings of rabbit RGCs, we investigated the causes for the spiking response depression during direct subretinal stimulation of these cells at 50-200 Hz. The response depression was not caused by inhibition arising from the retinal network but, instead, by a stimulus-frequency-dependent decline of RGC voltage-gated sodium current. Under identical experimental conditions, however, RGCs were able to spike at high frequency when driven by light stimuli and intracellular depolarization. Based on these observations, we demonstrated a technique to prevent the spiking response depression.

  2. From Ethics, Integrity and Moral Probity to Responsible Research and Innovation in Current Educational Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Monica GORGHIU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available As other social domains, the area of education is in a strong interdependence with environmental contexts, being in accordance with the economic conditions, political decisions, technological development and, not in the end, the demographic dynamics. Changes in all the above-mentioned aspects lead to modification of several educational variables. However, the actual educational settings and practices must take into consideration the future, projecting and addressing in this respect, the major challenges that will occur in the society in the following decades. In education, there were recorded a series of changes in theoretical frameworks or paradigms over the past decades. We have to admit that not all of them proved to be good or welcome, mostly in the cases when some of them were introduced considering the temporary social changes, limiting their evolution to a specific era or developmental goal or educational cult (Lindgren, 2013. But, it is obvious that paradigms or concepts which answer to the actual societal developments, which help the students in the process of becoming future responsible citizens, are more than welcome and beneficial. In this respect, this number of the Romanian Journal of Multidimensional Education tries to offer some answers to possible educational values of equity, integrity or relevance principles, together with the possibilities of exploiting the dimensions of Responsible Research and Innovation in the actual education.

  3. Cold Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia due to High-grade non Hodgkin's B cell Lymphoma with Weak Response to Rituximab and Chemotherapy Regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazel Khosroshahi, Behzad; Jafari, Mohammad; Vazini, Hossein; Ahmadi, Alireza; Shams, Keivan; Kholoujini, Mahdi

    2015-07-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is characterized by shortening of red blood cell (RBC) survival and the presence of autoantibodies directed against autologous RBCs. Approximately 20% of autoimmune hemolytic anemia cases are associated with cold-reactive antibody. About half of patients with AIHA have no underlying associated disease; these cases are termed primary or idiopathic. Secondary cases are associated with underlying diseases or with certain drugs. We report herein a rare case of cold autoimmiune hemolytic anemia due to high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of B-cell type with weak response to rituximab and chemotherapy regimens. For treatment B cell lymphoma, Due to lack of treatment response, we used chemotherapy regimens including R- CHOP for the first time, and then Hyper CVAD, R- ICE and ESHAP were administered, respectively. For treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemia, we have used the corticosteroid, rituximab, plasmapheresis and blood transfusion and splenectomy. In spite of all attempts, the patient died of anemia and aggressive lymphoma nine months after diagnosis. To our knowledge, this is a rare report from cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia in combination with high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of B-cell type that is refractory to conventional therapies.

  4. Delayed baroclinic response of the Antarctic circumpolar current to surface wind stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG XiaoYi; HUANG RuiXin; WANG Jia; WANG DongXiao

    2008-01-01

    The Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) responds to the surface windstress via two processes,i.e.,the instant barotropic process and the delayed baroclinic process. This study focuses on the baroclinic instability mechanism in ACC,which was less reported in the literatures. Results show that the strengthening of surface zonal windstress causes the enhanced tilting of the isopycnal surface,leading to more intense baroclinic instability. Simultaneously,the mesoscale eddies resulting from the baroclinic instability facilitate the transformation of mean potential energy to eddy energy,which causes the remarkable decrease of the ACC volume transport with the 2-year lag time. This delayed negative correlation between the ACC transport and the zonal windstress may account for the steadiness of the ACC transport during last two decades.

  5. Blood Stage Plasmodium falciparum Exhibits Biological Responses to Direct Current Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, Lorena M.; Montealegre, Stephania; Chaverra, Zumara; Mojica, Luis; Espinosa, Carlos; Almanza, Alejandro; Correa, Ricardo; Stoute, José A.; Gittens, Rolando A.

    2016-01-01

    The development of resistance to insecticides by the vector of malaria and the increasingly faster appearance of resistance to antimalarial drugs by the parasite can dangerously hamper efforts to control and eradicate the disease. Alternative ways to treat this disease are urgently needed. Here we evaluate the in vitro effect of direct current (DC) capacitive coupling electrical stimulation on the biology and viability of Plasmodium falciparum. We designed a system that exposes infected erythrocytes to different capacitively coupled electric fields in order to evaluate their effect on P. falciparum. The effect on growth of the parasite, replication of DNA, mitochondrial membrane potential and level of reactive oxygen species after exposure to electric fields demonstrate that the parasite is biologically able to respond to stimuli from DC electric fields involving calcium signaling pathways. PMID:27537497

  6. Delayed baroclinic response of the Antarctic circum-polar current to surface wind stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) responds to the surface windstress via two processes, i.e., the instant barotropic process and the delayed baroclinic process. This study focuses on the baroclinic instability mechanism in ACC, which was less reported in the literatures. Results show that the strengthening of surface zonal windstress causes the enhanced tilting of the isopycnal surface, leading to more intense baroclinic instability. Simultaneously, the mesoscale eddies resulting from the baro- clinic instability facilitate the transformation of mean potential energy to eddy energy, which causes the remarkable decrease of the ACC volume transport with the 2-year lag time. This delayed negative cor- relation between the ACC transport and the zonal windstress may account for the steadiness of the ACC transport during last two decades.

  7. Climate response due to carbonaceous aerosols and aerosol-induced SST effects in NCAR community atmospheric model CAM3.5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.-C. Hsieh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study used Community Atmospheric Model 3.5 (CAM3.5 to investigate the effects of carbonaceous aerosols on climate. The simulations include control runs with carbonaceous aerosols and no carbon runs in which carbonaceous aerosols were removed. The Slab Ocean Model (SOM and the fixed Sea Surface Temperature (SST were used to examine effects of ocean boundary conditions. Throughout this study, climate response induced by aerosol forcing was mainly analyzed in the following three terms: (1 aerosol radiative effects under fixed SST, (2 effects of aerosol-induced SST feedbacks , and (3 total effects including effects of aerosol forcing and SST feedbacks. The change of SST induced by aerosols has large impacts on distribution of climate response, the magnitudes in response patterns such as temperature, precipitation, zonal winds, mean meridional circulation, radiative fluxes and cloud coverage are different between the SOM and fixed SST runs. Moreover, different spatial responses between the SOM and fixed SST runs can also be seen in some local areas. This implies the importance of SST feedbacks on simulated climate response. The aerosol dimming effects cause a cooling predicted at low layers near the surface in most of carbonaceous aerosol source regions. The temperature response shows a warming (cooling predicted in the north (south high latitudes, suggesting that aerosol forcing can cause climate change in regions far away from its origins. Our simulation results show that warming of the troposphere due to black carbon decreases rainfall in the tropics. This implies that black carbon has possibly strong influence on weakening of the tropical circulation. Most of these changes in precipitation are negatively correlated with changes of radiative fluxes at the top of model. The changes in radiative fluxes at top of model are physically consistent with the response patterns in cloud fields. On global average, low-level cloud coverage increases, mid

  8. Climate response due to carbonaceous aerosols and aerosol-induced SST effects in NCAR community atmospheric model CAM3.5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.-C. Hsieh

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This study used the Community Atmospheric Model 3.5 (CAM3.5 to investigate the effects of carbonaceous aerosols on climate. The simulations include control runs with 3 times the mass of carbonaceous aerosols as compared to the model's default carbonaceous aerosol mass, as well as no-carbon runs in which carbonaceous aerosols were removed. The slab ocean model (SOM and the fixed sea surface temperature (SST were used to examine effects of ocean boundary conditions. Throughout this study, climate response induced by aerosol forcing was mainly analyzed in the following three terms: (1 aerosol radiative effects under fixed SST, (2 effects of aerosol-induced SST feedbacks, and (3 total effects including effects of aerosol forcing and SST feedbacks. The change of SST induced by aerosols has large impacts on distribution of climate response; the magnitudes in response patterns such as temperature, precipitation, zonal winds, mean meridional circulation, radiative fluxes, and cloud coverage are different between the SOM and fixed SST runs. Moreover, different spatial responses between the SOM and fixed SST runs can also be seen in some local areas. This implies the importance of SST feedbacks on simulated climate response. The aerosol dimming effects cause a cooling predicted at low layers near the surface in most carbonaceous aerosol source regions. The temperature response shows a warming (cooling predicted in the north (south high latitudes, suggesting that aerosol forcing can cause climate change in regions far away from its origins. Our simulation results show that direct and semidirect radiative forcing due to carbonaceous aerosols decreases rainfall in the tropics. This implies that carbonaceous aerosols have possibly strong influence on weakening of the tropical circulation. Most changes in precipitation are negatively correlated with changes of radiative fluxes at the top of model. The changes in radiative fluxes at top of model are physically

  9. Central Banks’ Response to the Current Financial Crisis – Between Costs and Benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodora Cristina Barbu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Our study is inserted in the thematic area dedicated, during recent years, to the research on central banks’ response to financial crisis. The global financial crisis has outlined a series of weaknesses located at regulatory and supervisory activities’ level, causing major central banks to face a new operating environment, in which traditional monetary policy tools are ineffective (key interest rate close to zero in restoring the financial markets’ proper functioning. The unconventional monetary policy measures, the dramatic fall of the key interest rate, the balance sheet structure modification and extension of collateral accepted by central banks are the main issues on which we focused our attention, to highlight the costs and benefits recorded by these institutions. All major central banks have implemented highly innovative, flexible facilities and the main beneficiaries have been the banking systems in their entirety.

  10. Western Interventions in Current Wars: Political Justification and Civil Society´s Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelia Bueno Gómez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available On the one hand, it seems to be an agreement in Western countries in favor of values included in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. On the other hand, Western countries initiate or intervene in armed conflicts outside their territories, which implies actions contrary to such values. This article examines this apparent contradiction: it describes briefly the international context of contemporary conflicts and it refers to the just-war tradition in order to analyze both the position of the Charter of the United Nations and the justifications given by Western countries. Moreover, the arguments used by the US and the Spanish Governments to justify their interventions in the Afghanistan (2001 and Iraq (2008 wars, and the responses of civil society are considered.

  11. Enhanced Brain Responses to Pain-Related Words in Chronic Back Pain Patients and Their Modulation by Current Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Alexander; Franz, Marcel; Puta, Christian; Dietrich, Caroline; Miltner, Wolfgang H. R.; Weiss, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies in healthy controls (HC) and pain-free migraine patients found activations to pain-related words in brain regions known to be activated while subjects experience pain. The aim of the present study was to identify neural activations induced by pain-related words in a sample of chronic back pain (CBP) patients experiencing current chronic pain compared to HC. In particular, we were interested in how current pain influences brain activations induced by pain-related adjectives. Subjects viewed pain-related, negative, positive, and neutral words; subjects were asked to generate mental images related to these words during fMRI scanning. Brain activation was compared between CBP patients and HC in response to the different word categories and examined in relation to current pain in CBP patients. Pain-related words vs. neutral words activated a network of brain regions including cingulate cortex and insula in subjects and patients. There was stronger activation in medial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and anterior midcingulate cortex in CPB patients than in HC. The magnitude of activation for pain-related vs. negative words showed a negative linear relationship to CBP patients’ current pain. Our findings confirm earlier observations showing that pain-related words activate brain networks similar to noxious stimulation. Importantly, CBP patients show even stronger activation of these structures while merely processing pain-related words. Current pain directly influences on this activation. PMID:27517967

  12. Comparison of anamnestic responses to rabies vaccination in dogs and cats with current and out-of-date vaccination status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Michael C; Davis, Rolan D; Kang, Qing; Vahl, Christopher I; Wallace, Ryan M; Hanlon, Cathleen A; Mosier, Derek A

    2015-01-15

    To compare anamnestic antibody responses of dogs and cats with current versus out-of-date vaccination status. Cross-sectional study. 74 dogs and 33 cats. Serum samples were obtained from dogs and cats that had been exposed to rabies and brought to a veterinarian for proactive serologic monitoring or that had been brought to a veterinarian for booster rabies vaccination. Blood samples were collected on the day of initial evaluation (day 0) and then again 5 to 15 days later. On day 0, a rabies vaccine was administered according to label recommendations. Paired serum samples were analyzed for antirabies antibodies by means of a rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test. All animals had an antirabies antibody titer ≥ 0.5 IU/mL 5 to 15 days after booster vaccination. Dogs with an out-of-date vaccination status had a higher median increase in titer, higher median fold increase in titer, and higher median titer following booster vaccination, compared with dogs with current vaccination status. Most (26/33) cats, regardless of rabies vaccination status, had a titer ≥ 12 IU/mL 5 to 15 days after booster vaccination. Results indicated that dogs with out-of-date vaccination status were not inferior in their antibody response following booster rabies vaccination, compared with dogs with current vaccination status. Findings supported immediate booster vaccination followed by observation for 45 days of dogs and cats with an out-of-date vaccination status that are exposed to rabies, as is the current practice for dogs and cats with current vaccination status.

  13. Response of stream benthic macroinvertebrates to current water management in Alpine catchments massively developed for hydropower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadroni, Silvia; Crosa, Giuseppe; Gentili, Gaetano; Espa, Paolo

    2017-12-31

    The present work focuses on evaluating the ecological effects of hydropower-induced streamflow alteration within four catchments in the central Italian Alps. Downstream from the water diversions, minimum flows are released as an environmental protection measure, ranging approximately from 5 to 10% of the mean annual natural flow estimated at the intake section. Benthic macroinvertebrates as well as daily averaged streamflow were monitored for five years at twenty regulated stream reaches, and possible relationships between benthos-based stream quality metrics and environmental variables were investigated. Despite the non-negligible inter-site differences in basic streamflow metrics, benthic macroinvertebrate communities were generally dominated by few highly resilient taxa. The highest level of diversity was detected at sites where upstream minimum flow exceedance is higher and further anthropogenic pressures (other than hydropower) are lower. However, according to the current Italian normative index, the ecological quality was good/high on average at all of the investigated reaches, thus complying the Water Framework Directive standards. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of Twitch Responses During Current- or Voltage-Controlled Transcutaneous Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Luna, José Luis; Krenn, Matthias; Löfler, Stefan; Kern, Helmut; Cortés R, Jorge A; Mayr, Winfried

    2015-10-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is an established method for functional restoration of muscle function, rehabilitation, and diagnostics. In this work, NMES was applied with surface electrodes placed on the anterior thigh to identify the main differences between current-controlled (CC) and voltage-controlled (VC) modes. Measurements of the evoked knee extension force and the myoelectric signal of quadriceps and hamstrings were taken during stimulation with different amplitudes, pulse widths, and stimulation techniques. The stimulation pulses were rectangular and symmetric biphasic for both stimulation modes. The electrode-tissue impedance influences the differences between CC and VC stimulation. The main difference is that for CC stimulation, variation of pulse width and amplitude influences the amount of nerve depolarization, whereas VC stimulation is only dependent on amplitude variations for pulse widths longer than 150 μs. An important remark is that these findings are strongly dependent on the characteristics of the electrode-skin interface. In our case, we used large stimulation electrodes placed on the anterior thigh, which cause higher capacitive effects. The controllability, voltage compliance, and charge characteristics of each stimulation technique should be considered during the stimulators design. For applications that require the activation of a large amount of nerve fibers, VC is a more suitable option. In contrast, if the application requires a high controllability, then CC should be chosen prior to VC.

  15. Future Projections of Aerosol Optical Depth, Radiative Forcing, and Climate Response Due to Declining Aerosol Emissions in the Representative Concentration Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westervelt, D. M.; Mauzerall, D. L.; Horowitz, L. W.; Naik, V.

    2014-12-01

    It is widely expected that global emissions of atmospheric aerosols and their precursors will decrease strongly throughout the remainder of the 21st century, due to emission reduction policies enacted based on human health concerns. However, the resulting decrease in atmospheric aerosol burden will have unintended climate consequences. Since aerosols generally exert a net cooling influence on the climate, their removal will lead to an unmasking of global warming as well as other changes to the climate system. Aerosol and precursor global emissions decrease by as much as 80% by the year 2100, according to projections in four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios. We use the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 3 (GFDL CM3) to simulate future climate over the 21st century with and without aerosol emission changes projected by the RCPs in order to isolate the radiative forcing and climate response due to the aerosol reductions. We find that up to 1 W m-2 of radiative forcing may be unmasked globally by 2100 due to reductions in aerosol and precursor emissions, leading to average global temperature increases up to 1 K and global precipitation rate increases up to 0.09 mm d-1 (3%). Regionally and locally, climate impacts are much larger, as RCP8.5 projects a 2.1 K warming over China, Japan, and Korea due to reduced aerosol emissions. Our results highlight the importance of crafting emissions control policies with both climate and air pollution benefits in mind. The expected unmasking of additional global warming from aerosol reductions highlights the importance of robust greenhouse gas mitigation policies and may require more aggressive policies than anticipated.

  16. Can current moisture responses predict soil CO2 efflux under altered precipitation regimes? A synthesis of manipulation experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vicca

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a key component of the carbon cycle, soil CO2 efflux (SCE is being increasingly studied to improve our mechanistic understanding of this important carbon flux. Predicting ecosystem responses to climate change often depends on extrapolation of current relationships between ecosystem processes and their climatic drivers to conditions not yet experienced by the ecosystem. This raises the question to what extent these relationships remain unaltered beyond the current climatic window for which observations are available to constrain the relationships. Here, we evaluate whether current responses of SCE to fluctuations in soil temperature and soil water content can be used to predict SCE under altered rainfall patterns. Of the 58 experiments for which we gathered SCE data, 20 were discarded because either too few data were available, or inconsistencies precluded their incorporation in the analyses. The 38 remaining experiments were used to test the hypothesis that a model parameterized with data from the control plots (using soil temperature and water content as predictor variables could adequately predict SCE measured in the manipulated treatment. Only for seven of these 38 experiments, this hypothesis was rejected. Importantly, these were the experiments with the most reliable datasets, i.e., those providing high-frequency measurements of SCE. Accordingly, regression tree analysis demonstrated that measurement frequency was crucial; our hypothesis could be rejected only for experiments with measurement intervals of less than 11 days, and was not rejected for any of the 24 experiments with larger measurement intervals. This highlights the importance of high-frequency measurements when studying effects of altered precipitation on SCE, probably because infrequent measurement schemes have insufficient capacity to detect shifts in the climate-dependencies of SCE. We strongly recommend that future experiments focus more strongly on establishing response

  17. Assessment and monitoring of treatment response in adult ADHD patients: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, J Russell

    2017-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental syndrome that emerges in childhood or early adolescence and persists into adulthood for a majority of individuals. There are many other adults with ADHD who may not seek out evaluation and treatment until adulthood, having been able to “get by” before struggling with inattention, hyperactivity, and/or impulsivity in adulthood, in addition to facing the associated features of disorganization, poor time management, and procrastination among many others. A lifetime diagnosis of ADHD is associated with a wide range of life impairments, which makes a comprehensive and accurate diagnostic assessment essential in order to obtain appropriate treatment. Moreover, while there are effective medical and psychosocial treatments for ADHD, it is important to be able to track treatment response in order to evaluate whether adjustments in specific interventions are needed or referrals for adjunctive treatments and supports are indicated to facilitate optimal therapeutic outcomes. The goal of this article is to provide a clinically useful review of the various measures that practicing clinicians can use to aid in the diagnostic assessment and monitoring of psychosocial and medical treatment of ADHD in adult patients. This review includes various structured interviews, screening scales, adult ADHD symptom inventories, measures of associated features of ADHD, as well as ratings of impairment and functioning which can be adapted to clinicians’ practice needs in order to track treatment progress and optimize treatments for adults with ADHD. PMID:28184164

  18. Three-dimensional surface current loops in broadband responsive negative refractive metamaterial with isotropy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Xun-Jun; Wang Yue; Mei Jin-Shuo; Gui Tai-Long; Yin Jing-Hua

    2012-01-01

    We propose a bulk negative refractive index (NRI) metamaterial composed of periodic array of tightly coupled metallic cross-pairs printed on the six sides of a cube for applications of superlenses.The structural characteristics of the three-dimensional (3D) metamaterial consist in the high symmetry and the superposition of metallic cross-pairs,which can increase the magnetic inductive coupling between adjacent cross-pairs and realize a broadband and isotropic NRI.The proposed 3D structure is simulated using the CST Microwave Studio 2006 to verify the design validity.The simulation results show that the proposed structure can not only realize simultaneously an electric and magnetic response to an incident electromagnetic (EM) wave,but also exhibit a broadband NRI whose relative bandwidth can reach up to 56.7%.In addition,the NRI band is insensitive to the polarization and the incident angle of the incident EM wave.Therefore,the proposed metamaterial is a good candidate material as three-dimensional broadband isotropic NRI metamaterial.

  19. Impairments of motor-cortex responses to unilateral and bilateral direct current stimulation in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkomiet eHasan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is a non-invasive stimulation technique that can be applied to modulate cortical activity through induction of cortical plasticity. Since various neuropsychiatric disorders are characterised by fluctuations in cortical activity levels (e.g. schizophrenia, tDCS is increasingly investigated as a treatment tool. Several studies have shown that the induction of cortical plasticity following classical, unilateral tDCS is reduced or impaired in the stimulated and non-stimulated primary motor cortices (M1 of schizophrenia patients. Moreover, an alternative, bilateral tDCS setup has recently been shown to modulate cortical plasticity in both hemispheres in healthy subjects, highlighting another potential treatment approach. Here we present the first study comparing the efficacy of unilateral tDCS (cathode left M1, anode right supraorbital with simultaneous bilateral tDCS (cathode left M1, anode right M1 in schizophrenia patients. tDCS-induced cortical plasticity was monitored by investigating motor-evoked potentials induced by single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation applied to both hemispheres. Healthy subjects showed a reduction of left M1 excitability following unilateral tDCS on the stimulated left hemisphere and an increase in right M1 excitability following bilateral tDCS. In schizophrenia, no plasticity was induced following both stimulation paradigms. The pattern of these results indicates a complex interplay between plasticity and connectivity that is impaired in schizophrenia patients. Further studies are needed to clarify the biological underpinnings and clinical impact of these findings.

  20. Impairments of motor-cortex responses to unilateral and bilateral direct current stimulation in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Alkomiet; Bergener, Theresa; Nitsche, Michael A; Strube, Wolfgang; Bunse, Tilmann; Falkai, Peter; Wobrock, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive stimulation technique that can be applied to modulate cortical activity through induction of cortical plasticity. Since various neuropsychiatric disorders are characterized by fluctuations in cortical activity levels (e.g., schizophrenia), tDCS is increasingly investigated as a treatment tool. Several studies have shown that the induction of cortical plasticity following classical, unilateral tDCS is reduced or impaired in the stimulated and non-stimulated primary motor cortices (M1) of patients with schizophrenia. Moreover, an alternative, bilateral tDCS setup has recently been shown to modulate cortical plasticity in both hemispheres in healthy subjects, highlighting another potential treatment approach. Here we present the first study comparing the efficacy of unilateral tDCS (cathode left M1, anode right supraorbital) with simultaneous bilateral tDCS (cathode left M1, anode right M1) in patients with schizophrenia. tDCS-induced cortical plasticity was monitored by investigating motor-evoked potentials induced by single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation applied to both hemispheres. Healthy subjects showed a reduction of left M1 excitability following unilateral tDCS on the stimulated left hemisphere and an increase in right M1 excitability following bilateral tDCS. In schizophrenia, no plasticity was induced following both stimulation paradigms. The pattern of these results indicates a complex interplay between plasticity and connectivity that is impaired in patients with schizophrenia. Further studies are needed to clarify the biological underpinnings and clinical impact of these findings.

  1. Late radiation responses in man: Current evaluation from results from Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schull, William J.

    Among the late effects of exposure to the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, none looms larger than radiation related malignancies. Indeed, the late effects of A-bomb radiation on mortality appear to be limited to an increase in malignant tumors. At present, it can be shown that cancers of the breast, colon, esophagus, lungs, stomach, thyroid, and urinary tract as well as leukemia and multiple myeloma increase in frequency with an increase in exposure. No significant relationship to radiation can as yet be established for malignant lymphoma, nor cancers of the rectum, pancreas or uterus. Radiation induced malignancies other than leukemia seem to develop proportionally to the natural cancer rate for the attained age. For specific age-at-death intervals, both relative and absolute risks tend to be higher for those of younger age at the time of bombing. Other late effects include radiation-related lenticular opacities, disturbances of growth among those survivors still growing at the time of exposure, and mental retardation and small head sizes among the in utero exposed. Chromosomal abnormalities too are more frequently encountered in the peripheral leucocytes of survivors, and this increase is functionally related to their exposure. Some uncertainty continues to surround both the quantity and quality of the radiation released by these two nuclear devices, particularly the Hiroshima bomb. A recent reassessment suggests that the gamma radiation estimates which have been used in the past may be too low at some distances and the neutron radiation estimates too high at all distances; moreover, the energies of the neutrons released now appear ``softer'' than previously conjectured. These uncertainties not sufficiently large, however, to compromise the reality of the increased frequency of malignancy, but make estimates of the dose response, particularly in terms of gamma and neutron exposures, tentative.

  2. Assessment and monitoring of treatment response in adult ADHD patients: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramsay JR

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available J Russell Ramsay Adult ADHD Treatment & Research Program, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is a neurodevelopmental syndrome that emerges in childhood or early adolescence and persists into adulthood for a majority of individuals. There are many other adults with ADHD who may not seek out evaluation and treatment until adulthood, having been able to “get by” before struggling with inattention, hyperactivity, and/or impulsivity in adulthood, in addition to facing the associated features of disorganization, poor time management, and procrastination among many others. A lifetime diagnosis of ADHD is associated with a wide range of life impairments, which makes a comprehensive and accurate diagnostic assessment essential in order to obtain appropriate treatment. Moreover, while there are effective medical and psychosocial treatments for ADHD, it is important to be able to track treatment response in order to evaluate whether adjustments in specific interventions are needed or referrals for adjunctive treatments and supports are indicated to facilitate optimal therapeutic outcomes. The goal of this article is to provide a clinically useful review of the various measures that practicing clinicians can use to aid in the diagnostic assessment and monitoring of psychosocial and medical treatment of ADHD in adult patients. This review includes various structured interviews, screening scales, adult ADHD symptom inventories, measures of associated features of ADHD, as well as ratings of impairment and functioning which can be adapted to clinicians’ practice needs in order to track treatment progress and optimize treatments for adults with ADHD. Keywords: adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, adult ADHD, pharmacotherapy, psychosocial treatment, symptoms, functional impairments, executive functions

  3. Current treatment options and response rates in children with chronic hepatitis C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stefan Wirth

    2012-01-01

    Vertical transmission has become the most common mode of transmission of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in children. The rate of perinatal transmission from an HCVinfected mother to her child ranges from 2% to 5% and the prevalence of HCV in children in developed countries ranges between 0.1% and 0.4%. Spontaneous viral clearance seems to be dependent on the genotype and has been reported between 2.4%-25%. For chronically infected patients, treatment with recombinant polyethylene glycol (PEG)-interferon α-2b and daily ribavirin has now been approved as standard treatment for children 2-17 years of age. In five large prospective studies, a total of 318 children and adolescents aged 3-17 years were treated either with subcutaneous PEG-interferon α-2b at a dose of 1-1.5 μg/kg or 60 μg/m2 once a week in combination with oral ribavirin (15 mg/kg per day) or PEG-interferon α-2a with ribavirin. Subjects with genotype 1 and 4 received the medication for 48 wk and individuals with genotype 2 and 3 mainly for 24 wk. Overall sustained viral response (SVR) was achieved in 193/318 (60.7%) of treated patients. Stratified for genotype; 120/234 (51%) with genotype 1, 68/73 (93%) with genotype 2/3, and 6/11 (55%) with genotype 4 showed SVR. Relapse rate was between 7.7% and 17%. Overall, treatment was well tolerated; however,notable side effects were present in approximately 20%. According to recent experiences in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C in children and adolescents, a combination of PEG-interferon α with ribavirin has been found to be well tolerated and highly efficacious, particularly in individuals with genotype 2/3. Thus, this treatment can be recommended as standard of care until more effective treatment options will become available for genotype 1 patients.

  4. Responsivity drop due to conductance modulation in GaN metal-semiconductor-metal Schottky based UV photodetectors on Si(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikiran, L.; Radhakrishnan, K.; Dharmarasu, N.; Agrawal, M.; Wang, Zilong; Bruno, Annalisa; Soci, Cesare; Lihuang, Tng; Kian Siong, Ang

    2016-09-01

    GaN Schottky metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) UV photodetectors were fabricated on a 600 nm thick GaN layer, grown on 100 mm Si (111) substrate using an ammonia-MBE growth technique. In this report, the effect of device dimensions, applied bias and input power on the linearity of the GaN Schottky-based MSM photodetectors on Si substrate were investigated. Devices with larger interdigitated spacing, ‘S’ of 9.0 μm between the fingers resulted in good linearity and flat responsivity characteristics as a function of input power with an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of ˜33% at an applied bias of 15 V and an input power of 0.8 W m-2. With the decrease of ‘S’ to 3.0 μm, the EQE was found to increase to ˜97%. However, devices showed non linearity and drop in responsivity from flatness at higher input power. Moreover, the position of dropping from flatter responsivity was found to shift to lower powers with increased bias. The drop in the responsivity was attributed to the modulation of conductance in the MSM due to the trapping of electrons at the dislocations, resulting in the formation of depletion regions around them. In devices with lower ‘S’, both the image force reduction and the enhanced collection efficiency increased the photocurrent as well as the charging of the dislocations. This resulted in the increased depletion regions around the dislocations leading to the modulation of conductance and non-linearity.

  5. Differences in the effects of turns and constrictions on the resistive response in current-biased superconducting wire after single photon absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotova, A. N.; Y Vodolazov, D.

    2013-07-01

    We study how turns and constrictions affect the resistive response of superconducting wire after instantaneous, localized heating, by modeling the absorption of a single photon by the wire. We find that the presence of constrictions favors the detection of photons with a range of energies whereas the presence of turns increases the ability to detect only relatively ‘low’ energy photons. The main reason is that in the case of a constriction the current density is increased over the whole length and width of the constriction while in the case of a turn the current density is enhanced only near the inner corner of the turn. This results in inhomogeneous Joule heating near the turn and worsens the conditions for the appearance of the normal domain at relatively small currents, where the ‘high’ energy photons could already create a normal domain in the straight part of the wire. We also find that the amplitude of the voltage pulse depends on the location at which the photon is absorbed, being smallest when the photon is absorbed near the turn and largest when the photon is absorbed near the constriction. This effect is due to the difference in the resistance of constrictions and turns in the normal state from the resistance of the rest of the wire.

  6. Focal Hemodynamic Responses in the Stimulated Hemisphere During High-Definition Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthalib, Makii; Besson, Pierre; Rothwell, John; Perrey, Stéphane

    2017-07-17

    High-definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS) using a 4 × 1 electrode montage has been previously shown using modeling and physiological studies to constrain the electric field within the spatial extent of the electrodes. The aim of this proof-of-concept study was to determine if functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) neuroimaging can be used to determine a hemodynamic correlate of this 4 × 1 HD-tDCS electric field on the brain. In a three session cross-over study design, 13 healthy males received one sham (2 mA, 30 sec) and two real (HD-tDCS-1 and HD-tDCS-2, 2 mA, 10 min) anodal HD-tDCS targeting the left M1 via a 4 × 1 electrode montage (anode on C3 and 4 return electrodes 3.5 cm from anode). The two real HD-tDCS sessions afforded a within-subject replication of the findings. fNIRS was used to measure changes in brain hemodynamics (oxygenated hemoglobin integral-O2 Hbint ) during each 10 min session from two regions of interest (ROIs) in the stimulated left hemisphere that corresponded to "within" (Lin ) and "outside" (Lout ) the spatial extent of the 4 × 1 electrode montage, and two corresponding ROIs (Rin and Rout ) in the right hemisphere. The ANOVA showed that both real anodal HD-tDCS compared to sham induced a significantly greater O2 Hbint in the Lin than Lout ROIs of the stimulated left hemisphere; while there were no significant differences between the real and sham sessions for the right hemisphere ROIs. Intra-class correlation coefficients showed "fair-to-good" reproducibility for the left stimulated hemisphere ROIs. The greater O2 Hbint "within" than "outside" the spatial extent of the 4 × 1 electrode montage represents a hemodynamic correlate of the electrical field distribution, and thus provides a prospective reliable method to determine the dose of stimulation that is necessary to optimize HD-tDCS parameters in various applications. © 2017 International Neuromodulation Society.

  7. A 3 A sink/source current fast transient response low-dropout Gm driven linear regulator*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chu Xiuqin; Li Qingwei; Lai Xinquan; Yuan Bing; LiYanming; Zhao Yongrui

    2011-01-01

    A 3 A sink/source Gm-driven CMOS low-dropout regulator (LDO), specially designed for low input voltage and low cost, is presented by utilizing the structure of a current mirror Gm (transconductance) driving technique, which provides high stability as well as a fast load transient response. The proposed LDO was fabricated by a 0.5μm standard CMOS process, and the die size is as small as 1.0 mm2. The proposed LDO dissipates 220 μA of quiescent current in no-load conditions and is able to deliver up to 3 A of load current. The measured results show that the output voltage can be resumed within 2 μs with a less than l mV overshoot and undershoot in the output current step from -1.8 to 1.8 A with a 0.1μs rising and falling time at three 10μF ceramic capacitors.

  8. Assessment of pile response due to deep excavation in close proximity—A case study based on DTL3 Tampines West Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.G. Chinnaswamy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ground movements during deep excavations and tunnelling, especially in urban areas, may potentially have major impact on adjacent buildings, structures and utilities. This impact on buildings and structures needs to be assessed by considering the horizontal and vertical displacements induced by deep excavations to determine the necessary mitigation measures. One major factor affecting the degree of severity the impact due to deep excavation may have on the buildings and structures is the type of foundation systems. While methodology in determining the damage category for the buildings on shallow foundation has been quite well established, the methodology for assessing the impact on the pile foundation is not straightforward due to the geometry and complexity of soil structure interaction. Often simplified two-dimensional (2D or comprehensive three-dimensional (3D finite element analyses would be carried out for the stage excavation to predict the displacement and stresses in the piles. Suitable protective and preventive measures would need to be designed and implemented for the existing buildings/structures if the damage category falls within the unacceptable range. This paper discusses the analysis and methodology to assess the effect on the pile foundation of a high-rise building due to the deep excavation of the Down Town Line Stage 3 (DTL3 Tampines West (TPW Station. The approach to assess the geotechnical capacity of the pile as a result of the deep excavation is presented in this paper. Based on the assessment of pile response, predicted movement, structural and geotechnical capacities of the pile, it was found to be within the acceptable limit and the pile foundation has adequate factor of safety with the deep excavation in close proximity.

  9. CMV latent infection improves CD8+ T response to SEB due to expansion of polyfunctional CD57+ cells in young individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Pera

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus (CMV latent infection has a deleterious effect on the efficacy of influenza vaccination in the elderly, suggesting that CMV restricts immunological diversity impairing the immune system functionality in old age. Polyfunctional T cells produce multiple cytokines and higher amounts than mono-functional T cells. High number of polyfunctional T cells correlates with better prognosis during infection. Thus, the efficiency of T cell response associates with quality (polyfunctionality rather than with quantity (percentage of T cells. We analyze the effect of CMV infection on CD8+ T cells polyfunctionality --degranulation (CD107a, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha production--, from young CMV-seropositive and CMV-seronegative individuals and in middle age CMV-seropositive donors, in response to Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B (SEB. Our results show a higher percentage of polyfunctional CD8+ T cells in young CMV-seropositive individuals compared to CMV-seronegative. Also, we find an expansion of CD8+CD57+ T cells in CMV-seropositive individuals, which are more polyfunctional than CD8+CD57- cells. In middle age individuals there is a higher frequency of SEB-responding CD8+ T cells, mainly TNF-alpha or TNF-alpha/IFN-gamma producers, whereas the percentage of polyfunctional cells (IFN-gamma/TNF-alpha/CD107a is similar to the percentages found in young CMV-seropositive. Therefore, whereas it has been shown that CMV latent infection can be detrimental for immune response in old individuals, our results indicate that CMV-seropositivity is associated to higher levels of polyfunctional CD8+ T cells in young and middle age donors. This increase in polyfunctionality, which can provide an immunological advantage in the response to other pathogens, is due to a CD8+CD57+ T cell expansion in CMV-seropositive individuals and it is independent of age. Conversely, age could contribute to the inflammation found in old individuals by increasing the percentage of cells

  10. Bleaching Susceptibility and Recovery of Colombian Caribbean Corals in Response to Water Current Exposure and Seasonal Upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktarov, Elisa; Pizarro, Valeria; Eidens, Corvin; Wilke, Thomas; Wild, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Coral bleaching events are globally occurring more frequently and with higher intensity, mainly caused by increases in seawater temperature. In Tayrona National Natural Park (TNNP) in the Colombian Caribbean, local coral communities are subjected to seasonal wind-triggered upwelling events coinciding with stronger water currents depending on location. This natural phenomenon offers the unique opportunity to study potential water current-induced mitigation mechanisms of coral bleaching in an upwelling influenced region. Therefore, coral bleaching susceptibility and recovery patterns were compared during a moderate and a mild bleaching event in December 2010 and 2011, and at the end of the subsequent upwelling periods at a water current-exposed and -sheltered site of an exemplary bay using permanent transect and labeling tools. This was accompanied by parallel monitoring of key environmental variables. Findings revealed that in 2010 overall coral bleaching before upwelling was significantly higher at the sheltered (34%) compared to the exposed site (8%). Whereas 97% of all previously bleached corals at the water current-exposed site had recovered from bleaching by April 2011, only 77% recovered at the sheltered site, but 12% had died there. In December 2011, only mild bleaching (corals recovered significantly at both sites in the course of upwelling. No differences in water temperatures between sites occurred, but water current exposure and turbidity were significantly higher at the exposed site, suggesting that these variables may be responsible for the observed site-specific mitigation of coral bleaching. This indicates the existence of local resilience patterns against coral bleaching in Caribbean reefs. PMID:24282551

  11. Bleaching susceptibility and recovery of Colombian Caribbean corals in response to water current exposure and seasonal upwelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktarov, Elisa; Pizarro, Valeria; Eidens, Corvin; Wilke, Thomas; Wild, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Coral bleaching events are globally occurring more frequently and with higher intensity, mainly caused by increases in seawater temperature. In Tayrona National Natural Park (TNNP) in the Colombian Caribbean, local coral communities are subjected to seasonal wind-triggered upwelling events coinciding with stronger water currents depending on location. This natural phenomenon offers the unique opportunity to study potential water current-induced mitigation mechanisms of coral bleaching in an upwelling influenced region. Therefore, coral bleaching susceptibility and recovery patterns were compared during a moderate and a mild bleaching event in December 2010 and 2011, and at the end of the subsequent upwelling periods at a water current-exposed and -sheltered site of an exemplary bay using permanent transect and labeling tools. This was accompanied by parallel monitoring of key environmental variables. Findings revealed that in 2010 overall coral bleaching before upwelling was significantly higher at the sheltered (34%) compared to the exposed site (8%). Whereas 97% of all previously bleached corals at the water current-exposed site had recovered from bleaching by April 2011, only 77% recovered at the sheltered site, but 12% had died there. In December 2011, only mild bleaching (corals recovered significantly at both sites in the course of upwelling. No differences in water temperatures between sites occurred, but water current exposure and turbidity were significantly higher at the exposed site, suggesting that these variables may be responsible for the observed site-specific mitigation of coral bleaching. This indicates the existence of local resilience patterns against coral bleaching in Caribbean reefs.

  12. Bleaching susceptibility and recovery of Colombian Caribbean corals in response to water current exposure and seasonal upwelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Bayraktarov

    Full Text Available Coral bleaching events are globally occurring more frequently and with higher intensity, mainly caused by increases in seawater temperature. In Tayrona National Natural Park (TNNP in the Colombian Caribbean, local coral communities are subjected to seasonal wind-triggered upwelling events coinciding with stronger water currents depending on location. This natural phenomenon offers the unique opportunity to study potential water current-induced mitigation mechanisms of coral bleaching in an upwelling influenced region. Therefore, coral bleaching susceptibility and recovery patterns were compared during a moderate and a mild bleaching event in December 2010 and 2011, and at the end of the subsequent upwelling periods at a water current-exposed and -sheltered site of an exemplary bay using permanent transect and labeling tools. This was accompanied by parallel monitoring of key environmental variables. Findings revealed that in 2010 overall coral bleaching before upwelling was significantly higher at the sheltered (34% compared to the exposed site (8%. Whereas 97% of all previously bleached corals at the water current-exposed site had recovered from bleaching by April 2011, only 77% recovered at the sheltered site, but 12% had died there. In December 2011, only mild bleaching (<10% at both sites was observed, but corals recovered significantly at both sites in the course of upwelling. No differences in water temperatures between sites occurred, but water current exposure and turbidity were significantly higher at the exposed site, suggesting that these variables may be responsible for the observed site-specific mitigation of coral bleaching. This indicates the existence of local resilience patterns against coral bleaching in Caribbean reefs.

  13. Thermodynamics, electrostatics, and ionic current in nanochannels grafted with pH-responsive end-charged polyelectrolyte brushes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang; Das, Siddhartha

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we study the thermodynamics, electrostatics, and an external electric field driven ionic current in a pH-responsive, end-charged polyelectrolyte (PE) brush grafted nanochannel. By employing a mean field theory, we unravel a highly nonintuitive interplay of pH and electrolyte salt concentration in dictating the height of the end-charged PE brush. Larger pH or weak hydrogen ion concentration leads to maximum ionization of the charge-producing group-as a consequence, the resulting the electric double layer (EDL) energy get maximized causing a maximum deviation of the brush height from the value (d0 ) of the uncharged brush. This deviation may result in enhancement or lowering of the brush height as compared to d0 depending on whether the PE end locates lower or higher than h/2 (h is the nanochannel half height) and the salt concentration. Subsequently, we use this combined PE-brush-configuration-EDL-electrostatics framework to compute the ionic current in the nanochannel. We witness that the ionic current for smaller pH is much larger despite the corresponding magnitude of the EDL electrostatic potential being much smaller-this stems from the presence of a much larger concentration of H+ ions at small pH and the fact that H+ ions have very large mobilities. In fact, this ionic current shows a steep variation with pH that can be useful in exploring new designs for applications involving quantification and characterization of ionic current in PE-brush-grafted nanochannels. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Quantification of the glycogen cascade system: the ultrasensitive responses of liver glycogen synthase and muscle phosphorylase are due to distinctive regulatory designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh KV

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signaling pathways include intricate networks of reversible covalent modification cycles. Such multicyclic enzyme cascades amplify the input stimulus, cause integration of multiple signals and exhibit sensitive output responses. Regulation of glycogen synthase and phosphorylase by reversible covalent modification cycles exemplifies signal transduction by enzyme cascades. Although this system for regulating glycogen synthesis and breakdown appears similar in all tissues, subtle differences have been identified. For example, phosphatase-1, a dephosphorylating enzyme of the system, is regulated quite differently in muscle and liver. Do these small differences in regulatory architecture affect the overall performance of the glycogen cascade in a specific tissue? We address this question by analyzing the regulatory structure of the glycogen cascade system in liver and muscle cells at steady state. Results The glycogen cascade system in liver and muscle cells was analyzed at steady state and the results were compared with literature data. We found that the cascade system exhibits highly sensitive switch-like responses to changes in cyclic AMP concentration and the outputs are surprisingly different in the two tissues. In muscle, glycogen phosphorylase is more sensitive than glycogen synthase to cyclic AMP, while the opposite is observed in liver. Furthermore, when the liver undergoes a transition from starved to fed-state, the futile cycle of simultaneous glycogen synthesis and degradation switches to reciprocal regulation. Under such a transition, different proportions of active glycogen synthase and phosphorylase can coexist due to the varying inhibition of glycogen-synthase phosphatase by active phosphorylase. Conclusion The highly sensitive responses of glycogen synthase in liver and phosphorylase in muscle to primary stimuli can be attributed to distinctive regulatory designs in the glycogen cascade system. The different

  15. Ly6Chi monocyte recruitment is responsible for Th2 associated host-protective macrophage accumulation in liver inflammation due to schistosomiasis.

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    Marcia Nascimento

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of M2 macrophages in the liver, within the context of a strong Th2 response, is a hallmark of infection with the parasitic helminth, Schistosoma mansoni, but the origin of these cells is unclear. To explore this, we examined the relatedness of macrophages to monocytes in this setting. Our data show that both monocyte-derived and resident macrophages are engaged in the response to infection. Infection caused CCR2-dependent increases in numbers of Ly6Chi monocytes in blood and liver and of CX3CR1+ macrophages in diseased liver. Ly6Chi monocytes recovered from liver had the potential to differentiate into macrophages when cultured with M-CSF. Using pulse chase BrdU labeling, we found that most hepatic macrophages in infected mice arose from monocytes. Consistent with this, deletion of monocytes led to the loss of a subpopulation of hepatic CD11chi macrophages that was present in infected but not naïve mice. This was accompanied by a reduction in the size of egg-associated granulomas and significantly exacerbated disease. In addition to the involvement of monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages in hepatic inflammation due to infection, we observed increased incorporation of BrdU and expression of Ki67 and MHC II in resident macrophages, indicating that these cells are participating in the response. Expression of both M2 and M1 marker genes was increased in liver from infected vs. naive mice. The M2 fingerprint in the liver was not accounted for by a single cell type, but rather reflected expression of M2 genes by various cells including macrophages, neutrophils, eosinophils and monocytes. Our data point to monocyte recruitment as the dominant process for increasing macrophage cell numbers in the liver during schistosomiasis.

  16. Effect of defects due to lattice mismatch between GaAs and InP materials on gate-leakage current and microwave noise of GaAs MESFETS on InP substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertouk, Mourad; Boudiaf, A.; Azoulay, Rozette; Clei, A.

    1993-11-01

    The effect of traps due to lattice mismatch between GaAs and InP materials on the reverse current of Schottky diodes is demonstrated by the temperature dependence of the current, which exhibits a S.R.H. component at low reverse bias (also present in GaAs/GaAs with activation energy 0.125 eV) and a trap assisted tunneling one at high reverse bias (not observed in GaAs/GaAs). A model is developed which takes into account the temperature and channel doping level dependence. Application of this model to 0.25 micrometers gate GaAs MESFETs gives a good agreement with gate leakage current behavior as a function of drain and gate bias, for 6 X 1017 cm-3 and 1018 cm-3 channel doping. The excess gate-drain assisted tunneling current in 1018 cm-3 doped channel does not affect the MESFETs dc and microwave performances. However, the microwave noise (Fmin) is increased.

  17. The role of relativity in the optical response of gold within the time-dependent current-density-functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniello, P; de Boeij, P L

    2005-04-22

    We included relativistic effects in the formulation of the time-dependent current-density-functional theory for the calculation of linear response properties of metals [P. Romaniello and P. L. de Boeij, Phys. Rev. B (to be published)]. We treat the dominant scalar-relativistic effects using the zeroth-order regular approximation in the ground-state density-functional theory calculations, as well as in the time-dependent response calculations. The results for the dielectric function of gold calculated in the spectral range of 0-10 eV are compared with experimental data reported in literature and recent ellipsometric measurements. As well known, relativistic effects strongly influence the color of gold. We find that the onset of interband transitions is shifted from around 3.5 eV, obtained in a nonrelativistic calculation, to around 1.9 eV when relativity is included. With the inclusion of the scalar-relativistic effects there is an overall improvement of both real and imaginary parts of the dielectric function over the nonrelativistic ones. Nevertheless some important features in the absorption spectrum are not well reproduced, but can be explained in terms of spin-orbit coupling effects. The remaining deviations are attributed to the underestimation of the interband gap (5d-6sp band gap) in the local-density approximation and to the use of the adiabatic local-density approximation in the response calculation.

  18. The Pedersen current carried by electrons: a non-linear response of the ionosphere to magnetospheric forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Buchert

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Observations by the EISCAT Svalbard radar show that electron temperatures Te in the cusp electrojet reach up to about 4000 K. The heat is tapped and converted from plasma convection in the near Earth space by a Pedersen current that is carried by electrons due to the presence of irregularities and their demagnetising effect. The heat is transfered to the neutral gas by collisions. In order to enhance Te to such high temperatures the maximally possible dissipation at 50% demagnetisation must nearly be reached. The effective Pedersen conductances are found to be enhanced by up to 60% compared to classical values. Conductivities and conductances respond significantly to variations of the electric field strength E, and "Ohm's law" for the ionosphere becomes non-linear for large E.

  19. Cardiosphere-derived cells from pediatric end-stage heart failure patients have enhanced functional activity due to the heat shock response regulating the secretome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sudhish; Mishra, Rachana; Simpson, David; Wehman, Brody; Colletti, Evan J; Deshmukh, Savitha; Datla, Srinivasa Raju; Balachandran, Keerti; Guo, Yin; Chen, Ling; Siddiqui, Osama T; Kaushal, Shalesh; Kaushal, Sunjay

    2015-04-01

    We have demonstrated that human neonatal cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) derived from the young are more regenerative due to their robust secretome. However, it is unclear how the decompensated pediatric heart impacts the functional activity of their CDCs. Our aim was to characterize the potency of pediatric CDCs derived from normal functioning myocardium of control heart disease (CHD) patients to those generated from age-matched end stage heart failure (ESHF) patients and to determine the mechanisms involved. ESHF-derived CDCs contained a higher number of c-kit(+) , Islet-1(+) , and Sca-1(+) cells. When transplanted into an infarcted rodent model, ESHF-derived CDCs significantly demonstrated higher restoration of ventricular function, prevented adverse remodeling, and enhanced angiogenesis when compared with CHD patients. The superior functional recovery of the ESHF-derived CDCs was mediated in part by increased SDF-1α and VEGF-A secretion resulting in augmented recruitment of endogenous stem cells and proliferation of cardiomyocytes. We determined the mechanism is due to the secretome directed by the heat shock response (HSR), which is supported by three lines of evidence. First, gain of function studies demonstrated that increased HSR induced the lower functioning CHD-derived CDCs to significantly restore myocardial function. Second, loss-of function studies targeting the HSR impaired the ability of the ESHF-derived CDCs to functionally recover the injured myocardium. Finally, the native ESHF myocardium had an increased number of c-kit(+) cardiac stem cells. These findings suggest that the HSR enhances the functional activity of ESHF-derived CDCs by increasing their secretome activity, notably SDF-1α and VEGF-A.

  20. Epigenetic effects on the mouse mandible: common features and discrepancies in remodeling due to muscular dystrophy and response to food consistency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de la Porte Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In wild populations phenotypic differentiation of skeletal structures is influenced by many factors including epigenetic interactions and plastic response to environmental influences, possibly blurring the expression of genetic differences. In contrast, laboratory animals provide the opportunity to separate environmental from genetic effects. The mouse mandible is particularly prone to such plastic variations because bone remodeling occurs late in postnatal ontogeny, in interaction with muscular loading. In order to understand the impact of this process on mandible morphology, we investigated how change in the masticatory function affects the mandible shape, and its pattern of variation. Breeding laboratory mice on food of different consistencies mimicked a natural variation in feeding ecology, whereas mice affected by the murine analogue of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy provided a case of pathological modification of the mastication process. Results Food consistency as well as dystrophy caused significant shape changes in the mouse mandible. Further differences were observed between laboratory strains and between sexes within strains, muscular dystrophy causing the largest morphological change. The directions of the morphological changes due to food consistency and muscular dystrophy were discrepant, despite the fact that both are related to bone remodeling. In contrast, directions of greatest variance were comparable among most groups, and the direction of the change due to sexual dimorphism was parallel to the direction of main variance. Conclusions Bone remodeling is confirmed as an important factor driving mandible shape differences, evidenced by differences due to both the consistency of the food ingested and muscular dystrophy. However, the resulting shape change will depend on how the masticatory function is affected. Muscular dystrophy caused shape changes distributed all over the mandible, all muscles being

  1. Taxonomic and functional composition of the algal benthos exhibits similar successional trends in response to nutrient supply and current velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Chad A; Passy, Sophia I; Laanbroek, Riks

    2012-05-01

    In an effort to identify the causes and patterns of temporal change in periphytic communities, we examined biomass accumulation, taxonomic and functional composition, rate of species turnover, and pairwise species correlations in response to variability in current velocity and nutrient supply in artificial stream flumes. Divergent patterns in community growth and succession were observed between nutrient treatments and, to a lesser extent, between flow treatments best described by shifts in taxonomic and functional composition. Specifically, understory low profile species, tolerant to low resource supply, became dominant under low nutrients, while overstory high profile and motile species with higher nutrient demands dominated the high nutrient treatments. Increased resource supply or current velocity did not influence the species turnover rate, measured by a time-lag analysis. Interspecific interactions, especially competition, did not appear to be driving community dynamics, as the number of positive and negative pairwise species correlations ranged between low and extremely low, respectively. The overwhelming majority of correlations were not significant, indicating that species within the biofilm matrix were not perceptibly influencing one another. Thus, temporal trends in taxonomic and functional composition were largely environmentally driven, signifying that coexistence in biofilms is defined by the same mechanism along the hierarchy from species to functional groups.

  2. Current analogues of future climate indicate the likely response of a sensitive montane tropical avifauna to a warming world.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S Anderson

    Full Text Available Among birds, tropical montane species are likely to be among the most vulnerable to climate change, yet little is known about how climate drives their distributions, nor how to predict their likely responses to temperature increases. Correlative models of species' environmental niches have been widely used to predict changes in distribution, but direct tests of the relationship between key variables, such as temperature, and species' actual distributions are few. In the absence of historical data with which to compare observations and detect shifts, space-for-time substitutions, where warmer locations are used as analogues of future conditions, offer an opportunity to test for species' responses to climate. We collected density data for rainforest birds across elevational gradients in northern and southern subregions within the Australian Wet Tropics (AWT. Using environmental optima calculated from elevational density profiles, we detected a significant elevational difference between the two regions in ten of 26 species. More species showed a positive (19 spp. than negative (7 spp. displacement, with a median difference of ∼80.6 m across the species analysed that is concordant with that expected due to latitudinal temperature differences (∼75.5 m. Models of temperature gradients derived from broad-scale climate surfaces showed comparable performance to those based on in-situ measurements, suggesting the former is sufficient for modeling impacts. These findings not only confirm temperature as an important factor driving elevational distributions of these species, but also suggest species will shift upslope to track their preferred environmental conditions. Our approach uses optima calculated from elevational density profiles, offering a data-efficient alternative to distribution limits for gauging climate constraints, and is sensitive enough to detect distribution shifts in this avifauna in response to temperature changes of as little as 0

  3. Application of direct torque control to electric screw presses for speeding up torque response and reducing starting current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Yi; HUANG Shu-huai; LI Jun-chao; XIONG Xiao-hong

    2009-01-01

    Fast response and stable torque output are crucial to the performance of electric screw presses. This paper describes the design of a direct torque control (DTC) system for speeding up torque response and reducing the starting current of electric screw presses and its application to the J58K series of numerical control electric screw presses with a dual-motor drive. The DTC drive system encompasses speed control, torque reference control, and switching frequency control. Comparison of the DTC duaI-AC induction motor drive with corresponding AC servo motor drive showed that for the J58K-315 electric screw press, the DTC drive system attains a higher maximum speed (786 r/min) within a shorter time (1.13 s) during a 250 mm stroke and undergoes smaller rise in temperature (42.0 ℃) in the motor after running for 2 h at a 12 min strike fi'equency than the AC servo motor drive does (751 r/min within 1.19 s, and 50.6 ℃ rise). Moreover, the DTC AC induction motor drive, with no need for a tachometer or position encoder to feed back the speed or position of the motor shaft, enjoys increased reliability in a strong-shock work environment.

  4. 2,3-Butanedione monoxime attenuates the β-adrenergic response of the L-type Ca2+ current in rat ventricular cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Alvarez-Collazo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Context: 2,3-Butanedione monoxime (BDM, an uncoupler of cardiac contraction, is commonly used in enzymatic dissociations to prevent hypercontraction of cardiomyocytes and in cardioplegic solutions to decrease oxygen demand during surgery. However, BDM affects multiple cellular systems including the L-type Ca2+ current (ICaL. If its phosphatase activity is the mechanism underlying the decrease ICaL in cardiomyocytes is a still unresolved question. Aims: To study the effects of BDM on ICaL of rat ventricular cardiomyocytes focusing our attention on the response of ICaL to β-adrenergic stimulation. Methods: The whole-cell patch-clamp method was used to study ICaL in enzymatically dissociated rat ventricular cardiomyocytes. Results: Extracellular BDM (5 mM decreased peak ICaL by ≈45%, slowed its fast inactivation but accelerated its slow inactivation. Cardiomyocytes incubated in BDM (≥ 30 min; 5 mM perfused with normal extracellular solution, showed normal ICaL properties. However, extracellular BDM (in cardiomyocytes incubated in BDM or not markedly reduced the response of ICaL to isoproterenol (1 µM. BDM also strongly attenuated the increase of ICaL in cardiomyocytes intracellularly perfused with cyclic AMP (50 µM. Conclusions: The decrease of basal ICaL by BDM is not related to its dephosphorylation action. Its effect on the Ca2+ channel occurs most probably in a site in the extracellular side or within the sarcolemmal membrane. Due to its phosphatase action, BDM strongly attenuates the response of ICaL to β-adrenergic stimulation. These actions of BDM must be taken into account both for its use in the dissociation of cardiomyocytes and in cardioplegic solutions and myocardial preservation.

  5. Loss of local control due to tumor displacement as a function of margin size, dose-response slope, and number of fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Jothybasu; Uzan, Julien; Baker, Colin; Nahum, Alan

    2013-04-01

    Geometric uncertainties are inevitable in radiotherapy. To account for these uncertainties, a margin is added to the clinical target volume (CTV) to create the planning target volume (PTV), and its size is critical for obtaining an optimal treatment plan. Dose-based (i.e., physical) margin recipes have been published and widely used, but it is important to consider fractionation and the radiobiological characteristics of the tumor when deriving margins. Hence a tumor control probability (TCP)-based margin is arguably more appropriate. Margins required for ≤ 1% loss in mean population TCP (relative to a static tumor) for varying numbers of fractions, varying slope of the dose-response curve (γ50) and varying degrees of dose distribution conformity are investigated for spherical and four-field (4F)-brick dose distributions. To simulate geometric uncertainties, systematic (Σ) and random (σ) tumor displacements were sampled from Gaussian distributions and applied to each fraction for a spherical CTV. Interfraction tumor motion was simulated and the dose accumulated from fraction to fraction on a voxel-by-voxel basis to calculate TCP. PTV margins derived from this work for various fraction numbers and dose-response slopes (γ50) for different degrees of geometric uncertainties are compared with margins calculated using published physical-dose- and TCP-based recipes. Larger margins are required for a decrease in the number of fractions and for an increase in γ50 for both spherical and 4F-brick dose distributions. However, the margins can be close to zero for the 4F-brick distribution for small geometric uncertainties (Σ = 1, σ = 1 mm) irrespective of the number of fractions and the magnitude of γ50 due to the higher "incidental" dose outside the tumor. For Σ = 1 mm and σ = 3 mm, physical-dose-based recipes underestimate the margin only for the combination of hypofractionated treatments and tumors with a high γ50. For all other situations TCP-based margins are

  6. Suboptimal clinical response to ciprofloxacin in patients with enteric fever due to Salmonella spp. with reduced fluoroquinolone susceptibility: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessamine Peter

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella spp. with reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones have higher than usual MICs to these agents but are still considered "susceptible" by NCCLS criteria. Delayed treatment response to fluoroquinolones has been noted, especially in cases of enteric fever due to such strains. We reviewed the ciprofloxacin susceptibility and clinical outcome of our recent enteric fever cases. Methods Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhi (S. Typhi and Serotype Paratyphi (S. Paratyphi blood culture isolates (1998–2002 were tested against nalidixic acid by disk diffusion (DD and agar dilution (AD and to ciprofloxacin by AD using NCCLS methods and interpretive criteria. Reduced fluoroquinolone susceptibility was defined as a ciprofloxacin MIC of 0.125–1.0 mg/L. The clinical records of patients treated with ciprofloxacin for isolates with reduced fluoroquinolone susceptibility were reviewed. Results Seven of 21 (33% S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi isolates had reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones (MIC range 0.125–0.5 mg/L. All 7 were nalidixic acid resistant by DD (no zone and by AD (MIC 128- >512 mg/L. The other 14 isolates were nalidixic acid susceptible and fully susceptible to ciprofloxacin (MIC range 0.015–0.03 mg/L. Five of the 7 cases were treated initially with oral ciprofloxacin. One patient remained febrile on IV ciprofloxacin until cefotaxime was added, with fever recurrence when cefotaxime was discontinued. Two continued on oral or IV ciprofloxacin alone but had prolonged fevers of 9–10 days duration, one was switched to IV beta-lactam therapy after remaining febrile for 3 days on oral/IV ciprofloxacin and one was treated successfully with oral ciprofloxacin. Four of the 5 required hospitalization. Conclusions Our cases provide further evidence that reduced fluoroquinolone susceptibility of S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi is clinically significant. Laboratories should test extra-intestinal Salmonella spp. for reduced

  7. Absence of melatonin induces night-time hepatic insulin resistance and increased gluconeogenesis due to stimulation of nocturnal unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Tatiane C; Lellis-Santos, Camilo; Jesus, Daniel S; Taneda, Marco; Rodrigues, Sandra C; Amaral, Fernanda G; Lopes, Ana Maria S; Cipolla-Neto, José; Bordin, Silvana; Anhê, Gabriel F

    2011-04-01

    It is known that the circadian rhythm in hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase expression (a limiting catalytic step of gluconeogenesis) and hepatic glucose production is maintained by both daily oscillation in autonomic inputs to the liver and night feeding behavior. However, increased glycemia and reduced melatonin (Mel) levels have been recently shown to coexist in diabetic patients at the end of the night period. In parallel, pinealectomy (PINX) is known to cause glucose intolerance with increased basal glycemia exclusively at the end of the night. The mechanisms that underlie this metabolic feature are not completely understood. Here, we demonstrate that PINX rats show night-time hepatic insulin resistance characterized by reduced insulin-stimulated RAC-α serine/threonine-protein kinase phosphorylation and increased phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase expression. In addition, PINX rats display increased conversion of pyruvate into glucose at the end of the night. The regulatory mechanism suggests the participation of unfolded protein response (UPR), because PINX induces night-time increase in activating transcription factor 6 expression and prompts a circadian fashion of immunoglobulin heavy chain-binding protein, activating transcription factor 4, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein expression with Zenith values at the dark period. PINX also caused a night-time increase in Tribble 3 and regulatory-associated protein of mammalian target of rapamycin; both were reduced in liver of PINX rats treated with Mel. Treatment of PINX rats with 4-phenyl butyric acid, an inhibitor of UPR, restored night-time hepatic insulin sensitivity and abrogated gluconeogenesis in PINX rats. Altogether, the present data show that a circadian oscillation of UPR occurs in the liver due to the absence of Mel. The nocturnal UPR activation is related with night-time hepatic insulin resistance and increased gluconeogenesis in PINX rats.

  8. The VEMAP integrated dataset for simulation of ecological responses to global change: Current climate and climate change scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittel, T.G.F. [NCAR/UCAR, Boulder, CO (United States)]|[Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins, CO (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project (VEMAP) dataset consists of inputs for biogeochemical and biogeographical models, including current climate, climate scenarios, soils, and vegetation for the conterminous United States on a 0.5 deg lat./lon. grid. The set has daily and monthly representations of climate. Monthly temperature (T) and precipitation (PPT) were derived from station records or statistically-generated from nearby stations. These values were interpolated to the grid accounting for orographic effects in an effort to make the grid-scale climate representative of actual bioclimates within grid cells; this was crucial because ecosystem responses are nonlinearly related to climate. Daily T and PPT were stochastically simulated with WGEN, and daily solar radiation and humidity empirically estimated with CLIMSIM. Equilibrium climate change scenarios were selected to capture a range of potential change from GCM experiments. Transient scenario rates of change were based on atmosphere-ocean GCM results. Mean climate, equilibrium scenarios, vegetation, and soil data are available on CD-ROM.

  9. A cascaded model of spectral distortions due to spectral response effects and pulse pileup effects in a photon-counting x-ray detector for CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cammin, Jochen, E-mail: jcammin1@jhmi.edu, E-mail: ktaguchi@jhmi.edu; Taguchi, Katsuyuki, E-mail: jcammin1@jhmi.edu, E-mail: ktaguchi@jhmi.edu [Division of Medical Imaging Physics, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Xu, Jennifer [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Hartsough, Neal E. [DxRay, Inc., Northridge, California 91324 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Energy discriminating, photon-counting detectors (PCDs) are an emerging technology for computed tomography (CT) with various potential benefits for clinical CT. The photon energies measured by PCDs can be distorted due to the interactions of a photon with the detector and the interaction of multiple coincident photons. These effects result in distorted recorded x-ray spectra which may lead to artifacts in reconstructed CT images and inaccuracies in tissue identification. Model-based compensation techniques have the potential to account for the distortion effects. This approach requires only a small number of parameters and is applicable to a wide range of spectra and count rates, but it needs an accurate model of the spectral distortions occurring in PCDs. The purpose of this study was to develop a model of those spectral distortions and to evaluate the model using a PCD (model DXMCT-1; DxRay, Inc., Northridge, CA) and various x-ray spectra in a wide range of count rates. Methods: The authors hypothesize that the complex phenomena of spectral distortions can be modeled by: (1) separating them into count-rate independent factors that we call the spectral response effects (SRE), and count-rate dependent factors that we call the pulse pileup effects (PPE), (2) developing separate models for SRE and PPE, and (3) cascading the SRE and PPE models into a combined SRE+PPE model that describes PCD distortions at both low and high count rates. The SRE model describes the probability distribution of the recorded spectrum, with a photo peak and a continuum tail, given the incident photon energy. Model parameters were obtained from calibration measurements with three radioisotopes and then interpolated linearly for other energies. The PPE model used was developed in the authors’ previous work [K. Taguchi et al., “Modeling the performance of a photon counting x-ray detector for CT: Energy response and pulse pileup effects,” Med. Phys. 38(2), 1089–1102 (2011

  10. Active seismic monitoring of changes of the reflection response of a crystalline shear zone due to fluid injection in the crust at the Continental Deep Drilling Site, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilecke, T.; Kurt, B.; Stefan, B.

    2005-12-01

    In theory and in the laboratory variations of the hydraulic pressure can be detected with seismic methods: A lowering of the hydraulic pressure leads to the closure of micro-cracks within the rock (increase of the differential or effective pressure). Subsequently, the seismic velocities increase. An increase of the hydraulic pressure leads to reverse seismic effects. Consequently, seismic impedance contrasts and associated reflection amplitudes vary in the case of a propagating fluid pressure front in a rock matrix with inhomogeneous permeability - as is the case at shear zones. The largest amplitude changes can be expected with vertical ray inclination on the impedance contrast. Generally, the expected effects are small however (Kaselow, 2004). The practical utilization of active seismics for the detection of pressure changes at large scale in hard rock is currently being studied at the Continental Deep Drilling Site (KTB). The injection of water (200 l/min) in a depth of about 4000 m into the so-called SE2 shear zone in the KTB pilot hole was monitored with active seismics between May 2004 and April 2005. The core of the experiment layout is a fixed 5-arm geophone array consisting of 24 3-component geophones, buried at about 70 cm depth. The source signal is a vertical vibrator sweep of 30 s length with the spectrum 30-120 Hz. The signal is sent into the ground 32 times during each cycle, detected with the array and recorded separately for each geophone channel, without prior correlation with the source signal. This allows maximum post-processing with seismic processing and analysis tools and especially permits the use of array properties to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. Critical parameters of the experiment are the repeatability of the source signal as well as the stability of the receiver properties. Another pivot is the hydraulic pressure and its distribution built up within the rock matrix. Estimations based on model calculations show that a change of

  11. Public response to alerts and warnings using social media: report of a workshop on current knowledge and research gaps

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Computer Science and Telecommunications Board; Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences; National Research Council

    "Following an earlier NRC workshop on public response to alerts and warnings delivered to mobile devices, a related workshop was held on February 28 and 29, 2012 to look at the role of social media in disaster response...

  12. Differential gene-expression and host-response profiles against avian influenza virus within the chicken lung due to anatomy and airflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reemers, Sylvia S; van Haarlem, Daphne A; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J; Vervelde, Lonneke

    2009-09-01

    Sampling the complete organ instead of defined parts might affect analysis at both the cellular and transcriptional levels. We defined host responses to H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) in trachea and different parts of the lung. Chickens were spray-inoculated with either saline or H9N2 AIV. Trachea and lung were sampled at 1 and 3 days post-inoculation (p.i.) for immunocytochemistry, real-time quantitative RT-PCR and gene-expression profiling. The trachea was divided into upper and lower parts and the lung into four segments, according to anatomy and airflow. Two segments contained the primary and secondary bronchi, cranial versus caudal (parts L1 and L3), and two segments contained the tertiary bronchi, cranial versus caudal (parts L2 and L4). Between the upper and lower trachea in both control and infected birds, minor differences in gene expression and host responses were found. In the lung of control birds, differences in anatomy were reflected in gene expression, and in the lung of infected birds, virus deposition enhanced the differences in gene expression. Differential gene expression in trachea and lung suggested common responses to a wide range of agents and site-specific responses. In trachea, site-specific responses were related to heat shock and lysozyme activity. In lung L1, which contained most virus, site-specific responses were related to genes involved in innate responses, interleukin activity and endocytosis. Our study indicates that the anatomy of the chicken lung must be taken into account when investigating in vivo responses to respiratory virus infections.

  13. Evaluating crop response and environmental impact of the accumulation of phosphorus due to long-term manuring of vertisol soil in northern China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hua, Keke; Zhang, Wenju; Guo, Zhibin; Wang, Daozhong; Oenema, Oene

    2016-01-01

    The availability of soil phosphorus (P) is one of the key factors that regulate crop productivity. Fertilization practices with P fertilizers carry a high risk of non-point environmental pollution due to water run-off and leaching. The present work discusses data from a 29-year (1982-2011) fertil

  14. Differences in the Treatment Response to Antithyroid Drugs versus Electroconvulsive Therapy in a Case of Recurrent Catatonia due to Graves’ Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Saito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We reported a case which presented recurrent episodes of catatonia as a result of Graves’ disease with hyperthyroidism. The patient showed different treatment response in each episodes; in the first episode, psychiatric and physical symptoms were resolved by a combination of antithyroid and anxiolytic therapies, while in the second episode, the combination therapy did not ameliorate her symptoms and ECT was indicated. We postulated that decreased CSF level of TTR and the resulting susceptibility to the derangement of peripheral thyroid function might be involved in this different treatment response.

  15. Increased responsiveness of rat mast cells to compound 48/80 due to removal of extracellular magnesium. Effects of ouabain and EGTA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Niels Haldor; Johansen, Torben

    1991-01-01

    A decreased secretory response of mast cells to compound 48/80 (12% of control value) after preincubation of the cells with magnesium but without calcium was partially restored by removal of magnesium. EGTA (10 microM) blocked the restoration and decreased the restored secretory activity again...

  16. If photoinhibition of soybean photosystem II enhances the hypersensitive response, it is not solely due to blockage of electron transfer flow at D1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies have suggested that photoinhibition, through inactivation of photosystem II (PSII), could be beneficial to plants during defense to pathogens through enhanced reactive oxygen (ROS), especially during the hypersensitive response (HR). In this study, we addressed this question by focu...

  17. Maxwell-Cattaneo Heat Convection and Thermal Stresses Responses of a Semi-Infinite Medium to High-Speed Laser Heating due to High Speed Laser Heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah I. A.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on Maxwell-Cattaneo convection equation, the thermoelasticity problem is in- vestigated in this paper. The analytic solution of a boundary value problem for a semi- infinite medium with traction free surface heated by a high-speed laser-pulses have Dirac temporal profile is solved. The temperature, the displacement and the stresses distributions are obtained analytically using the Laplace transformation, and discussed at small time duration of the laser pulses. A numerical study for Cu as a target is performed. The results are presented graphically. The obtained results indicate that the small time duration of the laser pulses has no e ect on the finite velocity of the heat con- ductivity, but the behavior of the stress and the displacement distribution are affected due to the pulsed heating process and due to the structure of the governing equations.

  18. The Acute Inflammatory Response in Trauma/Hemorrhage and Traumatic Brain Injury : Current State and Emerging Prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Namas, R.; Ghuma, A.; Hermus, L.; Zamora, R.; Okonkwo, D. O.; Billiar, T. R.; Vodovotz, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic injury/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) elicits an acute inflammatory response that may result in death. Inflammation describes a coordinated series of molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and systemic responses that drive the pathology of various diseases including T/HS and traumatic brain injury

  19. Alignment and Elongation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells in Response to Direct-Current Electrical Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Tandon, Nina; Goh, Brian; Marsano, Anna; Chao, Pen-Hsiu Grace; Montouri-Sorrentino, Chrystina; Gimble, Jeffrey; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    In vivo, direct current electric fields are present during embryonic development and wound healing. In vitro, direct current (DC) electric fields induce directional cell migration and elongation. For the first time, we demonstrate that cultured human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASCs) respond to the presence of direct-current electric fields. Cells were stimulated for 2–4 hours with DC electric fields of 6 V/cm that were similar to those encountered in vivo post-injury. Upon stimulatio...

  20. Seasonal effects in the ionosphere-thermosphere response to the precipitation and field-aligned current variations in the cusp region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Namgaladze

    Full Text Available The seasonal effects in the thermosphere and ionosphere responses to the precipitating electron flux and field-aligned current variations, of the order of an hour in duration, in the summer and winter cusp regions have been investigated using the global numerical model of the Earth's upper atmosphere. Two variants of the calculations have been performed both for the IMF By < 0. In the first variant, the model input data for the summer and winter precipitating fluxes and field-aligned currents have been taken as geomagnetically symmetric and equal to those used earlier in the calculations for the equinoctial conditions. It has been found that both ionospheric and thermospheric disturbances are more intensive in the winter cusp region due to the lower conductivity of the winter polar cap ionosphere and correspondingly larger electric field variations leading to the larger Joule heating effects in the ion and neutral gas temperature, ion drag effects in the thermospheric winds and ion drift effects in the F2-region electron concentration. In the second variant, the calculations have been performed for the events of 28–29 January, 1992 when precipitations were weaker but the magnetospheric convection was stronger than in the first variant. Geomagnetically asymmetric input data for the summer and winter precipitating fluxes and field-aligned currents have been taken from the patterns derived by combining data obtained from the satellite, radar and ground magnetometer observations for these events. Calculated patterns of the ionospheric convection and thermospheric circulation have been compared with observations and it has been established that calculated patterns of the ionospheric convection for both winter and summer hemispheres are in a good agreement with the observations. Calculated patterns of the thermospheric circulation are in a good agreement with the average circulation for the Southern (summer Hemisphere obtained

  1. Whole-cell recording from honeybee olfactory receptor neurons: ionic currents, membrane excitability and odourant response in developing workerbee and drone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Stéphanie; Masson, Claudine; Jakob, Ingrid

    2002-04-01

    Whole-cell recording techniques were used to characterize ionic membrane currents and odourant responses in honeybee olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in primary cell culture. ORNs of workerbee (female) and drone (male) were isolated at an early stage of development before sensory axons connect to their target in the antennal lobe. The results collectively indicate that honeybee ORNs have electrical properties similar, but not necessarily identical to, those currently envisaged for ORNs of other species. Under voltage clamp at least four ionic currents could be distinguished. Inward currents were made of a fast transient, tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium current. In some ORNs a cadmium-sensitive calcium current was detected. ORNs showed heterogeneity in their outward currents: either outward currents were made of a delayed rectifier type potassium current, which was partially blocked by tetraethyl ammonium or quinidine, or were composed of a delayed rectifier type and a transient calcium-dependent potassium current, which was cadmium-sensitive and abolished by removal of external calcium. The proportion of each of the two outward currents, however, was different within the ORNs of the two sexes suggesting a gender-specific functional heterogeneity. ORNs showed heterogeneity in action potential firing properties: depolarizing current steps elicited either one action potential or, as in most of the cells, it led to repetitive spiking. Action potentials were tetrodotoxin-sensitive suggesting they are carried by sodium. Odourant stimulation with different mixtures and pure substances evoked depolarizing receptor potentials with superimposed action potentials when spike threshold was reached. In summary, honeybee ORNs are remarkably mature at early stages in their development.

  2. A novel method for modeling the neutron time of flight (nTOF) detector response in current mode to inertial confinement fusion experiments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Alan J. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Cooper, Gary Wayne [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Chandler, Gordon Andrew; Fehl, David Lee; Hahn, Kelly Denise; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Smelser, Ruth Marie; Torres, Jose A.

    2013-09-01

    could be removed or modified to produce %E2%80%9Ccleaner%E2%80%9D neutron signals? This process was first developed and then applied to the axial neutron time of flight detectors at the ZFacility mentioned above. First, MCNPPoliMi was used to model relevant portions of the facility between the source and the detector locations. To obtain useful statistics, variance reduction was utilized. Then, the resulting collision output table produced by MCNPPoliMi was further analyzed by a MATLAB postprocessing code. This converted the energy deposited by neutron and photon interactions in the plastic scintillator (i.e., nTOF detector) into light output, in units of MeVee%D1%84 (electron equivalent) vs time. The time response of the detector was then folded into the signal via another MATLAB code. The simulated response was then compared with experimental data and shown to be in good agreement. To address the issue of neutron scattering, an %E2%80%9CIdeal Case,%E2%80%9D (i.e., a plastic scintillator was placed at the same distance from the source for each detector location) with no structural components in the problem. This was done to produce as %E2%80%9Cpure%E2%80%9D a neutron signal as possible. The simulated waveform from this %E2%80%9CIdeal Case%E2%80%9D was then compared with the simulated data from the %E2%80%9CFull Scale%E2%80%9D geometry (i.e., the detector at the same location, but with all the structural materials now included). The %E2%80%9CIdeal Case%E2%80%9D was subtracted from the %E2%80%9CFull Scale%E2%80%9D geometry case, and this was determined to be the contribution due to scattering. The time response was deconvolved out of the empirical data, and the contribution due to scattering was then subtracted out of it. A transformation was then made from dN/dt to dN/dE to obtain neutron spectra at two different detector locations.

  3. On the Correct Application of the 100-40-40 Rule for Combining Responses Due to three Directions of Earthquake Loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, J.; Morante, R.; Miranda, M., Braverman, J.

    2010-07-18

    The 100-40-40 rule is often used with the response spectrum analysis method to determine the maximum seismic responses from structural responses resulting from the three spatial earthquake components. This rule has been referenced in several recent Design Certification applications of nuclear power plants, and appears to be gaining in popularity. However, this rule is described differently in ASCE 4-98 and Regulatory Guide 1.92, consequently causing confusion on correct implementation of this rule in practice. The square root of the sum of the squares method is another acceptable spatial combination method and was used to justify the adequacy of the 100-40-40 rule during the development of the Regulatory Guide 1.92. The 100-40-40 rule, when applied correctly, is almost always conservative compared to the SRSS method, and is only slightly unconservative in rare cases. The purpose of this paper is to describe in detail the proper application of the 100-40-40 rule, as prescribed in ASCE 4-98 and in Regulatory Guide 1.92, and to clarify the confusion caused by the two different formats of this rule.

  4. Early in situ changes in chondrocyte biomechanical responses due to a partial meniscectomy in the lateral compartment of the mature rabbit knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fick, J M; P Ronkainen, A; Madden, R; Sawatsky, A; Tiitu, V; Herzog, W; Korhonen, R K

    2016-12-08

    We determined the biomechanical responses of chondrocytes to indentation at specific locations within the superficial zone of cartilage (i.e. patellar, femoral groove, femoral condylar and tibial plateau sites) taken from female New Zealand white rabbits three days after a partial meniscectomy in the lateral compartment of a knee joint. Confocal laser scanning microscopy combined with a custom indentation system was utilized to image chondrocyte responses at sites taken from ten contralateral and experimental knee joints. Cell volume, height, width and depth changes, global, local axial and transverse strains and Young׳s moduli were determined. Histological assessment was performed and proteoglycan content from the superficial zone of each site was determined. Relative to contralateral group cells, patellar, femoral groove and lateral femoral condyle cells in the experimental group underwent greater volume decreases (p volume decreases (p 0.05), femoral groove, medial femoral condyle and medial tibial plateau experimental sites (p < 0.05). The findings suggest: (i) cell biomechanical responses to cartilage loading in the rabbit knee joint can become altered as early as 3 days after a partial meniscectomy, (ii) are site-specific, and (iii) occur before alterations in tissue mechanics or changes detectable with histology.

  5. "Child Divorce": A Break from Parental Responsibilities and Rights Due to the Traditional Socio-Cultural Practices and Beliefs of the Parents

    OpenAIRE

    M Bekink

    2012-01-01

    In a recent ground-breaking case the South African courts were for the first time requested to use their discretion to interfere in the parent-child relationship due to the traditional socio-cultural beliefs of the parents. In what has been described as "every parent's nightmare; the fancy of many teenagers", a 16 year-old schoolgirl from Milerton in the Western Cape asked to be "freed" from her parents to live semi-independently from them because of her unhappiness with the conservative mann...

  6. Femtosecond optical response of Y-Ba-Cu-O thin films: The dependence on optical frequency, excitation intensity, and electric current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, T.; Zheng, L.X.; Xiong, W.; Kula, W.; Kostoulas, Y.; Sobolewski, R.; Fauchet, P.M. (Laboratory for Laser Energetics and Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States))

    1993-06-01

    We have performed a series of femtosecond reflectivity experiments on various Y-Ba-Cu-O thin films at temperatures ranging from 12 to 300 K. In particular, the dependence of the optical response on probing laser frequency, pumping laser intensity, and bias electric current has been measured. Results obtained at room temperature provide quantitative information on the position of the Fermi level in films with different oxygen content. Systematic analysis of the measurements performed in the superconducting state indicates that the optical response associated with nonequilibrium properties of Y-Ba-Cu-O depends strongly on excitation intensity, sample thickness, and bias current. The results cannot be satisfactorily interpreted as the relaxation dynamics of quasiparticles, and a simple two-fluid model is shown to fail to explain data obtained under low laser excitation. Several tentative explanations are proposed, which provide a more comprehensive understanding of the transient optical response of Y-Ba-Cu-O.

  7. CD1d knockout mice exhibit aggravated contact hypersensitivity responses due to reduced interleukin-10 production predominantly by regulatory B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjelbye, Jonas; Antvorskov, Julie C; Buschard, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Conflicting observations have been reported concerning the role of CD1d-dependent natural killer T (NKT) cells in contact hypersensitivity (CHS), supporting either a disease-promoting or downregulatory function. We studied the role of NKT cells in CHS by comparing the immune response in CD1d.......5% DNCB (w/v) on the ears fifteen days later. We demonstrate that CD1d KO mice, as compared with Wt littermates, have more pronounced infiltration of mononuclear cells in the skin (29.1% increase; P

  8. Stochastic analysis on response change due to deteriorating of rubber-pads in base-isolation system for fast breeder reactor, (1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabana, Shuichi; Shibata, Heki (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Industrial Science)

    1990-03-01

    The aseismatic capability of practical FBRs in insufficient in the original design when those are installed in Japan, and for its improvement, the use of base isolation system has been studied. Many rubber pads are used for supporting building structures, and for the analysis of their characteristics, special consideration is required. Dispersion arises in their characteristics in the manufacturing processes and in the use of long period (20-40 years corresponding to plant life). In this paper, the phenomena which do not arise in ordinary earthquake response analysis, but occur under the premise of the dispersion in rubber pad characteristics are taken up. Consideration on the hardening model of rubber pads, the analysis model and the method of analysis of a base isolation system, and the examination on the basic characteristics of torsional response are reported. When the relation of the dispersion in rubber pad characteristics with the maximum torsional angle and others is determined by this method, the characteristics of other models can be estimated also by simplified techniques. (K.I.).

  9. Flooding impairs Fe uptake and distribution in Citrus due to the strong down-regulation of genes involved in Strategy I responses to Fe deficiency in roots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary-Rus Martínez-Cuenca

    Full Text Available This work determines the ffects of long-term anoxia conditions--21 days--on Strategy I responses to iron (Fe deficiency in Citrus and its impact on Fe uptake and distribution. The study was carried out in Citrus aurantium L. seedlings grown under flooding conditions (S and in both the presence (+Fe and absence of Fe (-Fe in nutritive solution. The results revealed a strong down-regulation (more than 65% of genes HA1 and FRO2 coding for enzymes proton-ATPase and Ferric-Chelate Reductase (FC-R, respectively, in -FeS plants when compared with -Fe ones. H+-extrusion and FC-R activity analyses confirmed the genetic results, indicating that flooding stress markedly repressed acidification and reduction responses to Fe deficiency (3.1- and 2.0-fold, respectively. Waterlogging reduced by half Fe concentration in +FeS roots, which led to 30% up-regulation of Fe transporter IRT1, although this effect was unable to improve Fe absorption. Consequently, flooding inhibited 57Fe uptake in +Fe and -Fe seedlings (29.8 and 66.2%, respectively and 57Fe distribution to aerial part (30.6 and 72.3%, respectively. This evidences that the synergistic action of both enzymes H+-ATPase and FC-R is the preferential regulator of the Fe acquisition system under flooding conditions and, hence, their inactivation implies a limiting factor of citrus in their Fe-deficiency tolerance in waterlogged soils.

  10. Current Situation of Modern College Students'Sense of Responsibility%当代大学生责任感现状分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈秀珍; 吉家文

    2015-01-01

    目的:了解当代大学生责任感现状。方法:编制大学生责任感问卷,以海南省4所高校的849名大学生作为研究对象,实施了问卷调查。结果:通过因素分析抽取出5个因素,即国家责任感、社会责任感、家庭责任感、集体责任感、他人责任感。专科院校学生的国家责任感、集体责任感分值显著高于本科院校( t=-3.332,-3.471;P<0.01),而本科院校学生的社会责任感分值则显著高于专科院校(t=2.026,P<0.05)。男生的家庭责任感、集体责任感分值均显著高于女生( t=2.264,3.475;P<0.01)。结论:大学生的责任感由国家、社会、家庭、集体、他人5个方面组成,并有人口学因素影响。%Objective:To understand current situation and basic trend of modern college students 'sense of responsibility .Methods:849 students completed a questionnaire survey at the four colleges and universities in Hainan Province .Results:The five factors:national responsibility , social responsibility , family responsibility ,group responsibility and the responsibility towards other people , were obtained with factor analysis .Through the survey ,it was found that junior college students got significantly lower values on national responsibility and social responsibility (t=-3.332,-3.471;P<0.01),but significantly higher value on social responsibility than undergraduates (t=2.026,P<0.05);male students got significantly higher values on family responsibility and group responsibility than female students (t=2.264,3.475;P<0.05,P<0.01).Conclusion:The responsibility sense of modern college students is affected by five factors:National responsibility ,social responsibility ,family responsibility ,group responsibility and the re-sponsibility towards other people ,and can be influenced by demographic factors .

  11. MgF2 as a material exhibiting all-angle negative refraction and subwavelength imaging due to the phonon response in the far infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macêdo, R.; Rodrigues da Silva, R.; Dumelow, T.; da Costa, J. A. P.

    2014-01-01

    We consider the possibility of using MgF2 crystals as a suitable material for achieving all-angle negative refraction at far infrared frequencies. This possibility is associated with the highly anisotropic nature of the phonon response, leading to dielectric tensor components of opposing signs. The results show that this phenomenon should occur at somewhat lower frequencies than that of quartz, which has previously been investigated experimentally, but with relatively high efficiency. We also simulate subwavelength imaging, through canalization, at 247 cm-1, corresponding to the frequency of a transverse optical phonon polarized perpendicular to the extraordinary axis. Our simulations show that the Fabry-Pérot condition (use of a slab of thickness equal to an integral number of half-wavelengths) is not necessarily helpful in achieving subwavelength resolution.

  12. Earthquake Response Analysis of Buildings at The Union Territory of Chandigarh, India, by using Building Vibration Observations due to Weak Earthquake Ground Motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, K.; Ito, T.; Masuda, T.; Koketsu, K.; Ramancharla, P. K.; Sangam, R.; Bodige, N.; Dasari, H. C.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the vulnerability of built environment in highly seismic areas is an important component of earthquake risk mitigation. As part of Indo-Japan collaborative research project (DISANET) sponsored by JST and JICA, six sets of building vibration sensors have been installed in the Union Territory of Chandigarh, India. The Union Territory of Chandigarh, India is located at South of the Himalayan Frontal Belt (HFT) is in zone IV of the seismic zone map of India (BIS, 2007). In past few decades, this area has experienced several minor earthquakes and a few moderate earthquakes. In spite of being in high seismic zone, most of the buildings in Chandigarh are designed and constructed for gravity loads only disregarding seismic forces. Such kind of buildings may deteriorate in strength even when they are subjected to minor earthquakes. To understand the response of buildings to micro-tremors, vibration sensors were installed in the building of Department of Geology of Panjab University in July 2012. Subsequently 5 more buildings were instrumented by January 2014. For each building, in order to capture the overall vibration of building during earthquake, vibration sensors of 8 or 10 units are installed to the ground floor, top floor and middle floor of the building. These sensors are continuously monitoring the building vibration and recording all data which include the weak ground motion occurring from near to far earthquakes. Through these sensors, over 20 minor ground motions have been recorded during last two years. Even in these weak ground motions, it was possible to confirm the state of the building response caused by earthquakes. In this presentation, we will introduce some building vibration records caused by the weak ground motion of the earthquakes and discuss the important insights drawn from analysis of recorded data.

  13. Increased Age, but Not Parity Predisposes to Higher Bacteriuria Burdens Due to Streptococcus Urinary Tract Infection and Influences Bladder Cytokine Responses, Which Develop Independent of Tissue Bacterial Loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Matthew J; Carey, Alison J; Leclercq, Sophie Y; Tan, Chee K; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae causes urinary tract infection (UTI) in pregnant adults, non-pregnant adults, immune-compromised individuals and the elderly. The pathogenesis of S. agalactiae UTI in distinct patient populations is poorly understood. In this study, we used murine models of UTI incorporating young mice, aged and dam mice to show that uropathogenic S. agalactiae causes bacteriuria at significantly higher levels in aged mice compared to young mice and this occurs coincident with equivalent levels of bladder tissue colonisation at 24 h post-infection (p.i.). In addition, aged mice exhibited significantly higher bacteriuria burdens at 48 h compared to young mice, confirming a divergent pattern of bacterial colonization in the urinary tract of aged and young mice. Multiparous mice, in contrast, exhibited significantly lower urinary titres of S. agalactiae compared to age-matched nulliparous mice suggesting that parity enhances the ability of the host to control S. agalactiae bacteriuria. Additionally, we show that both age and parity alter the expression levels of several key regulatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines, which are known to be important the immune response to UTI, including Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-12(p40), and Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1). Finally, we demonstrate that other cytokines, including IL-17 are induced significantly in the S. agalactiae-infected bladder regardless of age and parity status. Collectively, these findings show that the host environment plays an important role in influencing the severity of S. agalactiae UTI; infection dynamics, particularly in the context of bacteriuria, depend on age and parity, which also affect the nature of innate immune responses to infection.

  14. Coupled analysis of building damage due to tunneling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giardina, G.; Hendriks, M.A.N.; Rots, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    Excavation works in urban areas require a preliminary risk damage assessment. In historical cities, the prediction of building response to settlements is necessary to reduce the risk of damage of the architectural heritage. The current method used to predict the building damage due to ground

  15. Spatial response surface modelling in the presence of data paucity for the evaluation of potential human health risk due to the contamination of potable water resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shen; McGree, James; Hayes, John F; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2016-10-01

    Potential human health risk from waterborne diseases arising from unsatisfactory performance of on-site wastewater treatment systems is driven by landscape factors such as topography, soil characteristics, depth to water table, drainage characteristics and the presence of surface water bodies. These factors are present as random variables which are spatially distributed across a region. A methodological framework is presented that can be applied to model and evaluate the influence of various factors on waterborne disease potential. This framework is informed by spatial data and expert knowledge. For prediction at unsampled sites, interpolation methods were used to derive a spatially smoothed surface of disease potential which takes into account the uncertainty due to spatial variation at any pre-determined level of significance. This surface was constructed by accounting for the influence of multiple variables which appear to contribute to disease potential. The framework developed in this work strengthens the understanding of the characteristics of disease potential and provides predictions of this potential across a region. The study outcomes presented constitutes an innovative approach to environmental monitoring and management in the face of data paucity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A Simple Autonomous Current-Sharing Control Strategy for Fast Dynamic Response of Parallel Inverters in Islanded Microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guan, Yajuan; Vasquez, Juan Carlos; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposed a novel control strategy based on a virtual resistance and a phase locked loop for parallel three-phase inverters. The proposed controller can overcome the drawbacks of the conventional droop control such as slow transient response, complex design, and limited stability margin...

  17. Current and emerging quantitative magnetic resonance imaging methods for assessing and predicting the response of breast cancer to neoadjuvant therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abramson RG

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Richard G Abramson,1,2,9 Lori R Arlinghaus,1,2 Jared A Weis,1,2 Xia Li,1,2 Adrienne N Dula,1,2 Eduard Y Chekmenev,1–4,9 Seth A Smith,1–3,5 Michael I Miga,1–3,6 Vandana G Abramson,7,9 Thomas E Yankeelov1–3,5,8,91Institute of Imaging Science, 2Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, 4Department of Biochemistry, 5Department of Physics, 6Department of Neurosurgery, 7Department of Medical Oncology, 8Department of Cancer Biology, 9Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville,TN, USAAbstract: Reliable early assessment of breast cancer response to neoadjuvant therapy (NAT would provide considerable benefit to patient care and ongoing research efforts, and demand for accurate and noninvasive early-response biomarkers is likely to increase. Response assessment techniques derived from quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI hold great potential for integration into treatment algorithms and clinical trials. Quantitative MRI techniques already available for assessing breast cancer response to neoadjuvant therapy include lesion size measurement, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI, and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Emerging yet promising techniques include magnetization transfer MRI, chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI, magnetic resonance elastography, and hyperpolarized MR. Translating and incorporating these techniques into the clinical setting will require close attention to statistical validation methods, standardization and reproducibility of technique, and scanning protocol design.Keywords: treatment response, presurgical treatment, neoadjuvant chemotherapy

  18. Short term responses of nitrogen trace gas emissions to nitrogen fertilization in tropical sugar cane: Variations due to soils and management practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, P. A.; Billow, C.; Hall, S.; Zachariassen, J.

    1994-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilization of agricultural systems is thought to be a major source of the increase in atmospheric N2O; NO emissions from soils have also been shown to increase due to N fertilization. While N fertilizer use is increasing rapidly in the developing world and in the tropics, nearly all of our information on gas emissions is derived from studies of temperate zone agriculture. Using chambers, we measured fluxes of N2O and NO following urea fertilization in tropical sugar cane systems growing on a variety of soil types in the Hawaiian Islands, USA. On the island of Maui, where urea is applied in irrigation lines and soils are mollisols and inceptisols, N2O fluxes were elevated for a week or less following fertilization; maximum average fluxes were typically less than 30 ng cm(exp -2)/ h. NO fluxes were often an order of magnitude less than N2O. Together, N2O and NO represented from 0.01 - 0.5% of the applied N. In fields on the island of Hawaii, where urea is broadcast on the surface and soils are andisols, N2O fluxes were similar in magnitude to Maui but remained elevated for much longer periods after fertilization. NO emissions were 2-5 times higher than N2O through most of the sampling periods. Together the gases loss represented approximately 1. 1 - 3% of the applied N. Laboratory studies indicate that denitrification is a critical source of N2O in Maui, but that nitrification is more important in Hawaii. Experimental studies suggest that differences in the pattern of N2O/NO and the processes producing them are a result of both carbon availability and placement of fertilizer, and that the more information-intensive fertilizer management practice results in lower emissions.

  19. Co-operative intra-protein structural response due to protein-protein complexation revealed through thermodynamic quantification: study of MDM2-p53 binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Sudipta; Mukherjee, Sanchita

    2017-09-01

    The p53 protein activation protects the organism from propagation of cells with damaged DNA having oncogenic mutations. In normal cells, activity of p53 is controlled by interaction with MDM2. The well understood p53-MDM2 interaction facilitates design of ligands that could potentially disrupt or prevent the complexation owing to its emergence as an important objective for cancer therapy. However, thermodynamic quantification of the p53-peptide induced structural changes of the MDM2-protein remains an area to be explored. This study attempts to understand the conformational free energy and entropy costs due to this complex formation from the histograms of dihedral angles generated from molecular dynamics simulations. Residue-specific quantification illustrates that, hydrophobic residues of the protein contribute maximum to the conformational thermodynamic changes. Thermodynamic quantification of structural changes of the protein unfold the fact that, p53 binding provides a source of inter-element cooperativity among the protein secondary structural elements, where the highest affected structural elements (α2 and α4) found at the binding site of the protein affects faraway structural elements (β1 and Loop1) of the protein. The communication perhaps involves water mediated hydrogen bonded network formation. Further, we infer that in inhibitory F19A mutation of P53, though Phe19 is important in the recognition process, it has less prominent contribution in the stability of the complex. Collectively, this study provides vivid microscopic understanding of the interaction within the protein complex along with exploring mutation sites, which will contribute further to engineer the protein function and binding affinity.

  20. HiSCR (Hidradenitis Suppurativa Clinical Response)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimball, B. A.; Sobell, J. M.; Zouboulis, C C

    2016-01-01

    Background: Determining treatment response for patients with hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) can be challenging due to limitations of current disease activity evaluations. Objective: Evaluate the novel, validated endpoint, Hidradenitis Suppurativa Clinical Response (HiSCR) and its utility as an out...

  1. Calcium window currents, periodic forcing, and chaos: Understanding single neuron response with a discontinuous one-dimensional map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudanski, J.; Sumner, C.; Coombes, S.

    2010-07-01

    Thalamocortical (TC) neurones are known to express the low-voltage activated, inactivating Ca2+ current IT . The triggering of this current underlies the generation of low threshold Ca2+ potentials that may evoke single or bursts of action potentials. Moreover, this current can contribute to an intrinsic slow (dynamics for the gating variables in the model of IT . This model can be analyzed in closed form and is shown to support an unstable set of periodic orbits. Trajectories are repelled from these organizing centers until they reach the threshold for firing. By determining the condition for a grazing bifurcation (at the border between a spiking and nonspiking event) we show how knowledge of the unstable periodic orbits (existence and stability) can be combined with the grazing condition to determine an effective one-dimensional map that captures the essentials of the chaotic behavior. This map is discontinuous and has strong similarities with the universal limit mapping in grazing bifurcations derived in the context of impacting mechanical systems [A. B. Nordmark, Phys. Rev. E 55, 266 (1997)10.1103/PhysRevE.55.266].

  2. How reduction of theta rhythm by medial septum inactivation may covary with disruption of entorhinal grid cell responses due to reduced cholinergic transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen K. Pilly

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Oscillations in the coordinated firing of brain neurons have been proposed to play important roles in perception, cognition, attention, learning, navigation, and sensory-motor control. The network theta rhythm has been associated with properties of spatial navigation, as has the firing of entorhinal grid cells and hippocampal place cells. Two recent studies reduced the theta rhythm by inactivating the medial septum (MS and demonstrated a correlated reduction in the characteristic hexagonal spatial firing patterns of grid cells. These results, along with properties of intrinsic membrane potential oscillations (MPOs in slice preparations of entorhinal cells, have been interpreted to support oscillatory interference models of grid cell firing. The current article shows that an alternative self-organizing map model of grid cells can explain these data about intrinsic and network oscillations without invoking oscillatory interference. In particular, the adverse effects of MS inactivation on grid cells can be understood in terms of how the concomitant reduction in cholinergic inputs may increase the conductances of leak potassium (K+ and slow and medium after-hyperpolarization (sAHP and mAHP channels. This alternative model can also explain data that are problematic for oscillatory interference models, including how knockout of the HCN1 gene in mice, which flattens the dorsoventral gradient in MPO frequency and resonance frequency, does not affect the development of the grid cell dorsoventral gradient of spatial scales, and how hexagonal grid firing fields in bats can occur even in the absence of theta band modulation. These results demonstrate how models of grid cell self-organization can provide new insights into the relationship between brain learning, oscillatory dynamics, and navigational behaviors.

  3. Change in coccolith size and morphology due to response to temperature and salinity in coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi (Haptophyta) isolated from the Bering and Chukchi seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saruwatari, Kazuko; Satoh, Manami; Harada, Naomi; Suzuki, Iwane; Shiraiwa, Yoshihiro

    2016-05-01

    Strains of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi (Haptophyta) collected from the subarctic North Pacific and Arctic oceans in 2010 were established as clone cultures and have been maintained in the laboratory at 15 °C and 32 ‰ salinity. To study the physiological responses of coccolith formation to changes in temperature and salinity, growth experiments and morphometric investigations were performed on two strains, namely MR57N isolated from the northern Bering Sea and MR70N at the Chukchi Sea. This is the first report of a detailed morphometric and morphological investigation of Arctic Ocean coccolithophore strains. The specific growth rates at the logarithmic growth phases in both strains markedly increased as temperature was elevated from 5 to 20 °C, although coccolith productivity (estimated as the percentage of calcified cells) was similar at 10-20 % at all temperatures. On the other hand, the specific growth rate of MR70N was affected less by changes in salinity in the range 26-35 ‰, but the proportion of calcified cells decreased at high and low salinities. According to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations, coccolith morphotypes can be categorized into Type B/C on the basis of their biometrical parameters. The central area elements of coccoliths varied from thin lath type to well-calcified lath type when temperature was increased or salinity was decreased, and coccolith size decreased simultaneously. Coccolithophore cell size also decreased with increasing temperature, although the variation in cell size was slightly greater at the lower salinity level. This indicates that subarctic and arctic coccolithophore strains can survive in a wide range of seawater temperatures and at lower salinities with change in their morphology. Because all coccolith biometric parameters followed the scaling law, the decrease in coccolith size was caused simply by the reduced calcification. Taken together, our results suggest that calcification productivity may

  4. Permanent neonatal diabetes due to mutations in KCNJ11 encoding Kir6.2: patient characteristics and initial response to sulfonylurea therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagen, Jørn V; Raeder, Helge; Hathout, Eba; Shehadeh, Naim; Gudmundsson, Kolbeinn; Baevre, Halvor; Abuelo, Dianne; Phornphutkul, Chanika; Molnes, Janne; Bell, Graeme I; Gloyn, Anna L; Hattersley, Andrew T; Molven, Anders; Søvik, Oddmund; Njølstad, Pål R

    2004-10-01

    Permanent neonatal diabetes (PND) can be caused by mutations in the transcription factors insulin promoter factor (IPF)-1, eukaryotic translation initiation factor-2alpha kinase 3 (EIF2AK3), and forkhead box-P3 and in key components of insulin secretion: glucokinase (GCK) and the ATP-sensitive K(+) channel subunit Kir6.2. We sequenced the gene encoding Kir6.2 (KCNJ11) in 11 probands with GCK-negative PND. Heterozygous mutations were identified in seven probands, causing three novel (F35V, Y330C, and F333I) and two known (V59M and R201H) Kir6.2 amino acid substitutions. Only two probands had a family history of diabetes. Subjects with the V59M mutation had neurological features including motor delay. Three mutation carriers tested had an insulin secretory response to tolbutamide, but not to glucose or glucagon. Glibenclamide was introduced in increasing doses to investigate whether sulfonylurea could replace insulin. At a glibenclamide dose of 0.3-0.4 mg. kg(-1). day(-1), insulin was discontinued. Blood glucose did not deteriorate, and HbA(1c) was stable or fell during 2-6 months of follow-up. An oral glucose tolerance test performed in one subject revealed that glucose-stimulated insulin release was restored. Mutations in Kir6.2 were the most frequent cause of PND in our cohort. Apparently insulin-dependent patients with mutations in Kir6.2 may be managed on an oral sulfonylurea with sustained metabolic control rather than insulin injections, illustrating the principle of pharmacogenetics applied in diabetes treatment.

  5. Evaluation of perturbations in serum thyroid hormones during human pregnancy due to dietary iodide and perchlorate exposure using a biologically based dose-response model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumen, Annie; Mattie, David R; Fisher, Jeffrey W

    2013-06-01

    A biologically based dose-response model (BBDR) for the hypothalamic pituitary thyroid (HPT) axis was developed in the near-term pregnant mother and fetus. This model was calibrated to predict serum levels of iodide, total thyroxine (T4), free thyroxine (fT4), and total triiodothyronine (T3) in the mother and fetus for a range of dietary iodide intake. The model was extended to describe perchlorate, an environmental and food contaminant, that competes with the sodium iodide symporter protein for thyroidal uptake of iodide. Using this mode-of-action framework, simulations were performed to determine the daily ingestion rates of perchlorate that would be associated with hypothyroxinemia or onset of hypothyroidism for varying iodide intake. Model simulations suggested that a maternal iodide intake of 75 to 250 µg/day and an environmentally relevant exposure of perchlorate (~0.1 µg/kg/day) did not result in hypothyroxinemia or hypothyroidism. For a daily iodide-sufficient intake of 200 µg/day, the dose of perchlorate required to reduce maternal fT4 levels to a hypothyroxinemic state was estimated at 32.2 µg/kg/day. As iodide intake was lowered to 75 µg/day, the model simulated daily perchlorate dose required to cause hypothyroxinemia was reduced by eightfold. Similarly, the perchlorate intake rates associated with the onset of subclinical hypothyroidism ranged from 54.8 to 21.5 µg/kg/day for daily iodide intake of 250-75 µg/day. This BBDR-HPT axis model for pregnancy provides an example of a novel public health assessment tool that may be expanded to address other endocrine-active chemicals found in food and the environment.

  6. 有限厚铁磁性试件脉冲涡流响应研究%Pulsed eddy current response to a ferromagnetic specimen with finite thickness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐志远; 武新军; 黄琛; 康宜华

    2011-01-01

    Method for the pulsed eddy current (PEC) response to a specimen based on direct analysis of transient eddy currents and induced magnetic fields was presented. Based on the experimental verification, the PEC response to a ferromagnetic specimen of finite thickness was computed with numerical simulation method. The law of eddy current diffusion in specimen was studied, and thus the PEC response was divided into two stages. The relation between the response and resistivity or permeability of the specimen was obtained by fitting the response curves of different resistivity or permeability models at the same time points, and the relation between the response and time was obtained by fitting the response curves with time. The results show that early PEC response decays with 0. 5 powers to the resistivity, 0. 5 powers to the permeability, and 1. 5 powers to the time. The latter response decays with negative exponent to time, and the exponential decay coefficient is proportional to the resistivity but inversely proportional to the permeability.%提出了通过直接分析瞬变涡流和感应磁场来研究被测试件脉冲涡流响应的方法.在实验验证的基础上,采用数值模拟的方法计算得到了有限厚铁磁性试件的脉冲涡流响应.研究了试件中涡流扩散规律并将脉冲涡流响应分为前后2个阶段,将相同时间点不同电阻率、磁导率模型的响应曲线及感应电压随时间变化的曲线进行拟合,得到了感应电压与电阻率、磁导率及时间的关系.结果表明:脉冲涡流前期感应电压按试件电阻率的0.5次幂、磁导率的0.5次幂进行衰减,按时间的1.5次幂进行衰减;后期感应电压随时间按照负指数规律衰减,指数衰减系数与试件电阻率成正比,与磁导率成反比.

  7. Differences in the effects of turns and constrictions on the resistive response in current-biased superconducting wire after single photon absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Zotova, A. N.; Vodolazov, D. Y.

    2013-01-01

    We study how turns and constrictions affect the resistive response of the superconducting wire after instant in time and local in space heating, which models the absorption of the single photon by the wire. We find that the presence of constriction favors detection of photons of various energies but the presence of turn increases only ability to detect relatively "low" energy photons. The main reason is that in case of constriction the current density is increased over whole length and width ...

  8. Developmental Defects Mediated by the P1/HC-Pro Potyviral Silencing Suppressor Are Not Due to Misregulation of AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlotshwa, Sizolwenkosi; Pruss, Gail J; MacArthur, John L; Reed, Jason W; Vance, Vicki

    2016-11-01

    Plant viral suppressors of RNA silencing induce developmental defects similar to those caused by mutations in genes involved in the microRNA pathway. A recent report has attributed viral suppressor-mediated developmental defects to up-regulation of AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 8 (ARF8), a target of miR167. The key piece of evidence was that the developmental defects in transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing viral suppressors were greatly alleviated in the F1 progeny of a cross with plants carrying the arf8-6 mutation. Arf8-6 is a SALK line T-DNA insertion mutant, a class of mutations prone to inducing transcriptional silencing of transgenes expressed from the 35S promoter. We have reinvestigated the role of ARF8 in viral suppressor-mediated developmental defects, using two independent arf8 mutations and the P1/HC-Pro potyviral suppressor of silencing. Progeny of a cross between P1/HC-Pro transgenic Arabidopsis and the arf8-6 T-DNA insertion mutant showed little effect on the P1/HC-Pro phenotype in the F1 generation, but almost all arf8-6/P1/HC-Pro progeny had lost the phenotype in the F2 generation. However, the loss of phenotype in the F2 generation was not correlated with the number of functional copies of the ARF8 gene. Instead, it reflected transcriptional silencing of the P1/HC-Pro transgene, as evidenced by a pronounced decrease in P1/HC-Pro mRNA and the appearance of 35S promoter small interfering RNAs. Furthermore, an independent loss-of-function point mutation, Arf8-8, had no detectable effects on P1/HC-Pro phenotype in either the F1 or F2 generations. Together, these data argue against the previously reported role of increased ARF8 expression in developmental defects caused by P1/HC-Pro. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Slow-rise and fast-drop current feature of ultraviolet response spectra for ZnO-nanowire film modulated by water molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Shou-Tian; Wang Qiang; Zhao Feng; Qu Shi-Liang

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the fabrication of ZnO-nanowire films by electro-chemical anodization of Zn foil.The ZnO films are characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy,X-ray diffraction patterns,and transmission electron microscopy,respectively.The ultraviolet (UV) photo-response properties of the surface-contacted ZnO film are studied through the current evolution processes under different relative humidities.Unlike the usually observed current spectra of the ZnO films,the drop time is shorter than the rise time.The photo-conductivity gain G and the response time γ are both increased with the increase of the applied bias.The photo-conductivity gain G is lowered with the increase of the environmental humidity,while the response time γ is increased.These results can be explained by considering three different surface processes:1) the electron-hole (e-p) pair generation by the UV light illumination,2)the following surface (O-2) species desorption,and 3) the photo-catalytic hydrolysis of water molecules adsorbed on the ZnO surface.The slow-rise and fast-drop current feature is suggested to originate from the sponge-like structure of the ZnO nanowires.

  10. "Child Divorce": A Break from Parental Responsibilities and Rights Due to the Traditional Socio-Cultural Practices and Beliefs of the Parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Bekink

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In a recent ground-breaking case the South African courts were for the first time requested to use their discretion to interfere in the parent-child relationship due to the traditional socio-cultural beliefs of the parents. In what has been described as "every parent's nightmare; the fancy of many teenagers", a 16 year-old schoolgirl from Milerton in the Western Cape asked to be "freed" from her parents to live semi-independently from them because of her unhappiness with the conservative manner in which her parents treated her. After considering the matter the judge assigned to the case granted her request to live semi-independently with a school friend and her family (called by the judge the host family until she reaches the age of 18 (her majority. Her parents were accorded permission to have limited contact with her. This case represents an example of the difficulties involved when balancing the rights of a teenager against those of the parents in matters of socio-cultural practice and belief. In a multi-cultural society such as South Africa the case raises numerous serious questions for other families. For instance, what standards will a court use to determine if parents are too conservative in bringing up their children and what factors will be taken into account? How much freedom and autonomy should children be given? How will courts prevent children from misusing the system just to get what their friends have, and - the ultimate question - are the rights of children superior to the traditional rights of parents in matters of socio-cultural practice, with specific reference to their upbringing? In this context it is the aim of this contribution to focus primarily on the questions asked above. Possible solutions for striking a balance between the rights of children and their parents are explored. The submission is made that the best interests principle is still the most important factor to be taken into account when balancing or weighing

  11. Mechanism of the Pyroelectric Response under Direct-Current Bias in La-Modified Lead Zirconate Titanate Stannate Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong-Ling; WANG Gen-Shui; CHEN Xue-Feng; CAO Fei; DONG Xian-Lin; GU Yan; HE Hong-Liang; LIU Yu-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Dielectric and pyroelectric properties ofPbo.97Lao.o2(Zro.42Sno.4oTio.i8)03 ceramics are investigated as functions of temperature and dc bias field. Induced and intrinsic pyroelectric coefficients pind and p0 are calculated and analyzed. It is found that the sign, value and variation of the net pyroelectric coefficient p with increasing dc bias all are dominated by p0 under applied biases. Polarization and depolarization processes under dc biases are analyzed. Besides the contribution of pind, the diffuse and decreased pyroelectric response under dc bias compared with that of an identical Geld poled sample without dc bias is mainly attributed to the depolarization process under dc bias.%@@ Dielectric and pyroelectric properties of Pbo.s7Lao.o2(Zro.42Sno.4OTio.is)O3 ceramics are investigated as functions of temperature and do bias field.Induced and intrinsic pyroelectric coefficients pind and p0 are calculated and analyzed.It is found that the sign,value and variation of the net pyroelectric coefficient p with increasing dc bias all are dominated by p0 under applied biases.Polarization and depolarization processes under do biases are analyzed.Besides the contribution of pind,the diffuse and decreased pyroelectric response under do bias compared with that of an identical field poled sample without do bias is mainly attributed to the depolarization process under do bias.

  12. A current view of the diagnosis, clinical variants, response to treatment and prognosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viala, Karine; Maisonobe, Thierry; Stojkovic, Tanya; Koutlidis, Régine; Ayrignac, Xavier; Musset, Lucile; Fournier, Emmanuel; Léger, Jean-Marc; Bouche, Pierre

    2010-03-01

    We retrospectively analyzed 146 patients fulfilling the European Federation of Neurological Societies and the Peripheral Nerve Society (EFNS/PNS) criteria for definite chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) to (1) evaluate the relevance of these criteria, (2) assess the frequency of CIDP variants, and (3) determine the response to treatment and the prognosis. We found that 75% of these patients fulfilled the main EFNS/PNS clinical and electrophysiological criteria (type I). The remaining patients were diagnosed using laboratory tools as supportive criteria. The common form of CIDP represented 51% of patients. We observed a high frequency of the sensory variant (35% of patients) and the rapid onset form (18%). A positive response to treatment was observed in 87% of patients, with a similar efficacy of prednisone and IVIg. However, in the long term, 40% of treated patients remained dependent on treatment. The IVIg dependency rate was higher than the prednisone or plasma exchange dependency rate (55%, 18%, and 23%, respectively; p = 0.0054). Severe handicap was observed in 24% of patients.

  13. Response of current phosphorus mitigation measures across the nutrient transfer continuum in two hydrological contrasting agricultural catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Noeleen; Shore, Mairead; Mellander, Per-Erik; Shortle, Ger; Jordan, Phil

    2015-04-01

    Effective assessment of National Action Programme (NAP) measures introduced under the EU Nitrates Directive (ND), to manage nutrient use and risk of loss to waters from agriculture, is best achieved when examined across the nutrient transfer continuum at catchment scale. The Irish NAP measures are implemented on a whole-territory basis for both nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), with P being the key trophic pressure. The aim of this research was to observe the efficacy of P regulation measures and P source management across the transfer continuum and resultant water quality status (i.e. source to impact), in two contrasting agricultural catchments over a four year period. The catchments are ca. 11 km2 and are located in the south-east of Ireland. One is well-drained and arable dominated, while the other is mostly poorly-drained and grassland dominated. In 2009 and 2013 soil surveys for plant-available P were carried out (sustained level of P inputs in both catchments. Indications of responses to soil P change in the surface waters of these catchments appeared to be highly influenced by their hydrological differences and the impact that annual and inter-annual climate and hydrological processes have on nutrient delivery. In the arable catchment total reactive P (TRP) concentrations in interpreted pathways declined across the quickflow, interflow and shallow groundwater of the slowflow, while TRP concentrations in the deeper groundwater, mostly contributing to baseflow, remained the same. However, the complexity of the flow pathways in the grassland catchment made it difficult to determine any trends in P concentrations as a result of changes in P source pressures. Additionally, although there were some inter annual trends, there was no clear indication of improvement in the ecological quality status in either catchment. Overall, a positive response to NAP measures (high soil P declines) was more clearly observable in the source component of the P transfer continuum

  14. Spatial analysis of plague in California: niche modeling predictions of the current distribution and potential response to climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tucker James R

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, is a public and wildlife health concern in California and the western United States. This study explores the spatial characteristics of positive plague samples in California and tests Maxent, a machine-learning method that can be used to develop niche-based models from presence-only data, for mapping the potential distribution of plague foci. Maxent models were constructed using geocoded seroprevalence data from surveillance of California ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi as case points and Worldclim bioclimatic data as predictor variables, and compared and validated using area under the receiver operating curve (AUC statistics. Additionally, model results were compared to locations of positive and negative coyote (Canis latrans samples, in order to determine the correlation between Maxent model predictions and areas of plague risk as determined via wild carnivore surveillance. Results Models of plague activity in California ground squirrels, based on recent climate conditions, accurately identified case locations (AUC of 0.913 to 0.948 and were significantly correlated with coyote samples. The final models were used to identify potential plague risk areas based on an ensemble of six future climate scenarios. These models suggest that by 2050, climate conditions may reduce plague risk in the southern parts of California and increase risk along the northern coast and Sierras. Conclusion Because different modeling approaches can yield substantially different results, care should be taken when interpreting future model predictions. Nonetheless, niche modeling can be a useful tool for exploring and mapping the potential response of plague activity to climate change. The final models in this study were used to identify potential plague risk areas based on an ensemble of six future climate scenarios, which can help public managers decide where to allocate surveillance resources

  15. Spatial analysis of plague in California: niche modeling predictions of the current distribution and potential response to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Ashley C; Salkeld, Daniel J; Fritz, Curtis L; Tucker, James R; Gong, Peng

    2009-06-28

    Plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, is a public and wildlife health concern in California and the western United States. This study explores the spatial characteristics of positive plague samples in California and tests Maxent, a machine-learning method that can be used to develop niche-based models from presence-only data, for mapping the potential distribution of plague foci. Maxent models were constructed using geocoded seroprevalence data from surveillance of California ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi) as case points and Worldclim bioclimatic data as predictor variables, and compared and validated using area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) statistics. Additionally, model results were compared to locations of positive and negative coyote (Canis latrans) samples, in order to determine the correlation between Maxent model predictions and areas of plague risk as determined via wild carnivore surveillance. Models of plague activity in California ground squirrels, based on recent climate conditions, accurately identified case locations (AUC of 0.913 to 0.948) and were significantly correlated with coyote samples. The final models were used to identify potential plague risk areas based on an ensemble of six future climate scenarios. These models suggest that by 2050, climate conditions may reduce plague risk in the southern parts of California and increase risk along the northern coast and Sierras. Because different modeling approaches can yield substantially different results, care should be taken when interpreting future model predictions. Nonetheless, niche modeling can be a useful tool for exploring and mapping the potential response of plague activity to climate change. The final models in this study were used to identify potential plague risk areas based on an ensemble of six future climate scenarios, which can help public managers decide where to allocate surveillance resources. In addition, Maxent model results were significantly

  16. Variation in response dynamics of regular and irregular vestibular-nerve afferents during sinusoidal head rotations and currents in the chinchilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyu-Sung; Minor, Lloyd B; Della Santina, Charles C; Lasker, David M

    2011-05-01

    In mammals, vestibular-nerve afferents that innervate only type I hair cells (calyx-only afferents) respond nearly in phase with head acceleration for high-frequency motion, whereas afferents that innervate both type I and type II (dimorphic) or only type II (bouton-only) hair cells respond more in phase with head velocity. Afferents that exhibit irregular background discharge rates have a larger phase lead re-head velocity than those that fire more regularly. The goal of this study was to investigate the cause of the variation in phase lead between regular and irregular afferents at high-frequency head rotations. Under the assumption that externally applied galvanic currents act directly on the nerve, we derived a transfer function describing the dynamics of a semicircular canal and its hair cells through comparison of responses to sinusoidally modulated head velocity and currents. Responses of all afferents were fit well with a transfer function with one zero (lead term). Best-fit lead terms describing responses to current for each group of afferents were similar to the lead term describing responses to head velocity for regular afferents (0.006 s + 1). This finding indicated that the pre-synaptic and synaptic inputs to regular afferents were likely to be pure velocity transducers. However, the variation in phase lead between regular and irregular afferents could not be explained solely by the ratio of type I to II hair cells (Baird et al 1988), suggesting that the variation was caused by a combination of pre- (type of hair cell) and post-synaptic properties.

  17. Would transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) enhance the effects of working memory training in older adults with mild neurocognitive disorder due to Alzheimer’s disease: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Calvin P. W.; Chan, Sandra S. M.; Arthur D P Mak; Chan, Wai Chi; Cheng, Sheung Tak; Shi, Lin; Wang, Defeng; Lam, Linda Chiu-wa

    2015-01-01

    Background There has been longstanding interesting in cognitive training for older adults with cognitive impairment. In this study, we will investigate the effects of working memory training, and explore augmentation strategies that could possibly consolidate the effects in older adults with mild neurocognitive disorder. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been demonstrated to affect the neuronal excitability and reported to enhance memory performance. As tDCS may also modulate...

  18. No effect of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation over the motor cortex on response-related ERPs during a conflict task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Christian Conley

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS over the motor cortex is considered a potential treatment for motor rehabilitation following stroke and other neurological pathologies. However, both the context under which this stimulation is effective and the underlying mechanisms remain to be determined. In this study, we examined the mechanisms by which anodal tDCS may affect motor performance by recording event-related potentials (ERPs during a cued go/nogo task after anodal tDCS over dominant M1 in young adults (Experiment 1 and both dominant and non-dominant M1 in old adults (Experiment 2. In both experiments, anodal tDCS had no effect on either response time or response-related ERPs, including the cue-locked contingent negative variation (CNV and both target-locked and response-locked lateralised readiness potentials (LRP. Bayesian model selection analyses showed that, for all measures, the null effects model was stronger than a model including anodal tDCS vs. sham. We conclude that anodal tDCS has no effect on response time or response-related ERPs during a cued go/nogo task in either young or old adults.

  19. Association of heart rate variability and inflammatory response in patients with cardiovascular diseases: current strengths and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, Vasilios; Pneumatikos, Ioannis; Maglaveras, Nikos

    2013-01-01

    Many experimental and clinical studies have confirmed a continuous cross-talk between both sympathetic and parasympathetic branches of autonomic nervous system and inflammatory response, in different clinical scenarios. In cardiovascular diseases, inflammation has been proven to play a pivotal role in disease progression, pathogenesis and resolution. A few clinical studies have assessed the possible inter-relation between neuro-autonomic output, estimated with heart rate variability analysis, which is the variability of R-R in the electrocardiogram, and different inflammatory biomarkers, in patients suffering from stable or unstable coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart failure. Moreover, different indices derived from heart rate signals' processing, have been proven to correlate strongly with severity of heart disease and predict final outcome. In this review article we will summarize major findings from different investigators, evaluating neuro-immunological interactions through heart rate variability analysis, in different groups of cardiovascular patients. We suggest that markers originating from variability analysis of heart rate signals seem to be related to inflammatory biomarkers. However, a lot of open questions remain to be addressed, regarding the existence of a true association between heart rate variability and autonomic nervous system output or its adoption for risk stratification and therapeutic monitoring at the bedside. Finally, potential therapeutic implications will be discussed, leading to autonomic balance restoration in relation with inflammatory control.

  20. Current and calcium responses to local activation of axonal NMDA receptors in developing cerebellar molecular layer interneurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bénédicte Rossi

    Full Text Available In developing cerebellar molecular layer interneurons (MLIs, NMDA increases spontaneous GABA release. This effect had been attributed to either direct activation of presynaptic NMDA receptors (preNMDARs or an indirect pathway involving activation of somato-dendritic NMDARs followed by passive spread of somatic depolarization along the axon and activation of axonal voltage dependent Ca(2+ channels (VDCCs. Using Ca(2+ imaging and electrophysiology, we searched for preNMDARs by uncaging NMDAR agonists either broadly throughout the whole field or locally at specific axonal locations. Releasing either NMDA or glutamate in the presence of NBQX using short laser pulses elicited current transients that were highly sensitive to the location of the spot and restricted to a small number of varicosities. The signal was abolished in the presence of high Mg(2+ or by the addition of APV. Similar paradigms yielded restricted Ca(2+ transients in interneurons loaded with a Ca(2+ indicator. We found that the synaptic effects of NMDA were not inhibited by blocking VDCCs but were impaired in the presence of the ryanodine receptor antagonist dantrolene. Furthermore, in voltage clamped cells, bath applied NMDA triggers Ca(2+ elevations and induces neurotransmitter release in the axonal compartment. Our results suggest the existence of preNMDARs in developing MLIs and propose their involvement in the NMDA-evoked increase in GABA release by triggering a Ca(2+-induced Ca(2+ release process mediated by presynaptic Ca(2+ stores. Such a mechanism is likely to exert a crucial role in various forms of Ca(2+-mediated synaptic plasticity.

  1. Due diligence issues report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-05-01

    The administrative and regulatory issues associated with offshore oil and gas exploration and development in British Columbia were discussed with reference to the creation of a management framework that would ensure that resource development occurs in a socially responsible manner. Provincial governments have jurisdiction over resource management, including intra-provincial trade, commerce and environmental issues within their borders. The federal government has control over resources, subsoil and the seabed out to 200 miles beyond the baseline. The federal government also regulates Frontier Lands, which are divided into Non-Accord and Accord areas. In Accord areas such as Newfoundland and Nova Scotia, oil and gas development is managed by the respective Offshore Petroleum Board. Currently, the British Columbia offshore is a Non-Accord area subject to the administration of Federal legislation. Environmental and regulatory issues were also discussed, along with regional equity, benefits planning, equity versus efficiency, proactivity, and public consultation. It was concluded that there is no scientific, technical or environmental barriers that would prevent the socially responsible development of British Columbia's offshore. There is also much evidence from other jurisdictions that indicates that British Columbia and Canada would benefit from prudent development of offshore oil and gas resources. refs., tabs., figs.

  2. History and modern applications of nano-composite materials carrying GA/cm2 current density due to a Bose-Einstein Condensate at room temperature produced by Focused Electron Beam Induced Processing for many extraordinary novel technical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koops, Hans W. P.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of Focused Electron Beam Induced Processing and early applications of this technology led to the possible use of a novel nanogranular material “Koops-GranMat®” using Pt/C and Au/C material. which carries at room temperature a current density > 50 times the current density which high TC superconductors can carry. The explanation for the characteristics of this novel material is given. This fact allows producing novel products for many applications using Dual Beam system having a gas supply and X.Y.T stream data programming and not using GDSII layout pattern control software. Novel products are possible for energy transportation. -distribution.-switching, photon-detection above 65 meV energy for very efficient energy harvesting, for bright field emission electron sources used for vacuum electronic devices like amplifiers for HF electronics, micro-tubes, 30 GHz to 6 THz switching amplifiers with signal to noise ratio >10(!), THz power sources up to 1 Watt, in combination with miniaturized vacuum pumps, vacuum gauges, IR to THz detectors, EUV- and X-Ray sources. Since focusing electron beam induced deposition works also at low energy, selfcloning multibeam-production machines for field emitter lamps, displays, multi-beam - lithography, - imaging, and - inspection, energy harvesting, and power distribution with switches controlling field-emitter arrays for KA of currents but with < 100 V switching voltage are possible. Finally the replacement of HTC superconductors and its applications by the Koops-GranMat® having Koops-Pairs at room temperature will allow the investigation devices similar to Josephson Junctions and its applications now called QUIDART (Quantum interference devices at Room Temperature). All these possibilities will support a revolution in the optical, electric, power, and electronic technology.

  3. The Chukchi slope current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlett, W. Bryce; Pickart, Robert S.

    2017-04-01

    Using a collection of 46 shipboard hydrographic/velocity transects occupied across the shelfbreak and slope of the Chukchi Sea between 2002 and 2014, we have quantified the existence of a current transporting Pacific-origin water westward over the upper continental slope. It has been named the Chukchi slope current, which is believed to emanate from Barrow Canyon. The current is surface-intensified, order 50 km wide, and advects both summer and winter waters. It is not trapped to a particular isobath, but instead is reminiscent of a free jet. There is no significant variation in Pacific water transport with distance from Barrow Canyon. A potential vorticity analysis suggests that the flow is baroclinically unstable, consistent with the notion that it meanders. The current is present during all synoptic wind conditions, but increases in strength from summer to fall presumably due to the seasonal enhancement of the easterly winds in the region. Its transport increased over the 12-year period of data coverage, also likely in response to wind forcing. In the mean, the slope current transports 0.50 ± 0.07 Sv of Pacific water. This estimate allows us to construct a balanced mass budget of the Chukchi shelf inflows and outflows. Our study also confirms the existence of an eastward-flowing Chukchi shelfbreak jet transporting 0.10 ± 0.03 Sv of Pacific water towards Barrow Canyon.

  4. Ionospheric Response Due to Seismic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Dinesh Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Signatures of the seismic activity in the ionospheric F2 region have been studied by analyzing the measurement of electron and ion temperatures during the occurrence of earthquake. The ionospheric electron and ion temperatures data recorded by the RPA payload aboard the Indian SROSS-C2 satellite during the period from January 1995 to December 2000 were used for the altitude range 430-630 km over Indian region. The normal day's electron and ion temperatures have been compared to the temperatures recorded during the seismic activity. The details of seismic events were obtained from USGS earthquake data information website. It has been found that the average electron temperature is enhanced during the occurrence of earthquakes by 1.2 to 1.5 times and this enhancement was for ion temperature ranging from 1.1to 1.3 times over the normal day's average temperatures. The above careful quantitative analysis of ionospheric electron and ion temperatures data shows the consistent enhancement in the ionospheric electron and ion temperatures. It is expected that the seismogenic vertical electrical field propagates up to the ionospheric heights and induces Joule heating that may cause the enhancement in ionospheric temperatures.

  5. Springing response due to bidirectional wave excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidic-Perunovic, Jelena

    2005-01-01

    theories deal with the unidirectional wave excitation. This is quite standard. The problem is how to include more than one directional wave systems described by a wave spectrum with arbitrary heading. The main objective of the present work has been to account for the additional second-order springing...... a discrepancy with full-scale measurements exists, but worse is that no tendency in the measurement trend is captured. An important source of high frequency springing excitation is undoubtedly missing. The full-scale measurements that are presented in the thesis and have been used for the validation are unique...... because, to the author's knowledge, this is the first time that the wave data were collected simultaneously with stress records on the deck of the ship. This is highly appreciated because one can use the precise input and not only the most probable sea state statistics. The actual picture of the sea waves...

  6. Probing genetic control of swine responses to PRRSV infection: current progress of the PRRS host genetics consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lunney Joan K

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the role of host genetics in resistance to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV infection, and the effects of PRRS on pig health and related growth, are goals of the PRRS Host Genetics Consortium (PHGC. Methods The project uses a nursery pig model to assess pig resistance/susceptibility to primary PRRSV infection. To date, 6 groups of 200 crossbred pigs from high health farms were donated by commercial sources. After acclimation, the pigs were infected with PRRSV in a biosecure facility and followed for 42 days post infection (dpi. Blood samples were collected at 0, 4, 7, 10, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42 dpi for serum and whole blood RNA gene expression analyses; weekly weights were recorded for growth traits. All data have been entered into the PHGC relational database. Genomic DNAs from all PHGC1-6 pigs were prepared and genotyped with the Porcine SNP60 SNPchip. Results Results have affirmed that all challenged pigs become PRRSV infected with peak viremia being observed between 4-21 dpi. Multivariate statistical analyses of viral load and weight data have identified PHGC pigs in different virus/weight categories. Sera are now being compared for factors involved in recovery from infection, including speed of response and levels of immune cytokines. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS are underway to identify genes and chromosomal locations that identify PRRS resistant/susceptible pigs and pigs able to maintain growth while infected with PRRSV. Conclusions Overall, the PHGC project will enable researchers to discover and verify important genotypes and phenotypes that predict resistance/susceptibility to PRRSV infection. The availability of PHGC samples provides a unique opportunity to continue to develop deeper phenotypes on every PRRSV infected pig.

  7. The response of O3 and PM2.5 to temperature under current and future conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkey, M.; Holloway, T.; Bickford, E.; Janssen, M.

    2012-12-01

    Although both observational and model studies have shown clear links between climate and air quality, rarely are observed climate-chemistry relationships used to evaluate model skill. Here we present an analysis of the correlation between temperature (and other meteorological variables) and ambient concentrations of ozone, fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and individual PM2.5 constituents. We employ the EPA Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) v. 4.7.1, with meteorology from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The study domain covers the eastern United States at a 12 km x 12 km resolution. For both historic and future simulations we use an emissions inventory reflecting 2007 technology and activity, developed by the Lake Michigan Air Directors Consortium (LADCO). In previous studies, our group used the same inventory as input to CMAQ over the Upper Midwestern U.S. and found strong performance against ground-based measurements. Simulated chemistry-climate correlations from the summers of 2006 and 2007 are evaluated against those of ground-based observations from the EPA Air Quality System (AQS) database, the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) retrievals of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol product. For comparison with CMAQ results, OMI and MODIS data have been re-gridded using the Wisconsin Horizontal Interpolation Program for Satellites (WHIPS). The observed climate-chemistry response is compared to CMAQ simulations to assess model skill in capturing key climate dependencies. These climate-chemistry relationships are also considered under future climate scenarios, which take as input the WRF-Community Climate System Model (CCSM) climate projection from the North American Regional Climate Change Program (NARCCAP), further downscaled with WRF.

  8. A biophysical model examining the role of low-voltage-activated potassium currents in shaping the responses of vestibular ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hight, Ariel E; Kalluri, Radha

    2016-08-01

    The vestibular nerve is characterized by two broad groups of neurons that differ in the timing of their interspike intervals; some fire at highly regular intervals, whereas others fire at highly irregular intervals. Heterogeneity in ion channel properties has been proposed as shaping these firing patterns (Highstein SM, Politoff AL. Brain Res 150: 182-187, 1978; Smith CE, Goldberg JM. Biol Cybern 54: 41-51, 1986). Kalluri et al. (J Neurophysiol 104: 2034-2051, 2010) proposed that regularity is controlled by the density of low-voltage-activated potassium currents (IKL). To examine the impact of IKL on spike timing regularity, we implemented a single-compartment model with three conductances known to be present in the vestibular ganglion: transient sodium (gNa), low-voltage-activated potassium (gKL), and high-voltage-activated potassium (gKH). Consistent with in vitro observations, removing gKL depolarized resting potential, increased input resistance and membrane time constant, and converted current step-evoked firing patterns from transient (1 spike at current onset) to sustained (many spikes). Modeled neurons were driven with a time-varying synaptic conductance that captured the random arrival times and amplitudes of glutamate-driven synaptic events. In the presence of gKL, spiking occurred only in response to large events with fast onsets. Models without gKL exhibited greater integration by responding to the superposition of rapidly arriving events. Three synaptic conductance were modeled, each with different kinetics to represent a variety of different synaptic processes. In response to all three types of synaptic conductance, models containing gKL produced spike trains with irregular interspike intervals. Only models lacking gKL when driven by rapidly arriving small excitatory postsynaptic currents were capable of generating regular spiking.

  9. Clopidogrel Resistance: Current Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NS Neki

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Antiplatelet agents are mainly used in the prevention and management of atherothrombotic complications. Dual antiplatelet therapy, combining aspirin and clopidogrel, is the standard care for patients having acute coronary syndromes or undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention according to the current ACC/AHA and ESC guidelines. But in spite of administration of dual antiplatelet therapy, some patients develop recurrent cardiovascular ischemic events especially stent thrombosis which is a serious clinical problem. Antiplatelet response to clopidogrel varies widely among patients based on ex vivo platelet function measurements. Clopidogrel is an effective inhibitor of platelet activation and aggregation due to its selective and irreversible blockade of the P2Y12 receptor. Patients who display little attenuation of platelet reactivity with clopidogrel therapy are labeled as low or nonresponders or clopidogrel resistant. The mechanism of clopidogrel resistance remains incompletely defined but there are certain clinical, cellular and genetic factors including polymorphisms responsible for therapeutic failure. Currently there is no standardized or widely accepted definition of clopidogrel resistance. The future may soon be realised in the routine measurement of platelet activity in the same way that blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar are followed to help guide the therapy, thus improving the care for millions of people. This review focuses on the methods used to identify patients with clopidogrel resistance, the underlying mechanisms, metabolism, clinical significance and current therapeutic strategies to overcome clopidogrel resistance. J Enam Med Col 2016; 6(1: 38-46

  10. Low-dose oral tolerance due to antigen in the diet suppresses differentially the cholera toxin-adjuvantized IgE, IgA and IgG response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanne Risager; Kjær, Tanja; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2003-01-01

    Background: Cholera toxin (CT) is used as a mucosal adjuvant amongst other applications for studying food allergy because oral administration of antigen with CT induces an antigen-specific type 2 response, including IgE and IgA production. Priorly established oral tolerance due to antigen...... soy-trypsin inhibitor (KSTI) (F0 mice) and mice fed a soy-free diet (F2 mice) were orally immunized with KSTI and CT. KSTI-specific serum IgG1, IgG2a, IgA and IgE and fecal IgA were monitored. KSTI-stimulated cell proliferation and interleukin (IL)-6 production were determined. Results: The anti......-KSTI IgE and IgA responses in the F0 mice were substantially suppressed, while the IgG1 and IgG2a responses were not suppressed after five oral immunizations. The response suppression tended to decline with increasing numbers of immunizations suggesting that the suppression could be overcome by multiple...

  11. Dynamic movement of N100m current sources in auditory evoked fields: comparison of ipsilateral versus contralateral responses in human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chun Yu; Ozaki, Isamu; Suzuki, Yasumi; Baba, Masayuki; Hashimoto, Isao

    2008-04-01

    We recorded auditory evoked magnetic fields (AEFs) to monaural 400Hz tone bursts and investigated spatio-temporal features of the N100m current sources in the both hemispheres during the time before the N100m reaches at the peak strength and 5ms after the peak. A hemispheric asymmetry was evaluated as the asymmetry index based on the ratio of N100m peak dipole strength between right and left hemispheres for either ear stimulation. The results of asymmetry indices showed right-hemispheric dominance for left ear stimulation but no hemispheric dominance for right ear stimulation. The current sources for N100m in both hemispheres in response to monaural 400Hz stimulation moved toward anterolateral direction along the long axis of the Heschl gyri during the time before it reaches the peak strength; the ipsilateral N100m sources were located slightly posterior to the contralateral N100m ones. The onset and peak latencies of the right hemispheric N100m in response to right ear stimulation are shorter than those of the left hemispheric N100m to left ear stimulation. The traveling distance of the right hemispheric N100m sources following right ear stimulation was longer than that for the left hemispheric ones following left ear stimulation. These results suggest the right-dominant hemispheric asymmetry in pure tone processing.

  12. Age or ischemia uncouples the blood flow response, tissue acidosis, and direct current potential signature of spreading depolarization in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menyhárt, Ákos; Zölei-Szénási, Dániel; Puskás, Tamás; Makra, Péter; Bari, Ferenc; Farkas, Eszter

    2017-08-01

    Spreading depolarization (SD) events contribute to lesion maturation in the acutely injured human brain. Neurodegeneration related to SD is thought to be caused by the insufficiency of the cerebral blood flow (CBF) response; yet the mediators of the CBF response, or their deficiency in the aged or ischemic cerebral cortex, remain the target of intensive research. Here, we postulated that tissue pH effectively modulates the magnitude of hyperemia in response to SD, the coupling of which is prone to be dysfunctional in the aged or ischemic cerebral cortex. To test this hypothesis, we conducted systematic correlation analysis between the direct current (DC) potential signature of SD, SD-associated tissue acidosis, and hyperemic element of the CBF response in the isoflurane-anesthetized, young or old, and intact or ischemic rat cerebral cortex. The data demonstrate that the amplitude of the SD-related DC potential shift, tissue acidosis, and hyperemia are tightly coupled in the young intact cortex; ischemia and old age uncouples the amplitude of hyperemia from the amplitude of the DC potential shift and acidosis; the duration of the DC potential shift, hyperemia and acidosis positively correlate under ischemia alone; and old age disproportionally elongates the duration of acidosis with respect to the DC potential shift and hyperemia under ischemia. The coincidence of the variables supports the view that local CBF regulation with SD must have an effective metabolic component, which becomes dysfunctional with age or under ischemia. Finally, the known age-related acceleration of ischemic neurodegeneration may be promoted by exaggerated tissue acidosis.NEW & NOTEWORTHY The hyperemic element of the cerebral blood flow response to spreading depolarization is effectively modulated by tissue pH in the young intact rat cerebral cortex. This coupling becomes dysfunctional with age or under ischemia, and tissue acidosis lasts disproportionally longer in the aged cortex, making

  13. 接地线缆HEMP电流响应规律研究%Study on Current Response of Grounding Cable in HEMP Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴焱杰; 张春光; 许凯; 赵煜

    2014-01-01

    The cable connecting the information systems may be coupled by the electromagnetic pulse energy to the internal cir-cuit,resulting in system performance degradation,damage and even burned,and bringing great harm. Therefore,the work to research cables’ effects under electromagnetic pulse is the precondition to take electromagnetic protective measures. The finite-difference time-domain ( FDTD) method and Noda thin models are used to establish the space and computational model with high-altitude nuclear elec-tromagnetic pulse (HEMP) as the incident source,the grounding cable HEMP current response in the different states is analyzed and calculated. The results show that the response current of grounding cable attenuates rapidly in the oscillation process with a large peak at a position higher;the incident direction changes of the wave source can produce different results in response,and the response current mainly appears from the cable laid in the same direction with the electric field excitation component. The conclusions can provide useful guidance for the cable electromagnetic protection.%连接电子系统的线缆能够将电磁脉冲能量耦合至系统的内部电路,造成系统性能降级、损伤甚至烧毁,带来极大的危害,因此开展线缆的电磁脉冲效应研究工作是采取针对性电磁防护措施的必要前提。以高空核爆电磁脉冲(HEMP)为入射源,基于时域有限差分(FDTD)方法和Noda细线模型建立仿真空间和计算模型,分析计算了不同状态下接地线缆的HEMP电流响应。结果表明,接地线缆的响应电流在振荡过程中迅速衰减,且在较高位置处峰值较大;波源入射方向的改变会产生不同的响应结果,线缆响应电流主要来自与其布设方向一致的电场分量的激励。所得结论能够为线缆的电磁防护提供有益指导。

  14. Elephantine nose due to rhinoentomophthoromycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorpade, Ashok; Sarma, Podila S A; Iqbal, Syed Md

    2006-01-01

    Rhinoentomophthoromycosis in an immunocompetent Indian male due to Basidiobolus species resulting in a huge (elephantine) nasal deformity, is reported. The diagnosis was done by demonstration of hyphae in direct tissue smear examination in potassium hydroxide, histopathological examination and by cultural characteristics. He showed an excellent response to oral potassium iodide solution.

  15. Current Situation and Education Exploration of Vocational Students' Sense of Responsibility%高职生责任意识现状及其教育探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁晓军; 朱琦

    2012-01-01

    高等职业院校培养的是高素质技能型专门人才,他们的责任意识直接关系到自身职业能力的获取以及经济社会的发展。当前,高职生责任意识的缺失已成为现阶段我国高职教育中一个不可忽视的问题。本文在分析高职生责任意识现状及其缺失原因的基础上,提出了相应的对策建议。%The vocational institutions cultivate high-quality skilled expertise, their sense of responsibility is directly related to their own professional ability as well as the economic and social development. Currently, the lack of the sense of responsibility of the vocational high school students has become a problem can not be ignored at this stage of higher vocational education in China. In this paper, based on the analysis of vocational high school students a sense of responsibility to the status quo and its deletion causes, put forward corresponding suggestions.

  16. Changes in gas exchange characteristics during the life span of giant sequoia: Implications for response to current and future concentrations of atmospheric ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grulke, N.E.; Miller, P.R. (USDA Forest Service, Riverside, CA (United States))

    Native stands of giant sequoia are being exposed to relatively high concentrations of atmospheric ozone produced in urban and agricultural areas upwind. The expected change in environmental conditions over the next 100 y is likely to be unprecendented in the life span (ca 2,500 y) of giant sequoia. Changes in the physiological responses of three age classes of giant sequoia (current year, 12 y and 25 y) to different concentrations of ozone were determined, and age-related differences in sensitivity to pollutants were assessed by examining physiological changes (gas exchange, water use efficiency) across the life span of giant sequoia. The CO[sub 2] exchange rate (CER) was greater in current year (12.1 [mu]mol CO[sub 2]/m[sup 2]s) and 2 year old seedlings (4.8 [mu]mol CO[sub 2]/m[sup 2]s) than in all older trees (average of 3.0 [mu]mol CO[sub 2]/m[sup 2]s). Dark respiration was highest for current year seedlings and was increased twofold in symptotic individuals exposed to elevated ozone concentrations. Stomatal conductance was greater in current-year and 2 year old seedlings (335 and 200 mmol H[sub 2]O/m[sup 2]s), respectively, than in all older trees (50 mmol H[sub 2]O/m[sup 2]s), indicating that the ozone concentration in substomatol cavities is higher in young seedlings than in older trees. Significant changes in water use efficiency occurred in trees between ages 5 and 20 years. It is concluded that giant sequoia seedlings are sensitive to atmospheric ozone until they are ca 5 y old. Low conductance, high water use efficiency, and compact mesophyll all contribute to a natural ozone tolerance, or defense, or both, in foliage of older trees. 11 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. Modeling mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal response to earthquakes, tides, and ocean currents: a case study at the Grotto mound, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, G.; Bemis, K. G.

    2014-12-01

    Seafloor hydrothermal systems feature intricate interconnections among oceanic, geological, hydrothermal, and biological processes. The advent of the NEPTUNE observatory operated by Ocean Networks Canada at the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge enables scientists to study these interconnections through multidisciplinary, continuous, real-time observations. The multidisciplinary observatory instruments deployed at the Grotto Mound, a major study site of the NEPTUNE observatory, makes it a perfect place to study the response of a seafloor hydrothermal system to geological and oceanic processes. In this study, we use the multidisciplinary datasets recorded by the NEPTUNE Observatory instruments as observational tools to demonstrate two different aspects of the response of hydrothermal activity at the Grotto Mound to geological and oceanic processes. First, we investigate a recent increase in venting temperature and heat flux at Grotto observed by the Benthic and Resistivity Sensors (BARS) and the Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS) respectively. This event started in Mar 2014 and is still evolving by the time of writing this abstract. An initial interpretation in light of the seismic data recorded by a neighboring ocean bottom seismometer on the NEPTUNE observatory suggests the temperature and heat flux increase is probably triggered by local seismic activities. Comparison of the observations with the results of a 1-D mathematical model simulation of hydrothermal sub-seafloor circulation elucidates the potential mechanisms underlying hydrothermal response to local earthquakes. Second, we observe significant tidal oscillations in the venting temperature time series recorded by BARS and the acoustic imaging of hydrothermal plumes by COVIS, which is evidence for hydrothermal response to ocean tides and currents. We interpret the tidal oscillations of venting temperature as a result of tidal loading on a poroelastic medium. We then invoke poroelastic

  18. Theoretical calculation of losses due to coupling currents inside a Nb{sub 3}Sn ``tin inside``-type wire; Calcul theorique des pertes par courants de couplage a l`interieur d`un brin Nb{sub 3}Sn de type ``etain interne``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otmani, R

    1998-03-01

    The Nb{sub 3}Sn ITER-type wire is made up of 19 sub-elements and 162 filaments compose each sub-element. The calculation of the loss by coupling current inside a wire follows 2 stages: first we evaluate the loss due to the mutual interaction between filaments inside a sub-element then we calculate the loss due to the coupling between sub-elements of the wire. In both calculations the hypothesis of stationary states is made and we assume that the filaments are not saturated. (A.C.) 9 refs.

  19. Changes in gas exchange characteristics during the life span of giant sequoia: implications for response to current and future concentrations of atmospheric ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grulke, N. E.; Miller, P. R.

    1994-01-01

    Native stands of giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum Bucholz) are being exposed to relatively high concentrations of atmospheric ozone produced in urban and agricultural areas upwind. The expected change in environmental conditions over the next 100 years is likely to be unprecedented in the life span (about 2,500 years) of giant sequoia. We determined changes in physiological responses of three age classes of giant sequoia (current-year, 12-, and 125-year-old) to differing concentrations of ozone, and assessed age-related differences in sensitivity to pollutants by examining physiological changes (gas exchange, water use efficiency) across the life span of giant sequoia (current-year, 2-, 5-, 20-, 125-, and > 2,000-year-old trees). The CO(2) exchange rate (CER) was greater in current-year (12.1 micro mol CO(2) m(-2) s(-1)) and 2-year-old seedlings (4.8 micro mol CO(2) m(-2) s(-1)) than in all older trees (3.0 micro mol CO(2) m(-2) s(-1), averaged across the four older age classes). Dark respiration was highest for current-year seedlings (-6.5 +/- 0.7 micro mol CO(2) m(-2) s(-1)) and was increased twofold in symptomatic individuals exposed to elevated ozone concentrations. Stomatal conductance (g(s)) was greater in current-year (355 mmol H(2)O m(-2) s(-1)) and 2-year-old seedlings (200 mmol H(2)O m(-2) s(-1)) than in all older trees (50 mmol H(2)O m(-2) s(-1)), indicating that the ozone concentration in substomatal cavities is higher in young seedlings than in trees. Significant changes in water use efficiency, as indicated by C(i)/C(a), occurred in trees between ages 5 and 20 years. We conclude that giant sequoias seedlings are sensitive to atmospheric ozone until they are about 5 years old. Low conductance, high water use efficiency, and compact mesophyll all contribute to a natural ozone tolerance, or defense, or both, in foliage of older trees.

  20. Current induced magnetic flux response in frustrated three-band superconductors as a bulk probe of broken time reversal symmetry (BTRS) ground states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yerin, Yuriy; Omelyanchouk, Alexander [Verkin Inst. for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering. 61103 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Drechsler, Stefan-Ludwig; Brink, Jeroen van den; Efremov, Dmitriy [Inst. for Theorretical Solid State Physics at the Leibniz Inst. for Solid State an Materials Research, IFW-Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Within the Ginzburg-Landau formalism we provide a classification of all possible ground states (GS) of a three-band superconductor (3BSC) where either frustrated states with BTRS or a single non-BTRS GS with unconventional/conventional s-wave symmetry, respectively, exist. The necessary condition for a BTRS GS in general cannot be reduced to a ''-''sign of the product of all interband couplings (IBC) valid in the case of 3 equivalent bands with repulsive equal IBC, only. It corresponds to a maximal IBC frustration. We show that with increasing diversity of the parameter space this frustration is reduced and the regions of possible BTRS GS start to shrink. We track possible evolutions of a BTRS GS of a 3BSC based doubly-connected system in an external magnetic field. Depending on its parameters, a magnetic flux can induce various current density leaps, connected with adiabatic or non-adiabatic transitions from BTRS to non-BTRS states and vice versa. The current induced magnetic flux response of samples with a doubly-connected geometry e.g. as a thin tube provides a suitable experimental tool for the detection of BTRS GS.

  1. 简谐点荷载下饱和土中圆形隧道系统的动力响应%Dynamic response of circular tunnels in saturated soil due to harmonic point Load

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄晓吉; 扶名福; 徐斌

    2014-01-01

    Because of the fluid-solid coupling effect in water-rich region,research about the dynamic re-sponse of tunnel system under actual rail traffic load was not done much.A new method was proposed to study the dynamic response of the circular tunnel systems in saturated soil due to non-axisymmetrically harmonic point load.The liner was modelled as Flügge thin cylindrical shell and soil considered as saturated porous medium.Load and dynamic response were expanded into series form along ring modes circumferen-tially.Dynamic response of the tunnel-saturated soil system was firstly presented by using Fourier transfor-mation.On this base,we modelled the track slab as an infinitely long Euler beam.The interaction between the slab and tunnel-saturated soil system was also taken into account.We also calculated the response of ballastess track slab-tunnel-saturated soil system.The research results showed this method could effective-ly achieve the response of two tunnel systems in saturated soil under non-axisymmetric load.The load fre-quency had much effect on the dynamic response of both tunnel systems.The slab reduced the response of liner and soil.%在饱和土体地区,由于流-固耦合效应,实际轨道交通荷载作用下隧道系统动力响应的研究较少,为此提出一种新方法来研究非轴对称简谐点荷载作用下饱和土体中圆形隧道系统的动力响应。假定衬砌为 Flügge 薄壁圆柱壳,土体为饱和多孔介质,将荷载、动力响应沿环向模态展成级数形式,利用傅里叶积分变换首先求得衬砌-饱和土体系统的动力响应。在此基础上,将道床板作为无限长的 Euler 梁,考虑道床板、衬砌、饱和土体的相互作用,进一步求解无砟轨道道床板-衬砌-饱和土体系统在点荷载作用下的响应。研究的结果表明这种方法可有效求解非轴对称荷载作用下饱和土中2种隧道系统的动力响应;荷载频率对饱和土中2种隧

  2. Response ofPinus koraiensisseedling growth to different light condi-tions based on the assessment of photosynthesis in current and one-year-old needles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiaojun Zhu; Kai Wang; Yirong Sun; Qiaoling Yan

    2014-01-01

    As one of the three major five-leaved pines in the northern hemisphere,Pinus koraiensis is the most important dominant tree species in the natural mixed-broadleaved Korean pine forests. However, the regeneration ofP. koraiensisunder the canopy of secondary forest stands is poor because of the light limitation. This study was conducted to understand howP. koraiensisseedlings adapt to different light intensities and what would be the optimum light level for their establishment and growth. Three repetition plots with four light intensities (15%, 30%, 60% and 100% of the natural incident irradiances, achieved by suspending layers of black nylon net above and surrounding the plots) were set up under natural climate conditions in a montane region in eastern Liaoning Province, Northeast China. A total of 80P. koraiensis seedlings with similar height and root collar diameter were transplanted into four plots. After one year of acclimation to the specific light conditions, the seasonal variations of the photosynthetic variables and needle traits of the current and one-year-old needles, and the growth parameters were observed under four light intensities. The results indicated that: (1) The seedling at 60% treatment exhibited the greatest growth, which agreed with the response of the light-saturated photosynthetic rates (Amax) and the dark respiration rate (Rd) in the current and one-year-old needles, i.e.,Rd at 60% treatment was significantly lower than that at 100% treatment, but Amax did not differ between the seedlings at 100% and 60% treatments. (2) TheP. koraiensis seedlings have a certain photosynthetic plasticity to adapt the light conditions by adjusting their needle traits and regulating the physiological processes, becauseAmax,Rd, light saturation point and compensation point, the needle mass area, needle nitrogen and chlorophyll contents were significantly (p<0.05) correlated with the light intensities. Especially,Amax at 100% and 60% treatments was

  3. Ocean current data measured by the Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) aboard the Development Driller III from 2010-05-31 to 2010-07-04 in the Gulf of Mexico in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (NODC Accession 0083634)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ocean current data were collected by ADCP aboard the Discoverer Enterprise in the Gulf of Mexico in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill event on April 20,...

  4. Ocean current data measured by the Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) aboard the Discoverer Enterprise oil platform from May 23, 2010 to July 04, 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (NODC Accession 0083684)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ocean current data were collected by ADCP aboard the Discoverer Enterprise in the Gulf of Mexico in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill event on April 20,...

  5. Diplopia due to Dacryops

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmi Duman; Reşat Duman; Mehmet Balcı

    2013-01-01

    Dacryops is a lacrimal ductal cyst. It is known that it can cause globe displacement, motility restriction, and proptosis because of the mass effect. Diplopia due to dacryops has not been reported previously. Here, we present a 57-year-old man with binocular horizontal diplopia that occurred during left direction gaze due to dacryops.

  6. Diplopia due to Dacryops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmi Duman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dacryops is a lacrimal ductal cyst. It is known that it can cause globe displacement, motility restriction, and proptosis because of the mass effect. Diplopia due to dacryops has not been reported previously. Here, we present a 57-year-old man with binocular horizontal diplopia that occurred during left direction gaze due to dacryops.

  7. Evolution of the Coronal Magnetic Configurations Including a Current-Carrying Flux Rope in Response to the Change in the Background Field

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Hong-Juan; Gong, Jian-Cun; Lin, Jun

    2014-01-01

    We investigate equilibrium height of the flux rope, and its internal equilibrium in a realistic plasma environment by carrying out numerical simulations of the evolution of systems including a current-carrying flux rope. We find that the equilibrium height of the flux rope is approximately a power-law function of the relative strength of the background field. Our simulations indicate that the flux rope can escape more easily from a weaker background field. This further confirms the catastrophe in the magnetic configuration of interest can be triggered by decrease of strength of the background field. Our results show that it takes some time to reach internal equilibrium depending on the initial state of the flux rope. The plasma flow inside the flux rope due to the adjustment for the internal equilibrium of the flux rope remains small and does not last very long when the initial state of the flux rope commences from the stable branch of the theoretical equilibrium curve. This work also confirms the influence o...

  8. Transcranial direct current stimulation combined with aerobic exercise to optimize analgesic responses in fibromyalgia: A randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Emerenciano Mendonça

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain syndrome that is associated with maladaptive plasticity in neural central circuits. One of the neural circuits that are involved in pain in fibromyalgia is the primary motor cortex. We tested a combination intervention that aimed to modulate the motor system: transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS of the primary motor cortex (M1 and aerobic exercise (AE. In this phase II, sham-controlled randomized clinical trial, 45 subjects were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: tDCS + AE, AE only, and tDCS only. The following outcomes were assessed: intensity of pain, level of anxiety, quality of life, mood, pressure pain threshold, and cortical plasticity, as indexed by transcranial magnetic stimulation. There was a significant effect for the group-time interaction for intensity of pain, demonstrating that tDCS/AE was superior to AE (F(13,364=2.25, p=0.007 and tDCS (F(13.364=2.33, p=0.0056 alone. Post hoc adjusted analysis showed a difference between tDCS/AE and tDCS group after the first week of stimulation and after one month intervention period (p=0.02 and p=0.03, respectively. Further, after treatment there was a significant difference between groups in anxiety and mood levels. The combination treatment effected the greatest response. The three groups had no differences regarding responses in motor cortex plasticity, as assessed by TMS. The combination of tDCS with aerobic exercise is superior compared with each individual intervention (cohen’s d effect sizes > 0.55. The combination intervention had a significant effect on pain, anxiety and mood. Based on the similar effects on cortical plasticity outcomes, the combination intervention might have affected other neural circuits, such as those that control the affective-emotional aspects of pain.

  9. Item response theory analysis to evaluate reliability and minimal clinically important change of the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire in patients with severe disability due to back pain from vertebral compression fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minji K; Yost, Kathleen J; McDonald, Jennifer S; Dougherty, Ryne W; Vine, Roanna L; Kallmes, David F

    2017-06-01

    The majority of validation done on the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) has been in patients with mild or moderate disability. There is paucity of research focusing on the psychometric quality of the RMDQ in patients with severe disability. To evaluate the psychometric quality of the RMDQ in patients with severe disability. Observational clinical study. The sample consisted of 214 patients with painful vertebral compression fractures who underwent vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty. The 23-item version of the RMDQ was completed at two time points: baseline and 30-day postintervention follow-up. With the two-parameter logistic unidimensional item response theory (IRT) analyses, we derived the range of scores that produced reliable measurement and investigated the minimal clinically important difference (MCID). Scores for 214 (100%) patients at baseline and 108 (50%) patients at follow-up did not meet the reliability criterion of 0.90 or higher, with the majority of patients having disability due to back pain that was too severe to be reliably measured by the RMDQ. Depending on methodology, MCID estimates ranged from 2 to 8 points and the proportion of patients classified as having experienced meaningful improvement ranged from 26% to 68%. A greater change in score was needed at the extreme ends of the score scale to be classified as having achieved MCID using IRT methods. Replacing items measuring moderate disability with items measuring severe disability could yield a version of the RMDQ that better targets patients with severe disability due to back pain. Improved precision in measuring disability would be valuable to clinicians who treat patients with greater functional impairments. Caution is needed when choosing criteria for interpreting meaningful change using the RMDQ. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Impaired beta-adrenergic response and decreased L-type calcium current of hypertrophied left ventricular myocytes in postinfarction heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Saraiva

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Infarct-induced heart failure is usually associated with cardiac hypertrophy and decreased ß-adrenergic responsiveness. However, conflicting results have been reported concerning the density of L-type calcium current (I Ca(L, and the mechanisms underlying the decreased ß-adrenergic inotropic response. We determined I Ca(L density, cytoplasmic calcium ([Ca2+]i transients, and the effects of ß-adrenergic stimulation (isoproterenol in a model of postinfarction heart failure in rats. Left ventricular myocytes were obtained by enzymatic digestion 8-10 weeks after infarction. Electrophysiological recordings were obtained using the patch-clamp technique. [Ca2+]i transients were investigated via fura-2 fluorescence. ß-Adrenergic receptor density was determined by [³H]-dihydroalprenolol binding to left ventricle homogenates. Postinfarction myocytes showed a significant 25% reduction in mean I Ca(L density (5.7 ± 0.28 vs 7.6 ± 0.32 pA/pF and a 19% reduction in mean peak [Ca2+]i transients (0.13 ± 0.007 vs 0.16 ± 0.009 compared to sham myocytes. The isoproterenol-stimulated increase in I Ca(L was significantly smaller in postinfarction myocytes (Emax: 63.6 ± 4.3 vs 123.3 ± 0.9% in sham myocytes, but EC50 was not altered. The isoproterenol-stimulated peak amplitude of [Ca2+]i transients was also blunted in postinfarction myocytes. Adenylate cyclase activation through forskolin produced similar I Ca(L increases in both groups. ß-Adrenergic receptor density was significantly reduced in homogenates from infarcted hearts (Bmax: 93.89 ± 20.22 vs 271.5 ± 31.43 fmol/mg protein in sham myocytes, while Kd values were similar. We conclude that postinfarction myocytes from large infarcts display reduced I Ca(L density and peak [Ca2+]i transients. The response to ß-adrenergic stimulation was also reduced and was probably related to ß-adrenergic receptor down-regulation and not to changes in adenylate cyclase activity.

  11. A FRAME response to the Draft Report on Alternative (Non-animal) Methods for Cosmetics Testing: Current Status and Future Prospects--2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balls, Michael; Clothier, Richard

    2010-10-01

    This response on behalf of FRAME to the European Commission's consultation on the five chapters of the Draft Report on Alternative (Non-animal) Methods for Cosmetics Testing: Current Status and Future Prospects--2010, is via a Comment in ATLA, rather than via the template supplied by the Commission. This is principally so that a number of general points about cosmetic ingredient testing can be made. It is concluded that the five draft chapters do not provide a credible basis for the Commission's forthcoming report to the European Parliament and the European Council on the five cosmetic ingredient safety issues for which the 7th Amendment to the Cosmetic Directive's ban on animal testing was postponed until 2013. This is mainly because there is insufficient focus in the draft chapters on the specific nature of cosmetic ingredients, their uses, their local effects and metabolism at their sites of application, and, in particular, on whether their possible absorption into the body would be likely to lead to their accumulation in target sites at levels approaching Thresholds of Toxicological Concern. Meanwhile, there continues to be uncertainty about how the provisions of the Cosmetics Directive should be applied, given the requirements of the REACH system and directives concerned with the safety of other chemicals and products. © 2010 FRAME.

  12. Decreased CD8+ T cell response to Epstein-Barr virus infected B cells in multiple sclerosis is not due to decreased HLA class I expression on B cells or monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csurhes Peter A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS have a decreased frequency of CD8+ T cells reactive to their own Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infected B cells. We have proposed that this might predispose to the development of MS by allowing EBV-infected autoreactive B cells to accumulate in the central nervous system. The decreased CD8+ T cell response to EBV results from a general CD8+ T cell deficiency and also a decreased proportion of EBV-specific T cells within the total CD8+ T cell population. Because decreased HLA class I expression on monocytes and B cells has been reported in MS and could influence the generation and effector function of EBV-specific CD8+ T cells, the present study was undertaken to measure the expression of HLA molecules on B cells and monocytes in patients with MS. Methods We used flow cytometry to determine the proportions of T cells, natural killer cells, B cells and monocytes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and to quantify the expression of HLA molecules on T cells, B cells and monocytes of 59 healthy subjects and 62 patients with MS who had not received corticosteroids or immunomodulatory therapy in the previous 3 months. Results The levels of HLA class I and class II molecules expressed on T cells, B cells and monocytes were normal in patients with MS, with the exception of two patients with secondary progressive MS with very low class II expression on B cells. In confirmation of previous studies we also found that the percentage of CD8+ T cells was significantly decreased whereas the percentage of CD4+ T cells and the CD4:CD8 ratio were significantly increased in patients with MS compared to healthy subjects. Conclusions The decreased CD8+ T cell response to EBV-infected B cells in MS patients is not due to decreased HLA class I expression on monocytes or B cells. In a small proportion of patients decreased HLA class II expression on B cells might impair the CD8+ T cell response to EBV by

  13. Dynamic Response and Damage Analysis of a Subway Station Structure due to Internal Exolosion%内爆炸作用下地铁车站结构的动力响应与破坏分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曲树盛; 李忠献

    2012-01-01

    Strong dynamic responses and local damages might occur in the subway station structure once an accidental or a terrorist explosion happens internally due to its enclosed environment. The responses of a subway station structure to internal explosions from typical small explosive devices, such as suitcase bombs, were simulated. The dynamic displacement and strain of typical columns, beams and floors were derived for estimating the safety of the structure. Parametric studies were also carried out to investigate the influences of TNT equivalent charge weight, reinforcement ratio of concrete members and soil-structure dynamic interaction on the dynamic responses of the structural members. The results showed that the platform floor was the most seriously damaged member under the internal explosion, while minor damage such as small cracks might occur in the members near the explosion. Dynamic responses of the structure would get stronger with the increase of the TNT equivalent charge weight, and weaker with the increase of reinforcement ratio. The soil-structure dynamic interaction need not be considered since it had little effect on the dynamic response of the members near the explosion.%地铁车站环境封闭,一旦其内部发生意外或恐怖爆炸事件,结构会在爆炸波的冲击作用下产生强烈的动力响应和局部破坏.采用数值方法对地铁车站在背包炸弹等中小型爆炸装置产生的内部爆炸作用下的结构动态响应进行了分析,得到了梁、板、柱等主要受力构件的位移和应变等动力响应,同时分析了炸药量、构件配筋率以及土-结构相互作用等因素对结构主要受力构件响应的影响.研究表明:在内部爆炸作用下,地铁车站的站台板是结构中破坏最为严重的构件,临近柱和中板会产生开裂等轻微破坏;结构的动力响应随炸药量的增大而增大,随构件配筋率的增大而减小;土-结构相互作用对于距离爆源最近的梁、

  14. Due process traditionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunstein, Cass R

    2008-06-01

    In important cases, the Supreme Court has limited the scope of "substantive due process" by reference to tradition, but it has yet to explain why it has done so. Due process traditionalism might be defended in several distinctive ways. The most ambitious defense draws on a set of ideas associated with Edmund Burke and Friedrich Hayek, who suggested that traditions have special credentials by virtue of their acceptance by many minds. But this defense runs into three problems. Those who have participated in a tradition may not have accepted any relevant proposition; they might suffer from a systematic bias; and they might have joined a cascade. An alternative defense sees due process traditionalism as a second-best substitute for two preferable alternatives: a purely procedural approach to the Due Process Clause, and an approach that gives legislatures the benefit of every reasonable doubt. But it is not clear that in these domains, the first-best approaches are especially attractive; and even if they are, the second-best may be an unacceptably crude substitute. The most plausible defense of due process traditionalism operates on rule-consequentialist grounds, with the suggestion that even if traditions are not great, they are often good, and judges do best if they defer to traditions rather than attempting to specify the content of "liberty" on their own. But the rule-consequentialist defense depends on controversial and probably false assumptions about the likely goodness of traditions and the institutional incapacities of judges.

  15. Onycholysis due to trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Chang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Female patient, 35 years old who came to the private office due to discoloration of her left thumbnail and little pain since 1 month ago. Clinical examination shows nail disease on her left thumbnail with onycholysis and dyschromia, dermatoscopy showed white-yellowish discoloration (Fig. 1A, B. The rest of the clinical examination was normal. Patient use to using acrylic nails since 2 years ago and denied some trauma at the nail. The diagnosis of onycholysis due to trauma was done and recommended her not to use acrylic nail, maintain the nail short and avoid wetness.

  16. Technical Due Diligence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker; Varano, Mattia

    2011-01-01

    Technical Due Diligence (TDD) as an evaluation of the performance of constructed facilities has become an important new field of practice for consultants. Before the financial crisis started in autumn 2008 it represented the fastest growing activity in some consulting companies. TDD is mostly car...

  17. Sleep disturbance due to aircraft noise exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence S Finegold

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on nighttime sleep disturbance due to community noise sources, particularly from exposure to aircraft noise, has been conducted for over a half decade. However, there are still no national environmental noise policies (i.e., laws and regulations promulgated which prescribe a specific criterion for an exposure limit which is regulatory in nature. In the U.S., the new American National Standards Institute (ANSI Noise Standard, ANSI S12.9-2008/Part 6, Quantities and Procedures for Description and Measurement of Environmental Sound - Part 6: Methods for Estimation of Awakenings Associated with Outdoor Noise Events Heard in Homes, does provide the currently recommended exposure-response relationship used in the U.S. In Europe, there has also been significant laboratory and field research on sleep disturbance, although the U.S. and European research publications often use different research methodologies, different noise metrics and different meta-analysis techniques. The current article will provide a brief overview of sleep disturbance research internationally to document the similarities and differences between the various research approaches and research results.

  18. The utility and limitations of current web-available algorithms to predict peptides recognized by CD4 T cells in response to pathogen infection #

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Francisco A.; Lee, Alvin H.; Nayak, Jennifer; Richards, Katherine A.; Sant, Andrea J.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to track CD4 T cells elicited in response to pathogen infection or vaccination is critical because of the role these cells play in protective immunity. Coupled with advances in genome sequencing of pathogenic organisms, there is considerable appeal for implementation of computer-based algorithms to predict peptides that bind to the class II molecules, forming the complex recognized by CD4 T cells. Despite recent progress in this area, there is a paucity of data regarding their success in identifying actual pathogen-derived epitopes. In this study, we sought to rigorously evaluate the performance of multiple web-available algorithms by comparing their predictions and our results using purely empirical methods for epitope discovery in influenza that utilized overlapping peptides and cytokine Elispots, for three independent class II molecules. We analyzed the data in different ways, trying to anticipate how an investigator might use these computational tools for epitope discovery. We come to the conclusion that currently available algorithms can indeed facilitate epitope discovery, but all shared a high degree of false positive and false negative predictions. Therefore, efficiencies were low. We also found dramatic disparities among algorithms and between predicted IC50 values and true dissociation rates of peptide:MHC class II complexes. We suggest that improved success of predictive algorithms will depend less on changes in computational methods or increased data sets and more on changes in parameters used to “train” the algorithms that factor in elements of T cell repertoire and peptide acquisition by class II molecules. PMID:22467652

  19. Efficient Preparation of Streptochlorin from Marine Streptomyces sp. SYYLWHS-1-4 by Combination of Response Surface Methodology and High-Speed Counter-Current Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Since first isolated from the lipophilic extract of Streptomyces sp. SF2583, streptochlorin, has attracted a lot of attention because of its various pharmacological properties, such as antibiotic, antiallergic, antitumor, and anti-inflammatory activities. For the efficient preparation of streptochlorin from a producing strain Streptomyces sp. SYYLWHS-1-4, we developed a combinative method by using response surface methodology (RSM and high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC. In the fermentation process, we used RSM to optimize the condition for the efficient accumulation of streptochlorin, and the optimal parameters were: yeast extract 1.889 g/L, soluble starch 8.636 g/L, K2HPO4 0.359 g/L, CaCl2 2.5 g/L, MgSO4 0.625 g/L, marine salt 25 g/L, medium volume 50%, initial pH value 7.0, temperature 27.5 °C, which enhanced streptochlorin yield by 17.7-fold. During the purification process, the preparative HSCCC separation was performed using a petroleum ether–ethyl acetate–methanol–water (9:0.8:5:5, v/v/v/v biphasic solvent system, where 300 mg of crude sample yielded 16.5 mg streptochlorin with over 95% purity as determined by UPLC. Consequently, the combination method provided a feasible strategy for highly effective preparation of streptochlorin, which ensured the supply of large amounts of streptochlorin for in vivo pharmacological assessments or other requirements.

  20. Simulation of Species Diversity in Phyllostachys edulis Forest Responses to the Habitat Destruction due to Intensive Management%毛竹林物种多样性对集约经营的响应模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨清培; 时培建; 王兵; 赵广东; 郭起荣; 杨光耀

    2011-01-01

    From a landscape perspective and based on the theory of island biogeography and its species -area relationship: S = cAz, mathematic ecological models were established to analyze the changes of species diversity in Phyllostachys edulis forests or woody forests responses to the habitat destruction due to intensive management. Here the activity range of species apart from the borders of forests is also considered as a part of the area in the species - area formula. The followings were found: ( 1 ) intensive management had an influence on species diversity in the Ph. edulis forest ( i. e. the larger the area of forest was, the larger the species loss was;the smaller the area of forest was, the smaller the species loss was during intensive management); (2) the expansion to woody forest of the Ph. edulis forest fulfilled the Logistic equation, and the loss of species diversity could reach its limit as time went on.%根据岛屿生物地理学理论及其物种-面积关系:S=cAz,构建数学生态模型,研究集约经营对毛竹林物种多样性的影响.得出两点:(1)竹林生物多样性对集约经营的响应具有一定的面积效应,即原粗放经营竹林的面积越大,物种减少幅度就越大,原竹林越小,物种减少幅度就越小;(2)毛竹林诱导扩张过程符合Logistic方程,随着时间的延长,竹林内物种多样性会达到极限.

  1. 振荡磁场量子点中自旋流的交流响应%Alternating response of spin current in a magnetic-oscillating quantum dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋红岩; 宋小龙; 张爱芳; 吴留坡; 施耀铭

    2007-01-01

    We investigate alternating response of the spin current in a quantum dot system coupled to a normal metal electrode, to which an alternating driving voltage and a pumping rotating magnetic field are applied. The expression of the time-averaged spin current and its differential is obtained based on a non-equilibrium Green's function method. We find that for a given rotating frequency, the spin current increases rapidly and appears to have small steps when the driven frequency increases. As the driven frequency is further increasing, the spin current can be significantly enhanced and approaches a stable value. The photon-assisted processes bring about interesting features of spin current. The influence of the gate voltage and temperature on the spin current is examined in detail.

  2. Magnetic current sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Jr., William C. (Inventor); Hermann, Theodore M. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A current determiner having an output at which representations of input currents are provided having an input conductor for the input current and a current sensor supported on a substrate electrically isolated from one another but with the sensor positioned in the magnetic fields arising about the input conductor due to any input currents. The sensor extends along the substrate in a direction primarily perpendicular to the extent of the input conductor and is formed of at least a pair of thin-film ferromagnetic layers separated by a non-magnetic conductive layer. The sensor can be electrically connected to a electronic circuitry formed in the substrate including a nonlinearity adaptation circuit to provide representations of the input currents of increased accuracy despite nonlinearities in the current sensor, and can include further current sensors in bridge circuits.

  3. Spin current

    CERN Document Server

    Valenzuela, Sergio O; Saitoh, Eiji; Kimura, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    In a new branch of physics and technology called spin-electronics or spintronics, the flow of electrical charge (usual current) as well as the flow of electron spin, the so-called 'spin current', are manipulated and controlled together. This book provides an introduction and guide to the new physics and application of spin current.

  4. Photoinduced current and emission induced by current in a nanowire transistor: Temperature dependence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Darehdor Mahvash Arabi; Shahtahmassebi Nasser

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present a theoretical study on a light emitting and current carrying nanosystem, in the nonzero temperature regime. The system under consideration is a semiconducting nanowire sandwiched between two semi-infinite metallic electrodes. The study was performed using the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green’s function method. We systematically investigate the photoinduced current and the light emission induced by this electronic current in the presence of gate voltage. The temperature dependence of these processes are also investigated in the temperature range of 3–300 K. Our study shows that, the photoinduced current is due to the transfer of electrons from highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) to the lowest unoccupied molecularorbital (LUMO). Thus, the separation of electron from the electron–hole pair creates a free electron which is responsible for the observed photoinduced current. The same conclusion is also arrived at for the reverse process of light emission under the influence of the electronic current.

  5. Credit where due.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Steven G

    2016-08-01

    The history of medicine is filled with stories of tireless researchers who failed to get credit for their hard work. Examples of this include Rosalind Franklin, who helped to elucidate the structure of DNA; Frederick Banting, who helped to discover insulin; and Jay McLean, who discovered heparin. The founding of the field of vascular surgery provides one of the most vivid examples of uncredited work. Even though Alexis Carrel was an unpaid, untitled assistant in Charles Guthrie's laboratory, it was Carrel alone who received a Nobel Prize for their work. In an attempt to give credit where due, the reasons for this injustice are described. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Responses to atmospheric CO2 concentrations in crop simulation models: a review of current simple and semicomplex representations and options for model development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanuytrecht, Eline; Thorburn, Peter J

    2017-01-30

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2 ]) cause direct changes in crop physiological processes (e.g. photosynthesis and stomatal conductance). To represent these CO2 responses, commonly used crop simulation models have been amended, using simple and semicomplex representations of the processes involved. Yet, there is no standard approach to and often poor documentation of these developments. This study used a bottom-up approach (starting with the APSIM framework as case study) to evaluate modelled responses in a consortium of commonly used crop models and illuminate whether variation in responses reflects true uncertainty in our understanding compared to arbitrary choices of model developers. Diversity in simulated CO2 responses and limited validation were common among models, both within the APSIM framework and more generally. Whereas production responses show some consistency up to moderately high [CO2 ] (around 700 ppm), transpiration and stomatal responses vary more widely in nature and magnitude (e.g. a decrease in stomatal conductance varying between 35% and 90% among models was found for [CO2 ] doubling to 700 ppm). Most notably, nitrogen responses were found to be included in few crop models despite being commonly observed and critical for the simulation of photosynthetic acclimation, crop nutritional quality and carbon allocation. We suggest harmonization and consideration of more mechanistic concepts in particular subroutines, for example, for the simulation of N dynamics, as a way to improve our predictive understanding of CO2 responses and capture secondary processes. Intercomparison studies could assist in this aim, provided that they go beyond simple output comparison and explicitly identify the representations and assumptions that are causal for intermodel differences. Additionally, validation and proper documentation of the representation of CO2 responses within models should be prioritized.

  7. Current surges and seabed erosion near the shelf break in the Canadian Beaufort Sea: A response to wind and ice motion stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, Alexandre; Osborne, Philip D.; Curtiss, Gregory; Lowings, Malcolm G.

    2016-08-01

    Estimating the erosion potential of seabed sediments and the magnitude of the resulting suspended load in relation to current dynamics near the shelf break is a key issue for better understanding shelf-slope sediment transport. On the outer Mackenzie Shelf (Canadian Beaufort Sea, Arctic Ocean), a thin and discontinuous veneer of recent surficial clays overlie old glaciomarine sediments that further pinch out at the shelf edge. Gas and fluid venting is known to underlie part of sediment instability in the area, but recent mooring-based measurements also indicate that sediments near the shelf break are recurrently remobilized by strong subsurface currents. Here, we relate storms to the development of current surges that resulted in the abrupt resuspension of sediments at two locations along the shelf break. Near-bottom concentrations of suspended sediments were estimated using the acoustic backscatter of high-frequency acoustic Doppler current profilers deployed from September 2011 to September 2013 as part of the Beaufort Regional Environmental Assessment (BREA) program. Near-bottom currents near the shelf edge (140 to 150 m isobaths) were characterized by recurring episodes of elevated velocities (instantaneous speeds up to ~ 40-50 cm s-1) that were extensions of current surges (~ 60-80 cm s-1) occurring in the core of the shelfbreak jet located at ca. 90-120 m. Sudden peaks in suspended sediments (above 100 g m-3) corresponded closely with current surges in the near-bottom boundary layer (fade, such as during the major ice fracturing events of January to March 2013 that were associated with strong and persistent current speeds.

  8. Collisional Aggregation due to Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Pumir, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Collisions between particles suspended in a fluid play an important role in many physical processes. As an example, collisions of microscopic water droplets in clouds are a necessary step in the production of macroscopic raindrops. Collisions of dust grains are also conjectured to be important for planet formation in the gas surrounding young stars, and also to play a role in the dynamics of sand storms. In these processes, collisions are favoured by fast turbulent motions. Here we review recent advances in the understanding of collisional aggregation due to turbulence. We discuss the role of fractal clustering of particles, and caustic singularities of their velocities. We also discuss limitations of the Smoluchowski equation for modelling these processes. These advances lead to a semi-quantitative understanding on the influence of turbulence on collision rates, and point to deficiencies in the current understanding of rainfall and planet formation.

  9. Pulmonary responses in current smokers and ex-smokers following a two hour exposure at rest to clean air and fine ambient air particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Increased susceptibility of smokers to ambient PM may potentially promote development of COPD and accelerate already present disease. OBJECTIVES: To characterize the acute and subacute lung function response and inflammatory effects of controlled chamber exposure t...

  10. [Enteropathy due to olmesartan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ould Sidi Mohamed, M; Colardelle, P

    2016-09-01

    The olmesartan is a selective antagonist of angiotensin II indicated for the treatment of essential hypertension. We report the case of a gastrointestinal involvement with duodenal villous atrophy and lymphocytic infiltrate duodenal epithelial and colonic secondary to the olmesartan taking with test of positive reintroduction. The patient had chronic diarrhea with weight loss of 10kg occurring one month after the passage of 20 to 40mg/day olmesartan took three years. A rectosigmoidoscopy highlighted some puncture slightly erythematous areas. The responsibility of olmesartan was suspected and the drug was stopped. The evolution was rapidly favorable with disappearance of diarrhea 48hours later. Two days after the patient took the drug on its own initiative. Sigmoid biopsies showed an inflammatory infiltrate rich in lymphocytes. Gastroscopy showed erosive esophagitis and duodenal biopsies showed chronic duodenitis with epithelial lymphocytosis and subtotal villous atrophy. The reintroduction has led to the immediate resumption of diarrhea. Olmesartan was finalized. Diarrhea has not returned since. A colonoscopy performed six weeks after discharge was normal. Knowledge of the bowel olmesartan is recent and based almost solely on the description of 22 cases observed at the Mayo Clinic with patients, as in our case, have similar symptoms and lesions. We stress, about a publication of an isolated case, the possibility of less severe cases with histological abnormalities without clinical translation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Phtotsynthetic physiological Response of Larrea tridentata due to the increase of CO2 concentration and drought%拉瑞尔Larrea tridentata光合特性对CO2摩尔分数和干旱的响应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张香凝; 乔杰; 孙向阳; 王保平; 崔令军

    2011-01-01

    Li-6400 portable photosynthesis system was used to measure the photosynthetic physiological responses of larrea tridentara to the increase of CO2 concentration and drought. The results showed that: Water stress had little influence on the leaf's actinic process. Photosynthetic apparatus were not harmed by drought when the soil water potential was above-0.884 5 MPa. The light saturation point, the photosynthetic rate and the apparent photon utilization efficiency increased as the CO2 concentration increased. The positive effect of CO2 concentration increased is bigger than the negative effect from the drought, so the drought resistance ability of L. tridentata was raised to a certain extent by the CO2 concentration increase. The CO2 concentration saturation point(CSP) increased with the PARs and CO2 concentration increase. This indicated that the CO2 utilization efficiency increased. The stomatal conductance and transpiration decreased while WUE increased with the increase in CO2 concentration. The CO2 concentration which saturated leaf RubisCO while cause stoma closed was 700-800 μmol·mo1-1. The current CO2 concentration has not saturated the RubisCO of L. tridentata. The CO2 concentration increased in the future will promote the photosynthesis of L. tridentata, and may increase the drought resistance ability of L.tridentata.%利用Li-6400光合测定系统测定拉瑞尔L.tridentata 的光合生理特性及其对CO2摩尔分数升高和干旱的响应.结果表明:土壤水势在-0.8845 MPa以上,L.tridentata的光合器没有任何损害,抵御干旱的能力很强;适当的增加CO2摩尔分数有利于提高光饱和点、光量子利用效率和最大净光合速率,且CO2摩尔分数升高的正效应要大于土壤水分胁迫的负效应,因而在一定程度上CO2摩尔分数的增加,提高了L.tridentata的抗旱能力;随着光合有效辐射的增强和CO2摩尔分数的升高,叶片净光合速率、CO2饱和点和羧化速率都有增大趋

  12. Health risks due to coffee dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenburg, Marcus; Bittner, Cordula; Baur, Xaver

    2009-08-01

    This study assessed current health risks due to occupational exposure to coffee dust. We performed a cross-sectional study in a coffee haulage company (n = 24), a coffee silo (n = 19), and a decaffeinating company (n = 17). Cross-shift and cross-week case histories of these employees as well as lung function values were recorded. During the handling of green coffee, measurements of airborne dust were conducted. The employees in these workplaces were mainly affected by erythematous and rhinoconjunctival symptoms. They occurred especially in subjects exposed to a high dust load (> 10 mg of inhalable dust per cubic meter of air; n = 28) [Pearson chi(2) test, p = 0.020 and p = 0.023]. IgE antibodies to green coffee and castor beans were detected in 3 workers and 10 workers, respectively. The majority of them (two employees and six employees, respectively) had shown respiratory symptoms during the past 12 months. The preshift lung function values were below average but were not dependent on the level of the inhalable coffee dust exposure. Employees with a coffee dust load > 10 mg/m(3) of air showed higher unspecific bronchial responsiveness more frequently than those with lower exposures. During the transshipment (especially during unloading) of green coffee, a high and clinically relevant exposure to irritative and sensitizing dust occurs. Therefore, efforts to reduce these dust exposures are generally recommended.

  13. Experimentally-Based Computational Investigation into Beat-To-Beat Variability in Ventricular Repolarization and Its Response to Ionic Current Inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Pueyo

    Full Text Available Beat-to-beat variability in repolarization (BVR has been proposed as an arrhythmic risk marker for disease and pharmacological action. The mechanisms are unclear but BVR is thought to be a cell level manifestation of ion channel stochasticity, modulated by cell-to-cell differences in ionic conductances. In this study, we describe the construction of an experimentally-calibrated set of stochastic cardiac cell models that captures both BVR and cell-to-cell differences in BVR displayed in isolated canine action potential measurements using pharmacological agents. Simulated and experimental ranges of BVR are compared in control and under pharmacological inhibition, and the key ionic currents determining BVR under physiological and pharmacological conditions are identified. Results show that the 4-aminopyridine-sensitive transient outward potassium current, Ito1, is a fundamental driver of BVR in control and upon complete inhibition of the slow delayed rectifier potassium current, IKs. In contrast, IKs and the L-type calcium current, ICaL, become the major contributors to BVR upon inhibition of the fast delayed rectifier potassium current, IKr. This highlights both IKs and Ito1 as key contributors to repolarization reserve. Partial correlation analysis identifies the distribution of Ito1 channel numbers as an important independent determinant of the magnitude of BVR and drug-induced change in BVR in control and under pharmacological inhibition of ionic currents. Distributions in the number of IKs and ICaL channels only become independent determinants of the magnitude of BVR upon complete inhibition of IKr. These findings provide quantitative insights into the ionic causes of BVR as a marker for repolarization reserve, both under control condition and pharmacological inhibition.

  14. Current limiters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loescher, D.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Systems Surety Assessment Dept.; Noren, K. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1996-09-01

    The current that flows between the electrical test equipment and the nuclear explosive must be limited to safe levels during electrical tests conducted on nuclear explosives at the DOE Pantex facility. The safest way to limit the current is to use batteries that can provide only acceptably low current into a short circuit; unfortunately this is not always possible. When it is not possible, current limiters, along with other design features, are used to limit the current. Three types of current limiters, the fuse blower, the resistor limiter, and the MOSFET-pass-transistor limiters, are used extensively in Pantex test equipment. Detailed failure mode and effects analyses were conducted on these limiters. Two other types of limiters were also analyzed. It was found that there is no best type of limiter that should be used in all applications. The fuse blower has advantages when many circuits must be monitored, a low insertion voltage drop is important, and size and weight must be kept low. However, this limiter has many failure modes that can lead to the loss of over current protection. The resistor limiter is simple and inexpensive, but is normally usable only on circuits for which the nominal current is less than a few tens of milliamperes. The MOSFET limiter can be used on high current circuits, but it has a number of single point failure modes that can lead to a loss of protective action. Because bad component placement or poor wire routing can defeat any limiter, placement and routing must be designed carefully and documented thoroughly.

  15. Predicting the response of the Amazon rainforest to persistent drought conditions under current and future climates: a major challenge for global land surface models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Joetzjer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available While a majority of Global Climate Models project dryer and longer dry seasons over the Amazon under higher CO2 levels, large uncertainties surround the response of vegetation to persistent droughts in both present-day and future climates. We propose a detailed evaluation of the ability of the ISBACC Land Surface Model to capture drought effects on both water and carbon budgets, comparing fluxes and stocks at two recent ThroughFall Exclusion (TFE experiments performed in the Amazon. We also explore the model sensitivity to different Water Stress Function (WSF and to an idealized increase in CO2 concentration and/or temperature. In spite of a reasonable soil moisture simulation, ISBACC struggles to correctly simulate the vegetation response to TFE whose amplitude and timing is highly sensitive to the WSF. Under higher CO2 concentration, the increased Water Use Efficiency (WUE mitigates the ISBACC's sensitivity to drought. While one of the proposed WSF formulation improves the response of most ISBACC fluxes, except respiration, a parameterization of drought-induced tree mortality is missing for an accurate estimate of the vegetation response. Also, a better mechanistic understanding of the forest responses to drought under a warmer climate and higher CO2 concentration is clearly needed.

  16. An optimal current observer for predictive current controlled buck DC-DC converters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Run; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zou, Xuecheng; Tong, Qiaoling; Zhang, Qiao

    2014-05-19

    In digital current mode controlled DC-DC converters, conventional current sensors might not provide isolation at a minimized price, power loss and size. Therefore, a current observer which can be realized based on the digital circuit itself, is a possible substitute. However, the observed current may diverge due to the parasitic resistors and the forward conduction voltage of the diode. Moreover, the divergence of the observed current will cause steady state errors in the output voltage. In this paper, an optimal current observer is proposed. It achieves the highest observation accuracy by compensating for all the known parasitic parameters. By employing the optimal current observer-based predictive current controller, a buck converter is implemented. The converter has a convergently and accurately observed inductor current, and shows preferable transient response than the conventional voltage mode controlled converter. Besides, costs, power loss and size are minimized since the strategy requires no additional hardware for current sensing. The effectiveness of the proposed optimal current observer is demonstrated experimentally.

  17. Review of current Southern California edison load management programs and proposal for a new market-driven, mass-market, demand-response program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, G.H.

    2002-01-01

    Utility load management programs, including direct load control and interruptible load programs, constitute a large installed base of controllable loads that are employed by utilities as system reliability resources. In response to energy supply shortfalls expected during the summer of 2001, the California Public Utilities Commission in spring 2001 authorized new utility load management programs as well as revisions to existing programs. This report provides an independent review of the designs of these new programs for a large utility (Southern California Edison) and suggests possible improvements to enhance the price responsiveness of the customer actions influenced by these programs. The report also proposes a new program to elicit a mass-market demand response to utility price signals.

  18. Phreatophytic vegetation and groundwater fluctuations: a review of current research and application of ecosystem response modeling with an emphasis on great basin vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumburg, Elke; Mata-Gonzalez, Ricardo; Hunter, Rachael G; McLendon, Terry; Martin, David W

    2005-06-01

    Although changes in depth to groundwater occur naturally, anthropogenic alterations may exacerbate these fluctuations and, thus, affect vegetation reliant on groundwater. These effects include changes in physiology, structure, and community dynamics, particularly in arid regions where groundwater can be an important water source for many plants. To properly manage ecosystems subject to changes in depth to groundwater, plant responses to both rising and falling groundwater tables must be understood. However, most research has focused exclusively on riparian ecosystems, ignoring regions where groundwater is available to a wider range of species. Here, we review responses of riparian and other species to changes in groundwater levels in arid environments. Although decreasing water tables often result in plant water stress and reduced live biomass, the converse is not necessarily true for rising water tables. Initially, rising water tables kill flooded roots because most species cannot tolerate the associated low oxygen levels. Thus, flooded plants can also experience water stress. Ultimately, individual species responses to either scenario depend on drought and flooding tolerance and the change in root system size and water uptake capacity. However, additional environmental and biological factors can play important roles in the severity of vegetation response to altered groundwater tables. Using the reviewed information, we created two conceptual models to highlight vegetation dynamics in areas with groundwater fluctuations. These models use flow charts to identify key vegetation and ecosystem properties and their responses to changes in groundwater tables to predict community responses. We then incorporated key concepts from these models into EDYS, a comprehensive ecosystem model, to highlight the potential complexity of predicting community change under different fluctuating groundwater scenarios. Such models provide a valuable tool for managing vegetation and

  19. The Effect of Eddy Current in External Magnetic Circuit on Response Time of Ferrite Switch%外磁路涡流对铁氧体开关响应时间的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范兵

    2012-01-01

    The effect of eddy current is studied deeply in terms of switch circuit and response magnetic field. The effect of eddy current effect on response time of switch circuit of external magnetic circuit is derived from the change of equivalent impedance of excitation coil. With regard to response magnetic field, in the type of typical mode, effect of typical model eddy current on response magnetic field is educed through deducing with mathematic formula using Ampere's law, lenz's law, and electromagnetic induction equation. As such, effect factor and order of eddy current on response time of switch of external magnetic circuit are gotten. Furthermore, the conclusion is justified through design and verification of a specific product.%从开关电路和响应磁场2个方面对涡流的影响进行了研究.以激励线圈等效阻抗的变化,得出涡流效应对外磁路开关电路响应时间的影响;在响应磁场方面,以典型模的方式,应用安培定律、楞次定律、电磁感应方程,以数学推导得出典型模涡流对响应磁场的影响,以此得出涡流对外磁路开关响应时间的影响因素及其量级大小.通过具体产品的设计验证,证明了结论的正确.

  20. Mechanisms Responsible for the Trophic Effect of Beta-Adrenoceptors on the Ito Current Density in Type 1 Diabetic Rat Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Setién

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In diabetic ventricular myocytes, transient outward potassium current (Ito amplitude is severely reduced because of the impaired catecholamine release that characterizes diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Sympathetic nervous system exhibits a trophic effect on Ito since incubation of myocytes with noradrenaline restores current amplitude via beta-adrenoceptor (βAR stimulation. Here, we investigate the intracellular signalling pathway though which incubation of diabetic cardiomyocytes with the βAR agonist isoproterenol recovers Ito amplitude to normal values. Methods: Experiments were performed in ventricular myocytes isolated from streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Ito current was recorded by using the patch-clamp technique. Kv4 channel expression was determined by immunofluorescence. Protein-protein interaction was determined by coimmunoprecipitation. Results: Stimulation of βAR activates first a Gαs protein, adenylyl cyclase and Protein Kinase A. PKA-phosphorylated receptor then switches to the Gαi protein. This leads to the activation of the βAR-Kinase-1 and further receptor phosphorylation and arrestin dependent internalization. The internalized receptor-arrestin complex recruits and activates cSrc and the MAPK cascade, where Ras, c-Raf1 and finally ERK1/2 mediate the increase in Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 protein abundance in the plasma membrane. Conclusion: β2AR stimulation activates a Gαs and Gαi protein dependent pathway where the ERK1/2 modulates the Ito current amplitude and the density of the Kv4.2 and Kv4.2 channels in the plasma membrane upon sympathetic stimulation in diabetic heart.

  1. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Combined with Aerobic Exercise to Optimize Analgesic Responses in Fibromyalgia: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Mendonca, Mariana E.; Simis, Marcel; Grecco, Luanda C.; Battistella, Linamara R.; Baptista, Abrahão F; Fregni, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain syndrome that is associated with maladaptive plasticity in neural central circuits. One of the neural circuits that are involved in pain in fibromyalgia is the primary motor cortex. We tested a combination intervention that aimed to modulate the motor system: transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the primary motor cortex (M1) and aerobic exercise (AE). In this phase II, sham-controlled randomized clinical trial, 45 subjects were assigned to 1 of 3 gr...

  2. Giving Power Its Due: The Powerful Possibilities and the Problems of Power with Deliberative Democracy and English Language Learners. A Response to "Deliberative Democracy in English-Language Education: Cultural and Linguistic Inclusion in the School Community"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Jarrod S.

    2015-01-01

    The use of deliberation with English Language Learners presents possibilities to both improve language learning, but also expand the potential for civics education for all students. In particular, this response examines the issue of power to extend Liggett's (2014) arguments for using deliberative democracy with English Language Learners and…

  3. Giving Power Its Due: The Powerful Possibilities and the Problems of Power with Deliberative Democracy and English Language Learners. A Response to "Deliberative Democracy in English-Language Education: Cultural and Linguistic Inclusion in the School Community"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Jarrod S.

    2015-01-01

    The use of deliberation with English Language Learners presents possibilities to both improve language learning, but also expand the potential for civics education for all students. In particular, this response examines the issue of power to extend Liggett's (2014) arguments for using deliberative democracy with English Language Learners and…

  4. A logarithmic low dark current CMOS pixel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Alessandro Michel; Choubey, Bhaskar

    2016-04-01

    High dynamic range pixels are required in a number of automotive and scientific applications. CMOS pixels provide different approaches to achieve this. However, these suffer from poor performance under low light conditions due to inherently high leakage current that is present in CMOS processes, also known as dark current. The typical approach to reduce this dark current involves process modifications. Nevertheless, energy considerations suggest that the leakage current will be close to zero at a close to zero voltage on the photodiode. Hence, the reduction in dark current can be achieved by forcing a zero voltage across the photodiode. In this paper, a novel logarithmic CMOS pixel design capable of reducing dark current without any process modifications is proposed. This pixel is also able to produce a wide dynamic range response. This circuit utilizes two current mirrors to force the in-pixel photodiode at a close to zero voltage. Additionally, a bias voltage is used to reduce a higher order effect known as Drain Induced Barrier Lowering (DIBL). In fact, the contribution of this effect can be compensated by increasing the body effect. In this paper, we studied the consequences of a negative bias voltage applied to the body of the current mirror pair to compensate for the DIBL effect thereby achieving a very small voltage drop on the photodiode and consequently, a higher sensitivity in low light conditions.

  5. 全身炎症反应综合征的治疗现状%Current treatment of systemic inflammatory response syndrome(Review)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨新军; 吴广礼

    2003-01-01

    @@ 全身炎症反应综合征(systemic inflammatory response syndrome,SIRS)是由不同疾病,包括微生物感染、创伤、烧伤等感染性疾病所引起的全身性的非特异性炎症反应,最终导致机体对炎症反应失控.

  6. Sexual and reproductive health needs of young people : a study examining the fit between needs and current programming responses in India

    OpenAIRE

    Kolencherry, Shuby

    2004-01-01

    The study intended to explore the magnitude and characteristics of sexual and reproductive health risks of young people in Gujarat, India. In particular, the study examined the fit between sexual and reproductive health needs and the existing programming responses in terms of policies, programs and access to health care services. The study is based on empirical research and Social Cognitive Theory framework. The investigation was conceived in the context following the International Conference...

  7. Antimicrobial activity of cationic antimicrobial peptides against gram-positives: Current progress made in understanding the mode of action and the response of bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya Omardien

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have been proposed as a novel class of antimicrobials that could aid the fight against antibiotic resistant bacteria. The mode of action of AMPs as acting on the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane has often been presented as an enigma and there are doubts whether the membrane is the sole target of AMPs. Progress has been made in clarifying the possible targets of these peptides, which is reported in this review with as focus gram-positive vegetative cells and spores. Numerical estimates are discussed to evaluate the possibility that targets, other than the membrane, could play a role in susceptibility to AMPs. Concerns about possible resistance that bacteria might develop to AMPs are addressed. Proteomics, transcriptomics and other molecular techniques are reviewed in the context of explaining the response of bacteria to the presence of AMPs and to predict what resistance strategies might be. Emergent mechanisms are cell envelope stress responses as well as enzymes able to degrade and/or specifically bind (and thus inactivate AMPs. Further studies are needed to address the broadness of the AMP resistance and stress responses observed.

  8. Antimicrobial Activity of Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides against Gram-Positives: Current Progress Made in Understanding the Mode of Action and the Response of Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omardien, Soraya; Brul, Stanley; Zaat, Sebastian A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been proposed as a novel class of antimicrobials that could aid the fight against antibiotic resistant bacteria. The mode of action of AMPs as acting on the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane has often been presented as an enigma and there are doubts whether the membrane is the sole target of AMPs. Progress has been made in clarifying the possible targets of these peptides, which is reported in this review with as focus gram-positive vegetative cells and spores. Numerical estimates are discussed to evaluate the possibility that targets, other than the membrane, could play a role in susceptibility to AMPs. Concerns about possible resistance that bacteria might develop to AMPs are addressed. Proteomics, transcriptomics, and other molecular techniques are reviewed in the context of explaining the response of bacteria to the presence of AMPs and to predict what resistance strategies might be. Emergent mechanisms are cell envelope stress responses as well as enzymes able to degrade and/or specifically bind (and thus inactivate) AMPs. Further studies are needed to address the broadness of the AMP resistance and stress responses observed.

  9. Current concepts in osteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollivere, B; Wimhurst, J A; Clark, I M; Donell, S T

    2012-01-01

    The most frequent cause of failure after total hip replacement in all reported arthroplasty registries is peri-prosthetic osteolysis. Osteolysis is an active biological process initiated in response to wear debris. The eventual response to this process is the activation of macrophages and loss of bone. Activation of macrophages initiates a complex biological cascade resulting in the final common pathway of an increase in osteolytic activity. The biological initiators, mechanisms for and regulation of this process are beginning to be understood. This article explores current concepts in the causes of, and underlying biological mechanism resulting in peri-prosthetic osteolysis, reviewing the current basic science and clinical literature surrounding the topic.

  10. Estimation of phase signal change in neuronal current MRI for evoke response of tactile detection with realistic somatosensory laminar network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BagheriMofidi, Seyed Mehdi; Pouladian, Majid; Jameie, Seyed Behnamedin; Abbaspour Tehrani-Fard, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic field generated by neuronal activity could alter magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals but detection of such signal is under debate. Previous researches proposed that magnitude signal change is below current detectable level, but phase signal change (PSC) may be measurable with current MRI systems. Optimal imaging parameters like echo time, voxel size and external field direction, could increase the probability of detection of this small signal change. We simulate a voxel of cortical column to determine effect of such parameters on PSC signal. We extended a laminar network model for somatosensory cortex to find neuronal current in each segment of pyramidal neurons (PN). 60,000 PNs of simulated network were positioned randomly in a voxel. Biot-savart law applied to calculate neuronal magnetic field and additional phase. The procedure repeated for eleven neuronal arrangements in the voxel. PSC signal variation with the echo time and voxel size was assessed. The simulated results show that PSC signal increases with echo time, especially 100/80 ms after stimulus for gradient echo/spin echo sequence. It can be up to 0.1 mrad for echo time = 175 ms and voxel size = 1.48 × 1.48 × 2.18 mm(3). With echo time less than 25 ms after stimulus, it was just acquired effects of physiological noise on PSC signal. The absolute value of the signal increased with decrease of voxel size, but its components had complex variation. External field orthogonal to local surface of cortex maximizes the signal. Expected PSC signal for tactile detection in the somatosensory cortex increase with echo time and have no oscillation.

  11. Current Titles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2006-06-01

    This booklet is published for those interested in current research being conducted at the National Center for Electron Microscopy. The NCEM is a DOE-designated national user facility and is available at no charge to qualified researchers. Access is controlled by an external steering committee. Interested researchers may contact Jane Cavlina, Administrator, at 510/486-6036.

  12. A computational study of the piezoelectric response due to the material effect in periodic, single island thin films and the geometric effect in periodic, bi-island thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, B. [Department of Applied Science, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University, ETAS 575, Little Rock, AR 72204-1099 (United States); Bhattacharyya, A., E-mail: axbhattachar@ualr.ed [Department of Applied Science, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University, ETAS 575, Little Rock, AR 72204-1099 (United States)

    2010-05-03

    The electromechanical response of a square-periodic array of circular piezoelectric (PE) thin films alternating with non-piezoelectric (NPE) films is studied in this paper. The material effects are studied for four film/substrate combinations in absence of NPE films for which it is found that if d{sub zxx} << d{sub zzz} (z-axis being normal to the interfacial plane between the film and the substrate), it results in reduced substrate bending leading to reduced degradation in the electromechanical response of the thin film. The bi-island structure is studied for zinc oxide on strontium titanate, and, in general, it is seen that the NPE films not only reduce degradation of the electromechanical response of the PE films but also increase their internal stresses; the effect on the former is less than the latter. These effects are most prominent when the circular NPE thin films fill the space between the PE thin films and are elastically very stiff compared to the substrate.

  13. Aeroelastic response for straight wing with high aspect ratio due to sharp edge gust%锐边突风对大展弦比机翼的气动弹性响应影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伏虎; 马晓平

    2012-01-01

    基于Theodorsen非定常气动力理论,以大展弦比均匀直机翼为研究对象,建立了系统的气动弹性响应方程.选取二阶弯曲和二阶扭转模态,采用V-g法求解了系统的颤振速度.基于Kussner函数,建立了锐边突风系统模型,并推导了在弯曲和扭转模态阶数为Nw和Na下的系统状态方程,仿真研究了加入突风后系统的气动弹性响应.结果表明,加入突风后翼尖响应振幅增大.%Based on Theodorsen unsteady aerodynamics theory, the equation of aeroelastic response for straight wing with high aspect ratio is established. Flutter speed is determined for two bending modes and two torsional modes using V-g methods. The sharp edge gust system model is established and the system state equations are derived with Nw bending modes and Na torsional modes wing systems based on the function Kussner. The aeroelastic response of system shows that the amplitude oscillation becomes higher. The modeling method may offer reference for research of gust response.

  14. Academic Due Process in Clinical Pharmacy Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abood, Richard R.; Iovacchini, Eric V.

    1979-01-01

    The historical evolution of academic due process, its current concept as revealed in the Supreme Court ruling in Horowitz vs Board of Curators of the University of Missouri, and the application of that judicial opinion to clinical clerkship programs in pharmacy are discussed. Guidelines to protect faculty and administration are offered. (JMD)

  15. Galactorrhea due to psychotropic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropp, S; Ziegenbein, M; Grohmann, R; Engel, R R; Degner, D

    2004-03-01

    Within the drug safety program in psychiatry AMSP ( Arzneimittelsicherheit in der Psychiatrie), severe adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are assessed. Currently 35 psychiatric hospitals and departments are participating in detecting severe ADRs. This paper focuses on prolactin-dependent ADRs such as gynecomastia and galactorrhea due to psychotropic medications. Related to the number of patients surveyed (122,562 from 1993 to 2000), these are rare events (0.03 % or 35 cases). Imputed drugs were mostly antipsychotics, but antidepressants were also imputed in single cases. In the group of antipsychotics, relative frequencies of galactorrhea were highest for amisulpride and risperidone and corresponded to the degree of D2 binding. Galactorrhea assessed as "severe" was accompanied by distressing symptoms such as pain, tension, enlargement of breasts, or soaked clothing. The AMSP data contribute to the knowledge on endocrine ADRs by the large number of patients examined and help clinicians select the appropriate drug if their patients have been prone to for these ADRs in the past.

  16. Hyperekplexia and trismus due to brainstem encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellett, M.; Humphrey, P.; Tedman, B.; Steiger, M.

    1998-01-01

    The brainstem is said to be the generator of pathological startle responses due to reticular reflex myoclonus or hyperekplexia. A patient with facial weakness, nystagmus, and pyramidal tract signs had generalised reflex spasms in response to auditory, visual and tactile stimuli which clinically and neurophysiologically resembled hyperekplexia. The case is unusual because as well as hyperekplexia, the patient's initial presentation was with an equally rare manifestation of brainstem pathology—brainstem mediated trismus. The causes of brainstem trismus and exaggerated startle responses are discussed with respect to their underlying mechanisms. 

 PMID:9667574

  17. A current reader's response to the article of 50 years ago by Karpman, B. (1949): "The principles and methods of objective psychotherapy".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luborsky, L

    2000-07-01

    The first aim is to describe the psychotherapy of 1949 in the light of today's psychotherapies. The old psychotherapy is suited to treating severely ill patients. It does not use free association, but rather is focused on current problems. It uses dreams, yet it also uses homework and bibliotherapy. The second aim is to critique the treatment. Consistent with its era. it does not make use of medications, and there is an absence of references to psychotherapy research, which was then just starting. The treatment relies over-heavily on the authority of the therapist. A third aim is to describe the changes in our field in the past 50 years and examine the predictions for the future. Although the treatment is called objective psychotherapy, it does not make use of the most up-to-date means of measuring accuracy of interpretations, such as the Core Conflictual Relationship Theme (CCRT) method and other methods like it.

  18. Hybrid simulations of whistler waves generation and current closure by a pulsed tether in the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C. L.; Lipatov, A. S.; Drobot, A. T.; Papadopoulos, K.; Satya-Narayana, P.

    1994-01-01

    The dynamic response of a magnetized collisionless plasma to an externally driven, finite size, sudden switch-on current source across the magnetic field has been studied using a two dimensional hybrid code. It was found that the predominant plasma response was the excitation of whistler waves and the formation of current closure by induced currents in the plasma. The results show that the current closure path consists of: (a) two antiparallel field-aligned current channels at the end of the imposed current sheet; and (b) a cross-field current region connecting these channels. The formation of the current closure path occured in the whistler timescale much shorter than that of MHD and the closure region expanded continuously in time. The current closure process was accompanied by significant energy loss due to whistler radiation.

  19. Philopatry in a changing world: Response of Pink-footed Geese Anser brachyrhynchus to the loss of a key autumn staging area due to restoration of Filsø Lake, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Kevin; Madsen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    to the sudden loss of a major autumn staging area along their migration corridor, Filsø in Denmark, which followed the re-establishment of a former lake on open arable land serving as foraging site to tens of thousands of geese. Comparisons of goose usage before and after the restoration event revealed that 1...... to alter site use allows a swift response to rapidly changing environmental conditions. This might above all relate to the agricultural habitat use of this species, leaving them plenty of alternatives in the modern Danish landscape....

  20. 轨道梁在磁浮列车以共振速度通过时动力响应分析%DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF GUIDEWAY GIRDERS DUE TO HIGH-SPEED MAGLEV TRAINS MOVING AT RESONANT SPEEDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    时瑾; 姚忠达; 王英杰

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the investigation of dynamic response of a guideway subjected to a maglev train moving with very high speeds. By using modal synthesis technology to establish the guideway-pier model, the equations of motion for the maglev train/guideway coupling system are derived and the dynamic response of the train-guideway system are computed using iterative methods. From the numerical studies of a 24m elevated guideway girder under a high-speed maglev train model of TR08, the results indicate increasing moving speeds may result in an amplified response of the guideway, and the second sub-resonance of the first mode of the guideway would be excited as well once the moving speed reaches around 350km/h. Furthermore, when the moving speed of the malgev train is higher than 400kin/h, the response amplitudes of the guideway girder and moving vehicles are both amplified significantly. To avoid possible train-induced resonance of guideway vibration, the first natural frequency of the guideway should be designed to be higher than the characteristic frequency of the maglev vehicle/guideway system, which is equal to the ratio of the designed speed to the carriage length.%该文研究了高速磁浮列车运行引起的轨道梁动力响应问题。采用模态综合技术建立了梁墩体系模型,推导了高速磁浮列车轨道梁运动方程,运用迭代技术求解了列车轨道梁系统动力学方程,计算分析了高速磁浮列车通过24m简支轨道梁引起的动力响应,结果表明:随着运行速度提高,轨道梁动力响应相应提高,在350km/h左右存在一阶二次谐波共振;当列车运行速度超过400km/h时,轨道梁和列车动力响应将被显着放大,为避免轨道梁出现一阶一次共振现象,在设计上,应使轨道梁的一阶自振频率远高于磁浮列车与轨道梁的特征频率(即设计速度与车长比值)。

  1. Current titles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This booklet is published for those interested in current research being conducted at the National Center for Electron Microscopy. The NCEM is a DOE-designated national user facility and is available at no charge to qualified researchers. Access is controlled by an external steering committee. Interested researchers may contact Gretchen Hermes at (510) 486-5006 or address below for a User`s Guide. Copies of available papers can be ordered from: Theda Crawford National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, One Cyclotron Rd., MS72, Berkeley, California, USA 94720.

  2. Responsible tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birkaš E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Realising tourism in the context of responsibility is a problem of historical-social and economic time-space continuum; the problem of possibility of temporal unification of these parts. The study aims to emphasize that the essence of problem can only be understood in the depth of a general problematic of tourism, as a question of temporalisation of historical-social space, which, however, leads to a grand question of today: does the human activity which creates temporalised spaces have its own gravitational direction? Ad deliberandum. The study proposes the viewpoint that the context of responsibility requires overcoming the dimension of interpretation where the subject is understood as an ultimate human-singularity and a perfect match of responsibility with a dominant and current form of temporalisation of time suggests a paradigm of participating consciousness, the consciousness of unity, which, in Berdyaev's words, is never logical, but existential. The study, on the basis of a meticulous studying of a new narrative of tourism, primarily due to volume restrictions does not go beyond presenting the key attributes of this ever-expanding understanding of tourism - with a demonstration of a concrete practice - but all this with an emphasis that qualification of the actors' activities is possible only along the lines of a previous consideration of comprehension of structure of space and time - along the revalorisation of a motivational horison (Anzenbacher, A 1987, 264.p. and also the very term of responsibility and freedom. Responsibility can only then become an orientation of tourist activities, if the primary focus is set on re-comprehension (revalorisation of civilisational legacies in a timeless perspective.

  3. Modulation of systemic and intestinal immune response by interleukin-2 therapy in gastrointestinal surgical oncology. Personal experience in the context of current knowledge and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nespoli, Luca; Uggeri, Fabio; Romano, Fabrizio; Nespoli, Angelo; Brivo, Fernando; Fumagalli, Luca; Sargenti, Manuela; Uggeri, Franco; Gianotti, Luca

    2012-03-01

    Interactions between host and malignant tumor is currently under intensive investigation. The immune system seems to have a key role in cancer development and spread. Novel strategies to actively modulate the immune system have been proposed to improve the outcome of disease in patients with neoplasms. Our experience with systemic immunomodulation by interleukin-2 (IL-2) focused on both systemic and local immunity in surgical gastrointestinal cancer. Preoperative IL-2 subcutaneous injection was effective in counteracting postoperative immunosuppression, with a reduction of serum levels of IL-6 and the maintenance of preoperative levels of IL-12, a higher number of circulating total lymphocytes, and CD3(+) and CD4(+) T-cells, and a smaller decrease in circulating mature and immature dendritic cells (DCs), as well as a reduction in postoperative serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor. At the intestinal level, in patients with colorectal cancer, preoperative administration of IL-2 affected both phenotype and function of resident dendritic cells and T-cells, skewing local immunity toward a more immunogenic one. Our data showed that immunomodulation by IL-2 was effective in counteracting the systemic postoperative immune suppression related to surgical stress. IL-2 was also active at a local level on intestinal immunity, affecting both phenotype and function of resident T-cells and DCs. Future studies will encompass the possibility of reaching more adequate intratumoral IL-2 concentrations by direct intralesional injection to maximize immunostimulatory effects and minimize adverse effects.

  4. Distinct structural features of cyclothiazide are responsible for effects on peak current amplitude and desensitization kinetics at iGluR2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Helle; Ahring, Philip Kiær; Timmermann, Daniel Brunicardi

    2009-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) mediate fast excitatory neurotransmission. Upon glutamate application, 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid receptors undergo rapid and almost complete desensitization that can be attenuated by positive allosteric modulators. The molecu......Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) mediate fast excitatory neurotransmission. Upon glutamate application, 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid receptors undergo rapid and almost complete desensitization that can be attenuated by positive allosteric modulators......) in micromolar: 10 (CTZ), 26 (NS1493), 43 (NS5206), and 48 (NS5217)]. The four modulators divide into three groups according to efficacy and desensitization kinetics: (1) CTZ increases the peak current efficacy twice as much as the three analogues and nearly completely blocks receptor desensitization; (2) NS5206...... and NS5217 have low efficacy and only attenuate desensitization partially; (3) NS1493 has low efficacy but nearly completely blocks receptor desensitization. A hydrophobic substituent at the 3-position of the 1,1-dioxo-3,4-dihydro-2H-benzo[e][1,2,4]thiadiazine ring system is important for compound...

  5. How does pharmacogenetic testing alter the treatment course and patient response for chronic-pain patients in comparison with the current "trial-and-error" standard of care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFeo, Kelly; Sykora, Kristen; Eley, Susan; Vincent, Debra

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate if pharmacogenetic testing (PT) holds value for pain-management practitioners by identifying the potential applications of pharmacogenetic research as well as applications in practice. A review of the literature was conducted utilizing the databases EBSCOhost, Biomedical Reference Collection, CINAHL, Health Business: Full Text, Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition, and MEDLINE with the keywords, personalized medicine, cytochrome P450, and phamacogenetics. Chronic-pain patients present some of the most challenging patients to manage medically. Often paired with persistent, life-altering pain, they might also have oncologic and psychological comorbidities that can further complicate their management. One-step in-office PT is now widely available to optimize management of complicated patients and affectively remove the "trial-and-error" process of medication therapy. Practitioners must be familiar with the genetic determinants that affect a patient's response to medications in order to decrease preventable morbidity and mortality associated with drug-drug and patient-drug interactions, and to provide cost-effective care through avoidance of inappropriate medications. Improved pain managements will impove patient outcomes and satisfaction. ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  6. Differentiation of sensorimotor neuronal structures responsible for induction of motor evoked potentials, attenuation in detection of somatosensory stimuli, and induction of sensation of movement by mapping of optimal current directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Leone, A; Cohen, L G; Brasil-Neto, J P; Valls-Solé, J; Hallett, M

    1994-06-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the sensorimotor cortex can evoke motor evoked potentials (MEPs), attenuation in detection of somatosensory stimuli (ADSS), and sensation of movement (SOM) referred to the same body part. In this study we tried to differentiate the substrates responsible for these effects. In 6 normal volunteers, TMS was applied with a nearly monopolar Dantec stimulator and a butterfly coil. Optimal scalp location and current direction were determined for induction of MEPs in abductor pollicis brevis (APB), first dorsal interosseous (FDI), and adductor digiti minimi (ADM); SOM in digits 2 and 5 in an ischemically paralyzed hand; and ADSS applied to digits 2 and 5. All 3 muscles' MEPs and SOM and ADSS in both digits were optimally activated from a single scalp position. In all subjects, optimal current directions for MEPs pointed anteriorly; those for ADSS and SOM pointed posteriorly. Optimal current directions showed the same progression in all subjects for MEPs (ADM, FDI, and APB from antero-lateral to antero-medial), ADSS (digit 5 postero-medial, 2 postero-lateral), and SOM (digit 1 through 5 postero-lateral to postero-medial). We conclude that neuronal networks targeting corticospinal neurons responsible for MEPs are different from those leading to SOM and ADSS (which could not be differentiated).

  7. Current ornithology

    CERN Document Server

    1983-01-01

    The appearance of the first volume of a projected series is the occasion for comment on scope, aims, and genesis of the work. The scope of Current Ornithology is all of the biology of birds. Ornithology, as a whole-organism science, is concerned with birds at every level of bi­ ological organization, from the molecular to the community, at least from the Jurassic to the present time, and over every scholarly discipline in which bird biology is done; to say this is merely to expand a dic­ tionary definition of "ornithology. " The aim of the work, to be realized over several volumes, is to present reviews or position statements con­ cerning the active fields of ornithological research. The reviews will be relatively short, and often will be done from the viewpoint of a readily­ identified group or school. Such a work could have come into being at any time within the past fifty years, but that Current Ornithology appears now is a result of events that are only seven to eight years old. One important event wa...

  8. Low birth weight in response to salt restriction during pregnancy is not due to alterations in uterine-placental blood flow or the placental and peripheral renin-angiotensin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leandro, Sandra Márcia; Furukawa, Luzia Naôko Shinohara; Shimizu, Maria Heloisa Massola; Casarini, Dulce Elena; Seguro, Antonio Carlos; Patriarca, Giuliana; Coelho, Michella Soares; Dolnikoff, Miriam Sterman; Heimann, Joel Claudio

    2008-09-03

    A number of studies conducted in humans and in animals have observed that events occurring early in life are associated with the development of diseases in adulthood. Salt overload and restriction during pregnancy and lactation are responsible for functional (hemodynamic and hormonal) and structural alterations in adult offspring. Our group observed that lower birth weight and insulin resistance in adulthood is associated with salt restriction during pregnancy. On the other hand, perinatal salt overload is associated with higher blood pressure and higher renal angiotensin II content in adult offspring. Therefore, we hypothesised that renin-angiotensin system (RAS) function is altered by changes in sodium intake during pregnancy. Such changes may influence fetoplacental blood flow and thereby fetal nutrient supply, with effects on growth in utero and, consequently, on birth weight. Female Wistar rats were fed low-salt (LS), normal-salt (NS), or high-salt (HS) diet, starting before conception and continuing until day 19 of pregnancy. Blood pressure, heart rate, fetuses and dams' body weight, placentae weight and litter size were measured on day 19 of pregnancy. Cardiac output, uterine and placental blood flow were also determined on day 19. Expressions of renin-angiotensin system components and of the TNF-alpha gene were evaluated in the placentae. Plasma renin activity (PRA) and plasma and tissue angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity, as well as plasma and placental levels of angiotensins I, II, and 1-7 were measured. Body weight and kidney mass were greater in HS than in NS and LS dams. Food intake did not differ among the maternal groups. Placental weight was lower in LS dams than in NS and HS dams. Fetal weight was lower in the LS group than in the NS and HS groups. The PRA was greater in LS dams than in NS and HS dams, although ACE activity (serum, cardiac, renal, and placental) was unaffected by the level of sodium intake. Placental levels of

  9. Modification of the Doppler effect due to the helicity-rotation coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashhoon, Bahram

    2002-12-30

    The helicity-rotation coupling and its current empirical basis are examined. The modification of the Doppler effect due to the coupling of photon spin with the rotation of the observer is considered in detail in connection with its applications in the Doppler tracking of spacecraft. Further implications of this coupling and the possibility of searching for it in the intensity response of a rotating detector are briefly discussed.

  10. In vivo induction of antioxidant response and oxidative stress associated with genotoxicity and histopathological alteration in two commercial fish species due to heavy metals exposure in northern India (Kali) river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Mahino; Usmani, Nazura; Firdaus, Fakiha; Zafeer, Mohammad Fa